WorldWideScience

Sample records for solid thermal conductivity

  1. Thermal pressure and isochoric thermal conductivity of solid CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purs'kij, O.Yi.

    2005-01-01

    The analysis of the correlation between the thermal pressure and the isochoric thermal conductivity of solid CO 2 has been carried out. The temperature dependences of the thermal pressure and isochoric thermal conductivity for samples with various molar volumes have been obtained. The isothermal pressure dependences of the thermal conductivity of solid CO 2 have been calculated. The form of the temperature dependence of the isochoric thermal conductivity taking the thermal pressure into account has been revealed. Behaviour of the isochoric thermal conductivity is explained by phonon-phonon interaction and additional influence of the thermal pressure

  2. Thermal conductivity of fusion solid breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.Y.; Tam, S.W.

    1986-06-01

    Several simple and useful formulae for estimating the thermal conductivity of lithium-containing ceramic tritium breeder materials for fusion reactor blankets are given. These formulae account for the effects of irradiation, as well as solid breeder configuration, i.e., monolith or a packed bed. In the latter case, a coated-sphere concept is found more attractive in incorporating beryllia (a neutron multiplier) into the blanket than a random mixture of solid breeder and beryllia spheres

  3. Thermal Conductivity of Carbon Nanotubes Embedded in Solids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Bing-Yang; HOU Quan-Wen

    2008-01-01

    @@ A carbon-nanotube-atom fixed and activated scheme of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations is put forward to extract the thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded in solid argon. Though a 6.5% volume fraction of CNTs increases the composite thermal conductivity to about twice as much as that of the pure basal material, the thermal conductivity of CNTs embedded in solids is found to be decreased by 1/8-1/5with reference to that of pure ones. The decrease of the intrinsic thermal conductivity of the solid-embedded CNTs and the thermal interface resistance are demonstrated to be responsible for the results.

  4. Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of solid UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.K.; Chasanov, M.G.; Leibowitz, L.

    1981-06-01

    New equations for the thermal conductivity of solid UO 2 were derived based upon a nonlinear least squares fit of the data available in the literature. In the development of these equations, consideration was given to their thermodynamic consistency with heat capacity and density and theoretical consistency with enthalpy and heat capacity. Consistent with our previous treatment of enthalpy and heat capacity, 2670 K was selected as the temperature of a phase transition. A nonlinear equation, whose terms represent contributions due to phonons and electrons, was selected for the temperature region below 2670 K. Above 2670 K, the data were fit by a linear equation

  5. Liquid-like thermal conduction in intercalated layered crystalline solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B.; Wang, H.; Kawakita, Y.; Zhang, Q.; Feygenson, M.; Yu, H. L.; Wu, D.; Ohara, K.; Kikuchi, T.; Shibata, K.; Yamada, T.; Ning, X. K.; Chen, Y.; He, J. Q.; Vaknin, D.; Wu, R. Q.; Nakajima, K.; Kanatzidis, M. G.

    2018-03-01

    As a generic property, all substances transfer heat through microscopic collisions of constituent particles1. A solid conducts heat through both transverse and longitudinal acoustic phonons, but a liquid employs only longitudinal vibrations2,3. As a result, a solid is usually thermally more conductive than a liquid. In canonical viewpoints, such a difference also serves as the dynamic signature distinguishing a solid from a liquid. Here, we report liquid-like thermal conduction observed in the crystalline AgCrSe2. The transverse acoustic phonons are completely suppressed by the ultrafast dynamic disorder while the longitudinal acoustic phonons are strongly scattered but survive, and are thus responsible for the intrinsically ultralow thermal conductivity. This scenario is applicable to a wide variety of layered compounds with heavy intercalants in the van der Waals gaps, manifesting a broad implication on suppressing thermal conduction. These microscopic insights might reshape the fundamental understanding on thermal transport properties of matter and open up a general opportunity to optimize performances of thermoelectrics.

  6. Influence of foaming agents on solid thermal conductivity of foam glasses prepared from CRT panel glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Martin Bonderup; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    The understanding of the thermal transport mechanism of foam glass is still lacking. The contribution of solid- and gas conduction to the total thermal conductivity remains to be reported. In many foam glasses, the solid phase consist of a mix of an amorphous and a crystalline part where foaming...... containing glass and crystalline foaming agents and amorphous samples where the foaming agents are completely dissolved in the glass structure, respectively. Results show that the samples prepared by sintering have a higher thermal conductivity than the samples prepared by melt-quenching. The thermal...... conductivities of the sintered and the melt-quenched samples represent an upper and lower limit of the solid phase thermal conductivity of foam glasses prepared with these foaming agents. The content of foaming agents dissolved in the glass structure has a major impact on the solid thermal conductivity of foam...

  7. The influence of the solid thermal conductivity on active magnetic regenerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Engelbrecht, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the thermal conductivity of the regenerator solid on the performance of a flat plate active magnetic regenerator (AMR) is investigated using an established numerical AMR model. The cooling power at different (fixed) temperature spans is used as a measure of the performance...... for a range of thermal conductivities, operating frequencies, a long and short regenerator, and finally a regenerator with a low and a high number of transfer units (NTU) regenerator. In this way the performance is mapped out and the impact of the thermal conductivity of the solid is probed. Modeling shows...... that under certain operating conditions, the AMR cycle is sensitive to the solid conductivity. It is found that as the operating frequency is increased it is not only sufficient to have a high NTU regenerator but the regenerator performance will also benefit from increased thermal conductivity in the solid...

  8. Thermal conductivities of (ZrxPu(1-x)/2Am(1-x)/2)N solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Tsuyoshi; Takano, Masahide; Akabori, Mitsuo; Arai, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of Zr-based transuranium (TRU) nitride solid solutions is important for designing subcritical cores in nitride-fueled ADS. Some results have been reported concerning the thermal conductivities of (Zr,Pu)N. However, there have been no experimental data on the thermal conductivities of Zr-based nitride solid solutions containing MA. In this study, the authors prepared sintered samples of (Zr x Pu (1-x)/2 Am (1-x)/2) N (x=0.0, 0.58, 0.80) solid solutions. The thermal diffusivity and heat capacity of (Zr x Pu (1-x)/2 Am (1-x)/2) N solid solutions were measured using a laser flash method and drop calorimetry, respectively. Thermal conductivities were determined from the measured thermal diffusivities, heat capacities and bulk densities over a temperature range of 473 to 1473 K. The thermal conductivities of (Zr 0.58 Pu 0.21 Am 0.21 )N and (Zr 0.80 Pu 0.10 Am 0.10 )N solid solutions were found to be higher than that of (Pu 0.5 Am 0.5 )N due to the high thermal conductivity of ZrN as the principal component, although they were lower than that of ZrN due to the impurifying effect of the transuranium elements. Thus, the thermal conductivities of (Zr x Pu (1-x)/2 Am (1-x)/2) N solid solutions increased with increasing ZrN concentration. Moreover, in order to help to promote the design study of nitride-fueled ADS, the thermal conductivity of the (Zr x Pu (1-x)/2 Am (1-x)/2) N solid solutions were fitted to an equation using the least squares method. (author)

  9. Thermal conductivity of solid cyclohexane in orientationally ordered and disordered phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinov, V. A.; Revyakin, V. P.; Sagan, V. V.; Pursky, O. I.; Sysoev, V. M.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal conductivity Λ P of solid cyclohexane is measured at a pressure P = 0.1 MPa in the temperature range from 80 K to the melting point, which covers the ranges of low-temperature orientationally ordered phase II and high-temperature orientationally disordered phase I. Thermal conductivity Λ V is measured at a constant volume in orientationally disordered phase I. The thermal conductivity measured at atmospheric pressure decreases with increasing temperature as Λ P ∝ T −1.15 in phase II, whereas Λ P ∝ T −0.3 in phase I. As temperature increases, isochoric thermal conductivity Λ V in phase I increases gradually. The experimental data are described in terms of a modified Debye model of thermal conductivity with allowance for heat transfer by both phonons and “diffuse” modes.

  10. Thermal battery. [solid metal halide electrolytes with enhanced electrical conductance after a phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsten, R.W.; Nissen, D.A.

    1973-03-06

    The patent describes an improved thermal battery whose novel design eliminates various disadvantages of previous such devices. Its major features include a halide cathode, a solid metal halide electrolyte which has a substantially greater electrical conductance after a phase transition at some temperature, and a means for heating its electrochemical cells to activation temperature.

  11. Direct measurement of thermal conductivity in solid iron at planetary core conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konôpková, Zuzana; McWilliams, R Stewart; Gómez-Pérez, Natalia; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2016-06-02

    The conduction of heat through minerals and melts at extreme pressures and temperatures is of central importance to the evolution and dynamics of planets. In the cooling Earth's core, the thermal conductivity of iron alloys defines the adiabatic heat flux and therefore the thermal and compositional energy available to support the production of Earth's magnetic field via dynamo action. Attempts to describe thermal transport in Earth's core have been problematic, with predictions of high thermal conductivity at odds with traditional geophysical models and direct evidence for a primordial magnetic field in the rock record. Measurements of core heat transport are needed to resolve this difference. Here we present direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of solid iron at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the cores of Mercury-sized to Earth-sized planets, using a dynamically laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Our measurements place the thermal conductivity of Earth's core near the low end of previous estimates, at 18-44 watts per metre per kelvin. The result is in agreement with palaeomagnetic measurements indicating that Earth's geodynamo has persisted since the beginning of Earth's history, and allows for a solid inner core as old as the dynamo.

  12. Consistency in thermophysical properties: enthalpy, heat capacity, thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of solid UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.K.; Chasanov, M.G.; Leibowitz, L.

    Equations have been derived for the enthalpy, heat capacity, thermal conductivity, and thermal diffusivity of UO 2 . In selection of these equations, we considered the traditional criterion of lowest relative standard deviation between experimental data and the function chosen to fit these data as well as consistency between the thermophysical properties. In the latter case, we considered consistency in (1) thermodynamic relations among properties, (2) the choice of physical phenomena on which to base the theoretical formulation of the equations, and (3) the existence and temperature of phase transitions

  13. Isochoric thermal conductivity of solid carbon oxide: the role of phonons and 'diffusive' modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinov, V A; Manzhelii, V G; Revyakin, V P; Sagan, V V; Pursky, O I

    2006-01-01

    The isochoric thermal conductivity of solid CO was investigated in three samples of different densities in the interval from 35 K to the onset of melting. In α-CO the temperature dependence of the isochoric thermal conductivity is significantly weaker than Λ∝1/T; in β-CO it increases slightly with temperature. A quantitative description of the experimental results is given within the Debye model of thermal conductivity in the approximation of the corresponding relaxation times and which allows for the fact that the mean-free path of phonons cannot become smaller than half the phonon wavelength. On this consideration the heat is transported by both phonons and 'diffusive' modes

  14. Four-phonon scattering significantly reduces intrinsic thermal conductivity of solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tianli; Lindsay, Lucas; Ruan, Xiulin

    2017-10-01

    For decades, the three-phonon scattering process has been considered to govern thermal transport in solids, while the role of higher-order four-phonon scattering has been persistently unclear and so ignored. However, recent quantitative calculations of three-phonon scattering have often shown a significant overestimation of thermal conductivity as compared to experimental values. In this Rapid Communication we show that four-phonon scattering is generally important in solids and can remedy such discrepancies. For silicon and diamond, the predicted thermal conductivity is reduced by 30% at 1000 K after including four-phonon scattering, bringing predictions in excellent agreement with measurements. For the projected ultrahigh-thermal conductivity material, zinc-blende BAs, a competitor of diamond as a heat sink material, four-phonon scattering is found to be strikingly strong as three-phonon processes have an extremely limited phase space for scattering. The four-phonon scattering reduces the predicted thermal conductivity from 2200 to 1400 W/m K at room temperature. The reduction at 1000 K is 60%. We also find that optical phonon scattering rates are largely affected, being important in applications such as phonon bottlenecks in equilibrating electronic excitations. Recognizing that four-phonon scattering is expensive to calculate, in the end we provide some guidelines on how to quickly assess the significance of four-phonon scattering, based on energy surface anharmonicity and the scattering phase space. Our work clears the decades-long fundamental question of the significance of higher-order scattering, and points out ways to improve thermoelectrics, thermal barrier coatings, nuclear materials, and radiative heat transfer.

  15. Experimental determination of the thermal contact conductance between two solid surfaces by the energy pulse technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, Gerson Antonio

    1979-01-01

    An experimental procedure for the determination of the thermal contact conductance between two solid surfaces as a function of the contact pressure and the energy of the laser radiation has been developed using the laser pulse method. A rubi laser with variable energy levels was employed as a radiating pulse energy source. The laser beam was allowed to impinge perpendicularly on the front face of a electrolytic iron 73 4 . The temperature fluctuations resulting on the back surface of the sample was detected by a thermocouple, which Is coupled to a PDP-11/45 Computer 32 Kbytes of memory, through a Analog-Digital Converter. A theoretical function, derived exclusively for the problem mentioned in this work, was adjusted by a method of least square fitting of experimental results. This adjustment yielded the value of a parameter related to the contact conductance between two surfaces. The experimental error obtained for the thermal contact conductance was +- 4.9%. (author)

  16. Phonon-mediated Thermal Conductivity in Ionic Solids by Lattice Dynamics-based Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Turney, Joseph E. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); McGaughey, Alan J. H. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Amon, Christina H. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Phillpot, Simon R. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2011-07-22

    Phonon properties predicted from lattice dynamics calculations and the Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) are used to elucidate the thermal-transport properties of ionic materials. It is found that a rigorous treatment of the Coulombic interactions within the harmonic analysis is needed for the analysis of the phonon structure of the solid, while a short-range approximation is sufficient for the third-order force constants. The effects on the thermal conductivity of the relaxation time approximation, the classical approximation to the phonon statistics, the direct summation method for the electrostatic interactions, and the quasi-harmonic approximation to lattice dynamics are quantified. Quantitative agreement is found between predictions from molecular dynamics simulations (a method valid at temperatures above the Debye temperature) and the BTE result within quasi-harmonic approximation over a wide temperature range.

  17. Reversible temperature regulation of electrical and thermal conductivity using liquid–solid phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ruiting; Gao, Jinwei; Wang, Jianjian; Chen, Gang

    2011-01-01

    Reversible temperature tuning of electrical and thermal conductivities of materials is of interest for many applications, including seasonal regulation of building temperature, thermal storage and sensors. Here we introduce a general strategy to achieve large contrasts in electrical and thermal conductivities using first-order phase transitions in percolated composite materials. Internal stress generated during a phase transition modulates the electrical and thermal contact resistances, leading to large contrasts in the electrical and thermal conductivities at the phase transition temperature. With graphite/hexadecane suspensions, the electrical conductivity changes 2 orders of magnitude and the thermal conductivity varies up to 3.2 times near 18 °C. The generality of the approach is also demonstrated in other materials such as graphite/water and carbon nanotube/hexadecane suspensions. PMID:21505445

  18. Reversible temperature regulation of electrical and thermal conductivity using liquid-solid phase transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ruiting; Gao, Jinwei; Wang, Jianjian; Chen, Gang

    2011-01-01

    Reversible temperature tuning of electrical and thermal conductivities of materials is of interest for many applications, including seasonal regulation of building temperature, thermal storage and sensors. Here we introduce a general strategy to achieve large contrasts in electrical and thermal conductivities using first-order phase transitions in percolated composite materials. Internal stress generated during a phase transition modulates the electrical and thermal contact resistances, leading to large contrasts in the electrical and thermal conductivities at the phase transition temperature. With graphite/hexadecane suspensions, the electrical conductivity changes 2 orders of magnitude and the thermal conductivity varies up to 3.2 times near 18 °C. The generality of the approach is also demonstrated in other materials such as graphite/water and carbon nanotube/hexadecane suspensions.

  19. The effect of gadolinium content on the thermal conductivity of near-stoichiometric (U,Gd)O2 solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, S.; Ohmichi, T.; Maeda, A.; Watanabe, H.

    1982-01-01

    The thermal conductivities of near-stoichiometric (U, Gd)O 2 solid solutions containing CdOsub(1.5) up to 15 mol% were determined in the temperature range 700 to 2000 K from thermal diffusivities measured by the laser flash method. Temperature dependence of the thermal conductivities up to around 1600 K could be expressed by the phonon conduction equation K = (A + BT) -1 . The thermal conductivity decreased gradually with an increase of gadolinium content. Thermal resistivities caused by lattice defects were calculated from a theoretical model considering U 4+ , U 5+ and Gd 3+ ions as phonon scattering centers. It was found that this model was in good agreement with the experimental results. The calculation based on this model indicates that the lattice strain effect on the lattice defect thermal resistivity is much larger than the mass effect. (orig.)

  20. Analytical model for the effects of wetting on thermal boundary conductance across solid/classical liquid interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplan, Matthew E.; Giri, Ashutosh; Hopkins, Patrick E., E-mail: phopkins@virginia.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2014-04-21

    We develop an analytical model for the thermal boundary conductance between a solid and a liquid. By infusing recent developments in the phonon theory of liquid thermodynamics with diffuse mismatch theory, we derive a closed form model that can predict the effects of wetting on the thermal boundary conductance across an interface between a solid and a classical liquid. We account for the complete wetting (hydrophilicity), or lack thereof (hydrophobicity), of the liquid to the solid by considering varying contributions of transverse mode interactions between the solid and liquid interfacial layers; this transverse coupling relationship is determined with local density of states calculations from molecular dynamics simulations between Lennard-Jones solids and a liquids with different interfacial interaction energies. We present example calculations for the thermal boundary conductance between both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interfaces of Al/water and Au/water, which show excellent agreement with measured values reported by Ge et al. [Z. Ge, D. G. Cahill, and P. V. Braun, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 186101 (2006)]. Our model does not require any fitting parameters and is appropriate to model heat flow across any planar interface between a solid and a classical liquid.

  1. The influence of the disordered dipole subsystem on the thermal conductivity of the CO solid at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumarokov, V.; Jezowski, A.; Stachowiak, P.

    2009-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of solid CO is investigated in the temperature range 1-20 K. The experimental temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of solid CO is described using the time-relaxation method within the Debye model. The comparison of the experimental temperature dependences of the thermal conductivity of N 2 and CO shows that in the case of CO there is an additional large phonon scattering at temperatures near the maximum. Analysis of the experimental data indicates that this scattering is caused by the frozen disordered dipole subsystem, similar to a dipole glass. The scattering is described by resonant phonon scattering on tunneling states and on low-energy quasi-harmonic oscillations within the soft potential model

  2. A Novel Portable Absolute Transient Hot-Wire Instrument for the Measurement of the Thermal Conductivity of Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assael, Marc J.; Antoniadis, Konstantinos D.; Metaxa, Ifigeneia N.; Mylona, Sofia K.; Assael, John-Alexander M.; Wu, Jiangtao; Hu, Miaomiao

    2015-11-01

    A new portable absolute Transient Hot-Wire instrument for measuring the thermal conductivity of solids over a range of 0.2 { W}{\\cdot }m^{-1}{\\cdot }{K}^{-1} to 4 { W}{\\cdot }m^{-1}{\\cdot }{K}^{-1} is presented. The new instrument is characterized by three novelties: (a) an innovative two-wires sensor which provides robustness and portability, while at the same time employs a soft silicone layer to eliminate the effect of the contact resistance between the wires and the sample, (b) a newly designed compact portable printed electronic board employing an FPGA architecture CPU to the control output voltage and data processing—the new board replaces the traditional, large in size Wheatstone-type bridge system required to perform the experimental measurements, and (c) a cutting-edge software suite, developed for the mesh describing the structure of the sensor, and utilizing the Finite Elements Method to model the heat flow. The estimation of thermal conductivity is modeled as a minimization problem and is solved using Bayesian Optimization. Our revolutionizing proposed methodology exhibits radical speedups of up to × 120, compared to previous approaches, and considerably reduces the number of simulations performed, achieving convergence only in a few minutes. The new instrument was successfully employed to measure, at room temperature, the thermal conductivity of two thermal conductivity reference materials, Pyroceram 9606 and Pyrex 7740, and two possible candidate glassy solids, PMMA and BK7, with an absolute low uncertainty of 2 %.

  3. Low thermal conductivity skutterudites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleurial, J P; Caillat, T; Borshchevsky, A

    1997-07-01

    Recent experimental results on semiconductors with the skutterudite crystal structure show that these materials possess attractive transport properties and have a good potential for achieving ZT values substantially larger than for state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials. Both n-type and p-type conductivity samples have been obtained, using several preparation techniques. Associated with a low hole effective mass, very high carrier mobilities, low electrical resistivities and moderate Seebeck coefficients are obtained in p-type skutterudites. For a comparable doping level, the carrier mobilities of n-type samples are about an order of magnitude lower than the values achieved on p-type samples. However, the much larger electron effective masses and Seebeck coefficients on p-type samples. However, the much larger electron effective masses and Seebeck coefficients make n-type skutterudite promising candidates as well. Unfortunately, the thermal conductivities of the binary skutterudites compounds are too large, particularly at low temperatures, to be useful for thermoelectric applications. Several approaches to the reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity in skutterudites are being pursued: heavy doping, formation of solid solutions and alloys, study of novel ternary and filled skutterudite compounds. All those approaches have already resulted in skutterudite compositions with substantially lower thermal conductivity values in these materials. Recently, superior thermoelectric properties in the moderate to high temperature range were achieved for compositions combining alloying and filling of the skutterudite structure. Experimental results and mechanisms responsible for low thermal conductivity in skutterudites are discussed.

  4. Multivalent ion conducting solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanaka, N. [Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry

    2008-07-01

    Solid electrolytes possess important characteristics for industrial applications. Only a single ionic species can macroscopically migrate in these solids. This paper described a the new NASICON (M-Zr-Nb-P-O) type system, exhibiting an exceptionally high level of trivalent M3+ ion conductivity on polycrystalline solids. The partial substitution of the smaller higher valent Nb5+ ion for Zr4+ stabilized the NASICON phase and realized the M3+ ion conduction in the NASICON structure. It was concluded that the conductivities of the series are comparable to those of the practically applied solid electrolytes of oxide anion conductors of YSZ and CSZ. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Effect of epoxidation level on thermal properties and ionic conductivity of epoxidized natural rubber solid polymer nanocomposite electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harun, Fatin; Chan, Chin Han; Winie, Tan [Faculty of Applied Sciences, UniversitiTeknologi MARA (UiTM), Shah Alam, 40450 Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Sim, Lai Har; Zainal, Nurul Fatahah Asyqin [Center of Foundation Studies, PuncakAlam Campus, UniversitiTeknologi MARA, 40430 Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2015-08-28

    Effect of epoxide content on the thermal and conductivity properties of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR) solid polymer nanocomposite electrolytes was investigated. Commercial available epoxidized natural rubber having 25 (ENR25) and 50 mole% (ENR50) epoxide, respectively were incorporated with lithium perchlorate (LiClO{sub 4}) salt and titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanofiller via solution casting method. The solid polymer nanocomposite electrolytes were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and impedance spectroscopy (IS) for their thermal properties and conductivity, respectively. It was evident that introduction of LiClO{sub 4} causes a greater increase in glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) and ionic conductivity of ENR50 as compared to ENR25. Upon addition of TiO{sub 2} in ENR/LiClO{sub 4} system, a remarkable T{sub g} elevation was observed for both ENRs where ENR50 reveals a more pronounced changes. It is interesting to note that they exhibit different phenomenon in ionic conductivity with TiO{sub 2} loading where ENR25 shows enhancement of conductivity while ENR50 shows declination.

  6. Effects of solid fission products forming dissolved oxide (Nd) and metallic precipitate (Ru) on the thermal conductivity of uranium base oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Yang, Jae-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hun; Rhee, Young-Woo; Kang, Ki-Won; Kim, Keon-Sik; Song, Kun-Woo

    2007-01-01

    The effects of solid fission products on the thermal conductivity of uranium base oxide nuclear fuel were experimentally investigated. Neodymium (Nd) and ruthenium (Ru) were added to represent the physical states of solid fission products such as 'dissolved oxide' and 'metallic precipitate', respectively. Thermal conductivity was determined on the basis of the thermal diffusivity, density and specific heat values. The effects of the additives on the thermal conductivity were quantified in the form of the thermal resistivity equation - the reciprocal of the phonon conduction equation - which was determined from the measured data. It is concluded that the thermal conductivity of the irradiated nuclear fuel is affected by both the 'dissolved oxide' and the 'metallic precipitate', however, the effects are in the opposite direction and the 'dissolved oxide' influences the thermal conductivity more significantly than that of the 'metallic precipitate'

  7. Thermal Conductivities in Solids from First Principles: Accurate Computations and Rapid Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbogno, Christian; Scheffler, Matthias

    In spite of significant research efforts, a first-principles determination of the thermal conductivity κ at high temperatures has remained elusive. Boltzmann transport techniques that account for anharmonicity perturbatively become inaccurate under such conditions. Ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) techniques using the Green-Kubo (GK) formalism capture the full anharmonicity, but can become prohibitively costly to converge in time and size. We developed a formalism that accelerates such GK simulations by several orders of magnitude and that thus enables its application within the limited time and length scales accessible in ab initio MD. For this purpose, we determine the effective harmonic potential occurring during the MD, the associated temperature-dependent phonon properties and lifetimes. Interpolation in reciprocal and frequency space then allows to extrapolate to the macroscopic scale. For both force-field and ab initio MD, we validate this approach by computing κ for Si and ZrO2, two materials known for their particularly harmonic and anharmonic character. Eventually, we demonstrate how these techniques facilitate reasonable estimates of κ from existing MD calculations at virtually no additional computational cost.

  8. Thermal conductivity of technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, K.; Serizawa, H.; Fukuda, K.

    1998-01-01

    The thermal diffusivity of technetium was measured on a disk sample of 5 mm in diameter and 1 mm in thickness by the laser flash method from room temperature to 1173 K, and the thermal conductivity was determined by the measured thermal diffusivity and density, and the reported specific heat capacity. The thermal diffusivity of technetium decreases with increasing temperature though it is almost constant above 600 K. The thermal conductivity of technetium shows a minimum around 400 K, above which the thermal conductivity increases with temperature. The electronic and phonon components of the thermal conductivity were evaluated approximately. The increase in the thermal conductivity of technetium with temperature is due to the increase in the electronic component. (orig.)

  9. Thermophysical Properties of Matter - The TPRC Data Series. Volume 2. Thermal Conductivity - Nonmetallic Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-01

    Rept. NYO-6451, 1-16, 1955. [AD 80 699] Ratcliffe, E.H.. Phys. and Chem. of Glasses, 1.(3), 103-4, 1960. Sujak, B. , ACTA Physica Polonica , 20(2...1954. Boundary Resistance 61. Casimir, H. B. G., "Note on the Conduction of Heat in Crystals," Physica , 5(6), 495-500, 1938. 62. Berman, R., Simon...TP! r, f Theory, Estimation, and Measurement 39« Liquids by a Nonstationary Method." Physica , 19(3) 208-16, 1953. 429. Hooper, F. C. and

  10. Thermal conductivity of hyperstoichiometric SIMFUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucuta, P G; Verrall, R A [Chalk River Labs., AECL Research, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Matzke, H [CEC Joint Research Centre, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1997-08-01

    At extended burnup, reduction in fuel thermal conductivity occurs as fission-gas bubble, solid fission-product (dissolved and precipitated) build-up, and the oxygen-to-uranium ratio (O/U) possible increases. The effects of solid fission products and the deviation from stoichiometry can be investigated using SIMFUEL (SIMulated high-burnup UO{sub 2} FUEL). The reduction in fuel conductivity due to solid fission products was assessed and reported previously. In this paper, thermal conductivity measurements on hyperstoichiometric SIMFUEL and UO{sub 2+x} investigating the effect of the excess of oxygen on fuel thermal properties, are reported. The thermal diffusivity, specific heat and density of hyperstorichiometric SIMFUEL and UO{sub 2+x}, annealed at the same oxygen potential, were measured to obtain thermal conductivity. The excess of oxygen lowered to the thermal diffusivity, but did not significantly affect the specific heat. The thermal conductivity of UO{sub 2+x} (no fission products present) decreases with an increasing O/U ratio; a reduction of 15%, 37% and 56% at 600 deg. C, and 11%, 23% and 33% at 1500 deg. C, was found for O/U ratios of 2.007, 2.035 and 2.084, respectively. For the SIMFUEL annealed at {Delta}Go{sub 2} = -245 kJ/mol (corresponding to UO{sub 2,007}), the thermal conductivity was practically unchanged, although for the higher oxygen potentials ({Delta}Go{sub 2} {>=} -205 kJ/mol) a reduction in thermal conductivity of the same order as in UO{sub 2+x} W as measured. For SIMFUEL, annealed in reducing conditions, the fission products lowered thermal conductivity significantly. However, for high oxygen potentials ({Delta}Go{sub 2} {>=} -205 kJ/mol), the thermal conductivities of UO{sub 2+x} and SIMFUEL were found to be approximately equal in the temperature range of 600 to 1500 deg. C. Consequently, excess oxygen is the dominant factor contributing to thermal conductivity degradation at high oxygen potentials. (author). 9 figs, 2 tabs.

  11. Thermal conductivity of hyperstoichiometric SIMFUEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucuta, P.G.; Verrall, R.A.; Matzke, H.

    1997-01-01

    At extended burnup, reduction in fuel thermal conductivity occurs as fission-gas bubble, solid fission-product (dissolved and precipitated) build-up, and the oxygen-to-uranium ratio (O/U) possible increases. The effects of solid fission products and the deviation from stoichiometry can be investigated using SIMFUEL (SIMulated high-burnup UO 2 FUEL). The reduction in fuel conductivity due to solid fission products was assessed and reported previously. In this paper, thermal conductivity measurements on hyperstoichiometric SIMFUEL and UO 2+x investigating the effect of the excess of oxygen on fuel thermal properties, are reported. The thermal diffusivity, specific heat and density of hyperstorichiometric SIMFUEL and UO 2+x , annealed at the same oxygen potential, were measured to obtain thermal conductivity. The excess of oxygen lowered to the thermal diffusivity, but did not significantly affect the specific heat. The thermal conductivity of UO 2+x (no fission products present) decreases with an increasing O/U ratio; a reduction of 15%, 37% and 56% at 600 deg. C, and 11%, 23% and 33% at 1500 deg. C, was found for O/U ratios of 2.007, 2.035 and 2.084, respectively. For the SIMFUEL annealed at ΔGo 2 = -245 kJ/mol (corresponding to UO 2,007 ), the thermal conductivity was practically unchanged, although for the higher oxygen potentials (ΔGo 2 ≥ -205 kJ/mol) a reduction in thermal conductivity of the same order as in UO 2+x W as measured. For SIMFUEL, annealed in reducing conditions, the fission products lowered thermal conductivity significantly. However, for high oxygen potentials (ΔGo 2 ≥ -205 kJ/mol), the thermal conductivities of UO 2+x and SIMFUEL were found to be approximately equal in the temperature range of 600 to 1500 deg. C. Consequently, excess oxygen is the dominant factor contributing to thermal conductivity degradation at high oxygen potentials. (author). 9 figs, 2 tabs

  12. Measurement of thermal conductance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchnir, M.

    1977-01-01

    The 6-m long, 45-kG, warm-iron superconducting magnets envisioned for the Energy Doubler stage of the Fermilab accelerator require stiff supports with minimized thermal conductances in order to keep the refrigeration power reasonable. The large number of supports involved in the system required a careful study of their heat conduction from the room temperature wall to the intercepting refrigeration at 20 0 K and to the liquid helium. For this purpose the thermal conductance of this support was measured by comparing it with the thermal conductance of a copper strap of known geometry. An association of steady-state thermal analysis and experimental thermal conductivity techniques forms the basis of this method. An important advantage is the automatic simulation of the 20 0 K refrigeration intercept by the copper strap, which simplifies the apparatus considerably. This relative resistance technique, which uses electrical analogy as a guideline, is applicable with no restrictions for materials with temperature-independent thermal conductivity. For other materials the results obtained are functions of the specific temperature interval involved in the measurements. A comprehensive review of the literature on thermal conductivity indicates that this approach has not been used before. A demonstration of its self-consistency is stressed here rather than results obtained for different supports

  13. High Thermal Conductivity Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Shinde, Subhash L

    2006-01-01

    Thermal management has become a ‘hot’ field in recent years due to a need to obtain high performance levels in many devices used in such diverse areas as space science, mainframe and desktop computers, optoelectronics and even Formula One racing cars! Thermal solutions require not just taking care of very high thermal flux, but also ‘hot spots’, where the flux densities can exceed 200 W/cm2. High thermal conductivity materials play an important role in addressing thermal management issues. This volume provides readers a basic understanding of the thermal conduction mechanisms in these materials and discusses how the thermal conductivity may be related to their crystal structures as well as microstructures developed as a result of their processing history. The techniques for accurate measurement of these properties on large as well as small scales have been reviewed. Detailed information on the thermal conductivity of diverse materials including aluminum nitride (AlN), silicon carbide (SiC), diamond, a...

  14. Power and Thermal Technologies for Air and Space. Delivery Order 0001: Single Ionic Conducting Solid-State Electrolyte

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Turner, Allen

    2005-01-01

    This report focuses on the development of a lithium-ion conducting channel as a solid-state electrolyte for rechargeable lithium batteries through the use of thin films of dilithium phthalocyanine (Li2Pc...

  15. Thermal conductivity of Zn{sub 4{minus}x}Cd{sub x}Sb{sub 3} solid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillat, T; Borshchevsky, A; Fleurial, J P

    1997-07-01

    {beta}-Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 3} was recently identified at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory as a new high performance p-type thermoelectric material with a maximum dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit ZT of 1.4 at a temperature of 673K. A usual approach, used for many state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials, to further improve ZT values is to alloy {beta}-Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 3} with isostructural compounds because of the expected decrease in lattice thermal conductivity. The authors have grown Zn{sub 4{minus}x}Cd{sub x}Sb{sub 3} crystals with 0.2 {le} x < 1.2 and measured their thermal conductivity from 10 to 500K. The thermal conductivity values of Zn{sub 4{minus}x}Cd{sub x}Sb{sub 3} alloys are significantly lower than those measured for {beta}-Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 3} and are comparable to its calculated minimum thermal conductivity. A strong atomic disorder is believed to be primarily at the origin of the very low thermal conductivity of these materials which are also fairly good electrical conductors and are therefore excellent candidates for thermoelectric applications.

  16. Time-resolved electron thermal conduction by probing of plasma formation in transparent solids with high power subpicosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu, Brian -Tinh Van [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1994-02-01

    This dissertation work includes a series of experimental measurements in a search for better understanding of high temperature (104-106K) and high density plasmas (1022-1024cm-3) produced by irradiating a transparent solid target with high intensity (1013 - 1015W/cm2) and subpicosecond (10-12-10-13s) laser pulses. Experimentally, pump and probe schemes with both frontside (vacuum-plasma side) and backside (plasma-bulk material side) probes are used to excite and interrogate or probe the plasma evolution, thereby providing useful insights into the plasma formation mechanisms. A series of different experiments has been carried out so as to characterize plasma parameters and the importance of various nonlinear processes. Experimental evidence shows that electron thermal conduction is supersonic in a time scale of the first picosecond after laser irradiation, so fast that it was often left unresolved in the past. The experimental results from frontside probing demonstrate that upon irradiation with a strong (pump) laser pulse, a thin high temperature (~40eV) super-critical density (~1023/cm3) plasma layer is quickly formed at the target surface which in turn becomes strongly reflective and prevents further transmission of the remainder of the laser pulse. In the bulk region behind the surface, it is also found that a large sub-critical (~1018/cm3) plasma is produced by inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption and collisional ionization. The bulk underdense plasma is evidenced by large absorption of the backside probe light. A simple and analytical model, modified from the avalanche model, for plasma evolution in transparent materials is proposed to explain the experimental results. Elimination of the bulk plasma is then experimentally illustrated by using targets overcoated with highly absorptive films.

  17. Time-resolved electron thermal conduction by probing of plasma formation in transparent solids with high power subpicosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, B.T.V.

    1994-02-01

    This dissertation work includes a series of experimental measurements in a search for better understanding of high temperature (10 4 -10 6 K) and high density plasmas (10 22 -10 24 cm -3 ) produced by irradiating a transparent solid target with high intensity (10 13 - 10 15 W/cm 2 ) and subpicosecond (10 -12 -10 -13 s) laser pulses. Experimentally, pump and probe schemes with both frontside (vacuum-plasma side) and backside (plasma-bulk material side) probes are used to excite and interrogate or probe the plasma evolution, thereby providing useful insights into the plasma formation mechanisms. A series of different experiments has been carried out so as to characterize plasma parameters and the importance of various nonlinear processes. Experimental evidence shows that electron thermal conduction is supersonic in a time scale of the first picosecond after laser irradiation, so fast that it was often left unresolved in the past. The experimental results from frontside probing demonstrate that upon irradiation with a strong (pump) laser pulse, a thin high temperature (∼40eV) super-critical density (∼10 23 /cm 3 ) plasma layer is quickly formed at the target surface which in turn becomes strongly reflective and prevents further transmission of the remainder of the laser pulse. In the bulk region behind the surface, it is also found that a large sub-critical (∼10 18 /cm 3 ) plasma is produced by inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption and collisional ionization. The bulk underdense plasma is evidenced by large absorption of the backside probe light. A simple and analytical model, modified from the avalanche model, for plasma evolution in transparent materials is proposed to explain the experimental results. Elimination of the bulk plasma is then experimentally illustrated by using targets overcoated with highly absorptive films

  18. A simple differential steady-state method to measure the thermal conductivity of solid bulk materials with high accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, D; Chen, G

    2014-02-01

    Accurate measurements of thermal conductivity are of great importance for materials research and development. Steady-state methods determine thermal conductivity directly from the proportionality between heat flow and an applied temperature difference (Fourier Law). Although theoretically simple, in practice, achieving high accuracies with steady-state methods is challenging and requires rather complex experimental setups due to temperature sensor uncertainties and parasitic heat loss. We developed a simple differential steady-state method in which the sample is mounted between an electric heater and a temperature-controlled heat sink. Our method calibrates for parasitic heat losses from the electric heater during the measurement by maintaining a constant heater temperature close to the environmental temperature while varying the heat sink temperature. This enables a large signal-to-noise ratio which permits accurate measurements of samples with small thermal conductance values without an additional heater calibration measurement or sophisticated heater guards to eliminate parasitic heater losses. Additionally, the differential nature of the method largely eliminates the uncertainties of the temperature sensors, permitting measurements with small temperature differences, which is advantageous for samples with high thermal conductance values and/or with strongly temperature-dependent thermal conductivities. In order to accelerate measurements of more than one sample, the proposed method allows for measuring several samples consecutively at each temperature measurement point without adding significant error. We demonstrate the method by performing thermal conductivity measurements on commercial bulk thermoelectric Bi2Te3 samples in the temperature range of 30-150 °C with an error below 3%.

  19. Solid state thermal rectifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    None

    2016-07-05

    Thermal rectifiers using linear nanostructures as core thermal conductors have been fabricated. A high mass density material is added preferentially to one end of the nanostructures to produce an axially non-uniform mass distribution. The resulting nanoscale system conducts heat asymmetrically with greatest heat flow in the direction of decreasing mass density. Thermal rectification has been demonstrated for linear nanostructures that are electrical insulators, such as boron nitride nanotubes, and for nanostructures that are conductive, such as carbon nanotubes.

  20. Thermal conductivity of sputtered amorphous Ge films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan, Tianzhuo; Xu, Yibin; Goto, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Kato, Ryozo; Sasaki, Michiko; Kagawa, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    We measured the thermal conductivity of amorphous Ge films prepared by magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity was significantly higher than the value predicted by the minimum thermal conductivity model and increased with deposition temperature. We found that variations in sound velocity and Ge film density were not the main factors in the high thermal conductivity. Fast Fourier transform patterns of transmission electron micrographs revealed that short-range order in the Ge films was responsible for their high thermal conductivity. The results provide experimental evidences to understand the underlying nature of the variation of phonon mean free path in amorphous solids

  1. Thermal conductivities for sintered and sphere-pac Li2O and γ-LiAlO2 solid breeders with and without irradiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.Y.; Tam, S.W.

    1984-07-01

    Thermal conductivities (k, k/sub eff/) have been estimated for sintered and sphere-pac Li 2 O and γ-LiAlO 2 with and without neutron irradiation effects. The estimation is based on (1) data from unirradiated UO 2 , Li 2 O, and γ-LiAlO 2 ; (2) data from irradiated dielectric insulator materials; and (3) relatively simple physical models. Comparison of model predictions with limited ex- and in-reactor data found reasonable agreement, thus lending credence for their use in design applications. The impact of thermal conductivities on tritium breeding and power generation in fusion solid-breeder blankets is briefly highlighted

  2. Effect of graphene layer thickness and mechanical compliance on interfacial heat flow and thermal conduction in solid-liquid phase change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warzoha, Ronald J; Fleischer, Amy S

    2014-08-13

    Solid-liquid phase change materials (PCMs) are attractive candidates for thermal energy storage and electronics cooling applications but have limited applicability in state-of-the-art technologies due to their low intrinsic thermal conductivities. Recent efforts to incorporate graphene and multilayer graphene into PCMs have led to the development of thermal energy storage materials with remarkable values of bulk thermal conductivity. However, the full potential of graphene as a filler material for the thermal enhancement of PCMs remains unrealized, largely due to an incomplete understanding of the physical mechanisms that govern thermal transport within graphene-based nanocomposites. In this work, we show that the number of graphene layers (n) within an individual graphene nanoparticle has a significant effect on the bulk thermal conductivity of an organic PCM. Results indicate that the bulk thermal conductivity of PCMs can be tuned by over an order of magnitude simply by adjusting the number of graphene layers (n) from n = 3 to 44. Using scanning electron microscopy in tandem with nanoscale analytical techniques, the physical mechanisms that govern heat flow within a graphene nanocomposite PCM are found to be nearly independent of the intrinsic thermal conductivity of the graphene nanoparticle itself and are instead found to be dependent on the mechanical compliance of the graphene nanoparticles. These findings are critical for the design and development of PCMs that are capable of cooling next-generation electronics and storing heat effectively in medium-to-large-scale energy systems, including solar-thermal power plants and building heating and cooling systems.

  3. Thermal contact conductance

    CERN Document Server

    Madhusudana, Chakravarti V

    2013-01-01

    The work covers both theoretical and practical aspects of thermal contact conductance. The theoretical discussion focuses on heat transfer through spots, joints, and surfaces, as well as the role of interstitial materials (both planned and inadvertent). The practical discussion includes formulae and data that can be used in designing heat-transfer equipment for a variety of joints, including special geometries and configurations. All of the material has been updated to reflect the latest advances in the field.

  4. In situ characterization of thermal conductivities of irradiated solids by using ion beam heating and infrared imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondrik, Nicholas; Gigax, Jonathan; Wang, Xuemei; Price, Lloyd [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Wei, Chaochen [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Shao, Lin, E-mail: lshao@tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Department, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We propose a method to characterize thermal properties of ion irradiated materials. This method uses an ion beam as a heating source to create a hot spot on sample surface. Infrared imaging is used as a surface temperature mapping tool to record hot zone spreading. Since ion energy, ion flux, and ion penetration depth can be precisely controlled, the beam heating data is highly reliable and repeatable. Using a high speed infrared camera to capture lateral spreading of the hot zone, thermal diffusivity can be readily extracted. The proposed method has advantages in studying radiation induced thermal property changes, for which radiation damage can be introduced by using an irradiating beam over a relatively large beam spot and beam heating can be introduced by using a focused testing beam over a relatively small beam spot. These two beams can be switched without breaking vacuum. Thus thermal conductivity changes can be characterized in situ with ion irradiation. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated on a single crystal quartz substrate.

  5. In situ characterization of thermal conductivities of irradiated solids by using ion beam heating and infrared imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondrik, Nicholas; Gigax, Jonathan; Wang, Xuemei; Price, Lloyd; Wei, Chaochen; Shao, Lin

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method to characterize thermal properties of ion irradiated materials. This method uses an ion beam as a heating source to create a hot spot on sample surface. Infrared imaging is used as a surface temperature mapping tool to record hot zone spreading. Since ion energy, ion flux, and ion penetration depth can be precisely controlled, the beam heating data is highly reliable and repeatable. Using a high speed infrared camera to capture lateral spreading of the hot zone, thermal diffusivity can be readily extracted. The proposed method has advantages in studying radiation induced thermal property changes, for which radiation damage can be introduced by using an irradiating beam over a relatively large beam spot and beam heating can be introduced by using a focused testing beam over a relatively small beam spot. These two beams can be switched without breaking vacuum. Thus thermal conductivity changes can be characterized in situ with ion irradiation. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated on a single crystal quartz substrate

  6. Thermal conductivity of (Np0.20Pu0.50Am0.25Cm0.05)O2−x solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Tsuyoshi; Takano, Masahide; Akabori, Mitsuo; Arai, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal conductivity of (Np 0.20 Pu 0.50 Am 0.25 Cm 0.05 )O 2−x was evaluated. • Dependence of thermal conductivity on storage time was clarified. • Results were discussed with the lattice expansion model by self-irradiation. • After annealing at 1423 K in vacuum, thermal conductivity returned. -- Abstract: The authors prepared the sintered sample of (Np 0.20 Pu 0.50 Am 0.25 Cm 0.05 )O 2−x (2 − x = 1.98, 1.96) solid solution and evaluated the dependence of the thermal conductivity on storage time and temperature. The heat capacity of (Np 0.20 Pu 0.50 Am 0.25 Cm 0.05 )O 1.98 was measured between 324 and 1082 K by a drop calorimetry. The thermal diffusivity of (Np 0.20 Pu 0.50 Am 0.25 Cm 0.05 )O 1.98 was measured when the storage time became 48, 216, 720 and 1584 h and that of (Np 0.20 Pu 0.50 Am 0.25 Cm 0.05 )O 1.96 was measured when the storage time became 0,528 and 1386 h. In this study, the latter sample was annealed at 1423 K in vacuum with background pressure of less than 2.0 × 10 −4 Pa just after the measurement on the storage time, 1386 h. The thermal diffusivity of (Np 0.20 Pu 0.50 Am 0.25 Cm 0.05 )O 1.96 just after annealing returned to the values of the storage time, 0 h. This result reveals the thermal recovery behavior by annealing. The thermal conductivity of (Np 0.20 Pu 0.50 Am 0.25 Cm 0.05 )O 2−x was determined from the measured thermal diffusivity, heat capacity and bulk density. The thermal conductivity of (Np 0.20 Pu 0.50 Am 0.25 Cm 0.05 )O 2−x exponentially decreased with increasing storage time. This result suggested that the decrease of the thermal conductivity was attributed to the accumulation of lattice defects caused by self-irradiation

  7. Thermal conductivity at very low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locatelli, M [CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38 (France). Service des Basses Temperatures

    1976-06-01

    The interest of low and very low temperatures in solid physics and especially that of thermal measurements is briefly mentioned. Some notes on the thermal conductivity of dielectrics, the method and apparatus used to measure this property at very low temperatures (T<1.5K) and some recent results of fundamental and applied research are then presented.

  8. Shape memory thermal conduction switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Rajan (Inventor); Krishnan, Vinu (Inventor); Notardonato, William U. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A thermal conduction switch includes a thermally-conductive first member having a first thermal contacting structure for securing the first member as a stationary member to a thermally regulated body or a body requiring thermal regulation. A movable thermally-conductive second member has a second thermal contacting surface. A thermally conductive coupler is interposed between the first member and the second member for thermally coupling the first member to the second member. At least one control spring is coupled between the first member and the second member. The control spring includes a NiTiFe comprising shape memory (SM) material that provides a phase change temperature <273 K, a transformation range <40 K, and a hysteresis of <10 K. A bias spring is between the first member and the second member. At the phase change the switch provides a distance change (displacement) between first and second member by at least 1 mm, such as 2 to 4 mm.

  9. Conductivity And Thermal Stability of Solid Acid Composites CsH2PO4 /NaH2PO4/ SiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norsyahida Mohammad; Abu Bakar Mohamad; Abu Bakar Mohamad; Abdul Amir Hassan Kadhum

    2016-01-01

    Solid acid composites CsH 2 PO 4 / NaH 2 PO 4 / SiO 2 with different mole ratios of CsH 2 PO 4 and NaH 2 PO 4 to SiO 2 were synthesized and characterized. Preliminary infrared measurements of CsH 2 PO 4 and its composites indicated that hydrogen bonds breaking and formation were detected between 1710 to 2710 cm -1 , while the rotation of phosphate tetrahedral anions occurred between 900 and 1200 cm -1 . The superprotonic transition of CsH 2 PO 4 / NaH 2 PO 4 / SiO 2 composite was identified at superprotonic temperatures between 230 and 260 degree Celcius, under atmospheric pressure. This study reveals higher conductivity values for composites with higher CsH 2 PO 4 (CDP) content. Solid acid composite CDP 613 appeared as the composite with the highest conductivity that is 7.2x10 -3 S cm -1 at 230 degree Celcius. Thermal stability of the solid acid composites such as temperature of dehydration, melting and decomposition were investigated. The addition of NaH 2 PO 4 lowers the dehydration temperature of the solid acid composites. (author)

  10. An efficient and accurate framework for calculating lattice thermal conductivity of solids: AFLOW—AAPL Automatic Anharmonic Phonon Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plata, Jose J.; Nath, Pinku; Usanmaz, Demet; Carrete, Jesús; Toher, Cormac; de Jong, Maarten; Asta, Mark; Fornari, Marco; Nardelli, Marco Buongiorno; Curtarolo, Stefano

    2017-10-01

    One of the most accurate approaches for calculating lattice thermal conductivity, , is solving the Boltzmann transport equation starting from third-order anharmonic force constants. In addition to the underlying approximations of ab-initio parameterization, two main challenges are associated with this path: high computational costs and lack of automation in the frameworks using this methodology, which affect the discovery rate of novel materials with ad-hoc properties. Here, the Automatic Anharmonic Phonon Library (AAPL) is presented. It efficiently computes interatomic force constants by making effective use of crystal symmetry analysis, it solves the Boltzmann transport equation to obtain , and allows a fully integrated operation with minimum user intervention, a rational addition to the current high-throughput accelerated materials development framework AFLOW. An "experiment vs. theory" study of the approach is shown, comparing accuracy and speed with respect to other available packages, and for materials characterized by strong electron localization and correlation. Combining AAPL with the pseudo-hybrid functional ACBN0 is possible to improve accuracy without increasing computational requirements.

  11. Thermal conductivity of unsaturated clay-rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jougnot

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The parameters used to describe the electrical conductivity of a porous material can be used to describe also its thermal conductivity. A new relationship is developed to connect the thermal conductivity of an unsaturated porous material to the thermal conductivity of the different phases of the composite, and two electrical parameters called the first and second Archie's exponents. A good agreement is obtained between the new model and thermal conductivity measurements performed using packs of glass beads and core samples of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rocks at different saturations of the water phase. We showed that the three model parameters optimised to fit the new model against experimental data (namely the thermal conductivity of the solid phase and the two Archie's exponents are consistent with independent estimates. We also observed that the anisotropy of the effective thermal conductivity of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rock was mainly due to the anisotropy of the thermal conductivity of the solid phase.

  12. A compilation of correlation parameters for predicting the enthalpy and thermal conductivity of solid foods within the temperature range of -40 C to +40 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amos, N.D. [Comvita New Zealand Limited, Private Bag 1, Te Puke 3153 (New Zealand); Willix, J.; North, M.F. [AgResearch Limited, MIRINZ Centre, Ruakura Campus, East Street, Private Bag 3123, Hamilton (New Zealand); Chadderton, T. [Crop and Food Research Ltd, PO Box 5114, Nelson (New Zealand)

    2008-11-15

    This paper presents thermal conductivity data for 40 foods, enthalpy data for 58 foods and density data for nine foods, along with the compositions of the foods. Measurements cover a range of solid food types (including meats, fats, offal, fish, dairy products and horticultural products). Some measurements reported are for foods that have never before been studied, others have been published elsewhere, but are included here for convenience. Thermal conductivity was measured using a guarded hot-plate apparatus, enthalpy using an adiabatic calorimeter and density using a water displacement meter. Thermal conductivity and enthalpy values were measured within the temperature range of -40 C to +40 C. (author) [French] Cette publication presente des donnes sur la conductivite thermique, l'enthalpie et la densite respectivement de 40, 58 et 9 produits alimentaires, ainsi que leurs compositions. Les mesures couvrent une variete de types de produits alimentaires (viande, matieres grasses, abats, poisson, produits laitiers, produits horticoles). Certaines sont rapportees pour des produits qui n 'ant jamais ete etudie auparavant, d'autres ant ete publie ailleurs mais sont aussi inclues pour plus de commodite. La conductivite thermique a ete mesure avec un appareil a plaque electrique protegee, l'enthalpie avec un calorimetre adiabatique et la densite avec un appareil mesurant Ie deplacement d'eau. La conductivite thermique et l'enthalpie ont ete toutes les mesures pour une fourchette de temperatures allant de -40 C a 40 C. (orig.)

  13. Thermal conductivity of supercooled water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, John W; Holten, Vincent; Sengers, Jan V; Anisimov, Mikhail A

    2013-04-01

    The heat capacity of supercooled water, measured down to -37°C, shows an anomalous increase as temperature decreases. The thermal diffusivity, i.e., the ratio of the thermal conductivity and the heat capacity per unit volume, shows a decrease. These anomalies may be associated with a hypothesized liquid-liquid critical point in supercooled water below the line of homogeneous nucleation. However, while the thermal conductivity is known to diverge at the vapor-liquid critical point due to critical density fluctuations, the thermal conductivity of supercooled water, calculated as the product of thermal diffusivity and heat capacity, does not show any sign of such an anomaly. We have used mode-coupling theory to investigate the possible effect of critical fluctuations on the thermal conductivity of supercooled water and found that indeed any critical thermal-conductivity enhancement would be too small to be measurable at experimentally accessible temperatures. Moreover, the behavior of thermal conductivity can be explained by the observed anomalies of the thermodynamic properties. In particular, we show that thermal conductivity should go through a minimum when temperature is decreased, as Kumar and Stanley observed in the TIP5P model of water. We discuss physical reasons for the striking difference between the behavior of thermal conductivity in water near the vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid critical points.

  14. Electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faussurier, G., E-mail: gerald.faussurier@cea.fr; Blancard, C.; Combis, P.; Videau, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2014-09-15

    Expressions for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas are derived combining the Chester-Thellung-Kubo-Greenwood approach and the Kramers approximation. The infrared divergence is removed assuming a Drude-like behaviour. An analytical expression is obtained for the Lorenz number that interpolates between the cold solid-state and the hot plasma phases. An expression for the electrical resistivity is proposed using the Ziman-Evans formula, from which the thermal conductivity can be deduced using the analytical expression for the Lorenz number. The present method can be used to estimate electrical and thermal conductivities of mixtures. Comparisons with experiment and quantum molecular dynamics simulations are done.

  15. Radiative thermal conduction fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkowski, K.J.; Balbus, S.A.; Fristrom, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of the O VI interstellar absorption lines in our Galaxy by the Copernicus observatory was a turning point in our understanding of the Interstellar Medium (ISM). It implied the presence of widespread hot (approx. 10 to the 6th power K) gas in disk galaxies. The detection of highly ionized species in quasi-stellar objects' absorption spectra may be the first indirect observation of this hot phase in external disk galaxies. Previous efforts to understand extensive O VI absorption line data from our Galaxy were not very successful in locating the regions where this absorption originates. The location at interfaces between evaporating ISM clouds and hot gas was favored, but recent studies of steady-state conduction fronts in spherical clouds by Ballet, Arnaud, and Rothenflug (1986) and Bohringer and Hartquist (1987) rejected evaporative fronts as the absorption sites. Researchers report here on time-dependent nonequilibrium calculations of planar conductive fronts whose properties match well with observations, and suggest reasons for the difference between the researchers' results and the above. They included magnetic fields in additional models, not reported here, and the conclusions are not affected by their presence

  16. High Thermal Conductivity Composite Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bootle, John

    1999-01-01

    ... applications and space based radiators. The advantage of this material compared to competing materials that it can be used to fabricate high strength, high thermal conductivity, relatively thin structures less than 0.050" thick...

  17. Thermal conductivity of granular materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buyevich, Yu A

    1974-01-01

    Stationary heat transfer in a granular material consisting of a continuous medium containing spherical granules of other substances is considered under the assumption that the spatial distribution of granules is random. The effective thermal conductivity characterizing macroscopic heat transfer in such a material is expressed as a certain function of the conductivities and volume fractions of the medium and dispersed substances. For reasons of mathematical analogy, all the results obtained for the thermal conductivity are valid while computing the effective diffusivity of some admixture in granular materials as well as for evaluation of the effective electric conductivity or the mean dielectric and magnetic permeabilities of granular conductors and dielectrics. (23 refs.)

  18. Thermal Conductivity of Foam Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Due to the increased focus on energy savings and waste recycling foam glass materials have gained increased attention. The production process of foam glass is a potential low-cost recycle option for challenging waste, e.g. CRT glass and industrial waste (fly ash and slags). Foam glass is used...... as thermal insulating material in building and chemical industry. The large volume of gas (porosity 90 – 95%) is the main reason of the low thermal conductivity of the foam glass. If gases with lower thermal conductivity compared to air are entrapped in the glass melt, the derived foam glass will contain...... only closed pores and its overall thermal conductivity will be much lower than that of the foam glass with open pores. In this work we have prepared foam glass using different types of recycled glasses and different kinds of foaming agents. This enabled the formation of foam glasses having gas cells...

