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Sample records for solid earth system

  1. The European Plate Observing System (EPOS) Services for Solid Earth Science

    Cocco, Massimo; Atakan, Kuvvet; Pedersen, Helle; Consortium, Epos

    2016-04-01

    The European Plate Observing System (EPOS) aims to create a pan-European infrastructure for solid Earth science to support a safe and sustainable society. The main vision of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS) is to address the three basic challenges in Earth Sciences: (i) unravelling the Earth's deformational processes which are part of the Earth system evolution in time, (ii) understanding the geo-hazards and their implications to society, and (iii) contributing to the safe and sustainable use of geo-resources. The mission of EPOS is to monitor and understand the dynamic and complex Earth system by relying on new e-science opportunities and integrating diverse and advanced Research Infrastructures in Europe for solid Earth Science. EPOS will enable innovative multidisciplinary research for a better understanding of the Earth's physical and chemical processes that control earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, ground instability and tsunami as well as the processes driving tectonics and Earth's surface dynamics. EPOS will improve our ability to better manage the use of the subsurface of the Earth. Through integration of data, models and facilities EPOS will allow the Earth Science community to make a step change in developing new concepts and tools for key answers to scientific and socio-economic questions concerning geo-hazards and geo-resources as well as Earth sciences applications to the environment and to human welfare. EPOS has now started its Implementation Phase (EPOS-IP). One of the main challenges during the implementation phase is the integration of multidisciplinary data into a single e-infrastructure. Multidisciplinary data are organized and governed by the Thematic Core Services (TCS) and are driven by various scientific communities encompassing a wide spectrum of Earth science disciplines. These include Data, Data-products, Services and Software (DDSS), from seismology, near fault observatories, geodetic observations, volcano observations

  2. The European Plate Observing System (EPOS): Integrating Thematic Services for Solid Earth Science

    Atakan, Kuvvet; Bailo, Daniele; Consortium, Epos

    2016-04-01

    The mission of EPOS is to monitor and understand the dynamic and complex Earth system by relying on new e-science opportunities and integrating diverse and advanced Research Infrastructures in Europe for solid Earth Science. EPOS will enable innovative multidisciplinary research for a better understanding of the Earth's physical and chemical processes that control earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, ground instability and tsunami as well as the processes driving tectonics and Earth's surface dynamics. Through integration of data, models and facilities EPOS will allow the Earth Science community to make a step change in developing new concepts and tools for key answers to scientific and socio-economic questions concerning geo-hazards and geo-resources as well as Earth sciences applications to the environment and to human welfare. EPOS, during its Implementation Phase (EPOS-IP), will integrate multidisciplinary data into a single e-infrastructure. Multidisciplinary data are organized and governed by the Thematic Core Services (TCS) and are driven by various scientific communities encompassing a wide spectrum of Earth science disciplines. These include Data, Data-products, Services and Software (DDSS), from seismology, near fault observatories, geodetic observations, volcano observations, satellite observations, geomagnetic observations, as well as data from various anthropogenic hazard episodes, geological information and modelling. In addition, transnational access to multi-scale laboratories and geo-energy test-beds for low-carbon energy will be provided. TCS DDSS will be integrated into Integrated Core Services (ICS), a platform that will ensure their interoperability and access to these services by the scientific community as well as other users within the society. This requires dedicated tasks for interactions with the various TCS-WPs, as well as the various distributed ICS (ICS-Ds), such as High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities, large scale data storage

  3. The Solid Earth

    Fowler, C. M. R.

    2005-02-01

    The second edition of this acclaimed textbook has been brought fully up-to-date to reflect the latest advances in geophysical research. It is designed for students in introductory geophysics courses who have a general background in the physical sciences, including introductory calculus. New to this edition are a section of color plates and separate sections on the earth's mantle and core. The book also contains an extensive glossary of terms, and includes numerous exercises for which solutions are available to instructors from solutions@cambridge.org. First Edition Hb (1990): 0-521-37025-6 First Edition Pb (1990): 0-521-38590-3

  4. High-Precision Global Geodetic Systems: Revolution And Revelation In Fluid And 'Solid' Earth Tracking (Invited)

    Minster, J. H.; Altamimi, Z.; Blewitt, G.; Carter, W. E.; Cazenave, A. A.; Davis, J. L.; Dragert, H.; Feary, D. A.; Herring, T.; Larson, K. M.; Ries, J. C.; Sandwell, D. T.; Wahr, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    Over the past half-century, space geodetic technologies have changed profoundly the way we look at the planet, not only in the matter of details and accuracy, but also in the matter of how the entire planet changes with time, even on “human” time scales. The advent of space geodesy has provided exquisite images of the ever-changing land and ocean topography and global gravity field of the planet. We now enjoy an International Terrestrial Reference System with a time-dependent geocenter position accurate to a few millimeters. We can image small and large tectonic deformations of the surface before, during, and after earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. We measure both the past subtle changes as well as the recent dramatic changes in the ice sheets, and track global and regional sea-level change to a precision of a millimeter per year or better. The remarkable achievements of Earth observing missions over the past two decades, and the success of future international missions described in the Decadal Survey depend both implicitly and explicitly on the continued availability and enhancement of a reliable and resilient global infrastructure for precise geodesy, and on ongoing advances in geodetic science that are linked to it. This allows us to deal with global scientific, technological and social issues such as climate change and natural hazards, but the impact of the global precise geodetic infrastructure also permeates our everyday lives. Nowadays drivers, aviators, and sailors can determine their positions inexpensively to meter precision in real time, anywhere on the planet. In the foreseeable future, not only will we be able to know a vehicle’s position to centimeter accuracy in real time, but also to control that position, and thus introduce autonomous navigation systems for many tasks which are beyond the reach of “manual” navigation capabilities. This vision will only be realized with sustained international support of the precise global geodetic

  5. The Earth System Model

    Schoeberl, Mark; Rood, Richard B.; Hildebrand, Peter; Raymond, Carol

    2003-01-01

    The Earth System Model is the natural evolution of current climate models and will be the ultimate embodiment of our geophysical understanding of the planet. These models are constructed from components - atmosphere, ocean, ice, land, chemistry, solid earth, etc. models and merged together through a coupling program which is responsible for the exchange of data from the components. Climate models and future earth system models will have standardized modules, and these standards are now being developed by the ESMF project funded by NASA. The Earth System Model will have a variety of uses beyond climate prediction. The model can be used to build climate data records making it the core of an assimilation system, and it can be used in OSSE experiments to evaluate. The computing and storage requirements for the ESM appear to be daunting. However, the Japanese ES theoretical computing capability is already within 20% of the minimum requirements needed for some 2010 climate model applications. Thus it seems very possible that a focused effort to build an Earth System Model will achieve succcss.

  6. Geomagnetism solid Earth and upper atmosphere perspectives

    Basavaiah, Nathani

    2011-01-01

    This volume elaborates several important aspects of solid Earth geomagnetism. It covers all the basics of the subject, including biomagnetism and instrumentation, and offers a number of practical applications with carefully selected examples and illustrations.

  7. Propagation Velocity of Solid Earth Tides

    Pathak, S.

    2017-12-01

    One of the significant considerations in most of the geodetic investigations is to take into account the outcome of Solid Earth tides on the location and its consequent impact on the time series of coordinates. In this research work, the propagation velocity resulting from the Solid Earth tides between the Indian stations is computed. Mean daily coordinates for the stations have been computed by applying static precise point positioning technique for a day. The computed coordinates are used as an input for computing the tidal displacements at the stations by Gravity method along three directions at 1-minute interval for 24 hours. Further the baseline distances are computed between four Indian stations. Computation of the propagation velocity for Solid Earth tides can be done by the virtue of study of the concurrent effect of it in-between the stations of identified baseline distance along with the time consumed by the tides for reaching from one station to another. The propagation velocity helps in distinguishing the impact at any station if the consequence at a known station for a specific time-period is known. Thus, with the knowledge of propagation velocity, the spatial and temporal effects of solid earth tides can be estimated with respect to a known station. As theoretically explained, the tides generated are due to the position of celestial bodies rotating about Earth. So the need of study is to observe the correlation of propagation velocity with the rotation speed of the Earth. The propagation velocity of Solid Earth tides comes out to be in the range of 440-470 m/s. This velocity comes out to be in a good agreement with the Earth's rotation speed.

  8. The International Solid Earth Research Virtual Observatory

    Fox, G.; Pierce, M.; Rundle, J.; Donnellan, A.; Parker, J.; Granat, R.; Lyzenga, G.; McLeod, D.; Grant, L.

    2004-12-01

    We describe the architecture and initial implementation of the International Solid Earth Research Virtual Observatory (iSERVO). This has been prototyped within the USA as SERVOGrid and expansion is planned to Australia, China, Japan and other countries. We base our design on a globally scalable distributed "cyber-infrastructure" or Grid built around a Web Services-based approach consistent with the extended Web Service Interoperability approach. The Solid Earth Science Working Group of NASA has identified several challenges for Earth Science research. In order to investigate these, we need to couple numerical simulation codes and data mining tools to observational data sets. This observational data are now available on-line in internet-accessible forms, and the quantity of this data is expected to grow explosively over the next decade. We architect iSERVO as a loosely federated Grid of Grids with each country involved supporting a national Solid Earth Research Grid. The national Grid Operations, possibly with dedicated control centers, are linked together to support iSERVO where an International Grid control center may eventually be necessary. We address the difficult multi-administrative domain security and ownership issues by exposing capabilities as services for which the risk of abuse is minimized. We support large scale simulations within a single domain using service-hosted tools (mesh generation, data repository and sensor access, GIS, visualization). Simulations typically involve sequential or parallel machines in a single domain supported by cross-continent services. We use Web Services implement Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) using WSDL for service description and SOAP for message formats. These are augmented by UDDI, WS-Security, WS-Notification/Eventing and WS-ReliableMessaging in the WS-I+ approach. Support for the latter two capabilities will be available over the next 6 months from the NaradaBrokering messaging system. We augment these

  9. FIN-EPOS - Finnish national initiative of the European Plate Observing System: Bringing Finnish solid Earth infrastructures into EPOS

    Vuorinen, Tommi; Korja, Annakaisa

    2017-04-01

    FIN-EPOS consortium is a joint community of Finnish national research institutes tasked with operating and maintaining solid-earth geophysical and geological observatories and laboratories in Finland. These national research infrastructures (NRIs) seek to join EPOS research infrastructure (EPOS RI) and further pursue Finland's participation as a founding member in EPOS ERIC (European Research Infrastructure Consortium). Current partners of FIN-EPOS are the University of Helsinki (UH), the University of and Oulu (UO), Finnish Geospatial Research Institute (FGI) of the National Land Survey (NLS), Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), Geological Survey of Finland (GTK), CSC - IT Center for Science and MIKES Metrology at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd. The consortium is hosted by the Institute of Seismology, UH (ISUH). The primary purpose of the consortium is to act as a coordinating body between various NRIs and the EPOS RI. FIN-EPOS engages in planning and development of the national EPOS RI and will provide support in EPOS implementation phase (IP) for the partner NRIs. FIN-EPOS also promotes the awareness of EPOS in Finland and is open to new partner NRIs that would benefit from participating in EPOS. The consortium additionally seeks to advance solid Earth science education, technologies and innovations in Finland and is actively engaging in Nordic co-operation and collaboration of solid Earth RIs. The main short term objective of FIN-EPOS is to make Finnish geoscientific data provided by NRIs interoperable with the Thematic Core Services (TCS) in the EPOS IP. Consortium partners commit into applying and following metadata and data format standards provided by EPOS. FIN-EPOS will also provide a national Finnish language web portal where users are identified and their user rights for EPOS resources are defined.

  10. Geodesy by radio interferometry - Determinations of baseline vector, earth rotation, and solid earth tide parameters with the Mark I very long baseline radio interferometery system

    Ryan, J. W.; Clark, T. A.; Coates, R. J.; Ma, C.; Wildes, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-seven very long baseline radio interferometry experiments performed between 1972 and 1978 are analyzed and estimates of baseline vectors between six sites, five in the continental United States and one in Europe are derived. No evidence of significant changes in baseline length is found. For example, with a statistical level of confidence of approximately 85 percent, upper bounds on such changes within the United States ranged from a low of 10 mm/yr for the 850 km baseline between Westford, Massachusetts, and Green Bank, West Virginia, to a high of 90 mm/yr for the nearly 4000 km baseline between Westford and Goldstone, California. Estimates for universal time and for the x component of the position of the earth's pole are obtained. For the last 15 experiments, the only ones employing wideband receivers, the root-mean-square differences between the derived values and the corresponding ones published by the Bureau International de l'Heure are 0.0012 s and 0.018 arc sec respectively. The average value obtained for the radial Love number for the solid earth is 0.62 + or - 0.02 (estimated standard error).

  11. Earth System Science Project

    Rutherford, Sandra; Coffman, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    For several decades, science teachers have used bottles for classroom projects designed to teach students about biology. Bottle projects do not have to just focus on biology, however. These projects can also be used to engage students in Earth science topics. This article describes the Earth System Science Project, which was adapted and developed…

  12. Modeling the earth system

    Ojima, D. [ed.

    1992-12-31

    The 1990 Global Change Institute (GCI) on Earth System Modeling is the third of a series organized by the Office for Interdisciplinary Earth Studies to look in depth at particular issues critical to developing a better understanding of the earth system. The 1990 GCI on Earth System Modeling was organized around three themes: defining critical gaps in the knowledge of the earth system, developing simplified working models, and validating comprehensive system models. This book is divided into three sections that reflect these themes. Each section begins with a set of background papers offering a brief tutorial on the subject, followed by working group reports developed during the institute. These reports summarize the joint ideas and recommendations of the participants and bring to bear the interdisciplinary perspective that imbued the institute. Since the conclusion of the 1990 Global Change Institute, research programs, nationally and internationally, have moved forward to implement a number of the recommendations made at the institute, and many of the participants have maintained collegial interactions to develop research projects addressing the needs identified during the two weeks in Snowmass.

  13. Universities Earth System Scientists Program

    Estes, John E.

    1995-01-01

    This document constitutes the final technical report for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Grant NAGW-3172. This grant was instituted to provide for the conduct of research under the Universities Space Research Association's (USRA's) Universities Earth System Scientist Program (UESSP) for the Office of Mission to Planet Earth (OMTPE) at NASA Headquarters. USRA was tasked with the following requirements in support of the Universities Earth System Scientists Programs: (1) Bring to OMTPE fundamental scientific and technical expertise not currently resident at NASA Headquarters covering the broad spectrum of Earth science disciplines; (2) Conduct basic research in order to help establish the state of the science and technological readiness, related to NASA issues and requirements, for the following, near-term, scientific uncertainties, and data/information needs in the areas of global climate change, clouds and radiative balance, sources and sinks of greenhouse gases and the processes that control them, solid earth, oceans, polar ice sheets, land-surface hydrology, ecological dynamics, biological diversity, and sustainable development; (3) Evaluate the scientific state-of-the-field in key selected areas and to assist in the definition of new research thrusts for missions, including those that would incorporate the long-term strategy of the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). This will, in part, be accomplished by study and evaluation of the basic science needs of the community as they are used to drive the development and maintenance of a global-scale observing system, the focused research studies, and the implementation of an integrated program of modeling, prediction, and assessment; and (4) Produce specific recommendations and alternative strategies for OMTPE that can serve as a basis for interagency and national and international policy on issues related to Earth sciences.

  14. The Australian Computational Earth Systems Simulator

    Mora, P.; Muhlhaus, H.; Lister, G.; Dyskin, A.; Place, D.; Appelbe, B.; Nimmervoll, N.; Abramson, D.

    2001-12-01

    Numerical simulation of the physics and dynamics of the entire earth system offers an outstanding opportunity for advancing earth system science and technology but represents a major challenge due to the range of scales and physical processes involved, as well as the magnitude of the software engineering effort required. However, new simulation and computer technologies are bringing this objective within reach. Under a special competitive national funding scheme to establish new Major National Research Facilities (MNRF), the Australian government together with a consortium of Universities and research institutions have funded construction of the Australian Computational Earth Systems Simulator (ACcESS). The Simulator or computational virtual earth will provide the research infrastructure to the Australian earth systems science community required for simulations of dynamical earth processes at scales ranging from microscopic to global. It will consist of thematic supercomputer infrastructure and an earth systems simulation software system. The Simulator models and software will be constructed over a five year period by a multi-disciplinary team of computational scientists, mathematicians, earth scientists, civil engineers and software engineers. The construction team will integrate numerical simulation models (3D discrete elements/lattice solid model, particle-in-cell large deformation finite-element method, stress reconstruction models, multi-scale continuum models etc) with geophysical, geological and tectonic models, through advanced software engineering and visualization technologies. When fully constructed, the Simulator aims to provide the software and hardware infrastructure needed to model solid earth phenomena including global scale dynamics and mineralisation processes, crustal scale processes including plate tectonics, mountain building, interacting fault system dynamics, and micro-scale processes that control the geological, physical and dynamic

  15. Analyze satellite-tracking laser data in order to study satellite ephemerides, solid-Earth and ocean tides and laser system performance

    Gaposchkin, E. M.

