Sample records for solid rocket plume

  1. Lidar measurements of solid rocket propellant fire particle plumes.

    Brown, David M; Brown, Andrea M; Willitsford, Adam H; Dinello-Fass, Ryan; Airola, Marc B; Siegrist, Karen M; Thomas, Michael E; Chang, Yale


    This paper presents the first, to our knowledge, direct measurement of aerosol produced by an aluminized solid rocket propellant (SRP) fire on the ground. Such fires produce aluminum oxide particles small enough to loft high into the atmosphere and disperse over a wide area. These results can be applied to spacecraft launchpad accidents that expose spacecraft to such fires; during these fires, there is concern that some of the plutonium from the spacecraft power system will be carried with the aerosols. Accident-related lofting of this material would be the net result of many contributing processes that are currently being evaluated. To resolve the complexity of fire processes, a self-consistent model of the ground-level and upper-level parts of the plume was determined by merging ground-level optical measurements of the fire with lidar measurements of the aerosol plume at height during a series of SRP fire tests that simulated propellant fire accident scenarios. On the basis of the measurements and model results, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) team was able to estimate the amount of aluminum oxide (alumina) lofted into the atmosphere above the fire. The quantification of this ratio is critical for a complete understanding of accident scenarios, because contaminants are transported through the plume. This paper provides an estimate for the mass of alumina lofted into the air.

  2. ASRM radiation and flowfield prediction status. [Advanced Solid Rocket Motor plume radiation prediction

    Reardon, J. E.; Everson, J.; Smith, S. D.; Sulyma, P. R.


    Existing and proposed methods for the prediction of plume radiation are discussed in terms of their application to the NASA Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) and Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) projects. Extrapolations of the Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) are discussed with respect to preliminary predictions of the primary and secondary radiation environments. The methodology for radiation and initial plume property predictions are set forth, including a new code for scattering media and independent secondary source models based on flight data. The Monte Carlo code employs a reverse-evaluation approach which traces rays back to their point of absorption in the plume. The SRM sea-level plume model is modified to account for the increased radiation in the ASRM plume due to the ASRM's propellant chemistry. The ASRM cycle-1 environment predictions are shown to identify a potential reason for the shutdown spike identified with pre-SRM staging.

  3. Numerical study on similarity of plume infrared radiation between reduced-scale solid rocket motors

    Zhang Xiaoying; Chen Huandong


    This study seeks to determine the similarities in plume radiation between reduced and full-scale solid rocket models in ground test conditions through investigation of flow and radiation for a series of scale ratios ranging from 0.1 to 1. The radiative transfer equation (RTE) considering gas and particle radiation in a non-uniform plume has been adopted and solved by the finite volume method (FVM) to compute the three dimensional, spectral and directional radiation of a plume in the infrared waveband 2–6μm. Conditions at wavelengths 2.7μm and 4.3μm are discussed in detail, and ratios of plume radiation for reduced-scale through full-scale models are examined. This work shows that, with increasing scale ratio of a computed rocket motor, area of the high-temperature core increases as a 2 power function of the scale ratio, and the radiation intensity of the plume increases with 2–2.5 power of the scale ratio. The infrared radiation of plume gases shows a strong spectral dependency, while that of Al2O3 particles shows spectral continuity of gray media. Spectral radiation intensity of a computed solid rocket plume’s high temperature core increases sig-nificantly in peak radiation spectra of plume gases CO and CO2. Al2O3 particles are the major radi-ation component in a rocket plume. There is good similarity between contours of plume spectral radiance from different scale models of computed rockets, and there are two peak spectra of radi-ation intensity at wavebands 2.7–3.0μm and 4.2–4.6μm. Directed radiation intensity of the entire plume volume will rise with increasing elevation angle.

  4. Measurement and Characterization of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Plume Acoustics

    Kenny, Jeremy; Hobbs, Chris; Plotkin, Ken; Pilkey, Debbie


    Lift-off acoustic environments generated by the future Ares I launch vehicle are assessed by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) acoustics team using several prediction tools. This acoustic environment is directly caused by the Ares I First Stage booster, powered by the five-segment Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRMV). The RSRMV is a larger-thrust derivative design from the currently used Space Shuttle solid rocket motor, the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). Lift-off acoustics is an integral part of the composite launch vibration environment affecting the Ares launch vehicle and must be assessed to help generate hardware qualification levels and ensure structural integrity of the vehicle during launch and lift-off. Available prediction tools that use free field noise source spectrums as a starting point for generation of lift-off acoustic environments are described in the monograph NASA SP-8072: "Acoustic Loads Generated by the Propulsion System." This monograph uses a reference database for free field noise source spectrums which consist of subscale rocket motor firings, oriented in horizontal static configurations. The phrase "subscale" is appropriate, since the thrust levels of rockets in the reference database are orders of magnitude lower than the current design thrust for the Ares launch family. Thus, extrapolation is needed to extend the various reference curves to match Ares-scale acoustic levels. This extrapolation process yields a subsequent amount of uncertainty added upon the acoustic environment predictions. As the Ares launch vehicle design schedule progresses, it is important to take every opportunity to lower prediction uncertainty and subsequently increase prediction accuracy. Never before in NASA s history has plume acoustics been measured for large scale solid rocket motors. Approximately twice a year, the RSRM prime vendor, ATK Launch Systems, static fires an assembled RSRM motor in a horizontal configuration at their test facility

  5. Development of a miniature solid propellant rocket motor for use in plume simulation studies

    Baran, W. J.


    A miniature solid propellant rocket motor has been developed to be used in a program to determine those parameters which must be duplicated in a cold gas flow to produce aerodynamic effects on an experimental model similar to those produced by hot, particle-laden exhaust plumes. Phenomena encountered during the testing of the miniature solid propellant motors included erosive propellant burning caused by high flow velocities parallel to the propellant surface, regressive propellant burning as a result of exposed propellant edges, the deposition of aluminum oxide on the nozzle surfaces sufficient to cause aerodynamic nozzle throat geometry changes, and thermal erosion of the nozzle throat at high chamber pressures. A series of tests was conducted to establish the stability of the rocket chamber pressure and the repeatibility of test conditions. Data are presented which define the tests selected to represent the final test matrix. Qualitative observations are also presented concerning the phenomena experienced based on the results of a large number or rocket tests not directly applicable to the final test matrix.

  6. Ozone depletion in the plume of a solid-fuelled rocket

    B. C. Krüger

    Full Text Available The local effects of the emission of a solid-fuelled rocket on the stratospheric ozone concentration have been investigated by photochemical model calculations. A one-dimensional horizontal model has been applied which calculates the trace gas composition at a single atmospheric altitude spatially resolved around the exhaust plume. Different cases were tested for the emissions of the Space Shuttle concerning the composition of the exhaust and the effects of heterogeneous reactions on atmospheric background aerosol.

    The strongest depletion of ozone is achieved when a high amount of the emitted chlorine is Cl2. If it is purely HCl, the effect is smallest, though in this case the heterogeneous reactions show their largest influence. From the results it may be estimated whether ozone depletion caused by rocket launches can be detected by satellite instruments. It appears that the chance of coincidental detection of such an event is rather small.

  7. Analysis of large solid propellant rocket engine exhaust plumes using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    Hueser, J. E.; Brock, F. J.; Melfi, L. T., Jr.; Bird, G. A.


    A new solution procedure has been developed to analyze the flowfield properties in the vicinity of the Inertial Upper Stage/Spacecraft during the 1st stage (SRMI) burn. Continuum methods are used to compute the nozzle flow and the exhaust plume flowfield as far as the boundary where the breakdown of translational equilibrium leaves these methods invalid. The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is applied everywhere beyond this breakdown boundary. The flowfield distributions of density, velocity, temperature, relative abundance, surface flux density, and pressure are discussed for each species for 2 sets of boundary conditions: vacuum and freestream. The interaction of the exhaust plume and the freestream with the spacecraft and the 2-stream direct interaction are discussed. The results show that the low density, high velocity, counter flowing free-stream substantially modifies the flowfield properties and the flux density incident on the spacecraft. A freestream bow shock is observed in the data, located forward of the high density region of the exhaust plume into which the freestream gas does not penetrate. The total flux density incident on the spacecraft, integrated over the SRM1 burn interval is estimated to be of the order of 10 to the 22nd per sq m (about 1000 atomic layers).

  8. Rocket Plume Scaling for Orion Wind Tunnel Testing

    Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Greathouse, James S.; White, Molly E.


    A wind tunnel test program was undertaken to assess the jet interaction effects caused by the various solid rocket motors used on the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV). These interactions of the external flowfield and the various rocket plumes can cause localized aerodynamic disturbances yielding significant and highly non-linear control amplifications and attenuations. This paper discusses the scaling methodologies used to model the flight plumes in the wind tunnel using cold air as the simulant gas. Comparisons of predicted flight, predicted wind tunnel, and measured wind tunnel forces-and-moments and plume flowfields are made to assess the effectiveness of the selected scaling methodologies.

  9. Hydroxyl Tagging Velocimetry for Rocket Plumes Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the need for non-intrusive sensors for rocket plume properties, we propose a laser-based velocity diagnostic that does not require seeding, works in high...

  10. Prediction of rocket plume radiative heating using backward Monte-Carlo method

    Wang, K. C.


    A backward Monte-Carlo plume radiation code has been developed to predict rocket plume radiative heating to the rocket base region. This paper provides a description of this code and provides sample results. The code was used to predict radiative heating to various locations during test firings of 48-inch solid rocket motors at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Comparisons with test measurements are provided. Predictions of full scale sea level Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) and Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) plume radiative heating to the Space Shuttle external tank (ET) dome center were also made. A comparison with the Development Flight Instrumentation (DFI) measurements is also provided.

  11. Implementation of microwave transmissions for rocket exhaust plume diagnostics

    Coutu, Nicholas George

    Rocket-launched vehicles produce a trail of exhaust that contains ions, free electrons, and soot. The exhaust plume increases the effective conductor length of the rocket. A conductor in the presence of an electric field (e.g. near the electric charge stored within a cloud) can channel an electric discharge. The electrical conductivity of the exhaust plume is related to its concentration of free electrons. The risk of a lightning strike in-flight is a function of both the conductivity of the body and its effective length. This paper presents an approach that relates the electron number density of the exhaust plume to its propagation constant. Estimated values of the collision frequency and electron number density generated from a numerical simulation of a rocket plume are used to guide the design of the experimental apparatus. Test par meters are identified for the apparatus designed to transmit a signal sweep form 4 GHz to 7 GHz through the exhaust plume of a J-class solid rocket motor. Measurements of the scattering parameters imply that the transmission does not penetrate the plume, but instead diffracts around it. The electron density 20 cm downstream from the nozzle exit is estimated to be between 2.7x1014 m--3 and 5.6x10 15 m--3.

  12. Rocket plume tomography of combustion species


    Interest in accurate detection and targeting of aggressor missiles has received considerable interest with the national priority of developing a missile defense system. Understanding the thermal signatures of the exhaust plumes of such missiles is key to accomplishing that mission. Before signature models can be precisely developed for specific rockets, the radiation of the molecular or combustion species within those plumes must be accurately predicted. A combination translation / rotation s...

  13. Solid propellant rocket motor

    Dowler, W. L.; Shafer, J. I.; Behm, J. W.; Strand, L. D. (Inventor)


    The characteristics of a solid propellant rocket engine with a controlled rate of thrust buildup to a desired thrust level are discussed. The engine uses a regressive burning controlled flow solid propellant igniter and a progressive burning main solid propellant charge. The igniter is capable of operating in a vacuum and sustains the burning of the propellant below its normal combustion limit until the burning propellant surface and combustion chamber pressure have increased sufficiently to provide a stable chamber pressure.

  14. Hydrocarbon Rocket Engine Plume Imaging with Laser Induced Incandescence Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA/ Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) needs sensors that can be operated on rocket engine plume environments to improve NASA/SSC rocket engine performance. In...

  15. Radiation/convection coupling in rocket motors and plumes

    Farmer, R. C.; Saladino, A. J.


    The three commonly used propellant systems - H2/O2, RP-1/O2, and solid propellants - primarily radiate as molecular emitters, non-scattering small particles, and scattering larger particles, respectively. Present technology has accepted the uncoupling of the radiation analysis from that of the flowfield. This approximation becomes increasingly inaccurate as one considers plumes, interior rocket chambers, and nuclear rocket propulsion devices. This study will develop a hierarchy of methods which will address radiation/convection coupling in all of the aforementioned propulsion systems. The nature of the radiation/convection coupled problem is that the divergence of the radiative heat flux must be included in the energy equation and that the local, volume-averaged intensity of the radiation must be determined by a solution of the radiative transfer equation (RTE). The intensity is approximated by solving the RTE along several lines of sight (LOS) for each point in the flowfield. Such a procedure is extremely costly; therefore, further approximations are needed. Modified differential approximations are being developed for this purpose. It is not obvious which order of approximations are required for a given rocket motor analysis. Therefore, LOS calculations have been made for typical rocket motor operating conditions in order to select the type approximations required. The results of these radiation calculations, and the interpretation of these intensity predictions are presented herein.

  16. Particle Size Distributions Measured in the Stratospheric Plumes of Three Rockets During the ACCENT Missions

    Wiedinmyer, C.; Brock, C. A.; Reeves, J. M.; Ross, M. N.; Schmid, O.; Toohey, D.; Wilson, J. C.


    The global impact of particles emitted by rocket engines on stratospheric ozone is not well understood, mainly due to the lack of comprehensive in situ measurements of the size distributions of these emitted particles. During the Atmospheric Chemistry of Combustion Emissions Near the Tropopause (ACCENT) missions in 1999, the NASA WB-57F aircraft carried the University of Denver N-MASS and FCAS instruments into the stratospheric plumes from three rockets. Size distributions of particles with diameters from 4 to approximately 2000 nm were calculated from the instrument measurements using numerical inversion techniques. The data have been averaged over 30-second intervals. The particle size distributions observed in all of the rocket plumes included a dominant mode near 60 nm diameter, probably composed of alumina particles. A smaller mode at approximately 25 nm, possibly composed of soot particles, was seen in only the plumes of rockets that used liquid oxygen and kerosene as a propellant. Aircraft exhaust emitted by the WB-57F was also sampled; the size distributions within these plumes are consistent with prior measurements in aircraft plumes. The size distributions for all rocket intercepts have been fitted to bimodal, lognormal distributions to provide input for global models of the stratosphere. Our data suggest that previous estimates of the solid rocket motor alumina size distributions may underestimate the alumina surface area emission index, and so underestimate the particle surface area available for heterogeneous chlorine activation reactions in the global stratosphere.

  17. Infrared signature modelling of a rocket jet plume - comparison with flight measurements

    Rialland, V.; Guy, A.; Gueyffier, D.; Perez, P.; Roblin, A.; Smithson, T.


    The infrared signature modelling of rocket plumes is a challenging problem involving rocket geometry, propellant composition, combustion modelling, trajectory calculations, fluid mechanics, atmosphere modelling, calculation of gas and particles radiative properties and of radiative transfer through the atmosphere. This paper presents ONERA simulation tools chained together to achieve infrared signature prediction, and the comparison of the estimated and measured signatures of an in-flight rocket plume. We consider the case of a solid rocket motor with aluminized propellant, the Black Brant sounding rocket. The calculation case reproduces the conditions of an experimental rocket launch, performed at White Sands in 1997, for which we obtained high quality infrared signature data sets from DRDC Valcartier. The jet plume is calculated using an in-house CFD software called CEDRE. The plume infrared signature is then computed on the spectral interval 1900-5000 cm-1 with a step of 5 cm-1. The models and their hypotheses are presented and discussed. Then the resulting plume properties, radiance and spectra are detailed. Finally, the estimated infrared signature is compared with the spectral imaging measurements. The discrepancies are analyzed and discussed.

  18. High-speed schlieren imaging of rocket exhaust plumes

    Coultas-McKenney, Caralyn; Winter, Kyle; Hargather, Michael


    Experiments are conducted to examine the exhaust of a variety of rocket engines. The rocket engines are mounted in a schlieren system to allow high-speed imaging of the engine exhaust during startup, steady state, and shutdown. A variety of rocket engines are explored including a research-scale liquid rocket engine, consumer/amateur solid rocket motors, and water bottle rockets. Comparisons of the exhaust characteristics, thrust and cost for this range of rockets is presented. The variety of nozzle designs, target functions, and propellant type provides unique variations in the schlieren imaging.

  19. Hydroxyl Tagging Velocimetry for Rocket Plumes Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A non-intrusive method for measuring velocities in a rocket exhaust is proposed in a joint effort by MetroLaser and Vanderbilt University. Hydroxyl Tagging...

  20. Some typical solid propellant rocket motors

    Zandbergen, B.T.C.


    Typical Solid Propellant Rocket Motors (shortly referred to as Solid Rocket Motors; SRM's) are described with the purpose to form a database, which allows for comparative analysis and applications in practical SRM engineering.

  1. Some typical solid propellant rocket motors

    Zandbergen, B.T.C.


    Typical Solid Propellant Rocket Motors (shortly referred to as Solid Rocket Motors; SRM's) are described with the purpose to form a database, which allows for comparative analysis and applications in practical SRM engineering.

  2. Nanoparticles for solid rocket propulsion

    Galfetti, L [Politecnico di Milano, SPLab, Milan (Italy); De Luca, L T [Politecnico di Milano, SPLab, Milan (Italy); Severini, F [Politecnico di Milano, SPLab, Milan (Italy); Meda, L [Polimeri Europa, Istituto G Donegani, Novara (Italy); Marra, G [Polimeri Europa, Istituto G Donegani, Novara (Italy); Marchetti, M [Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Dipartimento di Ingegneria Aerospaziale ed Astronautica, Rome (Italy); Regi, M [Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Dipartimento di Ingegneria Aerospaziale ed Astronautica, Rome (Italy); Bellucci, S [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy)


    The characterization of several differently sized aluminium powders, by BET (specific surface), EM (electron microscopy), XRD (x-ray diffraction), and XPS (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), was performed in order to evaluate their application in solid rocket propellant compositions. These aluminium powders were used in manufacturing several laboratory composite solid rocket propellants, based on ammonium perchlorate (AP) as oxidizer and hydroxil-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) as binder. The reference formulation was an AP/HTPB/Al composition with 68/17/15% mass fractions respectively. The ballistic characterization of the propellants, in terms of steady burning rates, shows better performance for propellant compositions employing nano-aluminium when compared to micro-aluminium. Results obtained in the pressure range 1-70 bar show that by increasing the nano-Al mass fraction or decreasing the nano-Al size, larger steady burning rates are measured with essentially the same pressure sensitivity.

  3. Nanoparticles for solid rocket propulsion

    Galfetti, L.; DeLuca, L. T.; Severini, F.; Meda, L.; Marra, G.; Marchetti, M.; Regi, M.; Bellucci, S.


    The characterization of several differently sized aluminium powders, by BET (specific surface), EM (electron microscopy), XRD (x-ray diffraction), and XPS (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), was performed in order to evaluate their application in solid rocket propellant compositions. These aluminium powders were used in manufacturing several laboratory composite solid rocket propellants, based on ammonium perchlorate (AP) as oxidizer and hydroxil-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) as binder. The reference formulation was an AP/HTPB/Al composition with 68/17/15% mass fractions respectively. The ballistic characterization of the propellants, in terms of steady burning rates, shows better performance for propellant compositions employing nano-aluminium when compared to micro-aluminium. Results obtained in the pressure range 1-70 bar show that by increasing the nano-Al mass fraction or decreasing the nano-Al size, larger steady burning rates are measured with essentially the same pressure sensitivity.

  4. Bipropellant rocket exhaust plume analysis on the Galileo spacecraft

    Guernsey, C. S.; Mcgregor, R. D.


    This paper describes efforts to quantify the contaminant flow field produced by 10 N thrust bipropellant rocket engines used on the Galileo spacecraft. The prediction of the composition of the rocket exhaust by conventional techniques is found to be inadequate to explain experimental observations of contaminant deposition on moderately cold (200 K) surfaces. It is hypothesized that low volatility contaminants are formed by chemical reactions which occur on the surfaces. The flow field calculations performed using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method give the expected result that the use of line-of-sight plume shields may have very little effect on the flux of vapor phase contaminant species to a surface, especially if the plume shields are located so close to the engine that the interaction of the plume with the shield is in the transition flow regime. It is shown that significant variations in the exhaust plume composition caused by nonequilibrium effects in the flow field lead to very low concentrations of species which have high molecular weights in the more rarefied regions of the flow field. Recommendations for the design of spacecraft plume shields and further work are made.

  5. Solid Rocket Booster-Illustration


    This illustration is a cutaway of the solid rocket booster (SRB) sections with callouts. The Shuttle's two SRB's are the largest solids ever built and the first designed for refurbishment and reuse. Standing nearly 150-feet high, the twin boosters provide the majority of thrust for the first two minutes of flight, about 5.8 million pounds, augmenting the Shuttle's main propulsion system during liftoff. The major design drivers for the solid rocket motors (SRM's) were high thrust and reuse. The desired thrust was achieved by using state-of-the-art solid propellant and by using a long cylindrical motor with a specific core design that allows the propellant to burn in a carefully controlled marner. At burnout, the boosters separate from the external tank and drop by parachute to the ocean for recovery and subsequent refurbishment. The boosters are designed to survive water impact at almost 60 miles per hour, maintain flotation with minimal damage, and preclude corrosion of the hardware exposed to the harsh seawater environment. Under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, the SRB's are assembled and refurbished by the United Space Boosters. The SRM's are provided by the Morton Thiokol Corporation.

  6. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    Mitchell, Royce E.


    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor will utilize improved design features and automated manufacturing methods to produce an inherently safer propulsive system for the Space Shuttle and future launch systems. This second-generation motor will also provide an additional 12,000 pounds of payload to orbit, enhancing the utility and efficiency of the Shuttle system. The new plant will feature strip-wound, asbestos-free insulation; propellant continuous mixing and casting; and extensive robotic systems. Following a series of static tests at the Stennis Space Center, MS flights are targeted to begin in early 1997.

  7. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    Mitchell, Royce E.


    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor will utilize improved design features and automated manufacturing methods to produce an inherently safer propulsive system for the Space Shuttle and future launch systems. This second-generation motor will also provide an additional 12,000 pounds of payload to orbit, enhancing the utility and efficiency of the Shuttle system. The new plant will feature strip-wound, asbestos-free insulation; propellant continuous mixing and casting; and extensive robotic systems. Following a series of static tests at the Stennis Space Center, MS flights are targeted to begin in early 1997.

  8. An expert system for spectroscopic analysis of rocket engine plumes

    Reese, Greg; Valenti, Elizabeth; Alphonso, Keith; Holladay, Wendy

    The expert system described in this paper analyzes spectral emissions of rocket engine exhaust plumes and shows major promise for use in engine health diagnostics. Plume emission spectroscopy is an important tool for diagnosing engine anomalies, but it is time-consuming and requires highly skilled personnel. The expert system was created to alleviate such problems. The system accepts a spectral plot in the form of wavelength vs intensity pairs and finds the emission peaks in the spectrum, lists the elemental emitters present in the data and deduces the emitter that produced each peak. The system consists of a conventional language component and a commercially available inference engine that runs on an Apple Macintosh computer. The expert system has undergone limited preliminary testing. It detects elements well and significantly decreases analysis time.

  9. Plume spectrometry for liquid rocket engine health monitoring

    Powers, William T.; Sherrell, F. G.; Bridges, J. H., III; Bratcher, T. W.


    An investigation of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) testing failures identified optical events which appeared to be precursors of those failures. A program was therefore undertaken to detect plume trace phenomena characteristic of the engine and to design a monitoring system, responsive to excessive activity in the plume, capable of delivering a warning of an anomalous condition. By sensing the amount of extraneous material entrained in the plume and considering engine history, it may be possible to identify wearing of failing components in time for a safe shutdown and thus prevent a catastrophic event. To investigate the possibilities of safe shutdown and thus prevent a monitor to initiate the shutdown procedure, a large amount of plume data were taken from SSME firings using laboratory instrumentation. Those data were used to design a more specialized instrument dedicated to rocket plume diagnostics. The spectral wavelength range of the baseline data was about 220 nanometers (nm) to 15 micrometer with special attention given to visible and near UV. The data indicates that a satisfactory design will include a polychromator covering the range of 250 nM to 1000 nM, along with a continuous coverage spectrometer, each having a resolution of at least 5A degrees. The concurrent requirements for high resolution and broad coverage are normally at odds with one another in commercial instruments, therefore necessitating the development of special instrumentation. The design of a polychromator is reviewed herein, with a detailed discussion of the continuous coverage spectrometer delayed to a later forum. The program also requires the development of applications software providing detection, variable background discrimination, noise reduction, filtering, and decision making based on varying historical data.

  10. Reducing Thrusts In Solid-Fuel Rockets

    Bement, Laurence J.


    Thrust-terminating system conceived to reduce thrust of solid-propellant rocket motor in controlled manner such that thrust loads not increased or decreased beyond predictable levels. Concept involves explosively cutting opposing venting pairs in case of rocket motor above nozzles to initiate venting of chamber and reduction of thrust. Vents sized and numbered to control amount and rate of reduction in thrust.

  11. Environmentally compatible solid rocket propellants

    Jacox, James L.; Bradford, Daniel J.


    Hercules' clean propellant development research is exploring three major types of clean propellant: (1) chloride-free formulations (no chlorine containing ingredients), being developed on the Clean Propellant Development and Demonstration (CPDD) contract sponsored by Phillips Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base, CA; (2) low HCl scavenged formulations (HCl-scavenger added to propellant oxidized with ammonium perchlorate (AP)); and (3) low HCl formulations oxidized with a combination of AN and AP (with or without an HCl scavenger) to provide a significant reduction (relative to current solid rocket boosters) in exhaust HCl. These propellants provide performance approaching that of current systems, with less than 2 percent HCl in the exhaust, a significant reduction (greater than or equal to 70 percent) in exhaust HCl levels. Excellent processing, safety, and mechanical properties were achieved using only readily available, low cost ingredients. Two formulations, a sodium nitrate (NaNO3) scavenged HTPB and a chloride-free hydroxy terminated polyether (HTPE) propellant, were characterized for ballistic, mechanical, and rheological properties. In addition, the hazards properties were demonstrated to provide two families of class 1.3, 'zero-card' propellants. Further characterization is planned which includes demonstration of ballistic tailorability in subscale (one to 70 pound) motors over the range of burn rates required for retrofit into current Hercules space booster designs (Titan 4 SRMU and Delta 2 GEM).

  12. NASA's Advanced solid rocket motor

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) will not only bring increased safety, reliability and performance for the Space Shuttle Booster, it will enhance overall Shuttle safety by effectively eliminating 174 failure points in the Space Shuttle Main Engine throttling system and by reducing the exposure time to aborts due to main engine loss or shutdown. In some missions, the vulnerability time to Return-to-Launch Site aborts is halved. The ASRM uses case joints which will close or remain static under the effects of motor ignition and pressurization. The case itself is constructed of the weldable steel alloy HP 9-4-0.30, having very high strength and with superior fracture toughness and stress corrosion resistance. The internal insulation is strip-wound and is free of asbestos. The nozzle employs light weight ablative parts and is some 5,000 pounds lighter than the Shuttle motor used to date. The payload performance of the ASRM-powered Shuttle is 12,000 pounds higher than that provided by the present motor. This is of particular benefit for payloads delivered to higher inclinations and/or altitudes. The ASRM facility uses state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, including continuous propellant mixing and direct casting.

  13. NASA's Advanced solid rocket motor

    Mitchell, Royce E.


    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) will not only bring increased safety, reliability and performance for the Space Shuttle Booster, it will enhance overall Shuttle safety by effectively eliminating 174 failure points in the Space Shuttle Main Engine throttling system and by reducing the exposure time to aborts due to main engine loss or shutdown. In some missions, the vulnerability time to Return-to-Launch Site aborts is halved. The ASRM uses case joints which will close or remain static under the effects of motor ignition and pressurization. The case itself is constructed of the weldable steel alloy HP 9-4-0.30, having very high strength and with superior fracture toughness and stress corrosion resistance. The internal insulation is strip-wound and is free of asbestos. The nozzle employs light weight ablative parts and is some 5,000 pounds lighter than the Shuttle motor used to date. The payload performance of the ASRM-powered Shuttle is 12,000 pounds higher than that provided by the present motor. This is of particular benefit for payloads delivered to higher inclinations and/or altitudes. The ASRM facility uses state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, including continuous propellant mixing and direct casting.

  14. Advanced Solid Rocket Launcher and Its Evolution

    Morita, Yasuhiro; Imoto, Takayuki; Habu, Hiroto; Ohtsuka, Hirohito; Hori, Keiichi; Koreki, Takemasa; Fukuchi, Apollo; Uekusa, Yasuyuki; Akiba, Ryojiro

    The research on next generation solid propellant rockets is actively underway in various spectra. JAXA is developing the Advanced Solid Rocket (ASR) as a successor to the M-V launch vehicle, which was utilized over past ten years for space science programs including planetary missions. ASR is a result of the development of the next generation technology including a highly intelligent autonomous check-out system, which is connected to not only the solid rocket but also future transportation systems. It is expected to improve the efficiency of the launch system and double the cost performance. Far beyond this effort, the passion of the volunteers among the industry-government-academia cooperation has been united to establish the society of the freewheeling thinking “Next generation Solid Rocket Society (NSRS)”. It aims at a larger revolution than what the ASR provides so that the order of the cost performance is further improved. A study of the Low melting temperature Thermoplastic Propellant (LTP) is now at the experimental stage, which is expected to reform the manufacturing process of the solid rocket propellant and lead to a significant increase in cost performance. This paper indicates the direction of the big flow towards the next generation solid-propellant rockets: the concept of the intelligent ASR under development; and the innovation behind LTP.

  15. Rocket-Plume Spectroscopy Simulation for Hydrocarbon-Fueled Rocket Engines

    Tejwani, Gopal D.


    The UV-Vis spectroscopic system for plume diagnostics monitors rocket engine health by using several analytical tools developed at Stennis Space Center (SSC), including the rocket plume spectroscopy simulation code (RPSSC), to identify and quantify the alloys from the metallic elements observed in engine plumes. Because the hydrocarbon-fueled rocket engine is likely to contain C2, CO, CH, CN, and NO in addition to OH and H2O, the relevant electronic bands of these molecules in the spectral range of 300 to 850 nm in the RPSSC have been included. SSC incorporated several enhancements and modifications to the original line-by-line spectral simulation computer program implemented for plume spectral data analysis and quantification in 1994. These changes made the program applicable to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and the Diagnostic Testbed Facility Thruster (DTFT) exhaust plume spectral data. Modifications included updating the molecular and spectral parameters for OH, adding spectral parameter input files optimized for the 10 elements of interest in the spectral range from 320 to 430 nm and linking the output to graphing and analysis packages. Additionally, the ability to handle the non-uniform wavelength interval at which the spectral computations are made was added. This allowed a precise superposition of wavelengths at which the spectral measurements have been made with the wavelengths at which the spectral computations are done by using the line-by-line (LBL) code. To account for hydrocarbon combustion products in the plume, which might interfere with detection and quantification of metallic elements in the spectral region of 300 to 850 nm, the spectroscopic code has been enhanced to include the carbon-based combustion species of C2, CO, and CH. In addition, CN and NO have spectral bands in 300 to 850 nm and, while these molecules are not direct products of hydrocarbon-oxygen combustion systems, they can show up if nitrogen or a nitrogen compound is present

  16. Specific Impulses Losses in Solid Propellant Rockets


    to use the collision function form proposed by Golovin to simplify this production term: 4C><=) <P- .: Accordingly: m hence, by integration: Now, we...November 21, 1940 in Paris, Seine. VFirst Thesis. "Contribution to the Study of Specific i Impulse Loss in Solid Propellant Rockets." Second Thesis

  17. Stennis Space Center's approach to liquid rocket engine health monitoring using exhaust plume diagnostics

    Gardner, D. G.; Tejwani, G. D.; Bircher, F. E.; Loboda, J. A.; Van Dyke, D. B.; Chenevert, D. J.


    Details are presented of the approach used in a comprehensive program to utilize exhaust plume diagnostics for rocket engine health-and-condition monitoring and assessing SSME component wear and degradation. This approach incorporates both spectral and video monitoring of the exhaust plume. Video monitoring provides qualitative data for certain types of component wear while spectral monitoring allows both quantitative and qualitative information. Consideration is given to spectral identification of SSME materials and baseline plume emissions.

  18. Ignition transient analysis of solid rocket motor

    Han, Samuel S.


    Measurement data on the performance of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor show wide variations in the head-end pressure changes and the total thrust build-up during the ignition transient periods. To analyze the flow and thermal behavior in the tested solid rocket motors, a 1-dimensional, ideal gas flow model via the SIMPLE algorithm was developed. Numerical results showed that burning patterns in the star-shaped head-end segment of the propellant and the erosive burning rate are two important factors controlling the ignition transients. The objective of this study is to extend the model to include the effects of aluminum particle commonly used in solid propellants. To treat the effects of aluminum-oxide particles in the combustion gas, conservation of mass, momentum, and energy equations for the particles are added in the numerical formulation and integrated by an inter-phase-slip algorithm.

  19. Atmospheric scavenging of solid rocket exhaust effluents

    Fenton, D. L.; Purcell, R. Y.


    Solid propellant rocket exhaust was directly utilized to ascertain raindrop scavenging rates for hydrogen chloride. Two chambers were used to conduct the experiments; a large, rigid walled, spherical chamber stored the exhaust constituents, while the smaller chamber housing all the experiments was charged as required with rocket exhaust HCl. Surface uptake experiments demonstrated an HCl concentration dependence for distilled water. Sea water and brackish water HCl uptake was below the detection limit of the chlorine-ion analysis technique used. Plant life HCl uptake experiments were limited to corn and soybeans. Plant age effectively correlated the HCl uptake data. Metallic corrosion was not significant for single 20 minute exposures to the exhaust HCl under varying relative humidity. Characterization of the aluminum oxide particles substantiated the similarity between the constituents of the small scale rocket and the full size vehicles.

  20. Combustion diagnosis for analysis of solid propellant rocket abort hazards: Role of spectroscopy

    Gill, W.; Cruz-Cabrera, A. A.; Donaldson, A. B.; Lim, J.; Sivathanu, Y.; Bystrom, E.; Haug, A.; Sharp, L.; Surmick, D. M.


    Solid rocket propellant plume temperatures have been measured using spectroscopic methods as part of an ongoing effort to specify the thermal-chemical-physical environment in and around a burning fragment of an exploded solid rocket at atmospheric pressures. Such specification is needed for launch safety studies where hazardous payloads become involved with large fragments of burning propellant. The propellant burns in an off-design condition producing a hot gas flame loaded with burning metal droplets. Each component of the flame (soot, droplets and gas) has a characteristic temperature, and it is only through the use of spectroscopy that their temperature can be independently identified.

  1. Analyzing rocket plume spectral data with neural networks

    Whitaker, Kevin W.; Krishnakumar, K. S.; Benzing, Daniel A.


    The Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) system is under development to provide early-warning failure detection in support of ground-level testing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Failure detection is to be achieved through the acquisition of spectrally resolved plume emissions and subsequent identification of abnormal levels indicative of engine corrosion or component failure. Two computer codes (one linear and the other non-linear) are used by the OPAD system to iteratively determine specific element concentrations in the SSME plume, given emission intensity and wavelength information. Since this analysis is extremely labor intensive, a study was initiated to develop neural networks that would model the 'inverse' of these computer codes. Optimally connected feed-forward networks with imperceptible prediction error have been developed for each element modeled by the linear code, SPECTRA4. Radial basis function networks were developed for the non-linear code, SPECTRA5, and predict combustion temperature in addition to element concentrations.

  2. Analyzing rocket plume spectral data with neural networks

    Whitaker, K.W.; Krishnakumar, K.S.; Benzing, D.A.


    The Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) system is under development to provide early-warning failure detection in support of ground-level testing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Failure detection is to be achieved through the acquisition of spectrally resolved plume emissions and subsequent identification of abnormal levels indicative of engine corrosion or component failure. Two computer codes (one linear and the other non-linear) are used by the OPAD system to iteratively determine specific element concentrations in the SSME plume, given emission intensity and wavelength information. Since this analysis is extremely labor intensive, a study was initiated to develop neural networks that would model the `inverse` of these computer codes. Optimally connected feed-forward networks with imperceptible prediction error have been developed for each element modeled by the linear code, SPECTRA4. Radial basis function networks were developed for the non-linear code, SPECTRA5, and predict combustion temperature in addition to element concentrations.

  3. Analyzing rocket plume spectral data with neural networks

    Whitaker, Kevin W.; Krishnakumar, K. S.; Benzing, Daniel A.

    The Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) system is under development to provide early-warning failure detection in support of ground-level testing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Failure detection is to be achieved through the acquisition of spectrally resolved plume emissions and subsequent identification of abnormal levels indicative of engine corrosion or component failure. Two computer codes (one linear and the other non-linear) are used by the OPAD system to iteratively determine specific element concentrations in the SSME plume, given emission intensity and wavelength information. Since this analysis is extremely labor intensive, a study was initiated to develop neural networks that would model the 'inverse' of these computer codes. Optimally connected feed-forward networks with imperceptible prediction error have been developed for each element modeled by the linear code, SPECTRA4. Radial basis function networks were developed for the non-linear code, SPECTRA5, and predict combustion temperature in addition to element concentrations.

  4. Solid Rocket Launch Vehicle Explosion Environments

    Richardson, E. H.; Blackwood, J. M.; Hays, M. J.; Skinner, T.


    Empirical explosion data from full scale solid rocket launch vehicle accidents and tests were collected from all available literature from the 1950s to the present. In general data included peak blast overpressure, blast impulse, fragment size, fragment speed, and fragment dispersion. Most propellants were 1.1 explosives but a few were 1.3. Oftentimes the data from a single accident was disjointed and/or missing key aspects. Despite this fact, once the data as a whole was digitized, categorized, and plotted clear trends appeared. Particular emphasis was placed on tests or accidents that would be applicable to scenarios from which a crew might need to escape. Therefore, such tests where a large quantity of high explosive was used to initiate the solid rocket explosion were differentiated. Also, high speed ground impacts or tests used to simulate such were also culled. It was found that the explosions from all accidents and applicable tests could be described using only the pressurized gas energy stored in the chamber at the time of failure. Additionally, fragmentation trends were produced. Only one accident mentioned the elusive "small" propellant fragments, but upon further analysis it was found that these were most likely produced as secondary fragments when larger primary fragments impacted the ground. Finally, a brief discussion of how this data is used in a new launch vehicle explosion model for improving crew/payload survival is presented.

  5. Status report on a real time Engine Diagnostics Console for rocket engine exhaust plume monitoring

    Bircher, F. E.; Gardner, D. G.; Vandyke, D. B.; Harris, A. B.; Chenevert, D. J.


    This paper describes the work done on the Engine Diagnostics Console during the past year of development at Stennis Space Center. The Engine Diagnostics Console (EDC) is a hardware and software package which provides near real time monitoring of rocket engine exhaust plume emissions during ground testing. The long range goal of the EDC development program is to develop an instrument that can detect engine degradation leading to catastrophic failure, and respond by taking preventative measures. The immediate goal for the past year's effort is the ability to process spectral data, taken from a rocket engine's exhaust plume, and to identify in an automated and high speed manner, the elemental species and multielemental materials that are present in the exhaust plume.

  6. Assessment of analytical techniques for predicting solid propellant exhaust plumes and plume impingement environments

    Tevepaugh, J. A.; Smith, S. D.; Penny, M. M.


    An analysis of experimental nozzle, exhaust plume, and exhaust plume impingement data is presented. The data were obtained for subscale solid propellant motors with propellant Al loadings of 2, 10 and 15% exhausting to simulated altitudes of 50,000, 100,000 and 112,000 ft. Analytical predictions were made using a fully coupled two-phase method of characteristics numerical solution and a technique for defining thermal and pressure environments experienced by bodies immersed in two-phase exhaust plumes.

  7. The Chameleon Solid Rocket Propulsion Model

    Robertson, Glen A.


    The Khoury and Weltman (2004a and 2004b) Chameleon Model presents an addition to the gravitation force and was shown by the author (Robertson, 2009a and 2009b) to present a new means by which one can view other forces in the Universe. The Chameleon Model is basically a density-dependent model and while the idea is not new, this model is novel in that densities in the Universe to include the vacuum of space are viewed as scalar fields. Such an analogy gives the Chameleon scalar field, dark energy/dark matter like characteristics; fitting well within cosmological expansion theories. In respect to this forum, in this paper, it is shown how the Chameleon Model can be used to derive the thrust of a solid rocket motor. This presents a first step toward the development of new propulsion models using density variations verse mass ejection as the mechanism for thrust. Further, through the Chameleon Model connection, these new propulsion models can be tied to dark energy/dark matter toward new space propulsion systems utilizing the vacuum scalar field in a way understandable by engineers, the key toward the development of such systems. This paper provides corrections to the Chameleon rocket model in Robertson (2009b).

  8. Innovative Metallized Formulations for Solid Rocket Propulsion

    Luigi T DeLUCA; Luciano GALFETTI; Filippo MAGGI; Giovanni COLOMBO; Alice REINA; Stefano DOSSI; Daniele CONSONNI; Melissa BRAMBILLA


    Several metallized solid rocket propellants,AP/Metal/HTPB in the ratio 68/18/1 4,were experimentally analyzed at the Space Propulsion Laboratory of Politecnico di Milano.Effects of the metals (micrometric and nanometric Al,B,Mg,and a variety of dual metals) on the performance of the propellant were studied and contrasted to a conventional micrometric aluminum (30 μm average grain size) taken as reference.It is shown that the propellant microstructure plays a fundamental role in controlling the critical aggregation/agglomeration phenomena occurring below and near the burning surface.Two specific effects of microstructure in terms of steady burning rate and average agglomerate size are illustrated.

  9. An experimental and computational study of moderately underexpanded rocket exhaust plumes in a co-flowing hypersonic free stream

    Morris, N.; Buttsworth, D.; Jones, T.; Brescianini, C. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)]|[Macquarie Univ., Sydney (Australia)


    Rocket plume exhaust structures are aerodynamically and thermochemically very complex and the prediction of plume properties such as temperature, velocity, pressure, chemical species concentrations and turbulence properties is a formidable task as there are no definitive models for viscous and chemical effects. Contemporary computational techniques are still in their infancy and cannot yet reliably predict plume properties. Only through validation of computer codes using experimental data, can computational models be developed to the point where they can be confidently used as design and predictive tools. The motivation for this study was to acquire well defined data for rocket plumes at low altitude hypersonic flight conditions so that the above issues could be investigated.

  10. Experimental determination of plume properties in full-scale hydrogen-oxygen rockets

    Brown, D. G.; Limbaugh, C. C.; Zaccardi, V. A.; Eskridge, R.


    An IR emission/absorption technique for determining radial profiles of static temperature and species partial pressure for cylindrically symmetric combustion gases typical of the effluent of turbine engines and liquid-propellant rockets is described. In the technique, the IR plume radiance and absorption is measured using a 1 x 256-element platinum silicide detector array which is filtered to obtain plume emission measurements in the H2O band near 3.0 microns. A minicomputer is employed to control data acquisition and reduction.

  11. Solid Rocket Motor Design Using Hybrid Optimization

    Kevin Albarado


    Full Text Available A particle swarm/pattern search hybrid optimizer was used to drive a solid rocket motor modeling code to an optimal solution. The solid motor code models tapered motor geometries using analytical burn back methods by slicing the grain into thin sections along the axial direction. Grains with circular perforated stars, wagon wheels, and dog bones can be considered and multiple tapered sections can be constructed. The hybrid approach to optimization is capable of exploring large areas of the solution space through particle swarming, but is also able to climb “hills” of optimality through gradient based pattern searching. A preliminary method for designing tapered internal geometry as well as tapered outer mold-line geometry is presented. A total of four optimization cases were performed. The first two case studies examines designing motors to match a given regressive-progressive-regressive burn profile. The third case study studies designing a neutrally burning right circular perforated grain (utilizing inner and external geometry tapering. The final case study studies designing a linearly regressive burning profile for right circular perforated (tapered grains.

  12. Inexpensive photodiode arrays for use in rocket plume and hot source monitoring and diagnostics

    Snider, Dallas; Shanks, Robert; Cole, Reagan; Hudson, M. Keith


    The spectroscopic analysis of plume emissions is a non-intrusive method which has been used to check for fatigue and possible damage throughout the pumps and other mechanisms in a rocket motor or engine. These components are made of various alloys. Knowing the composition of the alloys and for which parts they are used, one can potentially determine from the emissions in the plume which component is failing. Currently, optical multichannel analyser systems are being used which utilize charge coupled devices, cost tens of thousands of dollars, are somewhat delicate, and usually require cooling. We have developed two rugged instruments using less expensive linear photodiode arrays as detectors. A high-resolution system was used to detect atomic emission lines while a low-resolution system was used to detect molecular emission bands. We have also written data acquisition software and built electronic circuits to control the arrays and collect data. While the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has used similar systems for characterization of the space shuttle main engine, the emissions from other rocket systems have not been surveyed so well. The two instruments described will be utilized to study hybrid rocket emissions at the University of Arkansas-Little Rock hybrid rocket facility.

  13. The development of space solid rocket motors in China

    Jianding, Huang; Dingyou, Ye


    China has undertaken to research and develop composite solid propellant rocket motors since 1958. At the request of the development of space technology, composite solid propellant rocket motor has developed from small to large, step by step. For the past thirty eight years, much progress has made, many technical obstacles, such as motor design, case materials and their processing technology, propellant formulations and manufacture, nozzles and thrust vector control, safe ignition, environment tests, nondestructive inspection and quality assurance, static firing test and measurement etc. have been solved. A serial of solid rocket motors have been offered for China's satellites launch. The systems of research, design, test and manufacture of solid rocket motors have been formed.

  14. On-board Optical Spectrometry for Detection of Mixture Ratio and Eroded Materials in Rocket Engine Exhaust Plume

    Barkhoudarian, Sarkis; Kittinger, Scott


    Optical spectrometry can provide means to characterize rocket engine exhaust plume impurities due to eroded materials, as well as combustion mixture ratio without any interference with plume. Fiberoptic probes and cables were designed, fabricated and installed on Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), allowing monitoring of the plume spectra in real time with a Commercial of the Shelf (COTS) fiberoptic spectrometer, located in a test-stand control room. The probes and the cables survived the harsh engine environments for numerous hot-fire tests. When the plume was seeded with a nickel alloy powder, the spectrometer was able to successfully detect all the metallic and OH radical spectra from 300 to 800 nanometers.

  15. Assessment of analytical techniques for predicting solid propellant exhaust plumes

    Tevepaugh, J. A.; Smith, S. D.; Penny, M. M.


    The calculation of solid propellant exhaust plume flow fields is addressed. Two major areas covered are: (1) the applicability of empirical data currently available to define particle drag coefficients, heat transfer coefficients, mean particle size and particle size distributions, and (2) thermochemical modeling of the gaseous phase of the flow field. Comparisons of experimentally measured and analytically predicted data are made. The experimental data were obtained for subscale solid propellant motors with aluminum loadings of 2, 10 and 15%. Analytical predictions were made using a fully coupled two-phase numerical solution. Data comparisons will be presented for radial distributions at plume axial stations of 5, 12, 16 and 20 diameters.

  16. In situ plume radiance measurements from the bow shock ultraviolet 2 rocket flight

    Erdman, Peter W.; Zipf, Edward C.; Espy, Patrick; Howlett, Carl; Christou, Carol; Levin, Deborah A.; Collins, Robert J.; Candler, Graham V.


    The ultraviolet spectrum (200-400 nm) of the plumes generated by the second- and third-stage engines of a Strypi XI rocket and of the Mach 17 re-entry bow shock were obtained by a sounding rocket experiment launched from the Barking Sands Research Range (Kauai, Hawaii) on February 18, 1991 at 14:30 GMT. The re-entry optical data were obtained as the payload descended from 120 to 65 km with a vehicle velocity of 5.1 km/s. The intensities of the vacuum ultraviolet resonance radiation emitted by atomic oxygen and hydrogen in the bow shock at 130.4 and 121.5 nm, respectively, were also measured. Complementary Langmuir probe measurements provided data on the total plasma density and electron temperature in the boundary layer.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of solid rocket components

    Wallner, A.S. [Missouri Western State College, St. Joseph, MO (United States); Nissan, R.A.; Merwin, L.H. [Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA (United States)] [and others


    The evaluation of solid rocket components has become an area of great interest. Studying these materials with MRI offers a great advantage to observe knit lines, regions of inhomogeneity, voids, defects, plasticizer rich/poor areas and solids distribution because of the nondestructive nature of the technique. Aspects of sample preparation, spectroscopic relaxation studies, and MRI as a method of studying these systems will be discussed. Initial images show the ability to image propellant, liner, and explosive materials with an in-plane resolution of 70 {mu}m/pixel. These initial images show that MRI can be developed as a viable nondestructive evaluation method of solid rocket components.

  18. Effect of gaseous and solid simulated jet plumes on an 040A space shuttle launch configuration at m=1.6 to 2.2

    Dods, J. B., Jr.; Brownson, J. J.; Kassner, D. L.; Blackwell, K. L.; Decker, J. P.; Roberts, B. B.


    The effect of plume-induced flow separation and aspiration effects due to operation of both orbiter and the solid rocket motors on a 0.019-scale model of the launch configuration of the Space Shuttle Vehicle is determined. Longitudinal and lateral-directional stability data were obtained at Mach numbers of 1.6, 2.0, and 2.2 with and without the engines operating. The plumes exiting from the engines were simulated by a cold-gas jet supplied by an auxiliary 200-atm air supply system and solid-body plume simulators. The aerodynamic effects produced by these two simulation procedures are compared. The parameters most significantly affected by the jet plumes are pitching moment, elevon control effectiveness, axial force, and orbiter wing loads. The solid rocket motor (SRM) plumes have the largest effect on the aerodynamic characteristics. The effect of the orbiter plumes in combination with the SRM plumes is also significant. Variations in the nozzle design parameters and configuration changes can reduce the jet plume-induced aerodynamic effects.

  19. Thermal radiation of heterogeneous combustion products in the model rocket engine plume

    Kuzmin, V. A.; Maratkanova, E. I.; Zagray, I. A.; Rukavishnikova, R. V.


    The work presents a method of complex investigation of thermal radiation emitted by heterogeneous combustion products in the model rocket engine plume. Realization of the method has allowed us to obtain full information on the results in all stages of calculations. Dependence of the optical properties (complex refractive index), the radiation characteristics (coefficients and cross sections) and emission characteristics (flux densities, emissivity factors) of the main determining factors and parameters was analyzed. It was found by the method of computational experiment that the presence of the gaseous phase in the combustion products causes a strongly marked selectivity of emission, due to which the use of gray approximation in the calculation of thermal radiation is unnecessary. The influence of the optical properties, mass fraction, the function of particle size distribution, and the temperature of combustion products on thermal radiation in the model rocket engine plume was investigated. The role of "spotlight" effect-increasing the amount of energy of emission exhaust combustion products due to scattering by condensate particles radiation from the combustion chamber-was established quantitatively.

  20. On the history of the development of solid-propellant rockets in the Soviet Union

    Pobedonostsev, Y. A.


    Pre-World War II Soviet solid-propellant rocket technology is reviewed. Research and development regarding solid composite preparations of pyroxyline TNT powder is described, as well as early work on rocket loading calculations, problems of flight stability, and aircraft rocket launching and ground rocket launching capabilities.

  1. Stratospheric aluminum oxide. [possibly from solid-fuel rocket exhausts

    Brownlee, D. E.; Tomandl, D.; Ferry, G. V.


    Balloons and U-2 aircraft were used to collect micrometer-sized stratospheric aerosols. It was discovered that for the past 6 years at least, aluminum oxide spheres have been the major stratospheric particulate in the size range from 3 to 8 micrometers. The most probable source of the spheres is the exhaust from solid-fuel rockets.

  2. Study of Liquid Breakup Process in Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle


    34Chemical Erosion of Refractory - Metal Nozzle Inserts in Solid-Propellant Rocket Motors," J. Propulsion and Power, Vol. 25, no.1,, 2009. [4] E. Y. Wong...Paul A.;, "Gelcasting of Alumina," J. Am. Ceram . Soc. 74[3], pp. 612-618, 1991. [18] Blomquist , B. A.; Fink, J. K.; Leibowitz, L.;, "The

  3. Burn Rate Modelling of Solid Rocket Propellants (Short Communication

    A.R. Kulkarni


    Full Text Available A generalised model of burning of a solid rocket propellant based on kinetics of propellant hasbeen developed. A complete set of variables has been formed after examining the existing models.Buckingham theorem provides the functional form of the model, such that the existing models are thesubcases of this generalised model. This proposed model has been validated by an experimental data.

  4. STS-27 Atlantis, OV-104, solid rocket booster (SRB) inspection


    Engineers, kneeling inside a hollow solid rocket booster (SRB), closely inspect the SRB segments and seams in the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) rotation and processing facility. The SRB will be used on STS-27 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. The booster segments were transported via rail car from Morton Thiokol's Utah manufacturing plant. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-88PC-492.

  5. Storable Hypergolic Solid Fuel for Hybrid Rocket Engines

    R. V. Singh


    Full Text Available A solid fuel was synthesised by condensing aniline with furfuraldehyde. The product was directly cast in the rocket motor casing. After curing a hard solid mass was obtained. This was found to have good hypergolicity with RFNA (Red Fuming Nitric Acid, good storability at room temperature and the mechanical properties. The paper presented the techniques of casting, ignition delay measurements and indicates the future programme for this study.

  6. Development of small solid rocket boosters for the ILR-33 sounding rocket

    Nowakowski, Pawel; Okninski, Adam; Pakosz, Michal; Cieslinski, Dawid; Bartkowiak, Bartosz; Wolanski, Piotr


    This paper gives an overview of the development of a 6000 Newton-class solid rocket motor for suborbital applications. The design configuration and results of interior ballistics calculations are given. The initial use of the motor as the main propulsion system of the H1 experimental in-flight test platform, within the Polish Small Sounding Rocket Program, is presented. Comparisons of theoretical and experimental performance are shown. Both on-ground and in-flight tests are discussed. A novel composite-case manufacturing technology, which enabled to reach high propellant mass fractions, was validated and significant cost-reductions were achieved. This paper focuses on the process of adapting the design for use as the booster stage of the ILR-33 sounding rocket, under development at the Institute of Aviation in Warsaw, Poland. Parallel use of two of the flight-proven rocket motors along with the main stage is planned. The process of adapting the rocket motor for booster application consists of stage integration, aerothermodynamics and reliability analyses. The separation mechanism and environmental impact are also discussed within this paper. Detailed performance analysis with focus on propellant grain geometry is provided. The evolution of the design since the first flights of the H1 rocket is covered and modifications of the manufacturing process are described. Issues of simultaneous ignition of two motors and their non-identical performance are discussed. Further applications and potential for future development are outlined. The presented results are based on the initial work done by the Rocketry Group of the Warsaw University of Technology Students' Space Association. The continuation of the Polish Small Sounding Rocket Program on a larger scale at the Institute of Aviation proves the value of the outcomes of the initial educational project.

  7. Calculation of Free-Atom Fractions in Hydrocarbon-Fueled Rocket Engine Plume

    Verma, Satyajit


    Free atom fractions (Beta) of nine elements are calculated in the exhaust plume of CH4- oxygen and RP-1-oxygen fueled rocket engines using free energy minimization method. The Chemical Equilibrium and Applications (CEA) computer program developed by the Glenn Research Center, NASA is used for this purpose. Data on variation of Beta in both fuels as a function of temperature (1600 K - 3100 K) and oxygen to fuel ratios (1.75 to 2.25 by weight) is presented in both tabular and graphical forms. Recommendation is made for the Beta value for a tenth element, Palladium. The CEA computer code was also run to compare with experimentally determined Beta values reported in literature for some of these elements. A reasonable agreement, within a factor of three, between the calculated and reported values is observed. Values reported in this work will be used as a first approximation for pilot rocket engine testing studies at the Stennis Space Center for at least six elements Al, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe and Ni - until experimental values are generated. The current estimates will be improved when more complete thermodynamic data on the remaining four elements Ag, Co, Mn and Pd are added to the database. A critique of the CEA code is also included.

  8. Solid rocket motor fire tests: Phases 1 and 2

    Chang, Yale; Hunter, Lawrence W.; Han, David K.; Thomas, Michael E.; Cain, Russell P.; Lennon, Andrew M.