  19. Thermal conductivity of molten metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peralta-Martinez, Maria Vita

    2000-02-01

    were carried out for liquid mercury, gallium, indium and tin in a range of temperature from 300 to 750 K, at atmospheric pressure. In each case the results are compared with predictions using the Wiedemann and Franz law which, although it is based on the solid state metals, it is still the only available theoretical approach for the thermal conductivity of metals in molten state. The new measurements reported for these metals are of demonstrably higher accuracy than any literature published. [Spanish] Ha sido disenado, construido y puesto en servicio un nuevo instrumento para la medicion de la conductividad termica de metales fundidos. El aparato esta basado en la tecnica transiente del alambre caliente y se propone para operacion en un amplio rango de temperaturas, desde la temperatura ambiente hasta los 1200 K, con una precision cercana a {+-} 2%. En su forma presente el instrumento opera hasta los 750 K. La construccion del aparato involucro cuatro diferentes etapas, primero, el diseno y construccion del sensor y segundo, la construccion de un sistema electronico para la medicion y almacenamiento de datos. La tercera etapa fue el diseno e instrumentacion del horno de alta temperatura para la fusion y control de la temperatura de la muestra, y finalmente, se desarrollo un algoritmo para la extraccion de la conductividad termica de los datos crudos de las mediciones. El sensor consiste de un alambre de platino cilindrico emparedado simetricamente entre dos hojas planas rectangulares de alumina. El sensor rectangular se sumerge en el metal fundido de interes y se aplica un paso de voltaje a los extremos del alambre de platino para inducir la disipacion de calor y una consecuente elevacion de temperatura, la que es, en parte, determinada por la conductividad termica del metal fundido. El proceso se describe por un conjunto de ecuaciones diferenciales parciales y apropiadas condiciones de frontera, mas que una solucion analitica aproximada. Se diseno y construyo una

  20. Thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, C.G.S.; George, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide of composition UO 2.015 was measured from 300 to 1400 K. The phonon component of the conductivity is found to be quantitatively accounted for by the theoretical expression of Slack derived by modifying the Leibfried-Schlomann equation. (orig.)

  1. Thermal Conductivity of Metallic Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hin, Celine

    2018-03-10

    This project has developed a modeling and simulation approaches to predict the thermal conductivity of metallic fuels and their alloys. We focus on two methods. The first method has been developed by the team at the University of Wisconsin Madison. They developed a practical and general modeling approach for thermal conductivity of metals and metal alloys that integrates ab-initio and semi-empirical physics-based models to maximize the strengths of both techniques. The second method has been developed by the team at Virginia Tech. This approach consists of a determining the thermal conductivity using only ab-initio methods without any fitting parameters. Both methods were complementary. The models incorporated both phonon and electron contributions. Good agreement with experimental data over a wide temperature range were found. The models also provided insight into the different physical factors that govern the thermal conductivity under different temperatures. The models were general enough to incorporate more complex effects like additional alloying species, defects, transmutation products and noble gas bubbles to predict the behavior of complex metallic alloys like U-alloy fuel systems under burnup. 3 Introduction Thermal conductivity is an important thermal physical property affecting the performance and efficiency of metallic fuels [1]. Some experimental measurement of thermal conductivity and its correlation with composition and temperature from empirical fitting are available for U, Zr and their alloys with Pu and other minor actinides. However, as reviewed in by Kim, Cho and Sohn [2], due to the difficulty in doing experiments on actinide materials, thermal conductivities of metallic fuels have only been measured at limited alloy compositions and temperatures, some of them even being negative and unphysical. Furthermore, the correlations developed so far are empirical in nature and may not be accurate when used for prediction at conditions far from those

  2. Thermal Conductivity of Diamond Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedor M. Shakhov

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A major problem challenging specialists in present-day materials sciences is the development of compact, cheap to fabricate heat sinks for electronic devices, primarily for computer processors, semiconductor lasers, high-power microchips, and electronics components. The materials currently used for heat sinks of such devices are aluminum and copper, with thermal conductivities of about 250 W/(m·K and 400 W/(m·K, respectively. Significantly, the thermal expansion coefficient of metals differs markedly from those of the materials employed in semiconductor electronics (mostly silicon; one should add here the low electrical resistivity metals possess. By contrast, natural single-crystal diamond is known to feature the highest thermal conductivity of all the bulk materials studied thus far, as high as 2,200 W/(m·K. Needless to say, it cannot be applied in heat removal technology because of high cost. Recently, SiC- and AlN-based ceramics have started enjoying wide use as heat sink materials; the thermal conductivity of such composites, however, is inferior to that of metals by nearly a factor two. This prompts a challenging scientific problem to develop diamond-based composites with thermal characteristics superior to those of aluminum and copper, adjustable thermal expansion coefficient, low electrical conductivity and a moderate cost, below that of the natural single-crystal diamond. The present review addresses this problem and appraises the results reached by now in studying the possibility of developing composites in diamond-containing systems with a view of obtaining materials with a high thermal conductivity.

  3. Thermal conductivity of glass copper-composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Makoto; Terai, Ryohei; Haidai, Haruki

    1980-01-01

    Glass-metal composites are to be one of the answers for promoting thermal conduction in the glassy solids containing high-level radioactive wastes. In order to investigate the effect of metal addition on thermal conductivity of glasses, glass-copper composites were selected, and the conductivities of the composites were measured and discussed in regards to copper content and microstructure. Fully densified composites were successfully prepared by pressure sintering of the powder mixtures of glass and copper at temperatures above the yield points of the constituent glasses if the copper content was not so much. The conductivity was measured by means of a comparative method, in which the thermal gradient of the specimen was compared with that of quartz glass as standard under thermally steady state. Measurements were carried out at around 50 0 C. The thermal conductivity increased with increasing content of copper depending on the kind of copper powder used. The conductivities of the composites of the same copper content differed considerably each another. Fine copper powder was effective on increasing conductivity, and the conductivity became about threefold of that of glass by mixing the fine copper powder about 10 vol%. For the composites containing the fine copper powder less than 5 vol%, the conductivity obeyed so-called logarithmic rule, one of the mixture rules of conductivity, whereas for composites containing more than 5 vol%, the conductivity remarkably increased apart from the rule. This fact suggests that copper becomes continuous in the composite when the copper content increased beyond 5 vol%. For the composites containing coarse copper powder, the conductivity was increased not significantly, and obeyed an equation derived from the model in which conductive material dispersed in less conductive one. (author)

  4. Thermal conductivity of ytterbia-stabilized zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Jing; Ren, Xiaorui; Wang, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Rong; Pan, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The 3–10 mol.% Yb 2 O 3 –ZrO 2 (YbSZ) ceramics were synthesized by solid reaction methods and sintered at 1600 °C. The phases were identified by high-resolution X-ray diffraction with a K α1 monochromator, and it was found that the tetragonal-prime phases exist in 3–6 mol.% YbSZ. The thermal conductivity of the sintered YbSZ ceramics were measured using a laser flash method and it was demonstrated that the values of the thermal conductivities of the 5 and 10 mol.% YbSZ ceramics are the lowest at high and room temperature, respectively, and much lower than that of 7YSZ. The lower thermal conductivity of YbSZ ceramics may be due to the heavier dopant of ytterbium and the tetragonal-prime ZrO 2 phase.

  5. Invert Effective Thermal Conductivity Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.J. Anderson; H.M. Wade; T.L. Mitchell

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the temperature-dependent effective thermal conductivities of a repository-emplaced invert steel set and surrounding ballast material. The scope of this calculation analyzes a ballast-material thermal conductivity range of 0.10 to 0.70 W/m · K, a transverse beam spacing range of 0.75 to 1.50 meters, and beam compositions of A 516 carbon steel and plain carbon steel. Results from this calculation are intended to support calculations that identify waste package and repository thermal characteristics for Site Recommendation (SR). This calculation was developed by Waste Package Department (WPD) under Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 1, ICN 0, Calculations

  6. Thermal conduction and gravitational collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, L.; Jimenez, J.; Esculpi, M.

    1987-01-01

    A method used to study the evolution of radiating spheres, reported some years ago by Herrera, Jimenez, and Ruggeri, is extended to the case in which thermal conduction within the sphere is taken into account. By means of an explicit example it is shown that heat flow, if present, may play an important role, affecting the final outcome of collapse

  7. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Douglas D.; Martin, Ana I.; Yun, Tae Sup; Francisca, Franco M.; Santamarina, J. Carlos; Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate–saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate–bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces.

  8. High-Thermal-Conductivity Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibante, L. P. Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Heat management with common textiles such as nylon and spandex is hindered by the poor thermal conductivity from the skin surface to cooling surfaces. This innovation showed marked improvement in thermal conductivity of the individual fibers and tubing, as well as components assembled from them. The problem is centered on improving the heat removal of the liquid-cooled ventilation garments (LCVGs) used by astronauts. The current design uses an extensive network of water-cooling tubes that introduces bulkiness and discomfort, and increases fatigue. Range of motion and ease of movement are affected as well. The current technology is the same as developed during the Apollo program of the 1960s. Tubing material is hand-threaded through a spandex/nylon mesh layer, in a series of loops throughout the torso and limbs such that there is close, form-fitting contact with the user. Usually, there is a nylon liner layer to improve comfort. Circulating water is chilled by an external heat exchanger (sublimator). The purpose of this innovation is to produce new LCVG components with improved thermal conductivity. This was addressed using nanocomposite engineering incorporating high-thermalconductivity nanoscale fillers in the fabric and tubing components. Specifically, carbon nanotubes were added using normal processing methods such as thermoplastic melt mixing (compounding twin screw extruder) and downstream processing (fiber spinning, tubing extrusion). Fibers were produced as yarns and woven into fabric cloths. The application of isotropic nanofillers can be modeled using a modified Nielsen Model for conductive fillers in a matrix based on Einstein s viscosity model. This is a drop-in technology with no additional equipment needed. The loading is limited by the ability to maintain adequate dispersion. Undispersed materials will plug filtering screens in processing equipment. Generally, the viscosity increases were acceptable, and allowed the filled polymers to still be

  9. Development of irradiated UO2 thermal conductivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Bang Je-Geon; Kim Dae Ho; Jung Youn Ho

    2001-01-01

    Thermal conductivity model of the irradiated UO 2 pellet was developed, based upon the thermal diffusivity data of the irradiated UO 2 pellet measured during thermal cycling. The model predicts the thermal conductivity by multiplying such separate correction factors as solid fission products, gaseous fission products, radiation damage and porosity. The developed model was validated by comparison with the variation of the measured thermal diffusivity data during thermal cycling and prediction of other UO 2 thermal conductivity models. Since the developed model considers the effect of gaseous fission products as a separate factor, it can predict variation of thermal conductivity in the rim region of high burnup UO 2 pellet where the fission gases in the matrix are precipitated into bubbles, indicating that decrease of thermal conductivity by bubble precipitation in rim region would be significantly compensated by the enhancing effect of fission gas depletion in the UO 2 matrix. (author)

  10. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY ANALYSIS OF GASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, W.J.

    1949-06-01

    This patent describes apparatus for the quantitative analysis of a gaseous mixture at subatmospheric pressure by measurement of its thermal conductivity. A heated wire forms one leg of a bridge circuit, while the gas under test is passed about the wire at a constant rate. The bridge unbalance will be a measure of the change in composition of the gas, if compensation is made for the effect due to gas pressure change. The apparatus provides a voltage varying with fluctuations of pressure in series with the indicating device placed across the bridge, to counterbalance the voltage change caused by fluctuations in the pressure of the gaseous mixture.

  11. Model of thermal conductivity of anisotropic nanodiamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudnik, S.F.; Kalinichenko, A.I.; Strel'nitskij, V.E.

    2014-01-01

    Dependence of thermal conductivity of nanocrystalline diamond on grain size and shape is theoretically investigated. Nanodiamond is considered as two-phase material composed of diamond grains characterizing by three main dimensions and segregated by thin graphite layers with electron, phonon or hybrid thermal conductivity. Influence of type of thermal conductance and thickness of boundary layer on thermal conductivity of nanodiamond is analyzed. Derived dependences of thermal conductivity on grain dimensions are compared with experimental data

  12. Sulfide-conducting solid electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinina, L.A.; Shirokova, G.I.; Murin, I.V.; Ushakova, Yu.N.; Fominykh, E.G.; Lyalina, M.Yu.

    2000-01-01

    Feasibility of sulfide transfer in phases on the basis of BaZrS 3 and MLn 2 S 4 ( M = Ca, Ba; Ln = La, Y, Tm, Nd, Sm, Pr) is considered. Solid solution regions on the basis of ternary compounds are determined. Systematic study of the phases is carried out making use of the methods of conductometry, emf in chemical concentration chains without/with transfer, potentiostatic chronoamperometry. Possible mechanism of defect formation during successive alloying of ternary sulfides by binary ones in suggested [ru

  13. Deterioration in effective thermal conductivity of aqueous magnetic nanofluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altan, C.L.; Gurten, B.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.; Bucak, S.

    2014-01-01

    Common heat transfer fluids have low thermal conductivities, which decrease their efficiency in many applications. On the other hand, solids have much higher thermal conductivity values. Previously, it was shown that the addition of different nanoparticles to various base fluids increases the

  14. Experimental determination of thermal conductivity and gap conductance of fuel rod for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Teruo; Iwamoto, Kazumi; Ikawa, Katsuichi; Ishimoto, Kiyoshi

    1985-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of fuel compacts and the gap conductance between the fuel compact and the graphite sleeve in fuel rods for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) were measured by the center heating method. These measurements were made as functions of volume percent particle loading and temperature for thermal conductivity and as functions of gap distance and gas composition for gap conductance. The thermal conductivity of fuel compacts decreases with increasing temperature and with increasing particle loading. The gap conductance increases with increasing temperature and decrease with increasing gap distance. A good gap conductance was observed with helium fill gas. It was seen that the gap conductance was dependent on the thermal conductivity of fill gas and conductance by radiation and could be neglected the conductance through solid-solid contact points of fuel compact and graphite sleeve. (author)

  15. Thermal conductivity of crushed salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, K.

    Heat transfer through an annular space filled with crushed salt depends primarily on the thermal conductivity, lambda, of the material. This report gives a formula with which lambda can be computed. The formula includes two quantities that can be influenced through screening of the salt smalls: the porosity, psi, and the fraction, alpha, of the more highly resistive heat-flow paths. The report computes and presents graphically the thermal conductivities for various values of psi and alpha. Heat-transfer properties are computed and compared for an annular space filled with crushed salt and for an air gap. The comparison shows that the properties of the annular space are larger only up to a certain temperature, because the properties of the air gap increase exponentially while those f the annular space increase only in an approximately linear way. Experimental results from Project Salt Vault in the U.S. are in good agreement with the calculations performed. Trials in Temperature Experimental Field 2 at the Asse II salt mine will provide an additional check on the calculations. 3 figures, 3 tables

  16. An introduction to proton conduction in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, F.W.

    1980-09-01

    Proton conducting solids have been studied intensively in recent years due to their potential use as ion conducting separators in efficient fuel cells for electricity generation. This report describes fuel cell - and other possible applications of solid proton conductors. The best performing materials known today are listed. Typical synthetic routes and some models for proton transport in solids are discussed. Hints to future research are given. The litterature collected for this report covers mainly the period 1974-1980. (author)

  17. Self-irradiation effect on thermal conductivity of Zr{sub 0.70}Pu{sub 0.25}Cm{sub 0.05}N solid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishi, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: tsuyoshi.nishi.75@vc.ibaraki.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Ibaraki University, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 316-8511 (Japan); Hayashi, Hirokazu; Sato, Takumi; Takano, Masahide [Nuclear Science and Engineering Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan)

    2017-04-01

    This study evaluated the dependence of the thermal conductivity of Zr{sub 0.70}Pu{sub 0.25}Cm{sub 0.05}N on storage time and temperature. The authors prepared sintered samples of Zr{sub 0.70}Pu{sub 0.25}Cm{sub 0.05}N solid solution and measured thermal diffusivity at storage times of 0, 24, 72, 144, 240, 408, 552, 816, 1,680, and 2064 h, from which it was determined that the thermal conductivity decreased exponentially with increasing storage time. This result suggests that the decrease of the thermal conductivity could be attributed to the accumulation of lattice defects from self-irradiation. To confirm the thermal recovery behavior of Zr{sub 0.70}Pu{sub 0.25}Cm{sub 0.05}N under annealing, thermal diffusivity was also measured just after annealing. The thermal conductivity of Zr{sub 0.70}Pu{sub 0.25}Cm{sub 0.05}N was determined to be larger than that of Zr{sub 0.58}Pu{sub 0.21}Cm{sub 0.21}N but smaller than that of Zr{sub 0.80}Pu{sub 0.10}Cm{sub 0.10}N. - Highlights: •The authors prepared Zr{sub 0.70}Pu{sub 0.25}Cm{sub 0.05}N and measured thermal diffusivity. •Dependence of thermal conductivity on storage time was clarified. •After annealing at 1423 K in vacuum, thermal conductivity was recovered.

  18. Test design requirements: Thermal conductivity probe testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    This document establishes the test design requirements for development of a thermal conductivity probe test. The thermal conductivity probe determines in situ thermal conductivity using a line source transient heat conduction analysis. This document presents the rationale for thermal conductivity measurement using a thermal conductivity probe. A general test description is included. Support requirements along with design constraints are detailed to allow simple design of the thermal conductivity probe and test. The schedule and delivery requirements of the responsible test designer are also included. 7 refs., 1 fig

  19. Preparation of conducting solid mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spokas, J.J.

    1978-01-01

    The application of conducting plastic mixtures to the fundamental problem of radiation dosimetry is briefly reviewed. A particular approach to achieving formulations with the necessary characteristics is described. A number of successful mixtures are defined for a number of different specific dosimetry situations. To obtain high quality stable materials requires intense blending and working of the materials at elevated temperatures. One machine that succeeds in this task is the Shonka plastics mixer-extruder. The Shonka mixer is described in complete detail. The procedures used in preparing representative formulations with this device are presented. A number of properties of successful conducting mixtures so prepared are summarized. The conditions required for molding such material are given. Several special welding methods for specific application with these formulations have been devised and are described

  20. High thermal conductivity materials for thermal management applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broido, David A.; Reinecke, Thomas L.; Lindsay, Lucas R.

    2018-05-29

    High thermal conductivity materials and methods of their use for thermal management applications are provided. In some embodiments, a device comprises a heat generating unit (304) and a thermally conductive unit (306, 308, 310) in thermal communication with the heat generating unit (304) for conducting heat generated by the heat generating unit (304) away from the heat generating unit (304), the thermally conductive unit (306, 308, 310) comprising a thermally conductive compound, alloy or composite thereof. The thermally conductive compound may include Boron Arsenide, Boron Antimonide, Germanium Carbide and Beryllium Selenide.

  1. Thermal conductivity of microPCMs-filled epoxy matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    Su, J.F.; Wang, X.Y; Huang, Z.; Zhao, Y.H.; Yuan, X.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Microencapsulated phase change materials (microPCMs) have been widely applied in solid matrix as thermal-storage or temperature-controlling functional composites. The thermal conductivity of these microPCMs/matrix composites is an important property need to be considered. In this study, a series of microPCMs have been fabricated using the in situ polymerization with various core/shell ratio and average diameter; the thermal conductivity of microPCMs/epoxy composites were investigated in detai...

  2. Novel Transparent Phosphor Conversion Matrix with High Thermal Conductivity for Next Generation Phosphor-Converted LED-based Solid State Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockstaller, Michael [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-02-06

    The low thermal conductivity of state-of-the-art polymer encapsulants (k ~ 0.15 Wm-1K-1) limits the efficiency and power density of current phosphor conversion light emitting diodes (pc-LEDs). The technical objective of this project was to demonstrate synthesis and processing schemes for the fabrication of polymer hybrid encapsulants with a thermal conductivity exceeding k = 0.4 Wm-1K-1 for LED applications. The ‘hybrid polymer’ approach encompasses the dispersion of high thermal conductivity particle fillers (zinc oxide, ZnO as well as the alpha-polymorph of alumina, Al2O3) within a polysiloxane matrix (poly(dimethylsiloxane), PDMS as well as poly(phenyl methyl siloxane), PPMS) to increase the thermal conductivity while maintaining optical transparency and photothermal stability at levels consistent with LED applications. To accomplish this goal, a novel synthesis method for the fabrication of nanosized ZnO particles was developed and a novel surface chemistry was established to modify the surface of zinc oxide particle fillers and thus to enable their dispersion in poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) matrix polymers. Molecular dynamics and Mie simulations were used to optimize ligand structure and to enable the concurrent mixing of particles in PDMS/PPMS embedding media while also minimizing the thermal boundary resistance as well as optical scattering of particle fillers. Using this approach the synthesis of PDMS/ZnO hybrid encapsulants exhibiting a thermal conductivity of 0.64 Wm-1K-1 and optical transparency > 0.7 mm-1 was demonstrated. A forming process based on micromolding was developed to demonstrate the forming of particle filled PDMS into film and lens shapes. Photothermal stability testing revealed stability of the materials for approximately 4000 min when exposed to blue light LED (450 nm, 30 W/cm2). One postgraduate and seven graduate students were supported by the project. The research performed within this project led to fifteen publications in peer

  3. Calculating lattice thermal conductivity: a synopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugallo, Giorgia; Colombo, Luciano

    2018-04-01

    We provide a tutorial introduction to the modern theoretical and computational schemes available to calculate the lattice thermal conductivity in a crystalline dielectric material. While some important topics in thermal transport will not be covered (including thermal boundary resistance, electronic thermal conduction, and thermal rectification), we aim at: (i) framing the calculation of thermal conductivity within the general non-equilibrium thermodynamics theory of transport coefficients, (ii) presenting the microscopic theory of thermal conduction based on the phonon picture and the Boltzmann transport equation, and (iii) outlining the molecular dynamics schemes to calculate heat transport. A comparative and critical addressing of the merits and drawbacks of each approach will be discussed as well.

  4. Thermal conductivity model for nanofiber networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinpeng; Huang, Congliang; Liu, Qingkun; Smalyukh, Ivan I.; Yang, Ronggui

    2018-02-01

    Understanding thermal transport in nanofiber networks is essential for their applications in thermal management, which are used extensively as mechanically sturdy thermal insulation or high thermal conductivity materials. In this study, using the statistical theory and Fourier's law of heat conduction while accounting for both the inter-fiber contact thermal resistance and the intrinsic thermal resistance of nanofibers, an analytical model is developed to predict the thermal conductivity of nanofiber networks as a function of their geometric and thermal properties. A scaling relation between the thermal conductivity and the geometric properties including volume fraction and nanofiber length of the network is revealed. This model agrees well with both numerical simulations and experimental measurements found in the literature. This model may prove useful in analyzing the experimental results and designing nanofiber networks for both high and low thermal conductivity applications.

  5. Thermal conductivity model for nanofiber networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xinpeng [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Huang, Congliang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; School of Electrical and Power Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116, China; Liu, Qingkun [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Smalyukh, Ivan I. [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Yang, Ronggui [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Buildings and Thermal Systems Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, USA

    2018-02-28

    Understanding thermal transport in nanofiber networks is essential for their applications in thermal management, which are used extensively as mechanically sturdy thermal insulation or high thermal conductivity materials. In this study, using the statistical theory and Fourier's law of heat conduction while accounting for both the inter-fiber contact thermal resistance and the intrinsic thermal resistance of nanofibers, an analytical model is developed to predict the thermal conductivity of nanofiber networks as a function of their geometric and thermal properties. A scaling relation between the thermal conductivity and the geometric properties including volume fraction and nanofiber length of the network is revealed. This model agrees well with both numerical simulations and experimental measurements found in the literature. This model may prove useful in analyzing the experimental results and designing nanofiber networks for both high and low thermal conductivity applications.

  6. Effective thermal conductivity in thermoelectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranowski, LL; Snyder, GJ; Toberer, ES

    2013-05-28

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are solid state heat engines that generate electricity from a temperature gradient. Optimizing these devices for maximum power production can be difficult due to the many heat transport mechanisms occurring simultaneously within the TEG. In this paper, we develop a model for heat transport in thermoelectric materials in which an "effective thermal conductivity" (kappa(eff)) encompasses both the one dimensional steady-state Fourier conduction and the heat generation/consumption due to secondary thermoelectric effects. This model is especially powerful in that the value of kappa(eff) does not depend upon the operating conditions of the TEG but rather on the transport properties of the TE materials themselves. We analyze a variety of thermoelectric materials and generator designs using this concept and demonstrate that kappa(eff) predicts the heat fluxes within these devices to 5% of the exact value. (C) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  7. SOLID STATE BATTERIES WITH CONDUCTING POLYMERS

    OpenAIRE

    Bénière , F.; Boils , D.; Cánepa , H.; Franco , J.; Le Corre , A.; Louboutin , J.

    1983-01-01

    The conducting polymers like (CH)x are very interesting materials for electrodes in electrochemical cells. We have combined such electrodes with solid electrolytes to build "all solid-state" batteries. The first prototypes using a silver anode and a silver conducting electrolyte have been working satisfactorily since two years. The performances have been tested with many batteries to study the electrical properties as well as the thermodynamical parameters. A number of cycles of charge-discha...

  8. Homogenized thermal conduction model for particulate foods

    OpenAIRE

    Chinesta , Francisco; Torres , Rafael; Ramón , Antonio; Rodrigo , Mari Carmen; Rodrigo , Miguel

    2002-01-01

    International audience; This paper deals with the definition of an equivalent thermal conductivity for particulate foods. An homogenized thermal model is used to asses the effect of particulate spatial distribution and differences in thermal conductivities. We prove that the spatial average of the conductivity can be used in an homogenized heat transfer model if the conductivity differences among the food components are not very large, usually the highest conductivity ratio between the foods ...

  9. The thermal conductivity of beds of spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, D.L.; Weaver, F.J.; Shapiro, M.; Longest, A.W.; Yarbrough, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    The thermal conductivities (k) of beds of solid and hollow microspheres were measured using two radial heat flow techniques. One technique provided k-data at 300 K for beds with the void spaces between particles filled with argon, nitrogen, or helium from 5 kPa to 30 MPa. The other technique provided k-data with air at atmospheric pressure from 300 to 1000 K. The 300 K technique was used to study bed systems with high k-values that can be varied by changing the gas type and gas pressure. Such systems can be used to control the operating temperature of an irradiation capsule. The systems studied included beds of 500 μm dia solid Al 2 O 3 , the same Al 2 O 3 spheres mixed with spheres of silica--alumina or with SiC shards, carbon spheres, and nickel spheres. Both techniques were used to determine the k-value of beds of hollow spheres with solid shells of Al 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 /center dot/7 w/o Cr 2 O 3 , and partially stabilized ZrO 2 . The hollow microspheres had diameters from 2100 to 3500 μm and wall thicknesses from 80 to 160 μm. 12 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  10. Broadband white light emission from Ce:AlN ceramics: High thermal conductivity down-converters for LED and laser-driven solid state lighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Wieg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We introduce high thermal conductivity aluminum nitride (AlN as a transparent ceramic host for Ce3+, a well-known active ion dopant. We show that the Ce:AlN ceramics have overlapping photoluminescent (PL emission peaks that cover almost the entire visible range resulting in a white appearance under 375 nm excitation without the need for color mixing. The PL is due to a combination of intrinsic AlN defect complexes and Ce3+ electronic transitions. Importantly, the peak intensities can be tuned by varying the Ce concentration and processing parameters, causing different shades of white light without the need for multiple phosphors or light sources. The Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage coordinates calculated from the measured spectra confirm white light emission. In addition, we demonstrate the viability of laser driven white light emission by coupling the Ce:AlN to a readily available frequency tripled Nd-YAG laser emitting at 355 nm. The high thermal conductivity of these ceramic down-converters holds significant promise for producing higher power white light sources than those available today.

  11. Low temperature thermal conductivities of glassy carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.C.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of glassy carbon in the temperature range 0.1 to 100 0 K appears to depend only on the temperature at which the material was pyrolyzed. The thermal conductivity can be related to the microscopic structure of glassy carbon. The reticulated structure is especially useful for thermal isolation at cryogenic temperatures

  12. Tailoring thermal conductivity via three-dimensional porous alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Begoña; Maiz, Jon; Ruiz-Clavijo, Alejandra; Caballero-Calero, Olga; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2016-12-09

    Three-dimensional anodic alumina templates (3D-AAO) are an astonishing framework with open highly ordered three-dimensional skeleton structures. Since these templates are architecturally different from conventional solids or porous templates, they teem with opportunities for engineering thermal properties. By establishing the mechanisms of heat transfer in these frameworks, we aim to create materials with tailored thermal properties. The effective thermal conductivity of an empty 3D-AAO membrane was measured. As the effective medium theory was not valid to extract the skeletal thermal conductivity of 3D-AAO, a simple 3D thermal conduction model was developed, based on a mixed series and parallel thermal resistor circuit, giving a skeletal thermal conductivity value of approximately 1.25 W·m -1 ·K -1 , which matches the value of the ordinary AAO membranes prepared from the same acid solution. The effect of different filler materials as well as the variation of the number of transversal nanochannels and the length of the 3D-AAO membrane in the effective thermal conductivity of the composite was studied. Finally, the thermal conductivity of two 3D-AAO membranes filled with cobalt and bismuth telluride was also measured, which was in good agreement with the thermal model predictions. Therefore, this work proved this structure as a powerful approach to tailor thermal properties.

  13. Tailoring thermal conductivity via three-dimensional porous alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Begoña; Maiz, Jon; Ruiz-Clavijo, Alejandra; Caballero-Calero, Olga; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional anodic alumina templates (3D-AAO) are an astonishing framework with open highly ordered three-dimensional skeleton structures. Since these templates are architecturally different from conventional solids or porous templates, they teem with opportunities for engineering thermal properties. By establishing the mechanisms of heat transfer in these frameworks, we aim to create materials with tailored thermal properties. The effective thermal conductivity of an empty 3D-AAO membrane was measured. As the effective medium theory was not valid to extract the skeletal thermal conductivity of 3D-AAO, a simple 3D thermal conduction model was developed, based on a mixed series and parallel thermal resistor circuit, giving a skeletal thermal conductivity value of approximately 1.25 W·m−1·K−1, which matches the value of the ordinary AAO membranes prepared from the same acid solution. The effect of different filler materials as well as the variation of the number of transversal nanochannels and the length of the 3D-AAO membrane in the effective thermal conductivity of the composite was studied. Finally, the thermal conductivity of two 3D-AAO membranes filled with cobalt and bismuth telluride was also measured, which was in good agreement with the thermal model predictions. Therefore, this work proved this structure as a powerful approach to tailor thermal properties. PMID:27934930

  14. Thermal Conductivity of Foam Glasses Prepared using High Pressure Sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Martin Bonderup; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob

    The increasing focus on better building insulation is important to lower energy consumption. Development of new and improved insulation materials can contribute to solving this problem. Foam glass has a good insulating effect due to its large gas volume (porosity >90 %). It can be produced with o...... the thermal conductivity varies with gas composition. This allows us to determine the contribution of the gas and solid phase to the total thermal conductivity of a foam glass....

  15. Ballistic and Diffusive Thermal Conductivity of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Riichiro; Masashi, Mizuno; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2018-02-01

    This paper is a contribution to the Physical Review Applied collection in memory of Mildred S. Dresselhaus. Phonon-related thermal conductivity of graphene is calculated as a function of the temperature and sample size of graphene in which the crossover of ballistic and diffusive thermal conductivity occurs at around 100 K. The diffusive thermal conductivity of graphene is evaluated by calculating the phonon mean free path for each phonon mode in which the anharmonicity of a phonon and the phonon scattering by a 13C isotope are taken into account. We show that phonon-phonon scattering of out-of-plane acoustic phonon by the anharmonic potential is essential for the largest thermal conductivity. Using the calculated results, we can design the optimum sample size, which gives the largest thermal conductivity at a given temperature for applying thermal conducting devices.

  16. Thermal conductivity and heat transfer in superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, G; Neagu, M; Borca-Tasciuc, T

    1997-07-01

    Understanding the thermal conductivity and heat transfer processes in superlattice structures is critical for the development of thermoelectric materials and devices based on quantum structures. This work reports progress on the modeling of thermal conductivity of superlattice structures. Results from the models established based on the Boltzmann transport equation could explain existing experimental results on the thermal conductivity of semiconductor superlattices in both in plane and cross-plane directions. These results suggest the possibility of engineering the interfaces to further reduce thermal conductivity of superlattice structures.

  17. Ionic conduction in the solid state

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Li+, its lower weight, ease of handling and its poten- tial use in high energy density batteries. Li2SiO4 is one of the .... that influence the ionic conductivity of a crystal the activation energy is of utmost importance since the .... fraction techniques are commonly employed to elu- cidate the structure features of superionic solids.

  18. Electron thermal conduction in LASNEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, D.; Weber, S.

    1994-01-01

    This report is a transcription of hand-written notes by DM dated 29 January 1986, transcribed by SW, with some clarifying comments added and details specific to running the LASNEX code deleted. Reference to the esoteric measurement units employed in LASNEX has also been deleted by SW (hopefully, without introducing errors in the numerical constants). The report describes the physics equations only, and only of electron conduction. That is, it does not describe the numerical method, which may be finite difference or finite element treatment in space, and (usually) implicit treatment in time. It does not touch on other electron transport packages which are available, and which include suprathermal electrons, nonlocal conduction, Krook model conduction, and modifications to electron conduction by magnetic fields. Nevertheless, this model is employed for the preponderance of LASNEX simulations

  19. Controlling Thermal Conduction by Graded Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qin; Huang, Ji-Ping

    2018-04-01

    Manipulating thermal conductivities are fundamentally important for controlling the conduction of heat at will. Thermal cloaks and concentrators, which have been extensively studied recently, are actually graded materials designed according to coordinate transformation approaches, and their effective thermal conductivity is equal to that of the host medium outside the cloak or concentrator. Here we attempt to investigate a more general problem: what is the effective thermal conductivity of graded materials? In particular, we perform a first-principles approach to the analytic exact results of effective thermal conductivities of materials possessing either power-law or linear gradation profiles. On the other hand, by solving Laplace’s equation, we derive a differential equation for calculating the effective thermal conductivity of a material whose thermal conductivity varies along the radius with arbitrary gradation profiles. The two methods agree with each other for both external and internal heat sources, as confirmed by simulation and experiment. This work provides different methods for designing new thermal metamaterials (including thermal cloaks and concentrators), in order to control or manipulate the transfer of heat. Support by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11725521, by the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality under Grant No. 16ZR1445100

  20. Study of thermal conductivity of multilayer insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, D; Sundaram, S; Nath, G K; Sethuram, N P; Chandrasekharan, T; Varadarajan, T G [Heavy Water Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents experimental determination of the apparent thermal conductivity of multilayer insulation for a cryogenic system. The variation of thermal conductivity with residual gas pressure is studied and the optimum vacuum for good insulating performance is determined. Evaporation loss technique for heat-inleak determination is employed. (author). 3 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Variable Thermal Conductivity on Compressible Boundary Layer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, variable thermal conductivity on heat transfer over a circular cylinder is presented. The concept of assuming constant thermal conductivity on materials is however not efficient. Hence, the governing partial differential equation is reduced using non-dimensionless variables into a system of coupled non-linear ...

  2. Study of thermal conductivity of multilayer insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, D.; Sundaram, S.; Nath, G.K.; Sethuram, N.P.; Chandrasekharan, T.; Varadarajan, T.G.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents experimental determination of the apparent thermal conductivity of multilayer insulation for a cryogenic system. The variation of thermal conductivity with residual gas pressure is studied and the optimum vacuum for good insulating performance is determined. Evaporation loss technique for heat-inleak determination is employed. (author)

  3. The Electronic Thermal Conductivity of Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Yun; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Marzari, Nicola

    2016-04-13

    Graphene, as a semimetal with the largest known thermal conductivity, is an ideal system to study the interplay between electronic and lattice contributions to thermal transport. While the total electrical and thermal conductivity have been extensively investigated, a detailed first-principles study of its electronic thermal conductivity is still missing. Here, we first characterize the electron-phonon intrinsic contribution to the electronic thermal resistivity of graphene as a function of doping using electronic and phonon dispersions and electron-phonon couplings calculated from first-principles at the level of density-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory (GW). Then, we include extrinsic electron-impurity scattering using low-temperature experimental estimates. Under these conditions, we find that the in-plane electronic thermal conductivity κe of doped graphene is ∼300 W/mK at room temperature, independently of doping. This result is much larger than expected and comparable to the total thermal conductivity of typical metals, contributing ∼10% to the total thermal conductivity of bulk graphene. Notably, in samples whose physical or domain sizes are of the order of few micrometers or smaller, the relative contribution coming from the electronic thermal conductivity is more important than in the bulk limit, because lattice thermal conductivity is much more sensitive to sample or grain size at these scales. Last, when electron-impurity scattering effects are included we find that the electronic thermal conductivity is reduced by 30 to 70%. We also find that the Wiedemann-Franz law is broadly satisfied at low and high temperatures but with the largest deviations of 20-50% around room temperature.

  4. Thermal Conductivity of the Multicomponent Neutral Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    Approximate expressions for the thermal conductivity coefficient of the multicomponent neutral atmosphere consisting of N2, O2, O, He, and H are analyzed and evaluated for the atmospheric conditions by comparing them with that given by the rigorous hydrodynamic theory. The new approximations of the thermal conductivity coefficients of simple gases N2, O2, O, He, and H are derived and used. It is proved that the modified Mason and Saxena approximation of the atmospheric thermal conductivity coefficient is more accurate in reproducing the atmospheric values of the rigorous hydrodynamic thermal conductivity coefficient in comparison with those that are generally accepted in atmospheric studies. This approximation of the thermal conductivity coefficient is recommended to use in calculations of the neutral temperature of the atmosphere.

  5. Gas thermal conductivity (GASCON, GTHCON, GJUMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagrman, D.L.

    1979-10-01

    Revised models are presented for the thermal conductivity of initial and fission gases present in LWR fuel rods. The report will become part of an update to the Materials Properties (MATPRO) Handbook used in the fuel rod behavior modeling task performed at the INEL. The revision to the previous MATPRO gas thermal conductivity model replaces correlations based on smoothed values of thermal conductivity published by Gandhi and Saxena with correlations which incorporate new high temperature helium conductivity data. Also, uncertainty estimates have been provided and a consistent treatment of the effects of long mean free paths is employed

  6. Universality of ac conduction in disordered solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe; Schrøder, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    The striking similarity of ac conduction in quite different disordered solids is discussed in terms of experimental results, modeling, and computer simulations. After giving an overview of experiment, a macroscopic and a microscopic model are reviewed. For both models the normalized ac conductivity...... as a function of a suitably scaled frequency becomes independent of details of the disorder in the extreme disorder limit, i.e., when the local randomly varying mobilities cover many orders of magnitude. The two universal ac conductivities are similar, but not identical; both are examples of unusual non......-power-law universalities. It is argued that ac universality reflects an underlying percolation determining dc as well as ac conductivity in the extreme disorder limit. Three analytical approximations to the universal ac conductivities are presented and compared to computer simulations. Finally, model predictions...

  7. Effective thermal conductivity of advanced ceramic breeder pebble beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pupeschi, S., E-mail: simone.pupeschi@kit.edu; Knitter, R.; Kamlah, M.

    2017-03-15

    As the knowledge of the effective thermal conductivity of ceramic breeder pebble beds under fusion relevant conditions is essential for the development of solid breeder blanket concepts, the EU advanced and reference lithium orthosilicate material were investigated with a newly developed experimental setup based on the transient hot wire method. The effective thermal conductivity was investigated in the temperature range RT–700 °C. Experiments were performed in helium and air atmospheres in the pressure range 0.12–0.4 MPa (abs.) under a compressive load up to 6 MPa. Results show a negligible influence of the chemical composition of the solid material on the bed’s effective thermal conductivity. A severe reduction of the effective thermal conductivity was observed in air. In both atmospheres an increase of the effective thermal conductivity with the temperature was detected, while the influence of the compressive load was found to be small. A clear dependence of the effective thermal conductivity on the pressure of the filling gas was observed in helium in contrast to air, where the pressure dependence was drastically reduced.

  8. Thermal conductivity of nanoscale thin nickel films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Shiping; JIANG Peixue

    2005-01-01

    The inhomogeneous non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) scheme is applied to model phonon heat conduction in thin nickel films. The electronic contribution to the thermal conductivity of the film is deduced from the electrical conductivity through the use of the Wiedemann-Franz law. At the average temperature of T = 300 K, which is lower than the Debye temperature ()D = 450 K,the results show that in a film thickness range of about 1-11 nm, the calculated cross-plane thermal conductivity decreases almost linearly with the decreasing film thickness, exhibiting a remarkable reduction compared with the bulk value. The electrical and thermal conductivities are anisotropic in thin nickel films for the thickness under about 10 nm. The phonon mean free path is estimated and the size effect on the thermal conductivity is attributed to the reduction of the phonon mean free path according to the kinetic theory.

  9. Thermal conductivity of electrospun polyethylene nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian; Zhang, Qian; Mayo, Anthony; Ni, Zhonghua; Yi, Hong; Chen, Yunfei; Mu, Richard; Bellan, Leon M; Li, Deyu

    2015-10-28

    We report on the structure-thermal transport property relation of individual polyethylene nanofibers fabricated by electrospinning with different deposition parameters. Measurement results show that the nanofiber thermal conductivity depends on the electric field used in the electrospinning process, with a general trend of higher thermal conductivity for fibers prepared with stronger electric field. Nanofibers produced at a 45 kV electrospinning voltage and a 150 mm needle-collector distance could have a thermal conductivity of up to 9.3 W m(-1) K(-1), over 20 times higher than the typical bulk value. Micro-Raman characterization suggests that the enhanced thermal conductivity is due to the highly oriented polymer chains and enhanced crystallinity in the electrospun nanofibers.

  10. Conductivity-limiting bipolar thermal conductivity in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanyu; Yang, Jiong; Toll, Trevor; Yang, Jihui; Zhang, Wenqing; Tang, Xinfeng

    2015-01-01

    Intriguing experimental results raised the question about the fundamental mechanisms governing the electron-hole coupling induced bipolar thermal conduction in semiconductors. Our combined theoretical analysis and experimental measurements show that in semiconductors bipolar thermal transport is in general a “conductivity-limiting” phenomenon, and it is thus controlled by the carrier mobility ratio and by the minority carrier partial electrical conductivity for the intrinsic and extrinsic cases, respectively. Our numerical method quantifies the role of electronic band structure and carrier scattering mechanisms. We have successfully demonstrated bipolar thermal conductivity reduction in doped semiconductors via electronic band structure modulation and/or preferential minority carrier scatterings. We expect this study to be beneficial to the current interests in optimizing thermoelectric properties of narrow gap semiconductors. PMID:25970560

  11. Calibration of non-ideal thermal conductivity sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Kömle

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A popular method for measuring the thermal conductivity of solid materials is the transient hot needle method. It allows the thermal conductivity of a solid or granular material to be evaluated simply by combining a temperature measurement with a well-defined electrical current flowing through a resistance wire enclosed in a long and thin needle. Standard laboratory sensors that are typically used in laboratory work consist of very thin steel needles with a large length-to-diameter ratio. This type of needle is convenient since it is mathematically easy to derive the thermal conductivity of a soft granular material from a simple temperature measurement. However, such a geometry often results in a mechanically weak sensor, which can bend or fail when inserted into a material that is harder than expected. For deploying such a sensor on a planetary surface, with often unknown soil properties, it is necessary to construct more rugged sensors. These requirements can lead to a design which differs substantially from the ideal geometry, and additional care must be taken in the calibration and data analysis. In this paper we present the performance of a prototype thermal conductivity sensor designed for planetary missions. The thermal conductivity of a suite of solid and granular materials was measured both by a standard needle sensor and by several customized sensors with non-ideal geometry. We thus obtained a calibration curve for the non-ideal sensors. The theory describing the temperature response of a sensor with such unfavorable length-to-diameter ratio is complicated and highly nonlinear. However, our measurements reveal that over a wide range of thermal conductivities there is an almost linear relationship between the result obtained by the standard sensor and the result derived from the customized, non-ideal sensors. This allows for the measurement of thermal conductivity values for harder soils, which are not easily accessible when using

  12. Thermal conductivity of tungsten–copper composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Hyun; Kwon, Su Yong; Ham, Hye Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We present the temperature dependence of the thermophysical properties for tungsten–copper composite from room temperature to 400 °C. The powders of tungsten–copper were produced by the spray conversion method and the W–Cu alloys were fabricated by the metal injection molding. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of tungsten–copper composite was controllable by volume fraction copper. - Abstract: As the speed and degree of integration of semiconductor devices increases, more heat is generated, and the performance and lifetime of semiconductor devices depend on the dissipation of the generated heat. Tungsten–copper alloys have high electrical and thermal conductivities, low contact resistances, and low coefficients of thermal expansion, thus allowing them to be used as a shielding material for microwave packages, and heat sinks for high power integrated circuits (ICs). In this study, the thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of several types of tungsten–copper (W–Cu) composites are investigated, using compositions of 5–30 wt.% copper balanced with tungsten. The tungsten–copper powders were produced using the spray conversion method, and the W–Cu alloys were fabricated via the metal injection molding. The tungsten–copper composite particles were nanosized, and the thermal conductivity of the W–Cu alloys gradually decreases with temperature increases. The thermal conductivity of the W–30 wt.% Cu composite was 238 W/(m K) at room temperature.

  13. Increased thermal conductivity monolithic zeolite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, James; Klett, Lynn; Kaufman, Jonathan

    2008-11-25

    A monolith comprises a zeolite, a thermally conductive carbon, and a binder. The zeolite is included in the form of beads, pellets, powders and mixtures thereof. The thermally conductive carbon can be carbon nano-fibers, diamond or graphite which provide thermal conductivities in excess of about 100 W/mK to more than 1,000 W/mK. A method of preparing a zeolite monolith includes the steps of mixing a zeolite dispersion in an aqueous colloidal silica binder with a dispersion of carbon nano-fibers in water followed by dehydration and curing of the binder is given.

  14. An Innovative High Thermal Conductivity Fuel Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Jamil A.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of the fuel in today's Light Water Reactors, Uranium dioxide, can be improved by incorporating a uniformly distributed heat conducting network of a higher conductivity material, Silicon Carbide. The higher thermal conductivity of SiC along with its other prominent reactor-grade properties makes it a potential material to address some of the related issues when used in UO2 (97% TD). This ongoing research, in collaboration with the University of Florida, aims to investigate the feasibility and develop a formal methodology of producing the resultant composite oxide fuel. Calculations of effective thermal conductivity of the new fuel as a function of %SiC for certain percentages and as a function of temperature are presented as a preliminary approach. The effective thermal conductivities are obtained at different temperatures from 600K to 1600K. The corresponding polynomial equations for the temperature-dependent thermal conductivities are given based on the simulation results. Heat transfer mechanism in this fuel is explained using a finite volume approach and validated against existing empirical models. FLUENT 6.1.22 was used for thermal conductivity calculations and to estimate reduction in centerline temperatures achievable within such a fuel rod. Later, computer codes COMBINE-PC and VENTURE-PC were deployed to estimate the fuel enrichment required, to maintain the same burnup levels, corresponding to a volume percent addition of SiC.

  15. An Innovative High Thermal Conductivity Fuel Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil A. Khan

    2009-11-21

    Thermal conductivity of the fuel in today's Light Water Reactors, Uranium dioxide, can be improved by incorporating a uniformly distributed heat conducting network of a higher conductivity material, Silicon Carbide. The higher thermal conductivity of SiC along with its other prominent reactor-grade properties makes it a potential material to address some of the related issues when used in UO2 [97% TD]. This ongoing research, in collaboration with the University of Florida, aims to investigate the feasibility and develop a formal methodology of producing the resultant composite oxide fuel. Calculations of effective thermal conductivity of the new fuel as a function of %SiC for certain percentages and as a function of temperature are presented as a preliminary approach. The effective thermal conductivities are obtained at different temperatures from 600K to 1600K. The corresponding polynomial equations for the temperature-dependent thermal conductivities are given based on the simulation results. Heat transfer mechanism in this fuel is explained using a finite volume approach and validated against existing empirical models. FLUENT 6.1.22 was used for thermal conductivity calculations and to estimate reduction in centerline temperatures achievable within such a fuel rod. Later, computer codes COMBINE-PC and VENTURE-PC were deployed to estimate the fuel enrichment required, to maintain the same burnup levels, corresponding to a volume percent addition of SiC.

  16. Thermal conductivity of high purity vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, W.D.

    1975-01-01

    The thermal conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, and electrical resistivity of four high-purity vanadium samples were measured over the temperature range 5 to 300 0 K. The highest purity sample had a resistance ratio (rho 273 /rho 4 . 2 ) of 1524. The highest purity sample had a thermal conductivity maximum of 920 W/mK at 9 0 K and had a thermal conductivity of 35 W/mK at room temperature. At low temperatures, the thermal resistivity was limited by the scattering of electrons by impurities and phonons. The thermal resistivity of vanadium departed from Matthiessen's rule at low temperatures. The electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient of high purity vanadium showed no anomalous behavior above 130 0 K. The intrinsic electrical resistivity at low temperatures was due primarily to interband scattering of electrons. The Seebeck coefficient was positive from 10 to 240 0 K and had a maximum which was dependent upon sample purity

  17. Thermal conductivity of sedimentary rocks as function of Biot’s coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlander, Tobias; Pasquinelli, Lisa; Asmussen, J.J.

    2017-01-01

    A theoretical model for prediction of effective thermal conductivity with application to sedimentary rocks is presented. Effective thermal conductivity of sedimentary rocks can be estimated from empirical relations or theoretically modelled. Empirical relations are limited to the empirical...... conductivity of solids is typically orders of magnitude larger than that of fluids, grain contacts constituting the solid connectivity governs the heat transfer of sedi-mentary rocks and hence should be the basis for modelling effective thermal con-ductivity. By introducing Biot’s coefficient, α, we propose (1...... – α) as a measure of the solid connectivity and show how effective thermal conductivity of water saturated and dry sandstones can be modelled....

  18. Ultrahigh thermal conductivity of isotopically enriched silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inyushkin, Alexander V.; Taldenkov, Alexander N.; Ager, Joel W.; Haller, Eugene E.; Riemann, Helge; Abrosimov, Nikolay V.; Pohl, Hans-Joachim; Becker, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Most of the stable elements have two and more stable isotopes. The physical properties of materials composed of such elements depend on the isotopic abundance to some extent. A remarkably strong isotope effect is observed in the phonon thermal conductivity, the principal mechanism of heat conduction in nonmetallic crystals. An isotopic disorder due to random distribution of the isotopes in the crystal lattice sites results in a rather strong phonon scattering and, consequently, in a reduction of thermal conductivity. In this paper, we present new results of accurate and precise measurements of thermal conductivity κ(T) for silicon single crystals having three different isotopic compositions at temperatures T from 2.4 to 420 K. The highly enriched crystal containing 99.995% of 28Si, which is one of the most perfect crystals ever synthesized, demonstrates a thermal conductivity of about 450 ± 10 W cm-1 K-1 at 24 K, the highest measured value among bulk dielectrics, which is ten times greater than the one for its counterpart natSi with the natural isotopic constitution. For highly enriched crystal 28Si and crystal natSi, the measurements were performed for two orientations [001] and [011], a magnitude of the phonon focusing effect on thermal conductivity was determined accurately at low temperatures. The anisotropy of thermal conductivity disappears above 31 K. The influence of the boundary scattering on thermal conductivity persists sizable up to much higher temperatures (˜80 K). The κ(T) measured in this work gives the most accurate approximation of the intrinsic thermal conductivity of single crystal silicon which is determined solely by the anharmonic phonon processes and diffusive boundary scattering over a wide temperature range.

  19. Thermal conductivity of REIn3 compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucha, J

    2006-01-01

    The results of measurements of the thermal conductivity of REIn 3 (RE Pr, Nd, Dy, Ho, Tm) compounds as a function of the temperature in the interval 4-300 K in the absence and in the presence of an external magnetic field of 8 T are presented. Except for PRIn 3 all the compounds are antiferromagnetic. YIn 3 was also measured as a reference compound. The results were analysed in the paramagnetic phase, where an influence of the crystalline electric field on the thermal conductivity was found. Drastic changes in the thermal conductivity were observed and analysed in the vicinity of the Neel temperature and in the antiferromagnetic phases of the compounds. Below the Neel temperature an additional magnon contribution to the thermal conductivity was separated out

  20. Interface conductance between roughened Be and steel under thermal deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillack, M.S.; Abelson, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    Predictability and control over temperatures and stresses are necessary in order to assure acceptable tritium release, component reliability and lifetime in solid breeder blankets. These blankets usually contain beryllium multiplier in either pebble-bed or solid block forms. For the solid block forms, uncertainties remain in the prediction of the thermal resistance between the Be and its cladding. Several parameters are important, including surface roughness and flatness, background gas pressure, and external loads which may result from blanket thermal deformations and/or pressure stresses. Differential thermal deformation between Be and steel can cause separation to occur between the two solid surfaces, which could seriously degrade the heat transfer. Existing models and data for solid-solid conductance show inconsistencies, even for steel surfaces. Little data or none exists for the Be-steel system, in which differential surface deformations are expected. In this work, we describe a new model which incorporates the combined influences of thermal deformation and contact pressure. Data were taken with small Be specimens as a function of the relevant parameters. The results show that the inclusion of non-conforming surfaces provides a richer range of behavior. Thermal deformations degrade the heat transfer by about a factor of two from flat surfaces, but this effect tends to decrease above about 100 kW m -2 . Contact pressure (above about 1 MPa) between the two materials can effectively maintain good conductance. The flatness and roughness of the surfaces are the most critical parameters. The work also demonstrates the large degree of variation in conductance with background gas pressure. (orig.)

  1. Thermal conductivity characteristics of dewatered sewage sludge by thermal hydrolysis reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyoung Woon; Park, Keum Joo; Han, Seong Kuk; Jung, Hee Suk

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify the thermal conductivity of sewage sludge related to reaction temperature for the optimal design of a thermal hydrolysis reactor. We continuously quantified the thermal conductivity of dewatered sludge related to the reaction temperature. As the reaction temperature increased, the dewatered sludge is thermally liquefied under high temperature and pressure by the thermal hydrolysis reaction. Therefore, the bound water in the sludge cells comes out as free water, which changes the dewatered sludge from a solid phase to slurry in a liquid phase. As a result, the thermal conductivity of the sludge was more than 2.64 times lower than that of the water at 20. However, above 200, it became 0.704 W/m* degrees C, which is about 4% higher than that of water. As a result, the change in physical properties due to thermal hydrolysis appears to be an important factor for heat transfer efficiency. Implications: The thermal conductivity of dewatered sludge is an important factor the optimal design of a thermal hydrolysis reactor. The dewatered sludge is thermally liquefied under high temperature and pressure by the thermal hydrolysis reaction. The liquid phase slurry has a higher thermal conductivity than pure water.

  2. Thermal conductivity of multibarrier waste form components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokken, R.O.

    1981-01-01

    The multiple barrier concept of radioactive waste immobilization under investigation at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) uses composite waste forms which exhibit enhanced inertness through improvements in thermal stability, mechanical strength, and leachability by the use of coatings and metal matrices. Since excessive heat may be generated by radioactive decay of the waste, the thermal conductivity of the various barriers, and more importantly of the composite, becomes an important parameter in design criteria. This report presents results of thermal conductivity measurements on 21 various glass, ceramic, metal and composite materials used in multibarrier waste forms development

  3. Thermal conductivity of highly porous mullite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barea, Rafael; Osendi, Maria Isabel; Ferreira, Jose M.F.; Miranzo, Pilar

    2005-01-01

    The thermal diffusivity of highly porous mullite materials (35-60 vol.% porosity) has been measured up to 1000 deg C by the laser flash method. These materials were fabricated by a direct consolidation method based on the swelling properties of starch granules in concentrated aqueous suspensions and showed mainly spherical shaped pores of about 30 μm in diameter. From the point of view of heat conduction, they behave as a bi-phase material of voids dispersed in the continuous mullite matrix. The temperature dependence of thermal conductivity for the different porosities was modeled by a simple equation that considers the contribution to heat conduction of the mullite matrix and the gas inside the pores, as well as the radiation. The thermal conductivity of the matrix was taken from the measurements done in a dense mullite while the conductivity in the voids was assumed to be that of the testing atmosphere

  4. Fuel thermal conductivity (FTHCON). Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagrman, D.L.

    1979-02-01

    An improvement of the fuel thermal conductivity subcode is described which is part of the fuel rod behavior modeling task performed at EG and G Idaho, Inc. The original version was published in the Materials Properties (MATPRO) Handbook, Section A-2 (Fuel Thermal Conductivity). The improved version incorporates data which were not included in the previous work and omits some previously used data which are believed to come from cracked specimens. The models for the effect of porosity on thermal conductivity and for the electronic contribution to thermal coductivity have been completely revised in order to place these models on a more mechanistic basis. As a result of modeling improvements the standard error of the model with respect to its data base has been significantly reduced

  5. Thermal conductivity model for nanoporous thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Congliang; Zhao, Xinpeng; Regner, Keith; Yang, Ronggui

    2018-03-01

    Nanoporous thin films have attracted great interest because of their extremely low thermal conductivity and potential applications in thin thermal insulators and thermoelectrics. Although there are some numerical and experimental studies about the thermal conductivity of nanoporous thin films, a simplified model is still needed to provide a straightforward prediction. In this paper, by including the phonon scattering lifetimes due to film thickness boundary scattering, nanopore scattering and the frequency-dependent intrinsic phonon-phonon scattering, a fitting-parameter-free model based on the kinetic theory of phonon transport is developed to predict both the in-plane and the cross-plane thermal conductivities of nanoporous thin films. With input parameters such as the lattice constants, thermal conductivity, and the group velocity of acoustic phonons of bulk silicon, our model shows a good agreement with available experimental and numerical results of nanoporous silicon thin films. It illustrates that the size effect of film thickness boundary scattering not only depends on the film thickness but also on the size of nanopores, and a larger nanopore leads to a stronger size effect of the film thickness. Our model also reveals that there are different optimal structures for getting the lowest in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities.

  6. Thermal separation of soil particles from thermal conductivity measurement under various air pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sen; Ren, Tusheng; Lu, Yili; Meng, Ping; Zhang, Jinsong

    2017-01-05

    The thermal conductivity of dry soils is related closely to air pressure and the contact areas between solid particles. In this study, the thermal conductivity of two-phase soil systems was determined under reduced and increased air pressures. The thermal separation of soil particles, i.e., the characteristic dimension of the pore space (d), was then estimated based on the relationship between soil thermal conductivity and air pressure. Results showed that under both reduced and increased air pressures, d estimations were significantly larger than the geometrical mean separation of solid particles (D), which suggested that conductive heat transfer through solid particles dominated heat transfer in dry soils. The increased air pressure approach gave d values lower than that of the reduced air pressure method. With increasing air pressure, more collisions between gas molecules and solid surface occurred in micro-pores and intra-aggregate pores due to the reduction of mean free path of air molecules. Compared to the reduced air pressure approach, the increased air pressure approach expressed more micro-pore structure attributes in heat transfer. We concluded that measuring thermal conductivity under increased air pressure procedures gave better-quality d values, and improved soil micro-pore structure estimation.

