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Sample records for solid methane moderator

  1. IPNS grooved, solid methane moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.M.; Schulke, A.W.; Scott, T.L.; Wozniak, D.G.; Benson, B.E.; Leyda, B.D.

    1985-01-01

    There are two motives for using cold moderators in pulsed neutron sources, to provide higher fluxes of long-wavelength neutrons, and to extend the epithermal range with its short pulse structure to lower energies. For both these purposes solid methane, operated at the lowest possible temperatures, is the best material we know of. Two problems accompany the use of solid methane in high power sources, namely heat transport in view of the low thermal conductivity of solid methane, and deterioration due to radiation damage. We have designed a system suitable to operate in IPNS, subject to nuclear heating of about 25 W, which incorporates an aluminum foam matrix to conduct the heat from within the moderator. We report the results of the first few months' operation and of a few tests that we have performed

  2. Composite hydrogen-solid methane moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picton, D.; Bennington, S.; Ansell, S.; Fernandez-Garcia, J.; Broome, T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the results of Monte-Carlo calculations for a coupled moderator on a low-power pulsed neutron spallation source and is part of the design study for a second target station for the ISIS spallation source. Various options were compared including hydrogen, solid methane, grooving the solid methane and compound moderators made of hydrogen in front of solid methane. To maximise the neutron current at low energies two strategies appear to emerge from the calculations. For instruments that view a large area of moderator surface a layer of hydrogen in front of a thin solid-methane moderator is optimum, giving a gain of about a factor 10 relative to the current liquid hydrogen moderator on the existing ISIS tantalum target. For instruments that only view a restricted area higher flux, corresponding to a gain of 13.5, can be achieved with the use of a single groove or re-entrant hole in the moderator. (orig.)

  3. Solid methane cold moderator for the IBR-2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beliakov, A. A.; Tretiakov, I. T.; Shabalin, E. P.; Golikov, V. V.; Luschivkov, V I.

    1997-09-01

    The paper describes the research and design work carried out since 1986 at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna to create a cryogenic moderator for the IBR-22 reactor using solid methane as a moderating substance.

  4. Solid-methane moderator systems at KENS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusaka, M.

    1997-09-01

    An overview of the target-moderator-reflector assembly (TMRA) systems at the Neutron Science Laboratory (KENS) at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) is described together with the historical changes. Because of the optimized design of TMRA, the neutron-generation efficiency is very high. The characteristics of the cold moderator system, such as the absolute intensity, spectrum and radiation damage to it, are also described. There are a number of new neutron-scattering instruments which are being viewed at the moderator. A brief description of the proposed TMRA for our future project is also given. (auth)

  5. An advanced cold moderator using solid methane pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, C.A.; Carpenter, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports developments of the pellet formation and transport technologies required for producing a liquid helium or hydrogen cooled methane pellet moderator. The Phase I US DOE SBIR project, already completed, demonstrated the production of 3 mm transparent pellets of frozen methane and ammonia and transport of the pellets into a 40 cc observation cell cooled with liquid helium. The methane pellets, formed at 72 K, stuck together during the loading of the cell. Ammonia pellets did not stick and fell readily under vibration into a packed bed with a 60% fill fraction. A 60% fill fraction should produce a very significant increase in long-wavelength neutron production and advantages in shorter pulse widths as compared to a liquid hydrogen moderator. The work also demonstrated a method of rapidly changing the pellets in the moderator cell. The Phase II project, just now underway, will develop a full-scale pellet source and transport system with a 1.5 L 'moderator' cell. The Phase II effort will also produce an apparatus to sub-cool the methane pellets to below 20 K, which should prevent the methane pellets from sticking together. In addition to results of the phase I experiments, the presentation includes a short video of the pellets, and a description of plans for the Phase II project. (author)

  6. First experience with the new solid methane moderator at the IBR-2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beliakov, A.A.; Shabalin, E.P.; Tretyakov, I.T.

    2001-01-01

    In the 1999 Fall the solid methane moderator (CM) has been installed and tested at full power at the IBR-2 pulsed reactor. Its main features are a beryllium reflector and a light water premoderator. Radiation load on the methane was three times as much as that of IPNS facility, namely, 0.1 W/g. Effects of temperature, operation time, concentration of a hydrogen scavenger, and annealing procedure on both neutron and service performances were studied. Maximum operation time of a newly loaded portion of methane was 4 days. In this time around 30% of methane is transformed into hydrogen, ethane, and high molecular hydrocarbons, and yet no deterioration in cold neutron intensity was detected. Among new knowledge, the most important are two facts observed: two-fold decrease in hydrogen formation rate when methane is poisoned with 2.5% to 5% of ethylene, and low formation rate of solid, inremovable products of radiolysis - (1.5/3)10 -7 g/J, which means that after 10 years of operation the methane chamber will be filled with only 100 g of residue. Gain of factor 20 in cold neutron flux was obtained as compared to the routine grooved light water moderator. Presently, it is the highest among the intense pulsed neutron sources. (author)

  7. Methane pellet moderator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, C.A.; Schechter, D.E.; Carpenter, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    A methane pellet moderator assembly consisting of a pelletizer, a helium cooled sub-cooling tunnel, a liquid helium cooled cryogenic pellet storage hopper and a 1.5L moderator cell has been constructed for the purpose demonstrating a system for use in high-power spallation sources. (orig.)

  8. Conceptual design of a cold methane moderator system for the European Spallation Source (ESS)

    CERN Document Server

    Barnert-Wiemer, H

    2002-01-01

    As part of the work for the target station of the planned European spallation source (ESS) the Central Department of Technology at the Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH is also concerned with the moderators, particular attention being given to the development of cold methane moderators. This report discusses the technical feasibility of solid methane moderators. Methods to tailor the neutron output by adding absorption materials (decouplers or poisons) are not considered here, neither are composite moderators. Based on the given target-moderator-reflector assembly of the ESS project a concept for the ESS cold methane moderators has been developed and is being examined at the Forschungszentrum Juelich. According to this moderator concept the moderator is a fixed bed of small spheres, which makes moderator container filling homogeneous and reproducible. Since spheres form a defined packed bed, cooling of the moderator bed by H sub 2 is reliable. The process of filling the moderator container and of removing the pe...

  9. Conceptual design of a cold methane moderator system for the European Spallation Source (ESS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnert-Wiemer, H.

    2002-02-01

    As part of the work for the target station of the planned European spallation source (ESS) the Central Department of Technology at the Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH is also concerned with the moderators, particular attention being given to the development of cold methane moderators. This report discusses the technical feasibility of solid methane moderators. Methods to tailor the neutron output by adding absorption materials (decouplers or poisons) are not considered here, neither are composite moderators. Based on the given target-moderator-reflector assembly of the ESS project a concept for the ESS cold methane moderators has been developed and is being examined at the Forschungszentrum Juelich. According to this moderator concept the moderator is a fixed bed of small spheres, which makes moderator container filling homogeneous and reproducible. Since spheres form a defined packed bed, cooling of the moderator bed by H 2 is reliable. The process of filling the moderator container and of removing the pellets is batchwise to ensure complete removal of the pellets, so that no spent methane pellets accumulate in the system. For removal of the moderator spheres the fixed bed in the moderator container is fluidized with subsequent hydraulic transport of the pellets. The spent methane pellets are separated from the transport fluid and the methane is released over the stack or purified and reused. Depending on the kind and amount of the radioactive isotopes present these may have to be separated and stored. (orig.)

  10. Methane potential of sterilized solid slaughterhouse wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitk, Peep; Kaparaju, Prasad; Vilu, Raivo

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine chemical composition and methane potential of Category 2 and 3 solid slaughterhouse wastes rendering products (SSHWRP) viz. melt, decanter sludge, meat and bone meal (MBM), technical fat and flotation sludge from wastewater treatment. Chemical analyses showed that SSHWRP were high in protein and lipids with total solids (TS) content of 96-99%. Methane yields of the SSHWRP were between 390 and 978 m(3) CH(4)/t volatile solids (VS)(added). Based on batch experiments, anaerobic digestion of SSHWRP from the dry rendering process could recover 4.6 times more primary energy than the energy required for the rendering process. Estonia has technological capacity to sterilize all the produced Category 2 and 3 solid slaughterhouse wastes (SSHW) and if separated from Category 1 animal by-products (ABP), it could be further utilized as energy rich input material for anaerobic digestion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental study of swelling of irradiated solid methane during annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabalin, E.; Fedorov, A.; Kulagin, E.; Kulikov, S.; Melikhov, V.; Shabalin, D.

    2008-01-01

    Solid methane, notwithstanding its poor radiation properties, is still widely in use at pulsed neutron sources. One of the specific problems is radiolytic hydrogen gas pressure on the walls of a methane chamber during annealing of methane. Results of experimental study of this phenomenon under fast neutron irradiation with the help of a specially made low temperature irradiation rig at the IBR-2 pulsed reactor are presented. Peak pressure on the wall of the experimental capsule during heating of a sample irradiated at 23-35 K appeared to have a maximum of 27 bar at the absorbed dose 20 MGy, and then falls down with higher doses. Pressure always reached its peak value within the temperature range 72-79 K. Generally, three phases of methane swelling during heating can be distinguished, each characterized by proper rate and intensity. Results of this study were accounted for in design of the solid methane moderator of the second target station of the ISIS facility (England)

  12. LOW-TEMPERATURE EQUATION OF STATE OF SOLID METHANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Yakub

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical equation of state for solid methane, developed within the framework of perturbation theory, with the crystal consisting of spherical molecules as zero-order approximation, and octupole – octupole interaction of methane molecules as a perturbation, is proposed. Thermodynamic functions are computed on the sublimation line up to the triple point. The contribution of the octupole – octupole interaction to the thermodynamic properties of solid methane is estimated.

  13. Recombination of radiation defects in solid methane: neutron sources and cryo-volcanism on celestial bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichek, O.; Savchenko, E. V.; Lawson, C. R.; Khyzhniy, I. V.; Jenkins, D. M.; Uyutnov, S. A.; Bludov, M. A.; Haynes, D. J.

    2018-03-01

    Physicochemical properties of solid methane exposed to ionizing radiation have attracted significant interest in recent years. Here we present new trends in the study of radiation effects in solid methane. We particularly focus on relaxation phenomena in solid methane pre-irradiated by energetic neutrons and electron beam. We compare experimental results obtained in the temperature range from 10K to 100K with a model based on the assumption that radiolysis defect recombinations happen in two stages, at two different temperatures. In the case of slow heating up of the solid methane sample, irradiated at 10K, the first wave of recombination occurs around 20K with a further second wave taking place between 50 and 60K. We also discuss the role of the recombination mechanisms in “burp” phenomenon discovered by J. Carpenter in the late 1980s. An understanding of these mechanisms is vital for the designing and operation of solid methane moderators used in advanced neutron sources and could also be a possible explanation for the driving forces behind cryo-volcanism on celestial bodies.

  14. Methane productivity of manure, straw and solid fractions of manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, H.B.; Sommer, S.G.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2004-01-01

    are in the same range (282-301 m(3) CH4 LU-1). Pre-treatment of manure by separation is a way of making fractions of the manure that have a higher gas potential per volume. Theoretical methane potential and biodegradability of three types of fractions deriving from manure separation were tested. The volumetric...... methane yield of straw was found to be higher than the yield from total manure and the solid fractions of manure, due to the higher VS content, and hence the use of straw as bedding material will increase the volumetric as well as the livestock-based methane productivity....

  15. Methanization potential of anaerobic biodigestion of solid food waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laís R. G. de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Anaerobic biodigestion of solid and semi-solid wastes has been widely used for the treatment of these residues and methane production; however, during the process (more specifically in the acidogenic phase, there is a tendency of pH reduction, an unfavorable condition to methanogenic bacteria. Thus, the present work aims to evaluate the methanization potential of an agroindustrial anaerobic granular sludge (AIS from UASB (Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket reactor, individually and biodigested with food waste (FW from the University Restaurant of the Federal University of Pernambuco with buffering agent (AIS + FW + b and without it (AIS + FW. After the laboratory tests, the AIS + FW + b configuration obtained a cumulative methane production approximately six times greater than that of AIS + FW, and approximately twice that of the inoculum alone (AIS.

  16. Trends for Methane Oxidation at Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleis, Jesper; Jones, Glenn; Abild-Pedersen, Frank

    2009-01-01

    First-principles calculations are used to predict a plausible reaction pathway for the methane oxidation reaction. In turn, this pathway is used to obtain trends in methane oxidation activity at solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode materials. Reaction energetics and barriers for the elementary...... the Ni surfaces to other metals of interest. This allows the reactivity over the different metals to be understood in terms of two reactivity descriptors, namely, the carbon and oxygen adsorption energies. By combining a simple free-energy analysis with microkinetic modeling, activity landscapes of anode...

  17. Bio-methanation of municipal solid wastes for ecological balance and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadangi, Subhash Ch.

    2000-01-01

    The importance of bio-methanation of municipal solid wastes for over all improvement of environment and for converting wastes into wealth, the national planners should make all out efforts to implement the concept on a large scale to meet the challenges of future demands of energy, ecology and sustainable development. The huge quantity of methane generated from MSW (Municipal Solid Wastes) after treatment and desulfuration is utilised to generate electric power. Hence, development of methane resource as an alternative to energy source has attracted attention in recent years in many parts of the world. Methane is a much more powerful green house gas as its adverse impacts are felt more intensely due to its higher residence and higher potency in the atmosphere. The article highlights the process of bio-methanation of municipal solid wastes and planning for ecological balance and sustainable development

  18. Internal reforming of methane in solid oxide fuel cell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, R.; Dahl, R.; Klüttgen, U.; Palm, C.; Stolten, D.

    Internal reforming is an attractive option offering a significant cost reduction, higher efficiencies and faster load response of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power plant. However, complete internal reforming may lead to several problems which can be avoided with partial pre-reforming of natural gas. In order to achieve high total plant efficiency associated with low energy consumption and low investment costs, a process concept has been developed based on all the components of the SOFC system. In the case of anode gas recycling an internal steam circuit exists. This has the advantage that there is no need for an external steam generator and the steam concentration in the anode gas is reduced. However, anode gas recycling has to be proven by experiments in a pre-reformer and for internal reforming. The addition of carbon dioxide clearly shows a decrease in catalyst activity, while for temperatures higher than 1000 K hydrogen leads to an increase of the measured methane conversion rates.

  19. Microbial diversity and dynamics during methane production from municipal solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bareither, Christopher A., E-mail: christopher.bareither@colostate.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering, Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, CO 80532 (United States); Geological Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Wolfe, Georgia L., E-mail: gwolfe@wisc.edu [Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); McMahon, Katherine D., E-mail: tmcmahon@engr.wisc.edu [Bacteriology, Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Benson, Craig H., E-mail: chbenson@wisc.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering, Geological Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Similar bacterial communities developed following different start-up operation. ► Total methanogens in leachate during the decelerated methane phase reflected overall methane yield. ► Created correlations between methanogens, methane yield, and available substrate. ► Predominant bacteria identified with syntrophic polysaccharide degraders. ► Hydrogenotrophic methanogens were dominant in the methane generation process. - Abstract: The objectives of this study were to characterize development of bacterial and archaeal populations during biodegradation of municipal solid waste (MSW) and to link specific methanogens to methane generation. Experiments were conducted in three 0.61-m-diameter by 0.90-m-tall laboratory reactors to simulate MSW bioreactor landfills. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes was used to characterize microbial communities in both leachate and solid waste. Microbial assemblages in effluent leachate were similar between reactors during peak methane generation. Specific groups within the Bacteroidetes and Thermatogae phyla were present in all samples and were particularly abundant during peak methane generation. Microbial communities were not similar in leachate and solid fractions assayed at the end of reactor operation; solid waste contained a more abundant bacterial community of cellulose-degrading organisms (e.g., Firmicutes). Specific methanogen populations were assessed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinaceae, and Methanobacteriales were the predominant methanogens in all reactors, with Methanomicrobiales consistently the most abundant. Methanogen growth phases coincided with accelerated methane production, and cumulative methane yield increased with increasing total methanogen abundance. The difference in methanogen populations and corresponding methane yield is attributed to different initial cellulose and hemicellulose contents of the MSW. Higher initial cellulose and

  20. Microbial diversity and dynamics during methane production from municipal solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bareither, Christopher A.; Wolfe, Georgia L.; McMahon, Katherine D.; Benson, Craig H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Similar bacterial communities developed following different start-up operation. ► Total methanogens in leachate during the decelerated methane phase reflected overall methane yield. ► Created correlations between methanogens, methane yield, and available substrate. ► Predominant bacteria identified with syntrophic polysaccharide degraders. ► Hydrogenotrophic methanogens were dominant in the methane generation process. - Abstract: The objectives of this study were to characterize development of bacterial and archaeal populations during biodegradation of municipal solid waste (MSW) and to link specific methanogens to methane generation. Experiments were conducted in three 0.61-m-diameter by 0.90-m-tall laboratory reactors to simulate MSW bioreactor landfills. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes was used to characterize microbial communities in both leachate and solid waste. Microbial assemblages in effluent leachate were similar between reactors during peak methane generation. Specific groups within the Bacteroidetes and Thermatogae phyla were present in all samples and were particularly abundant during peak methane generation. Microbial communities were not similar in leachate and solid fractions assayed at the end of reactor operation; solid waste contained a more abundant bacterial community of cellulose-degrading organisms (e.g., Firmicutes). Specific methanogen populations were assessed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinaceae, and Methanobacteriales were the predominant methanogens in all reactors, with Methanomicrobiales consistently the most abundant. Methanogen growth phases coincided with accelerated methane production, and cumulative methane yield increased with increasing total methanogen abundance. The difference in methanogen populations and corresponding methane yield is attributed to different initial cellulose and hemicellulose contents of the MSW. Higher initial cellulose and

  1. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) of solid organic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raposo, Francisco; Fernández-Cegrí, V.; De la Rubia, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the results obtained for different participating research groups in an interlaboratory study related to the biochemical methane potential (BMP). In this research work, the full experimental conditions influencing the test such as inoculum, substrate characteristics and experi...

  2. Evaluation and modeling of biochemical methane potential (BMP) of landfilled solid waste: a pilot scale study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilgili, M Sinan; Demir, Ahmet; Varank, Gamze

    2009-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to present a comparison of landfill performance with respect to solids decomposition. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) test was used to determine the initial and the remaining CH(4) potentials of solid wastes during 27 months of landfilling operation in two pilot...... scale landfill reactors. The initial methane potential of solid wastes filled to the reactors was around 0.347 L/CH(4)/g dry waste, which decreased with operational time of landfill reactors to values of 0.117 and 0.154 L/CH(4)/g dry waste for leachate recirculated (R1) and non-recirculated (R2...

  3. Hydrogen and methane production from household solid waste in the two-stage fermentation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lui, D.; Liu, D.; Zeng, Raymond Jianxiong

    2006-01-01

    A two-stage process combined hydrogen and methane production from household solid waste was demonstrated working successfully. The yield of 43 mL H-2/g volatile solid (VS) added was generated in the first hydrogen production stage and the methane production in the second stage was 500 mL CH4/g VS...... added. This figure was 21% higher than the methane yield from the one-stage process, which was run as control. Sparging of the hydrogen reactor with methane gas resulted in doubling of the hydrogen production. PH was observed as a key factor affecting fermentation pathway in hydrogen production stage....... Furthermore, this study also provided direct evidence in the dynamic fermentation process that, hydrogen production increase was reflected by acetate to butyrate ratio increase in liquid phase. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  4. Solid methane on Triton and Pluto - 3- to 4-micron spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John R.; Buie, Marc W.; Bjoraker, Gordon L.

    1990-01-01

    Methane has been identified in the Pluto/Charon system on the basis of absorption features in the reflectance spectrum at 1.5 and 2.3 microns; attention is presently given to observations of a 3.25 micron-centered deep absorption feature in Triton and Pluto/Charon system reflectance spectra. This absorption may indicate the presence of solid methane, constituting either the dominant surface species or a mixture with a highly transparent substance, such as N2 frost.

  5. The effect of moderators on the reactions of hot hydrogen atoms with methane

    CERN Document Server

    Estrup, Peder J.

    1960-01-01

    The reaction of recoil tritium with methane has been examined in further detail. The previous hypothesis that this system involves a hot displacement reaction of high kinetic energy hydrogen to give CH$_{3}$T, CH$_{2}$T and HT is confirmed. The effect of moderator on this process is studied by the addition of noble gases. As predicted these gases inhibit the hot reaction action, their efficiency in this respect being He > Ne > A > Se. The data are quantitatively in accord with a theory of hot atom kinetics. The mechanism of the hot displacement process is briefly discussed.

  6. Methane activation on palladium and mercury loaded solid supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataja, K; Huuska, M; Karinto, K; Maijanen, A; Reinikainen, M; Kiviaho, J; Hase, A [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    Methane activation by non-radical method and especially possibilities to heterogenize the homogeneous non-radical system of Periana et al. was studied. Varied loadings of Pd and Hg were ion exchanged to acidic ZSM-5 zeolites with two different Si/A1 ratios. Activation was tested in tubular flow reactor and the outcoming gas was analyzed with quadrupole mass spectrometer. Catalysts, fresh and used, were characterized by XRF and XRD spectroscopies. The methane activation was observed on tested catalysts. However, the activation was concluded to occur mainly through radical reaction and only to some extent by the expected non-radical mechanism. (author) (9 refs.)

  7. Methane activation on palladium and mercury loaded solid supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataja, K.; Huuska, M.; Karinto, K.; Maijanen, A.; Reinikainen, M.; Kiviaho, J.; Hase, A. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Methane activation by non-radical method and especially possibilities to heterogenize the homogeneous non-radical system of Periana et al. was studied. Varied loadings of Pd and Hg were ion exchanged to acidic ZSM-5 zeolites with two different Si/A1 ratios. Activation was tested in tubular flow reactor and the outcoming gas was analyzed with quadrupole mass spectrometer. Catalysts, fresh and used, were characterized by XRF and XRD spectroscopies. The methane activation was observed on tested catalysts. However, the activation was concluded to occur mainly through radical reaction and only to some extent by the expected non-radical mechanism. (author) (9 refs.)

  8. Tuneable diode laser gas analyser for methane measurements on a large scale solid oxide fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengden, Michael; Cunningham, Robert; Johnstone, Walter

    2011-10-01

    A new in-line, real time gas analyser is described that uses tuneable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) for the measurement of methane in solid oxide fuel cells. The sensor has been tested on an operating solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) in order to prove the fast response and accuracy of the technology as compared to a gas chromatograph. The advantages of using a TDLS system for process control in a large-scale, distributed power SOFC unit are described. In future work, the addition of new laser sources and wavelength modulation will allow the simultaneous measurement of methane, water vapour, carbon-dioxide and carbon-monoxide concentrations.

  9. methane generation potentia generation potential of municipal solid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2014-01-01

    Jan 1, 2014 ... environmental effect of its consumption made many ... Solid Waste (MSW) of two landfills serving four local govern landfills ... solid waste management in .... for efficient applicability of MSW incineration .... Collection Systems?

  10. Steam Methane Reformation Testing for Air-Independent Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwara, Kamwana N.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, NASA has been looking into utilizing landers that can be propelled by LOX-CH (sub 4), to be used for long duration missions. Using landers that utilize such propellants, also provides the opportunity to use solid oxide fuel cells as a power option, especially since they are able to process methane into a reactant through fuel reformation. One type of reformation, called steam methane reformation, is a process to reform methane into a hydrogen-rich product by reacting methane and steam (fuel cell exhaust) over a catalyst. A steam methane reformation system could potentially use the fuel cell's own exhaust to create a reactant stream that is hydrogen-rich, and requires less internal reforming of the incoming methane. Also, steam reformation may hold some advantages over other types of reforming, such as partial oxidation (PROX) reformation. Steam reformation does not require oxygen, while up to 25 percent can be lost in PROX reformation due to unusable CO (sub 2) reformation. NASA's Johnson Space Center has conducted various phases of steam methane reformation testing, as a viable solution for in-space reformation. This has included using two different types of catalysts, developing a custom reformer, and optimizing the test system to find the optimal performance parameters and operating conditions.

  11. Co-digestion of solid waste: Towards a simple model to predict methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouas, Mokhles; Torrijos, Michel; Schmitz, Sabine; Sousbie, Philippe; Sayadi, Sami; Harmand, Jérôme

    2018-04-01

    Modeling methane production is a key issue for solid waste co-digestion. Here, the effect of a step-wise increase in the organic loading rate (OLR) on reactor performance was investigated, and four new models were evaluated to predict methane yields using data acquired in batch mode. Four co-digestion experiments of mixtures of 2 solid substrates were conducted in semi-continuous mode. Experimental methane yields were always higher than the BMP values of mixtures calculated from the BMP of each substrate, highlighting the importance of endogenous production (methane produced from auto-degradation of microbial community and generated solids). The experimental methane productions under increasing OLRs corresponded well to the modeled data using the model with constant endogenous production and kinetics identified at 80% from total batch time. This model provides a simple and useful tool for technical design consultancies and plant operators to optimize the co-digestion and the choice of the OLRs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. An afterburner-powered methane/steam reformer for a solid oxide fuel cells application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozdzierz, Marcin; Chalusiak, Maciej; Kimijima, Shinji; Szmyd, Janusz S.; Brus, Grzegorz

    2018-04-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems can be fueled by natural gas when the reforming reaction is conducted in a stack. Due to its maturity and safety, indirect internal reforming is usually used. A strong endothermic methane/steam reforming process needs a large amount of heat, and it is convenient to provide thermal energy by burning the remainders of fuel from a cell. In this work, the mathematical model of afterburner-powered methane/steam reformer is proposed. To analyze the effect of a fuel composition on SOFC performance, the zero-dimensional model of a fuel cell connected with a reformer is formulated. It is shown that the highest efficiency of a solid oxide fuel cell is achieved when the steam-to-methane ratio at the reforming reactor inlet is high.

  13. Frozen orientation disorder and rotation excitation in solid mixtures of methane and krypton (neutron diffraction experiments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grondey, S.

    1986-09-01

    The effect of a statistical replacement of CH 4 molecules by Kr atoms on the rotational states in solid methane has been examined. Obviously the anisotropic molecular interaction (octopole-octopole interaction) is disturbed in a way analogous to magnetic systems with random internal fields. Inelastic neutron scattering experiments on solid mixtures (CH 4 ) 1-x Kr x with 0≤x≤0.35 have been carried out, and simple models have been developed to interpret the spectra. (orig./BHO)

  14. Methane Steam Reforming over an Ni-YSZ Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode in Stack Configuration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, David; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2014-01-01

    The kinetics of catalytic steam reforming of methane over an Ni-YSZ anode of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) have been investigated with the cell placed in a stack configuration. In order to decrease the degree of conversion, a single cell stack with reduced area was used. Measurements were...

  15. Estimation of Methane Emissions from Municipal Solid Waste Landfills in China Based on Point Emission Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Bo-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Citation: Cai, B.-F., Liu, J.-G., Gao, Q.-X., et al., 2014. Estimation of methane emissions from municipal solid waste landfills in China based on point emission sources. Adv. Clim. Change Res. 5(2, doi: 10.3724/SP.J.1248.2014.081.

  16. On direct internal methane steam reforming kinetics in operating solid oxide fuel cells with nickel-ceria anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thallam Thattai, A.; van Biert, L.; Aravind, P. V.

    2017-12-01

    Major operating challenges remain to safely operate methane fuelled solid oxide fuel cells due to undesirable temperature gradients across the porous anode and carbon deposition. This article presents an experimental study on methane steam reforming (MSR) global kinetics for single operating SOFCs with Ni-GDC (gadolinium doped ceria) anodes for low steam to carbon (S/C) ratios and moderate current densities. The study points out the hitherto insufficient research on MSR global and intrinsic kinetics for operating SOFCs with complete Ni-ceria anodes. Further, it emphasizes the need to develop readily applicable global kinetic models as a subsequent step from previously reported state-of-art and complex intrinsic models. Two rate expressions of the Power law (PL) and Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) type have been compared and based on the analysis, limitations of using previously proposed rate expressions for Ni catalytic beds to study MSR kinetics for complete cermet anodes have been identified. Firstly, it has been shown that methane reforming on metallic (Ni) current collectors may not be always negligible, contrary to literature reports. Both PL and LH kinetic models predict significantly different local MSR reaction rate and species partial pressure distributions along the normalized reactor length, indicating a strong need for further experimental verifications.

  17. Thermal Modeling and Management of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating with Internally Reformed Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiyang; Shi, Yixiang; Cai, Ningsheng; Ni, Meng

    2018-06-01

    A detailed three-dimensional mechanistic model of a large-scale solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) unit running on partially pre-reformed methane is developed. The model considers the coupling effects of chemical and electrochemical reactions, mass transport, momentum and heat transfer in the SOFC unit. After model validation, parametric simulations are conducted to investigate how the methane pre-reforming ratio affects the transport and electrochemistry of the SOFC unit. It is found that the methane steam reforming reaction has a "smoothing effect", which can achieve more uniform distributions of gas compositions, current density and temperature among the cell plane. In the case of 1500 W/m2 power density output, adding 20% methane absorbs 50% of internal heat production inside the cell, reduces the maximum temperature difference inside the cell from 70 K to 22 K and reduces the cathode air supply by 75%, compared to the condition of completely pre-reforming of methane. Under specific operating conditions, the pre-reforming ratio of methane has an optimal range for obtaining a good temperature distribution and good cell performance.

  18. NMR relaxation and phase transitions in solid methane and deuterated derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putten, D. van der.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis describes an investigation of properties of solid methane at high pressure (till 10 kbar) with temperatures ranging from 2 until 100 K. The high inverse moment of inertia of the molecule combined with low ordering potentials gives rise to properties for which quantum effects play an important role: e.g. the transition temperature to a partially ordered phase shows an isotope effect of 35% when CH 4 protons are substituted by deuterons. Interpretation of NMR properties of solid methane also show quantum effects. First, a helium cryostat is developed and described and NMR results for CH 4 , CH 2 D 2 and CD 4 are given. The influence of discrete tunnel states on the spin-lattice relaxation is studied theoretically. Application of group theory has simplified the calculations considerably. (G.J.P.)

  19. The hydrolytic stage in high solids temperature phased anaerobic digestion improves the downstream methane production rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffière, P; Dooms, M; Hattou, S; Benbelkacem, H

    2018-07-01

    The role of the hydrolytic stage in high solids temperature phased anaerobic digestion was investigated with a mixture of cattle slurry and maize silage with variable ratios (100, 70 and 30% volatile solids coming from cattle slurry). It was incubated for 48 h at 37, 55, 65 and 72 °C. Soluble chemical oxygen demand and biochemical methane potential were measured at 0, 24 and 48 h. Higher temperatures improved the amount of solubilized COD, which confirmed previously reported results. Nevertheless, solubilization mostly took place during the first 24 h. The rate of methane production in post-hydrolysis BMPs increased after 48 h hydrolysis time, but not after 24 h. The first order kinetic constant rose by 40% on average. No correlation was observed between soluble COD and downstream methane production rate, indicating a possible modification of the physical structure of the particulate solids during the hydrolytic stage. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A correction in the CDM methodological tool for estimating methane emissions from solid waste disposal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M M O; van Elk, A G P; Romanel, C

    2015-12-01

    Solid waste disposal sites (SWDS) - especially landfills - are a significant source of methane, a greenhouse gas. Although having the potential to be captured and used as a fuel, most of the methane formed in SWDS is emitted to the atmosphere, mainly in developing countries. Methane emissions have to be estimated in national inventories. To help this task the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has published three sets of guidelines. In addition, the Kyoto Protocol established the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) to assist the developed countries to offset their own greenhouse gas emissions by assisting other countries to achieve sustainable development while reducing emissions. Based on methodologies provided by the IPCC regarding SWDS, the CDM Executive Board has issued a tool to be used by project developers for estimating baseline methane emissions in their project activities - on burning biogas from landfills or on preventing biomass to be landfilled and so avoiding methane emissions. Some inconsistencies in the first two IPCC guidelines have already been pointed out in an Annex of IPCC latest edition, although with hidden details. The CDM tool uses a model for methane estimation that takes on board parameters, factors and assumptions provided in the latest IPCC guidelines, while using in its core equation the one of the second IPCC edition with its shortcoming as well as allowing a misunderstanding of the time variable. Consequences of wrong ex-ante estimation of baseline emissions regarding CDM project activities can be of economical or environmental type. Example of the first type is the overestimation of 18% in an actual project on biogas from landfill in Brazil that harms its developers; of the second type, the overestimation of 35% in a project preventing municipal solid waste from being landfilled in China, which harms the environment, not for the project per se but for the undue generated carbon credits. In a simulated landfill - the same

  1. Combustible gas production (methane) and biodegradation of solid and liquid mixtures of meat industry wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcos, A.; Al-Kassir, A.; Cuadros, F.; Lopez-Rodriguez, F. [School of Engineering, University of Extremadura, Avda. De Elva, s/n, 06071, Badajoz (Spain); Mohamad, A.A. [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Calgary, 2500 University Dr. N.W., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2010-05-15

    This work is devoted to determine the optimal operational conditions on the methane production as well as on the biodegradation obtained from the anaerobic codigestion of solid (fat, intestines, rumen, bowels, whiskers, etc.) and liquid (blood, washing water, manure, etc.) wastes of meat industry, particularly the ones rising from the municipal slaughterhouse of Badajoz (Spain). The experiments were performed using a 2 l capacity discontinuous digester at 38 C. The loading rate were 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4.5 g COD for wastewater (washing water and blood; Mixture 1), and 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4 g COD for the co-digestion of a mixture of 97% liquid effluent and 3% solid wastes v/v (Mixture 2) which represents the annual mean composition of the waste generated by the slaughterhouse. The maximal biodegradation rates obtained were: Mixture 1, 56.9% for a COD load of 1 g; and Mixture 2, 19.1% for a COD load of 2 g. For both mixtures, the greatest methane production was for the maximum COD load (4.5 g for Mixture 1, and 4 g for Mixture 2), at which values the amounts of methane obtained during and at the end of the co-digestion were practically indistinguishable between the two mixtures. The results will be used to design, construct, and establish the optimal operating conditions of a continuous complete-mixture biodigester. (author)

  2. Modeling and parametric simulations of solid oxide fuel cells with methane carbon dioxide reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni, Meng

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A 2D model is developed for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). ► CH 4 reforming by CO 2 (MCDR) is included. ► SOFC with MCDR shows comparable performance with methane steam reforming SOFC. ► Increasing CO electrochemical oxidation greatly enhances the SOFC performance. ► Effects of potential and temperature on SOFC performance are also discussed. - Abstract: A two-dimensional model is developed to simulate the performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) fed with CO 2 and CH 4 mixture. The electrochemical oxidations of both CO and H 2 are included. Important chemical reactions are considered in the model, including methane carbon dioxide reforming (MCDR), reversible water gas shift reaction (WGSR), and methane steam reforming (MSR). It’s found that at a CH 4 /CO 2 molar ratio of 50/50, MCDR and reversible WGSR significantly influence the cell performance while MSR is negligibly small. The performance of SOFC fed with CO 2 /CH 4 mixture is comparable to SOFC running on CH 4 /H 2 O mixtures. The electric output of SOFC can be enhanced by operating the cell at a low operating potential or at a high temperature. In addition, the development of anode catalyst with high activity towards CO electrochemical oxidation is important for SOFC performance enhancement. The model can serve as a useful tool for optimization of the SOFC system running on CH 4 /CO 2 mixtures

  3. Methane Steam Reforming over an Ni-YSZ Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode in Stack Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mogensen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of catalytic steam reforming of methane over an Ni-YSZ anode of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC have been investigated with the cell placed in a stack configuration. In order to decrease the degree of conversion, a single cell stack with reduced area was used. Measurements were performed in the temperature range 600–800°C and the partial pressures of all reactants and products were varied. The obtained rates could be well fitted with a power law expression (r ∝PCH40.7. A simple model is presented which is capable of predicting the methane conversion in a stack configuration from intrinsic kinetics of the anode support material. The predictions are compared with the stack measurements presented here, and good agreement is observed.

  4. Determination of as-discarded methane potential in residential and commercial municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chickering, Giles W; Krause, Max J; Townsend, Timothy G

    2018-06-01

    Methane generation potential, L 0 , is a primary parameter of the first-order decay (FOD) model used for prediction and regulation of landfill gas (LFG) generation in municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The current US EPA AP-42 default value for L 0 , which has been in place for almost 20 years, is 100 m 3 CH 4 /Mg MSW as-discarded. Recent research suggests the yield of landfilled waste could be less than 60 m 3 CH 4 /Mg MSW. This study aimed to measure the L 0 of present-day residential and commercial as-discarded MSW. In doing so, 39 waste collection vehicles were sorted for composition before samples of each biodegradable fraction were analyzed for methane generation potential. Methane yields were determined for over 450 samples of 14 different biodegradable MSW fractions, later to be combined with moisture content and volatile solids data to calculate L 0 values for each waste load. An average value of 80 m 3 CH 4 /Mg MSW was determined for all samples with 95% of values in the interval 74-86 m 3 CH 4 /Mg MSW as-discarded. While no statistically significant difference was observed, commercial MSW yields (mean 85, median 88 m 3 CH 4 /Mg MSW) showed a higher average L 0 than residential MSW (mean 75, median 71 m 3 CH 4 /Mg MSW). Many methane potential values for individual fractions described in previous work were found within the range of values determined by BMP in this study. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Photo-stimulated desorption from water and methane clusters on the surface of solid neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa Ichiri; Matsumoto Dairo; Takekuma Shinichi; Tamura Reimi; Miura Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Photo-stimulated desorption of ions from methane and water heterocluster on the surface of solid neon was studied. The desorption yields of the variety of photo-desorbed species showed strong dependence on the composition and the size of the mother cluster. It was found that the presence of a water molecule in the cluster significantly enhanced, or was almost essential for, the desorption of any species observed. Systematic investigation of the correlation between the cluster size and the desorption yield of each ion has revealed the mother cluster which yields the each desorbed ion.

  6. Methane-free biogas for direct feeding of solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, P.; Lanzini, A.; Santarelli, M.; Calì, M.; Sagnelli, F.; Boulanger, A.; Scaletta, A.; Zitella, P.

    This paper deals with the experimental analysis of the performance and degradation issues of a Ni-based anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell fed by a methane-free biogas from dark-anaerobic digestion of wastes by pastry and fruit shops. The biogas is produced by means of an innovative process where the biomass is fermented with a pre-treated bacteria inoculum (Clostridia) able to completely inhibit the methanization step during the fermentation process and to produce a H 2/CO 2 mixture instead of conventional CH 4/CO 2 anaerobic digested gas (bio-methane). The proposed biogas production route leads to a biogas composition which avoids the need of introducing a reformer agent into or before the SOFC anode in order to reformate it. In order to analyse the complete behaviour of a SOFC with the bio-hydrogen fuel, an experimental session with several H 2/CO 2 synthetic mixtures was performed on an anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell with a Ni-based anode. It was found that side reactions occur with such mixtures in the typical thermodynamic conditions of SOFCs (650-800 °C), which have an effect especially at high currents, due to the shift to a mixture consisting of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and water. However, cells operated with acceptable performance and carbon deposits (typical of a traditional hydrocarbon-containing biogas) were avoided after 50 h of cell operation even at 650 °C. Experiments were also performed with traditional bio-methane from anaerobic digestion with 60/40 vol% of composition. It was found that the cell performance dropped after few hours of operation due to the formation of carbon deposits. A short-term test with the real as-produced biogas was also successfully performed. The cell showed an acceptable power output (at 800 °C, 0.35 W cm -2 with biogas, versus 0.55 W cm -2 with H 2) although a huge quantity of sulphur was present in the feeding fuel (hydrogen sulphide at 103 ppm and mercaptans up to 10 ppm). Therefore, it

  7. Methane-free biogas for direct feeding of solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, P.; Lanzini, A.; Santarelli, M.; Cali, M. [Dipartimento di Energetica, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Sagnelli, F.; Boulanger, A.; Scaletta, A.; Zitella, P. [BioEnergy Lab, Environment Park S.p.A., Via Livorno 60, 10144 Turin (Italy)

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the experimental analysis of the performance and degradation issues of a Ni-based anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell fed by a methane-free biogas from dark-anaerobic digestion of wastes by pastry and fruit shops. The biogas is produced by means of an innovative process where the biomass is fermented with a pre-treated bacteria inoculum (Clostridia) able to completely inhibit the methanization step during the fermentation process and to produce a H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixture instead of conventional CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} anaerobic digested gas (bio-methane). The proposed biogas production route leads to a biogas composition which avoids the need of introducing a reformer agent into or before the SOFC anode in order to reformate it. In order to analyse the complete behaviour of a SOFC with the bio-hydrogen fuel, an experimental session with several H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} synthetic mixtures was performed on an anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell with a Ni-based anode. It was found that side reactions occur with such mixtures in the typical thermodynamic conditions of SOFCs (650-800 C), which have an effect especially at high currents, due to the shift to a mixture consisting of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and water. However, cells operated with acceptable performance and carbon deposits (typical of a traditional hydrocarbon-containing biogas) were avoided after 50 h of cell operation even at 650 C. Experiments were also performed with traditional bio-methane from anaerobic digestion with 60/40 vol% of composition. It was found that the cell performance dropped after few hours of operation due to the formation of carbon deposits. A short-term test with the real as-produced biogas was also successfully performed. The cell showed an acceptable power output (at 800 C, 0.35 W cm{sup -2} with biogas, versus 0.55 W cm{sup -2} with H{sub 2}) although a huge quantity of sulphur was present in the feeding fuel (hydrogen sulphide at 103 ppm and

  8. Methane production as from the mixture of the urban solid waste lixiviate and municipal wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monroy-Hermosillo, Oscar; Ramírez-Vives, Florina; Rodríguez-Pimentel, Reyna I.; Rodríguez-Pérez, Suyén

    2015-01-01

    The generation of solid wastes and wastewater in Mexico , as other countries, has increased considerably of late years, so its treatment is very important to reduce the pollution. In this work are presented the results on the anaerobic digestion of lixiviate generated with the hydrolysis and acidogenesis of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste recollected in the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Unidad Iztapalapa coffee shop. Theses lixiviated were diluted with municipal wastewater to different organic loads (2,3-20 gCOD/L.d) and after treated anaerobically in UASB reactor. Biogas's average production in the last load of the UASB reactor was up to 12 L/L.d with an efficiency to remove COD on top of 90 % and a production of methane of 0,38 LCH4. gSSV-1. (author)

  9. Biological Production of Methane from Lunar Mission Solid Waste: An Initial Feasibility Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, Richard; Garland, Jay; Janine, Captain

    A preliminary assessment was made of the potential for biological production of methane from solid waste generated during an early planetary base mission to the moon. This analysis includes: 1) estimation of the amount of biodegradable solid waste generated, 2) background on the potential biodegradability of plastics given their significance in solid wastes, and 3) calculation of potential methane production from the estimate of biodegradable waste. The completed analysis will also include the feasibility of biological methane production costs associated with the biological processing of the solid waste. NASA workshops and Advanced Life Support documentation have estimated the projected amount of solid wastes generated for specific space missions. From one workshop, waste estimates were made for a 180 day transit mission to Mars. The amount of plastic packaging material was not specified, but our visual examination of trash returned from stocktickerSTS missions indicated a large percentage would be plastic film. This plastic, which is not biodegradable, would amount to 1.526 kgdw crew-1 d-1 or 6.10 kgdw d-1 for a crew of 4. Over a mission of 10 days this would amount to 61 kgdw of plastics and for an 180 day lunar surface habitation it would be nearly 1100 kgdw . Approx. 24 % of this waste estimate would be biodegradable (human fecal waste, food waste, and paper), but if plastic packaging was replaced with biodegradable plastic, then 91% would be biodegradable. Plastics are man-made long chain polymeric molecules, and can be divided into two main groups; thermoplastics and thermoset plastics. Thermoplastics comprise over 90% of total plastic use in the placecountry-regionUnited States and are derived from polymerization of olefins via breakage of the double bond and subsequent formation of additional carbon to carbon bonds. The resulting sole-carbon chain polymers are highly resistant to biodegradation and hydrolytic cleavage. Common thermoplastics include low

  10. The impact of a 50% reduction of solid waste disposal in Canada on methane emissions from landfills in 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patenaude, L.M.F.; Owen, G.T.; Barclay, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Canada's Green Plan established a goal of 50% reduction in municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal between 1988 and the year 2000. Canada has also committed to stabilizing greenhouse gas emissions at 1990 levels by 2000. MSW landfills are targeted since they account for a significant portion of anthropogenic methane emissions. Current composition and quantities of MSW were estimated. Using five scenarios for achieving a 50% reduction of waste disposed, the quantities and composition of waste managed were estimated through to the year 2000. A first-order decay model was used to estimate methane emissions from landfills of each scenario by varying the methane generation potential (L o ) based on the amount of biodegradable carbon in the MSW stream. Despite the overall reduction in waste, methane emissions are still projected on increase between 1990 and 2000 for scenarios with 25 to 45% of waste going to landfill in 2000. The estimated increases in methane emissions range from 2% for the high composting scenario to 16% for the high landfill scenario. In general, emissions peak during the 1990's and are decreasing by 2000. The projected increase in emissions is due to the 65--75% contribution of MSW landfilled before 1990. In conclusion, a significant reduction in methane emissions from landfills by 2000 will require methane recovery systems in addition to MSW reduction initiatives

  11. Hot reactions of 13N in solid methane at 77 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiergolla, J.; Nebeling, B.; Roessler, K.

    1987-09-01

    The chemical reactions of recoil- 13 N were studied in solid methane at 77 K. 13 N was generated via the the nuclear reaction 12 C(d,n) 13 N. The radiation dose deliverd by the 8.5 MeV deuterons amounted to D * = 0.6 eV per target molecule. The products formed by high energy chemical processes (hot chemistry) were analyzed by radio-gaschromatography. 13 NH 3 with 52% and CH 3 13 NH 2 with 25% radiochemical yield were found to be the main products. HC 13 N was not formed, but CH 3 13 CN amounts to 4%. For the more complex products carbon chain prolongation is prefered over multiple methylation such as show the yields of 8% for C 2 H 5 13 NH 2 and 3% (CH 3 ) 2 13 NH. (CH 3 ) 3 N was not detected. The formation of 13 NH 3 is due to hydrogen abstraction, that of CH 3 13 NH 2 due to insertion of NH radical into the C-H bond of CH 4 . Another, however, less probable pathway could be the insertion of 13 N into methane. The methylamine radical may react with another methane molecule via hydrogen transfer to methylamine or attack to CH 4 to dimethylamine. The 13 N-products were formed with high radiochemical purity and can potentially be applied for the synthesis of 13 N-radiopharmaceuticals. The reactions studied bear also informations on chemical processes in space (e.g. solar wind interactions with comets or interplanetary dust). 13 N-high energy chemical products are, however, of a less exobiological significance then those formed by hot carbon atoms, e.g. in the 'mirror' system 11 C/NH 3 (s). (orig.) [de

  12. Investigation of methane steam reforming in planar porous support of solid oxide fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yongping; Du Xiaoze; Yang Lijun; Huang Yuan; Xian Haizhen

    2009-01-01

    Adopting the porous support in integrated-planar solid oxide fuel cell (IP-SOFC) can reduce the operating temperature by reducing thickness of electrolyte layer, and also, provide internal reforming environment for hydrogen-rich fuel gas. The distributions of reactant and product components, and temperature of methane steam reforming for IP-SOFC were investigated by the developed physical and mathematical model with thermodynamic analysis, in which eleven possible reaction mechanisms were considered by the source terms and Arrhenius relationship. Numerical simulation of the model revealed that the progress of reforming reaction and the distribution of the product, H 2 , were influenced by the operating conditions, included that of temperature, ratio of H 2 O and CH 4 , as well as by the porosity of the supporting material. The simulating results indicate that the methane conversion rate can reach its maximum value under the operating temperature of 800 deg. C and porosity of ε = 0.4, which rather approximate to the practical operating conditions of IP-SOFC. In addition, characteristics of carbon deposition on surface of catalyst were discussed under various operating conditions and configuration parameters of the porous support. The present works provided some theoretical explanations to the numerous experimental observations and engineered practices

  13. Effects of platinum stagnation surface on the lean extinction limits of premixed methane/air flames at moderate surface temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiswall, J.T.; Li, J.; Wooldridge, M.S.; Im, H.G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-01-15

    A stagnation flow reactor was used to study the effects of platinum on the lean flammability limits of atmospheric pressure premixed methane/air flames at moderate stagnation surface temperatures. Experimental and computational methods were used to quantify the equivalence ratio at the lean extinction limit ({phi}{sub ext}) and the corresponding stagnation surface temperature (T{sub s}). A range of flow rates (57-90 cm/s) and corresponding strain rates were considered. The results indicate that the gas-phase methane/air flames are sufficiently strong relative to the heterogeneous chemistry for T{sub s} conditions less than 750 K that the platinum does not affect {phi}{sub ext}. The computational results are in good agreement with the experimentally observed trends and further indicate that higher reactant flow rates (>139 cm/s) and levels of dilution (>{proportional_to}10% N{sub 2}) are required to weaken the gas-phase flame sufficiently for surface reaction to play a positive role on extending the lean flammability limits. (author)

  14. Release of non-methane organic compounds during simulated landfilling of aerobically pretreated municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yue, Dongbei; Liu, Jianguo; Lu, Peng; Wang, Ying; Liu, Jing; Nie, Yongfeng

    2012-06-30

    Characteristics of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) emissions during the anaerobic decomposition of untreated (APD-0) and four aerobically pretreated (APD-20, APD-39, APD-49, and APD-63) samples of municipal solid waste (MSW) were investigated in laboratory. The cumulative mass of the NMOCs of APD-20, APD-39, APD-49, and APD-63 accounted for 15%, 9%, 16%, and 15% of that of APD-0, respectively. The intensities of the NMOC emissions calculated by dividing the cumulative NMOC emissions by the quantities of organic matter removed (Q(VS)) decreased from 4.1 mg/kg Q(VS) for APD-0 to 0.8-3.4 mg/kg Q(VS) for aerobically pretreated MSW. The lipid and starch contents might have significant impact on the intensity of the NMOC emissions. Alkanes dominated the NMOCs released from the aerobically pretreated MSW, while oxygenated compounds were the chief component of the NMOCs generated from untreated MSW. Aerobic pretreatment of MSW prior to landfilling reduces the organic content of the waste and the intensity of the NMOC emissions, and increases the odor threshold, thereby reducing the environmental impact of landfills. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of total solids content on methane and volatile fatty acid production in anaerobic digestion of food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotta, Flavia; d'Antonio, Giuseppe; Esposito, Giovanni; Fabbricino, Massimiliano; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Lens, Piet N L; Pirozzi, Francesco; Pontoni, Ludovico

    2014-10-01

    This work investigates the role of the moisture content on anaerobic digestion of food waste, as representative of rapidly biodegradable substrates, analysing the role of volatile fatty acid production on process kinetics. A range of total solids from 4.5% to 19.2% is considered in order to compare methane yields and kinetics of reactors operated under wet to dry conditions. The experimental results show a reduction of the specific final methane yield of 4.3% and 40.8% in semi-dry and dry conditions compared with wet conditions. A decreasing trend of the specific initial methane production rate is observed when increasing the total solids concentration. Because of lack of water, volatile fatty acids accumulation occurs during the first step of the process at semi-dry and dry conditions, which is considered to be responsible for the reduction of process kinetic rates. The total volatile fatty acids concentration and speciation are proposed as indicators of process development at different total solids content. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Recovery of methane-rich gas from solid-feed anaerobic digestion of ipomoea (Ipomoea carnea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar Ganesh, P; Sanjeevi, R; Gajalakshmi, S; Ramasamy, E V; Abbasi, S A

    2008-03-01

    Studies are presented on new types of anaerobic digesters in which chopped or dry crushed Ipomoea carnea was fed without any other pretreatment, in an attempt to develop commercially viable means of utilizing the otherwise very harmful plant. Two types of solid-feed anaerobic digesters (SFADs) were studied. The first type had a single vessel in which the bottom 35% portion was separated from the top portion by a perforated PVC disk. The weed was charged from the top and inoculated with anaerobically digested cowdung-water slurry. The fermentation of the weed in the reactor led to the formation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) plus some biogas. The leachate, rich in the VFAs, was passed through the perforated PVC sheet and collected in the lower portion of the vessel. The other type of reactors had two vessels, the first one was fully charged with the weed and the second received the VFA leachate. With both types were attached upflow anaerobic filters (UAFs) which converted the leachate into combustible biogas consisting of approximately 70% methane. All SFADs developed very consistent performance in terms of biogas yield within 17 weeks of start. The two-compartment reactors yielded significantly more biogas than the single-compartment reactors of corresponding total volume, and the reactors with which anaerobic filters (AF) were attached yielded more biogas than the ones without AF. The best performing units generated 2.41m(3) of biogas per m(3) of digester volume, as compared to 0.1-0.2m(3) of biogas, m(-3)d(-1), obtainable with conventional digesters. This indicates the viability of this technology. The spent weed can be vermicomposted directly to obtain good soil-conditioner cum fertilizer; earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae produced 540mg vermicast per animal every day, achieving near total conversion of feed to vermicast in 20 days. The proposed systems, thus, makes it possible to accomplish total utilization of ipomoea.

  17. High-solid anaerobic digestion of corn straw for methane production and pretreatment of bio-briquette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yeqing; Yan, Fang; Li, Tao; Zhou, Ying; Jiang, Hao; Qian, Mingyu; Xu, Quan

    2018-02-01

    In this study, an integrated process was developed to produce methane and high-quality bio-briquette (BB) using corn straw (CS) through high-solid anaerobic digestion (HS-AD). CS was anaerobic digested by using a leach bed reactor at four leachate recirculation strategies. After digesting for 28 days, highest methane yield of 179.6 mL/g-VS, which was corresponded to energy production of 5.55 MJ/kg-CS, was obtained at a higher initial recirculation rate of 32 L-leachate per day. Compared with bio-briquette manufactured from raw CS and lignite, the compressive, immersion and falling strength properties of bio-briquette made from AD-treated CS (solid digestate) and lignite were significantly improved. A preferred BB can be obtained with side compressive strength of 863.8 ± 10.8 N and calorific value of 20.21 MJ/kg-BB. The finding of this study indicated that the integrated process could be an alternative way to produce methane and high-quality BB with CS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Consideration of the 'Burp' phenomenon in solid methane accounting for nonuniform distribution of irradiation defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabalin, E. P.

    1997-09-01

    This paper focuses on an optional model of radical recombination in solid methane, apart from conventional theory. It shares the common property of two-order reactions, but accounts for local nonuniformitites of the objects involved (such as radical concentration, the track nature of energy deposition, and others). Accounting for local nonuniformity provides absolutely different results for the time dependence of the space-averaged concentration of radicals, both for the processes of their storage and 'burping', compared to the common approach; it also brings new conditions for the thermal instability of the methane slug under irradiation and gives a better understanding of most of the strange features of burp performances.

  19. Cold moderators for pulsed neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews cold moderators in pulsed neutron sources and provides details of the performance of different cold moderator materials and configurations. Analytical forms are presented which describe wavelength spectra and emission time distributions. Several types of cooling arrangements used in pulsed source moderators are described. Choices of materials are surveyed. The author examines some of the radiation damage effects in cold moderators, including the phenomenon of ''burping'' in irradiated cold solid methane. 9 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs

  20. The synthetic scattering function and application to the design of cold moderators for pulsed neutron sources: a fast response methane based array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granada, J. R.; Mayer, R. E.; Gillette, V. H.

    1997-09-01

    The Synthetic Scattering Function (SSF) allows a simple description of the incoherent interaction of slow neutrons with hydrogenous materials. The main advantages of this model reside in the analytical expressions that it produces for double-differential cross sections, energy-transfer kernels, and total cross sections, which in turn permit the fast evaluation of neutron scattering and transport properties. In this work we briefly discuss basic features of the SSF, review some previous applications to a number of moderating materials, and present new Monte Carlo results for a fast time-response moderator concept based on methane at low temperatures. (auth)

  1. Gas suspension flows of a moderately dense binary mixture of solid particles in vertical tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamankhan, P.; Huotari, J. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland). Combustion and Conversion Lab.

    1996-12-01

    The turbulent, steady, fully-developed flow of a moderately dense (solid volume faction >>0.001) binary mixture of spherical particles in a gaseous carrier is investigated for the case of flow in a vertical riser. The suspended particles are considered to be in turbulent motion, driven by random aerodynamic forces acting between the particle and the gaseous carrier as well as particle-particle interactive forces. A model is constructed based on the combination of the time-averaged after volume-averaged conservation equations of mass, momentum and mechanical energy of the gas phase in the continuum theory and the corresponding equations for the solid particles obtained using the recently developed Enskog theory for dense multi-component mixtures of slightly inelastic spherical particles. The model properly takes into account the contributions of particle-particle collisions, as well as the fluid-dynamic fluctuating forces on individual particles. To demonstrate the validity of this approach, the fully-developed steady-state mean velocity and concentration distributions of a moderately dense binary mixture of solid particles in a turbulent vertical flow calculated by the present model are compared with available experimental measurements. The results provide a qualitative description of the experimentally observed motion of coarse particles in a fast bed of fine solids. (author)

  2. Co-digestion of sewage sludge and sterilized solid slaughterhouse waste: methane production efficiency and process limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitk, Peep; Kaparaju, Prasad; Palatsi, Jordi; Affes, Rim; Vilu, Raivo

    2013-04-01

    The rendering product of Category 2 and 3 Animal By-Products is known as sterilized mass (SM) and it is mainly composed of fat and proteins, making it interesting substrate for anaerobic digestion. Batch and semi-continuous laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of SM addition in co-digestion with sewage sludge on methane production and possible process limitations. Results showed that SM addition in the feed mixture up to 5% (w/w), corresponding to 68.1% of the organic loading, increased methane production 5.7 times, without any indication of process inhibition. Further increase of SM addition at 7.5% (w/w) caused methane production decrease and volatile solids removal reduction, that was mainly related to remarkably increased free ammonia concentration in the digester of 596.5±68.6 gNH3 L(-1). Sterilized mass addition of 10% (w/w) caused intensive foaming, LCFA accumulation of 9172±701.2 mgCOD-LCFA g(-1) sample and termination of the experiment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Modeling of electrochemistry and steam-methane reforming performance for simulating pressurized solid oxide fuel cell stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Ryan, Emily M.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Khaleel, Moe A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2010-10-01

    This paper examines the electrochemical and direct internal steam-methane reforming performance of the solid oxide fuel cell when subjected to pressurization. Pressurized operation boosts the Nernst potential and decreases the activation polarization, both of which serve to increase cell voltage and power while lowering the heat load and operating temperature. A model considering the activation polarization in both the fuel and the air electrodes was adopted to address this effect on the electrochemical performance. The pressurized methane conversion kinetics and the increase in equilibrium methane concentration are considered in a new rate expression. The models were then applied in simulations to predict how the distributions of direct internal reforming rate, temperature, and current density are effected within stacks operating at elevated pressure. A generic 10 cm counter-flow stack model was created and used for the simulations of pressurized operation. The predictions showed improved thermal and electrical performance with increased operating pressure. The average and maximum cell temperatures decreased by 3% (20 C) while the cell voltage increased by 9% as the operating pressure was increased from 1 to 10 atm. (author)

  4. Catalytic properties of new anode materials for solid oxide fuel cells operated under methane at intermediary temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvet, A.-L.; Fouletier, J.