    1981-01-01

    The decrease in the semimajor axis of Lageos is considerably larger than expected. Gravitational effects, reference system effects, solar radiation pressure, Earth albedo pressure, neutral atmospheric drag, the Poynting Robertson Effect, and electrodynamic effects were used in explaining the observations. Quick look data provided are used to determine the Earth's polar motion and length of day. This process is routine, and provides these geophysical data every five days.

  16. Defect structure of cubic solid solutions of alkaline earth and rare earth fluorides

    DenHartog, HW

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we will consider the disorder in some cubic solid solutions consisting of one of the alkaline earth fluorides and one of the rare earth fluorides. This is an attractive group of model materials, because these materials have a rather simple overall cubic structure. We will discuss the

  17. ForM@Ter: a solid Earth thematic pole

    Ostanciaux, Emilie; Jamet, Olivier; Mandea, Mioara; Diament, Michel

    2014-05-01

    Over the last years, several notable initiatives have been developed to provide Solid Earth sciences with an efficient research e-infrastructure. The EPOS project (European Plate Observing System) was included in the EFSRI roadmap in 2008. The 7th European frame program funded an e-science environment such as the Virtual Earthquake and Seismology Research Community in Europe (VERCE). GEO supports the development of the Geohazard SuperSites and Natural Laboratories portal, while the ESA SSEP project (SuperSites exploitation plateform) is developing as an Helix Nebula usecase. Meanwhile, operational use of space data for emergency management is in constant progress, within the Copernicus services. This rich activity is still leaving some gaps between the data availability and its scientific use, either for technical reasons (big data issues) or due to the need for a better support in term of expert knowledge on the data, of software availability, or of data cost. French infrastructures for data distribution are organized around National Observatory Services (in situ data), scientific services participating to the International association of geodesy data centres and wider research infrastructures such as the Réseau Sismologique et géodésique Français (RESIF) that is contributing to EPOS. The need for thematic cooperative platforms has been underlined over tha last years. In 2009, after a scientific prospective of the French national space agency (CNES) it becomes clear the urgent need to create thematic centres designed to federate the scientific community of Earth observation. Four thematic data centres are currently developing in France in the field of ocean , atmosphere, critical zone and solid Earth sciences. For Solid Earth research, the project - named ForM@Ter - was initiated at the beginning of 2012 to design, with the scientific community, the perimeter, structure and functions of such a thematic centre. It was launched by the CNES and the National

  18. Deep-Earth Equilibration between Molten Iron and Solid Silicates

    Brennan, M.; Zurkowski, C. C.; Chidester, B.; Campbell, A.

    2017-12-01

    Elemental partitioning between iron-rich metals and silicate minerals influences the properties of Earth's deep interior, and is ultimately responsible for the nature of the core-mantle boundary. These interactions between molten iron and solid silicates were influential during planetary accretion, and persist today between the mantle and liquid outer core. Here we report the results of diamond anvil cell experiments at lower mantle conditions (40 GPa, >2500 K) aimed at examining systems containing a mixture of metals (iron or Fe-16Si alloy) and silicates (peridotite). The experiments were conducted at pressure-temperature conditions above the metallic liquidus but below the silicate solidus, and the recovered samples were analyzed by FIB/SEM with EDS to record the compositions of the coexisting phases. Each sample formed a three-phase equilibrium between bridgmanite, Fe-rich metallic melt, and an oxide. In one experiment, using pure Fe, the quenched metal contained 6 weight percent O, and the coexisting oxide was ferropericlase. The second experiment, using Fe-Si alloy, was highly reducing; its metal contained 10 wt% Si, and the coexisting mineral was stishovite. The distinct mineralogies of the two experiments derived from their different starting metals. These results imply that metallic composition is an important factor in determining the products of mixed phase iron-silicate reactions. The properties of deep-Earth interfaces such as the core-mantle boundary could be strongly affected by their metallic components.

  19. Contextualizing Earth Science Professional Development Courses for Geoscience Teachers in Boston: Earth Science II (Solid Earth)

    Pringle, M. S.; Kamerer, B.; Vugrin, M.; Miller, M.

    2009-12-01

    Earth Science II: The Solid Earth -- Earth History and Planetary Science -- is the second of two Earth Science courses, and one of eleven graduate level science Contextualized Content Courses (CCC), that have been developed by the Boston Science Partnership as part of an NSF-funded Math Science Partnership program. A core goal of these courses is to provide high level science content to middle and high school teachers while modeling good instructional practices directly tied to the Boston Public Schools and Massachusetts science curriculum frameworks. All of these courses emphasize hands-on, lab-based, inquiry-driven, student-centered lessons. The Earth Science II team aimed to strictly adhere to ABC (Activity Before Concept) and 5E/7E models of instruction, and limited lecture or teacher-centered instruction to the later “Explanation” stages of all lessons. We also introduced McNeill and Krajick’s Claim-Evidence-Reasoning (CER) model of scientific explanation for middle school classroom discourse, both as a powerful scaffold leading to higher levels of accountable talk in the classroom, and to model science as a social construct. Daily evaluations, dutifully filled out by the course participants and diligently read by the course instructors, were quite useful in adapting instruction to the needs of the class on a real-time basis. We find the structure of the CCC teaching teams - university-based faculty providing expert content knowledge, K-12-based faculty providing age appropriate pedagogies and specific links to the K-12 curriculum - quite a fruitful, two-way collaboration. From the students’ perspective, one of the most useful takeaways from the university-based faculty was “listening to experts model out loud how they reason,” whereas some of the more practical takeaways (i.e., lesson components directly portable to the classroom?) came from the K-12-based faculty. The main takeaways from the course as a whole were the promise to bring more hands

  20. Encyclopedia of earth system science

    Nierenberg, William Aaron

    1992-01-01

    .... The very diversity of the articles attests to the complexity of earth system science as a unique interdisciplinary venture to place humanity in a position to move wisely to protect the global habitat...

  1. NASA's Earth Science Data Systems

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Earth Science Data Systems (ESDS) Program has evolved over the last two decades, and currently has several core and community components. Core components provide the basic operational capabilities to process, archive, manage and distribute data from NASA missions. Community components provide a path for peer-reviewed research in Earth Science Informatics to feed into the evolution of the core components. The Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is a core component consisting of twelve Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) and eight Science Investigator-led Processing Systems spread across the U.S. The presentation covers how the ESDS Program continues to evolve and benefits from as well as contributes to advances in Earth Science Informatics.

  2. Solid state chemistry of rare earth oxides. Final report, September 1, 1950--July 31, 1977

    Eyring, L.

    1977-07-01

    Work under Contract E(11-1)-1109 and its antecedents has been primarily for the purpose of obtaining detailed thermodynamic, kinetic and structural information on the complex rare earth oxides of praseodymium and terbium. These systems exhibit homologous series of ordered phases, order-disorder transformations, wide-range nonstoichiometric phases, chemical hysteresis in two-phase regions and many other solid state reaction phenomena. Fluorite-related materials of importance to ERDA occur as nuclear fuels, radiation power sources, insulators and solid electrolytes. The rare earth oxides serve directly as model systems for such similar materials and, in a more general sense, they serve as models of solids in general since they exhibit nearly the full range of solid state properties

  3. Immersive Visualization of the Solid Earth

    Kreylos, O.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2017-12-01

    , or using commodity low-cost virtual reality headsets such as HTC's Vive. The recent emergence of high-quality commodity VR means that researchers can buy a complete VR system off the shelf, install it and the 3D Visualizer software themselves, and start using it for data analysis immediately.

  4. Smarter Earth Science Data System

    Huang, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The explosive growth in Earth observational data in the recent decade demands a better method of interoperability across heterogeneous systems. The Earth science data system community has mastered the art in storing large volume of observational data, but it is still unclear how this traditional method scale over time as we are entering the age of Big Data. Indexed search solutions such as Apache Solr (Smiley and Pugh, 2011) provides fast, scalable search via keyword or phases without any reasoning or inference. The modern search solutions such as Googles Knowledge Graph (Singhal, 2012) and Microsoft Bing, all utilize semantic reasoning to improve its accuracy in searches. The Earth science user community is demanding for an intelligent solution to help them finding the right data for their researches. The Ontological System for Context Artifacts and Resources (OSCAR) (Huang et al., 2012), was created in response to the DARPA Adaptive Vehicle Make (AVM) programs need for an intelligent context models management system to empower its terrain simulation subsystem. The core component of OSCAR is the Environmental Context Ontology (ECO) is built using the Semantic Web for Earth and Environmental Terminology (SWEET) (Raskin and Pan, 2005). This paper presents the current data archival methodology within a NASA Earth science data centers and discuss using semantic web to improve the way we capture and serve data to our users.

  5. Estimation of solid earth tidal parameters and FCN with VLBI

    Krásná, H.

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of a space-geodetic technique VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) are influenced by a variety of processes which have to be modelled and put as a priori information into the analysis of the space-geodetic data. The increasing accuracy of the VLBI measurements allows access to these parameters and provides possibilities to validate them directly from the measured data. The gravitational attraction of the Moon and the Sun causes deformation of the Earth's surface which can reach several decimetres in radial direction during a day. The displacement is a function of the so-called Love and Shida numbers. Due to the present accuracy of the VLBI measurements the parameters have to be specified as complex numbers, where the imaginary parts describe the anelasticity of the Earth's mantle. Moreover, it is necessary to distinguish between the single tides within the various frequency bands. In this thesis, complex Love and Shida numbers of twelve diurnal and five long-period tides included in the solid Earth tidal displacement modelling are estimated directly from the 27 years of VLBI measurements (1984.0 - 2011.0). In this work, the period of the Free Core Nutation (FCN) is estimated which shows up in the frequency dependent solid Earth tidal displacement as well as in a nutation model describing the motion of the Earth's axis in space. The FCN period in both models is treated as a single parameter and it is estimated in a rigorous global adjustment of the VLBI data. The obtained value of -431.18 ± 0.10 sidereal days differs slightly from the conventional value -431.39 sidereal days given in IERS Conventions 2010. An empirical FCN model based on variable amplitude and phase is determined, whose parameters are estimated in yearly steps directly within VLBI global solutions. (author) [de

  6. Uncertainty analysis of atmospheric friction torque on the solid Earth

    Haoming Yan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The wind stress acquired from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF, National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP climate models and QSCAT satellite observations are analyzed by using frequency-wavenumber spectrum method. The spectrum of two climate models, i.e., ECMWF and NCEP, is similar for both 10 m wind data and model output wind stress data, which indicates that both the climate models capture the key feature of wind stress. While the QSCAT wind stress data shows the similar characteristics with the two climate models in both spectrum domain and the spatial distribution, but with a factor of approximately 1.25 times larger than that of climate models in energy. These differences show the uncertainty in the different wind stress products, which inevitably cause the atmospheric friction torque uncertainties on solid Earth with a 60% departure in annual amplitude, and furtherly affect the precise estimation of the Earth's rotation.

  7. Application of TOPEX Altimetry for Solid Earth Deformation Studies

    Hyongki Lee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the use of satellite radar altimetry to detect solid Earth deformation signals such as Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA. Our study region covers moderately flat land surfaces seasonally covered by snow/ice/vegetation. The maximum solid Earth uplift of ~10 mm yr-1 is primarily due to the incomplete glacial isostatic rebound that occurs around Hudson Bay, North America. We use decadal (1992 - 2002 surface height measurements from TOPEX/POSEIDON radar altimetry to generate height changes time series for 12 selected locations in the study region. Due to the seasonally varying surface characteristics, we first perform radar waveform shape classification and have found that most of the waveforms are quasi-diffuse during winter/spring and specular during summer/fall. As a result, we used the NASA £]-retracker for the quasi-diffuse waveforms and the Offset Center of Gravity or the threshold retracker for the specular waveforms, to generate the surface height time series. The TOPEX height change time series exhibit coherent seasonal signals (higher amplitude during the winter and lower amplitude during the summer, and the estimated deformation rates agree qualitatively well with GPS vertical velocities, and with altimeter/tide gauge combined vertical velocities around the Great Lakes. The TOPEX observations also agree well with various GIA model predictions, especially with the ICE-5G (VM2 model with differences at 0.2 ¡_ 1.4 mm yr-1, indicating that TOPEX has indeed observed solid Earth deformation signals manifested as crustal uplift over the former Laurentide Ice Sheet region.

  8. Recent advances in rare earth doped alkali-alkaline earth borates for solid state lighting applications

    Verma, Shefali; Verma, Kartikey; Kumar, Deepak; Chaudhary, Babulal; Som, Sudipta; Sharma, Vishal; Kumar, Vijay; Swart, Hendrik C.

    2018-04-01

    As a novel class of inorganic phosphor, the alkali-alkaline earth borate phosphors have gained huge attention due to their charming applications in solid-state lighting (SSL) and display devices. The current research drive shows that phosphors based on the alkali-alkaline earth borates have transformed the science and technology due to their high transparency over a broad spectral range, their flexibility in structure and durability for mechanical and high-laser applications. Recent advances in various aspects of rare-earth (RE) doped borate based phosphors and their utilizations in SSL and light emitting diodes are summarized in this review article. Moreover, the present status and upcoming scenario of RE-doped borate phosphors were reviewed in general along with the proper credential from the existing literature. It is believed that this review is a sole compilation of crucial information about the RE-doped borate phosphors in a single platform.

  9. Solid state electrolyte systems

    Pederson, L.R.; Armstrong, B.L.; Armstrong, T.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-01

    Lanthanum gallates are a new family of solid electrolytes that exhibit high ionic conductivity and are stable to high temperatures. Compositions have been developed that are as much as a factor of two more conductive than yttria-stabilized zirconia at a given temperature, through partial replacement of lanthanum by calcium, strontium, and/or barium and through partial replacement of gallium by magnesium. Oxide powders were prepared using combustion synthesis techniques developed in this laboratory; these were sintered to >95% of theoretical density and consisted of a single crystalline phase. Electrical conductivities, electron and ion transference numbers, thermal expansion, and phase behavior were evaluated as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure. A key advantage of the use of lanthanum gallate electrolytes in solid oxide fuel cells is that the temperature of operation may be lowered to perhaps 800 C, yet provide approximately the same power density as zirconia-based cells operating at 1000 C. Ceramic electrolytes that conduct both oxygen ions and electrons are potentially useful to passively separate pure oxygen from an air source at low cost. In such materials, an oxygen ion flux in one direction is charge-compensated by an opposing electron flux. The authors have examined a wide range of mixed ion and electron conducting perovskite ceramics in the system La{sub 1{minus}x}M{sub x}Co{sub 1{minus}y{minus}z}Fe{sub y}N{sub z}O{sub 3{minus}{delta}}, where M = Sr, Ca, and Ba, and N = Pr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Ti, and Al, as well as mixed conducting brownmillerite ceramics, and have characterized oxygen permeation behavior, defect chemistry, structural and phase stability, and performance as cathodes.

  10. Building Thematic and Integrated Services for European Solid Earth Sciences: the EPOS Integrated Approach

    Harrison, M.; Cocco, M.