  7. Thermal conductance of nanofluids: is the controversy over?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keblinski, Pawel; Prasher, Ravi; Eapen, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade nanofluids (colloidal suspensions of solid nanoparticles) sparked excitement as well as controversy. In particular, a number of researches reported dramatic increases of thermal conductivity with small nanoparticle loading, while others showed moderate increases consistent with the effective medium theories on well-dispersed conductive spheres. Accordingly, the mechanism of thermal conductivity enhancement is a hotly debated topic. We present a critical analysis of the experimental data in terms of the potential mechanisms and show that, by accounting for linear particle aggregation, the well established effective medium theories for composite materials are capable of explaining the vast majority of the reported data without resorting to novel mechanisms such as Brownian motion induced nanoconvection, liquid layering at the interface, or near-field radiation. However, particle aggregation required to significantly enhance thermal conductivity, also increases fluid viscosity rendering the benefit of nanofluids to flow based cooling applications questionable.

  8. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF NON-REPOSITORY LITHOSTRATIGRAPHIC LAYERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. JONES

    2004-10-22

    This model report addresses activities described in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport Thermal Properties and Analysis Reports Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171708]). The model develops values for thermal conductivity, and its uncertainty, for the nonrepository layers of Yucca Mountain; in addition, the model provides estimates for matrix porosity and dry bulk density for the nonrepository layers. The studied lithostratigraphic units, as identified in the ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM 2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]), are the Timber Mountain Group, the Tiva Canyon Tuff, the Yucca Mountain Tuff, the Pah Canyon Tuff, the Topopah Spring Tuff (excluding the repository layers), the Calico Hills Formation, the Prow Pass Tuff, the Bullfrog Tuff, and the Tram Tuff. The deepest model units of the GFM (Tund and Paleozoic) are excluded from this study because no data suitable for model input are available. The parameter estimates developed in this report are used as input to various models and calculations that simulate heat transport through the rock mass. Specifically, analysis model reports that use product output from this report are: (1) Drift-scale coupled processes (DST and TH seepage) models; (2) Drift degradation analysis; (3) Multiscale thermohydrologic model; and (4) Ventilation model and analysis report. In keeping with the methodology of the thermal conductivity model for the repository layers in ''Thermal Conductivity of the Potential Repository Horizon'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169854]), the Hsu et al. (1995 [DIRS 158073]) three-dimensional (3-D) cubic model (referred to herein as ''the Hsu model'') was used to represent the matrix thermal conductivity as a function of the four parameters (matrix porosity, thermal conductivity of the saturating fluid, thermal conductivity of the solid, and geometric connectivity of the solid). The Hsu model requires input data

  9. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF NON-REPOSITORY LITHOSTRATIGRAPHIC LAYERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. JONES

    2004-01-01

    This model report addresses activities described in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport Thermal Properties and Analysis Reports Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171708]). The model develops values for thermal conductivity, and its uncertainty, for the nonrepository layers of Yucca Mountain; in addition, the model provides estimates for matrix porosity and dry bulk density for the nonrepository layers. The studied lithostratigraphic units, as identified in the ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM 2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]), are the Timber Mountain Group, the Tiva Canyon Tuff, the Yucca Mountain Tuff, the Pah Canyon Tuff, the Topopah Spring Tuff (excluding the repository layers), the Calico Hills Formation, the Prow Pass Tuff, the Bullfrog Tuff, and the Tram Tuff. The deepest model units of the GFM (Tund and Paleozoic) are excluded from this study because no data suitable for model input are available. The parameter estimates developed in this report are used as input to various models and calculations that simulate heat transport through the rock mass. Specifically, analysis model reports that use product output from this report are: (1) Drift-scale coupled processes (DST and TH seepage) models; (2) Drift degradation analysis; (3) Multiscale thermohydrologic model; and (4) Ventilation model and analysis report. In keeping with the methodology of the thermal conductivity model for the repository layers in ''Thermal Conductivity of the Potential Repository Horizon'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169854]), the Hsu and others (1995 [DIRS 158073]) three-dimensional (3-D) cubic model (referred to herein as ''the Hsu model'') was used to represent the matrix thermal conductivity as a function of the four parameters (matrix porosity, thermal conductivity of the saturating fluid, thermal conductivity of the solid, and geometric connectivity of the solid). The Hsu model requires input data from each test specimen to meet three specific conditions: (1) Known value

  10. Using Nanoparticles for Enhance Thermal Conductivity of Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baydaa Jaber Nabhan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Phase change materials (PCMs such as paraffin wax can be used to store or release large amount of energy at certain temperature at which their solid-liquid phase changes occurs. Paraffin wax that used in latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES has low thermal conductivity. In this study, the thermal conductivity of paraffin wax has been enhanced by adding different mass concentration (1wt.%, 3wt.%, 5wt.% of (TiO2 nano-particles with about (10nm diameter. It is found that the phase change temperature varies with adding (TiO2 nanoparticles in to the paraffin wax. The thermal conductivity of the composites is found to decrease with increasing temperature. The increase in thermal conductivity has been found to increase by about (10% at nanoparticles loading (5wt.% and 15oC.

  11. Thermal conductivity and thermal rectification in unzipped carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Xiaoxi; Li Baowen; Zhang Gang

    2011-01-01

    We study the thermal transport in completely unzipped carbon nanotubes, which are called graphene nanoribbons, partially unzipped carbon nanotubes, which can be seen as carbon-nanotube-graphene-nanoribbon junctions, and carbon nanotubes by using molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the thermal conductivity of a graphene nanoribbon is much less than that of its perfect carbon nanotube counterparts because of the localized phonon modes at the boundary. A partially unzipped carbon nanotube has the lowest thermal conductivity due to additional localized modes at the junction region. More strikingly, a significant thermal rectification effect is observed in both partially unzipped armchair and zigzag carbon nanotubes. Our results suggest that carbon-nanotube-graphene-nanoribbon junctions can be used in thermal energy control.

  12. Thermal conductivity of different colored compomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, Cigdem; Keles, Ali; Guler, Mehmet S; Karagoz, Sendogan; Cora, Ömer N; Keskin, Gul

    2017-11-10

    Compomers are mostly used in primary dentition. The thermal conductivity properties of traditional or colored compomers have not been investigated in detail so far. The aim of this in vitro study was to assess and compare the thermal conductivities of traditional and colored compomers. Two sets of compomers - namely, Twinky Star (available in berry, lemon, green, silver, blue, pink, gold and orange shades) and Dyract Extra (available in B1, A3 and A2 shades) - were included in this study. All of the traditional and colored compomers were applied to standard molds and polymerized according to the manufacturers' instructions. Three samples were prepared from each compomer. Measurements were conducted using a heat conduction test setup, and the coefficient of heat conductivity was calculated for each material. The heat conductivity coefficients were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Duncan tests. Uncertainty analysis was also performed on the calculated coefficients of heat conductivity. Statistically significant differences were found (p<0.05) between the thermal conductivity properties of the traditional and colored compomers examined. Among all of the tested compomers, the silver shade compomer exhibited the highest coefficient of heat conductivity (p<0.05), while the berry shade exhibited the lowest coefficient (p<0.05). Uncertainty analyses revealed that 6 out of 11 samples showed significant differences. The silver shade compomer should be avoided in deep cavities. The material properties could be improved for colored compomers.

  13. Gas storage carbon with enhanced thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Rogers, Michael Ray; Judkins, Roddie R.

    2000-01-01

    A carbon fiber carbon matrix hybrid adsorbent monolith with enhanced thermal conductivity for storing and releasing gas through adsorption and desorption is disclosed. The heat of adsorption of the gas species being adsorbed is sufficiently large to cause hybrid monolith heating during adsorption and hybrid monolith cooling during desorption which significantly reduces the storage capacity of the hybrid monolith, or efficiency and economics of a gas separation process. The extent of this phenomenon depends, to a large extent, on the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent hybrid monolith. This invention is a hybrid version of a carbon fiber monolith, which offers significant enhancements to thermal conductivity and potential for improved gas separation and storage systems.

  14. Thermal conductivity of electron-irradiated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasinghe, Asanka; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2017-10-01

    We report results of a systematic analysis of thermal transport in electron-irradiated, including irradiation-induced amorphous, graphene sheets based on nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations. We focus on the dependence of the thermal conductivity, k, of the irradiated graphene sheets on the inserted irradiation defect density, c, as well as the extent of defect passivation with hydrogen atoms. While the thermal conductivity of irradiated graphene decreases precipitously from that of pristine graphene, k0, upon introducing a low vacancy concentration, c reduction of the thermal conductivity with the increasing vacancy concentration exhibits a weaker dependence on c until the amorphization threshold. Beyond the onset of amorphization, the dependence of thermal conductivity on the vacancy concentration becomes significantly weaker, and k practically reaches a plateau value. Throughout the range of c and at all hydrogenation levels examined, the correlation k = k0(1 + αc)-1 gives an excellent description of the simulation results. The value of the coefficient α captures the overall strength of the numerous phonon scattering centers in the irradiated graphene sheets, which include monovacancies, vacancy clusters, carbon ring reconstructions, disorder, and a rough nonplanar sheet morphology. Hydrogen passivation increases the value of α, but the effect becomes very minor beyond the amorphization threshold.

  15. Overview of thermal conductivity models of anisotropic thermal insulation materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurikhin, A. V.; Kostanovsky, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    Currently, the most of existing materials and substances under elaboration are anisotropic. It makes certain difficulties in the study of heat transfer process. Thermal conductivity of the materials can be characterized by tensor of the second order. Also, the parallelism between the temperature gradient vector and the density of heat flow vector is violated in anisotropic thermal insulation materials (TIM). One of the most famous TIM is a family of integrated thermal insulation refractory material («ITIRM»). The main component ensuring its properties is the «inflated» vermiculite. Natural mineral vermiculite is ground into powder state, fired by gas burner for dehydration, and its precipitate is then compressed. The key feature of thus treated batch of vermiculite is a package structure. The properties of the material lead to a slow heating of manufactured products due to low absorption and high radiation reflection. The maximum of reflection function is referred to infrared spectral region. A review of current models of heat propagation in anisotropic thermal insulation materials is carried out, as well as analysis of their thermal and optical properties. A theoretical model, which allows to determine the heat conductivity «ITIRM», can be useful in the study of thermal characteristics such as specific heat capacity, temperature conductivity, and others. Materials as «ITIRM» can be used in the metallurgy industry, thermal energy and nuclear power-engineering.

  16. Thermal conductivity issues of EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, U.; Raetzer-Scheibe, H.J.; Saruhan, B. [DLR - German Aerospace Center, Institute of Materials Research, 51170 Cologne (Germany); Renteria, A.F. [BTU, Physical Metallurgy and Materials Technology, Cottbus (Germany)

    2007-09-15

    The thermal conductivity of electron-beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was investigated by the Laser Flash technique. Sample type and methodology of data analyses as well as atmosphere during the measurement have some influence on the data. A large variation of the thermal conductivity was found by changes in TBC microstructure. Exposure at high temperature caused sintering of the porous microstructure that finally increased thermal conductivity up to 30 %. EB-PVD TBCs show a distinct thickness dependence of the thermal conductivity due to the anisotropic microstructure in thickness direction. Thin TBCs had a 20 % lower thermal conductivity than thick coatings. New compositions of the ceramic top layer offer the largest potential to lower thermal conductivity. Values down to 0.8W/(mK) have been already demonstrated with virgin coatings of pyrochlore compositions. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Die Waermeleitfaehigkeit von elektronenstrahl-aufgedampften (EB-PVD) Waermedaemmschichten (TBCs) wurde mittels Laser-Flash untersucht. Probentyp, Messmethodik und die Atmosphaere waehrend der Messung haben einen Einfluss auf die Ergebnisse. Aenderungen in der Mikrostruktur der TBC fuehrten zu grossen Unterschieden der Waermeleitfaehigkeit. Eine Hochtemperaturbelastung verursachte Sintervorgaenge in der poroesen Mikrostruktur, was die Waermeleitfaehigkeit um bis zu 30 % ansteigen liess. EB-PVD TBCs zeigen eine deutliche Dickenabhaengigkeit der Waermeleitfaehigkeit durch die Anisotropie der Mikrostruktur in dieser Richtung. Duenne TBCs haben eine um 20 % geringere Waermeleitfaehigkeit als dicke Schichten. Neue Zusammensetzungen der keramischen Deckschicht bieten die groessten Moeglichkeiten fuer eine Reduktion der Waermeleitfaehigkeit. Werte bis zu 0,8 W/(mK) wurden damit bereits erreicht. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Thermal transport across solid-solid interfaces enhanced by pre-interface isotope-phonon scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eungkyu; Luo, Tengfei

    2018-01-01

    Thermal transport across solid interfaces can play critical roles in the thermal management of electronics. In this letter, we use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the isotope effect on the thermal transport across SiC/GaN interfaces. It is found that engineered isotopes (e.g., 10% 15N or 71Ga) in the GaN layer can increase the interfacial thermal conductance compared to the isotopically pure case by as much as 23%. Different isotope doping features, such as the isotope concentration, skin depth of the isotope region, and its distance from the interface, are investigated, and all of them lead to increases in thermal conductance. Studies of spectral temperatures of phonon modes indicate that interfacial thermal transport due to low-frequency phonons (transport. This work may provide insights into interfacial thermal transport and useful guidance to practical material design.

  18. Phonon conductivity and relaxation rate in solids with disturbances by the Green function method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M.

    1980-09-01

    In this present article we have established an expression for the temperature dependence of the lattice thermal conductivity of solids with harmonic disturbances. The relaxation rate for scattering of phonons with point defect is also derived. We will apply the Kubo-correlation function formalism for the thermal conductivity, and the double time temperature dependent Green function technique for the evaluation of correlation functions

  19. Experimental analysis of current conduction through thermally ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electrical properties of SiO2 grown on the Si-face of the epitaxial 4H-SiC ... Thermal oxide reliability is one of the most critical concerns in the realization of ... material for high temperature, high power, high frequency, and nonvolatile .... conduction mechanism in MOSiC system with varying oxide thicknesses has been.

  20. Calculation of thermal conductivity of frozen food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orrego A, Carlos E.

    1998-01-01

    A simple model is presented for the presage of the thermal conductivities of frozen foods that combines different authors' proposals. For varied materials on those that there is available information of the modification of this property with the temperature in frozen systems, the comparison of the dear and empiric values is made to evaluate these predictions

  1. Thermal conductivity measurements of pacific illite sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickox, C. E.; McVey, D. F.; Miller, J. B.; Olson, L. O.; Silva, A. J.

    1986-07-01

    Results are reported for effective thermal conductivity measurements performed in situ and in core samples of illite marine sediment. The measurements were obtained during a recent oceanographic expedition to a study site in the north central region of the Pacific Ocean. This study was undertaken in support of the U.S. Subseabed Disposal Project, the purpose of which is to investigate the scientific feasibility of using the fine-grained sediments of the sea floor as a repository for high-level nuclear waste. In situ measurements were made and 1.5-m-long hydrostatic piston cores were taken, under remote control, from a platform that was lowered to the sea floor, 5844 m below sea level. The in situ measurement of thermal conductivity was made at a nominal depth of 80 cm below the sediment surface using a specially developed, line-source, needle probe. Thermal conductivity measurements in three piston cores and one box core (obtained several kilometers from the study site) were made on shipboard using a miniature needle probe. The in situ thermal conductivity was approximately 0.91 W · m-1 · K-1. Values determined from the cores were within the range 0.81 to 0.89 W · m-1 · K-1.

  2. Thermal conductivity measurements of Pacific illite sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickox, C.E.; McVey, D.F.; Miller, J.B.; Olson, L.O.; Silva, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported for effective thermal conductivity measurements performed in situ and in core samples of illite marine sediment. The measurements were obtained during a recent oceanographic expedition to a study site in the north central region of the Pacific Ocean. This study was undertaken in support of the US Subseabed Disposal Project, the purpose of which is to investigate the scientific feasibility of using the fine grained sediments of the sea floor as a repository for high level nuclear waste. In situ measurements were made and 1.5-meter long hydrostatic piston cores were taken, under remote control, from a platform that was lowered to the sea floor, 5844 m below sea level. The in situ measurement of thermal conductivity was made at a nominal depth of 80 cm below the sediment surface using a specially developed, line source, needle probe. Thermal conductivity measurements in three piston cores and one box core (obtained several kilometers from the study site) were made on shipboard using a miniature needle probe. The in situ thermal conductivity was approximately 0.91 W/m.K. Values determined from the cores were within the range 0.81 to 0.89 W/m.K

  3. Model calculation of thermal conductivity in antiferromagnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhail, I.F.I., E-mail: ifi_mikhail@hotmail.com; Ismail, I.M.M.; Ameen, M.

    2015-11-01

    A theoretical study is given of thermal conductivity in antiferromagnetic materials. The study has the advantage that the three-phonon interactions as well as the magnon phonon interactions have been represented by model operators that preserve the important properties of the exact collision operators. A new expression for thermal conductivity has been derived that involves the same terms obtained in our previous work in addition to two new terms. These two terms represent the conservation and quasi-conservation of wavevector that occur in the three-phonon Normal and Umklapp processes respectively. They gave appreciable contributions to the thermal conductivity and have led to an excellent quantitative agreement with the experimental measurements of the antiferromagnet FeCl{sub 2}. - Highlights: • The Boltzmann equations of phonons and magnons in antiferromagnets have been studied. • Model operators have been used to represent the magnon–phonon and three-phonon interactions. • The models possess the same important properties as the exact operators. • A new expression for the thermal conductivity has been derived. • The results showed a good quantitative agreement with the experimental data of FeCl{sub 2}.

  4. Theoretical prediction of thermal conductivity for thermal protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gori, F.; Corasaniti, S.; Worek, W.M.; Minkowycz, W.J.

    2012-01-01

    The present work is aimed to evaluate the effective thermal conductivity of an ablative composite material in the state of virgin material and in three paths of degradation. The composite material is undergoing ablation with formation of void pores or char and void pores. The one dimensional effective thermal conductivity is evaluated theoretically by the solution of heat conduction under two assumptions, i.e. parallel isotherms and parallel heat fluxes. The paper presents the theoretical model applied to an elementary cubic cell of the composite material which is made of two crossed fibres and a matrix. A numerical simulation is carried out to compare the numerical results with the theoretical ones for different values of the filler volume fraction. - Highlights: ► Theoretical models of the thermal conductivity of an ablative composite. ► Composite material is made of two crossed fibres and a matrix. ► Three mechanisms of degradation are investigated. ► One dimensional thermal conductivity is evaluated by the heat conduction equation. ► Numerical simulations to be compared with the theoretical models.

  5. A new thermal conductivity model for nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Junemoo; Kleinstreuer, Clement [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (United States)], E-mail: ck@eos.ncsu.edu

    2004-12-15

    In a quiescent suspension, nanoparticles move randomly and thereby carry relatively large volumes of surrounding liquid with them. This micro-scale interaction may occur between hot and cold regions, resulting in a lower local temperature gradient for a given heat flux compared with the pure liquid case. Thus, as a result of Brownian motion, the effective thermal conductivity, k{sub eff}, which is composed of the particles' conventional static part and the Brownian motion part, increases to result in a lower temperature gradient for a given heat flux. To capture these transport phenomena, a new thermal conductivity model for nanofluids has been developed, which takes the effects of particle size, particle volume fraction and temperature dependence as well as properties of base liquid and particle phase into consideration by considering surrounding liquid traveling with randomly moving nanoparticles.The strong dependence of the effective thermal conductivity on temperature and material properties of both particle and carrier fluid was attributed to the long impact range of the interparticle potential, which influences the particle motion. In the new model, the impact of Brownian motion is more effective at higher temperatures, as also observed experimentally. Specifically, the new model was tested with simple thermal conduction cases, and demonstrated that for a given heat flux, the temperature gradient changes significantly due to a variable thermal conductivity which mainly depends on particle volume fraction, particle size, particle material and temperature. To improve the accuracy and versatility of the k{sub eff}model, more experimental data sets are needed.

  6. Advanced Testing Method for Ground Thermal Conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL; Clemenzi, Rick [Geothermal Design Center Inc.; Liu, Su [University of Tennessee (UT)

    2017-04-01

    A new method is developed that can quickly and more accurately determine the effective ground thermal conductivity (GTC) based on thermal response test (TRT) results. Ground thermal conductivity is an important parameter for sizing ground heat exchangers (GHEXs) used by geothermal heat pump systems. The conventional GTC test method usually requires a TRT for 48 hours with a very stable electric power supply throughout the entire test. In contrast, the new method reduces the required test time by 40%–60% or more, and it can determine GTC even with an unstable or intermittent power supply. Consequently, it can significantly reduce the cost of GTC testing and increase its use, which will enable optimal design of geothermal heat pump systems. Further, this new method provides more information about the thermal properties of the GHEX and the ground than previous techniques. It can verify the installation quality of GHEXs and has the potential, if developed, to characterize the heterogeneous thermal properties of the ground formation surrounding the GHEXs.

  7. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF SIC AND C FIBERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngblood, Gerald E.; Senor, David J.; Kowbel, W.; Webb, J.; Kohyama, Akira

    2000-09-01

    Several rod-shaped specimens with uniaxially packed fibers (Hi-Nicalon, Hi-Nicalon Type S, Tyranno SA and Amoco K1100 types) and a pre-ceramic polymer matrix have been fabricated. By using appropriate analytic models, the bare fiber thermal conductivity (Kf) and the interface thermal conductance (h) will be determined as a function of temperature up to 1000?C before and after irradiation for samples cut from these rods. Initial results are: (1) for unirradiated Hi-Nicalon SiC fiber, Kf varied from 4.3 up to 5.9 W/mK for the 27-1000?C range, (2) for unirradiated K1100 graphite fiber, Kf varied from 576 down to 242 W/mK for the 27-1000?C range, and (3) h = 43 W/cm2K at 27?C as a typical fiber/matrix interface conductance.

  8. Highly conducting one-dimensional solids

    CERN Document Server

    Evrard, Roger; Doren, Victor

    1979-01-01

    Although the problem of a metal in one dimension has long been known to solid-state physicists, it was not until the synthesis of real one-dimensional or quasi-one-dimensional systems that this subject began to attract considerable attention. This has been due in part to the search for high­ temperature superconductivity and the possibility of reaching this goal with quasi-one-dimensional substances. A period of intense activity began in 1973 with the report of a measurement of an apparently divergent conduc­ tivity peak in TfF-TCNQ. Since then a great deal has been learned about quasi-one-dimensional conductors. The emphasis now has shifted from trying to find materials of very high conductivity to the many interesting problems of physics and chemistry involved. But many questions remain open and are still under active investigation. This book gives a review of the experimental as well as theoretical progress made in this field over the last years. All the chapters have been written by scientists who have ...

  9. Thermal properties of conducting polypyrrole nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rudajevová, A.; Varga, M.; Prokeš, J.; Kopecká, J.; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 128, č. 4 (2015), s. 730-736 ISSN 0587-4246. [ISPMA 13 - International Symposium on Physics of Materials /13./. Praha, 31.08.2014-04.09.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00270S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : conducting polymer * polyaniline * polypyrrole Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.525, year: 2015

  10. Thermal management of solid state lighting module

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, H.

    2014-01-01

    Solid-State Lighting (SSL), powered by Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs), is an energy-efficient technology for lighting systems. In contrast to incandescent lights which obtain high efficiency at high temperatures, the highest efficiency of LEDs is reached at low temperatures. The thermal management in

  11. Solid Layer Thermal-conductivity Measurement Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    deposited on the sample, and the absorption of laser radiation. Temperature-measurement tools include thermocouples, infrared (IR) pyrometers , and...A, Nishimura H, and Sawada T (1990), Laser-Induc~d Surface Acoustic Waves and Photothc:rmal Surfitce Gratings Generated by Crossing Two Pulsed

  12. Thermal effects in microfluidics with thermal conductivity spatially modulated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Toro, Agustín.

    2014-05-01

    A heat transfer model on a microfluidic is resolved analytically. The model describes a fluid at rest between two parallel plates where each plate is maintained at a differentially specified temperature and the thermal conductivity of the microfluidic is spatially modulated. The heat transfer model in such micro-hydrostatic configuration is analytically resolved using the technique of the Laplace transform applying the Bromwich Integral and the Residue theorem. The temperature outline in the microfluidic is presented as an infinite series of Bessel functions. It is shown that the result for the thermal conductivity spatially modulated has as a particular case the solution when the thermal conductivity is spatially constant. All computations were performed using the computer algebra software Maple. It is claimed that the analytical obtained results are important for the design of nanoscale devices with applications in biotechnology. Furthermore, it is suggested some future research lines such as the study of the heat transfer model in a microfluidic resting between coaxial cylinders with radially modulated thermal conductivity in order to achieve future developments in this area.

  13. Thermally stimulated exoelectron emission from solid Xe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khyzhniy, I.V.; Grigorashchenko, O.N.; Savchenko, E.V.; Ponomarev, A.N.; Bondybey, V.E.

    2007-01-01

    Thermally-stimulated emission of exoelectrons and photons from solid Xe pre-irradiated by low-energy electrons were studied. A high sensitivity of thermally-stimulated luminescence (TSL) and thermally-stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) to sample prehistory was demonstrated. It was shown that electron traps in unannealed samples are characterized by much broader distribution of trap levels in comparison with annealed samples and their concentration exceeds in number that in annealed samples. Both phenomena, TSL and TSEE, were found to be triggered by release of electrons from the same kind of traps. The data obtained suggest a competition between two relaxation channels: charge recombination and electron transport terminated by TSL and TSEE. It was found that TSEE predominates at low temperatures while at higher temperatures TSL prevails. An additional relaxation channel, a photon-stimulated exoelectron emission pre-irradiated solid Xe, was revealed

  14. Lattice thermal conductivity of silicate glasses at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y. Y.; Hsieh, W. P.

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of the thermodynamic and transport properties of magma holds the key to understanding the thermal evolution and chemical differentiation of Earth. The discovery of the remnant of a deep magma ocean above the core mantle boundary (CMB) from seismic observations suggest that the CMB heat flux would strongly depend on the thermal conductivity, including lattice (klat) and radiative (krad) components, of dense silicate melts and major constituent minerals around the region. Recent measurements on the krad of dense silicate glasses and lower-mantle minerals show that krad of dense silicate glasses could be significantly smaller than krad of the surrounding solid mantle phases, and therefore the dense silicate melts would act as a thermal insulator in deep lower mantle. This conclusion, however, remains uncertain due to the lack of direct measurements on the lattice thermal conductivity of silicate melts under relevant pressure-temperature conditions. Besides the CMB, magmas exist in different circumstances beneath the surface of the Earth. Chemical compositions of silicate melts vary with geological and geodynamic settings of the melts and have strong influences on their thermal properties. In order to have a better view of heat transport within the Earth, it is important to study compositional and pressure dependences of thermal properties of silicate melts. Here we report experimental results on lattice thermal conductivities of silicate glasses with basaltic and rhyolitic compositions up to Earth's lower mantle pressures using time-domain thermoreflectance coupled with diamond-anvil cell techniques. This study not only provides new data for the thermal conductivity of silicate melts in the Earth's deep interior, but is crucial for further understanding of the evolution of Earth's complex internal structure.

  15. Multiscale Modeling of UHTC: Thermal Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Murry, Daw; Squire, Thomas; Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a multiscale framework in computational modeling for the ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC) ZrB2 and HfB2. These materials are characterized by high melting point, good strength, and reasonable oxidation resistance. They are candidate materials for a number of applications in extreme environments including sharp leading edges of hypersonic aircraft. In particular, we used a combination of ab initio methods, atomistic simulations and continuum computations to obtain insights into fundamental properties of these materials. Ab initio methods were used to compute basic structural, mechanical and thermal properties. From these results, a database was constructed to fit a Tersoff style interatomic potential suitable for atomistic simulations. These potentials were used to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity of single crystals and the thermal resistance of simple grain boundaries. Finite element method (FEM) computations using atomistic results as inputs were performed with meshes constructed on SEM images thereby modeling the realistic microstructure. These continuum computations showed the reduction in thermal conductivity due to the grain boundary network.

  16. Thermal conduction down steep temperature gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, A.R.; Evans, R.G.; Nicholas, D.J.

    1980-08-01

    The Fokker-Planck equation has been solved numerically in one spatial and two velocity dimensions in order to study thermal conduction in large temperature gradients. An initially cold plasma is heated at one end of the spatial grid producing temperature gradients with scale lengths of a few times the electron mean free path. The heat flow is an order of magnitude smaller than that predicted by the classical theory which is valid in the limit of small temperature gradients. (author)

  17. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF THE POTENTIAL REPOSITORY HORIZON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.E. BEAN

    2004-09-27

    The primary purpose of this report is to assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of bulk thermal conductivity in the host horizon for the repository at Yucca Mountain. More specifically, the lithostratigraphic units studied are located within the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) and consist of the upper lithophysal zone (Tptpul), the middle nonlithophysal zone (Tptpmn), the lower lithophysal zone (Tptpll), and the lower nonlithophysal zone (Tptpln). Design plans indicate that approximately 81 percent of the repository will be excavated in the Tptpll, approximately 12 percent in the Tptpmn, and the remainder in the Tptul and Tptpln (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168370]). This report provides three-dimensional geostatistical estimates of the bulk thermal conductivity for the four stratigraphic layers of the repository horizon. The three-dimensional geostatistical estimates of matrix and lithophysal porosity, dry bulk density, and matrix thermal conductivity are also provided. This report provides input to various models and calculations that simulate heat transport through the rock mass. These models include the ''Drift Degradation Analysis, Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model, Ventilation Model and Analysis Report, Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms, Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'', and ''Drift Scale THM Model''. These models directly or indirectly provide input to the total system performance assessment (TSPA). The main distinguishing characteristic among the lithophysal and nonlithophysal units is the percentage of large-scale (centimeters-meters) voids within the rock. The Tptpul and Tptpll, as their names suggest, have a higher percentage of lithophysae than the Tptpmn and the Tptpln. Understanding the influence of the lithophysae is of great importance to understanding bulk thermal conductivity.

  18. Thermally Conductive Structural 2D Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    Dimensional Pitch Polyimide Composite Micrographs ........ 27 Figure 23. 4-Ply Silver Polyimide Laminate ...through-thickness thermal conductivity of up to 20 W/m.K. This novel structural prepreg material will be developed through engineering of an optimal fiber...with an EPON 862/Epikure W epoxy resin system to form unidirectional prepreg tapes. Each prepreg was then cut to 6 inch by 6 inch plies and

  19. Microscale solid-state thermal diodes enabling ambient temperature thermal circuits for energy applications

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Song

    2017-05-10

    Thermal diodes, or devices that transport thermal energy asymmetrically, analogous to electrical diodes, hold promise for thermal energy harvesting and conservation, as well as for phononics or information processing. The junction of a phase change material and phase invariant material can form a thermal diode; however, there are limited constituent materials available for a given target temperature, particularly near ambient. In this work, we demonstrate that a micro and nanoporous polystyrene foam can house a paraffin-based phase change material, fused to PMMA, to produce mechanically robust, solid-state thermal diodes capable of ambient operation with Young\\'s moduli larger than 11.5 MPa and 55.2 MPa above and below the melting transition point, respectively. Moreover, the composites show significant changes in thermal conductivity above and below the melting point of the constituent paraffin and rectification that is well-described by our previous theory and the Maxwell–Eucken model. Maximum thermal rectifications range from 1.18 to 1.34. We show that such devices perform reliably enough to operate in thermal diode bridges, dynamic thermal circuits capable of transforming oscillating temperature inputs into single polarity temperature differences – analogous to an electrical diode bridge with widespread implications for transient thermal energy harvesting and conservation. Overall, our approach yields mechanically robust, solid-state thermal diodes capable of engineering design from a mathematical model of phase change and thermal transport, with implications for energy harvesting.

  20. Thermal properties of paramagnetic solid helium 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, L.

    1983-01-01

    It was shown in recent work that over a limited molar volume range and at asymptotically high temperatures the thermal modulations of the pressure along isochores of paramagnetic solid 3 He could be accounted for through the formalism of the Heisenberg model of an antiferromagnetically interacting localized spin- 1/2 system. The internal consistency of this formalism requires the characteristic exchange-interaction parameter of the model derived from pressure modulation data to be identical with that appearing in the other thermal properties of this quantum solid. In a restricted temperature region where the spin excitations are the dominant thermal excitations of the solid, heat capacity data yield exchange-interaction parameters in fair agreement with those derived from pressures along isochores of larger molar volume. At higher temperatures, within well-defined limitations, thermal excitations involve both spin and phononexcitations. Here, because of the opposite temperature variations of the spin and phonon heat capacity components, the ensuing heat capacity minimum determines exactly the exchange-energy parameter and the relevant limiting Debye temperature as a function of the measured temperature location and value of the heat capacity extremum along the experimentally explored isochore. The exchange-energy parameters so derived display larger deviations from their predicted pressure-based values than those resulting from the lower temperature but still asymptotic spin-only heat capacities. At the present time, ambiguities in the experimental determinations of the characteristic Weiss temperatures of the asymptotic paramagnetic susceptibilities prevent one from deriving exchange-energy parameters with them. The present work leads to the prediction, within the limitations of the model formalism, of thermal properties of magnetized solid 3 He

  1. Highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Akio; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Goto, Sumitaka; Saito, Yukio; Jinbo, Ryutaro; Ogiwara, Norio; Saido, Masahiro.

    1996-01-01

    In a composite member for use in walls of a thermonuclear reactor, if carbon fibers and boron carbide are mixed, since they are brought into contact with each other directly, boron is reacted with the carbon fibers to form boron carbide to lower thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers. Then, in the present invention, graphite or amorphous carbon is filled between the carbon fibers to provide a fiber bundle of not less than 500 carbon fibers. Further, the surface of the fiber bundle is coated with graphite or amorphous carbon to suppress diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers or reaction of them. Then, lowering of thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers is prevented, as well as the mixing amount of the carbon fiber bundles with boron carbide, a sintering temperature and orientation of carbon fiber bundles are optimized to provide a highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material. In addition, carbide or boride type short fibers, spherical graphite, and amorphous carbon are mixed in the boron carbide to prevent development of cracks. Diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers is reduced or reaction of them if the carbon fibers are bundled. (N.H.)

  2. Thermal conductivities of thin, sputtered optical films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henager, C.H. Jr.; Pawlewicz, W.T.

    1991-05-01

    The normal component of the thin film thermal conductivity has been measured for the first time for several advanced sputtered optical materials. Included are data for single layers of boron nitride (BN), aluminum nitride (AIN), silicon aluminum nitride (Si-Al-N), silicon aluminum oxynitride (Si-Al-O-N), silicon carbide (SiC), and for dielectric-enhanced metal reflectors of the form Al(SiO 2 /Si 3 N 4 ) n and Al(Al 2 O 3 /AIN) n . Sputtered films of more conventional materials like SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , Ta 2 O 5 , Ti, and Si have also been measured. The data show that thin film thermal conductivities are typically 10 to 100 times lower than conductivities for the same materials in bulk form. Structural disorder in the amorphous or very fine-grained films appears to account for most of the conductivity difference. Conclusive evidence for a film/substrate interface contribution is presented

  3. Measuring Thermal Conductivity at LH2 Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvidge, Shawn; Watwood, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    For many years, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) produced reference materials for materials testing. One such reference material was intended for use with a guarded hot plate apparatus designed to meet the requirements of ASTM C177-97, "Standard Test Method for Steady-State Heat Flux Measurements and Thermal Transmission Properties by Means of the Guarded-Hot-Plate Apparatus." This apparatus can be used to test materials in various gaseous environments from atmospheric pressure to a vacuum. It allows the thermal transmission properties of insulating materials to be measured from just above ambient temperature down to temperatures below liquid hydrogen. However, NIST did not generate data below 77 K temperature for the reference material in question. This paper describes a test method used at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to optimize thermal conductivity measurements during the development of thermal protection systems. The test method extends the usability range of this reference material by generating data at temperatures lower than 77 K. Information provided by this test is discussed, as are the capabilities of the MSFC Hydrogen Test Facility, where advanced methods for materials testing are routinely developed and optimized in support of aerospace applications.

  4. Treating Fibrous Insulation to Reduce Thermal Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, Alfred; Tarkanian, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    A chemical treatment reduces the convective and radiative contributions to the effective thermal conductivity of porous fibrous thermal-insulation tile. The net effect of the treatment is to coat the surfaces of fibers with a mixture of transition-metal oxides (TMOs) without filling the pores. The TMO coats reduce the cross-sectional areas available for convection while absorbing and scattering thermal radiation in the pores, thereby rendering the tile largely opaque to thermal radiation. The treatment involves a sol-gel process: A solution containing a mixture of transition-metal-oxide-precursor salts plus a gelling agent (e.g., tetraethylorthosilicate) is partially cured, then, before it visibly gels, is used to impregnate the tile. The solution in the tile is gelled, then dried, and then the tile is fired to convert the precursor salts to the desired mixed TMO phases. The amounts of the various TMOs ultimately incorporated into the tile can be tailored via the concentrations of salts in the solution, and the impregnation depth can be tailored via the viscosity of the solution and/or the volume of the solution relative to that of the tile. The amounts of the TMOs determine the absorption and scattering spectra.

  5. Thermal conductivity of heterogeneous LWR MOX fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staicu, D.; Barker, M.

    2013-11-01

    It is generally observed that the thermal conductivity of LWR MOX fuel is lower than that of pure UO2. For MOX, the degradation is usually only interpreted as an effect of the substitution of U atoms by Pu. This hypothesis is however in contradiction with the observations of Duriez and Philiponneau showing that the thermal conductivity of MOX is independent of the Pu content in the ranges 3-15 and 15-30 wt.% PuO2 respectively. Attributing this degradation to Pu only implies that stoichiometric heterogeneous MOX can be obtained, while we show that any heterogeneity in the plutonium distribution in the sample introduces a variation in the local stoichiometry which in turn has a strong impact on the thermal conductivity. A model quantifying this effect is obtained and a new set of experimental results for homogeneous and heterogeneous MOX fuels is presented and used to validate the proposed model. In irradiated fuels, this effect is predicted to disappear early during irradiation. The 3, 6 and 10 wt.% Pu samples have a similar thermal conductivity. Comparison of the results for this homogeneous microstructure with MIMAS (heterogeneous) fuel of the same composition showed no difference for the Pu contents of 3, 5.9, 6, 7.87 and 10 wt.%. A small increase of the thermal conductivity was obtained for 15 wt.% Pu. This increase is of about 6% when compared to the average of the values obtained for 3, 6 and 10 wt.% Pu. For comparison purposes, Duriez also measured the thermal conductivity of FBR MOX with 21.4 wt.% Pu with O/M = 1.982 and a density close to 95% TD and found a value in good agreement with the estimation obtained using the formula of Philipponneau [8] for FBR MOX, and significantly lower than his results corresponding to the range 3-15 wt.% Pu. This difference in thermal conductivity is of about 20%, i.e. higher than the measurement uncertainties.Thus, a significant difference was observed between FBR and PWR MOX fuels, but was not explained. This difference

  6. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1992-09-01

    Two legal-weight truck casks the GA-4 and GA-9, will carry four PWR and nine BWR spent fuel assemblies, respectively. Each cask has a solid neutron shielding material separating the steel body and the outer steel skin. In the thermal accident specified by NRC regulations in 10CFR Part 71, the cask is subjected to an 800 degree C environment for 30 minutes. The neutron shield need not perform any shielding function during or after the thermal accident, but its behavior must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-AL 9897, R. H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series, a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280 degree F. The neutron shield materials tested were boronated (0.8--4.5%) polymers (polypropylene, HDPE, NS-4). The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found

  7. Numerical study for enhancing the thermal conductivity of phase change material (PCM) storage using high thermal conductivity porous matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesalhy, Osama; Lafdi, Khalid; Elgafy, Ahmed; Bowman, Keith

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the melting process inside an irregular geometry filled with high thermal conductivity porous matrix saturated with phase change material PCM is investigated numerically. The numerical model is resting on solving the volume averaged conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy with phase change (melting) in the porous medium. The convection motion of the liquid phase inside the porous matrix is solved considering the Darcy, Brinkman and Forchiemer effects. A local thermal non-equilibrium assumption is considered due to the large difference in thermal properties between the solid matrix and PCM by applying a two energy equation model. The numerical code shows good agreement for pure PCM melting with another published numerical work. Through this study it is found that the presence of the porous matrix has a great effect on the heat transfer and melting rate of the PCM energy storage. Decreasing the porosity of the matrix increases the melting rate, but it also damps the convection motion. It is also found that the best technique to enhance the response of the PCM storage is to use a solid matrix with high porosity and high thermal conductivity

  8. Determination of Thermal Conductivity of Silicate Matrix for Applications in Effective Media Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiala, Lukáš; Jerman, Miloš; Reiterman, Pavel; Černý, Robert

    2018-02-01

    Silicate materials have an irreplaceable role in the construction industry. They are mainly represented by cement-based- or lime-based materials, such as concrete, cement mortar, or lime plaster, and consist of three phases: the solid matrix and air and water present in the pores. Therefore, their effective thermal conductivity depends on thermal conductivities of the involved phases. Due to the time-consuming experimental determination of the effective thermal conductivity, its calculation by means of homogenization techniques presents a reasonable alternative. In the homogenization theory, both volumetric content and particular property of each phase need to be identified. For porous materials the most problematic part is to accurately identify thermal conductivity of the solid matrix. Due to the complex composition of silicate materials, the thermal conductivity of the matrix can be determined only approximately, based on the knowledge of thermal conductivities of its major compounds. In this paper, the thermal conductivity of silicate matrix is determined using the measurement of a sufficiently large set of experimental data. Cement pastes with different open porosities are prepared, dried, and their effective thermal conductivity is determined using a transient heat-pulse method. The thermal conductivity of the matrix is calculated by means of extrapolation of the effective thermal conductivity versus porosity functions to zero porosity. Its practical applicability is demonstrated by calculating the effective thermal conductivity of a three-phase silicate material and comparing it with experimental data.

  9. Effect of heat treatment temperature on binder thermal conductivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.

    1975-12-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the thermal conductivities of a pitch and a polyfurfuryl alcohol binder residue was investigated. Graphites specially prepared with these two binders were used for the experiments. Measured thermal conductivities were treated in terms of a two-component system, and the binder thermal conductivities were calculated. Both binder residues showed increased thermal conductivity with increased heat treatment temperature

  10. Synthesis and thermal conductivity of type II silicon clathrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekman, M.; Nolas, G. S.

    2006-08-01

    We have synthesized and characterized polycrystalline Na 1Si 136 and Na 8Si 136, compounds possessing the type II clathrate hydrate crystal structure. Resistivity measurements from 10 to 300 K indicate very large resistivities in this temperature range, with activated temperature dependences indicative of relatively large band gap semiconductors. The thermal conductivity is very low; two orders-of-magnitude lower than that of diamond-structure silicon at room temperature. The thermal conductivity of Na 8Si 136 displays a temperature dependence that is atypical of crystalline solids and more indicative of amorphous materials. This work is part of a continuing effort to explore the many different compositions and structure types of clathrates, a class of materials that continues to be of interest for scientific and technological applications.

  11. Numerical Investigation of the Thermal Conductivity of Graphite Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakak Khadem, Masoud

    The thermal conductivity of graphite nano-fibers (GNFs) with different styles is predicted computationally. GNFs are formed as basal planes of graphene stacked based on the catalytic configuration. The large GNF thermal conductivity relative to a base phase change material (PCM) may lead to improved PCM performance when embedded with GNFs. Three different types of GNFs are modeled: platelet, ribbon, and herringbone. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used in this study as a means to predict the thermal conductivity tensor based on atomic behavior. The in-house MD code, Molecular Dynamics in Arbitrary Geometries (MDAG), was updated with the features required to create the predictions. To model both interlayer van-der Waals and intralayer covalent bonding of carbon atoms in GNFs, a combination of the optimized Tersoff potential function for atoms within the layers and a pairwise Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential function to model the interactions between the layers was used. Tests of energy conservation in the NVE ensemble have been performed to validate the employed potential model. Nose-Hoover, Andersen, and Berendsen thermostats were also incorporated into MDAG to enable MD simulations in NVT ensembles, where the volume, number of atoms, and temperature of the system are conserved. Equilibrium MD with Green-Kubo (GK) relations was then employed to extract the thermal conductivity tensor for symmetric GNFs (platelet and ribbon). The thermal conductivity of solid argon at different temperatures was calculated and compared to other studies to validate the GK implementation. Different heat current formulations, as a result of using the three-body Tersoff potential, were considered and the discrepancy in the calculated thermal conductivity values of graphene using each formula was resolved by employing a novel comparative technique that identifies the most accurate formulation. The effect of stacking configuration on the thermal conductivity of platelet and ribbon GNFs

  12. Radiative shocks with electron thermal conduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz.

    1988-01-01

    The authors studies the influence of electron thermal conduction on radiative shock structure for both one- and two-temperature plasmas. The dimensionless ratio of the conductive length to the cooling length determines whether or not conduction is important, and shock jump conditions with conduction are established for a collisionless shock front. He obtains approximate solutions with the assumptions that the ionization state of the gas is constant and the cooling rate is a function of temperature alone. In the absence of magnetic fields, these solutions indicate that conduction noticeably influences normal-abundance interstellar shocks with velocities 50-100 km s -1 and dramatically affects metal-dominated shocks over a wide range of shock velocities. Magnetic fields inhibit conduction, but the conductive energy flux and the corresponding decrease in the post-shock electron temperature may still be appreciable. He calculates detailed steady-state radiative shock models in gas composed entirely of oxygen, with the purpose of explaining observations of fast-moving knots in Cas A and other oxygen-rich supernova remnants (SNRs). The O III ion, whose forbidden emission usually dominates the observed spectra, is present over a wide range of shock velocities, from 100 to 170 kms -1 . All models with conduction have extensive warm photoionization zones, which provides better agreement with observed optical (O I) line strengths. However, the temperatures in these zones could be lowered by (Si II) 34.8 μm and (Ne II) 12.8 μm cooling if Si and Ne are present in appreciable abundance relative to O. Such low temperatures would be inconsistent with the observed (O I) emission in oxygen-rich SNRs

  13. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1990-03-01

    The GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel shipping casks employ a solid neutron shielding material. During a hypothetical thermal accident, any combustion of the neutron shield must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. A two-phase thermal testing program was carried out to assist in selecting satisfactory shielding materials. In the first phase, small-scale screening tests were performed on nine candidate materials using ASTM procedures. From these initial results, three of the nine candidates were chosen for inclusion in the second phase of testing, These materials were Bisco Products NS-4-FR, Reactor Experiments 201-1, and Reactor Experiments 207. In the second phase, each selected material was fabricated into a test article which simulated a full-scale of neutron shield from the cask. The test article was heated in an environmental prescribed by NRC regulations. Results of this second testing phase showed that all three materials are thermally acceptable

  14. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    The GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel shipping casks employ a solid neutron shielding material. During a hypothetical thermal accident, any combustion of the neutron shield must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. A two-phase thermal testing program was carried out to assist in selecting satisfactory shielding materials. In the first phase, small-scale screening tests were performed on nine candidate materials using ASTM procedures. From these initial results, three of the nine candidates were chosen for inclusion in the second phase of testing. These materials were Bisco Products NS-4-FR, Reactor Experiments 201-1, and Reactor Experiments 207. In the second phase, each selected material was fabricated into a test article which simulated a full-scale section of neutron shield from the cask. The test article was heated in an environment prescribed by NRC regulations. Results of this second testing phase show that all three materials are thermally acceptable

  15. Multifunctional Lattices with Low Thermal Expansion and Low Thermal Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hang; Liu, Lu; Pasini, Damiano

    Systems in space are vulnerable to large temperature changes when travelling into and out of the Earth's shadow. Variations in temperature can lead to undesired geometric changes in susceptible applications requiring very fine precision. In addition, temperature-sensitive electronic equipment hosted in a satellite needs adequate thermal-control to guarantee a moderate ambient temperature. To address these specifications, materials with low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and low coefficient of thermal conductivity (CTC) over a wide range of temperatures are often sought, especially for bearing components in satellites. Besides low CTE and low CTC, these materials should also provide desirable stiffness, strength and extraordinarily low mass. This work presents ultralightweight bi-material lattices with tunable CTE and CTC, besides high stiffness and strength. We show that the compensation of the thermal expansion and joint rotation at the lattice joints can be used as an effective strategy to tailor thermomechanical performance. Proof-of-concept lattices are fabricated from Al and Ti alloy sheets via a simple snap-fit technique and vacuum brazing, and their CTE and CTC are assessed via a combination of experiments and theory. Corresponding Author.

  16. 15th International Conference on Thermal Conductivity

    CERN Document Server

    1978-01-01

    Once again, it gives me a great pleasure to pen the Foreword to the Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Thermal Conductivity. As in the past, these now biannual conferences pro­ vide a broadly based forum for those researchers actively working on this important property of matter to convene on a regular basis to exchange their experiences and report their findings. As it is apparent from the Table of Contents, the 15th Conference represents perhaps the broadest coverage of subject areas to date. This is indicative of the times as the boundaries between disciplines be­ come increasingly diffused. I am sure the time has come when Con­ ference Chairmen in coming years will be soliciting contributions not only in the physical sciences and engineering', but will actively seek contributions from the earth sciences and life sciences as well. Indeed, the thermal conductivity and related properties of geological and biological materials are becoming of increasing im­ portance to our way of life. As...

  17. LBM estimation of thermal conductivity in meso-scale modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grucelski, A

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there is a growing engineering interest in more rigorous prediction of effective transport coefficients for multicomponent, geometrically complex materials. We present main assumptions and constituents of the meso-scale model for the simulation of the coal or biomass devolatilisation with the Lattice Boltzmann method. For the results, the estimated values of the thermal conductivity coefficient of coal (solids), pyrolytic gases and air matrix are presented for a non-steady state with account for chemical reactions in fluid flow and heat transfer. (paper)

  18. Room-Temperature Voltage Tunable Phonon Thermal Conductivity via Reconfigurable Interfaces in Ferroelectric Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihlefeld, Jon F. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Foley, Brian M. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Scrymgeour, David A. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Michael, Joseph R. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); McKenzie, Bonnie B. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Medlin, Douglas L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA; Wallace, Margeaux [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Hopkins, Patrick E. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    2015-02-19

    Dynamic control of thermal transport in solid-state systems is a transformative capability with the promise to propel technologies including phononic logic, thermal management, and energy harvesting. A solid-state solution to rapidly manipulate phonons has escaped the scientific community. Here, we demonstrate active and reversible tuning of thermal conductivity by manipulating the nanoscale ferroelastic domain structure of a Pb(Zr0.3Ti0.7)O3 film with applied electric fields. With subsecond response times, the room-temperature thermal conductivity was modulated by 11%.

  19. Room-temperature voltage tunable phonon thermal conductivity via reconfigurable interfaces in ferroelectric thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihlefeld, Jon F; Foley, Brian M; Scrymgeour, David A; Michael, Joseph R; McKenzie, Bonnie B; Medlin, Douglas L; Wallace, Margeaux; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Hopkins, Patrick E

    2015-03-11

    Dynamic control of thermal transport in solid-state systems is a transformative capability with the promise to propel technologies including phononic logic, thermal management, and energy harvesting. A solid-state solution to rapidly manipulate phonons has escaped the scientific community. We demonstrate active and reversible tuning of thermal conductivity by manipulating the nanoscale ferroelastic domain structure of a Pb(Zr0.3Ti0.7)O3 film with applied electric fields. With subsecond response times, the room-temperature thermal conductivity was modulated by 11%.

  20. Hot filament technique for measuring the thermal conductivity of molten lithium fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Perry, William D.

    1990-01-01

    Molten salts, such as lithium fluoride, are attractive candidates for thermal energy storage in solar dynamic space power systems because of their high latent heat of fusion. However, these same salts have poor thermal conductivities which inhibit the transfer of heat into the solid phase and out of the liquid phase. One concept for improving the thermal conductivity of the thermal energy storage system is to add a conductive filler material to the molten salt. High thermal conductivity pitch-based graphite fibers are being considered for this application. Although there is some information available on the thermal conductivity of lithium fluoride solid, there is very little information on lithium fluoride liquid, and no information on molten salt graphite fiber composites. This paper describes a hot filament technique for determining the thermal conductivity of molten salts. The hot filament technique was used to find the thermal conductivity of molten lithium fluoride at 930 C, and the thermal conductivity values ranged from 1.2 to 1.6 W/mK. These values are comparable to the slightly larger value of 5.0 W/mK for lithium fluoride solid. In addition, two molten salt graphite fiber composites were characterized with the hot filament technique and these results are also presented.

  1. Design Considerations of a Solid State Thermal Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janbozorgi, Mohammad; Houssainy, Sammy; Thacker, Ariana; Ip, Peggy; Ismail, Walid; Kavehpour, Pirouz

    2016-11-01

    With the growing governmental restrictions on carbon emission, renewable energies are becoming more prevalent. A reliable use of a renewable source however requires a built-in storage to overcome the inherent intermittent nature of the available energy. Thermal design of a solid state energy storage has been investigated for optimal performance. The impact of flow regime, laminar vs. turbulent, on the design and sizing of the system is also studied. The implications of low thermal conductivity of the storage material are discussed and a design that maximizes the round trip efficiency is presented. This study was supported by Award No. EPC-14-027 Granted by California Energy Commission (CEC).

  2. Numerical Investigation of Characteristic of Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity of Natural Fiber Bundle with Numbered Lumens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Yu Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural fiber bundle like hemp fiber bundle usually includes many small lumens embedded in solid region; thus, it can present lower thermal conduction than that of conventional fibers. In the paper, characteristic of anisotropic transverse thermal conductivity of unidirectional natural hemp fiber bundle was numerically studied to determine the dependence of overall thermal property of the fiber bundle on that of the solid region phase. In order to efficiently predict its thermal property, the fiber bundle was embedded into an imaginary matrix to form a unit composite cell consisting of the matrix and the fiber bundle. Equally, another unit composite cell including an equivalent solid fiber was established to present the homogenization of the fiber bundle. Next, finite element thermal analysis implemented by ABAQUS was conducted in the two established composite cells by applying proper thermal boundary conditions along the boundary of unit cell, and influences of the solid region phase and the equivalent solid fiber on the composites were investigated, respectively. Subsequently, an optional relationship of thermal conductivities of the natural fiber bundle and the solid region was obtained by curve fitting technique. Finally, numerical results from the obtained fitted curves were compared with the analytic Hasselman-Johnson’s results and others to verify the present numerical model.

  3. Solidification behavior and thermal conductivity of bulk sodium acetate trihydrate composites with thickening agents and graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dannemand, Mark; Johansen, Jakob Berg; Furbo, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Sodium acetate trihydrate is a promising phase change material for long term storage of solar thermal energy if supercooling is actively utilized. Well performing thermal energy storages need to be able to charge and discharge energy at a high rate. The relatively low thermal conductivity....... Investigations of the solidification behavior, the formation of cavities and thermal conductivity of composites based on sodium acetate trihydrate crystalizing with or without supercooling are presented in this paper. The thermal conductivity was measured with an ISOMET hot disc surface measurement probe....... Samples that crystalized without supercooling tended to form solid crystals near the heat transfer surface and cavities away from the heat transfer surface. The measured thermal conductivity was up to 0.7 W/m K in solid sodium acetate trihydrate. Samples that crystalized from supercooled state formed...

  4. Thermal conductivity at different humidity conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Finn Harken; Rode, Carsten

    1999-01-01

    by an accumulation of moisture as condensation in the parts of the insulation that lie immediately close to the cold side of the apparatus. The high l-values found are therefore of no practical importance in structures where no condensation occurs. Disregarding these condensation situations, the maximum increase...... humidified air can pass. Thus, it is possible to build up different degrees of moisture on each side of the test specimen.The thermal conductivity is determined for the following types of alternative insulation: sheep's wool, flax, paper insulation, perlite and mineral wool. The insulation products were...... Ekofiber Vind, Herawool (without support fibres), Heraflax, Isodan with and without salts, Miljø Isolering with and without salts, Perlite (water-repellent), and Rockwool A-batts for comparison.All measurements of the materials started with no affection of moisture. Nevertheless, results were achieved...

  5. Lattice thermal conductivity of LaSe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wei, E-mail: tolwwt@163.com [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, 510006 Guangzhou (China); Pan, Zhong-liang; Chen, Jun-fang; He, Qin-yu [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, 510006 Guangzhou (China); Wang, Teng [School of Computer, South China Normal University, 510631 Guangzhou (China)

    2015-07-15

    The phonon dispersions and phonon density of states of LaSe are obtained, based on density functional perturbation theory and the norm-conserving pseudo-potential method. An anomaly in calculated phonon dispersion curves is presented and interpreted as a Kohn anomaly. The heat capacity of LaSe is calculated then. For the three-phonon process scattering, the lowest non-harmonic cubic terms of the interatomic potential are considered to obtain single-phonon relaxation rate by applying the Fermi's golden rule. For the boundary scattering, the average phonon relaxation time was obtained. Considering two kinds of phonon scattering mechanisms, we obtain the lattice thermal conductivity of LaSe.

  6. Thermal conductivity of thoria-urania SIMFUEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhagat, R.K.; Kutty, T.R.G.; Kumar, Arun; Kulkarni, R.V.; Kamath, H.S.