    The recent trend in solid oxide fuel cell concerns the use of natural gas as fuel. Steam reforming of methane is a well-established process for producing hydrogen directly at the anode side. In order to develop new anode materials, the catalytic activities of several oxides for the steam reforming of methane were characterized by gas chromatography. We studied the catalytic activity as a function of steam/carbon ratios r. The methane and the steam content were varied between 5 and 30% and between 1.5 and 3.5%, respectively, corresponding to r-values between 0.07 and 0.7. Catalyst (ruthenium and vanadium)-doped lanthanum chromites substituted with strontium, gadolinium-doped ceria (Ce 0.9Gd 0.1O 2) referred as to CeGdO 2, praseodymium oxide, molybdenum oxide and copper oxide were tested. The working temperature was fixed at 850°C, except for 5% ruthenium-doped La 1- xSr xCrO 3 where the temperature was varied between 700 and 850°C. Two types of behavior were observed as a function of the activity of the catalyst. The higher steam reforming efficiency was observed with 5% of ruthenium above 750°C.

  5. Pig feeding strategy coupled with effluent management - fresh or stored slurry, solid phase separation - on methane potential and methane conversion factors during storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarret, Guillaume; Martinez, José; Dourmad, Jean-Yves

    2011-11-01

    In the guideline for the determination of methane (CH 4) emission from animal manure (IPCC) the amount of CH 4 emitted is generally calculated according to an equation combining the amount of organic matter (OM) or volatile solids excreted, the ultimate CH 4 potential ( B0) of excreta and a system-specific methane conversion factor (MCF, %) that reflects the portion of B0 that is really converted into CH 4. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of the modification of dietary crude protein and fibre levels on B0 of pig slurry and on subsequent MCF according to different strategies of slurry management. Five experimental diets differing mainly in their crude protein and fibre content were compared. Two types of measurement of CH 4 emission were performed. The first was the measurement of B0 of slurry using biomethanogene potential (BMP) test. The second consisted in a storage simulation, which was performed on different kinds of effluents: fresh slurry (FSl), stored slurry (SSl), and faeces mixed with water (FaW). The type of diet and the type of effluent affected ( P storage from FaW, FSl and SSl samples representing 77%, 58% and 64% of the B0 value. The dynamic of CH 4 production during BMP tests was rather similar for all dietary treatments whereas it differed for storage simulation studies with significant effects of dietary CP and fibre contents. The results from this study indicate that the type of diet has a significant but rather limited effect on B0 value of effluent. The effect of diet is much more marked on MCF, with lower values for high protein diets, and higher values for high fibre diets. MCF is also affected by manure management, the values measured on separated faeces from urine being much higher than for slurry.

  6. Cold moderator scattering kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacFarlane, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    New thermal-scattering-law files in ENDF format have been developed for solid methane, liquid methane liquid ortho- and para-hydrogen, and liquid ortho- and para-deuterium using up-to-date models that include such effects as incoherent elastic scattering in the solid, diffusion and hindered vibration and rotations in the liquids, and spin correlations for the hydrogen and deuterium. These files were generated with the new LEAPR module of the NJOY Nuclear Data Processing System. Other modules of this system were used to produce cross sections for these moderators in the correct format for the continuous-energy Monte Carlo code (MCNP) being used for cold-moderator-design calculations at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE). 20 refs., 14 figs

  7. Analytical investigation of high temperature 1 kW solid oxide fuel cell system feasibility in methane hydrate recovery and deep ocean power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azizi, Mohammad Ali; Brouwer, Jacob; Dunn-Rankin, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A dynamic Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) model was developed. • Hydrate bed methane dissociation model was integrated with the SOFC model. • SOFC operated steadily for 120 days at high pressure deep ocean environment. • Burning some of the dissociated gas for SMR heat leads to more net methane produced. • Higher SOFC fuel utilization produces higher integrated system efficiency. - Abstract: Methane hydrates are potential valuable energy resources. However, finding an efficient method for methane gas recovery from hydrate sediments is still a challenge. New challenges arise from increasing environmental protection. This is due in part to the technical difficulties involved in the efficient dissociation of methane hydrates at high pressures. In this study, a new approach is proposed to produce valuable products of: 1. Net methane gas recovery from the methane hydrate sediment, and 2. Deep ocean power generation. We have taken the first steps toward utilization of a fuel cell system in methane gas recovery from deep ocean hydrate sediments. An integrated high pressure and high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and steam methane reformer (SMR) system is analyzed for this application and the recoverable amount of methane from deep ocean sediments is measured. System analysis is accomplished for two major cases regarding system performance: 1. Energy for SMR is provided by the burning part of the methane gas dissociated from the hydrate sediment. 2. Energy for SMR is provided through heat exchange with fuel cell effluent gases. We found that the total production of methane gas is higher in the first case compared to the second case. The net power generated by the fuel cell system is estimated for all cases. The primary goal of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of integrated electrochemical devices to accomplish energy efficient dissociation of methane hydrate gases in deep ocean sediments. Concepts for use of electrochemical devices

  8. Contribution to the use of a solid moderator gas reactor, for naval propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pheline, J.; Gautier, A.

    1960-01-01

    In this contribution, the authors discuss works performed in France for the development of nuclear propulsion in merchant ships, notably for an oil tanker of 50.000 tons with 17 knot speed, i.e. a 20.000 Hp engine with an energy produced by a 60 MW gas reactor with a solid moderator and comprising 400 channels loaded with uranium oxide enriched ay 2.8 per cent and sheathed with a refractory alloy. The authors discuss the possible materials for the moderator, the heat transfer medium, the sheath, the fuel and the structures, and report technological studies (mechanical tests, irradiation tests) performed to investigate material properties and their behaviour in operation conditions. They report tests performed to investigate core structure characteristics with respect to neutrons. They finally briefly present a prototype

  9. Combined H2/CH4 cold moderator for a short pulse neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, K.D.; Lucas, A.T.

    1988-01-01

    Very low temperature methane would be an ideal moderating material as it has a high hydrogen density and many low frequency modes which facilitate thermalization. Such moderators are in service at two major world facilities, KEK (Japan) and Argonne National Laboratory (USA). Unfortunately solid methane has very low thermal conductivity and is subject to radiation damage making a moderator of this type impractical for use in high intensity beam. This report outlines a possible alternative using small spheres of solid methane in a matrix of supercritical hydrogen at 25 K. 4 figs

  10. An investigation of phase transitions in solid methane and deuterated derivatives to pressures of 3 kbar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprik, M.

    1982-01-01

    The first part of this thesis is an experimental investigation of the interaction responsible for the I-II transition and the second part comprises three theoretical studies of several of the properties of phase I and II. The first chapter of part I, is a general introduction to a thermodynamic treatment of the isotope effect in an orientational phase transition. The thermodynamic approach yields a corresponding state model for the phase diagrams of the five isotopes of methane (CH 4 , CHD 3 , CH 2 D 2 , CH 3 D and CD 4 ). In the remaining two chapters of part I, the corresponding state relation mentioned above is applied to the I-II transition of methane in order to obtain an experimental value for the effective exponent n of the dependence on intermolecular separation of the ordering anisotropic interaction. Part II starts with a derivation of a quasi-classical approximation to the statistical density matrix of a free spherical top. While the orientational system is treated classically, the consequences of the other characteristic of the methane molecules are considered, i.e. the high approximately odd symmetry of the molecule (the octupole field in phase II is odd under spatial inversion). It is argued that the renormalization group analysis of critical phenomena in certain highly complicated antiferromagnetic systems may be equally well applied to the I-II transition in methane. Finally, the study of the quantum effect in phase II is resumed. The spin lattice relaxation time at very low temperature is calculated from first principles using an orientational dynamical process of purely quantum-mechanical nature. (Auth.)

  11. Production of sustainable methane from renewable energy and captured carbon dioxide with the use of Solid Oxide Electrolyzer: A thermodynamic assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stempien, Jan Pawel; Ni, Meng; Sun, Qiang; Chan, Siew Hwa

    2015-01-01

    A possible pathway for renewable and sustainable methane production from captured carbon dioxide, water (or seawater) and renewable electricity is proposed and analysed. The proposed system includes Solid Oxide Electrolyzer Cell combined with ex-situ methane synthesis reactor comprising Sabatier, Methanation and Water-Gas Shift reactions. A well validated electrochemical model is used to describe the behaviour of the electrolyzer for steam/carbon dioxide co-electrolysis. The methane synthesis reactor is modelled by a set of equations based on thermodynamic equilibrium reaction constants. Effects of current density, temperature, pressure and initial steam to carbon dioxide ratio on system performance are analysed and their effects are discussed. It is found that a simple, single-pass system without heat recuperation could achieve a maximum overall energy efficiency of 60.87% (based on lower heating value), a maximum electrical energy efficiency of 81.08% (based on lower heating value), and a maximum amount of methane production of ∼1.52 Nm 3  h −1  m −2 of electrolyzer. It is also found that conversion of ∼100% captured carbon dioxide is possible in the proposed system. - Highlights: • Analysis of Solid Oxide Electrolyzer combined with methane synthesis process. • Efficiency of converting water and carbon dioxide into synthetic, renewable methane above 81%. • Effects of process temperature, pressure, gas flux and compositions were analysed. • Methane production of ∼1.52 [Nm 3 h −1 m −2 of electrolyzer]. • Conversion of ∼100% of captured CO 2 is possible

  12. Composition variability of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste and effects on hydrogen and methane production potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, Luca; Cossu, Raffaello

    2015-02-01

    The composition of the Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (OFMSW) strongly depends on the place and time of collection for a specific municipality or area. Moreover synthetic food waste or organic waste from cafeterias and restaurants may not be representative of the overall OFMSW received at treatment facilities for source-separated waste. This work is aimed at evaluating the composition variability of OFMSW, the potential productions of hydrogen and methane from specific organic waste fractions typically present in MSW and the effects of waste composition on overall hydrogen and methane yields. The organic waste fractions considered in the study were: bread-pasta, vegetables, fruits, meat-fish-cheese and undersieve 20mm. Composition analyses were conducted on samples of OFMSW that were source segregated at household level. Batch tests for hydrogen and methane productions were carried out under mesophilic conditions on selected fractions and OFMSW samples. Results indicated that the highest production of hydrogen was achieved by the bread-pasta fraction while the lowest productions were measured for the meat-fish-cheese fraction. The results indicated that the content of these two fractions in organic waste had a direct influence on the hydrogen production potentials of OFMSW. The higher the content of bread-pasta fraction, the higher the hydrogen yields were while the contrary was observed for the meat-fish-cheese fraction. The definition of waste composition therefore represents fundamental information to be reported in scientific literature to allow data comparison. The variability of OFMSW and its effects on hydrogen potentials might also represents a problematic issue in the management of pilot or full-scale plants for the production of hydrogen by dark fermentation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Neutronic analysis of graphite-moderated solid breeder design for INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, J.; Abdou, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    An in-depth analysis of the INTOR tritium-production-blanket design is presented. A ternary system of solid silicate breeder, lead neutron multiplier, and graphite moderator is explored primary from safety and blanket tritium-inventory considerations. Lithium-silicate (Li 2 SiO 3 ) breeder systems are studied along with water (H 2 O/D 2 O) and Type 316 stainless steel as coolant and structural material, respectively. The analysis examines the neutronics effects on tritium-production regarding: (1) coolant choice; (2) moderator choice; (3) moderator location; (4) multiplier thickness; (5) 6 Li enrichment; and (6) 6 Li burnup. The tritium-breeding-blanket modules are located at the top, outboard, and bottom (outer) parts of the torus, resulting in a breeding coverage of approx. 60% at the first-wall surface. It is found that the reference INTOR design yields, based on a three-dimensional analysis, a net tritium breeding ratio (BR) of approx. 0.65 at the beginning of reactor operation, satisfying the design criterion of BR > 0.6

  14. The effects of post-treatments and temperature on recovering the methane potential of > 2 mm solid fraction of digested cow manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaparaju, Prasad Laxmi-Narasimha; Rintala, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of thermal and chemical treatments, mechanical maceration and freezing and thawing on recovering the remaining methane potential of the > 2 mm solid fraction of digested cow manure - which accounted for 30% of the original potential of digested cow manure - were studied in laboratory...

  15. Landfill operation and waste management procedures in the reduction of methane and leachate pollutant emissions from municipal solid waste landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokela, J.

    2002-07-01

    The objective of the present research was to find ways of minimising emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills by means of laboratory experiments. During anaerobic incubation for 237 days, the grey waste components produced between 120 and 320 m{sup 3}CH{sub 4} tTS{sup -1} and between 0.32 and 3.5 kg NH{sub 4}-N tTS{sup -1} and the first-order rate constant of degradation ranged from 0.021 and 0.058 d{sup -1}. High amounts of COD and NH{sub 4}-N were observed in the leachate of grey waste in all the procedures tested during lysimeter experiments lasting 573 days. In the 10- year-old landfilled MSW, a high rate of methanisation was achieved with rainwater addition and leachate recirculation over 538 days, whereas initially pre-wetted grey waste and landfilled MSW were rapidly acidified, thus releasing a high amount of COD into the leachate. In batch assays, the grey waste produced a methane potential amounting to 70-85 % of the total methane potential of the grey waste plus putrescibles. In low moisture conditions, i.e. below 55%, methane production was delayed in the old landfill waste and prevented in the grey waste. In the emission potential study with five waste types, putrescibles produced 410 m{sup 3}CH{sub 4} tTS{sup -1} and 3.6 kgNH{sub 4}-N tTS{sup -1}, whereas composted putrescibles produced 41 m{sup 3}CH{sub 4} tVS{sup -1}, and 2.0 kgNH{sub 4}-N tTS{sup -1}. The remains of putrescibles probably caused the leaching potential of 2.1 kgNH{sub 4}-N tTS{sup -1} in the grey waste. Aeration for 51 days in lysimeters reduced the CH{sub 4} potential of putrescibles by more than 68 % and of the lysimeter landfilled grey waste by 50 %, indicating the potential of aeration for CH4 emission reduction. Nitrogen removal of landfill leachate was studied in the laboratory as well as on-site. Over 90 % nitrification of leachate was obtained with loading rates between 100 and 130 mgNH{sub 4}-N l{sup -1} d-1 at 25 deg C. Nitrified leachate was denitrified with a

  16. Methanol induces low temperature resilient methanogens and improves methane generation from domestic wastewater at low to moderate temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shaswati; Badhe, Neha; De Vrieze, Jo; Biswas, Rima; Nandy, Tapas

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature (methanol is a preferred substrate by methanogens in cold habitats. The study hypothesizes that methanol can induce the growth of low-temperature resilient, methanol utilizing, hydrogenotrophs in UASB reactor. The hypothesis was tested in field conditions to evaluate the impact of seasonal temperature variations on methane yield in the presence and absence of methanol. Results show that 0.04% (v/v) methanol increased methane up to 15 times and its effect was more pronounced at lower temperatures. The qPCR analysis showed the presence of Methanobacteriales along with Methanosetaceae in large numbers. This indicates methanol induced the growth of both the hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic groups through direct and indirect routes, respectively. This study thus demonstrated that methanol can impart resistance in methanogenic biomass to low temperature and can improve performance of UASB reactor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Numerical Simulation of CO2 Flooding of Coalbed Methane Considering the Fluid-Solid Coupling Effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Liu

    Full Text Available CO2 flooding of coalbed methane (CO2-ECBM not only stores CO2 underground and reduces greenhouse gas emissions but also enhances the gas production ratio. This coupled process involves multi-phase fluid flow and coal-rock deformation, as well as processes such as competitive gas adsorption and diffusion from the coal matrix into fractures. A dual-porosity medium that consists of a matrix and fractures was built to simulate the flooding process, and a mathematical model was used to consider the competitive adsorption, diffusion and seepage processes and the interaction between flow and deformation. Due to the effects of the initial pressure and the differences in pressure variation during the production process, permeability changes caused by matrix shrinkage were spatially variable in the reservoir. The maximum value of permeability appeared near the production well, and the degree of rebound decreased with increasing distance from the production well.

  18. Integration of CO2 air capture and solid oxide electrolysis for methane production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, Søren Lyng

    from all sectors of the energy system except for transportation. In the recently published Energikoncept 2035 [1], the Danish grid operator, Energinet.dk lays out a scenario based on 72 % wind power and 21 %biomass and waste in the electricity grid mix. In this scenario, biogas and electrolysis gasses....... were estimated according to standard methods.The plant had a yearly production capacity of 575,000 Nm3 of SNG with a methane content above 98.5 % which resulted in a Wobbe index of 49 MJ/Nm3 which is sufficient for injection into the natural gas grid. The SOEC stack power was around 700 k...... are projected to be used for production of process heat, peak-load power generation and on the longer term to replace hydrocarbons in the most energy intensive parts of the transportation sector; especially aviation. As a prerequisite for the scenario, no biomass can be imported to enhance the supply...

  19. Electrocatalytic oxidation of methane: investigations of new catalysts to be used in a solid polymer electrolyte methane fuel-cell; Oxydation electrocatalytique du methane: recherche de catalyseurs en vue d'une application a une pile au methane a electrolyte polymere solide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthelot, S

    1998-07-01

    This thesis evaluated the performances of many catalysts facing the methane oxidation which is a critical step in methane fuel cells development. In a first part the study of the methane electro-oxidation has been realized by classical electrochemical technics on many electrodes to determine the most active ones. In a second part the in situ reflection infra-red spectroscopy allowed to identify, during the methane oxidation, the adsorbed species on the electrode and the reaction products. These results also help the understanding of the part of the concerned materials mechanisms in the methane oxidation and then to optimize them for a whole oxidation of the methane in carbon dioxide. The final objective is the use of the methane in a PEMFC fuel cell type. A comparison with the methanol and C2 hydrocarbons behaviour, such as the ethane the ethylene and the acetylene, has been done to evaluate the performances. (A.L.B.)

  20. Post-anaerobic digestion thermal hydrolysis of sewage sludge and food waste: Effect on methane yields, dewaterability and solids reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Kine; Kjørlaug, Oda; Higgins, Matthew J; Linjordet, Roar; Horn, Svein J

    2018-04-01

    Post-anaerobic digestion (PAD) treatment technologies have been suggested for anaerobic digestion (AD) to improve process efficiency and assure hygenization of organic waste. Because AD reduces the amount of organic waste, PAD can be applied to a much smaller volume of waste compared to pre-digestion treatment, thereby improving efficiency. In this study, dewatered digestate cakes from two different AD plants were thermally hydrolyzed and dewatered, and the liquid fraction was recirculated to a semi-continuous AD reactor. The thermal hydrolysis was more efficient in relation to methane yields and extent of dewaterability for the cake from a plant treating waste activated sludge, than the cake from a plant treating source separated food waste (SSFW). Temperatures above 165 °C yielded the best results. Post-treatment improved volumetric methane yields by 7% and the COD-reduction increased from 68% to 74% in a mesophilic (37 °C) semi-continuous system despite lowering the solid retention time (from 17 to 14 days) compared to a conventional system with pre-treatment of feed substrates at 70 °C. Results from thermogravimetric analysis showed an expected increase in maximum TS content of dewatered digestate cake from 34% up to 46% for the SSFW digestate cake, and from 17% up to 43% in the sludge digestate cake, after the PAD thermal hydrolysis process (PAD-THP). The increased dewatering alone accounts for a reduction in wet mass of cake leaving the plant of 60% in the case of sludge digestate cake. Additionaly, the increased VS-reduction will contribute to further reduce the mass of wet cake. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Internal reforming characteristics of cermet supported solid oxide fuel cell using yttria stabilized zirconia fed with partially reformed methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momma, Akihiko; Takano, Kiyonami; Tanaka, Yohei; Negishi, Akira; Kato, Ken; Nozaki, Ken; Kato, Tohru [Energy Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono Tsukuba Ibaraki, 305-8568 (Japan); Ichigi, Takenori; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Ryu, Takashi [Application Development Project, Corporate R and D, NGK Insulators, Ltd., 2-56 Suda-cho Mizuho-ku Nagoya-shi Aichi, 467-8530 (Japan)

    2009-08-01

    In order to investigate the internal reforming characteristics in a cermet supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) using YSZ as the electrolyte, the concentration profiles of the gaseous species along the gas flow direction in the anode were measured. Partially reformed methane using a pre-reformer kept at a constant temperature is supplied to the center of the cell which is operated with a seal-less structure at the gas outlet. The anode gas is sucked in via silica capillaries to the initially evacuated gas tanks. The process is simultaneously carried out using five sampling ports. The sampled gas is analyzed by a gas chromatograph. Most of the measurements are made at the cell temperature (T{sub cell}) of 750 C and at various temperatures of the pre-reformer (T{sub ref}) with various fuel utilizations (U{sub f}) of the cell. The composition of the fuel at the inlet of the anode was confirmed to be almost the same as that theoretically calculated assuming equilibrium at the temperature of the pre-reformer. The effect of internal reforming in the anode is clearly observed as a steady decrease in the methane concentration along the flow axis. The effect of the water-gas shift reaction is also observed as a decrease in the CO{sub 2} concentration and an increase of CO concentration around the gas inlet region, as the water-gas shift reaction inversely proceeds when T{sub cell} is higher than T{sub ref}. The diffusion of nitrogen from the seal-less outermost edge is observed, and the diffusion is confirmed to be more significant as U{sub f} decreases. The observations are compared with the results obtained by the SOFC supported by lanthanum gallate electrolyte. With respect to the internal reforming performance, the cell investigated here is found to be more effective when compared to the previously reported electrolyte supported cell. (author)

  2. Internal reforming characteristics of cermet supported solid oxide fuel cell using yttria stabilized zirconia fed with partially reformed methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momma, Akihiko; Takano, Kiyonami; Tanaka, Yohei; Negishi, Akira; Kato, Ken; Nozaki, Ken; Kato, Tohru; Ichigi, Takenori; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Ryu, Takashi

    In order to investigate the internal reforming characteristics in a cermet supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) using YSZ as the electrolyte, the concentration profiles of the gaseous species along the gas flow direction in the anode were measured. Partially reformed methane using a pre-reformer kept at a constant temperature is supplied to the center of the cell which is operated with a seal-less structure at the gas outlet. The anode gas is sucked in via silica capillaries to the initially evacuated gas tanks. The process is simultaneously carried out using five sampling ports. The sampled gas is analyzed by a gas chromatograph. Most of the measurements are made at the cell temperature (T cell) of 750 °C and at various temperatures of the pre-reformer (T ref) with various fuel utilizations (U f) of the cell. The composition of the fuel at the inlet of the anode was confirmed to be almost the same as that theoretically calculated assuming equilibrium at the temperature of the pre-reformer. The effect of internal reforming in the anode is clearly observed as a steady decrease in the methane concentration along the flow axis. The effect of the water-gas shift reaction is also observed as a decrease in the CO 2 concentration and an increase of CO concentration around the gas inlet region, as the water-gas shift reaction inversely proceeds when T cell is higher than T ref. The diffusion of nitrogen from the seal-less outermost edge is observed, and the diffusion is confirmed to be more significant as U f decreases. The observations are compared with the results obtained by the SOFC supported by lanthanum gallate electrolyte. With respect to the internal reforming performance, the cell investigated here is found to be more effective when compared to the previously reported electrolyte supported cell.

  3. Ni modified ceramic anodes for direct-methane solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Guoliang; Chen, Fanglin

    2016-01-19

    In accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure, a method for fabricating a solid oxide fuel cell is described. The method includes synthesizing a composition having a perovskite present therein. The method further includes applying the composition on an electrolyte support to form an anode and applying Ni to the composition on the anode.

  4. Electrode design for direct-methane micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cell (MT-SOFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabuni, Mohamad Fairus; Li, Tao; Punmeechao, Puvich; Li, Kang

    2018-04-01

    Herein, a micro-structured electrode design has been developed via a modified phase-inversion method. A thin electrolyte integrated with a highly porous anode scaffold has been fabricated in a single-step process and developed into a complete fuel cell for direct methane (CH4) utilisation. A continuous and well-dispersed layer of copper-ceria (Cu-CeO2) was incorporated inside the micro-channels of the anode scaffold. A complete cell was investigated for direct CH4 utilisation. The well-organised micro-channels and nano-structured Cu-CeO2 anode contributed to an increase in electrochemical reaction sites that promoted charge-transfer as well as facilitating gaseous fuel distribution, resulting in outstanding performances. Excellent electrochemical performances have been achieved in both hydrogen (H2) and CH4 operation. The power density of 0.16 Wcm-2 at 750 °C with dry CH4 as fuel is one of the highest ever reported values for similar anode materials.

  5. Methane emission from ruminants and solid waste: A critical analysis of baseline and mitigation projections for climate and policy studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, E.

    2012-12-01

    Current and projected estimates of methane (CH4) emission from anthropogenic sources are numerous but largely unexamined or compared. Presented here is a critical appraisal of CH4 projections used in climate-chemistry and policy studies. We compare emissions for major CH4 sources from several groups, including our own new data and RCP projections developed for climate-chemistry models for the next IPCC Assessment Report (AR5). We focus on current and projected baseline and mitigation emissions from ruminant animals and solid waste that are both predicted to rise dramatically in coming decades, driven primarily by developing countries. For waste, drivers include increasing urban populations, higher per capita waste generation due to economic growth and increasing landfilling rates. Analysis of a new global data base detailing waste composition, collection and disposal indicates that IPCC-based methodologies and default data overestimate CH4 emission for the current period which cascades into substantial overestimates in future projections. CH4 emission from solid waste is estimated to be ~10-15 Tg CH4/yr currently rather than the ~35 Tg/yr often reported in the literature. Moreover, emissions from developing countries are unlikely to rise rapidly in coming decades because new management approaches, such as sanitary landfills, that would increase emissions are maladapted to infrastructures in these countries and therefore unlikely to be implemented. The low current emission associated with solid waste (~10 Tg), together with future modest growth, implies that mitigation of waste-related CH4 emission is a poor candidate for slowing global warming. In the case of ruminant animals (~90 Tg CH4/yr currently), the dominant assumption driving future trajectories of CH4 emission is a substantial increase in meat and dairy consumption in developing countries to be satisfied by growing animal populations. Unlike solid waste, current ruminant emissions among studies exhibit a

  6. A Conceptual Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor Design Using a Cruciform Solid Moderator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Hyung Kook; Bae, Kang Mok; Yoo, Jae Woon; Lee, Hyun Chul; Noh, Jae Man; Bae, Yoon Yong

    2006-01-15

    A Super Critical Water-Cooled Reactor(SCWR) concept proposed by Gen-IV has an advantage of a high thermal efficiency. However, there are some difficulties in neutronic core design for a SCWR due to lower moderator density resulting from the high operating temperature over the pseudo-critical temperature. In this report, the design concepts for the fuel assembly and the core for a SCWR were described as a feasibility study on the SCWR core design. HELIOS lattice code which will be used for group constants generation was verified for the application to the low coolant density condition of a SCWR. The TAF module for a thermal hydraulic feedback in MASTER was modified to consider high pressure and temperature of the supercritical coolant with single-phase fluid. A cruciform ZrH{sub 2} solid moderator was proposed for the SCWR fuel assembly design to compensate the lower coolant density. The axial zoning concept with three different enrichments for a fuel rod was used for the axial power shape control. Gadolinia burnable poison rods were used to reduce excess reactivity. Control rod system was grouped into 6 banks to control the excess reactivity of the core during normal operation. An orifice concept for each assembly was applied to control a coolant flow rate individually. As a result of the neutronic analysis for the equilibrium SCWR core, the maximum linear heat generation rete limit was satisfied and the maximum coolant temperature of the core outlet was {approx}590 .deg. C which is lower than 620 .deg. C of the maximum clad temperature limit.

  7. High-solid mesophilic methane fermentation of food waste with an emphasis on Iron, Cobalt, and Nickel requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Hong; Lang, Dong-Li; Li, Yu-You

    2012-01-01

    The effect of trace metals on the mesophilic methane fermentation of high-solid food waste was investigated using both batch and continuous experiments. The continuous experiment was conducted by using a CSTR-type reactor with three run. During the first run, the HRT of the reactor was stepwise decreased from 100 days to 30 days. From operation day 50, the reactor efficiency deteriorated due to the lack of trace metals. The batch experiment showed that iron, cobalt, and nickel combinations had a significant effect on food waste. According to the results of the batch experiment, a combination of iron, cobalt, and nickel was added into the CSTR reactor by two different methods at run II, and III. Based on experimental results and theoretical calculations, the most suitable values of Fe/COD, Co/COD, and Ni/COD in the substrate were identified as 200, 6.0, and 5.7 mg/kg COD, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Case study on prediction of remaining methane potential of landfilled municipal solid waste by statistical analysis of waste composition data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sel, İlker; Çakmakcı, Mehmet; Özkaya, Bestamin; Suphi Altan, H

    2016-10-01

    Main objective of this study was to develop a statistical model for easier and faster Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) prediction of landfilled municipal solid waste by analyzing waste composition of excavated samples from 12 sampling points and three waste depths representing different landfilling ages of closed and active sections of a sanitary landfill site located in İstanbul, Turkey. Results of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) were used as a decision support tool to evaluation and describe the waste composition variables. Four principal component were extracted describing 76% of data set variance. The most effective components were determined as PCB, PO, T, D, W, FM, moisture and BMP for the data set. Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) models were built by original compositional data and transformed data to determine differences. It was observed that even residual plots were better for transformed data the R(2) and Adjusted R(2) values were not improved significantly. The best preliminary BMP prediction models consisted of D, W, T and FM waste fractions for both versions of regressions. Adjusted R(2) values of the raw and transformed models were determined as 0.69 and 0.57, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The prospects for methane recovery from the anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste in the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coombs, J. (CPL Scientific Ltd., Newbury (GB))

    1990-01-01

    The availability, composition and energy output of municipal solid wastes (MSW) in the United Kingdom are considered. The sorting of MSW, the production of organic fractions and the technical aspects of their biological consolidation are examined. A description of anaerobic digestion activities and pilot and commercial scale plants in the United Kingdom, the European Communities and the USA is given. Finally,the potential for electricity generation from, and the co-products, by-products and cost of, the anaerobic digestion of MWS are summarized. It is concluded that, on the basis of the evidence available, there appears to be a good case for government support aimed at boosting the waste treatment industry's confidence in the anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of MSW in fabricated systems. A programme of field trials and related research is recommended. (UK).

  10. Regression models of ultimate methane yields of fruits and vegetable solid wastes, sorghum and napiergrass on chemical composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunaseelan, V.N. [PSG College of Arts and Science, Coimbatore (India). Department of Zoology

    2007-04-15

    Several fractions of fruits and vegetable solid wastes (FVSW), sorghum and napiergrass were analyzed for total solids (TS), volatile solids (VS), total organic carbon, total kjeldahl nitrogen, total soluble carbohydrate, extractable protein, acid-detergent fiber (ADF), lignin, cellulose and ash contents. Their ultimate methane yields (B{sub o}) were determined using the biochemical methane potential (BMP) assay. A series of simple and multiple regression models relating the B{sub o} to the various substrate constituents were generated and evaluated using computer statistical software, Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). The results of simple regression analyses revealed that, only weak relationship existed between the individual components such as carbohydrate, protein, ADF, lignin and cellulose versus B{sub o}. A regression of B{sub o} versus combination of two variables as a single independent variable such as carbohydrate/ADF and carbohydrate + protein/ADF also showed that the relationship is not strong. Thus it does not appear possible to relate the B{sub o} of FVSW, sorghum and napiergrass with single compositional characteristics. The results of multiple regression analyses showed promise and the relationship appeared to be good. When ADF and lignin/ADF were used as independent variables, the percentage of variation accounted for by the model is low for FVSW (r{sup 2}=0.665) and sorghum and napiergrass (r{sup 2}=0.746). Addition of nitrogen, ash and total soluble carbohydrate data to the model had a significantly higher effect on prediction of B{sub o} of these wastes with the r{sup 2} values ranging from 0.9 to 0.99. More than 90% of variation in B{sub o} of FVSW could be accounted for by the models when the variables carbohydrate, lignin, lignin/ADF, nitrogen and ash (r{sup 2}=0.904), carbohydrate, ADF, lignin/ADF, nitrogen and ash (r{sup 2}=0.90) and carbohydrate/ADF, lignin/ADF, lignin and ash (r{sup 2}=0.901) were used. All the models have

  11. Optimization of methane production in anaerobic co-digestion of poultry litter and wheat straw at different percentages of total solid and volatile solid using a developed response surface model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiacheng; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Poultry litter (PL) can be good feedstock for biogas production using anaerobic digestion. In this study, methane production from batch co-digestion of PL and wheat straw (WS) was investigated for two factors, i.e., total solid (2%, 5%, and 10%) and volatile solid (0, 25, and 50% of WS), constituting a 3 × 3 experimental design. The results showed that the maximum specific methane volume [197 mL (g VS)(‑1)] was achieved at 50% VS from WS at 5% TS level. It was estimated that the inhibitory threshold of free ammonia was about 289 mg L(--1), beyond which reduction of methanogenic activity by at least 54% was observed. The specific methane volume and COD removal can be expressed using two response surface models (R(2) = 0.9570 and 0.9704, respectively). Analysis of variance of the experimental results indicated that the C/N ratio was the most significant factor influencing the specific methane volume and COD removal in the co-digestion of these two materials.

  12. A robust NiO-Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.9 anode for direct-methane solid oxide fuel cell

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, Dong

    2015-07-02

    In order to directly use methane without a reforming process, NiO-Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.9 (NiO-SDC) nanocomposite anode are successfully synthesized via a one-pot, surfactant-assisted co-assembly approach for direct-methane solid oxide fuel cells. Both NiO with cubic phase and SDC with fluorite phase are obtained at 550 °C. Both NiO nanoparticles and SDC nanoparticles are highly monodispersed in size with nearly spherical shapes. Based on the as-synthesized NiO-SDC, two kinds of single cells with different micro/macro-porous structure are successfully fabricated. As a result, the cell performance was improved by 40%-45% with the new double-pore NiO-SDC anode relative to the cell performance with the conventional NiO-SDC anode due to a wider triple-phase-boundary (TPB) area. In addition, no significant degradation of the cell performance was observed after 60 hours, which means an increasing of long term stability. Therefore, the as-synthesized NiO-SDC nanocomposite is a promising anode for direct-methane solid oxide fuel cells.

  13. The Consistent Kinetics Porosity (CKP) Model: A Theory for the Mechanical Behavior of Moderately Porous Solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BRANNON,REBECCA M.

    2000-11-01

    A theory is developed for the response of moderately porous solids (no more than {approximately}20% void space) to high-strain-rate deformations. The model is consistent because each feature is incorporated in a manner that is mathematically compatible with the other features. Unlike simple p-{alpha} models, the onset of pore collapse depends on the amount of shear present. The user-specifiable yield function depends on pressure, effective shear stress, and porosity. The elastic part of the strain rate is linearly related to the stress rate, with nonlinear corrections from changes in the elastic moduli due to pore collapse. Plastically incompressible flow of the matrix material allows pore collapse and an associated macroscopic plastic volume change. The plastic strain rate due to pore collapse/growth is taken normal to the yield surface. If phase transformation and/or pore nucleation are simultaneously occurring, the inelastic strain rate will be non-normal to the yield surface. To permit hardening, the yield stress of matrix material is treated as an internal state variable. Changes in porosity and matrix yield stress naturally cause the yield surface to evolve. The stress, porosity, and all other state variables vary in a consistent manner so that the stress remains on the yield surface throughout any quasistatic interval of plastic deformation. Dynamic loading allows the stress to exceed the yield surface via an overstress ordinary differential equation that is solved in closed form for better numerical accuracy. The part of the stress rate that causes no plastic work (i.e-, the part that has a zero inner product with the stress deviator and the identity tensor) is given by the projection of the elastic stressrate orthogonal to the span of the stress deviator and the identity tensor.The model, which has been numerically implemented in MIG format, has been exercised under a wide array of extremal loading and unloading paths. As will be discussed in a companion

  14. Determinants and the Moderating Effect of Perceived Policy Effectiveness on Residents' Separation Intention for Rural Household Solid Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chuanhui; Zhao, Dingtao; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Lanfang

    2018-04-11

    Currently, villages "besieged with garbage" have become a serious problem in rural areas of China. Separation of rural residential solid waste (RRSW) is one of the main strategies for waste reduction. Although previous studies have analyzed the social and psychological motivations of residents' separation intention for municipal solid waste (MSW), little attention has been paid to the situation in rural areas. This paper investigates key factors influencing rural residents' separation intention, as well as analyzing the moderating effects of perceived policy effectiveness on the relationship between the determinants and the intention, using survey data of 538 rural residents in the province of Sichuan in China. The results show that all the proposed key factors influence the separation intention significantly. Furthermore, the policies were divided into two types and the moderating effects were tested for each type. The results show that the perceived effectiveness of both the inducement policy and the capacity building policy moderated the relationship between attitude and separation intention positively, while the perceived effectiveness of the inducement policy moderated the relationship between subjective norms and intention negatively. The findings provide insightful information for policymakers to design effective RRSW separation policies.

  15. Determinants and the Moderating Effect of Perceived Policy Effectiveness on Residents’ Separation Intention for Rural Household Solid Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dingtao; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Lanfang

    2018-01-01

    Currently, villages “besieged with garbage” have become a serious problem in rural areas of China. Separation of rural residential solid waste (RRSW) is one of the main strategies for waste reduction. Although previous studies have analyzed the social and psychological motivations of residents’ separation intention for municipal solid waste (MSW), little attention has been paid to the situation in rural areas. This paper investigates key factors influencing rural residents’ separation intention, as well as analyzing the moderating effects of perceived policy effectiveness on the relationship between the determinants and the intention, using survey data of 538 rural residents in the province of Sichuan in China. The results show that all the proposed key factors influence the separation intention significantly. Furthermore, the policies were divided into two types and the moderating effects were tested for each type. The results show that the perceived effectiveness of both the inducement policy and the capacity building policy moderated the relationship between attitude and separation intention positively, while the perceived effectiveness of the inducement policy moderated the relationship between subjective norms and intention negatively. The findings provide insightful information for policymakers to design effective RRSW separation policies. PMID:29641502

  16. Thermodynamic and structural study of two-dimensional melting within monolayers or rare gases or methane physically adsorbed upon the surface of layer-like solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tessier, Christine

    1983-01-01

    The 2D (two-dimensional) melting of monolayers of rare gases or methane physically adsorbed on the basal face of lamellar solids (graphite, boron nitride and lamellar halides) has been studied. Two different experimental measurements have been made: i) adsorption isotherms; ii) neutron diffraction spectra. The main part of this report deals with the 2D liquid-incommensurate solid transition within monolayers of rare gases or methane adsorbed on the basal face of lamellar halides. This transition is first order. It is observed only if certain conditions of dimensional incompatibility between the substrate and the absorbate are fulfilled. It is little affected by the structure of the underlying substrate. A number of thermodynamic parameters associated with it, are constants once properly scaled. These constants agree well with theoretical estimates for 6-12 Lennard Jones particles adsorbed on a smooth surface. For the monolayer of Xe adsorbed on graphite the temperature of the tricritical point above which melting becomes a continuous transition has been measured. The isotope effect associated with 2D melting has been investigated by comparing the behaviour of monolayers of CH 4 and CD 4 adsorbed on boron nitride. The vapor pressure of Xe has been determined in the temperature range 101-120 K. (author) [fr

  17. Chemical characteristics and methane potentials of source-separated and pre-treated organic municipal solid waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Trine Lund; Svärd, Å; Angelidaki, Irini

    2003-01-01

    A research project has investigated the biogas potential of pre-screened source-separated organic waste. Wastes from five Danish cities have been pre-treated by three methods: screw press; disc screen; and shredder and magnet. This paper outlines the sampling procedure used, the chemical...... composition of the wastes and the estimated methane potentials....

  18. Effects of solid-liquid separation on recovering residual methane and nitrogen from digested dairy cow manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaparaju, Prasad Laxmi-Narasimha; Rintala, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of optimizing methane and nitrogen recovery of samples obtained from farm biogas digester (35 degrees C) and post-storage tank (where digested material is stored for 9-12 months) was studied by separating the materials into different fractions using 2, 1, 0.5 and 0.25 mm sieves...

  19. Optimisation studies for a moderator on a pulsed neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picton, D.J.; Ross, D.K.; Taylor, A.D.

    1982-01-01

    Having reviewed general aspects of moderator design for pulsed neutron sources, calculations are presented on a number of aspects of moderator optimization. Results of time-independent calculations on metal hydride moderators and a detailed method of evaluating moderated pulse intensities and time distributions, are given. Using computer codes, neutron cross-sections have been calculated from vibrational frequency distributions and time-dependent moderator calculations performed by Monte Carlo methods. The choice of an ambient moderator material and the optimum configuration of heterogeneous poisoning are examined and evaluations of liquid-nitrogen-cooled moderators are presented. Conclusions are drawn concerning the relative merits of cooled and poisoned moderators and an evaluation presented of solid methane at 20 K as a moderator for the production of cold neutrons. (U.K.)

  20. Methane generation from waste materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samani, Zohrab A.; Hanson, Adrian T.; Macias-Corral, Maritza

    2010-03-23

    An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

  1. Suspended solids moderate the degradation and sorption of waste water-derived pharmaceuticals in estuarine waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminot, Yann; Fuster, Laura; Pardon, Patrick; Le Menach, Karyn; Budzinski, Hélène

    2018-01-15

    This study focuses on the fate of pharmaceuticals discharged into an estuarine environment, particularly into the Turbidity Maximum Zone (TMZ). Batch experiments were set up to investigate the factors regulating the degradation of 53 selected pharmaceuticals. Treated effluents from Bordeaux city (France) were mixed with water from the estuarine Garonne River during 4weeks under 6 characterized conditions in order to assess the influence of suspended particulates, sterilization, untreated wastewater input and dilution on the degradation kinetics. Of the 53 pharmaceuticals monitored, 43 were quantified at the initial time. Only 7 exhibited a persistent behavior (e.g. carbamazepine, meprobamate) while biotic degradation was shown to be the main attenuation process for 38 molecules (e.g. abacavir, ibuprofen highly degradable). Degradation was significantly enhanced by increasing concentrations of suspended solids. A persistence index based on the half-lives of the compounds has been calculated for each of the 43 pharmaceuticals to provide a practical estimate of their relative stability. The stability of pharmaceuticals in estuarine environments is likely to be highly variable and attenuated primarily by changes in suspended solid concentration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Measurement and fitting of pulse shapes of moderators at IPNS [Intense Pulsed Neutron Source]: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bywater, R.L. Jr.; Williams, R.E.; Carpenter, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    We present a progress report on measurements and fitting of pulse shapes for neutrons emerging from one solid and two liquid methane moderators in IPNS. A time-focused crystal spectrometer arrangement was used with a cooled Ge monochromator. Data analysis of one of the liquid methane moderators has shown the need for some generalization of the Ikeda-Carpenter function that worked well for fitting pulse shapes of polyethylene moderators. We describe attempts to model physical insight into the wavelength dependence of function parameters. 5 refs., 7 figs

  3. Solid oxide fuel cell technology coupled with methane dry reforming: A viable option for high efficiency plant with reduced CO2 emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barelli, L.; Ottaviano, A.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays the control of greenhouse gas is probably the most challenging environmental policy issue. Since CO 2 is considered the major greenhouse gas (GHG) that contributes to the global warming, enforcing technological strategies aiming to avoid or reuse CO 2 emissions becomes crucial, in order to mitigate GHG environmental impact. Currently, solutions conventionally adopted to this purpose are carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies. In this context, instead, the followed strategy aims to further improvements in energetic conversion efficiency with related reduced specific CO 2 emissions (per produced kWh e ). Therefore, with particular reference to the electric power generation, this paper proposes an innovative energy conversion system, based on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), characterized by higher efficiency and reduced CO 2 emission factor respect to an analogous conventional energy plant. In particular, the innovative solution consists of combining SOFC to methane dry reforming technology, while the conventional system refers to steam methane reforming-SOFC coupling. The innovative system performance up to 65% electric efficiency as cited in the paper, was validated through simulations carried out in Aspen Plus environment. - Highlights: • An innovative high efficiency plant with low CO 2 emissions is presented. • The new solution combined SOFC to methane dry reforming technology (CDR–SOFC). • A comparison between CDR–SOFC and SMR–SOFC system was carried out in Aspen Plus. • CDR–SOFC efficiency is greater of 6.4% percentage points respect to SMR–SOFC. • A CO 2 emission factor reduction of about 10% was achieved by CDR–SOFC plant

  4. Internal reforming of methane in a mono-block-layer build solid oxide fuel cell with an embedding porous pipe: Numerical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramírez-Minguela, J.J.; Mendoza-Miranda, J.M.; Muñoz-Carpio, V.D.; Rangel-Hernández, V.H.; Pérez-García, V.; Rodríguez-Muñoz, J.L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A MOLB-type SOFC with different biogas compositions is modeled. • Internal reforming of methane and water gas shift in the anode side are considered. • Changes in the SOFC according to the phenomena inside of them are assessed. • A new configuration for the MOLB-type geometry is proposed. • Temperature gradients effects in the new configuration are significant. - Abstract: A mono-block-layer build type (MOLB-type) geometry, composed with trapezoidal cross-section channels for fuel and air, of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), is modeled in this study using a three dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The model is used to obtain the performance of the SOFC considering internal reforming of methane in the anode side with different biogas compositions. From the results obtained, a new configuration for the MOLB-type geometry is proposed. The model takes into account the mass transfer, heat transfer, species transport, chemical and electrochemical reactions, detailed comparisons of species concentration, temperature and electric fields inside the cell analyzed in the present study. Results show that the biogas from local sludge has the lower temperature gradient and more homogeneous current density distributions along of the fuel cell, on the other hand, with the new configuration proposed for the MOLB-type geometry the temperature distribution inside of the fuel cell has lower temperature gradients

  5. Experiences in the emptying of waste silos containing solid nuclear waste from graphite- moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, S.; Schwarz, T.

    2003-01-01

    Before reactor sites can be handed over for ultimate decommissioning, at some sites silos containing waste from operations need to be emptied. The form and physical condition of the waste demands sophisticated retrieval technologies taking into account the onsite situation in terms of infrastructure and silo geometry. Furthermore, in the case of graphite moderated reactors, this waste usually includes several tonnes of graphite waste requiring special HVAC and dust handling measures. RWE NUKEM Group has already performed several contracts dealing with such emptying tasks. Of particular interest for the upcoming decommissioning projects in France might be the activities at Vandellos, Spain and Trawsfynnyd, UK. Retrieval System for Vandellos NPP is discussed. Following an international competitive tender exercise, RWE NUKEM won the contract to provide a turn-key retrieval system. This involved the design, manufacture and installation of a system built around the modules of a 200 kg capacity version of the ARTISAN manipulator system. The ARTISAN 200 manipulator, with remote slave arm detach facility, was deployed on a telescopic mast inserted into the silos through the roof penetrations. The manipulator deployed a range of tools to gather the waste and load it into a transfer basket, deployed through an adjacent penetration. After commissioning, the system cleared the vaults in less than the scheduled period with no failures. At the Trawsfynnyd Magnox plants two types of intermediate level waste (ILW) accumulated on site; namely Miscellaneous Activated Components (MAC) and Fuel Element Debris (FED). MAC is predominantly components that have been activated by the reactor core and then discharged. FED mainly consists of fuel cladding produced when fuel elements were prepared for dispatch to the reprocessing facility. RWE NUKEM Ltd. was awarded a contract to design, supply, commission and operate equipment to retrieve, pack and immobilize the two waste streams. Major

  6. Advanced manufacturing of intermediate temperature, direct methane oxidation membrane electrode assemblies for durable solid oxide fuel cell, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ITN proposes to create an innovative anode supported membrane electrode assembly (MEA) for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) that is capable of long-term operation at...

  7. Methane adsorption on activated carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perl, Andras; Koopman, Folkert; Jansen, Peter; de Rooij, Marietta; van Gemert, Wim

    2014-01-01

    Methane storage in adsorbed form is a promising way to effectively and safely store fuel for vehicular transportation or for any other potential application. In a solid adsorbent, nanometer wide pores can trap methane by van der Waals forces as high density fluid at low pressure and room

  8. Thermodynamic analysis of carbon formation in solid oxide fuel cells with a direct internal reformer fueled by ethanol, methanol, and methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laosiripojana, N.; Assabumrungrat, S.; Pavarajarn, V.; Sangtongkitcharoen, W.; Tangjitmatee, A.; Praserthdam, P.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' This paper concerns a detailed thermodynamic analysis of carbon formation for a Direct Internal Reformer (DIR) Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). The modeling of DIR-SOFC fueled by ethanol, methanol, and methane were compared. Two types of fuel cell electrolytes, i.e. oxygen-conducting and hydrogen-conducting, are considered. Equilibrium calculations were performed to find the ranges of inlet steam/fuel ratio where carbon formation is thermodynamically unfavorable in the temperature range of 500-1200 K. It was found that the key parameters determining the boundary of carbon formation are temperature, type of solid electrolyte and extent of the electrochemical reaction of hydrogen. The minimum requirements of H2O/fuel ratio for each type of fuel in which the carbon formation is thermodynamically unfavored were compared. At the same operating conditions, DIR-SOFC fueled by ethanol required the lowest inlet H2O/fuel ratio in which the carbon formation is thermodynamically unfavored. The requirement decreased with increasing temperature for all three fuels. Comparison between two types of the electrolytes reveals that the hydrogen-conducting electrolyte is impractical for use, regarding to the tendency of carbon formation. This is due mainly to the water formed by the electrochemical reaction at the electrodes. (author)

  9. Cold moderators at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, A. T.

    1997-09-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) cold moderators were not an 'Oak Ridge first', but would have been the largest both physically and in terms of cold neutron flux. Two cold moderators were planned each 410 mm in diameter and containing about 30L of liquid deuterium. They were to be completely independent of each other. A modular system design was used to provide greater reliability and serviceability. When the ANS was terminated, upgrading of the resident High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was examined and an initial study was made into the feasibility of adding a cold source. Because the ANS design was modular, it was possible to use many identical design features. Sub-cooled liquid at 4 bar abs was initially chosen for the HFIR design concept, but this was subsequently changed to 15 bar abs to operate above the critical pressure. As in the ANS, the hydrogen will operate at a constant pressure throughout the temperature range and a completely closed loop with secondary containment was adopted. The heat load of 2 kW made the heat flux comparable with that of the ANS. Subsequent studies into the construction of cryogenic moderators for the proposed new Synchrotron Neutron source indicated that again many of the same design concepts could be used. By connecting the two cold sources together in series, the total heat load of 2 kW is very close to that of the HFIR allowing a very similar supercritical hydrogen system to be configured. The two hydrogen moderators of the SNS provide a comparable heat load to the HFIR moderator. It is subsequently planned to connect the two in series and operate from a single cold loop system, once again using supercritical hydrogen. The spallation source also provided an opportunity to re-examine a cold pellet solid methane moderator operating at 20K.

  10. Highly cost-effective and sulfur/coking resistant VOx-grafted TiO2 nanoparticles as an efficient anode catalyst for direct conversion of dry sour methane in solid oxide fuel cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, A.; Yan, N.; Vincent, A.; Singh, A.; Hill, J.M.; Chuang, K. T.; Luo, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we show that grafted metal oxide can be a highly cost-effective and active anode for solid oxide fuel cells for sour methane conversion. The developed electro-catalyst was composed of vanadium oxide grafted TiO2 nanoparticles (VOx/TiO2) infiltrated into a porous La0.4Sr0.5Ba0.1TiO3+δ

  11. Identification of a Methane Oxidation Intermediate on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode Surfaces with Fourier Transform Infrared Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomfret, Michael B; Steinhurst, Daniel A; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C

    2013-04-18

    Fuel interactions on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes are studied with in situ Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy (FTIRES). SOFCs are operated at 800 °C with CH4 as a representative hydrocarbon fuel. IR signatures of gas-phase oxidation products, CO2(g) and CO(g), are observed while cells are under load. A broad feature at 2295 cm(-1) is assigned to CO2 adsorbed on Ni as a CH4 oxidation intermediate during cell operation and while carbon deposits are electrochemically oxidized after CH4 operation. Electrochemical control provides confirmation of the assignment of adsorbed CO2. FTIRES has been demonstrated as a viable technique for the identification of fuel oxidation intermediates and products in working SOFCs, allowing for the elucidation of the mechanisms of fuel chemistry.

  12. Anaerobic digestion of solid waste in RAS: Effect of reactor type on the biochemical acidogenic potential (BAP) and assessment of the biochemical methane potential (BMP) by a batch assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Karin Isabel; Letelier-Gordo, Carlos Octavio; Lund, Ivar

    2015-01-01

    the biochemical acidogenic potential of solid waste from juvenile rainbow trout was evaluated by measuring the yield of volatile fatty acids (VFA) during anaerobic digestion by batch or fed-batch reactor operation at hydrolysis time (HT) / hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 1, 5, or 10 days (and for batch......Anaerobic digestion is a way to utilize the potential energy contained in solid waste produced in recirculating aquaculture systems (RASs), either by providing acidogenic products for driving heterotrophic denitrification on site or by directly producing combustive methane. In this study...

  13. INFRARED AND ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRA OF METHANE DILUTED IN SOLID NITROGEN AND IRRADIATED WITH ELECTRONS DURING DEPOSITION AT VARIOUS TEMPERATURES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, Chih-Hao; Chen, Sian-Cong; Liu, Meng-Chen; Huang, Tzu-Ping; Wu, Yu-Jong

    2016-01-01

    We recorded the infrared and ultraviolet absorption spectra of CH 4 :N 2 matrix samples that underwent electron bombardment during deposition in the temperature range of 10–44 K. In contrast to a previous experiment on the IR spectroscopy of electron-bombarded icy samples, methyl and azide radicals became the main products upon electron bombardment during deposition; furthermore, reduced production of nitrile species was observed for deposition at 10 and 20 K. On the other hand, for deposition above 33 K, the observed bands of the radical species (such as methyl and azide) decreased, and bands of large nitriles appeared. This observation may suggest that radical species easily diffuse and recombine to form more complex molecules in solid nitrogen at higher temperatures. Further measurements of similar samples at 10–33 K in the UV region revealed the intense band of azide radicals at 272.5 nm and weak, broad, overlapping features of methyl and azide radicals in the 225–197 nm region. For deposition at 44 K, only a broad feature centered at 219.4 nm was observed, and the possible carriers of nitrile species were proposed based on the corresponding IR spectrum and theoretical predictions of excitation energy. This band is similar to the observed absorption feature of Pluto’s surface recorded by the Hubble telescope in terms of both band position and bandwidth. Our findings therefore further support the suggestion that complex nitrile species may exist on the surface of Pluto.

  14. Nuclear data generation for cryogenic moderators and high temperature moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petriw, Sergio

    2007-01-01

    The commonly used processing codes for nuclear data only allow the generation of cross section data for a limited number of materials and physical conditions.At present, one of the most used computer codes for the generation of neutron cross sections is N J O Y, which is based on a phonon expansion of the scattering function starting from the frequency spectrum.Therefore, the information related to the system's density of states is crucial to produce the required data of interest. In this work the formalism of the Synthetic Model for Molecular Solids (S M M S) was implemented, which is in turn based on the Synthetic Frequency Spectrum (S F S) concept.The synthetic spectrum is central in the present work, and it is built from simple, relevant parameters of the moderator, thus conforming an alternative tool when no information on the actual frequency spectrum of the moderator material is available.S F S 's for several material of interest where produced in this work, for both cryogenic and high temperature moderators.We studied some materials of special interest, like solid methane, ice, methyl clathrate and two which are of special interest in the nuclear industry: graphite and beryllium.The libraries generated in the present work for the materials considered, in spite of their synthetic origin, are able to produce results that are even in better agreement with available information [es

  15. Energy upcycle in anaerobic treatment: Ammonium, methane, and carbon dioxide reformation through a hybrid electrodeionization–solid oxide fuel cell system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Linji; Dong, Feifei; Zhuang, Huichuan; He, Wei; Ni, Meng; Feng, Shien-Ping; Lee, Po-Heng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • EDI-SOFC integrated with AD is introduced for energy extraction from C and N pollutants. • NH_4"+ dissociation to NH_3 and H_2 in EDI avoids C deposition in SOFC. • EDI exhibits nutrient and heavy metal recovery. • SOFCs display its adaptability with NH_3, H_2, and biogas. • Energy balance ratio boosts from 1.11 to 1.75 by EDI-SOFC in a HK landfill plant. - Abstract: To create possibilities for a more sustainable wastewater management, a novel system consisting of electrodeionization (EDI) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is proposed in this study. This system is integrated with anaerobic digestion/landfills to capture energy from carbonaceous and nitrogenous pollutants. Both EDI and SOFCs showed good performances. EDI removed 95% and 76% ammonium-nitrogen (NH_4"+-N) from diluted (0.025 M) to concentrated (0.5 M) synthetic ammonium wastewaters, respectively, accompanied by hydrogen production. SOFCs converted the recovered fuels, biogas mixtures of methane and carbon dioxide, to electricity. Under the optimal conditions of EDI (3.0 V applied voltage and 7.5 mm internal electrode distance (IED), and SOFCs (750 °C operating temperature), the system achieved 60% higher net energy output as compared to conventional systems. The estimated energy benefit of this proposed system showed that the net energy balance ratio is enhanced from 1.11 (existing system) to 1.75 (this study) for a local Hong Kong active landfill facility with 10.0 g L"−"1 chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 0.21 M NH_4"+-N. Additionally, an average of 80% inorganic ions (heavy metals and nutrient elements) can be removed from the raw landfill leachate by EDI cell. The results are successful demonstrations of the upgrades of anaerobic processes for energy extraction from wastewater streams.

  16. Design of a cold-neutron source for the Bariloche LINAC with solid mesitylene as moderator material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Lourdes; Granada, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of calculations performed with the code MCNP-4C relative to the neutron-field behaviour within the moderator for the Bariloche-LINAC cold-neutron source, using mesitylene at 89 K as moderating material. Throughout the design calculations we used preliminary nuclear-data libraries for that material that were previously generated and partially validated. The optimum dimensions for a slab and a cylindrical moderator were obtained, with and without a premoderator, from the point of view of neutron production and time-width of the neutron pulse

  17. A combined H2/CH4 cold moderator for a short pulsed neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, K.D.; Lucas, A.T.