    2017-12-01

    EPOS (European Plate Observing System) has been designed with the vision of creating a pan-European infrastructure for solid Earth science to support a safe and sustainable society. In accordance with this scientific vision, the EPOS mission is to integrate the diverse and advanced European Research Infrastructures for solid Earth science relying on new e-science opportunities to monitor and unravel the dynamic and complex Earth System. EPOS will enable innovative multidisciplinary research for a better understanding of the Earth's physical and chemical processes that control earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, ground instability and tsunami as well as the processes driving tectonics and Earth's surface dynamics. To accomplish its mission, EPOS is engaging different stakeholders, to allow the Earth sciences to open new horizons in our understanding of the planet. EPOS also aims at contributing to prepare society for geo-hazards and to responsibly manage the exploitation of geo-resources. Through integration of data, models and facilities, EPOS will allow the Earth science community to make a step change in developing new concepts and tools for key answers to scientific and socio-economic questions concerning geo-hazards and geo-resources as well as Earth sciences applications to the environment and human welfare. The research infrastructures (RIs) that EPOS is coordinating include: i) distributed geophysical observing systems (seismological and geodetic networks); ii) local observatories (including geomagnetic, near-fault and volcano observatories); iii) analytical and experimental laboratories; iv) integrated satellite data and geological information services; v) new services for natural and anthropogenic hazards; vi) access to geo-energy test beds. Here we present the activities planned for the implementation phase focusing on the TCS, the ICS and on their interoperability. We will discuss the data, data-products, software and services (DDSS) presently under

  11. Earthquake swarms and the semidiurnal solid earth tide

    Klein, F W

    1976-01-01

    Several correlations between peak earthquake activity during swarms and the phase and stress orientation of the calculated solid earth tide are described. The events correlating with the tide are clusters of swarm earthquakes. Swarm clusters from many sequences recorded over several years are used. Significant tidal correlations (which have less than a 5% chance of being observed if earthquakes were random) are found in the Reykjanes Peninsula in Iceland, the central Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the Imperial Valley and northern Gulf of California, and larger (m/sub b/ greater than or equal to 5.0) aftershocks of the 1965 Rat Islands earthquake. In addition, sets of larger single earthquakes on Atlantic and north-east Pacific fracture zones are significantly correlated with the calculated solid tide. No tidal correlation, however, could be found for the Matsushiro Japan swarm of 1965 to 1967. The earthquake-tide correlations other than those of the Reykjanes Peninsula and Mid-Atlantic Ridge can be interpreted as triggering caused by enhancement of the tectonic stress by tidal stress, i.e. the alignment of fault and tidal principal stresses. All tidal correlations except in the Aleutians are associated with oceanic rifts or their landward extensions. If lithospheric plates are decoupled at active rifts, then tidal stresses channeled along the lithospheric stress guide may be concentrated at ridge-type plate boundaries. Tidal triggering of earthquakes at rifts may reflect this possible amplification of tidal strains in the weakened lithosphere at ridges. 25 figures, 2 tables.

  12. Fire in the Earth system.

    Bowman, David M J S; Balch, Jennifer K; Artaxo, Paulo; Bond, William J; Carlson, Jean M; Cochrane, Mark A; D'Antonio, Carla M; Defries, Ruth S; Doyle, John C; Harrison, Sandy P; Johnston, Fay H; Keeley, Jon E; Krawchuk, Meg A; Kull, Christian A; Marston, J Brad; Moritz, Max A; Prentice, I Colin; Roos, Christopher I; Scott, Andrew C; Swetnam, Thomas W; van der Werf, Guido R; Pyne, Stephen J

    2009-04-24

    Fire is a worldwide phenomenon that appears in the geological record soon after the appearance of terrestrial plants. Fire influences global ecosystem patterns and processes, including vegetation distribution and structure, the carbon cycle, and climate. Although humans and fire have always coexisted, our capacity to manage fire remains imperfect and may become more difficult in the future as climate change alters fire regimes. This risk is difficult to assess, however, because fires are still poorly represented in global models. Here, we discuss some of the most important issues involved in developing a better understanding of the role of fire in the Earth system.

  13. Technology and human purpose: the problem of solids transport on the Earth's surface

    Haff, P. K.

    2012-11-01

    Displacement of mass of limited deformability ("solids") on the Earth's surface is opposed by friction and (the analog of) form resistance - impediments relaxed by rotational motion, self-powering of mass units, and transport infrastructure. These features of solids transport first evolved in the biosphere prior to the emergence of technology, allowing slope-independent, diffusion-like motion of discrete objects as massive as several tons, as illustrated by animal foraging and movement along game trails. However, high-energy-consumption technology powered by fossil fuels required a mechanism that could support fast advective transport of solids, i.e., long-distance, high-volume, high-speed, unidirectional, slope-independent transport across the land surface of materials like coal, containerized fluids, minerals, and economic goods. Pre-technology nature was able to sustain regional- and global-scale advection only in the limited form of piggybacking on geophysical flows of water (river sediment) and air (dust). The appearance of a mechanism for sustained advection of solids independent of fluid flows and gravity appeared only upon the emergence of human purpose. Purpose enables solids advection by, in effect, simulating a continuous potential gradient, otherwise lacking, between discrete and widely separated fossil-fuel energy sources and sinks. Invoking purpose as a mechanism in solids advection is an example of the need to import anthropic principles and concepts into the language and methodology of modern Earth system dynamics. As part of the emergence of a generalized solids advection mechanism, several additional transport requirements necessary to the function of modern large-scale technological systems were also satisfied. These include spatially accurate delivery of advected payload, targetability to essentially arbitrarily located destinations (such as cities), and independence of structure of advected payload from transport mechanism. The latter property

  14. Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System

    Borges, A.; Cerezo, F.; Fernandez, M.; Lomba, J.; Lopez, M.; Moreno, J.; Neira, A.; Quintana, C.; Torres, J.; Trigo, R.; Urena, J.; Vega, E.; Vez, E.

    2010-12-01

    The Spanish Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade (MITyC) and the Ministry of Defense (MoD) signed an agreement in 2007 for the development of a "Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System" based, in first instance, on two satellites: a high resolution optical satellite, called SEOSAT/Ingenio, and a radar satellite based on SAR technology, called SEOSAR/Paz. SEOSAT/Ingenio is managed by MITyC through the Centre for the Development of Industrial Technology (CDTI), with technical and contractual support from the European Space Agency (ESA). HISDESA T together with the Spanish Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA, National Institute for Aerospace Technology) will be responsible for the in-orbit operation and the commercial operation of both satellites, and for the technical management of SEOSAR/Paz on behalf of the MoD. In both cases EADS CASA Espacio (ECE) is the prime contractor leading the industrial consortia. The ground segment development will be assigned to a Spanish consortium. This system is the most important contribution of Spain to the European Programme Global Monitoring for Environment and Security, GMES. This paper presents the Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System focusing on SEOSA T/Ingenio Programme and with special emphasis in the potential contribution to the ESA Third Party Missions Programme and to the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security initiative (GMES) Data Access.

  15. The EPOS Implementation Phase: building thematic and integrated services for solid Earth sciences

    Cocco, Massimo; Epos Consortium, the

    2015-04-01

    The European Plate Observing System (EPOS) has a scientific vision and approach aimed at creating a pan-European infrastructure for Earth sciences to support a safe and sustainable society. To follow this vision, the EPOS mission is integrating a suite of diverse and advanced Research Infrastructures (RIs) in Europe relying on new e-science opportunities to monitor and understand the dynamic and complex Earth system. To this goal, the EPOS Preparatory Phase has designed a long-term plan to facilitate integrated use of data and products as well as access to facilities from mainly distributed existing and new research infrastructures for solid Earth Science. EPOS will enable innovative multidisciplinary research for a better understanding of the Earth's physical processes that control earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, ground instability and tsunami as well as the processes driving tectonics and Earth surface dynamics. Through integration of data, models and facilities EPOS will allow the Earth Science community to make a step change in developing new concepts and tools for key answers to scientific and socio-economic questions concerning geo-hazards and geo-resources as well as Earth sciences applications to the environment and to human welfare. Since its conception EPOS has been built as "a single, Pan-European, sustainable and distributed infrastructure". EPOS is, indeed, the sole infrastructure for solid Earth Science in ESFRI and its pan-European dimension is demonstrated by the participation of 23 countries in its preparatory phase. EPOS is presently moving into its implementation phase further extending its pan-European dimension. The EPOS Implementation Phase project (EPOS IP) builds on the achievements of the successful EPOS preparatory phase project. The EPOS IP objectives are synergetic and coherent with the establishment of the new legal subject (the EPOS-ERIC in Italy). EPOS coordinates the existing and new solid Earth RIs within Europe and builds the

  16. Earth Systems Science: An Analytic Framework

    Finley, Fred N.; Nam, Younkeyong; Oughton, John

    2011-01-01

    Earth Systems Science (ESS) is emerging rapidly as a discipline and is being used to replace the older earth science education that has been taught as unrelated disciplines--geology, meteorology, astronomy, and oceanography. ESS is complex and is based on the idea that the earth can be understood as a set of interacting natural and social systems.…

  17. Earth Observing System Covariance Realism Updates

    Ojeda Romero, Juan A.; Miguel, Fred

    2017-01-01

    This presentation will be given at the International Earth Science Constellation Mission Operations Working Group meetings June 13-15, 2017 to discuss the Earth Observing System Covariance Realism updates.

  18. The effects of the solid inner core and nonhydrostatic structure on the earth's forced nutations and earth tides

    De Vries, Dan; Wahr, John M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper computes the effects of the solid inner core (IC) on the forced nutations and earth tides, and on certain of the earth's rotational normal modes. The theoretical results are extended to include the effects of a solid IC and of nonhydrostatic structure. The presence of the IC is responsible for a new, almost diurnal, prograde normal mode which involves a relative rotation between the IC and fluid outer core about an equatorial axis. It is shown that the small size of the IC's effects on both nutations and tides is a consequence of the fact that the IC's moments of inertia are less than 1/1000 of the entire earth's.

  19. EarthN: A new Earth System Nitrogen Model

    Johnson, Benjamin W.; Goldblatt, Colin

    2018-01-01

    The amount of nitrogen in the atmosphere, oceans, crust, and mantle have important ramifications for Earth's biologic and geologic history. Despite this importance, the history and cycling of nitrogen in the Earth system is poorly constrained over time. For example, various models and proxies contrastingly support atmospheric mass stasis, net outgassing, or net ingassing over time. In addition, the amount available to and processing of nitrogen by organisms is intricately linked with and prov...

  20. Earth System Science Education Modules

    Hall, C.; Kaufman, C.; Humphreys, R. R.; Colgan, M. W.

    2009-12-01

    The College of Charleston is developing several new geoscience-based education modules for integration into the Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA). These three new modules provide opportunities for science and pre-service education students to participate in inquiry-based, data-driven experiences. The three new modules will be discussed in this session. Coastal Crisis is a module that analyzes rapidly changing coastlines and uses technology - remotely sensed data and geographic information systems (GIS) to delineate, understand and monitor changes in coastal environments. The beaches near Charleston, SC are undergoing erosion and therefore are used as examples of rapidly changing coastlines. Students will use real data from NASA, NOAA and other federal agencies in the classroom to study coastal change. Through this case study, learners will acquire remotely sensed images and GIS data sets from online sources, utilize those data sets within Google Earth or other visualization programs, and understand what the data is telling them. Analyzing the data will allow learners to contemplate and make predictions on the impact associated with changing environmental conditions, within the context of a coastal setting. To Drill or Not To Drill is a multidisciplinary problem based module to increase students’ knowledge of problems associated with nonrenewable resource extraction. The controversial topic of drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) examines whether the economic benefit of the oil extracted from ANWR is worth the social cost of the environmental damage that such extraction may inflict. By attempting to answer this question, learners must balance the interests of preservation with the economic need for oil. The learners are exposed to the difficulties associated with a real world problem that requires trade-off between environmental trust and economic well-being. The Citizen Science module challenges students to translate scientific

  1. GeoFramework: A Modeling Framework for Solid Earth Geophysics

    Gurnis, M.; Aivazis, M.; Tromp, J.; Tan, E.; Thoutireddy, P.; Liu, Q.; Choi, E.; Dicaprio, C.; Chen, M.; Simons, M.; Quenette, S.; Appelbe, B.; Aagaard, B.; Williams, C.; Lavier, L.; Moresi, L.; Law, H.

    2003-12-01

    As data sets in geophysics become larger and of greater relevance to other earth science disciplines, and as earth science becomes more interdisciplinary in general, modeling tools are being driven in new directions. There is now a greater need to link modeling codes to one another, link modeling codes to multiple datasets, and to make modeling software available to non modeling specialists. Coupled with rapid progress in computer hardware (including the computational speed afforded by massively parallel computers), progress in numerical algorithms, and the introduction of software frameworks, these lofty goals of merging software in geophysics are now possible. The GeoFramework project, a collaboration between computer scientists and geoscientists, is a response to these needs and opportunities. GeoFramework is based on and extends Pyre, a Python-based modeling framework, recently developed to link solid (Lagrangian) and fluid (Eulerian) models, as well as mesh generators, visualization packages, and databases, with one another for engineering applications. The utility and generality of Pyre as a general purpose framework in science is now being recognized. Besides its use in engineering and geophysics, it is also being used in particle physics and astronomy. Geology and geophysics impose their own unique requirements on software frameworks which are not generally available in existing frameworks and so there is a need for research in this area. One of the special requirements is the way Lagrangian and Eulerian codes will need to be linked in time and space within a plate tectonics context. GeoFramework has grown beyond its initial goal of linking a limited number of exiting codes together. The following codes are now being reengineered within the context of Pyre: Tecton, 3-D FE Visco-elastic code for lithospheric relaxation; CitComS, a code for spherical mantle convection; SpecFEM3D, a SEM code for global and regional seismic waves; eqsim, a FE code for dynamic

  2. Baltic Earth - Earth System Science for the Baltic Sea Region

    Meier, Markus; Rutgersson, Anna; Lehmann, Andreas; Reckermann, Marcus

    2014-05-01

    The Baltic Sea region, defined as its river catchment basin, spans different climate and population zones, from a temperate, highly populated, industrialized south with intensive agriculture to a boreal, rural north. It encompasses most of the Scandinavian Peninsula in the west; most of Finland and parts of Russia, Belarus, and the Baltic states in the east; and Poland and small parts of Germany and Denmark in the south. The region represents an old cultural landscape, and the Baltic Sea itself is among the most studied sea areas of the world. Baltic Earth is the new Earth system research network for the Baltic Sea region. It is the successor to BALTEX, which was terminated in June 2013 after 20 years and two successful phases. Baltic Earth stands for the vision to achieve an improved Earth system understanding of the Baltic Sea region. This means that the research disciplines of BALTEX continue to be relevant, i.e. atmospheric and climate sciences, hydrology, oceanography and biogeochemistry, but a more holistic view of the Earth system encompassing processes in the atmosphere, on land and in the sea as well as in the anthroposphere shall gain in importance in Baltic Earth. Specific grand research challenges have been formulated, representing interdisciplinary research questions to be tackled in the coming years. A major means will be scientific assessments of particular research topics by expert groups, similar to the BACC approach, which shall help to identify knowledge gaps and develop research strategies. Preliminary grand challenges and topics for which Working Groups have been installed include: • Salinity dynamics in the Baltic Sea • Land-Sea biogeochemical feedbacks in the Baltic Sea region • Natural hazards and extreme events in the Baltic Sea region • Understanding sea level dynamics in the Baltic Sea • Understanding regional variability of water and energy exchange • Utility of Regional Climate Models • Assessment of Scenario Simulations

  3. Building thematic and integrated services for solid Earth sciences: the EPOS integrated approach

    Cocco, Massimo; Consortium, Epos

    2016-04-01

    EPOS has been designed with the vision of creating a pan-European infrastructure for solid Earth science to support a safe and sustainable society. In accordance with this scientific vision, the EPOS mission is to integrate the diverse and advanced European Research Infrastructures for solid Earth science relying on new e-science opportunities to monitor and unravel the dynamic and complex Earth System. EPOS will enable innovative multidisciplinary research for a better understanding of the Earth's physical and chemical processes that control earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, ground instability and tsunami as well as the processes driving tectonics and Earth's surface dynamics. To accomplish its mission, EPOS is engaging different stakeholders, not limited to scientists, to allow the Earth sciences to open new horizons in our understanding of the planet. EPOS also aims at contributing to prepare society for geo-hazards and to responsibly manage the exploitation of geo-resources. Through integration of data, models and facilities, EPOS will allow the Earth science community to make a step change in developing new concepts and tools for key answers to scientific and socio-economic questions concerning geo-hazards and geo-resources as well as Earth sciences applications to the environment and human welfare. A long-term integration plan is necessary to accomplish the EPOS mission. EPOS is presently in its implementation phase further extending its pan-European dimension. The EPOS Implementation Phase builds on the achievements of the successful EPOS Preparatory Phase project and consists of two key activities: the legal establishment of the EPOS-ERIC and the EPOS IP project. The EPOS implementation phase will last from 2015 to 2019. Key objectives of the project are: implementing Thematic Core Services (TCS), the domain-specific service hubs for coordinating and harmonizing national resources/plans with the European dimension of EPOS; building the Integrated Core

  4. A new research project on the interaction of the solid Earth and the Antarctic Ice Sheet

    Fukuda, Y.; Nishijima, J.; Kazama, T.; Nakamura, K.; Doi, K.; Suganuma, Y.; Okuno, J.; Araya, A.; Kaneda, H.; Aoyama, Y.