    JHU/APL conducted a series of open-air burns of small blocks (3 to 10 kg) of solid rocket motor (SRM) propellant at the Thiokol Elkton MD facility to elucidate the thermal environment under burning propellant. The propellant was TP-H-3340A for the STAR 48 motor, with a weight ratio of 71/18/11 for the ammonium perchlorate, aluminum, and HTPB binder. Combustion inhibitor applied on the blocks allowed burning on the bottom and/or sides only. Burns were conducted on sand and concrete to simulate near-launch pad surfaces, and on graphite to simulate a low-recession surface. Unique test fixturing allowed propellant self-levitation while constraining lateral motion. Optics instrumentation consisted of a longwave infrared imaging pyrometer, a midwave spectroradiometer, and a UV/visible spectroradiometer. In-situ instrumentation consisted of rod calorimeters, Gardon gauges, elevated thermocouples, flush thermocouples, a two-color pyrometer, and Knudsen cells. Witness materials consisted of yttria, ceria, alumina, tungsten, iridium, and platinum/rhodium. Objectives of the tests were to determine propellant burn characteristics such as burn rate and self-levitation, to determine heat fluxes and temperatures, and to carry out materials analyses. A summary of qualitative results: alumina coated almost all surfaces, the concrete spalled, sand moisture content matters, the propellant self-levitated, the test fixtures worked as designed, and bottom-burning propellant does not self-extinguish. A summary of quantitative results: burn rate averaged 1.15 mm/s, thermocouples peaked at 2070 C, pyrometer readings matched MWIR data at about 2400 C, the volume-averaged plume temperatures were 2300-2400 C with peaks of 2400-2600 C, and the heat fluxes peaked at 125 W/cm2. These results are higher than other researchers' measurements of top-burning propellant in chimneys, and will be used, along with Phase 3 test results, to analyze hardware response to these environments, including General

  9. Particle behavior in solid propellant rockets

    Netzer, D. W.; Diloreto, V. D.; Dubrov, E.


    The use of holography, high speed motion pictures, light scattering measurements, and post-fire particle collection/scanning electron microscopic examination to study the combustion of composite solid propellants is discussed. The relative advantages and disadvantages of the different experimental techniques for obtaining two-phase flow characteristics within the combustion environment of a solid propellant grain are evaluated. Combustion bomb studies using high speed motion pictures and post-fire residue analysis were completed for six low metal content propellants. Resolution capabilities and the relationships between post-fire residue and motion picture data are determined. Initial testing using a holocamera together with a 2D windowed motor is also described.

  10. Wind Tunnel Tests on Aerodynamic Characteristics of Advanced Solid Rocket

    Kitamura, Keiichi; Fujimoto, Keiichiro; Nonaka, Satoshi; Irikado, Tomoko; Fukuzoe, Moriyasu; Shima, Eiji

    The Advanced Solid Rocket is being developed by JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency). Since its configuration has been changed very recently, its aerodynamic characteristics are of great interest of the JAXA Advanced Solid Rocket Team. In this study, we carried out wind tunnel tests on the aerodynamic characteristics of the present configuration for Mach 1.5. Six test cases were conducted with different body configurations, attack angles, and roll angles. A six component balance, oilflow visualization, Schlieren images were used throughout the experiments. It was found that, at zero angle-of-attack, the flow around the body were perturbed and its drag (axial force) characteristics were significantly influenced by protruding body components such as flanges, cable ducts, and attitude control units of SMSJ (Solid Motor Side Jet), while the nozzle had a minor role. With angle-of-attack of five degree, normal force of CNα = 3.50±0.03 was measured along with complex flow features observed in the full-component model; whereas no crossflow separations were induced around the no-protuberance model with CNα = 2.58±0.10. These values were almost constant with respect to the angle-of-attack in both of the cases. Furthermore, presence of roll angle made the flow more complicated, involving interactions of separation vortices. These data provide us with fundamental and important aerodynamic insights of the Advanced Solid Rocket, and they will be utilized as reference data for the corresponding numerical analysis.

  11. High temperature reformation of aluminum and chlorine compounds behind the Mach disk of a solid-fuel rocket exhaust

    Park, C.


    Chemical reactions expected to occur among the constituents of solid-fuel rocket engine effluents in the hot region behind a Mach disk are analyzed theoretically. With the use of a rocket plume model that assumes the flow to be separated in the base region, and a chemical reaction scheme that includes evaporation of alumina and the associated reactions of 17 gas species, the reformation of the effluent is calculated. It is shown that AlClO and AlOH are produced in exchange for a corresponding reduction in the amounts of HCl and Al2O3. For the case of the space shuttle booster engines, up to 2% of the original mass of the rocket fuel can possibly be converted to these two new species and deposited in the atmosphere between the altitudes of 10 and 40 km. No adverse effects on the atmospheric environment are anticipated with the addition of these two new species.

  12. Effect of gaseous and solid simulated jet plumes on a 040A space shuttle launch configuration at Mach numbers from 1.6 to 2.2

    Lanfranco, M. J.; Sparks, V. W.; Kavanaugh, A. T.


    An experimental investigation was conducted in a 9- by 7-foot supersonic wind tunnel to determine the effect of plume-induced flow separation and aspiration effects due to operation of both the orbiter and the solid rocket motors on a 0.019-scale model of the launch configuration of the space shuttle vehicle. Longitudinal and lateral-directional stability data were obtained at Mach numbers of 1.6, 2.0, and 2.2 with and without the engines operating. The plumes exiting from the engines were simulated by a cold gas jet supplied by an auxiliary 200 atmosphere air supply system, and by solid body plume simulators. Comparisons of the aerodynamic effects produced by these two simulation procedures are presented. The data indicate that the parameters most significantly affected by the jet plumes are the pitching moment, the elevon control effectiveness, the axial force, and the orbiter wing loads.

  13. Advanced Computer Science on Internal Ballistics of Solid Rocket Motors

    Shimada, Toru; Kato, Kazushige; Sekino, Nobuhiro; Tsuboi, Nobuyuki; Seike, Yoshio; Fukunaga, Mihoko; Daimon, Yu; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Asakawa, Hiroya

    In this paper, described is the development of a numerical simulation system, what we call “Advanced Computer Science on SRM Internal Ballistics (ACSSIB)”, for the purpose of improvement of performance and reliability of solid rocket motors (SRM). The ACSSIB system is consisting of a casting simulation code of solid propellant slurry, correlation database of local burning-rate of cured propellant in terms of local slurry flow characteristics, and a numerical code for the internal ballistics of SRM, as well as relevant hardware. This paper describes mainly the objectives, the contents of this R&D, and the output of the fiscal year of 2008.

  14. Effect of Temperature on Mechanical Properties of Solid Rocket Propellants

    Himanshu Shekhar


    Full Text Available Mechanical properties of solid rocket propellants are dependent on temperature. Any change in temperature brings significant change in the tensile strength, percentage elongation, and elastic modulus of the propellant. Different classes of operational solid rocket propellants namely extruded double-base propellants, composite, extruded composite and nitrarte ester polyester propellants were evaluated at different temperatures in the operating range of the rockets and missiles preferably in the range of –50 oC to +55 oC. It was observed that for each class of propellant, as temperature reduces, propellant becomes hard. This is depicted by increase in elastic modulus and tensile strength of the material. However, trend of percentage elongation is not very uniform. Extruded double-base propellants show less percentage elongation (around 1 per cent at reduced temperature (–50 oC probably due to brittleness. So is the trend with case-bonded composite propellants. However, reverse trend is exhibited by cartridge-loaded composite propellants and nitrate ester polyester propellants. Such propellants show higher percentage elongation (6 per cent for CLCP and 35 per cent for NEPE at reduced temperature (–50 oC. This makes such propellants tough and more area under stress-strain curve at reduced temperature is observed.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(6, pp.529-533, DOI:

  15. Thermal Barriers Developed for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.


    Space shuttle solid rocket motor case assembly joints are sealed with conventional O-ring seals that are shielded from 5500 F combustion gases by thick layers of insulation and by special joint-fill compounds that fill assembly splitlines in the insulation. On a number of occasions, NASA has observed hot gas penetration through defects in the joint-fill compound of several of the rocket nozzle assembly joints. In the current nozzle-to-case joint, NASA has observed penetration of hot combustion gases through the joint-fill compound to the inboard wiper O-ring in one out of seven motors. Although this condition does not threaten motor safety, evidence of hot gas penetration to the wiper O-ring results in extensive reviews before resuming flight. The solid rocket motor manufacturer (Thiokol) approached the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field about the possibility of applying Glenn's braided fiber preform seal as a thermal barrier to protect the O-ring seals. Glenn and Thiokol are working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design and by using a braided carbon fiber thermal barrier that would resist any hot gases that the J-leg does not block.

  16. MEMS-Based Solid Propellant Rocket Array Thruster

    Tanaka, Shuji; Hosokawa, Ryuichiro; Tokudome, Shin-Ichiro; Hori, Keiichi; Saito, Hirobumi; Watanabe, Masashi; Esashi, Masayoshi

    The prototype of a solid propellant rocket array thruster for simple attitude control of a 10 kg class micro-spacecraft was completed and tested. The prototype has 10×10 φ0.8 mm solid propellant micro-rockets arrayed at a pitch of 1.2 mm on a 20×22 mm substrate. To realize such a dense array of micro-rockets, each ignition heater is powered from the backside of the thruster through an electrical feedthrough which passes along a propellant cylinder wall. Boron/potassium nitrate propellant (NAB) is used with/without lead rhodanide/potassium chlorate/nitrocellulose ignition aid (RK). Impulse thrust was measured by a pendulum method in air. Ignition required electric power of at least 3 4 W with RK and 4 6 W without RK. Measured impulse thrusts were from 2×10-5 Ns to 3×10-4 Ns after the calculation of compensation for air dumping.

  17. Rocket Solid Propellant Alternative Based on Ammonium Dinitramide

    Grigore CICAN


    Full Text Available Due to the continuous run for a green environment the current article proposes a new type of solid propellant based on the fairly new synthesized oxidizer, ammonium dinitramide (ADN. Apart of having a higher specific impulse than the worldwide renowned oxidizer, ammonium perchlorate, ADN has the advantage, of leaving behind only nitrogen, oxygen and water after decomposing at high temperatures and therefore totally avoiding the formation of hydrogen chloride fumes. Based on the oxidizer to fuel ratios of the current formulations of the major rocket solid booster (e.g. Space Shuttle’s SRB, Ariane 5’s SRB which comprises mass variations of ammonium perchlorate oxidizer (70-75%, atomized aluminum powder (10-18% and polybutadiene binder (12-20% a new solid propellant was formulated. As previously stated, the new propellant formula and its variations use ADN as oxidizer and erythritol tetranitrate as fuel, keeping the same polybutadiene as binder.

  18. Propellant development for the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    Landers, L. C.; Stanley, C. B.; Ricks, D. W.


    The properties of a propellant developed for the NASA Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) are described in terms of its composition, performance, and compliance to NASA specifications. The class 1.3 HTPB/AP/A1 propellant employs an ester plasticizer and the content of ballistic solids is set at 88 percent. Ammonia evolution is prevented by the utilization of a neutral bonding agent which allows continuous mixing. The propellant also comprises a bimodal AP blend with one ground fraction, ground AP of at least 20 microns, and ferric oxide to control the burning rate. The propellant's characteristics are discussed in terms of tradeoffs in AP particle size and the types of Al powder, bonding agent, and HTPB polymer. The size and shape of the ballistic solids affect the processability, ballistic properties, and structural properties of the propellant. The revised baseline composition is based on maximizing the robustness of in-process viscosity, structural integrity, and burning-rate tailoring range.

  19. Solid Rocket Fuel Constitutive Theory and Polymer Cure

    Ream, Robert


    Solid Rocket Fuel is a complex composite material for which no general constitutive theory, based on first principles, has been developed. One of the principles such a relation would depend on is the morphology of the binder. A theory of polymer curing is required to determine this morphology. During work on such a theory an algorithm was developed for counting the number of ways a polymer chain could assemble. The methods used to develop and check this algorithm led to an analytic solution to the problem. This solution is used in a probability distribution function which characterizes the morphology of the polymer.

  20. Facility for cold flow testing of solid rocket motor models

    Bacchus, D. L.; Hill, O. E.; Whitesides, R. Harold


    A new cold flow test facility was designed and constructed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center for the purpose of characterizing the flow field in the port and nozzle of solid propellant rocket motors (SRM's). A National Advisory Committee was established to include representatives from industry, government agencies, and universities to guide the establishment of design and instrumentation requirements for the new facility. This facility design includes the basic components of air storage tanks, heater, submicron filter, quiet control valve, venturi, model inlet plenum chamber, solid rocket motor (SRM) model, exhaust diffuser, and exhaust silencer. The facility was designed to accommodate a wide range of motor types and sizes from small tactical motors to large space launch boosters. This facility has the unique capability of testing ten percent scale models of large boosters such as the new Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM), at full scale motor Reynolds numbers. Previous investigators have established the validity of studying basic features of solid rocket motor development programs include the acquisition of data to (1) directly evaluate and optimize the design configuration of the propellant grain, insulation, and nozzle; and (2) provide data for validation of the computational fluid dynamics, (CFD), analysis codes and the performance analysis codes. A facility checkout model was designed, constructed, and utilized to evaluate the performance characteristics of the new facility. This model consists of a cylindrical chamber and converging/diverging nozzle with appropriate manifolding to connect it to the facility air supply. It was designed using chamber and nozzle dimensions to simulate the flow in a 10 percent scale model of the ASRM. The checkout model was recently tested over the entire range of facility flow conditions which include flow rates from 9.07 to 145 kg/sec (20 to 320 Ibm/sec) and supply pressure from 5.17 x 10 exp 5 to 8.27 x 10 exp 6 Pa. The

  1. SRM (Solid Rocket Motor) propellant and polymer materials structural modeling

    Moore, Carleton J.


    The following investigation reviews and evaluates the use of stress relaxation test data for the structural analysis of Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) propellants and other polymer materials used for liners, insulators, inhibitors, and seals. The stress relaxation data is examined and a new mathematical structural model is proposed. This model has potentially wide application to structural analysis of polymer materials and other materials generally characterized as being made of viscoelastic materials. A dynamic modulus is derived from the new model for stress relaxation modulus and is compared to the old viscoelastic model and experimental data.

  2. Development of Thermal Barriers For Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.


    Joints in the Space Shuttle solid rocket motors are sealed by O-rings to contain combustion gases inside the rocket that reach pressures of up to 900 psi and temperatures of up to 5500 F. To provide protection for the O-rings, the motors are insulated with either phenolic or rubber insulation. Gaps in the joints leading up to the O-rings are filled with polysulfide joint-fill compounds as an additional level of protection. The current RSRM nozzle-to-case joint design incorporating primary, secondary, and wiper O-rings experiences gas paths through the joint-fill compound to the innermost wiper O-ring in about one out of every seven motors. Although this does not pose a safety hazard to the motor, it is an undesirable condition that NASA and rocket manufacturer Thiokol want to eliminate. Each nozzle-to-case joint gas path results in extensive reviews and evaluation before flights can be resumed. Thiokol and NASA Marshall are currently working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design that has been used successfully in the field and igniter joint. They are also planning to incorporate the NASA Glenn braided carbon fiber thermal barrier into the joint. The thermal barrier would act as an additional level of protection for the O-rings and allow the elimination of the joint-fill compound from the joint.

  3. Numerically Modeling the Erosion of Lunar Soil by Rocket Exhaust Plumes


    In preparation for the Apollo program, Leonard Roberts of the NASA Langley Research Center developed a remarkable analytical theory that predicts the blowing of lunar soil and dust beneath a rocket exhaust plume. Roberts assumed that the erosion rate was determined by the excess shear stress in the gas (the amount of shear stress greater than what causes grains to roll). The acceleration of particles to their final velocity in the gas consumes a portion of the shear stress. The erosion rate continues to increase until the excess shear stress is exactly consumed, thus determining the erosion rate. Roberts calculated the largest and smallest particles that could be eroded based on forces at the particle scale, but the erosion rate equation assumed that only one particle size existed in the soil. He assumed that particle ejection angles were determined entirely by the shape of the terrain, which acts like a ballistic ramp, with the particle aerodynamics being negligible. The predicted erosion rate and the upper limit of particle size appeared to be within an order of magnitude of small-scale terrestrial experiments but could not be tested more quantitatively at the time. The lower limit of particle size and the predictions of ejection angle were not tested. We observed in the Apollo landing videos that the ejection angles of particles streaming out from individual craters were time-varying and correlated to the Lunar Module thrust, thus implying that particle aerodynamics dominate. We modified Roberts theory in two ways. First, we used ad hoc the ejection angles measured in the Apollo landing videos, in lieu of developing a more sophisticated method. Second, we integrated Roberts equations over the lunar-particle size distribution and obtained a compact expression that could be implemented in a numerical code. We also added a material damage model that predicts the number and size of divots which the impinging particles will cause in hardware surrounding the landing

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) analysis of axisymmetric plume and base flow of film/dump cooled rocket nozzle

    Tucker, P. K.; Warsi, S. A.


    Film/dump cooling a rocket nozzle with fuel rich gas, as in the National Launch System (NLS) Space Transportation Main Engine (STME), adds potential complexities for integrating the engine with the vehicle. The chief concern is that once the film coolant is exhausted from the nozzle, conditions may exist during flight for the fuel-rich film gases to be recirculated to the vehicle base region. The result could be significantly higher base temperatures than would be expected from a regeneratively cooled nozzle. CFD analyses were conduced to augment classical scaling techniques for vehicle base environments. The FDNS code with finite rate chemistry was used to simulate a single, axisymmetric STME plume and the NLS base area. Parallel calculations were made of the Saturn V S-1 C/F1 plume base area flows. The objective was to characterize the plume/freestream shear layer for both vehicles as inputs for scaling the S-C/F1 flight data to NLS/STME conditions. The code was validated on high speed flows with relevant physics. This paper contains the calculations for the NLS/STME plume for the baseline nozzle and a modified nozzle. The modified nozzle was intended to reduce the fuel available for recirculation to the vehicle base region. Plumes for both nozzles were calculated at 10kFT and 50kFT.

  5. Using Lunar Module Shadows To Scale the Effects of Rocket Exhaust Plumes


    Excavating granular materials beneath a vertical jet of gas involves several physical mechanisms. These occur, for example, beneath the exhaust plume of a rocket landing on the soil of the Moon or Mars. We performed a series of experiments and simulations (Figure 1) to provide a detailed view of the complex gas-soil interactions. Measurements taken from the Apollo lunar landing videos (Figure 2) and from photographs of the resulting terrain helped demonstrate how the interactions extrapolate into the lunar environment. It is important to understand these processes at a fundamental level to support the ongoing design of higher fidelity numerical simulations and larger-scale experiments. These are needed to enable future lunar exploration wherein multiple hardware assets will be placed on the Moon within short distances of one another. The high-velocity spray of soil from the landing spacecraft must be accurately predicted and controlled or it could erode the surfaces of nearby hardware. This analysis indicated that the lunar dust is ejected at an angle of less than 3 degrees above the surface, the results of which can be mitigated by a modest berm of lunar soil. These results assume that future lunar landers will use a single engine. The analysis would need to be adjusted for a multiengine lander. Figure 3 is a detailed schematic of the Lunar Module camera calibration math model. In this chart, formulas relating the known quantities, such as sun angle and Lunar Module dimensions, to the unknown quantities are depicted. The camera angle PSI is determined by measurement of the imaged aspect ratio of a crater, where the crater is assumed to be circular. The final solution is the determination of the camera calibration factor, alpha. Figure 4 is a detailed schematic of the dust angle math model, which again relates known to unknown parameters. The known parameters now include the camera calibration factor and Lunar Module dimensions. The final computation is the ejected

  6. Sensitivity of solid rocket propellants for card gap test

    Kimura, Eishu; Oyumi, Yoshio (Japan Defense Agency, Tokyo (Japan). Technical Research and Development Inst.)


    Card gap test, which is standardized in Japan Explosives Society, was modified in order to apply it to solid rocket propellants and carried out to evaluate sensitivities against shock stimuli. Solid propellants tested here were mainly azide polymer composite propellants, which contained ammonium nitrate (AN) as a main oxidizer. Double base propellant, composed nitroglycerin and nitrocellulose (NC), and ammonium perchlorate (AP)-based composite propellants. It is found that the sensitivity was dominated by the oxidizer characteristics. AP- and AN-based propellant had less sensitivity and HMX-based propellant showed higher sensitivity, and the adding of NC and TMETN contributed to worse sensitive for the card gap test. Good relationship was obtained between the card gap sensitivity and the oxygen balance of propellants tested here. (orig.)

  7. Laser optogalvanic spectroscopy of neon in a discharge plasma and modeling and analysis of rocket plume RF-line emissions

    Ogungbemi, Kayode I.

    The Optogalvanic Effect (OGE) of neon in a hollow cathode discharge lamp has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. A tunable dye laser was tuned to several 1si -- 2pj neon transitions and the associated time--resolved optogalvanic (OG) spectral waveforms recorded corresponding to the DeltaJ = DeltaK = 0, +/-1 selection rules and modeled using a semi-empirical model. Decay rate constants, amplitudes and the instrumentation time constants were recorded following a good least-squares fit (between the experimental and the theoretical OG data) using the Monte Carlo technique and utilizing both the search and random walk methods. Dominant physical processes responsible for the optogalvanic effect have been analyzed, and the corresponding populations of the laser-excited level and collisional excited levels determined. The behavior of the optogalvanic signal waveform as a function of time, together with the decay rate constants as a function of the discharge current and the instrumentation time constant as a function of current have been studied in detail. The decay times of the OG signals and the population redistributions were also determined. Fairly linear relationships between the decay rate constant and the discharge current, as well as between the instrumental time constant and the discharge current, have been observed. The decay times and the electron collisional rate parameters of the 1s levels involved in the OG transitions have been obtained with accuracy. The excitation temperature of the discharge for neon transitions grouped with the same 1s level have been determined and found to be fairly constant for the neon transitions studied. The experimental optogalvanic effort in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum has been complemented by a computation-intensive modeling investigation of rocket plumes in the microwave region. Radio frequency lines of each of the plume species identified were archived utilizing the HITRAN and other

  8. Time-Accurate Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of a Pair of Moving Solid Rocket Boosters

    Strutzenberg, Louise L.; Williams, Brandon R.


    Since the Columbia accident, the threat to the Shuttle launch vehicle from debris during the liftoff timeframe has been assessed by the Liftoff Debris Team at NASA/MSFC. In addition to engineering methods of analysis, CFD-generated flow fields during the liftoff timeframe have been used in conjunction with 3-DOF debris transport methods to predict the motion of liftoff debris. Early models made use of a quasi-steady flow field approximation with the vehicle positioned at a fixed location relative to the ground; however, a moving overset mesh capability has recently been developed for the Loci/CHEM CFD software which enables higher-fidelity simulation of the Shuttle transient plume startup and liftoff environment. The present work details the simulation of the launch pad and mobile launch platform (MLP) with truncated solid rocket boosters (SRBs) moving in a prescribed liftoff trajectory derived from Shuttle flight measurements. Using Loci/CHEM, time-accurate RANS and hybrid RANS/LES simulations were performed for the timeframe T0+0 to T0+3.5 seconds, which consists of SRB startup to a vehicle altitude of approximately 90 feet above the MLP. Analysis of the transient flowfield focuses on the evolution of the SRB plumes in the MLP plume holes and the flame trench, impingement on the flame deflector, and especially impingment on the MLP deck resulting in upward flow which is a transport mechanism for debris. The results show excellent qualitative agreement with the visual record from past Shuttle flights, and comparisons to pressure measurements in the flame trench and on the MLP provide confidence in these simulation capabilities.

  9. Validation of Methods to Predict Vibration of a Panel in the Near Field of a Hot Supersonic Rocket Plume

    Bremner, P. G.; Blelloch, P. A.; Hutchings, A.; Shah, P.; Streett, C. L.; Larsen, C. E.


    This paper describes the measurement and analysis of surface fluctuating pressure level (FPL) data and vibration data from a plume impingement aero-acoustic and vibration (PIAAV) test to validate NASA s physics-based modeling methods for prediction of panel vibration in the near field of a hot supersonic rocket plume. For this test - reported more fully in a companion paper by Osterholt & Knox at 26th Aerospace Testing Seminar, 2011 - the flexible panel was located 2.4 nozzle diameters from the plume centerline and 4.3 nozzle diameters downstream from the nozzle exit. The FPL loading is analyzed in terms of its auto spectrum, its cross spectrum, its spatial correlation parameters and its statistical properties. The panel vibration data is used to estimate the in-situ damping under plume FPL loading conditions and to validate both finite element analysis (FEA) and statistical energy analysis (SEA) methods for prediction of panel response. An assessment is also made of the effects of non-linearity in the panel elasticity.

  10. Solid rocket booster internal flow analysis by highly accurate adaptive computational methods

    Huang, C. Y.; Tworzydlo, W.; Oden, J. T.; Bass, J. M.; Cullen, C.; Vadaketh, S.


    The primary objective of this project was to develop an adaptive finite element flow solver for simulating internal flows in the solid rocket booster. Described here is a unique flow simulator code for analyzing highly complex flow phenomena in the solid rocket booster. New methodologies and features incorporated into this analysis tool are described.

  11. Overview of the manufacturing sequence of the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    Chapman, John S.; Nix, Michael B.


    The manufacturing sequence of NASA's new Advanced Solid Rocket Motor, developed as a replacement of the Space Shuttle's existing Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor, is overviewed. Special attention is given to the case preparation, the propellant mix/cast, the nondestructuve evaluation, the motor finishing, and the refurbishment. The fabrication sequences of the case, the nozzle, and the igniter are described.

  12. Environmental impact statement Space Shuttle advanced solid rocket motor program


    The proposed action is design, development, testing, and evaluation of Advanced Solid Rocket Motors (ASRM) to replace the motors currently used to launch the Space Shuttle. The proposed action includes design, construction, and operation of new government-owned, contractor-operated facilities for manufacturing and testing the ASRM's. The proposed action also includes transport of propellant-filled rocket motor segments from the manufacturing facility to the testing and launch sites and the return of used and/or refurbished segments to the manufacturing site. Sites being considered for the new facilities include John C. Stennis Space Center, Hancock County, Mississippi; the Yellow Creek site in Tishomingo County, Mississippi, which is currently in the custody and control of the Tennessee Valley Authority; and John F. Kennedy Space Center, Brevard County, Florida. TVA proposes to transfer its site to the custody and control of NASA if it is the selected site. All facilities need not be located at the same site. Existing facilities which may provide support for the program include Michoud Assembly Facility, New Orleans Parish, Louisiana; and Slidell Computer Center, St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana. NASA's preferred production location is the Yellow Creek site, and the preferred test location is the Stennis Space Center.

  13. Exploring the Solid Rocket Boosters and Properties of Matter

    Moffett, Amy


    I worked for the United Space Alliance, LLC (USA) with the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Materials and Process engineers (M&P). I was assigned a project in which I needed to research and collect chemical and physical properties information, material safety data sheets (MSDS), and other product information from the vendor's websites and existing "inhouse" files for a select group of materials used in building and refurbishing the SRBs. This information was then compiled in a report that summarized the information collected. My work site was at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This allowed for many opportunities to visit and tour sites operated by NASA, by USA, and by the Air Force. This included the vehicle assembly building (VAB), orbital processing facilities (OPF), the crawler with the mobile launch pad (MLP), and the SRB assembly and refurbishment facility (ARF), to name a few. In addition, the launch, of STS- 117 took place within the first week of employment allowing a day by day following of that mission including post flight operations for the SRBs. Two Delta II rockets were also launched during these 7 weeks. The sights were incredible and the operations witnessed were amazing. I learned so many things I never knew about the entire program and the shuttle itself. The entire experience, especially my work with the SRB materials, inspired my plan for implementation into the classroom.

  14. The 260: The Largest Solid Rocket Motor Ever Tested

    Crimmins, P.; Cousineau, M.; Rogers, C.; Shell, V.


    Aerojet in the mid 1960s, under contract to NASA, built and static hot fire tested the largest solid rocket motor (SRM) in history for the purpose of demonstrating the feasibility of utilizing large SRMs for space exploration. This program successfully fabricated two high strength steel chambers, loaded each with approximately 1,68 million pounds of propellant, and static test fired these giants with their nozzles up from an underground silo located adjacent to the Florida everglades. Maximum thrust and total impulse in excess of 5,000,000 lbf and 3,470,000,000 lbf-sec were achieved. Flames from the second firing, conducted at night, were seen over eighty miles away. For comparative purposes: the thrust developed was nearly 100 times that of a Minuteman III second stage and the 260 in.-dia cross-section was over 3 times that of the Space Shuttle SRM.

  15. Scale Effects on Solid Rocket Combustion Instability Behaviour

    David R. Greatrix


    Full Text Available The ability to understand and predict the expected internal behaviour of a given solid-propellant rocket motor under transient conditions is important. Research towards predicting and quantifying undesirable transient axial combustion instability symptoms necessitates a comprehensive numerical model for internal ballistic simulation under dynamic flow and combustion conditions. A numerical model incorporating pertinent elements, such as a representative transient, frequency-dependent combustion response to pressure wave activity above the burning propellant surface, is applied to the investigation of scale effects (motor size, i.e., grain length and internal port diameter on influencing instability-related behaviour in a cylindrical-grain motor. The results of this investigation reveal that the motor’s size has a significant influence on transient pressure wave magnitude and structure, and on the appearance and magnitude of an associated base pressure rise.

  16. Cathodic Protection Deployment on Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters

    Zook, Lee M.


    Corrosion protection of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters incorporates the use of cathodic protection(anodes) in concert with several coatings systems. The SRB design has large carbon/carbon composites(motor nozzle) electrically connected to an aluminum alloy structure. Early in the STS program, the aluminum structures incurred tremendous corrosive attack due primarily to the galvanic couple to the carbon/carbon nozzle at coating damage locations. Also contributing to the galvanic corrosion problem were stainless steel and titanium alloy components housed within the aluminum structures and electrically connected to the aluminum structures. This paper will highlight the evolution in the protection of the aluminum structures, providing historical information and summary data from the operation of the corrosion protection systems. Also, data and information will be included regarding the evaluation and deployment of inorganic zinc rich primers as anode area on the aluminum structures.

  17. Ecological effects and environmental fate of solid rocket exhaust

    Nimmo, B.; Stout, I. J.; Mickus, J.; Vickers, D.; Madsen, B.


    Specific target processes were classified as to the chemical, chemical-physical, and biological reactions and toxic effects of solid rocket emissions within selected ecosystems at Kennedy Space Center. Exposure of Citris seedlings, English peas, and bush beans to SRM exhaust under laboratory conditions demonstrated reduced growth rates, but at very high concentrations. Field studies of natural plant populations in three diverse ecosystems failed to reveal any structural damage at the concentration levels tested. Background information on elemental composition of selected woody plants from two terrestrial ecosystems is reported. LD sub 50 for a native mouse (peromysous gossypinus) exposed to SRM exhaust was determined to be 50 ppm/g body weight. Results strongly indicate that other components of the SRM exhaust act synergically to enhance the toxic effects of HCl gas when inhaled. A brief summary is given regarding the work on SRM exhaust and its possible impact on hatchability of incubating bird eggs.

  18. Design and Experimental Study on Spinning Solid Rocket Motor

    Xue, Heng; Jiang, Chunlan; Wang, Zaicheng

    The study on spinning solid rocket motor (SRM) which used as power plant of twice throwing structure of aerial submunition was introduced. This kind of SRM which with the structure of tangential multi-nozzle consists of a combustion chamber, propellant charge, 4 tangential nozzles, ignition device, etc. Grain design, structure design and prediction of interior ballistic performance were described, and problem which need mainly considered in design were analyzed comprehensively. Finally, in order to research working performance of the SRM, measure pressure-time curve and its speed, static test and dynamic test were conducted respectively. And then calculated values and experimental data were compared and analyzed. The results indicate that the designed motor operates normally, and the stable performance of interior ballistic meet demands. And experimental results have the guidance meaning for the pre-research design of SRM.

  19. Internal Flow Simulation of High-Performance Solid Rockets using a k-ωTurbulence Model



    @@ For technological reasons many high-performance solid rocket motors are made from segmented propellant grains with non-uniform port geometry. In this paper parametric studies have been carried out to examine the geometric dependence of transient flow features in solid rockets with non-uniform ports. Numerical computations have been carried out in an inert simulator of solid propellant rocket motor with the aid of a standard k-ω turbulence model. It was seen that the damping of the temperature fluctuation is faster in solid rocket with convergent port than with divergent port geometry. We inferred that the damping of the flow fluctuations using the port geometry is a meaningful objective for the suppression and control of the instability and/or pressure/thrust oscillations during the starting transient of solid rockets.

  20. Rocket

    K. Karmarkar


    Full Text Available The rockets of World War II represented, not the invention of a new weapon, but the modernization of a very old one. As early as 1232 A.D, the Chinese launched rockets against the Mongols. About a hundred years later the knowledge of ledge of rockets was quite widespread and they were used to set fire to buildings and to terrorize the enemy. But as cannon developed, rockets declined in warfare. However rockets were used occasionally as weapons till about 1530 A.D. About this time improvements in artillery-rifled gun barrel and mechanism to absorb recoil-established a standard of efficiency with which rockets could not compare until World War II brought pew conditions

  1. Thermodynamic cycle analysis of solid propellant air-turbo-rocket

    CHEN Xiang; CHEN Yu-chun; TU Qiu-ye; ZHANG Hong; CAI Yuan-hu


    Solid propellant air-turbo-rocket (SPATR) is an air-breathing propulsion system. A numerical model of performance and characteristics analysis for SPATR was presented and the corresponding computer program was written according to the operation characteristics of SPATR. The influence on the SPATR performance at design point caused by the gas generator exit parameters and compressor pressure ratio had been computed and analyzed in detail. The off-design perform-ance of SPATR at sea level and high altitude had also been computed. The performance of thrust and specific impulse for SPATR with different solid propellant had been compared at off-design points, and the off-design performance comparison had been made between fuel-rich and oxygen-rich. The computation results indicated that SPATR operates within wide range of Maeh number (0 ~3) and altitude (0~12 km), and SPATR possesses high specific thrust (1 200 N/(kg/s)) and high specific impulse (7000 N/ (kg/s)) when fuel-air ratio of combustor equals fuel-air ratio.

  2. Multiscale GasKinetics/Particle (MGP) Simulation for Rocket Plume/Lunar Dust Interactions Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A Multiscale GasKinetic/Particle (MGP) computational method is proposed to simulate the plume-crater-interaction/dust-impingement(PCIDI) problem. The MGP method...

  3. Laser-Induced Emissions Sensor for Soot Mass in Rocket Plumes Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A method is proposed to measure soot mass concentration non-intrusively from a distance in a rocket engine exhaust stream during ground tests using laser-induced...

  4. Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Flight System Integration at Its Best

    Wood, T. David; Kanner, Howard S.; Freeland, Donna M.; Olson, Derek T.


    The Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) element integrates all the subsystems needed for ascent flight, entry, and recovery of the combined Booster and Motor system. These include the structures, avionics, thrust vector control, pyrotechnic, range safety, deceleration, thermal protection, and retrieval systems. This represents the only human-rated, recoverable and refurbishable solid rocket ever developed and flown. Challenges included subsystem integration, thermal environments and severe loads (including water impact), sometimes resulting in hardware attrition. Several of the subsystems evolved during the program through design changes. These included the thermal protection system, range safety system, parachute/recovery system, and others. Because the system was recovered, the SRB was ideal for data and imagery acquisition, which proved essential for understanding loads, environments and system response. The three main parachutes that lower the SRBs to the ocean are the largest parachutes ever designed, and the SRBs are the largest structures ever to be lowered by parachutes. SRB recovery from the ocean was a unique process and represented a significant operational challenge; requiring personnel, facilities, transportation, and ground support equipment. The SRB element achieved reliability via extensive system testing and checkout, redundancy management, and a thorough postflight assessment process. However, the in-flight data and postflight assessment process revealed the hardware was affected much more strongly than originally anticipated. Assembly and integration of the booster subsystems required acceptance testing of reused hardware components for each build. Extensive testing was done to assure hardware functionality at each level of stage integration. Because the booster element is recoverable, subsystems were available for inspection and testing postflight, unique to the Shuttle launch vehicle. Problems were noted and corrective actions were implemented as needed

  5. A Multiconstrained Ascent Guidance Method for Solid Rocket-Powered Launch Vehicles

    Si-Yuan Chen


    Full Text Available This study proposes a multiconstrained ascent guidance method for a solid rocket-powered launch vehicle, which uses a hypersonic glide vehicle (HGV as payload and shuts off by fuel exhaustion. First, pseudospectral method is used to analyze the two-stage launch vehicle ascent trajectory with different rocket ignition modes. Then, constraints, such as terminal height, velocity, flight path angle, and angle of attack, are converted into the constraints within height-time profile according to the second-stage rocket flight characteristics. The closed-loop guidance method is inferred by different spline curves given the different terminal constraints. Afterwards, a thrust bias energy management strategy is proposed to waste the excess energy of the solid rocket. Finally, the proposed method is verified through nominal and dispersion simulations. The simulation results show excellent applicability and robustness of this method, which can provide a valuable reference for the ascent guidance of solid rocket-powered launch vehicles.

  6. Solid Rocket Booster Hydraulic Pump Port Cap Joint Load Testing

    Gamwell, W. R.; Murphy, N. C.


    The solid rocket booster uses hydraulic pumps fabricated from cast C355 aluminum alloy, with 17-4 PH stainless steel pump port caps. Corrosion-resistant steel, MS51830 CA204L self-locking screw thread inserts are installed into C355 pump housings, with A286 stainless steel fasteners installed into the insert to secure the pump port cap to the housing. In the past, pump port cap fasteners were installed to a torque of 33 Nm (300 in-lb). However, the structural analyses used a significantly higher nut factor than indicated during tests conducted by Boeing Space Systems. When the torque values were reassessed using Boeing's nut factor, the fastener preload had a factor of safety of less than 1, with potential for overloading the joint. This paper describes how behavior was determined for a preloaded joint with a steel bolt threaded into steel inserts in aluminum parts. Finite element models were compared with test results. For all initial bolt preloads, bolt loads increased as external applied loads increased. For higher initial bolt preloads, less load was transferred into the bolt, due to external applied loading. Lower torque limits were established for pump port cap fasteners and additional limits were placed on insert axial deformation under operating conditions after seating the insert with an initial preload.

  7. NDE of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor field joint

    Johnston, Patrick H.

    One of the most critical areas for inspection in the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motors is the bond between the steel case and rubber insulation in the region of the field joints. The tang-and-clevis geometry of the field joints is sufficiently complex to prohibit the use of resonance-based techniques. One approach we are investigating is to interrogate the steel-insulation bondline in the tang and clevis regions using surface-travelling waves. A low-frequency contact surface wave transmitting array transducer is under development at our laboratory for this purpose. The array is placed in acoustic contact with the steel and surface waves are launched on the inside surface or the clevis leg which propagate along the steel-insulation interface. As these surface waves propagate along the bonded surface, the magnitude of the ultrasonic energy leaking into the steel is monitored on the outer surface of the case. Our working hypothesis is that the magnitude of energy received at the outer surface of the case is dependent upon the integrity of the case-insulation bond, with less attenuation for propagation along a disbond due to imperfect acoustic coupling between the steel and rubber. Measurements on test specimens indicate a linear relationship between received signal amplitude and the length of good bend between the transmitter and receiver, suggesting the validity of this working hypothesis.

  8. Viscoelastic Modelling of Solid Rocket Propellants using Maxwell Fluid Model

    Himanshu Shekhar


    Full Text Available Maxwell fluid model consisting of a spring and a dashpot in series is applied for viscoelastic characterisation of solid rocket propellants. Suitable values of spring constant and damping coefficient wereemployed by least square variation of errors for generation of complete stress-strain curve in uniaxial tensile mode for case-bonded solid propellant formulations. Propellants from the same lot were tested at different strain rates. It was observed that change in spring constant, representing elastic part was very small with strain rate but damping constant varies significantly with variation in strain rate. For a typical propellant formulation, when strain rate was raised from 0.00037/s to 0.185/s, spring constant K changed from 5.5 MPato 7.9 MPa, but damping coefficient D was reduced from 1400 MPa-s to 4 MPa-s. For all strain rates, stress-strain curve was generated using Maxwell model and close matching with actual test curve was observed.This indicates validity of Maxwell fluid model for uniaxial tensile testing curves of case-bonded solid propellant formulations. It was established that at higher strain rate, damping coefficient becomes negligible as compared to spring constant. It was also observed that variation of spring constant is logarithmic with strain rate and that of damping coefficient follows power law. The correlation coefficients were introduced to ascertain spring constants and damping coefficients at any strain rate from that at a reference strain rate. Correlationfor spring constant needs a coefficient H, which is function of propellant formulation alone and not of test conditions and the equation developeds K2 = K1 + H ´ ln{(de2/dt/(de1/dt}. Similarly for damping coefficient D also another constant S is introduced and prediction formula is given by D2 = D1 ´ {(de2/dt/(de1/dt}S.Evaluating constants H and S at different strain rates validate this mathematical formulation for differentpropellant formulations

  9. Shuttle Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor aluminum oxide investigations

    Blomshield, Fred S.; Kraeutle, Karl J.; Stalnaker, Richard A.


    During the launch of STS-54, a 15 psi pressure blip was observed in the ballistic pressure trace of one of the two Space Shuttle Redesigned Solid Rocket Motors (RSRM). One possible scenario for the observed pressure increase deals with aluminum oxide slag formation in the RSRM. The purpose of this investigation was to examine changes which may have occurred in the aluminum oxide formation in shuttle solid propellant due to changes in the ammonium perchlorate. Aluminum oxide formation from three propellants, all having the same formulation, but containing ammonium perchlorate from different manufacturers, will be compared. Three methods have been used to look for possible differences among the propellants. The first method was to examine window bomb movies of the propellants burning at 100, 300 and 600 psia. The motor operating pressure during the pressure blip was around 600 psia. The second method used small samples of propellant which were fired in a combustion bomb which quenched the burning aluminum particles soon after they left the propellant surface. The bomb was fired in both argon and Nitrogen atmospheres at various pressures. Products from this device were examined by optical microscopy. The third method used larger propellant samples fired into a particle collection device which allowed the aluminum to react and combust more completely. This device was pressurized with Nitrogen to motor operating pressures. The collected products were subdivided into size fractions by screening and sedimentation and analyzed optically with an optical microscope. the results from all three methods indicate very small changes in the size distribution of combustion products.

  10. Infrared radiation signature of exhaust plume from solid propellants with different energy characteristics

    Wang Weichen; Li Shipeng; Zhang Qiao; Wang Ningfei


    The infrared radiation signature of the plume from solid propellants with different energy characteristics is not the same.Three kinds of double-base propellants of different energy characteristics are chosen to measure the infrared spectral radiance from 1000cm-1 to 4500 cm-1 of their plumes.The radiative spectrum is obtained in the tests.The experimental results indicate that the infrared radiation of the plume is determined by the energy characteristics of the propellant.The radiative transfer calculation models of the exhaust plume for the solid propellants are established.By including the chemical reaction source term and the radiation source term into the energy equation,the plume field and the radiative transfer are solved in a coupled way.The calculated results are consistent with the experimental data,so the reliability of the models is confirmed.The temperature distribution and the extent of the afterburning of the plume are distinct for the propellants of different energy characteristics,therefore the plume radiation varies for different propellants.The temperature of the fluid cell in the plume will increase or decrease to some extent by the influence of the radiation term.

  11. Maturation of Structural Health Management Systems for Solid Rocket Motors Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Solid rocket motor cases are subject to a variety of external environmental and loading conditions from cradle-to-grave. These conditions can significantly impact...

  12. Electrets used in measuring rocket exhaust effluents from the space shuttle's solid rocket booster during static test firing, DM-3

    Susko, M.


    The purpose of this experimental research was to compare Marshall Space Flight Center's electrets with Thiokol's fixed flow air samplers during the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Demonstration Model-3 static test firing on October 19, 1978. The measurement of rocket exhaust effluents by Thiokol's samplers and MSFC's electrets indicated that the firing of the Solid Rocket Booster had no significant effect on the quality of the air sampled. The highest measurement by Thiokol's samplers was obtained at Plant 3 (site 11) approximately 8 km at a 113 degree heading from the static test stand. At sites 11, 12, and 5, Thiokol's fixed flow air samplers measured 0.0048, 0.00016, and 0.00012 mg/m3 of CI. Alongside the fixed flow measurements, the electret counts from X-ray spectroscopy were 685, 894, and 719 counts. After background corrections, the counts were 334, 543, and 368, or an average of 415 counts. An additional electred, E20, which was the only measurement device at a site approximately 20 km northeast from the test site where no power was available, obtained 901 counts. After background correction, the count was 550. Again this data indicate there was no measurement of significant rocket exhaust effluents at the test site.

  13. Ballistic anomalies in solid rocket motors due to migration effects

    Pröbster, M.; Schmucker, R. H.

    Double base and composite propellants are generally used for rocket motors, whereby double base propellants basically consist of nitrocellulose plasticized with an explosive plasticizer, mostly nitroglycerine, and in some cases with an additional inert plasticizer and ballistic additives. Composite propellants consist of an oxidizer like ammonium perchlorate and of aluminum, binder and plasticizer and often contain liquid or solid burning rate catalysts. A common feature of both propellants is that they contain smaller or larger amounts of chemically unbonded liquid species which tend to migrate. If these propellants loose part of the plasticizer by migration into the insulation layer, not only will there be a change in mechanical propellant properties but also the bond between propellant and insulation may degrade. However, depending on the severity of these effects, the change in the ballistic properties of the propellant grain caused by plasticizer migration may be of even more importance. In the past, most emphasis was placed on the behaviour of end-burning configurations. However, more recent theoretical and experimental studies revealed that not only for end-burning grain configurations but also for internal burning configurations there is a common effect which is responsible for ballistic anomalies: migration of liquid species from the propellant into the insulation. By using a plasticizer equilibrated insulation in an internal burning configuration the liquid species migration and thus the previously observed ballistic anomalies are avoided. Using this approach for end-burning configurations provides similar positive results. The various factors affecting plasticizer migration are studied and discussed, and several methods to prevent liquid species migration are described as well as methods to obtain plasticizer resistant insulations.

  14. Modeling of Heat Transfer and Ablation of Refractory Material Due to Rocket Plume Impingement

    Harris, Michael F.; Vu, Bruce T.


    CR Tech's Thermal Desktop-SINDA/FLUINT software was used in the thermal analysis of a flame deflector design for Launch Complex 39B at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The analysis of the flame deflector takes into account heat transfer due to plume impingement from expected vehicles to be launched at KSC. The heat flux from the plume was computed using computational fluid dynamics provided by Ames Research Center in Moffet Field, California. The results from the CFD solutions were mapped onto a 3-D Thermal Desktop model of the flame deflector using the boundary condition mapping capabilities in Thermal Desktop. The ablation subroutine in SINDA/FLUINT was then used to model the ablation of the refractory material.

  15. Numerical and experimental capabilities for studying rocket plume-regolith interactions

    White, C.; Scanlon, T. J.; Merrifield, J. A.; Kontis, K.; Langener, T.; Alves, J.


    Soft landings on extra-terrestrial airless bodies will be required for future sample return missions, such as the Phobos Sample Return (PhSR). PhSR is a candidate mission of ESA's Mars Robotic Exploration Preparation (MREP-2) Programme. Its main objective is to acquire and return a sample from the Martian moon Phobos, after a scientific characterisation phase of the moon and of the landing site. If a rocket is used to slow down the spacecraft to a vertical descent velocity that it will be able to free-fall from, care has to be taken to ensure that the rocket exhaust does not contaminate the surface regolith that is to be collected, and that the rocket does not cause unacceptable levels of erosion to the surface, which could jeopardise the mission. In addition to the work being done in the scope of PhSR, the European Space Agency is funding an experimental facility for investigating these nozzle expansion problems; the current progress of this is described. To support this work, an uncoupled hybrid computational fluid dynamics-direct simulation Monte Carlo method is developed and used to simulate the exhaust of a mono-propellant rocket above the surface of an airless body. The pressure, shear stress, and heat flux at the surface are compared to an analytical free-molecul solution to determine the altitude above which the free-molecular solution is suffcient for predicting these properties. The pressures match well as low as 15 m above the surface, but the heat flux and shear stress are not in agreement until an altitude of 40 m. A new adsorption/desorption boundary condition for the direct simulation Monte Carlo code has also been developed for future use in in-depth contamination studies.




    Full Text Available In this study, three dimensional modelling of extrusion forming of a double base solid rocket propellant is performed on Ansys® finite element simulation package. For the purpose of initial model construction and later comparisons with elastoviscoplastik model, the solid propellant is assumed to obey the elastic-plastic material response during the direct extrusion process. Taking into account the contact surface behavior with Coulomb friction and geometric and material nonlinearities, an incremental large large strain solution methodology has been adapted in the simulation. The hydrostatic pressure, stress, strain, and displacement values during extrusion of the solid rocket propellant are obtained from the simulation.

  17. Multi-Dimensional Combustion Instability Analysis of Solid Propellant Rocket Motors.


    RI D-R159 314 MULTI-DIMENSIONAL COMBUSTION INSTABLITY ANALYSIS OF 1/1 I SOLID PROPELLANT ROCK.. (U) ALABAMA UNIY IN HUNTSVILLE I DEPT OF MECHANICAL...STANDARDS MlICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART 0 0 0 03 V.%% f iSR.TR. 85-0567 NULTI-DIMNSIONAL COMBUSTION INSTABILITY ANALYSIS OF SOLID PROPELLANT ROCKET...analysis of solid propellant rocket motors. This research was motivated by the need for im- provement of the current practice in combustion instability

  18. Mathematical Modelling of In-Chamber Processes in Hydrocombined Propellant Solid Rocket Motors

    Nikolai A. Obukhov


    Full Text Available The special conditions of employment of commercial rockets in the sea environment has opened up new possibilities of improving motor performance. The interesting method suggests supplying water into the running motor. This paper reports the calculations and experiments carried out with solid propellant model setups. The results prove the validity of the proposed method and allow the refinement of calculation techniques for the prediction of solid rocket motor performance characteristics. The serviceability of the solid propellant charges working in combination with water is demonstrated. A mathematical model is proposed for the operation of a hydrocombined propellant motor with water and powdered additives applied to the combustion chamber."

  19. Analysis of reacting flowfields in low-thrust rocket engines and plumes

    Weiss, Jonathan Mitchell

    The mixing and combustion processes in small gaseous hydrogen-oxygen thrusters and plumes are studied by means of a computational model developed as a general purpose analytic procedure for solving low speed, reacting, internal flowfields. The model includes the full Navier-Stokes equations coupled with species diffusion equations for a hydrogen-oxygen reaction kinetics system as well as the option to use either the k-Epsilon or q-Omega low Reynolds number, two-equation turbulence models. Solution of the governing equations is accomplished by a finite-volume formulation with central-difference spatial discretizations and an explicit, four-stage, Runge Kutta time-integration procedure. The Runge-Kutta scheme appears to provide efficient convergence when applied to the calculation of turbulent, reacting flowfields in these small thrusters. Appropriate boundary conditions are developed to properly model propellant mass flowrates and regenerative wall cooling. The computational method is validated against measured engine performance parameters on a global level, as well as experimentally obtained exit plane and plume flowfield properties on a local level. The model does an excellent job of predicting the measured performance trends of an auxiliary thruster as a function of O/F ratio, although the performance levels are consistently underpredicted by approximately 4 percent. These differences arise because the extent to which the wall coolant layer and combustion gases mix and react is underpredicted. Predictions of velocity components, temperature and species number densities in the near-field plume regions of several low-thrust engines show reasonable agreement with experimental data obtained by two separate laser diagnostic techniques. Discrepancies between the predictions and measurements are primarily due to three-dimensional mixing processes which are not accounted for in the analysis. Both comparisons with experiment and the evident reason for errors in absolute

  20. Plasma-gas interactions studies in a hybrid plume plasma rocket

    Chang, F. R.; Krueger, W. A.; Yang, T. F.; Fisher, J. L.


    Plasma-gas interaction was investigated and the basic mechanisms for energy and particle transport. The solution approach assumes cylindrical geometry and includes a multiplicity of atomic reactions, and the presence of a strong magnetic field is described. The principal reactions are electron and ion impact ionization, and charge exchange between hot ions and cold neutrals. Radial particle and energy transport is mainly by diffusion. A modified Bohm diffusion model for plasma in the core of the plume, and classical neutral particle diffusion in the cooler regions of the flow are presented. Neutrals are allowed to free stream in the low density regions, where the collision mean-free-path becomes comparable, or even larger than the characteristic dimensions of the system.

  1. Prediction of engine and near-field plume reacting flows in low-thrust chemical rockets

    Weiss, Jonathan M.; Merkle, Charles L.


    A computational model is employed to study the reacting flow within the engine and near-field plumes of several small gaseous hydrogen-oxygen thrusters. The model solves the full Navier-Stokes equations coupled with species diffusion equations for a hydrogen-oxygen reaction kinetics system and includes a two-equation q-omega model for turbulence. Predictions of global performance parameters and localized flowfield variables are compared with experimental data in order to assess the accuracy with which these flowfields are modeled and to identify aspects of the model which require improvement. Predicted axial and radial velocities 3 mm downstream of the exit plane show reasonable agreement with the measurements. The predicted peak in axial velocity in the hydrogen film coolant along the nozzle wall shows the best agreement; however, predictions within the core region are roughly 15 percent below measured values, indicating an underprediction of the extent to which the hydrogen diffuses and mixes with the core flow. There is evidence that this is due to three-dimensional mixing processes which are not included in the axisymmetric model.

  2. Laser Transmission Measurements of Soot Extinction Coefficients in the Exhaust Plume of the X-34 60k-lb Thrust Fastrac Rocket Engine

    Dobson, C. C.; Eskridge, R. H.; Lee, M. H.


    A four-channel laser transmissometer has been used to probe the soot content of the exhaust plume of the X-34 60k-lb thrust Fastrac rocket engine at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The transmission measurements were made at an axial location about equal 1.65 nozzle diameters from the exit plane and are interpreted in terms of homogeneous radial zones to yield extinction coefficients from 0.5-8.4 per meter. The corresponding soot mass density, spatially averaged over the plume cross section, is, for Rayleigh particles, approximately equal to 0.7 micrograms/cubic cm and alternative particle distributions are briefly considered. Absolute plume radiance at the laser wavelength (515 nm) is estimated from the data at approximately equal to 2.200 K equivalent blackbody temperature, and temporal correlations in emission from several spatial locations are noted.

  3. Radiometric observations of the 752.033-GHz rotational absorption line of H2O from a laboratory jet. [simulation of rocket plumes

    Dionne, G. F.; Fitzgerald, J. F.; Chang, T.-S.; Fetterman, H. R.; Litvak, M. M.


    With the aid of a high-resolution two-stage heterodyne radiometer, spectral absorption measurements of the 752.033 GHz line of water vapor were carried out, using a blackbody continuum as a background radiation source for investigating the absorptive properties of the H2O content of high altitude rocket plumes. To simulate this physical situation in a laboratory environment, a small steam jet was operated within a large high-vacuum chamber, with the H2O jet plume traversing the radiometer line of sight. The experiments verified that this rotational line is optically thick, with excitation temperatures below 100 K, in the downstream part of the plume, as predicted by theoretical modelling.

  4. Investigation on plume interference effect of solid propellant micro-thruster

    ZHANG Bin; MAO Gen-wang; HU Song-qi; CHEN Mao-lin


    The three-dimensional numerical simulation of two-phase plume flow of solid propellant micro-thrusters was developed.Then it was used to investigate the plume interference effect by combining the direct simulation Monte Carlo(DSMC) method for multi-component gas flow with the two-way coupling model for two-phase rarefied flow.At different space between the two micro-thrusters and different wall temperature,the plume interference effect was analyzed specifically.The results show that under the plume interference effect the gas is compressed and the flow direction is changed,which resulted in the increasing of gas pressure and temperature;solid phase made no significant effect on the flow parameters of gas phase;with the rising of the space between the two micro-thrusters,the maximum pressure decreased and the maximum temperature increased in the domain under the plume interference effect;the wall temperature could influence the temperature of the gas which is extremely close to the wall,but not the gas pressure.

  5. Missile Plume Temperature Sensor and ARCAS Rocket VLF/LF Payload


    would be met. W,- A test run of the system was made using internal battery power and a dummy load in place of the antenna. The system operated for...also discovered that standard solid state transmitters for the " sonde " class of experiments were not readily available as off-the-shelf items. Most of...of the RCA models or the VIZ sonde transmitter. The VIZ unit is reputed to be quite reliable and provides more than ade- quate output power (300 mw

  6. Verification of Model of Calculation of Intra-Chamber Parameters In Hybrid Solid-Propellant Rocket Engines

    Zhukov Ilya S.


    Full Text Available On the basis of obtained analytical estimate of characteristics of hybrid solid-propellant rocket engine verification of earlier developed physical and mathematical model of processes in a hybrid solid-propellant rocket engine for quasi-steady-state flow regime was performed. Comparative analysis of calculated and analytical data indicated satisfactory comparability of simulation results.

  7. Verification of Model of Calculation of Intra-Chamber Parameters In Hybrid Solid-Propellant Rocket Engines

    Zhukov Ilya S.; Borisov Boris V.; Bondarchuk Sergey S.; Zhukov Alexander S.


    On the basis of obtained analytical estimate of characteristics of hybrid solid-propellant rocket engine verification of earlier developed physical and mathematical model of processes in a hybrid solid-propellant rocket engine for quasi-steady-state flow regime was performed. Comparative analysis of calculated and analytical data indicated satisfactory comparability of simulation results.

  8. Solid propellant processing factor in rocket motor design


    The ways are described by which propellant processing is affected by choices made in designing rocket engines. Tradeoff studies, design proof or scaleup studies, and special design features are presented that are required to obtain high product quality, and optimum processing costs. Processing is considered to include the operational steps involved with the lining and preparation of the motor case for the grain; the procurement of propellant raw materials; and propellant mixing, casting or extrusion, curing, machining, and finishing. The design criteria, recommended practices, and propellant formulations are included.