    2011-01-01

    In India, there has been sustained interest in thorium fuels and fuel cycles because of large deposits of thorium as compared to very modest reserves uranium. An Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) has been designed in BARC for the timely development of thorium-based technologies for the entire thorium fuel cycle. The average composition of the proposed fuel for AHWR is ThO 2 -3.45% 233 UO 2 . Thermal conductivity of the fuel is required in computer codes for modeling the fuel performance and is one of the important parameters which determine the maximum allowable power rating of the reactor fuel. In order to evaluate the safety and predict the performance of the fuel, it is important to understand the effect of fission products on thermophysical properties of the fuel under irradiation. Due to a very limited PIE data available in literature, measurement of these properties on simulated high burn-up nuclear fuels (SIMFUEL) was carried out

  7. Thermal Conductivity of Nanotubes: Effects of Chirality and Isotope Impurity

    OpenAIRE

    Gang, Zhang; Li, Baowen

    2005-01-01

    We study the dependence of thermal conductivity of single walled nanotubes (SWNT) on chirality and isotope impurity by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method with accurate potentials. It is found that, contrary to electronic conductivity, the thermal conductivity is insensitive to the chirality. The isotope impurity, however, can reduce the thermal conductivity up to 60% and change the temperature dependence behavior. We also study the dependence of thermal conductivity on tube length for t...

  8. Magnetomechanical coupling in thermal amorphous solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschel, H. George E.; Ilyin, Valery; Mondal, Chandana; Procaccia, Itamar

    2018-05-01

    Standard approaches to magnetomechanical interactions in thermal magnetic crystalline solids involve Landau functionals in which the lattice anisotropy and the resulting magnetization easy axes are taken explicitly into account. In glassy systems one needs to develop a theory in which the amorphous structure precludes the existence of an easy axis, and in which the constituent particles are free to respond to their local amorphous surroundings and the resulting forces. We present a theory of all the mixed responses of an amorphous solid to mechanical strains and magnetic fields. Atomistic models are proposed in which we test the predictions of magnetostriction for both bulk and nanofilm amorphous samples in the paramagnetic phase. The application to nanofilms with emergent self-affine free interfaces requires a careful definition of the film "width" and its change due to the magnetostriction effect.

  9. Thermal conductivity in high critical temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castello, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    A measuring procedure to obtain the electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and thermoelectric power of samples of low conductivity has been developed. The setup was designed to allow the removal of the sample in clean fashion, so that further heat treatments could be performed, and therefore no adhesives were used in the mounting of the thermocouples or heat sinks, etc. The heat equation has been analyzed with time-dependent boundary conditions, with the purpose of developing a dynamic measuring method which avoids the long delays involved in reaching thermal equilibrium above 30K. Based on this analysis, the developed measuring method allows a precise and reliable measurements, in a continuous fashion, for temperatures above 25K. The same setup is used in a stationary mode at low temperatures, so the sample needs to be mounted only once. κ(T) has been measured in two ceramic samples of La 2 CuO 4 : the first semiconducting, the other superconducting (SC) as a consequence of an oxygen annealing. Both exhibit a strong thermal resistivity due to defects, though lower in the SC, where two maxima are observed and are attributed to an AF ordering: T N ' ≅ 40K and T N '' ≅ 240K. The low temperature dependence is T 1 .6 and T 2 .3 respectively. It was interpreted that the former sample presents a greater dispersion due to localized excitations, characteristic of amorphouus materials, 'tunneling two-level systems' (TS). A third syntherized sample of CuO exhibits a typical behaviour of an insulator, with T 2 .6 at low temperatures, a maximum at 40K and a decrease in T -1 at high temperatures. κ(T) in a SC sample of La 1 .85Sr 1 .15CuO 4 with T c =35.5K has also been measured, observing a small increase below T c because of the diminishing of the phonon dispersion due to the condensating electrons. κ(T) is lower than in the previous samples and thus a greater number of defects was inferred. At low temperatures, its dependence is T 1 .4 in agreement with the

  10. Method for Measuring Thermal Conductivity of Small Samples Having Very Low Thermal Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria a.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a hot plate method capable of using air as a standard reference material for the steady-state measurement of the thermal conductivity of very small test samples having thermal conductivity on the order of air. As with other approaches, care is taken to ensure that the heat flow through the test sample is essentially one-dimensional. However, unlike other approaches, no attempt is made to use heated guards to block the flow of heat from the hot plate to the surroundings. It is argued that since large correction factors must be applied to account for guard imperfections when sample dimensions are small, it may be preferable to simply measure and correct for the heat that flows from the heater disc to directions other than into the sample. Experimental measurements taken in a prototype apparatus, combined with extensive computational modeling of the heat transfer in the apparatus, show that sufficiently accurate measurements can be obtained to allow determination of the thermal conductivity of low thermal conductivity materials. Suggestions are made for further improvements in the method based on results from regression analyses of the generated data.

  11. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-A19897, R.H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280degF. Table 1 lists the neutron shield materials tested. The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found. The Bisco modified NS-4 and Reactor Experiments HMPP are both acceptable materials from a thermal accident standpoint for use in the shipping cask. Tests of the Kobe PP-R01 and Envirotech HDPE were stopped for safety reasons, due to inability to deal with the heavy smoke, before completion of the 30-minute heating phase. However these materials may prove satisfactory if they could undergo the complete heating. (J.P.N.)

  12. Equivalent thermal conductivity of the storage basket with spent nuclear fuel of VVER-1000 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alyokhina, Svitlana; Kostikov, Andriy

    2014-01-01

    Due to limitation of computation resources and/or computation time many thermal problems require to use simplified geometrical models with equivalent thermal properties. A new method for definition of equivalent thermal conductivity of spent nuclear fuel storage casks is proposed. It is based on solving the inverse heat conduction problem. For the proposed method two approaches for equivalent thermal conductivity definition were considered. In the first approach a simplified model in conjugate formulation is used, in the second approach a simplified model of solid body which allows an analytical solution is used. For safety ensuring during all time of spent nuclear fuel storage the equivalent thermal conductivity was calculated for different storage years. The calculated equivalent thermal conductivities can be used in thermal researches for dry spent nuclear fuel storage safety.

  13. Lattice thermal conductivity in layered BiCuSeO

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, S.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    structure of the phonon dispersion. For example, at room temperature the optical phonons account for an enormous 42% of the lattice thermal conductivity. We also quantify the anisotropy of the lattice thermal conductivity and determine the distribution

  14. On non-extensive nature of thermal conductivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper we study non-extensive nature of thermal conductivity. It is observed that there is similarity between non-extensive entropic index and fractal dimension obtained for the silica aerogel thermal conductivity data at low temperature.

  15. Thermal conductivity of oriented polymer films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nysten, B.; Gonry, P.; Issi, J.P.; Govaert, L.E.; Lemstra, P.J.; Tong, T.W.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of stretching on the thermal cond. of polyethylene (PE) films is presented and compared to results obtained previously for oriented polyacetylene films and PE fibers. As expected, the longitudinal thermal cond. increases with the stretching level and thermal cond. values comparable to

  16. Electrical conduction in solid materials physicochemical bases and possible applications

    CERN Document Server

    Suchet, J P

    2013-01-01

    Electrical Conduction in Solid Materials (Physicochemical Bases and Possible Applications) investigates the physicochemical bases and possible applications of electrical conduction in solid materials, with emphasis on conductors, semiconductors, and insulators. Topics range from the interatomic bonds of conductors to the effective atomic charge in conventional semiconductors and magnetic transitions in switching semiconductors. Comprised of 10 chapters, this volume begins with a description of electrical conduction in conductors and semiconductors, metals and alloys, as well as interatomic bon

  17. Measurement of Thermal Radiation Properties of Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, J. C. (Editor)

    1963-01-01

    The overall objectives of the Symposium were to afford (1) an opportunity for workers in the field to describe the equipment and procedures currently in use for measuring thermal radiation properties of solids, (2) an opportunity for constructive criticism of the material presented, and (3) an open forum for discussion of mutual problems. It was also the hope of the sponsors that the published proceedings of the Symposium would serve as a valuable reference on measurement techniques for evaluating thermal radiation properties of solids, partic.ularly for those with limited experience in the field. Because of the strong dependence of emitted flux upon temperature, the program committee thought it advisable to devote the first session to a discussion of the problems of temperature measurement. All of the papers in Session I were presented at the request of and upon topics suggested by the Committee. Because of time and space limitations, it, was impossible to consider all temperature measurement problems that might arise--the objective was rather to call to the attention of the reader some of the problems that might be encountered, and to provide references that might provide solutions.

  18. Importance of layer thermal conductivity on the sharpness of patterns produced by laser interference

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peláez, R.J.; Afonso, C.N.; Škereň, M.; Bulíř, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 374, Jun (2016), s. 61-64 ISSN 0169-4332 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : dewetting * laser interference * metal layers * nanoparticles * thermal conductivity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.387, year: 2016

  19. Solid state phase change materials for thermal energy storage in passive solar heated buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D. K.; Christensen, C.

    1983-11-01

    A set of solid state phase change materials was evaluated for possible use in passive solar thermal energy storage systems. The most promising materials are organic solid solutions of pentaerythritol, pentaglycerine and neopentyl glycol. Solid solution mixtures of these compounds can be tailored so that they exhibit solid-to-solid phase transformations at any desired temperature within the range from less than 25 deg to 188 deg. Thermophysical properties such as thermal conductivity, density and volumetric expansion were measured. Computer simulations were used to predict the performance of various Trombe wall designs incorporating solid state phase change materials. Optimum performance was found to be sensitive to the choice of phase change temperatures and to the thermal conductivity of the phase change material. A molecular mechanism of the solid state phase transition is proposed and supported by infrared spectroscopic evidence.

  20. Thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube cross-bar structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, William J; Keblinski, Pawel

    2010-01-01

    We use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) to compute the thermal conductivity (κ) of orthogonally ordered cross-bar structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes. Such structures exhibit extremely low thermal conductivity in the range of 0.02-0.07 W m -1 K -1 . These values are five orders of magnitude smaller than the axial thermal conductivity of individual carbon nanotubes, and are comparable to the thermal conductivity of still air.

  1. Mean free path dependent phonon contributions to interfacial thermal conductance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Yi; Liu, Chenhan; Chen, Weiyu; Cai, Shuang; Chen, Chen; Wei, Zhiyong; Bi, Kedong; Yang, Juekuan; Chen, Yunfei, E-mail: yunfeichen@seu.edu.cn

    2017-06-15

    Interfacial thermal conductance as an accumulation function of the phonon mean free path is rigorously derived from the thermal conductivity accumulation function. Based on our theoretical model, the interfacial thermal conductance accumulation function between Si/Ge is calculated. The results show that the range of mean free paths (MFPs) for phonons contributing to the interfacial thermal conductance is far narrower than that for phonons contributing to the thermal conductivity. The interfacial thermal conductance is mainly contributed by phonons with shorter MFPs, and the size effects can be observed only for an interface constructed by nanostructures with film thicknesses smaller than the MFPs of those phonons mainly contributing to the interfacial thermal conductance. This is why most experimental measurements cannot detect size effects on interfacial thermal conductance. A molecular dynamics simulation is employed to verify our proposed model. - Highlights: • A model to account for the interfacial thermal conductance as an accumulation function of phonon mean free path is proposed; • The model predicts that the range of mean free paths (MFPs) for phonons contributing to the interfacial thermal conductance is far narrower than that contributing to the thermal conductivity; • This model can be conveniently implemented to estimate the size effects on the interfacial thermal conductance for the interfaces formed by a nanostructure contacting a substrate.

  2. Chemical Passivation of Li(exp +)-Conducting Solid Electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, William; Whitacre, Jay; Lim, James

    2008-01-01

    Plates of a solid electrolyte that exhibits high conductivity for positive lithium ions can now be passivated to prevent them from reacting with metallic lithium. Such passivation could enable the construction and operation of high-performance, long-life lithium-based rechargeable electrochemical cells containing metallic lithium anodes. The advantage of this approach, in comparison with a possible alternative approach utilizing lithium-ion graphitic anodes, is that metallic lithium anodes could afford significantly greater energy-storage densities. A major impediment to the development of such cells has been the fact that the available solid electrolytes having the requisite high Li(exp +)-ion conductivity are too highly chemically reactive with metallic lithium to be useful, while those solid electrolytes that do not react excessively with metallic lithium have conductivities too low to be useful. The present passivation method exploits the best features of both extremes of the solid-electrolyte spectrum. The basic idea is to coat a higher-conductivity, higher-reactivity solid electrolyte with a lower-conductivity, lower-reactivity solid electrolyte. One can then safely deposit metallic lithium in contact with the lower-reactivity solid electrolyte without incurring the undesired chemical reactions. The thickness of the lower-reactivity electrolyte must be great enough to afford the desired passivation but not so great as to contribute excessively to the electrical resistance of the cell. The feasibility of this method was demonstrated in experiments on plates of a commercial high-performance solid Li(exp +)- conducting electrolyte. Lithium phosphorous oxynitride (LiPON) was the solid electrolyte used for passivation. LiPON-coated solid-electrolyte plates were found to support electrochemical plating and stripping of Li metal. The electrical resistance contributed by the LiPON layers were found to be small relative to overall cell impedances.

  3. Electrochemical and Thermal Studies of Prepared Conducting Chitosan Biopolymer Film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hlaing Hlaing Oo; Kyaw Naing; Kyaw Myo Naing; Tin Tin Aye; Nyunt Wynn

    2005-09-01

    In this paper, chitosan based conducting bipolymer films were prepared by casting and solvent evaporating technique. All prepared chitosan films were of pale yellow colour, transparent, and smooth. Sulphuric acid was chosen as the cross-linking agent. It enhanced conduction pathway in cross-linked chitosan films. Mechanical properties, solid-state, and thermal behavior of prepared chitosan fimls were studied by means of a material testing machine, powder X-ray diffractometry (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TG-DTG), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). By the XRD diffraction pattern, high molecular weight of chitosan product indicates the semi-crystalline nature, but the prepared chitosan film and doped chitosan film indicate significantly lower in crystallinity prove which of the amorphous characteristics. In addition, DSC thermogram of pure chitosan film exhibited exothermic peak around at 300 C, indicating polymer decomposition of chitosan molecules in chitosan films. Furthermore, these DSC thermograms clearly showed that while pure chitosan film display exothermal decomposition, the doped chitosan films mainly endothermic characteristics. The ionic conductivity of doped chitosan films were in the order of 10 to 10 S cm , which is in the range of semi-conductor. These results showed that cross-linked chitoson films may be used as polymer electrolyte film to fabricate solid state electrochemical cells

  4. Review on mathematical basis for thermal conduction equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, D. G.; Kim, H. M

    2007-10-15

    In the view point of thermal conductivity measurement technology, It is very useful to understand mathematical theory of thermal conduction equation in order to evaluation of measurement data and to solve diverse technical problem in measurement. To approach this mathematical theory, thermal conduction equation is derived by Fourier thermal conduction law. Since thermal conduction equation depends on the Lapacian operator basically, mathematical meaning of Lapalacian and various diffusion equation including Laplacian have been studied. Stum-Liouville problem and Bessel function were studied in this report to understand analytical solution of various diffusion equation.

  5. Review on mathematical basis for thermal conduction equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, D. G.; Kim, H. M.

    2007-10-01

    In the view point of thermal conductivity measurement technology, It is very useful to understand mathematical theory of thermal conduction equation in order to evaluation of measurement data and to solve diverse technical problem in measurement. To approach this mathematical theory, thermal conduction equation is derived by Fourier thermal conduction law. Since thermal conduction equation depends on the Lapacian operator basically, mathematical meaning of Lapalacian and various diffusion equation including Laplacian have been studied. Stum-Liouville problem and Bessel function were studied in this report to understand analytical solution of various diffusion equation

  6. Reduction in thermal conductivity of ceramics due to radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemens, P.G.; Hurley, G.F.; Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a number of applications in fusion reactors. In several of these applications, the thermal conductivity is an important design parameter as it affects the level of temperature and thermal stress in service. Ceramic insulators are known to suffer substantial reduction in thermal conductivity due to neutron irradiation damage. The present study estimates the reduction in thermal conductivity at high temperature due to radiation induced defects. Point, extended, and extended partly transparent defects are considered

  7. About thermal properties of TIIn1-xNdxS2 (0≤X≤0.10) solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarbaliev, M.M.; Agaeva, U.M.; Sardarova, N.S.

    2013-01-01

    This report is devoted to investigation of thermal expansion and thermal conductivity of TIIn 1 -xNd x S 2 (0≤X≤0.10) solid solutions, depending on the concentration and temperature at 80-450 K. The measurements were carried out on the thermal expansion of polycrystalline, and the thermal conductivity of single-crystal samples

  8. Determination of thermal conductivity of magnesium-alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    An indirect method, Angstroms method was adopted and an instrument was designed to determine the thermal conductivity of magnesium metal and alloys. Angstroms method is an axial periodic heat flow technique by which the thermal diffusivity can be measured directly. Then thermal conductivity can be obtained with relation to thermal diffusivity. Compared with the recommended data from the literature the fitted values of the thermal diffiusivity correspond with 3%, and the credible probability of the thermal conductivity in the range of 0-450 ℃ is about 95%. The method is applicable in the given temperature range.

  9. Simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity and heat capacity by flash thermal imaging methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, N.; Li, X. L.; Sun, J. G.

    2017-06-01

    Thermal properties are important for material applications involved with temperature. Although many measurement methods are available, they may not be convenient to use or have not been demonstrated suitable for testing of a wide range of materials. To address this issue, we developed a new method for the nondestructive measurement of the thermal effusivity of bulk materials with uniform property. This method is based on the pulsed thermal imaging-multilayer analysis (PTI-MLA) method that has been commonly used for testing of coating materials. Because the test sample for PTI-MLA has to be in a two-layer configuration, we have found a commonly used commercial tape to construct such test samples with the tape as the first-layer material and the bulk material as the substrate. This method was evaluated for testing of six selected solid materials with a wide range of thermal properties covering most engineering materials. To determine both thermal conductivity and heat capacity, we also measured the thermal diffusivity of these six materials by the well-established flash method using the same experimental instruments with a different system setup. This paper provides a description of these methods, presents detailed experimental tests and data analyses, and discusses measurement results and their comparison with literature values.

  10. Thermal diffusivity of samarium-gadolinium zirconate solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, W.; Wan, C.L.; Xu, Q.; Wang, J.D.; Qu, Z.X.

    2007-01-01

    We synthesized samarium-gadolinium zirconate solid solutions and determined their thermal diffusivities, Young's moduli and thermal expansion coefficients, which are very important for their application in thermal barrier coatings. Samarium-gadolinium zirconate solid solutions have extremely low thermal diffusivity between 20 and 600 deg. C. The solid solutions have lower Young's moduli and higher thermal expansion coefficients than those of pure samarium and gadolinium zirconates. This combination of characteristics is promising for the application of samarium and gadolinium zirconates in gas turbines. The mechanism of phonon scattering by point defects is discussed

  11. Thermal Properties of Asphalt Mixtures Modified with Conductive Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byong Chol Bai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the thermal properties of asphalt mixtures modified with conductive fillers used for snow melting and solar harvesting pavements. Two different mixing processes were adopted to mold asphalt mixtures, dry- and wet-mixing, and two conductive fillers were used in this study, graphite and carbon black. The thermal conductivity was compared to investigate the effects of asphalt mixture preparing methods, the quantity, and the distribution of conductive filler on thermal properties. The combination of conductive filler with carbon fiber in asphalt mixture was evaluated. Also, rheological properties of modified asphalt binders with conductive fillers were measured using dynamic shear rheometer and bending beam rheometer at grade-specific temperatures. Based on rheological testing, the conductive fillers improve rutting resistance and decrease thermal cracking resistance. Thermal testing indicated that graphite and carbon black improve the thermal properties of asphalt mixes and the combined conductive fillers are more effective than the single filler.

  12. Experimental study of effective thermal conductivity of stainless steel fiber felt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, W.Q.; Qu, Z.G.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental apparatus was designed to measure the effective thermal conductivity of porous stainless steel fiber felt under different operating pressures. The total effective thermal conductivity was studied by analyzing matrix heat conduction, air natural convection, and matrix thermal radiation at ambient pressure. The contribution of air natural convection was experimentally obtained by changing the ambient pressure to vacuum condition and the solid matrix heat conduction was evaluated using a theoretical model. The ratios of the three mechanisms to the total effective thermal conductivity were approximately 40%, 37.9%, and 22.1%, respectively. In addition, the effects of fiber diameter and porosity on the three mechanisms and on the total effective thermal conductivity were studied. The air natural convection was found to gradually intensify when the operating pressure increases from vacuum condition (15 Pa) to ambient pressure (1.0 × 10 5  Pa). With an increase in fiber diameter under fixed porosity, the solid matrix heat conduction remained unchanged, and air natural convection and thermal radiation decreased, thereby resulting in reduced effective thermal conductivity. With an increase in porosity under fixed fiber diameter, the air natural convection was almost unchanged, and solid matrix heat conduction and thermal radiation were reduced, thereby resulting in reduced effective thermal conductivity. - Highlights: • Matrix conduction, radiation and air convection were in the same order of magnitude. • Air natural convection was suppressed by reducing operating pressure. • Intensity of air convection was more sensitive to fiber diameter than porosity. • Surface area and permeability was comparable in air convection as fiber diameter fixed. • Interfacial area exerted dominant role in radiation and air convection as porosity fixed

  13. Thermal conductance of heat transfer interfaces for conductively cooled superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, T.L.; Walters, J.D.; Fikse, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    Minimizing thermal resistances across interfaces is critical for efficient thermal performance of conductively cooled superconducting magnet systems. Thermal conductance measurements have been made for a flexible thermal coupling, designed to accommodate magnet-to-cryocooler and cryocooler-to-shield relative motion, and an interface incorporating Multilam designed as a sliding thermal connector for cryocoolers. Temperature changes were measured across each interface as a function of heat input. Thermal conductances have been calculated for each interface, and the impact of each interface on conductively cooled magnet systems will be discussed

  14. The Measurement of Thermal Conductivities of Silica and Carbon Black Powders at Different pressures by Thermal COnductivity Probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.G.Liang; X.S.Ge; 等

    1992-01-01

    This investigation was done to study the gas filled powder insulation and thermal conductivity probe for the measurent of thermal conductivity of powders.The mathematical analysis showed that the heat capacity of the probe itself and the thermal rsistance between the probe and powder must be considered .The authors developed a slender probe and measured the effective thermal conductivity of sillca and carbon black powders under a variety of conditions.

  15. Thermal conductivity of niobium single crystals in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladun, C.; Vinzelberg, H.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal conductivity in longitudinal magnetic fields up to 5 T and in the temperature range 3.5 to 15 K is measured in two high purity niobium single crystals having residual resistivity ratios of 22700 and 19200 and orientations of the rod axis [110] and [100]. The investigations show that by means of the longitudinal magnetic field the thermal conductivity may decrease only to a limiting value. In the crystal directions [110] and [100] for the ratio of the thermal conductivity in zero field and the thermal conductivity in the saturation field the temperature-independent factors 1.92 and 1.27, respectively, are determined. With the aid of these factors the thermal conductivity in the normal state is evaluated from the measured values of thermal conductivity below Tsub(c) in the magnetic field. The different conduction and scattering mechanisms are discussed. (author)

  16. An experimental correlation approach for predicting thermal conductivity of water-EG based nanofluids of zinc oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Nadooshan, Afshin

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the effects of temperature (20 °Cthermal conductivity of zinc oxide/ethylene glycol-water nanofluid have been presented. Nanofluid samples were prepared by a two-step method and thermal conductivity measurements were performed by a KD2 pro instrument. Results showed that the thermal conductivity increases uniformly with increasing solid volume fraction and temperature. The results also revealed that the thermal conductivity of nanofluids significantly increases with increasing solid volume fraction at higher temperatures. Moreover, it can be seen that for more concentrated samples, the effect of temperature was more tangible. Experimental thermal conductivity enhancement of the nanofluid in comparison with the Maxwell model indicated that Maxwell model was unable to predict the thermal conductivity of the present nanofluid. Therefore, a new correlation was presented for predicting the thermal conductivity of ZnO/EG-water nanofluid.

  17. Studies on Enhancing Transverse Thermal Conductivity Carbon/Carbon Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manocha, Lalit M; Manocha, Satish M; Roy, Ajit

    2007-01-01

    The structure derived potential properties of Graphite such as high stiffness coupled with high thermal conductivity and low coefficient of thermal expansion have been better achieved in Carbon fibers...

  18. The role of interfacial layers in the enhanced thermal conductivity of nanofluids: A renovated Hamilton-Crosser model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, W; Choi, S.U.S.

    2004-01-01

    We previously developed a renovated Maxwell model for the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids and determined that the solid/liquid interfacial layers play an important role in the enhanced thermal conductivity of nanofluids. However, this renovated Maxwell model is limited to suspensions with spherical particles. Here, we extend the Hamilton--Crosser model for suspensions of nonspherical particles to include the effect of a solid/liquid interface. The solid/liquid interface is described as a confocal ellipsoid with a solid particle. The new model for the three-phase suspensions is mathematically expressed in terms of the equivalent thermal conductivity and equivalent volume fraction of anisotropic complex ellipsoids, as well as an empirical shape factor. With a generalized empirical shape factor, the renovated Hamilton--Crosser model correctly predicts the magnitude of the thermal conductivity of nanotube-in-oil nanofluids. At present, this new model is not able to predict the nonlinear behavior of the nanofluid thermal conductivity

  19. Ion conduction in crystalline superionic solids and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Angesh

    2014-06-01

    Superionic solids an area of multidisciplinary research activity, incorporates to study the physical, chemical and technological aspects of rapid ion movements within the bulk of the special class of ionic materials. It is an emerging area of materials science, as these solids show tremendous technological scopes to develop wide variety of solid state electrochemical devices such as batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors, sensors, electrochromic displays (ECDs), memories, etc. These devices have wide range of applicabilities viz. power sources for IC microchips to transport vehicles, novel sensors for controlling atmospheric pollution, new kind of memories for computers, smart windows/display panels, etc. The field grew with a rapid pace since then, especially with regards to designing new materials as well as to explore their device potentialities. Amongst the known superionic solids, fast Ag+ ion conducting crystalline solid electrolytes are attracted special attention due to their relatively higher room temperature conductivity as well as ease of materials handling/synthesis. Ion conduction in these electrolytes is very much interesting part of today. In the present review article, the ion conducting phenomenon and some device applications of crystalline/polycrystalline superionic solid electrolytes have been reviewed in brief. Synthesis and characterization tools have also been discussed in the present review article.

  20. Thermal conductivity measurements in unsaturated hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Cha, Jong-Ho; Rosenbaum, Eilis J.; Zhang, Wu; Seol, Yongkoo

    2015-08-01

    Current database on the thermal properties of hydrate-bearing sediments remains limited and has not been able to capture their consequential changes during gas production where vigorous phase changes occur in this unsaturated system. This study uses the transient plane source (TPS) technique to measure the thermal conductivity of methane hydrate-bearing sediments with various hydrate/water/gas saturations. We propose a simplified method to obtain thermal properties from single-sided TPS signatures. Results reveal that both volume fraction and distribution of the pore constituents govern the thermal conductivity of unsaturated specimens. Thermal conductivity hysteresis is observed due to water redistribution and fabric change caused by hydrate formation and dissociation. Measured thermal conductivity increases evidently when hydrate saturation Sh > 30-40%, shifting upward from the geometric mean model prediction to a Pythagorean mixing model. These observations envisage a significant drop in sediment thermal conductivity when residual hydrate/water saturation falls below ~40%, hindering further gas production.

  1. Thermal conductivity of silicon nanocrystals and polystyrene nanocomposite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juangsa, Firman Bagja; Muroya, Yoshiki; Nozaki, Tomohiro; Ryu, Meguya; Morikawa, Junko

    2016-01-01

    Silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) are well known for their size-dependent optical and electronic properties; they also have the potential for low yet controllable thermal properties. As a silicon-based low-thermal conductivity material is required in microdevice applications, SiNCs can be utilized for thermal insulation. In this paper, SiNCs and polymer nanocomposites were produced, and their thermal conductivity, including the density and specific heat, was measured. Measurement results were compared with thermal conductivity models for composite materials, and the comparison shows a decreasing value of the thermal conductivity, indicating the effect of the size and presence of the nanostructure on the thermal conductivity. Moreover, employing silicon inks at room temperature during the fabrication process enables a low cost of fabrication and preserves the unique properties of SiNCs. (paper)

  2. Investigation of the Effective Thermal Conductivity in Containment Wall of OPR1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Hyung Gyun [Pohang University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hwi; Kang, Hie Chan [Kunsan National University, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Many computational codes used for analyzing pressure of containment was developed such as CAP (Containment Analysis Package). These computational codes consider concrete conductivity instead of thermal conductivity of containment wall which have special geometry as heat sink. For precise analysis, effective thermal conductivity of containment wall has to be measured in individual NPPs. Thermal properties of concrete such as thermal conductivity have been investigated as function of chemical composition and temperature. Generally, containment of OPR1000 is constructed by Prestressed (PS) concrete-a composite material. Containment wall of OPR1000 is made up of steel liner, tendon, rebar and concrete as shown in Figure 1. Role of steel liner protects release of radioactive materials so called leak tightness. The effective thermal conductivity of containment wall in OPR1000 is analyzed by numerical tool (CFD) and compared with thermal conductivity models in composite solids. The effective thermal conductivity of containment wall of OPR1000 is investigated by numerical analysis (CFD). The thermal conductivity of reinforced concrete is 18.6% higher than that of concrete only. Several models were compared with CFD results. Rayleigh-Parallel liner model agrees well with CFD results. Experiment results will be compared with CFD result and models. CFD result was calculated in low steel volume fraction (0.0809) than that of OPR1000 (0.1043). The effective thermal conductivity in OPR1000 has slightly higher than CFD result because of different volume fraction.

  3. The thermodynamical foundation of electronic conduction in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringuier, E.

    2018-03-01

    In elementary textbooks, the microscopic justification of Ohm’s local law in a solid medium starts with Drude’s classical model of electron transport and next discusses the quantum-dynamical and statistical amendments. In this paper, emphasis is laid instead upon the thermodynamical background motivated by the Joule-Lenz heating effect accompanying conduction and the fact that the conduction electrons are thermalized at the lattice temperature. Both metals and n-type semiconductors are considered; but conduction under a magnetic field is not. Proficiency in second-year thermodynamics and vector analysis is required from an undergraduate university student in physics so that the content of the paper can be taught to third-year students. The necessary elements of quantum mechanics are posited in this paper without detailed justification. We start with the equilibrium-thermodynamic notion of the chemical potential of the electron gas, the value of which distinguishes metals from semiconductors. Then we turn to the usage of the electrochemical potential in the description of near-equilibrium electron transport. The response of charge carriers to the electrochemical gradient involves the mobility, which is the reciprocal of the coefficient of the effective friction force opposing the carrier drift. Drude’s calculation of mobility is restated with the dynamical requirements of quantum physics. Where the carrier density is inhomogeneous, there appears diffusion, the coefficient of which is thermodynamically related to the mobility. Next, it is remarked that the release of heat was ignored in Drude’s original model. In this paper, the flow of Joule heat is handled thermodynamically within an energy balance where the voltage generator, the conduction electrons and the host lattice are involved in an explicit way. The notion of dissipation is introduced as the rate of entropy creation in a steady state. The body of the paper is restricted to the case of one

  4. A Network Model for the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Rigid Fibrous Refractory Insulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschall, Jochen; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A procedure is described for computing the effective thermal conductivity of a rigid fibrous refractory insulation. The insulation is modeled as a 3-dimensional Cartesian network of thermal conductance. The values and volume distributions of the conductance are assigned to reflect the physical properties of the insulation, its constituent fibers, and any permeating gas. The effective thermal conductivity is computed by considering the simultaneous energy transport by solid conduction, gas conduction and radiation through a cubic volume of model insulation; thus the coupling between heat transfer modes is retained (within the simplifications inherent to the model), rather than suppressed by treating these heat transfer modes as independent. The model takes into account insulation composition, density and fiber anisotropy, as well as the geometric and material properties of the constituent fibers. A relatively good agreement, between calculated and experimentally derived thermal conductivity values, is obtained for a variety of rigid fibrous insulations.

  5. On the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Frost Considering Mass Diffusion and Eddy Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2010-01-01

    A physical model for the effective thermal conductivity of water frost is proposed for application to the full range of frost density. The proposed model builds on the Zehner-Schlunder one-dimensional formulation for porous media appropriate for solid-to-fluid thermal conductivity ratios less than about 1000. By superposing the effects of mass diffusion and eddy convection on stagnant conduction in the fluid, the total effective thermal conductivity of frost is shown to be satisfactorily described. It is shown that the effects of vapor diffusion and eddy convection on the frost conductivity are of the same order. The results also point out that idealization of the frost structure by cylindrical inclusions offers a better representation of the effective conductivity of frost as compared to spherical inclusions. Satisfactory agreement between the theory and the measurements for the effective thermal conductivity of frost is demonstrated for a wide range of frost density and frost temperature.

  6. Anisotropic in-plane thermal conductivity in multilayer silicene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yang; Guo, Zhi-Xin; Chen, Shi-You; Xiang, Hong-Jun; Gong, Xin-Gao

    2018-06-01

    We systematically study thermal conductivity of multilayer silicene by means of Boltzmann Transportation Equation (BTE) method. We find that their thermal conductivity strongly depends on the surface structures. Thermal conductivity of bilayer silicene varies from 3.31 W/mK to 57.9 W/mK with different surface structures. Also, the 2 × 1 surface reconstruction induces unusual large thermal conductivity anisotropy, which reaches 70% in a four-layer silicene. We also find that the anisotropy decreases with silicene thickness increasing, owing to the significant reduction of thermal conductivity in the zigzag direction and its slight increment in the armchair direction. Finally, we find that both the phonon-lifetime anisotropy and the phonon-group-velocity anisotropy contribute to the thermal conductivity anisotropy of multilayer silicene. These findings could be helpful in the field of heat management, thermoelectric applications involving silicene and other multilayer nanomaterials with surface reconstructions in the future.

  7. Tuning thermal conductivity in molybdenum disulfide by electrochemical intercalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Gaohua; Liu, Jun; Zheng, Qiye; Zhang, Ruigang; Li, Dongyao; Banerjee, Debasish; Cahill, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of two-dimensional (2D) materials is of interest for energy storage, nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. Here, we report that the thermal conductivity of molybdenum disulfide can be modified by electrochemical intercalation. We observe distinct behaviour for thin films with vertically aligned basal planes and natural bulk crystals with basal planes aligned parallel to the surface. The thermal conductivity is measured as a function of the degree of lithiation, using time-domain thermoreflectance. The change of thermal conductivity correlates with the lithiation-induced structural and compositional disorder. We further show that the ratio of the in-plane to through-plane thermal conductivity of bulk crystal is enhanced by the disorder. These results suggest that stacking disorder and mixture of phases is an effective mechanism to modify the anisotropic thermal conductivity of 2D materials. PMID:27767030

  8. Electrothermal efficiency, temperature and thermal conductivity of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Different types of DC plasma torches operating at power levels between 2 to 6000 kW [1] ... systems and showed that η was higher for the LPPS system. ..... [8] M I Boulos, P Fauchais and E Pfender, Thermal plasmas fundamentals and ...

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation of thermal conductivities of superlattice nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Juekuan(杨决宽); CHEN; Yunfei(陈云飞); YAN; Jingping(颜景平)

    2003-01-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to investigate heat transfer in superlattice nanowires. Results show that for fixed period length superlattice nanowires, the ratio of the total interfacial thermal resistance to the total thermal resistance and the effective thermal conductivities are invariant with the changes in interface numbers. Increasing the period length leads to an increase in the average interfacial thermal resistance, which indicates that the interfacial thermal resistance depends not only on the materials that constitute the alternating segments of superlattice nanowires, but also on the lattice strain throughout the segments. The modification of the lattice structure due to the lattice mismatch should be taken into account in the acoustic mismatch model. Simulation results also demonstrated the size confinement effect on the thermal conductivities for low dimensional structures, i.e. the thermal conductivities and the interfacial thermal resistance increase as the nanowire cross-sectional area increases.

  10. Enhanced thermal conductance of polymer composites through embeddingaligned carbon nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale K. Hensley

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this work is to find a more efficient method of enhancing the thermal conductance of polymer thin films. This work compares polymer thin films embedded with randomly oriented carbon nanotubes to those with vertically aligned carbon nanofibers. Thin films embedded with carbon nanofibers demonstrated a similar thermal conductance between 40–60 μm and a higher thermal conductance between 25–40 μm than films embedded with carbon nanotubes with similar volume fractions even though carbon nanotubes have a higher thermal conductivity than carbon nanofibers.

  11. Reduced thermal conductivity of isotopically modulated silicon multilayer structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bracht, H.; Wehmeier, N.; Eon, S.

    2012-01-01

    We report measurements of the thermal conductivity of isotopically modulated silicon that consists of alternating layers of highly enriched silicon-28 and silicon-29. A reduced thermal conductivity of the isotopically modulated silicon compared to natural silicon was measured by means of time......-resolved x-ray scattering. Comparison of the experimental results to numerical solutions of the corresponding heat diffusion equations reveals a factor of three lower thermal conductivity of the isotope structure compared to natural Si. Our results demonstrate that the thermal conductivity of silicon can...

  12. Thermal Conductivity Measurement of Anisotropic Biological Tissue In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Kai; Cheng, Liang; Yang, Lina; Jin, Bitao; Zhang, Xinxin

    2017-06-01

    The accurate determination of the thermal conductivity of biological tissues has implications on the success of cryosurgical/hyperthermia treatments. In light of the evident anisotropy in some biological tissues, a new modified stepwise transient method was proposed to simultaneously measure the transverse and longitudinal thermal conductivities of anisotropic biological tissues. The physical and mathematical models were established, and the analytical solution was derived. Sensitivity analysis and experimental simulation were performed to determine the feasibility and measurement accuracy of simultaneously measuring the transverse and longitudinal thermal conductivities. The experimental system was set up, and its measurement accuracy was verified by measuring the thermal conductivity of a reference standard material. The thermal conductivities of the pork tenderloin and bovine muscles were measured using the traditional 1D and proposed methods, respectively, at different temperatures. Results indicate that the thermal conductivities of the bovine muscle are lower than those of the pork tenderloin muscle, whereas the bovine muscle was determined to exhibit stronger anisotropy than the pork tenderloin muscle. Moreover, the longitudinal thermal conductivity is larger than the transverse thermal conductivity for the two tissues and all thermal conductivities increase with the increase in temperature. Compared with the traditional 1D method, results obtained by the proposed method are slightly higher although the relative deviation is below 5 %.

  13. Ceramic materials with low thermal conductivity and low coefficients of thermal expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jesse; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Liu, Dean-Mo; Yang, Yaping; Li, Tingkai; Swanson, Robert E.; Van Aken, Steven; Kim, Jin-Min

    1992-01-01

    Compositions having the general formula (Ca.sub.x Mg.sub.1-x)Zr.sub.4 (PO.sub.4).sub.6 where x is between 0.5 and 0.99 are produced by solid state and sol-gel processes. In a preferred embodiment, when x is between 0.5 and 0.8, the MgCZP materials have near-zero coefficients of thermal expansion. The MgCZPs of the present invention also show unusually low thermal conductivities, and are stable at high temperatures. Macrostructures formed from MgCZP are useful in a wide variety of high-temperature applications. In a preferred process, calcium, magnesium, and zirconium nitrate solutions have their pH adjusted to between 7 and 9 either before or after the addition of ammonium dihydrogen phosphate. After dehydration to a gel, and calcination at temperatures in excess of 850.degree. C. for approximately 16 hours, single phase crystalline MgCZP powders with particle sizes ranging from approximately 20 nm to 50 nm result. The MgCZP powders are then sintered at temperatures ranging from 1200.degree. C. to 1350.degree. C. to form solid macrostructures with near-zero bulk coefficients of thermal expansion and low thermal conductivities. Porous macrostructures of the MgCZP powders of the present invention are also formed by combination with a polymeric powder and a binding agent, and sintering at high temperatures. The porosity of the resulting macrostructures can be adjusted by varying the particle size of the polymeric powder used.

  14. Electrical and Thermal Conductivity and Conduction Mechanism of Ge2Sb2Te5 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Rui; Endo, Rie; Kuwahara, Masashi; Kobayashi, Yoshinao; Susa, Masahiro

    2017-11-01

    Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy has drawn much attention due to its application in phase-change random-access memory and potential as a thermoelectric material. Electrical and thermal conductivity are important material properties in both applications. The aim of this work is to investigate the temperature dependence of the electrical and thermal conductivity of Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy and discuss the thermal conduction mechanism. The electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy were measured from room temperature to 823 K by four-terminal and hot-strip method, respectively. With increasing temperature, the electrical resistivity increased while the thermal conductivity first decreased up to about 600 K then increased. The electronic component of the thermal conductivity was calculated from the Wiedemann-Franz law using the resistivity results. At room temperature, Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy has large electronic thermal conductivity and low lattice thermal conductivity. Bipolar diffusion contributes more to the thermal conductivity with increasing temperature. The special crystallographic structure of Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy accounts for the thermal conduction mechanism.

  15. Electrical and Thermal Conductivity and Conduction Mechanism of Ge2Sb2Te5 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Rui; Endo, Rie; Kuwahara, Masashi; Kobayashi, Yoshinao; Susa, Masahiro

    2018-06-01

    Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy has drawn much attention due to its application in phase-change random-access memory and potential as a thermoelectric material. Electrical and thermal conductivity are important material properties in both applications. The aim of this work is to investigate the temperature dependence of the electrical and thermal conductivity of Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy and discuss the thermal conduction mechanism. The electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy were measured from room temperature to 823 K by four-terminal and hot-strip method, respectively. With increasing temperature, the electrical resistivity increased while the thermal conductivity first decreased up to about 600 K then increased. The electronic component of the thermal conductivity was calculated from the Wiedemann-Franz law using the resistivity results. At room temperature, Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy has large electronic thermal conductivity and low lattice thermal conductivity. Bipolar diffusion contributes more to the thermal conductivity with increasing temperature. The special crystallographic structure of Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy accounts for the thermal conduction mechanism.

  16. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of hot-pressed trisodium uranate (Na3UO4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, G.L.; Bottcher, J.H.; Buzzell, J.A.; Schwartzenberger, G.M.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of Na 3 UO 4 prepared by two different reaction processes were determined over a temperature range of 20-1000 0 C. Compositional differences in the samples resulting from the different reaction processes have a pronounced effect on thermal expansion and on thermal conductivity below 500 0 C. Above 500 0 C, these compositional differences in the thermal conductivities decrease. (orig.)

  17. A Model of Thermal Conductivity for Planetary Soils: 1. Theory for Unconsolidated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueux, S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    We present a model of heat conduction for mono-sized spherical particulate media under stagnant gases based on the kinetic theory of gases, numerical modeling of Fourier s law of heat conduction, theoretical constraints on the gas thermal conductivity at various Knudsen regimes, and laboratory measurements. Incorporating the effect of the temperature allows for the derivation of the pore-filling gas conductivity and bulk thermal conductivity of samples using additional parameters (pressure, gas composition, grain size, and porosity). The radiative and solid-to-solid conductivities are also accounted for. Our thermal model reproduces the well-established bulk thermal conductivity dependency of a sample with the grain size and pressure and also confirms laboratory measurements finding that higher porosities generally lead to lower conductivities. It predicts the existence of the plateau conductivity at high pressure, where the bulk conductivity does not depend on the grain size. The good agreement between the model predictions and published laboratory measurements under a variety of pressures, temperatures, gas compositions, and grain sizes provides additional confidence in our results. On Venus, Earth, and Titan, the pressure and temperature combinations are too high to observe a soil thermal conductivity dependency on the grain size, but each planet has a unique thermal inertia due to their different surface temperatures. On Mars, the temperature and pressure combination is ideal to observe the soil thermal conductivity dependency on the average grain size. Thermal conductivity models that do not take the temperature and the pore-filling gas composition into account may yield significant errors.

  18. Modelling of thermal conductance during microthermal machining with scanning thermal microscope using an inverse methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yuching; Chang Winjin; Fang Tehua; Fang Shihchung

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a general methodology for determining the thermal conductance between the probe tip and the workpiece during microthermal machining using Scanning Thermal Microscopy (SThM) has been proposed. The processing system was considered as an inverse heat conduction problem with an unknown thermal conductance. Temperature dependence for the material properties and thermal conductance in the analysis of heat conduction is taken into account. The conjugate gradient method is used to solve the inverse problem. Furthermore, this methodology can also be applied to estimate the thermal contact conductance in other transient heat conduction problems, like metal casting process, injection molding process, and electronic circuit systems

  19. Thermal conductivity of granular porous media: A pore scale modeling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Askari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pore scale modeling method has been widely used in the petrophysical studies to estimate macroscopic properties (e.g. porosity, permeability, and electrical resistivity of porous media with respect to their micro structures. Although there is a sumptuous literature about the application of the method to study flow in porous media, there are fewer studies regarding its application to thermal conduction characterization, and the estimation of effective thermal conductivity, which is a salient parameter in many engineering surveys (e.g. geothermal resources and heavy oil recovery. By considering thermal contact resistance, we demonstrate the robustness of the method for predicting the effective thermal conductivity. According to our results obtained from Utah oil sand samples simulations, the simulation of thermal contact resistance is pivotal to grant reliable estimates of effective thermal conductivity. Our estimated effective thermal conductivities exhibit a better compatibility with the experimental data in companion with some famous experimental and analytical equations for the calculation of the effective thermal conductivity. In addition, we reconstruct a porous medium for an Alberta oil sand sample. By increasing roughness, we observe the effect of thermal contact resistance in the decrease of the effective thermal conductivity. However, the roughness effect becomes more noticeable when there is a higher thermal conductivity of solid to fluid ratio. Moreover, by considering the thermal resistance in porous media with different grains sizes, we find that the effective thermal conductivity augments with increased grain size. Our observation is in a reasonable accordance with experimental results. This demonstrates the usefulness of our modeling approach for further computational studies of heat transfer in porous media.

  20. Influence of light masonry mortar on the thermal insulation of a solid brick wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupke, C

    1980-12-01

    For calculations of the thermal insulation of structural components according to DIN 4108 and to the Thermal Insulation Ordinance, characteristic data of thermal conductivity are used which are contained in DIN 4108 and in the Bundesanzeiger in Supplements to the publication of material characteristics for the calculation of thermal insulation according to the Thermal Insulation Ordinance. For masonry, this value is equivalent to the thermal conductivity of the bricks, including mortar joints. The mortar considered is standard mortar, group II, according to DIN 1053. In the last few years, in order to improve the thermal insulation, mortars of low thermal conductivity and low volume weight - so-called light masonry mortars - have been used to an increasing extent. The improvement in thermal conductivity as compared with standard mortar is referred to as ..delta..lambda; it depends mostly on the thermal conductivity of the light mortar and the bricks. In the article, the laws governing the influence of light masonry mortar on the thermal insulation of masonry of solid bricks and solid blocks are reviewed.

  1. In-Situ Spatial Variability Of Thermal Conductivity And Volumetric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies of spatial variability of thermal conductivity and volumetric water content of silty topsoil were conduct-ed on a 0.6 ha site at Abeokuta, South-Western Nigeria. The thermal conductivity (k) was measured at depths of up to 0.06 m along four parallel profiles of 200 m long and at an average temperature of 25 C, using ...

  2. Lattice thermal conductivity in layered BiCuSeO

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, S.

    2016-06-30

    We quantify the low lattice thermal conductivity in layered BiCuSeO (the oxide with the highest known figure of merit). It turns out that the scattering of acoustical into optical phonons is strongly enhanced in the material because of the special structure of the phonon dispersion. For example, at room temperature the optical phonons account for an enormous 42% of the lattice thermal conductivity. We also quantify the anisotropy of the lattice thermal conductivity and determine the distribution of the mean free path of the phonons at different temperatures to provide a guide for tuning the thermal properties. © the Owner Societies 2016.

  3. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Open Cell Polyurethane Foam Based on the Fractal Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Ankang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the fractal theory, the geometric structure inside an open cell polyurethane foam, which is widely used as adiabatic material, is illustrated. A simplified cell fractal model is created. In the model, the method of calculating the equivalent thermal conductivity of the porous foam is described and the fractal dimension is calculated. The mathematical formulas for the fractal equivalent thermal conductivity combined with gas and solid phase, for heat radiation equivalent thermal conductivity and for the total thermal conductivity, are deduced. However, the total effective heat flux is the summation of the heat conduction by the solid phase and the gas in pores, the radiation, and the convection between gas and solid phase. Fractal mathematical equation of effective thermal conductivity is derived with fractal dimension and vacancy porosity in the cell body. The calculated results have good agreement with the experimental data, and the difference is less than 5%. The main influencing factors are summarized. The research work is useful for the enhancement of adiabatic performance of foam materials and development of new materials.

  4. Effective electrical and thermal conductivity of multifilament twisted superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chechetkin, V.R.

    2013-01-01

    The effective electrical and thermal conductivity of composite wire with twisted superconducting filaments embedded into normal metal matrix is calculated using the extension of Bruggeman method. The resistive conductivity of superconducting filaments is described in terms of symmetric tensor, whereas the conductivity of a matrix is assumed to be isotropic and homogeneous. The dependence of the resistive electrical conductivity of superconducting filaments on temperature, magnetic field, and current density is implied to be parametric. The resulting effective conductivity tensor proved to be non-diagonal and symmetric. The non-diagonal transverse–longitudinal components of effective electrical conductivity tensor are responsible for the redistribution of current between filaments. In the limits of high and low electrical conductivity of filaments the transverse effective conductivity tends to that of obtained previously by Carr. The effective thermal conductivity of composite wires is non-diagonal and radius-dependent even for the isotropic and homogeneous thermal conductivities of matrix and filaments.

  5. Geometric model for softwood transverse thermal conductivity. Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong-mei Gu; Audrey Zink-Sharp

    2005-01-01

    Thermal conductivity is a very important parameter in determining heat transfer rate and is required for developing of drying models and in industrial operations such as adhesive cure rate. Geometric models for predicting softwood thermal conductivity in the radial and tangential directions were generated in this study based on obervation and measurements of wood...

  6. Thermal conductivity of a superconducting spin-glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisan, M.

    1988-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity for a superconducting spin-glass is calculated, taking a short-range spin-spin interaction in a super-conductor carrying a uniform flow. The presence of the short-range interaction between frozen spins gives rise to a strong depression in the thermal conductivity

  7. Structural relaxation and thermal conductivity coefficient of liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdurasulov, A.

    1992-01-01

    Present article is devoted to structural relaxation and thermal conductivity coefficient of liquids. The thermoelastic properties of liquids were studied taking into account the contribution of translational and structural relaxation. The results of determination of dynamic coefficient of thermal conductivity of liquids taking into account the contribution of translational and structural relaxation are presented.

  8. Effect of normal processes on thermal conductivity of germanium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of normal scattering processes is considered to redistribute the phonon momentum in (a) the same phonon branch – KK-S model and (b) between differ- ent phonon branches – KK-H model. Simplified thermal conductivity relations are used to estimate the thermal conductivity of germanium, silicon and ...

  9. Thermal conductivity of Cu–4⋅5 Ti alloy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. The thermal conductivity (TC) of peak aged Cu–4⋅5 wt% Ti alloy was measured at different tem- peratures and studied its variation with temperature. It was found that TC increased with increasing tem- perature. Phonon and electronic components of thermal conductivity were computed from the results. The.

  10. Thermal conductivity of Cu–4.5 Ti alloy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The thermal conductivity (TC) of peak aged Cu–4.5 wt% Ti alloy was measured at different temperatures and studied its variation with temperature. It was found that TC increased with increasing temperature. Phonon and electronic components of thermal conductivity were computed from the results. The alloy exhibits an ...

  11. Dependence of thermal conductivity in micro to nano silica

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This work presents the measurement of thermal conductivity of nano-silica particles using needle probe method. The validation test of thermal probe was conducted on ice and THF hydrates using our experimental set up and the results are satisfactory when compared with the literature data. The nano silica used in this ...

  12. Multi-sphere unit cell model to calculate the effective thermal conductivity in pebble bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Antwerpen, W.; Rousseau, P.G.; Du Toit, C.G.

    2010-01-01

    A proper understanding of the mechanisms of heat transfer, fluid flow and pressure drop through a packed bed of spheres is of utmost importance in the design of a high temperature Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR). While the gas flows predominantly in the axial direction through the bed, the total effective thermal conductivity is a lumped parameter that characterises the total heat transfer in the radial direction through the packed bed. The study of the effective thermal conductivity is important because it forms an intricate part of the self-acting decay heat removal chain, which is directly related to the PBR safety case. The effective thermal conductivity is the summation of various heat transport phenomena. These are the enhanced thermal conductivity due to turbulent mixing as the fluid passes through the voids between pebbles, heat transfer due to the movement of the solid spheres and thermal conduction and thermal radiation between the spheres in a stagnant fluid environment. In this study, the conduction and radiation between the spheres are investigated. Firstly, existing correlations for the effective thermal conductivity are investigated, with particular attention given to its applicability in the near-wall region. Several phenomena in particular are examined namely: conduction through the spheres, conduction through the contact area between the spheres, conduction through the gas phase and radiation between solid surfaces. A new approach to simulate the effective thermal conductivity for randomly packed beds is then presented, namely the so-called Multi-sphere Unit Cell Model. The model is validated by comparing the results with that obtained in experiments. (authors)

  13. Effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids: the effects of microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Jing; Wang Liqiu

    2010-01-01

    We examine numerically the effects of particle-fluid thermal conductivity ratio, particle volume fraction, particle size distribution and particle aggregation on macroscale thermal properties for seven kinds of two-dimensional nanofluids. The results show that the radius of gyration and the non-dimensional particle-fluid interfacial area are two important parameters in characterizing the geometrical structure of nanoparticles. A non-uniform particle size is found to be unfavourable for the conductivity enhancement, while particle-aggregation benefits the enhancement especially when the radius of gyration of aggregates is large. Without considering the interfacial thermal resistance, a larger non-dimensional particle-fluid interfacial area between the base fluid and the nanoparticles is also desirable for enhancing thermal conductivity. The nanofluids with nanoparticles of connected cross-shape show a much higher (lower) effective thermal conductivity when the particle-fluid conductivity ratio is larger (smaller) than 1.

  14. Experimental measurement of effective thermal conductivity of packed lithium-titanate pebble bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, D.; Sathiyamoorthy, D.; Vinjamur, M.

    2012-01-01

    Lithium titanate is a promising solid breeder material for the fusion reactor blanket. Packed lithium titanate pebble bed is considered for the blanket. The thermal energy; that will be produced in the bed during breeding and the radiated heat from the reactor core absorbed must be removed. So, the experimental thermal property data are important for the blanket design. In past, a significant amount of works were conducted to determine the effective thermal conductivity of packed solid breeder pebble bed, in helium atmosphere, but no flow of gas was considered. With increase in gas flow rate, effective thermal conductivity of pebble bed increases. Particle size and void fraction also affect the thermal properties of the bed significantly. An experimental facility with external heat source was designed and installed. Experiments were carried out with lithium-titanate pebbles of different sizes at variable gas flow rates and at different bed wall temperature. It was observed that effective thermal conductivity of pebble bed is a function of particle Reynolds number and temperature. From the experimental data two correlations have been developed to estimate the effective thermal conductivity of packed lithium-titanate pebble bed for different particle Reynolds number and at different temperatures. The experimental details and results are discussed in this paper.

  15. Lattice thermal conductivity of disordered NiPd and NiPt alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, Aftab; Mookerjee, Abhijit

    2006-01-01

    Numerical calculations of lattice thermal conductivity are reported for the binary alloys NiPd and NiPt. The present work is a continuation of an earlier paper by us (Alam and Mookerjee 2005 Phys. Rev. B 72 214207), which developed a theoretical framework for the calculation of configuration-averaged lattice thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity in disordered alloys. The formulation was based on the augmented space theorem (Mookerjee 1973 J. Phys. C: Solid State Phys. 6 L205) combined with a scattering diagram technique. In this paper we shall show the dependence of the lattice thermal conductivity on a series of variables like phonon frequency, temperature and alloy composition. The temperature dependence of κ(T) and its relation to the measured thermal conductivity is discussed. The concentration dependence of κ appears to justify the notion of a minimum thermal conductivity as discussed by Kittel, Slack and others (Kittel 1948 Phys. Rev. 75 972, Brich and Clark 1940 Am. J. Sci. 238 613; Slack 1979 Solid State Physics vol 34, ed H Ehrenreich, F Seitz and D Turnbull (New York: Academic) p 1). We also study the frequency and composition dependence of the thermal diffusivity averaged over modes. A numerical estimate of this quantity gives an idea about the location of the mobility edge and the fraction of states in the frequency spectrum which is delocalized

  16. Thermal and electrical conductivities of Cd-Zn alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saatci, B; Ari, M; Guenduez, M; Meydaneri, F; Bozoklu, M; Durmus, S

    2006-01-01

    The composition and temperature dependences of the thermal and electrical conductivities of three different Cd-Zn alloys have been investigated in the temperature range of 300-650 K. Thermal conductivities of the Cd-Zn alloys have been determined by using the radial heat flow method. It has been found that the thermal conductivity decreases slightly with increasing temperature and the data of thermal conductivity are shifting together to the higher values with increasing Cd composition. In addition, the electrical measurements were determined by using a standard DC four-point probe technique. The resistivity increases linearly and the electrical conductivity decreases exponentially with increasing temperature. The resistivity and electrical conductivity are independent of composition of Cd and Zn. Also, the temperature coefficient of Cd-Zn alloys has been determined, which is independent of composition of Cd and Zn. Finally, Lorenz number has been calculated using the thermal and electrical conductivity values at 373 and 533 K. The results satisfy the Wiedemann-Franz (WF) relation at T 373 K), the WF relation could not hold and the phonon component contribution of thermal conductivity dominates the thermal conduction

  17. Thermal conductivity of Al–Cu–Mg–Si alloys: Experimental measurement and CALPHAD modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Cong [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Sino-German cooperation group “Microstructure in Al alloys”, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Du, Yong, E-mail: yong-du@csu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Sino-German cooperation group “Microstructure in Al alloys”, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Liu, Shuhong; Liu, Yuling [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Sino-German cooperation group “Microstructure in Al alloys”, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Sundman, Bo. [INSTN, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2016-07-10

    Highlights: • The thermal conductivities of Al–x wt% Cu (x = 1, 3, 5, 15 and 30) and Al–y wt% Si (y = 2, 12.5 and 20) alloys were determined. • The reported thermal conductivities of Al–Cu–Mg–Si system were critically reviewed. • The CALPHAD approach was applied for the modeling of thermal conductivity. • The applicability of CALPHAD technique in the modeling of thermal conductivity was discussed. - Abstract: In the present work, the thermal conductivities and microstructure of Al–x wt% Cu (x = 1, 3, 5, 15 and 30) and Al–y wt% Si (y = 2, 12.5 and 20) alloys were investigated by using laser-flash method, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Besides, a CALPHAD (CALculation of PHAse Diagram) approach to evaluate the thermal conductivity of Al–Cu–Mg–Si system was performed. The numerical models for the thermal conductivity of pure elements and stoichiometric phases were described as polynomials, and the coefficients were optimized via PARROT module of Thermal-Calc software applied to the experimental data. The thermal conductivity of (Al)-based solid solutions was described by using Redlich–Kister interaction parameters. For alloys in two-phase region, the interface scattering parameter was proposed in the modeling to describe the impediment of interfaces on the heat transfer. Finally, a set of self-consistent parameters for the description of thermal conductivity in Al–Cu–Mg–Si system was obtained, and comprehensive comparisons between the calculated and measured thermal conductivities show that the experimental information is satisfactorily accounted for by the present modeling.