    1989-01-01

    Both the ISIS (Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory) spallation source and the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) were designed to produce neutrons as a result of an 800-MeV proton beam being incident on a target. Both systems are intended to accept beam intensities up to 200 μA. Cryogenic moderators of liquid hydrogen and methane are either in use or are planned for service at both facilities. Very low temperature methane would be an ideal moderating material as it has a high hydrogen density and many low frequency modes, which facilitate thermalization. Such moderators are in service at two major world facilities, KEK (Japan) and Argonne National Laboratory (USA). Unfortunately, solid methane has very low thermal conductivity and is subject to radiation damage making a moderator of this type impractical for use in high-intensity beam, such as indicated above. This report outlines a possible alternative using small spheres of solid methane in a matrix of supercritical hydrogen at 25 K. 4 figs

  18. Catalytic aromatization of methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, James J; Hutchings, Graham

    2014-02-07

    Recent developments in natural gas production technology have led to lower prices for methane and renewed interest in converting methane to higher value products. Processes such as those based on syngas from methane reforming are being investigated. Another option is methane aromatization, which produces benzene and hydrogen: 6CH4(g) → C6H6(g) + 9H2(g) ΔG°(r) = +433 kJ mol(-1) ΔH°(r) = +531 kJ mol(-1). Thermodynamic calculations for this reaction show that benzene formation is insignificant below ∼600 °C, and that the formation of solid carbon [C(s)] is thermodynamically favored at temperatures above ∼300 °C. Benzene formation is insignificant at all temperatures up to 1000 °C when C(s) is included in the calculation of equilibrium composition. Interestingly, the thermodynamic limitation on benzene formation can be minimized by the addition of alkanes/alkenes to the methane feed. By far the most widely studied catalysts for this reaction are Mo/HZSM-5 and Mo/MCM-22. Benzene selectivities are generally between 60 and 80% at methane conversions of ∼10%, corresponding to net benzene yields of less than 10%. Major byproducts include lower molecular weight hydrocarbons and higher molecular weight substituted aromatics. However, carbon formation is inevitable, but the experimental findings show this can be kinetically limited by the use of H2 or oxidants in the feed, including CO2 or steam. A number of reactor configurations involving regeneration of the carbon-containing catalyst have been developed with the goal of minimizing the cost of regeneration of the catalyst once deactivated by carbon deposition. In this tutorial review we discuss the thermodynamics of this process, the catalysts used and the potential reactor configurations that can be applied.

  19. An Effective Method to Detect Volatile Intermediates Generated in the Bioconversion of Coal to Methane by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry after In-Situ Extraction Using Headspace Solid-Phase Micro-Extraction under Strict Anaerobic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianmin; Wang, Baoyu; Tai, Chao; Wu, Li; Zhao, Han; Guan, Jiadong; Chen, Linyong

    2016-01-01

    Bioconversion of coal to methane has gained increased attention in recent decades because of its economic and environmental advantages. However, the mechanism of this process is difficult to study in depth, partly because of difficulties associated with the analysis of intermediates generated in coal bioconversion. In this investigation, we report on an effective method to analyze volatile intermediates generated in the bioconversion of coal under strict anaerobic conditions. We conduct in-situ extraction of intermediates using headspace solid-phase micro-extraction followed by detection by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Bioconversion simulation equipment was modified and combined with a solid-phase micro-extraction device. In-situ extraction could be achieved by using the combined units, to avoid a breakdown in anaerobic conditions and to maintain the experiment continuity. More than 30 intermediates were identified qualitatively in the conversion process, and the variation in trends of some typical intermediates has been discussed. Volatile organic acids (C2-C7) were chosen for a quantitative study of the intermediates because of their importance during coal bioconversion to methane. Fiber coating, extraction time, and solution acidity were optimized in the solid-phase micro-extraction procedure. The pressure was enhanced during the bioconversion process to investigate the influence of headspace pressure on analyte extraction. The detection limits of the method ranged from 0.0006 to 0.02 mmol/L for the volatile organic acids and the relative standard deviations were between 4.6% and 11.5%. The volatile organic acids (C2-C7) generated in the bioconversion process were 0.01-1.15 mmol/L with a recovery range from 80% to 105%. The developed method is useful for further in-depth research on the bioconversion of coal to methane.

  20. Investigation of sulfur interactions on a conventional nickel-based solid oxide fuel cell anode during methane steam and dry reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Whitney S.

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are an attractive energy source because they do not have undesirable emissions, are scalable, and are feedstock flexible, which means they can operate using a variety of fuel mixtures containing H2 and hydrocarbons. In terms of fuel flexibility, most potential fuel sources contain sulfur species, which severely poison the nickel-based anode. The main objective of this thesis is to systematically evaluate sulfur interactions on a conventional Ni/YSZ anode and compare sulfur poisoning during methane steam and dry reforming (SMR and DMR) to a conventional catalyst (Sud Chemie, Ni/K2O-CaAl2O4). Reforming experiments (SMR and DMR) were carried out in a packed bed reactor (PBR), and it was demonstrated that Ni/YSZ is much more sensitive to sulfur poisoning than Ni/K2O-CaAl2O4 as evidenced by the decline in activity to zero in under an hour for both SMR and DMR. Adsorption and desorption of H2S and SO2 on both catalysts was evaluated, and despite the low amount of accessible nickel on Ni/YSZ (14 times lower than Ni/K2O-CaAl2O4), it adsorbs 20 times more H2S and 50 times more SO2 than Ni/K 2O-CaAl2O4. A one-dimensional, steady state PBR model (DetchemPBED) was used to evaluate SMR and DMR under poisoning conditions using the Deutschmann mechanism and a recently published sulfur sub-mechanism. To fit the observed deactivation in the presence of 1 ppm H2S, the adsorption/desorption equilibrium constant was increased by a factor 16,000 for Ni/YSZ and 96 for Ni/K2O-CaAl2O4. A tubular SAE reactor was designed and fabricated for evaluating DMR in a reactor that mimics an SOFC. Evidence of hydrogen diffusion through a supposedly impermeable layer indicated that the tubular SAE reactor has a major flaw in which gases diffuse to unintended parts of the tube. It was also found to be extremely susceptible to coking which leads to cell failure even in operating regions that mimic real biogas. These problems made it impossible to validate the tubular SAE

  1. Study on neutronics performance of flower shape advanced supercritical water cooled fast reactor with different solid moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Tao; Li Zhifeng; Xie Jinsen; Peng Honghua

    2015-01-01

    The supercritical water cooled fast reactors worked at such harsh condition with high temperature and high pressure, huge hydrogen balance pressure and thermal shock can result in a great loss of hydrogen. The released hydrogen would be out of control under accident situations. K_e_f_f, conversion ratio, moderator temperature effect, Doppler effect and void effect of different material such as ZrH_1_._7, Bp, BeO, C and SiC are discussed. BeO and SiC hold better integrated performance among these materials. Besides, moderators have less effect on the Doppler effect of fuel. (authors)

  2. Methane reacts with heteropolyacids chemisorbed on silica to produce acetic acid under soft conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Miao

    2013-01-16

    Selective functionalization of methane at moderate temperature is of crucial economic, environmental, and scientific importance. Here, we report that methane reacts with heteropolyacids (HPAs) chemisorbed on silica to produce acetic acid under soft conditions. Specially, when chemisorbed on silica, H 4SiW12O40, H3PW12O 40, H4SiMo12O40, and H 3PMo12O40 activate the primary C-H bond of methane at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. With these systems, acetic acid is produced directly from methane, in a single step, in the absence of Pd and without adding CO. Extensive surface characterization by solid-state NMR spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggests that C-H activation of methane is triggered by the protons in the HPA-silica interface with concerted reduction of the Keggin cage, leading to water formation and hydration of the interface. This is the simplest and mildest way reported to date to functionalize methane. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  3. Direct Aromaization of Methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Marcelin

    1997-01-15

    The thermal decomposition of methane offers significant potential as a means of producing higher unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons when the extent of reaction is limited. Work in the literature previous to this project had shown that cooling the product and reacting gases as the reaction proceeds would significantly reduce or eliminate the formation of solid carbon or heavier (Clo+) materials. This project studied the effect and optimization of the quenching process as a means of increasing the amount of value added products during the pyrolysis of methane. A reactor was designed to rapidly quench the free-radical combustion reaction so as to maximize the yield of aromatics. The use of free-radical generators and catalysts were studied as a means of lowering the reaction temperature. A lower reaction temperature would have the benefits of more rapid quenching as well as a more feasible commercial process due to savings realized in energy and material of construction costs. It was the goal of the project to identify promising routes from methane to higher hydrocarbons based on the pyrolysis of methane.

  4. Experimental study on a cold neutron source of solid methylbenzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utsuro, M; Sugimoto, M; Fujita, Y [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    1975-10-01

    An experimental study to produce cold neutrons with low temperature solid mesitylene as cold moderator in liquid helium and liquid nitrogen cryostats is reported. Measured cold neutron spectra by using an electron linac and time-of-flight method shows that this material is a better cold moderator than light water ice, giving the cold neutron output not so much inferior to that of solid methane in the temperature range above about 20 K and in the neutron energy region above about 1 MeV.

  5. Anaerobic co-digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste with FOG waste from a sewage treatment plant: Recovering a wasted methane potential and enhancing the biogas yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin-Gonzalez, L.; Colturato, L.F.; Font, X.; Vicent, T.

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is applied widely to treat the source collected organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (SC-OFMSW). Lipid-rich wastes are a valuable substrate for anaerobic digestion due to their high theoretical methane potential. Nevertheless, although fat, oil and grease waste from sewage treatment plants (STP-FOGW) are commonly disposed of in landfill, European legislation is aimed at encouraging more effective forms of treatment. Co-digestion of the above wastes may enhance valorisation of STP-FOGW and lead to a higher biogas yield throughout the anaerobic digestion process. In the present study, STP-FOGW was evaluated as a co-substrate in wet anaerobic digestion of SC-OFMSW under mesophilic conditions (37 o C). Batch experiments carried out at different co-digestion ratios showed an improvement in methane production related to STP-FOGW addition. A 1:7 (VS/VS) STP-FOGW:SC-OFMSW feed ratio was selected for use in performing further lab-scale studies in a 5 L continuous reactor. Biogas yield increased from 0.38 ± 0.02 L g VS feed -1 to 0.55 ± 0.05 L g VS feed -1 as a result of adding STP-FOGW to reactor feed. Both VS reduction values and biogas methane content were maintained and inhibition produced by long chain fatty acid (LCFA) accumulation was not observed. Recovery of a currently wasted methane potential from STP-FOGW was achieved in a co-digestion process with SC-OFMSW.

  6. Grooved cold moderator tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, K.; Kiyanagi, Y.; Iwasa, H.; Watanabe, N.; Ikeda, S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Ishikawa, Y.

    1983-01-01

    We performed some grooved cold moderator experiments for methane at 20 K by using the Hokkaido University linac to obtain information to be used in the planning of the KENS-I' project. Cold neutron gains, spatial distribution of emitted beams and time distribution of the neutrons in the grooved cold moderator were measured. Furthermore, we assessed the effects of the grooved cold moderator on the performances of the spectrometers presently installed at the KENS-I cold source. We concluded that the grooved cold moderator benefited appreciably the performances of the spectrometers

  7. Agricultural methanization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    After having briefly outlined the interest of the development of methanization of agricultural by-products in the context of struggle against climate change, and noticed that France is only now developing this sector as some other countries already did, this publication describes the methanization process also called anaerobic digestion, which produces a digestate and biogas. Advantages for the agriculture sector are outlined, as well as drawbacks and recommendations (required specific technical abilities, an attention to the use of energetic crops, an improved economic balance which still depends on public subsidies, competition in the field of waste processing). Actions undertaken by the ADEME are briefly evoked

  8. Contribution to the use of a solid moderator gas reactor, for naval propulsion; Contribution a l'etude d'un reacteur a gaz, a moderateur solide, pour propulsion navale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pheline, J.; Gautier, A.

    1960-01-04

    In this contribution, the authors discuss works performed in France for the development of nuclear propulsion in merchant ships, notably for an oil tanker of 50.000 tons with 17 knot speed, i.e. a 20.000 Hp engine with an energy produced by a 60 MW gas reactor with a solid moderator and comprising 400 channels loaded with uranium oxide enriched ay 2.8 per cent and sheathed with a refractory alloy. The authors discuss the possible materials for the moderator, the heat transfer medium, the sheath, the fuel and the structures, and report technological studies (mechanical tests, irradiation tests) performed to investigate material properties and their behaviour in operation conditions. They report tests performed to investigate core structure characteristics with respect to neutrons. They finally briefly present a prototype.

  9. Effects of co-digestion of cucumber residues to corn stover and pig manure ratio on methane production in solid state anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaya; Li, Guoxue; Chi, Menghao; Sun, Yanbo; Zhang, Jiaxing; Jiang, Shixu; Cui, Zongjun

    2018-02-01

    This study investigated the performance of co-digesting cucumber residues, corn stover, and pig manure at different ratios. Microbial community structure was analyzed to elucidate functional microorganism contributing to methane production during co-digestion. Results show that mixing cucumber residues with pig manure and corn stover could significantly improved methane yields 1.27-3.46 times higher than mono-feedstock. The methane yields decreased with the cucumber residues increasing when the pig manure ratio was fixed at 4 and 3, and was opposite at ratio 5. The optimal mixture ratio was T2 with the highest methane yield (305.4 mL/g VS) and co-digestion performance index (1.97). The main microbiological community in T2 was bacteria of Firmicutes (44.6%), Bacteroidetes (32.5%), Synergistetes (3.8%) and archaea of Methanosaeta (37.1%), Methanospirillum (18.2%). The mixture ratios changed the microbial community structures. The adding proportion of cucumber residues changed the community composition of the archaea, especially the proportion of Methanosaeta. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Toward highly efficient in situ dry reforming of H2S contaminated methane in solid oxide fuel cells via incorporating a coke/sulfur resistant bimetallic catalyst layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hua, B.; Yan, N.; Li, M.; Sun, Y.-F.; Chen, J.; Zhang, Y.-Q.; Li, J.; Etsell, T.; Sarkar, P.; Luo, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    The escalating global warming effects are a reason for immediate measures to reduce the level of greenhouse gases. In this context, dry reforming of methane (DRM), an old yet both scientifically and industrially important process, is making a comeback in contributing to the utilization of CO2.

  11. Landfill Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfill methane (CH4) accounts for approximately 1.3% (0.6 Gt) of global anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions relative to total emissions from all sectors of about 49 Gt CO2-eq yr-1. For countries with a history of controlled landfilling, landfills can be one of the larger national sources of ant...

  12. Spallation neutron source moderator design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, L.A.; Barnes, J.M.; Gabriel, T.A.; Johnson, J.O.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes various aspects of the spallation neutron source (SNS) moderator design. Included are the effects of varying the moderator location, interaction effects between moderators, and the impact on neutron output when various reflector materials are used. Also included is a study of the neutron output from composite moderators, where it is found that a combination of liquid H 2 O and liquid H 2 can produce a spectrum very similar to liquid methane (L-CH 4 ). (orig.)

  13. Methane emissions from MBT landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyer, K.-U., E-mail: heyer@ifas-hamburg.de; Hupe, K.; Stegmann, R.

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Compilation of methane generation potential of mechanical biological treated (MBT) municipal solid waste. • Impacts and kinetics of landfill gas production of MBT landfills, approach with differentiated half-lives. • Methane oxidation in the waste itself and in soil covers. • Estimation of methane emissions from MBT landfills in Germany. - Abstract: Within the scope of an investigation for the German Federal Environment Agency (“Umweltbundesamt”), the basics for the estimation of the methane emissions from the landfilling of mechanically and biologically treated waste (MBT) were developed. For this purpose, topical research including monitoring results regarding the gas balance at MBT landfills was evaluated. For waste treated to the required German standards, a methane formation potential of approximately 18–24 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/t of total dry solids may be expected. Monitoring results from MBT landfills show that a three-phase model with differentiated half-lives describes the degradation kinetics in the best way. This is due to the fact that during the first years of disposal, the anaerobic degradation processes still proceed relatively intensively. In addition in the long term (decades), a residual gas production at a low level is still to be expected. Most of the soils used in recultivation layer systems at German landfills show a relatively high methane oxidation capacity up to 5 l CH{sub 4}/(m{sup 2} h). However, measurements at MBT disposal sites indicate that the majority of the landfill gas (in particular at non-covered areas), leaves the landfill body via preferred gas emission zones (hot spots) without significant methane oxidation. Therefore, rather low methane oxidation factors are recommended for open and temporarily covered MBT landfills. Higher methane oxidation rates can be achieved when the soil/recultivation layer is adequately designed and operated. Based on the elaborated default values, the First Order Decay (FOD

  14. Dry anaerobic co-digestion of food waste and cattle manure: Impact of total solids, substrate ratio and thermal pre treatment on methane yield and quality of biomanure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arelli, Vijayalakshmi; Begum, Sameena; Anupoju, Gangagni Rao; Kuruti, Kranti; S, Shailaja

    2018-04-01

    The objective of the present study is to assess the impact of TS concentration, substrate mixing ratio (co digestion) and thermal pretreatment on biogas production, methane yield, VS reduction (%) and quality of biomanure through dry anaerobic digestion (DAD) of food waste (FW) and cattle manure (CM). Results divulged that the optimum methane yield and biomanure of 0.18 and 0.21 m 3 CH 4 /(kg VS reduced) and 3.15 and 2.8 kg/kg waste was obtained from FW at TS of 25% and 30% at an HRT of 41 and 31 days respectively whereas it was 0.32 and 0.43 m 3 CH 4 /(kg VS reduced) and 2.2 and 1.15 kg/kg waste from pretreated FW at an HRT of 16 and 20 days correspondingly. Improvement of methane from 62 to 81% was obtained due to thermal pretreatment. The highest nutrient recovery in terms of N, P, K was found to be 5.14, 2.6 and 3.2 respectively. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Efficient Cryosolid Positron Moderators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    table layout Figure 21 shows the integration of the IR spectroscopy optics with the positron Moderation and Annihilation vacuum chambers on the...Characterization of Cryogenic Moderators The application of Matrix Isolation Spectroscopy (MIS) to characterizing cryogenic solid positron ...Matrix Isolation Spectroscopy capability into our Positron Moderation apparatus, which enables spectroscopic characterization of the cryogenic

  16. Chemical pretreatment of lignocellulosic agroindustrial waste for methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellera, Frantseska-Maria; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of different chemical pretreatments on the solubilization and the degradability of different solid agroindustrial waste, namely winery waste, cotton gin waste, olive pomace and juice industry waste. Eight different reagents were investigated, i.e. sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3 ), sodium chloride (NaCl), citric acid (H 3 Cit), acetic acid (AcOH), hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), acetone (Me 2 CO) and ethanol (EtOH), under three condition sets resulting in treatments of varying intensity, depending on process duration, reagent dosage and temperature. Results indicated that chemical pretreatment under more severe conditions is more effective on the solubilization of lignocellulosic substrates, such as those of the present study and among the investigated reagents, H 3 Cit, H 2 O 2 and EtOH appeared to be the most effective to this regard. At the same time, although chemical pretreatment in general did not improve the methane potential of the substrates, moderate to high severity conditions were found to generally be the most satisfactory in terms of methane production from pretreated materials. In fact, moderate severity treatments using EtOH for winery waste, H 3 Cit for olive pomace and H 2 O 2 for juice industry waste and a high severity treatment with EtOH for cotton gin waste, resulted in maximum specific methane yield values. Ultimately, the impact of pretreatment parameters on the different substrates seems to be dependent on their characteristics, in combination with the specific mode of action of each reagent. The overall energy balance of such a system could probably be improved by using lower operating powers and higher solid to liquid ratios. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Neutron Cross Section Libraries for Cryogenic Aromatic Moderator Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantargi, Florencia; Granada, J.R.; Sbaffoni, Maria Monica

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of a set of aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, toluene, mesitylene and a 3:2 mixture (by volume) of mesitylene and toluene, all of them in solid phase, was studied as potential moderator materials for cold neutron sources. Cross section libraries were generated for hydrogen bounded in those materials, at several temperatures in ACE format, and they were used in MCNP calculations to analyze their neutron production compared with traditional materials like solid methane and liquid hydrogen. In particular, cross section libraries were generated at 20 K, which is the operating temperature of the majority of the existing cold neutron sources. Although solid methane is the best moderator in terms of cold neutron production, it has very poor radiation resistance, causing spontaneous burping even at fairly low doses. Such effect is considerably reduced in the aromatic hydrocarbons. On the other hand, all of them show a similar and significant neutron production, with the exception of benzene. Even though those aromatic materials are very easy to handle, the solid phases that produce an enhanced flux of cold neutrons correspond to amorphous structures rich in low-energy excitations, and they can be created through lengthy cooling processes requiring in many cases additional annealing stages. The 3:2 mesitylene-toluene mixture, that forms in a simple and direct manner the appropriate disordered structure, constitutes an excellent cryogenic moderator material, as it is able to produce an intense flux of cold neutrons while presenting high resistance to radiation, thus conforming a new and advantageous alternative to traditional moderator materials. (authors)

  18. Solid oxide fuel cell performance comparison fuelled by methane, MeOH, EtOH and diesel surrogate C8H18

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Cinti, Giovanni; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2016-01-01

    Carbon deposition is a major cause of degradation in solid oxide fuel cell systems. The ability to predict carbon formation in reforming processes is thus absolutely necessary for stable operation of solid oxide fuel cell systems. In the open literature it is found that thesteam input is always c...

  19. Coalbed Methane Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coalbed Methane Outreach Program, voluntary program seeking to reduce methane emissions from coal mining activities. CMOP promotes profitable recovery/use of coal mine methane (CMM), addressing barriers to using CMM instead of emitting it to atmosphere.

  20. Methane hydrates in quaternary climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennett, J. P.; Hill, T. M.; Behl, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    The hydrate reservoir in marine sediments is known to contain a large volume of exchangeable carbon stored as solid methane hydrate and associated free gas. This reservoir has been shown to be potentially unstable in response to changing intermediate water temperature and sea level (pressure). Evidence continues to grow for past episodes of major methane release at times of climatic warming. Yet few studies of late Quaternary climate change include methane hydrates as an integral part of the global climate system, in spite of the largest known oscillations at this time in sea level and upper ocean temperature changes for the Cenozoic or earlier, conditions that favor instability of the methane hydrate reservoir. Abrupt increases in atmospheric methane recorded in polar ice cores are widely believed to have resulted, not from ocean-floor methane degassing, but instead from continental wetland activation, a hypothesis thus far unsupported by geological data. Furthermore, as part of this Wetland Methane Hypothesis, the abrupt methane increases have been seen as a response to climatic warming rather than contributing significantly to the change. An alternative view (formulated as the Clathrate Gun Hypothesis) is that the speed, magnitude and timing of abrupt climate change in the recent geologic past are consistent with the process of major degassing of methane hydrates. We summarize aspects of this hypothesis here and needs to test this hypothesis. (Author)

  1. Methane reacts with heteropolyacids chemisorbed on silica to produce acetic acid under soft conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Miao; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Rossini, Aaron J.; Zhang, Jizhe; Lesage, Anne; Zhu, Haibo; Pelletier, Jeremie; Emsley, Lyndon; Caps, Valerie; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Selective functionalization of methane at moderate temperature is of crucial economic, environmental, and scientific importance. Here, we report that methane reacts with heteropolyacids (HPAs) chemisorbed on silica to produce acetic acid under soft

  2. Evaluating the effects of activated carbon on methane generation and the fate of antibiotic resistant genes and class I integrons during anaerobic digestion of solid organic wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingxin; Mao, Feijian; Loh, Kai-Chee; Gin, Karina Yew-Hoong; Dai, Yanjun; Tong, Yen Wah

    2018-02-01

    The effects of activated carbon (AC) on methane production and the fate of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) were evaluated through comparing the anaerobic digestion performance and transformation of ARGs among anaerobic mono-digestion of food waste, co-digestion of food waste and chicken manure, and co-digestion of food waste and waste activated sludge. Results showed that adding AC in anaerobic digesters improved methane yield by at least double through the enrichment of bacteria and archaea. Conventional digestion process showed ability in removing certain types of ARGs, such as tetA, tetX, sul1, sul2, cmlA, floR, and intl1. Supplementing AC in anaerobic digester enhanced the removal of most of the ARGs in mono-digestion of food waste. The effects tended to be minimal in co-digestion of co-substrates such as chicken manure and waste activated sludge, both of which contain a certain amount of antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Methane release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Swiss Gas Industry has carried out a systematic, technical estimate of methane release from the complete supply chain from production to consumption for the years 1992/1993. The result of this survey provided a conservative value, amounting to 0.9% of the Swiss domestic output. A continuation of the study taking into account new findings with regard to emission factors and the effect of the climate is now available, which provides a value of 0.8% for the target year of 1996. These results show that the renovation of the network has brought about lower losses in the local gas supplies, particularly for the grey cast iron pipelines. (author)

  4. Moderator materials for the Spallation Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, L.A.

    1999-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a neutron source providing intense neutron fluxes that will be used for performing a large variety of neutron scattering experiments. SNS is to be completed and start operation in 2005. Protons will be accelerated to 1 GeV, stored in an accumulator ring, and then injected into a neutron-producing target. After leaving the target (Hg in the ca/se of SNS), the neutrons are prepared for experiments by first using a moderator to impose energy and width requirements on the neutron pulse. One of the most important ingredients is the moderator material. Four materials that are commonly used and that were considered for use in SNS are liquid hydrogen (L-H 2 ), liquid water (L-H 2 O), liquid methane (L-CH 4 ), and solid methane (S-CH 4 ). The spectra (neutron current versus neutron energy) for these four materials are shown. As may be seen, at low neutron energies ( 4 , which produces up to four times as many neutrons in this energy range as L-H 2 . The problem with the material is the internal storage of energy that can be spontaneously and explosively released. At energies of just above 10 MeV, the most effective moderator material is L-CH 4 . Polymerization problems, however, preclude its use at high powers (again such as in SNS), where the buildup of undesirable materials becomes prohibitive. This is, however, an important energy range for neutron experiments. Preliminary consideration is being given to a composite moderator that contains two adjacent sections, one of L-H 2 and one of L-H 2 O, which produces a spectrum that is very similar to L-CH 4

  5. Historical methane hydrate project review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Frye, Matt; Goldberg, Dave; Husebo, Jarle; Koh, Carolyn; Malone, Mitch; Shipp, Craig; Torres, Marta

    2013-01-01

    In 1995, U.S. Geological Survey made the first systematic assessment of the volume of natural gas stored in the hydrate accumulations of the United States. That study, along with numerous other studies, has shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world greatly exceeds the volume of known conventional gas resources. However, gas hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of gas hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various gas hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural gas hydrates, and (5) analyzing the effects of methane hydrate on drilling safety.Methane hydrates are naturally occurring crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid water-­‐lattice holds gas molecules in a cage-­‐like structure. The gas and water becomes a solid under specific temperature and pressure conditions within the Earth, called the hydrate stability zone. Other factors that control the presence of methane hydrate in nature include the source of the gas included within the hydrates, the physical and chemical controls on the migration of gas with a sedimentary basin containing methane hydrates, the availability of the water also included in the hydrate structure, and the presence of a suitable host sediment or “reservoir”. The geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrates have become collectively known as the “methane hydrate petroleum system”, which has become the focus of numerous hydrate research programs.Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated

  6. Preliminary optimization experiments of coupled liquid hydrogen moderator for KENS-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, N.; Kiyanagi, Y.; Inoue, K.; Furusaka, M.; Ikeda, S.; Arai, M.; Iwasa, H.

    1989-01-01

    As a preliminary optimization experiment on the cold-neutron source for KENS-II, energy and time distributions of cold neutrons emanating from coupled liquid-hydrogen moderators with and without a premoderator in a graphite reflector were measured and compared with those from a decoupled liquid-hydrogen moderator. The results showed that the energy spectra from the coupled liquid-hydrogen moderators are almost the same as those from a decoupled one. Relative gain of the former to the latter is fairly high, more than 5, and further increases with increasing wavelength. The broadening of the neutron pulse width in coupled moderators at the cold-neutron region is not so significant and only 1.5 times compared to the solid methane moderator presently operated at KENS-II. 2 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  7. Electrochemical evaluation of sulfur poisoning in a methane-fuelled solid oxide fuel cell: Effect of current density and sulfur concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Anke; Johnson, Gregory B.; Hjalmarsson, Per

    2014-01-01

    , the effect of sulfur was less pronounced on mass transfer/fuel reforming processes but quite significant on the charge transfer/TPB processes. Overall, sulfur related performance loss was more severe at the highest current density (1 A cm−2), due to the deactivation of catalytic fuel reforming reactions......A Ni/ScYSZ based SOFC was tested at 1, 0.5, 0.25, and 0 (OCV) A cm−2 in methane fuel containing 0–100 ppm H2S. Analysis of cell voltage loss during short-term H2S poisoning showed that SOFC performance loss was generally larger at higher current loads. Separating the effect of H2S on catalytic...... reforming and electrochemical activity by evaluating the relevant area specific resistances and charge transfer processes based on impedance spectroscopy revealed that the poisoning of electrochemical activity was not dependent on current density. Two major anode processes were significantly affected...

  8. Development a solid state sensor based on SnO_2 nanoparticles for underground coal mine methane detection using zeolites as filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abruzzi, R.C.; Dedavid, B.A.; Pires, M.J.R.; Luvizon, N.S.

    2016-01-01

    Aiming the monitoring of methane (CH_4) in underground coal mines, the tin oxide (SnO_2) was synthesis and applied to the development of a MOS sensor (metal oxide semiconductor). Zeolite have been tested as a filter of carbon dioxide (CO_2) to ensure the selectivity in the detection of CH_4. Analysis of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) indicated a synthesis of nanoscaled structures. The energy band gap showed characteristic values for a potential application of SnO_2 in CH_4 sensors. Analysis of surface area by BET isotherms showed high values for the zeolite 13X and Y, while adsorption tests indicated that the zeolite 13X presents greater adsorption efficiency of CO_2. The sputtering technique for deposition of the electrodes, as well as the method of drop coating for deposition of SnO_2, proved effective in developing the sensor. (author)

  9. Volatile organo-selenium speciation in biological matter by solid phase microextraction-moderate temperature multicapillary gas chromatography with microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, C.; Sanz Landaluze, J.; Ximenez-Embun, P.; Madrid-Albarran, Y.; Camara, C

    2004-01-16

    Microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES) in combination with multicapillary (MC) gas chromatography could be proven to be useful for element specific detection of volatile species. Solid phase microextraction (SPME) was used for preconcentration and sample-matrix separation. The fiber desorption unit as well as the heating control for the MC column were in-house developed and multicapillary column was operated at moderate temperatures (30-100 deg. C). The method was optimized for organo-selenium species (dimethylselenide (DMSe), diethylselenide (DEtSe) and dimethyldiselenide (DMDSe)), using a chemometric approach. Stationary phases for the separation column were optimized using a conventional GC and contrasted with the results obtained with the MC. Application was focussed on selenium accumulating biological matter, such as lupine, yeast, Indian mustard and garlic. These samples were grown in hydroponic solution containing inorganic selenium (Na{sub 2}SeO{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}SeO{sub 4}). SPME sampling was carried out in fixed volume flow boxes in headspace above the living plants and in vials using treated samples. Results demonstrate inorganic selenium transformation into volatile organic species during metabolism. Separation is fast, a chromatogram can be obtained in less than 3 min and detection limits were at sub-ppb level for all investigated species. The system is independent from the use of a conventional gas chromatographic oven and can be used as a versatile alternative to highly cost intensive methods such as GC-ICP-MS.

  10. Biogas and Methane Yield from Rye Grass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Vítěz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogas production in the Czech Republic has expanded substantially, including marginal regions for maize cultivation. Therefore, there are increasingly sought materials that could partially replace maize silage, as a basic feedstock, while secure both biogas production and its quality.Two samples of rye grass (Lolium multiflorum var. westerwoldicum silage with different solids content 21% and 15% were measured for biogas and methane yield. Rye grass silage with solid content of 15% reached an average specific biogas yield 0.431 m3·kg−1 of organic dry matter and an average specific methane yield 0.249 m3·kg−1 of organic dry matter. Rye grass silage with solid content 21% reached an average specific biogas yield 0.654 m3·kg−1 of organic dry matter and an average specific methane yield 0.399 m3·kg−1 of organic dry matter.

  11. Additive effect of Ce, Mo and K to nickel-cobalt aluminate supported solid oxide fuel cell for direct internal reforming of methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Bu Ho; Park, Jungdeok; Yoon, Heechul; Kim, Hyeon Hui; Kim, Lim; Chung, Jong Shik

    2014-01-01

    Direct internal reforming of methane (steam/carbon=0.031, 850 .deg. C) is tested using button cells of Ni-YSZ/YSZ/LSM in which the anode layer is supported either on Ni-YSZ or on Ni-CoAl 2 O 4 . The Ni-CoAl 2 O 4 supported cell shows little degradation with operating time, as a result of higher resistance against carbon deposition, whereas the Ni-YSZ supported cell deactivates quickly and suffers fracture in 50 h. Upon incorporation of additives such as K, Ce, or Mo into the Ni-CoAl 2 O 4 support, cells with 0.5 wt% CeO 2 exhibit the best stable performance as a result of reduced coke formation. Cells with 0.5 wt% Mo exhibit the lowest performance. Although no carbon deposit is detected in the cells with K 2 CO 3 additives, their performance is worse than that in the CeO 2 case, and, in constant-current mode, there is a sudden voltage drop to zero after a certain period of time; this time becomes shorter with increasing K content. The injection of potassium into the anode side facilitates the generation of OH - and CO 3 2- in the anode and promotes the diffusion of these ions to the cathode. Increased polarization resistance at the cathode and increased electrolyte resistance result in such a sudden failure

  12. Effect of the co-spun anode functional layer on the performance of the direct-methane microtubular solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiuxia; Gong, Xun; Yin, Yimei; Yang, Naitao; Tan, Xiaoyao; Ma, Zi-Feng

    2014-02-01

    NiO-YSZ/porous YSZ (NiO-YSZ/p-YSZ) dual-layer hollow fibers have been fabricated by a co-spinning-sintering method, on which a dense YSZ films has been formed by a dip-coating and sintering process. A LSM-YSZ ink has been dip-coated on the dense YSZ films as cathode, while the Cu-CeO2 carbon-resistant catalyst has been impregnated in the p-YSZ layer to form double-anode supported micro tubular fuel cells (MT-SOFCs). The thickness of the Ni-YSZ layer, so called anode functional layer (AFL), is controlled from 74 μm to 13 μm by varying the spinning rates of the NiO-YSZ dopes. The maximum power density of an MT-SOFC, which is fabricated based on a thin co-spun AFL, reaches 566 mW cm-2 operated at 850 °C fed with dry methane, and is stably operated for 85 h without power declination.

  13. Nanostructured palladium-La{sub 0.75}Sr{sub 0.25}Cr{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} composite anodes for direct methane and ethanol solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, San Ping; Ye, Yinmei; He, Tianmin; Ho, See Boon [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2008-10-15

    A palladium-impregnated La{sub 0.75}Sr{sub 0.25}Cr{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 0.5}O{sub 3-{delta}}/yttria-stabilized zirconia (LSCM/YSZ) composite anode is investigated for the direct utilization of methane and ethanol fuels in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Impregnation of Pd nanoparticles significantly enhances the electrocatalytic activity of LSCM/YSZ composite anodes for the methane and ethanol electrooxidation reaction. At 800 C, the maximum power density is increased by two and eight times with methane and ethanol fuels, respectively, for a cell with the Pd-impregnated LSCM/YSZ composite anode, as compared with that using a pure LSCM/YSZ anode. No carbon deposition is observed during the reaction of methane and ethanol fuels on the Pd-impregnated LSCM/YSZ composite anode. The results show the promises of nanostructured Pd-impregnated LSCM/YSZ composites as effective anodes for direct methane and ethanol SOFCs. (author)

  14. The moderator's moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, G.K.

    1990-01-01

    A brief account is given of the development of graphite moderators for Magnox and advanced gas cooled reactors. The accident at Windscale in 1957 brought to worldwide attention the importance of irradiation damage in graphite and the consequent storage of Wigner energy. In spite of the Windscale setback, preparations for the civil programme of Magnox reactors went ahead apace. Some of the background to the disastrous Dungeness B tender is presented. In spite of all the difficulties and uncertainties, the graphite in UK reactors has performed well. In all cases, as far as the author is aware, the behaviour of the graphite moderators will not prevent design life being achieved. (author)

  15. Additive effect of Ce, Mo and K to nickel-cobalt aluminate supported solid oxide fuel cell for direct internal reforming of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Bu Ho; Park, Jungdeok; Yoon, Heechul; Kim, Hyeon Hui; Kim, Lim; Chung, Jong Shik [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Direct internal reforming of methane (steam/carbon=0.031, 850 .deg. C) is tested using button cells of Ni-YSZ/YSZ/LSM in which the anode layer is supported either on Ni-YSZ or on Ni-CoAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The Ni-CoAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} supported cell shows little degradation with operating time, as a result of higher resistance against carbon deposition, whereas the Ni-YSZ supported cell deactivates quickly and suffers fracture in 50 h. Upon incorporation of additives such as K, Ce, or Mo into the Ni-CoAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} support, cells with 0.5 wt% CeO{sub 2} exhibit the best stable performance as a result of reduced coke formation. Cells with 0.5 wt% Mo exhibit the lowest performance. Although no carbon deposit is detected in the cells with K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} additives, their performance is worse than that in the CeO{sub 2} case, and, in constant-current mode, there is a sudden voltage drop to zero after a certain period of time; this time becomes shorter with increasing K content. The injection of potassium into the anode side facilitates the generation of OH{sup -} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} in the anode and promotes the diffusion of these ions to the cathode. Increased polarization resistance at the cathode and increased electrolyte resistance result in such a sudden failure.

  16. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  17. Coupled models of free methane gas and anaerobic oxidation of methane : from core to regional scales. Geologica Ultraiectina (339)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mogollón, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas that is produced in marine sediments containing high amounts of degrading organic carbon. It is therefore not surprising that marine sediments contain vast amounts of methane (500-5000 gigatons) present in dissolved (aqueous), free gas (gaseous), and solid

  18. Global Methane Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Global Methane Initiative promotes cost-effective, near-term methane recovery through partnerships between developed and developing countries, with participation from the private sector, development banks, and nongovernmental organizations.

  19. Some concluding remarks about cold moderator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is the transcription of remarks made at the conclusion of the Workshop on Cold Neutron Sources held at the Los Angeles National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, March 5--7, 1990. Areas of interest include the following: scattering functions; cold moderator materials; radiation mixing of chemical composition; comparison of some pulsed moderator spectra; hydrogen mixtures; premoderators and shields; composite reflectors; exotic moderator materials; deuterated methanes; mixed moderator materials; and test facility availabilities. 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  20. Solid oxide fuel cell performance comparison fueled by methane, MeOH, EtOH and gasoline surrogate C_8H_1_8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Cinti, Giovanni; Nielsen, Mads P.; Desideri, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    Carbon deposition is a major cause of degradation in solid oxide fuel cell systems. The ability to predict carbon formation in reforming processes is thus absolutely necessary for stable operation of solid oxide fuel cell systems. In the open literature it is found that the steam input is always considered in large excess compared to what required by the reforming process with the purpose of reducing carbon formation and avoiding rapid degradation of the cell performance. This makes it difficult to consistently compare system performance with different fuels. In this work, the molar compositions at equilibrium are calculated for a minimum steam to carbon ratio for each fuel type. We carry out a thermodynamic analysis of fuel/steam system using Gibbs Free Energy minimization method. A mathematical relationship between Lagrange's multipliers and carbon activity in the gas phase was deduced. Minimum steam required for the reforming process for each fuel was related to the heat required for the reforming process and fuel cell open circuit voltage. Furthermore, in an experimental test, steam reforming product compositions were used to evaluate and compare SOFC performance with different hydrocarbons. Comparing the model to the experimental activity, it is revealed that at temperatures exceeding 800 °C the gas composition is dominated by hydrogen and carbon monoxide for any of the fuels considered leading to similar cell polarization curves performance for different fuels. The main effect on the performance is related to OCV values which are dependent on different steam content for each fuel. It was concluded that the magnitude of the heat requested for the fuel reforming process is the major difference in system performance when comparing different fuels. However, reforming kinetic effects can become predominant rather than thermodynamics, especially at lower temperatures.

  1. Preliminary design of the cold neutron source for the Centro Atomico Bariloche Electron LINAC Facility. I. Solid benzene as moderating material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Lourdes; Granada, Jose R.

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of preliminary calculations performed with the code MCNP-4C relative to the neutron field behavior within the moderator for the CAB-LINAC cold neutron source, using benzene at 89 K as moderating material. Throughout the design calculations nuclear data libraries previously generated and validated were used. The optimum dimensions for a slab and a grid moderator were calculated, with and without a pre moderator, from the point of view of neutron production and the time-width of the neutron pulse. (author)

  2. Methane Hydrates: Chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Yamamoto, Koji; Lee, Sung-Rock; Collett, Timothy S.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Dallimore, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be

  3. Electrochemical performance and stability of Ni1-xCox-based cermet anode for direct methane-fuelled solid oxide fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicharee Wongsawatgul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon deposition on Ni-based anode is well-known as a major barrier for the practical use and commercialization of hydrocarbon-fuelled solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs. In this work, Co alloying in Ni-YSZ was studied as an alternative anode material for using CH4 as a fuel. The Ni-YSZ and Ni-Co alloyed-YSZ were prepared by the traditional impregnation method without further mixing processes. After sintering and reduction in H2 atmosphere, the introduced Co can completely dissolved into the Ni lattice and changed the morphology with an increase in the Ni-YSZ grain size and showed a better uniform microstructure. The Co alloying also enhanced the electrochemical performance under CH4 fuel by reducing the resistance and anodic overvoltage. Moreover, the Co addition enhanced the stability of the cell with CH4 a constant load current of 80 mA for 60 h. This performance related to the carbon deposition on the anode surface. The Co alloying showed a high efficiency to suppress the carbon deposition and improved the electrochemical performance of an SOFC cell operating under CH4 fuel.

  4. Potential for biohydrogen and methane production from olive pulp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Skiadas, Ioannis V.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigates the potential for thermophilic biohydrogen and methane production from olive pulp, which is the semi-solid residue coming from the two-phase processing of olives. It focussed on: a) production of methane from the raw olive pulp, b) anaerobic bio-production of hydrogen...... from the olive pulp, and c) subsequent anaerobic treatment of the hydrogen-effluent with the simultaneous production of methane. Both continuous and batch experiments were performed. The hydrogen potential of the olive pulp amounted to 1.6 mmole H-2 per g TS. The methane potential of the raw olive pulp...... and hydrogen-effluent was as high as 19 mmole CH4 per g TS. This suggests that olive pulp is an ideal substrate for methane production and it shows that biohydrogen production can be very efficiently coupled with a subsequent step for methane production....

  5. Methane Flux and Authigenic Carbonate in Shallow Sediments Overlying Methane Hydrate Bearing Strata in Alaminos Canyon, Gulf of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P. Smith

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In June 2007 sediment cores were collected in Alaminos Canyon, Gulf of Mexico across a series of seismic data profiles indicating rapid transitions between the presence of methane hydrates and vertical gas flux. Vertical profiles of dissolved sulfate, chloride, calcium, magnesium, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC concentrations in porewaters, headspace methane, and solid phase carbonate concentrations were measured at each core location to investigate the cycling of methane-derived carbon in shallow sediments overlying the hydrate bearing strata. When integrated with stable carbon isotope ratios of DIC, geochemical results suggest a significant fraction of the methane flux at this site is cycled into the inorganic carbon pool. The incorporation of methane-derived carbon into dissolved and solid inorganic carbon phases represents a significant sink in local carbon cycling and plays a role in regulating the flux of methane to the overlying water column at Alaminos Canyon. Targeted, high-resolution geochemical characterization of the biogeochemical cycling of methane-derived carbon in shallow sediments overlying hydrate bearing strata like those in Alaminos Canyon is critical to quantifying methane flux and estimating methane hydrate distributions in gas hydrate bearing marine sediments.

  6. Elimination of methane in exhaust gas from biogas upgrading process by immobilized methane-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ya-Min; Yang, Jing; Fan, Xiao-Lei; Fu, Shan-Fei; Sun, Meng-Ting; Guo, Rong-Bo

    2017-05-01

    Biogas upgrading is essential for the comprehensive utilization of biogas as substitute of natural gas. However, the methane in the biogas can be fully recovered during the upgrading process of biogas, and the exhaust gas produced during biogas upgrading may contain a very low concentration of methane. If the exhaust gas with low concentration methane releases to atmosphere, it will be harmful to environment. In addition, the utilization of large amounts of digestate produced from biogas plant is another important issue for the development of biogas industry. In this study, solid digestate was used to produce active carbon, which was subsequently used as immobilized material for methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) in biofilter. Biofilter with MOB immobilized on active carbon was used to eliminate the methane in exhaust gas from biogas upgrading process. Results showed porous active carbon was successfully made from solid digestate. The final methane elimination capacity of immobilized MOB reached about 13molh -1 m -3 , which was more 4 times higher than that of MOB without immobilization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Doses from radioactive methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, A.W.; Kendall, G.M.; Fell, T.P.; Harrison, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    A possible radiation hazard arises from exposure to methane labelled with either a 3 H or a 14 C nuclide. This radioactive methane could be released from a variety of sources, e.g. land burial sites containing radioactive waste. Standard assumptions adopted for vapours would not apply to an inert alkane like methane. This paper discusses mechanisms by which radioactive methane would irradiate tissues and provides estimates of doses. Data on skin thickness and metabolism of methane are discussed with reference to these mechanisms. It is found that doses are dominated by dose from the small fraction of methane which is inhaled and metabolised. This component of dose has been calculated under rather conservative assumptions. (author)

  8. [Moderately haloalkaliphilic aerobic methylobacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotsenko, Iu A; Doronina, N V; Li, Ts D; Reshetnikov, A S

    2007-01-01

    Aerobic methylobacteria utilizing oxidized and substituted methane derivatives as carbon and energy sources are widespread in nature and involved in the global carbon cycle, being a unique biofilter on the path of these C1 compounds from different ecosystems to the atmosphere. New data on the biological features of moderately halophilic, neutrophilic, and alkaliphilic methylobacteria isolated from biotopes with higher osmolarity (seas, saline and soda lakes, saline soils, and deteriorating marble) are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the latest advances in the study of the mechanisms of osmoadaptation of aerobic moderately haloalkaliphilic methylobacteria: formation of osmolytes, in particular, molecular and genetic aspects of biosynthesis of the universal bioprotectant ectoine. The prospects for further studies of the physiological and biochemical principles of haloalkalophily and for the application of haloalkaliphilic aerobic methylobacteria in biosynthesis and biodegradation are discussed.

  9. Methane yield enhancement via electroporation of organic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi, Seyedeh Masoumeh; Unnthorsson, Runar

    2017-08-01

    An experimental study with pulsed electric field (PEF) pre-treatment was conducted to investigate its effect on methane production. PEF pre-treatment converts organic solids into soluble and colloidal forms, increasing bioavailability for anaerobic microorganisms participating in methane generation process. The substrates tested were landfill leachate and fruit/vegetable. Three treatment intensities of 15, 30, and 50kWh/m 3 were applied to investigate the influence of pre-treatment on methane production via biochemical methane potential test. Threshold treatment intensity was found to be around 30kWh/m 3 for landfill leachate beyond which the methane production enhanced linearly with increase in intensity. Methane production of the landfill leachate significantly increased up to 44% with the highest intensity. The result of pulsed electric field pre-treatment on fruit/vegetable showed that 15kWh/m 3 was the intensity by which the highest amount of methane (up to 7%) was achieved. Beyond this intensity, the methane production decreased. Chemical oxygen demand removals were increased up to 100% for landfill leachate and 17% for fruit/vegetable, compared to the untreated slurries. Results indicate that the treatment intensity has a significant effect on the methane production and biosolid removal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Methane production from fermentation of winery waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, K V; Liao, P H

    1986-01-01

    A laboratory-scale reactor receiving a mixture of screened dairy manure and winery waste was studied at 35 degrees C and a hydraulic retention time of 4 days. The maximum methane production rate of 8.14 liter CH/sub 4//liter/day was achieved at a loading rate of 7.78 g VS/liter/day (VS = volatile solids). The corresponding methane yield was 1.048 liter CH/sub 4//g VS added. Using a mixture of winery wastes and screened dairy manure as the feed material to anaerobic reactor resulted in a significant increase in total methane production compared to that from screened dairy manure alone. The biodegradation efficiency increased with the addition of winery wastes to screened dairy manure. 18 references.

  11. Cryogenic moderator simulations: confronting reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iverson, E. B.

    1999-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a spallation neutron source dedicated to materials research. Its three cryogenic methane moderators provide twelve neutron beams to fourteen instruments and test facilities. This report concerns ongoing activities for benchmarking our Monte Carlo model of the IPNS neutron generation system. This paper concentrates on the techniques (both experimental and calculational) used in such benchmarking activities

  12. Utilization of coalbed methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavson, J.B. [Gustavson Associates Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Substantial progress has been made in capturing coalbed methane (CBM gas), which constitutes a valuable source of clean burning energy. It is of importance to study the various potential uses of coalbed methane and to understand the various technologies required, as well as their economics and any institutional constraints. In industrialised countries, the uses of coalbed methane are almost solely dependent on microeconomics; coalbed methane must compete for a market against natural gas and other energy sources - and frequently, coalbed methane is not competitive against other energy sources. In developing countries, on the other hand, particularly where other sources of energy are in short supply, coalbed methane economics yield positive results. Here, constraints to development of CBM utilization are mainly lack of technology and investment capital. Sociological aspects such as attitude and cultural habits, may also have a strong negative influence. This paper outlines the economics of coalbed methane utilization, particularly its competition with natural gas, and touches upon the many different uses to which coalbed methane may be applied. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Direct Activation Of Methane

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie; Sun, Miao; Caps, Valerie; Pelletier, Jeremie; Abou-Hamad, Edy

    2013-01-01

    Heteropolyacids (HPAs) can activate methane at ambient temperature (e.g., 20.degree. C.) and atmospheric pressure, and transform methane to acetic acid, in the absence of any noble metal such as Pd). The HPAs can be, for example, those with Keggin

  14. Methane and Climate Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reay, D.; Smith, P.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2010-01-01

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and is estimated to be responsible for approximately one-fifth of man-made global warming. Per kilogram, it is 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide over a 100-year time horizon -- and global warming is likely to enhance methane release from a number of

  15. Methane Hydrate in Confined Spaces: An Alternative Storage System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchardt, Lars; Casco, Mirian Elizabeth; Silvestre-Albero, Joaquin

    2018-03-14

    Methane hydrate inheres the great potential to be a nature-inspired alternative for chemical energy storage, as it allows to store large amounts of methane in a dense solid phase. The embedment of methane hydrate in the confined environment of porous materials can be capitalized for potential applications as its physicochemical properties, such as the formation kinetics or pressure and temperature stability, are significantly changed compared to the bulk system. We review this topic from a materials scientific perspective by considering porous carbons, silica, clays, zeolites, and polymers as host structures for methane hydrate formation. We discuss the contribution of advanced characterization techniques and theoretical simulations towards the elucidation of the methane hydrate formation and dissociation process within the confined space. We outline the scientific challenges this system is currently facing and look on possible future applications for this technology. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Significance of dissolved methane in effluents of anaerobically ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The need for energy efficient Domestic Wastewater (DWW) treatment is increasing annually with population growth and expanding global energy demand. Anaerobic treatment of low strength DWW produces methane which can be used to as an energy product. Temperature sensitivity, low removal efficiencies (Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), Suspended Solids (SS), and Nutrients), alkalinity demand, and potential greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have limited its application to warmer climates. Although well designed anaerobic Membrane Bioreactors (AnMBRs) are able to effectively treat DWW at psychrophilic temperatures (10–30 °C), lower temperatures increase methane solubility leading to increased energy losses in the form of dissolved methane in the effluent. Estimates of dissolved methane losses are typically based on concentrations calculated using Henry's Law but advection limitations can lead to supersaturation of methane between 1.34 and 6.9 times equilibrium concentrations and 11–100% of generated methane being lost in the effluent. In well mixed systems such as AnMBRs which use biogas sparging to control membrane fouling, actual concentrations approach equilibrium values. Non-porous membranes have been used to recover up to 92.6% of dissolved methane and well suited for degassing effluents of Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors which have considerable solids and organic contents and can cause pore wetting and clogging in microporous membrane modules. Micro

  17. Mechanics of coalbed methane production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creel, J C; Rollins, J B [Crawley, Gillespie and Associates, Inc. (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    Understanding the behaviour of coalbed methane reservoirs and the mechanics of production is crucial to successful management of coalbed methane resources and projects. This paper discusses the effects of coal properties and coalbed methane reservoir characteristics on gas production rates and recoveries with a review of completion techniques for coalbed methane wells. 4 refs., 17 figs.

  18. High-pressure raman study on single crystalline methane hydrate surrounded by methane in a diamond anvil cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Y; Sasaki, S; Kume, T; Shimizu, H

    2008-01-01

    High-pressure Raman measurements have been performed for single crystalline methane hydrate (MH) surrounded by fluid or solid methane in a diamond anvil cell. We successfully obtained the pure O-H stretching and lattice vibration spectra in MH-sI and MH-II phases. In these Raman spectra, there is no Raman band from water or ice-VI. The observed pressure of phase transformation from MH-sI to MH-II is 0.9 GPa, which is the same result as methane hydrate surrounded by water

  19. Filamentation and light bullet formation dynamics in solid-state dielectric media with weak, moderate and strong anomalous group velocity dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gražulevičiūtė, I; Garejev, N; Majus, D; Tamošauskas, G; A Dubietis; Jukna, V

    2016-01-01

    We present a series of measurements, which characterize filamentation dynamics of intense ultrashort laser pulses in the space–time domain, as captured by means of three-dimensional imaging technique in sapphire and fused silica, in the wavelength range of 1.45–2.25 μm, accessing the regimes of weak, moderate and strong anomalous group velocity dispersion (GVD). In the regime of weak anomalous GVD (at 1.45 μm), pulse splitting into two sub-pulses producing a pair of light bullets with spectrally shifted carrier frequencies in both nonlinear media is observed. In contrast, in the regimes of moderate (at 1.8 μm) and strong (at 2.25 μm) anomalous GVD we observe notably different transient dynamics, which however lead to the formation of a single self-compressed quasistationary light bullet with an universal spatiotemporal shape comprised of an extended ring-shaped periphery and a localized intense core that carries the self-compressed pulse. (paper)

  20. Filamentation and light bullet formation dynamics in solid-state dielectric media with weak, moderate and strong anomalous group velocity dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gražulevičiūtė, I.; Garejev, N.; Majus, D.; Jukna, V.; Tamošauskas, G.; Dubietis, A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a series of measurements, which characterize filamentation dynamics of intense ultrashort laser pulses in the space-time domain, as captured by means of three-dimensional imaging technique in sapphire and fused silica, in the wavelength range of 1.45-2.25 μm, accessing the regimes of weak, moderate and strong anomalous group velocity dispersion (GVD). In the regime of weak anomalous GVD (at 1.45 μm), pulse splitting into two sub-pulses producing a pair of light bullets with spectrally shifted carrier frequencies in both nonlinear media is observed. In contrast, in the regimes of moderate (at 1.8 μm) and strong (at 2.25 μm) anomalous GVD we observe notably different transient dynamics, which however lead to the formation of a single self-compressed quasistationary light bullet with an universal spatiotemporal shape comprised of an extended ring-shaped periphery and a localized intense core that carries the self-compressed pulse.

  1. An Eco-Friendly Improved Protocol for the Synthesis of Bis(3-indolyl)methanes Using Poly(4-vinylpyridinium)hydrogen Sulfate as Efficient, Heterogeneous, and Recyclable Solid Acid Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banothu, Janardhan; Gali, Rajitha; Velpula, Ravibabu; Bavantula, Rajitha; Crooks, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Highly efficient and eco-friendly protocol for the synthesis of bis(3-indolyl)methanes by the electrophilic substitution reaction of indole with aldehydes catalyzed by poly(4-vinylpyridinium)hydrogen sulfate was described. Excellent yields, shorter reaction times, simple work-up procedure, avoiding hazardous organic solvents, and reusability of the catalyst are the most obvious advantages of this method. PMID:24052864

  2. The direct aromatization of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcelin, G.; Oukaci, R.; Migone, R.A.; Kazi, A.M. [Altamira Instruments, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The thermal decomposition of methane shows significant potential as a process for the production of higher unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons when the extent of the reaction is limited. Thermodynamic calculations have shown that when the reaction is limited to the formation of C{sub 2} to C{sub 10} products, yields of aromatics can exceed 40% at temperatures of 1200{degrees}C. Preliminary experiments have shown that when the reaction is limited to the formation of C{sub 2} to C{sub 10} products, yields of aromatics can exceed 40% at temperatures of 1200{degrees}C. Preliminary experiments have shown that cooling the product and reacting gases as the reaction proceeds can significantly reduce or eliminate the formation of solid carbon and heavier (C{sub 10+}) materials. Much work remains to be done in optimizing the quenching process and this is one of the goals of this program. Means to lower the temperature of the reaction are being studied as this result in a more feasible commercial process due to savings realized in energy and material of construction costs. The use of free-radical generators and catalysts will be investigated as a means of lowering the reaction temperature thus allowing faster quenching. It is highly likely that such studies will lead to a successful direct methane to higher hydrocarbon process.

  3. Methane monitoring from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, C.; Alpers, M.; Millet, B.; Ehret, G.; Flamant, P.

    2017-11-01

    Methane is one of the strongest anthropogenic greenhouse gases. It contributes by its radiative forcing significantly to the global warming. For a better understanding of climate changes, it is necessary to apply precise space-based measurement techniques in order to obtain a global view on the complex processes that control the methane concentration in the atmosphere. The MERLIN mission is a joint French-German cooperation, on a micro satellite mission for space-based measurement of spatial and temporal gradients of atmospheric methane columns on a global scale. MERLIN will be the first Integrated Path Differential Absorption LIDAR for greenhouse gas monitoring from space. In contrast to passive methane missions, the LIDAR instrument allows measurements at alllatitudes, all-seasons and during night.

  4. Methane prediction in collieries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Creedy, DP

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of the project was to assess the current status of research on methane emission prediction for collieries in South Africa in comparison with methods used and advances achieved elsewhere in the world....