  9. Thermographic inspection of solid-fuel rocket booster field joint components

    Thompson, Karen G.; Crisman, Elton M.


    Thermographic nondestructive evaluation techniques were investigated for possible application on Space Shuttle solid rocket booster field joint hardware. This investigation included evaluation of the clevis and tang mating surfaces for scratches and measurement of grease film thickness. The field joint insulation system was inspected for voids and disbonds.

  10. Development of high temperature materials for solid propellant rocket nozzle applications

    Manning, C. R., Jr.; Lineback, L. D.


    Aspects of the development and characteristics of thermal shock resistant hafnia ceramic material for use in solid propellant rocket nozzles are presented. The investigation of thermal shock resistance factors for hafnia based composites, and the preparation and analysis of a model of elastic materials containing more than one crack are reported.

  11. Study of solid rocket motor for space shuttle booster, Volume 3: Program acquisition planning


    The program planning acquisition functions for the development of the solid propellant rocket engine for the space shuttle booster is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) program management, (2) contracts administration, (3) systems engineering, (4) configuration management, and (5) maintenance engineering. The plans for manufacturing, testing, and operations support are included.

  12. Research on Instantaneous Thrust Measurement for Attitude-control Solid Rocket Motor

    OUYANG Hua-bing; WANG Jian-ping; LIN Feng; XU Wen-gan


    In order to measure the instantaneous thrust of a certain attitude-control solid rocket motor, based on the analysis of the measurement principles, the difference between the instantaneous thrust and steady thrust measurements is pointed out. According to the measurement characteristics, a dynamic digital filter compensation method is presented. Combined the identification-modeling, dynamic compensation and simulation, the system's dynamic mathematic model is established. And then, a compensation digital filter is also designed. Thus, the dynamic response of the system is improved and the instantaneous thrust measurement can be implemented. The measurement results for the rocket motor show that the digital filter compensation is effective in the instantaneous thrust measurement.

  13. Draft environmental impact statement: Space Shuttle Advanced Solid Rocket Motor Program


    The proposed action is design, development, testing, and evaluation of Advanced Solid Rocket Motors (ASRM) to replace the motors currently used to launch the Space Shuttle. The proposed action includes design, construction, and operation of new government-owned, contractor-operated facilities for manufacturing and testing the ASRM's. The proposed action also includes transport of propellant-filled rocket motor segments from the manufacturing facility to the testing and launch sites and the return of used and/or refurbished segments to the manufacturing site.

  14. Modeling plasma plumes generated from laser solid interactions

    Wilks, Scott C.; Higginson, D. P.; Link, A. J.; Park, H.-S.; Ping, Y.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Ross, J. S.; Orban, C.; Hua, R.


    Laser pulses interacting with solid targets sitting in a vacuum form the basis for a large class of High Energy Density physics experiments. The resulting hydrodynamical evolution of the target during and after this interaction can be modeled using myriad techniques. These techniques range from pure particle-in-cell (PIC) to pure radiation-hydrodynamics, and include a large number of hybrid techniques in between. The particular method employed depends predominately on laser intensity. We compare and contrast several methods relevant for a large range of laser intensities (from Iλ2 1 ×1012W . μm2 /cm2 to Iλ2 1 ×1019W . μm2 /cm2) and energies (from E 100 mJ to E 100 kJ .) Density, temperature, and velocity profiles are benchmarked against recent experimental data. These experimental data include proton radiographs, time resolved x-ray images, and neutron yield and spectra. Methods to self-consistently handle backscatter and detailed energy deposition will also be discussed. LLNL-ABS-697767. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. 液体火箭发动机尾焰红外辐射计算方法%Calculation Method on Infrared Radiation of Liquid Rocket Exhaust Plume

    王大锐; 张楠; 葛明和


    针对液体火箭发动机尾焰红外辐射传输方程计算方法、气体辐射参数计算方法以及发动机尾焰红外辐射一体化数值计算研究进行归纳总结。提出发展适用性更广的尾焰红外辐射传输方程计算方法,建立气体光谱数据库及加快开展高精度的尾焰一体化计算研究。%The liquid rocket engine exhaust plume infrared radiation transfer equation calculation method, gas parameters of radiation calculation method and research on the integration numerical calculation of infrared radiation of engine exhaust plume are summarized. The author proposes to develop an exhaust plume infrared radiation transfer equation calculation method with more applicability, establish gas spectrum database and speed up research on the high precision integration calculation of exhaust plume.

  16. Combustion Stability Assessments of the Black Brant Solid Rocket Motor

    Fischbach, Sean


    The Black Brant variation of the Standard Brant developed in the 1960's has been a workhorse motor of the NASA Sounding Rocket Project Office (SRPO) since the 1970's. In March 2012, the Black Brant Mk1 used on mission 36.277 experienced combustion instability during a flight at White Sands Missile Range, the third event in the last four years, the first occurring in November, 2009, the second in April 2010. After the 2010 event the program has been increasing the motor's throat diameter post-delivery with the goal of lowering the chamber pressure and increasing the margin against combustion instability. During the most recent combustion instability event, the vibrations exceeded the qualification levels for the Flight Termination System. The present study utilizes data generated from T-burner testing of multiple Black Brant propellants at the Naval Air Warfare Center at China Lake, to improve the combustion stability predictions for the Black Brant Mk1 and to generate new predictions for the Mk2. Three unique one dimensional (1-D) stability models were generated, representing distinct Black Brant flights, two of which experienced instabilities. The individual models allowed for comparison of stability characteristics between various nozzle configurations. A long standing "rule of thumb" states that increased stability margin is gained by increasing the throat diameter. In contradiction to this experience based rule, the analysis shows that little or no margin is gained from a larger throat diameter. The present analysis demonstrates competing effects resulting from an increased throat diameter accompanying a large response function. As is expected, more acoustic energy was expelled through the nozzle, but conversely more acoustic energy was generated due to larger gas velocities near the propellant surfaces.

  17. Chemically Collapsible Mandrel for Solid Rocket Motor Processing

    Dey,Abhijit; Kumar, Arvind; Sikder,Arun K; Gupta, Manoj


    ABSTRACT: Composite propellant mainly consists of two parts, binder matrix (prepolymer, plasticizer, cross linker, antioxidant and curative etc.) and solid ingredients (oxidizer, metal fuel, burn rate modifier, combustion stabilizer etc.). Its processing involves several stages like ingredient preparation (grinding, 1.1 Hazard Division - 1.1 HD), mixing (1.1 HD), casting (1.1 HD), curing (1.3 HD) and extraction (1.3 HD). Each and every process is very hazardous. Removal of any of the mentione...

  18. U. S. Air Force approach to plume contamination

    Furstenau, Ronald P.; McCay, T. Dwayne; Mann, David M.


    Exhaust products from rocket engine firings can produce undesirable effects on sensitive satellite surfaces, such as optical systems, solar cells, and thermal control surfaces. The Air Force has an objective of minimizing the effect of rocket plume contamination on space-craft mission effectiveness. Plume contamination can result from solid rocket motors, liquid propellant engines, and electric thrusters. To solve the plume contamination problem, the Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory (AFRPL) has developed a plume contamination computer model which predicts the production, transport, and deposition of rocket exhaust products. In addition, an experimental data base is being obtained through ground-based vacuum chamber experiments and in-flight measurements with which to compare the analytical results. Finally, the experimental data is being used to verify and improve the analytical model. The plume contamination model, known as CONTAM, has been used to make contamination predictions for various engines. The experimental programs have yielded quantitative data, such as species concentrations and temperatures, in all regions of the plume. The result of the modelling and experimental programs will ultimately be computer models which can be used by the satellite designer to analyze and to minimize the effect plume contamination will have on a particular spacecraft system.

  19. Characterisation of Materials used in Flex Bearings of Large Solid Rocket Motors

    CH.V. Ram Mohan


    Full Text Available Solid rocket motors are propulsion devices for both satellite launchers and missiles, which require guidance and steering to fly along a programmed trajectory and to compensate for flight disturbances. A typical solid rocket motor consists of motor case, solid propellant grain, motor insulation, igniter and nozzle. In most solid rocket motors, thrust vector control (TVC is required. One of the most efficient methods of TVC is by flex nozzle system. The flex nozzle consists of a flexible bearing made of an elastomeric material alternating with reinforcement rings of metallic or composite material. The material characterisation of AFNOR 15CDV6 steel and the natural rubber-based elastomer developed for use in flex nozzle are discussed. This includes testing, modelling of the material, selection of a material model suitable for analysis, and the validation of material model.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(3, pp.264-269, DOI:

  20. Rocket Plume Burn Hazard.


    Directorate Command Projects 20 Systems Directorate 30 Sensors & Avionics Technology Directorate 40 Communication 6r Navigation Technology Directorate 50...the criterion for permissible flame contact as measured at the operational site of exposure. EXPERIENTAL PROCEDURES AND MATERIALS A synthesis of the...postulated from extrapolations of actual measurements (1) and computer analyses of combustion ingredients (W. Stone, NL, China Lake, personal communication

  1. Impact of the Surface Morphology on the Combustion of Simulated Solid Rocket Motor

    Abdelkarim M. Hegab


    Full Text Available An advanced and intensive computational solution development is integrated with an asymptotic technique, to examine the impact of the combustion surface morphology on the generated rotational flow field in a solid rocket chamber with wide ranges of forcing frequencies. The simulated rectangular chamber is closed at one end and is open at the aft end. The upper and lower walls are permeable to allow steady and unsteady injected air to generate internal flow mimicking the flow field of the combustion gases in real rocket chamber. The frequencies of the unsteady injected flow are chosen to be very close or away from the resonance frequencies of the adapted chamber. The current study accounts for a wide range of wave numbers that reflect the complexity of real burning processes. Detailed derivation for Navier-Stokes equations at the four boundaries of the chamber is introduced in the current study. Qualitative comparison is performed with recent experimental work carried out on a two-inch hybrid rocket motor using a mixture of polyethylene and aluminum powder. The higher the percentage of aluminum powder in the mixture, the more the corrugations of the combustion surface. This trend is almost similar to the computational and analytical results of a simulated solid rocket chamber.

  2. Estimation of Pressure Index and Temperature Sensitivity Coefficient of Solid Rocket Propellants by Static Evaluation

    Himanshu Shekhar


    Full Text Available Burning rate of a solid rocket propellant depends on pressure and temperature. Conventional strand burner and Crawford bomb test on propellant strands was conducted to assess these dependent parameters. However, behaviour of propellant in rocket motor is different from its behaviour in strand form. To overcome this anomaly, data from static evaluation of rocket motor was directly used for assessment of these burningrate controlling parameters. The conventional empirical power law (r=aoexp[p{T-To}]Pn was considered and a method was evolved for determination of pressure index (n and temperature sensitivity coefficient (p of burning rate for solid rocket propellants from static evaluation data. Effect of pressure index and temperature sensitivity coefficient on firing curve is also depicted. Propellant grain was fired in progressive mode to cover a very wide pressure range of 50 kg/cm2 to 250 kg/cm2 and propellant burning rate index was calculated to be 0.32 in the given pressure range. Propellant grain was fired at +35 °C and –20 °C temperatures and temperature sensitivity coefficient of burning rate was calculated to be 0.27 % per °C. Since both the values were evaluated from realised static evaluation curves, these are more realistic and accurate compared to data generated by conventional methods.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(6, pp.666-669, DOI:

  3. Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) for the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor

    Russell, D. L.; Blacklock, K.; Langhenry, M. T.


    The recertification of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) and Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) has included an extensive rewriting of the Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL). The evolution of the groundrules and methodology used in the analysis is discussed and compared to standard FMEA techniques. Especially highlighted are aspects of the FMEA/CIL which are unique to the analysis of an SRM. The criticality category definitions are presented and the rationale for assigning criticality is presented. The various data required by the CIL and contribution of this data to the retention rationale is also presented. As an example, the FMEA and CIL for the SRM nozzle assembly is discussed in detail. This highlights some of the difficulties associated with the analysis of a system with the unique mission requirements of the Space Shuttle.

  4. An improved heat transfer configuration for a solid-core nuclear thermal rocket engine

    Clark, John S.; Walton, James T.; Mcguire, Melissa L.


    Interrupted flow, impingement cooling, and axial power distribution are employed to enhance the heat-transfer configuration of a solid-core nuclear thermal rocket engine. Impingement cooling is introduced to increase the local heat-transfer coefficients between the reactor material and the coolants. Increased fuel loading is used at the inlet end of the reactor to enhance heat-transfer capability where the temperature differences are the greatest. A thermal-hydraulics computer program for an unfueled NERVA reactor core is employed to analyze the proposed configuration with attention given to uniform fuel loading, number of channels through the impingement wafers, fuel-element length, mass-flow rate, and wafer gap. The impingement wafer concept (IWC) is shown to have heat-transfer characteristics that are better than those of the NERVA-derived reactor at 2500 K. The IWC concept is argued to be an effective heat-transfer configuration for solid-core nuclear thermal rocket engines.

  5. Discrimination for ablative control mechanism in solid-propellant rocket nozzle


    The ablation in solid-propellant rocket nozzle is a coupling process resulted by chemistry, heat and mass transfer. Based on the heat and mass transfer theory, the aero-thermo-dynamic, and thermo-chemical kinetics, the thermal-chemical ablation model is established. Simulations are completed on the heat flow field and chemical ablation in the nozzle with different concentrations, frequency factors and activation energy of H2. The calculation results show that the concentration and the activation energy of H2 can provoke the transformation of control mechanism, whereas the influence brought by the frequency factor of H2 is feeble under a high-temperature and high-pressure combustion circumstance. The discrimination for ablative control mechanism is dependent on both concentration and activation energy of H2. This study will be useful in handling ablation and thermal protection problem in the design of solid-propellant rocket.

  6. Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics and Optimum Fracture Control Analytical Procedures for a Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Case

    Hanagud, S.; Uppaluri, B.


    A methodology for the reliability analysis of a reusable solid rocket motor case is discussed. The analysis is based on probabilistic fracture mechanics and probability distribution for initial flaw sizes. The developed reliability analysis is used to select the structural design variables of the solid rocket motor case on the basis of minimum expected cost and specified reliability bounds during the projected design life of the case. Effects of failure prevention plans such as nondestructive inspection and the material erosion between missions are also considered in the developed procedure for selection of design variables. The reliability-based procedure can be modified to consider other similar structures of reusable space vehicle systems with different failure prevention plans.

  7. Palynological Investigation of Post-Flight Solid Rocket Booster Foreign Material

    Nelson, Linda; Jarzen, David


    Investigations of foreign material in a drain tube, from the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) of a recent Space Shuttle mission, was identified as pollen. The source of the pollen is from deposits made by bees, collecting pollen from plants found at the Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida. The pollen is determined to have been present in the frustum drain tubes before the shuttle flight. During the flight the pollen did not undergo thermal maturation.

  8. Assessment of tbe Performance of Ablative Insulators Under Realistic Solid Rocket Motor Operating Conditions (a Doctoral Dissertation)

    Martin, Heath Thomas


    Ablative insulators are used in the interior surfaces of solid rocket motors to prevent the mechanical structure of the rocket from failing due to intense heating by the high-temperature solid-propellant combustion products. The complexity of the ablation process underscores the need for ablative material response data procured from a realistic solid rocket motor environment, where all of the potential contributions to material degradation are present and in their appropriate proportions. For this purpose, the present study examines ablative material behavior in a laboratory-scale solid rocket motor. The test apparatus includes a planar, two-dimensional flow channel in which flat ablative material samples are installed downstream of an aluminized solid propellant grain and imaged via real-time X-ray radiography. In this way, the in-situ transient thermal response of an ablator to all of the thermal, chemical, and mechanical erosion mechanisms present in a solid rocket environment can be observed and recorded. The ablative material is instrumented with multiple micro-thermocouples, so that in-depth temperature histories are known. Both total heat flux and thermal radiation flux gauges have been designed, fabricated, and tested to characterize the thermal environment to which the ablative material samples are exposed. These tests not only allow different ablative materials to be compared in a realistic solid rocket motor environment but also improve the understanding of the mechanisms that influence the erosion behavior of a given ablative material.

  9. Test and Analysis of Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Ablative Materials

    Clayton, J. Louie


    Asbestos free solid motor internal insulation samples were tested at the MSFC Hyperthermal Facility. Objectives of the test were to gather data for analog characterization of ablative and in-depth thermal performance of rubber materials subject to high enthalpy/pressure flow conditions. Tests were conducted over a range of convective heat fluxes for both inert and chemically reactive sub-sonic free stream gas flow. Instrumentation included use of total calorimeters, thermocouples, and a surface pyrometer for surface temperature measurement. Post-test sample forensics involved measurement of eroded depth, charred depth, total sample weight loss, and documentation of the general condition of the eroded profile. A complete Charring Material Ablator (CMA) style aero-thermal analysis was conducted for the test matrix and results compared to the measured data. In general, comparisons were possible for a number of the cases and the results show a limited predictive ability to model accurately both the ablative response and the in-depth temperature profiles. Lessons learned and modeling recommendations are made regarding future testing and modeling improvements that will increase understanding of the basic chemistry/physics associated with the complicated material ablation process of rubber materials.

  10. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor - Accomplishments, Lessons, and a Culture of Success

    Moore, Dennis R.; Phelps, Willie J.


    The Reusable Solid Rocket Motor represents the largest solid rocket motor ever flown and the only human rated solid motor. Each Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) provides approximately 3-million lb of thrust to lift the integrated Space Shuttle vehicle from the launch pad. The motors burn out approximately 2 minutes later, separate from the vehicle and are recovered and refurbished. The size of the motor and the need for high reliability were challenges. Thrust shaping, via shaping of the propellant grain, was needed to limit structural loads during ascent. The motor design evolved through several block upgrades to increase performance and to increase safety and reliability. A major redesign occurred after STS-51L with the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor. Significant improvements in the joint sealing systems were added. Design improvements continued throughout the Program via block changes with a number of innovations including development of low temperature o-ring materials and incorporation of a unique carbon fiber rope thermal barrier material. Recovery of the motors and post flight inspection improved understanding of hardware performance, and led to key design improvements. Because of the multidecade program duration material obsolescence was addressed, and requalification of materials and vendors was sometimes needed. Thermal protection systems and ablatives were used to protect the motor cases and nozzle structures. Significant understanding of design and manufacturing features of the ablatives was developed during the program resulting in optimization of design features and processing parameters. The project advanced technology in eliminating ozone-depleting materials in manufacturing processes and the development of an asbestos-free case insulation. Manufacturing processes for the large motor components were unique and safety in the manufacturing environment was a special concern. Transportation and handling approaches were also needed for the large

  11. Numerical Simulating Study on Rocket Base Plume Radiation Heating%火箭底部喷流辐射加热的数值模拟研究

    吕建伟; 刘欣; 洪文虎


    The thermal shield design for the base of rocket affects vehicle’s carrying capability directly. An accurate computation of rocket’s plume radiation is a crux of the thermal shield design. On the basis of finite volume method, a numerical computation concept that is used to calculate the thermal radiation of rocket’s plume on its base is proposed. This concept adopts finite volume method to solve the radiation transfer equation of high temperature mix gas, and develops a program applicable to plume radiation computation. To examine the reliability of the program, it has been validated and the results accord with those that were published in public reference. Finally, after a further computation of plume radiation, the change principles of radiation thermal flow density of various gas components are explored. The results indicates the crucial effects of rocket’s plume on base thermal environment. The study can be used as a practical guide for thermal shield design for base of rocket.%火箭底部防热结构设计直接关系其运载的能力,然而,如何准确计算火箭底部喷流辐射是其防热设计过程中的一个难点。提出一个基于有限体积法的火箭羽流对其底部热辐射的数值计算方案。在该方案中,采用有限体积法求解高温混合气体辐射传输方程,编制开发一个适用于计算火箭底部羽流辐射的程序。为了考察计算程序的可靠性,通过验证表明:计算结果与公开发表文献中的结果均符合很好。最后,进一步计算了发动机喷流对火箭底部热辐射,探讨气体成份各自辐射热流密度的变化规律,计算结果说明主要的火箭羽流组份对底部热环境的决定性影响,为火箭底部的防热设计提供依据。

  12. Laser transmittance measurement technology on plume from solid-propellant engine%固体发动机羽烟的激光透过率测试

    陈胜石; 宁子立; 欧秋晔; 陈文胜; 纪明; 高教波; 薛常佳


    为获得羽烟对激光透过率的影响,用烟箱法对2种配方的缩比发动机羽烟在1.06 μm、10.6 μm激光波段的透过率进行测试.采用1.064 μm激光调制发射、接收、数据采集系统对1.06 μm激光波段烟雾透过率测试;用黑体、光谱辐射计、数据采集系统可测出2 μm ~13 μm 的光学透过率,从中提出10.6 μm激光波段烟雾透过率,得到不同推进剂配方、不同烟雾浓度情况下10.6 μm光波和1.06 μm光波的烟雾透过率测试数据.烟箱1.8 m烟道上的测试数据表明:配方2推进剂优于配方1推进剂,10.6 μm光波的烟雾透过率96%~97%大于1.06 μm光波的烟雾透过率92%~93%.%The main performance of hyper-velocity kinetic missile and its solid propellants is described. The mechanism of laser attenuation caused by the plume of solid rocket motor is analyzed. The plume transmittance of two solid-propellant formulations was tested by the aid of a smoke-box when the laser wavebands were 1.06 μm and 10.6 μm. The plume transmittance in 1.06 μm laser was tested with 1.064 μm laser modulation emitting, receiving and data acqui-sition system. The plume transmittance of 10.6 μm laser was derived after the optical transmittance of 2 μm ~13 μm laser was tested with the blackbody radiation source, spectroradiometer and data acquisition system. The tested data indicates that formulation 2 is better than formulation 1, and the plume transmittance 96%~97% of 10.6 μm laser is higher than that 92%~93% of 1.06 μm laser.

  13. State Machine Modeling of the Space Launch System Solid Rocket Boosters

    Harris, Joshua A.; Patterson-Hine, Ann


    The Space Launch System is a Shuttle-derived heavy-lift vehicle currently in development to serve as NASA's premiere launch vehicle for space exploration. The Space Launch System is a multistage rocket with two Solid Rocket Boosters and multiple payloads, including the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle. Planned Space Launch System destinations include near-Earth asteroids, the Moon, Mars, and Lagrange points. The Space Launch System is a complex system with many subsystems, requiring considerable systems engineering and integration. To this end, state machine analysis offers a method to support engineering and operational e orts, identify and avert undesirable or potentially hazardous system states, and evaluate system requirements. Finite State Machines model a system as a finite number of states, with transitions between states controlled by state-based and event-based logic. State machines are a useful tool for understanding complex system behaviors and evaluating "what-if" scenarios. This work contributes to a state machine model of the Space Launch System developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The Space Launch System Solid Rocket Booster avionics and ignition subsystems are modeled using MATLAB/Stateflow software. This model is integrated into a larger model of Space Launch System avionics used for verification and validation of Space Launch System operating procedures and design requirements. This includes testing both nominal and o -nominal system states and command sequences.

  14. Thermo-Structural Response Caused by Structure Gap and Gap Design for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzles

    Lin Sun


    Full Text Available The thermo-structural response of solid rocket motor nozzles is widely investigated in the design of modern rockets, and many factors related to the material properties have been considered. However, little work has been done to evaluate the effects of structure gaps on the generation of flame leaks. In this paper, a numerical simulation was performed by the finite element method to study the thermo-structural response of a typical nozzle with consideration of the structure gap. Initial boundary conditions for thermo-structural simulation were defined by a quasi-1D model, and then coupled simulations of different gap size matching modes were conducted. It was found that frictional interface treatment could efficiently reduce the stress level. Based on the defined flame leak criteria, gap size optimization was carried out, and the best gap matching mode was determined for designing the nozzle. Testing experiment indicated that the simulation results from the proposed method agreed well with the experimental results. It is believed that the simulation method is effective for investigating thermo-structural responses, as well as designing proper gaps for solid rocket motor nozzles.

  15. Modal Survey of ETM-3, A 5-Segment Derivative of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster

    Nielsen, D.; Townsend, J.; Kappus, K.; Driskill, T.; Torres, I.; Parks, R.


    The complex interactions between internal motor generated pressure oscillations and motor structural vibration modes associated with the static test configuration of a Reusable Solid Rocket Motor have potential to generate significant dynamic thrust loads in the 5-segment configuration (Engineering Test Motor 3). Finite element model load predictions for worst-case conditions were generated based on extrapolation of a previously correlated 4-segment motor model. A modal survey was performed on the largest rocket motor to date, Engineering Test Motor #3 (ETM-3), to provide data for finite element model correlation and validation of model generated design loads. The modal survey preparation included pretest analyses to determine an efficient analysis set selection using the Effective Independence Method and test simulations to assure critical test stand component loads did not exceed design limits. Historical Reusable Solid Rocket Motor modal testing, ETM-3 test analysis model development and pre-test loads analyses, as well as test execution, and a comparison of results to pre-test predictions are discussed.

  16. Response of selected plant and insect species to simulated solid rocket exhaust mixtures and to exhaust components from solid rocket fuels

    Heck, W. W.; Knott, W. M.; Stahel, E. P.; Ambrose, J. T.; Mccrimmon, J. N.; Engle, M.; Romanow, L. A.; Sawyer, A. G.; Tyson, J. D.


    The effects of solid rocket fuel (SRF) exhaust on selected plant and and insect species in the Merritt Island, Florida area was investigated in order to determine if the exhaust clouds generated by shuttle launches would adversely affect the native, plants of the Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge, the citrus production, or the beekeeping industry of the island. Conditions were simulated in greenhouse exposure chambers and field chambers constructed to model the ideal continuous stirred tank reactor. A plant exposure system was developed for dispensing and monitoring the two major chemicals in SRF exhaust, HCl and Al203, and for dispensing and monitoring SRF exhaust (controlled fuel burns). Plants native to Merritt Island, Florida were grown and used as test species. Dose-response relationships were determined for short term exposure of selected plant species to HCl, Al203, and mixtures of the two to SRF exhaust.

  17. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor - Accomplishment, Lessons, and a Culture of Success

    Moore, D. R.; Phelps, W. J.


    The Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) represents the largest solid rocket motor (SRM) ever flown and the only human-rated solid motor. High reliability of the RSRM has been the result of challenges addressed and lessons learned. Advancements have resulted by applying attention to process control, testing, and postflight through timely and thorough communication in dealing with all issues. A structured and disciplined approach was taken to identify and disposition all concerns. Careful consideration and application of alternate opinions was embraced. Focus was placed on process control, ground test programs, and postflight assessment. Process control is mandatory for an SRM, because an acceptance test of the delivered product is not feasible. The RSRM maintained both full-scale and subscale test articles, which enabled continuous improvement of design and evaluation of process control and material behavior. Additionally RSRM reliability was achieved through attention to detail in post flight assessment to observe any shift in performance. The postflight analysis and inspections provided invaluable reliability data as it enables observation of actual flight performance, most of which would not be available if the motors were not recovered. RSRM reusability offered unique opportunities to learn about the hardware. NASA is moving forward with the Space Launch System that incorporates propulsion systems that takes advantage of the heritage Shuttle and Ares solid motor programs. These unique challenges, features of the RSRM, materials and manufacturing issues, and design improvements will be discussed in the paper.

  18. Mechanical characterization of composite solid rocket propellant based on hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene

    Gligorijević Nikola I.


    Full Text Available This paper presents the procedure of uniaxial mechanical characterization of composite solid rocket propellant based on hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB, whose mechanical properties strongly depend on temperature, strain rate, natural aging and accumulated damage. A method of processing data is presented in order to determine time-temperature shift factor and master curves for tensile strength, ultimate strain and relaxation modulus, depending on reduced time. Functional dependences of these features represent an input for structural analysis of a rocket motor propellant grain. The effects of natural aging on the mechanical properties are also considered. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 36050: Research and development of unmanned aircraft in support of traffic infrastructure monitoring

  19. Structural and mechanical design challenges of space shuttle solid rocket boosters separation and recovery subsystems

    Woodis, W. R.; Runkle, R. E.


    The design of the space shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB) subsystems for reuse posed some unique and challenging design considerations. The separation of the SRBs from the cluster (orbiter and external tank) at 150,000 ft when the orbiter engines are running at full thrust meant the two SRBs had to have positive separation forces pushing them away. At the same instant, the large attachments that had reacted launch loads of 7.5 million pounds thrust had to be servered. These design considerations dictated the design requirements for the pyrotechnics and separation rocket motors. The recovery and reuse of the two SRBs meant they had to be safely lowered to the ocean, remain afloat, and be owed back to shore. In general, both the pyrotechnic and recovery subsystems have met or exceeded design requirements. In twelve vehicles, there has only been one instance where the pyrotechnic system has failed to function properly.

  20. Range safety signal propagation through the SRM exhaust plume of the space shuttle

    Boynton, F. P.; Davies, A. R.; Rajasekhar, P. S.; Thompson, J. A.


    Theoretical predictions of plume interference for the space shuttle range safety system by solid rocket booster exhaust plumes are reported. The signal propagation was calculated using a split operator technique based upon the Fresnel-Kirchoff integral, using fast Fourier transforms to evaluate the convolution and treating the plume as a series of absorbing and phase-changing screens. Talanov's lens transformation was applied to reduce aliasing problems caused by ray divergence.

  1. Rocket noise - A review

    McInerny, S. A.


    This paper reviews what is known about far-field rocket noise from the controlled studies of the late 1950s and 1960s and from launch data. The peak dimensionless frequency, the dependence of overall sound power on exhaust parameters, and the directivity of the overall sound power of rockets are compared to those of subsonic jets and turbo-jets. The location of the dominant sound source in the rocket exhaust plume and the mean flow velocity in this region are discussed and shown to provide a qualitative explanation for the low peak Strouhal number, fD(e)/V(e), and large angle of maximum directivity. Lastly, two empirical prediction methods are compared with data from launches of a Titan family vehicle (two, solid rocket motors of 5.7 x 10 to the 6th N thrust each) and the Saturn V (five, liquid oxygen/rocket propellant engines of 6.7 x 10 to the 6th N thrust, each). The agreement is favorable. In contrast, these methods appear to overpredict the far-field sound pressure levels generated by the Space Shuttle.

  2. Internal Flow Analysis of Large L/D Solid Rocket Motors

    Laubacher, Brian A.


    Traditionally, Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) internal ballistic performance has been analyzed and predicted with either zero-dimensional (volume filling) codes or one-dimensional ballistics codes. One dimensional simulation of SRM performance is only necessary for ignition modeling, or for motors that have large length to port diameter ratios which exhibit an axial "pressure drop" during the early burn times. This type of prediction works quite well for many types of motors, however, when motor aspect ratios get large, and port to throat ratios get closer to one, two dimensional effects can become significant. The initial propellant grain configuration for the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) was analyzed with 2-D, steady, axi-symmetric computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The results of the CFD analysis show that the steady-state performance prediction at the initial burn geometry, in general, agrees well with 1-D transient prediction results at an early time, however, significant features of the 2-D flow are captured with the CFD results that would otherwise go unnoticed. Capturing these subtle differences gives a greater confidence to modeling accuracy, and additional insight with which to model secondary internal flow effects like erosive burning. Detailed analysis of the 2-D flowfield has led to the discovery of its hidden 1-D isentropic behavior, and provided the means for a thorough and simplified understanding of internal solid rocket motor flow. Performance parameters such as nozzle stagnation pressure, static pressure drop, characteristic velocity, thrust and specific impulse are discussed in detail and compared for different modeling and prediction methods. The predicted performance using both the 1-D codes and the CFD results are compared with measured data obtained from static tests of the RSRM. The differences and limitations of predictions using ID and 2-D flow fields are discussed and some suggestions for the design of large L/D motors and

  3. Coupled Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Solid Rocket Motor with Flexible Inhibitors

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff; Harris, Robert E.


    Flexible inhibitors are generally used in solid rocket motors (SRMs) as a means to control the burning of propellant. Vortices generated by the flow of propellant around the flexible inhibitors have been identified as a driving source of instabilities that can lead to thrust oscillations in launch vehicles. Potential coupling between the SRM thrust oscillations and structural vibration modes is an important risk factor in launch vehicle design. As a means to predict and better understand these phenomena, a multidisciplinary simulation capability that couples the NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with CFDRC's structural finite element code, CoBi, has been developed. This capability is crucial to the development of NASA's new space launch system (SLS). This paper summarizes the efforts in applying the coupled software to demonstrate and investigate fluid-structure interaction (FSI) phenomena between pressure waves and flexible inhibitors inside reusable solid rocket motors (RSRMs). The features of the fluid and structural solvers are described in detail, and the coupling methodology and interfacial continuity requirements are then presented in a general Eulerian-Lagrangian framework. The simulations presented herein utilize production level CFD with hybrid RANS/LES turbulence modeling and grid resolution in excess of 80 million cells. The fluid domain in the SRM is discretized using a general mixed polyhedral unstructured mesh, while full 3D shell elements are utilized in the structural domain for the flexible inhibitors. Verifications against analytical solutions for a structural model under a steady uniform pressure condition and under dynamic modal analysis show excellent agreement in terms of displacement distribution and eigenmode frequencies. The preliminary coupled results indicate that due to acoustic coupling, the dynamics of one of the more flexible inhibitors shift from its first modal frequency to the first acoustic frequency of the solid rocket motor

  4. Development of Terahertz Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostics for a Solid Rocket Exhaust Plume


    traveled by microwaves from transmitter 35  16. Sphere configuration (A) Single and (B) Double 36  xi Distribution A: Approved for public release...relatively low power sources have been developed. One of the most prominent environments for application is in space. Many interstellar particles emit...are created by using explosive emission cathodes. They have durations less than nanoseconds per pulse. A gyro- traveling - wave-tube (TWT) mechanism

  5. Diagnostic Methods for Particle Property Measurements in Solid Rocket Motor Plumes


    IN~RD AISLES v ] ~ & l13RIt~ KIP 04m.T "~ F~U~,’JJm) RATIo OF FORMARD SCATTER CROSS SECTI0~IS AT TM’O DIFFERENT AI;G1,ES 7. I ~ r i ~ r . ~ r...16. 17. Menzel, R., "Approximate Closed Form Solution to the Error Function," Am. J. Phys. 43 (1975). Thorn , L. B.,, presented at the

  6. Ignition of Liquid Fuel Spray and Simulated Solid Rocket Fuel by Photoignition of Carbon Nanotube Utilizing a Camera Flash


    Badakhshan A1 , Danczyk S. A.2, Wirth D.3 and Pilon L. 3 Abstract We have studied the ignition of fuel sprays and simulated solid rocket fuels (SRF...photoignition of solid oxidizer/CNT mixtures exposed to a flash of light. The flash source was a commercial studio flash lamp with a rated maximum

  7. Numerical and experimental study of liquid breakup process in solid rocket motor nozzle

    Yen, Yi-Hsin

    Rocket propulsion is an important travel method for space exploration and national defense, rockets needs to be able to withstand wide range of operation environment and also stable and precise enough to carry sophisticated payload into orbit, those engineering requirement makes rocket becomes one of the state of the art industry. The rocket family have been classified into two major group of liquid and solid rocket based on the fuel phase of liquid or solid state. The solid rocket has the advantages of simple working mechanism, less maintenance and preparing procedure and higher storage safety, those characters of solid rocket make it becomes popular in aerospace industry. Aluminum based propellant is widely used in solid rocket motor (SRM) industry due to its avalibility, combusion performance and economical fuel option, however after aluminum react with oxidant of amonimum perchrate (AP), it will generate liquid phase alumina (Al2O3) as product in high temperature (2,700˜3,000 K) combustion chamber enviornment. The liquid phase alumina particles aggromorate inside combustion chamber into larger particle which becomes major erosion calprit on inner nozzle wall while alumina aggromorates impinge on the nozzle wall surface. The erosion mechanism result nozzle throat material removal, increase the performance optimized throat diameter and reduce nozzle exit to throat area ratio which leads to the reduction of exhaust gas velocity, Mach number and lower the propulsion thrust force. The approach to avoid particle erosion phenomenon taking place in SRM's nozzle is to reduce the alumina particle size inside combustion chamber which could be done by further breakup of the alumina droplet size in SRM's combustion chamber. The study of liquid breakup mechanism is an important means to smaller combustion chamber alumina droplet size and mitigate the erosion tack place on rocket nozzle region. In this study, a straight two phase air-water flow channel experiment is set up

  8. Navier-Stokes analysis of solid propellant rocket motor internal flows

    Sabnis, J. S.; Gibeling, H. J.; Mcdonald, H.


    A multidimensional implicit Navier-Stokes analysis that uses numerical solution of the ensemble-averaged Navier-Stokes equations in a nonorthogonal, body-fitted, cylindrical coordinate system has been applied to the simulation of the steady mean flow in solid propellant rocket motor chambers. The calculation procedure incorporates a two-equation (k-epsilon) turbulence model and utilizes a consistently split, linearized block-implicit algorithm for numerical solution of the governing equations. The code was validated by comparing computed results with the experimental data obtained in cylindrical-port cold-flow tests. The agreement between the computed and experimentally measured mean axial velocities is excellent. The axial location of transition to turbulent flow predicted by the two-equation (k-epsilon) turbulence model used in the computations also agrees well with the experimental data. Computations performed to simulate the axisymmetric flowfield in the vicinity of the aft field joint in the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor using 14,725 grid points show the presence of a region of reversed axial flow near the downstream edge of the slot.

  9. Navier-Stokes analysis of solid propellant rocket motor internal flows

    Sabnis, J. S.; Gibeling, H. J.; Mcdonald, H.


    A multidimensional implicit Navier-Stokes analysis that uses numerical solution of the ensemble-averaged Navier-Stokes equations in a nonorthogonal, body-fitted, cylindrical coordinate system has been applied to the simulation of the steady mean flow in solid propellant rocket motor chambers. The calculation procedure incorporates a two-equation (k-epsilon) turbulence model and utilizes a consistently split, linearized block-implicit algorithm for numerical solution of the governing equations. The code was validated by comparing computed results with the experimental data obtained in cylindrical-port cold-flow tests. The agreement between the computed and experimentally measured mean axial velocities is excellent. The axial location of transition to turbulent flow predicted by the two-equation (k-epsilon) turbulence model used in the computations also agrees well with the experimental data. Computations performed to simulate the axisymmetric flowfield in the vicinity of the aft field joint in the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor using 14,725 grid points show the presence of a region of reversed axial flow near the downstream edge of the slot.

  10. Internal Ballistic Code for Solid Rocket Motors using Minimum Distance Function for Grain Burnback

    Afroz Javed


    Full Text Available A computer code has been developed for internal ballistic performance evaluation of solid rocket motors, using minimum distance function (MDF approach for prediction of geometry evolution. This method can handle any complex geometry without the need to define different geometrical shapes and their evolution as used in several existing analytical geometry evolution-based methodologies. The code is validated with both experimental results published in literature, as well as for solid rocket motors of tactical and strategic missiles and a very good match is obtained with static test results. The output of the code gives p-t (pressure-time curve as well as the detailed parameters of the flow along the axial direction, and geometries in the form of mesh file, which can be further used as input to codes for CFD analysis.Defence Science Journal, Vol. 65, No. 3, May 2015, pp.181-188, DOI:

  11. A Coupled Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Solid Rocket Motor with Flexible Inhibitors

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff


    A capability to couple NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with CFDRC's structural finite element code, CoBi, has been developed. This paper summarizes the efforts in applying the installed coupling software to demonstrate/investigate fluid-structure interaction (FSI) between pressure wave and flexible inhibitor inside reusable solid rocket motor (RSRM). First a unified governing equation for both fluid and structure is presented, then an Eulerian-Lagrangian framework is described to satisfy the interfacial continuity requirements. The features of fluid solver, Loci/CHEM and structural solver, CoBi, are discussed before the coupling methodology of the solvers is described. The simulation uses production level CFD LES turbulence model with a grid resolution of 80 million cells. The flexible inhibitor is modeled with full 3D shell elements. Verifications against analytical solutions of structural model under steady uniform pressure condition and under dynamic condition of modal analysis show excellent agreements in terms of displacement distribution and eigen modal frequencies. The preliminary coupled result shows that due to acoustic coupling, the dynamics of one of the more flexible inhibitors shift from its first modal frequency to the first acoustic frequency of the solid rocket motor.

  12. Coupled Solid Rocket Motor Ballistics and Trajectory Modeling for Higher Fidelity Launch Vehicle Design

    Ables, Brett


    Multi-stage launch vehicles with solid rocket motors (SRMs) face design optimization challenges, especially when the mission scope changes frequently. Significant performance benefits can be realized if the solid rocket motors are optimized to the changing requirements. While SRMs represent a fixed performance at launch, rapid design iterations enable flexibility at design time, yielding significant performance gains. The streamlining and integration of SRM design and analysis can be achieved with improved analysis tools. While powerful and versatile, the Solid Performance Program (SPP) is not conducive to rapid design iteration. Performing a design iteration with SPP and a trajectory solver is a labor intensive process. To enable a better workflow, SPP, the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST), and the interfaces between them have been improved and automated, and a graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed. The GUI enables real-time visual feedback of grain and nozzle design inputs, enforces parameter dependencies, removes redundancies, and simplifies manipulation of SPP and POST's numerous options. Automating the analysis also simplifies batch analyses and trade studies. Finally, the GUI provides post-processing, visualization, and comparison of results. Wrapping legacy high-fidelity analysis codes with modern software provides the improved interface necessary to enable rapid coupled SRM ballistics and vehicle trajectory analysis. Low cost trade studies demonstrate the sensitivities of flight performance metrics to propulsion characteristics. Incorporating high fidelity analysis from SPP into vehicle design reduces performance margins and improves reliability. By flying an SRM designed with the same assumptions as the rest of the vehicle, accurate comparisons can be made between competing architectures. In summary, this flexible workflow is a critical component to designing a versatile launch vehicle model that can accommodate a volatile

  13. Formulation and Testing of Paraffin-Based Solid Fuels Containing Energetic Additives for Hybrid Rockets

    Larson, Daniel B.; Boyer, Eric; Wachs,Trevor; Kuo, Kenneth K.; Story, George


    Many approaches have been considered in an effort to improve the regression rate of solid fuels for hybrid rocket applications. One promising method is to use a fuel with a fast burning rate such as paraffin wax; however, additional performance increases to the fuel regression rate are necessary to make the fuel a viable candidate to replace current launch propulsion systems. The addition of energetic and/or nano-sized particles is one way to increase mass-burning rates of the solid fuels and increase the overall performance of the hybrid rocket motor.1,2 Several paraffin-based fuel grains with various energetic additives (e.g., lithium aluminum hydride (LiAlH4) have been cast in an attempt to improve regression rates. There are two major advantages to introducing LiAlH4 additive into the solid fuel matrix: 1) the increased characteristic velocity, 2) decreased dependency of Isp on oxidizer-to-fuel ratio. The testing and characterization of these solid-fuel grains have shown that continued work is necessary to eliminate unburned/unreacted fuel in downstream sections of the test apparatus.3 Changes to the fuel matrix include higher melting point wax and smaller energetic additive particles. The reduction in particle size through various methods can result in more homogeneous grain structure. The higher melting point wax can serve to reduce the melt-layer thickness, allowing the LiAlH4 particles to react closer to the burning surface, thus increasing the heat feedback rate and fuel regression rate. In addition to the formulation of LiAlH4 and paraffin wax solid-fuel grains, liquid additives of triethylaluminum and diisobutylaluminum hydride will be included in this study. Another promising fuel formulation consideration is to incorporate a small percentage of RDX as an additive to paraffin. A novel casting technique will be used by dissolving RDX in a solvent to crystallize the energetic additive. After dissolving the RDX in a solvent chosen for its compatibility

  14. Indirect and direct methods for measuring a dynamic throat diameter in a solid rocket motor

    Colbaugh, Lauren

    In a solid rocket motor, nozzle throat erosion is dictated by propellant composition, throat material properties, and operating conditions. Throat erosion has a significant effect on motor performance, so it must be accurately characterized to produce a good motor design. In order to correlate throat erosion rate to other parameters, it is first necessary to know what the throat diameter is throughout a motor burn. Thus, an indirect method and a direct method for determining throat diameter in a solid rocket motor are investigated in this thesis. The indirect method looks at the use of pressure and thrust data to solve for throat diameter as a function of time. The indirect method's proof of concept was shown by the good agreement between the ballistics model and the test data from a static motor firing. The ballistics model was within 10% of all measured and calculated performance parameters (e.g. average pressure, specific impulse, maximum thrust, etc.) for tests with throat erosion and within 6% of all measured and calculated performance parameters for tests without throat erosion. The direct method involves the use of x-rays to directly observe a simulated nozzle throat erode in a dynamic environment; this is achieved with a dynamic calibration standard. An image processing algorithm is developed for extracting the diameter dimensions from the x-ray intensity digital images. Static and dynamic tests were conducted. The measured diameter was compared to the known diameter in the calibration standard. All dynamic test results were within +6% / -7% of the actual diameter. Part of the edge detection method consists of dividing the entire x-ray image by an average pixel value, calculated from a set of pixels in the x-ray image. It was found that the accuracy of the edge detection method depends upon the selection of the average pixel value area and subsequently the average pixel value. An average pixel value sensitivity analysis is presented. Both the indirect

  15. Advanced Multi-Phase Flow CFD Model Development for Solid Rocket Motor Flowfield Analysis

    Liaw, Paul; Chen, Y. S.; Shang, H. M.; Doran, Denise


    It is known that the simulations of solid rocket motor internal flow field with AL-based propellants require complex multi-phase turbulent flow model. The objective of this study is to develop an advanced particulate multi-phase flow model which includes the effects of particle dynamics, chemical reaction and hot gas flow turbulence. The inclusion of particle agglomeration, particle/gas reaction and mass transfer, particle collision, coalescence and breakup mechanisms in modeling the particle dynamics will allow the proposed model to realistically simulate the flowfield inside a solid rocket motor. The Finite Difference Navier-Stokes numerical code FDNS is used to simulate the steady-state multi-phase particulate flow field for a 3-zone 2-D axisymmetric ASRM model and a 6-zone 3-D ASRM model at launch conditions. The 2-D model includes aft-end cavity and submerged nozzle. The 3-D model represents the whole ASRM geometry, including additional grain port area in the gas cavity and two inhibitors. FDNS is a pressure based finite difference Navier-Stokes flow solver with time-accurate adaptive second-order upwind schemes, standard and extended k-epsilon models with compressibility corrections, multi zone body-fitted formulations, and turbulence particle interaction model. Eulerian/Lagrangian multi-phase solution method is applied for multi-zone mesh. To simulate the chemical reaction, penalty function corrected efficient finite-rate chemistry integration method is used in FDNS. For the AL particle combustion rate, the Hermsen correlation is employed. To simulate the turbulent dispersion of particles, the Gaussian probability distribution with standard deviation equal to (2k/3)(exp 1/2) is used for the random turbulent velocity components. The computational results reveal that the flow field near the juncture of aft-end cavity and the submerged nozzle is very complex. The effects of the turbulent particles affect the flow field significantly and provide better

  16. Introduction to rocket science and engineering

    Taylor, Travis S


    What Are Rockets? The History of RocketsRockets of the Modern EraRocket Anatomy and NomenclatureWhy Are Rockets Needed? Missions and PayloadsTrajectoriesOrbitsOrbit Changes and ManeuversBallistic Missile TrajectoriesHow Do Rockets Work? ThrustSpecific ImpulseWeight Flow RateTsiolkovsky's Rocket EquationStagingRocket Dynamics, Guidance, and ControlHow Do Rocket Engines Work? The Basic Rocket EngineThermodynamic Expansion and the Rocket NozzleExit VelocityRocket Engine Area Ratio and LengthsRocket Engine Design ExampleAre All Rockets the Same? Solid Rocket EnginesLiquid Propellant Rocket Engines

  17. Regarding the evaluation of the solid rocket propellant response function to pressure coupling

    Ioan ION


    Full Text Available High frequency combustion instabilities imply a major risk for the solid rocket motor stableworking and they are directly linked to the propellant response to chamber pressure coupling. Thisarticle discusses a laboratory testing method for the measurement and evaluation of the pressurecoupled response for non-metalized propellants in a first stage. Experimental researches were donewith an adequate setup, built and improved in our lab, able to evaluate the propellant response byinterpreting the pressure oscillations damping in terms of propellant response. Our paper aims atdefining a linearized one-dimensional flow study model to analyze the disturbed operation of the solidpropellant rocket motors. Based on the applied model we can assert that the real part of propellantresponse is a function of the oscillations damping, acoustic energy in the motor chamber and variouslosses in the burning chamber. The imaginary part of propellant response mainly depends on thenormalized pulsation, on the burning chamber gas column and on the pressure oscillations frequency.Our research purpose was obviously to minimize the risk of the combustion instabilities effects on therocket motors working, by experimental investigations using jet modulating techniques and sustainedby an interesting study model based on the perturbation method.

  18. Convective Heat Transfer in the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor of the Space Transportation System

    Ahmad, Rashid A.; Cash, Stephen F. (Technical Monitor)


    This simulation involved a two-dimensional axisymmetric model of a full motor initial grain of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) of the Space Transportation System (STS). It was conducted with CFD (computational fluid dynamics) commercial code FLUENT. This analysis was performed to: a) maintain continuity with most related previous analyses, b) serve as a non-vectored baseline for any three-dimensional vectored nozzles, c) provide a relatively simple application and checkout for various CFD solution schemes, grid sensitivity studies, turbulence modeling and heat transfer, and d) calculate nozzle convective heat transfer coefficients. The accuracy of the present results and the selection of the numerical schemes and turbulence models were based on matching the rocket ballistic predictions of mass flow rate, head end pressure, vacuum thrust and specific impulse, and measured chamber pressure drop. Matching these ballistic predictions was found to be good. This study was limited to convective heat transfer and the results compared favorably with existing theory. On the other hand, qualitative comparison with backed-out data of the ratio of the convective heat transfer coefficient to the specific heat at constant pressure was made in a relative manner. This backed-out data was devised to match nozzle erosion that was a result of heat transfer (convective, radiative and conductive), chemical (transpirating), and mechanical (shear and particle impingement forces) effects combined.

  19. Pressure oscillations and instability of working processes in the combustion chambers of solid rocket motors

    Emelyanov, V. N.; Teterina, I. V.; Volkov, K. N.; Garkushev, A. U.


    Metal particles are widely used in space engineering to increase specific impulse and to supress acoustic instability of intra-champber processes. A numerical analysis of the internal injection-driven turbulent gas-particle flows is performed to improve the current understanding and modeling capabilities of the complex flow characteristics in the combustion chambers of solid rocket motors (SRMs) in presence of forced pressure oscillations. The two-phase flow is simulated with a combined Eulerian-Lagrangian approach. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and transport equations of k - ε model are solved numerically for the gas. The particulate phase is simulated through a Lagrangian deterministic and stochastic tracking models to provide particle trajectories and particle concentration. The results obtained highlight the crucial significance of the particle dispersion in turbulent flowfield and high potential of statistical methods. Strong coupling between acoustic oscillations, vortical motion, turbulent fluctuations and particle dynamics is observed.

  20. Optimization of the stand for test of hybrid rocket engines of solid fuel

    Zolotorev Nikolay


    Full Text Available In the paper the laboratory experimental stand of the hybrid rocket engine of solid fuel to study ballistic parameters of the engine at burning of high-energy materials in flow of hot gas is presented. Mixture of air with nitrogen with a specified content of active oxygen is used as a gaseous oxidizer. The experimental stand has modular design and consists of system of gas supply, system of heating of gas, system for monitoring gas parameters, to which a load cell with a model engine was connected. The modular design of the stand allows to change its configuration under specific objective. This experimental stand allows to conduct a wide range of the pilot studies at interaction of a hot stream of gas with samples high-energy materials.

  1. Multisized Inert Particle Loading for Solid Rocket Axial Combustion Instability Suppression

    David R. Greatrix


    Full Text Available In the present investigation, various factors and trends, related to the usage of two or more sets of inert particles comprised of the same material (nominally aluminum but at different diameters for the suppression of axial shock wave development, are numerically predicted for a composite-propellant cylindrical-grain solid rocket motor. The limit pressure wave magnitudes at a later reference time in a given pulsed firing simulation run are collected for a series of runs at different particle sizes and loading distributions and mapped onto corresponding attenuation trend charts. The inert particles’ presence in the central core flow is demonstrated to be an effective means of instability symptom suppression, in correlating with past experimental successes in the usage of particles. However, the predicted results of this study suggest that one needs to be careful when selecting more than one size of particle for a given motor application.

  2. New discrimination method for ablative control mechanism in solid-propellant rocket nozzle


    A reasonable discrimination method for ablative control mechanism in solid-propellant rocket nozzle can improve the calculation accuracy of ablation rate. Based on the different rate constants for reactions of C with H2O and CO2,a new discrimination method for ablative control mechanism,which comprehensively considers the influence of nozzle surface temperature and gas component concentration,is presented. Using this new discrimination method,calculations were performed to simulate the nozzle throat insert ablation. The numerical results showed that the calculated ablation rate,which was more close to the measured values,was less than the value calculated by diffusion control mechanisms or by double control mechanisms. And H2O was proved to be the most detrimental oxidizing species in nozzle ablation.

  3. Numerical techniques for solving nonlinear instability problems in smokeless tactical solid rocket motors. [finite difference technique

    Baum, J. D.; Levine, J. N.


    The selection of a satisfactory numerical method for calculating the propagation of steep fronted shock life waveforms in a solid rocket motor combustion chamber is discussed. A number of different numerical schemes were evaluated by comparing the results obtained for three problems: the shock tube problems; the linear wave equation, and nonlinear wave propagation in a closed tube. The most promising method--a combination of the Lax-Wendroff, Hybrid and Artificial Compression techniques, was incorporated into an existing nonlinear instability program. The capability of the modified program to treat steep fronted wave instabilities in low smoke tactical motors was verified by solving a number of motor test cases with disturbance amplitudes as high as 80% of the mean pressure.

  4. Scale Effects on Quasi-Steady Solid Rocket Internal Ballistic Behaviour

    David R. Greatrix


    Full Text Available The ability to predict with some accuracy a given solid rocket motor’s performance before undertaking one or several costly experimental test firings is important. On the numerical prediction side, as various component models evolve, their incorporation into an overall internal ballistics simulation program allows for new motor firing simulations to take place, which in turn allows for updated comparisons to experimental firing data. In the present investigation, utilizing an updated simulation program, the focus is on quasi-steady performance analysis and scale effects (influence of motor size. The predicted effects of negative/positive erosive burning and propellant/casing deflection, as tied to motor size, on a reference cylindrical-grain motor’s internal ballistics, are included in this evaluation. Propellant deflection has only a minor influence on the reference motor’s internal ballistics, regardless of motor size. Erosive burning, on the other hand, is distinctly affected by motor scale.

  5. Alternate propellants for the space shuttle solid rocket booster motors. [for reducing environmental impact of launches


    As part of the Shuttle Exhaust Effects Panel (SEEP) program for fiscal year 1973, a limited study was performed to determine the feasibility of minimizing the environmental impact associated with the operation of the solid rocket booster motors (SRBMs) in projected space shuttle launches. Eleven hypothetical and two existing limited-experience propellants were evaluated as possible alternates to a well-proven state-of-the-art reference propellant with respect to reducing emissions of primary concern: namely, hydrogen chloride (HCl) and aluminum oxide (Al2O3). The study showed that it would be possible to develop a new propellant to effect a considerable reduction of HCl or Al2O3 emissions. At the one extreme, a 23% reduction of HCl is possible along with a ll% reduction in Al2O3, whereas, at the other extreme, a 75% reduction of Al2O3 is possible, but with a resultant 5% increase in HCl.

  6. Numerical Simulation of a Dual Pulse Solid Rocket Motor Flow Field

    Afroz Javed


    Full Text Available Numerical simulations are carried out for the internal flow field of a dual pulse solid rocket motor port to understand the flow behaviour. Three dimensional Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations are solved alongwith shear stress transport turbulence model using commercial code. The combustion gas is assumed as a mixture of alumina and gases and single phase flow calculations are done with the thermo chemical properties provided for the mixture. The simulation captures all the essential features of the flow field. The flow accelerates through the pulse separation device (PSD port and high temperature and high velocity gas is seen to impinge the motor wall near the PSD port. The overall total pressure drop through motor port and through PSD is found to be moderate.Defence Science Journal, 2012, 62(6, pp.369-374, DOI:

  7. Preliminary design and optimization of slotted tube grain for solid rocket motor


    In this paper,design and optimization technique of slotted tube grain for solid rocket motors has been discussed.In doing so,the design objectives and constraints have been set,geometric parameters identified,performance prediction parameters calculated,thereafter preliminary designs completed and finally optimal design reached.Geometric model for slotted tube grain configuration has been developed.Average thrust has been taken as the objective function with constraints of burning time,mass of propellant,fixed length and diameter of chamber case.Lumped parameter method has been used for calculating the performance prediction parameters.A set of preliminary designs has been completed and an analysis of these results conducted.Although all the preliminary results fulfill the design requirements in terms of objective function and constraints,however in order tO attain the optimal design,Sequen-tial quadratic programming optimization technique has been adopted.As the slotted tube grain ge-ometry is totally dependent upon various independent variables and each of these variables has a bearing on explicit characteristic of grain designing,hence affects of the independent variables on performance parameters have been examined,thus variation laws have been developed.Basing on the variation laws and the analysis of preliminary design results,upper and lower limits have been defined for the independent geometric variables and an initial guess provided for conducting optimi-zation.Resuhs attained exhibits that an optimal result has been attained and the value of objective function has been maximized.All the design constraint limits have also been met while ensuring sound values of volumetric loading fraction,web fraction and neutrality.This methodology of design and optimization of slotted tube grain for solid rocket motors can be used by engineers as a reference guide for actual design and engineering purposes.