    2017-12-01

    A new research project of "Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas" funded by JSPS (Japan Society for the Promotion of Science) has recently been launched. The title of the project is "Giant reservoirs of heat/water/material: Global environmental changes driven by Southern Ocean and Antarctic Ice Sheet", and as a five years project, is aiming to establish a new research area for Antarctic environmental system science. The project consists of 7 research topics, including Antarctic ice sheet and Southern ocean sciences, new observation methodology, modeling and other interdisciplinary topics, and we are involved in the topic A02-2, "Interaction of the solid Earth and the Antarctic Ice Sheet". The Antarctic ice sheet, which relates to the global climate changes through the sea level rise and ocean circulation, is an essential element of the Earth system for predicting the future environment changes. Thus many studies of the ice sheet changes have been conducted by means of geomorphological, geological, geodetic surveys, as well as satellite gravimetry and satellite altimetry. For these studies, one of the largest uncertainties is the effects of GIA. Therefore, GIA as a key to investigate the interaction between the solid Earth and the ice sheet changes, we plan to conduct geomorphological, geological and geodetic surveys in the inland mountain areas and the coastal areas including the surrounding areas of a Japanese station Syowa in East Antarctica, where the in-situ data for constraining GIA models are very few. Combining these new observations with other in-site data, various satellite data and numerical modeling, we aim to estimating a precise GIA model, constructing a reliable ice melting history after the last glacial maximum and obtaining the viscoelastic structure of the Earth's interior. In the presentation, we also show the five years research plans as well. This study was partially supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant No. 17H06321.

  5. Plan for Living on a Restless Planet Sets NASA's Solid Earth Agenda

    Solomon, Sean C.; Baker, Victor R.; Bloxham, Jeremy; Booth, Jeffrey; Donnellan, Andrea; Elachi, Charles; Evans, Diane; Rignot, Eric; Burbank, Douglas; Chao, Benjamin F.; Chave, Alan; Gillespie, Alan; Herring, Thomas; Jeanloz, Raymond; LaBrecque, John; Minster, Bernard; Pittman, Walter C., III; Simons, Mark; Turcotte, Donald L.; Zoback, Mary Lou C.

    What are the most important challenges facing solid Earth science today and over the next two decades? And what is the best approach for NASA, in partnership with other agencies, to address those challenges? A new report, Living on a Restless Planet, provides a blueprint for answering these questions. The top priority for a new spacecraft mission in the area of solid Earth science over the next 5 years, according to this report, is a satellite dedicated to Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). At the request of NASA, the Solid Earth Science Working Group (SESWG) developed a strategy for the highest priority objectives in solid Earth science for the space agency over the next 25 years. The strategy addresses six challenges that are of fundamental scientific importance, have strong implications for society, and are amenable to substantial progress through a concerted series of scientific observations from space.

  6. Zero drift and solid Earth tide extracted from relative gravimetric data with principal component analysis

    Hongjuan Yu; Jinyun Guo; Jiulong Li; Dapeng Mu; Qiaoli Kong

    2015-01-01

    Zero drift and solid Earth tide corrections to static relative gravimetric data cannot be ignored. In this paper, a new principal component analysis (PCA) algorithm is presented to extract the zero drift and the solid Earth tide, as signals, from static relative gravimetric data assuming that the components contained in the relative gravimetric data are uncorrelated. Static relative gravity observations from Aug. 15 to Aug. 23, 2014 are used as statistical variables to separate the signal and...

  7. Potential of the solid-Earth response for limiting long-term West Antarctic Ice Sheet retreat

    Konrad, Hannes; Sasgen, Ingo; Pollard, David; Klemann, Volker

    2016-04-01

    The West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) is assumed to be inherently unstable because it is grounded below sea level in a large part, where the bedrock deepens from today's grounding line towards the interior of the ice sheet. Idealized simulations have shown that bedrock uplift due to isostatic adjustment of the solid Earth and the associated sea-level fall may stop the retreat of such a marine-based ice sheet (Gomez et al., 2012). Here, we employ a coupled model for ice-sheet dynamics and solid-Earth dynamics, including a gravitationally consistent description of sea level, to investigate the influence of the viscoelastic Earth structure on the WAIS' future stability (Konrad et al. 2015). For this, we start from a steady-state condition for the Antarctic Ice Sheet close to present-day observations and apply atmospheric and oceanic forcing of different strength to initiate the retreat of the WAIS and investigate the effect of the viscoelastic deformation on the ice evolution for a range of solid-Earth rheologies. We find that the climate forcing is the primary control on the occurrence of the WAIS collapse. However, for moderate climate forcing and a weak solid-Earth rheology associated with the West Antarctic rift system (asthenosphere viscosities of 3x10^19 Pa s or less), we find that the combined effect of bedrock uplift and gravitational sea-level fall limits the retreat to the Amundsen Sea embayment on millennial time scales. In contrast, a stiffer Earth rheology yields a collapse under these conditions. Under a stronger climate forcing, weak Earth structures do not prevent the WAIS collapse; however, they produce a delay of up to 5000 years in comparison to a stiffer solid-Earth rheology. In an additional experiment, we test the impact of sea-level rise from an assumed fast deglaciation of the Greenland Ice Sheet. In cases when the climatic forcing is too weak to force WAIS collapse by itself, the additional rise in sea-level leads to disintegration of the WAIS

  8. EarthN: A new Earth System Nitrogen Model

    Goldblatt, Colin; Johnson, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    The amount of nitrogen in the atmosphere, oceans, crust, and mantle have important ramifications for Earth’s biologic and geologic history. Despite this importance, the history and cycling of nitrogen in the Earth system is poorly constrained over time. For example, various models and proxies contrastingly support atmospheric mass stasis, net outgassing, or net ingassing over time. In addition, the amount available to and processing of nitrogen by organisms is intricately linked with and prov...

  9. Development of the AuScope Australian Earth Observing System

    Rawling, T.

    2017-12-01

    Advances in monitoring technology and significant investment in new national research initiatives, will provide significant new opportunities for delivery of novel geoscience data streams from across the Australian continent over the next decade. The AuScope Australian Earth Observing System (AEOS) is linking field and laboratory infrastructure across Australia to form a national sensor array focusing on the Solid Earth. As such AuScope is working with these programs to deploy observational infrastructure, including MT, passive seismic, and GNSS networks across the entire Australian Continent. Where possible the observational grid will be co-located with strategic basement drilling in areas of shallow cover and tied with national reflection seismic and sampling transects. This integrated suite of distributed earth observation and imaging sensors will provide unprecedented imaging fidelity of our crust, across all length and time scales, to fundamental and applied researchers in the earth, environmental and geospatial sciences. The AEOS will the Earth Science community's Square Kilometer Array (SKA) - a distributed telescope that looks INTO the earth rather than away from it - a 10 million SKA. The AEOS is strongly aligned with other community strategic initiatives including the UNCOVER research program as well as other National Collaborative Research Infrastructure programs such as the Terrestrial Environmental Research Network (TERN) and the Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) providing an interdisciplinary collaboration platform across the earth and environmental sciences. There is also very close alignment between AuScope and similar international programs such as EPOS, the USArray and EarthCube - potential collaborative linkages we are currently in the process of pursuing more fomally. The AuScope AEOS Infrastructure System is ultimately designed to enable the progressive construction, refinement and ongoing enrichment of a live, "FAIR" four

  10. ForM@Ter: a French Solid Earth Research Infrastructure Project

    Mandea, M.; Diament, M.; Jamet, O.; Deschamps-Ostanciaux, E.

    2017-12-01

    Recently, some noteworthy initiatives to develop efficient research e-infrastructures for the study of the Earth's system have been set up. However, some gaps between the data availability and their scientific use still exists, either because technical reasons (big data issues) or because of the lack of a dedicated support in terms of expert knowledge of the data, software availability, or data cost. The need for thematic cooperative platforms has been underlined over the last years, as well as the need to create thematic centres designed to federate the scientific community of Earth's observation. Four thematic data centres have been developed in France, covering the domains of ocean, atmosphere, land, and solid Earth sciences. For the Solid Earth science community, a research infrastructure project named ForM@Ter was launched by the French Space Agency (CNES) and the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS), with the active participation of the National institute for geographical and forestry information (IGN). Currently, it relies on the contributions of scientists from more than 20 French Earth science laboratories.Preliminary analysis have showed that a focus on the determination of the shape and movements of the Earth surface (ForM@Ter: Formes et Mouvements de la Terre) can federate a wide variety of scientific areas (earthquake cycle, tectonics, morphogenesis, volcanism, erosion dynamics, mantle rheology, geodesy) and offers many interfaces with other geoscience domains, such as glaciology or snow evolution. This choice motivates the design of an ambitious data distribution scheme, including a wide variety of sources - optical imagery, SAR, GNSS, gravity, satellite altimetry data, in situ observations (inclinometers, seismometers, etc.) - as well as a wide variety of processing techniques. In the evolving context of the current and forthcoming national and international e-infrastructures, the challenge of the project is to design a non

  11. Earth System Science: An Integrated Approach.

    Environment, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Details how an understanding of the role played by human activities in global environmental change has emerged. Presents information about the earth system provided by research programs. Speculates about the direction of future research. (DDR)

  12. SESAR: Addressing the need for unique sample identification in the Solid Earth Sciences

    Lehnert, K. A.; Goldstein, S. L.; Lenhardt, C.; Vinayagamoorthy, S.

    2004-12-01

    The study of solid earth samples is key to our knowledge of Earth's dynamical systems and evolution. The data generated provide the basis for models and hypotheses in all disciplines of the Geosciences from tectonics to magmatic processes to mantle dynamics to paleoclimate research. Sample-based data are diverse ranging from major and trace element abundances, radiogenic and stable isotope ratios of rocks, minerals, fluid or melt inclusions, to age determinations and descriptions of lithology, texture, mineral or fossil content, stratigraphic context, physical properties. The usefulness of these data is critically dependent on their integration as a coherent data set for each sample. If different data sets for the same sample cannot be combined because the sample cannot be unambiguously recognized, valuable information is lost. The ambiguous naming of samples has been a major problem in the geosciences. Different samples are often given identical names, and there is a tendency for different people analyzing the same sample to rename it in their publications according to local conventions. This situation has generated significant confusion, with samples often losing their "history", making it difficult or impossible to link available data. This has become most evident through the compilation of geochemical data in relational databases such as PetDB, NAVDAT, and GEOROC. While the relational data structure allows linking of disparate data for samples published in different references, linkages cannot be established due to ambiguous sample names. SESAR is a response to this problem of ambiguous naming of samples. SESAR will create a common clearinghouse that provides a centralized registry of sample identifiers, to avoid ambiguity, to systematize sample designation, and ensure that all information associated with a sample would in fact be unique. The project will build a web-based digital registry for solid earth samples that will provide for the first time a way to

  13. Global Earth Observation System of Systems: Characterizing Uncertainties of Space- based Measurements and Earth System Models Informing Decision Tools

    Birk, R. J.; Frederick, M.

    2006-05-01

    performance of integrated system solutions. The U.S. Group on Earth Observations has identified six near-term opportunities (NTO) for integrated system solutions that contribute to the U.S. IEOS. The six NTOs include the use of space-based measurements of land use/land cover, biogeochemistry parameters, solid Earth perturbations, and ocean parameters important to dealing with decisions associated with such important areas as future sea level change. This paper describes the architectures of the 6 NTOs within a common framework and discusses challenges for systematically evaluating the capacity of discrete research components of NASA space-based observation systems, with models and computing systems and decision support systems.

  14. Immobilization of Radioactive Rare Earth oxide Waste by Solid Phase Sintering

    Ahn, Byung Gil; Park, Hwan Seo; Kim, Hwan Young; Lee, Han Soo; Kim, In Tae

    2010-01-01

    In the pyroprocessing of spent nuclear fuels, LiCl-KCl waste salt containing radioactive rare earth chlorides are generated. The radioactive rare earth oxides are recovered by co-oxidative precipitation of rare earth elements. The powder phase of rare earth oxide waste must be immobilized to produce a monolithic wasteform suitable for storage and ultimate disposal. The immobilization of these waste developed in this study involves a solid state sintering of the waste with host borosilicate glass and zinc titanate based ceramic matrix (ZIT). And the rare-earth monazite which synthesised by reaction of ammonium di-hydrogen phosphate with the rare earth oxides waste, were immobilized with the borosilicate glass. It is shown that the developed ZIT ceramic wasteform is highly resistant the leaching process, high density and thermal conductivity.

  15. Earth and space science information systems

    Zygielbaum, A. (ed.) (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States))

    1993-01-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the Earth and Space Science Information Systems (ESSIS) Conference. The attendees included scientists and engineers across many disciplines. New trends in information organizations were reviewed. One hundred and twenty eight papers are included in this volume, out of these two have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database. The topics covered in the papers range from Earth science and technology to astronomy and space, planetary science and education. (AIP)

  16. The UK Earth System Model project

    Tang, Yongming

    2016-04-01

    In this talk we will describe the development and current status of the UK Earth System Model (UKESM). This project is a NERC/Met Office collaboration and has two objectives; to develop and apply a world-leading Earth System Model, and to grow a community of UK Earth System Model scientists. We are building numerical models that include all the key components of the global climate system, and contain the important process interactions between global biogeochemistry, atmospheric chemistry and the physical climate system. UKESM will be used to make key CMIP6 simulations as well as long-time (e.g. millennium) simulations, large ensemble experiments and investigating a range of future carbon emission scenarios.

  17. Overview of NASA's Earth Science Data Systems

    McDonald, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    For over the last 15 years, NASA's Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) has devoted a tremendous effort to design and build the Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS) to acquire, process, archive and distribute the data of the EOS series of satellites and other ESE missions and field programs. The development of EOSDIS began with an early prototype to support NASA data from heritage missions and progressed through a formal development process to today's system that supports the data from multiple missions including Landsat 7, Terra, Aqua, SORCE and ICESat. The system is deployed at multiple Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) and its current holdings are approximately 4.5 petabytes. The current set of unique users requesting EOS data and information products exceeds 2 million. While EOSDIS has been the centerpiece of NASA's Earth Science Data Systems, other initiatives have augmented the services of EOSDIS and have impacted its evolution and the future directions of data systems within the ESE. ESDIS had an active prototyping effort and has continued to be involved in the activities of the Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO). In response to concerns from the science community that EOSDIS was too large and monolithic, the ESE initiated the Earth Science Information Partners (ESP) Federation Experiment that funded a series of projects to develop specialized products and services to support Earth science research and applications. Last year, the enterprise made 41 awards to successful proposals to the Research, Education and Applications Solutions Network (REASON) Cooperative Agreement Notice to continue and extend the ESP activity. The ESE has also sponsored a formulation activity called the Strategy for the Evolution of ESE Data Systems (SEEDS) to develop approaches and decision support processes for the management of the collection of data system and service providers of the enterprise. Throughout the development of its earth science

  18. The Earth's Mantle Is Solid: Teachers' Misconceptions About the Earth and Plate Tectonics.

    King, Chris

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the misconceptions revealed by the teachers' answers and outlines more accurate answers and explanations based on established evidence and uses these to provide a more complete understanding of plate tectonic process and the structure of Earth. (Author/YDS)

  19. Exploring Earth Systems Through STEM

    Chen, Loris; Salmon, Jennifer; Burns, Courtney

    2015-04-01

    During the 2010 school year, grade 8 science teachers at Dwight D. Eisenhower Middle School in Wyckoff, New Jersey, began using the draft of A Framework for K-12 Science Education to transition to the Next Generation Science Standards. In an evolutionary process of testing and revising, teachers work collaboratively to develop problem-based science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) units that integrate earth science, physical science, and life science topics. Students explore the interconnections of Earth's atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere through problem-based learning. Problem-based learning engages students in (1) direct observations in the field and classroom, (2) collection and analysis of data from remote sensors and hand-held sensors, and (3) analysis of physical, mathematical, and virtual models. Students use a variety of technologies and applications in their investigations, for example iPad apps, Google Classroom, and Vernier sensors. Data from NASA, NOAA, non-government organizations, and scientific research papers inspire student questions and spark investigations. Teachers create materials and websites to support student learning. Teachers curate reading, video, simulations, and other Internet resources for students. Because curriculum is standards-based as opposed to textbook-based, teacher participation in workshops and institutes frequently translates into new or improved study units. Recent programs include Toyota International Teacher Program to Costa Rica, Japan Society Going Global, Siemens STEM Academy, U.S. Naval Academy SET Sail, and NJSTA Maitland P. Simmons Memorial Award Summer Institute. Unit themes include weather and climate, introduction to general chemistry and biochemistry, and cells and heredity. Each if the three 12-week units has embedded engineering challenges inspired by current events, community needs, and/or the work of scientists. The unit segments begin with a problem, progress to

  20. Design and installation of earth energy systems

    Loggia, S; Adragna, M; Coyle, S; Foley, C; Hawryn, S; Martin, A; McConnell, J [eds.