  5. In situ x-ray diffraction study of crystal structure of Pd during hydrogen isotope loading by solid-state electrolysis at moderate temperatures 250−300 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukada, Yoshiki; Hioki, Tatsumi; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi; Ohshima, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes and metal interaction with respect to Pd under high hydrogen isotope potential at moderate temperature region around 300 °C was studied. A dry electrolysis technique using BaZr 1−x Y x O 3 solid state electrolyte was developed to generate high hydrogen isotope potential. Hydrogen or deuterium was loaded into a 200 nm thick Pd cathode. The cathode is deposited on SiO 2 substrate and covered with the solid state electrolyte and a Pd anode layer. Time resolved in situ monochromatic x-ray diffraction measurement was performed during the electrolysis. Two phase states of the Pd cathodes with large and small lattice parameters were observed during the electrolysis. Numerous sub-micron scale voids in the Pd cathode and dendrite-like Pd precipitates in the solid state electrolyte were found from the recovered samples. Hydrogen induced super-abundant-vacancy may take role in those phenomena. The observed two phase states may be attributed to phase separation into vacancy-rich and vacancy-poor states. The voids formed in the Pd cathodes seem to be products of vacancy coalescence. Isotope effects were also observed. The deuterium loaded samples showed more rapid phase changes and more formation of voids than the hydrogen doped samples. - Highlights: • High amount hydrogen loading into Pd by all solid-state electrolysis was performed. • Two phase states with large and small lattice parameters were observed. • Lattice contractions were observed suggesting formations of super-abundant-vacancy. • The absence of mechanical pressure might stimulate the formation of the vacancy. • Sub-micron void formations were found in the Pd from recovered samples

  6. In situ x-ray diffraction study of crystal structure of Pd during hydrogen isotope loading by solid-state electrolysis at moderate temperatures 250−300 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukada, Yoshiki, E-mail: yoshiki_fukada@mail.toyota.co.jp [Toyota Motor Corporation, 1200 Mishuku, Susono-shi, Shizuoka-ken, 410-1193 (Japan); Hioki, Tatsumi; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi [Toyota Central R& D Labs.,Inc, 41-1, Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi, 480-1192 (Japan); Green Mobility Collaborative Research Center & Graduate School of Engineering Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan); Ohshima, Shigeki [Toyota Central R& D Labs.,Inc, 41-1, Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi, 480-1192 (Japan)

    2015-10-25

    Hydrogen isotopes and metal interaction with respect to Pd under high hydrogen isotope potential at moderate temperature region around 300 °C was studied. A dry electrolysis technique using BaZr{sub 1−x} Y{sub x}O{sub 3} solid state electrolyte was developed to generate high hydrogen isotope potential. Hydrogen or deuterium was loaded into a 200 nm thick Pd cathode. The cathode is deposited on SiO{sub 2} substrate and covered with the solid state electrolyte and a Pd anode layer. Time resolved in situ monochromatic x-ray diffraction measurement was performed during the electrolysis. Two phase states of the Pd cathodes with large and small lattice parameters were observed during the electrolysis. Numerous sub-micron scale voids in the Pd cathode and dendrite-like Pd precipitates in the solid state electrolyte were found from the recovered samples. Hydrogen induced super-abundant-vacancy may take role in those phenomena. The observed two phase states may be attributed to phase separation into vacancy-rich and vacancy-poor states. The voids formed in the Pd cathodes seem to be products of vacancy coalescence. Isotope effects were also observed. The deuterium loaded samples showed more rapid phase changes and more formation of voids than the hydrogen doped samples. - Highlights: • High amount hydrogen loading into Pd by all solid-state electrolysis was performed. • Two phase states with large and small lattice parameters were observed. • Lattice contractions were observed suggesting formations of super-abundant-vacancy. • The absence of mechanical pressure might stimulate the formation of the vacancy. • Sub-micron void formations were found in the Pd from recovered samples.

  7. Radiation effects on methane in the presence of molecular sieves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Y.; Nagai, S.; Hatada, M.

    1983-01-01

    Product analysis has been carried out for the radiation-induced reaction of methane in the presence of molecular sieves (MS) 3A, 4A, 5A and 13X. Irradiation of methane over MS 4A selectively produces C 2 hydrocarbons, while the use of MS 5A leads to C 2 and C 3 hydrocarbons. The selectivity and yields of these hydrocarbons, however, decrease with irradiation time, owing to deposition of carbonaceous solid produced from methane on the surface of the molecular sieves. The carbonaceous solid is decomposed to low-molecular-weight hydrocarbons when irradiated in an H 2 atmosphere. Material balance estimated for the radiation-chemical reaction of argon containing 2 mol% methane over MS 5A reveals that the carbonaceous solid is highly abundant in carbon atoms. On the other hand the formation of carbonaceous solids plays a less important role in the radiation-chemical reaction of methane in the presence of silica gel, which is found to exhibit greater activity for the formation of hydrocarbons than the molecular sieves. (author)

  8. Phytoremediation of Atmospheric Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    REPORT Phytoremediation of Atmospheric Methane 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We have transformed a plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, with the...298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - 31-Mar-2012 Phytoremediation of Atmospheric Methane Report Title ABSTRACT We have transformed a...DD882) Scientific Progress See attachment Technology Transfer 1    Final Report for DARPA project W911NF1010027  Phytoremediation  of Atmospheric

  9. Terrestrial plant methane production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Bruhn, Dan; Møller, Ian M.

    We evaluate all experimental work published on the phenomenon of aerobic methane (CH4) generation in terrestrial plants. We conclude that the phenomenon is true. Four stimulating factors have been observed to induce aerobic plant CH4 production, i.e. cutting injuries, increasing temperature...... the aerobic methane emission in plants. Future work is needed for establishing the relative contribution of several proven potential CH4 precursors in plant material....

  10. Methanation of Carbon Dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, Daniel Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere has been linked to global warming. Carbon dioxide's (CO2) one of the most abundant greenhouse gases. Natural gas, mainly methane, is the cleanest fossil fuel for electricity production helping meet the United States ever growing energy needs. The methanation of CO2 has the potential to address both of these problems if a catalyst can be developed that meets the activity, economic and environmental requirements to industrialize the process. ...

  11. Drip irrigation emitter clogging in Dutch greenhouses as affected by methane and organic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreij, de C.; Burg, van der A.M.M.; Runia, W.T.

    2003-01-01

    It is believed that the serious clogging of drip irrigation emitters in the Dutch greenhouse industry is caused by methane-oxidising bacteria and/or organic acids used as anti-clogging agents. In this study greenhouses with moderate to severe emitter clogging have been examined. High methane

  12. Bioelectrochemical enhancement of methane production in low temperature anaerobic digestion at 10 °C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Dandan; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Si; Buisman, Cees; Heijne, ter Annemiek

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion at low temperature is an attractive technology especially in moderate climates, however, low temperature results in low microbial activity and low rates of methane formation. This study investigated if bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) can enhance methane production from

  13. Neutronic moderator design for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, L.A.; Barnes, J.M.; Johnson, J.O.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1998-01-01

    Neutronics analyses are now in progress to support the initial selection of moderator design parameters for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The results of the initial optimization studies involving moderator poison plate location, moderator position, and premoderator performance for the target system are presented in this paper. Also presented is an initial study of the use of a composite moderator to produce a liquid methane like spectrum

  14. Coalbed methane: new frontier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaton, S.

    2003-02-01

    There are large numbers of stacked coal seams permeated with methane or natural gas in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin, and approximately 20 coalbed methane pilot projects are operating in the area, and brief descriptions of some of them were provided. Coalbed methane reserves have a long life cycle. A definition of coalbed methane can be a permeability challenged reservoir. It is not uncommon for coalbed methane wells to flow water for periods varying from 2 to 6 months after completion before the production of natural gas. A made-in-Canada technological solution is being developed by CDX Canada Inc., along with its American parent company. The techniques used by CDX are a marriage between coal mining techniques and oil and gas techniques. A brief description of coalification was provided. Nexen is participating in the production of gas from an Upper Mannville coal at 1 000-metres depth in a nine-well pilot project. The Alberta Foothills are considered prime exploration area since older coal is carried close to the surface by thrusting. CDX Canada uses cavitation completion in vertical wells. Cavitation consists in setting the casing above the coal seam and drilling ahead under balanced. The design of wells for coalbed methane gas is based on rock and fluid mechanics. Hydraulic fracturing completions is also used, as are tiltmeters. An enhanced coalbed methane recovery pilot project is being conducted by the Alberta Research Council at Fenn-Big Valley, located in central Alberta. It injects carbon dioxide, which shows great potential for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. 1 figs.

  15. Anaerobic digestion of macroalgae: methane potentials, pre-treatment, inhibition and co-digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsø Nielsen, Henrik; Heiske, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    In the present study we tested four macroalgae species – harvested in Denmark – for their suitability of bioconversion to methane. In batch experiments (53 WC) methane yields varied from 132 ml g volatile solids1 (VS) for Gracillaria vermiculophylla, 152 ml g VS1 for Ulva lactuca, 166 ml g VS1...

  16. A sink for methane on Mars? The answer is blowing in the wind

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knak Jensen, Svend J.; Skibsted, Jørgen; Jakobsen, Hans J.; ten Kate, Inge L.; Gunnlaugsson, Haraldur P.; Merrison, Jonathan P.; Finster, Kai; Bak, Ebbe; Iversen, Jens J.; Kondrup, Jens C.; Nørnberg, Per

    2014-01-01

    Tumbling experiments that mimic the wind erosion of quartz grains in an atmosphere of 13C-enriched methane are reported. The eroded grains are analyzed by 13C and 29Si solid-state NMR techniques after several months of tumbling. The analysis shows that methane has reacted with the eroded surface to

  17. [Agroindustrial wastes methanization and bacterial composition in anaerobic digestion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sánchez, María E; Pérez-Fabiel, Sergio; Wong-Villarreal, Arnoldo; Bello-Mendoza, Ricardo; Yañez-Ocampo, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    The tons of organic waste that are annually generated by agro-industry, can be used as raw material for methane production. For this reason, it is important to previously perform biodegradability tests to organic wastes for their full scale methanization. This paper addresses biodegradability, methane production and the behavior of populations of eubacteria and archaeabacteria during anaerobic digestion of banana, mango and papaya agroindustrial wastes. Mango and banana wastes had higher organic matter content than papaya in terms of their volatile solids and total solid rate (94 and 75% respectively). After 63 days of treatment, the highest methane production was observed in banana waste anaerobic digestion: 63.89ml CH4/per gram of chemical oxygen demand of the waste. In the PCR-DGGE molecular analysis, different genomic footprints with oligonucleotides for eubacteria and archeobacteria were found. Biochemical methane potential results proved that banana wastes have the best potential to be used as raw material for methane production. The result of a PCR- DGGE analysis using specific oligonucleotides enabled to identify the behavior of populations of eubacteria and archaeabacteria present during the anaerobic digestion of agroindustrial wastes throughout the process. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Kinetics of Methane Production from Swine Manure and Buffalo Manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen; Cao, Weixing; Liu, Ronghou

    2015-10-01

    The degradation kinetics of swine and buffalo manure for methane production was investigated. Six kinetic models were employed to describe the corresponding experimental data. These models were evaluated by two statistical measurements, which were root mean square prediction error (RMSPE) and Akaike's information criterion (AIC). The results showed that the logistic and Fitzhugh models could predict the experimental data very well for the digestion of swine and buffalo manure, respectively. The predicted methane yield potential for swine and buffalo manure was 487.9 and 340.4 mL CH4/g volatile solid (VS), respectively, which was close to experimental values, when the digestion temperature was 36 ± 1 °C in the biochemical methane potential assays. Besides, the rate constant revealed that swine manure had a much faster methane production rate than buffalo manure.

  19. Experimental Study on Properties of Methane Diffusion of Coal Block under Triaxial Compressive Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong-Bao

    2014-01-01

    Taking the standard size coal block samples defined by ISRM as research objects, both properties of methane diffusion of coal block under triaxial compressive stress and characteristic influences caused by methane pressure were systematically studied with thermo-fluid-solid coupling with triaxial servocontrolled seepage equipment of methane-containing coal. The result shows the methane diffusion property of coal block under triaxial compressive stress was shown in four-stage as follow, first is sharply reduce stage, second is hyperbolic reduce stage, third is close to a fixed value stage, fourth stage is 0. There is a special point making the reduced rate of characteristic curve of methane diffusion speed become sharply small; the influences of shape of methane diffusion speed characteristic curve caused by methane pressure are not obvious, which only is shown in numerical size of methane diffusion speed. Test time was extended required by appear of the special point makes the reduce rate of methane diffusion speed become sharply small. The fitting four-phase relation of methane diffusion of coal block under triaxial compressive stress was obtained, and the idea is proposed that influences of the fitting four-phase relation caused by methane pressure were only shown in value of fitting parameters. PMID:25531000

  20. Methane of the coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasquez, H.

    1997-01-01

    In the transformation process of the vegetable material to the coal (Carbonization), the products that are generated include CH 4, CO2, N2 and H2. The methane is generated by two mechanisms: below 50 centigrade degree, as product of microbial decomposition, the methanogenic is generated; and above 50 centigrade degree, due to the effects of the buried and increase of the range of the coal, the thermogenic methane is detachment, as a result of the catagenic. The generated methane is stored in the internal surfaces of the coal, macro and micro pores and in the natural fractures. The presence of accumulations of gas of the coal has been known in the entire world by many years, but only as something undesirable for its danger in the mining exploitation of the coal

  1. Moderate Bravery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majgaard, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The ability to act in a purposeful and effective way amid institutional tensions and paradoxes is, right now, a highly prized quality in public leadership. The purpose of this chapter is to qualify moderately brave acts as a learning format that combines the analytical and performative...

  2. Direct Activation Of Methane

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie

    2013-07-15

    Heteropolyacids (HPAs) can activate methane at ambient temperature (e.g., 20.degree. C.) and atmospheric pressure, and transform methane to acetic acid, in the absence of any noble metal such as Pd). The HPAs can be, for example, those with Keggin structure: H.sub.4SiW.sub.12O.sub.40, H.sub.3PW.sub.12O.sub.40, H.sub.4SiMo.sub.12O.sub.40, or H.sub.3PMo.sub.12O.sub.40, can be when supported on silica.

  3. Methanization - Technical sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastide, Guillaume

    2015-02-01

    This document explains fundamentals of methanization such as biological reactions and conditions suitable for biogas production (temperature, pH, anaerobic medium, and so on). It also proposes an overview of available techniques, of the present regulation, of environmental impacts, and of costs and profitability of methanization installations. Examples of installations are provided, as well as a set of questions and answers. Perspectives of development are finally discussed in terms of sector development potential, of regulatory evolution, of new perspectives for gas valorisation, of need of acquisition of reference data due to the relatively low number of existing installations, and of research and development

  4. Australian methane fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Estimates are provided for the amount of methane emitted annually into the atmosphere in Australia for a variety of sources. The sources considered are coal mining, landfill, motor vehicles, natural gas suply system, rice paddies, bushfires, termites, wetland and animals. This assessment indicates that the major sources of methane are natural or agricultural in nature and therefore offer little scope for reduction. Nevertheless the remainder are not trival and reduction of these fluxes could play a significant part in any Australian action on the greenhouse problem. 19 refs., 7 tabs., 1 fig

  5. Methane, Ethane, and Nitrogen Stability on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, J.; Grundy, W. M.; Thompson, G.; Dustrud, S.; Pearce, L.; Lindberg, G.; Roe, H. G.; Tegler, S.

    2017-12-01

    Many outer solar system bodies are likely to have a combination of methane, ethane and nitrogen. In particular the lakes of Titan are known to consist of these species. Understanding the past and current stability of these lakes requires characterizing the interactions of methane and ethane, along with nitrogen, as both liquids and ices. Our cryogenic laboratory setup allows us to explore ices down to 30 K through imaging, and transmission and Raman spectroscopy. Our recent work has shown that although methane and ethane have similar freezing points, when mixed they can remain liquid down to 72 K. Concurrently with the freezing point measurements we acquire transmission or Raman spectra of these mixtures to understand how the structural features change with concentration and temperature. Any mixing of these two species together will depress the freezing point of the lake below Titan's surface temperature, preventing them from freezing. We will present new results utilizing our recently acquired Raman spectrometer that allow us to explore both the liquid and solid phases of the ternary system of methane, ethane and nitrogen. In particular we will explore the effect of nitrogen on the eutectic of the methane-ethane system. At high pressure we find that the ternary creates two separate liquid phases. Through spectroscopy we determined the bottom layer to be nitrogen rich, and the top layer to be ethane rich. Identifying the eutectic, as well as understanding the liquidus and solidus points of combinations of these species, has implications for not only the lakes on the surface of Titan, but also for the evaporation/condensation/cloud cycle in the atmosphere, as well as the stability of these species on other outer solar system bodies. These results will help interpretation of future observational data, and guide current theoretical models.

  6. Permafrost slowly exhales methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Elizabeth M.

    2018-04-01

    Permafrost soils store vast quantities of organic matter that are vulnerable to decomposition under a warming climate. Recent research finds that methane release from thawing permafrost may outpace carbon dioxide as a major contributor to global warming over the next century.

  7. Methane emissions from grasslands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol - van Dasselaar, van den A.

    1998-01-01

    Introduction

    Methane (CH 4 ) is an important greenhouse gas. The concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has been increasing since pre-industrial times, mainly due to human activities. This increase gives concern,

  8. Methane emissions from natural wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, J.L. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States); Burke, R.A. Jr. [Environmental Protection Agency, Athens, GA (United States). Environmental Research Lab.

    1993-09-01

    Analyses of air trapped in polar ice cores in conjunction with recent atmospheric measurements, indicate that the atmospheric methane concentration increased by about 250% during the past two or three hundred years (Rasmussen and Khalil, 1984). Because methane is a potent ``greenhouse`` gas, the increasing concentrations are expected to contribute to global warning (Dickinson and Cicerone, 1986). The timing of the methane increase suggests that it is related to the rapid growth of the human population and associated industrialization and agricultural development. The specific causes of the atmospheric methane concentration increase are not well known, but may relate to either increases in methane sources, decreases in the strengths of the sinks, or both.

  9. Optimization of moderators and beam extraction at the ESS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andersen, K. H.; Bertelsen, M.; Zanini, L.; Klinkby, E. B.; Schonfeldt, T.; Bentley, P. M.; Šaroun, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 4 (2018), s. 264-281 ISSN 1600-5767 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015048 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : water moderators * para-hydrogen moderators * low-dimensional moderators * pancake moderators * butterfly moderators * brilliance transfer * neutron instruments Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 2.495, year: 2016

  10. Production and Innovative Applications of Cryogenic Solid Pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.; Fisher, P.W.; Foster, C.A.; Foust, C.R.; Gouge, M.J.; Milora, S.L.

    1999-01-01

    For over two decades Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been developing cryogenic pellet injectors for fueling hot, magnetic fusion plasmas. Cryogenic solid pellets of all three hydrogen isotopes have been produced in a size range of 1- to 10-mm diameter and accelerated to speeds from <100 to ∼3000 m/s. The pellets have been formed discretely by cryocondensation in gun barrels and also by extrusion of cryogenic solids at mass flow rates up to ∼0.26 g/s and production rates up to ten pellets per second. The pellets traverse the hot plasma in a fraction of a millisecond and continuously ablate, providing fresh hydrogenic fuel to the interior of the plasma. From this initial application, uses of this technology have expanded to include (1) cryogenic xenon drops or solids for use as a debris-less target in a laser plasma source of X-rays for advanced lithography systems, (2) solid argon and carbon dioxide pellets for surface cleaning or decontamination, and (3) methane pellets in a liquid hydrogen bath for use as an innovative moderator of cold neutrons. Methods of production and acceleration/transport of these cryogenic solids will be described, and examples will be given of their use in prototype systems

  11. Methane cycling. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David T; Gruen, Danielle S; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Stewart, Lucy C; Holden, James F; Hristov, Alexander N; Pohlman, John W; Morrill, Penny L; Könneke, Martin; Delwiche, Kyle B; Reeves, Eoghan P; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N; Ritter, Daniel J; Seewald, Jeffrey S; McIntosh, Jennifer C; Hemond, Harold F; Kubo, Michael D; Cardace, Dawn; Hoehler, Tori M; Ono, Shuhei

    2015-04-24

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle, with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its multiply substituted "clumped" isotopologues (for example, (13)CH3D) has recently emerged as a proxy for determining methane-formation temperatures. However, the effect of biological processes on methane's clumped isotopologue signature is poorly constrained. We show that methanogenesis proceeding at relatively high rates in cattle, surface environments, and laboratory cultures exerts kinetic control on (13)CH3D abundances and results in anomalously elevated formation-temperature estimates. We demonstrate quantitatively that H2 availability accounts for this effect. Clumped methane thermometry can therefore provide constraints on the generation of methane in diverse settings, including continental serpentinization sites and ancient, deep groundwaters. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Methane from dairy waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-10-22

    This short article describes a facility which will incorporate features to allow for the recovery of the methane gas that is produced in the manufacture of cheese and spray-dried whey powder at the site. The dairy plant is expected to produce about 1,385 m/sup 3//day of methane which will supplement the operation of oil burners and replace the annual consumption of 4,000 bbl of heavy fuel oil. In addition, development of the treatment system would eliminate the consumption of 7,200 kWh/day of electrical energy that would otherwise be required to operate an aerobic disposal system. Total annual energy savings, when the project is fully operational in the spring of 1984, are expected to reach $321,000.

  13. Methanation: reality or fiction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The author discusses whether it is possible to partly replace oil and natural gas by electricity-based gas, i.e. to produce methane from water by electrolysis, or by using molecule cracking in dedicated nuclear reactors, and carbon dioxide. He outlines the benefits of this perspective in terms of reduction of imports, and of national electricity production optimisation. He also discusses the drawbacks: it will be difficult to produce the huge required quantity of CO 2 ; it will be even more difficult to produce the required quantity of electricity; the e-methane production cost is much higher than that of the currently imported natural gas. In appendix, the author discusses some key figures related to energy in France (consumption, shares, imports, crucial role of nuclear energy for the future)

  14. Project identification for methane reduction options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, T.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses efforts directed at reduction in emission of methane to the atmosphere. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, which on a 20 year timeframe may present a similar problem to carbon dioxide. In addition, methane causes additional problems in the form of smog and its longer atmospheric lifetime. The author discusses strategies for reducing methane emission from several major sources. This includes landfill methane recovery, coalbed methane recovery, livestock methane reduction - in the form of ruminant methane reduction and manure methane recovery. The author presents examples of projects which have implemented these ideas, the economics of the projects, and additional gains which come from the projects.

  15. Photofragment imaging of methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, A.J.; Zare, R.N.; Chandler, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    The photolysis of methane is studied using photofragment imaging techniques. Our study reveals that the photolysis of methane proceeds via many different pathways. The photofragment imaging technique is used to resolve and characterize these various pathways and provides therefore unique insight into the dynamical processes that govern this photodissociation. The formation of H-atom photofragments following absorption of a Lyman-α photon, and H 2 photofragments following absorption of two ultraviolet photons (λ=210 endash 230 nm) are studied. The measured H-atom photofragment images reveal that a channel that produces fast H atoms concomitant with methyl fragments is dominant in the Lyman-α photolysis of methane. This channel leads to an anisotropic recoil of the fragments. A secondary channel is observed leading to the formation of somewhat slower H atoms, but an unique identification of this second channel is not possible from the data. At least part of these slower H atoms are formed via a channel that produces H atoms concomitant with CH and H 2 photofragments. The recoil of these slower H atoms appears to be isotropic. The measured, state-resolved H 2 (v,J), photofragment images reveal that two channels lead to H 2 photofragments from the two-photon photolysis of methane: a channel that leads to H 2 products concomitant with methylene fragments; and a channel that leads to H 2 products concomitant with CH and H fragments. H 2 (v,J) rotational and vibrational distributions are measured for each of these two channels separately. The H 2 products formed via the H 2 +CH 2 channel are rotationally and vibrationally highly excited, whereas those formed via the H 2 +CH+H channel are rotationally and vibrationally cooler. Rotational distributions of H 2 formed via the H 2 +CH+H channel are well reproduced by Boltzmann distributions. (Abstract Truncated)

  16. Coal Bed Methane Primer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

    2005-05-25

    During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of

  17. Genomic selection for methane emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Haas, Yvette; Pryce, Jennie E; Wall, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is a growing area of international concern, and it is well established that the release of greenhouse gases (GHG) is a contributing factor. Of the various GHG produced by ruminants, enteric methane (CH4 ) is the most important contributor. One mitigation strategy is to reduce methane...... emission through genetic selection. Our first attempt used beef cattle and a GWAS to identify genes associated with several CH4 traits in Angus beef cattle. The Angus population consisted of 1020 animals with phenotypes on methane production (MeP), dry matter intake (DMI), and weight (WT). Additionally......, two new methane traits: residual genetic methane (RGM) and residual phenotypic methane (RPM) were calculated by adjusting CH4 for DMI and WT. Animals were genotyped using the 800k Illumina Bovine HD Array. Estimated heritabilities were 0.30, 0.19 and 0.15 for MeP, RGM and RPM respectively...

  18. Methane production from stable manures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poch, M

    1955-04-01

    A brief description of the methane-bacteria is given, their classification, biochemistry, and ecology, and a table of gas production expected from a dozen waste materials. Descriptions of three fermentation systems are given. The Ducellier-Isman, Massaux consists of 2 or 3 tanks of 6 to 14 m/sup 3/ capacity which daily produces 5 to 17 m/sup 3/ gas. Rotted manure is placed in the tanks, covered with water and liquid manure, and allowed to ferment for 3 months. The older tanks are unmixed, but the newest have provision for breaking the scum layer. Gas production virtually ceases during the winter, much manual labor is involved, and high losses of organic matter are caused by use of already rotted manure. The Darmstadt system, developed by Reinhold and similar to the systems of Harnisch and Mueller, consists of a 15 m/sup 3/ covered pit into which farm wastes and household wastes are fed through piping. The tank is heated and stirred, solids making their way from one end of the tank to the outlet in a matter of weeks, from which they are shoveled and stacked. Gas production is 0.3 to 0.5 m/sup 3/ gas/m/sup 3/ tank daily. A good deal of manual labor is involved, and losses of nutrients occur after the solids are extracted from the tank and piled. A fully mechanized Schmidt-Egersgluess system, the Biological Humus Gasworks (Bihugas), consists of heated (30/sup 0/ to 35/sup 0/), mixed tanks, gas compressor, gas storage tank, and effluent storage tank. Three m/sup 3/ tank capacity are required per head of cattle and gas production is 2 to 2.5 m/sup 3//livestock unit/day. Straw is stored to be ready for use as fermentation feedstock when the cattle are in the fields. The length of digestion in the process is 18 to 20 days.

  19. High-temperature conversion of methane on a composite gadolinia-doped ceria-gold electrode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marina, O.A.; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    1999-01-01

    Direct electrochemical oxidation of methane was attempted on a gadolinia-doped ceria Ce(0.6)Gd(0.4)O(1.8) (CG4) electrode in a solid oxide fuel cell using a porous gold-CG4 mixture as current collector Gold is relatively inert to methane in contrast to other popular SOFC anode materials such as n......Direct electrochemical oxidation of methane was attempted on a gadolinia-doped ceria Ce(0.6)Gd(0.4)O(1.8) (CG4) electrode in a solid oxide fuel cell using a porous gold-CG4 mixture as current collector Gold is relatively inert to methane in contrast to other popular SOFC anode materials...... such as nickel and platinum. CG4 was found to exhibit a low electrocatalytic activity for methane oxidation as well as no significant reforming activity implying that the addition of an electrocatalyst or cracking catalyst to the CG4 anode is required for SOFC operating on methane. The methane conversion...... observed at the open-circuit potential and low anodic overpotentials seems to be due to thermal methane cracking in the gas phase and on the alumina surfaces in the cell housing. At high anodic overpotentials, at electrode potentials where oxygen evolution was expected to take place, the formation of CO(2...

  20. Methanization of industrial liquid effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederic, S.; Lugardon, A.

    2007-01-01

    In a first part, this work deals with the theoretical aspects of the methanization of the industrial effluents; the associated reactional processes are detailed. The second part presents the technological criteria for choosing the methanization process in terms of the characteristics of the effluent to be treated. Some of the methanization processes are presented with their respective advantages and disadvantages. At last, is described the implementation of an industrial methanization unit. The size and the main choices are detailed: the anaerobic reactor, the control, the valorization aspects of the biogas produced. Some examples of industrial developments illustrate the different used options. (O.M.)

  1. Methane emissions from coal mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, C.M.; Kelafant, J.R.; Kuuskraa, V.A.; Manger, K.C.; Kruger, D.

    1990-09-01

    The report estimates global methane emissions from coal mining on a country specific basis, evaluates the technologies available to degasify coal seams and assesses the economics of recovering methane liberated during mining. 33 to 64 million tonnes were liberated in 1987 from coal mining, 75 per cent of which came from China, the USSR, Poland and the USA. Methane emissions from coal mining are likely to increase. Emission levels vary between surface and underground mines. The methane currently removed from underground mines for safety reasons could be used in a number of ways, which may be economically attractive. 55 refs., 19 figs., 24 tabs

  2. Plasma Thermal Conversion of Methane to Acetylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fincke, James Russell; Anderson, Raymond Paul; Hyde, Timothy Allen; Detering, Brent Alan; Wright, Randy Ben; Bewley, Randy Lee; Haggard, Delon C; Swank, William David

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a re-examination of a known process for the direct plasma thermal conversion of methane to acetylene. Conversion efficiencies (% methane converted) approached 100% and acetylene yields in the 90-95% range with 2-4% solid carbon production were demonstrated. Specificity for acetylene was higher than in prior work. Improvements in conversion efficiency, yield, and specificity were due primarily to improved injector design and reactant mixing, and minimization of temperature gradients and cold boundary layers. At the 60-kilowatt scale cooling by wall heat transfer appears to be sufficient to quench the product stream and prevent further reaction of acetylene resulting in the formation of heavier hydrocarbon products or solid carbon. Significantly increasing the quenching rate by aerodynamic expansion of the products through a converging-diverging nozzle led to a reduction in the yield of ethylene but had little effect on the yield of other hydrocarbon products. While greater product selectivity for acetylene has been demonstrated, the specific energy consumption per unit mass of acetylene produced was not improved upon. A kinetic model that includes the reaction mechanisms resulting in the formation of acetylene and heavier hydrocarbons, through benzene, is described

  3. Methane from wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, T. F.; Barreto, L.; Kypreos, S.; Stucki, S

    2005-07-15

    The role of wood-based energy technologies in the Swiss energy system in the long-term is examined using the energy-system Swiss MARKAL model. The Swiss MARKAL model is a 'bottom-up' energy-systems optimization model that allows a detailed representation of energy technologies. The model has been developed as a joint effort between the Energy Economics Group (EEG) at Paul Scherrer Institute PSI) and the University of Geneva and is currently used at PSI-EEG. Using the Swiss MARKAL model, this study examines the conditions under which wood-based energy technologies could play a role in the Swiss energy system, the most attractive pathways for their use and the policy measures that could support them. Given the involvement of PSI in the ECOGAS project, especial emphasis is put on the production of bio-SNG from wood via gasification and methanation of syngas and on hydrothermal gasification of woody biomass. Of specific interest as weIl is the fraction of fuel used in passenger cars that could be produced by locally harvested wood. The report is organized as follows: Section 2 presents a brief description of the MARKAL model. Section 3 describes the results of the base case scenario, which represents a plausible, 'middle-of-the-road' development of the Swiss energy system. Section 4 discusses results illustrating the conditions under which the wood-based methanation technology could become competitive in the Swiss energy market, the role of oil and gas prices, subsidies to methanation technologies and the introduction of a competing technology, namely the wood-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. FinaIly, section 5 outlines some conclusions from this analysis. (author)

  4. Methane from wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, T. F.; Barreto, L.; Kypreos, S.; Stucki, S.

    2005-07-01

    The role of wood-based energy technologies in the Swiss energy system in the long-term is examined using the energy-system Swiss MARKAL model. The Swiss MARKAL model is a 'bottom-up' energy-systems optimization model that allows a detailed representation of energy technologies. The model has been developed as a joint effort between the Energy Economics Group (EEG) at Paul Scherrer Institute PSI) and the University of Geneva and is currently used at PSI-EEG. Using the Swiss MARKAL model, this study examines the conditions under which wood-based energy technologies could play a role in the Swiss energy system, the most attractive pathways for their use and the policy measures that could support them. Given the involvement of PSI in the ECOGAS project, especial emphasis is put on the production of bio-SNG from wood via gasification and methanation of syngas and on hydrothermal gasification of woody biomass. Of specific interest as weIl is the fraction of fuel used in passenger cars that could be produced by locally harvested wood. The report is organized as follows: Section 2 presents a brief description of the MARKAL model. Section 3 describes the results of the base case scenario, which represents a plausible, 'middle-of-the-road' development of the Swiss energy system. Section 4 discusses results illustrating the conditions under which the wood-based methanation technology could become competitive in the Swiss energy market, the role of oil and gas prices, subsidies to methanation technologies and the introduction of a competing technology, namely the wood-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. FinaIly, section 5 outlines some conclusions from this analysis. (author)

  5. Methanogenesis and methane genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, J.N.; Shref, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the pathways leading to methane biosynthesis is presented. The steps investigated to date by gene cloning and DNA sequencing procedures are identified and discussed. The primary structures of component C of methyl coenzyme M reductase encoded by mcr operons in different methanogens are compared. Experiments to detect the primary structure of the genes encoding F420 reducing hydrogenase (frhABG) and methyl hydrogen reducing hydrogenase (mvhDGA) in methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum strain H are compared with each other and with eubacterial hydrogenase encoding genes. A biotechnological use for hydrogenases from hypermorphillic archaebacteria is suggested. (author)

  6. Large methane releases lead to strong aerosol forcing and reduced cloudiness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurten, T.; Zhou, L.; Makkonen, R.

    2011-01-01

    The release of vast quantities of methane into the atmosphere as a result of clathrate destabilization is a potential mechanism for rapid amplification of global warming. Previous studies have calculated the enhanced warming based mainly on the radiative effect of the methane itself, with smaller...... is predicted to significantly decrease hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations, while moderately increasing ozone (O-3). These changes lead to a 70% increase in the atmospheric lifetime of methane, and an 18% decrease in global mean cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC). The CDNC change causes a radiative...... forcing that is comparable in magnitude to the long-wave radiative forcing ("enhanced greenhouse effect") of the added methane. Together, the indirect CH4-O-3 and CH4-OHaerosol forcings could more than double the warming effect of large methane increases. Our findings may help explain the anomalously...

  7. Reaction of methane with coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, K.; Batts, B.D.; Wilson, M.A.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Maa, P.S.; Long, M.A.; He, S.J.X.; Attala, M.I. [Macquarie University, Macquarie, NSW (Australia). School of Chemistry

    1997-10-01

    A study of the reactivities of Australian coals and one American coal with methane or methane-hydrogen mixtures, in the range 350-400{degree}C and a range of pressures (6.0-8.3 MPa, cold) is reported. The effects of aluminophosphates (AIPO) or zeolite catalysts, with and without exchanged metals, on reactivity have also been examined. Yields of dichloromethane extractable material are increased by using a methane rather than a nitrogen atmosphere and different catalysts assist dissolution to various extends. It appears that surface exchanged catalysts are effective, but incorporating metals during AIPO lattice formation is detrimental. Aluminium phosphate catalysts are unstable to water produced during coal conversion, but are still able to increase extraction yields. For the American coal, under methane-hydrogen and a copper exchanged zeolite, 51.5% conversion was obtained, with a product selectivity close to that obtained under hydrogen alone, and with only 2% hydrogen consumption. The conversion under methane-hydrogen was also to that obtained under hydrogen alone, while a linear dependence of conversion on proportion of methane would predict a 43% conversion under methane-hydrogen. This illustrates a synergistic effect of the methane-hydrogen atmosphere for coal liquefaction using this catalyst systems. 31 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Methane and hydrogen production from crop biomass through anaerobic digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakarinen, O.

    2011-07-01

    The feasibility of methane and hydrogen production from energy crops through anaerobic digestion was evaluated in this thesis. The effects of environmental conditions, e.g. pH and temperature, as well as inoculum source on H{sub 2} yield were studied in batch assays. In addition, the effects of pre-treatments on methane and hydrogen yield as well as the feasibility of two-stage H{sub 2} + CH{sub 4} production was evaluated. Moreover, the effect of storage on methane yield of grasses was evaluated. Monodigestion of grass silage for methane production was studied, as well as shifting the methanogenic process to hydrogenic. Hydrogen production from grass silage and maize was shown to be possible with heat-treated inoculum in batch assays, with highest H{sub 2} yields of 16.0 and 9.9 ml gVS{sub added}-1 from untreated grass silage and maize, respectively. Pre-treatments (NaOH, HCl and water-extraction) showed some potential in increasing H{sub 2} yields, while methane yields were not affected. Two-stage H{sub 2} + CH{sub 4} producing process was shown to improve CH{sub 4} yields when compared to traditional one-stage CH{sub 4} process. Methane yield from grass silage monodigestion in continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with organic loading rate (OLR) of 2 kgVS (m3d)-1 and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 30 days was at most 218 l kgVS{sub fed}-1. Methanogenic process was shifted to hydrogenic by increasing the OLR to 10 kgVS (m3d)-1 and shortening the HRT to 6 days. Highest H{sub 2} yield from grass silage was 42 l kgVS{sub fed}-1 with a maximum H{sub 2} content of 24 %. Energy crops can be successfully stored even for prolonged periods without decrease in methane yield. However, under sub-optimal storage conditions loss in volatile solids (VS) content and methane yield can occur. According to present results energy crops such as grass silage and maize can be converted to hydrogen or methane in AD process. Hydrogen energy yields are typically only 2-5 % of the

  9. Investigation of the Methane Hydrate Formation by Cavitation Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, H.; Nagao, J.

    2015-12-01

    Methane hydrate (hereafter called "MH") is crystalline solid compound consisting of hydrogen-bonded water molecules forming cages and methane gas molecules enclosed in the cage. When using MH as an energy resource, MH is dissociated to methane gas and water and collect only the methane gas. The optimum MH production method was the "depressurization method". Here, the production of MH means dissociating MH in the geologic layers and collecting the resultant methane gas by production systems. In the production of MH by depressurization method, MH regeneration was consider to important problem for the flow assurance of MH production system. Therefore, it is necessary to clarify the effect of flow phenomena in the pipeline on hydrate regeneration. Cavitation is one of the flow phenomena which was considered a cause of MH regeneration. Large quantity of microbubbles are produced by cavitation in a moment, therefore, it is considered to promote MH formation. In order to verify the possible of MH regeneration by cavitation, it is necessary to detailed understanding the condition of MH formation by cavitation. As a part of a Japanese National hydrate research program (MH21, funded by METI), we performed a study on MH formation using by cavitation. The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate the formation MH by using cavitation in the various temperature and pressure condition, and to clarify the condition of MH formation by using observation results.

  10. Oxygen-Methane Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Tim

    2012-01-01

    An oxygen-methane thruster was conceived with integrated igniter/injector capable of nominal operation on either gaseous or liquid propellants. The thruster was designed to develop 100 lbf (approximately 445 N) thrust at vacuum conditions and use oxygen and methane as propellants. This continued development included refining the design of the thruster to minimize part count and manufacturing difficulties/cost, refining the modeling tools and capabilities that support system design and analysis, demonstrating the performance of the igniter and full thruster assembly with both gaseous and liquid propellants, and acquiring data from this testing in order to verify the design and operational parameters of the thruster. Thruster testing was conducted with gaseous propellants used for the igniter and thruster. The thruster was demonstrated to work with all types of propellant conditions, and provided the desired performance. Both the thruster and igniter were tested, as well as gaseous propellants, and found to provide the desired performance using the various propellant conditions. The engine also served as an injector testbed for MSFC-designed refractory combustion chambers made of rhenium.

  11. Search for interstellar methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knacke, R.F.; Kim, Y.H.; Noll, K.S.; Geballe, T.R.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers searched for interstellar methane in the spectra of infrared sources embedded in molecular clouds. New observations of several lines of the P and R branches of the nu 3 band of CH4 near 3.3 microns give column densities in the range N less than 1(-2) times 10 to the minus 16th power cm(-2). Resulting abundance ratios are (CH4)/(CO) less than 3.3 times 10 to the minus 2nd power toward GL961 in NGC 2244 and less than 2.4 times 10 to the minus 3rd power toward GL989 in the NGC 2264 molecular cloud. The limits, and those determined in earlier observations of BN in Orion and GL490, suggest that there is little methane in molecular clouds. The result agrees with predictions of chemical models. Exceptions could occur in clouds where oxygen may be depleted, for example by H2O freezing on grains. The present observations probably did not sample such regions

  12. Pretreatment of wheat straw for fermentation to methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of pretreating wheat straw with gamma-ray irradiation, ammonium hydroxide, and sodium hydroxide on methane yield, fermentation rate constant, and loss of feedstock constituents were evaluated using laboratory-scale batch fermentors. Results showed that methane yield increased as pretreatment alkali concentration increased, with the highest yield being 37% over untreated straw for the pretreatment consisting of sodium hydroxide dosage of 34 g OH - /kg volatile solids, at 90 0 C for 1 h. Gamma-ray irradiation had no significant effect on methane yield. Alkaline pretreatment temperatures above 100 0 C caused a decrease in methane yield. After more than 100 days of fermentation, all of the hemicellulose and more than 80% of the cellulose were degraded. The loss in cellulose and hemicellulose accounted for 100% of the volatile solids lost. No consistent effect of pretreatments on batch fermentation rates was noted. Semicontinuous fermentations of straw-manure mixtures confirmed the relative effectiveness of sodium- and ammonium-hydroxide pretreatments

  13. Methane production from marine macroalgae. A literature study with comments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josefsen, K.; Aasen, I.M.

    1995-06-16

    This report is a survey of the published literature on fermentation of marine macroalgae to produce methane. The emphasis is placed on modern fermentation process development, including both bio-technological and economic parameters. Marine macroalgae are mostly good feedstock for methane fermentation. The main carbohydrates in seaweeds are alginate, laminaria and mannitol. Both the N and P content of kelp are usually high enough to avoid nutrient limitation. The biogass produced from marine macroalgae usually contains 50 - 65% methane. Experimentally methane yields in the order of 0.35 - 0.43 m{sup 3}/kg volatile solids (VS) have been obtained from Macrocystis pyrifera and 0.20 - 0.30 m{sup 3}/kg VS for Laminaria sp. at long retention times (50-60 days) in completely mixed reactors. The maximum reported production rate in a completely mixed reactor is 2.7 vol CH{sub 4}/reactor volume x day for M. pyrifera. In reactor configurations giving longer solids retention times (SRT) than liquid retention times (LRT), the highest reported productivity was 3.3 vol/vol x day, with loading rate 9.6 kg VS/m{sup 3} x day, HRT 10 days and SRT 23 days. There are discussions of special problems related to fermentation of marine algae, in particular the sulphur content, the toxicity of H{sub 2}S and the precipitation of heavy metals as sulphides. 72 refs., 5 figs., 13 tabs.

  14. Methane production and methane consumption: a review of processes underlying wetland methane fluxes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, R.

    1998-01-01

    Potential rates of both methane production and methane consumption vary over three orders of magnitude and their distribution is skew. These rates are weakly correlated with ecosystem type, incubation temperature, in situ aeration, latitude, depth and distance to oxic/anoxic interface. Anaerobic

  15. Methane Recycling During Burial of Methane Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, K.; Flemings, P. B.

    2017-12-01

    We quantitatively investigate the integral processes of methane hydrate formation from local microbial methane generation, burial of methane hydrate with sedimentation, and methane recycling at the base of the hydrate stability zone (BHSZ) with a multiphase multicomponent numerical model. Methane recycling happens in cycles, and there is not a steady state. Each cycle starts with free gas accumulation from hydrate dissociation below the BHSZ. This free gas flows upward under buoyancy, elevates the hydrate saturation and capillary entry pressure at the BHSZ, and this prevents more free gas flowing in. Later as this layer with elevated hydrate saturation is buried and dissociated, the large amount of free gas newly released and accumulated below rapidly intrudes into the hydrate stability zone, drives rapid hydrate formation and creates three-phase (gas, liquid and hydrate) equilibrium above the BHSZ. The gas front retreats to below the BHSZ until all the free gas is depleted. The shallowest depth that the free gas reaches in one cycle moves toward seafloor as more and more methane is accumulated to the BHSZ with time. More methane is stored above the BHSZ in the form of concentrated hydrate in sediments with relatively uniform pore throat, and/or with greater compressibility. It is more difficult to initiate methane recycling in passive continental margins where the sedimentation rate is low, and in sediments with low organic matter content and/or methanogenesis reaction rate. The presence of a permeable layer can store methane for significant periods of time without recycling. In a 2D system where the seafloor dips rapidly, the updip gas flow along the BHSZ transports more methane toward topographic highs where methane gas and elevated hydrate saturation intrude deeper into the hydrate stability zone within one cycle. This could lead to intermittent gas venting at seafloor at the topographic highs. This study provides insights on many phenomenon associated with

  16. Titan's methane clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Romani, P. N.; Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Flasar, F. M.

    2010-04-01

    Measurements of the 12C/13C and D/H isotopic ratios in Titan's methane show intriguing differences from the values recorded in the giant planets. This implies that either (1) the atmosphere was differently endowed with material at the time of formation, or (2) evolutionary processes are at work in the moon's atmosphere - or some combination of the two. The Huygens Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer Instrument (GCMS) found 12CH4/13CH4 = 82 +/- 1 (Niemann et al. 2005), some 7% lower than the giant planets' value of 88 +/- 7 (Sada et al. 1996), which closely matches the terrestrial inorganic standard of 89. The Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) has previously reported 12CH4/13CH4 of 77 +/-3 based on nadir sounding, which we now revise upwards to 80 +/- 4 based on more accurate limb sounding. The CIRS and GCMS results are therefore in agreement about an overall enrichment in 13CH4 of ~10%. The value of D/H in Titan's CH4 has long been controversial: historical measurements have ranged from about 8-15 x 10-5 (e.g. Coustenis et al. 1989, Coustenis et al. 2003). A recent measurement based on CIRS limb data by Bezard et al. (2007) puts the D/H in CH4 at (13 +/- 1) x 10-5, very much greater than in Jupiter and Saturn, ~2 x 10-5 (Mahaffy et al. 1998, Fletcher et al. 2009). To add complexity, the 12C/13C and D/H vary among molecules in Titan atmosphere, typically showing enhancement in D but depletion in 13C in the daughter species (H2, C2H2, C2H6), relative to the photochemical progenitor, methane. Jennings et al. (2009) have sought to interpret the variance in carbon isotopes as a Kinetic Isotope Effect (KIE), whilst an explanation for the D/H in all molecules remains elusive (Cordier et al. 2008). In this presentation we argue that evolution of isotopic ratios in Titan's methane over time forms a ticking 'clock', somewhat analogous to isotopic ratios in geochronology. Under plausible assumptions about the initial values and subsequent replenishment, various

  17. Neutronic studies of a liquid hydrogen-water composite moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahara, T.; Ooi, M.; Iwasa, H.; Kiyanagi, Y.; Iverson, E.B.; Crabtree, J.A.; Lucas, A.T.

    2001-01-01

    A liquid hydrogen-liquid water composite moderator may provide performance like liquid methane at high-power spallation sources where liquid methane is impractical. We have measured the neutronic properties of such a composite moderator, where a hydrogen layer 1.25 cm thick was closely backed by water layers of 1.75 cm and 3.75 cm thickness. We also studied a moderator in which a 1.75 cm water layer was closely backed by a 1.25 cm hydrogen layer. We further performed simulations for each of these systems for comparison to the experimental results. We observed enhancement of the spectral intensity in the 'thermal' energy range as compared to the spectrum from a conventional liquid hydrogen moderator. This enhancement grew more significant as the water thickness increased, although the pulse shapes became wider as well. (author)

  18. Large methane releases lead to strong aerosol forcing and reduced cloudiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kurtén

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The release of vast quantities of methane into the atmosphere as a result of clathrate destabilization is a potential mechanism for rapid amplification of global warming. Previous studies have calculated the enhanced warming based mainly on the radiative effect of the methane itself, with smaller contributions from the associated carbon dioxide or ozone increases. Here, we study the effect of strongly elevated methane (CH4 levels on oxidant and aerosol particle concentrations using a combination of chemistry-transport and general circulation models. A 10-fold increase in methane concentrations is predicted to significantly decrease hydroxyl radical (OH concentrations, while moderately increasing ozone (O3. These changes lead to a 70 % increase in the atmospheric lifetime of methane, and an 18 % decrease in global mean cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC. The CDNC change causes a radiative forcing that is comparable in magnitude to the longwave radiative forcing ("enhanced greenhouse effect" of the added methane. Together, the indirect CH4-O3 and CH4-OH-aerosol forcings could more than double the warming effect of large methane increases. Our findings may help explain the anomalously large temperature changes associated with historic methane releases.

  19. Modeling and simulation of CO methanation process for renewable electricity storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Er-rbib, Hanaâ; Bouallou, Chakib

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a new approach of converting renewable electricity into methane via syngas (a mixture of CO and H 2 ) and CO methanation is presented. Surplus of electricity is used to electrolyze H 2 O and CO 2 to H 2 and CO by using a SOEC (Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cell). Syngas produced is then converted into methane. When high consumption peaks appear, methane is used to produce electricity. The main conversion step in this process is CO methanation. A modeling of catalytic fixed bed methanation reactor and a design of methanation unit composed of multistage adiabatic reactors are carried out using Aspen plus™ software. The model was validated by comparing the simulated results of gas composition (CH 4 , CO, CO 2 and H 2 ) with industrial data. In addition, the effects of recycle ratio on adiabatic reactor stages, outlet temperature, and H 2 and CO conversions are carefully investigated. It is found that for storing 10 MW of renewable electricity, methanation unit is composed of three adiabatic reactors with recycle loop and intermediate cooling at 553 K and 1.5 MPa. The methanation unit generates 3778.6 kg/h of steam at 523.2 K and 1 MPa (13.67 MW). - Highlights: • A catalytic fixed bed reactor of CO methanation was modeled. • The maximum relative error of the methanation reactor model is 12%. • For 10 MW storage of renewable electricity, three adiabatic reactors are required. • The recycle ratio affects the reactor outlet temperature and CO conversion

  20. Recent advances in methane activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huuska, M; Kataja, K [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    Considerable work has been done in the research and development of methane conversion technologies. Although some promising conversion processes have been demonstrated, further advances in engineering and also in the chemistry are needed before these technologies become commercial. High-temperature processes, e.g. the oxidative coupling of methane, studied thoroughly during the last 15 years, suffer from severe theoretical yield limits and poor economics. In the long term, the most promising approaches seem to be the organometallic and, especially, the biomimetic activation of methane. (author) (22 refs.)

  1. Recent advances in methane activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huuska, M.; Kataja, K. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Considerable work has been done in the research and development of methane conversion technologies. Although some promising conversion processes have been demonstrated, further advances in engineering and also in the chemistry are needed before these technologies become commercial. High-temperature processes, e.g. the oxidative coupling of methane, studied thoroughly during the last 15 years, suffer from severe theoretical yield limits and poor economics. In the long term, the most promising approaches seem to be the organometallic and, especially, the biomimetic activation of methane. (author) (22 refs.)

  2. Methane hydroxylation: a biomimetic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shilov, Aleksandr E; Shteinman, Al'bert A

    2012-01-01

    The review addresses direct methane oxidation — an important fundamental problem, which has attracted much attention of researchers in recent years. Analysis of the available results on biomimetic and bio-inspired methane oxygenation has demonstrated that assimilating of the experience of Nature on oxidation of methane and other alkanes significantly enriches the arsenal of chemistry and can radically change the character of the entire chemical production, as well as enables the solution of many material, energetic and environmental problems. The bibliography includes 310 references.

  3. Global Methane Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeburgh, W. S.

    2003-12-01

    Methane (CH4) has been studied as an atmospheric constituent for over 200 years. A 1776 letter from Alessandro Volta to Father Campi described the first experiments on flammable "air" released by shallow sediments in Lake Maggiore (Wolfe, 1996; King, 1992). The first quantitative measurements of CH4, both involving combustion and gravimetric determination of trapped oxidation products, were reported in French by Boussingault and Boussingault, 1864 and Gautier (1901), who reported CH4 concentrations of 10 ppmv and 0.28 ppmv (seashore) and 95 ppmv (Paris), respectively. The first modern measurements of atmospheric CH4 were the infrared absorption measurements of Migeotte (1948), who estimated an atmospheric concentration of 2.0 ppmv. Development of gas chromatography and the flame ionization detector in the 1950s led to observations of vertical CH4 distributions in the troposphere and stratosphere, and to establishment of time-series sampling programs in the late 1970s. Results from these sampling programs led to suggestions that the concentration of CH4, as that of CO2, was increasing in the atmosphere. The possible role of CH4 as a greenhouse gas stimulated further research on CH4 sources and sinks. Methane has also been of interest to microbiologists, but findings from microbiology have entered the larger context of the global CH4 budget only recently.Methane is the most abundant hydrocarbon in the atmosphere. It plays important roles in atmospheric chemistry and the radiative balance of the Earth. Stratospheric oxidation of CH4 provides a means of introducing water vapor above the tropopause. Methane reacts with atomic chlorine in the stratosphere, forming HCl, a reservoir species for chlorine. Some 90% of the CH4 entering the atmosphere is oxidized through reactions initiated by the OH radical. These reactions are discussed in more detail by Wofsy (1976) and Cicerone and Oremland (1988), and are important in controlling the oxidation state of the atmosphere

  4. Synthetic methane for power storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botta, G.; Barankin, Michael; Walspurger, S.

    2013-01-01

    With increased share of energy generated from variable renewable sources, storage becomes a critical issue to ensure constantly balanced supply/demand. Methane is a promising vector for energy storage and transport.

  5. Methane flux from boreal peatlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crill, P.; Bartlett, K.; Roulet, N.

    1992-01-01

    The peatlands in the boreal zone (roughly 45 deg - 60 degN) store a significant reservoir of carbon, much of which is potentially available for exchange with the atmosphere. The anaerobic conditions that cause these soils to accumulate carbon also makes wet, boreal peatlands significant sources of methane to the global troposphere. It is estimated that boreal wetlands contribute approximately 19.5 Tg methane per year. The data available on the magnitude of boreal methane emissions have rapidly accumulated in the past twenty years. This paper offers a short review of the flux measured (with range roughly 1 - 2000 mg methane/m2d), considers environmental controls of the flux and briefly discusses how climate change might affect future fluxes

  6. Enteric Methane Emission from Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henry; Theil, Peter Kappel; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    2011-01-01

    per kg meat produced is increased (Fernández et al. 1983; Lekule et al. 1990). The present chapter will summarise our current knowledge concerning dietary and enteric fermentation that may influence the methane (CH4) emission in pigs. Enteric fermentation is the digestive process by which.......3 % of the worlds pig population. The main number of pigs is in Asia (59.6 %) where the main pig population stay in China (47.8 % of the worlds pig population). The objective of the chapter is therefore: To obtain a general overview of the pigs’ contribution to methane emission. Where is the pigs’ enteric gas...... produced and how is it measured. The variation in methane emission and factors affecting the emission. Possibility for reducing the enteric methane emission and the consequences....

  7. Methane-bomb natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    About 50% of the so-called 'greenhouse-effect' is not caused by CO 2 , but by more dangerous gases, among them is methane. Natural gas consists to about 98% of methane. In Austria result about 15% of the methane emissions from offtake, storage, transport (pipelines) and distribution from natural gas. A research study of the Research Centre Seibersdorf points out that between 2.5% and 3.6% of the employed natural gas in Austria emits. The impact of this emitted methane is about 29 times worse than the impact of CO 2 (caused for examples by petroleum burning). Nevertheless the Austrian CO 2 -commission states that an increasing use of natural gas would decrease the CO 2 -emissions - but this statement is suspected to be based on wrong assumptions. (blahsl)

  8. Methane gas from cow dung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-01-01

    The Khadi and Village Industries Commission offers a gobar gas (methane gas) production scheme. The gas plant, available in sizes of 60 to 3000 cu ft, requires only low maintenance expenditures. The cow dung, which is at present being wasted or burned as domestic fuel, can be used for manufacturing methane for fuel gas. The residue will be a good fertilizer for increasing food production. There are now about 4000 gobar gas plants in India.

  9. Methane production from cheese whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, J Q; Liao, P H; Lo, K V

    1988-01-01

    Cheese whey was treated in a 17.5-litre laboratory-scale up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor operated over a range of hydraulic retention times and organic loading rates. The reactor performance was determined in terms of methane production, volatile fatty acids conversion and chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction. At a constant influent strength, the methane production rate decreased with decreasing hydraulic retention time. At constant hydraulic retention time the methane production rate increased as the influent strength was increased up to a concentration of 28.8 g COD litre/sup -1/. The methane production rate was similar for two influent concentrations studied at hydraulic retention times longer than 10 days. The effect of short hydraulic retention times on methane production rate was more pronounced for the higher influent concentration than for the lower influent concentration. The highest methane production rate of 9.57 litres CH/sub 4/ litre/sup -1/ feed day/sup -1/ was obtained at a loading rate of 5.96 g/sup -1/ COD litre/sup -1/ and an influent concentration of 28.8 g COD litre/sup -1/. A high treatment efficiency in terms of chemical oxygen demand reduction was obtained. In general, over 98% removal of chemical oxygen demand was achieved. The results indicated that anaerobic digestion of cheese whey using an upflow sludge blanket reactor could reduce pollution strength and produce energy for a cheese plant.

  10. The California Baseline Methane Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duren, R. M.; Thorpe, A. K.; Hopkins, F. M.; Rafiq, T.; Bue, B. D.; Prasad, K.; Mccubbin, I.; Miller, C. E.

    2017-12-01

    The California Baseline Methane Survey is the first systematic, statewide assessment of methane point source emissions. The objectives are to reduce uncertainty in the state's methane budget and to identify emission mitigation priorities for state and local agencies, utilities and facility owners. The project combines remote sensing of large areas with airborne imaging spectroscopy and spatially resolved bottom-up data sets to detect, quantify and attribute emissions from diverse sectors including agriculture, waste management, oil and gas production and the natural gas supply chain. Phase 1 of the project surveyed nearly 180,000 individual facilities and infrastructure components across California in 2016 - achieving completeness rates ranging from 20% to 100% per emission sector at < 5 meters spatial resolution. Additionally, intensive studies of key areas and sectors were performed to assess source persistence and variability at times scales ranging from minutes to months. Phase 2 of the project continues with additional data collection in Spring and Fall 2017. We describe the survey design and measurement, modeling and analysis methods. We present initial findings regarding the spatial, temporal and sectoral distribution of methane point source emissions in California and their estimated contribution to the state's total methane budget. We provide case-studies and lessons learned about key sectors including examples where super-emitters were identified and mitigated. We summarize challenges and recommendations for future methane research, inventories and mitigation guidance within and beyond California.