  8. Flight Investigation of the Performance of a Two-stage Solid-propellant Nike-deacon (DAN) Meteorological Sounding Rocket

    Heitkotter, Robert H


    A flight investigation of two Nike-Deacon (DAN) two-stage solid-propellant rocket vehicles indicated satisfactory performance may be expected from the DAN meteorological sounding rocket. Peak altitudes of 356,000 and 350,000 feet, respectively, were recorded for the two flight tests when both vehicles were launched from sea level at an elevation angle of 75 degrees. Performance calculations based on flight-test results show that altitudes between 358,000 feet and 487,000 feet may be attained with payloads varying between 60 pounds and 10 pounds.

  9. Evaluation of Solid Rocket Motor Component Data Using a Commercially Available Statistical Software Package

    Stefanski, Philip L.


    Commercially available software packages today allow users to quickly perform the routine evaluations of (1) descriptive statistics to numerically and graphically summarize both sample and population data, (2) inferential statistics that draws conclusions about a given population from samples taken of it, (3) probability determinations that can be used to generate estimates of reliability allowables, and finally (4) the setup of designed experiments and analysis of their data to identify significant material and process characteristics for application in both product manufacturing and performance enhancement. This paper presents examples of analysis and experimental design work that has been conducted using Statgraphics®(Registered Trademark) statistical software to obtain useful information with regard to solid rocket motor propellants and internal insulation material. Data were obtained from a number of programs (Shuttle, Constellation, and Space Launch System) and sources that include solid propellant burn rate strands, tensile specimens, sub-scale test motors, full-scale operational motors, rubber insulation specimens, and sub-scale rubber insulation analog samples. Besides facilitating the experimental design process to yield meaningful results, statistical software has demonstrated its ability to quickly perform complex data analyses and yield significant findings that might otherwise have gone unnoticed. One caveat to these successes is that useful results not only derive from the inherent power of the software package, but also from the skill and understanding of the data analyst.

  10. Arc Jet Test and Analysis of Asbestos Free Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Dome Ablative Materials

    Clayton, J. Louie


    Asbestos free solid motor internal insulation samples were recently tested at the MSFC Hyperthermal Arc Jet Facility. Objectives of the test were to gather data for solid rocket motor analog characterization of ablative and in-depth thermal performance of rubber materials subject to high enthalpy/pressure flow conditions. Tests were conducted over a range of convective heat fluxes for both inert and chemically reactive sub-sonic free stream gas flow. Active instrumentation included use of total calorimeters, in-depth thermocouples, and a surface pyrometer for in-situ surface temperature measurement. Post-test sample forensics involved determination of eroded depth, charred depth, total sample weight loss, and documentation of the general condition of the eroded profile. A complete Charring Material Ablator (CMA) style aero thermal analysis was conducted for the test matrix and results compared to the measured data. In general, comparisons were possible for a number of the cases and the results show a limited predictive ability to model accurately both the ablative response and the in-depth temperature profiles. Lessons learned and modeling recommendations are made regarding future testing and modeling improvements that will increase understanding of the basic chemistry/physics associated with the complicated material ablation process of rubber materials.

  11. Solid-propellant rocket motor internal ballistic performance variation analysis, phase 2

    Sforzini, R. H.; Foster, W. A., Jr.


    The Monte Carlo method was used to investigate thrust imbalance and its first time derivative throughtout the burning time of pairs of solid rocket motors firing in parallel. Results obtained compare favorably with Titan 3 C flight performance data. Statistical correlations of the thrust imbalance at various times with corresponding nominal trace slopes suggest several alternative methods of predicting thrust imbalance. The effect of circular-perforated grain deformation on internal ballistics is discussed, and a modified design analysis computer program which permits such an evaluation is presented. Comparisons with SRM firings indicate that grain deformation may account for a portion of the so-called scale factor on burning rate between large motors and strand burners or small ballistic test motors. Thermoelastic effects on burning rate are also investigated. Burning surface temperature is calculated by coupling the solid phase energy equation containing a strain rate term with a model of gas phase combustion zone using the Zeldovich-Novozhilov technique. Comparisons of solutions with and without the strain rate term indicate a small but possibly significant effect of the thermoelastic coupling.

  12. Studies on Stress-Strain Curves of Aged Composite Solid Rocket Propellants

    Himanshu Shekhar


    Full Text Available Mechanical property evaluation of composite solid rocket propellants is used as a quick quality control tool for propellant development and production. However, stress-strain curves from uni-axial tensile testing can be utilised to assess the shelf-life of propellants also. Composite propellants (CP of two varieties cartridge-loaded (CLCP and case-bonded (CBCP are utilized in rocket and missile applications. Both classes of propellants were evaluated for mechanical properties namely tensile strength, modulus and percentage elongation using specimens conforming to ASTM D638 type IV at different ageing time. Both classes of propellants show almost identical variation in various mechanical properties with time. Tensile strength increases with time for both classes of propellants and percentage elongation reduces. Initial modulus is also found to decrease with time. Tensile strength is taken as degradation criteria and it is observed that CLCP has slower degradation rate than CBCP. This is because of two facts–(i higher initial tensile strength of CLCP (1.39 MPa compared to CBCP (0.665 MPa and (ii lower degradation rate of CLCP (0.0014 MPa/day with respect to CBCP (0.0025 MPa/day. For the studied composite propellants, a degradation criterion in the form of percentage change in tensile strength is evaluated and shelf life for different degradation criteria is tabulated for quick reference.Defence Science Journal, 2012, 62(2, pp.90-94, DOI:

  13. Three-dimensional Numerical Study of Impactive Flowfield of Liquid Rocket Exhaust Plume while Space Launching%航天发射火箭尾焰冲击流场三维数值研究

    宋华; 蔡体敏; 李彬


    航天发射时火箭燃烧尾焰冲击干扰效应对发射稳定性和发射架、导流槽等地面设施有重要影响.采用压力隐式算子分裂算法,通过求解Navier-Stokes方程,对火箭外流场、发动机燃烧室内与尾焰流场进行了一体化三维数值计算.得到了火箭发射后尾焰与地面撞击产生的冲击流场.结果表明:尾焰流场计算模型、方法与结果合理;尾焰冲击干扰效应会大幅提高地面附近的压力和温度.火箭尾焰撞击地面后,高温区出现在离地面一定距离的高温层内,此时地面附近为低速区.尾焰对其正下面的地面区域产生冲击最大,主要干扰区域集中于半径为15 m的圆形区域.%The impactive and interferential effect of rocket combustion exhaust plume has important influence on launching stability and ground equipments including of rocket launcher and flow channel. Basing on PISO algorithm , three-dimensional numerical simulation both of plume flow field of hydrogen-oxygen liquid rocket and outside flow field of rocket is conducted by^olving Navier-Stokes equation. The impactive flow field while exhaust plume is impacting ground is obtained. The results show that the physical model, numerical method and flow field data herein are reasonable. The pressure and temperature increase greatly because of the impactive and interferential effect of plume. During impacting ground, plume has a high temperature zone appearing in a high temperature level near ground while the velocity in this zone is lower. The most impactive and interferential effect appears in ground area under exhaust plume, and the main interferential zone is focus on a round area with a radius of 15 m.

  14. Potential Climate and Ozone Impacts From Hybrid Rocket Engine Emissions

    Ross, M.


    Hybrid rocket engines that use N2O as an oxidizer and a solid hydrocarbon (such as rubber) as a fuel are relatively new. Little is known about the composition of such hybrid engine emissions. General principles and visual inspection of hybrid plumes suggest significant soot and possibly NO emissions. Understanding hybrid rocket emissions is important because of the possibility that a fleet of hybrid powered suborbital rockets will be flying on the order of 1000 flights per year by 2020. The annual stratospheric emission for these rockets would be about 10 kilotons, equal to present day solid rocket motor (SRM) emissions. We present a preliminary analysis of the magnitude of (1) the radiative forcing from soot emissions and (2) the ozone depletion from soot and NO emissions associated with such a fleet of suborbital hybrid rockets. Because the details of the composition of hybrid emissions are unknown, it is not clear if the ozone depletion caused by these hybrid rockets would be more or less than the ozone depletion from SRMs. We also consider the climate implications associated with the N2O production and use requirements for hybrid rockets. Finally, we identify the most important data collection and modeling needs that are required to reliably assess the complete range of environmental impacts of a fleet of hybrid rockets.

  15. Flow Simulation of Solid Rocket Motors. 2; Sub-Scale Air Flow Simulation of Port Flows

    Yeh, Y. P.; Ramandran, N.; Smith, A. W.; Heaman, J. P.


    The injection-flow issuing from a porous medium in the cold-flow simulation of internal port flows in solid rocket motors is characterized by a spatial instability termed pseudoturbulence that produces a rather non-uniform (lumpy) injection-velocity profile. The objective of this study is to investigate the interaction between the injection- and the developing axial-flows. The findings show that this interaction generally weakens the lumpy injection profile and affects the subsequent development of the axial flow. The injection profile is found to depend on the material characteristics, and the ensuing pseudoturbulence is a function of the injection velocity, the axial position and the distance from the porous wall. The flow transition (from laminar to turbulent) of the axial-flow is accelerated in flows emerging from smaller pores primarily due to the higher pseudoturbulence produced by the smaller pores in comparison to that associated with larger pores. In flows with rather uniform injection-flow profiles (weak or no pseudoturbulence), the axial and transverse velocity components in the porous duct are found to satisfy the sine/cosine analytical solutions derived from inviscid assumptions. The transition results from the present study are compared with previous results from surveyed literature, and detailed flow development measurements are presented in terms of the blowing fraction, and characterizing Reynolds numbers.

  16. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor - V(RSRMV)Nozzle Forward Nose Ring Thermo-Structural Modeling

    Clayton, J. Louie


    During the developmental static fire program for NASAs Reusable Solid Rocket Motor-V (RSRMV), an anomalous erosion condition appeared on the nozzle Carbon Cloth Phenolic nose ring that had not been observed in the space shuttle RSRM program. There were regions of augmented erosion located on the bottom of the forward nose ring (FNR) that measured nine tenths of an inch deeper than the surrounding material. Estimates of heating conditions for the RSRMV nozzle based on limited char and erosion data indicate that the total heat loading into the FNR, for the new five segment motor, is about 40-50% higher than the baseline shuttle RSRM nozzle FNR. Fault tree analysis of the augmented erosion condition has lead to a focus on a thermomechanical response of the material that is outside the existing experience base of shuttle CCP materials for this application. This paper provides a sensitivity study of the CCP material thermo-structural response subject to the design constraints and heating conditions unique to the RSRMV Forward Nose Ring application. Modeling techniques are based on 1-D thermal and porous media calculations where in-depth interlaminar loading conditions are calculated and compared to known capabilities at elevated temperatures. Parameters such as heat rate, in-depth pressures and temperature, degree of char, associated with initiation of the mechanical removal process are quantified and compared to a baseline thermo-chemical material removal mode. Conclusions regarding postulated material loss mechanisms are offered.

  17. Design and optimization of solid rocket motor Finocyl grain using simulated annealing

    Ali Kamran; LIANG Guo-zhu


    The research effort outlined the application of a computer aided design (CAD)-centric technique to the design and optimization of solid rocket motor Finocyl (fin in cylinder) grain using simulated annealing.The proper method for constructing the grain configuration model, ballistic performance and optimizer integration for analysis was presented. Finoeyl is a complex grain configuration, requiring thirteen variables to define the geometry. The large number of variables not only complicates the geometrical construction but also optimization process. CAD representation encapsulates all of the geometric entities pertinent to the grain design in a parametric way, allowing manipulation of grain entity (web), performing regression and automating geometrical data calculations. Robustness to avoid local minima and efficient capacity to explore design space makes simulated annealing an attractive choice as optimizer. It is demonstrated with a constrained optimization of Finocyl grain geometry for homogeneous, isotropic propellant, uniform regression, and a quasi-steady, bulk mode internal ballistics model that maximizes average thrust for required deviations from neutrality.

  18. Analysis of pressure blips in aft-finocyl solid rocket motor

    Di Giacinto, M.; Favini, B.; Cavallini, E.


    Ballistic anomalies have frequently occurred during the firing of several solid rocket motors (SRMs) (Inertial Upper Stage, Space Shuttle Redesigned SRM (RSRM) and Titan IV SRM Upgrade (SRMU)), producing even relevant and unexpected variations of the SRM pressure trace from its nominal profile. This paper has the purpose to provide a numerical analysis of the following possible causes of ballistic anomalies in SRMs: an inert object discharge, a slag ejection, and an unexpected increase in the propellant burning rate or in the combustion surface. The SRM configuration under investigation is an aft-finocyl SRM with a first-stage/small booster design. The numerical simulations are performed with a quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) unsteady model of the SRM internal ballistics, properly tailored to model each possible cause of the ballistic anomalies. The results have shown that a classification based on the head-end pressure (HEP) signature, relating each other the HEP shape and the ballistic anomaly cause, can be made. For each cause of ballistic anomalies, a deepened discussion of the parameters driving the HEP signatures is provided, as well as qualitative and quantitative assessments of the resultant pressure signals.

  19. Solid propellant rocket motor internal ballistics performance variation analysis, phase 3

    Sforzini, R. H.; Foster, W. A., Jr.; Murph, J. E.; Adams, G. W., Jr.


    Results of research aimed at improving the predictability of off nominal internal ballistics performance of solid propellant rocket motors (SRMs) including thrust imbalance between two SRMs firing in parallel are reported. The potential effects of nozzle throat erosion on internal ballistic performance were studied and a propellant burning rate low postulated. The propellant burning rate model when coupled with the grain deformation model permits an excellent match between theoretical results and test data for the Titan IIIC, TU455.02, and the first Space Shuttle SRM (DM-1). Analysis of star grain deformation using an experimental model and a finite element model shows the star grain deformation effects for the Space Shuttle to be small in comparison to those of the circular perforated grain. An alternative technique was developed for predicting thrust imbalance without recourse to the Monte Carlo computer program. A scaling relationship used to relate theoretical results to test results may be applied to the alternative technique of predicting thrust imbalance or to the Monte Carlo evaluation. Extended investigation into the effect of strain rate on propellant burning rate leads to the conclusion that the thermoelastic effect is generally negligible for both steadily increasing pressure loads and oscillatory loads.

  20. Study of plasticizer diffusion in a solid rocket motor´s bondline

    Juliano Libardi


    Full Text Available This work aims to determine the diffusion coefficient of the plasticizers dibutyl phthalate (DBP, dioctyl phthalate (DOP and dioctyl azelate (DOZ on the internal insulating layer of solid rocket motors. These plasticizers are originally present in the layers of rubber, liner and propellant, respectively. This species are not chemically bonded and tend to diffuse from propellant to insulating and vice versa. A computer program based on the mathematical model of Fick’s second Law of diffusion was developed to perform the calculus from the concentration data obtained by gas chromatographic (GC analyses. The samples were prepared with two different adhesive liners; one conventional (LHNA and the other with barrier properties (LHNT. A common feature of both liners was that they were synthesized by the reaction of hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB and diisocyanates. However, a bond promoter was used to increase the crosslink density of the LHNT liner and to improve its performance as barrier against the diffusion. The effects of the diffusion of the plasticizers were also investigated by hardness analyses, which were executed on samples aged at room temperature and at 80ºC. The results showed an increase trend for the samples aged at room temperature and an opposite behavior for the tests carried out at 80ºC.

  1. Numerical Evaluation of the Use of Aluminum Particles for Enhancing Solid Rocket Motor Combustion Stability

    David Greatrix


    Full Text Available The ability to predict the expected internal behaviour of a given solid-propellant rocket motor under transient conditions is important. Research towards predicting and quantifying undesirable transient axial combustion instability symptoms typically necessitates a comprehensive numerical model for internal ballistic simulation under dynamic flow and combustion conditions. On the mitigation side, one in practice sees the use of inert or reactive particles for the suppression of pressure wave development in the motor chamber flow. With the focus of the present study placed on reactive particles, a numerical internal ballistic model incorporating relevant elements, such as a transient, frequency-dependent combustion response to axial pressure wave activity above the burning propellant surface, is applied to the investigation of using aluminum particles within the central internal flow (particles whose surfaces nominally regress with time, as a function of current particle size, as they move downstream as a means of suppressing instability-related symptoms in a cylindrical-grain motor. The results of this investigation reveal that the loading percentage and starting size of the aluminum particles have a significant influence on reducing the resulting transient pressure wave magnitude.

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Combustion Instability in Solid Rocket Motor : Implementation of Pressure Coupled Response Function

    S. Saha


    Full Text Available Combustion instability in solid propellant rocket motor is numerically simulated by implementing propellant response function with quasi steady homogeneous one dimensional formulation. The convolution integral of propellant response with pressure history is implemented through a user defined function in commercial computational fluid dynamics software. The methodology is validated against literature reported motor test and other simulation results. Computed amplitude of pressure fluctuations compare closely with the literarture data. The growth rate of pressure oscillations of a cylindrical grain solid rocket motor is determined for different response functions at the fundamental longitudinal frequency. It is observed that for response function more than a critical value, the motor exhibits exponential growth rate of pressure oscillations.

  3. Experimental determination of the particle sizes in a subscale motor for application to the Ariane 5 solid rocket booster

    Traineau, J. C.; Kuentzmann, P.; Prevost, M.; Tarrin, P.; Delfour, A.

    The knowledge of the aluminum oxide particle size distribution inside the combustion chamber of a solid propellant rocket motor is an important factor for assessing the combustion stability or the slag mass accumulation in the motor. A representative subscale motor for the Ariane 5 P230 Solid Rocket Booster (SRB), in which helium is injected to quench the condensed phase reactions, has been designed and manufactured. Its use for combustion stability purpose has given the aluminum oxide particle size distribution in conditions representative of the actual Ariane 5 SRB. The experimental techniques, optical and particle capturing, have been found to give results in good agreement. A stretched distribution, with particles ranging from 1 micron to 120 microns and a maximum around 45 microns, has been demonstrated.

  4. Vibration, acoustic, and shock design and test criteria for components on the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB), Lightweight External Tank (LWT), and Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME)


    The vibration, acoustics, and shock design and test criteria for components and subassemblies on the space shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB), lightweight tank (LWT), and main engines (SSME) are presented. Specifications for transportation, handling, and acceptance testing are also provided.

  5. Reusable rocket engine optical condition monitoring

    Wyett, L.; Maram, J.; Barkhoudarian, S.; Reinert, J.


    Plume emission spectrometry and optical leak detection are described as two new applications of optical techniques to reusable rocket engine condition monitoring. Plume spectrometry has been used with laboratory flames and reusable rocket engines to characterize both the nominal combustion spectra and anomalous spectra of contaminants burning in these plumes. Holographic interferometry has been used to identify leaks and quantify leak rates from reusable rocket engine joints and welds.

  6. Asbestos Free Insulation Development for the Space Shuttle Solid Propellant Rocket Motor (RSRM)

    Allred, Larry D.; Eddy, Norman F.; McCool, A. A. (Technical Monitor)


    Asbestos has been used for many years as an ablation inhibitor in insulating materials. It has been a constituent of the AS/NBR insulation used to protect the steel case of the RSRM (Reusable Solid Rocket Motor) since its inception. This paper discusses the development of a potential replacement RSRM insulation design, several of the numerous design issues that were worked and processing problems that were resolved. The earlier design demonstration on FSM-5 (Flight Support Motor) of the selected 7% and 11% Kevlar(registered) filled EPDM (KF/EPDM) candidate materials was expanded. Full-scale process simulation articles were built and FSM-8 was manufactured using multiple Asbestos Free (AF) components and materials. Two major problems had to be overcome in developing the AF design. First, bondline corrosion, which occurred in the double-cured region of the aft dome, had to be eliminated. Second, KF/EPDM creates high levels of electrostatic energy (ESE), which does not readily dissipate from the insulation surface. An uncontrolled electrostatic discharge (ESD) of this surface energy during many phases of production could create serious safety hazards. Numerous processing changes were implemented and a conductive paint was developed to prevent exposed external insulation surfaces from generating ESE/ESD. Additionally, special internal instrumentation was incorporated into FSM-8 to record real-time internal motor environment data. These data included inhibitor insulation erosion rates and internal thermal environments. The FSM-8 static test was successfully conducted in February 2000 and much valuable data were obtained to characterize the AF insulation design.

  7. Lidar measurements of launch vehicle exhaust plumes

    Dao, Phan D.; Curtis, David; Farley, Robert; Soletsky, Philip; Davidson, Gilbert; Gelbwachs, Jerry A.


    The Mobile Lidar Trailer (MLT) was developed and operated to characterize launch vehicle exhaust plume and its effects on the environment. Two recent applications of this facility are discussed in this paper. In the first application, the MLT was used to characterize plumes in the stratosphere up to 45 km in support of the Air Force Space and Missile Center's Rocket Impact on Stratospheric Ozone program. Solid rocket motors used by Titan IV and other heavy launch vehicles release large quantities of gaseous hydrochloric acid in the exhaust and cause concerns about a possible depletion of the ozone layer. The MLT was deployed to Cape Canaveral Air Station since October 1995 to monitor ozone and to investigate plume dynamics and properties. Six campaigns have been conducted and more are planned to provide unique data with the objective of addressing the environmental issues. The plume was observed to disperse rapidly into horizontally extended yet surprisingly thin layer with thickness recorded in over 700 lidar profiles to be less than 250 meters. MLT operates with the laser wavelengths of 532, 355 and 308 nm and a scanning receiving telescope. Data on particle backscattering at the three wavelengths suggest a consistent growth of particle size in the 2-3 hour observation sessions following the launch. In the second type of application, the MLT was used as a remote sensor of nitrogen dioxide, a caustic gaseous by-product of common liquid propellant oxidizer. Two campaigns were conducted at the Sol Se Mete Canyon test site in New Mexico in December 1996 an January 1997 to study the dispersion of nitrogen dioxide and rocket plume.

  8. Experimental determination of convective heat transfer coefficients in the separated flow region of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor

    Whitesides, R. Harold; Majumdar, Alok K.; Jenkins, Susan L.; Bacchus, David L.


    A series of cold flow heat transfer tests was conducted with a 7.5-percent scale model of the Space Shuttle Rocket Motor (SRM) to measure the heat transfer coefficients in the separated flow region around the nose of the submerged nozzle. Modifications were made to an existing 7.5 percent scale model of the internal geometry of the aft end of the SRM, including the gimballed nozzle in order to accomplish the measurements. The model nozzle nose was fitted with a stainless steel shell with numerous thermocouples welded to the backside of the thin wall. A transient 'thin skin' experimental technique was used to measure the local heat transfer coefficients. The effects of Reynolds number, nozzle gimbal angle, and model location were correlated with a Stanton number versus Reynolds number correlation which may be used to determine the convective heating rates for the full scale Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor nozzle.

  9. Hybrid Rocket Technology

    Sankaran Venugopal; K K Rajesh; V Ramanujachari


    With their unique operational characteristics, hybrid rockets can potentially provide safer, lower-cost avenues for spacecraft and missiles than the current solid propellant and liquid propellant systems...

  10. Enhanced Large Solid Rocket Motor Understanding Through Performance Margin Testing: RSRM Five-Segment Engineering Test Motor (ETM-3)

    Huppi, Hal; Tobias, Mark; Seiler, James


    The Five-Segment Engineering Test Motor (ETM-3) is an extended length reusable solid rocket motor (RSRM) intended to increase motor performance and internal environments above the current four-segment RSRM flight motor. The principal purpose of ETM-3 is to provide a test article for RSRM component margin testing. As the RSRM and Space Shuttle in general continue to age, replacing obsolete materials becomes an ever-increasing issue. Having a five-segment motor that provides environments in excess of normal opera- tion allows a mechanism to subject replacement materials to a more severe environment than experienced in flight. Additionally, ETM-3 offers a second design data point from which to develop and/or validate analytical models that currently have some level of empiricism associated with them. These enhanced models have the potential to further the understanding of RSRM motor performance and solid rocket motor (SRM) propulsion in general. Furthermore, these data could be leveraged to support a five-segment booster (FSB) development program should the Space Shuttle program choose to pursue this option for abort mode enhancements during the ascent phase. A tertiary goal of ETM-3 is to challenge both the ATK Thiokol Propulsion and NASA MSFC technical personnel through the design and analysis of a large solid rocket motor without the benefit of a well-established performance database such as the RSRM. The end result of this undertaking will be a more competent and experienced workforce for both organizations. Of particular interest are the motor design characteristics and the systems engineering approach used to conduct a complex yet successful large motor static test. These aspects of ETM-3 and more will be summarized.

  11. Quality assurance and control in the production and static tests of the solid rocket boosters for the Space Shuttle

    Cerny, O. F.


    The paper surveys the various aspects of design and overhaul of the solid rocket boosters. It is noted that quality control is an integral part of the design specifications. Attention is given to the production process which is optimized towards highest quality. Also discussed is the role of the DCA (Defense Contract Administration) in inspecting the products of subcontractors, noting that the USAF performs this role for prime contractors. Fabrication and construction of the booster is detailed with attention given to the lining of the booster cylinder and the mixing of the propellant and the subsequent X-ray inspection.

  12. Filled Ethylene-propylene Diene Terpolymer Elastomer as ThermalInsulator for Case-bonded Solid Rocket Motors

    C. M. Bhuvaneswari


    Full Text Available Ethylene-propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM-based insulation system is being globallyused for case-bonded solid rocket motors. A study was undertaken using EPDM as base polymer,blended with hypalon and liquid EPDM and filled with fibrous and non-fibrous fillers. Theseformulations were evaluated as rocket motor insulation system. The basic objective of the studywas to develop an insulation system based on EPDM for case-bonded applications. A series ofrocket motor insulator compositions based on EPDM, filled with particulate and fibrous fillerslike precipitated silica, fumed silica, aramid, and carbon fibres have been studied for mechanical,rheological, thermal, and interface properties. Compositions based on particulate fillers wereoptimised for the filler content. Comparatively, fumed silica was found to be superior as fillerin terms of mechanical and interface properties. Addition of fibrous filler (5 parts improved thepeel strength, and reduced the thermal conductivity and erosion rate. All the compositions wereevaluated for sulphur and peroxide curing. Superior mechanical properties were achieved forsulphur-cured products, whereas peroxide-cured products exhibited an excellent ageing resistance.Rocket motors were insulated with optimised composition and propellant cast, and the motorswere evaluated by conducting static test in end-burning mode.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(1, pp.94-102, DOI :

  13. Numerical simulation of multi-phase combustion flow in solid rocket motors with metalized propellant%Nmerical simulation of multi-phase combustion flow in solid rocket motors with metalized propellant

    SHAFQAT Wahab; XIE Kan; LIU Yu


    Multi-phase flow field simulation has been performed on solid rocket motor and effect of multi-phases on the performance prediction of the solid rocket motor(SRM)is in- vestigation.During the combustion of aluminized propellant,the aluminum particles in the propellant melt and form liquid aluminum at the burning propellant surface.So the flow within the rocket motor is multi phase or two phase because it contains droplets and smoke particles of Al2O3.Flow simulations have been performed on a large scale motor,to observe the effect of the flowfield on the chamber and nozzle as well.Uniform particles diameters and Rosin-Rammler diameter distribution method that is based on the assumption that an expo- nential relationship exists between the droplet diameter,d and mass fraction of droplets with diameter greater than d have been used for the simulation of different distribution of Al2O3 droplets present in SRM.Particles sizes in the range of 1-1 00μm are used,as being the most common droplets.In this approach the complete range of particle sizes is divided into a set of discrete size ranges,each to be defined by single stream that is part of the group.Roe scheme-flux differencing splitting based on approximate Riemann problem has been used to simulate the effects of the multi-phase flowfeild.This is second order upwind scheme in which flux differencing splitting method is employed.To cater for the turbulence effect, Spalart-Allmaras model has been used.The results obtained show the great sensitivity of this diameters distribution and particles concentrations to the SRM flow dynamics,primarily at the motor chamber and nozzle exit.The results are shown with various sizes of the parti- cles concentrations and geometrical configurations including models for SRM and nozzle.The analysis also provides effect of multi-phase on performance prediction of solid rocket motor.

  14. Simulation of 3-D Ultraviolet Radiation from Liquid Rocket Engine Plume%液体火箭发动机羽烟三维紫外辐射仿真研究

    国爱燕; 唐义; 白廷柱; 黄刚


    针对液体火箭发动机羽烟紫外辐射的空间分布问题,建立三维数值计算模型.该模型采用标准κ-ε湍流模型和PDF模型仿真羽烟流场的状态参数,根据HITRAN数据库计算流场内吸收系数分布,并利用离散坐标法求解辐射传输方程,计算三维空间的紫外辐射分布.测试结果表明:三维紫外辐射模型的计算结果与实验数据一致,能够反应不同视角下液体火箭发动机羽烟紫外辐射强度的空间变化.%To analyze the spacial distribution of UV radiation from liquid rocket engine plume, a 3-D numerical model has been built. The standard κ -e model and probability density function (PDF) model were adopted to compute the flow-field properties of the plume. Combined with HITRAN database, the distribution of absorption coefficient was calculated, and the radiation transfer equation could be solved by the discrete ordinate method. Test results show that the 3-D computation model can provide numerical data that agree well with measured experimental data. It also could reflect the spacial distribution of UV radiation from the hydrogen-oxygen rocket engine plume at different angles of view.

  15. Test data from solid propellant plume aerodynamics test program in Ames 6 x 6 foot supersonic wind tunnel (shuttle test FA7) (Ames test 033-66)

    Hair, L. M.


    The aerodynamic effects of plumes from hot combustion gases in the presence of a transonic external flow field were measured to advance plumes simulation technology, extend a previously acquired data base, and provide data to compare with the effects observed using cold gas plumes. A variety of underexpanded plumes issuing from the base of a strut-mounted ogive-cylinder body were produced by combusting solid propellant gas generators. The gas generator fired in a short-duration mode (200 to 300 msec). Propellants containing 16 percent and 2 percent A1 were used, with chamber pressures from 400 to 1800 psia. Conical nozzles of 15 deg half-angle were tested with area ratios of 4 and 8. Pressures were measured in the gas generator combustion chamber, along the nozzle wall, on the base, and along the body rear exterior. Schlieren photographs were taken for all tests. Test data are presented along with a description of the test setup and procedures.

  16. Assessment of Various Flow Solvers Used to Predict the Thermal Environment inside Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Joints

    Wang, Qun-Zhen; Cash, Steve (Technical Monitor)


    It is very important to accurately predict the gas pressure, gas and solid temperature, as well as the amount of O-ring erosion inside the space shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) joints in the event of a leak path. The scenarios considered are typically hot combustion gas rapid pressurization events of small volumes through narrow and restricted flow paths. The ideal method for this prediction is a transient three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation with a computational domain including both combustion gas and surrounding solid regions. However, this has not yet been demonstrated to be economical for this application due to the enormous amount of CPU time and memory resulting from the relatively long fill time as well as the large pressure and temperature rising rate. Consequently, all CFD applications in RSRM joints so far are steady-state simulations with solid regions being excluded from the computational domain by assuming either a constant wall temperature or no heat transfer between the hot combustion gas and cool solid walls.

  17. Real-Time X-ray Radiography Diagnostics of Components in Solid Rocket Motors

    Cortopassi, A. C.; Martin, H. T.; Boyer, E.; Kuo, K. K.


    Solid rocket motors (SRMs) typically use nozzle materials which are required to maintain their shape as well as insulate the underlying support structure during the motor operation. In addition, SRMs need internal insulation materials to protect the motor case from the harsh environment resulting from the combustion of solid propellant. In the nozzle, typical materials consist of high density graphite, carbon-carbon composites and carbon phenolic composites. Internal insulation of the motor cases is typically a composite material with carbon, asbestos, Kevlar, or silica fibers in an ablative matrix such as EPDM or NBR. For both nozzle and internal insulation materials, the charring process occurs when the hot combustion products heat the material intensely. The pyrolysis of the matrix material takes away a portion of the thermal energy near the wall surface and leaves behind a char layer. The fiber reinforcement retains the porous char layer which provides continued thermal protection from the hot combustion products. It is of great interest to characterize both the total erosion rates of the material and the char layer thickness. By better understanding of the erosion process for a particular ablative material in a specific flow environment, the required insulation material thickness can be properly selected. The recession rates of internal insulation and nozzle materials of SRMs are typically determined by testing in some sort of simulated environment; either arc-jet testing, flame torch testing, or subscale SRMs of different size. Material recession rates are deduced by comparison of pre- and post-test measurements and then averaging over the duration of the test. However, these averaging techniques cannot be used to determine the instantaneous recession rates of the material. Knowledge of the variation in recession rates in response to the instantaneous flow conditions during the motor operation is of great importance. For example, in many SRM configurations

  18. Leachate plume delineation and lithologic profiling using surface resistivity in an open municipal solid waste dumpsite, Sri Lanka.

    Wijesekara, Hasintha Rangana; De Silva, Sunethra Nalin; Wijesundara, Dharani Thanuja De Silva; Basnayake, Bendict Francis Antony; Vithanage, Meththika Suharshini


    This study presents the use of direct current resistivity techniques (DCRT) for investigation and characterization of leachate-contaminated subsurface environment of an open solid waste dumpsite at Kandy, Sri Lanka. The particular dumpsite has no liner and hence the leachate flows directly to the nearby river via subsurface and surface channels. For the identification of possible subsurface flow paths and the direction of the leachate, DCRT (two-dimensional, three-dimensional and vertical electrical sounding) have been applied. In addition, the physico-chemical parameters such as pH, electrical conductivity (EC), alkalinity, hardness, chloride, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total organic carbon (TOC) of leachate collected from different points of the solid waste dumping area and leachate drainage channel were analysed. Resistivity data confirmed that the leachate flow is confined to the near surface and no separate plume is observed in the downstream area, which may be due to the contamination distribution in the shallow overburden thickness. The stratigraphy with leachate pockets and leachate plume movements was well demarcated inside the dumpsite via low resistivity zones (1-3 Ωm). The recorded EC, alkalinity, hardness and chloride contents in leachate were averaged as 14.13 mS cm⁻¹, 3236, 2241 and 320 mg L⁻¹, respectively, which confirmed the possible causes for low resistivity values. This study confirms that DCRT can be effectively utilized to assess the subsurface characteristics of the open dumpsites to decide on corridor placement and depth of permeable reactive barriers to reduce the groundwater contamination.

  19. Introduction of laser initiation for the 48-inch Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) test motors at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    Zimmerman, Chris J.; Litzinger, Gerald E.


    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor is a new design for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. The new design will provide more thrust and more payload capability, as well as incorporating many design improvements in all facets of the design and manufacturing process. A 48-inch (diameter) test motor program is part of the ASRM development program. This program has multiple purposes for testing of propellent, insulation, nozzle characteristics, etc. An overview of the evolution of the 48-inch ASRM test motor ignition system which culminated with the implementation of a laser ignition system is presented. The laser system requirements, development, and operation configuration are reviewed in detail.

  20. Thermal-Flow Code for Modeling Gas Dynamics and Heat Transfer in Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Joints

    Wang, Qunzhen; Mathias, Edward C.; Heman, Joe R.; Smith, Cory W.


    A new, thermal-flow simulation code, called SFLOW. has been developed to model the gas dynamics, heat transfer, as well as O-ring and flow path erosion inside the space shuttle solid rocket motor joints by combining SINDA/Glo, a commercial thermal analyzer. and SHARPO, a general-purpose CFD code developed at Thiokol Propulsion. SHARP was modified so that friction, heat transfer, mass addition, as well as minor losses in one-dimensional flow can be taken into account. The pressure, temperature and velocity of the combustion gas in the leak paths are calculated in SHARP by solving the time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations while the heat conduction in the solid is modeled by SINDA/G. The two codes are coupled by the heat flux at the solid-gas interface. A few test cases are presented and the results from SFLOW agree very well with the exact solutions or experimental data. These cases include Fanno flow where friction is important, Rayleigh flow where heat transfer between gas and solid is important, flow with mass addition due to the erosion of the solid wall, a transient volume venting process, as well as some transient one-dimensional flows with analytical solutions. In addition, SFLOW is applied to model the RSRM nozzle joint 4 subscale hot-flow tests and the predicted pressures, temperatures (both gas and solid), and O-ring erosions agree well with the experimental data. It was also found that the heat transfer between gas and solid has a major effect on the pressures and temperatures of the fill bottles in the RSRM nozzle joint 4 configuration No. 8 test.

  1. Solid amine-boranes as high performance hypergolic hybrid rocket fuels

    Pfeil, Mark A.

    Hypergolic hybrid rockets have the potential of providing systems that are simple, reliable, have high performance, and allow for energy management. Such a propulsion system can be applied to fields that need a single tactical motor with flexible mission requirements of either high speed to target or extended loitering. They also provide the possibility for alternative fast response dynamic altitude control systems if ignition delays are sufficiently short. Amines are the traditional fuel of choice when selecting a hypergolic combination as these tend to react readily with both nitric acid and dinitrogen tertroxide based oxidizers. It has been found that the addition of a borane adduct to an amine fuel tends to reduce the ignition delay by up to an order of magnitude with white fuming nitric acid (WFNA). The borane addition has resulted in fuels with very short ignition delays between 2-10 ms - the fastest times for an amine based fuel reacting with nitric acid based oxidizers. The incorporation of these amine-boranes, specifically ethylenediamine bisborane (EDBB), into various fuel binders has also been found to result in ignition delays between 3-10 ms - the fastest times again for amine based fuels. It was found that the addition of a borane to an amine increased theoretical performance of the amine resulting in high performance fuels. The amine-borane/fuel binder combinations also produced higher theoretical performance values than previously used hypergolic hybrid rockets. Some of the theoretical values are on par or higher than the current toxic liquid hypergolic fuels, making amine boranes an attractive replacement. The higher performing amine-borane/fuel binder combinations also have higher performance values than the traditional rocket fuels, excluding liquid hydrogen. Thus, amine-borane based fuels have the potential to influence various area in the rocket field. An EDBB/ferrocene/epoxy fuel was tested in a hypergolic hybrid with pure nitric acid as the

  2. Simple-1: Development stage of the data transmission system for a solid propellant mid-power rocket model

    Yarce, Andrés; Sebastián Rodríguez, Juan; Galvez, Julián; Gómez, Alejandro; García, Manuel J.


    This paper presents the development stage of a communication module for a solid propellant mid-power rocket model. The communication module was named. Simple-1 and this work considers its design, construction and testing. A rocket model Estes Ventris Series Pro II® was modified to introduce, on the top of the payload, several sensors in a CanSat form factor. The Printed Circuit Board (PCB) was designed and fabricated from Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) components and assembled in a cylindrical rack structure similar to this small format satellite concept. The sensors data was processed using one Arduino Mini and transmitted using a radio module to a Software Defined Radio (SDR) HackRF based platform on the ground station. The Simple-1 was tested using a drone in successive releases, reaching altitudes from 200 to 300 meters. Different kind of data, in terms of altitude, position, atmospheric pressure and vehicle temperature were successfully measured, making possible the progress to a next stage of launching and analysis.

  3. Scaled Rocket Testing in Hypersonic Flow

    Dufrene, Aaron; MacLean, Matthew; Carr, Zakary; Parker, Ron; Holden, Michael; Mehta, Manish


    NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) uses four clustered liquid rocket engines along with two solid rocket boosters. The interaction between all six rocket exhaust plumes will produce a complex and severe thermal environment in the base of the vehicle. This work focuses on a recent 2% scale, hot-fire SLS base heating test. These base heating tests are short-duration tests executed with chamber pressures near the full-scale values with gaseous hydrogen/oxygen engines and RSRMV analogous solid propellant motors. The LENS II shock tunnel/Ludwieg tube tunnel was used at or near flight duplicated conditions up to Mach 5. Model development was strongly based on the Space Shuttle base heating tests with several improvements including doubling of the maximum chamber pressures and duplication of freestream conditions. Detailed base heating results are outside of the scope of the current work, rather test methodology and techniques are presented along with broader applicability toward scaled rocket testing in supersonic and hypersonic flow.

  4. Influence of Structural Parameters on the Performance of Vortex Valve Variable-Thrust Solid Rocket Motor

    Wei, Xianggeng; Li, Jiang; He, Guoqiang


    The vortex valve solid variable thrust motor is a new solid motor which can achieve Vehicle system trajectory optimization and motor energy management. Numerical calculation was performed to investigate the influence of vortex chamber diameter, vortex chamber shape, and vortex chamber height of the vortex valve solid variable thrust motor on modulation performance. The test results verified that the calculation results are consistent with laboratory results with a maximum error of 9.5%. The research drew the following major conclusions: the optimal modulation performance was achieved in a cylindrical vortex chamber, increasing the vortex chamber diameter improved the modulation performance of the vortex valve solid variable thrust motor, optimal modulation performance could be achieved when the height of the vortex chamber is half of the vortex chamber outlet diameter, and the hot gas control flow could result in an enhancement of modulation performance. The results can provide the basis for establishing the design method of the vortex valve solid variable thrust motor.

  5. An Evaluation Of Rocket Parameters

    J. N. Beri


    Full Text Available The dependence of conventional parameters of internal ballistics of Solid Propellant Rockets using external burning cruciform charge, on the geometry of charge aad rocket motor is discussed and results applied in a special case.

  6. Navier-Stokes calculation of solid-propellant rocket motor internal flowfields

    Hsieh, Kwang-Chung; Yang, Vigor; Tseng, Jesse I. S.


    A comprehensive numerical analysis has been carried out to study the detailed physical and chemical processes involved in the combustion of homogeneous propellant in a rocket motor. The formulation is based on the time-dependent full Navier-Stokes equations, with special attention devoted to the chemical reactions in both gas and condensed phases. The turbulence closure is achieved using both the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic model and a modified k-epsilon two-equation scheme with a low Reynolds number and near-wall treatment. The effects of variable thermodynamic and transport properties are also included. The system of governing equations are solved using a multi-stage Runge-Kutta shceme with the source terms treated implicitly. Preliminary results clearly demonstrate the presence of various combustion regimes in the vicinity of propellant surface. The effects of propellant combustion on the motor internal flowfields are investigated in detail.

  7. Velocity-coupled flow oscillations in a simulated solid-propellant rocket environment

    Yang, Vigor; Hsieh, Kwang-Chung; Tseng, Jesse I. S.


    A comprehensive numerical analysis has been carried out to study the unsteady flowfields in a simulated rocket-motor environment. The model is based on the time-dependent compressible Navier-Stokes equations with a two-equation turbulence closure scheme. Various important aspects of the coupling between acoustic oscillations and mean flowfields, including flow reversal, modification of transport properties, etc., are addressed. Results indicate that multi-dimensional effects play important roles in determining local flow structures and wave characteristics. In much of the domain, acoustic velocity nodal points are observed in the near-wall region. The classical one-dimensional theory fails to describe several important mechanisms associated with velocity-induced flow instabilities.

  8. Advanced Flow Analysis Tools for Transient Solid Rocket Motor Simulations Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The challenges of designing, developing, and fielding man-rated propulsion systems continue to increase as NASA's mission moves forward with evolving solid...

  9. Transient Burning Rate Model for Solid Rocket Motor Internal Ballistic Simulations

    David R. Greatrix


    Full Text Available A general numerical model based on the Zeldovich-Novozhilov solid-phase energy conservation result for unsteady solid-propellant burning is presented in this paper. Unlike past models, the integrated temperature distribution in the solid phase is utilized directly for estimating instantaneous burning rate (rather than the thermal gradient at the burning surface. The burning model is general in the sense that the model may be incorporated for various propellant burning-rate mechanisms. Given the availability of pressure-related experimental data in the open literature, varying static pressure is the principal mechanism of interest in this study. The example predicted results presented in this paper are to a substantial extent consistent with the corresponding experimental firing response data.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Rocket Exhaust Interaction with Lunar Soil Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rocket plume impingement may cause significant damage and contaminate co-landed spacecraft and surrounding habitat structures during Lunar landing operations. Under...

  11. Numerical Simulation of Rocket Exhaust Interaction with Lunar Soil Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rocket plume impingement can cause significant damage and contaminate co-landing spacecraft and surrounding habitat structures during lunar landing operations. CFDRC...

  12. Feasibility of an advanced thrust termination assembly for a solid propellant rocket motor


    A total of 68 quench tests were conducted in a vented bomb assembly (VBA). Designed to simulate full-scale motor operating conditions, this laboratory apparatus uses a 2-inch-diameter, end-burning propellant charge and an insulated disc of consolidated hydrated aluminum sulfate along with the explosive charge necessary to disperse the salt and inject it onto the burning surface. The VBA was constructed to permit variation of motor design parameters of interest; i.e., weight of salt per unit burning surface area, weight of explosive per unit weight of salt, distance from salt surface to burning surface, incidence angle of salt injection, chamber pressure, and burn time. Completely satisfactory salt quenching, without re-ignition, occurred in only two VBA tests. These were accomplished with a quench charge ratio (QCR) of 0.023 lb salt per square inch of burning surface at dispersing charge ratios (DCR) of 13 and 28 lb of salt per lb of explosive. Candidate materials for insulating salt charges from the rocket combustion environment were evaluated in firings of 5-inch-diameter, uncured end-burner motors. A pressed, alumina ceramic fiber material was selected for further evaluation and use in the final demonstration motor.

  13. The development of a solid-state hydrogen sensor for rocket engine leakage detection

    Liu, Chung-Chiun

    Hydrogen propellant leakage poses significant operational problems in the rocket propulsion industry as well as for space exploratory applications. Vigorous efforts have been devoted to minimizing hydrogen leakage in assembly, test, and launch operations related to hydrogen propellant. The objective has been to reduce the operational cost of assembling and maintaining hydrogen delivery systems. Specifically, efforts have been made to develop a hydrogen leak detection system for point-contact measurement. Under the auspices of Lewis Research Center, the Electronics Design Center at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, has undertaken the development of a point-contact hydrogen gas sensor with potential applications to the hydrogen propellant industry. We envision a sensor array consisting of numbers of discrete hydrogen sensors that can be located in potential leak sites. Silicon-based microfabrication and micromachining techniques are used in the fabrication of these sensor prototypes. Evaluations of the sensor are carried out in-house at Case Western Reserve University as well as at Lewis Research Center and GenCorp Aerojet, Sacramento, California. The hydrogen gas sensor is not only applicable in a hydrogen propulsion system, but also usable in many other civilian and industrial settings. This includes vehicles or facility use, or in the production of hydrogen gas. Dual space and commercial uses of these point-contacted hydrogen sensors are feasible and will directly meet the needs and objectives of NASA as well as various industrial segments.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of solid rocket propellants at 14.1 T.

    Maas, W E; Merwin, L H; Cory, D G


    Proton NMR images of solid propellant materials, consisting of a polybutadiene binder material filled with 82% solid particles, have been obtained at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 T and at a resolution of 8.5 x 8.5 micron. The images are the first of elastomeric materials obtained at a proton frequency of 600 MHz and have the highest spatial resolution yet reported. The images display a high contrast and are rich in information content. They reveal the distribution of individual filler particles in the polymer matrix as well as a thin polymer film of about 10-30 micron which is found to surround some of the larger filler particles.

  15. Common Cause Case Study: An Estimated Probability of Four Solid Rocket Booster Hold-Down Post Stud Hang-ups

    Cross, Robert


    Until Solid Rocket Motor ignition, the Space Shuttle is mated to the Mobil Launch Platform in part via eight (8) Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) hold-down bolts. The bolts are fractured using redundant pyrotechnics, and are designed to drop through a hold-down post on the Mobile Launch Platform before the Space Shuttle begins movement. The Space Shuttle program has experienced numerous failures where a bolt has hung up. That is, it did not clear the hold-down post before liftoff and was caught by the SRBs. This places an additional structural load on the vehicle that was not included in the original certification requirements. The Space Shuttle is currently being certified to withstand the loads induced by up to three (3) of eight (8) SRB hold-down experiencing a "hang-up". The results of loads analyses performed for (4) stud hang-ups indicate that the internal vehicle loads exceed current structural certification limits at several locations. To determine the risk to the vehicle from four (4) stud hang-ups, the likelihood of the scenario occurring must first be evaluated. Prior to the analysis discussed in this paper, the likelihood of occurrence had been estimated assuming that the stud hang-ups were completely independent events. That is, it was assumed that no common causes or factors existed between the individual stud hang-up events. A review of the data associated with the hang-up events, showed that a common factor (timing skew) was present. This paper summarizes a revised likelihood evaluation performed for the four (4) stud hang-ups case considering that there are common factors associated with the stud hang-ups. The results show that explicitly (i.e. not using standard common cause methodologies such as beta factor or Multiple Greek Letter modeling) taking into account the common factor of timing skew results in an increase in the estimated likelihood of four (4) stud hang-ups of an order of magnitude over the independent failure case.

  16. Propellant grain dynamics in aft attach ring of shuttle solid rocket booster

    Verderaime, V.


    An analytical technique for implementing simultaneously the temperature, dynamic strain, real modulus, and frequency properties of solid propellant in an unsymmetrical vibrating ring mode is presented. All dynamic parameters and sources are defined for a free vibrating ring-grain structure with initial displacement and related to a forced vibrating system to determine the change in real modulus. Propellant test data application is discussed. The technique was developed to determine the aft attach ring stiffness of the shuttle booster at lift-off.

  17. Rocket propulsion elements - An introduction to the engineering of rockets (6th revised and enlarged edition)

    Sutton, George P.

    The subject of rocket propulsion is treated with emphasis on the basic technology, performance, and design rationale. Attention is given to definitions and fundamentals, nozzle theory and thermodynamic relations, heat transfer, flight performance, chemical rocket propellant performance analysis, and liquid propellant rocket engine fundamentals. The discussion also covers solid propellant rocket fundamentals, hybrid propellant rockets, thrust vector control, selection of rocket propulsion systems, electric propulsion, and rocket testing.

  18. Novel plume deflection concept testing Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort will explore the feasibility and effectiveness of utilizing an electrically driven thermal shield for use as part of rocket plume deflectors. To...

  19. Design, analysis, fabrication and test of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster motor case

    Kapp, J. R.


    The motor case used in the solid propellant booster for the Space Shuttle is unique in many respects, most of which are indigenous to size and special design requirements. The evolution of the case design from initial requirements to finished product is discussed, with increased emphasis of reuse capability, special design features, fracture mechanics and corrosion control. Case fabrication history and the resulting procedure are briefly reviewed with respect to material development, processing techniques and special problem areas. Case assembly, behavior and performance during the DM-1 static firing are reviewed, with appropriate comments and conclusions.

  20. Removing hydrochloric acid exhaust products from high performance solid rocket propellant using aluminum-lithium alloy.

    Terry, Brandon C; Sippel, Travis R; Pfeil, Mark A; Gunduz, I Emre; Son, Steven F


    Hydrochloric acid (HCl) pollution from perchlorate based propellants is well known for both launch site contamination, as well as the possible ozone layer depletion effects. Past efforts in developing environmentally cleaner solid propellants by scavenging the chlorine ion have focused on replacing a portion of the chorine-containing oxidant (i.e., ammonium perchlorate) with an alkali metal nitrate. The alkali metal (e.g., Li or Na) in the nitrate reacts with the chlorine ion to form an alkali metal chloride (i.e., a salt instead of HCl). While this technique can potentially reduce HCl formation, it also results in reduced ideal specific impulse (ISP). Here, we show using thermochemical calculations that using aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy can reduce HCl formation by more than 95% (with lithium contents ≥15 mass%) and increase the ideal ISP by ∼7s compared to neat aluminum (using 80/20 mass% Al-Li alloy). Two solid propellants were formulated using 80/20 Al-Li alloy or neat aluminum as fuel additives. The halide scavenging effect of Al-Li propellants was verified using wet bomb combustion experiments (75.5±4.8% reduction in pH, ∝ [HCl], when compared to neat aluminum). Additionally, no measurable HCl evolution was detected using differential scanning calorimetry coupled with thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared absorption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Real-time radiography of Titan IV Solid Rocket Motor Upgrade (SRMU) static firing test QM-2

    Dolan, K.W.; Curnow, G.M.; Perkins, D.E.; Schneberk, D.J.; Costerus, B.W.; La Chapell, M.J.; Turner, D.E.; Wallace, P.W.


    Real-time radiography was successfully applied to the Titan-IV Solid Rocket Motor Upgrade (SRMU) static firing test QM-2 conducted February 22, 1993 at Phillips Laboratory, Edwards AFB, CA. The real-time video data obtained in this test gave the first incontrovertible evidence that the molten slag pool is low (less than 5 to 6 inches in depth referenced to the bottom of the aft dome cavity) before T + 55 seconds, builds fairly linearly from this point in time reaching a quasi-equilibrium depth of 16 to 17 inches at about T + 97 seconds, which is well below the top of the vectored nozzle, and maintains that level until T + 125 near the end motor burn. From T + 125 seconds to motor burn-out at T + 140 seconds the slag pool builds to a maximum depth of about 20 to 21 inches, still well below the top of the nozzle. The molten slag pool was observed to interact with motions of the vectored nozzle, and exhibit slosh and wave mode oscillations. A few slag ejection events were also observed.

  2. The starting transient of solid propellant rocket motors with high internal gas velocities. Ph.D. Thesis

    Peretz, A.; Caveny, L. H.; Kuo, K. K.; Summerfield, M.


    A comprehensive analytical model which considers time and space development of the flow field in solid propellant rocket motors with high volumetric loading density is described. The gas dynamics in the motor chamber is governed by a set of hyperbolic partial differential equations, that are coupled with the ignition and flame spreading events, and with the axial variation of mass addition. The flame spreading rate is calculated by successive heating-to-ignition along the propellant surface. Experimental diagnostic studies have been performed with a rectangular window motor (50 cm grain length, 5 cm burning perimeter and 1 cm hydraulic port diameter), using a controllable head-end gaseous igniter. Tests were conducted with AP composite propellant at port-to-throat area ratios of 2.0, 1.5, 1.2, and 1.06, and head-end pressures from 35 to 70 atm. Calculated pressure transients and flame spreading rates are in very good agreement with those measured in the experimental system.

  3. Design of Multi-Propellant Star Grains for Solid Propellant Rockets

    S. Krishnan


    Full Text Available A new approach to solve the geometry-problem of solid propellant star is presented. The basis of the approach is to take the web-thickness (a ballistic as well as a geometrical property as the characteristic length. The nondimensional characteristic parameters representing diameter, length, slenderness-ratio, and ignitor accommodation of the grain are all identified. Many particular cases of star configurations (from the configurations of single propellant to those of four different propellants can be analysed through the identified characteristic parameters. A better way of representing the single-propellant-star-performance in a design graph is explained. Two types of dual propellant grains are analysed in detail. The first type is characterised by its two distinct stages of burning (initially by single propellant burning and then by dual propellant burning; the second type has the dual propellant burning throughout. Suitability of the identified characteristic parameters to an optimisation study is demonstrated through examples.

  4. Removing hydrochloric acid exhaust products from high performance solid rocket propellant using aluminum-lithium alloy

    Terry, Brandon C., E-mail: [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, Zucrow Laboratories, 500 Allison Rd, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Sippel, Travis R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, 2025 Black Engineering, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Pfeil, Mark A. [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, Zucrow Laboratories, 500 Allison Rd, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Gunduz, I.Emre; Son, Steven F. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, Zucrow Laboratories, 500 Allison Rd, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)


    Highlights: • Al-Li alloy propellant has increased ideal specific impulse over neat aluminum. • Al-Li alloy propellant has a near complete reduction in HCl acid formation. • Reduction in HCl was verified with wet bomb experiments and DSC/TGA-MS/FTIR. - Abstract: Hydrochloric acid (HCl) pollution from perchlorate based propellants is well known for both launch site contamination, as well as the possible ozone layer depletion effects. Past efforts in developing environmentally cleaner solid propellants by scavenging the chlorine ion have focused on replacing a portion of the chorine-containing oxidant (i.e., ammonium perchlorate) with an alkali metal nitrate. The alkali metal (e.g., Li or Na) in the nitrate reacts with the chlorine ion to form an alkali metal chloride (i.e., a salt instead of HCl). While this technique can potentially reduce HCl formation, it also results in reduced ideal specific impulse (I{sub SP}). Here, we show using thermochemical calculations that using aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy can reduce HCl formation by more than 95% (with lithium contents ≥15 mass%) and increase the ideal I{sub SP} by ∼7 s compared to neat aluminum (using 80/20 mass% Al-Li alloy). Two solid propellants were formulated using 80/20 Al-Li alloy or neat aluminum as fuel additives. The halide scavenging effect of Al-Li propellants was verified using wet bomb combustion experiments (75.5 ± 4.8% reduction in pH, ∝ [HCl], when compared to neat aluminum). Additionally, no measurable HCl evolution was detected using differential scanning calorimetry coupled with thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared absorption.

  5. Performance of a UTC FW-4S solid propellant rocket motor under the command effects of simulated altitude and rotational spin

    Merryman, H. L.; Smith, L. R.