    2002-07-01

    This first edition of the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) Standard C448 Series, replaces CSA Standards CAN/CSA-C445-M92 entitled Design and Installation of Earth Energy Heat Pump Systems for Residential and Other Small Buildings, as well as C447-94 entitled Design and Installation of Earth Energy Heat Pump Systems for Commercial and Institutional Buildings. This standard document consists of three parts: (C448.1) Design and installation of earth energy systems for commercial and institutional buildings; (C448.2) Design and installation of earth energy systems for residential and small buildings; and, (C448.3) Design and installation of underground thermal energy storage systems for commercial and institutional buildings. In C448.1, the requirements applicable to any system falling within the scope of the C448 series were included. Alternative requirements for houses and small buildings were added in C448.2. It was noted that either standard may be implemented. The standards applicable to the intentional storage of energy in the earth for later use were presented in C448.3. This latter section includes a brief introduction on underground thermal energy storage (UTES). tabs.

  1. Use of satellite gravimetry for estimating recent solid Earth changes

    Ramillien, Guillaume

    2014-05-01

    Since its launch in March 2002, the Gravity Recovery & Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission provides a global mapping of the time variations of the Earth's gravity field for the recent period. Official centers such as Center of Space Research (CSR) in Austin, TX, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, CA and GeoForschungZentrum (GFZ) in Potsdam, Germany, provide 10-day and monthly solutions of Stokes coefficients (i.e., spherical harmonic coefficients of the geopotential) up to harmonic degree 50-60 (or, equivalently, a spatial resolution of 300-400 km) for the timespan 2002-2012. Tiny variations of the gravity measured by GRACE are mainly due to the total water storage change on continents. Therefore, these solutions of water mass can be used to correct other datasets, and then isolate the gravity signatures of large and sudden earthquakes, as well as of the continuous Post Glacial Rebound (PGR) rate. As these measured seasonal variations of continental hydrology represent the variations of water mass load, it is also possible to derive the deformation of the terrestrial surface associated to this varying load using Love numbers. These latter numbers are obtained by assuming an elastic Earth model. In the center of the Amazon basin, the seasonal displacements of the surface due to hydrology reach amplitudes of a few centimeters typically. Time-series of GRACE-based radial displacement of the surface can be analysed and compared with independent local GPS records for validation.

  2. Earth observing system - Concepts and implementation strategy

    Hartle, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    The concepts of an Earth Observing System (EOS), an information system being developed by the EOS Science and Mission Requirements Working Group for international use and planned to begin in the 1990s, are discussed. The EOS is designed to study the factors that control the earth's hydrologic cycle, biochemical cycles, and climatologic processes by combining the measurements from remote sensing instruments, in situ measurement devices, and a data and information system. Three EOS platforms are planned to be launched into low, polar, sun-synchronous orbits during the Space Station's Initial Operating Configuration, one to be provided by ESA and two by the United States.

  3. 1995 Baseline solid waste management system description

    Anderson, G.S.; Konynenbelt, H.S.

    1995-09-01

    This provides a detailed solid waste system description that documents the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) strategy for managing Hanford's solid low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, transuranic and transuranic mixed waste, and greater-than-Class III waste. This system description is intended for use by managers of the solid waste program, facility and system planners, as well as system modelers. The system description identifies the TSD facilities that constitute the solid waste system and defines these facilities' interfaces, schedules, and capacities. It also provides the strategy for treating each of the waste streams generated or received by the Hanford Site from generation or receipt through final destination

  4. Solid state radiation detector system

    1977-01-01

    A solid state radiation flux detector system utilizes a detector element, consisting of a bar of semiconductor having electrical conductance of magnitude dependent upon the magnitude of photon and charged particle flux impinging thereon, and negative feedback circuitry for adjusting the current flow through a light emitting diode to facilitate the addition of optical flux, having a magnitude decreasing in proportion to any increase in the magnitude of radiation (e.g. x-ray) flux incident upon the detector element, whereby the conductance of the detector element is maintained essentially constant. The light emitting diode also illuminates a photodiode to generate a detector output having a stable, highly linear response with time and incident radiation flux changes

  5. System and process for dissolution of solids

    Liezers, Martin; Farmer, III, Orville T.

    2017-10-10

    A system and process are disclosed for dissolution of solids and "difficult-to-dissolve" solids. A solid sample may be ablated in an ablation device to generate nanoscale particles. Nanoparticles may then swept into a coupled plasma device operating at atmospheric pressure where the solid nanoparticles are atomized. The plasma exhaust may be delivered directly into an aqueous fluid to form a solution containing the atomized and dissolved solids. The composition of the resulting solution reflects the composition of the original solid sample.

  6. Student Learning of Complex Earth Systems: Conceptual Frameworks of Earth Systems and Instructional Design

    Scherer, Hannah H.; Holder, Lauren; Herbert, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Engaging students in authentic problem solving concerning environmental issues in near-surface complex Earth systems involves both developing student conceptualization of Earth as a system and applying that scientific knowledge using techniques that model those used by professionals. In this first paper of a two-part series, we review the state of…

  7. Earth Observing System, Conclusions and Recommendations

    1984-01-01

    The following Earth Observing Systems (E.O.S.) recommendations were suggested: (1) a program must be initiated to ensure that present time series of Earth science data are maintained and continued. (2) A data system that provides easy, integrated, and complete access to past, present, and future data must be developed as soon as possible. (3) A long term research effort must be sustained to study and understand these time series of Earth observations. (4) The E.O.S. should be established as an information system to carry out those aspects of the above recommendations which go beyond existing and currently planned activities. (5) The scientific direction of the E.O.S. should be established and continued through an international scientific steering committee.

  8. Global Change and the Earth System

    Pollack, Henry N.

    2004-08-01

    The Earth system in recent years has come to mean the complex interactions of the atmosphere, biosphere, lithosphere and hydrosphere, through an intricate network of feedback loops. This system has operated over geologic time, driven principally by processes with long time scales. Over the lifetime of the solar system, the Sun has slowly become more radiant, and the geography of continents and oceans basins has evolved via plate tectonics. This geography has placed a first-order constraint on the circulation of ocean waters, and thus has strongly influenced regional and global climate. At shorter time scales, the Earth system has been influenced by Milankovitch orbital factors and occasional exogenous events such as bolide impacts. Under these influences the system chugged along for eons, until some few hundred thousand years ago, when one remarkable species evolved: Homo sapiens. As individuals, humans are of course insignificant in shaping the Earth system, but collectively the six billion human occupants of the planet now rival ``natural'' processes in modifying the Earth system. This profound human influence underlies the dubbing of the present epoch of geologic history as the ``Anthropocene.''

  9. NASA's Earth Observing Data and Information System

    Mitchell, Andrew E.; Behnke, Jeanne; Lowe, Dawn; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) has been a central component of NASA Earth observation program for over 10 years. It is one of the largest civilian science information system in the US, performing ingest, archive and distribution of over 3 terabytes of data per day much of which is from NASA s flagship missions Terra, Aqua and Aura. The system supports a variety of science disciplines including polar processes, land cover change, radiation budget, and most especially global climate change. The EOSDIS data centers, collocated with centers of science discipline expertise, archive and distribute standard data products produced by science investigator-led processing systems. Key to the success of EOSDIS is the concept of core versus community requirements. EOSDIS supports a core set of services to meet specific NASA needs and relies on community-developed services to meet specific user needs. EOSDIS offers a metadata registry, ECHO (Earth Observing System Clearinghouse), through which the scientific community can easily discover and exchange NASA s Earth science data and services. Users can search, manage, and access the contents of ECHO s registries (data and services) through user-developed and community-tailored interfaces or clients. The ECHO framework has become the primary access point for cross-Data Center search-and-order of EOSDIS and other Earth Science data holdings archived at the EOSDIS data centers. ECHO s Warehouse Inventory Search Tool (WIST) is the primary web-based client for discovering and ordering cross-discipline data from the EOSDIS data centers. The architecture of the EOSDIS provides a platform for the publication, discovery, understanding and access to NASA s Earth Observation resources and allows for easy integration of new datasets. The EOSDIS also has developed several methods for incorporating socioeconomic data into its data collection. Over the years, we have developed several methods for determining

  10. Earth Observing Data System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Overview

    Klene, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) acquires and distributes an abundance of Earth science data on a daily basis to a diverse user community worldwide. The NASA Big Earth Data Initiative (BEDI) is an effort to make the acquired science data more discoverable, accessible, and usable. This presentation will provide a brief introduction to the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) project and the nature of advances that have been made by BEDI to other Federal Users.

  11. Earth System Science Education Interdisciplinary Partnerships

    Ruzek, M.; Johnson, D. R.

    2002-05-01

    Earth system science in the classroom is the fertile crucible linking science with societal needs for local, national and global sustainability. The interdisciplinary dimension requires fruitful cooperation among departments, schools and colleges within universities and among the universities and the nation's laboratories and agencies. Teaching and learning requires content which brings together the basic and applied sciences with mathematics and technology in addressing societal challenges of the coming decades. Over the past decade remarkable advances have emerged in information technology, from high bandwidth Internet connectivity to raw computing and visualization power. These advances which have wrought revolutionary capabilities and resources are transforming teaching and learning in the classroom. With the launching of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) the amount and type of geophysical data to monitor the Earth and its climate are increasing dramatically. The challenge remains, however, for skilled scientists and educators to interpret this information based upon sound scientific perspectives and utilize it in the classroom. With an increasing emphasis on the application of data gathered, and the use of the new technologies for practical benefit in the lives of ordinary citizens, there comes the even more basic need for understanding the fundamental state, dynamics, and complex interdependencies of the Earth system in mapping valid and relevant paths to sustainability. Technology and data in combination with the need to understand Earth system processes and phenomena offer opportunities for new and productive partnerships between researchers and educators to advance the fundamental science of the Earth system and in turn through discovery excite students at all levels in the classroom. This presentation will discuss interdisciplinary partnership opportunities for educators and researchers at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

  12. Apollo experience report: Earth landing system

    West, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    A brief discussion of the development of the Apollo earth landing system and a functional description of the system are presented in this report. The more significant problems that were encountered during the program, the solutions, and, in general, the knowledge that was gained are discussed in detail. Two appendixes presenting a detailed description of the various system components and a summary of the development and the qualification test programs are included.

  13. Evolving NASA's Earth Science Data Systems

    Walter, J.; Behnke, J.; Murphy, K. J.; Lowe, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System Project (ESDIS) is charged with managing, maintaining, and evolving NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) and is responsible for processing, archiving, and distributing NASA Earth science data. The system supports a multitude of missions and serves diverse science research and other user communities. Keeping up with ever-changing information technology and figuring out how to leverage those changes across such a large system in order to continuously improve and meet the needs of a diverse user community is a significant challenge. Maintaining and evolving the system architecture and infrastructure is a continuous and multi-layered effort. It requires a balance between a "top down" management paradigm that provides a coherent system view and maintaining the managerial, technological, and functional independence of the individual system elements. This presentation will describe some of the key elements of the current system architecture, some of the strategies and processes we employ to meet these challenges, current and future challenges, and some ideas for meeting those challenges.

  14. 5th Annual Earth System Grid Federation

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the Fifth Annual Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) Face-to-Face (F2F) Conference was to present the most recent information on the state of ESGF’s software stack and to identify and address the data needs and gaps for the climate and weather communities that ESGF supports.

  15. Precession of the Earth-Moon System

    Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2009-01-01

    The precession rate of the Earth-Moon system by the gravitational influence of the Sun is derived. Attention is focussed on a physically transparent but complete presentation accessible to first- or second-year physics students. Both a shortcut and a full analysis are given, which allows the inclusion of this material as an example of the physics…

  16. Quantum Computing in Solid State Systems

    Ruggiero, B; Granata, C

    2006-01-01

    The aim of Quantum Computation in Solid State Systems is to report on recent theoretical and experimental results on the macroscopic quantum coherence of mesoscopic systems, as well as on solid state realization of qubits and quantum gates. Particular attention has been given to coherence effects in Josephson devices. Other solid state systems, including quantum dots, optical, ion, and spin devices which exhibit macroscopic quantum coherence are also discussed. Quantum Computation in Solid State Systems discusses experimental implementation of quantum computing and information processing devices, and in particular observations of quantum behavior in several solid state systems. On the theoretical side, the complementary expertise of the contributors provides models of the various structures in connection with the problem of minimizing decoherence.

  17. LCA of Solid Waste Management Systems

    Bakas, Ioannis; Laurent, Alexis; Clavreul, Julie

    2018-01-01

    The chapter explores the application of LCA to solid waste management systems through the review of published studies on the subject. The environmental implications of choices involved in the modelling setup of waste management systems are increasingly in the spotlight, due to public health...... concerns and new legislation addressing the impacts from managing our waste. The application of LCA to solid waste management systems, sometimes called “waste LCA”, is distinctive in that system boundaries are rigorously defined to exclude all life cycle stages except from the end-of-life. Moreover...... LCA on solid waste systems....

  18. NASA's Earth Observing Data and Information System

    Mitchell, A. E.; Behnke, J.; Lowe, D.; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2009-12-01

    NASA’s Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) has been a central component of NASA Earth observation program for over 10 years. It is one of the largest civilian science information system in the US, performing ingest, archive and distribution of over 3 terabytes of data per day much of which is from NASA’s flagship missions Terra, Aqua and Aura. The system supports a variety of science disciplines including polar processes, land cover change, radiation budget, and most especially global climate change. The EOSDIS data centers, collocated with centers of science discipline expertise, archive and distribute standard data products produced by science investigator-led processing systems. Key to the success of EOSDIS is the concept of core versus community requirements. EOSDIS supports a core set of services to meet specific NASA needs and relies on community-developed services to meet specific user needs. EOSDIS offers a metadata registry, ECHO (Earth Observing System Clearinghouse), through which the scientific community can easily discover and exchange NASA’s Earth science data and services. Users can search, manage, and access the contents of ECHO’s registries (data and services) through user-developed and community-tailored interfaces or clients. The ECHO framework has become the primary access point for cross-Data Center search-and-order of EOSDIS and other Earth Science data holdings archived at the EOSDIS data centers. ECHO’s Warehouse Inventory Search Tool (WIST) is the primary web-based client for discovering and ordering cross-discipline data from the EOSDIS data centers. The architecture of the EOSDIS provides a platform for the publication, discovery, understanding and access to NASA’s Earth Observation resources and allows for easy integration of new datasets. The EOSDIS also has developed several methods for incorporating socioeconomic data into its data collection. Over the years, we have developed several methods for

  19. EOS Reference Handbook 1999: A Guide to NASA's Earth Science Enterprise and the Earth Observing System

    King, M. D. (Editor); Greenstone, R. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The content of this handbook includes Earth Science Enterprise; The Earth Observing System; EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS); Data and Information Policy; Pathfinder Data Sets; Earth Science Information Partners and the Working Prototype-Federation; EOS Data Quality: Calibration and Validation; Education Programs; International Cooperation; Interagency Coordination; Mission Elements; EOS Instruments; EOS Interdisciplinary Science Investigations; and Points-of-Contact.

  20. Earth land landing alternatives: Lunar transportation system

    Meyerson, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this study are as follows: (1) develop a landing option such that it is a viable trade option for future NASA missions; (2) provide NASA programs with solid technical support in the landing systems area; (3) develop the technical staff; and (4) advance the state of landing systems technology to apply to future NASA missions. All results are presented in viewgraph format.

  1. Recycling of rare earths from Hg-containing fluorescent lamp scraps by solid state chlorination

    Lorenz, Tom; Froehlich, Peter; Bertau, Martin; Golon, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Solid state chlorination with NH 4 Cl comprises a method for rare earth recycling apart from pyro- or hydrometallurgical strategies. The examined partially Hg-containing fluorescent lamp scraps are rich in rare earths like La, Ce, Tb and Gd, but especially in Y and Eu. By mixing with NH 4 Cl and heating up to NH 4 Cl decomposition temperature in a sublimation reactor, Y and Eu could be transferred selectively into their respective metal chlorides with high yields. The yield and selectivity depend on temperature and the ratio of NH 4 Cl to fluorescent lamp scraps, which were varied systematically.