  11. Rapid solar-thermal decarbonization of methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Jaimee Kristen

    Due to the ever-increasing demand for energy and the concern over the environmental impact of continuing to produce energy using current methods, there is interest in developing a hydrogen economy. Hydrogen is a desirable energy source because it is abundant in nature and burns cleanly. One method for producing hydrogen is to utilize a renewable energy source to obtain high enough temperatures to decompose a fossil fuel into its elements. This thesis work is directed at developing a solar-thermal aerosol flow reactor to dissociate methane to carbon black and hydrogen. The technology is intended as a "bridge" between current hydrogen production methods, such as conventional steam-methane reformers, and future "zero emission" technology for producing hydrogen, such as dissociating water using a renewable heating source. A solar furnace is used to heat a reactor to temperatures in excess of 2000 K. The final reactor design studied consists of three concentric vertical tubes---an outer quartz protection tube, a middle solid graphite heating tube, and an inner porous graphite reaction tube. A "fluid-wall" is created on the inside wall of the porous reaction tube in order to prevent deposition of the carbon black co-product on the reactor tube wall. The amorphous carbon black produced aids in heating the gas stream by absorbing radiation from the reactor wall. Conversions of 90% are obtained at a reactor wall temperature of 2100 K and an average residence time of 0.01 s. Computer modeling is also performed to study the gas flow and temperature profiles in the reactor as well as the kinetics of the methane dissociation reaction. The simulations indicate that there is little flow of the fluid-wall gas through the porous wall in the hot zone region, but this can be remedied by increasing the inlet temperature of the fluid-wall gas and/or increasing the tube permeability only in the hot zone region of the wall. The following expression describes the kinetics of methane

  12. Pembuatan gas methane dari limbah padat penyamakan kulit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prayitno Prayitno

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Leather tanning industry is one of the industry which potentially causes environmental problem. For processing, a lot of water and chemical are used, generates a lot of liquid waste, which are powerful pollution in water an in soil. There will also be animal residues from such operation as cleaning, fleshing, splitting and trimming. Each of these generates solid waste which must be disposed. It is a big problem for handling the solid waste because of their volume and highly odours when they decompose in their solid form. Untanned solid waste and liquid waste generated in the tanning process have a high organic content (protein and fats and their humidity …. are such that they are readily degradated by methane fermentation.

  13. Quantification of methane emissions from danish landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Mønster, Jacob; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Whole-landfill methane emission was quantified using a tracer technique that combines controlled tracer gas release from the landfill with time-resolved concentration measurements downwind of the landfill using a mobile high-resolution analytical instrument. Methane emissions from 13 Danish...... landfills varied between 2.6 and 60.8 kg CH4 h–1. The highest methane emission was measured at the largest (in terms of disposed waste amounts) of the 13 landfills, whereas the lowest methane emissions (2.6-6.1 kgCH4 h–1) were measured at the older and smaller landfills. At two of the sites, which had gas...... collection, emission measurements showed that the gas collection systems only collected between 30-50% of the methane produced (assuming that the produced methane equalled the sum of the emitted methane and the collected methane). Significant methane emissions were observed from disposed shredder waste...

  14. Is methane a new therapeutic gas?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wenwu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methane is an attractive fuel. Biologically, methanogens in the colon can use carbon dioxide and hydrogen to produce methane as a by-product. It was previously considered that methane is not utilized by humans. However, in a recent study, results demonstrated that methane could exert anti-inflammatory effects in a dog small intestinal ischemia-reperfusion model. Point of view Actually, the bioactivity of methane has been investigated in gastrointestinal diseases, but the exact mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory effects is required to be further elucidated. Methane can cross the membrane and is easy to collect due to its abundance in natural gas. Although methane is flammable, saline rich in methane can be prepared for clinical use. These seem to be good news in application of methane as a therapeutic gas. Conclusion Several problems should be resolved before its wide application in clinical practice.

  15. Influence of biogenic gas production on coalbed methane recovery index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Guo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In investigating the effect of biogenic gas production on the recovery of coalbed methane (CBM, coal samples spanning different ranks were applied in the microbial-functioned simulation experiments for biogenic methane production. Based on the biogenic methane yield, testing of pore structures, and the isothermal adsorption data of coals used before and after the simulation experiments, several key parameters related to the recovery of CBM, including recovery rate, gas saturation and ratio of critical desorption pressure to reservoir pressure, etc., were calculated and the corresponding variations were further analyzed. The results show that one of the significant functions of microbial communities on coal is possibly to weaken its affinity for methane gas, especially with the advance of coal ranks; and that by enhancing the pore system of coal, which can be evidenced by the increase of porosity and permeability, the samples collected from Qianqiu (Yima in Henan and Shaqu (Liulin in Shanxi coal mines all see a notable increase in the critical desorption pressure, gas saturation and recovery rate, as compared to the moderate changes of that of Guandi (Xishan in Shanxi coal sample. It is concluded that the significance of enhanced biogenic gas is not only in the increase of CBM resources and the improvement of CBM recoverability, but in serving as an engineering reference for domestic coalbed biogenic gas production.

  16. Manufacture of Methane Hydrate using Carbon Nano Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Seek

    2010-02-01

    Methane hydrate is formed by physical binding between water molecule and gas such as methane, ethane, propane, or carbon dioxide, etc., which is captured in the cavities of water molecule under the specific temperature and pressure. More than 99% of naturally produced methane hydrate consists of methane, and is widely dispersed in the continental slope and continental Shelf of the Pacific and the Atlantic, the Antarctica etc. The reserve of fossil fuel is 500 billion carbon ton and the reserve of methane is 360 million carbon ton. The reserve of gas hydrate is more than 1 trillion carbon ton, which is twice the fossil fuel. Therefore, natural gas hydrate as a kind of gas hydrate is expected to replace fossil fuel as new energy source of 21st century. Also 1 m 3 hydrate of pure methane can be decomposed to the maximum of 216 m 3 methane at standard condition. If these characteristics of hydrate are reversely utilized, natural gas is fixed into water in the form of hydrate solid. Therefore, the hydrate is considered to be a great way to transport and store natural gas in large quantity. Especially the transportation cost is known to be 18∼25% less than the liquefied transportation. However, when natural gas hydrate is artificially formed, its reaction time may be too long and the gas consumption in water becomes relatively low, because the reaction rate between water and gas is low. Therefore, for the practical purpose in the application, the present investigation focuses on the rapid production of hydrates and increases gas consumption by adding MWCNT and NaCl into pure water. The results show that the equilibrium pressure in seawater is more higher than that in pure water, and methane hydrate could be formed rapidly during pressurization if the subcooling is maintained at 9K or above in seawater and 8K or above in pure water, respectively. Also, amount of consumed gas volume in pure water is more higher that in seawater at the same experimental conditions

  17. Characterization of Methane Degradation and Methane-Degrading Microbes in Alaska Coastal Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchman, David L. [Univ. of Delaware, Lewes, DE (United States)

    2012-03-29

    The net flux of methane from methane hydrates and other sources to the atmosphere depends on methane degradation as well as methane production and release from geological sources. The goal of this project was to examine methane-degrading archaea and organic carbon oxidizing bacteria in methane-rich and methane-poor sediments of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska. The Beaufort Sea system was sampled as part of a multi-disciplinary expedition (Methane in the Arctic Shelf or MIDAS) in September 2009. Microbial communities were examined by quantitative PCR analyses of 16S rRNA genes and key methane degradation genes (pmoA and mcrA involved in aerobic and anaerobic methane degradation, respectively), tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to determine the taxonomic make up of microbes in these sediments, and sequencing of all microbial genes (metagenomes ). The taxonomic and functional make-up of the microbial communities varied with methane concentrations, with some data suggesting higher abundances of potential methane-oxidizing archaea in methane-rich sediments. Sequence analysis of PCR amplicons revealed that most of the mcrA genes were from the ANME-2 group of methane oxidizers. According to metagenomic data, genes involved in methane degradation and other degradation pathways changed with sediment depth along with sulfate and methane concentrations. Most importantly, sulfate reduction genes decreased with depth while the anaerobic methane degradation gene (mcrA) increased along with methane concentrations. The number of potential methane degradation genes (mcrA) was low and inconsistent with other data indicating the large impact of methane on these sediments. The data can be reconciled if a small number of potential methane-oxidizing archaea mediates a large flux of carbon in these sediments. Our study is the first to report metagenomic data from sediments dominated by ANME-2 archaea and is one of the few to examine the entire microbial assemblage potentially involved in

  18. Microwave Pretreatments of Switchgrass Leaf and Stem Fractions to Increase Methane Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhui Wu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of microwave pretreatments on methane production from two switchgrass tissues (leaf vs. stem. The methane production from the leaf fraction was significantly affected by the microwave final temperature, while production from the stem fraction was affected by the combination of the microwave final temperature and heating rate. Thus, the highest methane yield from the leaf (134.81 mL CH4/g of volatile solids (VS was obtained at 100 °C, while the highest yield from the stem (99.35 mL CH4/g VS was obtained at 150 °C, with a heating rate of 10 °C/min. Although methane production from the leaf fraction was merely enhanced by 9.1% after microwave pretreatments, the time required to reach 80% of ultimate methane production was reduced by 12 days. For the stem fraction, methane production was improved by 5.2% after microwave pretreatment, and the time to obtain 80% of ultimate methane production increased.

  19. Screening boreal energy crops and crop residues for methane biofuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtomaeki, A.; Rintala, J.A. [Department of Biological and Environmental Science, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Viinikainen, T.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of the study was to screen potential boreal energy crops and crop residues for their suitability in methane production and to investigate the effect of harvest time on the methane production potential of different crops. The specific methane yields of crops, determined in 100-200 d methane potential assays, varied from 0.17 to 0.49 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4} kg{sup -1} VS{sub added} (volatile solids added) and from 25 to 260 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4} t{sub ww}{sup -1} (tonnes of wet weight). Jerusalem artichoke, timothy-clover grass and reed canary grass gave the highest potential methane yields of 2900-5400 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4} ha{sup -1}, corresponding to a gross energy yield of 28-53 MWh ha{sup -1} and ca. 40,000-60,000 km ha{sup -1} in passenger car transport. The effect of harvest time on specific methane yields per VS of crops varied a lot, whereas the specific methane yields per t{sub ww} increased with most crops as the crops matured. (author)

  20. Concentrations and carbon isotope compositions of methane in the cored sediments from offshore SW Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, P.C.; Yang, T.F.; Hong, W.L. [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Geosciences; Lin, S.; Chen, J.C. [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei, Taiwan (China). Inst. of Oceanography; Sun, C.H. [CPC Corp., Wen Shan, Miaoli, Taiwan (China). Exploration and Development Research Inst.; Wang, Y. [Central Geological Survey, MOEA, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates are natural occurring solids that contain natural gases, mainly methane, within a rigid lattice of water molecules. They are a type of non-stoichiometric clathrates and metastable crystal products in low temperature and high pressure conditions and are widely distributed in oceans and in permafrost regions around the world. Gas hydrates have been considered as potential energy resources for the future since methane is the major gas inside gas hydrates. Methane is also a greenhouse gas that might affect the global climates from the dissociations of gas hydrates. Bottom simulating reflections (BSRs) have been found to be widely distributed in offshore southwestern Taiwan therefore, inferring the existence of potential gas hydrates underneath the seafloor sediments. This paper presented a study that involved the systematic collection of sea waters and cored sediments as well as the analysis of the gas composition of pore-space of sediments through ten cruises from 2003 to 2006. The paper discussed the results in terms of the distribution of methane concentrations in bottom waters and cored sediments; methane fluxes in offshore southwestern Taiwan; and isotopic compositions of methane in pore spaces of cored sediments. It was concluded that the carbon isotopic compositions of methane demonstrated that biogenic gas source was dominated at shallower depth. However, some thermogenic gases might be introduced from deeper source in this region. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Methane as a climate gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsdottir, S.

    1996-03-01

    This paper was read at the workshop ``The Norwegian Climate and Ozone Research Programme`` held on 11-12 March 1996. Methane is a key component in the atmosphere where its concentration has increased rapidly since pre-industrial time. About 2/3 of it is caused by human activities. Changes in methane will affect the concentrations of other gases, and a model is a very important tool to study sensitivity due to changes in concentration of gases. The author used a three-dimensional global chemistry transport model to study the effect of changes in methane concentration on other trace gases. The model includes natural and anthropogenic emissions of NOx, CO, CH{sub 4} and non-methane hydrocarbons. Wet and dry deposition are also included. The chemical scheme in the model includes 49 compounds, 101 reactions, and 16 photolytic reactions. The trace gas concentrations are calculated every 30 min, using a quasi steady state approximation. Model calculations of three cases are reported and compared. Enhanced methane concentration will have strongest effect in remote regions. In polluted areas local chemistry will have remarked effect. The feedback was always positive. Average atmospheric lifetime calculated in the model was 7.6 years, which agrees with recent estimates based on observations. 8 refs.

  2. Methane layering in bord and pillar workings.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Creedy, DP

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available This report reviews the state of knowledge on the occurrence, investigation, detection, monitoring, prevention and dispensation of methane layers in coal mines. Mining practice throughout the world in respect of methane layering is generally reliant...

  3. A Possible Sink for Methane on Mars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nørnberg, P.; Jensen, S. J. K.; Skibsted, J.; Jakobsen, H. J.; ten Kate, I. L.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Merrison, J. P.; Finster, K.; Bak, E.; Iversen, J. J.; Kondrup, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical simulated wind activation of mineral surfaces act as a trap for Methane through formation of covalent Si-C bonds stable up to temperatures above 250 C. This mechanism is proposed as a Methane sink on Mars.

  4. METHANE INCORPORATION BY PROCARYOTIC PHOTOSYNTHETICMICROORGANISMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, Charles J.; Kirk, Martha; Calvin, Melvin

    1970-08-01

    The procaryotic photosynthetic microorganisms Anacystis nidulans, Nostoc and Rhodospirillum rubrum have cell walls and membranes that are resistant to the solution of methane in their lipid components and intracellular fluids. But Anacystis nidulans, possesses a limited bioxidant system, a portion of which may be extracellularly secreted, which rapidly oxidizes methane to carbon dioxide. Small C{sup 14} activities derived from CH{sub 4} in excess of experimental error are detected in all the major biochemical fractions of Anacystis nidulans and Nostoc. This limited capacity to metabolize methane appears to be a vestigial potentiality that originated over two billion years ago in the early evolution of photosynthetic bacteria and blue-green algae.

  5. Uncertainty assessment of the breath methane concentration method to determine methane production of dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Liansun; Groot Koerkamp, Peter W.G.; Ogink, Nico

    2018-01-01

    The breath methane concentration method uses the methane concentrations in the cow's breath during feed bin visits as a proxy for the methane production rate. The objective of this study was to assess the uncertainty of a breath methane concentration method in a feeder and its capability to measure

  6. Handbook methane potential; Handbok metanpotential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, My (AnoxKaldnes AB (Sweden)); Schnurer, Anna (Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2011-07-15

    Before using a organic material for biogas production it is essential to evaluate the methane production potential. The methane potential is one important tool possible to use during planning of new plants but also when new materials are considered for already running biogas plants. The chemical composition of different organic material varies extensively and this will have an impact on both the degradability and the methane potential. Information about the methane potential of a specific material can sometimes be found in the literature or can be calculated after a chemical/ physical or biological characterization. Here, the BMP test (Biochemical Methane Potential) is a commonly used method. Today the BMP test is a commonly used method to determine the methane potential. Many national and international research groups, consultants as well as personal at biogas plants are using this method and there is a lot of data available in the literature from such tests. In addition there are several protocols giving guidelines on how to execute a BMP-test. The BMP-test is performed in many different ways, not always under optimized conditions, and there is a lack of information on how to interpret the obtained data. This report summarizes knowledge from the literature and the experience from a Swedish referee group, consisting of persons being active performers of BMP-tests. The report does not include a standardized protocol as the procedure can be performed in different ways depending on available equipment and on the type of material to be tested. Instead the report discusses different factors of great importance for a successful test giving reliable results. The report also summarizes important information concerning the interpretation and how to present results in order to allow comparison of data from different test.

  7. Methane from landfills in Sweden. Final report; Metan fraan avfallsupplag i Sverige. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelsson, Jerker [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Galle, Bo; Boerjesson, Gunnar [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Water and Environmental Studies

    2006-01-15

    {sup 13}CH4 compared to {sup 12}CH4 that takes part as the landfill gas is transported through the landfill cover soil. The measurement procedure is complex and 95%-confidence intervals in the range of (-50%, +200%) of the measurement value are not unusual. A comparison between measurement data and model calculations, using the IPCC-model applied in the national climate gas reporting of methane from landfills, shows that the model overestimates the methane production in most cases. A linear model of methane production dependent on the amount of landfilled municipal solid waste, gave a good fit to measurement data (R{sup 2}=0.94). This model was applied to Swedish landfill statistics from 1990 and onward. The resulting Swedish budget for landfill methane emissions became 95{+-}21 k tonnes/year, assuming 10% methane oxidation over all. The IPCC-model arrived at a value 41% higher. Adjusting the IPCC model parameter called DOCf, from 0.7 to 0.54 according to a fit against measurement data, the IPCC-model arrived at yearly methane emission 9% higher than the linear model discussed. The DOCf factor describes the fraction of the gas potential that is converted into methane.

  8. Performance Simulations for a Spaceborne Methane Lidar Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiemle, C.; Kawa, Stephan Randolph; Quatrevalet, Mathieu; Browell, Edward V.

    2014-01-01

    Future spaceborne lidar measurements of key anthropogenic greenhouse gases are expected to close current observational gaps particularly over remote, polar, and aerosol-contaminated regions, where actual in situ and passive remote sensing observation techniques have difficulties. For methane, a "Methane Remote Lidar Mission" was proposed by Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt and Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales in the frame of a German-French climate monitoring initiative. Simulations assess the performance of this mission with the help of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations of the earth's surface albedo and atmospheric optical depth. These are key environmental parameters for integrated path differential absorption lidar which uses the surface backscatter to measure the total atmospheric methane column. Results showthat a lidar with an average optical power of 0.45W at 1.6 µm wavelength and a telescope diameter of 0.55 m, installed on a low Earth orbit platform(506 km), will measure methane columns at precisions of 1.2%, 1.7%, and 2.1% over land, water, and snow or ice surfaces, respectively, for monthly aggregated measurement samples within areas of 50 × 50 km2. Globally, the mean precision for the simulated year 2007 is 1.6%, with a standard deviation of 0.7%. At high latitudes, a lower reflectance due to snow and ice is compensated by denser measurements, owing to the orbital pattern. Over key methane source regions such as densely populated areas, boreal and tropical wetlands, or permafrost, our simulations show that the measurement precision will be between 1 and 2%.

  9. Methane Post-Processing for Oxygen Loop Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Zachary W.; Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee

    2016-01-01

    State-of-the-art United States Atmospheric Revitalization carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction is based on the Sabatier reaction process, which recovers approximately 50% of the oxygen (O2) from crew metabolic CO2. Oxygen recovery from carbon dioxide is constrained by the limited availability of reactant hydrogen. Post-processing of methane to recover hydrogen with the Umpqua Research Company Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) has the potential to further close the Atmospheric Revitalization oxygen loop. The PPA decomposes methane into hydrogen and hydrocarbons, predominantly acetylene, and a small amount of solid carbon. The hydrogen must then be purified before it can be recycled for additional oxygen recovery. Long duration testing and evaluation of a four crew-member sized PPA and a discussion of hydrogen recycling system architectures are presented.

  10. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) of artichoke waste: the inoculum effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Andrea; Serranti, Silvia; Bonifazi, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate anaerobic digestibility of artichoke waste resulting from industrial transformation. A series of batch anaerobic digestion tests was performed in order to evaluate the biochemical methane potential of the matrix in respect of the process. A comparison of the different performances of the laboratory-scale reactors operating in mesophilic conditions and utilizing three different values of the inoculum/substrate ratio was carried out. The best performance was achieved with an inoculum/substrate ratio of 2. Artichoke-processing byproducts showed a classical organic waste decomposition behaviour: a fast start-up phase, an acclimation stage, and a final stabilization phase. Following this approach, artichoke waste reached chemical oxygen demand removal of about 90% in 40 days. The high methane yield (average 408.62 mL CH4 gvs (-1) voltatile solids), makes artichoke waste a good product to be utilized in anaerobic digestion plants for biogas production.

  11. Implementation of methane cycling for deep time, global warming simulations with the DCESS Earth System Model (Version 1.2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaffer, Gary; Villanueva, Esteban Fernández; Rondanelli, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Geological records reveal a number of ancient, large and rapid negative excursions of carbon-13 isotope. Such excursions can only be explained by massive injections of depleted carbon to the Earth System over a short duration. These injections may have forced strong global warming events, sometimes....... With this improved DCESS model version and paleo-reconstructions, we are now better armed to gauge the amounts, types, time scales and locations of methane injections driving specific, observed deep time, global warming events......., or from warming-induced dissociation of methane hydrate, a solid compound of methane and water found in ocean sediments. As a consequence of the ubiquity and importance of methane in major Earth events, Earth System models should include a comprehensive treatment of methane cycling but such a treatment...

  12. Thermophilic anaerobic oxidation of methane by marine microbial consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holler, Thomas; Widdel, Friedrich; Knittel, Katrin; Amann, Rudolf; Kellermann, Matthias Y; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Teske, Andreas; Boetius, Antje; Wegener, Gunter

    2011-12-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate controls the emission of the greenhouse gas methane from the ocean floor. AOM is performed by microbial consortia of archaea (ANME) associated with partners related to sulfate-reducing bacteria. In vitro enrichments of AOM were so far only successful at temperatures ≤25 °C; however, energy gain for growth by AOM with sulfate is in principle also possible at higher temperatures. Sequences of 16S rRNA genes and core lipids characteristic for ANME as well as hints of in situ AOM activity were indeed reported for geothermally heated marine environments, yet no direct evidence for thermophilic growth of marine ANME consortia was obtained to date. To study possible thermophilic AOM, we investigated hydrothermally influenced sediment from the Guaymas Basin. In vitro incubations showed activity of sulfate-dependent methane oxidation between 5 and 70 °C with an apparent optimum between 45 and 60 °C. AOM was absent at temperatures ≥75 °C. Long-term enrichment of AOM was fastest at 50 °C, yielding a 13-fold increase of methane-dependent sulfate reduction within 250 days, equivalent to an apparent doubling time of 68 days. The enrichments were dominated by novel ANME-1 consortia, mostly associated with bacterial partners of the deltaproteobacterial HotSeep-1 cluster, a deeply branching phylogenetic group previously found in a butane-amended 60 °C-enrichment culture of Guaymas sediments. The closest relatives (Desulfurella spp.; Hippea maritima) are moderately thermophilic sulfur reducers. Results indicate that AOM and ANME archaea could be of biogeochemical relevance not only in cold to moderate but also in hot marine habitats.

  13. Methane-fueled vehicles: A promising market for coalbed methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deul, M.

    1993-01-01

    The most acceptable alternative fuel for motor vehicles is compressed natural gas (CNG). An important potential source of such gas is coalbed methane, much of which is now being wasted. Although there are no technological impediments to the use of CNG it has not been adequately promoted for a variety of reasons: structural, institutional and for coalbed gas, legal. The benefits of using CNG fuel are manifold: clean burning, low cost, abundant, and usable in any internal combustion engine. Even though more than 30,000 CNG vehicles are now in use in the U.S.A., they are not readily available, fueling stations are not easily accessible, and there is general apathy on the part of the public because of negligence by such agencies as the Department of Energy, the Department of Transportation and the Environmental Protection Agency. The economic benefits of using methane are significant: 100,000 cubic feet of methane is equivalent to 800 gallons of gasoline. Considering the many millions of cubic feet methane wasted from coal mines conservation and use of this resource is a worthy national goal

  14. Nitrogen-fixing methane-utilizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, de J.A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Methane occurs abundantly in nature. In the presence of oxygen this gas may be metabolized by bacteria that are able to use it as carbon and energy source. Several types of bacteria involved in the oxidation of methane have been described in literature. Methane-utilizing bacteria have in

  15. Experimental study of methanic fermentation of straw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dopter, P; Beerens, H

    1952-12-03

    The amount of liquid manure obtainable was a limiting factor in methanic fermentation of wheat straw. An equal volume of 0.2% aqueous solution of Na formate could be substituted for 90% of the normal requirements of liquid manure. This shortened the preliminary stages of cellulosic fermentation when no methane was produced and slightly increased the subsequent yield of methane.

  16. 75 FR 9886 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane... the Committee: The purpose of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential...

  17. 46 CFR 154.703 - Methane (LNG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Methane (LNG). 154.703 Section 154.703 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... and Temperature Control § 154.703 Methane (LNG). Unless a cargo tank carrying methane (LNG) can...

  18. Methane emission reduction: an application of FUND

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, R.S.J.; Heintz, R.J.; Lammers, P.E.M.

    2003-01-01

    Methane is, after carbon dioxide, the most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas. Governments plan to abate methane emissions. A crude set of estimates of reduction costs is included in FUND, an integrated assessment model of climate change. In a cost-benefit analysis, methane emission reduction is

  19. Renewable Biochemical Methane Potential through Anaerobic Co-digestion from Selective Feed Stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thara, K.; Navis Karthika, Ignatius; Dheenadayalan, M. S., Dr

    2017-08-01

    Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) analysis provides a measure of the anaerobic biodegradability of a given substrate. BMP test is also used to evaluate the potential biogas (methane) production between various Co-digestion substrates. This test is also used to determine the amount of organic carbon in a given material that can be an aerobically converted to methane-Biogas. Studies were carried out for the production of biogas from the leather solid waste. Co-digestion (simultaneous digestion of two or more substrates) studies were carried out in batch reactor using the fleshing (a solid waste generated during the processing of raw hides or skins into finished leather) along with the fruit and vegetable waste at mesophilic condition 35° C). The anaerobic methanogenic seed sludge prepared separately followed by standard BMP test, which was used as the seed inoculums. Recent research on this topic is reviewed in this current paper.

  20. Enhanced methane productivity from swine manure fibers by aqueous ammonia soaking pretreatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurado, Esperanza; Skiadas, Ioannis; Gavala, Hariklia N.

    2011-01-01

    The necessity of increasing the methane productivity of manure based biogas plants has triggered the development of new separation technologies for being applied before anaerobic digestion of the manure. Thus, manure solid and liquid fractions could be used to centralized biogas plants for methane...... production and as fertilizer on the farm, respectively. One of the challenges of this approach is that the solid fraction of manure contains lignocellulosic fibers, which are difficult to digest and thus make anaerobic digestion process slow and economically unfavourable. In the present study, aqueous...... ammonia soaking (AAS) was investigated as a pretreatment method to disrupt lignocellulosic structure and increase methane potential of swine manure fibers. It was proven that AAS broke down the lignocellulosic structure dissolving approximately the 35% of lignin and maintaining cellulose...

  1. Application of Aqueous Ammonia Soaking for enhancement of methane potential of swine manure fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurado, Esperanza; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Skiadas, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    . No inhibition was observed for the digested fibers at the loadings tested while raw fibers exhibited slight inhibition only at very high loadings. Main conclusions: In the present study, AAS was successfully applied as a pretreatment method to increase methane potential of swine manure fibers. Batch anaerobic......Purpose: Increasing the methane productivity of manure based biogas plants is challenging because the solid fraction of manure contains lignocellulosic fibers, which are difficult to biodegrade and thus make anaerobic digestion process slow and economically unfavourable. Therefore, pretreatment...... of the solid fraction is a prerequisite for increasing its digestibility. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate aqueous ammonia soaking (AAS) and subsequent ammonia removal as a pretreatment method for increasing methane potential and biogas productivity of raw and digested manure fibers. Methods...

  2. Methane oxidation and methane fluxes in the ocean surface layer and deep anoxic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, B. B.; Kilpatrick, K. A.; Novelli, P. C.; Scranton, M. I.

    1987-01-01

    Measured biological oxidation rates of methane in near-surface waters of the Cariaco Basin are compared with the diffusional fluxes computed from concentration gradients of methane in the surface layer. Methane fluxes and oxidation rates were investigated in surface waters, at the oxic/anoxic interface, and in deep anoxic waters. It is shown that the surface-waters oxidation of methane is a mechanism which modulates the flux of methane from marine waters to the atmosphere.

  3. Diversity of condensed tannin structures affects rumen in vitro methane production in sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia) accessions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatew, B.; Hayot Carbonero, C.; Stringano, E.; Sales, L. F.; Smith, L. M J; Mueller-Harvey, I.; Hendriks, W. H.; Pellikaan, W. F.

    2015-01-01

    Sainfoin is a non-bloating temperate forage legume with a moderate-to-high condensed tannin (CT) content. This study investigated whether the diversity of sainfoin accessions in terms of CT structures and contents could be related to rumen in vitro gas and methane (CH4) production and fermentation

  4. Biogasification of solid wastes by two-phase anaerobic fermentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, S.; Vieitez, E.R.; Liu, T.; Kato, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Municipal, industrial and agricultural solid wastes, and biomass deposits, cause large-scale pollution of land and water. Gaseous products of waste decomposition pollute the air and contribute to global warming. This paper describes the development of a two-phase fermentation system that alleviates methanogenic inhibition encountered with high-solids feed, accelerates methane fermentation of the solid bed, and captures methane (renewable energy) for captive use to reduce global warming. The innovative system consisted of a solid bed reactor packed with simulated solid waste at a density of 160 kg/m 3 and operated with recirculation of the percolated culture (bioleachate) through the bed. A rapid onset of solids hydrolysis, acidification, denitrification and hydrogen gas formation was observed under these operating conditions. However, these fermentative reactions stopped at a total fatty acids concentration of 13,000 mg/l (as acetic) at pH 5, with a reactor head-gas composition of 75 percent carbon dioxide, 20 percent nitrogen, 2 percent hydrogen and 3 percent methane. Fermentation inhibition was alleviated by moving the bioleachate to a separate methane-phase fermenter, and recycling methanogenic effluents at pH 7 to the solid bed. Coupled operation of the two reactors promoted methanogenic conversion of the high-solids feed. (author)

  5. Enzyme treatment to decrease solids and improve digestion of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of anaerobic digestion of primary sewage sludge is to convert the carbonaceous material contained in the solids into methane and carbon dioxide. The products of digestion are therefore gases, stabilised sludge solids which are subsequently dewatered and disposed of, and sludge liquor which is generally further ...

  6. Potential of biogas and methane production from anaerobic digestion of poultry slaughterhouse effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália da Silva Sunada

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of anaerobic digestion on the treatment of effluent from poultry slaughterhouse. The experiment was conducted at the Laboratory of Waste Recycling from Animal Production/FCA/UFGD. During four weeks, eight experimental digesters, semi-continuous models, were loaded and set according to the hydraulic retention time (HRT of 7, 14, 21 and 28 days, and according to the solid fraction treatment, separated with 1 mm sieve or without separation. The average weekly production of biogas and methane as well as the methane concentrations, the potential production per amount of chemical oxygen demand (COD added and reduced, the concentrations of N, P and K at the beginning and end of process, and the most likely numbers of total and thermotolerant coliforms were evaluated. For data analysis, a completely randomized design was performed in a 4 × 2 factorial arrangement (4 HRT: 7, 14, 21 and 28 days and separation with 1 mm sieve or without separation, with repetition over time. The highest production of biogas and methane was statistically significant for the HRT of 7 and 14 days (5.29 and 2.38 L of biogas and 4.28 and 1.73 L of methane, respectively. There was an interaction between HRT and the separation of the solid with sieve and the highest production was obtained in the treatment without separation. Similar behavior was observed for the potential production with a maximum of 0.41 m³ methane.kg-1 COD added with an HRT of 7 days without separation of the solid fraction. The separation of the solid fraction is not recommended in the pretreatment of liquid effluent from poultry slaughterhouse, once the potential for production and production of methane and biogas were reduced with this treatment.

  7. Simulation and Characterization of Methane Hydrate Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, S.; Gupta, I.

    2017-12-01

    The ever rising global energy demand dictates human endeavor to explore and exploit new and innovative energy sources. As conventional oil and gas reserves deplete, we are constantly looking for newer sources for sustainable energy. Gas hydrates have long been discussed as the next big energy resource to the earth. Its global occurrence and vast quantity of natural gas stored is one of the main reasons for such interest in its study and exploration. Gas hydrates are solid crystalline substances with trapped molecules of gas inside cage-like crystals of water molecules. Gases such as methane, ethane, propane and carbon dioxide can form hydrates but in natural state, methane hydrates are the most common. Subsurface geological conditions with high pressure and low temperature favor the formation and stability of gas hydrates. While the occurrence and potential of gas hydrates as energy source has long been studied, there are still gaps in knowledge, especially in the quantitative research of gas hydrate formation and reservoir characterization. This study is focused on exploring and understanding the geological setting in which gas hydrates are formed and the subsequent changes in rock characteristics as they are deposited. It involves the numerical simulation of methane gas flow through fault to form hydrates. The models are representative of the subsurface geologic setting of Gulf of Mexico with a fault through layers of shale and sandstone. Hydrate formation simulated is of thermogenic origin. The simulations are conducted using TOUGH+HYDRATE, a numerical code developed at the Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory for modeling multiphase flow through porous medium. Simulation results predict that as the gas hydrates form in the pores of the model, the porosity, permeability and other rock properties are altered. Preliminary simulation results have shown that hydrates begin to form in the fault zone and gradually in the sandstone layers. The increase in hydrate

  8. Cryptic Methane Emissions from Upland Forest Ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megonigal, Patrick [Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (United States); Pitz, Scott [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-04-19

    This exploratory research on Cryptic Methane Emissions from Upland Forest Ecosystems was motivated by evidence that upland ecosystems emit 36% as much methane to the atmosphere as global wetlands, yet we knew almost nothing about this source. The long-term objective was to refine Earth system models by quantifying methane emissions from upland forests, and elucidate the biogeochemical processes that govern upland methane emissions. The immediate objectives of the grant were to: (i) test the emerging paradigm that upland trees unexpectedly transpire methane, (ii) test the basic biogeochemical assumptions of an existing global model of upland methane emissions, and (iii) develop the suite of biogeochemical approaches that will be needed to advance research on upland methane emissions. We instrumented a temperate forest system in order to explore the processes that govern upland methane emissions. We demonstrated that methane is emitted from the stems of dominant tree species in temperate upland forests. Tree emissions occurred throughout the growing season, while soils adjacent to the trees consumed methane simultaneously, challenging the concept that forests are uniform sinks of methane. High frequency measurements revealed diurnal cycling in the rate of methane emissions, pointing to soils as the methane source and transpiration as the most likely pathway for methane transport. We propose the forests are smaller methane sinks than previously estimated due to stem emissions. Stem emissions may be particularly important in upland tropical forests characterized by high rainfall and transpiration, resolving differences between models and measurements. The methods we used can be effectively implemented in order to determine if the phenomenon is widespread.

  9. Microbial electrolysis contribution to anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge, leading to accelerated methane production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wenzong; Cai, Weiwei; Guo, Zechong

    2016-01-01

    Methane production rate (MPR) in waste activated sludge (WAS) digestion processes is typically limitedby the initial steps of complex organic matter degradation, leading to a limited MPR due to sludgefermentation speed of solid particles. In this study, a novel microbial electrolysis AD reactor (ME...

  10. Methane Dynamics in Flooded Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas with a heat trapping capacity 34 times greater than that of carbon dioxide on a100 year time scale. Known anthropogenic CH4 sources include livestock production, rice agriculture, landfills, and natural gas m...

  11. Coal Mine Methane in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This paper discusses coal mine methane emissions (CMM) in the Russian Federation and the potential for their productive utilisation. It highlights specific opportunities for cost-effective reductions of CMM from oil and natural gas facilities, coal mines and landfills, with the aim of improving knowledge about effective policy approaches.

  12. Reducing Open Cell Landfill Methane Emissions with a Bioactive Alternative Daily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helene Hilger; James Oliver; Jean Bogner; David Jones

    2009-03-31

    Methane and carbon dioxide are formed in landfills as wastes degrade. Molecule-for-molecule, methane is about 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the earth's atmosphere, and thus, it is the methane emissions from landfills that are scrutinized. For example, if emissions composed of 60% methane and 40% carbon dioxide were changed to a mix that was 40% methane and 60% carbon dioxide, a 30% reduction in the landfill's global warming potential would result. A 10% methane, 90% carbon dioxide ratio will result in a 75% reduction in global warming potential compared to the baseline. Gas collection from a closed landfill can reduce emissions, and it is sometimes combined with a biocover, an engineered system where methane oxidizing bacteria living in a medium such as compost, convert landfill methane to carbon dioxide and water. Although methane oxidizing bacteria merely convert one greenhouse gas (methane) to another (carbon dioxide), this conversion can offer significant reductions in the overall greenhouse gas contribution, or global warming potential, associated with the landfill. What has not been addressed to date is the fact that methane can also escape from a landfill when the active cell is being filled with waste. Federal regulations require that newly deposited solid waste to be covered daily with a 6 in layer of soil or an alternative daily cover (ADC), such as a canvas tarp. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of immobilizing methane oxidizing bacteria into a tarp-like matrix that could be used for alternative daily cover at open landfill cells to prevent methane emissions. A unique method of isolating methanotrophs from landfill cover soil was used to create a liquid culture of mixed methanotrophs. A variety of prospective immobilization techniques were used to affix the bacteria in a tarp-like matrix. Both gel encapsulation of methanotrophs and gels with liquid cores containing methanotrophs were readily

  13. Methane in German hard coal mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martens, P.N.; Den Drijver, J.

    1995-01-01

    Worldwide, hard coal mining is being carried out at ever increasing depth, and has, therefore, to cope with correspondingly increasing methane emissions are caused by coal mining. Beside carbon dioxide, chloro-fluoro-carbons (CFCs) and nitrogen oxides, methane is one of the most significant 'greenhouse' gases. It is mainly through the release of such trace gases that the greenhouse effect is brought about. Reducing methane emissions is therefore an important problem to be solved by the coal mining industry. This paper begins by highlighting some of the fundamental principles of methane in hard coal mining. The methane problem in German hard coal mining and the industry's efforts to reduce methane emissions are presented. The future development in German hard coal mining is illustrated by an example which shows how large methane volumes can be managed, while still maintaining high outputs at increasing depth. (author). 7 tabs., 10 figs., 20 refs

  14. methanes using Expanded Perlite-PPA as a heterogeneous solid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    or more of the following disadvantages such as high to- xicity, high cost .... Constituent. SiO2. Al2O3. K2O. Fe2O3. Na2O. CaO. MgO. Percentage. 75.22. 12.77. 5.18. 0.74 ...... I and Savvidis T 2006 Influence of thermal treatment on the water ...

  15. Response of the Black Sea methane budget to massive short-term submarine inputs of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmale, O.; Haeckel, M.; McGinnis, D. F.

    2011-01-01

    A steady state box model was developed to estimate the methane input into the Black Sea water column at various water depths. Our model results reveal a total input of methane of 4.7 Tg yr(-1). The model predicts that the input of methane is largest at water depths between 600 and 700 m (7......% of the total input), suggesting that the dissociation of methane gas hydrates at water depths equivalent to their upper stability limit may represent an important source of methane into the water column. In addition we discuss the effects of massive short-term methane inputs (e. g. through eruptions of deep......-water mud volcanoes or submarine landslides at intermediate water depths) on the water column methane distribution and the resulting methane emission to the atmosphere. Our non-steady state simulations predict that these inputs will be effectively buffered by intense microbial methane consumption...

  16. Improved methane removal in exhaust gas from biogas upgrading process using immobilized methane-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meng-Ting; Yang, Zhi-Man; Fu, Shan-Fei; Fan, Xiao-Lei; Guo, Rong-Bo

    2018-05-01

    Methane in exhaust gas from biogas upgrading process, which is a greenhouse gas, could cause global warming. The biofilter with immobilized methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) is a promising approach for methane removal, and the selections of inoculated MOB culture and support material are vital for the biofilter. In this work, five MOB consortia were enriched at different methane concentrations. The MOB-20 consortium enriched at the methane concentration of 20.0% (v/v) was then immobilized on sponge and two particle sizes of volcanic rock in biofilters to remove methane in exhaust gas from biogas upgrading process. Results showed that the immobilized MOB performed more admirable methane removal capacity than suspended cells. The immobilized MOB on sponge reached the highest methane removal efficiency (RE) of 35%. The rough surface, preferable hydroscopicity, appropriate pore size and particle size of support material might favor the MOB immobilization and accordingly methane removal. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Methane clathrates in the solar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousis, Olivier; Chassefière, Eric; Holm, Nils G; Bouquet, Alexis; Waite, Jack Hunter; Geppert, Wolf Dietrich; Picaud, Sylvain; Aikawa, Yuri; Ali-Dib, Mohamad; Charlou, Jean-Luc; Rousselot, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    We review the reservoirs of methane clathrates that may exist in the different bodies of the Solar System. Methane was formed in the interstellar medium prior to having been embedded in the protosolar nebula gas phase. This molecule was subsequently trapped in clathrates that formed from crystalline water ice during the cooling of the disk and incorporated in this form into the building blocks of comets, icy bodies, and giant planets. Methane clathrates may play an important role in the evolution of planetary atmospheres. On Earth, the production of methane in clathrates is essentially biological, and these compounds are mostly found in permafrost regions or in the sediments of continental shelves. On Mars, methane would more likely derive from hydrothermal reactions with olivine-rich material. If they do exist, martian methane clathrates would be stable only at depth in the cryosphere and sporadically release some methane into the atmosphere via mechanisms that remain to be determined. In the case of Titan, most of its methane probably originates from the protosolar nebula, where it would have been trapped in the clathrates agglomerated by the satellite's building blocks. Methane clathrates are still believed to play an important role in the present state of Titan. Their presence is invoked in the satellite's subsurface as a means of replenishing its atmosphere with methane via outgassing episodes. The internal oceans of Enceladus and Europa also provide appropriate thermodynamic conditions that allow formation of methane clathrates. In turn, these clathrates might influence the composition of these liquid reservoirs. Finally, comets and Kuiper Belt Objects might have formed from the agglomeration of clathrates and pure ices in the nebula. The methane observed in comets would then result from the destabilization of clathrate layers in the nuclei concurrent with their approach to perihelion. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations show that methane-rich clathrate

  18. Towards developing IPCC methane ‘emission factors’ for peatlands (organic soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Couwenberg

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available (1 Huge reductions of carbon dioxide (CO2 and nitrous oxide (N2O effluxes can be attained by rewetting drained peatlands, but this will increase methane (CH4 effluxes.(2 The scientific data base for methane effluxes from peatlands is much larger than that for CO2 or N2O. Once anoxic conditions are provided, the availability of fresh plant material is the major factor in methane production. Old (recalcitrant peat plays only a subordinate role in gas efflux.(3 The annual mean water level is a surprisingly good indicator for methane effluxes, but at high water levels the cover of aerenchymous shunts (gas conductive plant tissue becomes a better proxy. Ideally, both water level and cover of aerenchymous shunts should be assessed to arrive at robust estimates of methane effluxes.(4 The available data provide sufficient guidance for arriving at moderately accurate (Tier 1 estimates consistent with IPCC methodologies. For more accurate estimation (higher tier approaches, vegetation provides a promising basis for development of more detailed efflux factors. Vegetation is a good proxy for mean water levels and can provide - with extra attention to aerenchymous shunts - a robust proxy for accurate and spatially explicit estimates of methane effluxes over large areas.

  19. Turbulent burning rates of methane and methane-hydrogen mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairweather, M. [School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Ormsby, M.P.; Sheppard, C.G.W. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Woolley, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    Methane and methane-hydrogen (10%, 20% and 50% hydrogen by volume) mixtures have been ignited in a fan stirred bomb in turbulence and filmed using high speed cine schlieren imaging. Measurements were performed at 0.1 MPa (absolute) and 360 K. A turbulent burning velocity was determined for a range of turbulence velocities and equivalence ratios. Experimental laminar burning velocities and Markstein numbers were also derived. For all fuels the turbulent burning velocity increased with turbulence velocity. The addition of hydrogen generally resulted in increased turbulent and laminar burning velocity and decreased Markstein number. Those flames that were less sensitive to stretch (lower Markstein number) burned faster under turbulent conditions, especially as the turbulence levels were increased, compared to stretch-sensitive (high Markstein number) flames. (author)

  20. Production of electricity using methane generated from landfill site at Mehmood Booti, Lahore, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahjabeen, A.

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted to find out the potential of municipal solid waste of Lahore to generate electricity from the methane gas produced during anaerobic decomposition of rapidly decomposable organic waste fraction separated from the MSW i.e., food and yard waste. The objectives of the study were to determine the composition of waste in order to find out the emission of methane from its decomposition and to calculate the amount of electricity that can be generated using this methane. The study was conducted with a multi-method approach, including direct field observation, questionnaire-based surveys, and document surveys. The findings of the study highlight that municipal solid waste of Lahore, is composed of 28.3% recycle able waste (paper, tetra pack, textiles, wood and straw, plastic and polythene, glass and metal, rubber and leather), 32.7% inert material (bricks, stones and miscellaneous wastes) and 39.4% rapidly decompose able organic matter named as compostables (food and yard wastes). Gas produced during the anaerobic decomposition of food and yard waste comprises of 51.54% methane and 48.46% carbon dioxide gas. Further calculations reveal that 24 MW electricity could be produced from methane emitted from Mehmood Booti landfill site. More extensive research and application of the research work can be very useful to humans as well as to the environment. (author)

  1. Anaerobic digestion of industrial hemp-effect of harvest time on methane energy yield per hectare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuger, E; Escobar, F; Bjoernsson, L [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Prade, T; Svensson, S -E; Englund, J -E [Department of Agriculture-Farming Systems, Technology and Product Quality, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 104, SE-230 53 Alnarp (Sweden)

    2011-02-15

    There is a worldwide emphasis to increase the share of renewable transportation fuels. When using agricultural land for production of renewable transportation fuels, the energy output per hectare for different crops and transportation fuels is a crucial factor. In this study, the gross methane energy yield per hectare from anaerobic digestion of industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L.), was determined at four different harvest times between July and October in Southern Sweden, a cold climate region. The biomass yield was determined for three years and the methane yield was determined for two years through the biochemical methane potential test. The highest biomass yield, 16 tonnes dry matter per hectare on an average, and the highest methane energy yield per hectare was achieved when the hemp was harvested in September or October, with an average gross methane energy yield of 136 {+-} 24 GJ per hectare. There was no significant difference in the specific methane yield between the harvest times; the average being 234 {+-} 35 m{sup 3} per tonne volatile solids. Biogas from hemp turned out to be a high yielding alternative to the currently dominating renewable transportation fuels produced from crops grown in Sweden: ethanol from wheat and biodiesel from rapeseed. (author)

  2. New materials for methane capture from dilute and medium-concentration sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J; Maiti, A; Lin, LC; Stolaroff, JK; Smit, B; Aines, RD

    2013-04-16

    Methane (CH4) is an important greenhouse gas, second only to CO2, and is emitted into the atmosphere at different concentrations from a variety of sources. However, unlike CO2, which has a quadrupole moment and can be captured both physically and chemically in a variety of solvents and porous solids, methane is completely non-polar and interacts very weakly with most materials. Thus, methane capture poses a challenge that can only be addressed through extensive material screening and ingenious molecular-level designs. Here we report systematic in silico studies on the methane capture effectiveness of two different materials systems, that is, liquid solvents (including ionic liquids) and nanoporous zeolites. Although none of the liquid solvents appears effective as methane sorbents, systematic screening of over 87,000 zeolite structures led to the discovery of a handful of candidates that have sufficient methane sorption capacity as well as appropriate CH4/CO2 and/or CH4/N-2 selectivity to be technologically promising.

  3. Martian dust storms as a possible sink of atmospheric methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, W. M.; Delory, G. T.; Atreya, S. K.

    2006-11-01

    Recent laboratory tests, analog studies and numerical simulations all suggest that Martian dust devils and larger dusty convective storms generate and maintain large-scale electric fields. Such expected E-fields will have the capability to create significant electron drift motion in the collisional gas and to form an extended high energy (u $\\gg$ kT) electron tail in the distribution. We demonstrate herein that these energetic electrons are capable of dissociating any trace CH4 in the ambient atmosphere thereby acting as an atmospheric sink of this important gas. We demonstrate that the methane destruction rate increases by a factor of 1012 as the dust storm E-fields, E, increase from 5 to 25 kV/m, resulting in an apparent decrease in methane stability from ~ 1010 sec to a value of ~1000 seconds. While destruction in dust storms is severe, the overall methane lifetime is expected to decrease only moderately due to recycling of products, heterogeneous effects from localized sinks, etc. We show further evidence that the electrical activity anticipated in Martian dust storms creates a new harsh electro-chemical environment.

  4. Photocatalytic conversion of methane to methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, C.E.; Noceti, R.P.; D`Este, J.R. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A long-term goal of our research group is the exploration of novel pathways for the direct oxidation of methane to liquid fuels, chemicals, and intermediates. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol is attractive. The products of reaction, methanol and hydrogen, are both commercially desirable, methanol being used as is or converted to a variety of other chemicals, and the hydrogen could be utilized in petroleum and/or chemical manufacturing. Methane is produced as a by-product of coal gasification. Depending upon reactor design and operating conditions, up to 18% of total gasifier product may be methane. In addition, there are vast proven reserves of geologic methane in the world. Unfortunately, a large fraction of these reserves are in regions where there is little local demand for methane and it is not economically feasible to transport it to a market. There is a global research effort under way in academia, industry, and government to find methods to convert methane to useful, more readily transportable and storable materials. Methanol, the initial product of methane oxidation, is a desirable product of conversion because it retains much of the original energy of the methane while satisfying transportation and storage requirements. Investigation of direct conversion of methane to transportation fuels has been an ongoing effort at PETC for over 10 years. One of the current areas of research is the conversion of methane to methanol, under mild conditions, using light, water, and a semiconductor photocatalyst. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol, is attractive. Research in the laboratory is directed toward applying the techniques developed for the photocatalytic splitting of the water and the photochemical conversion of methane.

  5. Liquid hydrogen production via hydrogen sulfide methane reformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Cunping; T-Raissi, Ali [University of Central Florida, Florida Solar Energy Center, 1769 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, FL 32922 (United States)

    2008-01-03

    Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) methane (CH{sub 4}) reformation (H{sub 2}SMR) (2H{sub 2}S + CH{sub 4} = CS{sub 2} + 4H{sub 2}) is a potentially viable process for the removal of H{sub 2}S from sour natural gas resources or other methane containing gases. Unlike steam methane reformation that generates carbon dioxide as a by-product, H{sub 2}SMR produces carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), a liquid under ambient temperature and pressure - a commodity chemical that is also a feedstock for the synthesis of sulfuric acid. Pinch point analyses for H{sub 2}SMR were conducted to determine the reaction conditions necessary for no carbon lay down to occur. Calculations showed that to prevent solid carbon formation, low inlet CH{sub 4} to H{sub 2}S ratios are needed. In this paper, we analyze H{sub 2}SMR with either a cryogenic process or a membrane separation operation for production of either liquid or gaseous hydrogen. Of the three H{sub 2}SMR hydrogen production flowsheets analyzed, direct liquid hydrogen generation has higher first and second law efficiencies of exceeding 80% and 50%, respectively. (author)

  6. Extension - Upgrading Methane Using Ultra-Fast Thermal Swing Adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anna Lee Tonkovich

    2008-08-11

    The need for cost effective technologies for upgrading coal mine methane to pipeline quality natural gas is becoming ever greater. The current work presents and investigates a new approach to reduce the impact of the most costly step in the conventional technology, nitrogen rejection. The proposed approach is based on the Velocys microchannel platform, which is being developed to commercialize compact and cost efficient chemical processing technology. For this separation, ultra fast thermal swing sorption is enabled by the very high rates of heat and mass transfer inherent in microchannel processing. In a first phase of the project solid adsorbents were explored. Feasibility of ultrafast thermal swing was demonstrated but the available adsorbents had insufficient differential methane capacity to achieve the required commercial economics. In a second phase, ionic liquids were adopted as absorbents of choice, and experimental work and economic analyses, performed to gauge their potential, showed promise for this novel alternative. Final conclusions suggest that a combination of a required cost target for ionic liquids or a methane capacity increase or a combination of both is required for commercialization.

  7. Enhanced catalytic behavior of Ni alloys in steam methane reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeongpil; Kim, Hanmi; Lee, Jaichan

    2017-08-01

    The dissociation process of methane on Ni and Ni alloys are investigated by density functional theory (DFT) in terms of catalytic efficiency and carbon deposition. Examining the dissociation to CH3, CH2, CH, C, and H is not sufficient to properly predict the catalytic efficiency and carbon deposition, and further investigation of the CO gas-evolving reaction is required to completely understand methane dissociation in steam. The location of alloying element in Ni alloy needed be addressed from the results of ab-inito molecular dynamics (MD). The reaction pathway of methane dissociation associated with CO gas evolution is traced by performing first-principles calculations of the adsorption and activation energies of each dissociation step. During the dissociation process, two alternative reaction steps producing adsorbed C and H or adsorbed CO are critically important in determining coking inhibition as well as H2 gas evolution (i.e., the catalytic efficiency). The theoretical calculations presented here suggest that alloying Ni with Ru is an effective way to reduce carbon deposition and enhance the catalytic efficiency of H2 fueling in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs).

  8. Liquid hydrogen production via hydrogen sulfide methane reformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cunping; T-Raissi, Ali

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2S) methane (CH 4) reformation (H 2SMR) (2H 2S + CH 4 = CS 2 + 4H 2) is a potentially viable process for the removal of H 2S from sour natural gas resources or other methane containing gases. Unlike steam methane reformation that generates carbon dioxide as a by-product, H 2SMR produces carbon disulfide (CS 2), a liquid under ambient temperature and pressure-a commodity chemical that is also a feedstock for the synthesis of sulfuric acid. Pinch point analyses for H 2SMR were conducted to determine the reaction conditions necessary for no carbon lay down to occur. Calculations showed that to prevent solid carbon formation, low inlet CH 4 to H 2S ratios are needed. In this paper, we analyze H 2SMR with either a cryogenic process or a membrane separation operation for production of either liquid or gaseous hydrogen. Of the three H 2SMR hydrogen production flowsheets analyzed, direct liquid hydrogen generation has higher first and second law efficiencies of exceeding 80% and 50%, respectively.

  9. Experiment and modeling of low-concentration methane catalytic combustion in a fluidized bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhongqing; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Li; Guo, Mingnv; Ran, Jingyu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The catalytic combustion of 0.15~3 vol. % low concentration methane in a fluidized bed was studied. • A mathematical model was proposed on the basis of gas–solid flow theory. • A comparative analysis of the established model with plug flow, mixed flow and K-L models was carried out. • The axial methane profile along fluidized bed was predicted by using the mathematical model. • The bed temperature has greater impact on methane conversion than fluidized velocity. - Abstract: This study undertakes a theoretical analysis and an experimental investigation into the characteristics of low-concentration methane catalytic combustion in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor using 0.5 wt.% Pd/Al_2O_3 as catalytic particles. A mathematical model is established based on gas–solid flow theory and is used to study the effects of bed temperature and fluidized velocity on methane catalytic combustion, and predict the dimensionless methane concentration axial profile in reactor. It is shown that methane conversion increases with bed temperature, but decreases with increasing fluidized velocity. These theoretical results are found to correlate well with the experimental measurement, with a deviation within 5%. A comparative analysis of the developed model with plug flow, mixed flow and K-L models is also carried out, and this further verifies that the established model better reflects the characteristics of low-concentration methane catalytic combustion in a bubbling fluidized bed. Using this reaction model, it was found that the difference in methane conversion between dense and freeboard zones gradually increases with bed temperature; the dense zone reaction levels off at 650 °C, thereby minimizing the difference between the dense and freeboard regions to around 15%. With an increase in bed temperature, the dimensionless methane concentration in the dense zone decreases exponentially, while in the splash zone, it varies from an exponential decay to a slow

  10. Fluid-bed methane proposed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    The first full scale plant for the production of methane from organic waste could be built in the next few years believes M.J. Nyns of the University of Louvain, Belgium, utilizing either expanded bed or fluidised bed systems, with more than one stage, in a continuous flow arrangement. Up to 8.0 m cubed gas/m cubed digester/day could be produced with residence times reduced to 34 hours.

  11. Methane emissions from coal mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, A.; Mitchell, C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper outlines some of the problems associated with the prediction of levels of methane emission from underground and surface coal mines. Current knowledge of coal mining emissions sources is outlined. On the basis of this information the methodology proposed by the IPCC/OECD Programme on National Inventories is critically examined and alternatives considered. Finally, the technical options for emissions control are examined together with their feasibility. 8 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Microwave Hydrogen Production from Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    combustion NOx control of reciprocating engine exhaust and fuel cell application of biogas . Our target is to obtain the methane conversion efficiency...demonstration of MW technology removing and destroying hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and siloxanes from biogas produced by Sacramento Regional Wastewater...running on biogas and is currently conducting the field demonstration of the unit at Tollenaar Dairy in Elk Grove, CA. SMUD, California Air Resources

  13. Titan's Methane Cycle is Closed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofgartner, J. D.; Lunine, J. I.

    2013-12-01

    Doppler tracking of the Cassini spacecraft determined a polar moment of inertia for Titan of 0.34 (Iess et al., 2010, Science, 327, 1367). Assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, one interpretation is that Titan's silicate core is partially hydrated (Castillo-Rogez and Lunine, 2010, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L20205). These authors point out that for the core to have avoided complete thermal dehydration to the present day, at least 30% of the potassium content of Titan must have leached into an overlying water ocean by the end of the core overturn. We calculate that for probable ammonia compositions of Titan's ocean (compositions with greater than 1% ammonia by weight), that this amount of potassium leaching is achievable via the substitution of ammonium for potassium during the hydration epoch. Formation of a hydrous core early in Titan's history by serpentinization results in the loss of one hydrogen molecule for every hydrating water molecule. We calculate that complete serpentinization of Titan's core corresponds to the release of more than enough hydrogen to reconstitute all of the methane atoms photolyzed throughout Titan's history. Insertion of molecular hydrogen by double occupancy into crustal clathrates provides a storage medium and an opportunity for ethane to be converted back to methane slowly over time--potentially completing a cycle that extends the lifetime of methane in Titan's surface atmosphere system by factors of several to an order of magnitude over the photochemically-calculated lifetime.

  14. Syngas Generation from Methane Using a Chemical-Looping Concept: A Review of Oxygen Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kongzhai Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Conversion of methane to syngas using a chemical-looping concept is a novel method for syngas generation. This process is based on the transfer of gaseous oxygen source to fuel (e.g., methane by means of a cycling process using solid oxides as oxygen carriers to avoid direct contact between fuel and gaseous oxygen. Syngas is produced through the gas-solid reaction between methane and solid oxides (oxygen carriers, and then the reduced oxygen carriers can be regenerated by a gaseous oxidant, such as air or water. The oxygen carrier is recycled between the two steps, and the syngas with a ratio of H2/CO = 2.0 can be obtained successively. Air is used instead of pure oxygen allowing considerable cost savings, and the separation of fuel from the gaseous oxidant avoids the risk of explosion and the dilution of product gas with nitrogen. The design and elaboration of suitable oxygen carriers is a key issue to optimize this method. As one of the most interesting oxygen storage materials, ceria-based and perovskite oxides were paid much attention for this process. This paper briefly introduced the recent research progresses on the oxygen carriers used in the chemical-looping selective oxidation of methane (CLSOM to syngas.