    One United Technology Center FW-4S solid-propellant rocket motor was fired at an average simulated altitude of 103,000 ft while spinning about its axial centerline at 180 rpm. The objectives of the test program were to determine motor altitude ballistic performance including the measurement of the nonaxial thrust vector and to demonstrate structural integrity of the motor case and nozzle. These objectives are presented and discussed.

  6. Application Analysis of Multi-functional Structure Design for Solid Rocket%多功能结构在固体火箭上的应用分析

    曹莉; 介党阳; 熊楚杨; 徐嘉


    It was very limited to realize light-weight design for solid rocket adopting traditional mechanical structure optimization method. Due to the design philosophy of mechanical, electrical, thermal integration, multi-functional structure design broke a new path for solid rocket performance promotion. The method and thought of multi-functional structure design were introduced systematically. Combining with the development of a new onboard recording equipment prototype, the application prospect of multi-functional structure was discussed deeply on solid rocket area.%为实现固体火箭轻质化设计,采用传统机械结构优化的方法能力十分有限。多功能结构优化设计方法,由于采用机、电、热一体化的系统工程级设计思路,为提升火箭整体性能开辟了一个全新的方向。介绍多功能结构设计方法及思路,结合一种新型箭载记录设备原型样机的研制,对多功能结构在固体火箭领域应用的前景进行深入探讨。

  7. 氢氧火箭发动机射流仿真与试验台热防护%Thermal Protection and Plume Simulation for Hydrogen/Oxygen Rocket Engine Test Stage

    李茂; 王占林


    The plume characteristics of the hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine were studied with the method of CFD ( computational fluid dynamics ) .The influences of the geometry model , the combus-tion model and the turbulence model on the characteristics of the combustion flowfield were ana-lyzed .The results from the numerical simulation were compared with those from the experiments qualitatively and quantitatively .Based on the distributions of the temperature from the numerical simulation results in the different tests , the armor plate was designed for the thermal protection and applied for the test stage .It is confirmed that the approach is effective and reliable .%采用计算流体方法获得氢氧火箭发动机地面试验射流特征,开展了几何模型、燃烧模型和湍流模型对射流场的影响分析以及与试验结果的定性和定量对比。依据不同试验模式下的射流场温度的数值分布,提出试验台钢板防护方案并进行防护,试验证明方案可靠有效。

  8. Infrared spectroradiometer for rocket exhaust analysis

    Herget, W. F.


    Infrared spectroradiometer measures high-resolution spectral absorption, emission, temperature, and concentration of chemical species in radically symmetric zones of the exhaust plumes of large rocket engines undergoing static firing tests. Measurements are made along predetermined lines of sight through the plume.

  9. Three Questions about the Enceladus Plumes: Are Large Vapor Chambers Necessary? Do the Plumes Vary in Strength from Year to Year? Do Fractal Aggregates Fit the Brightness Data as Well as Solid Ice?

    Ingersoll, A. P.; Nakajima, M.; Ewald, S.; Gao, P.


    Postberg et al (2009) argued that the observed plume activity requires large vapor chambers above the evaporating liquid (left figure). Here we argue that large vapor chambers are unnecessary, and that a liquid-filled crack 1 meter wide extending along the 500 km length of the tiger stripes would be an adequate source (right figure). We consider controlled boiling (companion paper by Nakajima and Ingersoll 2015AGU) regulated by friction between the gas and the walls. Postberg et al use formulas from Rayleigh-Benard convection, which we argue does not apply when bubbles are transferring their latent heat across the liquid-gas interface. We show that modest convection currents in the liquid (few cm/s) can supply energy to the boiling zone and prevent it from freezing. Hedman et al (2013) reported brightness variations with orbital phase, but they also reported that their 2005 observations were roughly 50% higher than the 2009 observations. Here we extend the observation period to 2015 (Ingersoll and Ewald 2015). Our analysis relies on ISS images whereas Hedman et al rely on VIMS near-IR images, which have 40 times lower resolution. We successfully separate the brightness of the plume from the E-ring background. Our earlier analysis of the particle size distribution (Ingersoll and Ewald 2011) allows us to correct for differences in scattering angle. We confirm a general decline in activity over the 10-year period, but we find hints of fluctuations on shorter time scales. Kempf (Cassini project science meeting, Jan 22, 2015) reported that the mass of particles in the plumes could be an order of magnitude less than that reported by Ingersoll and Ewald (2011). Kempf used in situ particle measurements by CDA, whereas I&E used brightness observations and the assumption that the particles are solid ice. Here we show (Gao et al 2015AGU) that fractal aggregates fit the brightness data just as well as solid ice, and are consistent with the lower mass reported by Kempf.

  10. Measurements of temperature profiles at the exit of small rockets.

    Griggs, M; Harshbarger, F C


    The sodium line reversal technique was used to determine the reversal temperature profile across the exit of small rockets. Measurements were made on one 73-kg thrust rocket, and two 23-kg thrust rockets with different injectors. The large rocket showed little variation of reversal temperature across the plume. However, the 23-kg rockets both showed a large decrease of reversal temperature from the axis to the edge of the plume. In addition, the sodium line reversal technique of temperature measurement was compared with an infrared technique developed in these laboratories.

  11. Mechanical and Combustion Performance of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as an Additive to Paraffin-Based Solid Fuels for Hybrid Rockets

    Larson, Daniel B.; Boyer, Eric; Wachs, Trevor; Kuo, Kenneth, K.; Koo, Joseph H.; Story, George


    Paraffin-based solid fuels for hybrid rocket motor applications are recognized as a fastburning alternative to other fuel binders such as HTPB, but efforts to further improve the burning rate and mechanical properties of paraffin are still necessary. One approach that is considered in this study is to use multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) as an additive to paraffin wax. Carbon nanotubes provide increased electrical and thermal conductivity to the solid-fuel grains to which they are added, which can improve the mass burning rate. Furthermore, the addition of ultra-fine aluminum particles to the paraffin/MWNT fuel grains can enhance regression rate of the solid fuel and the density impulse of the hybrid rocket. The multi-walled carbon nanotubes also present the possibility of greatly improving the mechanical properties (e.g., tensile strength) of the paraffin-based solid-fuel grains. For casting these solid-fuel grains, various percentages of MWNT and aluminum particles will be added to the paraffin wax. Previous work has been published about the dispersion and mixing of carbon nanotubes.1 Another manufacturing method has been used for mixing the MWNT with a phenolic resin for ablative applications, and the manufacturing and mixing processes are well-documented in the literature.2 The cost of MWNT is a small fraction of single-walled nanotubes. This is a scale-up advantage as future applications and projects will require low cost additives to maintain cost effectiveness. Testing of the solid-fuel grains will be conducted in several steps. Dog bone samples will be cast and prepared for tensile testing. The fuel samples will also be analyzed using thermogravimetric analysis and a high-resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM). The SEM will allow for examination of the solid fuel grain for uniformity and consistency. The paraffin-based fuel grains will also be tested using two hybrid rocket test motors located at the Pennsylvania State University s High Pressure

  12. Evaluation of Geopolymer Concrete for Rocket Test Facility Flame Deflectors

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Montes, Carlos; Islam, Rashedul; Allouche, Erez


    The current paper presents results from a combined research effort by Louisiana Tech University (LTU) and NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) to develop a new alumina-silicate based cementitious binder capable of acting as a high performance refractory material with low heat ablation rate and high early mechanical strength. Such a binder would represent a significant contribution to NASA's efforts to develop a new generation of refractory 'hot face' liners for liquid or solid rocket plume environments. This project was developed as a continuation of on-going collaborations between LTU and SSC, where test sections of a formulation of high temperature geopolymer binder were cast in the floor and walls of Test Stand E-1 Cell 3, an active rocket engine test stand flame trench. Additionally, geopolymer concrete panels were tested using the NASA-SSC Diagnostic Test Facility (DTF) thruster, where supersonic plume environments were generated on a 1ft wide x 2ft long x 6 inch deep refractory panel. The DTF operates on LOX/GH2 propellants producing a nominal thrust of 1,200 lbf and the combustion chamber conditions are Pc=625psig, O/F=6.0. Data collected included high speed video of plume/panel area and surface profiles (depth) of the test panels measured on a 1-inch by 1-inch giving localized erosion rates during the test. Louisiana Tech conducted a microstructure analysis of the geopolymer binder after the testing program to identify phase changes in the material.

  13. An evaluation of the total quality management implementation strategy for the advanced solid rocket motor project at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. M.S. Thesis - Tennessee Univ.

    Schramm, Harry F.; Sullivan, Kenneth W.


    An evaluation of the NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) strategy to implement Total Quality Management (TQM) in the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) Project is presented. The evaluation of the implementation strategy reflected the Civil Service personnel perspective at the project level. The external and internal environments at MSFC were analyzed for their effects on the ASRM TQM strategy. Organizational forms, cultures, management systems, problem solving techniques, and training were assessed for their influence on the implementation strategy. The influence of ASRM's effort was assessed relative to its impact on mature projects as well as future projects at MSFC.

  14. Enantioselective synthesis of aziridines using asymmetric transfer hydrogenation as a precursor for chiral derivatives used as bonding agent for rocket solid propellants

    Aparecida M. Kawamoto


    Full Text Available A rapid, expedient and enantioselective method for the synthesis of beta-hydroxy amines and monosubstituted aziridines in up to 99% e.e., via asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of a-amino ketones and cyclisation through treatment with tosyl chloride and base, is described. (1R,2R-N-(para-toluenesulfonyl-1,2-ethylenediamine with formic acid has been utilised as a ligand for the Ruthenium (II catalysed enantioselective transfer hydrogenation of the ketones.The chiral 2-methyl aziridine, which is a potentially more efficient bonding agent for Rocket Solid Propellant has been successfully achieved.

  15. Rocket Flight.

    Van Evera, Bill; Sterling, Donna R.


    Describes an activity for designing, building, and launching rockets that provides students with an intrinsically motivating and real-life application of what could have been classroom-only concepts. Includes rocket design guidelines and a sample grading rubric. (KHR)

  16. Technology Method Design of Assembly and Testing for Solid Propellant Rocket Engine of Aviation Seat%航空座椅固体火箭发动机装配及检测工艺技术设计



    本文对航空座椅某型固体火箭发动机部装、总装及检测、试验、包装技术难点等进行了工艺分析;介绍了固体火箭发动机装配全过程工艺流程、检测、试验方法及注意事项等,对于同类及新型火箭发动机的装配制造过程具有良好的借鉴、推广应用意义。%Aiming at the difficulty of solid propellant rocket engine of aviation seat to assembly, testing and packaging technology, the assembly, testing process and method for solid propellant rocket engine were introduced. It can be regarded as reference with application for solid propellant rocket engine assembly process.

  17. Program ELM: A tool for rapid thermal-hydraulic analysis of solid-core nuclear rocket fuel elements

    Walton, James T.


    This report reviews the state of the art of thermal-hydraulic analysis codes and presents a new code, Program ELM, for analysis of fuel elements. ELM is a concise computational tool for modeling the steady-state thermal-hydraulics of propellant flow through fuel element coolant channels in a nuclear thermal rocket reactor with axial coolant passages. The program was developed as a tool to swiftly evaluate various heat transfer coefficient and friction factor correlations generated for turbulent pipe flow with heat addition which have been used in previous programs. Thus, a consistent comparison of these correlations was performed, as well as a comparison with data from the NRX reactor experiments from the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications (NERVA) project. This report describes the ELM Program algorithm, input/output, and validation efforts and provides a listing of the code.

  18. Simulation of reactive polydisperse sprays strongly coupled to unsteady flows in solid rocket motors: Efficient strategy using Eulerian Multi-Fluid methods

    Sibra, A.; Dupays, J.; Murrone, A.; Laurent, F.; Massot, M.


    In this paper, we tackle the issue of the accurate simulation of evaporating and reactive polydisperse sprays strongly coupled to unsteady gaseous flows. In solid propulsion, aluminum particles are included in the propellant to improve the global performances but the distributed combustion of these droplets in the chamber is suspected to be a driving mechanism of hydrodynamic and acoustic instabilities. The faithful prediction of two-phase interactions is a determining step for future solid rocket motor optimization. When looking at saving computational ressources as required for industrial applications, performing reliable simulations of two-phase flow instabilities appears as a challenge for both modeling and scientific computing. The size polydispersity, which conditions the droplet dynamics, is a key parameter that has to be accounted for. For moderately dense sprays, a kinetic approach based on a statistical point of view is particularly appropriate. The spray is described by a number density function and its evolution follows a Williams-Boltzmann transport equation. To solve it, we use Eulerian Multi-Fluid methods, based on a continuous discretization of the size phase space into sections, which offer an accurate treatment of the polydispersion. The objective of this paper is threefold: first to derive a new Two Size Moment Multi-Fluid model that is able to tackle evaporating polydisperse sprays at low cost while accurately describing the main driving mechanisms, second to develop a dedicated evaporation scheme to treat simultaneously mass, moment and energy exchanges with the gas and between the sections. Finally, to design a time splitting operator strategy respecting both reactive two-phase flow physics and cost/accuracy ratio required for industrial computations. Using a research code, we provide 0D validations of the new scheme before assessing the splitting technique's ability on a reference two-phase flow acoustic case. Implemented in the industrial

  19. Quantitative, three-dimensional imaging of aluminum drop combustion in solid propellant plumes via digital in-line holography.

    Guildenbecher, Daniel R; Cooper, Marcia A; Gill, Walter; Stauffacher, Howard Lee; Oliver, Michael S; Grasser, Thomas W


    Burning aluminized propellants eject reacting molten aluminum drops with a broad size distribution. Prior to this work, in situ measurement of the drop size statistics and other quantitative flow properties was complicated by the narrow depth-of-focus of microscopic videography. Here, digital in-line holography (DIH) is demonstrated for quantitative volumetric imaging of the propellant plume. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, in-focus features, including burning surfaces, drop morphologies, and reaction zones, are automatically measured through a depth spanning many millimeters. By quantifying all drops within the line of sight, DIH provides an order of magnitude increase in the effective data rate compared to traditional imaging. This enables rapid quantification of the drop size distribution with limited experimental repetition.

  20. Contrail formation in the tropopause region caused by emissions from an Ariane 5 rocket

    Voigt, Ch.; Schumann, U.; Graf, K.


    Rockets directly inject water vapor and aerosol into the atmosphere, which promotes the formation of ice clouds in ice supersaturated layers of the atmosphere. Enhanced mesospheric cloud occurrence has frequently been detected near 80-kilometer altitude a few days after rocket launches. Here, unique evidence for cirrus formation in the tropopause region caused by ice nucleation in the exhaust plume from an Ariane 5-ECA rocket is presented. Meteorological reanalysis data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts show significant ice supersaturation at the 100-hectopascal level in the American tropical tropopause region on November 26, 2011. Near 17-kilometer altitudes, the temperatures are below the Schmidt-Appleman threshold temperature for rocket condensation trail formation on that day. Immediately after the launch from the Ariane 5-ECA at 18:39 UT (universal time) from Kourou, French Guiana, the formation of a rocket contrail is detected in the high resolution visible channel from the SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager) on the METEOSAT9 satellite. The rocket contrail is transported to the south and its dispersion is followed in SEVIRI data for almost 2 h. The ice crystals predominantly nucleated on aluminum oxide particles emitted by the Ariane 5-ECA solid booster and further grow by uptake of water vapor emitted from the cryogenic main stage and entrained from the ice supersaturated ambient atmosphere. After rocket launches, the formation of rocket contrails can be a frequent phenomenon under ice supersaturated conditions. However, at present launch rates, the global climate impact from rocket contrail cirrus in the tropopause region is small.

  1. OPAD data analysis. [Optical Plumes Anomaly Detection

    Buntine, Wray L.; Kraft, Richard; Whitaker, Kevin; Cooper, Anita E.; Powers, W. T.; Wallace, Tim L.


    Data obtained in the framework of an Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) program intended to create a rocket engine health monitor based on spectrometric detections of anomalous atomic and molecular species in the exhaust plume are analyzed. The major results include techniques for handling data noise, methods for registration of spectra to wavelength, and a simple automatic process for estimating the metallic component of a spectrum.

  2. Formulation, Casting, and Evaluation of Paraffin-Based Solid Fuels Containing Energetic and Novel Additives for Hybrid Rockets

    Larson, Daniel B.; Desain, John D.; Boyer, Eric; Wachs, Trevor; Kuo, Kenneth K.; Borduin, Russell; Koo, Joseph H.; Brady, Brian B.; Curtiss, Thomas J.; Story, George


    This investigation studied the inclusion of various additives to paraffin wax for use in a hybrid rocket motor. Some of the paraffin-based fuels were doped with various percentages of LiAlH4 (up to 10%). Addition of LiAlH4 at 10% was found to increase regression rates between 7 - 10% over baseline paraffin through tests in a gaseous oxygen hybrid rocket motor. Mass burn rates for paraffin grains with 10% LiAlH4 were also higher than those of the baseline paraffin. RDX was also cast into a paraffin sample via a novel casting process which involved dissolving RDX into dimethylformamide (DMF) solvent and then drawing a vacuum on the mixture of paraffin and RDX/DMF in order to evaporate out the DMF. It was found that although all DMF was removed, the process was not conducive to generating small RDX particles. The slow boiling generated an inhomogeneous mixture of paraffin and RDX. It is likely that superheating the DMF to cause rapid boiling would likely reduce RDX particle sizes. In addition to paraffin/LiAlH4 grains, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) were cast in paraffin for testing in a hybrid rocket motor, and assorted samples containing a range of MWNT percentages in paraffin were imaged using SEM. The fuel samples showed good distribution of MWNT in the paraffin matrix, but the MWNT were often agglomerated, indicating that a change to the sonication and mixing processes were required to achieve better uniformity and debundled MWNT. Fuel grains with MWNT fuel grains had slightly lower regression rate, likely due to the increased thermal conductivity to the fuel subsurface, reducing the burning surface temperature.

  3. The sky is falling: chemical characterization and corrosion evaluation of deposition produced during the static testing of solid rocket motors.

    Doucette, William J; McNeill, Laurie S; Mendenhall, Scout; Hancock, Paul V; Wells, Jason E; Thackeray, Kevin J; Gosen, David P


    Static tests of horizontally restrained rocket motors at the ATK facility in Promontory UT, USA result in the deposition of entrained soil and fuel combustion products, referred to as Test Fire Soil (TFS), over areas as large as 30-50 mile (80-130 km) and at distances up to 10-12 miles (16-20 km) from the test site. Chloride is the main combustion product generated from the ammonium perchlorate-aluminum based composite propellant. Deposition sampling/characterization and a 6-month field corrosivity study using mild steel coupons were conducted in conjunction with the February 25th 2010 FSM-17 static test. The TFS deposition rates at the three study sites ranged from 1 to 5 g/min/m. TFS contained significantly more chloride than the surface soil collected from the test site. The TFS collected during two subsequent tests had similarly elevated chloride, suggesting that the results obtained in this study are applicable to other tests assuming that the rocket fuel composition remains similar. The field-deployed coupons exposed to the TFS had higher corrosion rates (3.6-5.0 mpy) than paired non-exposed coupons (1.6-1.8 mpy). Corrosion rates for all coupons decreased over time, but coupons exposed to the TFS always had a higher rate than the non-exposed. Differences in corrosion rates between the three study sites were also observed, with sites receiving more TFS deposition having higher corrosion rates.

  4. 固体火箭发动机预固化技术及其应用%Pre-cure Technique and Its Applications for Solid Rocket Motors

    苏昌银; 张爱科


    Based on interface properties of HTPB propellant, the cross linking level is regulated through the temperature and time of cure reaction. The chemical reaction takes place gradually in remainder functional groups of the system to form chemical bonds and hydrogen bond, so as to improve the mechanical properties of the resultant. Pre-cure technique and bonding model are described in the paper. They can be used in propellant-liner bonding, propellant loading and integral repairing of the propellant grain of the solid rocket motor (SRM). These test results have been qualified by the successful static firing tests, flight tests of motors and storage tests of specimens for ten-years. The performances of the motor meet the design requirements with good reproducibilities.

  5. Solid propellants for rockets. Rocket suishin yaku

    Kubota, N. (Defense Agency, Tokyo (Japan). Technical Research and Development Inst.)


    Physical and chemical ProPerties and combustion characteristics of propellants differ according to the combination of oxidizers and fuel components. Composite smoke propellant, having crystalline ammonium perchlorate as an oxidizer and hydrocarbon Polymer as a fuel, has higher specific impulse and improved mechanical properties compared to smokeless double base propellant consisting of nitroglycerin and nirocellulose. Double base propellants with low specific impulse are combined with nitramines( RDX or HMX ) to make composite modified double based( CMDB ) propellants, as a result the smokeless property of double base propellant is preserved and the combustion efficiency is increased. With the combination of oxidizing agents and fuels, formation of various high functional propellants has been possible and energetic azide polymers have provided possibilities for fuels of propellants. 3 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Digital filtering of plume emission spectra

    Madzsar, George C.


    Fourier transformation and digital filtering techniques were used to separate the superpositioned spectral phenomena observed in the exhaust plumes of liquid propellant rocket engines. Space shuttle main engine (SSME) spectral data were used to show that extraction of spectral lines in the spatial frequency domain does not introduce error, and extraction of the background continuum introduces only minimal error. Error introduced during band extraction could not be quantified due to poor spectrometer resolution. Based on the atomic and molecular species found in the SSME plume, it was determined that spectrometer resolution must be 0.03 nm for SSME plume spectral monitoring.

  7. Hybrid Rocket Technology

    Sankaran Venugopal


    Full Text Available With their unique operational characteristics, hybrid rockets can potentially provide safer, lower-cost avenues for spacecraft and missiles than the current solid propellant and liquid propellant systems. Classical hybrids can be throttled for thrust tailoring, perform in-flight motor shutdown and restart. In classical hybrids, the fuel is stored in the form of a solid grain, requiring only half the feed system hardware of liquid bipropellant engines. The commonly used fuels are benign, nontoxic, and not hazardous to store and transport. Solid fuel grains are not highly susceptible to cracks, imperfections, and environmental temperature and are therefore safer to manufacture, store, transport, and use for launch. The status of development based on the experience of the last few decades indicating the maturity of the hybrid rocket technology is given in brief.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(3, pp.193-200, DOI:


    Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Amidon, M.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart, L.


    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently developing a Proposed Plan (PP) for remediation of designated sources of chlorinated solvents that contribute contamination to the Southwest (SW) Groundwater Plume at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), in Paducah, KY. The principal contaminants in the SW Plume are trichloroethene (TCE) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); these industrial solvents were used and disposed in various facilities and locations at PGDP. In the SW plume area, residual TCE sources are primarily in the fine-grained sediments of the Upper Continental Recharge System (UCRS), a partially saturated zone that delivers contaminants downward into the coarse-grained Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). The RGA serves as the significant lateral groundwater transport pathway for the plume. In the SW Plume area, the four main contributing TCE source units are: (1) Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 1 / Oil Landfarm; (2) C-720 Building TCE Northeast Spill Site (SWMU 211A); (3) C-720 Building TCE Southeast Spill Site (SWMU 211B); and (4) C-747 Contaminated Burial Yard (SWMU 4). The PP presents the Preferred Alternatives for remediation of VOCs in the UCRS at the Oil Landfarm and the C-720 Building spill sites. The basis for the PP is documented in a Focused Feasibility Study (FFS) (DOE, 2011) and a Site Investigation Report (SI) (DOE, 2007). The SW plume is currently within the boundaries of PGDP (i.e., does not extend off-site). Nonetheless, reasonable mitigation of the multiple contaminant sources contributing to the SW plume is one of the necessary components identified in the PGDP End State Vision (DOE, 2005). Because of the importance of the proposed actions DOE assembled an Independent Technical Review (ITR) team to provide input and assistance in finalizing the PP.

  9. DSMC simulation of two-phase plume flow with UV radiation

    Li, Jie; Liu, Ying; Wang, Ning; Jin, Ling [College of Aerospace Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan, 410073 (China)


    Rarefied gas-particle two-phase plume in which the phase of particles is liquid or solid flows from a solid propellant rocket of hypersonic vehicle flying at high altitudes, the aluminum oxide particulates not only impact the rarefied gas flow properties, but also make a great difference to plume radiation signature, so the radiation prediction of the rarefied gas-particle two-phase plume flow is very important for space target detection of hypersonic vehicles. Accordingly, this project aims to study the rarefied gas-particle two-phase flow and ultraviolet radiation (UV) characteristics. Considering a two-way interphase coupling of momentum and energy, the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is developed for particle phase change and the particle flow, including particulate collision, coalescence as well as separation, and a Monte Carlo ray trace model is implemented for the particulate UV radiation. A program for the numerical simulation of the gas-particle two-phase flow and radiation in which the gas flow nonequilibrium is strong is implemented as well. Ultraviolet radiation characteristics of the particle phase is studied based on the calculation of the flow field coupled with the radiation calculation, the radiation model for different size particles is analyzed, focusing on the effects of particle emission, absorption, scattering as well as the searchlight emission of the nozzle. A new approach may be proposed to describe the rarefied gas-particle two-phase plume flow and radiation transfer characteristics in this project.

  10. STS-31 Discovery, OV-103, rockets through low-lying clouds after KSC liftoff


    STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, rides above the firey glow of the solid rocket boosters (SRBs) and space shuttle main engines (SSMEs) and a long trail of exhaust as it heads toward Earth orbit. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39B is covered in an exhaust cloud moments after the liftoff of OV-103 at 8:33:51.0492 am (Eastern Daylight Time (EDT)). The exhaust plume pierces the low-lying clouds as OV-103 soars into the clear skies above. A nearby waterway appears in the foreground.

  11. Thermal Hydraulics Design and Analysis Methodology for a Solid-Core Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engine Thrust Chamber

    Wang, Ten-See; Canabal, Francisco; Chen, Yen-Sen; Cheng, Gary; Ito, Yasushi


    Nuclear thermal propulsion is a leading candidate for in-space propulsion for human Mars missions. This chapter describes a thermal hydraulics design and analysis methodology developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, in support of the nuclear thermal propulsion development effort. The objective of this campaign is to bridge the design methods in the Rover/NERVA era, with a modern computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer methodology, to predict thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments of a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine the Small Engine, designed in the 1960s. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based, all speeds, chemically reacting, computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer platform, while formulations of flow and heat transfer through porous and solid media were implemented to describe those of hydrogen flow channels inside the solid24 core. Design analyses of a single flow element and the entire solid-core thrust chamber of the Small Engine were performed and the results are presented herein


    Walton, J. T.


    ELM is a simple computational tool for modeling the steady-state thermal-hydraulics of propellant flow through fuel element coolant channels in nuclear thermal rockets. Written for the nuclear propulsion project of the Space Exploration Initiative, ELM evaluates the various heat transfer coefficient and friction factor correlations available for turbulent pipe flow with heat addition. In the past, these correlations were found in different reactor analysis codes, but now comparisons are possible within one program. The logic of ELM is based on the one-dimensional conservation of energy in combination with Newton's Law of Cooling to determine the bulk flow temperature and the wall temperature across a control volume. Since the control volume is an incremental length of tube, the corresponding pressure drop is determined by application of the Law of Conservation of Momentum. The size, speed, and accuracy of ELM make it a simple tool for use in fuel element parametric studies. ELM is a machine independent program written in FORTRAN 77. It has been successfully compiled on an IBM PC compatible running MS-DOS using Lahey FORTRAN 77, a DEC VAX series computer running VMS, and a Sun4 series computer running SunOS UNIX. ELM requires 565K of RAM under SunOS 4.1, 360K of RAM under VMS 5.4, and 406K of RAM under MS-DOS. Because this program is machine independent, no executable is provided on the distribution media. The standard distribution medium for ELM is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. ELM was developed in 1991. DEC, VAX, and VMS are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation. Sun4 and SunOS are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. IBM PC is a registered trademark of International Business Machines. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

  13. Analysis of velocity-coupled response function data from the dual rotating valve. [combustion stability of solid rocket propellants

    Brown, R. S.; Waugh, R. C.


    The results of a re-evaluation of the propellant combustion data obtained using the dual valve approach for measuring velocity-coupling characteristics of solid propellants are presented. Data analysis and testing procedures are described. The velocity response is compared to pressure-coupled response data within the context of thermal wave response theory. This comparison shows important inconsistencies which cast doubt on inferring the velocity response from pressure-coupled response functions.

  14. Ground and Space-Based Measurement of Rocket Engine Burns in the Ionosphere

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Ballenthin, J. O.; Baumgardner, J. L.; Bhatt, A.; Boyd, I. D.; Burt, J. M.; Caton, R. G.; Coster, A.; Erickson, P. J.; Huba, J. D.; Earle, G. D.; Kaplan, C. R.; Foster, J. C.; Groves, K. M.; Haaser, R. A.; Heelis, R. A.; Hunton, D. E.; Hysell, D. L.; Klenzing, J. H.; Larsen, M. F.; Lind, F. D.; Pedersen, T. R.; Pfaff, R. F.; Stoneback, R. A.; Roddy, P. A.; Rodriguez, S. P.; San Antonio, G. S.; Schuck, P. W.; Siefring, C. L.; Selcher, C. A.; Smith, S. M.; Talaat, E. R.; Thomason, J. F.; Tsunoda, R. T.; Varney, R. H.


    On-orbit firings of both liquid and solid rocket motors provide localized disturbances to the plasma in the upper atmosphere. Large amounts of energy are deposited to ionosphere in the form of expanding exhaust vapors which change the composition and flow velocity. Charge exchange between the neutral exhaust molecules and the background ions (mainly O+) yields energetic ion beams. The rapidly moving pickup ions excite plasma instabilities and yield optical emissions after dissociative recombination with ambient electrons. Line-of-sight techniques for remote measurements rocket burn effects include direct observation of plume optical emissions with ground and satellite cameras, and plume scatter with UHF and higher frequency radars. Long range detection with HF radars is possible if the burns occur in the dense part of the ionosphere. The exhaust vapors initiate plasma turbulence in the ionosphere that can scatter HF radar waves launched from ground transmitters. Solid rocket motors provide particulates that become charged in the ionosphere and may excite dusty plasma instabilities. Hypersonic exhaust flow impacting the ionospheric plasma launches a low-frequency, electromagnetic pulse that is detectable using satellites with electric field booms. If the exhaust cloud itself passes over a satellite, in situ detectors measure increased ion-acoustic wave turbulence, enhanced neutral and plasma densities, elevated ion temperatures, and magnetic field perturbations. All of these techniques can be used for long range observations of plumes in the ionosphere. To demonstrate such long range measurements, several experiments were conducted by the Naval Research Laboratory including the Charged Aerosol Release Experiment, the Shuttle Ionospheric Modification with Pulsed Localized Exhaust experiments, and the Shuttle Exhaust Ionospheric Turbulence Experiments.

  15. Optimization of Tape Winding Process Parameters to Enhance the Performance of Solid Rocket Nozzle Throat Back Up Liners using Taguchi's Robust Design Methodology

    Nath, Nayani Kishore


    The throat back up liners is used to protect the nozzle structural members from the severe thermal environment in solid rocket nozzles. The throat back up liners is made with E-glass phenolic prepregs by tape winding process. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the optimization of process parameters of tape winding process to achieve better insulative resistance using Taguchi's robust design methodology. In this method four control factors machine speed, roller pressure, tape tension, tape temperature that were investigated for the tape winding process. The presented work was to study the cogency and acceptability of Taguchi's methodology in manufacturing of throat back up liners. The quality characteristic identified was Back wall temperature. Experiments carried out using L{9/'} (34) orthogonal array with three levels of four different control factors. The test results were analyzed using smaller the better criteria for Signal to Noise ratio in order to optimize the process. The experimental results were analyzed conformed and successfully used to achieve the minimum back wall temperature of the throat back up liners. The enhancement in performance of the throat back up liners was observed by carrying out the oxy-acetylene tests. The influence of back wall temperature on the performance of throat back up liners was verified by ground firing test.

  16. The Analysis for Grain Structural Integrity of a Certain Solid Rocket Motor%某发动机装药结构完整性分析

    张亮; 邢国强


    Based on three-dimension viscoelastic finite element method, by MSC/NASTRAN software system, the grain structural integrity of the motor under internal pressure load, under thermal load and under the combined action of the two load is analyzed and evaluatedrespectively. The results show that the grain structural integrity of the solid rocket motor meets the design requirement satisfaction.%基于三维粘弹性有限元模型,应用MSC/NASTRAN软件对某发动机分别在固化降温、燃气内压载荷条件下的装药结构完整性进行分析,并对该发动机在固化降温、燃气内压两种载荷联合作用下的装药结构完整性进行评估。结果表明,该发动机的装药结构完整性满足要求。

  17. Adsorption and chemical reaction of gaseous mixtures of hydrogen chloride and water on aluminum oxide and application to solid-propellant rocket exhaust clouds

    Cofer, W. R., III; Pellett, G. L.


    Hydrogen chloride (HCl) and aluminum oxide (Al2O3) are major exhaust products of solid rocket motors (SRM). Samples of calcination-produced alumina were exposed to continuously flowing mixtures of gaseous HCl/H2O in nitrogen. Transient sorption rates, as well as maximum sorptive capacities, were found to be largely controlled by specific surface area for samples of alpha, theta, and gamma alumina. Sorption rates for small samples were characterized linearly with an empirical relationship that accounted for specific area and logarithmic time. Chemisorption occurred on all aluminas studied and appeared to form from the sorption of about a 2/5 HCl-to-H2O mole ratio. The chemisorbed phase was predominantly water soluble, yielding chloride/aluminum III ion mole ratios of about 3.3/1 suggestive of dissolved surface chlorides and/or oxychlorides. Isopiestic experiments in hydrochloric acid indicated that dissolution of alumina led to an increase in water-vapor pressure. Dissolution in aqueous SRM acid aerosol droplets, therefore, might be expected to promote evaporation.

  18. FEM Modelling and Oscillation Analysis of Solid Propellant Rocket Motor%固体火箭发动机柔性喷管有限元建模及摆动分析

    王成林; 刘勇; 文立华


    The methods of FEM Modelling and Oscillation Analysis of Solid Propellant Rocket Motor were explores. The FEM model of flexible nozzle using the equivalent model of flexible joint based on the three-direction custom spring elements is build; modify the FEM model of the flexible joint according to the experiment data; and carry out the oscillation analysis of solid propellant rocket motor.%研究了固态火箭发动机柔性喷管有限元建模及摆动分析方法.利用基于自定义三向弹簧单元的柔性接头线性等效模型,建立了发动机柔性喷管有限元模型.根据试验数据对柔性接头模型进行修正,并对发动机柔性喷管进行了摆动分析.

  19. 高精度小型固体火箭发动机184性能检测系统研究%Research on the Performance Detecting System of High-precision Small-scale Solid Rocket Motor

    冯喜平; 董韬; 李进贤; 曹琪


    针对固体火箭发动机研制和生产中的性能检测需求,基于柔性试验架建立试验平台,采用虚拟仪器技术搭建测控平台,使用LabvieW7.1开发一套包含参数标定、数据测量、数据处理等模块的固体火箭发动机性能检测试验测控软件,构建了固体火箭发动机性能检测系统。通过对标准发动机进行测试,结果表明:该系统实现了发动机参数的现场方便标定、发动机数据的高速采集和实验数据的快速处理,测量精度达到0.3%的工程要求,并同步监测了整个发动机的工作过程,满足了发动机性能检测的高精度要求。%According to the performance detecting requirements in development and manufacture of solid rocket motor, a test platform has been set up based on flexible test stand, in which the measurement and control platform has been built using virtual instrument technology ; a set of solid rocket motor ground test performance detecting software including parameter calibration model, data measure model and data processing model have been developed based on the LabViewT. 1 ; and the solid rocket motor performance detecting system was built. The application results through testing normative solid rocket motor show that: this system could actualize parameter calibration expediently, experimental data collection and processing rapidly, even reach the measurement precision by 0.3% required in projects and could monitor the testing process of solid rocket motor simultaneously, which satisfied high-precision requirements of motor performance detection.

  20. 固体火箭发动机环缝式气动喉部研究%Investigation of ring aerodynamic throat for solid rocket motor

    谢侃; 刘宇; 王一白


    对固体火箭发动机气体二次流控制的环缝式气动喉部方案进行了数值模拟.研究了二次流不同喷射位置、角度、流率及喷嘴几何参数对气动喉部调节性能的影响规律.计算得到了气动喉部的流场特征,即气动喉部的声速线起点在二次流喷口的下游,并得到了气动喉部特征存在的喷注范围.结果还表明使二次流的喷入位置越靠近喉部、增大二次流流量或减小喷射角度都能明显增加气动喉部调节性能.%A ring aerodynamic throat concept of solid rocket motor controlled by secondary injection was simulated numerically. The influence and rules of secondary flow injection positions, injection angle, secondary flow rate and injector geometry parameters on the performance of aerodynamic throat were studied. The flow field character of aerodynamic throat was attained by calculation, namely: the starting point of sonic line from the downstream of secondary injection outlet. And the scope of injection positions for the existence of aerodynamic throat character was also attained. The results show that, the performance of aerodynamic throat can be obviously increased by making secondary flow injector close to the throat, increasing secondary flow rate or decreasing secondary flow injection angle.

  1. 某发动机石墨喉衬的裂纹成因分析%Graphite throat insert cracks analysis of a solid rocket motor

    熊波; 白彦军; 唐敏


    确保石墨喉衬在工作期间的结构完整性是某级间分离固体发动机设计的重要任务,初步设计方案经试车考核后,部分石墨喉衬出现了裂纹。针对该发动机喷管进行了喉衬热结构仿真分析,获得了不同危险点的应力大小和状态,并探讨了该喉衬裂纹的成因。结果表明,喷管仿真分析结果与实际试车结果吻合较好,点火初期石墨喉衬在大梯度的温度和压力冲击下,内部易产生较大的热应力,若石墨材料轴向拉伸强度不足,将可能导致裂纹出现。%A solid rocket motor is used for the separation of new launch vehicle stage. One of the important tasks is to ensure the integrality of graphite throat insert in the firing time. After experiment of the initial design, crack was observed in some of the throat insert was proposed. A simulation analysis method for throat insert thermal structure was proposed. The reason for the crack was explored. The results show that, in the initial time of firing, interior of graphite throat may produce great thermal stress under large gradient temperature and pressure, and the insufficiency of tensile strength in axial direction gives birth to the crack.

  2. 固体火箭发动机药柱加压固化仿真%Simulation on pressure cure of solid rocket motor grain

    宗路航; 杜聪; 卢山; 姚东; 郜婕; 沙宝林


    For those case-bonded casting solid rocket motors ( SRMs) with large outside/inside radius ratio of the grain, high thermal strain will be generated in the propellant grain subjected to thermal loading, which significantly limit the performance of SRM. Pressure cure is an effective method to reduce the thermal strain in the grain. In this paper, the theory of pressure cure was analyzed and the relationship between the desired pressure and the parameters of the SRM was deduced. Then, a finite element method ( FEM) of pressure cure named two step method was proposed. Theoretical calculation and FEM simulation were carried out on a tube motor with four different material cases. The recommended pressure of pressure cure of four cases were given out.%对于药柱外/内径比(m数)很大的贴壁浇注式固体火箭发动机,在固化降温后,推进剂药柱内会产生显著的热应变,这严重限制了发动机的进一步高性能化. 加压固化是一种降低推进剂药柱内热应变的有效方法. 文中分析了加压固化的原理,推导出了加压固化所需压强与发动机参数之间的关系式,提出了一种两步分析法的加压固化有限元分析方法. 针对4种不同壳体材料的圆管发动机,进行了加压固化理论计算与有限元仿真分析,给出了4种壳体加压固化时的推荐压强.

  3. Rocket Tablet,


    is a vast and desolate world, this is a strip of mir- aculous land! How many struggling dramas full of power and * grandeur were cheered, resisted and...rocket officers and men, a group enormous and powerful , marched into this land soaked with the fresh blood of our ancestors. This place is about to...and tough pestering said he wanted an American aircraft ob- tained on the battlefield to transport goods from Lanzhou, Xian, Beijing, Guangzhou and

  4. Numerical Analysis on the Thermal Safety of Solid Rocket Motor Propellant%固体发动机装药热安全性数值分析

    刘文一; 焦冀光


    Objective To investigate the safety of solid rocket motor(SRM)when it was cook-off. Methods Finite element model of solid SRM was established, and the temperature distribution and the explosion delay time of propellant in fast cook-off mode and slow cook- off mode were computed. Results Propellant reached its critical temperature (352 ℃) after 47 h slow cook-off, while it reached its critical temperature (355 ℃) after 697 s fast cook-off. Conclusion It was proven that the thermal diffusivity in fast cook-off mode was greater than that in slow cook-off mode, while the temperature gradient had an opposite trend. The reaction position of propellant was different in the two different working modes when it reached critical temperature, and the thermal storage capacity of propellant was dependent on its thickness.%目的:研究固体火箭发动机遭受火烤时的安全性。方法建立发动机有限元模型,计算推进剂在慢速烤燃和快速烤燃工况下的温度分布和爆炸延迟时间。结果推进剂慢烤47 h后达到临界温度,其值为352℃;快烤推进剂加热697 s后达到临界温度,临界温度为355℃。结论推进剂在快速烤燃模式下的热扩散速率大于慢速烤燃工况下,但是温度梯度则相反。两种工况下推进剂达到临界温度后开始反应的位置不同,推进剂厚度决定了其储热能力。

  5. Skylon Aerodynamics and SABRE Plumes

    Mehta, Unmeel; Afosmis, Michael; Bowles, Jeffrey; Pandya, Shishir


    An independent partial assessment is provided of the technical viability of the Skylon aerospace plane concept, developed by Reaction Engines Limited (REL). The objectives are to verify REL's engineering estimates of airframe aerodynamics during powered flight and to assess the impact of Synergetic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine (SABRE) plumes on the aft fuselage. Pressure lift and drag coefficients derived from simulations conducted with Euler equations for unpowered flight compare very well with those REL computed with engineering methods. The REL coefficients for powered flight are increasingly less acceptable as the freestream Mach number is increased beyond 8.5, because the engineering estimates did not account for the increasing favorable (in terms of drag and lift coefficients) effect of underexpanded rocket engine plumes on the aft fuselage. At Mach numbers greater than 8.5, the thermal environment around the aft fuselage is a known unknown-a potential design and/or performance risk issue. The adverse effects of shock waves on the aft fuselage and plumeinduced flow separation are other potential risks. The development of an operational reusable launcher from the Skylon concept necessitates the judicious use of a combination of engineering methods, advanced methods based on required physics or analytical fidelity, test data, and independent assessments.

  6. The four INTA-300 rocket prototypes

    Calero, J. S.


    A development history and performance capability assessment is presented for the INTA-300 'Flamenco' sounding rocket prototype specimens. The Flamenco is a two-stage solid fuel rocket, based on British sounding rocket technology, that can lift 50 km payloads to altitudes of about 300 km. The flight of the first two prototypes, in 1974 and 1975, pointed to vibration problems which reduced the achievable apogee, and the third prototype's flight was marred by a premature detonation that destroyed the rocket. The fourth Flamenco flight, however, yielded much reliable data.


    This presentation presents an assessment of plume diving. Observations included: vertical plume delineation at East Patchogue, NY showed BTEX and MTBE plumes sinking on either side of a gravel pit; Lake Druid TCE plume sank beneath unlined drainage ditch; and aquifer recharge/dis...

  8. Investigations of Rocket Engine Combustion Emissions During ACCENT

    Ross, M. N.; Friedl, R. R.


    The composition of rocket combustion emissions and the atmospheric processes that determine their stratospheric impacts are poorly understood. While present day rocket emissions do not significantly affect stratospheric chemistry, the potential for vigorous growth of the space transportation industry in coming decades suggests that rocket emissions and their stratospheric impacts should be better understood. A variety of in-situ measurements and modeling results were obtained during the Atmospheric Chemistry of Combustion Emissions Near the Tropopause (ACCENT) effort that will be used to evaluate the role of rocket exhaust in perturbing ozone chemistry in plume wakes and in the global stratosphere. We present a review of the ACCENT rocket emissions science objectives, summarize data obtained during the WB-57F plume wake sorties, and briefly discuss how the data will help resolve several outstanding questions regarding the impact of rocket emissions on the stratosphere. These include measurement of the emission indices for several important rocket engine combustion products and validation of plume wake chemistry models.

  9. Plume Mitigation: Soil Erosion and Lunar Prospecting Sensor Project

    Metzger, Philip T.


    Demonstrate feasibility of the simplest, lowest-mass method of measuring density of a cloud of lunar soil ejected by rocket exhaust, using new math techniques with a small baseline laser/camera system. Focus is on exploring the erosion process that occurs when the exhaust plume of a lunar rocket impacts the regolith. Also, predicting the behavior of the lunar soil that would be blasted from a lunar landing/launch site shall assist in better design and protection of any future lunar settlement from scouring of structures and equipment. NASA is gathering experimental data to improve soil erosion models and understand how lunar particles enter the plume flow.

  10. Development of Kabila rocket: A radioisotope heated thermionic plasma rocket engine


    A new type of plasma rocket engine, the Kabila rocket, using a radioisotope heated thermionic heating chamber instead of a conventional combustion chamber or catalyst bed is introduced and it achieves specific impulses similar to the ones of conventional solid and bipropellant rockets. Curium-244 is chosen as a radioisotope heat source and a thermal reductive layer is also used to obtain precise thermionic emissions. The self-sufficiency principle is applied by simultaneously heating up the e...

  11. Process-Hardened, Multi-Analyte Sensor for Characterizing Rocket Plum Constituents Under Test Environment Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This STTR project aims to develop a process-hardened, simple and low cost multi-analyte sensor for detecting components of rocket engine plumes. The sensor will be...

  12. Design of Solid-fuel Rocket Attitude Control System Based on Monte Carlo Method%基于蒙特卡罗方法的固体火箭姿态控制系统设计

    王辰琳; 赵长见; 宋志国


    在固体火箭姿态控制系统设计过程中,为保证设计结果的可靠性,需要针对发动机性能、全箭质量及气动参数等进行拉偏仿真分析,各项偏差的大小及使用方法直接影响对固体火箭控制能力的需求。传统固体火箭姿态控制系统设计时,一般针对各项偏差进行极限拉偏组合仿真,导致设计结果较为保守。针对总体各项偏差量,建立概率模型,采用蒙特卡罗方法进行控制力分析。数学仿真结果表明,相比传统设计方法,在保证系统具有一定的可靠度情况下,大幅降低了对姿态控制系统的需求,优化了系统方案。%In the design process of solid-fuel rocket attitude control system, it is necessary to simulate based on population deviations of engine performance, whole solid-fuel rocket mass and aerodynamic parameter in order to assure the reliability of design results, because the using method of deviation factors are accounted for the demand of solid-fuel rocket control. The extreme value of population deviations are taken in the traditional design method, but it leads to more conservative design results. The probability models of population deviations are established, and then Monte Carlo methods are introduced to analysis the controlling force. The simulated results show that, compared to the traditional design method, the probability design method reduces the demand of solid-fuel rocket attitude control system and optimizes the system design scheme obviously.

  13. Improving of Hybrid Rocket Engine on the Basis of Optimizing Design Fuel Grain

    Oriekov, K. M.; Ushkin, M. P.


    This article examines the processes intrachamber in hybrid rocket engine (HRE) and the comparative assessment of the use of solid rocket motors (SRM) and HRE for meteorological rockets with a mass of payload of the 364 kg. Results of the research showed the possibility of a significant increase in the ballistic effectiveness of meteorological rocket.

  14. Research on Integrative Bonding Process of Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle%固体火箭发动机喷管一体化粘接工艺研究

    王纪霞; 包乐; 胡大宁; 张崇耿; 张新航


    Influence factors on nozzle bonding property including temperature, adhesive, bonding process and gap between metal shell and insert were analyzed to satisfy integrative bonding process of some solid rocket nozzle. The result of the test indicated that the best bonding process was found through controlling the factors, and the reliability of solid rocket was protected.%为了满足固体火箭发动机喷管一体化的粘接要求,提高产品的粘接质量,分析了胶粘剂性能、粘接工艺、温度及内衬与壳体的配合间隙对喷管粘接质量的影响,结果表明,通过控制影响一体化喷管粘接的各种因素,得出了最佳的工艺生产条件,保证了发动机工作的可靠性。

  15. Mixing and reaction processes in rocket based combined cycle and conventional rocket engines

    Lehman, Matthew Kurt

    Raman spectroscopy was used to make species measurements in two rocket engines. An airbreathing rocket, the rocket based combined cycle (RBCC) engine, and a conventional rocket were investigated. A supersonic rocket plume mixing with subsonic coflowing air characterizes the ejector mode of the RBCC engine. The mixing length required for the air and plume to become homogenous is a critical dimension. For the conventional rocket experiments, a gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen single-element shear coaxial injector was used. Three chamber Mach number conditions, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3, were chosen to assess the effect of Mach number on mixing. The flow within the chamber was entirely subsonic. For the RBCC experiments, vertical Raman line measurements were made at multiple axial locations downstream from the rocket nozzle plane. Species profiles assessed the mixing progress between the supersonic plume and subsonic air. For the conventional rocket, Raman line measurements were made downstream from the injector face. The goal was to evaluate the effect of increased chamber Mach number on injector mixing/reaction. For both engines, quantitative and qualitative information was collected for computational fluid dynamics (CFD development. The RBCC experiments were conducted for three distinct geometries. The primary flow path was a diffuse and afterburner design with a direct-connect air supply. A sea-level static (SLS) version and a thermally choked variant were also tested. The experimental results show that mixing length increases with additional coflow air in the DAB geometry. Operation of variable rocket mixture ratios at identical air flow rates did not significantly affect the mixing length. The thermally choked variant had a longer mixing length compared to the DAB geometry, and the SLS modification had a shorter mixing length due to a reduced air flow. The conventional rocket studies focused on the effect of chamber Mach number on primary injector mixing. Chamber Mach

  16. Effects of rocket engines on laser during lunar landing

    Wan, Xiong, E-mail: [Key Laboratory of Space Active Opto-Electronics Technology, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 200083 (China); Key Laboratory of Nondestructive Test (Ministry of Education), Nanchang Hangkong University, Nanchang 330063 (China); Shu, Rong; Huang, Genghua [Key Laboratory of Space Active Opto-Electronics Technology, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 200083 (China)


    In the Chinese moon exploration project “ChangE-3”, the laser telemeter and lidar are important equipments on the lunar landing vehicle. A low-thrust vernier rocket engine works during the soft landing, whose plume may influence on the laser equipments. An experiment has first been accomplished to evaluate the influence of the plume on the propagation characteristics of infrared laser under the vacuum condition. Combination with our theoretical analysis has given an appropriate assessment of the plume's effects on the infrared laser hence providing a valuable basis for the design of lunar landing systems.

  17. Multiple dopant injection system for small rocket engines

    Sakala, G. G.; Raines, N. G.


    The Diagnostics Test Facility (DTF) at NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC) was designed and built to provide a standard rocket engine exhaust plume for use in the research and development of engine health monitoring instrumentation. A 1000 lb thrust class liquid oxygen (LOX)-gaseous hydrogen (GH2) fueled rocket engine is used as the subscale plume source to simulate the SSME during experimentation and instrument development. The ability of the DTF to provide efficient, and low cost test operations makes it uniquely suited for plume diagnostic experimentation. The most unique feature of the DTF is the Multiple Dopant Injection System (MDIS) that is used to seed the exhaust plume with the desired element or metal alloy. The dopant injection takes place at the fuel injector, yielding a very uniform and homogeneous distribution of the seeding material in the exhaust plume. The MDIS allows during a single test firing of the DTF, the seeding of the exhaust plume with up to three different dopants and also provides distilled water base lines between the dopants. A number of plume diagnostic-related experiments have already utilized the unique capabilities of the DTF.

  18. Replacement of chemical rocket launchers by beamed energy propulsion.

    Fukunari, Masafumi; Arnault, Anthony; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Komurasaki, Kimiya


    Microwave Rocket is a beamed energy propulsion system that is expected to reach space at drastically lower cost. This cost reduction is estimated by replacing the first-stage engine and solid rocket boosters of the Japanese H-IIB rocket with Microwave Rocket, using a recently developed thrust model in which thrust is generated through repetitively pulsed microwave detonation with a reed-valve air-breathing system. Results show that Microwave Rocket trajectory, in terms of velocity versus altitude, can be designed similarly to the current H-IIB first stage trajectory. Moreover, the payload ratio can be increased by 450%, resulting in launch-cost reduction of 74%.

  19. A computational scheme usable for calculating the plume backflow region

    Cooper, B. P., Jr.


    The effects of the nozzle wall boundary layer on the plume flowfield are neglected in the majority of computational schemes which exist for the calculation of rocket engine exhaust plume flowfields. This neglect, which is unimportant in many applications, becomes unacceptable for applications where a surface which can be adversely affected by plume impingement forces, heating, or contamination is located behind the nozzle exit plane in what is called the 'plume backflow region'. The flow in this region originates in, and is highly affected by, the nozzle wall boundary layer. The inclusion of the effects of the boundary layer in the calculations is required for an appropriate determination of the flowfield properties within this region. A description is presented of the results of modifications of a method-of-characteristics computer program. The modifications were made to include the effects of the nozzle wall boundary layer on the plume flowfield. A comparison of computed and experimental data indicates that the employed computer program may be a useful tool for calculating the entire plume flowfield for liquid propellant rocket engines.

  20. Improved hybrid rocket fuel

    Dean, David L.


    McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, as part of its Independent R&D, has initiated development of a clean burning, high performance hybrid fuel for consideration as an alternative to the solid rocket thrust augmentation currently utilized by American space launch systems including Atlas, Delta, Pegasus, Space Shuttle, and Titan. It could also be used in single stage to orbit or as the only propulsion system in a new launch vehicle. Compared to solid propellants based on aluminum and ammonium perchlorate, this fuel is more environmentally benign in that it totally eliminates hydrogen chloride and aluminum oxide by products, producing only water, hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon oxides, and trace amounts of nitrogen oxides. Compared to other hybrid fuel formulations under development, this fuel is cheaper, denser, and faster burning. The specific impulse of this fuel is comparable to other hybrid fuels and is between that of solids and liquids. The fuel also requires less oxygen than similar hybrid fuels to produce maximum specific impulse, thus reducing oxygen delivery system requirements.

  1. Rocket propulsion elements

    Sutton, George P


    The definitive text on rocket propulsion-now revised to reflect advancements in the field For sixty years, Sutton's Rocket Propulsion Elements has been regarded as the single most authoritative sourcebook on rocket propulsion technology. As with the previous edition, coauthored with Oscar Biblarz, the Eighth Edition of Rocket Propulsion Elements offers a thorough introduction to basic principles of rocket propulsion for guided missiles, space flight, or satellite flight. It describes the physical mechanisms and designs for various types of rockets' and provides an unders

  2. Study on Horizontal Docking Assembly Method for Segment Thin-walled Solid Rocket Motor with Large Opening%薄壁大开口分段固体发动机卧式对接装配研究

    彭莎莎; 刘永盛; 宗路航; 罗玲莉; 苏昌银


    对薄壁大开口分段固体发动机卧式对接装配进行研究,应用ANSYS软件对燃烧室在重力作用下的应力、应变云图进行分析,提出变形识别与安全校正是解决结构件形变的一种方法。采用径向圆周10点均分校正法,采集燃烧室对接径向U型件边沿的变形量,制定了燃烧室变形安全校正值,经校正后中段与前段燃烧室对接径向边沿的10个点之间距离最大值为0.02mm。实现了Φ2m/分段式大型发动机对接装配。经Φ2m/分段式发动机地面试车获得成功证实校正值合理。%In this paper, the horizontal docking assembly of segment thin-walled large opening solid rocket motor is analyzed. The stress and strain of combustion chamber under the gravity is analyzed by ANSYS software and then deformation recognition and safe correction are proposed to prevent deformation of structural parts. The radial circular 10 average points correction method is used to collect the deformation amount of docking radial direction of edge of the U-shaped part, and to devise the safety correction value of deformation of single and double combustion chamber. Finally it is proved that the biggest gap of docking radial edge of 10 points between front and middle chamber is 0.02mm using different angle correction. Docking assembly of 2m/ segment solid rocket motor is realized and the correction value is proved reasonable after the success of ground fire test of 2m/segment solid rocket motor.

  3. Computation of ablation of thermal-protection layer in long-time working solid rocket motors%长时间工作固体火箭发动机燃烧室热防护层烧蚀计算

    张斌; 刘宇; 王长辉; 任军学


    为了研究长时间工作固体火箭发动机燃烧室的热防护性能,运用三方程烧蚀模型和运动边界显示差分格式,对长时间固体火箭发动机内绝热层烧蚀及温度场进行了耦合计算.计算得到了化学烧蚀率、扩散烧蚀率、燃烧室内壁温度等参数.计算结果表明,所研究的长时间工作发动机燃烧室烧蚀由扩散过程控制.此外,在求解烧蚀子程序时,提出了一种简便有效的赋初值方法.采用文中方法在得到合理计算结果的同时,使得烧蚀计算时间大大缩短.该项研究为长时间工作固体火箭发动机燃烧室热防护层设计提供了有效的分析手段.%In order to study thermal-protection function of long-time working solid rocket motors, insulation ablation and temperature field of long-time working solid rocket motors were coupling calculated by moving boundary explicit-difference method and three equations ablation model. Ablation velocity caused by chemical reaction or diffnsion process and temperature of inner wall were calculated. Numerical results show that the ablation is restricted by the diffusion process. In addition, when solving the ablation subroutine,a convenient and effective method for setting initial value was proposed. Using this new method, the reasonable results were obtained and the calculation time was greatly decreased. This research can offer an effective analytical method for long-time working solid rocket motors.