  18. Thermal Conductivities of Some Polymers and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    conductivities (Kt) of epoxies, polyurethanes, and hydrocarbons of interest to the Army. The study explores the effects of different curing agents...obtained. 4.12 p-DCPD P-DCPD is currently of interest for composite armor applications because of its unusual ballistic properties and its high TG...the matrix, and recalling that Kt for the fiber does not dominate in the simple model above, a reasonable upper bound for Kt for a 50 volume

  19. Thermal conductivity tests on buffermasses of bentonite/silt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knutsson, S.

    1977-09-01

    The investigation concerns the thermal conductivity of the bentonite/quartz buffer mass suggested as embedding substance for radioactive canisters. The first part presents the theoretical relationships associated with the various heat transfer mechanisms in moist granular materials. Chapter 3 describes the author's experimental determination of the thermal conductivity of the buffer mass. The tested mass consisted of 10 percent (by weight) bentonite and 90 percent natural silt. Four tests were made with different water content values and degree of water saturation. A comparison between the measured and calculated thermal conductivities is given. It is shown that the conductivity can be calculated with an accuracy of +-20 percent. (author)

  20. Method for estimating the lattice thermal conductivity of metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarbrough, D.W.; Williams, R.K.

    1978-08-01

    A method is described for calculating the lattice thermal conductivity of alloys as a function of temperature and composition for temperatures above theta/sub D//2 using readily available information about the atomic species present in the alloy. The calculation takes into account phonon interactions with point defects, electrons and other phonons. Comparisons between experimental thermal conductivities (resistivities) and calculated values are discussed for binary alloys of semiconductors, alkali halides and metals. A discussion of the theoretical background is followed by sufficient numerical work to facilitate the calculation of lattice thermal conductivity of an alloy for which no conductivity data exist

  1. Thermal-Conductivity Studies of Macro-porous Polymer-Derived SiOC Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, L.; Li, Y. M.; Zheng, X. H.; Zhu, J.; Tang, D. W.; Wu, J. Q.; Xu, C. H.

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional reticular macro-porous SiOC ceramics structure, made of spherical agglomerates, has been thermally characterized using a freestanding sensor-based method. The effective thermal conductivity of the macro-porous SiOC ceramics, including the effects of voids, is found to be to at room temperature, comparable with that of alumina aerogel or carbon aerogel. These results suggest that SiOC ceramics hold great promise as a thermal insulation material for use at high temperatures. The measured results further reveal that the effective thermal conductivity is limited by the low solid-phase volume fraction for the SiOC series processed at the same conditions. For SiOC ceramics processed under different pyrolysis temperatures, the contact condition between neighboring particles in the SiOC networks is another key factor influencing the effective thermal conductivity.

  2. Study of organic ablative thermal-protection coating for solid rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Zenggong

    1992-06-01

    A study is conducted to find a new interior thermal-protection material that possesses good thermal-protection performance and simple manufacturing possibilities. Quartz powder and Cr2O3 are investigated using epoxy resin as a binder and Al2O3 as the burning inhibitor. Results indicate that the developed thermal-protection coating is suitable as ablative insulation material for solid rocket motors.

  3. Phonon thermal conductance of disordered graphene strips with armchair edges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Lipeng; Xiong Shijie

    2009-01-01

    Based on the model of lattice dynamics together with the transfer matrix technique, we investigate the thermal conductances of phonons in quasi-one-dimensional disordered graphene strips with armchair edges using Landauer formalism for thermal transport. It is found that the contributions to thermal conductance from the phonon transport near von Hove singularities is significantly suppressed by the presence of disorder, on the contrary to the effect of disorder on phonon modes in other frequency regions. Besides the magnitude, for different widths of the strips, the thermal conductance also shows different temperature dependence. At low temperatures, the thermal conductance displays quantized features of both pure and disordered graphene strips implying that the transmission of phonon modes at low frequencies are almost unaffected by the disorder

  4. Thermal conductivity analysis and applications of nanocellulose materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uetani, Kojiro; Hatori, Kimihito

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In this review, we summarize the recent progress in thermal conductivity analysis of nanocellulose materials called cellulose nanopapers, and compare them with polymeric materials, including neat polymers, composites, and traditional paper. It is important to individually measure the in-plane and through-plane heat-conducting properties of two-dimensional planar materials, so steady-state and non-equilibrium methods, in particular the laser spot periodic heating radiation thermometry method, are reviewed. The structural dependency of cellulose nanopaper on thermal conduction is described in terms of the crystallite size effect, fibre orientation, and interfacial thermal resistance between fibres and small pores. The novel applications of cellulose as thermally conductive transparent materials and thermal-guiding materials are also discussed. PMID:29152020

  5. Tuning thermal conduction via extended defects in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huaqing; Xu, Yong; Zou, Xiaolong; Wu, Jian; Duan, Wenhui

    2013-05-01

    Designing materials for desired thermal conduction can be achieved via extended defects. We theoretically demonstrate the concept by investigating thermal transport in graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with the extended line defects observed by recent experiments. Our nonequilibrium Green's function study excluding phonon-phonon interactions finds that thermal conductance can be tuned over wide ranges (more than 50% at room temperature), by controlling the orientation and the bond configuration of the embedded extended defect. Further transmission analysis reveals that the thermal-conduction tuning is attributed to two fundamentally different mechanisms, via modifying the phonon dispersion and/or tailoring the strength of defect scattering. The finding, applicable to other materials, provides useful guidance for designing materials with desired thermal conduction.

  6. Ion thermal conductivity for a pure tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolton, C.W. III.

    1981-06-01

    The ion thermal conductivity is calculated for a wide range of aspect ratios and collision frequencies. The calculation is done by solving the drift kinetic equation, with a model collision operator, using a finite element method, and then calculating the energy weighted friction force to determine the heat flux. The thermal conductivity, determined from the heat flux, is then curve fitted to analytic formulas. These formulas allow the conductivity to be calculated at all collision frequencies and aspect ratios down to about 3

  7. Thermal conductivity of nonlinear waves in disordered chains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    c Indian Academy of Sciences. Vol. 77, No. ... Therefore deterministic chaos will lead to an incoherent spreading. ..... dependence, and a clear indication that the small-temperature conductivity drops faster than ... Thin solid lines guide the eye.

  8. Study on thermal conductive BN/novolac resin composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shasha; Qi, Shuhua; Liu, Nailiang; Cao, Peng

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Boron nitride (BN) particles were used to modify novolac resin. → BN particles were pretreated by γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. → The thermal conductivity trend of composite almost agrees with the predicted data from the Maxwell-Eucken model. → At BN concentration of 80 wt.%, thermal conductivity value of composite is 4.5 times that of pure novolac resin. → Combined use of the larger and smaller particles with a mass ratio of 1:2 provides the composites with the maximum thermal conductivity among the testing systems. → The composite thermal property also increases with an increase in the BN concentration. - Abstract: In this study, γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane-treated boron nitride (BN) particles were used to modify novolac resin. The effect of varying the BN concentration, particle size, and hybrid BN fillers with the binary particle size distribution on the thermal conductivity of the composites was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging showed homogeneously dispersed treated BN particles in the matrix. Furthermore, the thermal conductivity increased as the BN concentration was increased. This behavior was also observed when the filler size was increased. Experimentally obtained thermal conductivity values agree with the predicted data from the Maxwell-Eucken model well at less than 70 wt.% BN loading. A larger particle size BN-filled novolac resin exhibits a higher thermal conductivity than a smaller particle size BN-filled one. The combined use of 0.5 and 15 μm particles with a mass ratio of 2:1 achieved the maximum thermal conductivity among the testing systems. The thermal resistance properties of the composites were also studied.

  9. A recommendation for the thermal conductivity of oxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, K. H.; Ryu, H. J.; Song, K. C.; Yang, M. S.; Na, S. H.; Lee, Y. W.; Moon, H. S.; Kim, H. S.

    2004-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of nuclear fuel is one of the most important properties because it affects the fuel operating temperature. Therefore, it influences almost all the important processes occurred in nuclear fuel during irradiation, such as gas release, swelling and grain growth. The model of the thermal conductivity of nuclear fuel should be used in the codes to evaluate the performance of it analytically and be required in the nuclear fuel research and development. The thermal conductivity, k, of UO 2 depends on the deviation from stoichiometry, x, the burnup, b, and the fractional porosity, p, as well as the temperature, T: k = k(x, b, p, T), (1) Changes in thermal conductivity occur during irradiation because of fission-gas bubble formation, pores, cracks, fission product build-up and possible changes in the oxygen to uranium ratio (O/U). The dependence on temperature and porosity has been well studied and incorporated in computer codes used for the in-pile fuel behavior analysis. There are several studies on the effect of impurity on the thermal conductivity of UO 2 . In this paper, the variables affected on the thermal conductivity were studied. The available data of the thermal conductivity of UO 2 , UO 2+x , (U, Pu)O 2 , (U, Pu)O 2 and simulated fuel for irradiation fuel were reviewed and analyzed. The best models were recommended

  10. Thermal conductivity of a h-BCN monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-Yan; Pei, Qing-Xiang; Liu, Hong-Yuan; Wei, Ning

    2017-10-18

    A hexagonal graphene-like boron-carbon-nitrogen (h-BCN) monolayer, a new two-dimensional (2D) material, has been synthesized recently. Herein we investigate for the first time the thermal conductivity of this novel 2D material. Using molecular dynamics simulations based on the optimized Tersoff potential, we found that the h-BCN monolayers are isotropic in the basal plane with close thermal conductivity magnitudes. Though h-BCN has the same hexagonal lattice as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), it exhibits a much lower thermal conductivity than the latter two materials. In addition, the thermal conductivity of h-BCN monolayers is found to be size-dependent but less temperature-dependent. Modulation of the thermal conductivity of h-BCN monolayers can also be realized by strain engineering. Compressive strain leads to a monotonic decrease in the thermal conductivity while the tensile strain induces an up-then-down trend in the thermal conductivity. Surprisingly, the small tensile strain can facilitate the heat transport of the h-BCN monolayers.

  11. Thermal characteristics of expanded perlite/paraffin composite phase change material with enhanced thermal conductivity using carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karaipekli, Ali; Biçer, Alper; Sarı, Ahmet; Tyagi, Vineet Veer

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Expanded perlite/n-eicosane composite for thermal energy storage was prepared. • Addition of CNTs increases considerably the thermal conductivity of the composite. • The composite PCM including 1 wt% CNTs is promising material. - Abstract: Paraffins constitute a class of solid-liquid organic phase change materials (PCMs). However, low thermal conductivity limits their feasibility in thermal energy storage (TES) applications. Carbon nano tubes (CNTs) are one of the best materials to increase the thermal conductivity of paraffins. In this regard, the present study is focus on the preparation, characterization, and improvement of thermal conductivity using CNTs as well as determination of TES properties of expanded perlite (ExP)/n-eicosane (C20) composite as a novel type of form-stable composite PCM (F-SCPCM). It was found that the ExP could retain C20 at weight fraction of 60% without leakage. The SEM and FTIR analyses were carried out to characterize the microstructure and chemical properties of the composite PCM. The TES properties of the prepared F-SCPCM were determined using DSC and TG analyses. The analysis results showed that the components of the composite are in good compatibleness and C20 used as PCM are well-infiltrated into the structure of ExP/CNTs matrix. The DSC analysis indicated that the ExP/C20/CNTs (1 wt%) composite has a melting point of 36.12 °C and latent heat of 157.43 J/g. The TG analysis indicated that the F-SCPCM has better thermal durability compared with pure C20 and also it has good long term-TES reliability. In addition, the effects of CNTs on the thermal conductivity of the composite PCM were investigated. Compared to ExP/C20 composite, the use of CNTs has apparent improving effect for the thermal conductivity without considerably affecting the compatibility of components, TES properties, and thermal stability.

  12. Thermal Conductivity Measurement and Analysis of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. G.; Kim, D. J.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, W. J.; Lee, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    FCM nuclear fuel is composed of tristructural isotropic(TRISO) fuel particle and SiC ceramic matrix. SiC ceramic matrix play an essential part in protecting fission product. In the FCM fuel concept, fission product is doubly protected by TRISO coating layer and SiC ceramic matrix in comparison with the current commercial UO2 fuel system of LWR. In addition to a safety enhancement of FCM fuel, thermal conductivity of SiC ceramic matrix is better than that of UO2 fuel. Because the centerline temperature of FCM fuel is lower than that of the current UO2 fuel due to the difference of thermal conductivity of fuel, an operational release of fission products from the fuel can be reduced. SiC ceramic has attracted for nuclear fuel application due to its high thermal conductivity properties with good radiation tolerant properties, a low neutron absorption cross-section and a high corrosion resistance. Thermal conductivity of ceramic matrix composite depends on the thermal conductivity of each component and the morphology of reinforcement materials such as fibers and particles. There are many results about thermal conductivity of fiber-reinforced composite like as SiCf/SiC composite. Thermal conductivity of SiC ceramics and FCM pellets with the volume fraction of TRISO particles were measured and analyzed by analytical models. Polycrystalline SiC ceramics and FCM pellets with TRISO particles were fabricated by hot press sintering with sintering additives. Thermal conductivity of the FCM pellets with TRISO particles of 0 vol.%, 10 vol.%, 20 vol.%, 30 vol.% and 40 vol.% show 68.4, 52.3, 46.8, 43.0 and 34.5 W/mK, respectively. As the volume fraction of TRISO particles increased, the measured thermal conductivity values closely followed the prediction of Maxwell's equation

  13. Anisotropic thermal conductivity in epoxy-bonded magnetocaloric composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Bruno; Sellschopp, Kai; Bierdel, Marius; Funk, Alexander; Bobeth, Manfred; Krautz, Maria; Waske, Anja

    2016-09-01

    Thermal management is one of the crucial issues in the development of magnetocaloric refrigeration technology for application. In order to ensure optimal exploitation of the materials "primary" properties, such as entropy change and temperature lift, thermal properties (and other "secondary" properties) play an important role. In magnetocaloric composites, which show an increased cycling stability in comparison to their bulk counterparts, thermal properties are strongly determined by the geometric arrangement of the corresponding components. In the first part of this paper, the inner structure of a polymer-bonded La(Fe, Co, Si)13-composite was studied by X-ray computed tomography. Based on this 3D data, a numerical study along all three spatial directions revealed anisotropic thermal conductivity of the composite: Due to the preparation process, the long-axis of the magnetocaloric particles is aligned along the xy plane which is why the in-plane thermal conductivity is larger than the thermal conductivity along the z-axis. Further, the study is expanded to a second aspect devoted to the influence of particle distribution and alignment within the polymer matrix. Based on an equivalent ellipsoids model to describe the inner structure of the composite, numerical simulation of the thermal conductivity in different particle arrangements and orientation distributions were performed. This paper evaluates the possibilities of microstructural design for inducing and adjusting anisotropic thermal conductivity in magnetocaloric composites.

  14. Thermal Conductivity of Polymer Composite poypropilene-Sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betha; Mashuri; Sudirman; Karo Karo, Aloma

    2001-01-01

    Thermal conductivity composite materials polypropylene (PP)-sand have been investigated. PP composite with sand to increase thermal conductivity from the polymer. The composite in this observation is done by mixing matrix (PP melt flow 2/10)and filler sand)by means tool labo plastomil. The result of thermal conductivity is composite of PP-sand which is obtained increase and followed by the raising of filler particle volume fraction. The analysis of thermal conductivity based on the model Cheng and Vachon, model Lewis and Nielsen where this model has the function to support experiment finding. It is proved that Lewis' and Nielsen's model almost approach experiment result. And then thermal conductivity raising will be analyzed by the model of pararel-series conductive with the two (2)phases system. It is showed that sand in PP MF 2 composite have the big role to increase the thermal conductivity than sand in PP MF 10 composition, but it is not easy to shape conductive medium

  15. Development of a direct push based in-situ thermal conductivity measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirla, Marian Andrei; Vienken, Thomas; Dietrich, Peter; Bumberger, Jan

    2016-04-01

    push based approaches, called Thermal Conductivity Profiler (TCP), that operates based on the principles of a hollow cylindrical geometry heat source. To determinate thermal conductivity in situ, the transient temperature at the middle of the probe and electrical power dissipation is measured. At the same time, this work presents laboratory results obtained when this novel hollow cylindrical probe system was tested on different materials for calibration. By using the hollow cylindrical probe, the thermal conductivity results have an error of less than 2.5% error for solid samples (Teflon, Agar jelly, and Nylatron). These findings are useful to achieve a proper thermal energy balance in the shallow subsurface by using direct push technology and TCP. By providing information of layers with high thermal conductivity, suitable for thermal storage capability, can be used determine borehole heat exchanger design and, therefore, determine geothermal heat pump architecture.

  16. The contribution of thermal radiation to the thermal conductivity of porous UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakker, K.; Kwast, H.; Cordfunke, E.H.P.

    1994-09-01

    The influence of cylindrical, spherical and ellipsoidal inclusions on the overall thermal conductivity was computed with the finite element technique. The results of these calculations were compared with equations that describe the effect of inclusions on the overall thermal conductivity. The analytical equation of Schulz that describes the effect of inclusions on the overall thermal conductivity is in good agreement with the results of the finite element computations. This good agreement shows that among a variety of porosity correction formulas, the equation of Schulz gives the best description of the effect of inclusions on the overall thermal conductivity. This equation and the results of finite element calculations allow us to compute the contribution of radiation to the overall thermal conductivity of UO 2 with oblate ellipsoidal porosity. The present radiation calculations show that Hayes and Peddicord overestimated the contribution of thermal radiation to the thermal conductivity. (orig.)

  17. Remarkable reduction of thermal conductivity in phosphorene phononic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Wen; Zhang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorene has received much attention due to its interesting physical and chemical properties, and its potential applications such as thermoelectricity. In thermoelectric applications, low thermal conductivity is essential for achieving a high figure of merit. In this work, we propose to reduce the thermal conductivity of phosphorene by adopting the phononic crystal structure, phosphorene nanomesh. With equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we find that the thermal conductivity is remarkably reduced in the phononic crystal. Our analysis shows that the reduction is due to the depressed phonon group velocities induced by Brillouin zone folding, and the reduced phonon lifetimes in the phononic crystal. Interestingly, it is found that the anisotropy ratio of thermal conductivity could be tuned by the ‘non-square’ pores in the phononic crystal, as the phonon group velocities in the direction with larger projection of pores is more severely suppressed, leading to greater reduction of thermal conductivity in this direction. Our work provides deep insight into thermal transport in phononic crystals and proposes a new strategy to reduce the thermal conductivity of monolayer phosphorene. (paper)

  18. Predicting lattice thermal conductivity with help from ab initio methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broido, David

    2015-03-01

    The lattice thermal conductivity is a fundamental transport parameter that determines the utility a material for specific thermal management applications. Materials with low thermal conductivity find applicability in thermoelectric cooling and energy harvesting. High thermal conductivity materials are urgently needed to help address the ever-growing heat dissipation problem in microelectronic devices. Predictive computational approaches can provide critical guidance in the search and development of new materials for such applications. Ab initio methods for calculating lattice thermal conductivity have demonstrated predictive capability, but while they are becoming increasingly efficient, they are still computationally expensive particularly for complex crystals with large unit cells . In this talk, I will review our work on first principles phonon transport for which the intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity is limited only by phonon-phonon scattering arising from anharmonicity. I will examine use of the phase space for anharmonic phonon scattering and the Grüneisen parameters as measures of the thermal conductivities for a range of materials and compare these to the widely used guidelines stemming from the theory of Liebfried and Schölmann. This research was supported primarily by the NSF under Grant CBET-1402949, and by the S3TEC, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US DOE, office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award No. DE-SC0001299.

  19. Thermal conductivity of polymer composites with oriented boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Hong Jun; Eoh, Young Jun; Park, Sung Dae; Kim, Eung Soo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal conductivity depended on the orientation of BN in the polymer matrices. • Hexagonal boron nitride (BN) particles were treated by C 27 H 27 N 3 O 2 and C 14 H 6 O 8 . • Amphiphilic-agent-treated BN particles are more easily oriented in the composite. • BN/PVA composites with C 14 H 6 O 8 -treated BN showed the highest thermal conductivity. • Thermal conductivity of the composites was compared with several theoretical models. - Abstract: Thermal conductivity of boron nitride (BN) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and/or polyvinyl butyral (PVB) was investigated as a function of the degree of BN orientation, the numbers of hydroxyl groups in the polymer matrices and the amphiphilic agents used. The composites with in-plane orientation of BN showed a higher thermal conductivity than the composites with out-of-plane orientation of BN due to the increase of thermal pathway. For a given BN content, the composites with in-plane orientation of BN/PVA showed higher thermal conductivity than the composites with in-plane orientation of BN/PVB. This result could be attributed to the improved degree of orientation of BN, caused by a larger number of hydroxyl groups being present. Those treated with C 14 H 6 O 8 amphiphilic agent demonstrated a higher thermal conductivity than those treated by C 27 H 27 N 3 O 2 . The measured thermal conductivity of the composites was compared with that predicted by the several theoretical models

  20. Experiments on thermal conductivity in buffer materials for geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, T.; Yano, T.; Wakamatsu, H.; Matsushima, E.

    1989-01-01

    Engineered barriers for geologic disposal for HLW are planned to consist of canister, overpack and buffer elements. One of important physical characteristics of buffer materials is determining temperature profiles within the near field in a repository. Buffer materials require high thermal conductivity to disperse radiogenic heat away to the host rock. As the buffer materials, compacted blocks of the mixture of sodium bentonite and sand have been the most promising candidate in some countries, e.g. Sweden, Switzerland and Japan. The authors have been carrying out a series of thermal dispersion experiments to evaluate thermal conductivity of bentonite/quartz sand blocks. In this study, the following two factors considered to affect thermal properties of the near field were examined: effective thermal conductivities of buffer materials, and heat transfer characteristics of the gap between overpack and buffer materials

  1. Thermal conductivity at the nanoscale: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyver, John W., IV

    With the growing use of nanotechnology and nanodevices in many fields of engineering and science, a need for understanding the thermal properties of such devices has increased. The ability for nanomaterials to conduct heat is highly dependent on the purity of the material, internal boundaries due to material changes and the structure of the material itself. Experimentally measuring the heat transport at the nanoscale is extremely difficult and can only be done as a macro output from the device. Computational methods such as various Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) techniques for studying the contribution of atomic vibrations associated with heat transport properties are very useful. The Green--Kubo method in conjunction with Fourier's law for calculating the thermal conductivity, kappa, has been used in this study and has shown promise as one approach well adapted for understanding nanosystems. Investigations were made of the thermal conductivity using noble gases, modeled with Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions, in solid face-centered cubic (FCC) structures. MC and MD simulations were done to study homogeneous monatomic and binary materials as well as slabs of these materials possessing internal boundaries. Additionally, MD simulations were done on silicon carbide nanowires, nanotubes, and nanofilaments using a potential containing two-body and three-body terms. The results of the MC and MD simulations were matched against available experimental and other simulations and showed that both methods can accurately simulate real materials in a fraction of the time and effort. The results of the study show that in compositionally disordered materials the selection of atomic components by their mass, hard-core atomic diameter, well depth, and relative concentration can change the kappa by as much as an order of magnitude. It was found that a 60% increase in mass produces a 25% decrease in kappa. A 50% increase in interatomic strength produces a 25% increase in

  2. Fiber/matrix interfacial thermal conductance effect on the thermal conductivity of SiC/SiC composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-01-01

    SiC/SiC composites used in fusion reactor applications are subjected to high heat fluxes and require knowledge and tailoring of their in-service thermal conductivity. Accurately predicting the thermal conductivity of SiC/SiC composites as a function of temperature will guide the design of these materials for their intended use, which will eventually include the effects of 14-MeV neutron irradiations. This paper applies an Eshelby–Mori–Tanaka approach (EMTA) to compute the thermal conductivity of unirradiated SiC/SiC composites. The homogenization procedure includes three steps. In the first step EMTA computes the homogenized thermal conductivity of the unidirectional (UD) SiC fiber embraced by its coating layer. The second step computes the thermal conductivity of the UD composite formed by the equivalent SiC fibers embedded in a SiC matrix, and finally the thermal conductivity of the as-formed SiC/SiC composite is obtained by averaging the solution for the UD composite over all possible fiber orientations using the second-order fiber orientation tensor. The EMTA predictions for the transverse thermal conductivity of several types of SiC/SiC composites with different fiber types and interfaces are compared to the predicted and experimental results by Youngblood et al. [J. Nucl. Mater. 307–311 (2002) 1120–1125, Fusion Sci. Technol. 45 (2004) 583–591, Compos. Sci. Technol. 62 (2002) 1127–1139.

  3. Statistical analysis of thermal conductivity of nanofluid containing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thermal conductivity measurements of nanofluids were analysed via two-factor completely randomized design and comparison of data means is carried out with Duncan's multiple-range test. Statistical analysis of experimental data show that temperature and weight fraction have a reasonable impact on the thermal ...

  4. Dependence of thermal conductivity in micro to nano silica

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    on the effects of particle size on thermal conductivity of sili- ca. Several methods have been used to measure thermal con- ductivity of soils and details of these methods have been presented (Donazzi 1977). The methods can be divided into two major categories: steady heat-flow method and transient heat-flow method.

  5. High power solid state retrofit lamp thermal characterization and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakovenko, J.; Formánek, J.; Vladimír, J.; Husák, M.; Werkhoven, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal and thermo-mechanical modeling and characterization of solid state lightening (SSL) retrofit LED Lamp are presented in this paper. Paramount Importance is to design SSL lamps for reliability, in which thermal and thermo-mechanical aspects are key points. The main goal is to get a precise 3D

  6. An Integrated Approach to Thermal Analysis of Pharmaceutical Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Shelley R. Rabel

    2015-01-01

    A three-tiered experiment for undergraduate Instrumental Analysis students is presented in which students characterize the solid-state thermal behavior of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (acetaminophen) and excipient (a-lactose hydrate) using differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and thermal microscopy. Students are…

  7. Measurement of total dissolved solids using electrical conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, Vinod K.; Jat, J.R.; Reddy, G.B.; Balaji Rao, Y.; Phani Babu, C.; Kalyanakrishnan, G.

    2017-01-01

    Total dissolved solids (TDS) is an important parameter for the disposal of effluents generated during processing of different raw materials like Magnesium Di-uranate (MDU), Heat Treated Uranium Peroxide (HTUP), Sodium Di-uranate (SDU) in Uranium Extraction plant and Washed and Dried Frit (WDF) in Zirconium Extraction Plant. The present paper describes the use of electrical conductivity for determination of TDS. As electrical conductivity is matrix dependent property, matrix matched standards were prepared for determination of TDS in ammonium nitrate solution (AN) and mixture of ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulphate (AN/AS) and results were found to be in good agreement when compared with evaporation method. (author)

  8. MHD simulations of coronal dark downflows considering thermal conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurbriggen, E.; Costa, A.; Esquivel, A.; Schneiter, M.; Cécere, M.

    2017-10-01

    While several scenarios have been proposed to explain supra-arcade downflows (SADs) observed descending through turbulent hot regions, none of them have systematically addressed the consideration of thermal conduction. The SADs are known to be voided cavities. Our model assumes that SADs are triggered by bursty localized reconnection events that produce non-linear waves generating the voided cavity. These subdense cavities are sustained in time because they are hotter than their surrounding medium. Due to the low density and large temperature values of the plasma we expect the thermal conduction to be an important process. Our main aim here is to study if it is possible to generate SADs in the framework of our model considering thermal conduction. We carry on 2D MHD simulations including anisotropic thermal conduction, and find that if the magnetic lines envelope the cavities, they can be isolated from the hot environment and be identified as SADs.

  9. Parametrisation of the niobium thermal conductivity in the superconducting state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koechlin, F.; Bonin, B.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal conductivity measurements of niobium sheets manufactured for deep-drawing of superconducting cavities have been gathered. Due to various histories of the niobium samples and a wide range of metal purities (35< RRR<1750) the data offer a large scatter of thermal conductivities. An attempt is made to obtain an analytical expression with realistic parameters for the thermal conductivity between 1.8 K and 9.25 K. The set of parameters deduced from a least square fit of experimental data is not very different from those yielded by the theory of superconducting metals, taken as a starting point. This should make possible to obtain a reasonable guess of the thermal conductivity of niobium in this temperature range, once the RRR and the past history of the metal samples have been determined. (author)

  10. Thermal conductivity of newspaper sandwiched aerated lightweight concrete panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Soon-Ching; Low, Kaw-Sai [Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Genting Kelang, Setapak, 53300 Kuala Lumpur, Wilayah Persekutuan (Malaysia)

    2010-12-15

    Investigation on the thermal conductivity of newspaper sandwiched aerated lightweight concrete (ALC) panels is the main purpose of this study. Various densities of ALC panels ranging from 1700, 1400 and 1100 kg/m{sup 3} with three different aerial intensities of newspaper sandwiched were produced. Investigation was limited to the effect of aerial intensity of newspaper sandwiched and the effect of density of ALC on thermal conductivity. It is found that the thermal conductivity of newspaper sandwiched ALC panels reduced remarkably compared to control ALC panels. The reduction was recorded at 18.0%, 21.8% and 20.7% correspond to densities of 1700, 1400 and 1100 kg/m{sup 3} with just a mere 0.05 g/cm{sup 2} aerial intensity of newspaper sandwiched. Newspaper sandwiched has a significant impact on the performance of thermal conductivity of ALC panels based on regression analysis. (author)

  11. Thermal conductivity measurements at cryogenic temperatures at LASA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broggi, F.; Pedrini, D.; Rossi, L.

    1995-08-01

    Here the improvement realised to have better control of the reference junction temperature and measurements carried out on Nb 3 Sn cut out from 2 different coils (named LASA3 and LASA5), showing the difference between the longitudinal and the transverse thermal conductivity, is described. Two different methods of data analysis are presented, the DAM (derivative approximated method) and the TCI (thermal conductivity integral. The data analysis for the tungsten and the LASA5 coil has been done according to the two methods showing that the TCI method with polynomial functions is not adequate to describe the thermal conductivity. Only a polynomial fit based on the TCI method but limited at a lower order than the nominal, when the data are well distributed along the range of measurements, can describe reasonably the thermal conductivity dependence with the temperature. Finally the measurements on a rod of BSCCO 2212 high T c superconductor are presented

  12. Cryogenic Thermal Conductivity Measurements on Candidate Materials for Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, JIm; Canavan, Ed; Jahromi, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Spacecraft and instruments on space missions are built using a wide variety of carefully-chosen materials. In addition to having mechanical properties appropriate for surviving the launch environment, these materials generally must have thermal conductivity values which meet specific requirements in their operating temperature ranges. Space missions commonly propose to include materials for which the thermal conductivity is not well known at cryogenic temperatures. We developed a test facility in 2004 at NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center to measure material thermal conductivity at temperatures between 4 and 300 Kelvin, and we have characterized many candidate materials since then. The measurement technique is not extremely complex, but proper care to details of the setup, data acquisition and data reduction is necessary for high precision and accuracy. We describe the thermal conductivity measurement process and present results for several materials.

  13. Prediction of thermal conductivity of sedimentary rocks from well logs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sven; Förster, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The calculation of heat-flow density in boreholes requires reliable values for the change of temperature and rock thermal conductivity with depth. As rock samples for laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity (TC) are usually rare geophysical well logs are used alternatively to determine TC...... parameters (i.e. thermal conductivity, density, hydrogen index, sonic interval transit time, gamma-ray response, photoelectric factor) of artificial mineral assemblages consisting 15 rock-forming minerals that are used in different combinations to typify sedimentary rocks. The predictive capacity of the new...... equations is evaluated on subsurface data from four boreholes drilled into the Mesozoic sequence of the North German Basin, including more than 1700 laboratory-measured thermal-conductivity values. Results are compared with those from other approaches published in the past. The new approach predicts TC...

  14. Statistical analysis of thermal conductivity of nanofluid containing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    four temperatures for thermal conductivity of pristine. MWCNTs ... MWCNTs. In other words, the augmentation of the ... TiO2 nanofluid, means with different letters are significantly different .... Chen L and Xie H 2010 Thermochim Acta 497 67.

  15. Thermal conductivities of some lead and bismuth glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velden, P.F. van

    1965-01-01

    Thermal conductivities have been measured, mainly at 40°C, of glasses within the systems PbO-Bi2O3-SiO2, PbO-Bi2O3-Al2O3-SiO2, and BaO- (Bi2O3 or PbO) -SiO2. Aiming at lowest thermal conductivity, preference was given to glasses of low silica and low alumina contents. Glass formation persists at

  16. Mechanism of the thermal conductivity of type-I clathrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Due to their intrinsically low thermal conductivity, intermetallic type-I clathrates are promising candidates for thermoelectric energy conversion, most notably for waste-heat recovery above room temperature. Combining their low thermal conductivity with the enhanced electrical power factor of strongly correlated materials can be considered as one of the most promising routes to a next generation thermoelectric material. However, although much investigated, the physical origin of the low thermal conductivity of type-I clathrates is still debated. Therefore, the main goal of this thesis was to gain deeper insight into the mechanism of the low thermal conductivity of type-I clathrates. On the basis of recent inelastic neutron and X-ray scattering studies on type-I clathrates and skutterudites, an analytical model for describing the phonon thermal conductivity of such filled cage compounds was developed within this thesis. This model is based on the phononic filter effect and on strongly enhanced Umklapp scattering. Data on several Ge-based single crystalline type-I clathrates are discussed in the context of this model, revealing the influence of host framework vacancies, charge carriers, and large defects such as grain boundaries on the low-temperature thermal conductivity of type-I clathrates. Since for waste heat recovery the thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures is of interest, a sophisticated 3w-experiment for accurate measurements of bulk and thin film materials at elevated temperatures was developed. With the help of this experiment, a universal dependence of the intrinsic phonon thermal conductivity of type-I clathrates on the sound velocity and the lowest-lying guest Einstein mode was demonstrated for the first time. Further investigations on thermoelectric materials including the first Ce-containing type-I clathrate, skutterudites, and thin films complete this doctoral work. (author)

  17. Thermal conductivity of ZnTe investigated by molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hanfu; Chu Weiguo

    2009-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of ZnTe with zinc-blende structure has been computed by equilibrium molecular dynamics method based on Green-Kubo formalism. A Tersoff's potential is adopted in the simulation to model the atomic interactions. The calculations are performed as a function of temperature up to 800 K. The calculated thermal conductivities are in agreement with the experimental values between 150 K and 300 K, while the results above the room temperature are comparable with the Slack's equation.

  18. Identification of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and experimental verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Weizhen; Yi, Fajun; Zhu, Yanwei; Meng, Songhe

    2016-01-01

    A modified Levenberg–Marquardt method (LMM) for the identification of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity is proposed; the experiment and structure of the specimen for identification are also designed. The temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of copper C10200 and brass C28000 are identified to verify the effectiveness of the proposed identification method. The comparison between identified results and the measured data of laser flash diffusivity apparatus indicates the fine consistency and potential usage of the proposed method. (paper)

  19. Robust solid polymer electrolyte for conducting IPN actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Festin, Nicolas; Maziz, Ali; Plesse, Cédric; Teyssié, Dominique; Chevrot, Claude; Vidal, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) based on nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) as first component and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) as second component were synthesized and used as a solid polymer electrolyte film in the design of a mechanically robust conducting IPN actuator. IPN mechanical properties and morphologies were mainly investigated by dynamic mechanical analysis and transmission electron microscopy. For 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis-(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-imide (EMITFSI) swollen IPNs, conductivity values are close to 1 × 10 −3 S cm −1 at 25 ° C. Conducting IPN actuators have been synthesized by chemical polymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) within the PEO/NBR IPN. A pseudo-trilayer configuration has been obtained with PEO/NBR IPN sandwiched between two interpenetrated PEDOT electrodes. The robust conducting IPN actuators showed a free strain of 2.4% and a blocking force of 30 mN for a low applied potential of ±2 V. (paper)

  20. Robust solid polymer electrolyte for conducting IPN actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festin, Nicolas; Maziz, Ali; Plesse, Cédric; Teyssié, Dominique; Chevrot, Claude; Vidal, Frédéric

    2013-10-01

    Interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) based on nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) as first component and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) as second component were synthesized and used as a solid polymer electrolyte film in the design of a mechanically robust conducting IPN actuator. IPN mechanical properties and morphologies were mainly investigated by dynamic mechanical analysis and transmission electron microscopy. For 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis-(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-imide (EMITFSI) swollen IPNs, conductivity values are close to 1 × 10-3 S cm-1 at 25 ° C. Conducting IPN actuators have been synthesized by chemical polymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) within the PEO/NBR IPN. A pseudo-trilayer configuration has been obtained with PEO/NBR IPN sandwiched between two interpenetrated PEDOT electrodes. The robust conducting IPN actuators showed a free strain of 2.4% and a blocking force of 30 mN for a low applied potential of ±2 V.

  1. Thermal conductivity of leaf compost used in biofilters: An experimental and theoretical investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrakanthi, M.; Mehrotra, A.K.; Hettiaratchi, J.P.A.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal conductivity is an important property that governs the behaviour of leaf compost biofilters used in treating gaseous pollutants. Measurements were carried out for the thermal conductivity (K) of 44 samples of leaf compost, covering wide ranges of the volume fractions of water (ξ w ), solids (ξ s ) and air (ξ a ), at 20 deg. C using an unsteady state thermal probe. The results indicated that the compost thermal conductivity increased with an increase in ξ w , with a decrease in ξ a , and with an increase in the degree of saturation (defined as the volumetric fraction of water in the total void space). The predictions from the Woodside-Messmer quadratic parallel (QP) model for the thermal conductivity of leaf compost were higher than the experimental values. A simple linear relationship was developed between the thermal conductivity and the degree of saturation, which provided a satisfactory correlation for the data measured in this study as well as those reported recently for sandy and clay loams. -Thermal conductivity of compost exhibits a linear relationship with the degree of saturation of the matrix

  2. Evaluation of uranium dioxide thermal conductivity using molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woongkee; Kaviany, Massoud; Shim, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    It can be extended to larger space, time scale and even real reactor situation with fission product as multi-scale formalism. Uranium dioxide is a fluorite structure with Fm3m space group. Since it is insulator, dominant heat carrier is phonon, rather than electrons. So, using equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, we present the appropriate calculation parameters in MD simulation by calculating thermal conductivity and application of it to the thermal conductivity of polycrystal. In this work, we investigate thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide and optimize the parameters related to its process. In this process, called Green Kubo formula, there are two parameters i.e correlation length and sampling interval, which effect on ensemble integration in order to obtain thermal conductivity. Through several comparisons, long correlation length and short sampling interval give better results. Using this strategy, thermal conductivity of poly crystal is obtained and comparison with that of pure crystal is made. Thermal conductivity of poly crystal show lower value that that of pure crystal. In further study, we broaden the study to transport coefficient of radiation damaged structures using molecular dynamics. Although molecular dynamics is tools for treating microscopic scale, most macroscopic issues related to nuclear materials such as voids in fuel materials and weakened mechanical properties by radiation are based on microscopic basis. Thus, research on microscopic scale would be expanded in this field and many hidden mechanism in atomic scales will be revealed via both atomic scale simulations and experiments

  3. Low-temperature thermal conductivity of terbium-gallium garnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inyushkin, A. V.; Taldenkov, A. N.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of paramagnetic Tb 3 Ga 5 O 12 (TbGG) terbium-gallium garnet single crystals is investigated at temperatures from 0.4 to 300 K in magnetic fields up to 3.25 T. A minimum is observed in the temperature dependence κ(T) of thermal conductivity at T min = 0.52 K. This and other singularities on the κ(T) dependence are associated with scattering of phonons from terbium ions. The thermal conductivity at T = 5.1 K strongly depends on the magnetic field direction relative to the crystallographic axes of the crystal. Experimental data are considered using the Debye theory of thermal conductivity taking into account resonance scattering of phonons from Tb 3+ ions. Analysis of the temperature and field dependences of the thermal conductivity indicates the existence of a strong spin-phonon interaction in TbGG. The low-temperature behavior of the thermal conductivity (field and angular dependences) is mainly determined by resonance scattering of phonons at the first quasi-doublet of the electron spectrum of Tb 3+ ion.

  4. Thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galliero, Guillaume; Boned, Christian

    2009-12-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to estimate, analyze, and correlate the thermal conductivity of a fluid composed of short Lennard-Jones chains (up to 16 segments) over a large range of thermodynamic conditions. It is shown that the dilute gas contribution to the thermal conductivity decreases when the chain length increases for a given temperature. In dense states, simulation results indicate that the residual thermal conductivity of the monomer increases strongly with density, but is weakly dependent on the temperature. Compared to the monomer value, it has been noted that the residual thermal conductivity of the chain was slightly decreasing with its length. Using these results, an empirical relation, including a contribution due to the critical enhancement, is proposed to provide an accurate estimation of the thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model (up to 16 segments) over the domain 0.8values of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model merge on the same "universal" curve when plotted as a function of the excess entropy. Furthermore, it is shown that the reduced configurational thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model is approximately proportional to the reduced excess entropy for all fluid states and all chain lengths.

  5. Estimation of effective thermal conductivity tensor from composite microstructure images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, M; Boyard, N; Jarny, Y; Delaunay, D

    2008-01-01

    The determination of the effective thermal properties of inhomogeneous materials is a long-standing problem of continuously interest. The impressive number of methods developed to measure or estimate the thermal properties of composite materials clearly exhibits the importance given to their knowledge. Homogenization models are a cheap way to determine or predict them. Many different approaches of homogenization were developed, but the last advances are credited to numerical methods. In this study, a new computational model is developed to estimate the 2D thermal conductivity tensor and the thermal main directions of a pure carbon/epoxy unidirectional composite. This tool is based on real composite microstructure.

  6. Voltage tunability of thermal conductivity in ferroelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihlefeld, Jon; Hopkins, Patrick Edward

    2016-02-09

    A method to control thermal energy transport uses mobile coherent interfaces in nanoscale ferroelectric films to scatter phonons. The thermal conductivity can be actively tuned, simply by applying an electrical potential across the ferroelectric material and thereby altering the density of these coherent boundaries to directly impact thermal transport at room temperature and above. The invention eliminates the necessity of using moving components or poor efficiency methods to control heat transfer, enabling a means of thermal energy control at the micro- and nano-scales.

  7. A molecular dynamics study of thermal transport in nanoparticle doped Argon like solid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahadat, Muhammad Rubayat Bin, E-mail: rubayat37@gmail.com; Ahmed, Shafkat; Morshed, A. K. M. M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET) Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2016-07-12

    Interfacial phenomena such as mass and type of the interstitial atom, nano scale material defect influence heat transfer and the effect become very significant with the reduction of the material size. Non Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) simulation was carried out in this study to investigate the effect of the interfacial phenomena on solid. Argon like solid was considered in this study and LJ potential was used for atomic interaction. Nanoparticles of different masses and different molecular defects were inserted inside the solid. From the molecular simulation, it was observed that a large interfacial mismatch due to change in mass in the homogenous solid causes distortion of the phonon frequency causing increase in thermal resistance. Position of the doped nanoparticles have more profound effect on the thermal conductivity of the solid whereas influence of the mass ratio is not very significant. Interstitial atom positioned perpendicular to the heat flow causes sharp reduction in thermal conductivity. Structural defect caused by the molecular defect (void) also observed to significantly affect the thermal conductivity of the solid.

  8. Round robin testing of thermal conductivity reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulstrom, L.C.; Tye, R.P.; Smith, S.E.

    1985-07-01

    The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP), operated by Rockwell Hanford Operations, has a need to determine the thermal properties of basalt in the region being considered for a nuclear waste repository in basalt. Experimental data on thermal conductivity and its variation with temperature are information required for the characterization of basalt. To establish thermal conductivity values for the reference materials, an interlaboratory measurements program was undertaken. The program was planned to meet the objectives of performing an experimental characterization of the new stock and providing a detailed analysis of the results such that reference values of thermal conductivity could be determined. This program of measurements of the thermal conductivity of Pyrex 7740 and Pyroceram 9606 has produced recommended values that are within +- 1% of those accepted previously. These measurements together with those of density indicate that the present lots of material are similar to those previously available. Pyrex 7740 and Pyroceram 9606 can continue to be used with confidence as thermal conductivity reference materials for studies on rocks and minerals and other materials of similar thermal conductivity. The uncertainty range for Pyrex 7740 and Pyroceram 9606 up to 300 0 C is +- 10.3% and +- 5.6%, respectively. This range is similar to that indicated for the previously recommended values proposed some 18 years ago. It would appear that the overall state of the art in thermal conductivity measurements for materials in this range has changed little in the intervening years. The above uncertainties, which would have been greater had not three data sets been eliminated, are greater than those which are normally claimed for each individual method. Analyses of these differences through refinements in techniques and additional measurements to higher temperatures are required. 13 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  9. Multiscale Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of Polymer/Carbon Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation was used to estimate the interfacial thermal (Kapitza) resistance between nanoparticles and amorphous and crystalline polymer matrices. Bulk thermal conductivities of the nanocomposites were then estimated using an established effective medium approach. To study functionalization, oligomeric ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymers were chemically bonded to a single wall carbon nanotube. The results, in a poly(ethylene-vinyl acetate) matrix, are similar to those obtained previously for grafted linear hydrocarbon chains. To study the effect of noncovalent functionalization, two types of polyethylene matrices. -- aligned (extended-chain crystalline) vs. amorphous (random coils) were modeled. Both matrices produced the same interfacial thermal resistance values. Finally, functionalization of edges and faces of plate-like graphite nanoparticles was found to be only modestly effective in reducing the interfacial thermal resistance and improving the composite thermal conductivity

  10. Thermal diffusivity of solids; Diffusivite thermique des solides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleimann, H; Fetiveau, Y; Richard, M; Eyraud, L; Eyraud, C; Elston, J [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees, Lyon (France); Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The authors recall the different methods of thermal diffusivity measurements and point out the possible causes of errors. They study in particular the sinusoidal methods of thermal attack using the measurement of either an amplitude or a phase, in which the controlled energy in-put is obtained either by Joule effect or by radiation. By the use of controlled systems, it is possible to apply those methods to the measurement of thermal diffusivity of their samples in a large scale of temperature. The authors describe their experimental achievements and give several results dealing especially with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, BeO, MgO. (author) [French] Les auteurs rappellent les diverses methodes de mesure de la diffusivite thermique et indiquent les sources d'erreurs possibles. Ils etudient particulierement les methodes d'attaque thermique sinusoidales utilisant soit une mesure d'amplitude, soit une mesure de phase dans lesquelles l'apport energetique controle est effectue soit par effet Joule, soit par rayonnement. La mise en oeuvre de systemes asservis permet l'utilisation de ces methodes pour la mesure de la diffusivite thermique d'echantillons minces dans une gamme etendue de temperature. Les auteurs decrivent les realisations experimentales et fournissent divers resultats concernant notamment Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, BeO, MgO. (auteur)

  11. All conducting polymer electrodes for asymmetric solid-state supercapacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Kurra, Narendra

    2015-02-16

    In this study, we report the fabrication of solid-state asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs) based on conducting polymer electrodes on a plastic substrate. Nanostructured conducting polymers of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), PEDOT, and polyaniline (PANI) are deposited electrochemically over Au-coated polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) plastic substrates. Due to the electron donating nature of the oxygen groups in the PEDOT, reduction potentials are higher, allowing it to be used as a negative electrode material. In addition, the high stability of PEDOT in its oxidised state makes it capable to exhibit electrochemical activity in a wide potential window. This can qualify PEDOT to be used as a negative electrode in fabricating asymmetric solid state supercapacitors with PANI as a positive electrode while employing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/H2SO4 gel electrolyte. The ASCs exhibit a maximum power density of 2.8 W cm−3 at an energy density of 9 mW h cm−3, which is superior to the carbonaceous and metal oxide based ASC solid state devices. Furthermore, the tandem configuration of asymmetric supercapacitors is shown to be capable of powering a red light emitting diode for about 1 minute after charging for 10 seconds.

  12. Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Measurements of CDA 510 Phosphor Bronze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, James E.; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Many cryogenic systems use electrical cables containing phosphor bronze wire. While phosphor bronze's electrical and thermal conductivity values have been published, there is significant variation among different phosphor bronze formulations. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will use several phosphor bronze wire harnesses containing a specific formulation (CDA 510, annealed temper). The heat conducted into the JWST instrument stage is dominated by these harnesses, and approximately half of the harness conductance is due to the phosphor bronze wires. Since the JWST radiators are expected to just keep the instruments at their operating temperature with limited cooling margin, it is important to know the thermal conductivity of the actual alloy being used. We describe an experiment which measured the electrical and thermal conductivity of this material between 4 and 295 Kelvin.

  13. Thermal conductive epoxy enhanced by nanodiamond-coated carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Jiang, Guohua

    2017-11-01

    Nanodiamond (ND) particles were coated on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by chemical reactions. Reliable bonding was formed by the combination of acyl chloride on NDs and amine group on CNTs. ND coated CNTs (CNT-ND) were dispersed into epoxy to fabricate thermal conductive resins. The results show that the surface energy of CNTs is decreased by the coated NDs, which is contributed to the excellent dispersion of CNT-NDs in the epoxy matrix. The heat-transfer channels were built by the venous CNTs cooperating with the coated NDs, which not only plays an effective role of heat conduction for CNTs and NDs, but also avoids the electrical leakage by the protection of NDs surrounding outside of CNTs. Electrical and thermal conductance measurements demonstrate that the influence of the CNT-ND incorporation on the electrical conductance is minor, however, the thermal conductivity is improved significantly for the epoxy filled with CNT-ND.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Design and Construction of a Thermal Contact Resistance and Thermal Conductivity Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    thank my Mom, Dad , Allison, Jessica, and father-in-law, Tom, for always being there to listen and encourage me. xxiv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY...thermal conductivity is temperature measurement inaccuracies. A probe constructed of a poor thermally conductive material when inserted into a hot...interface- resistance-measurement-using-a-transient-method/ [26] H. Fukushima, L. T. Drzal, B. P. Rook and M. J. Rich , “Thermal conductivity of exfoliated

  15. Determining Effective Thermal Conductivity of Fabrics by Using Fractal Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fanglong; Li, Kejing

    2010-03-01

    In this article, a fractal effective thermal conductivity model for woven fabrics with multiple layers is developed. Structural models of yarn and plain woven fabric are derived based on the fractal characteristics of macro-pores (gap or channel) between the yarns and micro-pores inside the yarns. The fractal effective thermal conductivity model can be expressed as a function of the pore structure (fractal dimension) and architectural parameters of the woven fabric. Good agreement is found between the fractal model and the thermal conductivity measurements in the general porosity ranges. It is expected that the model will be helpful in the evaluation of thermal comfort for woven fabric in the whole range of porosity.

  16. Fuel thermal conductivity (FTHCON). Status report. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagrman, D. L.

    1979-02-01

    An improvement of the fuel thermal conductivity subcode is described which is part of the fuel rod behavior modeling task performed at EG and G Idaho, Inc. The original version was published in the Materials Properties (MATPRO) Handbook, Section A-2 (Fuel Thermal Conductivity). The improved version incorporates data which were not included in the previous work and omits some previously used data which are believed to come from cracked specimens. The models for the effect of porosity on thermal conductivity and for the electronic contribution to thermal coductivity have been completely revised in order to place these models on a more mechanistic basis. As a result of modeling improvements the standard error of the model with respect to its data base has been significantly reduced.

  17. Superior thermal conductivity in suspended bilayer hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengru; Guo, Jie; Dong, Lan; Aiyiti, Adili; Xu, Xiangfan; Li, Baowen

    2016-01-01

    We reported the basal-plane thermal conductivity in exfoliated bilayer hexagonal boron nitride h-BN that was measured using suspended prepatterned microstructures. The h-BN sample suitable for thermal measurements was fabricated by dry-transfer method, whose sample quality, due to less polymer residues on surfaces, is believed to be superior to that of PMMA-mediated samples. The measured room temperature thermal conductivity is around 484 Wm−1K−1(+141 Wm−1K−1/ −24 Wm−1K−1) which exceeds that in bulk h-BN, providing experimental observation of the thickness-dependent thermal conductivity in suspended few-layer h-BN. PMID:27142571

  18. Atomistic Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasanella, Nicholas A.; Sundararaghavan, Veera

    2016-05-01

    The Green-Kubo method was used to investigate the thermal conductivity as a function of temperature for epoxy/single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) nanocomposites. An epoxy network of DGEBA-DDS was built using the `dendrimer' growth approach, and conductivity was computed by taking into account long-range Coulombic forces via a k-space approach. Thermal conductivity was calculated in the direction perpendicular to, and along the SWNT axis for functionalized and pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposites. Inefficient phonon transport at the ends of nanotubes is an important factor in the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites, and for this reason discontinuous nanotubes were modeled in addition to long nanotubes. The thermal conductivity of the long, pristine SWNT/epoxy system is equivalent to that of an isolated SWNT along its axis, but there was a 27% reduction perpendicular to the nanotube axis. The functionalized, long SWNT/epoxy system had a very large increase in thermal conductivity along the nanotube axis (~700%), as well as the directions perpendicular to the nanotube (64%). The discontinuous nanotubes displayed an increased thermal conductivity along the SWNT axis compared to neat epoxy (103-115% for the pristine SWNT/epoxy, and 91-103% for functionalized SWNT/epoxy system). The functionalized system also showed a 42% improvement perpendicular to the nanotube, while the pristine SWNT/epoxy system had no improvement over epoxy. The thermal conductivity tensor is averaged over all possible orientations to see the effects of randomly orientated nanotubes, and allow for experimental comparison. Excellent agreement is seen for the discontinuous, pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposite. These simulations demonstrate there exists a threshold of the SWNT length where the best improvement for a composite system with randomly oriented nanotubes would transition from pristine SWNTs to functionalized SWNTs.

  19. Discussion on the thermal conductivity enhancement of nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Increasing interests have been paid to nanofluids because of the intriguing heat transfer enhancement performances presented by this kind of promising heat transfer media. We produced a series of nanofluids and measured their thermal conductivities. In this article, we discussed the measurements and the enhancements of the thermal conductivity of a variety of nanofluids. The base fluids used included those that are most employed heat transfer fluids, such as deionized water (DW), ethylene glycol (EG), glycerol, silicone oil, and the binary mixture of DW and EG. Various nanoparticles (NPs) involving Al2O3 NPs with different sizes, SiC NPs with different shapes, MgO NPs, ZnO NPs, SiO2 NPs, Fe3O4 NPs, TiO2 NPs, diamond NPs, and carbon nanotubes with different pretreatments were used as additives. Our findings demonstrated that the thermal conductivity enhancements of nanofluids could be influenced by multi-faceted factors including the volume fraction of the dispersed NPs, the tested temperature, the thermal conductivity of the base fluid, the size of the dispersed NPs, the pretreatment process, and the additives of the fluids. The thermal transport mechanisms in nanofluids were further discussed, and the promising approaches for optimizing the thermal conductivity of nanofluids have been proposed. PMID:21711638

  20. Pretest Calculations of Temperature Changes for Field Thermal Conductivity Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N.S. Brodsky

    2002-01-01

    A large volume fraction of the potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain may reside in the Tptpll (Tertiary, Paintbrush Group, Topopah Spring Tuff, crystal poor, lower lithophysal) lithostratigraphic unit. This unit is characterized by voids, or lithophysae, which range in size from centimeters to meters. A series of thermal conductivity field tests are planned in the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. The objective of the pretest calculation described in this document is to predict changes in temperatures in the surrounding rock for these tests for a given heater power and a set of thermal transport properties. The calculation can be extended, as described in this document, to obtain thermal conductivity, thermal capacitance (density x heat capacity, J · m -3 · K -1 ), and thermal diffusivity from the field data. The work has been conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan For: Testing and Monitoring'' (BSC 2001). One of the outcomes of this analysis is to determine the initial output of the heater. This heater output must be sufficiently high that it will provide results in a reasonably short period of time (within several weeks or a month) and be sufficiently high that the heat increase is detectable by the instruments employed in the test. The test will be conducted in stages and heater output will be step increased as the test progresses. If the initial temperature is set too high, the experiment will not have as many steps and thus fewer thermal conductivity data points will result

  1. Robustly Engineering Thermal Conductivity of Bilayer Graphene by Interlayer Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Gao, Yufei; Chen, Yuli; Hu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Graphene and its bilayer structure are the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon, whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. Their realistic applications in emerging nanoelectronics usually call for thermal transport manipulation in a controllable and precise manner. In this paper we systematically studied the effect of interlayer covalent bonding, in particular different interlay bonding arrangement, on the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. It is revealed that, the thermal conductivity of randomly bonded bilayer graphene decreases monotonically with the increase of interlayer bonding density, however, for the regularly bonded bilayer graphene structure the thermal conductivity possesses unexpectedly non-monotonic dependence on the interlayer bonding density. The results suggest that the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene depends not only on the interlayer bonding density, but also on the detailed topological configuration of the interlayer bonding. The underlying mechanism for this abnormal phenomenon is identified by means of phonon spectral energy density, participation ratio and mode weight factor analysis. The large tunability of thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene through rational interlayer bonding arrangement paves the way to achieve other desired properties for potential nanoelectronics applications involving graphene layers. PMID:26911859

  2. Modelling and Characterization of Effective Thermal Conductivity of Single Hollow Glass Microsphere and Its Powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Wang, Hui; Qin, Qing-Hua

    2018-01-14

    Tiny hollow glass microsphere (HGM) can be applied for designing new light-weighted and thermal-insulated composites as high strength core, owing to its hollow structure. However, little work has been found for studying its own overall thermal conductivity independent of any matrix, which generally cannot be measured or evaluated directly. In this study, the overall thermal conductivity of HGM is investigated experimentally and numerically. The experimental investigation of thermal conductivity of HGM powder is performed by the transient plane source (TPS) technique to provide a reference to numerical results, which are obtained by a developed three-dimensional two-step hierarchical computational method. In the present method, three heterogeneous HGM stacking elements representing different distributions of HGMs in the powder are assumed. Each stacking element and its equivalent homogeneous solid counterpart are, respectively, embedded into a fictitious matrix material as fillers to form two equivalent composite systems at different levels, and then the overall thermal conductivity of each stacking element can be numerically determined through the equivalence of the two systems. The comparison of experimental and computational results indicates the present computational modeling can be used for effectively predicting the overall thermal conductivity of single HGM and its powder in a flexible way. Besides, it is necessary to note that the influence of thermal interfacial resistance cannot be removed from the experimental results in the TPS measurement.