  15. Methods of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory - Determination of Moderate-Use Pesticides and Selected Degradates in Water by C-18 Solid-Phase Extraction and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandstrom, Mark W.; Stroppel, Max E.; Foreman, William T.; Schroeder, Michael P.

    2001-01-01

    A method for the isolation and analysis of 21 parent pesticides and 20 pesticide degradates in natural-water samples is described. Water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter and then are pumped through disposable solid-phase-extraction columns that contain octadecyl-bonded porous silica to extract the analytes. The columns are dried by using nitrogen gas, and adsorbed analytes are eluted with ethyl acetate. Extracted analytes are determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion monitoring of three characteristic ions. The upper concentration limit is 2 micrograms per liter (?g/L) for most analytes. Single-operator method detection limits in reagent-water samples range from 0.00 1 to 0.057 ?g/L. Validation data also are presented for 14 parent pesticides and 20 degradates that were determined to have greater bias or variability, or shorter holding times than the other compounds. The estimated maximum holding time for analytes in pesticide-grade water before extraction was 4 days. The estimated maximum holding time for analytes after extraction on the dry solid-phase-extraction columns was 7 days. An optional on-site extraction procedure allows for samples to be collected and processed at remote sites where it is difficult to ship samples to the laboratory within the recommended pre-extraction holding time. The method complements existing U.S. Geological Survey Method O-1126-95 (NWQL Schedules 2001 and 2010) by using identical sample preparation and comparable instrument analytical conditions so that sample extracts can be analyzed by either method to expand the range of analytes determined from one water sample.

  16. Evidence for methane in Martian meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blamey, Nigel J F; Parnell, John; McMahon, Sean; Mark, Darren F; Tomkinson, Tim; Lee, Martin; Shivak, Jared; Izawa, Matthew R M; Banerjee, Neil R; Flemming, Roberta L

    2015-06-16

    The putative occurrence of methane in the Martian atmosphere has had a major influence on the exploration of Mars, especially by the implication of active biology. The occurrence has not been borne out by measurements of atmosphere by the MSL rover Curiosity but, as on Earth, methane on Mars is most likely in the subsurface of the crust. Serpentinization of olivine-bearing rocks, to yield hydrogen that may further react with carbon-bearing species, has been widely invoked as a source of methane on Mars, but this possibility has not hitherto been tested. Here we show that some Martian meteorites, representing basic igneous rocks, liberate a methane-rich volatile component on crushing. The occurrence of methane in Martian rock samples adds strong weight to models whereby any life on Mars is/was likely to be resident in a subsurface habitat, where methane could be a source of energy and carbon for microbial activity.

  17. Methane generated from graphite--tritium interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffin, D.O.; Walthers, C.R.

    1979-01-01

    When hydrogen isotopes are separated by cryogenic distillation, as little as 1 ppM of methane will eventually plug the still as frost accumulates on the column packings. Elemental carbon exposed to tritium generates methane spontaneously, and yet some dry transfer pumps, otherwise compatible with tritium, convey the gas with graphite rotors. This study was to determine the methane production rate for graphite in tritium. A pump manufacturer supplied graphite samples that we exposed to tritium gas at 0.8 atm. After 137 days we measured a methane synthesis rate of 6 ng/h per cm 2 of graphite exposed. At this rate methane might grow to a concentration of 0.01 ppM when pure tritium is transferred once through a typical graphite--rotor transfer pump. Such a low methane level will not cause column blockage, even if the cryogenic still is operated continuously for many years

  18. Electrochemical and partial oxidation of methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rahul

    2008-10-01

    negligible coke formation on the novel fabricated anode by electroless plating process. Hydrogen is an environmentally cleaner source of energy. The recent increase in the demand of hydrogen as fuel for all types of fuel cells and petroleum refining process has boosted the need of production of hydrogen. Methane, a major component of natural gas is the major feedstock for production of hydrogen. The route of partial oxidation of methane to produce syngas (CO + H2) offers significant advantages over commercialized steam reforming process for higher efficiency and lower energy requirements. Partial oxidation of methane was studied by pulsing O2 into a CH4 flow over Rh/Al2O3 in a sequence of in situ infrared (IR) cell and fixed bed reactor at 773 K. The results obtained from the sequence of an IR cell followed by a fixed bed reactor show that (i) adsorbed CO produced possesses a long residence time, indicating that adsorbed oxygen leading to the formation of CO is significantly different from those leading to CO2 and (ii) CO2 is not an intermediate species for the formation of CO. In situ IR of pulse reaction coupled with alternating reactor sequence is an effective approach to study the primary and secondary reactions as well as the nature of their adsorbed species. As reported earlier, hydrogen remains to be the most effective fuel for fuel cells, the production of high purity hydrogen from naturally available resources such as coal, petroleum, and natural gas requires a number of energy-intensive steps, making fuel cell processes for stationary electric power generation prohibitively uneconomic. Direct use of coal or coal gas as the feed is a promising approach for low cost electricity generation. Coal gas solid oxide fuel cell was studied by pyrolyzing Ohio #5 coal to coal gas and transporting to a Cu anode solid oxide fuel cell to generate power. The study of coal-gas solid oxide fuel cell is divided into two sections, i.e., (i) understanding the composition of coal gas by

  19. High-temperature process heat reactor with solid coolant and radiant heat exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, A.M.; Bulkin, Yu.M.; Vasil'ev, S.I.

    1984-01-01

    The high temperature graphite reactor with the solid coolant in which heat transfer is realized by radiant heat exchange is described. Neutron-physical and thermal-technological features of the reactor are considered. The reactor vessel is made of sheet carbon steel in the form of a sealed rectangular annular box. The moderator is a set of graphite blocks mounted as rows of arched laying Between the moderator rows the solid coolant annular layings made of graphite blocks with high temperature nuclear fuel in the form of coated microparticles are placed. The coolant layings are mounted onto ring movable platforms, the continuous rotation of which is realizod by special electric drives. Each part of the graphite coolant laying consecutively passes through the reactor core neutron cut-off zones and technological zone. In the core the graphite is heated up to the temperature of 1350 deg C sufficient for effective radiant heat transfer. In the neutron cut-off zone the chain reaction and further graphite heating are stopped. In the technological zone the graphite transfers the accumulated heat to the walls of technological channels in which the working medium moves. The described reactor is supposed to be used in nuclear-chemical complex for ammonia production by the method of methane steam catalytic conversion

  20. International Methane Partnership Fighting Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    Due to the growth of international attention on the problem of climate change combined with the attractiveness of methane mitigation technologies, the capture and use of methane in agriculture, coal mines, landfills, and the oil and gas sector has increasingly become popular over the past few years. Highlighting this, several countries hosted the international 'Methane to Market' Partnership Conference and Exposition in October 2007 in Beijing, China.

  1. Ebullitive methane emissions from oxygenated wetland streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, John T.; Stanley, Emily H.; Spawn, Seth A.; Finlay, Jacques C.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Stream and river carbon dioxide emissions are an important component of the global carbon cycle. Methane emissions from streams could also contribute to regional or global greenhouse gas cycling, but there are relatively few data regarding stream and river methane emissions. Furthermore, the available data do not typically include the ebullitive (bubble-mediated) pathway, instead focusing on emission of dissolved methane by diffusion or convection. Here, we show the importance of ebullitive methane emissions from small streams in the regional greenhouse gas balance of a lake and wetland-dominated landscape in temperate North America and identify the origin of the methane emitted from these well-oxygenated streams. Stream methane flux densities from this landscape tended to exceed those of nearby wetland diffusive fluxes as well as average global wetland ebullitive fluxes. Total stream ebullitive methane flux at the regional scale (103 Mg C yr−1; over 6400 km2) was of the same magnitude as diffusive methane flux previously documented at the same scale. Organic-rich stream sediments had the highest rates of bubble release and higher enrichment of methane in bubbles, but glacial sand sediments also exhibited high bubble emissions relative to other studied environments. Our results from a database of groundwater chemistry support the hypothesis that methane in bubbles is produced in anoxic near-stream sediment porewaters, and not in deeper, oxygenated groundwaters. Methane interacts with other key elemental cycles such as nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur, which has implications for ecosystem changes such as drought and increased nutrient loading. Our results support the contention that streams, particularly those draining wetland landscapes of the northern hemisphere, are an important component of the global methane cycle.

  2. Evaluation of methane emissions from Taiwanese paddies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.-W.; Wu, C.-Y.

    2004-01-01

    The main greenhouse gases are carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide. Methane is the most important because the warming effect of methane is 21 times greater than that of carbon dioxide. Methane emitted from rice paddy fields is a major source of atmospheric methane. In this work, a methane emission model (MEM), which integrates climate change, plant growth and degradation of soil organic matter, was applied to estimate the emission of methane from rice paddy fields in Taiwan. The estimated results indicate that much methane is emitted during the effective tillering and booting stages in the first crop season and during the transplanting stage in the second crop season in a year. Sensitivity analysis reveals that the temperature is the most important parameter that governs the methane emission rate. The order of the strengths of the effects of the other parameters is soil pH, soil water depth (SWD) and soil organic matter content. The masses of methane emitted from rice paddy fields of Taiwan in the first and second crop seasons are 28,507 and 350,231 tons, respectively. The amount of methane emitted during the second crop season is 12.5 times higher than that emitted in the first crop season. With a 12% reduction in planted area during the second crop season, methane emission could be reduced by 21%. In addition, removal of rice straw left from the first crop season and increasing the depth of flooding to 25 cm are also strategies that could help reduce annual emission by up to 18%

  3. Atmospheric methane removal by methane-oxidizing bacteria immobilized on porous building materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganendra, G; De Muynck, W; Ho, A.; Hoefman, S.; De Vos, P.; Boeckx, P.; Boon, N.

    2014-01-01

    Biological treatment using methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) immobilized on six porous carrier materials have been used to mitigate methane emission. Experiments were performed with different MOB inoculated in building materials at high (similar to 20 % (v/v)) and low (similar to 100 ppmv) methane

  4. Quantification of the methane concentration using anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to extracellular electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A biofilm anode acclimated with acetate, acetate+methane, and methane growth media for over three years produced a steady current density of 1.6-2.3 mA/m^2 in a microbial electrochemical cell (MxC) fed with methane as the sole electron donor. Geobacter was the dominant genus for...

  5. MethaneSat: Detecting Methane Emissions in the Barnett Shale Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propp, A. M.; Benmergui, J. S.; Turner, A. J.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we investigate the new information that will be provided by MethaneSat, a proposed satellite that will measure the total column dry-air mole fraction of methane at 1x1 km or 2x2 km spatial resolution with 0.1-0.2% random error. We run an atmospheric model to simulate MethaneSat's ability to characterize methane emissions from the Barnett Shale, a natural gas province in Texas. For comparison, we perform observation system simulation experiments (OSSEs) for MethaneSat, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric administration (NOAA) surface and aircraft network, and Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT). The results demonstrate the added benefit that MethaneSat would provide in our efforts to monitor and report methane emissions. We find that MethaneSat successfully quantifies total methane emissions in the region, as well as their spatial distribution and steep gradients. Under the same test conditions, both the NOAA network and GOSAT fail to capture this information. Furthermore, we find that the results for MethaneSat depend far less on the prior emission estimate than do those for the other observing systems, demonstrating the benefit of high sampling density. The results suggest that MethaneSat would be an incredibly useful tool for obtaining detailed methane emission information from oil and gas provinces around the world.

  6. Chemical composition and methane yield of reed canary grass as influenced by harvesting time and harvest frequency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandel, Tanka Prasad; Sutaryo, Sutaryo; Møller, Henrik Bjarne

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the influence of harvest time on biomass yield, dry matter partitioning, biochemical composition and biological methane potential of reed canary grass harvested twice a month in one-cut (OC) management. The regrowth of biomass harvested in summer was also harvested in autumn...... as a two-cut management with (TC-F) or without (TC-U) fertilization after summer harvest. The specific methane yields decreased significantly with crop maturity that ranged from 384 to 315 and from 412 to 283 NL (normal litre) (kg VS)-1 for leaf and stem, respectively. Approximately 45% more methane...... was produced by the TC-F management (5430 Nm3 ha-1) as by the OC management (3735 Nm3 ha-1). Specific methane yield was moderately correlated with the concentrations of fibre components in the biomass. Larger quantity of biogas produced at the beginning of the biogas assay from early harvested biomass...

  7. Enteric methane emissions and lactational performance of Holstein cows fed different concentrations of coconut oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmann, M; Powers, W J; Fogiel, A C; Liesman, J S; Bello, N M; Beede, D K

    2012-05-01

    To determine if dietary medium-chain fatty acids (FA; C(8) to C(14)) may mitigate enteric methane emissions, 24 cows were blocked by body size (n=2) and randomly assigned to 1 sequence of dietary treatments. Diets were fed for 35 d each in 2 consecutive periods. Diets differed in concentrations of coconut oil (CNO; ~75% medium-chain FA): 0.0 (control) or 1.3, 2.7, or 3.3% CNO, dry matter basis. The control diet contained 50% forage (74% from corn silage), 16.5% crude protein (60% from rumen-degradable protein), 34% neutral detergent fiber (NDF; 71% from forage), and 28% starch, dry matter basis. Data and sample collections were from d 29 to 35 in environmentally controlled rooms to measure methane (CH(4)) production. Methane emitted was computed from the difference in concentrations of inlet and outlet air and flux as measured 8 times per day. Control cows emitted 464 g of CH(4)/d, consumed 22.9 kg of DM/d, and produced 34.8 kg of solids-corrected milk/d and 1.3 kg of milk fat/d. Treatment with 1.3, 2.7, or 3.3% dietary CNO reduced CH(4) (449, 291, and 253 g/d, respectively), but concomitantly depressed dry matter intake (21.4, 17.9, and 16.2 kg/d, respectively), solids-corrected milk yield (36.3, 28.4, and 26.8 kg/d, respectively), and milk fat yield (1.4, 0.9, and 0.9 kg/d, respectively). The amount of NDF digested in the total tract decreased with increased dietary CNO concentrations; thus, CH(4) emitted per unit of NDF digested rose from 118 to 128, 153, and 166 g/kg across CNO treatments. Dietary CNO did not significantly affect apparent digestibility of CP but increased apparent starch digestibility from 92 to 95%. No FA C(10) or shorter were detected in feces, and apparent digestibility decreased with increasing FA chain length. Coconut oil concentrations of 2.7 or 3.3% decreased yields of milk FA C(14). The highest milk fat concentration (3.69%; 1.3% CNO) was due to the greatest yields of C(12) to C(16) milk FA. Milk FA concentrations of C(18:2 trans-10,cis

  8. Enhanced activity and stability of La-doped CeO2 monolithic catalysts for lean-oxygen methane combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenjun; Jin, Jianhui; Chen, Xiao; Li, Chuang; Wang, Tonghua; Tsang, Chi-Wing; Liang, Changhai

    2018-02-01

    Effective utilization of coal bed methane is very significant for energy utilization and environment protection. Catalytic combustion of methane is a promising way to eliminate trace amounts of oxygen in the coal bed methane and the key to this technology is the development of high-efficiency catalysts. Herein, we report a series of Ce 1-x La x O 2-δ (x = 0-0.8) monolithic catalysts for the catalytic combustion of methane, which are prepared by citric acid method. The structural characterization shows that the substitution of La enhance the oxygen vacancy concentration and reducibility of the supports and promote the migration of the surface oxygen, as a result improve the catalytic activity of CeO 2 . M-Ce 0.8 La 0.2 O 2-δ (monolithic catalyst, Ce 0.8 La 0.2 O 2-δ coated on cordierite honeycomb) exhibits outstanding activity for methane combustion, and the temperature for 10 and 90% methane conversion are 495 and 580 °C, respectively. Additionally, Ce 0.8 La 0.2 O 2-δ monolithic catalyst presents excellent stability at high temperature. These Ce 1-x La x O 2-δ monolithic materials with a small amount of La incorporation therefore show promises as highly efficient solid solution catalysts for lean-oxygen methane combustion. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  9. Controlled deposition and utilization of carbon on Ni-YSZ anodes of SOFCs operating on dry methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, Yong; Zhang, Liqin; An, Wenting; Zhou, Wei; Sha, Yujing; Shao, Zongping; Bai, Jianping; Li, Si-Dian

    2016-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are promising power-generation systems to utilize methane or methane-based fuels with a high energy efficiency and low environmental impact. A successive multi-stage process is performed to explore the operation of cells using dry methane or the deposited carbon from methane decomposition as fuel. Stable operation can be maintained by optimizing the fuel supply and current density parameters. An electrochemical impedance analysis suggests that the partial oxidization of Ni can occur at anodes when the carbon fuel is consumed. The stability of cells operated on pure methane is investigated in three operating modes. The cell can run in a comparatively stable state with continuous power output in an intermittent methane supply mode, where the deposition and utilization of carbon is controlled by balancing the fuel supply and consumption. The increase in the polarization resistance of the cell might originate from the small amount of NiO and residual carbon at the anode, which can be removed via an oxidation-and-reduction maintenance process. Based on the above strategy, this work provides an alternative operating mode to improve the stability of direct methane SOFCs and demonstrates the feasibility of its application. - Highlights: • A new strategy to control the deposition and utilization of carbon was developed. • A stable fuel cell operation was obtained with an intermittent fuel supply mode. • Polarization resistance increased due to small amount of NiO and residual carbon.

  10. Moderation for Professional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earle, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Moderation is put forward as they key strategy for improving the reliability of teacher assessment. However, for many teachers the word "moderation" conjures up ideas of uncomfortable situations in which marking is being checked by others and there are prolonged arguments about tiny features of individual work. In this article, the…

  11. Microalgae to biofuels: life cycle impacts of methane production of anaerobically digested lipid extracted algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jason C; Hanif, Asma; Sharvelle, Sybil; Bradley, Thomas H

    2014-11-01

    This study presents experimental measurements of the biochemical methane production for whole and lipid extracted Nannochloropsis salina. Results show whole microalgae produced 430 cm(3)-CH4 g-volatile solids(-1) (g-VS) (σ=60), 3 times more methane than was produced by the LEA, 140 cm(3)-CH4 g-VS(-1) (σ=30). Results illustrate current anaerobic modeling efforts in microalgae to biofuel assessments are not reflecting the impact of lipid removal. On a systems level, the overestimation of methane production is shown to positively skew the environmental impact of the microalgae to biofuels process. Discussion focuses on a comparison results to those of previous anaerobic digestion studies and quantifies the corresponding change in greenhouse gas emissions of the microalgae to biofuels process based on results from this study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Moderator for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milgram, M.S.; Dunn, J.T.; Hart, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a moderator for a nuclear reactor and more specifically, to a composite moderator. A moderator is designed to slow down, or thermalize, neutrons which are released during nuclear reactions in the reactor fuel. Pure or almost pure materials like light water, heavy water, beryllium or graphite are used singly as moderators at present. All these materials, are used widely. Graphite has a good mechanical strength at high temperatures encountered in the nuclear core and therefore is used as both the moderator and core structural material. It also exhibits a low neutron-capture cross section and high neutron scattering cross section. However, graphite is susceptible to attach by carbon dioxide and/or oxygen where applicable, and releases stress energy under certain circumstances, although under normal operating conditions these reactions can be controlled. (author). 1 tab

  13. Plasma catalytic reforming of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Rabinovich, A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Alexeev, N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Baikov Inst. of Metallurgy

    1998-08-01

    Thermal plasma technology can be efficiently used in the production of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich gases from methane and a variety of fuels. This paper describes progress in plasma reforming experiments and calculations of high temperature conversion of methane using heterogeneous processes. The thermal plasma is a highly energetic state of matter that is characterized by extremely high temperatures (several thousand degrees Celsius) and high degree of dissociation and substantial degree of ionization. The high temperatures accelerate the reactions involved in the reforming process. Hydrogen-rich gas (50% H{sub 2}, 17% CO and 33% N{sub 2}, for partial oxidation/water shifting) can be efficiently made in compact plasma reformers. Experiments have been carried out in a small device (2--3 kW) and without the use of efficient heat regeneration. For partial oxidation/water shifting, it was determined that the specific energy consumption in the plasma reforming processes is 16 MJ/kg H{sub 2} with high conversion efficiencies. Larger plasmatrons, better reactor thermal insulation, efficient heat regeneration and improved plasma catalysis could also play a major role in specific energy consumption reduction and increasing the methane conversion. A system has been demonstrated for hydrogen production with low CO content ({approximately} 1.5%) with power densities of {approximately} 30 kW (H{sub 2} HHV)/liter of reactor, or {approximately} 10 m{sup 3}/hr H{sub 2} per liter of reactor. Power density should further increase with increased power and improved design.

  14. Ultrasonic sludge disintegration for enhanced methane production in anaerobic digestion: effects of sludge hydrolysis efficiency and hydraulic retention time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Jin; Lee, Jonghak

    2012-01-01

    Hydrolysis of waste activated sludge (WAS) has been regarded as the rate limiting step of anaerobic sludge digestion. Therefore, in this study, the effect of ultrasound and hydraulic residence time during sludge hydrolysis was investigated with the goal of enhancing methane production from anaerobic digestion (AD). WAS was ultrasonically disintegrated for hydrolysis, and it was semi-continuously fed to an anaerobic digesters at various hydraulic retention times (HRTs). The results of these experiments showed that the solids and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies when using ultrasonically disintegrated sludge were higher during AD than the control sludge. The longer the HRT, the higher the removal efficiencies of solids and COD, while methane production increased with lower HRT. Sludge with 30% hydrolysis produced 7 × more methane production than the control sludge. The highest methane yields were 0.350 m(3)/kg volatile solids (VS)(add) and 0.301 m(3)/kg COD(con) for 16 and 30% hydrolyzed sludge, respectively. In addition, we found that excess ultrasound irradiation may inhibit AD since the 50% hydrolyzed sludge produced lower methane yields than 16 and 30% hydrolyzed sludge.

  15. Methanization takes countryside by storm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Guerny, St.

    2011-01-01

    A new plant is operating in Brittany: it transforms cattle effluents and slaughterhouse wastes into electric power through natural fermentation. Thus, every year, 75.000 tons of organic wastes will produce methane and 1.5 MW. Other projects exist in the same region. One faced the opposition of the population. Therefore, the idea is now to develop smaller projects. France is very late compared to Germany and the Netherlands. The Grenelle de l'Environnement seems to have boosted these projects, notably due to the increase of the electricity purchase price proposed by EDF. Another issue is discussed: the development of this industrial sector in France

  16. Modeling of methane bubbles released from large sea-floor area: Condition required for methane emission to the atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, A.; Yamanaka, Y.; Tajika, E.

    2009-01-01

    Massive methane release from sea-floor sediments due to decomposition of methane hydrate, and thermal decomposition of organic matter by volcanic outgassing, is a potential contributor to global warming. However, the degree of global warming has not been estimated due to uncertainty over the proportion of methane flux from the sea-floor to reach the atmosphere. Massive methane release from a large sea-floor area would result in methane-saturated seawater, thus some methane would reach the atm...

  17. Light-Dependent Aerobic Methane Oxidation Reduces Methane Emissions from Seasonally Stratified Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Kirsten; Milucka, Jana; Brand, Andreas; Littmann, Sten; Wehrli, Bernhard; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Schubert, Carsten J.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes are a natural source of methane to the atmosphere and contribute significantly to total emissions compared to the oceans. Controls on methane emissions from lake surfaces, particularly biotic processes within anoxic hypolimnia, are only partially understood. Here we investigated biological methane oxidation in the water column of the seasonally stratified Lake Rotsee. A zone of methane oxidation extending from the oxic/anoxic interface into anoxic waters was identified by chemical profiling of oxygen, methane and δ13C of methane. Incubation experiments with 13C-methane yielded highest oxidation rates within the oxycline, and comparable rates were measured in anoxic waters. Despite predominantly anoxic conditions within the zone of methane oxidation, known groups of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea were conspicuously absent. Instead, aerobic gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs were identified as the active methane oxidizers. In addition, continuous oxidation and maximum rates always occurred under light conditions. These findings, along with the detection of chlorophyll a, suggest that aerobic methane oxidation is tightly coupled to light-dependent photosynthetic oxygen production both at the oxycline and in the anoxic bottom layer. It is likely that this interaction between oxygenic phototrophs and aerobic methanotrophs represents a widespread mechanism by which methane is oxidized in lake water, thus diminishing its release into the atmosphere. PMID:26193458

  18. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  19. Mechanistic insights into heterogeneous methane activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latimer, Allegra A.; Aljama, Hassan; Kakekhani, Arvin; Yoo, Jong Suk; Kulkarni, Ambarish

    2017-01-01

    While natural gas is an abundant chemical fuel, its low volumetric energy density has prompted a search for catalysts able to transform methane into more useful chemicals. This search has often been aided through the use of transition state (TS) scaling relationships, which estimate methane activation TS energies as a linear function of a more easily calculated descriptor, such as final state energy, thus avoiding tedious TS energy calculations. It has been shown that methane can be activated via a radical or surface-stabilized pathway, both of which possess a unique TS scaling relationship. Herein, we present a simple model to aid in the prediction of methane activation barriers on heterogeneous catalysts. Analogous to the universal radical TS scaling relationship introduced in a previous publication, we show that a universal TS scaling relationship that transcends catalysts classes also seems to exist for surface-stabilized methane activation if the relevant final state energy is used. We demonstrate that this scaling relationship holds for several reducible and irreducible oxides, promoted metals, and sulfides. By combining the universal scaling relationships for both radical and surface-stabilized methane activation pathways, we show that catalyst reactivity must be considered in addition to catalyst geometry to obtain an accurate estimation for the TS energy. Here, this model can yield fast and accurate predictions of methane activation barriers on a wide range of catalysts, thus accelerating the discovery of more active catalysts for methane conversion.

  20. Methane from the East Siberian Arctic shelf

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrenko...[], Vasilii V.; Etheridge, David M.

    2010-01-01

    In their Report “Extensive methane venting to the atmosphere from sediments of the East Siberian Arctic Shelf” (5 March, p. 1246), N. Shakhova et al. write that methane (CH4) release resulting from thawing Arctic permafrost “is a likely positive feedback to climate warming.” They add...

  1. Methane emission from wetland rice fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.

    1996-01-01


    Methane (CH 4 ) is an important greenhouse gas and plays a key role in tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry. Wetland rice fields are an important source of methane, accounting for approximately 20% of the global anthropogenic

  2. Trading coalbed methane for carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberger, L.S.

    1991-01-01

    This article discusses a proposal for reducing methane emissions in coal mining activities and at the same time reducing the burden on utilities to cut carbon dioxide emissions. Emission credits would be issued to mines that recover the methane for use. These credits could then be bought by utilities and exchanged for the right to emit carbon dioxide

  3. Reducing methane emissions from ruminant animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathison, G.W.; Okine, E.K.; McAllister, T.A.; Dong, Y.; Galbraith, J.; Dmytruk, O.I.N. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Science

    1998-09-01

    In 1992 it was estimated that 30 x 10{sup 12}g more methane was emitted into the atmosphere than was removed, with animals being considered the largest single anthropogenic source. Ruminants produce 97% of the methane generated in enteric fermentation by animals. Estimates for methane emissions from animal wastes vary between 6 and 31% of that produced directly by the animal, with the most likely value being between 5 and 10% globally. Methane inhibitors can reduce methane emissions to zero in the short term but due to microbial adaptation the effects of these compounds are quickly neutralized and feed intake is often depressed. Methane emissions per unit of feed consumed from sheep and cattle fed hay diets appear to be quite similar but differences between other ruminants have been measured. The most practical way of influencing methane emissions per unit product is to increase productivity level since the proportion of feed energy required to just maintain the animal will be reduced, methane production falls with increased intake level, and the animal may go to market sooner. The most promising avenues for future research for reducing methanogenesis are the development of new products for reducing protozoal numbers in the rumen and the use of bacterocins or other compounds which specifically target methanogenic bacteria.

  4. Small Molecule Catalysts for Harvesting Methane Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, S. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ceron-Hernandez, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Oakdale, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lau, E. Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-06

    As the average temperature of the earth increases the impact of these changes are becoming apparent. One of the most dramatic changes to the environment is the melting of arctic permafrost. The disappearance of the permafrost has resulted in release of streams of methane that was trapped in remote areas as gas hydrates in ice. Additionally, the use of fracking has also increased emission of methane. Currently, the methane is either lost to the atmosphere or flared. If these streams of methane could be brought to market, this would be an abundant source of revenue. A cheap conversion of gaseous methane to a more convenient form for transport would be necessary to economical. Conversion of methane is a difficult reaction since the C-H bond is very stable (104 kcal/mole). At the industrial scale, the Fischer-Tropsch reaction can be used to convert gaseous methane to liquid methanol but is this method is impractical for these streams that have low pressures and are located in remote areas. Additionally, the Fischer-Tropsch reaction results in over oxidation of the methane leading to many products that would need to be separated.

  5. Reaction between infusion water and methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ettinger, I L

    1977-09-01

    This paper discusses the effect of infused water on the initial gas emission rate and on the pore structure of the coal. Water traps methane in micro-pores, so that lengthy periods are needed for the methane to penetrate large voids and cavities.

  6. Methane storage in porous activated carbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    András Perl; prof. dr. Wim van Gemert

    2014-01-01

    Locally produced methane, - either as biomethane or power-to-gas product, has to be stored to provide a reliable gas source for the fluctuating demand of any local gas distribution network. Additionally, methane is a prominent transportation fuel but its suitability for vehicular application depends

  7. Abiotic production of methane in terrestrial planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Marmolejo, Andrés; Segura, Antígona; Escobar-Briones, Elva

    2013-06-01

    On Earth, methane is produced mainly by life, and it has been proposed that, under certain conditions, methane detected in an exoplanetary spectrum may be considered a biosignature. Here, we estimate how much methane may be produced in hydrothermal vent systems by serpentinization, its main geological source, using the kinetic properties of the main reactions involved in methane production by serpentinization. Hydrogen production by serpentinization was calculated as a function of the available FeO in the crust, given the current spreading rates. Carbon dioxide is the limiting reactant for methane formation because it is highly depleted in aqueous form in hydrothermal vent systems. We estimated maximum CH4 surface fluxes of 6.8×10(8) and 1.3×10(9) molecules cm(-2) s(-1) for rocky planets with 1 and 5 M⊕, respectively. Using a 1-D photochemical model, we simulated atmospheres with volume mixing ratios of 0.03 and 0.1 CO2 to calculate atmospheric methane concentrations for the maximum production of this compound by serpentinization. The resulting abundances were 2.5 and 2.1 ppmv for 1 M⊕ planets and 4.1 and 3.7 ppmv for 5 M⊕ planets. Therefore, low atmospheric concentrations of methane may be produced by serpentinization. For habitable planets around Sun-like stars with N2-CO2 atmospheres, methane concentrations larger than 10 ppmv may indicate the presence of life.

  8. Determination of soil-entrapped methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberto, M.C.R.; Neue, H.U.; Lantin, R.S.; Aduna, J.B. [Soil and Water Sciences Division, Manila (Philippines)

    1996-12-31

    A sampling method was developed and modified to sample soil from paddy fields for entrapped methane determination. A 25-cm long plexiglass tube (4.4-cm i.d.) fitted with gas bag was used to sample soil and entrapped gases to a depth of 15-cm. The sampling tube was shaken vigorously to release entrapped gases. Headspace gas in sampling tube and gas bag was analyzed for methane. The procedure was verified by doing field sampling weekly at an irrigated ricefield in the IRRI Research Farm on a Maahas clay soil. The modified sampling method gave higher methane concentration because it eliminated gas losses during sampling. The method gave 98% {+-} 5 recovery of soil-entrapped methane. Results of field sampling showed that the early growth stage of the rice plant, entrapped methane increased irrespective of treatment. This suggests that entrapped methane increased irrespective of treatment. This suggests that entrapped methane was primarily derived from fermentation of soil organic matter at the early growth stage. At the latter stage, the rice plant seems to be the major carbon source for methane production. 7 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Assessment of anaerobic biodegradability of five different solid organic wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristanto, Gabriel Andari; Asaloei, Huinny

    2017-03-01

    The concept of waste to energy emerges as an alternative solution to increasing waste generation and energy crisis. In the waste to energy concept, waste will be used to produce renewable energy through thermochemical, biochemical, and physiochemical processes. In an anaerobic digester, organic matter brake-down due to anaerobic bacteria produces methane gas as energy source. The organic waste break-down is affected by various characteristics of waste components, such as organic matter content (C, N, O, H, P), solid contents (TS and VS), nutrients ratio (C/N), and pH. This research aims to analyze biodegradability and potential methane production (CH4) from organic waste largely available in Indonesia. Five solid wastes comprised of fecal sludge, cow rumen, goat farm waste, traditional market waste, and tofu dregs were analyzed which showed tofu dregs as waste with the highest rate of biodegradability compared to others since the tofu dregs do not contain any inhibitor which is lignin, have 2.7%VS, 14 C/N ratios and 97.3% organic matter. The highest cumulative methane production known as Biochemical Methane Potential was achieved by tofu dregs with volume of 77 ml during 30-day experiment which then followed by cow rumen, goat farm waste, and traditional market waste. Subsequently, methane productions were calculated through percentage of COD reduction, which showed the efficiency of 99.1% that indicates complete conversion of the high organic matter into methane.

  10. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Don Augenstein; Ramin Yazdani; Rick Moore; Michelle Byars; Jeff Kieffer; Professor Morton Barlaz; Rinav Mehta

    2000-01-01

    Controlled landfilling is an approach to manage solid waste landfills, so as to rapidly complete methane generation, while maximizing gas capture and minimizing the usual emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated to more rapid and earlier completion to full potential by improving conditions (principally moisture, but also temperature) to optimize biological processes occurring within the landfill. Gas is contained through use of surface membrane cover. Gas is captured via porous layers, under the cover, operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project has been ongoing under NETL sponsorship for the past several years near Davis, CA. Results have been extremely encouraging. Two major benefits of the technology are reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times, more predictably, than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role both in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions and in US renewable energy. The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons[tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional

  11. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David T.; Gruen, Danielle S.; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Stewart, Lucy C.; Holden, James F.; Hristov, Alexander N.; Pohlman, John W.; Morrill, Penny L.; Könneke, Martin; Delwiche, Kyle B.; Reeves, Eoghan P.; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N.; Ritter, Daniel J.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Hemond, Harold F.; Kubo, Michael D.; Cardace, Dawn; Hoehler, Tori M.; Ono, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its multiply-substituted “clumped” isotopologues, e.g., 13CH3D, has recently emerged as a proxy for determining methane-formation temperatures; however, the impact of biological processes on methane’s clumped isotopologue signature is poorly constrained. We show that methanogenesis proceeding at relatively high rates in cattle, surface environments, and laboratory cultures exerts kinetic control on 13CH3D abundances and results in anomalously elevated formation temperature estimates. We demonstrate quantitatively that H2 availability accounts for this effect. Clumped methane thermometry can therefore provide constraints on the generation of methane in diverse settings, including continental serpentinization sites and ancient, deep groundwaters.

  12. Enteric methane emissions from German dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammgen, U; Rosemann, C; Haenel, H D

    2012-01-01

    Up to now, the German agricultural emission inventory used a model for the assessment of methane emissions from enteric fermentation that combined an estimate of the energy and feed requirements as a function of performance parameters and diet composition, with the constant methane conversion rate......, as stated by IPCC. A methane emission model was selected here that is based on German feed data. It was combined with the hitherto applied model describing energy requirements. The emission rates thus calculated deviate from those previously obtained. In the new model, the methane conversion rate is back......-calculated from emission rates and gross energy intake rates. For German conditions of animal performance and diet composition, the national means of methane conversion rates range between 71 kJ MJ(-1) and 61 kJ MJ(-1) for low and high performances (4700 kg animal(-1) a(-1) in 1990 to 7200 kg animal(-1) a(-1...

  13. Greenhouse effect contributions of US landfill methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augenstein, D.

    1991-01-01

    The greenhouse effect has recently been receiving a great deal of scientific and popular attention. The term refers to a cause-and-effect relationship in which ''heat blanketing'' of the earth, due to trace gas increases in the atmosphere, is expected to result in global warming. The trace gases are increasing as the result of human activities. Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is the trace gas contributing most importantly to the ''heat blanketing'' and currently receives the most attention. Less widely recognized has been the high importance of methane (CH 4 ). Methane's contribution to the increased heat blanketing occurring since 1980 is estimated to be over a third as much as that of carbon dioxide. Gas from landfills has in turn been recognized to be a source of methane to the atmospheric buildup. However the magnitude of the landfill methane contribution, and the overall significance of landfill methane to the greenhouse phenomenon has been uncertain and the subject of some debate. (Author)

  14. Decarbonisation of fossil energy via methane pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreysa, G.; Agar, D.W.; Schultz, I. [Technische Univ. Dortmund (Germany)

    2010-12-30

    Despite the rising consumption of energy over the last few decades, the proven reserves of fossil fuels have steadily increased. Additionally, there are potentially tremendous reserves of methane hydrates available, which remain to be exploited. The use of fossil energy sources is thus increasingly being dictated less by supply than by the environmental concerns raised by climate change. In the context of the decarbonisation of the global energy system that this has stimulated, new means must be explored for using methane as energy source. Noncatalytic thermal pyrolysis of methane is proposed here as a promising concept for utilising methane with low to zero carbon dioxide emissions. Following cracking, only the energy content of the hydrogen is used, while the carbon can be stored safely and retrievably in disused coal mines. The thermodynamics and different process engineering concepts for the technical realisation of such a carbon moratorium technology are discussed. The possible contribution of methane pyrolysis to carbon negative geoengineering is also addressed. (orig.)

  15. Evaluation of two-phase thermophilic anaerobic methane fermentation for the treatment of garbage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y.J.; Hong, F.; Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo; Tsuno, H.; Hidaka, T.; Cheon, J.H.; Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo

    2004-01-01

    Municipal solid wastes (MSW) in Japan are generally incinerated. However, in recent years, garbage has been recognized as a renewable energy source. This has resulted in an increase in the use of biological processes, such as anaerobic digestion, to treat organic waste such as sewage sludge and garbage. The two phases of anaerobic digestion are the acidogenic phase and the methane producing phase. Both differ significantly in their nutritional and physiological requirements. This study evaluated the effectiveness of treating garbage with the two-phase thermophilic methane fermentation system (TPS). The performance of the acid fermentation phase in TPS was examined with particular reference to operational parameters such as pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading rate on volatile fatty acid fermentation. It was shown that TPS was more efficient than the single-phase thermophilic methane fermentation system (SPS). Acidification control in the first stage resulted in better stability of methane fermentation in the second stage. VFA formation was optimized at a pH of 6. The recovery ratios of VFAs and methane were achieved in the range of 42 to 44 per cent and 88 to 91 per cent of garbage by high organic loading rate respectively. 12 refs., 6 tabs., 4 figs

  16. Thermal conductivity measurements in porous mixtures of methane hydrate and quartz sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W.F.; deMartin, B.J.; Kirby, S.H.; Pinkston, J.; Ruppel, C.D.

    2002-01-01

    Using von Herzen and Maxwell's needle probe method, we measured thermal conductivity in four porous mixtures of quartz sand and methane gas hydrate, with hydrate composing 0, 33, 67 and 100% of the solid volume. Thermal conductivities were measured at a constant methane pore pressure of 24.8 MPa between -20 and +15??C, and at a constant temperature of -10??C between 3.5 and 27.6 MPa methane pore pressure. Thermal conductivity decreased with increasing temperature and increased with increasing methane pore pressure. Both dependencies weakened with increasing hydrate content. Despite the high thermal conductivity of quartz relative to methane hydrate, the largest thermal conductivity was measured in the mixture containing 33% hydrate rather than in hydrate-free sand. This suggests gas hydrate enhanced grain-to-grain heat transfer, perhaps due to intergranular contact growth during hydrate synthesis. These results for gas-filled porous mixtures can help constrain thermal conductivity estimates in porous, gas hydrate-bearing systems.

  17. Anaerobic digestion of macroalgae: methane potentials, pre-treatment, inhibition and co-digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, H B; Heiske, S

    2011-01-01

    In the present study we tested four macroalgae species--harvested in Denmark--for their suitability of bioconversion to methane. In batch experiments (53 degrees C) methane yields varied from 132 ml g volatile solids(-1) (VS) for Gracillaria vermiculophylla, 152 mi gVS(-1) for Ulva lactuca, 166 ml g VS(-1) for Chaetomorpha linum and 340 ml g VS(-1) for Saccharina latissima following 34 days of incubation. With an organic content of 21.1% (1.5-2.8 times higher than the other algae) S. latissima seems very suitable for anaerobic digestion. However, the methane yields of U. lactuca, G. vermiculophylla and C. linum could be increased with 68%, 11% and 17%, respectively, by pretreatment with maceration. U. lactuca is often observed during 'green tides' in Europe and has a high cultivation potential at Nordic conditions. Therefore, U. lactuca was selected for further investigation and co-digested with cattle manure in a lab-scale continuously stirred tank reactor. A 48% increase in methane production rate of the reactor was observed when the concentration of U. lactuca in the feedstock was 40% (VS basis). Increasing the concentration to 50% had no further effect on the methane production, which limits the application of this algae at Danish centralized biogas plant.

  18. High efficiency positron moderation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taqqu, D.

    1990-01-01

    A new positron moderation scheme is proposed. It makes use of electric and magnetic fields to confine the β + emitted by a radioactive source forcing them to slow down within a thin foil. A specific arrangement is described where an intermediary slowed-down beam of energy below 10 keV is produced. By directing it towards a standard moderator optimal conversion into slow positrons is achieved. This scheme is best applied to short lived β + emitters for which a 25% moderation efficiency can be reached. Within the state of the art technology a slow positron source intensity exceeding 2 x 10 10 e + /sec is achievable. (orig.)

  19. Interviewing the moderator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traulsen, Janine Morgall; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Björnsdóttir, Ingunn

    2004-01-01

    There has been an upsurge of academic interest in using focus groups (FGs) as a main or stand-alone qualitative method. In this article, the authors introduce a recently developed ancillary method to FGs called interviewing the moderator. The method is employed immediately after an FG and consists...... of a one-on-one interview with the FG moderator by another member of the research team. The authors argue, with reference to a specific study, that interviewing the moderator adds a new and valuable dimension to group interviews used in research. They describe how this method came about and provide...

  20. Carbon and hydrogen isotope composition and C-14 concentration in methane from sources and from the atmosphere: Implications for a global methane budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlen, Martin

    1994-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: biogenic methane studies; forest soil methane uptake; rice field methane sources; atmospheric measurements; stratospheric samples; Antarctica; California; and Germany.

  1. Methane measurements manual; Handbok metanmaetningar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmgren, Magnus Andreas (SP Technical research institute of Sweden, Boraas (Sweden))

    2011-02-15

    Emissions to air in different parts of the system may arise in biogas plants, where there is biological treatment of organic matter by anaerobic degradation, and during upgrading of biogas to vehicle fuel. There are mainly four reasons why these emissions must be minimized. These are safety, greenhouse gas emissions, economy and smell. This manual gathers experience of several years of work with measurement of methane emissions from biogas and upgrading facilities. This work has been done mainly in the context of Swedish Waste Management's system of voluntary commitment. The purpose of this manual is to standardize methods and procedures when methane measurements are carried out so that the results are comparable between different providers. The main target group of the manual is measurement consultants performing such measurements. Calculation template in Excel is part of the manual, which further contributes to the measurements evaluated in a standardized way. The manual contains several examples which have been calculated in the accompanying Excel template. The handbook also contains a chapter mainly intended for facility staff, in which implementation of accurate leak detection is described, and where there are hints of a system of so-called intermediate inspections to detect leaks in time

  2. Environmental controls over methane emissions from bromeliad phytotelmata: The role of phosphorus and nitrogen availability, temperature, and water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotowska, Martyna M.; Werner, Florian A.

    2013-12-01

    bromeliads are common epiphytic plants throughout neotropical forests that store significant amounts of water in phytotelmata (tanks) formed by highly modified leafs. Methanogenic archaea in these tanks have recently been identified as a significant source of atmospheric methane. We address the effects of environmental drivers (temperature, tank water content, sodium phosphate [P], and urea [N] addition) on methane production in anaerobically incubated bromeliad slurry and emissions from intact bromeliad tanks in montane Ecuador. N addition ≥ 1 mg g-1 had a significantly positive effect on headspace methane concentrations in incubation jars while P addition did not affect methane production at any dosage (≤ 1 mg g-1). Tank bromeliads (Tillandsia complanata) cultivated in situ showed significantly increased effluxes of methane in response to the addition of 26 mg N addition per tank but not to lower dosage of N or any dosage of P (≤ 5.2 mg plant-1). There was no significant interaction between N and P addition. The brevity of the stimulatory effect of N addition on plant methane effluxes (1-2 days) points at N competition by other microorganisms or bromeliads. Methane efflux from plants closely followed within-day temperature fluctuations over 24 h cycles, yet the dependency of temperature was not exponential as typical for terrestrial wetlands but instead linear. In simulated drought, methane emission from bromeliad tanks was maintained with minimum amounts of water and regained after a short lag phase of approximately 24 h. Our results suggest that methanogens in bromeliads are primarily limited by N and that direct effects of global change (increasing temperature and seasonality, remote fertilization) on bromeliad methane emissions are of moderate scale.

  3. Biochemically enhanced methane production from coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opara, Aleksandra

    For many years, biogas was connected mostly with the organic matter decomposition in shallow sediments (e.g., wetlands, landfill gas, etc.). Recently, it has been realized that biogenic methane production is ongoing in many hydrocarbon reservoirs. This research examined microbial methane and carbon dioxide generation from coal. As original contributions methane production from various coal materials was examined in classical and electro-biochemical bench-scale reactors using unique, developed facultative microbial consortia that generate methane under anaerobic conditions. Facultative methanogenic populations are important as all known methanogens are strict anaerobes and their application outside laboratory would be problematic. Additional testing examined the influence of environmental conditions, such as pH, salinity, and nutrient amendments on methane and carbon dioxide generation. In 44-day ex-situ bench-scale batch bioreactor tests, up to 300,000 and 250,000 ppm methane was generated from bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste respectively, a significant improvement over 20-40 ppm methane generated from control samples. Chemical degradation of complex hydrocarbons using environmentally benign reagents, prior to microbial biodegradation and methanogenesis, resulted in dissolution of up to 5% bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste and up to 25% lignite in samples tested. Research results confirm that coal waste may be a significant underutilized resource that could be converted to useful fuel. Rapid acidification of lignite samples resulted in low pH (below 4.0), regardless of chemical pretreatment applied, and did not generate significant methane amounts. These results confirmed the importance of monitoring and adjusting in situ and ex situ environmental conditions during methane production. A patented Electro-Biochemical Reactor technology was used to supply electrons and electron acceptor environments, but appeared to influence methane generation in a

  4. Effects of water vapor on the radiolysis of methane over molecular sieve 5A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Y.; Nagai, S.

    1989-01-01

    Effects of the addition of H 2 O on the radiation-induced chemical reaction of methane over molecular sieve 5A at 460 0 C have been studied by product analysis. Hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and hydrocarbons consisting mainly of C 2 and C 3 alkanes and alkenes were produced from CH 4 + H 2 O mixtures at high conversion levels. The yields of hydrocarbons from 3:1 and 3:2 CH 4 + H 2 O mixtures decreased slightly with time but those from 3:4 mixture showed no decrease with time. When the molecular sieve 5A that had been irradiated in flowing methane was reirradiated in the presence of H 2 O, carbonaceous solid produced from methane on molecular sieve 5A was readily decomposed to carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen and hydrocarbons, mainly alkanes. Therefore, it is concluded that the suppression of decrease of product yields with time by the addition of H 2 O is mainly ascribed to decomposition of the carbonaceous solid by H 2 O under electron beam irradiation. The role of added H 2 O is also discussed in connection with the conventional methane-steam reforming reaction. (author)

  5. The presence of hydrogenotrophic methanogens in the inoculum improves methane gas production in microbial electrolysis cells.

    KAUST Repository

    Siegert, Michael; Li, Xiu-Fen; Yates, Matthew D; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-01-01

    High current densities in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) result from the predominance of various Geobacter species on the anode, but it is not known if archaeal communities similarly converge to one specific genus. MECs were examined here on the basis of maximum methane production and current density relative to the inoculum community structure. We used anaerobic digester (AD) sludge dominated by acetoclastic Methanosaeta, and an anaerobic bog sediment where hydrogenotrophic methanogens were detected. Inoculation using solids to medium ratio of 25% (w/v) resulted in the highest methane production rates (0.27 mL mL(-1) cm(-2), gas volume normalized by liquid volume and cathode projected area) and highest peak current densities (0.5 mA cm(-2)) for the bog sample. Methane production was independent of solid to medium ratio when AD sludge was used as the inoculum. 16S rRNA gene community analysis using pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR confirmed the convergence of Archaea to Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter, and of Bacteria to Geobacter, despite their absence in AD sludge. Combined with other studies, these findings suggest that Archaea of the hydrogenotrophic genera Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter are the most important microorganisms for methane production in MECs and that their presence in the inoculum improves the performance.

  6. Methane from waste containing paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-12-24

    Waste solids containing paper are biologically treated in a system by: fermentation with lactobacilli, separation of the solids, ion exchange of the supernatant from the separation, anaerobic digestion of the ion-exchanged liquor, separation of a liquor from the fermentation, and digestion of the liquor. Thus, a municipal waste containing paper and water was inoculated with Aspergillus niger and lactobacilli for 2 days; the mixture was anaerobically treated and centrifuged; the clear liquor was ion exchanged; and the solid waste was filter pressed. The filter cake was treated with Trichoderma nigricaus and filtered. The filtrate and the ion-exchanged liquor were digested for CH/sub 4/ production.

  7. Determining the flux of methane into Hudson Canyon at the edge of methane clathrate hydrate stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinsten, A.; Navarrete, L; Ruppel, Carolyn D.; Weber, T.C.; Leonte, M.; Kellermann, M.; Arrington, E.; Valentine, D.L.; Scranton, M.L; Kessler, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Methane seeps were investigated in Hudson Canyon, the largest shelf-break canyon on the northern US Atlantic Margin. The seeps investigated are located at or updip of the nominal limit of methane clathrate hydrate stability. The acoustic identification of bubble streams was used to guide water column sampling in a 32 km2 region within the canyon's thalweg. By incorporating measurements of dissolved methane concentration with methane oxidation rates and current velocity into a steady-state box model, the total emission of methane to the water column in this region was estimated to be 12 kmol methane per day (range: 6 – 24 kmol methane per day). These analyses suggest this methane is largely retained inside the canyon walls below 300 m water depth, and that it is aerobically oxidized to near completion within the larger extent of Hudson Canyon. Based on estimated methane emissions and measured oxidation rates, the oxidation of this methane to dissolved CO2 is expected to have minimal influences on seawater pH. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of air addition to methane on performance stability and coking over NiO-YSZ anodes of SOFC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aslannejad, Hamed; Barelli, L.; Babaie, A.; Bozorgmehri, S.

    2016-01-01

    The use of natural gas as fuel for solid oxide fuel cell is one of main potentials of this technology to be exploited as an efficient and profitable future power generation source. However, using direct methane (main component of natural gas) in conventional nickel-based fuel cells leads to carbon

  9. Stimulation of methane oxidation potential and effects on vegetation growth by bottom ash addition in a landfill final evapotranspiration cover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, G.W.; Ho, A.; Kim, P.J.; Kim, Sang Yun

    2016-01-01

    The landfilling of municipal solid waste is a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH4), contributing up to 20% of total anthropogenic CH4 emissions. The evapotranspiration (ET) cover system, an alternative final cover system in waste landfills, has been considered to be a promising way to

  10. Segmented fuel and moderator rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doshi, P.K.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a continuous segmented fuel and moderator rod for use with a water cooled and moderated nuclear fuel assembly. The rod comprises: a lower fuel region containing a column of nuclear fuel; a moderator region, disposed axially above the fuel region. The moderator region has means for admitting and passing the water moderator therethrough for moderating an upper portion of the nuclear fuel assembly. The moderator region is separated from the fuel region by a water tight separator

  11. Regional landfills methane emission inventory in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abushammala, Mohammed F M; Noor Ezlin Ahmad Basri; Basri, Hassan; Ahmed Hussein El-Shafie; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H

    2011-08-01

    The decomposition of municipal solid waste (MSW) in landfills under anaerobic conditions produces landfill gas (LFG) containing approximately 50-60% methane (CH(4)) and 30-40% carbon dioxide (CO(2)) by volume. CH(4) has a global warming potential 21 times greater than CO(2); thus, it poses a serious environmental problem. As landfills are the main method for waste disposal in Malaysia, the major aim of this study was to estimate the total CH(4) emissions from landfills in all Malaysian regions and states for the year 2009 using the IPCC, 1996 first-order decay (FOD) model focusing on clean development mechanism (CDM) project applications to initiate emission reductions. Furthermore, the authors attempted to assess, in quantitative terms, the amount of CH(4) that would be emitted from landfills in the period from 1981-2024 using the IPCC 2006 FOD model. The total CH(4) emission using the IPCC 1996 model was estimated to be 318.8 Gg in 2009. The Northern region had the highest CH(4) emission inventory, with 128.8 Gg, whereas the Borneo region had the lowest, with 24.2 Gg. It was estimated that Pulau Penang state produced the highest CH(4) emission, 77.6 Gg, followed by the remaining states with emission values ranging from 38.5 to 1.5 Gg. Based on the IPCC 1996 FOD model, the total Malaysian CH( 4) emission was forecast to be 397.7 Gg by 2020. The IPCC 2006 FOD model estimated a 201 Gg CH(4) emission in 2009, and estimates ranged from 98 Gg in 1981 to 263 Gg in 2024.

  12. Exploring and Monitoring of Methane Hydrate Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudac, D.; Obhođaš, J.; Nađ, K.; Valković, V.

    2018-01-01

    Relatively recently, in the last 20 years, it was discovered that methane hydrate (MH) deposits are globally distributed in the permafrost and oceans. Before 1965 when first deposits were discovered in nature, it was believed that MH can occur only in laboratory conditions or in vast parts of the Universe. Presently it is presumed that this solid crystalline compounds in which CH4 molecules occupies the water ice lattices (nominal chemical formula of MH is C4H62O23) can serve as an energy source favorably to the all of the world remaining conventional hydrocarbon sources. The worldwide estimates of MH deposits range from 2x1014 m3 to 3.053x1018 cubic meters. This uncertainty partly results from our limitations in geological understanding of the MH deposits, which is due to the relatively bad quality of data obtained by presently available seismic and electromagnetic techniques. Moreover, MH deposits can become vulnerable to climate changes, which were already occurring in geological past whit tremendous consequences for the global life on Earth. Thus, further development of advanced techniques is needed to enhance our abilities to better characterize, quantify and monitor the MH deposits. In the work presented 14 MeV neutrons and associated alpha particle imaging (API) where used to quantify the amount of MH in the sample. Samples were prepared from sea sediment, quartz sand and MH simulant. MH simulant with chemical formula C4H46O23 was made from sucrose (25 % by mass) and water. MH quantity was measured by measuring the carbon content in the sample [1-8].

  13. Exploring and Monitoring of Methane Hydrate Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudac D.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Relatively recently, in the last 20 years, it was discovered that methane hydrate (MH deposits are globally distributed in the permafrost and oceans. Before 1965 when first deposits were discovered in nature, it was believed that MH can occur only in laboratory conditions or in vast parts of the Universe. Presently it is presumed that this solid crystalline compounds in which CH4 molecules occupies the water ice lattices (nominal chemical formula of MH is C4H62O23 can serve as an energy source favorably to the all of the world remaining conventional hydrocarbon sources. The worldwide estimates of MH deposits range from 2x1014 m3 to 3.053x1018 cubic meters. This uncertainty partly results from our limitations in geological understanding of the MH deposits, which is due to the relatively bad quality of data obtained by presently available seismic and electromagnetic techniques. Moreover, MH deposits can become vulnerable to climate changes, which were already occurring in geological past whit tremendous consequences for the global life on Earth. Thus, further development of advanced techniques is needed to enhance our abilities to better characterize, quantify and monitor the MH deposits. In the work presented 14 MeV neutrons and associated alpha particle imaging (API where used to quantify the amount of MH in the sample. Samples were prepared from sea sediment, quartz sand and MH simulant. MH simulant with chemical formula C4H46O23 was made from sucrose (25 % by mass and water. MH quantity was measured by measuring the carbon content in the sample [1-8].

  14. Nanocrystalline solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleiter, H.

    1991-01-01

    Nanocrystalline solids are polycrystals, the crystal size of which is a few (typically 1 to 10) nanometres so that 50% or more of the solid consists of incoherent interfaces between crystals of different orientations. Solids consisting primarily of internal interfaces represent a separate class of atomic structures because the atomic arrangement formed in the core of an interface is known to be an arrangement of minimum energy in the potential field of the two adjacent crystal lattices with different crystallographic orientations on either side of the boundary core. These boundary conditions result in atomic structures in the interfacial cores which cannot be formed elsewhere (e.g. in glasses or perfect crystals). Nanocrystalline solids are of interest for the following four reasons: (1) Nanocrystalline solids exhibit an atomic structure which differs from that of the two known solid states: the crystalline (with long-range order) and the glassy (with short-range order). (2) The properties of nanocrystalline solids differ (in some cases by several orders of magnitude) from those of glasses and/or crystals with the same chemical composition, which suggests that they may be utilized technologically in the future. (3) Nanocrystalline solids seem to permit the alloying of conventionally immiscible components. (4) If small (1 to 10 nm diameter) solid droplets with a glassy structure are consolidated (instead of small crystals), a new type of glass, called nanoglass, is obtained. Such glasses seem to differ structurally from conventional glasses. (orig.)