  4. Nitrous Oxide/Paraffin Hybrid Rocket Engines

    Zubrin, Robert; Snyder, Gary


    Nitrous oxide/paraffin (N2OP) hybrid rocket engines have been invented as alternatives to other rocket engines especially those that burn granular, rubbery solid fuels consisting largely of hydroxyl- terminated polybutadiene (HTPB). Originally intended for use in launching spacecraft, these engines would also be suitable for terrestrial use in rocket-assisted takeoff of small airplanes. The main novel features of these engines are (1) the use of reinforced paraffin as the fuel and (2) the use of nitrous oxide as the oxidizer. Hybrid (solid-fuel/fluid-oxidizer) rocket engines offer advantages of safety and simplicity over fluid-bipropellant (fluid-fuel/fluid-oxidizer) rocket en - gines, but the thrusts of HTPB-based hybrid rocket engines are limited by the low regression rates of the fuel grains. Paraffin used as a solid fuel has a regression rate about 4 times that of HTPB, but pure paraffin fuel grains soften when heated; hence, paraffin fuel grains can, potentially, slump during firing. In a hybrid engine of the present type, the paraffin is molded into a 3-volume-percent graphite sponge or similar carbon matrix, which supports the paraffin against slumping during firing. In addition, because the carbon matrix material burns along with the paraffin, engine performance is not appreciably degraded by use of the matrix.

  5. Spacecraft plume interactions with the magnetosphere plasma environment in geostationary Earth orbit

    Stephani, K. A.; Boyd, I. D.


    Particle-based kinetic simulations of steady and unsteady hydrazine chemical rocket plumes are presented in a study of plume interactions with the ambient magnetosphere in geostationary Earth orbit. The hydrazine chemical rocket plume expands into a near-vacuum plasma environment, requiring the use of a combined direct simulation Monte Carlo/particle-in-cell methodology for the rarefied plasma conditions. Detailed total and differential cross sections are employed to characterize the charge exchange reactions between the neutral hydrazine plume mixture and the ambient hydrogen ions, and ion production is also modeled for photoionization processes. These ionization processes lead to an increase in local plasma density surrounding the spacecraft owing to a partial ionization of the relatively high-density hydrazine plume. Results from the steady plume simulations indicate that the formation of the hydrazine ion plume are driven by several competing mechanisms, including (1) local depletion and (2) replenishing of ambient H+ ions by charge exchange and thermal motion of 1 keV H+ from the ambient reservoir, respectively, and (3) photoionization processes. The self-consistent electrostatic field forces and the geostationary magnetic field have only a small influence on the dynamics of the ion plume. The unsteady plume simulations show a variation in neutral and ion plume dissipation times consistent with the variation in relative diffusion rates of the chemical species, with full H2 dissipation (below the ambient number density levels) approximately 33 s after a 2 s thruster burn.

  6. Ablative Rocket Deflector Testing and Computational Modeling

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Lott, Jeffrey W.; Raines, Nickey


    A deflector risk mitigation program was recently conducted at the NASA Stennis Space Center. The primary objective was to develop a database that characterizes the behavior of industry-grade refractory materials subjected to rocket plume impingement conditions commonly experienced on static test stands. The program consisted of short and long duration engine tests where the supersonic exhaust flow from the engine impinged on an ablative panel. Quasi time-dependent erosion depths and patterns generated by the plume impingement were recorded for a variety of different ablative materials. The erosion behavior was found to be highly dependent on the material s composition and corresponding thermal properties. For example, in the case of the HP CAST 93Z ablative material, the erosion rate actually decreased under continued thermal heating conditions due to the formation of a low thermal conductivity "crystallization" layer. The "crystallization" layer produced near the surface of the material provided an effective insulation from the hot rocket exhaust plume. To gain further insight into the complex interaction of the plume with the ablative deflector, computational fluid dynamic modeling was performed in parallel to the ablative panel testing. The results from the current study demonstrated that locally high heating occurred due to shock reflections. These localized regions of shock-induced heat flux resulted in non-uniform erosion of the ablative panels. In turn, it was observed that the non-uniform erosion exacerbated the localized shock heating causing eventual plume separation and reversed flow for long duration tests under certain conditions. Overall, the flow simulations compared very well with the available experimental data obtained during this project.

  7. Solar Thermal Rocket Propulsion

    Sercel, J. C.


    Paper analyzes potential of solar thermal rockets as means of propulsion for planetary spacecraft. Solar thermal rocket uses concentrated Sunlight to heat working fluid expelled through nozzle to produce thrust.

  8. High-Fidelity Gas and Granular Flow Physics Models for Rocket Exhaust Interaction with Lunar Soil Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current modeling of Lunar and Martian soil erosion and debris transport caused by rocket plume impingement lacks essential physics from the peculiar granular...

  9. Factors of Influencing Bond Characteristics at II Interface of a Single Chamber Dual Thrust Solid Rocket Motor Grains%一种单室双推力发动机装药Ⅱ界面粘接性能研究

    何德伟; 刘戎; 侯少锋


    Based on the properties of single chamber dual thrust solid rocket motor grain,the effects of the thickness of thermal insulation,liner pre-curing and the vertical storage of pre-cured liner in vacuum on the bond characteristics at II interface were discussed in this paper.Some technical methods were proposed for improving the bond properties at interface.%根据单室双推力发动机装药的特点,对厚度绝热层、衬层的预反应及预固化衬层在真空状态下垂直存放等绝热衬层加工工艺条件对装药Ⅱ界面粘接性能的影响进行了研究,并提出了改善界面性能的技术途径。

  10. Effects of Ignition Process on the Internal Ballistics of Small-size Solid Rocket Motor%点火过程对小型固体火箭发动机内弹道影响

    刘赟; 王浩; 陶如意; 朱德龙


    为了研究某小型固体火箭发动机点火过程对内弹道性能的影响,建立包含点火过程的小型固体火箭发动机的内弹道数值研究模型和试验验证方案,对点火药量为1.0g、0.8g、0.6g和0.4g的发动机进行了内弹道数值研究,试验研究了点火药量为1.0g和0.8g两种情况,数值计算结果与试验结果基本一致.研究结果表明:小型固体火箭发动机由于燃烧室体积小,点火过程对内弹道影响明显;点火药量越大,点火药装填密度越大,引起压力峰值越大,稳定工作时间越短;经验估算得到的1.0g点火药量产生了过高的压力,是稳定压力的三倍,0.8g的点火药量能够满足点火可靠性和总体设计要求,产生最大压力为27.08 MPa,稳定工作时长159 ms,建议该小型火箭发动机的点火药量为0.8g.%To study the effects of ignition process on interior ballistic performance of a small-size solid rocket motor,the model for interior ballistic calculation including ignition process of small-size solid rocket motor and verification plan were set up. The numerical calculations interior ballistic performance with 1.0 g,0.8 g,0,6 g and 0.4 g igniter masses were carried out. The tests of 1.0 g and 0.8 g igniter mass were done. The compute result and test data were basically consistent. The results indicated that; the effect of ignition process on interior ballistic about small-size solid rocket motor is obvious for the small combustion chamber volume. The igniting charge density and pressure peak increase .stable operating time of motor decreases as the igniter mass increases. The 1.0 g igniter mass is estimated by empirical formula,1.0 g igniter mass brings too high pressure to motor,the value of pressure reaches three times the stable pressure. 0.8 g igniter mass meets ignition reliability and general design requirements,and the maximum pressure is 27.08 MPa,and stable work time is 159 ms,and 0.8 g igniter mass is suggested for the

  11. 固体火箭发动机自动回转系统的设计与实现%Design and Implementation of Auto-rotation System for Solid Rocket Engine

    赵锴; 何敏; 于殿泓; 郑毅


    In the process of high energy X-ray radiography detection, the disadvantages of low control accuracy and difficult radiation-proof for operators exist in manually controlling the rotation of solid rocket engine. Thus, the auto-rotation system based on OMRON CQM1H PLC has been designed. Two operating modes: auto and manual are equipped in this system to implement remote and high accurate automatic rotating function for solid rocket engine. The practice shows that the system features high stability and reliability, ease maintenance, and satisfies the requirements of explosion-proof, safety and high reliability.%在对固体火箭发动机进行高能X射线照相检测的过程中,针对采用人工方式存在回转固体火箭发动机存在控制精度不高、人员辐射防护困难等问题,设计了一种基于OMRON CQM1H PLC的自动回转系统.系统具备手动和自动两种运行模式,实现了固体火箭发动机的远程、高精度和自动化回转控制功能.实际应用表明,系统稳定性好、可靠性高且易于维护,符合检测现场防爆安全和高可靠性的要求.

  12. Mechanics Numerical Simulation of Filament ̄wound Solid Rocket Motor Shell%纤维缠绕固体火箭发动机壳体的力学数值仿真

    王凯; 鞠玉涛


    针对某种纤维缠绕复合材料固体火箭发动机壳体,依据原壳体在ABAQUS中建立了有限元模型,建模过程中将纤维缠绕层视为层合板来处理,简化了模型,并对发射瞬态进行有限元数值计算,分别求出了环向层6层的应力和缠绕层6层的应力,以便于强度分析,并对于铺层方案进行求解,得出数据结论,数据结果与实际情况符合,研究结果为纤维缠绕固体火箭发动机优化分析提供了理论依据。%Aiming at some certain kind of filament ̄wound composite solid rocket motor shel,on the basis of the original shel,the fi ̄nite element model is established. During the process of modeling,the filament winding layers are regarded as the laminated plate,and the finite element numerical calculation of the instantaneous state of the firing is done. Throug the stress calculation,its strength is analyzed to find the way of laying down that it needs to meet the strength requirement. The results provide a theoretical basis for better analysis of filament ̄wound solid rocket motor.

  13. A plume spectroscopy system for flight applications

    Makel, D. B.; Petersen, T. V.; Duncan, D. B.; Madzsar, G. C.


    An operational plume spectroscopy system will be an important element of any rocket engine health management system (HMS). The flight capable FPI spectrometer will enable prognosis and response to incipient rocket engine failures as well as diagnosis of wear and degradation for on-condition maintenance. Spectrometer application to development programs, such as the Space Lifter, NASP, and SSTO, will reduce program risks, allow better adherence to schedules and save money by reducing or eliminating redesign and test costs. The diagnostic capability of a proven, calibrated spectrometer will enhance post-burn certification of high value, reusable engines, such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), where life and reliability are key cost drivers. This paper describes a prototype FPI spectrometer for demonstration and validation testing on NASA's Technology Test Bed Engine (TTBE) at Marshall Space Flight Center. The TTBE test unit is designed with flight prototype optics and a commercial off-the-shelf data processing system.

  14. Rockets two classic papers

    Goddard, Robert


    Rockets, in the primitive form of fireworks, have existed since the Chinese invented them around the thirteenth century. But it was the work of American Robert Hutchings Goddard (1882-1945) and his development of liquid-fueled rockets that first produced a controlled rocket flight. Fascinated by rocketry since boyhood, Goddard designed, built, and launched the world's first liquid-fueled rocket in 1926. Ridiculed by the press for suggesting that rockets could be flown to the moon, he continued his experiments, supported partly by the Smithsonian Institution and defended by Charles Lindbergh. T

  15. The Kinetics and Spectroscopy of Aircraft and Rocket Plume Constituents.


    Truhlar, private communications , (1980). 27. G. Schatz and A. Wagner, private communications , (1980). 28. R. Zellner, W. Steinert, and H. Gg. Wagner...photolysis of H20/D2/Ar mixture. Experiental conditions: T = 932K; P = 100 Torr (Ar); Flash Energy = 80J; [H20] = 70 mTorr; Concentration of D2 in molecules

  16. Heterogeneous fuel for hybrid rocket

    Stickler, David B. (Inventor)


    Heterogeneous fuel compositions suitable for use in hybrid rocket engines and solid-fuel ramjet engines, The compositions include mixtures of a continuous phase, which forms a solid matrix, and a dispersed phase permanently distributed therein. The dispersed phase or the matrix vaporizes (or melts) and disperses into the gas flow much more rapidly than the other, creating depressions, voids and bumps within and on the surface of the remaining bulk material that continuously roughen its surface, This effect substantially enhances heat transfer from the combusting gas flow to the fuel surface, producing a correspondingly high burning rate, The dispersed phase may include solid particles, entrained liquid droplets, or gas-phase voids having dimensions roughly similar to the displacement scale height of the gas-flow boundary layer generated during combustion.

  17. Determination of 1-methyl-1H-1,2,4-triazole in soils contaminated by rocket fuel using solid-phase microextraction, isotope dilution and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Yegemova, Saltanat; Bakaikina, Nadezhda V; Kenessov, Bulat; Koziel, Jacek A; Nauryzbayev, Mikhail


    Environmental monitoring of Central Kazakhstan territories where heavy space booster rockets land requires fast, efficient, and inexpensive analytical methods. The goal of this study was to develop a method for quantitation of the most stable transformation product of rocket fuel, i.e., highly toxic unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine - 1-methyl-1H-1,2,4-triazole (MTA) in soils using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Quantitation of organic compounds in soil samples by SPME is complicated by a matrix effect. Thus, an isotope dilution method was chosen using deuterated analyte (1-(trideuteromethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole; MTA-d3) for matrix effect control. The work included study of the matrix effect, optimization of a sample equilibration stage (time and temperature) after spiking MTA-d3 and validation of the developed method. Soils of different type and water content showed an order of magnitude difference in SPME effectiveness of the analyte. Isotope dilution minimized matrix effects. However, proper equilibration of MTA-d3 in soil was required. Complete MTA-d3 equilibration at temperatures below 40°C was not observed. Increase of temperature to 60°C and 80°C enhanced equilibration reaching theoretical MTA/MTA-d3 response ratios after 13 and 3h, respectively. Recoveries of MTA depended on concentrations of spiked MTA-d3 during method validation. Lowest spiked MTA-d3 concentration (0.24 mg kg(-1)) provided best MTA recoveries (91-121%). Addition of excess water to soil sample prior to SPME increased equilibration rate, but it also decreased method sensitivity. Method detection limit depended on soil type, water content, and was always below 1 mg kg(-1). The newly developed method is fully automated, and requires much lower time, labor and financial resources compared to known methods.

  18. Plasma Plume Characterization of the HERMeS during a 1722-hr Wear Test Campaign

    Huang, Wensheng; Williams, George J.; Peterson, Peter Y.; Kamhawi, Hani; Gilland, James H.; Herman, Daniel A.


    A 1722-hour wear test campaign of NASAs 12.5 kilowatt Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding was completed. This wear test campaign, completed in 2016, was divided into four segments including an electrical configuration characterization test, two short duration tests, and one long wear test. During the electrical configuration characterization test, the plasma plume was examined to provide data to support the down select of the electrical configuration for further testing. During the long wear tests, the plasma plume was periodically examined for indications of changes in thruster behavior. Examination of the plasma plume data from the electrical configuration characterization test revealed a correlation between the plume properties and the presence of a conduction path through the front poles. Examination of the long wear test plasma plume data revealed that the plume characteristics remained unchanged during testing to within the measurement uncertainty.

  19. Solar Coronal Plumes

    Giannina Poletto


    Full Text Available Polar plumes are thin long ray-like structures that project beyond the limb of the Sun polar regions, maintaining their identity over distances of several solar radii. Plumes have been first observed in white-light (WL images of the Sun, but, with the advent of the space era, they have been identified also in X-ray and UV wavelengths (XUV and, possibly, even in in situ data. This review traces the history of plumes, from the time they have been first imaged, to the complex means by which nowadays we attempt to reconstruct their 3-D structure. Spectroscopic techniques allowed us also to infer the physical parameters of plumes and estimate their electron and kinetic temperatures and their densities. However, perhaps the most interesting problem we need to solve is the role they cover in the solar wind origin and acceleration: Does the solar wind emanate from plumes or from the ambient coronal hole wherein they are embedded? Do plumes have a role in solar wind acceleration and mass loading? Answers to these questions are still somewhat ambiguous and theoretical modeling does not provide definite answers either. Recent data, with an unprecedented high spatial and temporal resolution, provide new information on the fine structure of plumes, their temporal evolution and relationship with other transient phenomena that may shed further light on these elusive features.

  20. Chemistry in aircraft plumes

    Kraabol, A.G.; Stordal, F.; Knudsen, S. [Norwegian Inst. for Air Research, Kjeller (Norway); Konopka, P. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere


    An expanding plume model with chemistry has been used to study the chemical conversion of NO{sub x} to reservoir species in aircraft plumes. The heterogeneous conversion of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} to HNO{sub 3}(s) has been investigated when the emissions take place during night-time. The plume from an B747 has been simulated. During a ten-hour calculation the most important reservoir species was HNO{sub 3} for emissions at noon. The heterogeneous reactions had little impact on the chemical loss of NO{sub x} to reservoir species for emissions at night. (author) 4 refs.

  1. The flight of uncontrolled rockets

    Gantmakher, F R; Dryden, H L


    International Series of Monographs on Aeronautics and Astronautics, Division VII, Volume 5: The Flight of Uncontrolled Rockets focuses on external ballistics of uncontrolled rockets. The book first discusses the equations of motion of rockets. The rocket as a system of changing composition; application of solidification principle to rockets; rotational motion of rockets; and equations of motion of the center of mass of rockets are described. The text looks at the calculation of trajectory of rockets and the fundamentals of rocket dispersion. The selection further focuses on the dispersion of f

  2. The 2016 Case for Mantle Plumes and a Plume-Fed Asthenosphere (Augustus Love Medal Lecture)

    Morgan, Jason P.


    The process of science always returns to weighing evidence and arguments for and against a given hypothesis. As hypotheses can only be falsified, never universally proved, doubt and skepticism remain essential elements of the scientific method. In the past decade, even the hypothesis that mantle plumes exist as upwelling currents in the convecting mantle has been subject to intense scrutiny; from geochemists and geochronologists concerned that idealized plume models could not fit many details of their observations, and from seismologists concerned that mantle plumes can sometimes not be 'seen' in their increasingly high-resolution tomographic images of the mantle. In the place of mantle plumes, various locally specific and largely non-predictive hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origins of non-plate boundary volcanism at Hawaii, Samoa, etc. In my opinion, this debate has now passed from what was initially an extremely useful restorative from simply 'believing' in the idealized conventional mantle plume/hotspot scenario to becoming an active impediment to our community's ability to better understand the dynamics of the solid Earth. Having no working hypothesis at all is usually worse for making progress than having an imperfect and incomplete but partially correct one. There continues to be strong arguments and strong emerging evidence for deep mantle plumes. Furthermore, deep thermal plumes should exist in a mantle that is heated at its base, and the existence of Earth's (convective) geodynamo clearly indicates that heat flows from the core to heat the mantle's base. Here I review recent seismic evidence by French, Romanowicz, and coworkers that I feel lends strong new observational support for the existence of deep mantle plumes. I also review recent evidence consistent with the idea that secular core cooling replenishes half the mantle's heat loss through its top surface, e.g. that the present-day mantle is strongly bottom heated. Causes for

  3. The sky is falling II: Impact of deposition produced during the static testing of solid rocket motors on corn and alfalfa.

    Doucette, William J; Mendenhall, Scout; McNeill, Laurie S; Heavilin, Justin


    Tests of horizontally restrained rocket motors at the ATK facility in Promontory, Utah, USA result in the deposition of an estimated 1.5million kg of entrained soil and combustion products (mainly aluminum oxide, gaseous hydrogen chloride and water) on the surrounding area. The deposition is referred to as test fire soil (TFS). Farmers observing TFS deposited on their crops expressed concerns regarding the impact of this material. To address these concerns, we exposed corn and alfalfa to TFS collected during a September 2009 test. The impact was evaluated by comparing the growth and tissue composition of controls relative to the treatments. Exposure to TFS, containing elevated levels of chloride (1000 times) and aluminum (2 times) relative to native soils, affected the germination, growth and tissue concentrations of various elements, depending on the type and level of exposure. Germination was inhibited by high concentrations of TFS in soil, but the impact was reduced if the TFS was pre-leached with water. Biomass production was reduced in the TFS amended soils and corn grown in TFS amended soils did not develop kernels. Chloride concentrations in corn and alfalfa grown in TFS amended soils were two orders of magnitude greater than controls. TFS exposed plants contained higher concentrations of several cations, although the concentrations were well below livestock feed recommendations. Foliar applications of TFS had no impact on biomass, but some differences in the elemental composition of leaves relative to controls were observed. Washing the TFS off the leaves lessened the impact. Results indicate that the TFS deposition could have an effect, depending on the amount and growth stage of the crops, but the impact could be mitigated with rainfall or the application of additional irrigation water. The high level of chloride associated with the TFS is the main cause of the observed impacts.

  4. Numerical investigation on operation process of solid ducted rocket with postpositional gas generator%后置燃气发生器的新型固冲发动机工作过程数值模拟

    王云霞; 陈林泉; 杨向明; 张胜勇


    进行了后置燃气发生器的新型固体火箭冲压发动机直连式试验,并对实验演示用发动机补燃室三维内流场进行了数值模拟,将试验结果与数值模拟结果进行对比,验证了数值模拟的准确性.采用单因素比较分析的方法,研究了一次燃气喷射方式与补燃室长度对固冲发动机性能的影响.结果表明,一次燃气喷射角度为150°时的燃烧效率比60°时高14%,补燃室燃烧效率在一次燃气喷射角度为180°时达到最大值;8喷口的燃烧效率高于4喷口;补燃室长度增加,燃烧效率增大,补燃室长度为149 mm时的燃烧效率比99 mm仅高5%.%Direct-connected test of solid ducted rocket with postpositional gas generator was completed. Numerical investigation on the field of solid ducted rocket secondary chamber was presented. The simulation model was proved by comparing the test and CFD results. Furthermore, the effect of fuel injection style and length of secondary chamber on combustion efficiency was carried out by analysis method of single factor. The numerical results show that the combustion efficiency increases with either the number of fuel-inlet or the length of secondary chamber. In addition, the combustion efficiency was increased by 14 % when the fuel injection angle was equal to 150°, then increased to the maximum while the fuel injection angle was 180° , and the combustion efficiency was increased by only 5% when the length of secondary chamber increased to 149 mm.

  5. Fluidized-Solid-Fuel Injection Process

    Taylor, William


    Report proposes development of rocket engines burning small grains of solid fuel entrained in gas streams. Main technical discussion in report divided into three parts: established fluidization technology; variety of rockets and rocket engines used by nations around the world; and rocket-engine equation. Discusses significance of specific impulse and ratio between initial and final masses of rocket. Concludes by stating three important reasons to proceed with new development: proposed engines safer; fluidized-solid-fuel injection process increases variety of solid-fuel formulations used; and development of fluidized-solid-fuel injection process provides base of engineering knowledge.

  6. The use of solid phase microextraction as sample preparation technique for determination of n-nitrosodimethylamine in water polluted by hydrazine-based rocket fuel

    Bulat Kenessov


    Full Text Available A paper describes a method for determination of N-nitrosodimethylamine in water, polluted by spills of 1,1-dimethylhydrazine, based on solid phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. A method detection limit was determined to be 1 ug/kg, relative error was below 20%. A method is very sensitive and selective as well as quite simple, relatively cheap and fully automated.

  7. Solid propellants.

    Marsh, H. E., Jr.; Hutchison, J. J.


    The basic principles underlying propulsion by rocket motor are examined together with the configuration of a solid propellant motor. Solid propellants and their preparation are discussed, giving attention to homogeneous propellants, composite propellants, energetic considerations in choosing a solid propellant, the processing of composite propellants, and some examples of new developments. The performance of solid propellants is investigated, taking into account characteristics velocity, the specific impulse, and performance calculations. Aspects of propellant development considered include nonperformance requirements for solid propellants, the approach to development, propellant mechanical properties, and future trends.

  8. Plume Measurement System (PLUMES) Calibration Experiment


    Atle Lohrmann SonTek, Inc. 7940 Silverton Avenue, No. 105 San Diego, California 92126 and Craig Huhta JIMAR University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822...Measurement System (PLUMES) Calibration Experiment by Age Lohrmann SonTek, Inc. 7940 Silverton Avenue, No. 105 San Diego, CA 92126 Craig Huhta JIMAR...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) &. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION SonTek, Inc., 7940 Silverton Avenue, No. 105, San Diego, CA 92126 REPORT NUMBER

  9. Flow field description of the Space Shuttle Vernier reaction control system exhaust plumes

    Cerimele, Mary P.; Alred, John W.


    The flow field for the Vernier Reaction Control System (VRCS) jets of the Space Shuttle Orbiter has been calculated from the nozzle throat to the far-field region. The calculations involved the use of recently improved rocket engine nozzle/plume codes. The flow field is discussed, and a brief overview of the calculation techniques is presented. In addition, a proposed on-orbit plume measurement experiment, designed to improve future estimations of the Vernier flow field, is addressed.

  10. The Ion Rocket


    discharge velocity w and the speci- fic impulse lap respectively cannot be increased. At this limit condition the thermal rocket oecouos "choked up...structural quality is 900 t, 3) In the case of an atomic-driven thermal rocket ’,;lth specific Ipipulse ISjy«8C0 sec and thrust to weight ratio « 1, the

  11. Model Rockets and Microchips.

    Fitzsimmons, Charles P.


    Points out the instructional applications and program possibilities of a unit on model rocketry. Describes the ways that microcomputers can assist in model rocket design and in problem calculations. Provides a descriptive listing of model rocket software for the Apple II microcomputer. (ML)

  12. The Green Propellant Infusion Mission Thruster Performance Testing for Plume Diagnostics

    Deans, Matthew C.; Reed, Brian D.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Williams, George J.; Kojima, Jun J.; Kinzbach, McKenzie I.; McLean, Christopher H.


    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) is sponsored by NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) office. The goal of GPIM is to advance the technology readiness level of a green propulsion system, specifically, one using the monopropellant, AF-M315E, by demonstrating ground handling, spacecraft processing, and on-orbit operations. One of the risks identified for GPIM is potential contamination of sensitive spacecraft surfaces from the effluents in the plumes of AF-M315E thrusters. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is conducting activities to characterize the effects of AF-M315E plume impingement and deposition. GRC has established individual plume models of the 22-N and 1-N thrusters that will be used on the GPIM spacecraft. The model simulations will be correlated with plume measurement data from Laboratory and Engineering Model 22-N, AF-M315E thrusters. The thrusters are currently being tested in a small rocket, altitude facility at NASA GRC. A suite of diagnostics, including Raman spectroscopy, Rayleigh spectroscopy, and Schlieren imaging are being used to acquire plume measurements of AF-M315E thrusters. Plume data will include temperature, velocity, relative density, and species concentration. The plume measurement data will be compared to the corresponding simulations of the plume model. The GRC effort will establish a data set of AF-M315E plume measurements and a plume model that can be used for future AF-M315E applications.

  13. An analytical and experimental investigation of resistojet plumes

    Zana, Lynnette M.; Hoffman, David J.; Breyley, Loranell R.; Serafini, John S.


    As a part of the electrothermal propulsion plume research program at the NASA Lewis Research Center, efforts have been initiated to analytically and experimentally investigate the plumes of resistojet thrusters. The method of Simons for the prediction of rocket exhaust plumes is developed for the resistojet. Modifications are made to the source flow equations to account for the increased effects of the relatively large nozzle boundary layer. Additionally, preliminary mass flux measurements of a laboratory resistojet using CO2 propellant at 298 K have been obtained with a cryogenically cooled quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). There is qualitative agreement between analysis and experiment, at least in terms of the overall number density shape functions in the forward flux region.

  14. Thermodynamic cycle analysis on solid propellant air-turbo-rocket%固体推进剂吸气式涡轮火箭发动机的气动热力循环分析

    屠秋野; 丁朝霞; 陈玉春; 蔡元虎


    A numerical model for calculating performance of solid propellant air-turbo-rocket at design point was set up,and a relationship expression of fuel-air ratio of combustion based on compressor pressure ratio,tubine intet total temperature and turbine expansion ratio was put forward.And a relationship between the turbine expansion ratio and the bypass ratio was given.The effects of compressor pressure ratio, turbine inlet temperature,bypass ratio/turbine expansion ratio and flight Mach number on the specific thrust and specific impulse were analyzed quantitatively.%建立了固体推进剂吸气式涡轮火箭发动机的设计状态数值模型,提出了基于压气机增压比、涡轮前温度和涡轮落压比关系的燃烧室燃气与空气配比表达式,以及涡轮落压比和发动机涵道比的匹配关系.定量分析了压气机增压比、涡轮进口燃气总温、涵道比/涡轮落压比和飞行马赫数对固体推进剂吸气式涡轮火箭发动机的单位推力和比冲的影响.

  15. Characterization of High-Power Rocket and Jet Noise Using Near-Field Acoustical Holography


    Structural fatigue, hearing damage, and community disturbances are all consequences of rocket and jet noise, especially as they become more powerful. Noise-reduction schemes require accurate characterization of the noise sources within rocket plumes and jets. Nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) measurements were made to visualize the sound field in the jet exhaust region of an F-22 Raptor. This is one of the largest-scale applications of NAH since its development in the 1980s. A scan-based ...

  16. Martian Atmospheric Plumes: Behavior, Detectability and Plume Tracing

    Banfield, Don; Mischna, M.; Sykes, R.; Dissly, R.


    We will present our recent work simulating neutrally buoyant plumes in the martian atmosphere. This work is primarily directed at understanding the behavior of discrete plumes of biogenic tracer gases, and thus increasing our understanding of their detectability (both from orbit and from in situ measurements), and finally how to use the plumes to identify their precise source locations. We have modeled the detailed behavior of martian atmospheric plumes using MarsWRF for the atmospheric dynamics and SCIPUFF (a terrestrial state of the art plume modeling code that we have modified to represent martian conditions) for the plume dynamics. This combination of tools allows us to accurately simulate plumes not only from a regional scale from which an orbital observing platform would witness the plume, but also from an in situ perspective, with the instantaneous concentration variations that a turbulent flow would present to a point sampler in situ instrument. Our initial work has focused on the detectability of discrete plumes from an orbital perspective and we will present those results for a variety of notional orbital trace gas detection instruments. We have also begun simulating the behavior of the plumes from the perspective of a sampler on a rover within the martian atmospheric boundary layer. The detectability of plumes within the boundary layer has a very strong dependence on the atmospheric stability, with plume concentrations increasing by a factor of 10-1000 during nighttime when compared to daytime. In the equatorial regions of the planet where we have simulated plumes, the diurnal tidal “clocking” of the winds is strongly evident in the plume trail, which similarly “clocks” around its source. This behavior, combined with the strong diurnal concentration variations suggests that a rover hunting a plume source would be well suited to approach it from a particular azimuth (downwind at night) to maximize detectability of the plume and the ability to

  17. OPAD through 1991 - Status report no. 2. [Optical Plume Anomaly Detection

    Powers, W. T.; Cooper, A. E.; Wallace, T. L.


    The Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) experimental program has attempted to develop a rocket engine health monitor for the detection, and if possible the quantification, of anomalous atomic and molecular species in exhaust plumes. The test program has formulated instrument designs allowing both wide spectral range and high spectral resolution. Attention is presently given to OPAD data collected for the SSME at NASA-Marshall's technology test stand, with a view to spectral emissions at startup and variations in baseline plume emissions due to changes in rated power level.

  18. Unsteady turbulent buoyant plumes

    Woodhouse, Mark J; Hogg, Andrew J


    We model the unsteady evolution of turbulent buoyant plumes following temporal changes to the source conditions. The integral model is derived from radial integration of the governing equations expressing the conservation of mass, axial momentum and buoyancy. The non-uniform radial profiles of the axial velocity and density deficit in the plume are explicitly described by shape factors in the integral equations; the commonly-assumed top-hat profiles lead to shape factors equal to unity. The resultant model is hyperbolic when the momentum shape factor, determined from the radial profile of the mean axial velocity, differs from unity. The solutions of the model when source conditions are maintained at constant values retain the form of the well-established steady plume solutions. We demonstrate that the inclusion of a momentum shape factor that differs from unity leads to a well-posed integral model. Therefore, our model does not exhibit the mathematical pathologies that appear in previously proposed unsteady i...

  19. 红外热像仪在固体火箭发动机羽焰测温中的应用%Application of infrared thermal imaging device in temperature measurement of solid rocket motor plume

    贺博; 龚晓红; 林辉; 叶玉春




    孙晓刚; 戴景民; 王雪峰; 褚载祥


    针对连续测量固体火箭发动机羽焰温度的特点,提出了一种新的发射率假设模型,并在此基础上提出了一种新的多波长高温计的数据处理方法,即通过处理两个不同时刻多波长高温计的测量数据,由计算可同时获知两个时刻的真温及光谱发射率. 实验结果表明,其真温计算值与火箭发动机设计提供的理论值之差在±20K以内,说明该方法是解决固体火箭发动机羽焰温度测量的可行性方法.

  1. Use of Several Thermal Analysis Techniques on a Hypalon Paint Coating for the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) of the Space Shuttle

    Wingard, Charles D.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)


    White Hypalon paint is brush-applied as a moisture barrier coating over cork surfaces on each of the two Space Shuttle SRBs. Fine cracks have been observed in the Hypalon coating three times historically on laboratory witness panels, but never on flight hardware. Samples of the cracked and standard ("good") Hypalon were removed from witness panel cork surfaces, and were tested in 1998 by Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), TMA and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) thermal analysis techniques. The TGA data showed that at 700C, where only paint pigment solids remain, the cracked material had about 9 weight percent more material remaining than the standard material, probably indicating incomplete mixing of the paint before it was brush-applied to produce the cracked material. Use of the TMA film/fiber technique showed that the average modulus (stiffness) vs. temperature was about 3 to 6 times higher for the cracked material than for the standard material. The TMA data also showed that an increase in coating thickness for the cracked Hypalon was not a factor in the anomaly.

  2. Plumes Do Not Exist

    Hamilton, W. B.; Anderson, D. L.; Foulger, G. R.; Winterer, E. L.

    Hypothetical plumes from the deep mantle are widely assumed to provide an abso- lute hotspot reference frame, inaugurate rifting, drive plates, and profoundly influence magmatic and tectonic evolution of oceans and continents. Many papers on local to global tectonics, magmatism, and geochemistry invoke plumes, and assign to the man- tle whatever properties, dynamics, and composition are needed to enable them. The fixed-plume concept arose from the Emperor-Hawaii seamount-and-island province, the 45 Ma inflection in which was assumed to record a 60-degree change in direction by the Pacific plate. Paleomagnetic latitudes and smooth Pacific spreading patterns show that such a change did not occur. Other Pacific chains once assumed to be syn- chronous with, and Euler-parallel to, Hawaii have proved to be neither. Thermal and physical properties of Hawaiian lithosphere falsify plume predictions. Rationales for fixed hotspots elsewhere also have become untenable as databases enlarged. Astheno- sphere is everywhere near solidus temperature, so buoyant melt does not require a local heat source but, rather, needs a thin roof or crack or tensional setting for egress. MORB and ocean-island basalt (OIB) broadly intergrade in composition, but MORB typically is richer in refractory elements and their radiogenic daughters, whereas OIB commonly is richer in fusible elements and their daughters. MORB and OIB contrasts are required by melt behavior and do not indicate unlike source reservoirs. MORB melts rise, with minimal reaction, through hot asthenosphere, whereas OIB melts re- act, and thereby lose substance, by crystallizing refractories and retaining and assim- ilating subordinate fusibles, with thick, cool lithosphere and crust. There is no need for hypotheses involving chaotic plume behavior or thousands of km of lateral flow of plume material, nor for postulates of SprimitiveT lower mantle contrary to cos- & cedil;mological and thermodynamic considerations. Plume

  3. Where Plumes Live

    King, S. D.


    From the perspective of fluid dynamics, `Plumes or not?' might be the wrong question. Let me begin by defining a few terms. Plume with a `P' is the well-known thermal structure with thin (order 100 km) tail and large, bulbous head that originates at the core-mantle boundary. The thin tail/large, bulbous-head morphology has been generated in a number of laboratory and numerical experiments. It can be seen, for example, on the cover of the famous fluid dynamics text by Batchelor. There is a clearly-defined range of parameters for which this structure is the preferred solution for instabilities arising from a bottom boundary layer in a convecting fluid. For example, a strong temperature-dependent rheology is needed. By contrast, plume with a `p' is any cylindrical or quasi-cylindrical instability originating from a thermal (or thermo-chemical) boundary layer. In fluid dynamics plume is sometimes used interchangeable with jet. Unless there is a very small temperature drop across the core-mantle boundary or a rather remarkable balance between temperature and composition at the base of the mantle, there are almost certainly plumes. (Note the little p.) Are these plumes the thermal structures with thin (order 100 km) tails and large bulbous heads or could they be broad, hot regions such as the degree 2 pattern seen in global seismic tomography images of the lower mantle, or the disconnected droplets seen in chaotic convection? To study this question, I will present a sequence of numerical `experiments' that illustrate the morphology of instabilities from a basal thermal boundary layer, i.e., plumes. Some of the aspects I will present include: spherical geometry, temperature-and pressure-dependence of rheology, internal heating, pressure-dependent coefficient of thermal expansion, variable coefficient of thermal diffusivity, phase transformations, and compositional layering at the base of the mantle. The goal is to map out the parameters and conditions where Plumes live

  4. Another Look at Rocket Thrust

    Hester, Brooke; Burris, Jennifer


    Rocket propulsion is often introduced as an example of Newton's third law. The rocket exerts a force on the exhaust gas being ejected; the gas exerts an equal and opposite force--the thrust--on the rocket. Equivalently, in the absence of a net external force, the total momentum of the system, rocket plus ejected gas, remains constant. The law of…

  5. Another Look at Rocket Thrust

    Hester, Brooke; Burris, Jennifer


    Rocket propulsion is often introduced as an example of Newton's third law. The rocket exerts a force on the exhaust gas being ejected; the gas exerts an equal and opposite force--the thrust--on the rocket. Equivalently, in the absence of a net external force, the total momentum of the system, rocket plus ejected gas, remains constant. The law of…

  6. Dilution in Transition Zone between Rising Plumes and Surface Plumes

    Larsen, Torben


    The papers presents some physical experiments with the dilution of sea outfall plumes with emphasize on the transition zone where the relative fast flowing vertical plume turns to a horizontal surface plume following the slow sea surface currents. The experiments show that a considerable dilution...

  7. Rocket University at KSC

    Sullivan, Steven J.


    "Rocket University" is an exciting new initiative at Kennedy Space Center led by NASA's Engineering and Technology Directorate. This hands-on experience has been established to develop, refine & maintain targeted flight engineering skills to enable the Agency and KSC strategic goals. Through "RocketU", KSC is developing a nimble, rapid flight engineering life cycle systems knowledge base. Ongoing activities in RocketU develop and test new technologies and potential customer systems through small scale vehicles, build and maintain flight experience through balloon and small-scale rocket missions, and enable a revolving fresh perspective of engineers with hands on expertise back into the large scale NASA programs, providing a more experienced multi-disciplined set of systems engineers. This overview will define the Program, highlight aspects of the training curriculum, and identify recent accomplishments and activities.

  8. Identification of Noise Sources During Rocket Engine Test Firings and a Rocket Launch Using a Microphone Phased-Array

    Panda, Jayanta; Mosher, Robert N.; Porter, Barry J.


    A 70 microphone, 10-foot by 10-foot, microphone phased array was built for use in the harsh environment of rocket launches. The array was setup at NASA Wallops launch pad 0A during a static test firing of Orbital Sciences' Antares engines, and again during the first launch of the Antares vehicle. It was placed 400 feet away from the pad, and was hoisted on a scissor lift 40 feet above ground. The data sets provided unprecedented insight into rocket noise sources. The duct exit was found to be the primary source during the static test firing; the large amount of water injected beneath the nozzle exit and inside the plume duct quenched all other sources. The maps of the noise sources during launch were found to be time-dependent. As the engines came to full power and became louder, the primary source switched from the duct inlet to the duct exit. Further elevation of the vehicle caused spilling of the hot plume, resulting in a distributed noise map covering most of the pad. As the entire plume emerged from the duct, and the ondeck water system came to full power, the plume itself became the loudest noise source. These maps of the noise sources provide vital insight for optimization of sound suppression systems for future Antares launches.

  9. Turbulent buoyant jets and plumes

    Rodi, Wolfgang

    The Science & Applications of Heat and Mass Transfer: Reports, Reviews, & Computer Programs, Volume 6: Turbulent Buoyant Jets and Plumes focuses on the formation, properties, characteristics, and reactions of turbulent jets and plumes. The selection first offers information on the mechanics of turbulent buoyant jets and plumes and turbulent buoyant jets in shallow fluid layers. Discussions focus on submerged buoyant jets into shallow fluid, horizontal surface or interface jets into shallow layers, fundamental considerations, and turbulent buoyant jets (forced plumes). The manuscript then exami

  10. On predicting mantle mushroom plumes

    Ka-Kheng Tan


    Top cooling may produce plunging plumes of diameter of 585 km and at least 195 Myr old. The number of cold plumes is estimated to be 569, which has not been observed by seismic tomography or as cold spots. The cold plunging plumes may overwhelm and entrap some of the hot rising plumes from CMB, so that together they may settle in the transition zone.

  11. Development of Kabila rocket: A radioisotope heated thermionic plasma rocket engine

    Kalomba Mboyi


    Full Text Available A new type of plasma rocket engine, the Kabila rocket, using a radioisotope heated thermionic heating chamber instead of a conventional combustion chamber or catalyst bed is introduced and it achieves specific impulses similar to the ones of conventional solid and bipropellant rockets. Curium-244 is chosen as a radioisotope heat source and a thermal reductive layer is also used to obtain precise thermionic emissions. The self-sufficiency principle is applied by simultaneously heating up the emitting material with the radioisotope decay heat and by powering the different valves of the plasma rocket engine with the same radioisotope decay heat using a radioisotope thermoelectric generator. This rocket engine is then benchmarked against a 1 N hydrazine thruster configuration operated on one of the Pleiades-HR-1 constellation spacecraft. A maximal specific impulse and power saving of respectively 529 s and 32% are achieved with helium as propellant. Its advantages are its power saving capability, high specific impulses and simultaneous ease of storage and restart. It can however be extremely voluminous and potentially hazardous. The Kabila rocket is found to bring great benefits to the existing spacecraft and further research should optimize its geometric characteristics and investigate the physical principals of its operation.

  12. Thermal plumes in ventilated rooms

    Kofoed, Peter; Nielsen, Peter V.


    The design of a displacement ventilation system involves determination of the flow rate in the thermal plumes. The flow rate in the plumes and the vertical temperature gradient influence each other, and they are influenced by many factors. This paper shows some descriptions of these effects. Free...... to be the only possible approach to obtain the volume flow in: thermal plumes in ventilated rooms....

  13. Flow Separation and Numerical Simulation of Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle%固体火箭发动机喷管分离流动及其数值模拟

    王晓辉; 于存贵


    Separation flow could be generated in a high-altitude nozzle, in order to study the flow separation on the nozzle performance. A three-dimensional numerical simulation about the separation flow in the high-altitude nozzle of a solid rocket motor (SRM) was conducted. The flow results with different inlet total pressure were obtained by utilizing CFX software. It shows that, due to the separation flow, there are some adverse effects for the stability and thermal protection of the nozzle. The simulation provides a reference of the design of the high-altitude nozzle, also a basis for further study.%大面积比喷管在火箭发动机工作过程中可能产生流动分离的问题,为研究喷管流动分离对喷管性能的影响,利用计算流体力学软件CFX对某固体火箭发动机大面积比喷管内燃气分离流动进行数值模拟.计算出喷管在几种不同入口总压情况下的流场参数分布,显示分离流动会改变燃气内流场流动参数分布,进而会对喷管推力稳定性和热防护性产生不利影响.该研究能为进一步研究大面积比喷管设计提供参考.

  14. 二次进气固冲发动机补燃室粒子沉积数值模拟%Numerical simulation of particle deposition in solid rocket ramjet chamber with secondary air inlets

    严聪; 张志峰; 马岑睿; 张成涛


    基于随机颗粒轨道模型和颗粒部分沉积模型,对二次进气固冲发动机补燃室壁面的粒子沉积进行了探索研究,讨论了空燃比、进气间距及流量分配比等参数对沉积的影响。结果表明,随空燃比增大,沉积区域有一个明显的前移,空燃比对沉积的影响分为两个阶段;进气间距对沉积的影响较复杂;流量分配比增大,沉积区域变化不大,但沉积总量增加。%Particle deposition in solid rocket ramjet chamber with secondary air inlets was numerically simulated based on ran-dom particle stochastic trajectory and particle partial deposition model. The effects of several parameters on deposition were dis-cussed,such as air-to-fuel ratio,inlet interval,flow distribution ratio etc.The results show that there is an obvious forward move with accretion of air-to-fuel rate,leading to two sections concerning the effects of air-to-fuel ratio.The effects of inlet interval on deposition are complex.The deposition regions change little but the deposition gross increases with the accretion of flow distribution ratio.

  15. Thermochemical Erosion of Hafnium Carbide Modified Carbon/Carbon Composite Throat in a Small Solid Rocket Motor%碳化铪改性炭/炭复合材料喉衬的热化学烧蚀

    沈学涛; 李克智; 李贺军; 冯涛; 张磊磊; 王斌


    Thermochemical erosion of hafnium carbide (HfC) modified carbon/carbon (C/C) composite throat was investigated using a hot-fire testing system in a small solid rocket motor. Chemical composition of the equilibrium combustion products was calculated by NASA-CEA program based on the principle of free energy minimum. The reaction products between the oxidizing species and HfC in the C/C composites were also calculated by FactSage.The results show that H2O, CO2, and OH are the main oxidizing species to consume carbon and HfC and generate thermochemical erosion to the throat materials. The interface of the fibers and matrix is preferentially ablated, and then erosion extends to the fibers and matrix. The formation of cone-shaped fibers and shell-shaped matrix is attributed to the thermochemical erosion of the flame.%采用小型固体火箭发动机研究了碳化铪(HfC)改性炭/炭复合材料喉衬的热化学烧蚀.借助基于最小自由能原理的NASA-CEA程序计算了燃气组成,借助化学热力学软件FactSage计算了燃气组分与碳、HfC的化学反应.结果表明,燃气中的H2O、CO2和OH是碳和HfC的主要氧化组分,使材料发生热化学烧蚀;纤维-基体界面是烧蚀的薄弱环节,烧蚀沿着界面分别向碳纤维和基体方向推进.热化学作用(氧化)造成纤维变细,顶端呈锥状,基体变薄,呈壳状.

  16. Computation of two-phase reacting flows in solid-liquid rocket ramjets%固液火箭冲压发动机内两相反应流场数值计算

    马智博; 朱建士


    In order to compute three-dimens ional reacting flow fieldsestabl ished in the chambers of solid-liquid rocket ramjets,the block implicit algorit hm was used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations about gas,the Continuum Formul a tion Model and k-ε-Ap model were used to characterize the turbulent fl ow and vaporizatio n of droplets.The modified k-ε-g model was adopted to represent the combu stion of the fuels.Calculations were carried out under different chamber configuration s and initial droplet diameters,from which the effects of these conditions on t he combustion efficiency were analyzed.The numerical results reveal the p r ocesses of droplet vaporization and combustion.%为了计算固液混合式火箭冲压发动机补燃室内的三维反应流场,用块隐式法求解气相Navier-Stokes方程组,用连续介质模型和k-ε-Ap模型计算颗粒相的湍流流动与蒸发过程,用修正的k-ε-g模型描述燃料的燃烧。为了分析发动机设计参数对反应流场的影响,用不同的条件进行计算,并由此分析了补燃室几何结构和液体燃料初始颗粒直径对燃烧效率的影响。算例表明,计算方法有效可行,数值结果能够反映流场结构、液体燃料的蒸发和两种燃料的燃烧过程。

  17. A subscale facility for liquid rocket propulsion diagnostics at Stennis Space Center

    Raines, N. G.; Bircher, F. E.; Chenevert, D. J.


    The Diagnostics Testbed Facility (DTF) at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center in Mississippi was designed to provide a testbed for the development of rocket engine exhaust plume diagnostics instrumentation. A 1200-lb thrust liquid oxygen/gaseous hydrogen thruster is used as the plume source for experimentation and instrument development. Theoretical comparative studies have been performed with aerothermodynamic codes to ensure that the DTF thruster (DTFT) has been optimized to produce a plume with pressure and temperature conditions as much like the plume of the Space Shuttle Main Engine as possible. Operation of the DTFT is controlled by an icon-driven software program using a series of soft switches. Data acquisition is performed using the same software program. A number of plume diagnostics experiments have utilized the unique capabilities of the DTF.

  18. West Antarctic Mantle Plume Hypothesis and Basal Water Generation

    Ivins, Erik; Seroussi, Helene; Wiens, Doug; Bondzio, Johannes


    The hypothesis of a deep mantle plume that manifests Pliocene and Quaternary volcanism and present-day seismicity in West Antarctica has been speculated for more than 30 years. Recent seismic images support the plume hypothesis as the cause of Marie Byrd Land (MBL) volcanism and geophysical structure [ Lloyd et al., 2015; Ramirez et al., 2016]. Mantle plumes can more that double the geothermal heat flux, qGHF, above nominal continental values at their axial peak position and raise qGHF in the surrounding plume head to 60 mW/m2 or higher. Unfortunately, there is a dearth of in-situ basal ice sheet data that sample the heat flux. Consequently, we examine a realistic distribution of heat flux associated with a late-Cenozoic mantle plume in West Antarctica and explore its impact on thermal and melt conditions near the ice sheet base. The solid Earth model assumes a parameterized deep mantle plume and head. The 3-D ice flow model includes an enthalpy framework and full-Stokes stress balance. Both the putative plume location and extent are uncertain. Therefore, we perform broadly scoped experiments to characterize plume related basal conditions. The experiments show that mantle plumes have an important local impact on the ice sheet, with basal melting rates reaching several centimeters per year directly above the hotspot. The downstream active lake system of Whillans Ice Stream suggests a rift-related source of anomalous mantle heat. However, the lack of lake and stream activity in MBL suggests a relatively weak plume: one that delivers less flux by 35% below the heat flux to the crustal surface at the site of the Yellowstone hotspot [e.g., DeNosaquo et al., 2009], with peak value no higher than about 145 mW/m2.

  19. Ignition and Flame Stabilization of a Strut-Jet RBCC Combustor with Small Rocket Exhaust

    Jichao Hu


    Full Text Available A Rocket Based Combined Cycle combustor model is tested at a ground direct connected rig to investigate the flame holding characteristics with a small rocket exhaust using liquid kerosene. The total temperature and the Mach number of the vitiated air flow, at exit of the nozzle are 1505 K and 2.6, respectively. The rocket base is embedded in a fuel injecting strut and mounted in the center of the combustor. The wall of the combustor is flush, without any reward step or cavity, so the strut-jet is used to make sure of the flame stabilization of the second combustion. Mass flow rate of the kerosene and oxygen injected into the rocket is set to be a small value, below 10% of the total fuel when the equivalence ratio of the second combustion is 1. The experiment has generated two different kinds of rocket exhaust: fuel rich and pure oxygen. Experiment result has shown that, with a relative small total mass flow rate of the rocket, the fuel rich rocket plume is not suitable for ignition and flame stabilization, while an oxygen plume condition is suitable. Then the paper conducts a series of experiments to investigate the combustion characteristics under this oxygen pilot method and found that the flame stabilization characteristics are different at different combustion modes.

  20. Ignition and flame stabilization of a strut-jet RBCC combustor with small rocket exhaust.

    Hu, Jichao; Chang, Juntao; Bao, Wen


    A Rocket Based Combined Cycle combustor model is tested at a ground direct connected rig to investigate the flame holding characteristics with a small rocket exhaust using liquid kerosene. The total temperature and the Mach number of the vitiated air flow, at exit of the nozzle are 1505 K and 2.6, respectively. The rocket base is embedded in a fuel injecting strut and mounted in the center of the combustor. The wall of the combustor is flush, without any reward step or cavity, so the strut-jet is used to make sure of the flame stabilization of the second combustion. Mass flow rate of the kerosene and oxygen injected into the rocket is set to be a small value, below 10% of the total fuel when the equivalence ratio of the second combustion is 1. The experiment has generated two different kinds of rocket exhaust: fuel rich and pure oxygen. Experiment result has shown that, with a relative small total mass flow rate of the rocket, the fuel rich rocket plume is not suitable for ignition and flame stabilization, while an oxygen plume condition is suitable. Then the paper conducts a series of experiments to investigate the combustion characteristics under this oxygen pilot method and found that the flame stabilization characteristics are different at different combustion modes.

  1. 双脉冲固体发动机喷管传热烧蚀特性%Characterization of nozzle thermal and ablation response in dual-pulse solid rocket motors

    张晓光; 刘宇; 王长辉


    In order to investigate the nozzle thermal and ablation characteristics in dual- pulse solid rocket motors, the transient value of the throat diameter was obtained from the pressure and thrust measurements. Furthermore, the in-depth thermal response, pyroly- sis/char profiles and surface recession of the nozzle assembly were predicted through fully coupled fluid-solid analysis using the commercial code FLUENT. Results show that during pulse operation, the insulation material pyrolysis/char profiles expand and the nozzle insert erosion rate increases. During pulse separation, heat conduction in the material leads to the decrease in the material temperature difference. The heat transfer and ablation processes of pulse 1 and pulse separation make the nozzle insert exhibit small heat sink, high surface temperature and large surface roughness, which would result in higher throat erosion rate when pulse 2 operates.%为了研究双脉冲固体发动机喷管的传热烧蚀特性,由燃烧室压强及发动机推力试验曲线得到了喷管喉径的瞬变值,由FLUENT流体计算软件进行流固耦合传热烧蚀计算,得到了喷管瞬态温度分布、绝热材料热解炭化情况及碳/碳(C/C)喉衬瞬态烧蚀率,分析了脉冲工作过程及脉冲间隔时间对喷管传热烧蚀的影响.计算结果表明,脉冲工作过程中,绝热材料热解线、炭化线向材料内部扩展,喉衬烧蚀率不断增大;脉冲间隔时间内,喷管材料内部的导热使各处温差减小,温度趋于一致;第一脉冲的传热烧蚀与脉冲间隔的材料导热使第二脉冲工作时喉衬整体热沉小、内壁初始温度高、表面粗糙度大,从而导致较高烧蚀率.

  2. Carbon-Based Nozzle Thermochemical Erosion Characteristics in Solid Rocket Motors%固体火箭发动机碳基材料喷管热化学烧蚀特性

    张晓光; 王长辉; 刘宇; 任军学


    Based on the thermochemical erosion theory, a two-dimensional axisymmetric, coupled gas-solid-thermal numerical framework was established to predict the carbon-based nozzle erosion in solid rocket motors. Numerical simulations were carried out using the Wall Surface Reaction model of the commercial code FLUENT and the assumption whether the erosion process was chemical kinetics or diffusion controlled was not needed. The method was introduced to simulate the 70-1b BATES motor nozzle erosion and examine the effects of propellant composition, oxidizing species and chamber pressure. The calculated results agree well with experimental data. The erosion rate follows the trend exhibited by the heat flux distribution, and peaks slightly upstream of the throat. The erosion rate decreases with increasing aluminum content and increases almost linearly with chamber pressure. H20 is the dominant oxidizing species in dictating nozzle erosion.%为了准确预示固体火箭发动机碳基材料喷管的烧蚀率,依据热化学烧蚀理论,建立了喷管传热烧蚀的二维轴对称气-固-热耦合计算模型,计算通过FLUENT壁面化学反应模型完成,无需事先假设烧蚀控制机制。针对70-lb BATES发动机喷管进行了烧蚀计算,研究了推进剂配方、氧化性组分、燃烧室压强对喷管烧蚀的影响。结果表明:烧蚀率计算值与试验测试值吻合较好;烧蚀率分布遵循喷管内壁热流密度分布规律,在喉部上游入口处达到峰值;烧蚀率随推进剂Al含量增加而降低,随燃烧室压强升高而近似正比例增大;H2O是决定烧蚀的主要氧化性组分。

  3. 固体火箭发动机喉衬流场及热结构耦合分析%Coupled fluid, thermal and structural analysis of nozzle inserts in solid rocket motors

    张晓光; 王长辉; 刘宇; 任军学


    In order to accurately predict the thermal and structural behavior of throat inserts in solid rocket-motor environments, a fluid-thermal-structural coupling model was established based on CFD code FLUENT and FEM code ANSYS. Fully coupled fluid-solid analysis was performed first to simulate the heat transfer and material erosion process, using the method of whole-field discretization and solution in FLUENT. Subsequently, the structural analysis was carried out in ANSYS based on the resulting pressure and thermal loading. In such a procedure, two-way coupling was considered between flow and heat transfer while one-way coupling method was employed in structural analysis. Numerical results show that the convective heat transfer coefficient gradually decreases with increase of wall temperature during the motor firing. The wall temperature and erosion rate follow the trend exhibited by the heat flux distribution, and attain peak at upstream of the throat. The stress is most severe in the throat region due to the steep temperature gradient.%为了准确预示固体火箭发动机喉衬在燃气环境中的烧蚀传热及热结构行为,建立了基于FLUENT流体计算软件和ANSYS结构分析软件的流场及热结构耦合分析模型.由FLUENT采用整场离散、整场求解的方法进行流固耦合烧蚀传热模拟,得到的压强及温度分布导入ANSYS进行结构分析,实现了流场与烧蚀传热的双向耦合以及流场、热到结构的单向耦合.算例结果表明,在发动机工作过程中,喉衬内壁对流换热系数因壁温升高而逐渐降低;内壁温度及烧蚀率遵循内壁热流密度的分布规律,在喉部上游达到峰值;喉部区域对流换热严重,固相材料温度梯度高,是应力集中区.