  2. Earth system commitments due to delayed mitigation

    Pfister, Patrik L; Stocker, Thomas F

    2016-01-01

    As long as global CO 2 emissions continue to increase annually, long-term committed Earth system changes grow much faster than current observations. A novel metric linking this future growth to policy decisions today is the mitigation delay sensitivity (MDS), but MDS estimates for Earth system variables other than peak temperature (ΔT max ) are missing. Using an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity, we show that the current emission increase rate causes a ΔT max increase roughly 3–7.5 times as fast as observed warming, and a millenial steric sea level rise (SSLR) 7–25 times as fast as observed SSLR, depending on the achievable rate of emission reductions after the peak of emissions. These ranges are only slightly affected by the uncertainty range in equilibrium climate sensitivity, which is included in the above values. The extent of ocean acidification at the end of the century is also strongly dependent on the starting time and rate of emission reductions. The preservable surface ocean area with sufficient aragonite supersaturation for coral reef growth is diminished globally at an MDS of roughly 25%–80% per decade. A near-complete loss of this area becomes unavoidable if mitigation is delayed for a few years to decades. Also with respect to aragonite, 12%–18% of the Southern Ocean surface become undersaturated per decade, if emission reductions are delayed beyond 2015–2040. We conclude that the consequences of delaying global emission reductions are much better captured if the MDS of relevant Earth system variables is communicated in addition to current trends and total projected future changes. (letter)

  3. 2016 Earth System Grid Federation Annual Report

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-05-10

    The Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) experienced a major setback in June 2015, when it experienced a security incident that brought all systems to a halt for more than half a year. However, federation developers and management committee members turned the incident into an opportunity to dramatically upgrade the system security and functionality and to develop planning and policy documents to guide ESGF evolution and success. Moreover, despite the incident, ESGF developer working teams continue to make strong and significant progress on various enhancement projects that will help ensure ESGF can meet the needs of the climate community in the coming years.

  4. Young Earth System Scientists (YESS) Community

    Reed, K. A.; Langendijk, G.; Bahar, F.; Huang-Lachmann, J. T.; Osman, M.; Mirsafa, M.; Sonntag, S.

    2017-12-01

    The Young Earth System Scientists (YESS) community is compiled of early career researchers (including students) coming from a range of scientific backgrounds, spanning both natural and social sciences. YESS unifies young researchers in an influential network to give them a collective voice and leverage within the geosciences community, while supporting career development. The YESS community has used its powerful network to provide a unified perspective on the future of Earth system science (Rauser et al. 2017), to be involved in the organization of international conferences, and to engage with existing international structures that coordinate science. Since its founding in Germany in 2010, the YESS community has grown extensively across the globe, with currently almost 1000 members from over 80 countries, and has become truly interdisciplinary. Recently, the organization has carried elections for Regional Representatives and the Executive Committee as part of its self-sustained governance structure. YESS is ready to continue pioneering crucial areas of research which provide solutions to benefit society for the long-term advancement of Earth system science.

  5. The Earth Observing System Terra Mission

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Langley's remarkable solar and lunar spectra collected from Mt. Whitney inspired Arrhenius to develop the first quantitative climate model in 1896. After the launch in Dec. 16 1999, NASA's Earth Observing AM Satellite (EOS-Terra) will repeat Langley's experiment, but for the entire planet, thus pioneering a wide array of calibrated spectral observations from space of the Earth System. Conceived in response to real environmental problems, EOS-Terra, in conjunction with other international satellite efforts, will fill a major gap in current efforts by providing quantitative global data sets with a resolution better than 1 km on the physical, chemical and biological elements of the earth system. Thus, like Langley's data, EOS-Terra can revolutionize climate research by inspiring a new generation of climate system models and enable us to assess the human impact on the environment. In the talk I shall review the historical perspective of the Terra mission and the key new elements of the mission. We expect to have first images that demonstrate the most innovative capability from EOS Terra 5 instruments: MODIS - 1.37 micron cirrus cloud channel; 250m daily coverage for clouds and vegetation change; 7 solar channels for land and aerosol studies; new fire channels; Chlorophyll fluorescence; MISR - first 9 multi angle views of clouds and vegetation; MOPITT - first global CO maps and C114 maps; ASTER - Thermal channels for geological studies with 15-90 m resolution.

  6. Fluorescence line-narrowing studies of rare earths in disordered solids

    Hall, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    This dissertation is made up of two experimental studies dealing with apparently diverse topics within the subject of rare earths (RE) in solids. The first study, described in Part II, concerns the vibrations of a disordered host material about an optically active rare-earth ion as manifested by vibrationally-assisted-electronic, or vibronic transitions. Part III of the dissertation describes an investigation of the influence of site anisotropy on the purely electronic, laser transition of Nd 3+ in glass. These two studies are bound together by the common experimental technique of laser-induced fluorescence line narrowing (FLN). By exciting fluorescence with monochromatic light of well-characterized polarization, one may select and observe the response of a single subset of the optically active ions and obtain information that is usually masked by the inhomogeneous nature of disordered solids

  7. Smouldering Fires in the Earth System

    Rein, G.

    2012-04-01

    Smouldering fires, the slow, low-temperature, flameless burning, represent the most persistent type of combustion phenomena and the longest continuously fires on Earth system. Indeed, smouldering mega-fires of peatlands occur with some frequency during the dry session in, for example, Indonesia, Canada, Russia, UK and USA. Smouldering fires propagate slowly through organic layers of the ground and can reach depth >5 m if large cracks, natural piping or channel systems exist. It threatens to release sequestered carbon deep into the soil. Once ignited, they are particularly difficult to extinguish despite extensive rains, weather changes or fire-fighting attempts, and can persist for long periods of time (months, years) spreading deep and over extensive areas. Recent figures at the global scale estimate that average annual greenhouse gas emissions from smouldering fires are equivalent to 15% of man-made emissions. These fires are difficult or impossible to detect with current remote sensing methods because the chemistry is significantly different, their thermal radiation signature is much smaller, and the plume is much less buoyant. These wildfires burn fossil fuels and thus are a carbon-positive fire phenomena. This creates feedbacks in the climate system because soil moisture deficit and self-heating are enchanted under warmer climate scenarios and lead to more frequent fires. Warmer temperatures at high latitudes are resulting in more frequent Artic fires. Unprecedented permafrost thaw is leaving large soil carbon pools exposed to smouldering fires for the fist time since millennia. Although interactions between flaming fires and the Earth system have been a central focus, smouldering fires are as important but have received very little attention. DBut differences with flaming fires are important. This paper reviews the current knowledge on smouldering fires in the Earth system regarding combustion dynamics, damage to the soil, emissions, remote sensing and

  8. Critical Thresholds in Earth-System Dynamics

    Rothman, D.

    2017-12-01

    The history of the Earth system is a story of change. Some changesare gradual and benign, but others, especially those associated withcatastrophic mass extinction, are relatively abrupt and destructive.What sets one group apart from the other? Here I hypothesize thatperturbations of Earth's carbon cycle lead to mass extinction if theyexceed either a critical rate at long time scales or a critical sizeat short time scales. By analyzing 31 carbon-isotopic events duringthe last 542 million years, I identify the critical rate with a limitimposed by mass conservation. Further analysis identifies thecrossover timescale separating fast from slow events with thetimescale of the ocean's homeostatic response to a change in pH. Theproduct of the critical rate and the crossover timescale then yieldsthe critical size. The modern critical size for the marine carboncycle is roughly similar to the mass of carbon that human activitieswill likely have added to the oceans by the year 2100.

  9. NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System - EOSDIS

    Ramapriyan, Hampapuram K.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), a petabyte-scale archive of environmental data that supports global climate change research. The Earth Science Data Systems provide end-to-end capabilities to deliver data and information products to users in support of understanding the Earth system. The presentation contains photographs from space of recent events, (i.e., the effects of the tsunami in Japan, and the wildfires in Australia.) It also includes details of the Data Centers that provide the data to EOSDIS and Science Investigator-led Processing Systems. Information about the Land, Atmosphere Near-real-time Capability for EOS (LANCE) and some of the uses that the system has made possible are reviewed. Also included is information about how to access the data, and evolutionary plans for the future of the system.

  10. Rapid Ice-Sheet Changes and Mechanical Coupling to Solid-Earth/Sea-Level and Space Geodetic Observation

    Adhikari, S.; Ivins, E. R.; Larour, E. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Perturbations in gravitational and rotational potentials caused by climate driven mass redistribution on the earth's surface, such as ice sheet melting and terrestrial water storage, affect the spatiotemporal variability in global and regional sea level. Here we present a numerically accurate, computationally efficient, high-resolution model for sea level. Unlike contemporary models that are based on spherical-harmonic formulation, the model can operate efficiently in a flexible embedded finite-element mesh system, thus capturing the physics operating at km-scale yet capable of simulating geophysical quantities that are inherently of global scale with minimal computational cost. One obvious application is to compute evolution of sea level fingerprints and associated geodetic and astronomical observables (e.g., geoid height, gravity anomaly, solid-earth deformation, polar motion, and geocentric motion) as a companion to a numerical 3-D thermo-mechanical ice sheet simulation, thus capturing global signatures of climate driven mass redistribution. We evaluate some important time-varying signatures of GRACE inferred ice sheet mass balance and continental hydrological budget; for example, we identify dominant sources of ongoing sea-level change at the selected tide gauge stations, and explain the relative contribution of different sources to the observed polar drift. We also report our progress on ice-sheet/solid-earth/sea-level model coupling efforts toward realistic simulation of Pine Island Glacier over the past several hundred years.

  11. The Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) Project

    Carenton-Madiec, Nicolas; Denvil, Sébastien; Greenslade, Mark

    2015-04-01

    The Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) Peer-to-Peer (P2P) enterprise system is a collaboration that develops, deploys and maintains software infrastructure for the management, dissemination, and analysis of model output and observational data. ESGF's primary goal is to facilitate advancements in Earth System Science. It is an interagency and international effort led by the US Department of Energy (DOE), and co-funded by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Science Foundation (NSF), Infrastructure for the European Network of Earth System Modelling (IS-ENES) and international laboratories such as the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPI-M) german Climate Computing Centre (DKRZ), the Australian National University (ANU) National Computational Infrastructure (NCI), Institut Pierre-Simon Laplace (IPSL), and the British Atmospheric Data Center (BADC). Its main mission is to support current CMIP5 activities and prepare for future assesments. The ESGF architecture is based on a system of autonomous and distributed nodes, which interoperate through common acceptance of federation protocols and trust agreements. Data is stored at multiple nodes around the world, and served through local data and metadata services. Nodes exchange information about their data holdings and services, trust each other for registering users and establishing access control decisions. The net result is that a user can use a web browser, connect to any node, and seamlessly find and access data throughout the federation. This type of collaborative working organization and distributed architecture context en-lighted the need of integration and testing processes definition to ensure the quality of software releases and interoperability. This presentation will introduce the ESGF project and demonstrate the range of tools and processes that have been set up to support release management activities.

  12. NASA's Earth Science Data Systems - Lessons Learned and Future Directions

    Ramapriyan, Hampapuram K.

    2010-01-01

    In order to meet the increasing demand for Earth Science data, NASA has significantly improved the Earth Science Data Systems over the last two decades. This improvement is reviewed in this slide presentation. Many Earth Science disciplines have been able to access the data that is held in the Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS) at the Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) that forms the core of the data system.

  13. Solid State Lighting Reliability Components to Systems

    Fan, XJ

    2013-01-01

    Solid State Lighting Reliability: Components to Systems begins with an explanation of the major benefits of solid state lighting (SSL) when compared to conventional lighting systems including but not limited to long useful lifetimes of 50,000 (or more) hours and high efficacy. When designing effective devices that take advantage of SSL capabilities the reliability of internal components (optics, drive electronics, controls, thermal design) take on critical importance. As such a detailed discussion of reliability from performance at the device level to sub components is included as well as the integrated systems of SSL modules, lamps and luminaires including various failure modes, reliability testing and reliability performance. This book also: Covers the essential reliability theories and practices for current and future development of Solid State Lighting components and systems Provides a systematic overview for not only the state-of-the-art, but also future roadmap and perspectives of Solid State Lighting r...

  14. Chemical Mechanisms and Their Applications in the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Earth System Model.

    Nielsen, J Eric; Pawson, Steven; Molod, Andrea; Auer, Benjamin; da Silva, Arlindo M; Douglass, Anne R; Duncan, Bryan; Liang, Qing; Manyin, Michael; Oman, Luke D; Putman, William; Strahan, Susan E; Wargan, Krzysztof

    2017-12-01

    NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Earth System Model (ESM) is a modular, general circulation model (GCM), and data assimilation system (DAS) that is used to simulate and study the coupled dynamics, physics, chemistry, and biology of our planet. GEOS is developed by the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. It generates near-real-time analyzed data products, reanalyses, and weather and seasonal forecasts to support research targeted to understanding interactions among Earth System processes. For chemistry, our efforts are focused on ozone and its influence on the state of the atmosphere and oceans, and on trace gas data assimilation and global forecasting at mesoscale discretization. Several chemistry and aerosol modules are coupled to the GCM, which enables GEOS to address topics pertinent to NASA's Earth Science Mission. This paper describes the atmospheric chemistry components of GEOS and provides an overview of its Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF)-based software infrastructure, which promotes a rich spectrum of feedbacks that influence circulation and climate, and impact human and ecosystem health. We detail how GEOS allows model users to select chemical mechanisms and emission scenarios at run time, establish the extent to which the aerosol and chemical components communicate, and decide whether either or both influence the radiative transfer calculations. A variety of resolutions facilitates research on spatial and temporal scales relevant to problems ranging from hourly changes in air quality to trace gas trends in a changing climate. Samples of recent GEOS chemistry applications are provided.

  15. Diffusion in ordered binary solid systems

    Stolwijk, N.A.

    1980-01-01

    This thesis contains contributions to the field of diffusion in ordered binary solid systems. An extensive experimental investigation of the self diffusion in CoGa is presented. The results of these diffusion measurements strongly suggest that a substantial part of the atomic migration is caused by a new type of defect. A quantitative description of the atomic displacements via this defect is given. Finally computer simulations are presented of diffusion and ordering in binary solid systems. (Auth.)

  16. Earth

    Carter, Jason

    2017-01-01

    This curriculum-based, easy-to-follow book teaches young readers about Earth as one of the eight planets in our solar system in astronomical terms. With accessible text, it provides the fundamental information any student needs to begin their studies in astronomy, such as how Earth spins and revolves around the Sun, why it's uniquely suitable for life, its physical features, atmosphere, biosphere, moon, its past, future, and more. To enhance the learning experience, many of the images come directly from NASA. This straightforward title offers the fundamental information any student needs to sp

  17. Observation of the Earth system from space

    Flury, Jakob; Reigber, Christoph; Rothacher, Markus; Boedecker, Gerd

    2006-01-01

    In the recent years, space-based observation methods have led to a subst- tially improved understanding of Earth system. Geodesy and geophysics are contributing to this development by measuring the temporal and spatial va- ations of the Earth's shape, gravity ?eld, and magnetic ?eld, as well as at- sphere density. In the frame of the GermanR&D programmeGEOTECHNO- LOGIEN,researchprojectshavebeen launchedin2002relatedto the satellite missions CHAMP, GRACE and ESA's planned mission GOCE, to comp- mentary terrestrial and airborne sensor systems and to consistent and stable high-precision global reference systems for satellite and other techniques. In the initial 3-year phase of the research programme (2002-2004), new gravity ?eld models have been computed from CHAMP and GRACE data which outperform previous models in accuracy by up to two orders of m- nitude for the long and medium wavelengths. A special highlight is the - termination of seasonal gravity variations caused by changes in continental water masses...

  18. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    The Journal of Earth System Science was earlier a part of the Proceedings of the Indian Academy of Sciences – Section A begun in 1934, and later split in 1978 into theme journals. This journal was published as Proceedings – Earth and Planetary Sciences since 1978, and in 2005 was renamed 'Journal of Earth System ...

  19. Municipal solid waste management system: decision support through systems analysis

    Pires, Ana Lúcia Lourenço

    2010-01-01

    Thesis submitted to the Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Environmental Engineering The present study intends to show the development of systems analysis model applied to solid waste management system, applied into AMARSUL, a solid waste management system responsible for the management of municipal solid waste produced in Setúbal peninsula, Portugal. The model developed intended to promote sustainable decision making, ...