  3. Ionic Conductivity of Solid Lithium Iodide and its Monohydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Finn Willy

    1981-01-01

    The solid electrolytes LiI, LiI,H2O and LiI,D2O have been characterized by ac- and dc-conductivity measurements. LiI exhibits two conductivity regions: an extrinsic below ≈ 180°C and an intrinsic above, with activation energies of 0.43±0.04 eV and 0.81±0.05 eV respectively. The room temperature c...... conductivities of the hydrates LiI,H2O and LiI,D2O are 6.6× 10−6 and 6.1×10−6 (Ω cm)−1 respectively. The activation energy for Li-ion motion in LiI,D2O is 0.66±0.05 eV....

  4. Thermal conductivity of yttrium iron garnet at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Y.P.; Sing, D.P.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of the low-temperature thermal conductivity of yttrium iron garnet is presented giving consideration to the fact that in a conventional conductivity experiment the magnon temperature gradient inside a magnetic insulator need not be necessarily equal to the phonon temperature gradient. Consequently the effective conductivity can be less than the algebraic sum of the phonon and magnon intrinsic conductivities, depending on the magnon-phonon thermal relaxation rate. This relaxation rate has been distinguished from the individual phonon and magnon relaxation rates and an expression is derived for it. Theoretical calculations of the effective conductivity are found to be in good agreement with experimental results. The contribution of magnons to the effective conductivity is observed to be small at all temperatures below the conductivity maximum. (author)

  5. Importance of layer thermal conductivity on the sharpness of patterns produced by laser interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peláez, R.J., E-mail: rpelaez@io.cfmac.csic.es [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Afonso, C.N. [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Škereň, M. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Brehova 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Bulíř, J. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Temperature profile matches laser intensity profile in poor thermally conducting layers. • Patterns produced in poor thermally conducting layers have sharp interfaces. • Lateral heat flow smears the temperature profile in thermally conducting layers. • Both liquid and solid state dewetting occurs upon patterning thermally conducting layers. • The thermal conductivity of layers limits the minimum period achievable. - Abstract: In this work, we compare patterns produced in Ag layers having similar thickness in the range 8.3–10.8 nm but having different initial nanostructure, i.e. behaving either as discontinuous or continuous layers and thus having very different thermal conductivities. The patterns are produced by exposing a phase mask to an excimer laser operating at 193 nm and using a projection optics that leads to similar fringed patterns with periods in the range 6.3–6.7 μm. The layer breaks up into isolated NPs due to laser induced melting at the regions around the intensity maxima sites. The resulting fringes have sharp interfaces in the case of discontinuous layers while a variety of regions across the pattern with no sharp interfaces are produced in the case of continuous layers. The results show that while the temperature distribution across the pattern matches almost perfectly the laser beam intensity profile for the former case, it becomes smeared due to lateral heat flow for the latter case. These results provide evidences for significant heating at the intensity minima sites that lead to solid-state dewetting and will eventually limit the minimum period achievable in the case of continuous metal layers or thermally conducting layers.

  6. A thermal conductivity model for U-­Si compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-02

    U3Si2 is a candidate for accident tolerant nuclear fuel being developed as an alternative to UO2 in commercial light water reactors (LWRs). One of its main benefits compared to UO2 is higher thermal conductivity that increases with temperature. This increase is contrary to UO2, for which the thermal conductivity decreases with temperature. The reason for the difference is the electronic origin of thermal conductivity in U3Si2, as compared to the phonon mechanism responsible for thermal transport in UO2. The phonon thermal conductivity in UO2 is unusually low for a fluorite oxide due to the strong interaction with the spins in the paramagnetic phase. The thermal conductivity of U3Si2 as well as other U-­Si compounds has been measured experimentally [1-­4]. However, for fuel performance simulations it is also critical to model the degradation of the thermal conductivity due to damage and microstructure evolution caused by the reactor environment (irradiation and high temperature). For UO2 this reduction is substantial and it has been the topic of extensive NEAMS research resulting in several publications [5, 6]. There are no data or models for the evolution of the U3Si2 thermal conductivity under irradiation. We know that the intrinsic thermal conductivities of UO2 (semi-conductor) and U3Si2 (metal) are very different, and we do not necessarily expect the dependence on damage to be the same either, which could present another advantage for the silicide fuel. In this report we summarize the first step in developing a model for the thermal conductivity of U-­Si compounds with the goal of capturing the effect of damage in U3Si2. Next year, we will focus on lattice damage. We will also attempt to assess the impact of fission gas bubbles.

  7. Thermal conductivity of mesoporous films measured by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoib, B.; Filser, S.; Petermann, N.; Wiggers, H.; Stutzmann, M.; Brandt, M. S.

    2014-04-01

    We measure the in-plane thermal conductance of mesoporous Ge and SiGe thin films using the Raman-shift method and, based on a finite differences simulation accounting for the geometry of the sample, extract the in-plane thermal conductivity. For a suspended thin film of laser-sintered SiGe nanoparticles doped with phosphorus, we find an effective in-plane thermal conductivity of 0.05 W/m K in vacuum for a temperature difference of 400 K and a mean temperature of 500 K. Under similar conditions, the effective in-plane thermal conductivity of a laser-sintered undoped Ge nanoparticle film is 0.5 W/m K. Accounting for a porosity of approximately 50%, the normalized thermal conductivities are 0.1 W/m K and 1 W/m K, respectively. The thermoelectric performance is discussed, considering that the electrical in-plane conductivity is also affected by the mesoporosity.

  8. Advances in estimation technology of thermal conductivity of irradiated fuels (1). Application of a thermal microscope to measure the thermal conductivity of the second phases in irradiated pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Masayoshi; Murakami, Yukihiro

    2011-01-01

    CeO 2 sample as a surrogate for fuel and BaCeO 3 and BaMoO 4 samples as surrogates for the second phases, which have a lower thermal conductivity than the fuel matrix, were made. The thermal conductivity of these samples was measured by a thermal microscope. In this method, the thermal conductivity of a small region (e.g. 20 μm x 20 μm) of the sample can be measured. The valid thermal conductivity values for all the samples were obtained and the conditions of sample surface preparation and the thermal microscope measurement were found out. The thermal conductivity of a CeO 2 composite pellet which had the BaCeO 3 or BaMoO 4 second phase layer was also estimated. (author)

  9. Estimation of Thermal Conductivity in the North- Western Niger Delta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thermal conductivity estimates are computed from nineteen petroleum wells in the north-western Niger Delta, Nigeria, using a geometric mean model. Sonic and gamma-ray logs were digitised and used in the estimation of in situ conductivity. The Niger Delta is composed of three major diachronous lithostratigraphic units of ...

  10. In-pile Thermal Conductivity Characterization with Time Resolved Raman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xinwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Hurley, David H. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2018-03-19

    The project is designed to achieve three objectives: (1) Develop a novel time resolved Raman technology for direct measurement of fuel and cladding thermal conductivity. (2) Validate and improve the technology development by measuring ceramic materials germane to the nuclear industry. (3) Conduct instrumentation development to integrate optical fiber into our sensing system for eventual in-pile measurement. We have developed three new techniques: time-domain differential Raman (TD-Raman), frequency-resolved Raman (FR-Raman), and energy transport state-resolved Raman (ET-Raman). The TD-Raman varies the laser heating time and does simultaneous Raman thermal probing, the FR-Raman probes the material’s thermal response under periodical laser heating of different frequencies, and the ET-Raman probes the thermal response under steady and pulsed laser heating. The measurement capacity of these techniques have been fully assessed and verified by measuring micro/nanoscale materials. All these techniques do not need the data of laser absorption and absolute material temperature rise, yet still be able to measure the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity with unprecedented accuracy. It is expected they will have broad applications for in-pile thermal characterization of nuclear materials based on pure optical heating and sensing.

  11. Process for fabricating composite material having high thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colella, Nicholas J.; Davidson, Howard L.; Kerns, John A.; Makowiecki, Daniel M.

    2001-01-01

    A process for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost.

  12. Thermal conductivity measurements in porous mixtures of methane hydrate and quartz sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W.F.; deMartin, B.J.; Kirby, S.H.; Pinkston, J.; Ruppel, C.D.

    2002-01-01

    Using von Herzen and Maxwell's needle probe method, we measured thermal conductivity in four porous mixtures of quartz sand and methane gas hydrate, with hydrate composing 0, 33, 67 and 100% of the solid volume. Thermal conductivities were measured at a constant methane pore pressure of 24.8 MPa between -20 and +15??C, and at a constant temperature of -10??C between 3.5 and 27.6 MPa methane pore pressure. Thermal conductivity decreased with increasing temperature and increased with increasing methane pore pressure. Both dependencies weakened with increasing hydrate content. Despite the high thermal conductivity of quartz relative to methane hydrate, the largest thermal conductivity was measured in the mixture containing 33% hydrate rather than in hydrate-free sand. This suggests gas hydrate enhanced grain-to-grain heat transfer, perhaps due to intergranular contact growth during hydrate synthesis. These results for gas-filled porous mixtures can help constrain thermal conductivity estimates in porous, gas hydrate-bearing systems.

  13. Thermal Conduction in Vertically Aligned Copper Nanowire Arrays and Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barako, Michael T; Roy-Panzer, Shilpi; English, Timothy S; Kodama, Takashi; Asheghi, Mehdi; Kenny, Thomas W; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2015-09-02

    The ability to efficiently and reliably transfer heat between sources and sinks is often a bottleneck in the thermal management of modern energy conversion technologies ranging from microelectronics to thermoelectric power generation. These interfaces contribute parasitic thermal resistances that reduce device performance and are subjected to thermomechanical stresses that degrade device lifetime. Dense arrays of vertically aligned metal nanowires (NWs) offer the unique combination of thermal conductance from the constituent metal and mechanical compliance from the high aspect ratio geometry to increase interfacial heat transfer and device reliability. In the present work, we synthesize copper NW arrays directly onto substrates via templated electrodeposition and extend this technique through the use of a sacrificial overplating layer to achieve improved uniformity. Furthermore, we infiltrate the array with an organic phase change material and demonstrate the preservation of thermal properties. We use the 3ω method to measure the axial thermal conductivity of freestanding copper NW arrays to be as high as 70 W m(-1) K(-1), which is more than an order of magnitude larger than most commercial interface materials and enhanced-conductivity nanocomposites reported in the literature. These arrays are highly anisotropic, and the lateral thermal conductivity is found to be only 1-2 W m(-1) K(-1). We use these measured properties to elucidate the governing array-scale transport mechanisms, which include the effects of morphology and energy carrier scattering from size effects and grain boundaries.

  14. Shear deformation-induced anisotropic thermal conductivity of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Liu; Shi, Sanqiang; Wei, Gaosheng; Du, Xiaoze

    2018-01-03

    Graphene-based materials exhibit intriguing phononic and thermal properties. In this paper, we have investigated the heat conductance in graphene sheets under shear-strain-induced wrinkling deformation, using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. A significant orientation dependence of the thermal conductivity of graphene wrinkles (GWs) is observed. The directional dependence of the thermal conductivity of GWs stems from the anisotropy of phonon group velocities as revealed by the G-band broadening of the phonon density of states (DOS), the anisotropy of thermal resistance as evidenced by the G-band peak mismatch of the phonon DOS, and the anisotropy of phonon relaxation times as a direct result of the double-exponential-fitting of the heat current autocorrelation function. By analyzing the relative contributions of different lattice vibrations to the heat flux, we have shown that the contributions of different lattice vibrations to the heat flux of GWs are sensitive to the heat flux direction, which further indicates the orientation-dependent thermal conductivity of GWs. Moreover, we have found that, in the strain range of 0-0.1, the anisotropy ratio of GWs increases monotonously with increasing shear strain. This is induced by the change in the number of wrinkles, which is more influential in the direction perpendicular to the wrinkle texture. The findings elucidated here emphasize the utility of wrinkle engineering for manipulation of nanoscale heat transport, which offers opportunities for the development of thermal channeling devices.

  15. Effects of lithium insertion on thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Wen; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2015-01-01

    Recently, silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have been applied as high-performance Li battery anodes, since they can overcome the pulverization and mechanical fracture during lithiation. Although thermal stability is one of the most important parameters that determine safety of Li batteries, thermal conductivity of SiNWs with Li insertion remains unclear. In this letter, using molecular dynamics simulations, we study room temperature thermal conductivity of SiNWs with Li insertion. It is found that compared with the pristine SiNW, there is as much as 60% reduction in thermal conductivity with 10% concentration of inserted Li atoms, while under the same impurity concentration the reduction in thermal conductivity of the mass-disordered SiNW is only 30%. With lattice dynamics calculations and normal mode decomposition, it is revealed that the phonon lifetimes in SiNWs decrease greatly due to strong scattering of phonons by vibrational modes of Li atoms, especially for those high frequency phonons. The observed strong phonon scattering phenomenon in Li-inserted SiNWs is similar to the phonon rattling effect. Our study serves as an exploration of thermal properties of SiNWs as Li battery anodes or weakly coupled with impurity atoms

  16. Thermal conductivities and conduction mechanisms of Sb-Te Alloys at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Rui; Endo, Rie; Kobayashi, Yoshinao; Susa, Masahiro; Kuwahara, Masashi

    2011-01-01

    Sb-Te alloys have drawn much attention due to its application in phase change memory as well as the unique properties as chalcogenide. In this work, the thermal conductivities of Sb-x mol%Te alloys (x = 14, 25, 44, 60, 70, and 90) have been measured by the hot strip method from room temperature up to temperature just below the respective melting points. For the intermetallic compound Sb 2 Te 3 (x = 60), the thermal conductivity decreases up to approximately 600 K and then increases. For other Sb-x mol%Te alloys where x > 60, the thermal conductivities of the alloys decrease with increasing temperature. In contrast, for x < 60, the thermal conductivities of the alloys keep roughly constant up to approximately 600 K and then increase with increasing temperature. It is proposed that free electron dominates the heat transport below 600 K, and ambipolar diffusion also contributes to the increase in the thermal conductivity at higher temperatures. The prediction equation from temperature and chemical composition has been proposed for thermal conductivities of Sb-Te alloys.

  17. The thermal properties of a carbon nanotube-enriched epoxy: Thermal conductivity, curing, and degradation kinetics

    KAUST Repository

    Ventura, Isaac Aguilar; Rahaman, Ariful; Lubineau, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    conductivity, and degradation kinetics were studied. Introducing the MWCNTs increased the curing activation energy as revealed by differential scanning calorimetry. The final thermal conductivity of the 0.5 and 1.0 wt % MWCNT-enriched epoxy samples measured

  18. Novel thermal efficiency-based model for determination of thermal conductivity of membrane distillation membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanneste, Johan; Bush, John A.; Hickenbottom, Kerri L.; Marks, Christopher A.; Jassby, David

    2017-01-01

    Development and selection of membranes for membrane distillation (MD) could be accelerated if all performance-determining characteristics of the membrane could be obtained during MD operation without the need to recur to specialized or cumbersome porosity or thermal conductivity measurement techniques. By redefining the thermal efficiency, the Schofield method could be adapted to describe the flux without prior knowledge of membrane porosity, thickness, or thermal conductivity. A total of 17 commercially available membranes were analyzed in terms of flux and thermal efficiency to assess their suitability for application in MD. The thermal-efficiency based model described the flux with an average %RMSE of 4.5%, which was in the same range as the standard deviation on the measured flux. The redefinition of the thermal efficiency also enabled MD to be used as a novel thermal conductivity measurement device for thin porous hydrophobic films that cannot be measured with the conventional laser flash diffusivity technique.

  19. Reduction of thermal conductivity in phononic nanomesh structures

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Jen-Kan

    2010-07-25

    Controlling the thermal conductivity of a material independently of its electrical conductivity continues to be a goal for researchers working on thermoelectric materials for use in energy applications1,2 and in the cooling of integrated circuits3. In principle, the thermal conductivity κ and the electrical conductivity σ may be independently optimized in semiconducting nanostructures because different length scales are associated with phonons (which carry heat) and electric charges (which carry current). Phonons are scattered at surfaces and interfaces, so κ generally decreases as the surface-to-volume ratio increases. In contrast, σ is less sensitive to a decrease in nanostructure size, although at sufficiently small sizes it will degrade through the scattering of charge carriers at interfaces. Here, we demonstrate an approach to independently controlling κ based on altering the phonon band structure of a semiconductor thin film through the formation of a phononic nanomesh film. These films are patterned with periodic spacings that are comparable to, or shorter than, the phonon mean free path. The nanomesh structure exhibits a substantially lower thermal conductivity than an equivalently prepared array of silicon nanowires, even though this array has a significantly higher surface-to-volume ratio. Bulk-like electrical conductivity is preserved. We suggest that this development is a step towards a coherent mechanism for lowering thermal conductivity. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  20. Reduction of thermal conductivity in phononic nanomesh structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jen-Kan; Mitrovic, Slobodan; Tham, Douglas; Varghese, Joseph; Heath, James R

    2010-10-01

    Controlling the thermal conductivity of a material independently of its electrical conductivity continues to be a goal for researchers working on thermoelectric materials for use in energy applications and in the cooling of integrated circuits. In principle, the thermal conductivity κ and the electrical conductivity σ may be independently optimized in semiconducting nanostructures because different length scales are associated with phonons (which carry heat) and electric charges (which carry current). Phonons are scattered at surfaces and interfaces, so κ generally decreases as the surface-to-volume ratio increases. In contrast, σ is less sensitive to a decrease in nanostructure size, although at sufficiently small sizes it will degrade through the scattering of charge carriers at interfaces. Here, we demonstrate an approach to independently controlling κ based on altering the phonon band structure of a semiconductor thin film through the formation of a phononic nanomesh film. These films are patterned with periodic spacings that are comparable to, or shorter than, the phonon mean free path. The nanomesh structure exhibits a substantially lower thermal conductivity than an equivalently prepared array of silicon nanowires, even though this array has a significantly higher surface-to-volume ratio. Bulk-like electrical conductivity is preserved. We suggest that this development is a step towards a coherent mechanism for lowering thermal conductivity.

  1. Size dictated thermal conductivity of GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beechem, Thomas E.; McDonald, Anthony E.; Fuller, Elliot J.; Talin, A. Alec; Rost, Christina M.; Maria, Jon-Paul; Gaskins, John T.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2016-09-01

    The thermal conductivity of n- and p-type doped gallium nitride (GaN) epilayers having thicknesses of 3-4 μm was investigated using time domain thermoreflectance. Despite possessing carrier concentrations ranging across 3 decades (1015-1018 cm-3), n-type layers exhibit a nearly constant thermal conductivity of 180 W/mK. The thermal conductivity of p-type epilayers, in contrast, reduces from 160 to 110 W/mK with increased doping. These trends—and their overall reduction relative to bulk—are explained leveraging established scattering models where it is shown that, while the decrease in p-type layers is partly due to the increased impurity levels evolving from its doping, size effects play a primary role in limiting the thermal conductivity of GaN layers tens of microns thick. Device layers, even of pristine quality, will therefore exhibit thermal conductivities less than the bulk value of 240 W/mK owing to their finite thickness.

  2. Thermal conductivity of the pine-biocarbon-preform/copper composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfen'eva, L. S.; Orlova, T. S.; Smirnov, B. I.; Smirnov, I. A.; Misiorek, H.; Jezowski, A.; Faber, K. T.

    2010-07-01

    The thermal conductivity of composites of a new type prepared by infiltration under vacuum of melted copper into empty sap channels (aligned with the sample length) of high-porosity biocarbon preforms of white pine tree wood has been studied in the temperature range 5-300 K. The biocarbon preforms have been prepared by pyrolysis of tree wood in an argon flow at two carbonization temperatures of 1000 and 2400°C. From the experimental values of the composite thermal conductivities, the fraction due to the thermal conductivity of the embedded copper is isolated and found to be substantially lower than that of the original copper used in preparation of the composites. The decrease in the thermal conductivity of copper in the composite is assigned to defects in its structure, namely, breaks in the copper filling the sap channels, as well as the radial ones, also filled by copper. A possibility of decreasing the thermal conductivity of copper in a composite due to its doping by the impurities present in the carbon preform is discussed.

  3. Thermal Conductivity of Graphene-hBN Superlattice Ribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Isaac M; Pereira, Luiz Felipe C

    2018-02-09

    Superlattices are ideal model systems for the realization and understanding of coherent (wave-like) and incoherent (particle-like) phonon thermal transport. Single layer heterostructures of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride have been produced recently with sharp edges and controlled domain sizes. In this study we employ nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the thermal conductivity of superlattice nanoribbons with equal-sized domains of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. We analyze the dependence of the conductivity with the domain sizes, and with the total length of the ribbons. We determine that the thermal conductivity reaches a minimum value of 89 W m -1 K -1 for ribbons with a superlattice period of 3.43 nm. The effective phonon mean free path is also determined and shows a minimum value of 32 nm for the same superlattice period. Our results also reveal that a crossover from coherent to incoherent phonon transport is present at room temperature for BNC nanoribbons, as the superlattice period becomes comparable to the phonon coherence length. Analyzing phonon populations relative to the smallest superlattice period, we attribute the minimum thermal conductivity to a reduction in the population of flexural phonons when the superlattice period equals 3.43 nm. The ability to manipulate thermal conductivity using superlattice-based two-dimensional materials, such as graphene-hBN nanoribbons, opens up opportunities for application in future nanostructured thermoelectric devices.

  4. OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES OF THE CORONAL KINK INSTABILITY WITH THERMAL CONDUCTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botha, G. J. J.; Arber, T. D.; Srivastava, Abhishek K.

    2012-01-01

    It is known from numerical simulations that thermal conduction along magnetic field lines plays an important role in the evolution of the kink instability in coronal loops. This study presents the observational signatures of the kink instability in long coronal loops when parallel thermal conduction is included. The three-dimensional nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic equations are solved numerically to simulate the evolution of a coronal loop that is initially in an unstable equilibrium. The loop has length 80 Mm, width 8 Mm, and an initial maximum twist of Φ = 11.5π, where Φ is a function of the radius. The initial loop parameters are obtained from a highly twisted loop observed in the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) 171 Å wave band. Synthetic observables are generated from the data. These observables include spatial and temporal averaging to account for the resolution and exposure times of TRACE images. Parallel thermal conduction reduces the maximum local temperature by up to an order of magnitude. This means that different spectral lines are formed and different internal loop structures are visible with or without the inclusion of thermal conduction. However, the response functions sample a broad range of temperatures. The result is that the inclusion of parallel thermal conductivity does not have as large an impact on observational signatures as the order of magnitude reduction in the maximum temperature would suggest; the net effect is a blurring of internal features of the loop structure.

  5. Thermal and electrical conductivities of high purity tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archer, S.L.

    1978-01-01

    The electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of three high purity tantalum samples have been measured as functions of temperature over a temperature range of 5K to 65K. Sample purities ranged up to a resistivity ratio of 1714. The highest purity sample had a residual resistivity of .76 x 10 -10 OMEGA-m. The intrinsic resistivity varied as T 3 . 9 from 10K to 31K. The thermal conductivity of the purest sample had a maximum of 840 W/mK at 9.8K. The intrinsic thermal resistivity varied as T 2 . 4 from 10K to 35K. At low temperatures electrons were scattered primarily by impurities and by phonons with both interband and intraband transitions observed. The electrical and thermal resistivity is departed from Matthiessen's rule at low temperatures

  6. Interfacial thermal conductance in multilayer graphene/phosphorene heterostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ying-Yan; Pei, Qing-Xiang; Mai, Yiu-Wing; Lai, Siu-Kai

    2016-01-01

    Vertical integration of 2D materials has recently appeared as an effective method for the design of novel nano-scale devices. Using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we study the interfacial thermal transport property of graphene/phosphorene heterostructures where phosphorene is sandwiched in between graphene. Various modulation techniques are thoroughly explored. We found that the interfacial thermal conductance at the interface of graphene and phosphorene can be enhanced significantly by using vacancy defects, hydrogenation and cross-plane compressive strain. By contrast, the reduction in the interfacial thermal conductance can be achieved by using cross-plane tensile strain. Our results provide important guidelines for manipulating the thermal transport in graphene/phosphorene based-nano-devices. (paper)

  7. Spectral mapping of thermal conductivity through nanoscale ballistic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongjie; Zeng, Lingping; Minnich, Austin J.; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Chen, Gang

    2015-08-01

    Controlling thermal properties is central to many applications, such as thermoelectric energy conversion and the thermal management of integrated circuits. Progress has been made over the past decade by structuring materials at different length scales, but a clear relationship between structure size and thermal properties remains to be established. The main challenge comes from the unknown intrinsic spectral distribution of energy among heat carriers. Here, we experimentally measure this spectral distribution by probing quasi-ballistic transport near nanostructured heaters down to 30 nm using ultrafast optical spectroscopy. Our approach allows us to quantify up to 95% of the total spectral contribution to thermal conductivity from all phonon modes. The measurement agrees well with multiscale and first-principles-based simulations. We further demonstrate the direct construction of mean free path distributions. Our results provide a new fundamental understanding of thermal transport and will enable materials design in a rational way to achieve high performance.

  8. Thermal resistance and conductivity of recycled construction and demolition waste (RCDW concrete blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Julio Apolonio Callejas

    Full Text Available Abstract In Brazil, studies to reuse construction and demolition waste are a special issue because a large amount of this material has been delivered to the public landfills and in illegal places. Some researchers have suggested reusing this material in building elements, such as bricks or blocks. It is possible to find a lot of researches in physical/mechanical characterization, while little effort has been made to characterize recycled construction and demolition waste blocks (RCDW for their thermal properties. The aim of this work was to characterize the RCDW thermal resistance and conductivity in order to provide subsidies for a building's thermal performance analysis. The hot-box method was adapted, together with measuring techniques with a heat-flow meter to determine the RCDW thermal properties. The results indicated that the RCDW block overall thermal resistance and thermal conductivity in the solid region was within the intervals of 0.33≤RT≤0.41m2KW-1 and 0.60≤l≤0.78Wm-1K-1, respectively. The lower resistance and conductivity values are justified by the presence of aggregate with a lower density and lower thermal conductivity than the natural aggregate.

  9. Porous Alumina and Zirconia Ceramics With Tailored Thermal Conductivity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gregorová, E.; Pabst, W.; Sofer, Z.; Jankovský, O.; Matějíček, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 395, č. 1 (2012), 012022-012022 ISSN 1742-6588. [European Thermal Sciences Conference (Eurotherm)/6./. Poitiers, 04.09.2012-07.09.2012] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Ceramics * alumina * zirconia * porosity * thermal conductivity * pore-forming agent * oxide ceramics * starch * porosity Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/395/1/012022/pdf/1742-6596_395_1_012022.pdf

  10. Determination of thermal conductivity in foundry mould mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Solenički

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available For a thorough understanding of the behaviour of foundry mould mixtures, a good knowledge of thermal properties of mould materials is needed. Laboratory determination of thermal conductivity of mould mixtures enables a better control over scabbing defects which are a major problem in green sand mould mixtures. A special instrument has been designed for that purpose and it is described in this work.

  11. Thermal computations for electronics conductive, radiative, and convective air cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Ellison, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    IntroductionPrimary mechanisms of heat flowConductionApplication example: Silicon chip resistance calculationConvectionApplication example: Chassis panel cooled by natural convectionRadiationApplication example: Chassis panel cooled only by radiation 7Illustrative example: Simple thermal network model for a heat sinked power transistorIllustrative example: Thermal network circuit for a printed circuit boardCompact component modelsIllustrative example: Pressure and thermal circuits for a forced air cooled enclosureIllustrative example: A single chip package on a printed circuit board-the proble

  12. Thermally conductive, dielectric PCM-boron nitride nanosheet composites for efficient electronic system thermal management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi; Zhou, Lihui; Luo, Wei; Wan, Jiayu; Dai, Jiaqi; Han, Xiaogang; Fu, Kun; Henderson, Doug; Yang, Bao; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-11-24

    Phase change materials (PCMs) possessing ideal properties, such as superior mass specific heat of fusion, low cost, light weight, excellent thermal stability as well as isothermal phase change behavior, have drawn considerable attention for thermal management systems. Currently, the low thermal conductivity of PCMs (usually less than 1 W mK -1 ) greatly limits their heat dissipation performance in thermal management applications. Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a two-dimensional material known for its excellent thermally conductive and electrically insulating properties, which make it a promising candidate to be used in electronic systems for thermal management. In this work, a composite, consisting of h-BN nanosheets (BNNSs) and commercialized paraffin wax was developed, which inherits high thermally conductive and electrically insulating properties from BNNSs and substantial heat of fusion from paraffin wax. With the help of BNNSs, the thermal conductivity of wax-BNNS composites reaches 3.47 W mK -1 , which exhibits a 12-time enhancement compared to that of pristine wax (0.29 W mK -1 ). Moreover, an 11.3-13.3 MV m -1 breakdown voltage of wax-BNNS composites was achieved, which shows further improved electrical insulating properties. Simultaneously enhanced thermally conductive and electrically insulating properties of wax-BNNS composites demonstrate their promising application for thermal management in electronic systems.

  13. Thermal conductivity of bulk and monolayer MoS2

    KAUST Repository

    Gandi, Appala

    2016-02-26

    © Copyright EPLA, 2016. We show that the lattice contribution to the thermal conductivity of MoS2 strongly dominates the carrier contribution in a broad temperature range from 300 to 800 K. Since theoretical insight into the lattice contribution is largely missing, though it would be essential for materials design, we solve the Boltzmann transport equation for the phonons self-consistently in order to evaluate the phonon lifetimes. In addition, the length scale for transition between diffusive and ballistic transport is determined. The low out-of-plane thermal conductivity of bulk MoS2 (2.3 Wm-1K-1 at 300 K) is useful for thermoelectric applications. On the other hand, the thermal conductivity of monolayer MoS2 (131 Wm-1K-1 at 300 K) is comparable to that of Si.

  14. Caliper variable sonde for thermal conductivity measurements in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oelsner, C; Leischner, H; Pischel, S

    1968-01-01

    For the measurement of the thermal conductivity of the formations surrounding a borehole, a sonde having variable diameter (consisting of an inflatable rubber cylinder with heating wires embedded in its wall) is described. The conditions for the usual sonde made of metal are no longer fulfilled, but the solution to the problem of determining the thermal conductivity from the temperature rise is given, based on an approach by Carslaw and Jaeger, which contains the Bessel functions of the second kind. It is shown that a simpler solution for large values of time can be obtained through the Laplace transformation, and the necessary series developments for computer application are also given. The sonde and the necessary measuring circuitry are described. Tests measurements have indicated that the thermal conductivity can be determined with this sonde with a precision of + 10%.

  15. High electron thermal conductivity of chiral carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mensah, S.Y.; Allotey, F.K.A.; Nkrumah, George; Mensah, N.G.

    2003-11-01

    Solving the Boltzmann kinetic equation with energy dispersion relation obtained in the tight binding approximation, the carrier thermal conductivity κ e of a chiral carbon nanotube (CCNT) was determined. The dependence of κ e on temperature T, chiral geometric angle φ h and overlap integrals Δ z and Δ s were obtained. The results were numerically analysed. Unusually high values of κ e were observed suggesting that ne is nontrivial in the calculation of the thermal conductivity κ of CCNT. More interestingly we noted also that at 104 K and for Δ z and Δ s values of 0.020 eV and 0.0150 eV respectively the κ e value is about 41000 W/mK as reported for a 99.9% pure 12 C crystal. We predict that the electron thermal conductivity of CCNT should exceed 200,000 W/mK at ∼ 80 K. (author)

  16. On thermal conductivity of gas mixtures containing hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, Victor P.; Pätz, Markus

    2017-06-01

    A brief review of formulas used for the thermal conductivity of gas mixtures in CFD simulations of rocket combustion chambers is carried out in the present work. In most cases, the transport properties of mixtures are calculated from the properties of individual components using special mixing rules. The analysis of different mixing rules starts from basic equations and ends by very complex semi-empirical expressions. The formulas for the thermal conductivity are taken for the analysis from the works on modelling of rocket combustion chambers. \\hbox {H}_2{-}\\hbox {O}_2 mixtures are chosen for the evaluation of the accuracy of the considered mixing rules. The analysis shows that two of them, of Mathur et al. (Mol Phys 12(6):569-579, 1967), and of Mason and Saxena (Phys Fluids 1(5):361-369, 1958), have better agreement with the experimental data than other equations for the thermal conductivity of multicomponent gas mixtures.

  17. Thermal conductivity at a disordered quantum critical point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartnoll, Sean A.; Ramirez, David M.; Santos, Jorge E.

    2016-01-01

    Strongly disordered and strongly interacting quantum critical points are difficult to access with conventional field theoretic methods. They are, however, both experimentally important and theoretically interesting. In particular, they are expected to realize universal incoherent transport. Such disordered quantum critical theories have recently been constructed holographically by deforming a CFT by marginally relevant disorder. In this paper we find additional disordered fixed points via relevant disordered deformations of a holographic CFT. Using recently developed methods in holographic transport, we characterize the thermal conductivity in both sets of theories in 1+1 dimensions. The thermal conductivity is found to tend to a constant at low temperatures in one class of fixed points, and to scale as T"0"."3 in the other. Furthermore, in all cases the thermal conductivity exhibits discrete scale invariance, with logarithmic in temperature oscillations superimposed on the low temperature scaling behavior. At no point do we use the replica trick.

  18. Simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and prediction of effective thermal conductivity of porous consolidated igneous rocks at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurangzeb; Ali, Zulqurnain; Gurmani, Samia Faiz; Maqsood, Asghari

    2006-01-01

    Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and heat capacity per unit volume of porous consolidated igneous rocks have been measured, simultaneously by Gustafsson's probe at room temperature and normal pressure using air as saturant. Data are presented for eleven samples of dunite, ranging in porosity from 0.130 to 0.665% by volume, taken from Chillas near Gilgit, Pakistan. The porosity and density parameters have been measured using American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards at ambient conditions. The mineral composition of samples has been analysed from their thin sections (petrography). An empirical model to predict the thermal conductivity of porous consolidated igneous rocks is also proposed. The thermal conductivities are predicted by some of the existing models along with the proposed one. It is observed that the values of effective thermal conductivity predicted by the proposed model are in agreement with the experimental thermal conductivity data within 6%

  19. Strain and thermal conductivity in ultrathin suspended silicon nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Daniel; Sigg, Hans; Spolenak, Ralph; Ekinci, Yasin

    2017-09-01

    We report on the uniaxial strain and thermal conductivity of well-ordered, suspended silicon nanowire arrays between 10 to 20 nm width and 22 nm half-pitch, fabricated by extreme-ultraviolet (UV) interference lithography. Laser-power-dependent Raman spectroscopy showed that nanowires connected monolithically to the bulk had a consistent strain of ˜0.1 % , whereas nanowires clamped by metal exhibited variability and high strain of up to 2.3%, having implications in strain engineering of nanowires. The thermal conductivity at room temperature was measured to be ˜1 W /m K for smooth nanowires and ˜0.1 W /m K for rougher ones, similar to results by other investigators. We found no modification of the bulk properties in terms of intrinsic scattering, and therefore, the decrease in thermal conductivity is mainly due to boundary scattering. Different types of surface roughness, such as constrictions and line-edge roughness, may play roles in the scattering of phonons of different wavelengths. Such low thermal conductivities would allow for very efficient thermal energy harvesting, approaching and passing values achieved by state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials.

  20. Theory of thermal conductivity in the disordered electron liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwiete, G., E-mail: schwiete@uni-mainz.de [Johannes Gutenberg Universität, Spin Phenomena Interdisciplinary Center (SPICE) and Institut für Physik (Germany); Finkel’stein, A. M. [Texas A& M University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United States)

    2016-03-15

    We study thermal conductivity in the disordered two-dimensional electron liquid in the presence of long-range Coulomb interactions. We describe a microscopic analysis of the problem using the partition function defined on the Keldysh contour as a starting point. We extend the renormalization group (RG) analysis developed for thermal transport in the disordered Fermi liquid and include scattering processes induced by the long-range Coulomb interaction in the sub-temperature energy range. For the thermal conductivity, unlike for the electrical conductivity, these scattering processes yield a logarithmic correction that may compete with the RG corrections. The interest in this correction arises from the fact that it violates the Wiedemann–Franz law. We checked that the sub-temperature correction to the thermal conductivity is not modified either by the inclusion of Fermi liquid interaction amplitudes or as a result of the RG flow. We therefore expect that the answer obtained for this correction is final. We use the theory to describe thermal transport on the metallic side of the metal–insulator transition in Si MOSFETs.

  1. Effect of Particle Size on Thermal Conductivity of Nanofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopkar, M.; Sudarshan, S.; Das, P. K.; Manna, I.

    2008-07-01

    Nanofluids, containing nanometric metallic or oxide particles, exhibit extraordinarily high thermal conductivity. It is reported that the identity (composition), amount (volume percent), size, and shape of nanoparticles largely determine the extent of this enhancement. In the present study, we have experimentally investigated the impact of Al2Cu and Ag2Al nanoparticle size and volume fraction on the effective thermal conductivity of water and ethylene glycol based nanofluid prepared by a two-stage process comprising mechanical alloying of appropriate Al-Cu and Al-Ag elemental powder blend followed by dispersing these nanoparticles (1 to 2 vol pct) in water and ethylene glycol with different particle sizes. The thermal conductivity ratio of nanofluid, measured using an indigenously developed thermal comparator device, shows a significant increase of up to 100 pct with only 1.5 vol pct nanoparticles of 30- to 40-nm average diameter. Furthermore, an analytical model shows that the interfacial layer significantly influences the effective thermal conductivity ratio of nanofluid for the comparable amount of nanoparticles.

  2. Theory of thermal conductivity in the disordered electron liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwiete, G.; Finkel’stein, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    We study thermal conductivity in the disordered two-dimensional electron liquid in the presence of long-range Coulomb interactions. We describe a microscopic analysis of the problem using the partition function defined on the Keldysh contour as a starting point. We extend the renormalization group (RG) analysis developed for thermal transport in the disordered Fermi liquid and include scattering processes induced by the long-range Coulomb interaction in the sub-temperature energy range. For the thermal conductivity, unlike for the electrical conductivity, these scattering processes yield a logarithmic correction that may compete with the RG corrections. The interest in this correction arises from the fact that it violates the Wiedemann–Franz law. We checked that the sub-temperature correction to the thermal conductivity is not modified either by the inclusion of Fermi liquid interaction amplitudes or as a result of the RG flow. We therefore expect that the answer obtained for this correction is final. We use the theory to describe thermal transport on the metallic side of the metal–insulator transition in Si MOSFETs.

  3. Time-resolved probing of electron thermal conduction in femtosecond-laser-pulse-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vue, B.T.V.

    1993-06-01

    We present time-resolved measurements of reflectivity, transmissivity and frequency shifts of probe light interacting with the rear of a disk-like plasma produced by irradiation of a transparent solid target with 0.1ps FWHM laser pulses at peak intensity 5 x 10 l4 W/CM 2 . Experimental results show a large increase in reflection, revealing rapid formation of a steep gradient and overdense surface plasma layer during the first picosecond after irradiation. Frequency shifts due to a moving ionization created by thermal conduction into the solid target are recorded. Calculations using a nonlinear thermal heat wave model show good agreement with the measured frequency shifts, further confining the strong thermal transport effect

  4. First principles calculations of thermal conductivity with out of equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puligheddu, Marcello; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia

    The prediction of the thermal properties of solids and liquids is central to numerous problems in condensed matter physics and materials science, including the study of thermal management of opto-electronic and energy conversion devices. We present a method to compute the thermal conductivity of solids by performing ab initio molecular dynamics at non equilibrium conditions. Our formulation is based on a generalization of the approach to equilibrium technique, using sinusoidal temperature gradients, and it only requires calculations of first principles trajectories and atomic forces. We discuss results and computational requirements for a representative, simple oxide, MgO, and compare with experiments and data obtained with classical potentials. This work was supported by MICCoM as part of the Computational Materials Science Program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science , Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Materials Sciences and Engineering Division under Grant DOE/BES 5J-30.

  5. Solid-state ionics: Studies of lithium-conducting sulfide glasses and a superconducting oxide compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Byung Tae.

    1989-01-01

    The first part of this work studies lithium-conducting sulfide glasses for battery applications, while the second part studies the thermodynamic properties of a superconducting oxide compound by using an oxide electrolyte. Lithium conducting glasses based on the SiS 2 -Li 2 S system are possible solid electrolytes for high-energy-density lithium batteries. The foremost requirement for solid electrolytes is that they should have high ionic conductivities. Unfortunately, most crystalline lithium conductors have low ionic conductivities at room temperature. However, glass ionic conductors show higher ionic conductivities than do crystalline forms of the same material. In addition to higher ionic conductivities, glasses appear to have several advantages over crystalline materials. These advantages include isotropic conductivity, absence of grain boundary effects, ease of glass forming, and the potential for a wide range of stability to oxidizing and reducing conditions. Using pyrolitic graphite-coated quartz ampoules, new ternary compounds and glasses in the SiS 2 -Li 2 S system were prepared. Several techniques were used to characterize the materials: powder x-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and AC impedance spectroscopy. The measured lithium conductivity of the sulfide glasses was one of the highest among the known solid lithium conductors. Measuring the equilibrium open circuit voltages assisted in determining the electrochemical stabilities of the ternary compounds and glasses with respect to pure Li. A solid-state ionic technique called oxygen coulometric titration was used to measure the thermodynamic stability, the oxygen stoichiometry, and the effects of the oxygen stoichiometry, and the effects of the oxygen stoichiometry and the cooling rate on superconductivity of the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x compound were investigated

  6. Microscopic electrical conductivity of nanodiamonds after thermal and plasma treatments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Jan; Kozak, Halyna; Stehlík, Štěpán; Švrček, V.; Pichot, V.; Spitzer, D.; Kromka, Alexander; Rezek, Bohuslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 16 (2016), s. 1105-1111 ISSN 2059-8521 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-01809S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : atomic force microscopy * conductive AFM * diamond * nanoparticles * plasma Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  7. Experimental Investigation of Thermal Conductivity of Meat During Freezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinbayeva, A.; Arkharov, I.; Aldiyarov, A.; Drobyshev, A.; Zhubaniyazova, M.; Kurnosov, V.

    2017-04-01

    The cryogenic technologies of processing and storage of agricultural products are becoming increasingly indispensable in the food industry as an important factor of ensuring food safety. One of such technologies is the shock freezing of meat, which provides a higher degree of preservation of the quality of frozen products in comparison with traditional technologies. The thermal conductivity of meat is an important parameter influencing the energy consumption in the freezing process. This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation of the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of beef. The measurements were taken by using a specially designed measurement cell, which allows covering the temperature range from 80 to 300 K.

  8. High thermal conductivity lossy dielectric using a multi layer configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Kiggans, Jr., James O.

    2003-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for loss dielectrics. A loss dielectric includes at least one high dielectric loss layer and at least one high thermal conductivity-electrically insulating layer adjacent the at least one high dielectric loss layer. A method of manufacturing a loss dielectric includes providing at least one high dielectric loss layer and providing at least one high thermal conductivity-electrically insulating layer adjacent the at least one high dielectric loss layer. The systems and methods provide advantages because the loss dielectrics are less costly and more environmentally friendly than the available alternatives.

  9. Origin of low thermal conductivity in nuclear fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Quan; Savrasov, Sergey Y

    2008-06-06

    Using a novel many-body approach, we report lattice dynamical properties of UO2 and PuO2 and uncover various contributions to their thermal conductivities. Via calculated Grüneisen constants, we show that only longitudinal acoustic modes having large phonon group velocities are efficient heat carriers. Despite the fact that some optical modes also show their velocities which are extremely large, they do not participate in the heat transfer due to their unusual anharmonicity. Ways to improve thermal conductivity in these materials are discussed.

  10. Nanostructure design for drastic reduction of thermal conductivity while preserving high electrical conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    2018-01-01

    The design and fabrication of nanostructured materials to control both thermal and electrical properties are demonstrated for high-performance thermoelectric conversion. We have focused on silicon (Si) because it is an environmentally friendly and ubiquitous element. High bulk thermal conductivity of Si limits its potential as a thermoelectric material. The thermal conductivity of Si has been reduced by introducing grains, or wires, yet a further reduction is required while retaining a high electrical conductivity. We have designed two different nanostructures for this purpose. One structure is connected Si nanodots (NDs) with the same crystal orientation. The phonons scattering at the interfaces of these NDs occurred and it depended on the ND size. As a result of phonon scattering, the thermal conductivity of this nanostructured material was below/close to the amorphous limit. The other structure is Si films containing epitaxially grown Ge NDs. The Si layer imparted high electrical conductivity, while the Ge NDs served as phonon scattering bodies reducing thermal conductivity drastically. This work gives a methodology for the independent control of electron and phonon transport using nanostructured materials. This can bring the realization of thermoelectric Si-based materials that are compatible with large scale integrated circuit processing technologies.

  11. Porosity influence of power generating equipment structural materials on its thermoelastic characteristics and thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarubin, V. S.; Sergeeva, E. S.

    2017-11-01

    This paper outlines simulation models that represent the quantitative interdependencies between the thermal conductivity and the thermoelastic properties of composites, on the one hand, and their porous structure and matrix properties, as well as the volume fraction of their reinforcing inclusions, on the other hand. As the reinforcing inclusions, randomly-oriented anisotropic single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are taken. The key means for constructing the simulation models are the self-matching method and the dual variational formulation of the thermal conductivity/thermoelasticity problem for a non-homogeneous solid body. With the simulation models presented below, it is possible to estimate the effect the nanocomposite porosity has on the thermoelastic properties and thermal conductivity of nanocomposites.

  12. On the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Porous Packed Beds with Uniform Spherical Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2010-01-01

    Point contact models for the effective thermal conductivity of porous media with uniform spherical inclusions have been briefly reviewed. The model of Zehner and Schlunder (1970) has been further validated with recent experimental data over a broad range of conductivity ratio from 8 to 1200 and over a range of solids fraction up to about 0.8. The comparisons further confirm the validity of Zehner-Schlunder model, known to be applicable for conductivity ratios less than about 2000, above which area contact between the particles becomes significant. This validation of the Zehner-Schlunder model has implications for its use in the prediction of the effective thermal conductivity of water frost (with conductivity ratio around 100) which arises in many important areas of technology.

  13. Effect of triangular vacancy defect on thermal conductivity and thermal rectification in graphene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ping, E-mail: yangpingdm@ujs.edu.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Manufacturing and Reliability for MEMS/NEMS/OEDS, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Li, Xialong; Zhao, Yanfan [Laboratory of Advanced Manufacturing and Reliability for MEMS/NEMS/OEDS, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Yang, Haiying [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Wang, Shuting, E-mail: wangst@mail.hust.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the thermal transport properties of armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) possessing various sizes of triangular vacancy defect within a temperature range of 200–600 K by using classical molecular dynamics simulation. The results show that the thermal conductivities of the graphene nanoribbons decrease with increasing sizes of triangular vacancy defects in both directions across the whole temperature range tested, and the presence of the defect can decrease the thermal conductivity by more than 40% as the number of removed cluster atoms is increased to 25 (1.56% for vacancy concentration) owing to the effect of phonon–defect scattering. In the meantime, we find the thermal conductivity of defective graphene nanoribbons is insensitive to the temperature change at higher vacancy concentrations. Furthermore, the dependence of temperatures and various sizes of triangular vacancy defect for the thermal rectification ration are also detected. This work implies a possible route to achieve thermal rectifier for 2D materials by defect engineering.

  14. Reduction in thermal conductivity of BiSbTe lump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Kaleem [King Saud University, Sustainable Energy Technologies Center, College of Engineering, PO Box 800, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Wan, C. [Tsinghua University, State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing (China); Al-Eshaikh, M.A.; Kadachi, A.N. [King Saud University, Research Center, College of Engineering, PO Box 800, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-03-15

    In this work, systematic investigations on the thermal conductivities of BiSbTe lump, microstructured pristine BiSbTe bulk and single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)/BiSbTe bulk nanocomposites were performed. BiSbTe lumps were crushed to form a coarse powder (200 μm) and effect of particle size reduction on the effective thermal conductivity of BiSbTe (200 μm) bulk were analyzed. For further reduction in the conductivity, a two pronged strategy has been employed. First, additional refinement of BiSbTe (200 μm) were performed through ball milling in an inert environment. Second, SWCNTs in 0.75, and 1.0 vol% were distributed uniformly in the fine BiSbTe ball milled powder. The results showed that the effective thermal conductivities decrease with the reduction in the particle size from lump to BiSbTe (200 μm) bulk as well as with the addition of SWCNTs accompanied by further refinement of BiSbTe particles. The significant reduction in thermal conductivities of the lump was achieved for pure BiSbTe (200 μm) bulk and 0.75 vol% of SWCNTs/BiSbTe composite. This can be ascribed to the enhanced phonon scattering by the grain boundaries between the nanostructured BiSbTe particles as well as the interfaces between BiSbTe and the low dimensional carbon nanotubes. (orig.)

  15. Thermal inertializing of solid incinerator residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proelss, J.

    2003-01-01

    Inertialization of residues is a key task of incinerators. Residues of conventional incineration processes may contain high levels of inorganic or organic pollutants and must be treated prior to recycling. the most effective process is thermal treatment above the melting point. This will destroy organic pollutants like dioxins/furans and pathogenic compounds, while the heavy metals will be partly volatilized. The glassy slag obtained as end product is low in heavy metals and more or less resistant to leaching. The The author describes a method for calculating activity coefficients of volatile components of diluted, liquid multicomponent systems. With these data, the data base for thermodynamic description of fluid mixtures was updated, and a set of characteristic data was established for describing transport in an inflatable module. Once the activity coefficients of interesting constituents of the slag are known along with the transport conditions in the volatilization process, it is possible to optimize the thermal treatment of critical ashes and dusts with a view to energy consumption and process control. In two different exemplary process concepts, the energy consumption for residue treatment is estimated. The processes proposed are compared with published process proposals, and their energy consumption is assessed in a comoparative study [de

  16. Estimating thermal diffusivity and specific heat from needle probe thermal conductivity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W.F.; Gilbert, L.Y.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity and specific heat can be estimated from thermal conductivity measurements made using a standard needle probe and a suitably high data acquisition rate. Thermal properties are calculated from the measured temperature change in a sample subjected to heating by a needle probe. Accurate thermal conductivity measurements are obtained from a linear fit to many tens or hundreds of temperature change data points. In contrast, thermal diffusivity calculations require a nonlinear fit to the measured temperature change occurring in the first few tenths of a second of the measurement, resulting in a lower accuracy than that obtained for thermal conductivity. Specific heat is calculated from the ratio of thermal conductivity to diffusivity, and thus can have an uncertainty no better than that of the diffusivity estimate. Our thermal conductivity measurements of ice Ih and of tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate, made using a 1.6 mm outer diameter needle probe and a data acquisition rate of 18.2 pointss, agree with published results. Our thermal diffusivity and specific heat results reproduce published results within 25% for ice Ih and 3% for THF hydrate. ?? 2006 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Thermal diffusivity and conductivity of thorium- uranium mixed oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saoudi, M.; Staicu, D.; Mouris, J.; Bergeron, A.; Hamilton, H.; Naji, M.; Freis, D.; Cologna, M.

    2018-03-01

    Thorium-uranium oxide pellets with high densities were prepared at the Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL) by co-milling, pressing, and sintering at 2023 K, with UO2 mass contents of 0, 1.5, 3, 8, 13, 30, 60 and 100%. At the Joint Research Centre, Karlsruhe (JRC-Karlsruhe), thorium-uranium oxide pellets were prepared using the spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique with 79 and 93 wt. % UO2. The thermal diffusivity of (Th1-xUx)O2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) was measured at CNL and at JRC-Karlsruhe using the laser flash technique. ThO2 and (Th,U)O2 with 1.5, 3, 8 and 13 wt. % UO2 were found to be semi-transparent to the infrared wavelength of the laser and were coated with graphite for the thermal diffusivity measurements. This semi-transparency decreased with the addition of UO2 and was lost at about 30 wt. % of UO2 in ThO2. The thermal conductivity was deduced using the measured density and literature data for the specific heat capacity. The thermal conductivity for ThO2 is significantly higher than for UO2. The thermal conductivity of (Th,U)O2 decreases rapidly with increasing UO2 content, and for UO2 contents of 60% and higher, the conductivity of the thorium-uranium oxide fuel is close to UO2. As the mass difference between the Th and U atoms is small, the thermal conductivity decrease is attributed to the phonon scattering enhanced by lattice strain due to the introduction of uranium in ThO2 lattice. The new results were compared to the data available in the literature and were evaluated using the classical phonon transport model for oxide systems.

  18. UJI KONDUKTIVITAS TERMAL PADA DAUN BAYAM DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY APPARATUS

    OpenAIRE

    Firmansyah, Firmansyah; Syafutra, Heriyanto; Sidikrubadi, Sidikrubadi; Irzaman, Irzaman

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Has successfully tested thermal conductivity on spinach leaves by using Thermal Conductivity Apparatus. Thermal conductivity Apparatus assisted with Steam generator, Caliper, Micrometer, and iron. The thermal conductivity value of spinach leaves is 0.5208 watts / (m.K). This thermal conductivity test on foliage, fruits using Thermal Conductivity Apparatus are very easy to do in Basic Physics Laboratory by physics study program students in Indonesia. Keywords: Thermal Conductivi...

  19. Heat pipes with variable thermal conductance property for space applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravets, V.; Alekseik, Ye.; Alekseik, O.; Khairnasov, S. [National Technical University of Ukraine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Baturkin, V.; Ho, T. [Explorationssysteme RY-ES, Bremen (Germany); Celotti, L. [Active Space Technologies GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    The activities presented in this paper demonstrate a new approach to provide passive thermal control using heat pipes, as demonstrated on the electronic unit of DLR’s MASCOT lander, which embarked on the NEA sample return mission Hayabusa 2 (JAXA). The focus is on the development and testing of heat pipes with variable thermal conductance in a predetermined temperature range. These heat pipes act as thermal switches. Unlike standard gasloaded heat pipes and thermal-diode heat pipes construction of presented heat pipes does not include any additional elements. Copper heat pipes with metal fibrous wicks were chosen as baseline design. We obtained positive results by choosing the heat carrier and structural parameters of the wick (i.e., pore diameter, porosity, and permeability). The increase in the thermal conductivity of the heat pipes from 0.04 W/K to 2.1 W/K was observed in the temperature range between −20 °C and +55 °C. Moreover, the heat pipes transferred the predetermined power of not less than 10 W within the same temperature range. The heat pipes have been in flight since December 2014, and the supporting telemetry data were obtained in September 2015. The data showed the nominal operation of the thermal control system.

  20. Thermal Diffusivity and Thermal Conductivity of Dispersed Glass Sphere Composites Over a Range of Volume Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, James K.

    2018-06-01

    Glass spheres are often used as filler materials for composites. Comparatively few articles in the literature have been devoted to the measurement or modelling of thermal properties of composites containing glass spheres, and there does not appear to be any reported data on the measurement of thermal diffusivities over a range of filler volume fractions. In this study, the thermal diffusivities of guar-gel/glass sphere composites were measured using a transient comparative method. The addition of the glass beads to the gel increased the thermal diffusivity of the composite, more than doubling the thermal diffusivity of the composite relative to the diffusivity of the gel at the maximum glass volume fraction of approximately 0.57. Thermal conductivities of the composites were derived from the thermal diffusivity measurements, measured densities and estimated specific heat capacities of the composites. Two approaches to modelling the effective thermal diffusivity were considered.

  1. Exploration of porous SiC nanostructures as thermal insulator with high thermal stability and low thermal conductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng; WAN; Jingyang; WANG

    2016-01-01

    The crucial challenge for current nanoscale thermal insulation materials,such as Al2O3 and SiO2 aerogel composites,is to solve the trade-off between extremely low thermal conductivity and unsatisfied thermal stability.Typical high-temperature ceramic SiC possesses excellent mechanical properties and

  2. Fractional Heat Conduction Models and Thermal Diffusivity Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Žecová

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with the fractional heat conduction models and their use for determining thermal diffusivity. A brief historical overview of the authors who have dealt with the heat conduction equation is described in the introduction of the paper. The one-dimensional heat conduction models with using integer- and fractional-order derivatives are listed. Analytical and numerical methods of solution of the heat conduction models with using integer- and fractional-order derivatives are described. Individual methods have been implemented in MATLAB and the examples of simulations are listed. The proposal and experimental verification of the methods for determining thermal diffusivity using half-order derivative of temperature by time are listed at the conclusion of the paper.