  4. US Rocket Propulsion Industrial Base Health Metrics

    Doreswamy, Rajiv


    The number of active liquid rocket engine and solid rocket motor development programs has severely declined since the "space race" of the 1950s and 1960s center dot This downward trend has been exacerbated by the retirement of the Space Shuttle, transition from the Constellation Program to the Space launch System (SLS) and similar activity in DoD programs center dot In addition with consolidation in the industry, the rocket propulsion industrial base is under stress. To Improve the "health" of the RPIB, we need to understand - The current condition of the RPIB - How this compares to past history - The trend of RPIB health center dot This drives the need for a concise set of "metrics" - Analogous to the basic data a physician uses to determine the state of health of his patients - Easy to measure and collect - The trend is often more useful than the actual data point - Can be used to focus on problem areas and develop preventative measures The nation's capability to conceive, design, develop, manufacture, test, and support missions using liquid rocket engines and solid rocket motors that are critical to its national security, economic health and growth, and future scientific needs. center dot The RPIB encompasses US government, academic, and commercial (including industry primes and their supplier base) research, development, test, evaluation, and manufacturing capabilities and facilities. center dot The RPIB includes the skilled workforce, related intellectual property, engineering and support services, and supply chain operations and management. This definition touches the five main segments of the U.S. RPIB as categorized by the USG: defense, intelligence community, civil government, academia, and commercial sector. The nation's capability to conceive, design, develop, manufacture, test, and support missions using liquid rocket engines and solid rocket motors that are critical to its national security, economic health and growth, and future scientific needs

  5. Optimization of Construction of the rocket-assisted projectile

    Arkhipov Vladimir


    Full Text Available New scheme of the rocket motor of rocket-assisted projectile providing the increase in distance of flight due to controlled and optimal delay time of ignition of the solid-propellant charge of the SRM and increase in reliability of initiation of the SRM by means of the autonomous system of ignition excluding the influence of high pressure gases of the propellant charge in the gun barrel has been considered. Results of the analysis of effectiveness of using of the ignition delay device on motion characteristics of the rocket-assisted projectile has been presented.

  6. Biogeochemistry and isotope geochemistry of a landfill leachate plume.

    van Breukelen, Boris M; Röling, Wilfred F M; Groen, Jacobus; Griffioen, Jasper; van Verseveld, Henk W


    The biogeochemical processes were identified which improved the leachate composition in the flow direction of a landfill leachate plume (Banisveld, The Netherlands). Groundwater observation wells were placed at specific locations after delineating the leachate plume using geophysical tests to map subsurface conductivity. Redox processes were determined using the distribution of solid and soluble redox species, hydrogen concentrations, concentration of dissolved gases (N(2), Ar, and CH(4)), and stable isotopes (delta15N-NO(3), delta34S-SO(4), delta13C-CH(4), delta2H-CH(4), and delta13C of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon (DOC and DIC, respectively)). The combined application of these techniques improved the redox interpretation considerably. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) decreased downstream in association with increasing delta13C-DOC values confirming the occurrence of degradation. Degradation of DOC was coupled to iron reduction inside the plume, while denitrification could be an important redox process at the top fringe of the plume. Stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures of methane indicated that methane was formed inside the landfill and not in the plume. Total gas pressure exceeded hydrostatic pressure in the plume, and methane seems subject to degassing. Quantitative proof for DOC degradation under iron-reducing conditions could only be obtained if the geochemical processes cation exchange and precipitation of carbonate minerals (siderite and calcite) were considered and incorporated in an inverse geochemical model of the plume. Simulation of delta13C-DIC confirmed that precipitation of carbonate minerals happened.

  7. Rocket Flight Path

    Jamie Waters


    Full Text Available This project uses Newton’s Second Law of Motion, Euler’s method, basic physics, and basic calculus to model the flight path of a rocket. From this, one can find the height and velocity at any point from launch to the maximum altitude, or apogee. This can then be compared to the actual values to see if the method of estimation is a plausible. The rocket used for this project is modeled after Bullistic-1 which was launched by the Society of Aeronautics and Rocketry at the University of South Florida.

  8. Combustion Instabilities In Solid Propellant Rocket Motors


    34 AIAA Paper No. 98{3218. Avalon, G., Ugurtas, B. Grisch, F. and Bresson , F. (2000) \\Numerical Computations and Visualization Tests of the Flow Inside...Burners and Related Devices," Prog. in Comb. Energy and Science, Vol. 19, No. 4, pp. 313{364. Roberts , A.K. and Brownlee, W.G. (1971) \\Nonlinear

  9. Solid Rocket Testing at AFRL (Briefing Charts)



  10. Rockets in World War I


    World War I enlisted rockets once again for military purposes. French pilots rigged rockets to the wing struts of their airplanes and aimed them at enemy observation balloons filled with highly inflammable hydrogen.

  11. Characterization of nal powders for rocket propulsion

    Merotto, L.; Galfetti, L.; Colombo, G.; DeLuca, L. T.


    Nanosized metal powders are known to significantly improve both solid and hybrid rocket performance, but have some drawbacks in terms of cost, safety, and possible influence on propellant mechanical properties. Performance enhancement through nanosized metal or metal hydride addition to solid fuels is currently under investigation also for hybrid propulsion. Therefore, a preburning characterization of the powders used in solid propellant or fuel manufacturing is useful to assess their effects on the ballistic properties and engine performance. An investigation concerning the comparative characterization of several aluminum powders having different particle size, age, and coating is presented. Surface area, morphology, chemical species concentration and characteristics, surface passivation layers, surface and subsurface chemical composition, ignition temperature and ignition delay are investigated. The aim of this characterization is to experimentally assess the effect of the nAl powder properties on ballistic characteristics of solid fuels and solidrocket composite-propellant performance, showing an increase in terms of Is caused by the decrease of two-phase losses in solid and a possible significant rf increase in hybrid rockets.

  12. Antithermal shield for rockets with heat evacuation by infrared radiation reflection


    At high speed, the friction between the air mass and the rocket surface causes a localheating of over 1000 Celsius degrees. For the heat protection of the rocket, on its outside surfacethermal shields are installed.Studying the Coanda effect, the fluid flow on solids surface, respectively, the author Ioan Rusuhas discovered by simply researches that the Coanda effect could be /extended also to the fluid flowon discontinuous solids, namely, on solids provided with orifices. This phenomenon was...

  13. Advanced Tactical Booster Technologies: Applications for Long-Range Rocket Systems


    System HIMARS [3] which can employ the MGM- 140 Army Tactical Missile System (ATacMS) solid propellant missile [4] to achieve the required range...launcher. 15. SUBJECT TERMS solid rocket; optimisation; artillery 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a...the volumetrically constrained environment of a land-based launcher. Keywords— solid rocket; optimisation; artillery I. INTRODUCTION The Australian

  14. Ozone Depletion Caused by Rocket Engine Emissions: A Fundamental Limit on the Scale and Viability of Space-Based Geoengineering Schemes

    Ross, M. N.; Toohey, D.


    Emissions from solid and liquid propellant rocket engines reduce global stratospheric ozone levels. Currently ~ one kiloton of payloads are launched into earth orbit annually by the global space industry. Stratospheric ozone depletion from present day launches is a small fraction of the ~ 4% globally averaged ozone loss caused by halogen gases. Thus rocket engine emissions are currently considered a minor, if poorly understood, contributor to ozone depletion. Proposed space-based geoengineering projects designed to mitigate climate change would require order of magnitude increases in the amount of material launched into earth orbit. The increased launches would result in comparable increases in the global ozone depletion caused by rocket emissions. We estimate global ozone loss caused by three space-based geoengineering proposals to mitigate climate change: (1) mirrors, (2) sunshade, and (3) space-based solar power (SSP). The SSP concept does not directly engineer climate, but is touted as a mitigation strategy in that SSP would reduce CO2 emissions. We show that launching the mirrors or sunshade would cause global ozone loss between 2% and 20%. Ozone loss associated with an economically viable SSP system would be at least 0.4% and possibly as large as 3%. It is not clear which, if any, of these levels of ozone loss would be acceptable under the Montreal Protocol. The large uncertainties are mainly caused by a lack of data or validated models regarding liquid propellant rocket engine emissions. Our results offer four main conclusions. (1) The viability of space-based geoengineering schemes could well be undermined by the relatively large ozone depletion that would be caused by the required rocket launches. (2) Analysis of space- based geoengineering schemes should include the difficult tradeoff between the gain of long-term (~ decades) climate control and the loss of short-term (~ years) deep ozone loss. (3) The trade can be properly evaluated only if our

  15. Effect of adiabatic inhibitor on afterward-dome insulation ablation in segmented solid rocket motors%分段式固体发动机绝热环对后封头绝热层烧蚀影响分析

    王建儒; 何国强; 许团委; 李江; 李强


    The ablation effect of adiabatic inhibitor on afterward-dome insulation was discussed systematically under combustion chamber operating condition for a typical SSRM(segmented solid rocket motor).Both numerical simulation results and tested data show that the existence of adiabatic inhibitor accelerate the gas flow speed to a certain extent,which result in two phase flow gas concentration and speed enhanced in certain scope of afterward-dome of combustion chamber,and make the ablation quantity of afterward-dome increased significantly.Furthermore,with the numerical analysis of modified SSRM,the result of this investigation is to provide the motor design characteristics and the system engineering approach used to effectively suppress the insulation ablation of afterward-dome for SSRMs.%针对某典型分段式固体发动机燃烧室内部绝热环在发动机工作过程中对后封头绝热层的烧蚀影响进行了系统分析,通过数值模拟和已有试验数据证明,分段式固体发动机工作过程中,分段药柱端面绝热环的存在一定程度上加速了燃烧室内部燃气流动的速度,导致燃烧室后封头一定范围内两相流燃气浓度的增加,从而导致后封头烧蚀量的大幅增加.在此基础上,结合改进型分段式固体发动机的数值分析,提出了分段式固体发动机在有效拟制后封头绝热层烧蚀加剧方面的设计措施和建议.

  16. Condensed phase particle acceleration analysis for overload test ground of solid rocket motor%固体发动机地面过载试验凝相粒子加速度分析

    许团委; 田维平; 王建儒; 李强


    Aiming at solid rocket motor overload ground simulation test, the acceleration theoretical analysis for condensate phase particle was carried out. The results show that the particles are mainly affected by the Coriolis acceleration and gas drag role, but the role of the centrifugal acceleration is not dominant. Finally,3D two-phase flow calculations as well as the ground simulation overload test under three groups overload conditions were carried out. Numerical calculation results reveal that particle deposition zone maintain between 60°~80° along the first quadrant to the four quadrant direction;the rotation test results reflect that serious e-rosion site and ablation site maintain between 70°~90° along the first quadrant to the four quadrant direction. Two results coincide well to a certain extent,which verify that the theoretical analysis is reasonable adn correct.%针对固体火箭发动机地面模拟过载试验,开展了燃烧室凝相粒子所受加速度理论分析,认为粒子主要受哥氏加速度和气相阻力的作用,离心加速度的作用并不占优。最后,针对3组不同过载下的缩比发动机,分别开展了三维两相流数值计算并进行了地面旋转模拟过载试验,数值计算得到的粒子聚集区维持在第Ⅰ象限偏第Ⅳ象限60°~80°之间;旋转试验解剖后的结果反映了颗粒冲刷严重部位及烧蚀严重部位维持在第Ⅰ象限偏第Ⅳ象限70°~90°之间。两种结果具有一定吻合性,也验证了理论分析的合理性和正确性。

  17. 固体火箭发动机壳体脱黏缺陷的热波检测%Debond defect detection in shell of solid rocket motor by thermal wave nondestructive testing

    宋远佳; 张炜; 杨正伟; 田干


    Based on thermal wave nondestructive testing technique, debond defects between composites shell and insulation layer of solid rocket motor ( SRM) were inspected by numerical analysis and experiment. The thermal images were enhanced and segmented by subtracting background method and watershed algorithms respectively. The hot spots area and the time characteristics of thermal sequence diagram were applied to quantificationally estimate the defects size and depth. The sample was also inspected by acoustic-ultrasonic ( AU) method for comparing testing effect. The results show that thermal wave technique has the disadvantage of fast, which can accurately test defect within 20 s; A best inspection time is exited, which was estimated at 7 s in experiment of the three 5 mm-deep defects; defect depths could be calculated by the material parameters and the estimated defect sizes. And the bigger of the debond area, the easier to be detected; the thermal images were more suitable for quantificational analysis than that by AU method.%基于热波技术,对固体火箭发动机复合材料壳体/绝热层脱黏缺陷进行检测研究,采用去除背景和分水岭方法对热图进行降噪、增强和分割处理,利用表面热斑区域的面积对缺陷尺寸进行估算,根据热图序列的时间特征计算缺陷的深度,并与声-超声检测结果进行比较.结果表明,热波技术检测速度快,20 s可对缺陷准确定位,检测结果直观;5 mm深的3个缺陷最佳检测时间均为7s;缺陷深度通过材料参数和缺陷尺寸进行计算,且缺陷越大,误差越小;与声-超声技术相比,热波检测更适合进行定量分析.

  18. Thrust Control Features for Aerodynamic Throat for Solid Rocket Motor%固体火箭发动机气动喉部的推力调控特性

    谢侃; 李博; 郭常超; 王宁飞


    为了研究固体火箭发动机气动喉部推力调节的一般规律,利用氮气作为介质对气动喉部喷管进行了冷流实验研究。研究了该种喷管的扼流性能,二次流嘴的面积、个数对其扼流性能的影响以及空腔容积与喷管压强调节时间的关系。掌握了气动喉部喷管的有效喉部面积随流量比变化的一般规律。结果表明,二次流与主流流量比越大,气动喉部面积越小。小的面积比具有更高的扼流性能,而当流量比大于0.4时,面积比对扼流性能无明显影响。空腔体积越小压强调节时间越短。%Adjust:In order to study the general rules of the thrust control features for aerodynamic throat for solid rocket motor, a cold-flow test research was performed on the aerodynamic nozzle throat using the nitrogen as working gas. Firstly, the choke performance of the aerodynamic throat was studied. Then, the performance of throat modification was studied considering the influence of area and number of secondary flow injectors. Final⁃ly,the relation about the volume of cavity with adjustment time of nozzle was also studied. The general law of ef⁃fective throat area along with the flow rate change was obtained through study. The results show that the larger the flow ratio of the secondary flow and main flow is, the smaller the pneumatic throat area is. The smaller area ratio has higher choke performance,and the influence of area is not obvious when the flow rate is greater than 0.4. Be⁃sides,the smaller the cavity volume is,the shorter the accommodation time of pressure is.

  19. Simulating Modulated Thermography of Cladding Debond in Solid Rockets%固体火箭包覆层脱粘调制红外热波检测法的数值模拟

    郭兴旺; 李苒笙; 丁蒙蒙


    调制红外热波无损检测是一种可以检测材料内部缺陷的先进技术,在固体火箭发动机包覆层脱粘的诊断中有一定的应用前景.以有限元法对固体火箭发动机包覆层脱粘的调制红外热波检测法进行数值模拟,研究加热条件和结构对可检测性的影响.得出可检信息参数(表面过余温度幅值、相位和相位差)随热波激励条件(调制频率、热流强度)和结构参数(材料、缺陷大小、深度、厚度等)变化的规律.针对典型材料和结构尺寸,给出最佳调制频率、盲频以及相位差的预测值.调制红外热波检测法可用于固体火箭发动机包覆层脱粘的无损检测,检测条件可通过计算机仿真来优化.%Modulated infrared thermal wave nondestructive testing (IR NDT) is an advanced technique of internal flaw inspection,and has certain application prospect in detecting cladding debond in solid rocket motors (SRM). The numerical simulation of modulated IR NDT for cladding debond in SRM is carried out by using finite element method, and the influences of heating condition and structure on the detectability are studied. The evolutions of informative parameters (i.e. the amplitude, phase and phase difference of surface excessive temperature) versus heating condition (i.e. the modulation frequency and heat flow intensity) and structural parameters (i.e. materials, defect size, depth and thickness) are obtained. The optimal modulation frequency, blind frequency and phase difference for typical material and structural size are predicted. Modulated thermography can be used in detecting cladding debond in SRM, and the test condition can be optimized through computer simulation.

  20. Overview of NASA GRCs Green Propellant Infusion Mission Thruster Testing and Plume Diagnostics

    Deans, Matthew C.; Reed, Brian D.; Yim, John T.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Williams, George J.; Kojima, Jun J.; McLean, Christopher H.


    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) is sponsored by NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) office. The goal of GPIM is to advance the technology readiness level of a green propulsion system, specifically, one using the monopropellant, AF-M315E, by demonstrating ground handling, spacecraft processing, and on-orbit operations. One of the risks identified for GPIM is potential contamination of sensitive spacecraft surfaces from the effluents in the plumes of AF-M315E thrusters. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is conducting activities to characterize the effects of AF-M315E plume impingement and deposition. GRC has established individual plume models of the 22-N and 1-N thrusters that will be used on the GPIM spacecraft. The models describe the pressure, temperature, density, Mach number, and species concentration of the AF-M315E thruster exhaust plumes. The models are being used to assess the impingement effects of the AF-M315E thrusters on the GPIM spacecraft. The model simulations will be correlated with plume measurement data from Laboratory and Engineering Model 22-N, AF-M315E thrusters. The thrusters will be tested in a small rocket, altitude facility at NASA GRC. The GRC thruster testing will be conducted at duty cycles representatives of the planned GPIM maneuvers. A suite of laser-based diagnostics, including Raman spectroscopy, Rayleigh spectroscopy, Schlieren imaging, and physical probes will be used to acquire plume measurements of AFM315E thrusters. Plume data will include temperature, velocity, relative density, and species concentration. The plume measurement data will be compared to the corresponding simulations of the plume model. The GRC effort will establish a data set of AF-M315E plume measurements and a plume model that can be used for future AF-M315E applications.

  1. Baking Soda and Vinegar Rockets

    Claycomb, James R.; Zachary, Christopher; Tran, Quoc


    Rocket experiments demonstrating conservation of momentum will never fail to generate enthusiasm in undergraduate physics laboratories. In this paper, we describe tests on rockets from two vendors that combine baking soda and vinegar for propulsion. The experiment compared two analytical approximations for the maximum rocket height to the…

  2. Baking Soda and Vinegar Rockets

    Claycomb, James R.; Zachary, Christopher; Tran, Quoc


    Rocket experiments demonstrating conservation of momentum will never fail to generate enthusiasm in undergraduate physics laboratories. In this paper, we describe tests on rockets from two vendors that combine baking soda and vinegar for propulsion. The experiment compared two analytical approximations for the maximum rocket height to the…

  3. Introduction to Rocket Propulsion


    Von Braun; 1966. 4. Introduction to Ordnance Technology; IHSP 76-129; 1976. 5. Physics; D. Halliday and R. Resnick ; 1963. 6. Physics Tells Why: Luke Sky- walker in Star Wars when he said "Don’t get cocky." We never plan for EVERYTHING, though we like to think we do. As we’ve said, rocket

  4. Low toxicity rocket propellants

    Wink, J.


    Hydrazine (N2H4) and its hypergolic mate nitrogen tetroxide (N2O4) are used on virtually all spacecraft and on a large number of launch vehicles. In recent years however, there has been an effort in identifying and developing alternatives to replace hydrazine as a rocket propellant.

  5. This "Is" Rocket Science!

    Keith, Wayne; Martin, Cynthia; Veltkamp, Pamela


    Using model rockets to teach physics can be an effective way to engage students in learning. In this paper, we present a curriculum developed in response to an expressed need for helping high school students review physics equations in preparation for a state-mandated exam. This required a mode of teaching that was more advanced and analytical…

  6. The Relativistic Rocket

    Antippa, Adel F.


    We solve the problem of the relativistic rocket by making use of the relation between Lorentzian and Galilean velocities, as well as the laws of superposition of successive collinear Lorentz boosts in the limit of infinitesimal boosts. The solution is conceptually simple, and technically straightforward, and provides an example of a powerful…

  7. Rocketing to the Skies


    ONE sunny morning,we startedfor Yanqi Lake,Huairou District,Beijing,to try“rocket bungy”,so farthe only facility for this sport inChina.On the way there,wequestioned our courage and heartendurance. Entering the gate we saw,towering over a banner saying,

  8. Low toxicity rocket propellants

    Wink, J.


    Hydrazine (N2H4) and its hypergolic mate nitrogen tetroxide (N2O4) are used on virtually all spacecraft and on a large number of launch vehicles. In recent years however, there has been an effort in identifying and developing alternatives to replace hydrazine as a rocket propellant.

  9. High Energy Density Additives for Hybrid Fuel Rockets to Improve Performance and Enhance Safety

    Jaffe, Richard L.


    We propose a conceptual study of prototype strained hydrocarbon molecules as high energy density additives for hybrid rocket fuels to boost the performance of these rockets without compromising safety and reliability. Use of these additives could extend the range of applications for which hybrid rockets become an attractive alternative to conventional solid or liquid fuel rockets. The objectives of the study were to confirm and quantify the high enthalpy of these strained molecules and to assess improvement in rocket performance that would be expected if these additives were blended with conventional fuels. We confirmed the chemical properties (including enthalpy) of these additives. However, the predicted improvement in rocket performance was too small to make this a useful strategy for boosting hybrid rocket performance.

  10. Coupled simulation of CFD-flight-mechanics with a two-species-gas-model for the hot rocket staging

    Li, Yi; Reimann, Bodo; Eggers, Thino


    The hot rocket staging is to separate the lowest stage by directly ignite the continuing-stage-motor. During the hot staging, the rocket stages move in a harsh dynamic environment. In this work, the hot staging dynamics of a multistage rocket is studied using the coupled simulation of Computational Fluid Dynamics and Flight Mechanics. Plume modeling is crucial for a coupled simulation with high fidelity. A 2-species-gas model is proposed to simulate the flow system of the rocket during the staging: the free-stream is modeled as "cold air" and the exhausted plume from the continuing-stage-motor is modeled with an equivalent calorically-perfect-gas that approximates the properties of the plume at the nozzle exit. This gas model can well comprise between the computation accuracy and efficiency. In the coupled simulations, the Navier-Stokes equations are time-accurately solved in moving system, with which the Flight Mechanics equations can be fully coupled. The Chimera mesh technique is utilized to deal with the relative motions of the separated stages. A few representative staging cases with different initial flight conditions of the rocket are studied with the coupled simulation. The torque led by the plume-induced-flow-separation at the aft-wall of the continuing-stage is captured during the staging, which can assist the design of the controller of the rocket. With the increasing of the initial angle-of-attack of the rocket, the staging quality becomes evidently poorer, but the separated stages are generally stable when the initial angle-of-attack of the rocket is small.

  11. A case for mantle plumes

    Geoffrey F. Davies


    The existence of at least several plumes in the Earth's mantle can be inferred with few assumptions from well-established observations. As well, thermal mantle plumes can be predicted from well-established and quantified fluid dynamics and a plausible assumption about the Earth's early thermal state. Some additional important observations, especially of flood basalts and rift-related magmatism, have been shown to be plausibly consistent with the physical theory. Recent claims to have detected plumes using seismic tomography may comprise the most direct evidence for plumes, but plume tails are likely to be difficult to resolve definitively and the claims need to be well tested. Although significant questions remain about its viability, the plume hypothesis thus seems to be well worth continued investigation. Nevertheless there are many non-plate-related magmatic phenomena whose association with plumes is unclear or unlikely. Compositional buoyancy has recently been shown potentially to substantially complicate the dynamics of plumes, and this may lead to explanations for a wider range of phenomena, including "headless" hotspot tracks, than purely thermal plumes.

  12. Mantle plumes and continental tectonics.

    Hill, R I; Campbell, I H; Davies, G F; Griffiths, R W


    Mantle plumes and plate tectonics, the result of two distinct modes of convection within the Earth, operate largely independently. Although plumes are secondary in terms of heat transport, they have probably played an important role in continental geology. A new plume starts with a large spherical head that can cause uplift and flood basalt volcanism, and may be responsible for regional-scale metamorphism or crustal melting and varying amounts of crustal extension. Plume heads are followed by narrow tails that give rise to the familiar hot-spot tracks. The cumulative effect of processes associated with tail volcanism may also significantly affect continental crust.

  13. Terrestrial Plume Impingement Testbed Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Masten Space Systems proposes to create a terrestrial plume impingement testbed for generating novel datasets for extraterrestrial robotic missions. This testbed...

  14. Exhaust Plume Measurements of the VASIMR VX-200

    Longmier, Benjamin; Bering, Edgar, III; Squire, Jared; Glover, Tim; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Brukardt, Michael


    Recent progress is discussed in the development of an advanced RF electric propulsion concept: the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) VX-200 engine, a 200 kW flight-technology prototype. Results from high power Helicon only and Helicon with ICRH experiments are performed on the VX-200 using argon plasma. Recent measurements of axial plasma density and potential profiles, magnetic field-line shaping, charge exchange, and force measurements taken in the plume of the VX-200 exhaust are made within a new 125 cubic meter cryo-pumped vacuum chamber and are presented in the context of RF plasma thruster physics.

  15. Underexpanded Supersonic Plume Surface Interactions: Applications for Spacecraft Landings on Planetary Bodies

    Mehta, M.; Sengupta, A.; Renno, N. O.; Norman, J. W.; Gulick, D. S.


    Numerical and experimental investigations of both far-field and near-field supersonic steady jet interactions with a flat surface at various atmospheric pressures are presented in this paper. These studies were done in assessing the landing hazards of both the NASA Mars Science Laboratory and Phoenix Mars spacecrafts. Temporal and spatial ground pressure measurements in conjunction with numerical solutions at altitudes of approx.35 nozzle exit diameters and jet expansion ratios (e) between 0.02 and 100 are used. Data from steady nitrogen jets are compared to both pulsed jets and rocket exhaust plumes at Mach approx.5. Due to engine cycling, overpressures and the plate shock dynamics are different between pulsed and steady supersonic impinging jets. In contrast to highly over-expanded (e plumes, results show that there is a relative ground pressure load maximum for moderately underexpanded (e approx.2-5) jets which demonstrate a long collimated plume shock structure. For plumes with e much >5 (lunar atmospheric regime), the ground pressure is minimal due to the development of a highly expansive shock structure. We show this is dependent on the stability of the plate shock, the length of the supersonic core and plume decay due to shear layer instability which are all a function of the jet expansion ratio. Asymmetry and large gradients in the spatial ground pressure profile and large transient overpressures are predominantly linked to the dynamics of the plate shock. More importantly, this study shows that thruster plumes exhausting into martian environments possess the largest surface pressure loads and can occur at high spacecraft altitudes in contrast to the jet interactions at terrestrial and lunar atmospheres. Theoretical and analytical results also show that subscale supersonic cold gas jets adequately simulate the flow field and loads due to rocket plume impingement provided important scaling parameters are in agreement. These studies indicate the critical

  16. Space shuttle with common fuel tank for liquid rocket booster and main engines (supertanker space shuttle)

    Thorpe, Douglas G.


    An operation and schedule enhancement is shown that replaces the four-body cluster (Space Shuttle Orbiter (SSO), external tank, and two solid rocket boosters) with a simpler two-body cluster (SSO and liquid rocket booster/external tank). At staging velocity, the booster unit (liquid-fueled booster engines and vehicle support structure) is jettisoned while the remaining SSO and supertank continues on to orbit. The simpler two-bodied cluster reduces the processing and stack time until SSO mate from 57 days (for the solid rocket booster) to 20 days (for the liquid rocket booster). The areas in which liquid booster systems are superior to solid rocket boosters are discussed. Alternative and future generation vehicles are reviewed to reveal greater performance and operations enhancements with more modifications to the current methods of propulsion design philosophy, e.g., combined cycle engines, and concentric propellant tanks.

  17. Growth and mixing dynamics of mantle wedge plumes

    Gorczyk, Weronika; Gerya, Taras V.; Connolly, James A. D.; Yuen, David A.


    Recent work suggests that hydrated partially molten thermal-chemical plumes that originate from subducted slab as a consequence of Rayleigh-Taylor instability are responsible for the heterogeneous composition of the mantle wedge. We use a two-dimensional ultrahigh-resolution numerical simulation involving 10 × 109 active markers to anticipate the detailed evolution of the internal structure of natural plumes beneath volcanic arcs in intraoceanic subduction settings. The plumes consist of partially molten hydrated peridotite, dry solid mantle, and subducted oceanic crust, which may compose as much as 12% of the plume. As plumes grow and mature these materials mix chaotically, resulting in attenuation and duplication of the original layering on scales of 1-1000 m. Comparison of numerical results with geological observations from the Horoman ultramafic complex in Japan suggests that mixing and differentiation processes related to development of partially molten plumes above slabs may be responsible for the strongly layered lithologically mixed (marble cake) structure of asthenospheric mantle wedges.

  18. Updated Conceptual Model for the 300 Area Uranium Groundwater Plume

    Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Last, George V.; Peterson, Robert E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.


    The 300 Area uranium groundwater plume in the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit is residual from past discharge of nuclear fuel fabrication wastes to a number of liquid (and solid) disposal sites. The source zones in the disposal sites were remediated by excavation and backfilled to grade, but sorbed uranium remains in deeper, unexcavated vadose zone sediments. In spite of source term removal, the groundwater plume has shown remarkable persistence, with concentrations exceeding the drinking water standard over an area of approximately 1 km2. The plume resides within a coupled vadose zone, groundwater, river zone system of immense complexity and scale. Interactions between geologic structure, the hydrologic system driven by the Columbia River, groundwater-river exchange points, and the geochemistry of uranium contribute to persistence of the plume. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) to document characterization of the 300 Area uranium plume and plan for beginning to implement proposed remedial actions. As part of the RI/FS document, a conceptual model was developed that integrates knowledge of the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties of the 300 Area and controlling processes to yield an understanding of how the system behaves and the variables that control it. Recent results from the Hanford Integrated Field Research Challenge site and the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Scientific Focus Area Project funded by the DOE Office of Science were used to update the conceptual model and provide an assessment of key factors controlling plume persistence.

  19. Liquid rocket engine injectors

    Gill, G. S.; Nurick, W. H.


    The injector in a liquid rocket engine atomizes and mixes the fuel with the oxidizer to produce efficient and stable combustion that will provide the required thrust without endangering hardware durability. Injectors usually take the form of a perforated disk at the head of the rocket engine combustion chamber, and have varied from a few inches to more than a yard in diameter. This monograph treats specifically bipropellant injectors, emphasis being placed on the liquid/liquid and liquid/gas injectors that have been developed for and used in flight-proven engines. The information provided has limited application to monopropellant injectors and gas/gas propellant systems. Critical problems that may arise during injector development and the approaches that lead to successful design are discussed.

  20. Dilution of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    Larsen, Torben; Petersen, Ole

    The purpose of present work is to establish a quantitative description of a surface plume which is valid for the range of density differences occurring in relation to sewage outfalls.......The purpose of present work is to establish a quantitative description of a surface plume which is valid for the range of density differences occurring in relation to sewage outfalls....

  1. Thermal Plumes in Ventilated Rooms

    Kofoed, Peter; Nielsen, Peter V.

    The design of a displacement ventilation system involves determination of the flow rate in the thermal plumes. The flow rate in the plumes and the vertical temperature gradient influence each other, and they are influenced by many factors. This paper shows some descriptions of these effects....

  2. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes.

    von Glasow, Roland


    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis.

  3. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing


    booster rocket engines • 6000-10000 psia capabilities – Can use gaseous nitrogen, helium, or hydrogen to pressurize propellant tanks 9Distribution A...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited. PA Clearance 16493 Simplified Test Stand Layout Oxidizer  TankFuel  Tank High  Pressure   Gas (GN2...requires large, complex facilities to deliver propellant at the proper pressure , temperature, and flow rates • The enormous energies involved

  4. Linear Spectral Analysis of Plume Emissions Using an Optical Matrix Processor

    Gary, C. K.


    Plume spectrometry provides a means to monitor the health of a burning rocket engine, and optical matrix processors provide a means to analyze the plume spectra in real time. By observing the spectrum of the exhaust plume of a rocket engine, researchers have detected anomalous behavior of the engine and have even determined the failure of some equipment before it would normally have been noticed. The spectrum of the plume is analyzed by isolating information in the spectrum about the various materials present to estimate what materials are being burned in the engine. Scientists at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have implemented a high resolution spectrometer to discriminate the spectral peaks of the many species present in the plume. Researchers at the Stennis Space Center Demonstration Testbed Facility (DTF) have implemented a high resolution spectrometer observing a 1200-lb. thrust engine. At this facility, known concentrations of contaminants can be introduced into the burn, allowing for the confirmation of diagnostic algorithms. While the high resolution of the measured spectra has allowed greatly increased insight into the functioning of the engine, the large data flows generated limit the ability to perform real-time processing. The use of an optical matrix processor and the linear analysis technique described below may allow for the detailed real-time analysis of the engine's health. A small optical matrix processor can perform the required mathematical analysis both quicker and with less energy than a large electronic computer dedicated to the same spectral analysis routine.

  5. Evidence for melt channelization in Galapagos plume-ridge interaction

    Mittal, T.; Richards, M. A.


    Many present-day hot spots are located within ~ 1000 km of a mid-ocean ridge, either currently or in the geologic past, leading to frequent interaction between these two magmatic regimes. The consequent plume-ridge interactions provide a unique opportunity to test models for asthenosphere-lithosphere dynamics, with the plume acting as a tracer fluid in the problem, and excess magmatism reflecting otherwise unsampled sub-surface phenomena. Galapagos is an off-ridge hotspot with the mantle plume located ~150-250 km south of the plate boundary. Plume-ridge interaction in Galapagos is expressed by the formation of volcanic lineaments of islands and seamounts - e.g., the Wolf-Darwin lineament (WDL) - providing a direct probe of the plume-ridge interaction process, especially in regards to geochemical data. Although several models have been proposed to explain plume-ridge interaction in Galapagos, none adequately explain the observed characteristics, especially the WDL. In particular, predicted lithospheric fault orientations and melt density considerations appear at odds with observations, suggesting that lithospheric extension is not the primary process for formation of these islands. Other off-ridge hotspots interacting with nearby spreading ridges, such as Reunion and Louisville, also exhibit volcanic lineaments linking the plume and the ridge. Thus these lineament-type features are a common outcome of plume-ridge interaction that are indicative of the underlying physics. We propose that the lineaments are surface expressions of narrow sub-lithospheric melt channels focused towards the spreading ridge. These channels should form naturally due to the reactive infiltration instability in a two-phase flow of magma and solid mantle as demonstrated in two-phase flow simulations (e.g., Katz & Weatherley 2012). For Galapagos, we show that melt channels can persist thermodynamically over sufficient length-scales to link the plume and nearby ridge segments. We also show that

  6. Iridium-Coated Rhenium Radiation-Cooled Rockets

    Reed, Brian D.; Biaglow, James A.; Schneider, Steven J.


    Radiation-cooled rockets are used for a range of low-thrust propulsion functions, including apogee insertion, attitude control, and repositioning of satellites, reaction control of launch vehicles, and primary propulsion for planetary space- craft. The key to high performance and long lifetimes for radiation-cooled rockets is the chamber temperature capability. The material system that is currently used for radiation-cooled rockets, a niobium alloy (C103) with a fused silica coating, has a maximum operating temperature of 1370 C. Temperature limitations of C103 rockets force the use of fuel film cooling, which degrades rocket performance and, in some cases, imposes a plume contamination issue from unburned fuel. A material system composed of a rhenium (Re) substrate and an iridium (Ir) coating has demonstrated operation at high temperatures (2200 C) and for long lifetimes (hours). The added thermal margin afforded by iridium-coated rhenium (Ir/Re) allows reduction or elimination of fuel film cooling. This, in turn, leads to higher performance and cleaner spacecraft environments. There are ongoing government- and industry-sponsored efforts to develop flight Ir/ Re engines, with the primary focus on 440-N, apogee insertion engines. Complementing these Ir/Re engine development efforts is a program to address specific concerns and fundamental characterization of the Ir/Re material system, including (1) development of Ir/Re rocket fabrication methods, (2) establishment of critical Re mechanical properly data, (3) development of reliable joining methods, and (4) characterization of Ir/Re life-limiting mechanisms.

  7. Image Analysis Based Estimates of Regolith Erosion Due to Plume Impingement Effects

    Lane, John E.; Metzger, Philip T.


    Characterizing dust plumes on the moon's surface during a rocket landing is imperative to the success of future operations on the moon or any other celestial body with a dusty or soil surface (including cold surfaces covered by frozen gas ice crystals, such as the moons of the outer planets). The most practical method of characterizing the dust clouds is to analyze video or still camera images of the dust illuminated by the sun or on-board light sources (such as lasers). The method described below was used to characterize the dust plumes from the Apollo 12 landing.

  8. Computational studies of hard-body and 3-D effects in plume flows

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Feiereisen, William J.; Obayashi, Shigeru


    Axisymmetric and three-dimensional, multi-nozzle plume flows around generic rocket geometries are investigated with a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver to study the interactive effects between hard body and the plume. Time-asymptotic, laminar, ideal-gas solutions obtained with a two-factor, flux-split scheme and a diagonal, upwind scheme are presented. Computed solutions to three-dimensional, multi-nozzle problems and single-nozzle, axisymmetric problems demonstrate flow field features including three-dimensionality and hard-body effects. Geometry and three-dimensional effects are shown to be significant in multi-nozzle flows.

  9. Inverse dynamic energy management for multi-constrained depleted shutdown of solid rocket%固体火箭多约束耗尽关机的动态逆能量管理方法

    张志健; 王小虎


    To solve the energy management problem of a solid rocket with multi-constraining depleted shutdown,a novel inverse dynamic energy management (IEM) method was proposed.Firstly,a novel model based on excess velocity capability was estab-lished,and its performance was studied.Secondly,a closed-loop IEM method with two specific realizations was proposed, and the constrained and unconstrained convergence condition was discussed.Finally,the IEM's performance,energy manage results and the difference with general energy management ( GEM) and spline energy management ( SEM) were verified by computer simulation, which demonstrates a strong robust,high control precision, low attitude maneuver,small terminal angle of IEM.Indeed,IEM can suc-cessfully manage 2%~83.3% energy under a sort of fixed parameters.As the ratio of excess energy is below 41.3%, the terminal ve-locity is less than 0.25 m/s,the flight-path angle is less than 0.014°,the attitude angular velocity is less than 0.25°/s,and the angle of attack is less than 5° .%针对具有速度控制能力的固体火箭多约束耗尽关机问题,建立以多余视速度增量为状态量的新型能量管理模型,分析了该模型能量管理动态特性,提出一种闭环动态逆能量管理( IEM)方式,得到了无约束和有约束关机时能量管理的收敛条件,并据此设计了IEM的2种具体实现。最后以数学仿真验证了该方法的特性、能量管理效果,分析了与其他2种闭环能量管理方法---通用能量管理(GEM)、样条能量管理(SEM)的异同。结果表明,IEM方法鲁棒性强、精度高、姿态变化缓慢,能量管理范围大,一组固定的参数实现了2.1%~83.3%的能量管理;当能耗小于41.3%时,关机点速度偏差小于0.25 m/s,速度倾角小于0.014°,姿态角速度小于0.25°/s,攻角小于5°。

  10. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Propulsion Systems


    NUCLEAR THERMAL ROCKET PROPULSION SYSTEMS, IAA WHITE PAPER PARIS, FRANCE, MARCH 2005 Lt Col Timothy J. Lawrence U.S. Air Force Academy...YYYY) 18-03-2005 2. REPORT TYPE White Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 18 Mar 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NUCLEAR THERMAL ROCKET PROPULSION...reduce radiation exposure, is to have a high energy system like a nuclear thermal rocket that can get the payload to the destination in the fastest

  11. Rocket Assembly and Checkout Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Integrates, tests, and calibrates scientific instruments flown on sounding rocket payloads. The scientific instruments are assembled on an optical bench;...

  12. Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) plume and plume effects study

    Smith, Sheldon D.


    The objective was to characterize the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) propulsion and attitude control system engine exhaust plumes and predict the resultant plume impingement pressure, heat loads, forces, and moments. Detailed description is provided of the OMV gaseous nitrogen (GN2) thruster exhaust plume flow field characteristics calculated with the RAMP2 snd SFPGEN computer codes. Brief descriptions are included of the two models, GN2 thruster characteristics and RAMP2 input data files. The RAMP2 flow field could be recalculated by other organizations using the information presented. The GN2 flow field can be readily used by other organizations who are interested in GN2 plume induced environments which require local flow field properties which can be supplied using the SFPGEN GN2 model.

  13. Rocket-Powered Parachutes Rescue Entire Planes


    Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Langley Research Center helped BRS Aerospace, of Saint Paul, Minnesota, to develop technology that has saved 246 lives to date. The company s whole aircraft parachute systems deploy in less than 1 second thanks to solid rocket motors and are capable of arresting the descent of a small aircraft, lowering it safely to the ground. BRS has sold more than 30,000 systems worldwide, and the technology is now standard equipment on many of the world s top-selling aircraft. Parachutes for larger airplanes are in the works.

  14. Biogeochemistry of landfill leachate plumes

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Kjeldsen, Peter; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup


    is on dissolved organic matter, xenobiotic organic compounds, inorganic macrocomponents as anions and cations, and heavy metals. Laboratory as well as field investigations are included. This review is an up-date of an earlier comprehensive review. The review shows that most leachate contamination plumes...... the behavior of the contaminants in the plume as the leachate migrates away from the landfill. Diverse microbial communities have been identified in leachate plumes and are believed to be responsible for the redox processes. Dissolved organic C in the leachate, although it appears to be only slowly degradable...

  15. Rocket + Science = Dialogue

    Morris,Bruce; Sullivan, Greg; Burkey, Martin


    It's a cliche that rocket engineers and space scientists don t see eye-to-eye. That goes double for rocket engineers working on human spaceflight and scientists working on space telescopes and planetary probes. They work fundamentally different problems but often feel that they are competing for the same pot of money. Put the two groups together for a weekend, and the results could be unscientific or perhaps combustible. Fortunately, that wasn't the case when NASA put heavy lift launch vehicle designers together with astronomers and planetary scientists for two weekend workshops in 2008. The goal was to bring the top people from both groups together to see how the mass and volume capabilities of NASA's Ares V heavy lift launch vehicle could benefit the science community. Ares V is part of NASA's Constellation Program for resuming human exploration beyond low Earth orbit, starting with missions to the Moon. In the current mission scenario, Ares V launches a lunar lander into Earth orbit. A smaller Ares I rocket launches the Orion crew vehicle with up to four astronauts. Orion docks with the lander, attached to the Ares V Earth departure stage. The stage fires its engine to send the mated spacecraft to the Moon. Standing 360 feet high and weighing 7.4 million pounds, NASA's new heavy lifter will be bigger than the 1960s-era Saturn V. It can launch almost 60 percent more payload to translunar insertion together with the Ares I and 35 percent more mass to low Earth orbit than the Saturn V. This super-sized capability is, in short, designed to send more people to more places to do more things than the six Apollo missions.

  16. The Alfred Nobel rocket camera. An early aerial photography attempt

    Ingemar Skoog, A.


    Alfred Nobel (1833-1896), mainly known for his invention of dynamite and the creation of the Nobel Prices, was an engineer and inventor active in many fields of science and engineering, e.g. chemistry, medicine, mechanics, metallurgy, optics, armoury and rocketry. Amongst his inventions in rocketry was the smokeless solid propellant ballistite (i.e. cordite) patented for the first time in 1887. As a very wealthy person he actively supported many Swedish inventors in their work. One of them was W.T. Unge, who was devoted to the development of rockets and their applications. Nobel and Unge had several rocket patents together and also jointly worked on various rocket applications. In mid-1896 Nobel applied for patents in England and France for "An Improved Mode of Obtaining Photographic Maps and Earth or Ground Measurements" using a photographic camera carried by a "…balloon, rocket or missile…". During the remaining of 1896 the mechanical design of the camera mechanism was pursued and cameras manufactured. In April 1897 (after the death of Alfred Nobel) the first aerial photos were taken by these cameras. These photos might be the first documented aerial photos taken by a rocket borne camera. Cameras and photos from 1897 have been preserved. Nobel did not only develop the rocket borne camera but also proposed methods on how to use the photographs taken for ground measurements and preparing maps.

  17. Mars Rocket Propulsion System

    Zubrin, Robert; Harber, Dan; Nabors, Sammy


    A report discusses the methane and carbon monoxide/LOX (McLOx) rocket for ascent from Mars as well as other critical space propulsion tasks. The system offers a specific impulse over 370 s roughly 50 s higher than existing space-storable bio-propellants. Current Mars in-situ propellant production (ISPP) technologies produce impure methane and carbon monoxide in various combinations. While separation and purification of methane fuel is possible, it adds complexity to the propellant production process and discards an otherwise useful fuel product. The McLOx makes such complex and wasteful processes unnecessary by burning the methane/CO mixtures produced by the Mars ISPP systems without the need for further refinement. Despite the decrease in rocket-specific impulse caused by the CO admixture, the improvement offered by concomitant increased propellant density can provide a net improvement in stage performance. One advantage is the increase of the total amount of propellant produced, but with a decrease in mass and complexity of the required ISPP plant. Methane/CO fuel mixtures also may be produced by reprocessing the organic wastes of a Moon base or a space station, making McLOx engines key for a human Lunar initiative or the International Space Station (ISS) program. Because McLOx propellant components store at a common temperature, very lightweight and compact common bulkhead tanks can be employed, improving overall stage performance further.

  18. Smoke plumes: Emissions and effects

    Susan O' Neill; Shawn Urbanski; Scott Goodrick; Sim Larkin


    Smoke can manifest itself as a towering plume rising against the clear blue sky-or as a vast swath of thick haze, with fingers that settle into valleys overnight. It comes in many forms and colors, from fluffy and white to thick and black. Smoke plumes can rise high into the atmosphere and travel great distances across oceans and continents. Or smoke can remain close...

  19. A cold plasma plume with a highly conductive liquid electrode

    Chen Guang-Liang; Chen Shi-gua; Chen Wen-Xing; Yang Si-Ze


    A cold dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma plume with one highly conductive liquid electrode has been developed to treat thermally sensitive materials, and its preliminary discharging characteristics have been studied. The averaged electron temperature and density is estimated to be 0.6eV and 1011/cm3, respectively. The length of plasma plume can reach 5cm with helium gas (He), and the conductivity of the outer electrode affects the plume length obviously. This plasma plume could be touched by bare hand without causing any burning or painful sensation,which may provide potential application for safe aseptic skin care. Moreover, the oxidative particles (e.g., OH, O*03) in the downstream oxygen (02) gas of the plume have been applied to treat the landfill leachate. The results show that the activated 02 gas can degrade the landfill leachate effectively, and the chemical oxygen demand (COD),conductivity, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and suspended solid (SS) can be decreased by 52%, 57%, 76% and 92%, respectively.

  20. Equatorial spread F fossil plumes

    S. L. Ossakow


    Full Text Available Behaviour of equatorial spread F (ESF fossil plumes, i.e., ESF plumes that have stopped rising, is examined using the NRL SAMI3/ESF three-dimensional simulation code. We find that fossil bubbles, plasma density depletions associated with fossil plumes, can persist as high-altitude equatorial depletions even while being "blown" by zonal winds. Corresponding airglow-proxy images of fossil plumes, plots of electron density versus longitude and latitude at a constant altitude of 288 km, are shown to partially "fill in" in most cases, beginning with the highest altitude field lines within the plume. Specifically, field lines upon which the E field has fallen entirely to zero are affected and only the low altitude (≤600 km portion if each field line fills in. This suggests that it should be possible to observe a bubble at high altitude on a field line for which the corresponding airglow image no longer shows a depletion. In all cases ESF plumes stop rising when the flux-tube-integrated ion mass density inside the upper edge of the bubble is equal to that of the nearby background, further supporting the result of Krall et al. (2010b.

  1. What fuel for a rocket?

    Miranda, E N


    Elementary concepts from general physics and thermodynamics have been used to analyze rocket propulsion. Making some reasonable assumptions, an expression for the exit velocity of the gases is found. From that expression one can conclude what are the desired properties for a rocket fuel.

  2. Rocket launchers as passive controllers

    Cochran, J. E., Jr.; Gunnels, R. T.; McCutchen, R. K., Jr.


    A concept is advanced for using the motion of launchers of a free-flight launcher/rocket system which is caused by random imperfections of the rockets launched from it to reduce the total error caused by the imperfections. This concept is called 'passive launcher control' because no feedback is generated by an active energy source after an error is sensed; only the feedback inherent in the launcher/rocket interaction is used. Relatively simple launcher models with two degrees of freedom, pitch and yaw, were used in conjunction with a more detailed, variable-mass model in a digital simulation code to obtain rocket trajectories with and without thrust misalignment and dynamic imbalance. Angular deviations of rocket velocities and linear deviations of the positions of rocket centers of mass at burnout were computed for cases in which the launcher was allowed to move ('flexible' launcher) and was constrained so that it did not rotate ('rigid' launcher) and ratios of flexible to rigid deviations were determined. Curves of these error ratios versus launcher frequency are presented. These show that a launcher which has a transverse moment of inertia about its pivot point of the same magnitude as that of the centroidal transverse moments of inertia of the rockets launched from it can be tuned to passively reduce the errors caused by rocket imperfections.

  3. Multi-spectral measurements program and guiding a rocket to hover

    Taylor, W. G.


    The Multi-Spectral Measurement Program (MSMP) was a large and sophisticated sounding rocket endeavor to examine in space the exhaust plume of rocket engines. The MSMP required that the plumes be analyzed at different wavelengths, from various aspects, and from varying distances. The ELF III provided the guidance signals necessary to orient the 'sensor' vehicle. UV, IR, television, and long-focal-length still-camera picture data were taken. Most of the data were telemetered down in real time. Because of the nature of the experiments, the number of data-gathering devices, and the monitoring of the large three-stage missile, the telemetering of data became a very complex subproject in itself.

  4. Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor

    Lanin, Anatoly


    The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER ) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  5. Antithermal shield for rockets with heat evacuation by infrared radiation reflection

    Ioan RUSU


    Full Text Available At high speed, the friction between the air mass and the rocket surface causes a localheating of over 1000 Celsius degrees. For the heat protection of the rocket, on its outside surfacethermal shields are installed.Studying the Coanda effect, the fluid flow on solids surface, respectively, the author Ioan Rusuhas discovered by simply researches that the Coanda effect could be /extended also to the fluid flowon discontinuous solids, namely, on solids provided with orifices. This phenomenon was named by theauthor, the expanded Coanda effect. Starting with this discovery, the author has invented a thermalshield, registered at The State Office for inventions and Trademarks OSIM, deposit F 2010 0153This thermal shield:- is built as a covering rocket sheet with many orifices installed with a minimum space fromthe rocket body- takes over the heat fluid generated by the frontal part of the rocket and avoids the directcontact between the heat fluid and the rocket body- ensures the evacuation of the infrared radiation, generated by the heat fluid flowing overthe shield because of the extended Coanda effect by reflection from the rocket bodysurface.

  6. Analysis of rocket beacon transmissions for computerized reconstruction of ionospheric densities

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Huba, J. D.; Chaturvedi, P. K.; Fulford, J. A.; Forsyth, P. A.; Anderson, D. N.; Zalesak, S. T.


    Three methods are described to obtain ionospheric electron densities from transionospheric, rocket-beacon TEC data. First, when the line-of-sight from a ground receiver to the rocket beacon is tangent to the flight trajectory, the electron concentration can be obtained by differentiating the TEC with respect to the distance to the rocket. A similar method may be used to obtain the electron-density profile if the layer is horizontally stratified. Second, TEC data obtained during chemical release experiments may be interpreted with the aid of physical models of the disturbed ionosphere to yield spatial maps of the modified regions. Third, computerized tomography (CT) can be used to analyze TEC data obtained along a chain of ground-based receivers aligned along the plane of the rocket trajectory. CT analysis of TEC data is used to reconstruct a 2D image of a simulated equatorial plume. TEC data is computed for a linear chain of nine receivers with adjacent spacings of either 100 or 200 km. The simulation data are analyzed to provide an F region reconstruction on a grid with 15 x 15 km pixels. Ionospheric rocket tomography may also be applied to rocket-assisted measurements of amplitude and phase scintillations and airglow intensities.

  7. HESTIA Commodities Exchange Pallet and Sounding Rocket Test Stand

    Chaparro, Javier


    the Commodities Exchange Pallet, I also assisted in preparation for testing the upper stage of a sounding rocket developed as a Center Innovation Fund project. The main objective of this project is to demonstrate the integration between a propulsion system and a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The upper stage and SOFC are scheduled to complete an integrated test in August of 2016. As part of preparation for scheduled testing, I was responsible for designing the upper stage's test stand/support structure and main engine plume deflector to be used during hot-fire testing (fig. 3). The structural components of the test stand need to meet safety requirements for operation of the propulsion system, which consist of a 100 pounds-thrust main engine and two 15 pounds-thrust reaction control thrusters. My main accomplishment for this project was the completion of the design and the parts selection for construction of the structure, scheduled to begin late April of 2016.

  8. A two-phase restricted equilibrium model for combustion of metalized solid propellants

    Sabnis, J. S.; Dejong, F. J.; Gibeling, H. J.


    An Eulerian-Lagrangian two-phase approach was adopted to model the multi-phase reacting internal flow in a solid rocket with a metalized propellant. An Eulerian description was used to analyze the motion of the continuous phase which includes the gas as well as the small (micron-sized) particulates, while a Lagrangian description is used for the analysis of the discrete phase which consists of the larger particulates in the motor chamber. The particulates consist of Al and Al2O3 such that the particulate composition is 100 percent Al at injection from the propellant surface with Al2O3 fraction increasing due to combustion along the particle trajectory. An empirical model is used to compute the combustion rate for agglomerates while the continuous phase chemistry is treated using chemical equilibrium. The computer code was used to simulate the reacting flow in a solid rocket motor with an AP/HTPB/Al propellant. The computed results show the existence of an extended combustion zone in the chamber rather than a thin reaction region. The presence of the extended combustion zone results in the chamber flow field and chemical being far from isothermal (as would be predicted by a surface combustion assumption). The temperature in the chamber increases from about 2600 K at the propellant surface to about 3350 K in the core. Similarly the chemical composition and the density of the propellant gas also show spatially non-uniform distribution in the chamber. The analysis developed under the present effort provides a more sophisticated tool for solid rocket internal flow predictions than is presently available, and can be useful in studying apparent anomalies and improving the simple correlations currently in use. The code can be used in the analysis of combustion efficiency, thermal load in the internal insulation, plume radiation, etc.

  9. Plumes in stellar convection zones

    Zahn, J P


    All numerical simulations of compressible convection reveal the presence of strong downwards directed flows. Thanks to helioseismology, such plumes have now been detected also at the top of the solar convection zone, on super- granular scales. Their properties may be crudely described by adopting Taylor's turbulent entrainment hypothesis, whose validity is well established under various conditions. Using this model, one finds that the strong density stratification does not prevent the plumes from traversing the whole convection zone, and that they carry upwards a net energy flux (Rieutord & Zahn 1995). They penetrate to some extent in the adjacent stable region, where they establish a nearly adiabatic stratification. These plumes have a strong impact on the dynamics of stellar convection zones, and they play probably a key role in the dynamo mechanism.

  10. 'RCHX-1-STORM' first Slovenian meteorological rocket program

    Kerstein, Aleksander; Matko, Drago; Trauner, Amalija; Britovšek, Zvone


    Astronautic and Rocket Society Celje (ARSC) formed a special working team for research and development of a small meteorological hail suppression rocket in the 70th. The hail suppression system was established in former Yugoslavia in the late 60th as an attempt to protect important agricultural regions from one of the summer's most vicious storm. In this time Slovenia was a part of Yugoslavia as one of the federal republic with relative high developed agricultural region production. The Rocket program 'RCHX-STORM' was a second attempt, for Slovenia indigenously developed in the production of meteorological hail suppression rocket. ARSC has designed a family of small sounding rocket that were based on highly promising hybrid propellant propulsion. Hybrid propulsion was selected for this family because it was offering low cost, save production and operation and simple logistics. Conventional sounding rockets use solid propellant motor for their propulsion. The introduction of hybrid motors has enabled a considerable decrease in overall cost. The transportation handling and storage procedures were greatly simplified due to the fact that a hybrid motor was not considered as explosive matter. A hybrid motor may also be designed to stand a severe environment without resorting to conditioning arrangements. The program started in the late 70th when the team ARSC was integrated in the Research and Development Institute in Celje (RDIC). The development program aimed to produce three types of meteorological rockets with diameters 76, 120 and 160 mm. Development of the RCHX-76 engine and rocket vehicle including flight certification has been undertaken by a joint team comprising of the ARCS, RDIC and the company Cestno podjetje Celje (CPC), Road building company Celje. Many new techniques and methods were used in this program such as computer simulation of external and internal ballistics, composite materials for rocket construction, intensive static testing of models and

  11. British used Congreve Rockets to Attack Napoleon


    Sir William Congreve developed a rocket with a range of about 9,000 feet. The incendiary rocket used black powder, an iron case, and a 16-foot guide stick. In 1806, British used Congreve rockets to attack Napoleon's headquarters in France. In 1807, Congreve directed a rocket attack against Copenhagen.