  20. Magnetoelastic interaction in rare earth systems

    Dohm, V.

    1975-01-01

    A theory of rotationally invariant spin-lattice interactions in rare earth systems is presented. It is shown that rotational invariance to leading order is ensured only if rotational interactions of first and second order in the displacements are included simultaneously in the spin-lattice Hamiltonian. The rotational second-order interactions yield effects which are as large as those of the linear rotational interaction. It is pointed out that a corresponding statement should hold also for pure strain interactions. The phonon Green's function is calculated for the paramagnetic phase of rare earth systems. It is found that in an applied magnetic field the rotational interactions cause measureable changes of the phonon dispersion and the sound velocity even for cubic symmetry. These effects turn out to be of the same order of magnitude as the conventional field-dependent strain effects and are qualitatively different from the latter. The results of our theory are illustrated by the example of SmSb, and quantitative predictions for the transverse sound velocities are given. (orig.) [de

  1. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 124; Issue 7 ... to good protective capacity rating as can be seen from the high longitudinal conductance ... School of Environment and Earth Sciences, North Maharashtra University, ...

  2. Smouldering Subsurface Fires in the Earth System

    Rein, Guillermo

    2010-05-01

    Smouldering fires, the slow, low-temperature, flameless form of combustion, are an important phenomena in the Earth system. These fires propagate slowly through organic layers of the forest ground and are responsible for 50% or more of the total biomass consumed during wildfires. Only after the 2002 study of the 1997 extreme haze event in South-East Asia, the scientific community recognised the environmental and economic threats posed by subsurface fires. This was caused by the spread of vast biomass fires in Indonesia, burning below the surface for months during the El Niño climate event. It has been calculated that these fires released between 0.81 and 2.57 Gton of carbon gases (13-40% of global emissions). Large smouldering fires are rare events at the local scale but occur regularly at a global scale. Once ignited, they are particularly difficult to extinguish despite extensive rains or fire-fighting attempts and can persist for long periods of time (months, years) spreading over very extensive areas of forest and deep into the soil. Indeed, these are the oldest continuously burning fires on Earth. Earth scientists are interested in smouldering fires because they destroy large amounts of biomass and cause greater damage to the soil ecosystem than flaming fires do. Moreover, these fires cannot be detected with current satellite remote sensing technologies causing inconsistencies between emission inventories and model predictions. Organic soils sustain smouldering fire (hummus, duff, peat and coal) which total carbon pool exceeds that of the world's forests or the atmosphere. This have important implications for climate change. Warmer temperatures at high latitudes are resulting in unprecedented permafrost thaw that is leaving large soil carbon pools exposed to fires. Because the CO2 flux from peat fires has been measured to be about 3000 times larger that the natural degradation flux, permafrost thaw is a risk for greater carbon release by fire and subsequently

  3. Development and application of earth system models.

    Prinn, Ronald G

    2013-02-26

    The global environment is a complex and dynamic system. Earth system modeling is needed to help understand changes in interacting subsystems, elucidate the influence of human activities, and explore possible future changes. Integrated assessment of environment and human development is arguably the most difficult and most important "systems" problem faced. To illustrate this approach, we present results from the integrated global system model (IGSM), which consists of coupled submodels addressing economic development, atmospheric chemistry, climate dynamics, and ecosystem processes. An uncertainty analysis implies that without mitigation policies, the global average surface temperature may rise between 3.5 °C and 7.4 °C from 1981-2000 to 2091-2100 (90% confidence limits). Polar temperatures, absent policy, are projected to rise from about 6.4 °C to 14 °C (90% confidence limits). Similar analysis of four increasingly stringent climate mitigation policy cases involving stabilization of greenhouse gases at various levels indicates that the greatest effect of these policies is to lower the probability of extreme changes. The IGSM is also used to elucidate potential unintended environmental consequences of renewable energy at large scales. There are significant reasons for attention to climate adaptation in addition to climate mitigation that earth system models can help inform. These models can also be applied to evaluate whether "climate engineering" is a viable option or a dangerous diversion. We must prepare young people to address this issue: The problem of preserving a habitable planet will engage present and future generations. Scientists must improve communication if research is to inform the public and policy makers better.

  4. iSERVO: Implementing the International Solid Earth Research Virtual Observatory by Integrating Computational Grid and Geographical Information Web Services

    Aktas, Mehmet; Aydin, Galip; Donnellan, Andrea; Fox, Geoffrey; Granat, Robert; Grant, Lisa; Lyzenga, Greg; McLeod, Dennis; Pallickara, Shrideep; Parker, Jay; Pierce, Marlon; Rundle, John; Sayar, Ahmet; Tullis, Terry

    2006-12-01

    We describe the goals and initial implementation of the International Solid Earth Virtual Observatory (iSERVO). This system is built using a Web Services approach to Grid computing infrastructure and is accessed via a component-based Web portal user interface. We describe our implementations of services used by this system, including Geographical Information System (GIS)-based data grid services for accessing remote data repositories and job management services for controlling multiple execution steps. iSERVO is an example of a larger trend to build globally scalable scientific computing infrastructures using the Service Oriented Architecture approach. Adoption of this approach raises a number of research challenges in millisecond-latency message systems suitable for internet-enabled scientific applications. We review our research in these areas.

  5. Exploration of solids based on representation systems

    Publio Suárez Sotomonte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article refers to some of the findings of a research project implemented as a teaching strategy to generate environments for the learning of platonic and archimedean solids, with a group of eighth grade students. This strategy was based on the meaningful learning approach and on the use of representation systems using the ontosemiotic approach in mathematical education, as a framework for the construction of mathematical concepts. This geometry teaching strategy adopts the stages of exploration, representation-modeling, formal construction and study of applications. It uses concrete, physical and tangible materials for origami, die making, and structures for the construction of threedimensional solids considered external tangible solid representation systems, as well as computer based educational tools to design dynamic geometry environments as intangible external representation systems.These strategies support both the imagination and internal systems of representation, fundamental to the comprehension of geometry concepts.

  6. Change in Water Cycle- Important Issue on Climate Earth System

    Singh, Pratik

    Change in Water Cycle- Important Issue on Climate Earth System PRATIK KUMAR SINGH1 1BALDEVRAM MIRDHA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY,JAIPUR (RAJASTHAN) ,INDIA Water is everywhere on Earth and is the only known substance that can naturally exist as a gas, liquid, and solid within the relatively small range of air temperatures and pressures found at the Earth's surface.Changes in the hydrological cycle as a consequence of climate and land use drivers are expected to play a central role in governing a vast range of environmental impacts.Earth's climate will undergo changes in response to natural variability, including solar variability, and to increasing concentrations of green house gases and aerosols.Further more, agreement is widespread that these changes may profoundly affect atmospheric water vapor concentrations, clouds and precipitation patterns.As we know that ,a warmer climate, directly leading to increased evaporation, may well accelerate the hydrological cycle, resulting in an increase in the amount of moisture circulating through the atmosphere.The Changing Water Cycle programmer will develop an integrated, quantitative understanding of the changes taking place in the global water cycle, involving all components of the earth system, improving predictions for the next few decades of regional precipitation, evapotranspiration, soil moisture, hydrological storage and fluxes.The hydrological cycle involves evaporation, transpiration, condensation, precipitation, and runoff. NASA's Aqua satellite will monitor many aspects of the role of water in the Earth's systems, and will do so at spatial and temporal scales appropriate to foster a more detailed understanding of each of the processes that contribute to the hydrological cycle. These data and the analyses of them will nurture the development and refinement of hydrological process models and a corresponding improvement in regional and global climate models, with a direct anticipated benefit of more accurate weather and

  7. Sea-level and solid-Earth deformation feedbacks in ice sheet modelling

    Konrad, Hannes; Sasgen, Ingo; Klemann, Volker; Thoma, Malte; Grosfeld, Klaus; Martinec, Zdeněk

    2014-05-01

    The interactions of ice sheets with the sea level and the solid Earth are important factors for the stability of the ice shelves and the tributary inland ice (e.g. Thomas and Bentley, 1978; Gomez et al, 2012). First, changes in ice extent and ice thickness induce viscoelastic deformation of the Earth surface and Earth's gravity field. In turn, global and local changes in sea level and bathymetry affect the grounding line and, subsequently, alter the ice dynamic behaviour. Here, we investigate these feedbacks for a synthetic ice sheet configuration as well as for the Antarctic ice sheet using a three-dimensional thermomechanical ice sheet and shelf model, coupled to a viscoelastic solid-Earth and gravitationally self-consistent sea-level model. The respective ice sheet undergoes a forcing from rising sea level, warming ocean, and/or changing surface mass balance. The coupling is realized by exchanging ice thickness, Earth surface deformation and sea level periodically. We apply several sets of viscoelastic Earth parameters to our coupled model, e.g. simulating a low-viscous upper mantle present at the Antarctic Peninsula (Ivins et al., 2011). Special focus of our study lies on the evolution of Earth surface deformation and local sea level changes, as well as on the accompanying grounding line evolution. N. Gomez, D. Pollard, J. X. Mitrovica, P. Huybers, and P. U. Clark 2012. Evolution of a coupled marine ice sheet-sea level model, J. Geophys. Res., 117, F01013, doi:10.1029/2011JF002128. E. R. Ivins, M. M. Watkins, D.-N. Yuan, R. Dietrich, G. Casassa, and A. Rülke 2011. On-land ice loss and glacial isostatic adjustment at the Drake Passage: 2003-2009, J. Geophys. Res. 116, B02403, doi: 10.1029/2010JB007607 R. H. Thomas and C. R. Bentley 1978. A model for Holocene retreat of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, Quaternary Research, 10 (2), pages 150-170, doi: 10.1016/0033-5894(78)90098-4.

  8. A new transfer system for solid targets

    Klug, J.; Buckley, K. R.; Zeisler, S. K.; Dodd, M.; Tsao, P.; Hoehr, C.; Economou, C.; Corsaut, J.; Appiah, J. P.; Kovacs, M. S.; Valliant, J. F.; Benard, F.; Ruth, T. J.; Schaffer, P.

    2012-12-01

    As part of a collaborative research project funded by Natural Resources Canada, TRIUMF has designed and manufactured solid target and solid target processing systems for the production of technetium-99m using small medical cyclotrons. The system described herein is capable of transporting the target from a hotcell, where the target is loaded and processed, to the cyclotron and back again. The versatility of the transfer system was demonstrated through the successful installation and operation on the ACSI TR 19 at the BC Cancer Agency, the GE PETtrace cyclotrons at Lawson Health Research (LHRI) and the Centre for Probe Development and Commercialization (CDPC).

  9. Galileo spacecraft solid-state imaging system view of Antarctica

    1990-01-01

    Galileo spacecraft solid-state imaging system view of Antarctica was taken during its first encounter with the Earth. This color picture of Antarctica is part of a mosaic of pictures covering the entire polar continent showing the Ross Ice Shelf and its border with the sea and mountains poking through the ice near the McMurdo Station. From top to bottom, the frame looks across about half of Antarctica. View provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) with alternate number P-37297.

  10. The international earth observing system: a cultural debate about earth sciences from space

    Menenti, M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the International Earth Observing System, i.e. the combined earth observation programmes of space agencies worldwide and of the relevance of advanced space-borne sensor systems to the study and understanding of interactions between land surface and atmosphere. The

  11. Studies with the EC-Earth seamless Earth system prediction model

    Hazeleger, W.; Bintanja, R.

    2012-01-01

    EC-Earth is a new Earth System Model (ESM) based on the operational seasonal forecast system of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Climate and weather forecasting applications share a common ancestry and are build on the same physical principles. The emerging concept of

  12. Making interdisciplinary solid Earth modeling and analysis tools accessible in a diverse undergraduate and graduate classroom

    Becker, T. W.

    2011-12-01

    I present results from ongoing, NSF-CAREER funded educational and research efforts that center around making numerical tools in seismology and geodynamics more accessible to a broader audience. The goal is not only to train students in quantitative, interdisciplinary research, but also to make methods more easily accessible to practitioners across disciplines. I describe the two main efforts that were funded, the Solid Earth Research and Teaching Environment (SEATREE, geosys.usc.edu/projects/seatree/), and a new Numerical Methods class. SEATREE is a modular and user-friendly software framework to facilitate using solid Earth research tools in the undergraduate and graduate classroom and for interdisciplinary, scientific collaboration. We use only open-source software, and most programming is done in the Python computer language. We strive to make use of modern software design and development concepts while remaining compatible with traditional scientific coding and existing, legacy software. Our goals are to provide a fully contained, yet transparent package that lets users operate in an easy, graphically supported "black box" mode, while also allowing to look under the hood, for example to conduct numerous forward models to explore parameter space. SEATREE currently has several implemented modules, including on global mantle flow, 2D phase velocity tomography, and 2D mantle convection and was used at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, and at a 2010 CIDER summer school tutorial. SEATREE was developed in collaboration with engineering and computer science undergraduate students, some of which have gone on to work in Earth Science projects. In the long run, we envision SEATREE to contribute to new ways of sharing scientific research, and making (numerical) experiments truly reproducible again. The other project is a set of lecture notes and Matlab exercises on Numerical Methods in solid Earth, focusing on finite difference and element methods. The

  13. Novel approach to high-throughput determination of endocrine disruptors using recycled diatomaceous earth as a green sorbent phase for thin-film solid-phase microextraction combined with 96-well plate system.

    Kirschner, Nicolas; Dias, Adriana Neves; Budziak, Dilma; da Silveira, Cristian Berto; Merib, Josias; Carasek, Eduardo

    2017-12-15

    A sustainable approach to TF-SPME is presented using recycled diatomaceous earth, obtained from a beer purification process, as a green sorbent phase for the determination of bisphenol A (BPA), benzophenone (BzP), triclocarban (TCC), 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC) and 2-ethylhexyl-p-methoxycinnamate (EHMC) in environmental water samples. TF-SPME was combined with a 96-well plate system allowing for high-throughput analysis due to the simultaneous extraction/desorption up to 96 samples. The proposed sorbent phase exhibited good stability in organic solvents, as well as satisfactory analytical performance. The optimized method consisted of 240 min of extraction at pH 6 with the addition of NaCl (15% w/v). A mixture of MeOH:ACN (50:50 v/v) was used for the desorption the analytes, using a time of 30 min. Limits of detection varied from 1 μg L -1 for BzP and TCC to 8 μg L -1 for the other analytes, and R 2 ranged from 0.9926 for 4-MBC to 0.9988 for BPA. This novel and straightforward approach offers an environmentally-friendly and very promising alternative for routine analysis. . The total sample preparation time per sample was approximately 2.8 min, which is a significant advantage when a large number of analytical run is required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. 1993 baseline solid waste management system description

    Armacost, L.L.; Fowler, R.A.; Konynenbelt, H.S.

    1994-02-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has prepared this report under the direction of Westinghouse Hanford Company. The report provides an integrated description of the system planned for managing Hanford's solid low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, transuranic waste, and transuranic mixed waste. The primary purpose of this document is to illustrate a collective view of the key functions planned at the Hanford Site to handle existing waste inventories, as well as solid wastes that will be generated in the future. By viewing this system as a whole rather than as individual projects, key facility interactions and requirements are identified and a better understanding of the overall system may be gained. The system is described so as to form a basis for modeling the system at various levels of detail. Model results provide insight into issues such as facility capacity requirements, alternative system operating strategies, and impacts of system changes (ie., startup dates). This description of the planned Hanford solid waste processing system: defines a baseline system configuration; identifies the entering waste streams to be managed within the system; identifies basic system functions and waste flows; and highlights system constraints. This system description will evolve and be revised as issues are resolved, planning decisions are made, additional data are collected, and assumptions are tested and changed. Out of necessity, this document will also be revised and updated so that a documented system description, which reflects current system planning, is always available for use by engineers and managers. It does not provide any results generated from the many alternatives that will be modeled in the course of analyzing solid waste disposal options; such results will be provided in separate documents

  15. Earth Observation System Flight Dynamics System Covariance Realism

    Zaidi, Waqar H.; Tracewell, David

    2016-01-01

    This presentation applies a covariance realism technique to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observation System (EOS) Aqua and Aura spacecraft based on inferential statistics. The technique consists of three parts: collection calculation of definitive state estimates through orbit determination, calculation of covariance realism test statistics at each covariance propagation point, and proper assessment of those test statistics.