  3. Surface effects on the thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Peng; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2018-03-01

    Thermal transport in silicon nanowires (SiNWs) has recently attracted considerable attention due to their potential applications in energy harvesting and generation and thermal management. The adjustment of the thermal conductivity of SiNWs through surface effects is a topic worthy of focus. In this paper, we briefly review the recent progress made in this field through theoretical calculations and experiments. We come to the conclusion that surface engineering methods are feasible and effective methods for adjusting nanoscale thermal transport and may foster further advancements in this field. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation ofChina (Grant No. 11504418), China Scholarship Council (Grant No. 201706425053), Basic Research Program in Shenzhen, China (Grant No. JCYJ20160229165210666), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. 2015XKMS075).

  4. System to Measure Thermal Conductivity and Seebeck Coefficient for Thermoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Skuza, Jonathan R.; Park, Yeonjoon; King, Glen C.; Choi, Sang H.; Nagavalli, Anita

    2012-01-01

    The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at elevated temperatures. This has led to the implementation of nonstandardized practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. The major objective of the procedure described is for the simultaneous measurement of the Seebeck coefficient and thermal diffusivity within a given temperature range. These thermoelectric measurements must be precise, accurate, and reproducible to ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data. The custom-built thermal characterization system described in this NASA-TM is specifically designed to measure the inplane thermal diffusivity, and the Seebeck coefficient for materials in the ranging from 73 K through 373 K.

  5. Interlayer thermal conductance within a phosphorene and graphene bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yang; Zhang, Jingchao; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-11-24

    Monolayer graphene possesses unusual thermal properties, and is often considered as a prototype system for the study of thermal physics of low-dimensional electronic/thermal materials, despite the absence of a direct bandgap. Another two-dimensional (2D) atomic layered material, phosphorene, is a natural p-type semiconductor and it has attracted growing interest in recent years. When a graphene monolayer is overlaid on phosphorene, the hybrid van der Waals (vdW) bilayer becomes a potential candidate for high-performance thermal/electronic applications, owing to the combination of the direct-bandgap properties of phosphorene with the exceptional thermal properties of graphene. In this work, the interlayer thermal conductance at the phosphorene/graphene interface is systematically investigated using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The transient pump-probe heating method is employed to compute the interfacial thermal resistance (R) of the bilayer. The predicted R value at the phosphorene/graphene interface is 8.41 × 10 -8 K m 2 W -1 at room temperature. Different external and internal conditions, i.e., temperature, contact pressure, vacancy defect, and chemical functionalization, can all effectively reduce R at the interface. Numerical results of R reduction as a function of temperature, interfacial coupling strength, defect ratio, or hydrogen coverage are reported with the most R reduction amounting to 56.5%, 70.4%, 34.8% and 84.5%, respectively.

  6. All-solid-state reference electrodes based on conducting polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisiel, Anna; Marcisz, Honorata; Michalska, Agata; Maksymiuk, Krzysztof

    2005-12-01

    A novel construction of solution free (pseudo)reference electrodes, compatible with all-solid-state potentiometric indicator electrodes, has been proposed. These electrodes use conducting polymers (CP): polypyrrole (PPy) or poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT). Two different arrangements have been tested: solely based on CP and those where the CP phase is covered with a poly(vinyl chloride) based outer membrane of tailored composition. The former arrangement was designed to suppress or compensate cation- and anion-exchange, using mobile perchlorate ions and poly(4-styrenesulfonate) or dodecylbenzenesulfonate anions as immobilized dopants. The following systems were used: (i) polypyrrole layers doped simultaneously by two kinds of anions, both mobile and immobilized in the polymer layer; (ii) bilayers of polypyrrole with anion exchanging inner layer and cation-exchanging outer layer; (iii) polypyrrole doped by surfactant dodecylbenzenesulfonate ions, which inhibit ion exchange on the polymer/solution interface. For the above systems, recorded potentials have been found to be practically independent of electrolyte concentration. The best results, profound stability of potentials, have been obtained for poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) or polypyrrole doped by poly(4-styrenesulfonate) anions covered by a poly(vinyl chloride) based membrane, containing both anion- and cation-exchangers as well as solid potassium chloride and silver chloride with metallic silver. Differently to the cases (i)-(iii) these electrodes are much less sensitive to the influence of redox and pH interferences. This arrangement has been also characterized using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and chronopotentiometry.

  7. Thermal properties of zirconium diboride -- transition metal boride solid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClane, Devon Lee

    This research focuses on the thermal properties of zirconium diboride (ZrB2) based ceramics. The overall goal was to improve the understanding of how different transition metal (TM) additives influence thermal transport in ZrB2. To achieve this, ZrB2 with 0.5 wt% carbon, and 3 mol% of individual transition metal borides, was densified by hot-press sintering. The transition metals that were investigated were: Y, Ti, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, and Re. The room temperature thermal diffusivities of the compositions ranged from 0.331 cm2/s for nominally pure ZrB2 to 0.105 cm2/s for (Zr,Cr)B2 and converged around 0.155cm2/s at higher temperatures for all compositions. Thermal conductivities were calculated from the diffusivities, using temperature-dependent values for density and heat capacity. The electron contribution to thermal conductivity was calculated from measured electrical resistivity according to the Wiedemann-Franz law. The phonon contribution to thermal conductivity was calculated by subtracting the electron contribution from the total thermal conductivity. Rietveld refinement of x-ray diffraction data was used to determine the lattice parameters of the compositions. The decrease in thermal conductivity for individual additives correlated directly to the metallic radius of the additive. Additional strain appeared to exist for additives when the stable TM boride for that metal had different crystal symmetries than ZrB2. This research provided insight into how additives and impurities affect thermal transport in ZrB2. The research potentially offers a basis for future modeling of thermal conductivity in ultra-high temperature ceramics based on the correlation between metallic radius and the decrease in thermal conductivity.

  8. Estimated Viscosities and Thermal Conductivities of Gases at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svehla, Roger A.

    1962-01-01

    Viscosities and thermal conductivities, suitable for heat-transfer calculations, were estimated for about 200 gases in the ground state from 100 to 5000 K and 1-atmosphere pressure. Free radicals were included, but excited states and ions were not. Calculations for the transport coefficients were based upon the Lennard-Jones (12-6) potential for all gases. This potential was selected because: (1) It is one of the most realistic models available and (2) intermolecular force constants can be estimated from physical properties or by other techniques when experimental data are not available; such methods for estimating force constants are not as readily available for other potentials. When experimental viscosity data were available, they were used to obtain the force constants; otherwise the constants were estimated. These constants were then used to calculate both the viscosities and thermal conductivities tabulated in this report. For thermal conductivities of polyatomic gases an Eucken-type correction was made to correct for exchange between internal and translational energies. Though this correction may be rather poor at low temperatures, it becomes more satisfactory with increasing temperature. It was not possible to obtain force constants from experimental thermal conductivity data except for the inert atoms, because most conductivity data are available at low temperatures only (200 to 400 K), the temperature range where the Eucken correction is probably most in error. However, if the same set of force constants is used for both viscosity and thermal conductivity, there is a large degree of cancellation of error when these properties are used in heat-transfer equations such as the Dittus-Boelter equation. It is therefore concluded that the properties tabulated in this report are suitable for heat-transfer calculations of gaseous systems.

  9. Enhancement in ionic conductivity on solid polymer electrolytes containing large conducting species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praveen, D. [Department of Physics, Amrita Viswha Vidyapeetham, Bangalore, India, E-mail: d-praveen@blr.amrita.edu (India); Damle, Ramakrishna [Department of Physics, Bangalore University, Bangalore, India. E-mail: ramkrishnadamle@bub.ernet.in (India)

    2016-05-23

    Solid Polymer Electrolytes (SPEs) lack better conducting properties at ambient temperatures. Various methods to enhance their ionic conductivity like irradiation with swift heavy ions, γ-rays, swift electrons and quenching at low temperature etc., have been explored in the literature. Among these, one of the oldest methods is incorporation of different conducting species into the polymer matrix and/or addition of nano-sized inert particles into SPEs. Various new salts like LiBr, Mg(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}, NH{sub 4}I etc., have already been tried in the past with some success. Also various nanoparticles like Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2} etc., have been tried in the past. In this article, we have investigated an SPE containing Rubidium as a conducting species. Rubidium has a larger ionic size compared to lithium and sodium ions which have been investigated in the recent past. In the present article, we have investigated the conductivity of large sized conducting species and shown the enhancement in the ionic conductivity by addition of nano-sized inert particles.

  10. Enhancement in ionic conductivity on solid polymer electrolytes containing large conducting species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praveen, D.; Damle, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Solid Polymer Electrolytes (SPEs) lack better conducting properties at ambient temperatures. Various methods to enhance their ionic conductivity like irradiation with swift heavy ions, γ-rays, swift electrons and quenching at low temperature etc., have been explored in the literature. Among these, one of the oldest methods is incorporation of different conducting species into the polymer matrix and/or addition of nano-sized inert particles into SPEs. Various new salts like LiBr, Mg(ClO_4)_2, NH_4I etc., have already been tried in the past with some success. Also various nanoparticles like Al_2O_3, TiO_2 etc., have been tried in the past. In this article, we have investigated an SPE containing Rubidium as a conducting species. Rubidium has a larger ionic size compared to lithium and sodium ions which have been investigated in the recent past. In the present article, we have investigated the conductivity of large sized conducting species and shown the enhancement in the ionic conductivity by addition of nano-sized inert particles.

  11. Thermally Conductive Metal-Tube/Carbon-Composite Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    An improved method of fabricating joints between metal and carbon-fiber-based composite materials in lightweight radiators and heat sinks has been devised. Carbon-fiber-based composite materials have been used in such heat-transfer devices because they offer a combination of high thermal conductivity and low mass density. Metal tubes are typically used to carry heat-transfer fluids to and from such heat-transfer devices. The present fabrication method helps to ensure that the joints between the metal tubes and the composite-material parts in such heat-transfer devices have both (1) the relatively high thermal conductances needed for efficient transfer of heat and (2) the flexibility needed to accommodate differences among thermal expansions of dissimilar materials in operation over wide temperature ranges. Techniques used previously to join metal tubes with carbon-fiber-based composite parts have included press fitting and bonding with epoxy. Both of these prior techniques have been found to yield joints characterized by relatively high thermal resistances. The present method involves the use of a solder (63 percent Sn, 37 percent Pb) to form a highly thermally conductive joint between a metal tube and a carbon-fiber-based composite structure. Ordinarily, the large differences among the coefficients of thermal expansion of the metal tube, solder, and carbon-fiber-based composite would cause the solder to pull away from the composite upon post-fabrication cooldown from the molten state. In the present method, the structure of the solder is modified (see figure) to enable it to deform readily to accommodate the differential thermal expansion.

  12. Thermal characterization of screen printed conductive pastes for RFID antennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janeczek, Kamil, E-mail: kamil.janeczek@itr.org.pl [Tele and Radio Research Institute, 11 Ratuszowa Street, 03-450 Warsaw (Poland); Jakubowska, Malgorzata [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, 133 Wolczynska Street, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Warsaw University of Technology, Institute of Metrology and Biomedical Engineering, 8 Sankt Andrzej Bobola Street, 02-525 Warsaw (Poland); Mlozniak, Anna [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, 133 Wolczynska Street, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Koziol, Grazyna [Tele and Radio Research Institute, 11 Ratuszowa Street, 03-450 Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-09-01

    Thermal resistance is an essential aspect of electronic circuits designing. It leads to unexpected changes in electronic components during their work. In this study, new materials for screen printed RFID tag's antennas were characterized in terms of their resistance to thermal exposure. Polymer materials containing silver flakes, silver nanopowder, carbon nanotubes or conductive polymer PEDOT:PSS were elaborated and used for antenna printing on flexible materials. In order to verify their long term susceptibility to damages caused by the changing environmental conditions, the temperature cycling test was used in three different temperature ranges: +65 Degree-Sign C, -12 Degree-Sign C, -40 Degree-Sign C/+85 Degree-Sign C (3 h in each temp., dwell time 1 h). The highest durability to thermal exposure exhibited the paste with carbon nanotubes dispersed in poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA and the lowest one - the paste with conductive polymer PEDOT:PSS.

  13. Thermal conductivity in one-dimensional nonlinear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politi, Antonio; Giardinà, Cristian; Livi, Roberto; Vassalli, Massimo

    2000-03-01

    Thermal conducitivity of one-dimensional nonlinear systems typically diverges in the thermodynamic limit, whenever the momentum is conserved (i.e. in the absence of interactions with an external substrate). Evidence comes from detailed studies of Fermi-Pasta-Ulam and diatomic Toda chains. Here, we discuss the first example of a one-dimensional system obeying Fourier law : a chain of coupled rotators. Numerical estimates of the thermal conductivity obtained by simulating a chain in contact with two thermal baths at different temperatures are found to be consistent with those ones based on linear response theory. The dynamics of the Fourier modes provides direct evidence of energy diffusion. The finiteness of the conductivity is traced back to the occurrence of phase-jumps. Our conclusions are confirmed by the analysis of two variants of the rotator model.

  14. Thermal characterization of screen printed conductive pastes for RFID antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeczek, Kamil; Jakubowska, Małgorzata; Młożniak, Anna; Kozioł, Grażyna

    2012-01-01

    Thermal resistance is an essential aspect of electronic circuits designing. It leads to unexpected changes in electronic components during their work. In this study, new materials for screen printed RFID tag's antennas were characterized in terms of their resistance to thermal exposure. Polymer materials containing silver flakes, silver nanopowder, carbon nanotubes or conductive polymer PEDOT:PSS were elaborated and used for antenna printing on flexible materials. In order to verify their long term susceptibility to damages caused by the changing environmental conditions, the temperature cycling test was used in three different temperature ranges: +65 °C, −12 °C, −40 °C/+85 °C (3 h in each temp., dwell time 1 h). The highest durability to thermal exposure exhibited the paste with carbon nanotubes dispersed in poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA and the lowest one – the paste with conductive polymer PEDOT:PSS.

  15. Entropy generation by nanofluid with variable thermal conductivity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The entropy generation by nanofluid with variable thermal conductivity and viscosity of assisted convective flow across a riser pipe of a horizontal flat plate solar collector is investigated numerically. The water based nanofluid with copper nanoparticles is used as the working fluid inside the fluid passing riser pipe.

  16. Thermal conductivity of food materials at elevated temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiess, W.E.L.; Walz, E.; Nesvadba, P.; Morley, M.; Haneghem, van I.A.; Salmon, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    In order to expand the available information on thermal conductivity of foods, within the framework of COST Action 93, a collaborative study was organised. In the first step, typical food components (apple pulp, meat, olive oil, sodium caseinate, starch, tomato paste) were used as standards for

  17. Evaluation of Electrical and Thermal Conductivity of Polymeric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF HORSFALL

    ABSTRACT: This work being gingered by the big menace being posed on our environment by polymeric waste and it's rechanneling involved the studying of the electrical and thermal conductivities of the polymers PP, PE, PS and nylon66 doped with charcoal and graphite. Five grams of each polymer was mixed with ...

  18. Calculation of the thermal conductivity of frozen foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orrego A, C.E.

    1998-01-01

    A simple model is presented for the presage of the thermal conductivity of frozen foods those combines different authors' proposals. For varied materials on those that there is available information of the modification of this property with the temperature in frozen systems, the comparison of the dear and empiric values is made to evaluate these predictions

  19. Fused silica thermal conductivity dispersion at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchut, P.; Decruppe, D.; Delrive, L.

    2004-01-01

    A continuous CO 2 laser is focused to locally anneal small fused silica spots. A noncontact radiometry diagnostic enables us to follow surface temperature variation that occurs from site to site. A 'steady state' dispersion of surface temperature is observed across our sample. We show that nonhomogeneous silica thermal conductivity, above 1000 K is responsible for this temperature dispersion

  20. Thermal conductivity in an argon arc at atmospheric pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, L.; Timmermans, C.J.; Schram, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of an argon plasma has been determined in a phi 5 mm wall stabilized atmospheric argon arc in the temperature range from 10000 to 16000 K. The calculations are based on the energy balance, and include non-LTE effects like ambipolar diffusion and overpopulation of the ground

  1. A method of measuring the thermal conductivity of liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Held, E.F.M. van der; Drunen, F.G. van

    1949-01-01

    We described the development of an apparatus for the determination of the thermal conductivity of liquids. The apparatus is suitable for all kinds of liquids, including the strongest acids. From a given time we pass an electric current through a thin straight wire, placed in a homogeneous material

  2. Origin of ultra-low thermal conductivity in complex chalcogenides ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kanishka Biswas

    Chem. A 2015, 3, 648. Banik et al. Chem. Mater., 2015, 27, 581. Guin et al. J. Mater. Chem. .... Thermal conductivity of SnTe. 13. 300 400 500 600 700. 0. 1. 2. 3. SnTe κ lat. (W. /mK). T (K) κ min .... (b) part-crystalline part-liquid state,. (c) rattling ...

  3. Determination of thermal conductivities of some topsoils using block ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study focuses on the determination of In situ measurement of the top soil layer, despite non-homogeneity of natural soils caused by changes in their water content, texture and structure. Thermal Conductivities of clay, loam and sand soils were determined using improved Block method with and without the use of ...

  4. Electrothermal efficiency, temperature and thermal conductivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A study was made to evaluate the electrothermal efficiency of a DC arc plasma torch and temperature and thermal conductivity of plasma jet in the torch. The torch was operated at power levels from 4 to 20 kW in non-transferred arc mode. The effect of nitrogen in combination with argon as plasma gas on the above ...

  5. Modeling of the effective thermal conductivity of sintered porous pastes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ordonez-Miranda, J.; Hermens, M.; Nikitin, I.; Kouznetsova, V.G.; Volz, S.

    2014-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of sintered porous pastes of metals is modelled, based on an analytical and a numerical approach. The first method arises from the differential effective medium theory and considers the air voids as ellipsoidal pores of different sizes, while second one is based on the

  6. Well-log based prediction of thermal conductivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sven; Förster, Andrea

    Rock thermal conductivity (TC) is paramount for the determination of heat flow and the calculation of temperature profiles. Due to the scarcity of drill cores compared to the availability of petrophysical well logs, methods are desired to indirectly predict TC in sedimentary basins. Most...

  7. Thermal conductivity reduction in oxygen-deficient strontium titanates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Choongho; Scullin, Matthew L.; Huijben, Mark; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Majumdar, Arun

    2008-01-01

    We report significant thermal conductivity reduction in oxygen-deficient lanthanum-doped strontium titanate (Sr1−xLaxTiO3−δ) films as compared to unreduced strontium titanates. Our experimental results suggest that the oxygen vacancies could have played an important role in the reduction. This could

  8. Silicate bonding properties: Investigation through thermal conductivity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzini, M; Cesarini, E; Cagnoli, G; Campagna, E; Losurdo, G; Martelli, F; Piergiovanni, F; Vetrano, F [INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Haughian, K; Hough, J; Martin, I; Reid, S; Rowan, S; Veggel, A A van, E-mail: lorenzini@fi.infn.i [SUPA, University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Kelvin Building G12 8QQ Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-01

    A direct approach to reduce the thermal noise contribution to the sensitivity limit of a GW interferometric detector is the cryogenic cooling of the mirrors and mirrors suspensions. Future generations of detectors are foreseen to implement this solution. Silicon has been proposed as a candidate material, thanks to its very low intrinsic loss angle at low temperatures and due to its very high thermal conductivity, allowing the heat deposited in the mirrors by high power lasers to be efficiently extracted. To accomplish such a scheme, both mirror masses and suspension elements must be made of silicon, then bonded together forming a quasi-monolithic stage. Elements can be assembled using hydroxide-catalysis silicate bonding, as for silica monolithic joints. The effect of Si to Si bonding on suspension thermal conductance has therefore to be experimentally studied. A measurement of the effect of silicate bonding on thermal conductance carried out on 1 inch thick silicon bonded samples, from room temperature down to 77 K, is reported. In the explored temperature range, the silicate bonding does not seem to affect in a relevant way the sample conductance.

  9. Thermal conductivity of fresh and irradiated U-Mo fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Tanja K.; Breitkreutz, Harald; Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Elgeti, Stefan; Reiter, Christian; Robinson, Adam. B.; Smith, Frances. N.; Wachs, Daniel. M.; Petry, Winfried

    2018-05-01

    The thermal conductivity of fresh and irradiated U-Mo dispersion and monolithic fuel has been investigated experimentally and compared to theoretical models. During in-pile irradiation, thermal conductivity of fresh dispersion fuel at a temperature of 150 °C decreased from 59 W/m·K to 18 W/m·K at a burn-up of 4.9·1021 f/cc and further to 9 W/m·K at a burn-up of 6.1·1021 f/cc. Fresh monolithic fuel has a considerably lower thermal conductivity of 15 W/m·K at a temperature of 150 °C and consequently its decrease during in-pile irradiation is less steep than for dispersion fuel. For a burn-up of 3.5·1021 f/cc of monolithic fuel, a thermal conductivity of 11 W/m·K at a temperature of 150 °C has been measured by Burkes et al. (2015). The difference of decrease for both fuels originates from effects in the matrix that occur during irradiation, like for dispersion fuel the gradual disappearance of the Al matrix with increased burn-up and the subsequent growth of an interaction layer (IDL) between the U-Mo fuel particle and Al matrix and subsequent matrix hardening. The growth of fission gas bubbles and the decomposition of the U-Mo crystal lattice also affect both dispersion and monolithic fuel.

  10. A micro-convection model for thermal conductivity of nanofluids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Increase in the specific surface area as well as Brownian motion are supposed to be the most significant reasons for the anomalous enhancement in thermal conductivity of nanofluids. This work presents a semi-empirical approach for the same by emphasizing the above two effects through micro-convection. A new way of ...

  11. Evaluation of electrical and thermal conductivity of polymeric wastes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work being gingered by the big menace being posed on our environment by polymeric waste and it's rechanneling involved the studying of the electrical and thermal conductivities of the polymers PP, PE, PS and nylon66 doped with charcoal and graphite. Five grams of each polymer was mixed with varying ...

  12. Pressure effects on thermal conductivity and expansion of geologic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweet, J.N.

    1979-02-01

    Through analysis of existing data, an estimate is made of the effect of pressure or depth on the thermal conductivity and expansion of geologic materials which could be present in radioactive waste repositories. In the case of homogeneous dense materials, only small shifts are predicted to occur at depths less than or equal to 3 km, and these shifts will be insignificant as compared with those caused by temperature variations. As the porosity of the medium increases, the variation of conductivity and expansion with pressure becomes greater, with conductivity increasing and expansion decreasing as pressure increases. The pressure dependence of expansion can be found from data on the temperature variation of the isobaric compressibility. In a worst case estimate, a decrease in expansion of approx. 25% is predicted for 5% porous sandstone at a depth of 3 km. The thermal conductivity of a medium with gaseous inclusions increases as the porosity decreases, with the magnitude of the increase being dependent on the details of the porosity collapse. Based on analysis of existing data on tuff and sandstone, a weighted geometric mean formula is recommended for use in calculating the conductivity of porous rock. As a result of this study, it is recommended that measurement of rock porosity versus depth receive increased attention in exploration studies and that the effect of porosity on thermal conductivity and expansion should be examined in more detail

  13. Low Thermal Conductance Transition Edge Sensor (TES) for SPICA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khosropanah, P.; Dirks, B.; Kuur, J. van der; Ridder, M.; Bruijn, M.; Popescu, M.; Hoevers, H.; Gao, J. R.; Morozov, D.; Mauskopf, P.

    2009-01-01

    We fabricated and characterized low thermal conductance transition edge sensors (TES) for SAFARI instrument on SPICA. The device is based on a superconducting Ti/Au bilayer deposited on suspended SiN membrane. The critical temperature of the device is 113 mK. The low thermal conductance is realized by using long and narrow SiN supporting legs. All measurements were performed having the device in a light-tight box, which to a great extent eliminates the loading of the background radiation. We measured the current-voltage (IV) characteristics of the device in different bath temperatures and determine the thermal conductance (G) to be equal to 320 fW/K. This value corresponds to a noise equivalent power (NEP) of 3x10 -19 W/√(Hz). The current noise and complex impedance is also measured at different bias points at 55 mK bath temperature. The measured electrical (dark) NEP is 1x10 -18 W/√(Hz), which is about a factor of 3 higher than what we expect from the thermal conductance that comes out of the IV curves. Despite using a light-tight box, the photon noise might still be the source of this excess noise. We also measured the complex impedance of the same device at several bias points. Fitting a simple first order thermal-electrical model to the measured data, we find an effective time constant of about 2.7 ms and a thermal capacity of 13 fJ/K in the middle of the transition.

  14. A prediction model for the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids considering agglomeration and the radial distribution function of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Z. M.; Wang, B.

    2018-06-01

    Conventional heat transfer fluids usually have low thermal conductivity, limiting their efficiency in many applications. Many experiments have shown that adding nanosize solid particles to conventional fluids can greatly enhance their thermal conductivity. To explain this anomalous phenomenon, many theoretical investigations have been conducted in recent years. Some of this research has indicated that the particle agglomeration effect that commonly occurs in nanofluids should play an important role in such enhancement of the thermal conductivity, while some have shown that the enhancement of the effective thermal conductivity might be accounted for by the structure of nanofluids, which can be described using the radial distribution function of particles. However, theoretical predictions from these studies are not in very good agreement with experimental results. This paper proposes a prediction model for the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids, considering both the agglomeration effect and the radial distribution function of nanoparticles. The resulting theoretical predictions for several sets of nanofluids are highly consistent with experimental data.

  15. Minimized thermal conductivity in highly stable thermal barrier W/ZrO{sub 2} multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doering, Florian; Major, Anna; Eberl, Christian; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich [University of Goettingen, Institut fuer Materialphysik, Goettingen (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Nanoscale thin-film multilayer materials are of great research interest since their large number of interfaces can strongly hinder phonon propagation and lead to a minimized thermal conductivity. When such materials provide a sufficiently small thermal conductivity and feature in addition also a high thermal stability, they would be possible candidates for high-temperature applications such as thermal barrier coatings. For this article, we have used pulsed laser deposition in order to fabricate thin multilayers out of the thermal barrier material ZrO{sub 2} in combination with W, which has both a high melting point and high density. Layer thicknesses were designed such that bulk thermal conductivity is governed by the low value of ZrO{sub 2}, while ultrathin W blocking layers provide a high number of interfaces. By this phonon scattering, reflection and shortening of mean free path lead to a significant reduction in overall thermal conductivity even below the already low value of ZrO{sub 2}. In addition to this, X-ray reflectivity measurements were taken showing strong Bragg peaks even after annealing such multilayers at 1300 K. Those results identify W/ZrO{sub 2} multilayers as desired thermally stable, low-conductivity materials. (orig.)

  16. The effect of radiation induced electrical conductivity (RIC) on the thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, D.P.

    1993-01-01

    Microwave heating of plasmas in fusion reactors requires the development of microwave windows through which the microwaves can pass without great losses. The degradation of the thermal conductivity of alumina in a radiation environment is an important consideration in reliability studies of these microwave windows. Several recent papers have addressed this question at higher temperatures and at low temperatures. The current paper extends the low temperature calculations to determine the effect of phonon-electron scattering on the thermal conductivity at 77 K due to RIC. These low temperature calculations are of interest because the successful application of high power (>1 MW) windows for electron cyclotron heating systems in fusion reactors will most likely require cryogenic cooling to take advantage of the low loss tangent and higher thermal conductivity of candidate window materials at these temperatures

  17. Experimental study of thermal conductivity of pyrolysised materials by means of a flat layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaniushkin, V. D.; Popov, S. K.; Sidenkov, D. V.

    2017-11-01

    Recycling of tires is currently a very important task. One of the areas of recycling tires is their low-temperature pyrolysis to produce marketable products - liquid fraction and a solid coke residue. For the development of the pyrolysis installation it is important to know the thermal conductivity of the coke residue at different temperatures of pyrolysis of initial material. As a property of matter, thermal conductivity depends in general on temperature and pressure. For materials with some structure, such as porous materials, the thermal conductivity depends on the characteristics of the structure. The thermal conductivity of the porous coke residue at pyrolysis temperatures of 300 0C, 400 0C, 500 0C and atmospheric pressure was studied experimentally at the laboratory unit of the department of “Theoretical basis of heat engineering” using the method of the flat layer in the temperature range 5…100 0C. Experimentally proved temperature dependencies of the coefficient of thermal conductivity of the coke residue are built to improve the accuracy of calculations of constructive and regime parameters of the pyrolysis installation.

  18. Thermal Properties and Phonon Spectral Characterization of Synthetic Boron Phosphide for High Thermal Conductivity Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joon Sang; Wu, Huan; Hu, Yongjie

    2017-12-13

    Heat dissipation is an increasingly critical technological challenge in modern electronics and photonics as devices continue to shrink to the nanoscale. To address this challenge, high thermal conductivity materials that can efficiently dissipate heat from hot spots and improve device performance are urgently needed. Boron phosphide is a unique high thermal conductivity and refractory material with exceptional chemical inertness, hardness, and high thermal stability, which holds high promises for many practical applications. So far, however, challenges with boron phosphide synthesis and characterization have hampered the understanding of its fundamental properties and potential applications. Here, we describe a systematic thermal transport study based on a synergistic synthesis-experimental-modeling approach: we have chemically synthesized high-quality boron phosphide single crystals and measured their thermal conductivity as a record-high 460 W/mK at room temperature. Through nanoscale ballistic transport, we have, for the first time, mapped the phonon spectra of boron phosphide and experimentally measured its phonon mean free-path spectra with consideration of both natural and isotope-pure abundances. We have also measured the temperature- and size-dependent thermal conductivity and performed corresponding calculations by solving the three-dimensional and spectral-dependent phonon Boltzmann transport equation using the variance-reduced Monte Carlo method. The experimental results are in good agreement with that predicted by multiscale simulations and density functional theory, which together quantify the heat conduction through the phonon mode dependent scattering process. Our finding underscores the promise of boron phosphide as a high thermal conductivity material for a wide range of applications, including thermal management and energy regulation, and provides a detailed, microscopic-level understanding of the phonon spectra and thermal transport mechanisms of

  19. Thermal conductivity model of vibro-packed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon Soo, Kim

    2001-01-01

    In an effort to dispose of excess weapons grade plutonium accumulated in the cold war era in the United States and the Russian Federation, one method currently under investigation is the conversion of the plutonium into mixed oxide (MOX) reactor fuel for LWRs and fast reactors in the Russian Federation. A fuel option already partly developed at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Dimitrovgrad is that of vibro-packed MOX. Fuel rod fabrication using powder vibro-packing is attractive because it includes neither a process too complex to operate in glove boxes (or remotely), nor a waste-producing step necessary for the conventional pellet rod fabrication. However, because of its loose bonding between fuel particles at the beginning of life, vibro-packed MOX fuel has a somewhat less effective thermal conductivity than fully sintered pellet fuel, and undergoes more restructuring. Helium would also likely be pressurized in vibro-packed MOX fuel rods for LWRs to enhance initial fuel thermal conductivity. The combination of these two factors complicates development of an accurate thermal conductivity model. But clearly in order to predict fuel thermomechanical responses during irradiation of vibro-packed MOX fuel, fuel thermal conductivity must be known. The Vibropac fuel of interest in this study refers the fuel that is compacted with irregular fragments of mixed oxide fuel. In this paper, the thermal-conductivity models in the literature that dealt with relatively similar situations to the present case are examined. Then, the best model is selected based on accuracy of prediction and applicability. Then, the selected model is expanded to fit the various situations of interest. (author)

  20. Effect of thermal conductivities of shape stabilized PCM on under-floor heating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Wenlong; Xie, Biao; Zhang, Rongming; Xu, Zhiming; Xia, Yuting

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • HCE-SSPCM was prepared and used in under-floor heating system. • Enhancing thermal conductivity improved the efficiency of energy and space. • Too high thermal conductivity over a range was meaningless. • The economic benefits of the phase change energy storage system were the best. - Abstract: A kind of heat conduction-enhanced shape-stabilized PCM (HCE-SSPCM) was utilized in the under-floor heating system for house heating in winter. This system charges heat by using cheap nighttime electricity and provides heating needs throughout all day. The effect of thermal conductivity of the PCM on energy savings and economic benefits of the system were theoretically and experimentally studied. HCE-SSPCM plates, made of (solid paraffin + liquid paraffin)/high density polyethylene/expanded graphite, were introduced to a test room with under-floor heating system. And the operating characteristics of the system were compared with that of the non-phase change energy storage system and the conventional air conditioning system. The results showed that enhancing the thermal conductivity of PCM in a certain range could significantly improve the energy efficiency of the heating system and reduce the thickness of thermal insulating materials. But the improving effect was not obvious when the thermal conductivity was beyond 1.0 W/m K. The phase change energy storage system had a comfortable temperature environment and the best economic benefits among the three different heating types especially when the ratio of peak-valley electric price was high. Therefore, increasing the thermal conductivity of SSPCM will be of great significance for house heating

  1. The contribution of thermal radiation to the thermal conductivity of porous UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakker, K.; Kwast, H.; Cordfunke, E.H.P.

    1995-01-01

    The influence of cylindrical, spherical and ellipsoidal inclusions on the overall thermal conductivity was computed with the finite element technique. The results of these calculations were compared with equations that describe the effect of inclusions on the overall thermal conductivity. The analytical equation of Schulz [B. Schulz, KfK-1988 (1974)] that describes the effect of inclusions on the overall thermal conductivity is in good agreement with the results of the finite element computations. This good agreement shows that among a variety of porosity correction formulas, the equation of Schulz gives the best description of the effect of inclusions on the overall thermal conductivity. This equation and the results of finite element calculations allow us to compute the contribution of radiation to the overall thermal conductivity of UO 2 with oblate ellipsoidal porosity. The present radiation calculations show that Hayes and Peddicord [S.L. Hayes and K.L. Peddicord, J. Nucl. Mater. 202 (1993) 87] overestimated the contribution of thermal radiation to the thermal conductivity. ((orig.))

  2. Experimental Investigations on Thermal Conductivity of Fenugreek and Banana Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujari, Satish; Venkatesh, Talari; Seeli, Hepsiba

    2018-04-01

    The use of composite materials in manufacturing has significantly increased in the past decade. Research is being done to identify natural fibers that can be used as composites. Several natural fibers are already being used in the industry as composites. The appealing advantages of using natural fibers are reflected in lower density when compared to synthetic fibers and also in saving costs. This research paper highlights the experiment that analyses the use of biodegradable fenugreek composite as natural fiber and concludes that fenugreek natural fibers are an excellent substitute to the synthetic fibers in terms of reinforcement properties for the polymers. These fenugreek fibers are naturally sourced, renewable, cost effective and bio-friendly. In thermal energy storage systems as well as in air conditioning systems, thermal insulators are predominantly used to enhance the storage properties. An experiment was created to investigate the thermal properties of fenugreek banana composites for different fiber concentrations. The experimental results showed that the thermal conductivity of the composites decrease with an increase in the fiber content. The experimental results were compared with the theoretical models to describe the variation of thermal conductivity with the volume fraction of the fiber. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results was observed.

  3. Illusion thermal device based on material with constant anisotropic thermal conductivity for location camouflage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Quanwen; Zhao, Xiaopeng; Meng, Tong; Liu, Cunliang

    2016-09-01

    Thermal metamaterials and devices based on transformation thermodynamics often require materials with anisotropic and inhomogeneous thermal conductivities. In this study, still based on the concept of transformation thermodynamics, we designed a planar illusion thermal device, which can delocalize a heat source in the device such that the temperature profile outside the device appears to be produced by a virtual source at another position. This device can be constructed by only one kind of material with constant anisotropic thermal conductivity. The condition which should be satisfied by the device is provided, and the required anisotropic thermal conductivity is then deduced theoretically. This study may be useful for the designs of metamaterials or devices since materials with constant anisotropic parameters have great facility in fabrication. A prototype device has been fabricated based on a composite composed by two naturally occurring materials. The experimental results validate the effectiveness of the device.

  4. Influence of moisture content and temperature on thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of rice flours

    Science.gov (United States)

    The thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of four types of rice flours and one type of rice protein were determine at temperatures ranging from 4.8 to 36.8 C, bulk densities 535 to 875.8 kg/m3, and moisture contents 2.6 to 16.7 percent (w.b.), using a KD2 Thermal Properties Analyzer. It was ...

  5. Thermal conductivity and rectification in asymmetric archaeal lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssefian, Sina; Rahbar, Nima; Van Dessel, Steven

    2018-05-01

    Nature employs lipids to construct nanostructured membranes that self-assemble in an aqueous environment to separate the cell interior from the exterior environment. Membrane composition changes among species and according to environmental conditions, which allows organisms to occupy a wide variety of different habitats. Lipid bilayers are phase-change materials that exhibit strong thermotropic and lyotropic phase behavior in an aqueous environment, which may also cause thermal rectification. Among different types of lipids, archaeal lipids are of great interest due to their ability to withstand extreme conditions. In this paper, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were employed to study the nanostructures and thermal properties of different archaeols and to investigate thermal rectification effects in asymmetric archaeal membranes. In particular, we are interested in understanding the role of bridged phytanyl chains and cyclopentane groups in controlling the phase transition temperature and heat flow across the membrane. Our results indicate that the bridged phytanyl chains decrease the molecular packing of lipids, whereas the existence of cyclopentane rings on the tail groups increases the molecular packing by enhancing the interactions between isoprenoid chains. We found that macrocyclic archaeols have the highest thermal conductivity, whereas macrocyclic archaeols with two cyclopentane rings have the lowest. The effect of the temperature on the variation of thermal conductivity was found to be progressive. Our results further indicate that small thermal rectification effects occur in asymmetric archaeol bilayer membranes at around 25 K temperature gradient. The calculated thermal rectification factor was around 0.09 which is in the range of rectification factor obtained experimentally for nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes (0.07). Such phenomena may be of biological significance and could also be optimized for use in various engineering

  6. Computational thermal, chemical, fluid, and solid mechanics for geosystems management.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davison, Scott; Alger, Nicholas; Turner, Daniel Zack; Subia, Samuel Ramirez; Carnes, Brian; Martinez, Mario J.; Notz, Patrick K.; Klise, Katherine A.; Stone, Charles Michael; Field, Richard V., Jr.; Newell, Pania; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Red-Horse, John Robert; Bishop, Joseph E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Hopkins, Polly L.; Mesh, Mikhail; Bean, James E.; Moffat, Harry K.; Yoon, Hongkyu

    2011-09-01

    This document summarizes research performed under the SNL LDRD entitled - Computational Mechanics for Geosystems Management to Support the Energy and Natural Resources Mission. The main accomplishment was development of a foundational SNL capability for computational thermal, chemical, fluid, and solid mechanics analysis of geosystems. The code was developed within the SNL Sierra software system. This report summarizes the capabilities of the simulation code and the supporting research and development conducted under this LDRD. The main goal of this project was the development of a foundational capability for coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, chemical (THMC) simulation of heterogeneous geosystems utilizing massively parallel processing. To solve these complex issues, this project integrated research in numerical mathematics and algorithms for chemically reactive multiphase systems with computer science research in adaptive coupled solution control and framework architecture. This report summarizes and demonstrates the capabilities that were developed together with the supporting research underlying the models. Key accomplishments are: (1) General capability for modeling nonisothermal, multiphase, multicomponent flow in heterogeneous porous geologic materials; (2) General capability to model multiphase reactive transport of species in heterogeneous porous media; (3) Constitutive models for describing real, general geomaterials under multiphase conditions utilizing laboratory data; (4) General capability to couple nonisothermal reactive flow with geomechanics (THMC); (5) Phase behavior thermodynamics for the CO2-H2O-NaCl system. General implementation enables modeling of other fluid mixtures. Adaptive look-up tables enable thermodynamic capability to other simulators; (6) Capability for statistical modeling of heterogeneity in geologic materials; and (7) Simulator utilizes unstructured grids on parallel processing computers.

  7. Thermal conductivity of nanofluids and size distribution of nanoparticles by Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yongjin; Yu Boming; Feng Kaiming; Xu Peng; Zou Mingqing

    2008-01-01

    Nanofluids, a class of solid-liquid suspensions, have received an increasing attention and studied intensively because of their anomalously high thermal conductivites at low nanoparticle concentration. Based on the fractal character of nanoparticles in nanofluids, the probability model for nanoparticle's sizes and the effective thermal conductivity model are derived, in which the effect of the microconvection due to the Brownian motion of nanoparticles in the fluids is taken into account. The proposed model is expressed as a function of the thermal conductivities of the base fluid and the nanoparticles, the volume fraction, fractal dimension for particles, the size of nanoparticles, and the temperature, as well as random number. This model has the characters of both analytical and numerical solutions. The Monte Carlo simulations combined with the fractal geometry theory are performed. The predictions by the present Monte Carlo simulations are shown in good accord with the existing experimental data.

  8. Research technique and experimental device for thermal conductivity measurements of refractory compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishnevetskaya, I.A.; Petrov, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Proposed is a new axial technique for determining thermal conductivity coefficient of solids at temperatures above 1000 deg C with the use of internal heating of specimens by passing electric current and with experimental determining the thermal flows on the lateral side of the working section of the specimen. This method is usable for investigating the thermal conductivity of materials whose surface radiation characteristics are unknown or unstable and for carrying out experiments not only in vacuum, but also in various atmospheres. The overall fiducial error of the results of the method is evaluated at 4-5 % within the range of temperatures between 1200 and 2300 K. A description of the experimental installation is given

  9. Simultaneous measurements of thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity of micro-machined Silicon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagino, H; Kawahara, Y; Goto, A; Miyazaki, K

    2012-01-01

    The in-plane effective thermal conductivity of free-standing Si thin films with periodic micropores was measured at -100 to 0 °C. The Si thin films with micropores were prepared from silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers by standard microfabrication processes. The dimensions of the free-standing Si thin films were 200μm×150μm×2 μm, with staggered 4 μm pores having an average pitch of 4 mm. The Si thin film serves both as a heater and thermometer. The average temperature rise of the thin film is a function of its in-plane thermal conductivity. The effective thermal conductivity was calculated using a simple one-dimensional heat conduction model. The measured thermal conductivity was much lower than that expected based on classical model evaluations. A significant phonon size effect was observed even in the microsized structures, and the mean free path for phonons is very long even at the room temperature.

  10. Instrument for Measuring Thermal Conductivity of Materials at Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James; Sass, Jared; Johnson, Wesley

    2010-01-01

    With the advance of polymer and other non-metallic material sciences, whole new series of polymeric materials and composites are being created. These materials are being optimized for many different applications including cryogenic and low-temperature industrial processes. Engineers need these data to perform detailed system designs and enable new design possibilities for improved control, reliability, and efficiency in specific applications. One main area of interest is cryogenic structural elements and fluid handling components and other parts, films, and coatings for low-temperature application. An important thermal property of these new materials is the apparent thermal conductivity (k-value).

  11. Influences in Thermal Conductivity Evaluation Using the Thermal Probe Method; some Practical Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Strâmbu, Vasile

    2012-01-01

    The thermal probe is a device used for measuring the thermal conductivity of materials in the food industry, plastics industry, geotechnical engineering and studies of soft soils and rocks. The method also started being utilized in the field of construction materials with particularities that take into account their composition and the state they are in.

  12. Influence of the solid-gas interface on the effective thermal parameters of a two-layer structure in photoacoustic experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguirre, N Munoz; Perez, L MartInez; Garibay-Febles, V; Lozada-Cassou, M

    2004-01-01

    From the theoretical point of view, the influence of the solid-gas interface on the effective thermal parameters in a two-layer structure of the photoacoustic technique is discussed. It is shown that the effective thermal parameters depend strongly upon the thermal resistance value associated with the solid-gas interface. New expressions for the effective thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity in the low frequency limit are obtained. In the high frequency limit, the 'resonant' behaviour of the effective thermal diffusivity is maintained and a new complex dependence on frequency of the effective thermal conductivity is shown

  13. Thermal Effects Induced by Laser Irradiation of Solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galovic, S.

    2004-01-01

    A part of incident energy is absorbed within the irradiated sample when a solid is exposed to the influence of laser radiation, to more general electromagnetic radiation within the wide range of wavelengths (from microwaves, to infrared radiation to X-rays), or to the energy of particle beams (electronic, protonic, or ionic). The absorption process signifies a highly selective excitation of the electronic state of atoms or molecules, followed by thermal and non-thermal de-excitation processes. Non-radiation de-excitation-relaxation processes induce direct sample heating. In addition, a great number of non-thermal processes (e.g., photoluminescence, photochemistry, photovoltage) may also induce heat generation as a secondary process. This method of producing heat is called the photothermal effect.The photothermal effect and subsequent propagation of thermal waves on the surface and in the volume of the solid absorbing the exciting beam may produce the following: variations in the temperature on the surfaces of the sample; deformation and displacement of surfaces; secondary infrared radiation (photothermal radiation); the formation of the gradient of the refractivity index; changes in coefficients of reflection and absorbtion; the generation of sound (photoacoustic generation), etc. These phenomena may be used in the investigation and measurement of various material properties since the profile and magnitude of the generated signal depend upon the nature of material absorbing radiation. A series of non-destructive spectroscopic, microscopic and defectoscopic detecting techniques, called photothermal methods, is developed on the basis of the above-mentioned phenomena.This paper outlines the interaction between the intensity modulated laser beam and solids, and presents a mathematical model of generated thermal sources. Generalized models for a photothermal response of optically excited materials have been obtained, including thermal memory influence on the propagation

  14. Thermal conductivity of a film of single walled carbon nanotubes measured with infrared thermal imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ya; Inoue, Taiki; Xiang, Rong; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo

    Heat dissipation has restricted the modern miniaturization trend with the development of electronic devices. Theoretically proven to be with high axial thermal conductivity, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) have long been expected to cool down the nanoscale world. Even though the tube-tube contact resistance limits the capability of heat transfer of the bulk film, the high intrinsic thermal conductivity of SWNT still glorify the application of films of SWNT network as a thermal interface material. In this work, we proposed a new method to straightly measure the thermal conductivity of SWNT film. We bridged two cantilevered Si thin plate with SWNT film, and kept a steady state heat flow in between. With the infrared camera to record the temperature distribution, the Si plates with known thermal conductivity can work as a reference to calculate the heat flux going through the SWNT film. Further, the thermal conductivity of the SWNT film can be obtained through Fourier's law after deducting the effect of thermal radiation. The sizes of the structure, the heating temperature, the vacuum degree and other crucial impact factors are carefully considered and analyzed. The author Y. F. was supported through the Advanced Integration Science Innovation Education and Research Consortium Program by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology.

  15. Tailoring the thermal conductivity of the powder bed in Electron Beam Melting (EBM) Additive Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C J; Tammas-Williams, S; Hernandez-Nava, E; Todd, I

    2017-09-05

    Metallic powder bed additive manufacturing is capable of producing complex, functional parts by repeatedly depositing thin layers of powder particles atop of each other whilst selectively melting the corresponding part cross-section into each layer. A weakness with this approach arises when melting overhanging features, which have no prior melted material directly beneath them. This is due to the lower thermal conductivity of the powder relative to solid material, which as a result leads to an accumulation of heat and thus distortion. The Electron Beam Melting (EBM) process alleviates this to some extent as the powder must first be sintered (by the beam itself) before it is melted, which results in the added benefit of increasing the thermal conductivity. This study thus sought to investigate to what extent the thermal conductivity of local regions in a titanium Ti-6Al-4V powder bed could be varied by imparting more energy from the beam. Thermal diffusivity and density measurements were taken of the resulting sintered samples, which ranged from being loosely to very well consolidated. It was found that the calculated thermal conductivity at two temperatures, 40 and 730 °C, was more than doubled over the range of input energies explored.

  16. Lattice dynamics and lattice thermal conductivity of thorium dicarbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Zongmeng [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Huai, Ping, E-mail: huaiping@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Qiu, Wujie [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Ke, Xuezhi, E-mail: xzke@phy.ecnu.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241 (China); Zhang, Wenqing [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhu, Zhiyuan [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2014-11-15

    The elastic and thermodynamic properties of ThC{sub 2} with a monoclinic symmetry have been studied by means of density functional theory and direct force-constant method. The calculated properties including the thermal expansion, the heat capacity and the elastic constants are in a good agreement with experiment. Our results show that the vibrational property of the C{sub 2} dimer in ThC{sub 2} is similar to that of a free standing C{sub 2} dimer. This indicates that the C{sub 2} dimer in ThC{sub 2} is not strongly bonded to Th atoms. The lattice thermal conductivity for ThC{sub 2} was calculated by means of the Debye–Callaway model. As a comparison, the conductivity of ThC was also calculated. Our results show that the ThC and ThC{sub 2} contributions of the lattice thermal conductivity to the total conductivity are 29% and 17%, respectively.

  17. Synthesis and thermal properties of the MA/HDPE composites with nano-additives as form-stable PCM with improved thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yaojie; Su, Di; Huang, Xiang; Alva, Guruprasad; Liu, Lingkun; Fang, Guiyin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • MA/HDPE composites with nano-additives were prepared for thermal conductivity enhancement. • Microstructure and chemical structure of the FSPCM were analyzed. • Thermal properties and thermal reliability of the FSPCM were investigated. • Thermal conductivity of the FSPCM can be enhanced by adding NAO and NG. - Abstract: For the purpose of improving the thermal conductivity of the form–stable phase change materials (FSPCM), two types of nano–powders with high thermal conductivity were added into the samples. In the modified FSPCM, myristic acid (MA) was used as a solid–liquid phase change material (PCM), high density polyethylene (HDPE) acted as supporting material to prevent the leakage of the melted MA. Nano–Al 2 O 3 (NAO) and nano–graphite (NG) were the additives for thermal conductivity enhancement. Scanning electronic microscope (SEM), Fourier transformation infrared spectroscope (FT–IR) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) were used to analyze the microstructure, chemical structure and crystalline phase of the samples, respectively. Furthermore, the specific latent heat and phase transition temperature, thermal conductivity and thermal reliability were investigated using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), thermal conductivity meter and thermo–gravimetric analyzer (TGA). The results showed that the MA was uniformly absorbed in the HDPE matrices and there was no leakage during the melting process when the mass fraction of the MA in the MA/HDPE composite was less than 70%. The DSC results revealed that the modified FSPCM have a constant phase change temperature and high specific latent heat. The thermal conductivity of the FSPCM was measured in the solid (30 °C) and liquid (60 °C) states of the MA. When the mass fraction of nano–powder additives is 12%, the thermal conductivities of the FSPCM increase by 95% (NAO) and 121% (NG) at 30 °C. It is anticipated that the FSPCM possess a potential application for thermal energy

  18. Effects of thermal efficiency in DCMD and the preparation of membranes with low thermal conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhehao, E-mail: ccgri_lzh@163.com [Changchun Gold Research Institute, 130012 (China); Peng, Yuelian, E-mail: pyl@live.com.au [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Dong, Yajun; Fan, Hongwei [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Chen, Ping [The Research Institute of Environmental Protection, North China Pharmaceutical Group Corporation, 050015 (China); Qiu, Lin [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Jiang, Qi [National Major Science and Technology Program Management Office for Water Pollution Control and Treatment, MEP, 100029 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • The effects on vapor flux and thermal efficiency were simulated. • The conditions favoring vapor flux also favored thermal efficiency. • Four microporous polymer membranes were compared. • The SiO{sub 2} aerogel coating reduced the thermal conductivity of polymer membranes. • A 3ω technique was used to measure the thermal conductivity of membranes. - Abstract: The effects of the membrane characteristics and operational conditions on the vapor flux and thermal efficiency in a direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) process were studied with a mathematical simulation. The membrane temperature, driving force of vapor transfer, membrane distillation coefficient, etc. were used to analyze the effects. The operating conditions that increased the vapor flux improved the thermal efficiency. The membrane characteristics of four microporous membranes and their performances in DCMD were compared. A polysulfone (PSf) membrane prepared via vapor-induced phase separation exhibited the lowest thermal conductivity. The PSf and polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membranes were modified using SiO{sub 2} aerogel blending and coating to reduce the thermal conductivity of the membrane. The coating process was more effective than the blending process toward this end. The changes in the structure of the modified membrane were observed with a scanning electron microscope. Si was found on the modified membrane surface with an energy spectrometer. The PVDF composite and support membranes were tested during the DCMD process; the composite membrane had a higher vapor flux and a better thermal efficiency than the support. A new method based on a 3ω technique was used to measure the thermal conductivity of the membranes.

  19. Effects of thermal efficiency in DCMD and the preparation of membranes with low thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhehao; Peng, Yuelian; Dong, Yajun; Fan, Hongwei; Chen, Ping; Qiu, Lin; Jiang, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects on vapor flux and thermal efficiency were simulated. • The conditions favoring vapor flux also favored thermal efficiency. • Four microporous polymer membranes were compared. • The SiO 2 aerogel coating reduced the thermal conductivity of polymer membranes. • A 3ω technique was used to measure the thermal conductivity of membranes. - Abstract: The effects of the membrane characteristics and operational conditions on the vapor flux and thermal efficiency in a direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) process were studied with a mathematical simulation. The membrane temperature, driving force of vapor transfer, membrane distillation coefficient, etc. were used to analyze the effects. The operating conditions that increased the vapor flux improved the thermal efficiency. The membrane characteristics of four microporous membranes and their performances in DCMD were compared. A polysulfone (PSf) membrane prepared via vapor-induced phase separation exhibited the lowest thermal conductivity. The PSf and polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membranes were modified using SiO 2 aerogel blending and coating to reduce the thermal conductivity of the membrane. The coating process was more effective than the blending process toward this end. The changes in the structure of the modified membrane were observed with a scanning electron microscope. Si was found on the modified membrane surface with an energy spectrometer. The PVDF composite and support membranes were tested during the DCMD process; the composite membrane had a higher vapor flux and a better thermal efficiency than the support. A new method based on a 3ω technique was used to measure the thermal conductivity of the membranes

  20. Characterization of various two-phase materials based on thermal conductivity using modified transient plane source method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayachandran, S.; Prithiviraajan, R. N.; Reddy, K. S.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the thermal conductivity of various two-phase materials using modified transient plane source (MTPS) technique. The values are determined by using commercially available C-Therm TCi apparatus. It is specially designed for testing of low to high thermal conductivity materials in the range of 0.02 to 100 Wm-1K-1 within a temperature range of 223-473 K. The results obtained for the two-phase materials (solids, powders and liquids) are having an accuracy better than 5%. The transient method is one of the easiest and less time consuming method to determine the thermal conductivity of the materials compared to steady state methods.

  1. The effect of pressure on the thermal conductivity of silicate rocks up to 12 kbar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horai, Ki-iti; Susaki, Jun-ichi

    1989-06-01

    The effect of high pressure up to 12 kbar on thermal conductivity of silicate rocks was determined. Measurements were made by the transient hot wire method on 23 samples. With the exception of one sedimentary rock, one meteorite and manufactured fused and crystalline quartz, the samples were igneous and metamorphic rocks of the oceanic and the continental lithospheres. The samples were of cylindrical shape, 24 mm long and 12 mm in diameter, containing a heater of 0.1 mm thick chromel wire along their axis and a thermocouple at the center. They were encased in cubes of 41 mm-edge-long pyrophyllite and then placed between slide-type cubic anvils of the IHI high-pressure apparatus, which transmitted quasi-hydrostatic pressure of more than 2 kbar to the sample through the solid pyrophyllite medium. The validity of the method was confirmed by comparing the conductivity of standard materials measured using the present method with literature values. The results show that the thermal conductivity of all samples increases with increasing pressure. The most rapid increase in the range below 2 kbar can be attributed to the closure of microcracks in the sample, and uniform, less pronounced increases above 2 kbar should be intrinsic to the material. The effect of temperature was also studied on a small number of selected samples. In the temperature range from 300 to 700 K, the thermal conductivities of crystalline rocks under quasi-hydrostatic compressive stresses of 4 and 10 kbar showed a monotonic decrease of thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of fused quartz, however, increased with temperature. Pressure appeared to have no appreciable effect on the temperature dependence of silicate thermal conductivity.

  2. Effect of microscale gaseous thermal conduction on the thermal behavior of a buckled microbridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jiaqi; Tang Zhenan; Li Jinfeng; Zhang Fengtian

    2008-01-01

    A microbridge is a basic micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device and has great potential for application in microsensors and microactuators. The thermal behavior of a microbridge is important for designing a microbridge-based thermal microsensor or microactuator. To study the thermal behavior of a microbridge consisting of Si 3 N 4 and polysilicon with a 2 µm suspended gap between the substrate and the microbridge while the microbridge is heated by an electrical current fed through the polysilicon, a microbridge model is developed to correlate theoretically the input current and the temperature distribution under the buckling conditions, especially considering the effects of the microscale gaseous thermal conduction due to the microbridge buckling. The calculated results show that the buckling of the microbridge changes the microscale gaseous thermal conduction, and thus greatly affects the thermal behavior of the microbridge. We also evaluate the effects of initial buckling on the temperature distribution of the microbridge. The experimental results show that buckling should be taken into account if the buckling is large. Therefore, the variation in gaseous thermal conduction and the suspended gap height caused by the buckling should be considered in the design of such thermomechanical microsensors and microactuators, which requires more accurate thermal behavior

  3. Measurements of thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity and thermal conductivity with LFA 447 apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zajas, Jan Jakub; Heiselberg, Per

    The LFA 447 can be successfully used for measurements of thermal diffusivity, specific heat and thermal conductivity of various samples. It is especially useful when determining the properties of materials on a very small scale. The matrix measurement mode allows for determining the local...... that the heat losses from both samples during the measurement are similar. Finally, the leveling of the samples is very important. Very small discrepancies can cause a massive error in the derivation of specific heat capacity and, as a result, thermal conductivity....

  4. Thermal Stir Welding: A New Solid State Welding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Thermal stir welding is a new welding process developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Thermal stir welding is similar to friction stir welding in that it joins similar or dissimilar materials without melting the parent material. However, unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the process are all independent of each other and are separately controlled. Furthermore, the heating element of the process can be either a solid-state process (such as a thermal blanket, induction type process, etc), or, a fusion process (YG laser, plasma torch, etc.) The separation of the heating, stirring, forging elements of the process allows more degrees of freedom for greater process control. This paper introduces the mechanics of the thermal stir welding process. In addition, weld mechanical property data is presented for selected alloys as well as metallurgical analysis.

  5. Existence of negative differential thermal conductance in one-dimensional diffusive thermal transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiuning; Chen, Yong P.