  12. Coastal river plumes: Collisions and coalescence

    Warrick, Jonathan A.; Farnsworth, Katherine L.


    Plumes of buoyant river water spread in the ocean from river mouths, and these plumes influence water quality, sediment dispersal, primary productivity, and circulation along the world's coasts. Most investigations of river plumes have focused on large rivers in a coastal region, for which the physical spreading of the plume is assumed to be independent from the influence of other buoyant plumes. Here we provide new understanding of the spreading patterns of multiple plumes interacting along simplified coastal settings by investigating: (i) the relative likelihood of plume-to-plume interactions at different settings using geophysical scaling, (ii) the diversity of plume frontal collision types and the effects of these collisions on spreading patterns of plume waters using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model, and (iii) the fundamental differences in plume spreading patterns between coasts with single and multiple rivers using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. Geophysical scaling suggests that coastal margins with numerous small rivers (watershed areas 100,000 km2). When two plume fronts meet, several types of collision attributes were found, including refection, subduction and occlusion. We found that the relative differences in pre-collision plume densities and thicknesses strongly influenced the resulting collision types. The three-dimensional spreading of buoyant plumes was found to be influenced by the presence of additional rivers for all modeled scenarios, including those with and without Coriolis and wind. Combined, these results suggest that plume-to-plume interactions are common phenomena for coastal regions offshore of the world's smaller rivers and for coastal settings with multiple river mouths in close proximity, and that the spreading and fate of river waters in these settings will be strongly influenced by these interactions. We conclude that new investigations are needed to characterize how plumes interact offshore of river mouths to better

  13. Coastal river plumes: Collisions and coalescence

    Warrick, Jonathan; Farnsworth, Katherine L


    Plumes of buoyant river water spread in the ocean from river mouths, and these plumes influence water quality, sediment dispersal, primary productivity, and circulation along the world’s coasts. Most investigations of river plumes have focused on large rivers in a coastal region, for which the physical spreading of the plume is assumed to be independent from the influence of other buoyant plumes. Here we provide new understanding of the spreading patterns of multiple plumes interacting along simplified coastal settings by investigating: (i) the relative likelihood of plume-to-plume interactions at different settings using geophysical scaling, (ii) the diversity of plume frontal collision types and the effects of these collisions on spreading patterns of plume waters using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model, and (iii) the fundamental differences in plume spreading patterns between coasts with single and multiple rivers using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. Geophysical scaling suggests that coastal margins with numerous small rivers (watershed areas  100,000 km2). When two plume fronts meet, several types of collision attributes were found, including refection, subduction and occlusion. We found that the relative differences in pre-collision plume densities and thicknesses strongly influenced the resulting collision types. The three-dimensional spreading of buoyant plumes was found to be influenced by the presence of additional rivers for all modeled scenarios, including those with and without Coriolis and wind. Combined, these results suggest that plume-to-plume interactions are common phenomena for coastal regions offshore of the world’s smaller rivers and for coastal settings with multiple river mouths in close proximity, and that the spreading and fate of river waters in these settings will be strongly influenced by these interactions. We conclude that new investigations are needed to characterize how plumes interact offshore of river mouths to

  14. Solid Propellant Test Article (SPTA) Test Firing


    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) engineers test fired a 26-foot long, 100,000-pound-thrust solid rocket motor for 30 seconds at the MSFC east test area, the first test firing of the Modified NASA Motor (M-NASA Motor). The M-NASA Motor was fired in a newly constructed stand. The motor is 48-inches in diameter and was loaded with two propellant cartridges weighing a total of approximately 12,000 pounds. The purpose of the test was to learn more about solid rocket motor insulation and nozzle materials and to provide young engineers additional hands-on expertise in solid rocket motor technology. The test is a part of NASA's Solid Propulsion Integrity Program, that is to provide NASA engineers with the techniques, engineering tools, and computer programs to be able to better design, build, and verify solid rocket motors.

  15. Alternate Propellant Thermal Rocket Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Alternate Propellant Thermal Rocket (APTR) is a novel concept for propulsion of space exploration or orbit transfer vehicles. APTR propulsion is provided by...

  16. Not just rocket science

    MacAdam, S.; Anderson, R. [Celan Energy Systems, Rancho Cordova, CA (United States)


    The paper explains a different take on oxyfuel combustion. Clean Energy Systems (CES) has integrated aerospace technology into conventional power systems, creating a zero-emission power generation technology that has some advantages over other similar approaches. When using coal as a feedstock, the CES process burns syngas rather than raw coal. The process uses recycled water and steam to moderate the temperature, instead of recycled CO{sub 2}. With no air ingress, the CES process produces very pure CO{sub 2}. This makes it possible to capture over 99% of the CO{sub 2} resulting from combustion. CES uses the combustion products to drive the turbines, rather than indirectly raising steam for steam turbines, as in the oxyfuel process used by companies such as Vattenfall. The core of the process is a high-pressure oxy-combustor adapted from rocket engine technology. This combustor burns gaseous or liquid fuels with gaseous oxygen in the presence of water. Fuels include natural gas, coal or coke-derived synthesis gas, landfill and biodigester gases, glycerine solutions and oil/water emulsion. 2 figs.

  17. Lidar measurements of plume statistics

    Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Mikkelsen, T.


    the source, instantaneous crosswind plume profiles were detected repetitively at high spatial (1.5 m) and temporal (3 sec) intervals by use of a mini LIDAR system. The experiments were accompanied by measurement of the surface-layer mean wind and turbulence quantities by sonic anemometers. On the basis...

  18. Ship exhaust gas plume cooling

    Schleijpen, H.M.A.; Neele, P.P.


    The exhaust gas plume is an important and sometimes dominating contributor to the infrared signature of ships. Suppression of the infrared ship signatures has been studied by TNO for the Royal Netherlands Navy over considerable time. This study deals with the suppression effects, which can be achiev

  19. Downwelling wind, tides, and estuarine plume dynamics

    Lai, Zhigang; Ma, Ronghua; Huang, Mingfen; Chen, Changsheng; Chen, Yong; Xie, Congbin; Beardsley, Robert C.


    The estuarine plume dynamics under a downwelling-favorable wind condition were examined in the windy dry season of the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) using the PRE primitive-equation Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM). The wind and tide-driven estuarine circulation had a significant influence on the plume dynamics on both local and remote scales. Specifically, the local effect of downwelling-favorable winds on the plume was similar to the theoretical descriptions of coastal plumes, narrowing the plume width, and setting up a vertically uniform downstream current at the plume edge. Tides tended to reduce these plume responses through local turbulent mixing and advection from upstream regions, resulting in an adjustment of the isohalines in the plume and a weakening of the vertically uniform downstream current. The remote effect of downwelling-favorable winds on the plume was due to the wind-induced estuarine sea surface height (SSH), which strengthened the estuarine circulation and enhanced the plume transport accordingly. Associated with these processes, tide-induced mixing tended to weaken the SSH gradient and thus the estuarine circulation over a remote influence scale. Overall, the typical features of downwelling-favorable wind-driven estuarine plumes revealed in this study enhanced our understanding of the estuarine plume dynamics under downwelling-favorable wind conditions.

  20. Characterization of redox conditions in pollution plumes

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwart, Steven A.


    Evalution of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...

  1. Characterization of redox conditions in pollution plumes

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwart, Steven A.


    Evalution of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...

  2. Computational simulation of liquid fuel rocket injectors

    Landrum, D. Brian


    A major component of any liquid propellant rocket is the propellant injection system. Issues of interest include the degree of liquid vaporization and its impact on the combustion process, the pressure and temperature fields in the combustion chamber, and the cooling of the injector face and chamber walls. The Finite Difference Navier-Stokes (FDNS) code is a primary computational tool used in the MSFC Computational Fluid Dynamics Branch. The branch has dedicated a significant amount of resources to development of this code for prediction of both liquid and solid fuel rocket performance. The FDNS code is currently being upgraded to include the capability to model liquid/gas multi-phase flows for fuel injection simulation. An important aspect of this effort is benchmarking the code capabilities to predict existing experimental injection data. The objective of this MSFC/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship term was to evaluate the capabilities of the modified FDNS code to predict flow fields with liquid injection. Comparisons were made between code predictions and existing experimental data. A significant portion of the effort included a search for appropriate validation data. Also, code simulation deficiencies were identified.

  3. Standard Molded Composite Rocket Pyrogen Igniter - A progress report

    Lucy, M. H.


    The pyrogen igniter has the function to furnish a controlled, high temperature, high pressure gas to ignite solid propellant surfaces in a rocket motor. Present pyrogens consist of numerous inert components. The Standard Molded Pyrogen Igniter (SMPI) consists of three basic parts, a cap with several integrally molded features, an ignition pellet retainer plate, and a tube with additional integrally molded features. A description is presented of an investigation which indicates that the SMPI concept is a viable approach to the design and manufacture of pyrogen igniters for solid propellant rocket motors. For some applications, combining the structural and thermal properties of molded composites can result in the manufacture of lighter assemblies at considerable cost reduction. It is demonstrated that high strength, thin walled tubes with high length to diameter ratios can be fabricated from reinforced plastic molding compound using the displacement compression process.

  4. The mixing of solid propellant by an artificial muscle actuator

    岩崎, 祥大; 伴, 遼介; 吉浜, 舜; 中村, 太郎; 羽生, 宏人; Iwasaki, Akihiro; Ban, Ryosuke; Yoshihama, Shun; Nakamura, Taro; Habu, Hiroto


    This research aims to reduce the cost of the solid rocket motor production, mainly solid propellant. The production process of the solid rocket propellant are usually employed the multi-batch mixing. However, this study using a peristaltic pump as a mixer will lead to the continuous process. The pump system can mix the powder materials for propellant and we consider that it will make the slurry of the solid propellant efficiently by the mechanism of the fluid dynamics in the pump.

  5. Study of Cavitation/Vaporization in Liquid Rocket Thruster Injectors


    Caveny, L. H., and Summerfield, M., Aluminized Solid Propellants Burning in a Rocket Motor Flowfield, AIAA Journal, Vol. 16, No. 7, 1978, pp. 736-739. [2...the swirl chamber, and the pulsator and manifold are made of 304 stainless steel . Figure 1: Nomenclature defined for swirl injector. Table 1...Wayne, NJ, 2009 [17] MATLAB, Matrix Laboratory, Software Package, R2009a, The MathWorks, Natick, MA, 2009. [18] Coleman, H.W. and Steele , W.G

  6. Ultrasonic inspection of rocket fuel model using laminated transducer and multi-channel step pulser

    Mihara, T.; Hamajima, T.; Tashiro, H.; Sato, A.


    For the ultrasonic inspection for the packing of solid fuel in a rocket booster, an industrial inspection is difficult. Because the signal to noise ratio in ultrasonic inspection of rocket fuel become worse due to the large attenuation even using lower frequency ultrasound. For the improvement of this problem, we tried to applied the two techniques in ultrasonic inspection, one was the step function pulser system with the super wideband frequency properties and the other was the laminated element transducer. By combining these two techniques, we developed the new ultrasonic measurement system and demonstrated the advantages in ultrasonic inspection of rocket fuel model specimen.

  7. Rocket Engine Innovations Advance Clean Energy


    During launch countdown, at approximately T-7 seconds, the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs) roar to life. When the controllers indicate normal operation, the solid rocket boosters ignite and the shuttle blasts off. Initially, the SSMEs throttle down to reduce stress during the period of maximum dynamic pressure, but soon after, they throttle up to propel the orbiter to 17,500 miles per hour. In just under 9 minutes, the three SSMEs burn over 1.6 million pounds of propellant, and temperatures inside the main combustion chamber reach 6,000 F. To cool the engines, liquid hydrogen circulates through miles of tubing at -423 F. From 1981to 2011, the Space Shuttle fleet carried crew and cargo into orbit to perform a myriad of unprecedented tasks. After 30 years and 135 missions, the feat of engineering known as the SSME boasted a 100-percent flight success rate.

  8. Integrated model of a composite propellant rocket

    Miccio, Francesco


    The combustion of composite solid propellants was investigated and an available numerical model was improved for taking into account the change of pressure, when the process occurs in a confined environment, as inside a rocket. The pressure increase upon ignition is correctly described by the improved model for both sandwich and dispersed particles propellants. In the latter case, self-induced fluctuations in the pressure and in all other computed variables occur, as consequence of the periodic rise and depletion of oxidizer particles from the binder matrix. The comparison with the results of the constant pressure model shows a different fluctuating profile of gas velocity, with a possible second order effect induced by the pressure fluctuations.

  9. Additive Manufacturing a Liquid Hydrogen Rocket Engine

    Jones, Carl P.; Robertson, Elizabeth H.; Koelbl, Mary Beth; Singer, Chris


    Space Propulsion is a 5 day event being held from 2nd May to the 6th May 2016 at the Rome Marriott Park Hotel in Rome, Italy. This event showcases products like Propulsion sub-systems and components, Production and manufacturing issues, Liquid, Solid, Hybrid and Air-breathing Propulsion Systems for Launcher and Upper Stages, Overview of current programmes, AIV issues and tools, Flight testing and experience, Technology building blocks for Future Space Transportation Propulsion Systems : Launchers, Exploration platforms & Space Tourism, Green Propulsion for Space Transportation, New propellants, Rocket propulsion & global environment, Cost related aspects of Space Transportation propulsion, Modelling, Pressure-Thrust oscillations issues, Impact of new requirements and regulations on design etc. in the Automotive, Manufacturing, Fabrication, Repair & Maintenance industries.

  10. Dynamic mechanical analysis of double base rocket propellants

    Marcin Cegła


    Full Text Available The article presents dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA for solid rocket propellants testing. Principles of operation and measured values are briefly described. The authors refer to the previous research of PTFE material and literature data providing information about proper experimental conditions and influence of measurement frequency, load amplitude, and heating rate on the results of DMA tests. The experimental results of solid double-base rocket propellant testing obtained on the N Netzsch DMA 242 device are presented. Mechanical properties such as the dynamic storage modulus E´, the dynamic loss modulus E˝ and tan(δ were measured within temperature range from (–120°C to (+90°C at the heating rate of 1 K/min. The test sample was subjected to a dual cantilever multi-frequency test. Special attention was paid to determination of the glass transition temperature of the tested propellant in reference to the NATO standardization agreement 4540 as well as influence of the measurement frequency on the glass transition.[b]Keywords[/b]: Dynamic mechanical analysis, solid rocket propellants, glass transition temperature

  11. Solid Propellant Grain Structural Integrity Analysis


    The structural properties of solid propellant rocket grains were studied to determine the propellant resistance to stresses. Grain geometry, thermal properties, mechanical properties, and failure modes are discussed along with design criteria and recommended practices.

  12. Compositional differentiation of Enceladus' plume

    Khawaja, N.; Postberg, F.; Schmidt, J.


    The Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) on board the Cassini spacecraft sampled Enceladus' plume ice particles emanated directly from Enceladus' fractured south polar terrain (SPT), the so-called "Tiger Stripes", during two consecutive flybys (E17 and E18) in 2012. The spacecraft passed through the dense plume with a moderate velocity of ~7.5km/s, horizontally to the SPT with a closest approach (CA) at an altitude of ~75km almost directly over the south pole. In both flybys, spectra were recorded during a time interval of ~ ±3 minutes with respect to the closest approach achieving an average sampling rate of about 0.6 sec-1. We assume that the spacecraft passed through the plume during an interval of about ±60(sec) from the CA. Particles encountered before and after this period are predominately from the E-ring background in which Enceladus is embedded. Most CDA TOF-mass spectra are identified as one of three compositional types: (i) almost pure water (ii) organic rich and (iii) salt rich [2]. A Boxcar Analysis (BCA) is performed from a count database for compositional mapping of the plume along the space-craft trajectory. In BCA, counts of each spectrum type are integrated for a certain interval of time (box size). The integral of counts represents frequencies of compositional types in absolute abundances, which are converted later into proportions. This technique has been proven to be a suitable for inferring the compositional profiles from an earlier flyby (E5) [1]. The inferred compositional profiles show similar trends on E17 and E18. The abundances of different compositional types in the plume clearly differ from the Ering background and imply a compositional differentiation inside the plume. Following up the work of Schmidt et al, 2008 and Postberg et al, 2011 we can link different compositional types to different origins. The E17/E18 results are compared with the E5 flyby in 2008, which yielded the currently best compositional profile [2] but was executed at much

  13. Rocket Science 101 Interactive Educational Program

    Armstrong, Dennis; Funkhouse, Deborah; DiMarzio, Donald


    To better educate the public on the basic design of NASA s current mission rockets, Rocket Science 101 software has been developed as an interactive program designed to retain a user s attention and to teach about basic rocket parts. This program also has helped to expand NASA's presence on the Web regarding educating the public about the Agency s goals and accomplishments. The software was designed using Macromedia s Flash 8. It allows the user to select which type of rocket they want to learn about, interact with the basic parts, assemble the parts to create the whole rocket, and then review the basic flight profile of the rocket they have built.

  14. Rocket Science at the Nanoscale.

    Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Wang, Joseph


    Autonomous propulsion at the nanoscale represents one of the most challenging and demanding goals in nanotechnology. Over the past decade, numerous important advances in nanotechnology and material science have contributed to the creation of powerful self-propelled micro/nanomotors. In particular, micro- and nanoscale rockets (MNRs) offer impressive capabilities, including remarkable speeds, large cargo-towing forces, precise motion controls, and dynamic self-assembly, which have paved the way for designing multifunctional and intelligent nanoscale machines. These multipurpose nanoscale shuttles can propel and function in complex real-life media, actively transporting and releasing therapeutic payloads and remediation agents for diverse biomedical and environmental applications. This review discusses the challenges of designing efficient MNRs and presents an overview of their propulsion behavior, fabrication methods, potential rocket fuels, navigation strategies, practical applications, and the future prospects of rocket science and technology at the nanoscale.

  15. Low-thrust rocket trajectories

    Keaton, P.W.


    The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report. 57 refs., 10 figs.

  16. Low-thrust rocket trajectories

    Keaton, P.W.


    The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report.

  17. Arsenic cycling in hydrocarbon plumes: secondary effects of natural attenuation

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Schreiber, Madeline E.; Erickson, Melinda L.; Ziegler, Brady A.


    Monitored natural attenuation is widely applied as a remediation strategy at hydrocarbon spill sites. Natural attenuation relies on biodegradation of hydrocarbons coupled with reduction of electron acceptors, including solid phase ferric iron (Fe(III)). Because arsenic (As) adsorbs to Fe-hydroxides, a potential secondary effect of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons coupled with Fe(III) reduction is a release of naturally occurring As to groundwater. At a crude-oil-contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota, anaerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons coupled to Fe(III) reduction has been well documented. We collected groundwater samples at the site annually from 2009 to 2013 to examine if As is released to groundwater and, if so, to document relationships between As and Fe inside and outside of the dissolved hydrocarbon plume. Arsenic concentrations in groundwater in the plume reached 230 µg/L, whereas groundwater outside the plume contained less than 5 µg/L As. Combined with previous data from the Bemidji site, our results suggest that (1) naturally occurring As is associated with Fe-hydroxides present in the glacially derived aquifer sediments; (2) introduction of hydrocarbons results in reduction of Fe-hydroxides, releasing As and Fe to groundwater; (3) at the leading edge of the plume, As and Fe are removed from groundwater and retained on sediments; and (4) downgradient from the plume, patterns of As and Fe in groundwater are similar to background. We develop a conceptual model of secondary As release due to natural attenuation of hydrocarbons that can be applied to other sites where an influx of biodegradable organic carbon promotes Fe(III) reduction.

  18. Composite Solid Propellant Predictability and Quality Assurance

    Ramohalli, Kumar


    Reports are presented at the meeting at the University of Arizona on the study of predictable and reliable solid rocket motors. The following subject areas were covered: present state and trends in the research of solid propellants; the University of Arizona program in solid propellants, particularly in mixing (experimental and analytical results are presented).

  19. On the great plume debate

    Yaoling Niu


    @@ 1 Introductory note Geological processes are ultimately consequences of Earth's thermal evolution. Plate tectonic theory, which explains geological phenomena along plate boundaries, elegantly illustrates this concept. For example, the origin of oceanic plates at ocean ridges, the movement and growth of these plates, and their ultimate consumption back into the Earth's deep interior through subduction zones provide an efficient mechanism to cool the earth's mantle, leading to large-scale mantle convection. Mantle plumes, which explain another set of global geological phenomena such as within-plate volcanism, cool the earth's deep interior (probably the Earth's core) and represent another mode of Earth's thermal convection. Plate tectonic theory and mantle plume hypothesis thus complement each other to explain much of the whole picture of Earth processes and phenomena.

  20. Agent-Based Chemical Plume Tracing Using Fluid Dynamics

    Zarzhitsky, Dimitri; Spears, Diana; Thayer, David; Spears, William


    This paper presents a rigorous evaluation of a novel, distributed chemical plume tracing algorithm. The algorithm is a combination of the best aspects of the two most popular predecessors for this task. Furthermore, it is based on solid, formal principles from the field of fluid mechanics. The algorithm is applied by a network of mobile sensing agents (e.g., robots or micro-air vehicles) that sense the ambient fluid velocity and chemical concentration, and calculate derivatives. The algorithm drives the robotic network to the source of the toxic plume, where measures can be taken to disable the source emitter. This work is part of a much larger effort in research and development of a physics-based approach to developing networks of mobile sensing agents for monitoring, tracking, reporting and responding to hazardous conditions.

  1. Experimental/Analytical Characterization of the RBCC Rocket-Ejector Mode

    Ruf, J. H.; Lehman, M.; Pal, S.; Santoro, R. J.


    are being conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center to benchmark the FDNS code for RBCC engine operations for such configurations. The primary fluid physics of interests are the mixing and interaction of the rocket plume and secondary flow, subsequent combustion of the fuel rich rocket exhaust with the secondary flow and combustion of the injected afterburner flow. The CFD results are compared to static pressure along the RBCC duct walls, Raman Spectroscopy specie distribution data at several axial locations, net engine thrust and entrained air for the SLS cases. The CFD results compare reasonably well with the experimental results.

  2. An numerical calculation method on cook-off of solid rocket motor of ship-based missiles%一种舰载导弹固体火箭发动机烤燃过程的数值计算方法

    原渭兰; 潘浪


    In order to avert the accidents of solid rocket motor explosion in fire and preserve warship's life-force and combat effectiveness, a one-dimensional mathematical model about the cook-off of the solid rocket motor of the ship-based missiles was established in this paper. The effects of radiation heat transfer, convective heat transfer,heat conduct and chemical reaction were considered in the model. The temperature-time curves, temperature-space curves and self-ignite delay times of the motor were obtained by means of solving numerically. The results indicated that there were marked effects of the temperature and the temperature rise rate of the fire on the self-ignite delay times of the motor, there was good adiabatical effect of the insulation of the motor on the fire and the ignition of the propellant appears firstly on the out surface under fast cook-off.%为了能够有效避免火灾中导弹固体火箭发动机着火爆炸的灾难发生、保存舰艇的生命力和战斗力,建立了一种舰载导弹固体火箭发动机烤燃过程的一维传热数学模型.该数学模型考虑了辐射换热、对流换热、导热和化学反应源项的作用.利用有限差分方法,通过数值计算得到了发动机的温度时间分布曲线、温度空间分布曲线和着火延迟时间.结果表明,火焰温度和火焰温升速率对发动机的着火延迟时间有显著影响;发动机的绝热层对外界火灾有好的隔热作用;快速热烤下,推进剂的着火首先发生在外表面上.

  3. Parametric studies with an atmospheric diffusion model that assesses toxic fuel hazards due to the ground clouds generated by rocket launches

    Stewart, R. B.; Grose, W. L.


    Parametric studies were made with a multilayer atmospheric diffusion model to place quantitative limits on the uncertainty of predicting ground-level toxic rocket-fuel concentrations. Exhaust distributions in the ground cloud, cloud stabilized geometry, atmospheric coefficients, the effects of exhaust plume afterburning of carbon monoxide CO, assumed surface mixing-layer division in the model, and model sensitivity to different meteorological regimes were studied. Large-scale differences in ground-level predictions are quantitatively described. Cloud alongwind growth for several meteorological conditions is shown to be in error because of incorrect application of previous diffusion theory. In addition, rocket-plume calculations indicate that almost all of the rocket-motor carbon monoxide is afterburned to carbon dioxide CO2, thus reducing toxic hazards due to CO. The afterburning is also shown to have a significant effect on cloud stabilization height and on ground-level concentrations of exhaust products.

  4. Integrated Composite Rocket Nozzle Extension Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop and demonstrate an Integrated Composite Rocket Nozzle Extension (ICRNE) for use in rocket thrust chambers. The ICRNE will utilize an...

  5. Study of Rapid-Regression Liquefying Hybrid Rocket Fuels

    Zilliac, Greg; DeZilwa, Shane; Karabeyoglu, M. Arif; Cantwell, Brian J.; Castellucci, Paul


    A report describes experiments directed toward the development of paraffin-based hybrid rocket fuels that burn at regression rates greater than those of conventional hybrid rocket fuels like hydroxyl-terminated butadiene. The basic approach followed in this development is to use materials such that a hydrodynamically unstable liquid layer forms on the melting surface of a burning fuel body. Entrainment of droplets from the liquid/gas interface can substantially increase the rate of fuel mass transfer, leading to surface regression faster than can be achieved using conventional fuels. The higher regression rate eliminates the need for the complex multi-port grain structures of conventional solid rocket fuels, making it possible to obtain acceptable performance from single-port structures. The high-regression-rate fuels contain no toxic or otherwise hazardous components and can be shipped commercially as non-hazardous commodities. Among the experiments performed on these fuels were scale-up tests using gaseous oxygen. The data from these tests were found to agree with data from small-scale, low-pressure and low-mass-flux laboratory tests and to confirm the expectation that these fuels would burn at high regression rates, chamber pressures, and mass fluxes representative of full-scale rocket motors.

  6. Metallic hydrogen: The most powerful rocket fuel yet to exist

    Silvera, Isaac F [Lyman Laboratory of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge MA 02138 (United States); Cole, John W, E-mail: silvera@physics.harvard.ed [NASA MSFC, Huntsville, AL 35801 (United States)


    Wigner and Huntington first predicted that pressures of order 25 GPa were required for the transition of solid molecular hydrogen to the atomic metallic phase. Later it was predicted that metallic hydrogen might be a metastable material so that it remains metallic when pressure is released. Experimental pressures achieved on hydrogen have been more than an order of magnitude higher than the predicted transition pressure and yet it remains an insulator. We discuss the applications of metastable metallic hydrogen to rocketry. Metastable metallic hydrogen would be a very light-weight, low volume, powerful rocket propellant. One of the characteristics of a propellant is its specific impulse, I{sub sp}. Liquid (molecular) hydrogen-oxygen used in modern rockets has an Isp of {approx}460s; metallic hydrogen has a theoretical I{sub sp} of 1700s. Detailed analysis shows that such a fuel would allow single-stage rockets to enter into orbit or carry economical payloads to the moon. If pure metallic hydrogen is used as a propellant, the reaction chamber temperature is calculated to be greater than 6000 K, too high for currently known rocket engine materials. By diluting metallic hydrogen with liquid hydrogen or water, the reaction temperature can be reduced, yet there is still a significant performance improvement for the diluted mixture.

  7. Summarization on variable liquid thrust rocket engines


    The technology actuality and development trend of variable thrust rocket engines at home and abroad are summarized. Key technologies of developing variable thrust rocket engines are analyzed. Development advices on developing variable thrust rocket engines that are adapted to the situation of our country are brought forward.

  8. Nuclear-Thermal Rocket Orbits Mars


    Originally investigated in the 1960's by Marshall Space Flight Center plarners as part of the Nuclear Energy for Rocket Vehicle Applications (NERVA) program, nuclear-thermal rocket propulsion has been more recently considered in spacecraft designs for interplanetary human exploration. This artist's concept illustrates a nuclear-thermal rocket with an aerobrake disk as it orbits Mars.

  9. Measuring Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    Penn, Kim; Slaton, William V.


    This paper describes a method and setup to quickly and easily measure a model rocket engine's thrust curve using a computer data logger and force probe. Horst describes using Vernier's LabPro and force probe to measure the rocket engine's thrust curve; however, the method of attaching the rocket to the force probe is not discussed. We show how a…

  10. Measuring Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    Penn, Kim; Slaton, William V.


    This paper describes a method and setup to quickly and easily measure a model rocket engine's thrust curve using a computer data logger and force probe. Horst describes using Vernier's LabPro and force probe to measure the rocket engine's thrust curve; however, the method of attaching the rocket to the force probe is not discussed. We show how a…

  11. Solid propellant motor

    Shafer, J. I.; Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)


    A case bonded end burning solid propellant rocket motor is described. A propellant with sufficiently low modulus to avoid chamber buckling on cooling from cure and sufficiently high elongation to sustain the stresses induced without cracking is used. The propellant is zone cured within the motor case at high pressures equal to or approaching the pressure at which the motor will operate during combustion. A solid propellant motor with a burning time long enough that its spacecraft would be limited to a maximum acceleration of less than 1 g is provided by one version of the case bonded end burning solid propellant motor of the invention.

  12. Lander rocket exhaust effects on Europa regolith nitrogen assays

    Lorenz, Ralph D.


    Soft-landings on large worlds such as Europa or our Moon require near-surface retropropulsion, which leads to impingement of the rocket plume on the surface. Surface modification by such plumes was documented on Apollo and Surveyor, and on Mars by Viking, Curiosity and especially Phoenix. The low temperatures of the Europan regolith may lead to efficient trapping of ammonia, a principal component of the exhaust from monopropellant hydrazine thrusters. Deposited ammonia may react with any trace organics, and may overwhelm the chemical and isotopic signatures of any endogenous nitrogen compounds, which are likely rare on Europa. An empirical correlation of the photometrically-altered regions ('blast zones') around prior lunar and Mars landings is made, indicating A=0.02T1.5, where A is the area in m2 and W is the lander weight (thus, ~thrust) at landing in N: this suggests surface alteration will occur out to a distance of ~9 m from a 200 kg lander on Europa.

  13. Experimental and computational data from a small rocket exhaust diffuser

    Stephens, Samuel E.


    The Diagnostics Testbed Facility (DTF) at the NASA Stennis Space Center in Mississippi is a versatile facility that is used primarily to aid in the development of nonintrusive diagnostics for liquid rocket engine testing. The DTF consists of a fixed, 1200 lbf thrust, pressure fed, liquid oxygen/gaseous hydrogen rocket engine, and associated support systems. An exhaust diffuser has been fabricated and installed to provide subatmospheric pressures at the exit of the engine. The diffuser aerodynamic design was calculated prior to fabrication using the PARC Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics code. The diffuser was then fabricated and tested at the DTF. Experimental data from these tests were acquired to determine the operational characteristics of the system and to correlate the actual and predicted flow fields. The results show that a good engineering approximation of overall diffuser performance can be made using the PARC Navier-Stokes code and a simplified geometry. Correlations between actual and predicted cell pressure and initial plume expansion in the diffuser are good; however, the wall pressure profiles do not correlate as well with the experimental data.

  14. Assessment of three numerical methods for the computation of a low-density plume flow

    Penko, Paul F.; Riley, Ben R.; Boyd, Iain D.


    Results from three numerical methods including one based on the Navier-Stokes equations, one based on kinetic theory using the DSMC method, and one based on the Boltzmann equation with a Krook-type collision term are compared to each other and to experimental data for a model problem of heated nitrogen flow in a conical nozzle expanding into a vacuum. The problem simulates flow in a resistojet, a low-thrust, electrothermal rocket. The continuum method is applied to both the internal flow and near-field plume. The DSMC and Boltzmann methods are applied primarily to the plume. Experimental measurements of Pitot pressure and flow angle, taken with an apparatus that duplicates the model nozzle flow, are used in the comparisons.

  15. Combustion Tests of Rocket Motor Washout Material: Focus on Air toxics Formation Potential and Asbestos Remediation

    G. C. Sclippa; L. L. Baxter; S. G. Buckley


    The objective of this investigation is to determine the suitability of cofiring as a recycle / reuse option to landfill disposal for solid rocket motor washout residue. Solid rocket motor washout residue (roughly 55% aluminum powder, 40% polybutadiene rubber binder, 5% residual ammonium perchlorate, and 0.2-1% asbestos) has been fired in Sandia's MultiFuel Combustor (MFC). The MFC is a down-fired combustor with electrically heated walls, capable of simulating a wide range of fuel residence times and stoichiometries. This study reports on the fate of AP-based chlorine and asbestos from the residue following combustion.

  16. A research on polyether glycol replaced APCP rocket propellant

    Lou, Tianyou; Bao, Chun Jia; Wang, Yiyang


    Ammonium perchlorate composite propellant (APCP) is a modern solid rocket propellant used in rocket vehicles. It differs from many traditional solid rocket propellants by the nature of how it is processed. APCP is cast into shape, as opposed to powder pressing it with black powder. This provides manufacturing regularity and repeatability, which are necessary requirements for use in the aerospace industry. For traditional APCP, ingredients normally used are ammonium peroxide, aluminum, Hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene(HTPB), curing agency and other additives, the greatest disadvantage is that the fuel is too expensive. According to the price we collected in our country, a single kilogram of this fuel will cost 200 Yuan, which is about 35 dollars, for a fan who may use tons of the fuel in a single year, it definitely is a great deal of money. For this reason, we invented a new kind of APCP fuel. Changing adhesive agency from cross-linked htpb to cross linked polyether glycol gives a similar specific thrust, density and mechanical property while costs a lower price.

  17. Investigation of the collision line broadening problem as applicable to the NASA Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) system, phase 1

    Dean, Timothy C.; Ventrice, Carl A.


    As a final report for phase 1 of the project, the researchers are submitting to the Tennessee Tech Office of Research the following two papers (reprinted in this report): 'Collision Line Broadening Effects on Spectrometric Data from the Optical Plume Anomaly System (OPAD),' presented at the 30th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference, 27-29 June 1994, and 'Calculation of Collision Cross Sections for Atomic Line Broadening in the Plume of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME),' presented at the IEEE Southeastcon '95, 26-29 March 1995. These papers fully state the problem and the progress made up to the end of NASA Fiscal Year 1994. The NASA OPAD system was devised to predict concentrations of anomalous species in the plume of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) through analysis of spectrometric data. The self absorption of the radiation of these plume anomalies is highly dependent on the line shape of the atomic transition of interest. The Collision Line Broadening paper discusses the methods used to predict line shapes of atomic transitions in the environment of a rocket plume. The Voigt profile is used as the line shape factor since both Doppler and collisional line broadening are significant. Methods used to determine the collisional cross sections are discussed and the results are given and compared with experimental data. These collisional cross sections are then incorporated into the current self absorbing radiative model and the predicted spectrum is compared to actual spectral data collected from the Stennis Space Center Diagnostic Test Facility rocket engine. The second paper included in this report investigates an analytical method for determining the cross sections for collision line broadening by molecular perturbers, using effective central force interaction potentials. These cross sections are determined for several atomic species with H2, one of the principal constituents of the SSME plume environment, and compared with experimental data.

  18. Axisymmetric Numerical Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    Morris, Christopher I.


    Pulse detonation rocket engines (PDREs) have generated research interest in recent years as a chemical propulsion system potentially offering improved performance and reduced complexity compared to conventional rocket engines. The detonative mode of combustion employed by these devices offers a thermodynamic advantage over the constant-pressure deflagrative combustion mode used in conventional rocket engines and gas turbines. However, while this theoretical advantage has spurred considerable interest in building PDRE devices, the unsteady blowdown process intrinsic to the PDRE has made realistic estimates of the actual propulsive performance problematic. The recent review article by Kailasanath highlights some of the progress that has been made in comparing the available experimental measurements with analytical and numerical models. In recent work by the author, a quasi-one-dimensional, finite rate chemistry CFD model was utilized to study the gasdynamics and performance characteristics of PDREs over a range of blowdown pressure ratios from 1-1000. Models of this type are computationally inexpensive, and enable first-order parametric studies of the effect of several nozzle and extension geometries on PDRE performance over a wide range of conditions. However, the quasi-one-dimensional approach is limited in that it cannot properly capture the multidimensional blast wave and flow expansion downstream of the PDRE, nor can it resolve nozzle flow separation if present. Moreover, the previous work was limited to single-pulse calculations. In this paper, an axisymmetric finite rate chemistry model is described and utilized to study these issues in greater detail. Example Mach number contour plots showing the multidimensional blast wave and nozzle exhaust plume are shown. The performance results are compared with the quasi-one-dimensional results from the previous paper. Both Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions are calculated in order to determine the effect of viscous

  19. Relationship between plume and plate tectonics

    Puchkov, V. N.


    The relationship between plate- and plume-tectonics is considered in view of the growth and breakdown of supercontinents, active rifting, the formation of passive volcanic-type continental margins, and the origin of time-progressive volcanic chains on oceanic and continental plates. The mantle wind phenomenon is described, as well as its effect on plume morphology and anisotropy of the ambient mantle. The interaction of plumes and mid-ocean ridges is discussed. The principles and problems of plume activity analysis in subduction- and collision-related foldbelts are considered and illustrated with examples.

  20. Redox conditions for mantle plumes

    Heister, L. E.; Lesher, C. E.


    The vanadium to scandium ratio (V/Sc) for basalts from mid-ocean ridge (MOR) and arc environments has been proposed as a proxy for fO2 conditions during partial melting (e.g. [1] and [2]). Contrary to barometric measurements of the fO2 of primitive lavas, the V/Sc ratio of the upper mantle at mid-ocean ridges and arcs is similar, leading previous authors to propose that the upper mantle has uniform redox potential and is well-buffered. We have attempted to broaden the applicability of the V/Sc parameter to plume-influenced localities (both oceanic and continental), where mantle heterogeneities associated with recycled sediments, mafic crust, and metasomatized mantle, whether of shallow or deep origin, exist. We find that primitive basalts from the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP), Hawaii (both the Loa and Kea trends), Deccan, Columbia River, and Siberian Traps show a range of V/Sc ratios that are generally higher (average ~9) than those for MOR (average ~ 6.7) or arc (average ~7) lavas. Based on forward polybaric decompression modeling, we attribute these differences to polybaric melting and melt segregation within the garnet stability field rather than the presence of a more oxidized mantle in plume-influenced settings. Like MORB, the V/Sc ratios for plume-influenced basalts can be accounted for by an oxidation state approximately one log unit below the Ni-NiO buffer (NNO-1). Our analysis suggests that source heterogeneities have little, if any, resolvable influence on mantle redox conditions, although they have significant influence on the trace element and isotopic composition of mantle-derived melts. We suggest that variations in the redox of erupted lavas is largely a function of shallow lithospheric processes rather than intrinsic to the mantle source, regardless of tectonic setting. [1] Li and Lee (2004) EPSL, [2] Lee et al. (2005) J. of Petrology

  1. Pulsed Plasma Thruster plume analysis

    Parker, K. [Washington Univ., Aerospace and Energetics Research Program, Seattle, WA (United States)


    Micro-Pulsed Plasma Thrusters ({mu}PPTs) are a promising method for precision attitude control for small spacecraft in formation flying. They create an ionized plasma plume, which may interfere with other spacecraft in the formation. To characterize the ions in the plume, a diagnostic has been built that couples a drift tube with an energy analyzer. The drift tube provides time of flight measurements to determine the exhaust velocity, and the energy analyzer discriminates the ion energies. The energy analyzer measures the current on a collector plate downstream of four grids that repel electrons and ions below a specified energy. The first grid lowers the density of the plasma, therefore increasing Debye length. The second and fourth grids have a negative potential applied to them so they repel the electrons, while the third grid's voltage can be varied to repel lower energy ions. The ion energies can be computed by differentiating the data. Combining the information of the ion energies and their velocities identifies the ion masses in the PPT plume. The PPT used for this diagnostic is the micro-PPT developed for the Dawgstar satellite. This PPT uses 5.2 Joules per pulse and has a 2.3 cm{sup 2} propellant area, a 1.3 cm electrode length, and an estimated thrust of 85 {mu}N [C. Rayburn et al., AIAA-2000-3256]. This paper will describe the development and design of the time of flight/gridded energy analyzer diagnostic and present recent experimental results. (Author)

  2. Plume spread and atmospheric stability

    Weber, R.O. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)


    The horizontal spread of a plume in atmospheric dispersion can be described by the standard deviation of horizontal direction. The widely used Pasquill-Gifford classes of atmospheric stability have assigned typical values of the standard deviation of horizontal wind direction and of the lapse rate. A measured lapse rate can thus be used to estimate the standard deviation of wind direction. It is examined by means of a large dataset of fast wind measurements how good these estimates are. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  3. Development of high performance hybrid rocket fuels

    Zaseck, Christopher R.

    In this document I discuss paraffin fuel combustion and investigate the effects of additives on paraffin entrainment and regression. In general, hybrid rockets offer an economical and safe alternative to standard liquid and solid rockets. However, slow polymeric fuel regression and low combustion efficiency have limited the commercial use of hybrid rockets. Paraffin is a fast burning fuel that has received significant attention in the 2000's and 2010's as a replacement for standard fuels. Paraffin regresses three to four times faster than polymeric fuels due to the entrainment of a surface melt layer. However, further regression rate enhancement over the base paraffin fuel is necessary for widespread hybrid rocket adoption. I use a small scale opposed flow burner to investigate the effect of additives on the combustion of paraffin. Standard additives such as aluminum combust above the flame zone where sufficient oxidizer levels are present. As a result no heat is generated below the flame itself. In small scale opposed burner experiments the effect of limited heat feedback is apparent. Aluminum in particular does not improve the regression of paraffin in the opposed burner. The lack of heat feedback from additive combustion limits the applicability of the opposed burner. In turn, the results obtained in the opposed burner with metal additive loaded hybrid fuels do not match results from hybrid rocket experiments. In addition, nano-scale aluminum increases melt layer viscosity and greatly slows the regression of paraffin in the opposed flow burner. However, the reactive additives improve the regression rate of paraffin in the opposed burner where standard metals do not. At 5 wt.% mechanically activated titanium and carbon (Ti-C) improves the regression rate of paraffin by 47% in the opposed burner. The mechanically activated Ti C likely reacts in or near the melt layer and provides heat feedback below the flame region that results in faster opposed burner regression

  4. Characteristics of bubble plumes, bubble-plume bubbles and waves from wind-steepened wave breaking

    Leifer, I.; Caulliez, G.; Leeuw, G. de


    Observations of breaking waves, associated bubble plumes and bubble-plume size distributions were used to explore the coupled evolution of wave-breaking, wave properties and bubble-plume characteristics. Experiments were made in a large, freshwater, wind-wave channel with mechanical wind-steepened w

  5. Plume expansion of a laser-induced plasma studied with the particle-in-cell method

    Ellegaard, Ole; Nedela, T; Urbassek, H;


     The initial stage of laser-induced plasma plume expansion from a solid in vacuum and the effect of the Coulomb field have been studied. We have performed a one-dimensional numerical calculation by mapping the charge on a computational grid according to the particle-in-cell (PIC) method of Birdsall...

  6. Plume expansion of a laser-induced plasma studied with the particle-in-cell method

    Ellegaard, O.; Nedelea, T.; Schou, Jørgen;


    The initial stage of laser-induced plasma plume expansion from a solid in vacuum and the effect of the Coulomb field have been studied. We have performed a one-dimensional numerical calculation by mapping the charge on a computational grid according to the particle-in-cell (PIC) method of Birdsall...

  7. Attitude Dynamics of a Spinning Rocket with Internal Fluid Whirling Motion

    Marius Ionut MARMUREANU


    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the impact that helical motion of fluid products of combustion within the combustion chamber of a rocket can have on the attitude dynamics of rocket systems. By developing the study presented by Sookgaew (2004, we determined the configuration of the Coriolis moment components, which catch the impact of the combustion product’s whirling motion, for the radial and centripetal propellant burn pattern specific to S-5M and S-5K solid rocket motors. We continue the investigation of the effects of internal whirling motion of fluid products of combustion on the attitude behavior of variable mass systems of the rocket type by examining the spin motion and transverse attitude motion of such systems. The results obtained show that internal fluid whirling motion can cause appreciable deviations in spin rate predictions, and also affects the frequencies of the transverse angular velocity components.

  8. Reusable, flyback liquid rocket booster for the Space Shuttle

    Benton, Mark G.


    This paper outlines a preliminary design for an unmanned, reusable, flyback liquid rocket booster (LRB) as an evolutionary follow-on to the Shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB). Previous Shuttle liquid-propellant booster concepts are reviewed in order to gain insight into these designs. The operating costs, environmental impacts, and abort options of the SRB are discussed. The LRB flight profile and advantages of LRB use are discussed. The preliminary design for the LRB is outlined in detail using calculations and drawings. This design maximizes the use of existing hardware and proven technology to minimize cost and development time. The LRB design is presented as a more capable, more environmentally acceptable, and safer Shuttle booster.

  9. Radiation Chemistry of Potential Europa Plumes

    Gudipati, M. S.; Henderson, B. L.


    Recent detection of atomic hydrogen and atomic oxygen and their correlation to potential water plumes on Europa [Roth, Saur et al. 2014] invoked significant interest in further understanding of these potential/putative plumes on Europa. Unlike on Enceladus, Europa receives significant amount of electron and particle radiation. If the plumes come from trailing hemisphere and in the high radiation flux regions, then it is expected that the plume molecules be subjected to radiation processing. Our interest is to understand to what extent such radiation alterations occur and how they can be correlated to the plume original composition, whether organic or inorganic in nature. We will present laboratory studies [Henderson and Gudipati 2014] involving pulsed infrared laser ablation of ice that generates plumes similar to those observed on Enceladus [Hansen, Esposito et al. 2006; Hansen, Shemansky et al. 2011] and expected to be similar on Europa as a starting point; demonstrating the applicability of laser ablation to simulate plumes of Europa and Enceladus. We will present results from electron irradiation of these plumes to determine how organic and inorganic composition is altered due to radiation. Acknowledgments:This research was enabled through partial funding from NASA funding through Planetary Atmospheres, and the Europa Clipper Pre-Project. B.L.H. acknowledges funding from the NASA Postdoctoral Program for an NPP fellowship. Hansen, C. J., L. Esposito, et al. (2006). "Enceladus' water vapor plume." Science 311(5766): 1422-1425. Hansen, C. J., D. E. Shemansky, et al. (2011). "The composition and structure of the Enceladus plume." Geophysical Research Letters 38. Henderson, B. L. and M. S. Gudipati (2014). "Plume Composition and Evolution in Multicomponent Ices Using Resonant Two-Step Laser Ablation and Ionization Mass Spectrometry." The Journal of Physical Chemistry A 118(29): 5454-5463. Roth, L., J. Saur, et al. (2014). "Transient Water Vapor at Europa's South

  10. Variability and Composition of Io's Pele Plume

    Jessup, K. L.; Spencer, J.; Yelle, R.


    The Pele plume is one of the largest and most dynamic of the plumes on Io. While sulfur dioxide (SO2) gas was always assumed to be a constituent of this plume, spectral observations obtained in 1999 were the first to positively identify elemental sulfur (S2) (Spencer et al. 2000) within the Pele plume. The S2/SO2 ratio derived from this observation provided a critical component necessary for the constraint of the magma chemistry and vent conditions of the Pele plume (Zolotov and Fegley 1998). But, because the Pele plume has long been known to be variable in its eruptive behavior, it is not likely that the vent conditions are invariant. Consequently, additional observations were needed to constrain the extent of the variability of the plume's composition and gas abundances. To this end, in February 2003, March 2003 and January 2004 we obtained spectra of Pele with Hubble's Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) in transit of Jupiter, using the 0.1 arcsec slit, for the wavelength region extending from 2100-3100 Å. Contemporaneous with the spectral data we also obtained UV and visible-wavelength images of the plume in reflected sunlight with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) prior to Jupiter transit, in order to constrain plume dust abundance. The newly acquired STIS data show both the S2 and SO2 absorption signatures, and provide concrete evidence of temporal variability in the abundance of these gases. Likewise, the degree of dust scattering recorded in the ACS data varied as a function of the date of observation. We will present preliminary constraints on the composition and variability of the gas abundances of the Pele plume as recorded within the STIS data. We will also give a brief overview of the variability of the plume dust signatures relative to the gas signatures as a function of time.

  11. Unique nuclear thermal rocket engine

    Culver, D.W. (Aerojet Propulsion Division, P.O. Box 13222, Sacramento, California 95813-6000 (United States)); Rochow, R. (Babcock Wilcox Space Nuclear Systems, P.O. Box 11165, Lynchburg, Virginia 24506-1165 (United States))


    Earlier this year Aerojet Propulsion Division (APD) introduced a new, advanced nuclear thermal rocket engine (NTRE) concept intended for manned missions to the moon and to Mars. This NTRE promises to be both shorter and lighter in weight than conventionally designed engines, because its forward flowing reactor is located within an expansion-deflection (E-D) rocket nozzle. The concept has matured during the year, and this paper discusses a nearer term version that resolves four open issues identified in the initial concept: (1)Reactor design and cooling scheme simplification while retaining a high pressure power balance option; (2)Eliminate need for a new, uncooled nozzle throat material suitable for long life application; (3)Practical provision for reactor power control; and (4)Use near term, long life turbopumps.

  12. Unique nuclear thermal rocket engine

    Culver, Donald W.; Rochow, Richard


    In January, 1992, a new, advanced nuclear thermal rocket engine (NTRE) concept intended for manned missions to the moon and to Mars was introduced (Culver, 1992). This NTRE promises to be both shorter and lighter in weight than conventionally designed engines, because its forward flowing reactor is located within an expansion-deflection rocket nozzle. The concept has matured during the year, and this paper discusses a nearer term version that resolves four open issues identified in the initial concept: (1) the reactor design and cooling scheme simplification while retaining a high pressure power balance option; (2) elimination need for a new, uncooled nozzle throat material suitable for long life application; (3) a practical provision for reactor power control; and (4) use of near-term, long-life turbopumps.

  13. Extended temperature range rocket injector

    Schneider, Steven J. (Inventor)


    A rocket injector is provided with multiple sets of manifolds for supplying propellants to injector elements. Sensors transmit the temperatures of the propellants to a suitable controller which is operably connnected to valves between these manifolds and propellant storage tanks. When cryogenic propellant temperatures are sensed, only a portion of the valves are opened to furnish propellants to some of the manifolds. When lower temperatures are sensed, additional valves are opened to furnish propellants to more of the manifolds.

  14. Mini-Rocket User Guide


    Missile Research , Development, and Engineering Center and Ray Sells DESE Research , Inc. 315 Wynn Drive Huntsville, AL 35805 August 2007...with the minirock command, you are prompted for a filename: Mini-Rocket v1.01 by Ray Sells, DESE Research , Inc. Input file: - Output is Commander, U.S. Army ARDEC Picatinny Arsenal, NJ 07806-5000 ATTN: AMSRD-AR-AIS -SA DESE Research , Inc. 3 15 Wynn Drive

  15. Optimization Problem of Multistage Rocket

    V. B. Tawakley


    Full Text Available The necessary conditions for the existence of minimum of a function of initial and final values of mass, position and velocity components and time of a multistage rocket have been reviewed when the thrust levels in each stage are considered to bounded and variation in gravity with height has been taken into account. The nature of the extremal subarcs comprising the complete extremal are has been studied. A few simple examples have been given as illustrations.

  16. Modelling the fate of the Tijuana River discharge plume

    van Ormondt, M.; Terrill, E.; Hibler, L. F.; van Dongeren, A. R.


    After rainfall events, the Tijuana River discharges excess runoff into the ocean in a highly turbid plume. The runoff waters contain large suspended solids concentrations, as well as high levels of toxic contaminants, bacteria, and hepatitis and enteroviruses. Public health hazards posed by the effluent often result in beach closures for several kilometers northward along the U.S. shoreline. A Delft3D model has been set up to predict the fate of the Tijuana River plume. The model takes into account the effects of tides, wind, waves, salinity, and temperature stratification. Heat exchange with the atmosphere is also included. The model consists of a relatively coarse outer domain and a high-resolution surf zone domain that are coupled with Domain Decomposition. The offshore boundary conditions are obtained from the larger NCOM SoCal model (operated by the US Navy) that spans the entire Southern California Bight. A number of discharge events are investigated, in which model results are validated against a wide range of field measurements in the San Diego Bight. These include HF Radar surface currents, REMUS tracks, drifter deployments, satellite imagery, as well as current and temperature profile measurements at a number of locations. The model is able to reproduce the observed current and temperature patterns reasonably well. Under calm conditions, the model results suggest that the hydrodynamics in the San Diego Bight are largely governed by internal waves. During rainfall events, which are typically accompanied by strong winds and high waves, wind and wave driven currents become dominant. An analysis will be made of what conditions determine the trapping and mixing of the plume inside the surfzone and/or the propagation of the plume through the breakers and onto the coastal shelf. The model is now also running in operational mode. Three day forecasts are made every 24 hours. This study was funded by the Office of Naval Research.

  17. Proceedings of plumes, plates and mineralisation symposium: an introduction

    Hatton, CJ


    Full Text Available of plume-theory. Mechanisms of magma formation are identified and plume positions and distances to their surface expression considered. Mantle plumes are considered as a heat and fluid source for the Witwatersrand gold deposits....

  18. The Guggenheim Aeronautics Laboratory at Caltech and the creation of the modern rocket motor (1936-1946): How the dynamics of rocket theory became reality

    Zibit, Benjamin Seth

    This thesis explores and unfolds the story of discovery in rocketry at The California Institute of Technology---specifically at Caltech's Guggenheim Aeronautics Laboratory---in the 1930s and 1940s. Caltech was home to a small group of engineering students and experimenters who, beginning in the winter of 1935--1936, formed a study and research team destined to change the face of rocket science in the United States. The group, known as the Guggenheim Aeronautics Laboratory (GALCIT, for short) Rocket Research Group, invented a new type of solid-rocket propellant, made distinct and influential discoveries in the theory of rocket combustion and design, founded the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and incorporated the first American industrial concern devoted entirely to rocket motor production: The Aerojet Corporation. The theoretical work of team members, Frank Malina, Hsueh-shen Tsien, Homer J. Stewart, and Mark Mills, is examined in this thesis in detail. The author scrutinizes Frank Malina's doctoral thesis (both its assumptions and its mathematics), and finds that, although Malina's key assertions, his formulae, hold, his work is shown to make key assumptions about rocket dynamics which only stand the test of validity if certain approximations, rather than exact measurements, are accepted. Malina studied the important connection between motor-nozzle design and thrust; in his Ph.D. thesis, he developed mathematical statements which more precisely defined the design/thrust relation. One of Malina's colleagues on the Rocket Research Team, John Whiteside Parsons, created a new type of solid propellant in the winter of 1941--1942. This propellant, known as a composite propellant (because it simply was a relatively inert amalgam of propellant and oxidizer in non-powder form), became the forerunner of all modern solid propellants, and has become one of the seminal discoveries in the field of Twentieth Century rocketry. The latter chapters of this dissertation discuss the

  19. Numerical modeling of mantle plume diffusion

    Krupsky, D.; Ismail-Zadeh, A.


    To clarify the influence of the heat diffusion on the mantle plume evolution, we develop a two-dimensional numerical model of the plume diffusion and relevant efficient numerical algorithm and code to compute the model. The numerical approach is based on the finite-difference method and modified splitting algorithm. We consider both von Neumann and Direchlet conditions at the model boundaries. The thermal diffusivity depends on pressure in the model. Our results show that the plume is disappearing from the bottom up - the plume tail at first and its head later - because of the mantle plume geometry (a thin tail and wide head) and higher heat conductivity in the lower mantle. We study also an effect of a lateral mantle flow associated with the plate motion on the distortion of the diffusing mantle plume. A number of mantle plumes recently identified by seismic tomography seem to disappear in the mid-mantle. We explain this disappearance as the effect of heat diffusion on the evolution of mantle plume.

  20. Aggregate Particles in the Plumes of Enceladus

    Gao, Peter; Zhang, Xi; Ingersoll, Andrew P


    Estimates of the total particulate mass of the plumes of Enceladus are important to constrain theories of particle formation and transport at the surface and interior of the satellite. We revisit the calculations of Ingersoll and Ewald (2011), who estimated the particulate mass of the Enceladus plumes from strongly forward scattered light in Cassini ISS images. We model the plume as a combination of spherical particles and irregular aggregates resulting from the coagulation of spherical monomers, the latter of which allows for plumes of lower particulate mass. Though a continuum of solutions are permitted by the model, the best fits to the ISS data consist either of low mass plumes composed entirely of small aggregates or high mass plumes composed of large aggregates and spheres. The high mass plumes can be divided into a population of large aggregates with total particulate mass of 116 +/- 12 X 10^3 kg, and a mixed population of spheres and aggregates consisting of a few large monomers that has a total plume...