  15. Solid Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Angelo, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Supported by a generous quantity of full-color illustrations and interesting sidebars, Solid Matter introduces the basic characteristics and properties of solid matter. It briefly describes the cosmic connection of the elements, leading readers through several key events in human pre-history that resulted in more advanced uses of matter in the solid state. Chapters include:. -Solid Matter: An Initial Perspective. -Physical Behavior of Matter. -The Gravity of Matter. -Fundamentals of Materials Science. -Rocks and Minerals. -Metals. -Building Materials. -Carbon Earth's Most Versatile Element. -S

  16. Genetic and phenotypic variance and covariance components for methane emission and postweaning traits in Angus cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, K A; Bird-Gardiner, T; Arthur, P F; Herd, R M; Hegarty, R F

    2016-04-01

    Ruminants contribute 80% of the global livestock greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions mainly through the production of methane, a byproduct of enteric microbial fermentation primarily in the rumen. Hence, reducing enteric methane production is essential in any GHG emissions reduction strategy in livestock. Data on 1,046 young bulls and heifers from 2 performance-recording research herds of Angus cattle were analyzed to provide genetic and phenotypic variance and covariance estimates for methane emissions and production traits and to examine the interrelationships among these traits. The cattle were fed a roughage diet at 1.2 times their estimated maintenance energy requirements and measured for methane production rate (MPR) in open circuit respiration chambers for 48 h. Traits studied included DMI during the methane measurement period, MPR, and methane yield (MY; MPR/DMI), with means of 6.1 kg/d (SD 1.3), 132 g/d (SD 25), and 22.0 g/kg (SD 2.3) DMI, respectively. Four forms of residual methane production (RMP), which is a measure of actual minus predicted MPR, were evaluated. For the first 3 forms, predicted MPR was calculated using published equations. For the fourth (RMP), predicted MPR was obtained by regression of MPR on DMI. Growth and body composition traits evaluated were birth weight (BWT), weaning weight (WWT), yearling weight (YWT), final weight (FWT), and ultrasound measures of eye muscle area, rump fat depth, rib fat depth, and intramuscular fat. Heritability estimates were moderate for MPR (0.27 [SE 0.07]), MY (0.22 [SE 0.06]), and the RMP traits (0.19 [SE 0.06] for each), indicating that genetic improvement to reduce methane emissions is possible. The RMP traits and MY were strongly genetically correlated with each other (0.99 ± 0.01). The genetic correlation of MPR with MY as well as with the RMP traits was moderate (0.32 to 0.63). The genetic correlation between MPR and the growth traits (except BWT) was strong (0.79 to 0.86). These results indicate that

  17. Low-Altitude Aerial Methane Concentration Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bara J. Emran

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Detection of leaks of fugitive greenhouse gases (GHGs from landfills and natural gas infrastructure is critical for not only their safe operation but also for protecting the environment. Current inspection practices involve moving a methane detector within the target area by a person or vehicle. This procedure is dangerous, time consuming, labor intensive and above all unavailable when access to the desired area is limited. Remote sensing by an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV equipped with a methane detector is a cost-effective and fast method for methane detection and monitoring, especially for vast and remote areas. This paper describes the integration of an off-the-shelf laser-based methane detector into a multi-rotor UAV and demonstrates its efficacy in generating an aerial methane concentration map of a landfill. The UAV flies a preset flight path measuring methane concentrations in a vertical air column between the UAV and the ground surface. Measurements were taken at 10 Hz giving a typical distance between measurements of 0.2 m when flying at 2 m/s. The UAV was set to fly at 25 to 30 m above the ground. We conclude that besides its utility in landfill monitoring, the proposed method is ready for other environmental applications as well as the inspection of natural gas infrastructure that can release methane with much higher concentrations.

  18. 30 CFR 75.323 - Actions for excessive methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions for excessive methane. 75.323 Section... excessive methane. (a) Location of tests. Tests for methane concentrations under this section shall be made.... (1) When 1.0 percent or more methane is present in a working place or an intake air course, including...

  19. Termites facilitate methane oxidation and shape the methanotrophic community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, A.; Erens, H.; Mujinya, B.B.; Boeckx, P.; Baert, G.; Schneider, B.; Frenzel, P.; Boon, N.; Van Ranst, E.

    2013-01-01

    Termite-derived methane contributes 3-4% to the total methane budget globally. Termites are not known to harbor methane-oxidizing microorganisms (methanotrophs). However, a considerable fraction of methane produced can be consumed by methanotrophs that inhabit the mound material. Yet, methanotroph

  20. Methane emissions form terrestrial plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergamaschi, P.; Dentener, F.; Grassi, G.; Leip, A.; Somogyi, Z.; Federici, S.; Seufert, G.; Raes, F. [European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    In a recent issue of Nature Keppler et al. (2006) report the discovery that terrestrial plants emit CH4 under aerobic conditions. Until now it was thought that bacterial decomposition of plant material under anaerobic conditions, such as in wetlands and water flooded rice paddies, is the main process leading to emissions from terrestrial ecosystems. In a first attempt to upscale these measurements, the authors estimate that global total emissions may be 149 Tg CH4/yr (62-236 Tg CH4/yr), with the main contribution estimated from tropical forests and grasslands (107 Tg CH4/yr with a range of 46-169 Tg CH4/yr). If confirmed, this new source of emission would constitute a significant fraction of the total global methane sources (estimated 500-600 Tg CH4/yr for present day total natural and anthropogenic sources) and have important implications for the global CH4 budget. To accommodate it within the present budget some sources would need to be re-assessed downwards and/or some sinks re-assessed upwards. Furthermore, also considering that methane is a {approx}23 times more powerful greenhouse gas than CO2, the possible feedbacks of these hitherto unknown CH4 emissions on global warming and their impacts on greenhouse gases (GHG) mitigation strategies need to be carefully evaluated. The merit of the paper is without doubt related to the remarkable discovery of a new process of methane emissions active under aerobic conditions. However, we think that the applied approach of scaling up emissions from the leaf level to global totals by using only few measured data (mainly from herbaceous species) and the Net Primary Productivity of the main biomes is scientifically questionable and tends to overestimate considerably the global estimates, especially for forest biomes. Furthermore, some significant constraints on the upper limit of the global natural CH4 emissions arise from the pre-industrial CH4 budget. Pre-industrial atmospheric CH4 mixing ratios have been measured

  1. Effect of Substrate-Inoculum Ratio on the Biochemical Methane Potential of Municipal Biowastes

    OpenAIRE

    Parra-Orobio Brayan Alexis; Torres-Lozada Patricia; Marmolejo-Rebellón Luis Fernando; Cárdenas-Cleves Lina Marcela; Vásquez-Franco Carlos; Torres-López Wilmar Alexander; Ordoñez-Andrade José Abdón

    2015-01-01

    Biowastes are the predominant fraction of municipal solid waste (MSW) of developing countries. Biowastes are characterized by a high content of organic matter; characteristics which facilitates its transformation through biological processes such as anaerobic digestion (AD). Using biochemical methane potential (PBM) assays, in this study we evaluated the influence of substrate-inoculum (S/I) ratio on the AD of biowaste from MSW. The S/I ranged between 0.25 to 9 gSVsubstrate * ...

  2. A detailed investigation of radicals and ions in ECR methane/argon microwave discharge

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Petr; Mišina, Martin; Novotný, Michal; Fitl, Přemysl; Vlček, Jan; Musil, Jindřich; Marešová, Eva; Bulíř, Jiří; Lančok, Ján

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 10 (2016), s. 970-980 ISSN 1612-8850 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1409; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-10279S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : diamond-like carbon * electron cyclotron resonance * mass spectrometry * methane * radicals Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.846, year: 2016

  3. Plasma conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons at surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Kamath, V.A. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Natural gas is widely abundant, is easily withdrawn from reservoirs, is commonly produced as an associated gas along with crude oil production, and is found in many geologic settings as a resource separate from oil. A much larger fraction of the natural gas may be produced from a gas reservoir, as compared with a crude oil reservoir. However, natural gas is normally transported by pipeline, and the energy throughput of such a pipeline is perhaps only 20% to 30% of the throughput of an oil pipeline of the same size and cost. Gas is difficult to transport in moderate quantities at low cost, as it must either have a special pipeline or must be liquified into LNG, shipped in cryogenic LNG tankers, and regasified chemical stability of methane has made it difficult to convert it directly into conventional hydrocarbon fuel mixtures, and has also impeded its use as a feedstock for petrochemical production. Experiments are described in which a methane plasma is created, and the resulting methyl and hydrogen ions have been accelerated within a microchannel array so that they interact with neutral methane molecules on the inside surfaces of the microchannels. No catalysts are used, and the device operates at room temperature. Impact energies of the ions are in the range of 15 ev to greater than 100 ev, and the energy delivered in the interaction at the surfaces has caused the production of larger hydrocarbon molecules, such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, along with C{sub 3}, C{sub 4}, C{sub 5}, C{sub 6}, C{sub 7}, and C{sub 8} molecules. Conversion effectiveness is greater at higher pressure, due to the increased ionic activity. The costs of production of the plasma conversion devices are projected to be quite low, and the technology appears to be commercially and economically feasible.

  4. Vade mecum for managers of collective waste methanation projects; Vade-Mecum du porteur de projet de methanisation des dechets des collectivites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deffontaine, P. [Vice-President Charge des Dechets Menagers, Lille Metropole Communaute Urbaine, 59 (France); Guillet, R. [Commission Dechets et Proprete de l' Astee, Conseil General des Mines (France)

    2006-07-01

    This document is the result of a collective work carried out by the 'biological treatment' working group of the 'wastes and cleanliness' commission of the French scientific and technical association for the water and the environment (ASTEE). It presents the different forms of implementation of the methanation or anaerobic digestion of organic fermentescible wastes. Each process has its advantages and drawbacks which are presented in this guidebook. It deals with the following points: when implementing methanation? (context of methanation and solid wastes, status of wastes methanation, biological mechanisms), upstream and inputs management (authorized wastes, typology, parameters to be considered, organization of wastes pre-collection and collection), processes implemented (parameters of the methanation process, operation of a methanation unit, technical status of some methanation facilities in operation, mass transfer status), valorization of methanation products (biogas, compost, liquid effluents), construction and operation (projects complexity and schedules, parameters to be considered, cost-benefit analysis), regulatory context (typology of sub-contexts, wastes management, legal aspects of facilities classified for environment protection, management of fertilizing matters, renewable energies), conclusion, glossary. (J.S.)

  5. Validation of landfill methane measurements from an unmanned aerial system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allen, Grant; Williams, Paul; Ricketts, hugo

    Landfill gas is made up of roughly equal amounts of methane and carbon dioxide. Modern UK landfills capture and use much of the methane gas as a fuel. But some methane escapes and is emitted to the atmosphere. Methane is an important greenhouse gas and controls on methane emissions are a part...... of international and national strategies to limit climate change. Better estimates of methane emissions from landfills and other similar sources would allow the UK to improve the quantification and control of greenhouse gas emissions. This project tested the accuracy of methane measurement using an unmanned aerial...

  6. Tapping methane hydrates for unconventional natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    Methane hydrate is an icelike form of concentrated methane and water found in the sediments of permafrost regions and marine continental margins at depths far shallower than conventional oil and gas. Despite their relative accessibility and widespread occurrence, methane hydrates have never been tapped to meet increasing global energy demands. With rising natural gas prices, production from these unconventional gas deposits is becoming economically viable, particularly in permafrost areas already being exploited for conventional oil and gas. This article provides an overview of gas hydrate occurrence, resource assessment, exploration, production technologies, renewability, and future challenges.

  7. Status of the methanization sector in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-09-01

    This report aims at describing the status of methanization installations, either operating or under construction, on the French national territory, all sectors included (industry, agriculture, sewage treatment, municipal wastes). In a first part, the authors propose a definition of methanization, a presentation of the various implementation techniques, a presentation of the different sectors using methanization (industry, agriculture and breeding, sewage treatment plants, household wastes), and a presentation of a survey. Then, they comment and discuss more precisely the different sectors, their history, their geographical distribution in France, their technologies, their effluents, their production, their economic data, their perspectives

  8. Methane storage in metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yabing; Zhou, Wei; Qian, Guodong; Chen, Banglin

    2014-08-21

    Natural gas (NG), whose main component is methane, is an attractive fuel for vehicular applications. Realization of safe, cheap and convenient means and materials for high-capacity methane storage can significantly facilitate the implementation of natural gas fuelled vehicles. The physisorption based process involving porous materials offers an efficient storage methodology and the emerging porous metal-organic frameworks have been explored as potential candidates because of their extraordinarily high porosities, tunable pore/cage sizes and easily immobilized functional sites. In this view, we provide an overview of the current status of metal-organic frameworks for methane storage.

  9. Martian methane plume models for defining Mars rover methane source search strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Christopher; Ellery, Alex; Lynch, Brian; Cloutis, Ed

    2018-07-01

    The detection of atmospheric methane on Mars implies an active methane source. This introduces the possibility of a biotic source with the implied need to determine whether the methane is indeed biotic in nature or geologically generated. There is a clear need for robotic algorithms which are capable of manoeuvring a rover through a methane plume on Mars to locate its source. We explore aspects of Mars methane plume modelling to reveal complex dynamics characterized by advection and diffusion. A statistical analysis of the plume model has been performed and compared to analyses of terrestrial plume models. Finally, we consider a robotic search strategy to find a methane plume source. We find that gradient-based techniques are ineffective, but that more sophisticated model-based search strategies are unlikely to be available in near-term rover missions.

  10. Solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The article drawn up within the framework of 'the assessment of the state of the environment in Lebanon' provides an overview of solid waste management, and assesses future wastes volume and waste disposal issues.In particular it addresses the following concerns: - Long term projections of solid waste arisings (i.e. domestic, industrial, such commercial wastes, vehicle types, construction waste, waste oils, hazardous toxic wastes and finally hospital and clinical wastes) are described. - Appropriate disposal routes, and strategies for reducing volumes for final disposal - Balance between municipal and industrial solid waste generation and disposal/treatment and - environmental impacts (aesthetics, human health, natural environment )of existing dumps, and the potential impact of government plans for construction of solid waste facilities). Possible policies for institutional reform within the waste management sector are proposed. Tables provides estimations of generation rates and distribution of wastes in different regions of Lebanon. Laws related to solid waste management are summarized

  11. Wave-induced release of methane : littoral zones as a source of methane in lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, Hilmar; Federwisch, Luisa; Peeters, Frank

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the role of surface waves and the associated disturbance of littoral sediments for the release and later distribution of dissolved methane in lakes. Surface wave field, wave-induced currents, acoustic backscatter strength, and the concentration and distribution of dissolved methane were measured simultaneously in Lake Constance, Germany. The data indicate that surface waves enhance the release of dissolved methane in the shallow littoral zone via burst-like releases of...

  12. Retooling the ethanol industry: thermophilic anaerobic digestion of thin stillage for methane production and pollution prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Scott H; Sung, Shihwu

    2008-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion of corn ethanol thin stillage was tested at thermophilic temperature (55 degrees C) with two completely stirred tank reactors. The thin stillage wastestream was organically concentrated with 100 g/L total chemical oxygen demand and 60 g/L volatiles solids and a low pH of approximately 4.0. Steady-state was achieved at 30-, 20-, and 15-day hydraulic retention times (HRTs) and digester failure at a 12-day HRT. Significant reduction of volatile solids was achieved, with a maximum reduction (89.8%) at the 20-day HRT. Methane yield ranged from 0.6 to 0.7 L methane/g volatile solids removed during steady-state operation. Effluent volatile fatty acids below 200 mg/L as acetic acid were achieved at 20- and 30-day HRTs. Ultrasonic pretreatment was used for one digester, although no significant improvement was observed. Ethanol plant natural gas consumption could be reduced 43 to 59% with the methane produced, while saving an estimated $7 to $17 million ($10 million likely) for a facility producing 360 million L ethanol/y.

  13. Co-Digestion of Napier Grass and Its Silage with Cow Dung for Methane Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wipa Prapinagsorn

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Methane production from co-digestion of grass with cow dung and silage with cow dung was conducted by a bioaugmentation technique. For self-fermentation, maximum methane yield (MY of 176.66 and 184.94 mL CH4/g-VSadded were achieved at a ratio of grass to cow dung and silage to cow dung of 1:1, respectively. A higher maximum MY of 179.59 and 208.11 mL CH4/g-VSadded was obtained from co-digestion of grass with cow dung and silage with cow dung bioaugmented with anaerobic sludge at a ratio of 3:1. The solid residue left over after co-digestion at a ratio of 3:1 was pretreated by alkaline plus enzyme before used to produce methane and a maximum MY of 333.63 and 301.38 mL CH4/g-VSadded, respectively, was achieved. Overall power generated from co-digestion of grass with cow dung plus pretreated solid residues and co-digestion of silage with cow dung plus pretreated solid residues were 0.0397 and 0.007 watt, respectively.

  14. Conversion of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Kammer Hansen, K.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, a number of papers about direct oxidation of methane and hydrocarbon in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) at relatively low temperatures (about 700degreesC) have been published. Even though the conversion of almost dry CH4 at 1000degreesC on ceramic anodes was demonstrated more than 10 years...

  15. Thermophilic Dry Methane Fermentation of Distillation Residue Eluted from Ethanol Fermentation of Kitchen Waste and Dynamics of Microbial Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Lian; Tan, Li; Wang, Ting-Ting; Sun, Zhao-Yong; Tang, Yue-Qin; Kida, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Thermophilic dry methane fermentation is advantageous for feedstock with high solid content. Distillation residue with 65.1 % moisture content was eluted from ethanol fermentation of kitchen waste and subjected to thermophilic dry methane fermentation, after adjusting the moisture content to 75 %. The effect of carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratio on thermophilic dry methane fermentation was investigated. Results showed that thermophilic dry methane fermentation could not be stably performed for >10 weeks at a C/N ratio of 12.6 and a volatile total solid (VTS) loading rate of 1 g/kg sludge/d; however, it was stably performed at a C/N ratio of 19.8 and a VTS loading rate of 3 g/kg sludge/d with 83.4 % energy recovery efficiency. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the number of bacteria and archaea decreased by two orders of magnitude at a C/N ratio of 12.6, whereas they were not influenced at a C/N ratio of 19.8. Microbial community analysis revealed that the relative abundance of protein-degrading bacteria increased and that of organic acid-oxidizing bacteria and acetic acid-oxidizing bacteria decreased at a C/N ratio of 12.6. Therefore, there was accumulation of NH 4 + and acetic acid, which inhibited thermophilic dry methane fermentation.

  16. Energy production from agricultural residues: High methane yields in pilot-scale two-stage anaerobic digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parawira, W.; Read, J.S.; Mattiasson, B.; Bjoernsson, L.

    2008-01-01

    There is a large, unutilised energy potential in agricultural waste fractions. In this pilot-scale study, the efficiency of a simple two-stage anaerobic digestion process was investigated for stabilisation and biomethanation of solid potato waste and sugar beet leaves, both separately and in co-digestion. A good phase separation between hydrolysis/acidification and methanogenesis was achieved, as indicated by the high carbon dioxide production, high volatile fatty acid concentration and low pH in the acidogenic reactors. Digestion of the individual substrates gave gross energy yields of 2.1-3.4 kWh/kg VS in the form of methane. Co-digestion, however, gave up to 60% higher methane yield, indicating that co-digestion resulted in improved methane production due to the positive synergism established in the digestion liquor. The integrity of the methane filters (MFs) was maintained throughout the period of operation, producing biogas with 60-78% methane content. A stable effluent pH showed that the methanogenic reactors had good ability to withstand the variations in load and volatile fatty acid concentrations that occurred in the two-stage process. The results of this pilot-scale study show that the two-stage anaerobic digestion system is suitable for effective conversion of semi-solid agricultural residues as potato waste and sugar beet leaves

  17. METHOD FOR PRODUCING ISOTOPIC METHANES AND PARTIALLY HALOGENATED DERIVATIVES THEROF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazer, J.W.

    1959-08-18

    A method is given for producing isotopic methanes and/ or partially halogenated derivatives. Lithium hydride, deuteride, or tritide is reacted with a halogenated methane or with a halogenated methane in combination with free halogen. The process is conveniently carried out by passing a halogenated methane preferably at low pressures or in an admixture with an inert gas through a fixed bed of finely divided lithium hydride heated initially to temperatures of 100 to 200 deg C depending upon the halogenated methane used.

  18. Coupled moderator neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Pitcher, E.J.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1995-01-01

    Optimizing the neutronic performance of a coupled-moderator system for a Long-Pulse Spallation Source is a new and challenging area for the spallation target-system designer. For optimal performance of a neutron source, it is essential to have good communication with instrument scientists to obtain proper design criteria and continued interaction with mechanical, thermal-hydraulic, and materials engineers to attain a practical design. A good comprehension of the basics of coupled-moderator neutronics will aid in the proper design of a target system for a Long-Pulse Spallation Source

  19. Biocatalytic conversion of methane to methanol as a key step for development of methane-based biorefineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In Yeub; Lee, Seung Hwan; Choi, Yoo Seong; Park, Si Jae; Na, Jeong Geol; Chang, In Seop; Kim, Choongik; Kim, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Yong Hwan; Lee, Jin Won; Lee, Eun Yeol

    2014-12-28

    Methane is considered as a next-generation carbon feedstock owing to the vast reserves of natural and shale gas. Methane can be converted to methanol by various methods, which in turn can be used as a starting chemical for the production of value-added chemicals using existing chemical conversion processes. Methane monooxygenase is the key enzyme that catalyzes the addition of oxygen to methane. Methanotrophic bacteria can transform methane to methanol by inhibiting methanol dehydrogenase. In this paper, we review the recent progress made on the biocatalytic conversion of methane to methanol as a key step for methane-based refinery systems and discuss future prospects for this technology.

  20. Indigenous microbial capability in solid manure residues to start-up solid-phase anaerobic digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, S D; Astals, S; Jensen, P D; Batstone, D J; Tait, S

    2017-06-01

    Batch solid-phase anaerobic digestion is a technology for sustainable on-farm treatment of solid residues, but is an emerging technology that is yet to be optimised with respect to start-up and inoculation. In the present study, spent bedding from two piggeries (site A and B) were batch digested at total solids (TS) concentration of 5, 10 and 20% at mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) temperatures, without adding an external inoculum. The results showed that the indigenous microbial community present in spent bedding was able to recover the full methane potential of the bedding (140±5 and 227±6L CH 4 kgVS fed -1 for site A and B, respectively), but longer treatment times were required than for digestion with an added external inoculum. Nonetheless, at high solid loadings (i.e. TS level>10%), the digestion performance was affected by chemical inhibition due to ammonia and/or humic acid. Thermophilic temperatures did not influence digestion performance but did increase start-up failure risk. Further, inoculation of residues from the batch digestion to subsequent batch enhanced start-up and achieved full methane potential recovery of the bedding. Inoculation with liquid residue (leachate) was preferred over a solid residue, to preserve treatment capacity for fresh substrate. Overall, the study highlighted that indigenous microbial community in the solid manure residue was capable of recovering full methane potential and that solid-phase digestion was ultimately limited by chemical inhibition rather than lack of suitable microbial community. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Methane production from marine, green macro-algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansson, G.

    1983-01-01

    Fermentation studies have been carried out to produce methane from green algae native to Scandinavian water and suitable for large scale cultivation. Long term semi-continuous fermentations during mesophilic and thermophilic conditions were performed as well as batch fermentations in flasks and syringes. A mixed inoculum was prepared from sediments, rotting seaweed, sewage sludge and rumen contents. Methane production from the seaweed substrate, consisting of ground green algae without any nutrient additions, started immediately in this culture, mesophilicly as well as thermophilicly. Fermentations were carried out with retention times from 27 to 11 days and loading rates from 1.1 to 2.6 g volatile solids (VS added) per litre per day. In the mesophilic fermentation, gas yields were 250-350 ml CH/sub 4//g VS added and the VS-reduction was around 50-55% at all tested retention times and loading rates. The level of volatile fatty acids was very low in this system. In the thermophilic digestor, gas yields were somewhat lower although the VS-reduction was around 50% also in this systems. The VFA-levels were higher and the culture more sensitive to disturbances. Thus no advantages were found with the thermophilic fermentation. In mesophilic batch fermentations the gas production was rather rapid and almost completed after 12-15 days, in agreement with the continuous fermentations. The gas yields in batch experiments were high, 350-480 ml CH/sub 4//g VS added. (Refs. 20).

  2. Dynamic effect of total solid content, low substrate/inoculum ratio and particle size on solid-state anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motte, J-C; Escudié, R; Bernet, N; Delgenes, J-P; Steyer, J-P; Dumas, C

    2013-09-01

    Among all the process parameters of solid-state anaerobic digestion (SS-AD), total solid content (TS), inoculation (S/X ratio) and size of the organic solid particles can be optimized to improve methane yield and process stability. To evaluate the effects of each parameter and their interactions on methane production, a three level Box-Behnken experimental design was implemented in SS-AD batch tests degrading wheat straw by adjusting: TS content from 15% to 25%, S/X ratio (in volatile solids) between 28 and 47 and particle size with a mean diameter ranging from 0.1 to 1.4mm. A dynamic analysis of the methane production indicates that the S/X ratio has only an effect during the start-up phase of the SS-AD. During the growing phase, TS content becomes the main parameter governing the methane production and its strong interaction with the particle size suggests the important role of water compartmentation on SS-AD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION Non-oxidative methane ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dell

    SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION. Non-oxidative methane dehydroaromatization reaction over highly active α-MoC1-x ZSM-5 derived from pretreatment. BUDDE PRADEEP KUMAR, ARVIND KUMAR SINGH and SREEDEVI UPADHYAYULA*. Heterogeneous Catalysis & Reaction Engineering Laboratory, Department of ...

  4. Sustainability: Bypassing the methane cycle : News & Views

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, Paul L. E.

    2015-01-01

    A genetically modified rice with more starch in its grains also provides fewer nutrients for methane-producing soil microbes. This dual benefit might help to meet the urgent need for globally sustainable food production.

  5. Biological conversion of coal gas to methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, S; Vega, J L; Clausen, E C; Gaddy, J L

    1988-08-01

    Biological conversion of low-Btu coal synthesis gas to higher Btu methane was demonstrated using both pure co-cultures and/or adapted-mixed anaerobic bacteria. Peptostreptococcus productus metabolized coal gas to mainly acetate and CO/sub 2/. The co-cultures containing methanogens converted these products to methane. In mixed culture studies, CH/sub 4/ and small amounts of acetate were produced. Reactor studies using stirred-tank and immobilized cell reactors exhibited excellent potential to convert CO, CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/ to methane at higher gas flow rates. Gas retention times ranging from 0.7 to 2 hours and high agitation were required for 90 percent CO conversion in these systems. This paper also illustrates the potential of biological methanation and demonstrates the need for good mass transfer in converting gas phase substrates. 21 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  6. Global climate: Methane contribution to greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metalli, P.

    1992-01-01

    The global atmospheric concentration of methane greatly contributes to the severity of the greenhouse effect. It has been estimated that this concentration, due mainly to human activities, is growing at the rate of roughly 1.1% per year. Environmental scientists suggest that a reduction, even as small as 10%, in global methane emissions would be enough to curtail the hypothetical global warning scenarios forecasted for the up-coming century. Through the recovery of methane from municipal and farm wastes, as well as, through the control of methane leaks and dispersions in coal mining and petrochemical processes, substantial progress towards the abatement of greenhouse gas effects could be achieved without having to resort to economically detrimental limitations on the use of fossil fuels

  7. Enteric methane emissions from German pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dämmgen, Ulrich; Schulz, Joachim; Klausing, Heinrich Kleine

    2012-01-01

    Methane emissions from enteric fermentation of pigs are object of emission reporting. Hitherto they were treated as part of the energy balance of pigs, in accordance with IPCC guidance documents. They were calculated from the gross energy intake rate and a constant methane conversion ratio....... Meanwhile numerous experimental data on methane emissions from enteric fermentation is available in Germany and abroad; the results are compiled in this work. These results also allow for a description of transformation processes in the hind gut and a subsequent establishment of models that relate emissions...... to feed and performance data. The model by Kirchgeßner et al. (1995) is based on German experimental data and reflects typical national diet compositions. It is used to quantify typical emissions and methane conversion ratios. The results agree with other experimental findings at home and abroad...

  8. Oxygen-Methane Thruster, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Two main innovations will be developed in the Phase II effort that are fundamentally associated with our gaseous oxygen/gaseous methane RCS thruster. The first...

  9. Oxygen-Methane Thruster, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Orion Propulsion, Inc. proposes to develop an Oxygen and Methane RCS Thruster to advance the technology of alternate fuels. A successful Oxygen/CH4 RCS Thruster will...

  10. Bio-methane. Challenges and technical solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaisonneau, Laurent; Carlu, Elieta; Feuillette, Vincent

    2012-06-01

    Among the new energy sectors in development, biogas has many benefits: several valorization possibilities (bio-methane, electricity and heat), continuous production, easy storage. In Europe, and particularly in France, the bio-methane market will be in the next years a driver for the improvement of the economic, environmental and social performance of the actors of the value chain of biogas. ENEA releases a report on the current state of the bio-methane market in Europe. This publication mainly describes: An outlook of the market evolution and the corresponding stakes for the actors of this sector, the technical and economic characteristics, maturity level and specificities of each biogas upgrading process, An analysis of the French regulatory framework for bio-methane injection into the grid

  11. Methane Tracking and Mitigation Options - EPA CMOP

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset contains the sub-model for EPA's MARKAL model, which tracks methane emissions from the energy system, and limited other sources (landfills and manure...

  12. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, D.A.; Lawson, M.; Davis, C.L.; Ferreira, A.A.; Santos Neto, E. V.; Ellis, G.S.; Lewan, M.D.; Martini, Anna M.; Tang, Y.; Schoell, M.; Sessions, A.L.; Eiler, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a “clumped isotope” technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yield formation temperatures consistent with their comparatively lower-temperature formational environments (<50°C). In systems where gases have migrated and other proxies for gas-generation temperature yield ambiguous results, methane clumped-isotope temperatures distinguish among and allow for independent tests of possible gas-formation models.

  13. Methane leakage in natural gas operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennervik, A.

    1992-01-01

    The world gas industry is efficient in conservation of natural gas within its systems. As the influence of methane as an infra-red absorbent gas has been more widely recognized, the considerations of methane's greenhouse effect has become vitally important to gas companies around the world. The industry is universally environmentally conscious. natural gas transmission and distribution companies want to maintain their image as suppliers of clean fuel. Further reductions in methane leakage --- particularly in older distribution systems --- can, should and will be pursued. Unfortunately, there has been little exchange of views on methane leakages between commentators on environmental matters and gas companies and organizations. There is absolutely no need for the industry to avoid the issue of greenhouse gases. Without industry involvement, the environmental debate concerning fossil fuels could lead to selective interpretation of scientific views and available evidence. Companies and authorities would be presented with confusing, contradictory evidence on which to base policy approaches and regulations

  14. Mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of municipal solid waste and sewage sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aghdam, Ehsan Fathi; Kinnunen, V.; Rintala, Jukka A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents mesophilic anaerobic digestion (AD) of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), biowaste (BW), sewage sludge (SS), and co-digestion of BW and SS. Average methane yields of 386 ± 54, 385 ± 82, 198 ± 14, and 318 ± 59 L CH4/kg volatile solids (VS) were obtained for OFMSW...

  15. Implementation of methane cycling for deep-time global warming simulations with the DCESS Earth system model (version 1.2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Gary; Fernández Villanueva, Esteban; Rondanelli, Roberto; Olaf Pepke Pedersen, Jens; Malskær Olsen, Steffen; Huber, Matthew

    2017-11-01

    Geological records reveal a number of ancient, large and rapid negative excursions of the carbon-13 isotope. Such excursions can only be explained by massive injections of depleted carbon to the Earth system over a short duration. These injections may have forced strong global warming events, sometimes accompanied by mass extinctions such as the Triassic-Jurassic and end-Permian extinctions 201 and 252 million years ago, respectively. In many cases, evidence points to methane as the dominant form of injected carbon, whether as thermogenic methane formed by magma intrusions through overlying carbon-rich sediment or from warming-induced dissociation of methane hydrate, a solid compound of methane and water found in ocean sediments. As a consequence of the ubiquity and importance of methane in major Earth events, Earth system models for addressing such events should include a comprehensive treatment of methane cycling but such a treatment has often been lacking. Here we implement methane cycling in the Danish Center for Earth System Science (DCESS) model, a simplified but well-tested Earth system model of intermediate complexity. We use a generic methane input function that allows variation in input type, size, timescale and ocean-atmosphere partition. To be able to treat such massive inputs more correctly, we extend the model to deal with ocean suboxic/anoxic conditions and with radiative forcing and methane lifetimes appropriate for high atmospheric methane concentrations. With this new model version, we carried out an extensive set of simulations for methane inputs of various sizes, timescales and ocean-atmosphere partitions to probe model behavior. We find that larger methane inputs over shorter timescales with more methane dissolving in the ocean lead to ever-increasing ocean anoxia with consequences for ocean life and global carbon cycling. Greater methane input directly to the atmosphere leads to more warming and, for example, greater carbon dioxide release

  16. Implementation of methane cycling for deep-time global warming simulations with the DCESS Earth system model (version 1.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Shaffer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Geological records reveal a number of ancient, large and rapid negative excursions of the carbon-13 isotope. Such excursions can only be explained by massive injections of depleted carbon to the Earth system over a short duration. These injections may have forced strong global warming events, sometimes accompanied by mass extinctions such as the Triassic-Jurassic and end-Permian extinctions 201 and 252 million years ago, respectively. In many cases, evidence points to methane as the dominant form of injected carbon, whether as thermogenic methane formed by magma intrusions through overlying carbon-rich sediment or from warming-induced dissociation of methane hydrate, a solid compound of methane and water found in ocean sediments. As a consequence of the ubiquity and importance of methane in major Earth events, Earth system models for addressing such events should include a comprehensive treatment of methane cycling but such a treatment has often been lacking. Here we implement methane cycling in the Danish Center for Earth System Science (DCESS model, a simplified but well-tested Earth system model of intermediate complexity. We use a generic methane input function that allows variation in input type, size, timescale and ocean–atmosphere partition. To be able to treat such massive inputs more correctly, we extend the model to deal with ocean suboxic/anoxic conditions and with radiative forcing and methane lifetimes appropriate for high atmospheric methane concentrations. With this new model version, we carried out an extensive set of simulations for methane inputs of various sizes, timescales and ocean–atmosphere partitions to probe model behavior. We find that larger methane inputs over shorter timescales with more methane dissolving in the ocean lead to ever-increasing ocean anoxia with consequences for ocean life and global carbon cycling. Greater methane input directly to the atmosphere leads to more warming and, for example

  17. Flux and reactive contributions to electron transport in methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ness, K.F.; Nolan, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    A previously developed theoretical analysis (Nolan et al. 1997) is applied to the study of electron transport in methane for reduced electric fields in the range 1 to 1000 Td. The technique of analysis identifies the flux and reactive components of the measurable transport, without resort to the two-term approximation. A comparison of the results of the Monte Carlo method with those of a multiterm Boltzmann equation analysis (Ness and Robson 1986) shows good agreement. The sensitivity of the modelled electron transport to post-ionisation energy partitioning is studied by comparison of three ionisation energy partitioning regimes at moderate (300 Td) and high (1000 Td) values of the reduced electric field. Copyright (2000) CSIRO Australia

  18. Production of methane by co-digestion of cassava pulp with various concentrations of pig manure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panichnumsin, Pornpan [The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Thungkru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Excellent Center of Waste Utilization and Management, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand); Nopharatana, Annop [Pilot Plant Development and Training Institute, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand); Ahring, Birgitte [AAU, Copenhagen Institute of Technology, Lautrupvang 15, 2750 Ballerup (Denmark); Chaiprasert, Pawinee [School of Bioresources and Technology, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand)

    2010-08-15

    Cassava pulp is a major by-product produced in a cassava starch factory, containing 50-60% of starch (dry basis). Therefore, in this study we are considering its potential as a raw material substrate for the production of methane. To ensure sufficient amounts of nutrients for the anaerobic digestion process, the potential of co-digestion of cassava pulp (CP) with pig manure (PM) was further examined. The effect of the co-substrate mixture ratio was carried out in a semi-continuously fed stirred tank reactor (CSTR) operated under mesophilic condition (37 C) and at a constant OLR of 3.5 kg VS m{sup -3} d{sup -1} and a HRT of 15 days. The results showed that co-digestion resulted in higher methane production and reduction of volatile solids (VS) but lower buffering capacity. Compared to the digestion of PM alone, the specific methane yield increased 41% higher when co-digested with CP in concentrations up to 60% of the incoming VS. This was probably due to an increase in available easily degradable carbohydrates as the CP ratio in feedstock increased. The highest methane yield and VS removal of 306 mL g{sup -1} VS{sub added} and 61%, respectively, were achieved with good process stability (VFA:Alkalinity ratio < 0.1) when CP accounted for 60% of the feedstock VS. A further increase of CP of the feedstock led to a decrease in methane yield and solid reductions. This appeared to be caused by an extremely high C:N ratio of the feedstock resulting in a deficiency of ammonium nitrogen for microbial growth and buffering capacity. (author)

  19. Production of methane by co-digestion of cassava pulp with various concentrations of pig manure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panichnumsin, Pornpan; Nopharatana, Annop; Ahring, Birgitte; Chaiprasert, Pawinee

    2010-01-01

    Cassava pulp is a major by-product produced in a cassava starch factory, containing 50-60% of starch (dry basis). Therefore, in this study we are considering its potential as a raw material substrate for the production of methane. To ensure sufficient amounts of nutrients for the anaerobic digestion process, the potential of co-digestion of cassava pulp (CP) with pig manure (PM) was further examined. The effect of the co-substrate mixture ratio was carried out in a semi-continuously fed stirred tank reactor (CSTR) operated under mesophilic condition (37 o C) and at a constant OLR of 3.5 kg VS m -3 d -1 and a HRT of 15 days. The results showed that co-digestion resulted in higher methane production and reduction of volatile solids (VS) but lower buffering capacity. Compared to the digestion of PM alone, the specific methane yield increased 41% higher when co-digested with CP in concentrations up to 60% of the incoming VS. This was probably due to an increase in available easily degradable carbohydrates as the CP ratio in feedstock increased. The highest methane yield and VS removal of 306 mL g -1 VS added and 61%, respectively, were achieved with good process stability (VFA:Alkalinity ratio < 0.1) when CP accounted for 60% of the feedstock VS. A further increase of CP of the feedstock led to a decrease in methane yield and solid reductions. This appeared to be caused by an extremely high C:N ratio of the feedstock resulting in a deficiency of ammonium nitrogen for microbial growth and buffering capacity.

  20. Abiotic Production of Methane in Terrestrial Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Marmolejo, Andrés; Escobar-Briones, Elva

    2013-01-01

    Abstract On Earth, methane is produced mainly by life, and it has been proposed that, under certain conditions, methane detected in an exoplanetary spectrum may be considered a biosignature. Here, we estimate how much methane may be produced in hydrothermal vent systems by serpentinization, its main geological source, using the kinetic properties of the main reactions involved in methane production by serpentinization. Hydrogen production by serpentinization was calculated as a function of the available FeO in the crust, given the current spreading rates. Carbon dioxide is the limiting reactant for methane formation because it is highly depleted in aqueous form in hydrothermal vent systems. We estimated maximum CH4 surface fluxes of 6.8×108 and 1.3×109 molecules cm−2 s−1 for rocky planets with 1 and 5 M⊕, respectively. Using a 1-D photochemical model, we simulated atmospheres with volume mixing ratios of 0.03 and 0.1 CO2 to calculate atmospheric methane concentrations for the maximum production of this compound by serpentinization. The resulting abundances were 2.5 and 2.1 ppmv for 1 M⊕ planets and 4.1 and 3.7 ppmv for 5 M⊕ planets. Therefore, low atmospheric concentrations of methane may be produced by serpentinization. For habitable planets around Sun-like stars with N2-CO2 atmospheres, methane concentrations larger than 10 ppmv may indicate the presence of life. Key Words: Serpentinization—Exoplanets—Biosignatures—Planetary atmospheres. Astrobiology 13, 550–559. PMID:23742231

  1. Upconversion detector for methane atmospheric sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Lichun; Fix, Andreas; Høgstedt, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate an efficient upconversion detector (UCD) for a methane (CH4) atmospheric sensor. The UCD shows comparable performance with a conventional detector when measuring the backscattered signal from the hard target located 2.3 km away.......We demonstrate an efficient upconversion detector (UCD) for a methane (CH4) atmospheric sensor. The UCD shows comparable performance with a conventional detector when measuring the backscattered signal from the hard target located 2.3 km away....

  2. A biomimetic methane-oxidising catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, H [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1997-12-31

    The diminishing resources of petroleum oil has meant that there has been considerable efforts in recent years to find a suitable substitute for gasoline as a transportation fuel. Methanol has been identified as a suitable substitute since it is a readily combustible fuel which can be manufactured from a number of different sources. Methane is commonly used as a starting material for the production of synthesis gas (CO + H{sub 2}) and hence methanol. It is well known that the cleavage of the C-H bond of methane is extremely difficult (bond energy is around 104 kcal/mol) and that fairly drastic conditions are required to convert methane into methanol. Temperatures around 1200 deg C and pressures of up to 100 atmospheres over metal catalysts in a series of reactions are required to effect this process. Efforts have been made to reduce the temperature and the number of steps by using lanthanide ruthenium oxide catalyst but such reactions are still thermodynamically endothermic. An energetically more efficient reaction would be the direct conversion of methane to methanol using oxygen as the oxidant: CH{sub 4} + 1/2O{sub 2} -> CH{sub 3}OH {Delta}H deg = - 30.7 kcal/mol. Such a direct oxidation route is manifest in the bacterially-mediated oxidation of methane by methanotrophic bacteria. These organisms effect the direct oxidation of methane to methanol by the enzyme methane monooxygenase (MMO) as part of the reaction sequences to oxidize methane to carbon dioxide. (14 refs.)

  3. Methane emissions from the natural gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, M.R.; Cowgill, R.M.; Campbell, L.M.; Lott, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. EPA and the United Nation's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) have suggested that global warming could be reduced if more energy was generated using natural gas rather than fuels such as coal. An increased use of natural gas instead of coal would decrease global warming since methane emits less carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) than any fossil fuel. However, methane is a more potent as a greenhouse gas than CO 2 , and leakage from the gas system could reduce or eliminate the inherent advantage of natural gas. For this reason, methane emissions must be quantified before a national policy on preferred fuels is developed. Therefore, GRI and EPA have developed this confunded program to quantify methane emissions from the U.S. gas industry. This paper presents, for general industry review, the approach and methodology that the project is using to determine the emissions. The study will measure or calculate all gas industry methane emissions - from production at the wellhead, through the system, to the customer's meter. When these data are combined with data from other studies, a definitive comparison of the relative environmental impact of using methane versus other fuels will be possible. The study will also provide data that can be used by the industry to identify cost-effective mitigation techniques to reduce losses. The methane emissions project is being conducted in three phases: the first two phases have identified and ranked all known potential methane-emitting sources and established methods for measuring, calculating, and extrapolating emissions from those sources. The third phase, which is currently in progress, will gather sufficient data to achieve the accuracy goal. This paper briefly summarizes the methodology being used for the completion of the third phase

  4. Biochemical composition and methane production correlations

    OpenAIRE

    Charnier, Cyrille; Latrille, Eric; Moscoviz, Roman; Miroux, Jérémie; Steyer, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Substrates for anaerobic digestion are composed of heterogeneous and complex organic matter. General parameters of the organic matter can be used to describe its composition such as sugar, protein and lipid contents, Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) and kinetic of methane production. These parameters are required for the monitoring of digesters but their characterization are time consuming and expensive; thus, these parameters are rarely assessed all together....

  5. A biomimetic methane-oxidising catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, H. [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1996-12-31

    The diminishing resources of petroleum oil has meant that there has been considerable efforts in recent years to find a suitable substitute for gasoline as a transportation fuel. Methanol has been identified as a suitable substitute since it is a readily combustible fuel which can be manufactured from a number of different sources. Methane is commonly used as a starting material for the production of synthesis gas (CO + H{sub 2}) and hence methanol. It is well known that the cleavage of the C-H bond of methane is extremely difficult (bond energy is around 104 kcal/mol) and that fairly drastic conditions are required to convert methane into methanol. Temperatures around 1200 deg C and pressures of up to 100 atmospheres over metal catalysts in a series of reactions are required to effect this process. Efforts have been made to reduce the temperature and the number of steps by using lanthanide ruthenium oxide catalyst but such reactions are still thermodynamically endothermic. An energetically more efficient reaction would be the direct conversion of methane to methanol using oxygen as the oxidant: CH{sub 4} + 1/2O{sub 2} -> CH{sub 3}OH {Delta}H deg = - 30.7 kcal/mol. Such a direct oxidation route is manifest in the bacterially-mediated oxidation of methane by methanotrophic bacteria. These organisms effect the direct oxidation of methane to methanol by the enzyme methane monooxygenase (MMO) as part of the reaction sequences to oxidize methane to carbon dioxide. (14 refs.)

  6. Biomass-derived carbon composites for enrichment of dilute methane from underground coal mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jun-Seok; Jin, Yonggang; Huynh, Chi; Su, Shi

    2018-07-01

    Ventilation air methane (VAM), which is the main source of greenhouse gas emissions from coal mines, has been a great challenge to deal with due to its huge flow rates and dilute methane levels (typically 0.3-1.0 vol%) with almost 100% humidity. As part of our continuous endeavor to further improve the methane adsorption capacity of carbon composites, this paper presents new carbon composites derived from macadamia nut shells (MNSs) and incorporated with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). These new carbon composites were fabricated in a honeycomb monolithic structure to tolerate dusty environment and to minimize pressure drop. This paper demonstrates the importance of biomass particle size distributions when formed in a composite and methane adsorption capacities at low pressures relevant to VAM levels. The selectivity of methane over nitrogen was about 10.4 at each relevant partial pressure, which was much greater than that (6.5) obtained conventionally (at very low pressures), suggesting that capturing methane in the presence of pre-adsorbed nitrogen would be a practical option. The equilibrium and dynamic performance of biomass-derived carbon composites were enhanced by 30 and 84%, respectively, compared to those of our previous carbon fiber composites. In addition, the presence of moisture in ventilation air resulted in a negligible effect on the dynamic VAM capture performance of the carbon composites, suggesting that our carbon composites have a great potential for site applications at coal mines because the cost and performance of solid adsorbents are critical factors to consider. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Production of Excess CO2 relative to methane in peatlands: a new H2 sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R.; Woodcroft, B. J.; Varner, R. K.; Tyson, G. W.; Tfaily, M. M.; Sebestyen, S.; Saleska, S. R.; Rogers, K.; Rich, V. I.; McFarlane, K. J.; Kostka, J. E.; Kolka, R. K.; Keller, J.; Iversen, C. M.; Hodgkins, S. B.; Hanson, P. J.; Guilderson, T. P.; Griffiths, N.; de La Cruz, F.; Crill, P. M.; Chanton, J.; Bridgham, S. D.; Barlaz, M.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is generated as the end product of anaerobic organic matter degradation following a series of reaction pathways including fermentation and syntrophy. Along with acetate and CO2, syntrophic reactions generate H2 and are only thermodynamically feasible when coupled to an exothermic reaction that consumes H2. The usual model of organic matter degradation in peatlands has assumed that methanogenesis is that exothermic H2-consuming reaction. If correct, this paradigm should ultimately result in equimolar production of CO2 and methane from the degradation of the model organic compound cellulose: i.e. C6H12O6 à 3CO2 + 3CH4. However, dissolved gas measurement and modeling results from field and incubation experiments spanning peatlands across the northern hemisphere have failed to demonstrate equimolar production of CO2 and methane. Instead, in a flagrant violation of thermodynamics, these studies show a large bias favoring CO2 production over methane generation. In this talk, we will use an array of complementary analytical techniques including FT-IR, cellulose and lignin measurements, 13C-NMR, fluorescence spectroscopy, and ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry to describe organic matter degradation within a peat column and identify the important degradation mechanisms. Hydrogenation was the most common transformation observed in the ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry data. From these results we propose a new mechanism for consuming H2 generated during CO2 production, without concomitant methane formation, consistent with observed high CO2/CH4 ratios. While homoacetogenesis is a known sink for H2 in these systems, this process also consumes CO2 and therefore does not explain the excess CO2 measured in field and incubation samples. Not only does the newly proposed mechanism consume H2 without generating methane, but it also yields enough energy to balance the coupled syntrophic reactions, thereby restoring thermodynamic order. Schematic of organic matter

  8. A novel free ammonia based pretreatment technology to enhance anaerobic methane production from primary sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Zhou, Xu; Xie, Guo-Jun; Duan, Haoran; Wang, Qilin

    2017-10-01

    This study proposed a novel free ammonia (FA, i.e., NH 3 ) pretreatment technology to enhance anaerobic methane production from primary sludge for the first time. The solubilization of primary sludge was substantially enhanced following 24 h FA pretreatment (250-680 mg NH 3 -N/L), by which the release of soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) (i.e., 0.4 mg SCOD/mg VS added; VS: volatile solids) was approximately 10 times as much as that without pretreatment (i.e., 0.03 mg SCOD/mg VS added). Then, biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests demonstrated that FA pretreatment of 250-680 mg NH 3 -N/L was capable of enhancing anaerobic methane production while the digestion time was more than 7 days. Model based analysis indicated that the improved anaerobic methane production was due to an increased biochemical methane potential (B 0 ) of 8-17% (i.e., from 331 to 357-387 L CH 4 /kg VS added), with the highest B 0 achieved at 420 mg NH 3 -N/L pretreatment. However, FA pretreatment of 250-680 mg NH 3 -N/L decreased hydrolysis rate (k) by 24-38% compared with control (i.e., from 0.29 d -1 to 0.18-0.22 d -1 ), which explained the lower methane production over the first 7 days' digestion period. Economic analysis and environmental evaluation demonstrated that FA pretreatment technology was environmentally friendly and economically favorable. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 2245-2252. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Free ammonia pre-treatment of secondary sludge significantly increases anaerobic methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Zhou, Xu; Wang, Dongbo; Sun, Jing; Wang, Qilin

    2017-07-01

    Energy recovery in the form of methane from sludge/wastewater is restricted by the poor and slow biodegradability of secondary sludge. An innovative pre-treatment technology using free ammonia (FA, i.e. NH 3 ) was proposed in this study to increase anaerobic methane production. The solubilisation of secondary sludge was significantly increased after FA pre-treatment at up to 680 mg NH 3 -N/L for 1 day, under which the solubilisation (i.e. 0.4 mg SCOD/mg VS; SCOD: soluble chemical oxygen demand; VS: volatile solids) was >10 times higher than that without FA pre-treatment (i.e. 0.03 mg SCOD/mg VS). Biochemical methane potential assays showed that FA pre-treatment at above 250 mg NH 3 -N/L is effective in improving anaerobic methane production. The highest improvement in biochemical methane potential (B 0 ) and hydrolysis rate (k) was achieved at FA concentrations of 420-680 mg NH 3 -N/L, and was determined as approximately 22% (from 160 to 195 L CH 4 /kg VS added) and 140% (from 0.22 to 0.53 d -1 ) compared to the secondary sludge without pre-treatment. More analysis revealed that the FA induced improvement in B 0 and k could be attributed to the rapidly biodegradable substances rather than the slowly biodegradable substances. Economic and environmental analyses showed that the FA-based technology is economically favourable and environmentally friendly. Since this FA technology aims to use the wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) waste (i.e. anaerobic digestion liquor) to enhance methane production from the WWTPs, it will set an example for the paradigm shift of the WWTPs from 'linear economy' to 'circular economy'. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Isotopic composition of methane and inferred methanogenic substrates along a salinity gradient in a hypersaline microbial mat system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Elyn G; Bebout, Brad M; Kelley, Cheryl A

    2009-05-01

    The importance of hypersaline environments over geological time, the discovery of similar habitats on Mars, and the importance of methane as a biosignature gas combine to compel an understanding of the factors important in controlling methane released from hypersaline microbial mat environments. To further this understanding, changes in stable carbon isotopes of methane and possible methanogenic substrates in microbial mat communities were investigated as a function of salinity here on Earth. Microbial mats were sampled from four different field sites located within salterns in Baja California Sur, Mexico. Salinities ranged from 50 to 106 parts per thousand (ppt). Pore water and microbial mat samples were analyzed for the carbon isotopic composition of dissolved methane, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and mat material (particulate organic carbon or POC). The POC delta(13)C values ranged from -6.7 to -13.5 per thousand, and DIC delta(13)C values ranged from -1.4 to -9.6 per thousand. These values were similar to previously reported values. The delta(13)C values of methane ranged from -49.6 to -74.1 per thousand; the methane most enriched in (13)C was obtained from the highest salinity area. The apparent fractionation factors between methane and DIC, and between methane and POC, within the mats were also determined and were found to change with salinity. The apparent fractionation factors ranged from 1.042 to 1.077 when calculated using DIC and from 1.038 to 1.068 when calculated using POC. The highest-salinity area showed the least fractionation, the moderate-salinity area showed the highest fractionation, and the lower-salinity sites showed fractionations that were intermediate. These differences in fractionation are most likely due to changes in the dominant methanogenic pathways and substrates used at the different sites because of salinity differences.

  11. Moderator Chemistry Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department's moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation

  12. Den moderate revolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bøje

    "normale" industrivirksomheder, men den er absolut set begrænset. Årsagerne til denne kun "moderate revolution" af organisationsformerne diskuteres: Er det fordi klassisk organisation og social nærkontakt er nødvendig i den nye økonomi, eller er det manglende fantasi og tryghedsbehov? Begge muligheder...

  13. Cryogenic moderator design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diplock, B.R.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the present design of the two cold moderators to be built for the Spallation Neutron Source. It discusses the reasons behind a number of the design features and highlights several problem areas requiring solutions before a final design can be constructed

  14. In Everything Moderation

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    For many people, drinking alcohol is a regular part of social occasions, but moderation is important. Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to serious health and social problems. A recent report found that binge drinking is common among women and girls. In this podcast, Dr. Dafna Kanny discusses the dangers of binge drinking.

  15. Methanation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, Marko; Busch, Günter

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The biologic methanation of exclusively gases like hydrogen and carbon dioxide is feasible. • Electrical energy can be stored in the established gas grid by conversion to methane. • The quality of produced biogas is very high (c CH4 = 98 vol%). • The conversion rate is depending on H 2 -flow rate. - Abstract: A new method for the methanation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide is presented. In a novel anaerobic trickle-bed reactor, biochemical catalyzed methanation at mesophilic temperatures and ambient pressure can be realized. The conversion of gaseous substrates by immobilized hydrogenotrophic methanogens is a unique feature of this reactor type. The already patented reactor produces biogas which has a very high quality (c CH4 = 97.9 vol%). Therefore, the storage of biogas in the existing natural gas grid is possible without extensive purification. The specific methane production was measured with P = 1.17 Nm CH4 3 /(m R 3 d). It is conceivable to realize the process at sites that generate solar or wind energy and sites subject to the conditions for hydrogen electrolysis (or other methods of hydrogen production). The combination with conventional biogas plants under hydrogen addition to methane enrichment is possible as well. The process enables the coupling of various renewable energy sources

  16. Methane emission by adult ostriches (Struthio camelus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Samuel; Dittmann, Marie T; Reutlinger, Christoph; Ortmann, Sylvia; Hatt, Jean-Michel; Kreuzer, Michael; Clauss, Marcus

    2015-02-01

    Ostriches (Struthio camelus) are herbivorous birds with a digestive physiology that shares several similarities with that of herbivorous mammals. Previous reports, however, claimed a very low methane emission from ostriches, which would be clearly different from mammals. If this could be confirmed, ostrich meat would represent a very attractive alternative to ruminant-and generally mammalian-meat by representing a particularly low-emission agricultural form of production. We individually measured, by chamber respirometry, the amount of oxygen consumed as well as carbon dioxide and methane emitted from six adult ostriches (body mass 108.3±8.3 kg) during a 24-hour period when fed a pelleted lucerne diet. While oxygen consumption was in the range of values previously reported for ostriches, supporting the validity of our experimental setup, methane production was, at 17.5±3.2 L d(-1), much higher than previously reported for this species, and was of the magnitude expected for similar-sized, nonruminant mammalian herbivores. These results suggest that methane emission is similar between ostriches and nonruminant mammalian herbivores and that the environmental burden of these animals is comparable. The findings furthermore indicate that it appears justified to use currently available scaling equations for methane production of nonruminant mammals in paleo-reconstructions of methane production of herbivorous dinosaurs. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Field test of methane fermentation incorporating with membrane module for sewage sludge. Bunrimaku wo fukugoshita gesui odei no methane hakko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiriyama, K.; Tanaka, Y. (Ebara Corp., Tokyo (Japan)); Adachi, T. (Nitto Denko Corp., Osaka (Japan))

    1993-02-01

    Field test results of methane fermentation incorporating with a membrane module were reported for sewage sludge. The methane fermentation was conducted at 25[degree]C using only raw sludge charged from a suspended solid (SS) separating device until the mid-stage of experiments and adding gradually concentrated backwash of a biological aerated filter after the mid-stage. As a result, the reduction rate of volatile SS (VSS) charged into the reactor increased from 76.8% to 84.8% until the mid-stage, while from 52% to 70% even after the mid-stage giving the effect of the membrane module. Stable operation of the membrane module was achieved at 20,000-25,000 mg/l in SS concentration at its inlet and 0.6 m/s in membrane linear velocity, together with the easy recovery of flux by back washing. The power consumption in membrane separation at 23,000 mg/l in SS concentration was estimated to be 2.15 kWh per m[sup 3] of permeant at both motor and pump efficiencies of 1.0, suggesting possible energy saving. 3 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Quantification of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from various waste treatment facilities by tracer dilution method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mønster, Jacob; Rella, Chris; Jacobson, Gloria; Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2013-04-01

    Urban activities generate solid and liquid waste, and the handling and aftercare of the waste results in the emission of various compounds into the surrounding environment. Some of these compounds are emitted as gasses into the atmosphere, including methane and nitrous oxide. Methane and nitrous oxide are strong greenhouse gases and are considered to have 25 and 298 times the greenhouse gas potential of carbon dioxide on a hundred years term (Solomon et al. 2007). Global observations of both gasses have shown increasing concentrations that significantly contribute to the greenhouse gas effect. Methane and nitrous oxide are emitted from both natural and anthropogenic sources and inventories of source specific fugitive emissions from the anthropogenic sources of methane and nitrous oxide of are often estimated on the basis of modeling and mass balance. Though these methods are well-developed, actual measurements for quantification of the emissions is a very useful tool for verifying the modeling and mass balance as well as for validation initiatives done for lowering the emissions of methane and nitrous oxide. One approach to performing such measurements is the tracer dilution method (Galle et al. 2001, Scheutz et al. 2011), where the exact location of the source is located and a tracer gas is released at this source location at a known flow. The ratio of downwind concentrations of the tracer gas and the methane and nitrous oxide gives the emissions rates of the greenhouse gases. This tracer dilution method can be performed using both stationary and mobile measurements and in both cases, real-time measurements of both tracer and quantified gas are required, placing high demands on the analytical detection method. To perform the methane and nitrous oxide measurements, two robust instruments capable of real-time measurements were used, based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy and operating in the near-infrared spectral region. One instrument measured the methane and

  19. Microwave Spectrum and Structure of the Methane-Propane Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Karen I.; Lin, Wei; Arsenault, Eric A.; Choi, Yoon Jeong; Novick, Stewart E.