    2013-06-01

    We show that in a finite one-dimensional (1D) system with diffusive thermal transport described by the Fourier's law, negative differential thermal conductance (NDTC) cannot occur when the temperature at one end is fixed and there are no abrupt junctions. We demonstrate that NDTC in this case requires the presence of junction(s) with temperature-dependent thermal contact resistance (TCR). We derive a necessary and sufficient condition for the existence of NDTC in terms of the properties of the TCR for systems with a single junction. We show that under certain circumstances we even could have infinite (negative or positive) differential thermal conductance in the presence of the TCR. Our predictions provide theoretical basis for constructing NDTC-based devices, such as thermal amplifiers, oscillators, and logic devices.

  6. Thermal rectification and negative differential thermal conductance in harmonic chains with nonlinear system-bath coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Yi; Li, Hui-Min; Ding, Ze-Jun

    2016-03-01

    Thermal rectification and negative differential thermal conductance were realized in harmonic chains in this work. We used the generalized Caldeira-Leggett model to study the heat flow. In contrast to most previous studies considering only the linear system-bath coupling, we considered the nonlinear system-bath coupling based on recent experiment [Eichler et al., Nat. Nanotech. 6, 339 (2011), 10.1038/nnano.2011.71]. When the linear coupling constant is weak, the multiphonon processes induced by the nonlinear coupling allow more phonons transport across the system-bath interface and hence the heat current is enhanced. Consequently, thermal rectification and negative differential thermal conductance are achieved when the nonlinear couplings are asymmetric. However, when the linear coupling constant is strong, the umklapp processes dominate the multiphonon processes. Nonlinear coupling suppresses the heat current. Thermal rectification is also achieved. But the direction of rectification is reversed compared to the results of weak linear coupling constant.

  7. Effective thermal conductivity of a heat generating rod bundle dissipating heat by natural convection and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senve, Vinay; Narasimham, G.S.V.L.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Transport processes in isothermal hexagonal sheath with 19 heat generating rods is studied. → Correlation is given to predict the maximum temperature considering all transport processes. → Effective thermal conductivity of rod bundle can be obtained using max temperature. → Data on the critical Rayleigh numbers for p/d ratios of 1.1-2.0 is presented. → Radiative heat transfer contributes to heat dissipation of 38-65% of total heat. - Abstract: A numerical study of conjugate natural convection and surface radiation in a horizontal hexagonal sheath housing 19 solid heat generating rods with cladding and argon as the fill gas, is performed. The natural convection in the sheath is driven by the volumetric heat generation in the solid rods. The problem is solved using the FLUENT CFD code. A correlation is obtained to predict the maximum temperature in the rod bundle for different pitch-to-diameter ratios and heat generating rates. The effective thermal conductivity is related to the heat generation rate, maximum temperature and the sheath temperature. Results are presented for the dimensionless maximum temperature, Rayleigh number and the contribution of radiation with changing emissivity, total wattage and the pitch-to-diameter ratio. In the simulation of a larger system that contains a rod bundle, the effective thermal conductivity facilitates simplified modelling of the rod bundle by treating it as a solid of effective thermal conductivity. The parametric studies revealed that the contribution of radiation can be 38-65% of the total heat generation, for the parameter ranges chosen. Data for critical Rayleigh number above which natural convection comes into effect is also presented.

  8. Thermal expansion anomaly and thermal conductivity of U3O8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, B.

    1975-01-01

    The anomaly in the thermal expansion of U 3 O 8 and results of the thermal conductivity of this compound are described. U 3 O 8 powder heat treated at 1,223 K was consolidated by pressing and sintering in air at 1,223 and 1,373 K to a density of 66% and 80.8% TD. The O/U ratio was 2.67 and 2.63 respectively, the crystal structure being orthorhombic in both cases. For UOsub(2.63) the thermal linear expansion was measured in the temperature range 293 K-1,063 K in pressing direction and normal to it, while for UOsub(2.67) measurements were done parallel to the pressing direction. The curves of the linear thermal expansion from 373 K up to 623 K show negative values and above positive for the three curves. The results are related to known data of phase-transition-temperatures of the orthorhombic U 3 O 8 . Measurements of the thermal conductivity were done on UOsub(2.67). Because of the high porosity of the samples, known relationships for the porosity correction of the thermal conductivity were proved on alumina with 34 % porosity. The values of the thermal conductivity of UOsub(2.67) (corrected to zero porosity) show a very slight temperature dependence, they are about three times lower than those of the stoichiometric uranium dioxide in the same temperature range

  9. Thermal conductivity and thermal rectification in graphene nanoribbons: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiuning; Ruan, Xiulin; Chen, Yong P

    2009-07-01

    We have used molecular dynamics to calculate the thermal conductivity of symmetric and asymmetric graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) of several nanometers in size (up to approximately 4 nm wide and approximately 10 nm long). For symmetric nanoribbons, the calculated thermal conductivity (e.g., approximately 2000 W/m-K at 400 K for a 1.5 nm x 5.7 nm zigzag GNR) is on the similar order of magnitude of the experimentally measured value for graphene. We have investigated the effects of edge chirality and found that nanoribbons with zigzag edges have appreciably larger thermal conductivity than nanoribbons with armchair edges. For asymmetric nanoribbons, we have found significant thermal rectification. Among various triangularly shaped GNRs we investigated, the GNR with armchair bottom edge and a vertex angle of 30 degrees gives the maximal thermal rectification. We also studied the effect of defects and found that vacancies and edge roughness in the nanoribbons can significantly decrease the thermal conductivity. However, substantial thermal rectification is observed even in the presence of edge roughness.

  10. Fabrication and thermal conductivity of boron carbide/copper cermet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Tadashi; Onose, Shoji

    1999-01-01

    Studies on fabrication and thermal conductivity of B 4 C/Cu cermet were made to obtain high performance neutron absorber materials for Liquid Metal-cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR). A mixed powder of B 4 C and Cu was mechanically blended at high speed thereby a coating layer of Cu was formed on the surface of B 4 C powder. Then the B 4 C powder with Cu coating was hot pressed at temperatures from 950 to 1,050degC to form a B 4 C cermet. A high density B 4 C/Cu cermet with 70 vol% of B 4 C and relative density higher than 90% was successfully fabricated. In spite of the low volume fraction of Cu, the B 4 C/Cu cermet exhibited high thermal conductivity which originated from the existence of continuous metallic phase Cu in B 4 C/Cu cermet. (author)

  11. Thermal conductivity and PVT measurements of pentafluoroethane (refrigerant HFC-125)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsvetkov, O.B.; Kletski, A.V.; Laptev, Yu.A.

    1995-01-01

    By means of the transient and steady-state coaxial cylinder methods, the thermal conductivity of pentfluoroethane was investigated at temperatures from 187 to 419 K and pressures from atmospheric to 6.0 MPa. The estimated uncertainty of the measured results is ± (2-3)%. The operation of the experimental apparatus was validated by measuring the thermal conductivity of R22 and R12. Determinations of the vapor pressure and PVT properties were carried out by a constant-volume apparatus for the temperature range 263 to 443 K, pressures up to 6 MPa, and densities from 36 to 516 kg m -3 . The uncertainties in temperature, pressure, and density are less than ±10 mK, ±0.08%, and ±0.1%, respectively

  12. Thermal Stability and Proton Conductivity of Rare Earth Orthophosphate Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anfimova, Tatiana; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2014-01-01

    as the rhabdophane structure is preserved. The bound hydrate water is accommodated in the rhabdophane structure and is stable at temperatures of up to 650 oC. The thermal stability of the hydrate water and the phosphate structure are of significance for the proton conductivity. The LaPO4·0.6H2O and NdPO4•0.5H2O......Hydrated orthophosphate powders of three rare earth metals, lanthanum, neodymium and gadolinium, were prepared and studied as potential proton conducting materials for intermediate temperature electrochemical applications. The phosphates undergo a transformation from the rhabdophane structure...... to the monazite structure upon dehydration. The thermal stability of the hydrate is studied and found to contain water of two types, physically adsorbed and structurally bound hydrate water. The adsorbed water is correlated to the specific surface area and can be reversibly recovered when dehydrated as long...

  13. Thermal Conductivity of the Potential Repository Horizon Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of thermal conductivity in the host horizon for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. More specifically, the lithostratigraphic units studied are located within the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) and consist of the upper lithophysal zone (Tptpul), the middle nonlithophysal zone (Tptpmn), the lower lithophysal zone (Tptpll), and the lower nonlithophysal zone (Tptpln). The Tptpul is the layer directly above the repository host layers, which consist of the Tptpmn, Tptpll, and the Tptpln. Current design plans indicate that the largest portion of the repository will be excavated in the Tptpll (Board et al. 2002 [157756]). The main distinguishing characteristic among the lithophysal and nonlithophysal units is the percentage of large scale (cm-m) voids within the rock. The Tptpul and Tptpll, as their names suggest, have a higher percentage of lithophysae than the Tptpmn and the Tptpln. Understanding the influence of the lithophysae is of great importance to understanding bulk thermal conductivity and perhaps repository system performance as well. To assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of thermal conductivity, a model is proposed that is functionally dependent on the volume fraction of lithophysae and the thermal conductivity of the matrix portion of the rock. In this model, void space characterized as lithophysae is assumed to be air-saturated under all conditions, while void space characterized as matrix may be either water- or air-saturated. Lithophysae are assumed to be air-saturated under all conditions since the units being studied are all located above the water table in the region of interest, and the relatively strong capillary forces of the matrix will, under most conditions, preferentially retain any moisture present in the rock

  14. Reference Correlations of the Thermal Conductivity of Ethene and Propene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assael, M J; Koutian, A; Huber, M L; Perkins, R A

    2016-09-01

    New, wide-range reference equations for the thermal conductivity of ethene and propene as a function of temperature and density are presented. The equations are based in part upon a body of experimental data that has been critically assessed for internal consistency and for agreement with theory whenever possible. For ethene, we estimate the uncertainty (at the 95% confidence level) for the thermal conductivity from 110 K to 520 K at pressures up to 200 MPa to be 5% for the compressed liquid and supercritical phases. For the low-pressure gas phase (to 0.1 MPa) over the temperature range 270 K to 680 K, the estimated uncertainty is 4%. The correlation is valid from 110 K to 680 K and up to 200 MPa, but it behaves in a physically reasonable manner down to the triple point and may be used at pressures up to 300 MPa, although the uncertainty will be larger in regions where experimental data were unavailable. In the case of propene, data are much more limited. We estimate the uncertainty for the thermal conductivity of propene from 180 K to 625 K at pressures up to 50 MPa to be 5% for the gas, liquid, and supercritical phases. The correlation is valid from 180 K to 625 K and up to 50 MPa, but it behaves in a physically reasonable manner down to the triple point and may be used at pressures up to 100 MPa, although the uncertainty will be larger in regions where experimental data were unavailable. For both fluids, uncertainties in the critical region are much larger, since the thermal conductivity approaches infinity at the critical point and is very sensitive to small changes in density.

  15. Further elucidation of nanofluid thermal conductivity measurement using a transient hot-wire method apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Donghoon; Lee, Joohyun; Lee, Byeongchan; Kwon, Suyong; Koo, Junemo

    2018-02-01

    The Transient Hot-Wire Method (THWM) was developed to measure the absolute thermal conductivity of gases, liquids, melts, and solids with low uncertainty. The majority of nanofluid researchers used THWM to measure the thermal conductivity of test fluids. Several reasons have been suggested for the discrepancies in these types of measurements, including nanofluid generation, nanofluid stability, and measurement challenges. The details of the transient hot-wire method such as the test cell size, the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) and the sampling number are further investigated to improve the accuracy and consistency of the measurements of different researchers. It was observed that smaller test apparatuses were better because they can delay the onset of natural convection. TCR values of a coated platinum wire were measured and statistically analyzed to reduce the uncertainty in thermal conductivity measurements. For validation, ethylene glycol (EG) and water thermal conductivity were measured and analyzed in the temperature range between 280 and 310 K. Furthermore, a detailed statistical analysis was conducted for such measurements, and the results confirmed the minimum number of samples required to achieve the desired resolution and precision of the measurements. It is further proposed that researchers fully report the information related to their measurements to validate the measurements and to avoid future inconsistent nanofluid data.

  16. Origin of low thermal conductivity in SnSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yu; Chang, Cheng; Pei, Yanling; Wu, Di; Peng, Kunling; Zhou, Xiaoyuan; Gong, Shengkai; He, Jiaqing; Zhang, Yongsheng; Zeng, Zhi; Zhao, Li-Dong

    2016-09-01

    We provide direct evidence to understand the origin of low thermal conductivity of SnSe using elastic measurements. Compared to state-of-the-art lead chalcogenides Pb Q (Q =Te , Se, S), SnSe exhibits low values of sound velocity (˜1420 m /s ) , Young's modulus (E ˜27.7 GPa ) , and shear modulus (G ˜9.6 GPa ) , which are ascribed to the extremely weak Sn-Se atomic interactions (or bonds between layers); meanwhile, the deduced average Grüneisen parameter γ of SnSe is as large as ˜3.13, originating from the strong anharmonicity of the bonding arrangement. The calculated phonon mean free path (l ˜ 0.84 nm) at 300 K is comparable to the lattice parameters of SnSe, indicating little room is left for further reduction of the thermal conductivity through introducing nanoscale microstructures and microscale grain boundaries. The low elastic properties indicate that the weak chemical bonding stiffness of SnSe generally causes phonon modes softening which eventually slows down phonon propagation. This work provides insightful data to understand the low lattice thermal conductivity of SnSe.

  17. Thermal conductivity and emissivity measurements of uranium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradetti, S.; Manzolaro, M.; Andrighetto, A.; Zanonato, P.; Tusseau-Nenez, S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal conductivity and emissivity measurements of uranium carbides were performed. • The tested materials are candidates as targets for radioactive ion beam production. • The results are correlated with the materials composition and microstructure. - Abstract: Thermal conductivity and emissivity measurements on different types of uranium carbide are presented, in the context of the ActiLab Work Package in ENSAR, a project within the 7th Framework Program of the European Commission. Two specific techniques were used to carry out the measurements, both taking place in a laboratory dedicated to the research and development of materials for the SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) target. In the case of thermal conductivity, estimation of the dependence of this property on temperature was obtained using the inverse parameter estimation method, taking as a reference temperature and emissivity measurements. Emissivity at different temperatures was obtained for several types of uranium carbide using a dual frequency infrared pyrometer. Differences between the analyzed materials are discussed according to their compositional and microstructural properties. The obtainment of this type of information can help to carefully design materials to be capable of working under extreme conditions in next-generation ISOL (Isotope Separation On-Line) facilities for the generation of radioactive ion beams.

  18. Tuning the thermal conductance of molecular junctions with interference effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klöckner, J. C.; Cuevas, J. C.; Pauly, F.

    2017-12-01

    We present an ab initio study of the role of interference effects in the thermal conductance of single-molecule junctions. To be precise, using a first-principles transport method based on density functional theory, we analyze the coherent phonon transport in single-molecule junctions made of several benzene and oligo(phenylene ethynylene) derivatives. We show that the thermal conductance of these junctions can be tuned via the inclusion of substituents, which induces destructive interference effects and results in a decrease of the thermal conductance with respect to the unmodified molecules. In particular, we demonstrate that these interference effects manifest as antiresonances in the phonon transmission, whose energy positions can be tuned by varying the mass of the substituents. Our work provides clear strategies for the heat management in molecular junctions and, more generally, in nanostructured metal-organic hybrid systems, which are important to determine how these systems can function as efficient energy-conversion devices such as thermoelectric generators and refrigerators.

  19. The Thermal Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for Phoenix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Hecht, Michael H.; Cobos, Doug R.; Campbell, Gaylon S.; Campbell, Colin S.; Cardell, Greg; Foote, Marc C.; Wood, Stephen E.; Mehta, Manish

    2009-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) is a component of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) payload on the Phoenix Lander. TECP will measure the temperature, thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of the regolith. It will also detect and quantify the population of mobile H2O molecules in the regolith, if any, throughout the polar summer, by measuring the electrical conductivity of the regolith, as well as the dielectric permittivity. In the vapor phase, TECP is capable of measuring the atmospheric H2O vapor abundance, as well as augment the wind velocity measurements from the meteorology instrumentation. TECP is mounted near the end of the 2.3 m Robotic Arm, and can be placed either in the regolith material or held aloft in the atmosphere. This paper describes the development and calibration of the TECP. In addition, substantial characterization of the instrument has been conducted to identify behavioral characteristics that might affect landed surface operations. The greatest potential issue identified in characterization tests is the extraordinary sensitivity of the TECP to placement. Small gaps alter the contact between the TECP and regolith, complicating data interpretation. Testing with the Phoenix Robotic Arm identified mitigation techniques that will be implemented during flight. A flight model of the instrument was also field tested in the Antarctic Dry Valleys during the 2007-2008 International Polar year. 2

  20. High-resolution and high-conductive electrode fabrication on a low thermal resistance flexible substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Bongchul; Kno, Jinsung; Yang, Minyang

    2011-01-01

    Processes based on the liquid-state pattern transfer, like inkjet printing, have critical limitations including low resolution and low electrical conductivity when fabricating electrodes on low thermal resistance flexible substrates such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET). Those are due to the nonlinear transfer mechanism and the limit of the sintering temperature. Although the laser direct curing (LDC) of metallic inks is an alternative process to improve the resolution, it is also associated with the disadvantages of causing thermal damage to the polymer substrate. This paper suggests the laser induced pattern adhesion transfer method to fabricate electrodes of both high electrical conductivity and high resolution on a PET substrate. First, solid patterns are cost-effectively created by the LDC of the organometallic silver ink on a glass that is optically and thermally stable. The solid patterns sintered on the glass are transferred to the PET substrate by the photo-thermally generated adhesion force of the substrate. Therefore, we achieved electrodes with a minimum line width of 10 µm and a specific resistance of 3.6 μΩcm on the PET substrate. The patterns also showed high mechanical reliability

  1. High-resolution and high-conductive electrode fabrication on a low thermal resistance flexible substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bongchul; Kno, Jinsung; Yang, Minyang

    2011-07-01

    Processes based on the liquid-state pattern transfer, like inkjet printing, have critical limitations including low resolution and low electrical conductivity when fabricating electrodes on low thermal resistance flexible substrates such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET). Those are due to the nonlinear transfer mechanism and the limit of the sintering temperature. Although the laser direct curing (LDC) of metallic inks is an alternative process to improve the resolution, it is also associated with the disadvantages of causing thermal damage to the polymer substrate. This paper suggests the laser induced pattern adhesion transfer method to fabricate electrodes of both high electrical conductivity and high resolution on a PET substrate. First, solid patterns are cost-effectively created by the LDC of the organometallic silver ink on a glass that is optically and thermally stable. The solid patterns sintered on the glass are transferred to the PET substrate by the photo-thermally generated adhesion force of the substrate. Therefore, we achieved electrodes with a minimum line width of 10 µm and a specific resistance of 3.6 μΩcm on the PET substrate. The patterns also showed high mechanical reliability.

  2. Thermal conductivity of organic semi-conducting materials using 3omega and photothermal radiometry techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reisdorffer Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic semiconductors for opto-electronic devices show several defects which can be enhanced while increasing the operating temperature. Their thermal management and especially the reduction of their temperature are of great interest. For the heat transfer study, one has to measure the thermal conductivity of thin film organic materials. However the major difficulty for this measurement is the very low thickness of the films which needs the use of very specific techniques. In our work, the 3-omega and photothermal radiometric methods were used to measure the thermal conductivity of thin film organic semiconducting material (Alq3. The measurements were performed as function of the thin film thickness from 45 to 785 nm and also of its temperature from 80 to 350 K. With the 3 omega method, a thermal conductivity value of 0.066 W.m−1K−1 was obtained for Alq3 thin film of 200 nm at room temperature, in close agreement with the photothermal value. Both techniques appear to be complementary: the 3 omega method is easier to implement for large temperature range and small thicknesses down to a few tens of nanometers whereas the photothermal method is more suitable for thicknesses over 200nm since it provides additional information such as the thin film volumetric heat capacity.

  3. Kinetic concepts of thermally stimulated reactions in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyazovkin, Sergey

    Historical analysis suggests that the basic kinetic concepts of reactions in solids were inherited from homogeneous kinetics. These concepts rest upon the assumption of a single-step reaction that disagrees with the multiple-step nature of solid-state processes. The inadequate concepts inspire such unjustified anticipations of kinetic analysis as evaluating constant activation energy and/or deriving a single-step reaction mechanism for the overall process. A more adequate concept is that of the effective activation energy, which may vary with temperature and extent of conversion. The adequacy of this concept is illustrated by literature data as well as by experimental data on the thermal dehydration of calcium oxalate monohydrate and thermal decomposition of calcium carbonate, ammonium nitrate and 1,3,5,7- tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine.

  4. Classical theory of thermal radiation from a solid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a solid at a finite temperature is modeled as an ensemble of identical atoms, each of which moves around a lattice site inside an isotropic harmonic potential. The motion of one such atom is studied first. It is found that the atom moves like a time-dependent current density and, thus, can emit electromagnetic radiation. Since all the atoms are identical, they can radiate, too. The resultant radiation from the atoms is the familiar thermal radiation from the solid. After its general expression is obtained, the intensity of the thermal radiation is discussed for its properties, and specifically calculated in the low-temperature limit. Both atomic motion and radiation are formulated in the classical domain.

  5. Measurements of Regolith Simulant Thermal Conductivity Under Asteroid and Mars Surface Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, A. J.; Christensen, P. R.

    2017-12-01

    Laboratory measurements have been necessary to interpret thermal data of planetary surfaces for decades. We present a novel radiometric laboratory method to determine temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of complex regolith simulants under rough to high vacuum and across a wide range of temperatures. This method relies on radiometric temperature measurements instead of contact measurements, eliminating the need to disturb the sample with thermal probes. We intend to determine the conductivity of grains that are up to 2 cm in diameter and to parameterize the effects of angularity, sorting, layering, composition, and eventually cementation. We present the experimental data and model results for a suite of samples that were selected to isolate and address regolith physical parameters that affect bulk conductivity. Spherical glass beads of various sizes were used to measure the effect of size frequency distribution. Spherical beads of polypropylene and well-rounded quartz sand have respectively lower and higher solid phase thermal conductivities than the glass beads and thus provide the opportunity to test the sensitivity of bulk conductivity to differences in solid phase conductivity. Gas pressure in our asteroid experimental chambers is held at 10^-6 torr, which is sufficient to negate gas thermal conduction in even our coarsest of samples. On Mars, the atmospheric pressure is such that the mean free path of the gas molecules is comparable to the pore size for many regolith particulates. Thus, subtle variations in pore size and/or atmospheric pressure can produce large changes in bulk regolith conductivity. For each sample measured in our martian environmental chamber, we repeat thermal measurement runs at multiple pressures to observe this behavior. Finally, we present conductivity measurements of angular basaltic simulant that is physically analogous to sand and gravel that may be present on Bennu. This simulant was used for OSIRIS-REx TAGSAM Sample Return

  6. Radiation effects on thermal decomposition of inorganic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedgaonkar, V.G.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation effects on the thermal decomposition characteristics of inorganic oxyanions like permanganates, nitrates, zeolites and particularly ammonium perchlorate (AP) have been highlighted.The last compound finds wide application as an oxidizer in solid rocket propellents and although several hundred papers have been published on it during the last 30-40 years, most of which from the point of view of understanding and controlling the decomposition behaviour, there are only a few reports available in this area following the radiation treatment. (author)

  7. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings: Models and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the coating apparent thermal conductivity to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature, coating material scattering, and absorption properties. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can be also derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. A comparison has been made for the gray and nongray coating models in the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings. The model prediction is found to have a good agreement with experimental observations.

  8. Thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of (Th,U)O2 fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, A.K.; Jarvis, T.; Nair, M.R.; Ramachandran, R.; Mujumdar, S.; Purushotham, D.S.C.

    2000-05-01

    India has vast reserves of thorium (> 460,000 tons) and sustained work on all aspects of thorium utilization has been initiated. In this context work on fabrication of sintered thoria and mixed (Th,U)O 2 pellets and evaluation of their thermophysical properties have been taken up in Radiometallurgy Division. Thermal conductivity, being the most important thermal properties, has been calculated using the experimentally measured thermal diffusivity, density and literature values of specific heats for ThO 2 and thoria containing 2,4,6,10 and 20% UO 2 . Thermal diffusivity was measured experimentally by the laser flash method from 600 to 1600 deg C in vacuum. It was observed that thermal conductivity of ThO 2 and mixed (Th,U)O 2 decrease with increase in temperature. It was also observed that the conductivity decreases with increase in UO 2 content, the decrease being more at lower temperature than that at higher temperatures. Empirical relations correlating thermal conductivity to temperatures have been generated by the least square fit method and reported. (author)

  9. Reducing thermal conductivity of binary alloys below the alloy limit via chemical ordering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duda, John C; English, Timothy S; Jordan, Donald A; Norris, Pamela M; Soffa, William A

    2011-01-01

    Substitutional solid solutions that exist in both ordered and disordered states will exhibit markedly different physical properties depending on their exact crystallographic configuration. Many random substitutional solid solutions (alloys) will display a tendency to order given the appropriate kinetic and thermodynamic conditions. Such order-disorder transitions will result in major crystallographic reconfigurations, where the atomic basis, symmetry, and periodicity of the alloy change dramatically. Consequently, the dominant scattering mechanism in ordered alloys will be different than that in disordered alloys. In this study, we present a hypothesis that ordered alloys can exhibit lower thermal conductivities than their disordered counterparts at elevated temperatures. To validate this hypothesis, we investigate the phononic transport properties of disordered and ordered AB Lennard-Jones alloys via non-equilibrium molecular dynamics and harmonic lattice dynamics calculations. It is shown that the thermal conductivity of an ordered alloy is the same as the thermal conductivity of the disordered alloy at ∼0.6T melt and lower than that of the disordered alloy above 0.8T melt .

  10. Electrically and Thermally Conducting Nanocomposites for Electronic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryl Santos

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites made up of polymer matrices and carbon nanotubes are a class of advanced materials with great application potential in electronics packaging. Nanocomposites with carbon nanotubes as fillers have been designed with the aim of exploiting the high thermal, electrical and mechanical properties characteristic of carbon nanotubes. Heat dissipation in electronic devices requires interface materials with high thermal conductivity. Here, current developments and challenges in the application of nanotubes as fillers in polymer matrices are explored. The blending together of nanotubes and polymers result in what are known as nanocomposites. Among the most pressing current issues related to nanocomposite fabrication are (i dispersion of carbon nanotubes in the polymer host, (ii carbon nanotube-polymer interaction and the nature of the interface, and (iii alignment of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix. These issues are believed to be directly related to the electrical and thermal performance of nanocomposites. The recent progress in the fabrication of nanocomposites with carbon nanotubes as fillers and their potential application in electronics packaging as thermal interface materials is also reported.

  11. Optical and thermal energy discharge from tritiated solid hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnotta, F.; Mapoles, E.R.; Collins, G.W.; Souers, P.C.

    1991-01-01

    The authors are investigating mechanisms of energy storage and release in tritiated solid hydrogens, by a variety of techniques including ESR, NMR and thermal and optical emission. The nuclear decay of a triton in solid hydrogen initiates the conversion of nuclear energy into stored chemical energy by producing unpaired hydrogen atoms which are trapped within the molecular lattice. The ability to store large quantities of atoms in this manner has been demonstrated and can serve as a basis for new forms of high energy density materials. This paper presents preliminary results of a study of the optical emission from solid hydrogen containing tritium over the visible and near infrared (NIR) spectral regions. Specifically, they have studied optical emission from DT and T 2 using CCD, silicon diode and germanium diode arrays. 8 refs., 6 figs

  12. The Kapitza thermal boundary resistance between two solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, A.C.

    1981-01-01

    In this article, the author develops a model of the Kapitza resistance between two solids in which this resistance is seen to be related to the refraction of thermal phonons at the interface, which is a function of the accoustic properties of the two solids. By calculating a kapitza boundary resistance for the two solids in an ideal case (with ideal temperature, ideal interface, and phonon scattering produced only by the interface) and then producing a summation of the three phonon modes, the angles of incidence, and the phonon frequencies, the author produces an equation which expresses the resistance; this equation is known as the accoustic-mis-match model. By then removing the conditions of ideality and adjusting the equation accordingly, the author finds that the acoustic mismatch model is successful in describing the resistance behavior

  13. Thermal Analysis of Fission Moly Target Solid Waste Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Hyung Min; Park, Jonghark [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    There are various ways to produce Mo-99. Among them, nuclear transmutation of uranium target became the major one owing to its superior specific activity. After the fission molybdenum (FM) target is irradiated, it is transported to treatment facility to extract wanted isotope. During the process, various forms of wastes are produced including filter cake and other solid wastes. The filter cake is mostly consisted of decaying uranium compounds. The solid wastes are then packaged and moved to storage facility which will stay there for considerable amount of time. Being the continuous source of heat, the solid wastes are required to be cooled for the certain amount of time before transported to the storage area. In this study, temperature evaluation of the storage facility is carried out with pre-cooling time sensitivity to check its thermal integrity. In this study, thermal analysis on the FM target solid waste storage is performed. Finite volume method is utilized to numerically discretize and solve the geometry of interest. Analysis shows that the developed method can simulate temperature behavior during storage process, but needs to be checked against other code to see calculation accuracy. Highest temperature distribution is observed when every hole is filled with waste containers. Sensitivity results on pre-cooling time shows that at least 13 months of cooling is necessary to keep the structure integrity.

  14. Thermal Conductive Heat Transfer and Partial Melting of Volatiles in Icy Moons, Asteroids, and Kuiper Belt Objects (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargel, J. S.; Furfaro, R.

    2013-12-01

    Thermal gradients within conductive layers of icy satellite and asteroids depend partly on heat flow, which is related to the secular decay of radioactive isotopes, to heat released by chemical phase changes, by conversion of gravitational potential energy to heat during differentiation, tidal energy dissipation, and to release of heat stored from prior periods. Thermal gradients are also dependent on the thermal conductivity of materials, which in turn depends on their composition, crystallinity, porosity, crystal fabric anisotropy, and details of their mixture with other materials. Small impurities can produce lattice defects and changes in polymerization, and thereby have a huge influence on thermal conductivity, as can cage-inclusion (clathrate) compounds. Heat flow and thermal gradients can be affected by fluid phase advection of mass and heat (in oceans or sublimating upper crusts), by refraction related to heterogeneities of thermal conductivity due to lateral variations and composition or porosity. Thermal profiles depend also on the surface temperature controlled by albedo and climate, surface relief, and latitude, orbital obliquity and surface insolation, solid state greenhouses, and endogenic heating of the surface. The thermal state of icy moon interiors and thermal gradients can be limited at depth by fluid phase advection of heat (e.g., percolating meteoric methane or gas emission), by the latent heat of phase transitions (melting, solid-state transitions, and sublimation), by solid-state convective or diapiric heat transfer, and by foundering. Rapid burial of thick volatile deposits can also affect thermal gradients. For geologically inactive or simple icy objects, most of these controls on heat flow and thermal gradients are irrelevant, but for many other icy objects they can be important, in some cases causing large lateral and depth variations in thermal gradients, large variations in heat flow, and dynamically evolving thermal states. Many of

  15. Nanoscale Electromechanics To Measure Thermal Conductivity, Expansion, and Interfacial Losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, John P; Patel, Raj; Borah, Abhinandan; Maliakkal, Carina B; Abhilash, T S; Deshmukh, Mandar M

    2015-11-11

    We study the effect of localized Joule heating on the mechanical properties of doubly clamped nanowires under tensile stress. Local heating results in systematic variation of the resonant frequency; these frequency changes result from thermal stresses that depend on temperature dependent thermal conductivity and expansion coefficient. The change in sign of the linear expansion coefficient of InAs is reflected in the resonant response of the system near a bath temperature of 20 K. Using finite element simulations to model the experimentally observed frequency shifts, we show that the thermal conductivity of a nanowire can be approximated in the 10-60 K temperature range by the empirical form κ = bT W/mK, where the value of b for a nanowire was found to be b = 0.035 W/mK(2), significantly lower than bulk values. Also, local heating allows us to independently vary the temperature of the nanowire relative to the clamping points pinned to the bath temperature. We suggest a loss mechanism (dissipation ~10(-4)-10(-5)) originating from the interfacial clamping losses between the metal and the semiconductor nanostructure.

  16. Lower-Conductivity Ceramic Materials for Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming

    2006-01-01

    Doped pyrochlore oxides of a type described below are under consideration as alternative materials for high-temperature thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs). In comparison with partially-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), which is the state-of-the-art TBC material now in commercial use, these doped pyrochlore oxides exhibit lower thermal conductivities, which could be exploited to obtain the following advantages: For a given difference in temperature between an outer coating surface and the coating/substrate interface, the coating could be thinner. Reductions in coating thicknesses could translate to reductions in weight of hot-section components of turbine engines (e.g., combustor liners, blades, and vanes) to which TBCs are typically applied. For a given coating thickness, the difference in temperature between the outer coating surface and the coating/substrate interface could be greater. For turbine engines, this could translate to higher operating temperatures, with consequent increases in efficiency and reductions in polluting emissions. TBCs are needed because the temperatures in some turbine-engine hot sections exceed the maximum temperatures that the substrate materials (superalloys, Si-based ceramics, and others) can withstand. YSZ TBCs are applied to engine components as thin layers by plasma spraying or electron-beam physical vapor deposition. During operation at higher temperatures, YSZ layers undergo sintering, which increases their thermal conductivities and thereby renders them less effective as TBCs. Moreover, the sintered YSZ TBCs are less tolerant of stress and strain and, hence, are less durable.

  17. Thermal expansion and thermal conductivity characteristics of Cu–Al2O3 nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathy, A.; El-Kady, Omyma

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The copper–alumina composites were prepared by powder metallurgy (P/M) method with nano-Cu/Al 2 O 3 powders. ► The Al 2 O 3 content was added by 2.5, 7.5 and 12.5 wt.% to the Cu matrix to detect its effect on thermal conductivity and thermal expansion behavior of the resultant Cu/Al 2 O 3 nanocomposites. ► The results showed that alumina nanoparticles (30 nm) were distributed in the copper matrix in a homogeneous manner. ► The measured thermal conductivity for the Cu–Al 2 O 3 nanocomposites decreased from 384 to 78.1 W/m K with increasing Al 2 O 3 content from 0 to 12.5 wt.%. ► Accordingly, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was tailored from 33 × 10 −6 to 17.74 × 10 −6 /K, which is compatible with the CTE of semiconductors in electronic packaging applications. - Abstract: Copper–alumina composites were prepared by powder metallurgy (P/M) technology. Nano-Cu/Al 2 O 3 powders, was deoxidized from CuO/Al 2 O 3 powders which synthesized by thermochemical technique by addition of Cu powder to an aqueous solution of aluminum nitrate. The Al 2 O 3 content was added by 2.5, 7.5 and 12.5 wt.% to the Cu matrix to detect its effect on thermal conductivity and thermal expansion behavior of the resultant Cu/Al 2 O 3 nanocomposites. The results showed that alumina nanoparticles (30 nm) were distributed in the copper matrix in a homogeneous manner. The measured thermal conductivity for the Cu–Al 2 O 3 nanocomposites decreased from 384 to 78.1 W/m K with increasing Al 2 O 3 content from 0 to 12.5 wt.%. The large variation in the thermal conductivities can be related to the microstructural characteristics of the interface between Al 2 O 3 and the Cu-matrix. Accordingly, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was tailored from 33 × 10 −6 to 17.74 × 10 −6 /K, which is compatible with the CTE of semiconductors in electronic packaging applications. The reduction of thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion were

  18. Enhanced thermoelectric efficiency via orthogonal electrical and thermal conductances in phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Ruixiang; Faghaninia, Alireza; Soklaski, Ryan; Yan, Jia-An; Lo, Cynthia; Yang, Li

    2014-11-12

    Thermoelectric devices that utilize the Seebeck effect convert heat flow into electrical energy and are highly desirable for the development of portable, solid state, passively powered electronic systems. The conversion efficiencies of such devices are quantified by the dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT), which is proportional to the ratio of a device's electrical conductance to its thermal conductance. In this paper, a recently fabricated two-dimensional (2D) semiconductor called phosphorene (monolayer black phosphorus) is assessed for its thermoelectric capabilities. First-principles and model calculations reveal not only that phosphorene possesses a spatially anisotropic electrical conductance, but that its lattice thermal conductance exhibits a pronounced spatial-anisotropy as well. The prominent electrical and thermal conducting directions are orthogonal to one another, enhancing the ratio of these conductances. As a result, ZT may reach the criterion for commercial deployment along the armchair direction of phosphorene at T = 500 K and is close to 1 even at room temperature given moderate doping (∼2 × 10(16) m(-2) or 2 × 10(12) cm(-2)). Ultimately, phosphorene hopefully stands out as an environmentally sound thermoelectric material with unprecedented qualities. Intrinsically, it is a mechanically flexible material that converts heat energy with high efficiency at low temperatures (∼300 K), one whose performance does not require any sophisticated engineering techniques.

  19. Hot wire needle probe for thermal conductivity detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condie, Keith Glenn; Rempe, Joy Lynn; Knudson, Darrell lee; Daw, Joshua Earl; Wilkins, Steven Curtis; Fox, Brandon S.; Heng, Ban

    2015-11-10

    An apparatus comprising a needle probe comprising a sheath, a heating element, a temperature sensor, and electrical insulation that allows thermal conductivity to be measured in extreme environments, such as in high-temperature irradiation testing. The heating element is contained within the sheath and is electrically conductive. In an embodiment, the heating element is a wire capable of being joule heated when an electrical current is applied. The temperature sensor is contained within the sheath, electrically insulated from the heating element and the sheath. The electrical insulation electrically insulates the sheath, heating element and temperature sensor. The electrical insulation fills the sheath having electrical resistance capable of preventing electrical conduction between the sheath, heating element, and temperature sensor. The control system is connected to the heating element and the temperature sensor.

  20. Analysis of thermal expansivity of solids at extreme compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Shanker

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamics of solids in the limit of infinite pressure formulated by Stacey reveals that the thermal expansivity (alpha of solids tends to zero at infinite pressure. The earlier models for the volume dependence of thermal expansivity do not satisfy the infinite pressure behaviour of thermal expansivity. The expressions for the volume dependence of the isothermal Anderson- Grüneisen parameter (delta T considered in the derivation of earlier formulations for alpha (V have been found to be inadequate. A formulation for the volume dependence of delta T is presented here which is similar to the model due to Burakovsky and Preston for the volume dependence of the Grüneisen parameter. The new formulation for alpha (V reveals that delta T infinity must be greater than zero for satisfying the thermodynamic result according to which alpha tends to zero at infinite pressure. It is found that our model fits well the experimental data on thermal expansivity alpha (V for hcp iron corresponding to a wide range of pressures (0-360 GPa.

  1. Solid-solid phase change thermal storage application to space-suit battery pack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Chang H.; Morehouse, Jeffrey H.

    1989-01-01

    High cell temperatures are seen as the primary safety problem in the Li-BCX space battery. The exothermic heat from the chemical reactions could raise the temperature of the lithium electrode above the melting temperature. Also, high temperature causes the cell efficiency to decrease. Solid-solid phase-change materials were used as a thermal storage medium to lower this battery cell temperature by utilizing their phase-change (latent heat storage) characteristics. Solid-solid phase-change materials focused on in this study are neopentyl glycol and pentaglycerine. Because of their favorable phase-change characteristics, these materials appear appropriate for space-suit battery pack use. The results of testing various materials are reported as thermophysical property values, and the space-suit battery operating temperature is discussed in terms of these property results.

  2. Thermal and Electrical Investigation of Conductive Polylactic Acid Based Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobre, R. A.; Marcu, A. E.; Drumea, A.; Vlădescu, M.

    2018-06-01

    Printed electronics gain momentum as the involved technologies become affordable. The ability to shape electrostatic dissipative materials in almost any form is useful. The idea to use a general-purpose 3D printer to manufacture the electrical interconnections for a circuit is very attractive. The advantage of using a 3D printed structure over other technologies are mainly the lower price, less requirements concerning storage and use conditions, and the capability to build thicker traces while maintaining flexibility. The main element allowing this to happen is a printing filament with conductive properties. The paper shows the experiments that were performed to determine the thermal and electrical properties of polylactic acid (PLA) based ESD dissipative filament. Quantitative results regarding the thermal behavior of the DC resistance and the variation of the equivalent parallel impedance model parameters (losses resistance, capacitance, impedance magnitude and phase angle) with frequency are shown.. Using these results, new applications like printed temperature sensors can be imagined.

  3. Synthesis, sintering properties and thermal conductivity of uranium carbonitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolters, R.A.M.

    1978-01-01

    An introduction to the applications and chemistry of uranium carbonitrides is given including the potential use as a nuclear fuel. The powder synthesis of UC, UN and mixtures of UC and UN by a cyclic process is described. The correlation between the composition ratio UN/(UC+UN) in the final product and the parameters of the process is only determined qualitatively. Batch synthesis of a powder does not lead to an increase of the content of metallic impurities and oxygen. The impurity level is determined by that of the starting uranium metal and the thermal conductivity of the sintered compacts of uranium carbonitrides are determined via the measurement of the thermal diffusivity at 1100-1700 K. (Auth.)

  4. Controlling thermal chaos in the mantle by positive feedback from radiative thermal conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dubuffet

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal conductivity of mantle materials has two components, the lattice component klat from phonons and the radiative component krad due to photons. These two contributions of variable thermal conductivity have a nonlinear dependence in the temperature, thus endowing the temperature equation in mantle convection with a strongly nonlinear character. The temperature derivatives of these two mechanisms have different signs, with ∂klat /∂T negative and dkrad /dT positive. This offers the possibility for the radiative conductivity to control the chaotic boundary layer instabilities developed in the deep mantle. We have parameterized the weight factor between krad and klat with a dimensionless parameter f , where f = 1 corresponds to the reference conductivity model. We have carried out two-dimensional, time-dependent calculations for variable thermal conductivity but constant viscosity in an aspect-ratio 6 box for surface Rayleigh numbers between 106 and 5 × 106. The averaged Péclet numbers of these flows lie between 200 and 2000. Along the boundary in f separating the chaotic and steady-state solutions, the number decreases and the Nusselt number increases with internal heating, illustrating the feedback between internal heating and radiative thermal conductivity. For purely basal heating situation, the time-dependent chaotic flows become stabilized for values of f of between 1.5 and 2. The bottom thermal boundary layer thickens and the surface heat flow increases with larger amounts of radiative conductivity. For magnitudes of internal heating characteristic of a chondritic mantle, much larger values of f , exceeding 10, are required to quench the bottom boundary layer instabilities. By isolating the individual conductive mechanisms, we have ascertained that the lattice conductivity is partly responsible for inducing boundary layer instabilities, while the radiative conductivity and purely depth-dependent conductivity exert a stabilizing

  5. The evolution of solid density within a thermal explosion II. Dynamic proton radiography of cracking and solid consumption by burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.; Romero, J. J.; Asay, B. W.; Saunders, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Grim, G.; Mariam, F.; Schwartz, C. L.; Hogan, G.; Nedrow, P.; Murray, M. M.; Thompson, T. N.; Espinoza, C.; Lewis, D.; Bainbridge, J.; McNeil, W.; Rightley, P.

    2012-01-01

    We report proton transmission images obtained subsequent to the laser assisted thermal ignition of a sample of PBX 9501 (a plastic bonded formulation of the explosive nitramine octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX)). We describe the laser assisted thermal ignition technique as a means to synchronize a non-linear thermal ignition event while preserving the subsequent post-ignition behavior. We have obtained dynamic proton transmission images at two spatial magnifications and viewed both the radial and transverse axis of a solid cylindrical sample encased in aluminum. Images have been obtained with 3 to 15 μs temporal resolution and approximately 100 μm spatial resolution at the higher magnification. We observe case expansion from very early in the experiment, until case fragmentation. We observe spatially anisotropic features in the transmission which we attribute to cracking in the solid explosive, in agreement with previous measurements conducted on two dimensional samples with optical viewing. Digital analysis of the images also reveals spatially isotropic features which we attribute to the evolution of the loss of density by burning subsequent to thermal ignition.

  6. The evolution of solid density within a thermal explosion II. Dynamic proton radiography of cracking and solid consumption by burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.; Romero, J. J.; Asay, B. W.; Saunders, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Grim, G.; Mariam, F.; Schwartz, C. L.; Hogan, G.; Nedrow, P.; Murray, M. M.; Thompson, T. N.; Espinoza, C.; Lewis, D.; Bainbridge, J.; McNeil, W.; Rightley, P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); and others

    2012-05-15

    We report proton transmission images obtained subsequent to the laser assisted thermal ignition of a sample of PBX 9501 (a plastic bonded formulation of the explosive nitramine octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX)). We describe the laser assisted thermal ignition technique as a means to synchronize a non-linear thermal ignition event while preserving the subsequent post-ignition behavior. We have obtained dynamic proton transmission images at two spatial magnifications and viewed both the radial and transverse axis of a solid cylindrical sample encased in aluminum. Images have been obtained with 3 to 15 {mu}s temporal resolution and approximately 100 {mu}m spatial resolution at the higher magnification. We observe case expansion from very early in the experiment, until case fragmentation. We observe spatially anisotropic features in the transmission which we attribute to cracking in the solid explosive, in agreement with previous measurements conducted on two dimensional samples with optical viewing. Digital analysis of the images also reveals spatially isotropic features which we attribute to the evolution of the loss of density by burning subsequent to thermal ignition.

  7. All conducting polymer electrodes for asymmetric solid-state supercapacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Kurra, Narendra; Wang, Ruiqi; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2015-01-01

    electrode material. In addition, the high stability of PEDOT in its oxidised state makes it capable to exhibit electrochemical activity in a wide potential window. This can qualify PEDOT to be used as a negative electrode in fabricating asymmetric solid

  8. Energy landscapes for mobile ions in ion conducting solids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    molecular dynamics (MD) simulations yields quantitative predictions of the ion transport characteristics. As ... Solid electrolytes; bond valence analysis; ion transport in glasses. 1. .... clusters are considered to contribute only to a.c. conduc-.

  9. Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays Bonded to Solid Graphite Substrates: Thermal Analysis for Future Device Cooling Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty T. Quinton

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are known for high thermal conductivity and have potential use as nano-radiators or heat exchangers. This paper focuses on the thermal performance of carpet-like arrays of vertically aligned CNTs on solid graphite substrates with the idea of investigating their behavior as a function of carpet dimensions and predicting their performance as thermal interface material (TIM for electronic device cooling. Vertically aligned CNTs were grown on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG substrate, which creates a robust and durable all-carbon hierarchical structure. The multi-layer thermal analysis approach using Netzsch laser flash analysis system was used to evaluate their performance as a function of carpet height, from which their thermal properties can be determined. It was seen that the thermal resistance of the CNT array varies linearly with CNT carpet height, providing a unique way of decoupling the properties of the CNT carpet from its interface. This data was used to estimate the thermal conductivity of individual multi-walled nanotube strands in this carpet, which was about 35 W/m-K. The influence of CNT carpet parameters (aerial density, diameter, and length on thermal resistance of the CNT carpet and its potential advantages and limitations as an integrated TIM are discussed.

  10. Temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity in chiral carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mensah, N.G. [Department of Mathematics, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast (Ghana); Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Nkrumah, G. [Department of Physics, University of Ghana, Legon, Accra (Ghana) and Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)]. E-mail: geon@ug.edu.gh; Mensah, S.Y. [Department of Physics, Laser and Fibre Optics Centre, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast (Ghana); Allotey, F.K.A. [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Accra (Ghana)

    2004-08-30

    The thermal conductivity of a chiral carbon nanotube (CCNT) is calculated using a tractable analytical approach. This is based on solving the Boltzmann kinetic equation with energy dispersion relation obtained in the tight binding approximation. The results obtained are numerically analysed. Unusually high electron thermal conductivity {chi}{sub ez} is observed along the tubular axis. The dependence of {chi}{sub ez} against temperature T was plotted for varying {delta}{sub z} and a given {delta}{sub s} ({delta}{sub z} and {delta}{sub s} are the overlapping integrals (exchange energy) for the jumps along the tubular axis and the base helix, respectively). It is noted that {chi}{sub ez} shows a peaking behaviour before falling off at higher temperature. As {delta}{sub z} varies from 0.010 eV to 0.048 eV for a given {delta}{sub s}=0.0150 eV, the peak values of {chi}{sub ez} shift from 40000 W/m K at 100 K to 55000 W/m K at about 300 K. Interestingly our results at 104 K which is 41000 W/m K and occurred at {delta}{sub z}=0.023 eV compares very well with that reported for a 99.9% isotopically enriched {sup 12}C diamond crystal. Another interesting result obtained is the fact that the circumferential electron thermal conductivity {chi}{sub ec} appears to be very small. The ratio of {chi}{sub ez} to {chi}{sub ec} is of the order of 2.

  11. Wide-range measurement of thermal effusivity using molybdenum thin film with low thermal conductivity for thermal microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Shugo; Matsui, Genzou; Ohta, Hiromichi; Hatori, Kimihito; Taguchi, Kohei; Yamamoto, Suguru

    2017-07-01

    Thermal microscopes are a useful technology to investigate the spatial distribution of the thermal transport properties of various materials. However, for high thermal effusivity materials, the estimated values of thermophysical parameters based on the conventional 1D heat flow model are known to be higher than the values of materials in the literature. Here, we present a new procedure to solve the problem which calculates the theoretical temperature response with the 3D heat flow and measures reference materials which involve known values of thermal effusivity and heat capacity. In general, a complicated numerical iterative method and many thermophysical parameters are required for the calculation in the 3D heat flow model. Here, we devised a simple procedure by using a molybdenum (Mo) thin film with low thermal conductivity on the sample surface, enabling us to measure over a wide thermal effusivity range for various materials.

  12. Coupled heat conduction and thermal stress formulation using explicit integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchertas, A.H.; Kulak, R.F.

    1982-06-01

    The formulation needed for the conductance of heat by means of explicit integration is presented. The implementation of these expressions into a transient structural code, which is also based on explicit temporal integration, is described. Comparisons of theoretical results with code predictions are given both for one-dimensional and two-dimensional problems. The coupled thermal and structural solution of a concrete crucible, when subjected to a sudden temperature increase, shows the history of cracking. The extent of cracking is compared with experimental data

  13. Shear viscosity and thermal conductivity of nuclear 'pasta'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.

    2008-01-01

    We calculate the shear viscosity η and thermal conductivity κ of a nuclear pasta phase in neutron star crusts. This involves complex nonspherical shapes. We use semiclassical molecular dynamics simulations involving 40, 000 to 100, 000 nucleons. The viscosity η can be simply expressed in terms of the height Z* and width Δq of the peak in the static structure factor S p (q). We find that η increases somewhat, compared to a lower density phase involving spherical nuclei, because Z* decreases from form factor and ion screening effects. However, we do not find a dramatic increase in η from nonspherical shapes, as may occur in conventional complex fluids

  14. Radiative contribution to the thermal conductivity of fibrous insulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linford, R. M. F.; Schmitt, R. J.; Hughes, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    An approach is shown for using a simple two-flux model to interpret infrared transmission data for a variety of reuseable surface insulations materials and to calculate the radiation transmission. A description is given of preliminary experiments on mullite and silica-based materials. The calculated parameters are compared with the measured values of the total thermal conductivity, as determined on guarded hot plate equipment. It is pointed out that for many samples the newly developed four-flux model must be utilized because the scattering properties of the fibers are often dependent on the wavelength of the radiation.

  15. Acoustical study of electro- and thermal conductivity of liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tekuchev, V.V.; Rygalov, L.N.; Ivanova, I.V.; Barashkov, B.I.

    2003-01-01

    One established a link between electrical, elastic and structural properties of electronic smelts. One calculated polyterms of resistance and thermal conductivity of liquid metals (Be, Cd, U, V, Mo, Cr, rare-earth metals) on the basis of data covering both melting and boiling points. For some metals the values were obtained for the first time. To analyze kinetic properties of metals under high temperatures one should apply complex many-particles model representations and efficient computing equipment. It is pointed out that essential problems blocking efforts to tackle the mentioned task result in necessity to find simple though approximate models describing satisfactorily properties of metals [ru

  16. The Temperature Condition of the Plate with Temperature-Dependent Thermal Conductivity and Energy Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Zarubin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature state of a solid body, in addition to the conditions of its heat exchange with the environment, can greatly depend on the heat release (or heat absorption processes within the body volume. Among the possible causes of these processes should be noted such as a power release in the fuel elements of nuclear reactors, exothermic or endothermic chemical reactions in the solid body material, which respectively involve heat release or absorbtion, heat transfer of a part of the electric power in the current-carrying conductors (so-called Joule’s heat or the energy radiation penetrating into the body of a semitransparent material, etc. The volume power release characterizes an intensity of these processes.The extensive list of references to the theory of heat conductivity of solids offers solutions to problems to determine a stationary (steady over time and non-stationary temperature state of the solids (as a rule, of the canonical form, which act as the sources of volume power release. Thus, in general case, a possibility for changing power release according to the body volume and in solving the nonstationary problems also a possible dependence of this value on the time are taken into consideration.However, in real conditions the volume power release often also depends on the local temperature, and such dependence can be nonlinear. For example, with chemical reactions the intensity of heat release or absorption is in proportion to their rate, which, in turn, is sensitive to the temperature value, and a dependence on the temperature is exponential. A further factor that in such cases makes the analysis of the solid temperature state complicated, is dependence on the temperature and the thermal conductivity of this body material, especially when temperature distribution therein  is significantly non-uniform. Taking into account the influence of these factors requires the mathematical modeling methods, which allow us to build an adequate

  17. Thermal Conductivity and Erosion Durability of Composite Two-Phase Air Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Michael P.; Rai, Amarendra K.; Zhu, Dongming; Dorfman, Mitchell R.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    To enhance efficiency of gas turbines, new thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be designed which improve upon the thermal stability limit of 7 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ), approximately 1200 C. This tenant has led to the development of new TBC materials and microstructures capable of improved high temperature performance. This study focused on increasing the erosion durability of cubic zirconia based TBCs, traditionally less durable than the metastable t' zirconia based TBCs. Composite TBC microstructures composed of a low thermal conductivity/high temperature stable cubic Low-k matrix phase and a durable t' Low-k secondary phase were deposited via APS. Monolithic coatings composed of cubic Low-k and t' Low-k were also deposited, in addition to a 7YSZ benchmark. The thermal conductivity and erosion durability were then measured and it was found that both of the Low-k materials have significantly reduced thermal conductivities, with monolithic t' Low-k and cubic Low-k improving upon 7YSZ by approximately 13 and approximately 25%, respectively. The 40 wt% t' Low-k composite (40 wt% t' Low-k - 60 wt% cubic Low-k) showed a approximately 22% reduction in thermal conductivity over 7YSZ, indicating even at high levels, the t' Low-k secondary phase had a minimal impact on thermal in the composite coating. It was observed that a mere 20 wt% t' Low-k phase addition can reduce the erosion of a cubic Low-k matrix phase composite coating by over 37%. Various mixing rules were then investigated to assess this non-linear composite behavior and suggestions were made to further improve erosion durability.

  18. Fluid-mechanic/thermal interaction of a molten material and a decomposing solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, D.W.; Lee, D.O.

    1976-12-01

    Bench-scale experiments of a molten material in contact with a decomposing solid were conducted to gain insight into the expected interaction of a hot, molten reactor core with a concrete base. The results indicate that either of two regimes can occur: violent agitation and splattering of the melt or a very quiescent settling of the melt when placed in contact with the solid. The two regimes appear to be governed by the interface temperature condition. A conduction heat transfer model predicts the critical interface temperature with reasonable accuracy. In addition, a film thermal resistance model correlates well with the data in predicting the time for a solid skin to form on the molten material

  19. Extremely high thermal conductivity anisotropy of double-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoji Ma

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on molecular dynamics simulations, we reveal that double-walled carbon nanotubes can possess an extremely high anisotropy ratio of radial to axial thermal conductivities. The mechanism is basically the same as that for the high thermal conductivity anisotropy of graphene layers - the in-plane strong sp2 bonds lead to a very high intralayer thermal conductivity while the weak van der Waals interactions to a very low interlayer thermal conductivity. However, different from flat graphene layers, the tubular structures of carbon nanotubes result in a diameter dependent thermal conductivity. The smaller the diameter, the larger the axial thermal conductivity but the smaller the radial thermal conductivity. As a result, a DWCNT with a small diameter may have an anisotropy ratio of thermal conductivity significantly higher than that for graphene layers. The extremely high thermal conductivity anisotropy allows DWCNTs to be a promising candidate for thermal management materials.

  20. Development of Tailorable Electrically Conductive Thermal Control Material Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, M. S.; Harada, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The optical characteristics of surfaces on spacecraft are fundamental parameters in controlling its temperature. Passive thermal control coatings with designed solar absorptance and infrared emittance properties have been developed and have been in use for some time. In this total space environment, the coating must be stable and maintain its desired optical properties as well as mechanical properties for the course of the mission lifetime. The mission lifetimes are increasing and in our quest to save weight, newer substrates are being integrated which limit electrical grounding schemes. All of this has added to already existing concerns about spacecraft charging and related spacecraft failures or operational failures. The concern is even greater for thermal control surfaces that are very large. One way of alleviating such concerns is to design new thermal control material systems (TCMS) that can help to mitigate charging via providing charge leakage paths. The objective of this program was to develop two types of passive electrically conductive TCMS. The first was a highly absorbing/emitting black surface and the second was a low (alpha(sub s)/epsilon(sub N)) type white surface. The surface resistance goals for the black absorber was 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 9) Omega/square, and for the white surfaces it was 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 10) Omega/square. Several material system concepts were suggested and evaluated for space environment stability and electrical performance characterization. Our efforts in designing and evaluating these material systems have resulted in several developments. New concepts, pigments and binders have been developed to provide new engineering quality TCMS. Some of these have already found application on space hardware, some are waiting to be recognized by thermal designers, and some require further detailed studies to become state-of-the-art for future space hardware and space structures. Our studies on baseline state-of-the-art materials and