    2017-06-01

    Methane is exceptional in its solid-phase orientational disorder that persists down to 24 K. Only below that temperature does the structure become partially ordered, and full crystallinity requires even lower temperatures and high pressures. Not surprisingly, methane appears to freely rotate in most van der Waals complexes, although two notable exceptions are CH_4-HF and CH_4-C_5H_5N. Of interest to us is how alkane interactions affect the methane rotation. Except for CH_4-CH_4, rotationally-resolved spectra of alkane-alkane complexes have not been studied. To fill this void, we present the microwave spectrum of CH_4-C_3H_8 which is the smallest alkane complex with a practical dipole moment. The microwave spectrum of CH_4-C_3H_8 was measured using the Fourier Transform microwave spectrometer at Wesleyan University. In the region between 7100 and 25300 MHz, we observed approximately 70 transitions that could plausibly be attributed to the CH_4-C_3H_8 complex (requiring high power and the proper mixture of gases). Of these, 16 were assigned to the A-state (lowest internal rotor state of methane) and four to the F-state. The A-state transitions were fitted with a Watson Hamiltonian using nine spectroscopic constants of which A = 7553.8144(97) MHz, B = 2483.9183(35) MHz, and C = 2041.8630(21) MHz. The A rotational constant is only 1.5 MHz higher than that of Ar-C_3H_8 and, since the a-axis of the complex passes approximately through the centers of mass of the subunits, this indicates a similar relative orientation. Thus, we find that the CH_4 is located above the plane of the propane. The center-of-mass separation of the subunits in CH_4-C_3H_8 is calculated to be 3.993 Å, 0.16 Å longer than the Ar-C_3H_8 distance of 3.825 Å, a reasonable difference considering the larger van der Waals radius of CH_4. The four F-state lines, which were about twice as strong as the A-state lines, could be fitted to A, B, and C rotational constants, and further analysis is in progress.

  20. The phase transition of methane caused by pressure change during its seeping up from seepage, revealed by video observation and acoustic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, C.

    2017-12-01

    Methane plumes often exist in the vicinity sea area where shallow type methane hydrates are extracted and they are observed as images displayed on monitors of multi-beam sonar and echo sounder onboard, where methane hydrates are expected at sea bottom on ROV observation data. The hydrates are generally considered to be generated in shallow depths below the sea floor. In this study, author examined annual amount of methane dissolving into seawater by measuring the amount of plume in order to make a quantification of dissolving methane from seafloor. Measurement procedure is plume exploration using multi-beam and quantitative echo sounder , submerge ROV to gushing point at seafloor , calculate the rising speed of methane plumes and examine the phases by monitoring seeping plumes from seafloor with high-definition camera. Components of seeping plumes were defined as methane hydrate particles based on the result by measuring water temperature. From this procedure, it can be concluded that the minimum rising speed of methane hydrate particles from gushing point is 1.6×10-1(m/s) and the maximum of 2.0×10-1(m/s) indicating a difference of more than ten times the gaseous theoretical value of 2.74(m/s). This speed is theoretically closer to the solid speed of the material with physical property similar to hydrates, which is 3.05×10-1 (m/s). Therefore, it can be determined that those particles are in the solid state, immediately above seafloor. To measure the amount of plumes seeping from gushing points funnel-shaped instruments with 20cm diameter opening were used to collect methane plumes in this sea area. This was performed in three different gushing points. As a result, 300ml of methane plume was collected in 643 seconds. Assuming that gushing points exist evenly in the sea area, the annual amount of methane gas seeping from these points will be 7.7×105m3 /per m2. Result shows a large quantity of methane seeping from seafloor into the water. This data is an important

  1. The determination of methane resources from liquidated coal mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenczek, Stanisław

    2017-11-01

    The article refers to methane presented in hard coal seams, which may pose a serious risk to workers, as evidenced by examples of incidents, and may also be a high energy source. That second issue concerns the possibility of obtaining methane from liquidated coal mines. There is discussed the current methodology for determination of methane resources from hard coal deposits. Methods of assessing methane emissions from hard coal deposits are given, including the degree of rock mass fracture, which is affected and not affected by mining. Additional criteria for methane recovery from the methane deposit are discussed by one example (of many types) of methane power generation equipment in the context of the estimation of potential viable resources. Finally, the concept of “methane resource exploitation from coal mine” refers to the potential for exploitation of the resource and the acquisition of methane for business purposes.

  2. Global diffusive fluxes of methane in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Matthias; Riedinger, Natascha; Mogollón, José M.; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2018-06-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane provides a globally important, yet poorly constrained barrier for the vast amounts of methane produced in the subseafloor. Here we provide a global map and budget of the methane flux and degradation in diffusion-controlled marine sediments in relation to the depth of the methane oxidation barrier. Our new budget suggests that 45-61 Tg of methane are oxidized with sulfate annually, with approximately 80% of this oxidation occurring in continental shelf sediments (methane in steady-state diffusive sediments, we calculate that 3-4% of the global organic carbon flux to the seafloor is converted to methane. We further report a global imbalance of diffusive methane and sulfate fluxes into the sulfate-methane transition with no clear trend with respect to the corresponding depth of the methane oxidation barrier. The observed global mean net flux ratio between sulfate and methane of 1.4:1 indicates that, on average, the methane flux to the sulfate-methane transition accounts for only 70% of the sulfate consumption in the sulfate-methane transition zone of marine sediments.

  3. Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanakya, H.N.; Sharma, Isha; Ramachandra, T.V.

    2009-01-01

    The fermentation characteristics of six specific types of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) were examined, with an emphasis on properties that are needed when designing plug-flow type anaerobic bioreactors. More specifically, the decomposition patterns of a vegetable (cabbage), fruits (banana and citrus peels), fresh leaf litter of bamboo and teak leaves, and paper (newsprint) waste streams as feedstocks were studied. Individual OFMSW components were placed into nylon mesh bags and subjected to various fermentation periods (solids retention time, SRT) within the inlet of a functioning plug-flow biogas fermentor. These were removed at periodic intervals, and their composition was analyzed to monitor decomposition rates and changes in chemical composition. Components like cabbage waste, banana peels, and orange peels fermented rapidly both in a plug-flow biogas reactor (PFBR) as well as under a biological methane potential (BMP) assay, while other OFMSW components (leaf litter from bamboo and teak leaves and newsprint) fermented slowly with poor process stability and moderate biodegradation. For fruit and vegetable wastes (FVW), a rapid and efficient removal of pectins is the main cause of rapid disintegration of these feedstocks, which left behind very little compost forming residues (2-5%). Teak and bamboo leaves and newsprint decomposed only to 25-50% in 30 d. These results confirm the potential for volatile fatty acids accumulation in a PFBR's inlet and suggest a modification of the inlet zone or operation of a PFBR with the above feedstocks

  4. Detection of Abiotic Methane in Terrestrial Continental Hydrothermal Systems: Implications for Methane on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Romanek, Christopher S.; Zhang, Chuanlun L.; Bissada, Kadry K.

    2008-01-01

    The recent detection of methane in the Martian atmosphere and the possibility that its origin could be attributed to biological activity, have highlighted the importance of understanding the mechanisms of methane formation and its usefulness as a biomarker. Much debate has centered on the source of the methane in hydrothermal fluids, whether it is formed biologically by microorganisms, diagenetically through the decomposition of sedimentary organic matter, or inorganically via reduction of CO2 at high temperatures. Ongoing research has now shown that much of the methane present in sea-floor hydrothermal systems is probably formed through inorganic CO2 reduction processes at very high temperatures (greater than 400 C). Experimental results have indicated that methane might form inorganically at temperatures lower still, however these results remain controversial. Currently, methane in continental hydrothermal systems is thought to be formed mainly through the breakdown of sedimentary organic matter and carbon isotope equilibrium between CO2 and CH4 is thought to be rarely present if at all. Based on isotopic measurements of CO2 and CH4 in two continental hydrothermal systems, we suggest that carbon isotope equilibration exists at temperatures as low as 155 C. This would indicate that methane is forming through abiotic CO2 reduction at lower temperatures than previously thought and could bolster arguments for an abiotic origin of the methane detected in the martian atmosphere.

  5. Methane-induced Activation Mechanism of Fused Ferric Oxide-Alumina Catalysts during Methane Decomposition

    KAUST Repository

    Reddy Enakonda, Linga; Zhou, Lu; Saih, Youssef; Ould-Chikh, Samy; Lopatin, Sergei; Gary, Daniel; Del-Gallo, Pascal; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Activation of Fe2O3-Al2O3 with CH4 (instead of H2) is a meaningful method to achieve catalytic methane decomposition (CMD). This reaction of CMD is more economic and simple against commercial methane steam reforming (MSR) as it produces COx-free H2

  6. Atmospheric methane removal by methane-oxidizing bacteria immobilized on porous building materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganendra, Giovanni; De Muynck, Willem; Ho, Adrian; Hoefman, Sven; De Vos, Paul; Boeckx, Pascal; Boon, Nico

    2014-04-01

    Biological treatment using methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) immobilized on six porous carrier materials have been used to mitigate methane emission. Experiments were performed with different MOB inoculated in building materials at high (~20 % (v/v)) and low (~100 ppmv) methane mixing ratios. Methylocystis parvus in autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) exhibited the highest methane removal rate at high (28.5 ± 3.8 μg CH₄ g⁻¹ building material h⁻¹) and low (1.7 ± 0.4 μg CH₄ g⁻¹ building material h⁻¹) methane mixing ratio. Due to the higher volume of pores with diameter >5 μm compared to other materials tested, AAC was able to adsorb more bacteria which might explain for the higher methane removal observed. The total methane and carbon dioxide-carbon in the headspace was decreased for 65.2 ± 10.9 % when M. parvus in Ytong was incubated for 100 h. This study showed that immobilized MOB on building materials could be used to remove methane from the air and also act as carbon sink.

  7. Methane distribution and methane oxidation in the water column of the Elbe estuary, Germany

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoušů, Anna; Osudar, R.; Šimek, Karel; Bussmann, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 3 (2017), s. 443-458 ISSN 1015-1621 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00243S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : estuary * methane * methane budget * ethane oxidation * River Elbe Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology OBOR OECD: Marine biology, freshwater biology, limnology Impact factor: 2.821, year: 2016

  8. Green chemistry perspectives of methane conversion via oxidative methylation of aromatics over zeolite catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adebajo, M.O. [University of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld. (Australia)

    2007-06-15

    This paper provides a general overview of the recent work that we and other researchers have done on the utilisation of methane for catalytic methylation of aromatic compounds and for direct coal liquefaction for the production of liquid hydrocarbons. In particular, the paper presents a detailed description of more recent substantial experimental evidence that we have provided for the requirement of oxygen as a stoichiometry reactant for benzene methylation with methane over moderately acidic zeolite catalysts. The reaction, which has been termed 'oxidative methylation', was thus postulated to involve a two-step mechanism involving intermediate methanol formation by methane partial oxidation, followed by benzene methylation with methanol in the second step. However, strongly acidic zeolites can cause cracking of benzene to yield methylated products in the absence of oxygen. The participation of methane and oxygen, and the effective use of zeolite catalysts in this methylation reaction definitely have some positive green chemistry implications. Thus, the results of these previous studies are also discussed in this review in light of the principles and tools of green chemistry. Various metrics were used to evaluate the greenness, cost-effectiveness, and material and energy efficiency of the oxidative methylation reaction.

  9. A combined matrix isolation spectroscopy and cryosolid positron moderation apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molek, Christopher D.; Michael Lindsay, C.; Fajardo, Mario E. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Munitions Directorate, Ordnance Division, Energetic Materials Branch, AFRL/RWME, 2306 Perimeter Road, Eglin AFB, Florida 32542-5910 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    We describe the design, construction, and operation of a novel apparatus for investigating efficiency improvements in thin-film cryogenic solid positron moderators. We report results from solid neon, argon, krypton, and xenon positron moderators which illustrate the capabilities and limitations of our apparatus. We integrate a matrix isolation spectroscopy diagnostic within a reflection-geometry positron moderation system. We report the optical thickness, impurity content, and impurity trapping site structures within our moderators determined from infrared absorption spectra. We use a retarding potential analyzer to modulate the flow of slow positrons, and report positron currents vs. retarding potential for the different moderators. We identify vacuum ultraviolet emissions from irradiated Ne moderators as the source of spurious signals in our channel electron multiplier slow positron detection channel. Our design is also unusual in that it employs a sealed radioactive Na-22 positron source which can be translated relative to, and isolated from, the cryogenic moderator deposition substrate. This allows us to separate the influences on moderator efficiency of surface contamination by residual gases from those of accumulated radiation damage.

  10. Investigations of Methane Production in Hypersaline Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebout, Brad M.

    2015-01-01

    The recent reports of methane in the atmosphere of Mars, as well as the findings of hypersaline paleo-environments on that planet, have underscored the need to evaluate the importance of biological (as opposed to geological) trace gas production and consumption. Methane in the atmosphere of Mars may be an indication of life but might also be a consequence of geologic activity and/or the thermal alteration of ancient organic matter. Hypersaline environments have now been reported to be extremely likely in several locations in our solar system, including: Mars, Europa, and Enceladus. Modern hypersaline microbial mat communities, (thought to be analogous to those present on the early Earth at a period of time when Mars was experiencing very similar environmental conditions), have been shown to produce methane. However, very little is known about the physical and/or biological controls imposed upon the rates at which methane, and other important trace gases, are produced and consumed in these environments. We describe here the results of our investigations of methane production in hypersaline environments, including field sites in Chile, Baja California Mexico, California, USA and the United Arab Emirates. We have measured high concentrations of methane in bubbles of gas produced both in the sediments underlying microbial mats, as well as in areas not colonized by microbial mats in the Guerrero Negro hypersaline ecosystem, Baja California Mexico, in Chile, and in salt ponds on the San Francisco Bay. The carbon isotopic (d13C) composition of the methane in the bubbles exhibited an extremely wide range of values, (ca. -75 per mille ca. -25 per mille). The hydrogen isotopic composition of the methane (d2H) ranged from -60 to -30per mille and -450 to -350per mille. These isotopic values are outside of the range of values normally considered to be biogenic, however incubations of the sediments in contact with these gas bubbles reveals that the methane is indeed being

  11. Rain increases methane production and methane oxidation in a boreal thermokarst bog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, R. B.; Moorberg, C.; Turner, J.; Wong, A.; Waldrop, M. P.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Edgar, C.; Turetsky, M. R.

    2017-12-01

    Bottom-up biogeochemical models of wetland methane emissions simulate the response of methane production, oxidation and transport to wetland conditions and environmental forcings. One reason for mismatches between bottom-up and top-down estimates of emissions is incomplete knowledge of factors and processes that control microbial rates and methane transport. To advance mechanistic understanding of wetland methane emissions, we conducted a multi-year field investigation and plant manipulation experiment in a thermokarst bog located near Fairbanks, Alaska. The edge of the bog is experiencing active permafrost thaw, while the center of the bog thawed 50 to 100 years ago. Our study, which captured both an average year and two of the wettest years on record, revealed how rain interacts with vascular vegetation and recently thawed permafrost to affect methane emissions. In the floating bog, rain water warmed and oxygenated the subsurface, but did not alter soil saturation. The warmer peat temperatures increased both microbial methane production and plant productivity at the edge of the bog near the actively thawing margin, but minimally altered microbial and plant activity in the center of the bog. These responses indicate processes at the edge of the bog were temperature limited while those in the center were not. The compounding effect of increased microbial activity and plant productivity at the edge of the bog doubled methane emissions from treatments with vascular vegetation during rainy years. In contrast, methane emissions from vegetated treatments in the center of the bog did not change with rain. The oxygenating influence of rain facilitated greater methane oxidation in treatments without vascular vegetation, which offset warming-induced increases in methane production at the edge of the bog and decreased methane emissions in the center of the bog. These results elucidate the complex and spatially variable response of methane production and oxidation in

  12. Catalytic combustion for the elimination of methane, BTEX and other VOC : IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, R.E.; Wanke, S.E.

    2008-01-01

    Options for volatile organic compound combustion include homogeneous combustion (flaring) or catalytic combustion involving a flameless combustion process that uses a solid catalyst to promote the combustion reaction. This presentation discussed relative reactivity testing for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) over commercial catalysts. Several commercial pad catalysts were tested, as well as other powders. The relative reactivity of methane as well as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) were investigated. The purpose of the project was to evaluate combustion of concentrated methane streams that contained BTEX compounds; evaluate catalytic combustion using a counter diffusive radiant heater; develop mathematical models for the reactor to enhance design and understanding; improve the catalyst for BTEX combustion; and target application-dehydrator units. Topics that were addressed in the presentation included methane and benzene conversion; catalytic radiant heaters; small industrial and commercial units; measured temperature distribution; fuel slippage, methane conversion; the effect of water and hydrocarbons; the effect of water-liquid injection; and water addition as vapour. Several observations were offered, including that high percentages of injected liquid water can reduce reactor operating temperature; combustion of BTEX remained highly efficient, however liquid injection could also cause temperature reductions and ultimately the reactor would extinguish; and pre-heating the feed can eliminate the temperature drop and pad wetness problem. It was concluded that BTEX compounds are reactive, and the technology appears promising. 19 figs

  13. Enhancing anaerobic digestion of food waste through biochemical methane potential assays at different substrate: inoculum ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Shakira R; Landis, Amy E; Rittmann, Bruce E; Young, Michelle N; Parameswaran, Prathap

    2018-01-01

    Food waste has a high energy potential that can be converted into useful energy in the form of methane via anaerobic digestion. Biochemical Methane Potential assays (BMPs) were conducted to quantify the impacts on methane production of different ratios of food waste. Anaerobic digester sludge (ADS) was used as the inoculum, and BMPs were performed at food waste:inoculum ratios of 0.42, 1.42, and 3.0g chemical oxygen demand/g volatile solids (VS). The 1.42 ratio had the highest CH 4 -COD recovery: 90% of the initial total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) was from food waste, followed by ratios 0.42 and 3.0 at 69% and 57%, respectively. Addition of food waste above 0.42 caused a lag time for CH 4 production that increased with higher ratios, which highlighted the negative impacts of overloading with food waste. The Gompertz equation was able to represent the results well, and it gave lag times of 0, 3.6 and 30days and maximum methane productions of 370, 910, and 1950mL for ratios 0.42, 1.42 and 3.0, respectively. While ratio 3.0 endured a long lag phase and low VSS destruction, ratio 1.42 achieved satisfactory results for all performance criteria. These results provide practical guidance on food-waste-to-inoculum ratios that can lead to optimizing methanogenic yield. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Employing response surface methodology (RSM) to improve methane production from cotton stalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Khalid, Habiba; Li, Wanwu; He, Yanfeng; Liu, Guangqing; Chen, Chang

    2018-03-01

    China is the largest cotton producer with the cotton output accounting for 25% of the total world's cotton production. A large quantity of cotton stalk (CS) waste is generated which is burned and causes environmental and ecological problems. This study investigated the anaerobic digestibility of CS by focusing on improving the methane yield by applying central composite design of response surface methodology (RSM). The purpose of this study was to determine the best level of factors to optimize the desired output of methane production from CS. Thus, it was necessary to describe the relationship of many individual variables with one or more response values for the effective utilization of CS. The influences of feed to inoculum (F/I) ratio and organic loading (OL) on methane production were investigated. Results showed that the experimental methane yield (EMY) and volatile solid (VS) removal were calculated to be 70.22 mL/gVS and 14.33% at F/I ratio of 0.79 and organic loading of 25.61 gVS/L, respectively. Characteristics of final effluent showed that the anaerobic system was stable. This research laid a foundation for future application of CS to alleviate the problems of waste pollution and energy output.

  15. Catalytic combustion for the elimination of methane, BTEX and other VOC : IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, R.E.; Wanke, S.E. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Options for volatile organic compound combustion include homogeneous combustion (flaring) or catalytic combustion involving a flameless combustion process that uses a solid catalyst to promote the combustion reaction. This presentation discussed relative reactivity testing for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) over commercial catalysts. Several commercial pad catalysts were tested, as well as other powders. The relative reactivity of methane as well as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) were investigated. The purpose of the project was to evaluate combustion of concentrated methane streams that contained BTEX compounds; evaluate catalytic combustion using a counter diffusive radiant heater; develop mathematical models for the reactor to enhance design and understanding; improve the catalyst for BTEX combustion; and target application-dehydrator units. Topics that were addressed in the presentation included methane and benzene conversion; catalytic radiant heaters; small industrial and commercial units; measured temperature distribution; fuel slippage, methane conversion; the effect of water and hydrocarbons; the effect of water-liquid injection; and water addition as vapour. Several observations were offered, including that high percentages of injected liquid water can reduce reactor operating temperature; combustion of BTEX remained highly efficient, however liquid injection could also cause temperature reductions and ultimately the reactor would extinguish; and pre-heating the feed can eliminate the temperature drop and pad wetness problem. It was concluded that BTEX compounds are reactive, and the technology appears promising. 19 figs.

  16. Multiparametric methane sensor for environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borecki, M.; Duk, M.; Kociubiński, A.; Korwin-Pawlowski, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    Today, methane sensors find applications mostly in safety alarm installations, gas parameters detection and air pollution classification. Such sensors and sensors elements exists for industry and home use. Under development area of methane sensors application is dedicated to ground gases monitoring. Proper monitoring of soil gases requires reliable and maintenance-free semi-constant and longtime examination at relatively low cost of equipment. The sensors for soil monitoring have to work on soil probe. Therefore, sensor is exposed to environment conditions, as a wide range of temperatures and a full scale of humidity changes, as well as rain, snow and wind, that are not specified for classical methane sensors. Development of such sensor is presented in this paper. The presented sensor construction consists of five commercial non dispersive infra-red (NDIR) methane sensing units, a set of temperature and humidity sensing units, a gas chamber equipped with a micro-fan, automated gas valves and also a microcontroller that controls the measuring procedure. The electronics part of sensor was installed into customized 3D printed housing equipped with self-developed gas valves. The main development of proposed sensor is on the side of experimental evaluation of construction reliability and results of data processing included safety procedures and function for hardware error correction. Redundant methane sensor units are used providing measurement error correction as well as improved measurement accuracy. The humidity and temperature sensors are used for internal compensation of methane measurements as well as for cutting-off the sensor from the environment when the conditions exceed allowable parameters. Results obtained during environment sensing prove that the gas concentration readings are not sensitive to gas chamber vertical or horizontal position. It is important as vertical sensor installation on soil probe is simpler that horizontal one. Data acquired during six

  17. An Aerial ``Sniffer Dog'' for Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Brian; Schaefer, Dave; Zondlo, Mark; Khan, Amir; Lary, David

    2012-10-01

    The Earth's surface and its atmosphere maintain a ``Radiation Balance.'' Any factor which influences this balance is labeled as a mechanism of ``Radiative Forcing'' (RF). Greenhouse Gas (GHG) concentrations are among the most important forcing mechanisms. Methane, the second-most-abundant noncondensing greenhouse gas, is over 25 times more effective per molecule at radiating heat than the most abundant, Carbon Dioxide. Methane is also the principal component of Natural Gas, and gas leaks can cause explosions. Additionally, massive quantities of methane reside (in the form of natural gas) in underground shale basins. Recent technological advancements--specifically the combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing--have allowed drillers access to portions of these ``plays'' which were previously unreachable, leading to an exponential growth in the shale gas industry. Presently, very little is known about the amount of methane which escapes into the global atmosphere from the extraction process. By using remote-controlled robotic helicopters equipped with specially developed trace gas laser sensors, we can get a 3-D profile of where and how methane is being released into the global atmosphere.

  18. 14C measurements in aquifers with methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, J.F.; Fritz, P.; Brown, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    A survey of various groundwater systems indicates that methane is a common trace constituent and occasionally a major carbon species in groundwaters. Thermocatalytic methane had delta 13 CCH 4 > -45% 0 and microbially-produced or biogenic methane had delta 13 CCH 4 0 . Groundwaters containing significant biogenic methane had abnormally heavy delta 13 C values for the inorganic carbon. Thermocatalytic methane had no apparent effect on the inorganic carbon. Because methanogenesis seriously affects the carbon isotope geochemistry of groundwaters, the correction of raw 14 C ages of affected groundwaters must consider these effects. Conceptual models are developed which adjust the 14 C activity of the groundwater for the effects of methanogenesis and for the dilution of carbon present during infiltration by simple dissolution of rock carbonate. These preliminary models are applied to groundwaters from the Alliston sand aquifer where methanogenesis has affected most samples. In this system, methanogenic bacteria using organic matter present in the aquifer matrix as substrate, have added inorganic carbon to the groundwater which has initiated further carbonate rock dissolution. These processes have diluted the inorganic carbon 14 C activity. (orig.) [de

  19. Methane emissions from different coastal wetlands in New England, US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F.; Tang, J.; Kroeger, K. D.; Gonneea, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    According to the IPCC, methane have 25 times warming effect than CO2, and natural wetlands contribute 20-39 % to the global emission of methane. Although most of these methane was from inland wetlands, there was still large uncertain in the methane emissions in coastal wetlands. In the past three years, we have investigated methane emissions in coastal wetlands in MA, USA. Contrary to previous assumptions, we have observed relative larger methane flux in some salt marshes than freshwater wetlands. We further detect the methane source, and found that plant activities played an important role in methane flux, for example, the growth of S. aterniflora, the dominate plants in salt marsh, could enhance methane emission, while in an fresh water wetland that was dominated by cattail, plant activity oxided methane and reduced total flux. Phragmite, an invasive plant at brackish marsh, have the highest methane flux among all coastal wetland investigated. This study indicated that coastal wetland could still emit relatively high amount of methane even under high water salinity condiations, and plant activity played an important role in methane flux, and this role was highly species-specific.

  20. Solid electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Kuzhikalail M.; Alamgir, Mohamed

    1993-06-15

    This invention pertains to Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized (encapsulated) in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing complexes (solvates) formed between a Li salt such as LiAsF.sub.6, LiCF.sub.3 SO.sub.3 or LiClO.sub.4 and a mixture of aprotic organic solvents having high dielectric constants such as ethylene carbonate (EC) (dielectric constant=89.6) and propylene carbonate (PC) (dielectric constant=64.4) in a polymer matrix such as polyacrylonitrile, poly(tetraethylene glycol diacrylate), or poly(vinyl pyrrolidinone).

  1. Anaerobic biodegradability and methane potential of crop residue co-digested with buffalo dung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahito, A.R.; Mahar, R.B.; Brohi, K.M.

    2013-01-01

    ABD (Anaerobic Biodegradability) and BMP (Biochemical Methane Potential) of banana plant waste, canola straw, cotton stalks, rice straw, sugarcane trash and wheat straw co-digested with buffalo dung was evaluated through AMPTS (Automatic Methane Potential Test System). The substrates were analyzed for moisture, TS (Total Solids) and VS (Volatile Solids), ultimate analysis (CHONS), pH and TA (Total Alkalinity). The BMP/sub observed/ during incubation of 30 days at the temperature of 37+-0.2+-degree C was 322 Nml CH4/g VSadd for wheat straw followed by 260, 170, 149, 142 and 138 Nml CH4/gVS/sub add/ for canola straw, rice straw, cotton stalks, banana plant waste and sugarcane trash respectively, whereas the maximum theoretical BMP was 481 Nml CH/sub 4//gVS/sub add/ for cotton stalks, followed by 473, 473, 446, 432 and 385 Nml CH/sub 4//gVS/sub add/ for wheat straw, banana plant waste, canola straw, rice straw and sugarcane trash respectively. The percentage ABD values were in the range of 68-30%. In addition to this, the effect of lignin content in the crop residue was evaluated on the ABD. The results of this study indicate that, the co-digestion of the crop residues with buffalo dung is feasible for production of renewable methane. (author)

  2. Anaerobic Biodegradability and Methane Potential of Crop Residue Co-Digested with Buffalo Dung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Razaque Sahito

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available ABD (Anaerobic Biodegradability and BMP (Biochemical Methane Potential of banana plant waste, canola straw, cotton stalks, rice straw, sugarcane trash and wheat straw co-digested with buffalo dung was evaluated through AMPTS (Automatic Methane Potential Test System. The substrates were analyzed for moisture, TS (Total Solids and VS (Volatile Solids, ultimate analysis (CHONS, pH and TA (Total Alkalinity. The BMPobserved during incubation of 30 days at the temperature of 37±0.2°C was 322 Nml CH4/g VSadd for wheat straw followed by 260, 170, 149, 142 and 138 Nml CH4/gVSadd for canola straw, rice straw, cotton stalks, banana plant waste and sugarcane trash respectively, whereas the maximum theoretical BMP was 481 Nml CH4/gVSadd for cotton stalks, followed by 473, 473, 446, 432 and 385 Nml CH4/gVSadd for wheat straw, banana plant waste, canola straw, rice straw and sugarcane trash respectively. The percentage ABD values were in the range of 68-30%. In addition to this, the effect of lignin content in the crop residue was evaluated on the ABD. The results of this study indicate that, the co-digestion of the crop residues with buffalo dung is feasible for production of renewable methane

  3. Effect of Aqueous Ammonia Soaking on the methane yield and composition of digested manure fibers applying different ammonia concentrations and treatment durations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirtsou-Xanthopoulou, Chrysoula; Jurado, Esperanza; Skiadas, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    , their economical profitable operation relies on increasing the methane yield from manure, and especially of its solid fraction which is not so easily degradable. In the present study, Aqueous Ammonia Soaking (AAS) in six different concentrations in ammonia (5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25% and 32%) and for 1, 3 and 5 days...... at 22°C was applied on digested fibers separated from the effluent of a manure-fed, full-scale anaerobic digester. A methane yield increase from 76% to 104% was achieved during the first series of experiments, while the difference in reagent concentration did not considerably affect the methane yield...... is a very promising treatment resulting to an overall increase of the methane yield of digested manure fibers from 76 to 265% depending on the conditions and the batch of digested fibers used (an even higher increase of 190-265% was achieved during the 2nd series of experiments, where different AAS...

  4. Source Attribution of Methane Emissions in Northeastern Colorado Using Ammonia to Methane Emission Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilerman, S. J.; Neuman, J. A.; Peischl, J.; Aikin, K. C.; Ryerson, T. B.; Perring, A. E.; Robinson, E. S.; Holloway, M.; Trainer, M.

    2015-12-01

    Due to recent advances in extraction technology, oil and natural gas extraction and processing in the Denver-Julesburg basin has increased substantially in the past decade. Northeastern Colorado is also home to over 250 concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), capable of hosting over 2 million head of ruminant livestock (cattle and sheep). Because of methane's high Global Warming Potential, quantification and attribution of methane emissions from oil and gas development and agricultural activity are important for guiding greenhouse gas emission policy. However, due to the co-location of these different sources, top-down measurements of methane are often unable to attribute emissions to a specific source or sector. In this work, we evaluate the ammonia:methane emission ratio directly downwind of CAFOs using a mobile laboratory. Several CAFOs were chosen for periodic study over a 12-month period to identify diurnal and seasonal variation in the emission ratio as well as differences due to livestock type. Using this knowledge of the agricultural ammonia:methane emission ratio, aircraft measurements of ammonia and methane over oil and gas basins in the western US during the Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus (SONGNEX) field campaign in March and April 2015 can be used for source attribution of methane emissions.

  5. Simulations of atmospheric methane for Cape Grim, Tasmania, to constrain southeastern Australian methane emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. M. Loh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study uses two climate models and six scenarios of prescribed methane emissions to compare modelled and observed atmospheric methane between 1994 and 2007, for Cape Grim, Australia (40.7° S, 144.7° E. The model simulations follow the TransCom-CH4 protocol and use the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS and the CSIRO Conformal-Cubic Atmospheric Model (CCAM. Radon is also simulated and used to reduce the impact of transport differences between the models and observations. Comparisons are made for air samples that have traversed the Australian continent. All six emission scenarios give modelled concentrations that are broadly consistent with those observed. There are three notable mismatches, however. Firstly, scenarios that incorporate interannually varying biomass burning emissions produce anomalously high methane concentrations at Cape Grim at times of large fire events in southeastern Australia, most likely due to the fire methane emissions being unrealistically input into the lowest model level. Secondly, scenarios with wetland methane emissions in the austral winter overestimate methane concentrations at Cape Grim during wintertime while scenarios without winter wetland emissions perform better. Finally, all scenarios fail to represent a~methane source in austral spring implied by the observations. It is possible that the timing of wetland emissions in the scenarios is incorrect with recent satellite measurements suggesting an austral spring (September–October–November, rather than winter, maximum for wetland emissions.

  6. Triphenylmethane, a possible moderator material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hügle, Th.; Mocko, M.; Hartl, M.A.; Daemen, L.L.; Muhrer, G.

    2014-01-01

    New challenges in neutron scattering result in an increased demand in novel moderator concepts. The most direct way to address the problem would be to change the moderator material itself. However the range of available neutron moderator materials is small. In this paper, we discuss triphenylmethane, a possible moderator material especially promising for cold neutron moderator applications. Our investigations include a parallel experimental and theoretical approach ranging from cross-section measurements and inelastic neutron spectroscopy to molecular modeling. -- Highlights: • Triphenylmethane as a potential moderator material is discussed. • Parallel theoretical and experimental approach. • Possibly very useful for cold neutrons

  7. Anaerobic methane oxidation rates at the sulfate-methane transition in marine sediments from Kattegat and Skagerrak (Denmark)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iversen, N.; Jorgensen, B.B.

    1985-01-01

    Concomitant radiotracer measurements were made of in situ rates of sulfate reduction and anaerobic methane oxidation in 2-3-m-long sediment cores. Methane accumulated to high concentrations (> 1 mM CH 4 ) only below the sulfate zone, at 1 m or deeper in the sediment. Sulfate reduction showed a broad maximum below the sediment surface and a smaller, narrow maximum at the sulfate-methane transition. Methane oxidation was low (0.002-0.1 nmol CH 4 cm -3 d -1 ) throughout the sulfate zone and showed a sharp maximum at the sulfate-methane transition, coinciding with the sulfate reduction maximum. Total anaerobic methane oxidation at two stations was 0.83 and 1.16 mmol CH 4 m -2 d -1 , of which 96% was confined to the sulfate-methane transition. All the methane that was calculated to diffuse up into the sulfate-methane transition was oxidized in this zone. The methane oxidation was equivalent to 10% of the electron donor requirement for the total measured sulfate reduction. A third station showed high sulfate concentrations at all depths sampled and the total methane oxidation was only 0.013 mmol m -2 d -1 . From direct measurements of rates, concentration gradients, and diffusion coefficients, simple calculations were made of sulfate and methane fluxes and of methane production rates

  8. Effect of hydrogen addition on autoignited methane lifted flames

    KAUST Repository

    Choin, Byung Chul; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Autoignited lifted flames in laminar jets with hydrogen-enriched methane fuels have been investigated experimentally in heated coflow air. The results showed that the autoignited lifted flame of the methane/hydrogen mixture, which had an initial

  9. Estimation of methane generation based on anaerobic digestion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drake

    Technology ... generation of methane from waste at Kiteezi landfill was measured using .... estimate methane gas generation by the anaerobic decomposition ..... Z (2007). Climate Change 2007. The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of ...

  10. Paradox reconsidered: Methane oversaturation in well-oxygenated lake waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Kam W.; McGinnis, Daniel F.; Frindte, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    The widely reported paradox of methane oversaturation in oxygenated water challenges the prevailing paradigm that microbial methanogenesis only occurs under anoxic conditions. Using a combination of field sampling, incubation experiments, and modeling, we show that the recurring mid-water methane...... peak in Lake Stechlin, northeast Germany, was not dependent on methane input from the littoral zone or bottom sediment or on the presence of known micro-anoxic zones. The methane peak repeatedly overlapped with oxygen oversaturation in the seasonal thermocline. Incubation experiments and isotope...... analysis indicated active methane production, which was likely linked to photosynthesis and/or nitrogen fixation within the oxygenated water, whereas lessening of methane oxidation by light allowed accumulation of methane in the oxygen-rich upper layer. Estimated methane efflux from the surface water...

  11. Hydrogen Recovery by ECR Plasma Pyrolysis of Methane, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a microgravity and hypogravity compatible microwave plasma methane pyrolysis reactor is proposed to recover hydrogen which is lost as methane in the...

  12. Methanization of domestic and industrial wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    After having recalled that methanization helps meeting objectives of the Grenelle de l'Environnement regarding waste valorisation and production of renewable heat and electricity, this publication presents the methanization process which produces a humid product (digestate) and biogas by using various wastes (from agriculture, food industry, cities, households, sludge and so on). The numbers of existing and planned methanization units are evoked. The publication discusses the main benefits (production of renewable energy, efficient waste processing, and compact installations), drawbacks (costs, necessary specific abilities, impossibility to treat all organic materials) and associated recommendations. Actions undertaken by the ADEME are evoked. In conclusion, the publication outlines some priorities related to the development of this sector, its benefits, and the main strategic recommendations

  13. High-pressure oxidation of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Gersen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    Methane oxidation at high pressures and intermediate temperatures was investigated in a laminar flow reactor and in a rapid compression machine (RCM). The flow-reactor experiments were conducted at 700–900 K and 100 bar for fuel-air equivalence ratios (Φ) ranging from 0.06 to 19.7, all highly...... diluted in nitrogen. It was found that under the investigated conditions, the onset temperature for methane oxidation ranged from 723 K under reducing conditions to 750 K under stoichiometric and oxidizing conditions. The RCM experiments were carried out at pressures of 15–80 bar and temperatures of 800......–1250 K under stoichiometric and fuel-lean (Φ=0.5) conditions. Ignition delays, in the range of 1–100 ms, decreased monotonically with increasing pressure and temperature. A chemical kinetic model for high-pressure methane oxidation was established, with particular emphasis on the peroxide chemistry...

  14. Development of Cold Neutron Scattering Kernels for Advanced Moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granada, J. R.; Cantargi, F.

    2010-01-01

    The development of scattering kernels for a number of molecular systems was performed, including a set of hydrogeneous methylated aromatics such as toluene, mesitylene, and mixtures of those. In order to partially validate those new libraries, we compared predicted total cross sections with experimental data obtained in our laboratory. In addition, we have introduced a new model to describe the interaction of slow neutrons with solid methane in phase II (stable phase below T = 20.4 K, atmospheric pressure). Very recently, a new scattering kernel to describe the interaction of slow neutrons with solid Deuterium was also developed. The main dynamical characteristics of that system are contained in the formalism, the elastic processes involving coherent and incoherent contributions are fully described, as well as the spin-correlation effects.

  15. Composition, texture and methane potential of cellulosic residues from Lewis acids organosolv pulping of wheat straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constant, Sandra; Barakat, Abdellatif; Robitzer, Mike; Di Renzo, Francesco; Dumas, Claire; Quignard, Françoise

    2016-09-01

    Cellulosic pulps have been successfully isolated from wheat straw through a Lewis acids organosolv treatment. The use of Lewis acids with different hardness produced pulps with different delignification degrees. The cellulosic residue was characterised by chemical composition, X-ray diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy, N2 physisorption, scanning electron microscopy and potential for anaerobic digestibility. Surface area and pore volume increased with the hardness of the Lewis acid, in correspondence with the decrease of the amount of lignin and hemicellulose in the pulp. The non linearity of the correlation between porosity and composition suggests that an agglomeration of cellulose fibrils occurs in the early stages of pulping. All organosolv pulps presented a significantly higher methane potential than the parent straw. A methane evolution of 295Ncm(3)/g OM was reached by a moderate improvement of the accessibility of the native straw. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Methane hydrates in nature - Current knowledge and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated effort, the United States Congress enacted the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. At the same time, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Japan launched a research program to develop plans for a methane hydrate exploratory drilling project in the Nankai Trough. India, China, the Republic of Korea, and other nations also have established large methane hydrate research and development programs. Government-funded scientific research drilling expeditions and production test studies have provided a wealth of information on the occurrence of methane hydrates in nature. Numerous studies have shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world may exceed the volume of known organic carbon sources. However, methane hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge, and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of methane hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various methane hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural methane hydrates, (5) analyzing the methane hydrate role as a geohazard, (6) establishing the means to detect and characterize methane hydrate accumulations using geologic and geophysical data, and (7) establishing the thermodynamic phase equilibrium properties of methane hydrates as a function of temperature, pressure, and gas composition. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL) combined their efforts in 2012 to assess the contributions that scientific drilling has made and could continue to make to advance

  17. Moderation of neutron energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlatt, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor system having a nuclear reactor which has a core including fuel assemblies, means for transmitting through the core a coolant, the coolant having a predetermined neutron-energy moderating property, sealed tubes in the core, each tube containing a material having a different neutron-energy moderating property than the coolant, means, when actuated, to engage at least certain of the tubes, for opening certain of the tubes to permit the coolant to replace the material in the tubes thereby to change the energy spectrum of the neutrons in the reactor, hydraulic means, connected to the opening means, for actuating the opening means to engage certain of the tubes to open the tubes. A device, external to the reactor, connected to the hydraulic means controlls the actuation of the opening means, the opening means being so set with reference to the tubes that only certain of the tubes are opened at any time as the opening means is advanced towards the tubes by the hydraulic means

  18. GOSAT-2014 methane spectral line list

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitin, A.V.; Lyulin, O.M.; Mikhailenko, S.N.; Perevalov, V.I.; Filippov, N.N.; Grigoriev, I.M.; Morino, I.; Yoshida, Y.; Matsunaga, T.

    2015-01-01

    The updated methane spectral line list GOSAT-2014 for the 5550–6240 cm −1 region with the intensity cutoff of 5×10 –25 cm/molecule at 296 K is presented. The line list is based on the extensive measurements of the methane spectral line parameters performed at different temperatures and pressures of methane without and with buffer gases N 2 , O 2 and air. It contains the following spectral line parameters of about 12150 transitions: line position, line intensity, energy of lower state, air-induced and self-pressure-induced broadening and shift coefficients and temperature exponent of air-broadening coefficient. The accuracy of the line positions and intensities are considerably improved in comparison with the previous version GOSAT-2009. The improvement of the line list is done mainly due to the involving to the line position and intensity retrieval of six new spectra recorded with short path way (8.75 cm). The air-broadening and air-shift coefficients for the J-manifolds of the 2ν 3 (F 2 ) band are refitted using the new more precise values of the line positions and intensities. The line assignment is considerably extended. The lower state J-value was assigned to 6397 lines representing 94.4% of integrated intensity of the considering wavenumber region. The complete assignment was done for 2750 lines. - Highlights: • The upgrade of the GOSAT methane line list in the 5550–6240 cm −1 region is done. • 12,146 experimental methane line positions and intensities are retrieved. • 6376 lower energy levels for methane lines are determined

  19. How do people define moderation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanDellen, Michelle R; Isherwood, Jennifer C; Delose, Julie E

    2016-06-01

    Eating in moderation is considered to be sound and practical advice for weight maintenance or prevention of weight gain. However, the concept of moderation is ambiguous, and the effect of moderation messages on consumption has yet to be empirically examined. The present manuscript examines how people define moderate consumption. We expected that people would define moderate consumption in ways that justified their current or desired consumption rather than view moderation as an objective standard. In Studies 1 and 2, moderate consumption was perceived to involve greater quantities of an unhealthy food (chocolate chip cookies, gummy candies) than perceptions of how much one should consume. In Study 3, participants generally perceived themselves to eat in moderation and defined moderate consumption as greater than their personal consumption. Furthermore, definitions of moderate consumption were related to personal consumption behaviors. Results suggest that the endorsement of moderation messages allows for a wide range of interpretations of moderate consumption. Thus, we conclude that moderation messages are unlikely to be effective messages for helping people maintain or lose weight. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Chemical composition and methane yield of reed canary grass as influenced by harvesting time and harvest frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Tanka P; Sutaryo, Sutaryo; Møller, Henrik B; Jørgensen, Uffe; Lærke, Poul E

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the influence of harvest time on biomass yield, dry matter partitioning, biochemical composition and biological methane potential of reed canary grass harvested twice a month in one-cut (OC) management. The regrowth of biomass harvested in summer was also harvested in autumn as a two-cut management with (TC-F) or without (TC-U) fertilization after summer harvest. The specific methane yields decreased significantly with crop maturity that ranged from 384 to 315 and from 412 to 283 NL (normal litre) (kgVS)(-1) for leaf and stem, respectively. Approximately 45% more methane was produced by the TC-F management (5430Nm(3)ha(-1)) as by the OC management (3735Nm(3)ha(-1)). Specific methane yield was moderately correlated with the concentrations of fibre components in the biomass. Larger quantity of biogas produced at the beginning of the biogas assay from early harvested biomass was to some extent off-set by lower concentration of methane. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Methane emissions from digestate at an agricultural biogas plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldé, Hambaliou; VanderZaag, Andrew C; Burtt, Stephen D; Wagner-Riddle, Claudia; Crolla, Anna; Desjardins, Raymond L; MacDonald, Douglas J

    2016-09-01

    Methane (CH4) emissions were measured over two years at an earthen storage containing digestate from a mesophilic biodigester in Ontario, Canada. The digester processed dairy manure and co-substrates from the food industry, and destroyed 62% of the influent volatile solids (VS). Annual average emissions were 19gCH4m(-3)d(-1) and 0.27gCH4kg(-1)VSd(-1). About 76% of annual emissions occurred from June to October. Annual cumulative emissions from digestate corresponded to 12% of the CH4 produced within the digester. A key contributor to CH4 emissions was the sludge layer in storage, which contained as much VS as the annual discharge from the digester. These findings suggest that digestate management provides an opportunity to further enhance the benefits of biogas (i.e. reducing CH4 emissions compared to undigested liquid manure, and producing renewable energy). Potential best practices for future study include complete storage emptying, solid-liquid separation, and storage covering. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Industrial energy conservation by methane fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, D L

    1981-11-01

    An engineering study was conducted to evalutate the possibility of making an entire dairy cooperative self-sufficient by methane fermentation of the whey permeate from the cheese plant and the dairy cattle manure from the dairy farms to fuel gas. A cooperative consisting of 284 dairy farms and one central cheese plant producing 9.5 Gg of cheese annually was used as the basis for evaluation. The feasibility was evaluated at four practical levels of technology. Preliminary economic analysis revealed that the cost of methane was competitive with current prices for purchased fuel. (Refs. 29).

  3. Terrestrial plant methane production and emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dan; Møller, Ian M.; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard

    2012-01-01

    In this minireview, we evaluate all experimental work published on the phenomenon of aerobic methane (CH4) generation in terrestrial plants and plant. Clearly, despite much uncertainty and skepticism, we conclude that the phenomenon is true. Four stimulating factors have been observed to induce...... aerobic CH4 into a global budget is inadequate. Thus it is too early to draw the line under the aerobic methane emission in plants. Future work is needed for establishing the relative contribution of several proven potential CH4 precursors in plant material....

  4. Methane emissions in Danish riparian wetlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Audet, Joachim; Johansen, Jan Ravn; Andersen, Peter Mejlhede

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to (i) investigate parameters influencing the fluxes of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) in Danish riparian wetlands with contrasting vegetation characteristics and (ii) develop models relating CH4 emissions to soil and/or vegetation parameters integrating the spat......The present study was conducted to (i) investigate parameters influencing the fluxes of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) in Danish riparian wetlands with contrasting vegetation characteristics and (ii) develop models relating CH4 emissions to soil and/or vegetation parameters integrating...

  5. Methane recovery from landfill in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaolai, L.

    1996-12-31

    GEF has approved a special project for a demonstration project for Methane Recovery from the Urban Refuse Land Fill. This paper will introduce the possibility of GHG reduction from the landfill in China, describe the activities of the GEF project, and the priorities for international cooperation in this field. The Global Environment Facility (GEF) approved the project, China Promoting Methane Recovery and Unlization from Mixed Municipal Refuse, at its Council meeting in last April. This project is the first one supported by international organization in this field.

  6. Methanator fueled engines for pollution control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliostro, D. E.; Winkler, E. L.

    1973-01-01

    A methanator fueled Otto-cycle engine is compared with other methods proposed to control pollution due to automobile exhaust emissions. The comparison is made with respect to state of development, emission factors, capital cost, operational and maintenance costs, performance, operational limitations, and impact on the automotive industries. The methanator fueled Otto-cycle engine is projected to meet 1975 emission standards and operate at a lower relative total cost compared to the catalytic muffler system and to have low impact. Additional study is required for system development.

  7. Renewable methane from anaerobic digestion of biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chynoweth, D.P.; Owens, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Production of methane via anaerobic digestion of energy crops and organic wastes would benefit society by providing a clean fuel from renewable feedstocks. This would replace fossil fuel-derived energy and reduce environmental impacts including global warming and acid rain. Although biomass energy is more costly than fossil fuel-derived energy, trends to limit carbon dioxide and other emissions through emission regulations, carbon taxes, and subsidies of biomass energy would make it cost competitive. Methane derived from anaerobic digestion is competitive in efficiencies and costs to other biomass energy forms including heat, synthesis gases, and ethanol. (author)

  8. An experimental study about effect of far infrared radiant ceramics on efficient methane fermentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, A.; Yamazaki, M.; Oida, A.

    2003-01-01

    Methane fermentation, well known as one of the methods for organic wastes treatment, has been used as an energy production process in order to produce a gaseous fuel. But methane fermentation has some problems to be solved about gas production rate and volatile solids reduction efficiency. Simple methods to improve these problems are needed. In this study, we focused on far infrared radiant ceramics as a stimulating substance to activate methanogenic bacteria. Firstly, through the experiment of one batch fermentation, it was confirmed that the ceramics in the fermenter caused increase of total gas production. Next, even through the experiment of continuous fermentation, same stimulating effect was confirmed. It was considered that this effect was caused not only by a function of bio-contactor of the ceramics but also by far infrared radiation from ceramics. (author)

  9. Greenhouse effect and waste sector in Italy: Analysis and quantitative estimates of methane emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzullo, Marcello; Tognotti, Leonardo

    1997-01-01

    Methane is the most important atmospheric gas with a considerable effect on climate change after carbon dioxide. In this work methane emissions from waste have been evaluated. Estimates include emissions resulting from anaerobic degradation of landfill municipal solid waste and industrial and municipal wastewater anaerobic treatments. The adopted methodology follows specific guidelines carried out by IPCC (Intergovernamental Panel on Climate Change), the scientific reference commission for the Framework Convention on Climate Change subscribed in 1992 during the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro. Some factors used in the methodology for landfill emissions have been modified and adapted to the italian situation. The estimate of emission resulting from industrial wastewater anaerobic treatments has required preliminary evaluation of annual wastewater quantities produced by some significant industrial sectors

  10. Various Transport Phenomena and Modeling in a Methane Reformer Duct for PEMFCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinliang Yuan; Fuan Ren; Jinliang Yuan; Bengt Sunden

    2006-01-01

    There are various physical processes (such as mass, heat and momentum transport) integrated with catalytic chemical reactions in a methane steam reforming duct. It is often found that endothermic and exothermic reactions in the ducts are strongly coupled by heat transfer from adjacent catalytic combustion ducts. In this paper, a three-dimensional calculation method is developed to simulate and analyze steam reforming of methane, and the effects on various transport processes in a steam reforming duct. The reformer conditions such as mass balances associated with the reforming reactions and gas permeation to/from the porous catalyst layer are applied in the analysis. The predicted results are presented and discussed for a composite duct consisting of a porous catalyst reaction area, the gas flow duct and solid layers. Parametric studies are conducted and the results show that the variables, such as fuel reformer temperatures and catalyst loadings, have significant effects on the transport processes and reformer performance. (authors)

  11. Working group report: methane emissions from fuel combustion and industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdowski, J.J.M.; Beck, L.; Piccot, S.; Olivier, J.G.J.; Veldt, C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper lists the source categories which are currently recognised as minor sources of methane. These fall into five broad groups: stationary fuel combustion (residential combustion of fuels, solid waste incineration at home sites, on-site agricultural waste burning, industrial and utility combustion of coal, wood, oil and gas, commercial and industrial waste incineration); mobile fuel combustion; non-combustion industrial processes (primary metals production, chemical manufacturing processes, petroleum refining, commercial charcoal manufacturing waste treatments); minor energy production sources (storage and distribution of automotive fuels, geothermal energy production; peat mining operations, oil shale mining operations); and miscellaneous sources. The paper also presents a preliminary estimate of global methane emissions from these minor sources and the results of the working group's discussion on recommendations for the IPCC/OECD methodology and specific research needs. A list of control options for emissions from minor sources is provided. 2 tabs

  12. Impact of mechanical, chemical and enzymatic pre-treatments on the methane yield from the anaerobic digestion of switchgrass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frigon, Jean-Claude; Mehta, Punita; Guiot, Serge R.

    2012-01-01

    The conversion of cellulosic crops into biofuels, including methane, is receiving a lot of attention lately. Panicum vergatum, or switchgrass, is a warm season perennial grass well adapted to grow in North America. Different pre-treatments were tested in 0.5 l batch reactors, at 35 °C, in order to enhance the methane production from switchgrass, including temperature, sonication, alkalinization and autoclaving. The methane production on the basis of volatile solids (VS) added to the fermentation were 112.4 ± 8.4, 132.5 ± 9.7 and 139.8 ml g −1 after 38 days of incubation for winter harvested switchgrass (WHS) after grinding, grinding with alkalinization, and grinding with alkalinization and autoclaving, respectively. The methane production was higher for fresh summer harvested switchgrass (SHS), with a production of 256.6 ± 8.2 ml g −1 VS after mulching, alkalinization and autoclaving. The methane production from SHS was improved by 29 and 42% when applying lignin (LiP) or manganese peroxidase (MnP), at 202.1 ± 9.8 and 222.9 ± 22.5 ml g −1 VS, respectively. The combination of an alkali pre-treatment with the MnP increased the methane production furthermore at 297.7 ml g −1 VS. The use of pectinases without chemical pre-treatment showed promising yields at 287.4 and 239.5 ml g −1 VS for pectate-lyase and poly-galacturonase, respectively. An estimation of the methane yield per hectare of crop harvested resulted in net energy production of 29.8, 49.7 and 78.1 GJ for winter harvested switchgrass, mulched and pretreated summer harvested switchgrass, respectively. Switchgrass represents an interesting candidate as a lignocellulosic crop for methane production. -- Highlights: ► Switchgrass is a model energy crops for biofuels production. ► This study evaluated different pre-treatments to enhance methane production. ► Pre-treatments increase significantly the methane produced from switchgrass. ► Enzymatic pre-treatments were superior to physical and

  13. Methane and carbon dioxide production from simulated anaerobic degradation of cattle carcasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Qi; Saunders, Samuel E.; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► This study evaluates methane and carbon dioxide production after land burial of cattle carcasses. ► Disposal of animal mortalities is often overlooked in evaluating the environmental impacts of animal production. ► we quantify annual emissions from cattle carcass disposal in the United States as 1.6 Tg CO 2 equivalents. - Abstract: Approximately 2.2 million cattle carcasses require disposal annually in the United States. Land burial is a convenient disposal method that has been widely used in animal production for disposal of both daily mortalities as well as during catastrophic mortality events. To date, greenhouse gas production after mortality burial has not been quantified, and this study represents the first attempt to quantify greenhouse gas emissions from land burial of animal carcasses. In this study, anaerobic decomposition of both homogenized and unhomogenized cattle carcass material was investigated using bench-scale reactors. Maximum yields of methane and carbon dioxide were 0.33 and 0.09 m 3 /kg dry material, respectively, a higher methane yield than that previously reported for municipal solid waste. Variability in methane production rates were observed over time and between reactors. Based on our laboratory data, annual methane emissions from burial of cattle mortalities in the United States could total 1.6 Tg CO 2 equivalents. Although this represents less than 1% of total emissions produced by the agricultural sector in 2009, greenhouse gas emissions from animal carcass burial may be significant if disposal of swine and poultry carcasses is also considered.

  14. Moderator Configuration Options for ESS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zanini, L.; Batkov, K.; Klinkby, Esben Bryndt

    2016-01-01

    The current, still evolving status of the design and the optimization work for the moderator configuration for the European Spallation Source is described. The moderator design has been strongly driven by the low-dimensional moderator concept recently proposed for use in spallation neutron sources...... or reactors. Quasi-two dimensional, disc- or tube-shaped moderators,can provide strong brightness increase (factor of 3 or more) with respect to volume para-H2moderators, which constitute the reference, state-of-the-art technology for high-intensity coupled moderators. In the design process other, more...... conventional, principles were also considered,such as the importance of moderator positioning, of the premoderator, and beam extraction considerations. Different design and configuration options are evaluated and compared with the reference volume moderator configuration described in the ESS Technical Design...

  15. The Methanizer : A Small Scale Biogas Reactor for a Restaurant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasudevan, R.; Karlsson, O.; Dhejne, K.; Derewonko, P.; Brezet, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of a smallscale bioreactor called the Methanizer for a restaurant. The bioreactor converts organic waste produced by the restaurant into methane. This methane can be used to power the restaurant’s cooking stoves. The

  16. Aquatic herbivores facilitate the emission of methane from wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dingemans, B.J.J.; Bakker, E.S.; Bodelier, P.L.E.

    2011-01-01

    Wetlands are significant sources of atmospheric methane. Methane produced by microbes enters roots and escapes to the atmosphere through the shoots of emergent wetland plants. Herbivorous birds graze on helophytes, but their effect on methane emission remains unknown. We hypothesized that grazing on

  17. 30 CFR 75.1106-1 - Test for methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test for methane. 75.1106-1 Section 75.1106-1... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1106-1 Test for methane. Until December 31, 1970, a permissible flame safety lamp may be used to make tests for methane required by the...

  18. Global diffusive fluxes of methane in marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egger, M.; Riedinger, N.; Mogollón, J.M.; Jørgensen, B.B.

    2018-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane provides a globally important, yet poorly constrained barrier for the vast amounts of methane produced in the subseafloor. Here we provide a global map and budget of the methane flux and degradation in diffusion-controlled marine sediments in relation to the depth of

  19. Methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis in anoxic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milucka, Jana; Kirf, Mathias; Lu, Lu; Krupke, Andreas; Lam, Phyllis; Littmann, Sten; Kuypers, Marcel MM; Schubert, Carsten J

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater lakes represent large methane sources that, in contrast to the Ocean, significantly contribute to non-anthropogenic methane emissions to the atmosphere. Particularly mixed lakes are major methane emitters, while permanently and seasonally stratified lakes with anoxic bottom waters are often characterized by strongly reduced methane emissions. The causes for this reduced methane flux from anoxic lake waters are not fully understood. Here we identified the microorganisms and processes responsible for the near complete consumption of methane in the anoxic waters of a permanently stratified lake, Lago di Cadagno. Interestingly, known anaerobic methanotrophs could not be detected in these waters. Instead, we found abundant gamma-proteobacterial aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria active in the anoxic waters. In vitro incubations revealed that, among all the tested potential electron acceptors, only the addition of oxygen enhanced the rates of methane oxidation. An equally pronounced stimulation was also observed when the anoxic water samples were incubated in the light. Our combined results from molecular, biogeochemical and single-cell analyses indicate that methane removal at the anoxic chemocline of Lago di Cadagno is due to true aerobic oxidation of methane fuelled by in situ oxygen production by photosynthetic algae. A similar mechanism could be active in seasonally stratified lakes and marine basins such as the Black Sea, where light penetrates to the anoxic chemocline. Given the widespread occurrence of seasonally stratified anoxic lakes, aerobic methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis might have an important but so far neglected role in methane emissions from lakes. PMID:25679533

  20. Effect of weir impoundments on methane dynamics in a river

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bednařík, A.; Blaser, M.; Matoušů, Anna; Hekera, P.; Rulík, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 584, April (2017), s. 164-174 ISSN 0048-9697 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00243S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : methane production * methane emission * methane ebullition * river impoundment * river sediment Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology OBOR OECD: Marine biology, freshwater biology, limnology Impact factor: 4.900, year: 2016