  16. New dynamic system suggested for earth expansion

    Fitzpatrick, J [Asuncion Nacional Univ. (Paraguay). Inst. de Ciencias

    1972-01-01

    It is here suggested that there may have been much more radioactive materials in the deep interior of the earth than bitherto supposed. Trapped heat being generated in the interior would provide a mechanism for earth expansion. An assumption of heat generation in the deep interior of the earth of the order of 0,5 X 10-13 calories per second, per cubic centimeter, would provide sufficient thermal expansion to account for approximately 0.1 mm. change in the radius of the earth per year.

  17. Age of the earth and solar system

    Manhes, G.

    1977-01-01

    The history of chemical element formation and radiochronology is given. The study of Pb isotope composition evolution enables to estimate the age of the earth. A series of galena of known ages was measured. By means of a model, it is possible to determine the initial isotope composition of Pb on the earth and the age of the earth. On the other hand, the analysis of stony meteorites provides a Pb isotope composition higher than the earth value. A comparison of the data shows a fundamental transition at 4.55 10 9 years [fr

  18. Conference on Earth Observation and Information Systems

    Morley, Lawrence

    1977-01-01

    The NATO Science Committee and its subsidiary Programme Panels provide support for Advanced Research Institutes (ARI) in various fields. The idea is to bring together scientists of a chosen field with the hope that they will achieve a consensus on research direc­ tions for the future, and make recommendations for the benefit of a wider scientific community. Attendance is therefore limited to those whose experience and expertise make the conclusions significant and acceptable to the wider community. Participants are selected on the basis of substantial track records in research or in the synthesis of research results to serve mankind. The proposal for a one-week ARIon Earth Observation and In­ formation Systems was initiated by the NATO Special Programme Panel on Systems Science (SPPOSS). In approving the ARI, the senior NATO Science Committee identified the subject as one of universal impor­ tance, requiring a broad perspective on the development of opera­ tional systems based on successful experimental s...

  19. Keeping Earth at work: Using thermodynamics to develop a holistic theory of the Earth system

    Kleidon, Axel

    2010-05-01

    The Earth system is unique among terrestrial planets in that it is maintained in a state far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Practically all processes are irreversible in their nature, thereby producing entropy, and these would act to destroy this state of disequilibrium. In order to maintain disequilibrium in steady state, driving forces are required that perform the work to maintain the Earth system in a state far from equilibrium. To characterize the functioning of the Earth system and the interactions among its subsystems we need to consider all terms of the first and second law of thermodynamics. While the global energy balance is well established in climatology, the global entropy and work balances receive little, if any, attention. Here I will present first steps in developing a holistic theory of the Earth system including quantifications of the relevant terms that is based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics. This theory allows us to compare the significance of different processes in driving and maintaining disequilibrium, allows us to explore interactions by investigating the role of power transfer among processes, and specifically illustrate the significance of life in driving planetary disequilibrium. Furthermore, the global work balance demonstrates the significant impact of human activity and it provides an estimate for the availability of renewable sources of free energy within the Earth system. Hence, I conclude that a holistic thermodynamic theory of the Earth system is not just some academic exercise of marginal use, but essential for a profound understanding of the Earth system and its response to change.

  20. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. C J Johny. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 125 Issue 3 April 2016 pp 521-538. Impact of hybrid GSI analysis using ETR ensembles · V S Prasad C J Johny · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Performance of a hybrid assimilation system ...

  1. A Desktop Virtual Reality Earth Motion System in Astronomy Education

    Chen, Chih Hung; Yang, Jie Chi; Shen, Sarah; Jeng, Ming Chang

    2007-01-01

    In this study, a desktop virtual reality earth motion system (DVREMS) is designed and developed to be applied in the classroom. The system is implemented to assist elementary school students to clarify earth motion concepts using virtual reality principles. A study was conducted to observe the influences of the proposed system in learning.…

  2. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. K Jeeva. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 111 Issue 1 March 2002 pp 51-62. Velocity of small-scale auroral ionospheric current systems over Indian Antarctic station Maitri · Girija Rajaram A N Hanchinal R Kalra K Unnikrishnan K Jeeva M ...

  3. Non-rocket Earth-Moon transport system

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2003-06-01

    This paper proposes a new transportation system for travel between Earth and Moon. This transportation system uses mechanical energy transfer and requires only minimal energy, using an engine located on Earth. A cable directly connects a pole of the Earth through a drive station to the lunar surface_ The equation for an optimal equal stress cable for complex gravitational field of Earth-Moon has been derived that allows significantly lower cable masses. The required strength could be provided by cables constructed of carbon nanotubes or carbon whiskers. Some of the constraints on such a system are discussed.

  4. Manipulating Quantum Coherence in Solid State Systems

    Flatté, Michael E; The NATO Advanced Study Institute "Manipulating Quantum Coherence in Solid State Systems"

    2007-01-01

    The NATO Advanced Study Institute "Manipulating Quantum Coherence in Solid State Systems", in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, August 29-September 9, 2005, presented a fundamental introduction to solid-state approaches to achieving quantum computation. This proceedings volume describes the properties of quantum coherence in semiconductor spin-based systems and the behavior of quantum coherence in superconducting systems. Semiconductor spin-based approaches to quantum computation have made tremendous advances in the past several years. Coherent populations of spins can be oriented, manipulated and detected experimentally. Rapid progress has been made towards performing the same tasks on individual spins (nuclear, ionic, or electronic) with all-electrical means. Superconducting approaches to quantum computation have demonstrated single qubits based on charge eigenstates as well as flux eigenstates. These topics have been presented in a pedagogical fashion by leading researchers in the fields of semiconductor-spin-based qu...

  5. Tropical forests and the changing earth system.

    Lewis, Simon L

    2006-01-29

    Tropical forests are global epicentres of biodiversity and important modulators of the rate of climate change. Recent research on deforestation rates and ecological changes within intact forests, both areas of recent research and debate, are reviewed, and the implications for biodiversity (species loss) and climate change (via the global carbon cycle) addressed. Recent impacts have most likely been: (i) a large source of carbon to the atmosphere, and major loss of species, from deforestation and (ii) a large carbon sink within remaining intact forest, accompanied by accelerating forest dynamism and widespread biodiversity changes. Finally, I look to the future, suggesting that the current carbon sink in intact forests is unlikely to continue, and that the tropical forest biome may even become a large net source of carbon, via one or more of four plausible routes: changing photosynthesis and respiration rates, biodiversity changes in intact forest, widespread forest collapse via drought, and widespread forest collapse via fire. Each of these scenarios risks potentially dangerous positive feedbacks with the climate system that could dramatically accelerate and intensify climate change. Given that continued land-use change alone is already thought to be causing the sixth mass extinction event in Earth's history, should such feedbacks occur, the resulting biodiversity and societal consequences would be even more severe.

  6. Hanford solid waste management system simulation

    Shaver, S.R.; Armacost, L.L.; Konynenbelt, H.S.; Wehrman, R.R.

    1994-12-01

    This paper describes systems analysis and simulation model development for a proposed solid waste management system at a U.S. Department of Energy Site. The proposed system will include a central storage facility, four treatment facilities, and three disposal sites. The material managed by this system will include radioactive, hazardous, and mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes. The objective of the modeling effort is to provide a means of evaluating throughput and capacity requirements for the proposed treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. The model is used to evaluate alternative system configurations and the effect on the alternatives of changing waste stream characteristics and receipt schedules. An iterative modeling and analysis approach is used that provides macro-level models early in the project and establishes credibility with the customer. The results from the analyses based on the macro models influence system design decisions and provide information that helps focus subsequent model development. Modeling and simulation of alternative system configurations and operating strategies yield a better understanding of the solid waste system requirements. The model effectively integrates information obtained through systems analysis and waste characterization to provide a consistent basis for system and facility planning

  7. Human impact on the planet: an earth system science perspective and ethical considerations

    Williams, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    The modern Earth Narrative, the scientific story of the 4.5 billion-year natural and human history of the Earth, has emerged from the solid foundation of two factual concepts: Deep (or Geologic) Time and Biological Evolution. spread acceptance of the Earth Narrative is critically important as we begin the third millennium, because it provides a clear understanding of the growing impact of human population growth and associated activities on the Earth System, especially the negative impact on Earth?s biosphere. It is important for humans to realize that we are but one of 4,500 species of mammals that exist on Earth and that we are but one species in the estimated 30 to 100 million species that form the complex biosphere. We also need to recognize that all species exist within the physical limits imposed by the geosphere. We are totally dependent on the biosphere for food, oxygen, and other necessities of life. mans are one of the latest results of biological evolution operating over a long period of Geologic Time. We find ourselves on Earth, after 4.5 billion years of Earth history by chance, not by design. Humans have become so successful at modifying their environment that many of the natural limitations on the expansion of populations of our fellow animals have been overcome by technological and cultural innovations. According to Peter Raven, ?Humans, at a current population of 6 billion [expected to nearly double by 2050], are consuming or wasting about 50 percent of the total net biological productivity on land and 50 percent of the available supply of freshwater. The overwhelming and expanding human presence leaves less and less room in the environment for other biota.? st century will be a pivotal time in the fate of Earth?s biosphere. Whereas human modification of the geosphere will slowly recover over time, human changes to the biosphere are a far more consequential matter? extinction of a species is forever! Will humans effectively use our new knowledge of

  8. Earth evolution as a thermal system

    Tang, C.

    2014-12-01

    After fifty years of plate-tectonic theory, the reasons why earth sometime freezed as a snowball or sometime became lethally hot resulting in mass extinction remain enigmatic. This article proposes a new hypothesis on Earth evolution. The unbalance of heat between the input and output is considered as the driving force for the Earth evolution, the lithospheric expansion and associated uplift are the triggers, the self-organized progressive failure leading to collapse of the Earth are the amplifier, and the global scale response in terms of volcanism and magmatism is the globalizer. This shallow process of lithosphere may reach a critical state with a positive feedback loop, and result in the formation of no-plume original Large Igneous Provinces (NPOLIP) in a top-down pattern. Endothermic phase changes during de-compressive melting remove heat from and cool their surroundings, including the upper parts of the lithosphere. The huge loss of Earth's heat during eruption of LIPs, together with the endothermic cooling, may put the thermal cycle to an end and a new start of the cycle initiates. In summary, Earth drives itself to evolve in terms of thermal cycles. Global cooling and warming are the two stages of the many cycles during the Earth evolution. Glaciations are the extreme result of global cooling, whereas the LIPs, sometime accompanied with remarkable sea level dropping, are the extreme result of global warming, with a long recovering age, the interglacialstage, between them. They come and go as thermal cycle evolves, with climate warming, being caused by Earth itself rather than by external forces or human activities, as the most attractive prediction.

  9. High Latitude Dust in the Earth System

    Bullard, Joanna E.; Baddock, Matthew; Bradwell, Tom; Crusius, John; Darlington, Eleanor; Gaiero, Diego; Gasso, Santiago; Gisladottir, Gudrun; Hodgkins, Richard; McCulloch, Robert; hide

    2016-01-01

    Natural dust is often associated with hot, subtropical deserts, but significant dust events have been reported from cold, high latitudes. This review synthesizes current understanding of high-latitude (> or = 50degN and > or = 40degS) dust source geography and dynamics and provides a prospectus for future research on the topic. Although the fundamental processes controlling aeolian dust emissions in high latitudes are essentially the same as in temperate regions, there are additional processes specific to or enhanced in cold regions. These include low temperatures, humidity, strong winds, permafrost and niveo-aeolian processes all of which can affect the efficiency of dust emission and distribution of sediments. Dust deposition at high latitudes can provide nutrients to the marine system, specifically by contributing iron to high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll oceans; it also affects ice albedo and melt rates. There have been no attempts to quantify systematically the expanse, characteristics, or dynamics of high-latitude dust sources. To address this, we identify and compare the main sources and drivers of dust emissions in the Northern (Alaska, Canada, Greenland, and Iceland) and Southern (Antarctica, New Zealand, and Patagonia) Hemispheres. The scarcity of year-round observations and limitations of satellite remote sensing data at high latitudes are discussed. It is estimated that under contemporary conditions high-latitude sources cover >500,000 sq km and contribute at least 80-100 Tg/yr1 of dust to the Earth system (approx. 5% of the global dust budget); both are projected to increase under future climate change scenarios.

  10. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Raghavendra Ashrit. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 115 Issue 3 June 2006 pp 299-313. Simulation of a Himalayan cloudburst event · Someshwar Das Raghavendra Ashrit M W Moncrieff · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Intense rainfall often ...

  11. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Denizhan Vardar. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 127 Issue 1 February 2018 pp 13. Seismic stratigraphy and depositional history of the BüyükÇekmece Bay since Latest Pleistocene, Marmara Sea, Turkey · Denizhan Vardar Hakan Alp Bedri ...

  12. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. M Alper Şengül. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 124 Issue 7 October 2015 pp 1429-1443. Determining the site effects of 23 October 2011 earthquake (Van province, Turkey) on the rural areas using HVSR microtremor method · İsmail Akkaya Ali ...

  13. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Barin Kumar De. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 122 Issue 4 August 2013 pp 1013-1021. Characteristics of severe thunderstorms studied with the aid of VLF atmospherics over North–East India · A Guha Trisanu Banik Barin Kumar De Rakesh ...

  14. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. V K Gaur. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 109 Issue 1 March 2000 pp 1-3. Editorial · V K Gaur · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 109 Issue 4 December 2000 pp 393-394. Editorial · V K Gaur · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 112 Issue 3 ...

  15. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. V D Mishra. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 118 Issue 1 February 2009 pp 11-26. Assessment of different topographic corrections in AWiFS satellite imagery of Himalaya terrain · V D Mishra J K Sharma K K Singh N K Thakur M Kumar.

  16. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Naveen Kumar. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 118 Issue 5 October 2009 pp 539-549. Analytical solutions of one-dimensional advection–diffusion equation with variable coefficients in a finite domain · Atul Kumar Dilip Kumar Jaiswal Naveen ...

  17. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. S Sajani. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 116 Issue 2 April 2007 pp 149-157. The role of low-frequency intraseasonal oscillations in the anomalous Indian summer monsoon rainfall of 2002 · S Sajani S Naseema Beegum K Krishna Moorthy.

  18. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. P K Sikdar. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 126 Issue 2 March 2017 pp 29. Numerical modelling of groundwater flow to understand the impacts of pumping on arsenic migration in the aquifer of North Bengal Plain · P K Sikdar Surajit Chakraborty.

  19. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Suman Sinha. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 125 Issue 4 June 2016 pp 725-735. Developing synergy regression models with space-borne ALOS PALSAR and Landsat TM sensors for retrieving tropical forest biomass · Suman Sinha C ...

  20. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. S Banerjee. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 114 Issue 1 February 2005 pp 87-96. Facies, dissolution seams and stable isotope compositions of the Rohtas Limestone (Vindhyan Supergroup) in the Son valley area, central India · S Banerjee S K ...

  1. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Abhijit Chakraborty. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 114 Issue 3 June 2005 pp 275-286. Significance of transition between Talchir Formation and Karharbari Formation in Lower Gondwana basin evolution — A study in West Bokaro Coal basin, ...

  2. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. A Shalini. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 115 Issue 4 August 2006 pp 451-460 Special Section on: Material exchanges at marine boundaries and surface ocean processes: Forcings and feedbacks. Spatial and temporal distribution of methane in ...

  3. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. P Pant. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 117 Issue S1 July 2008 pp 303-313. Characteristics of spectral aerosol optical depths over India during ICARB · S Naseema Beegum K Krishna Moorthy Vijayakumar S Nair S Suresh Babu S K Satheesh V ...

  4. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Gh Jeelani. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 120 Issue 3 June 2011 pp 399-411. Assessing variability of water quality in a groundwater-fed perennial lake of Kashmir Himalayas using linear geostatics · S Sarah Gh Jeelani Shakeel Ahmed.

  5. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. A Sarkar. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 109 Issue 1 March 2000 pp 157-169. Palaeomonsoon and palaeoproductivity records of O, C and CaCO3 variations in the northern Indian Ocean sediments · A Sarkar R Ramesh S K Bhattacharya ...

  6. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. V V S S Sarma. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 109 Issue 2 June 2000 pp 279-283. Controls of dimethyl sulphide in the Bay of Bengal during BOBMEX-Pilot cruise 1998 · D M Shenoy M Dileep Kumar V V S S Sarma · More Details Abstract ...

  7. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. K Dharanirajan. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 123 Issue 8 December 2014 pp 1819-1830. Geomorphic settings of mangrove ecosystem in South Andaman Island: A geospatial approach · E Yuvaraj K Dharanirajan S Jayakumar Saravanan.

  8. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. C Gnanaseelan. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 114 Issue 5 October 2005 pp 475-491. Hydrography and water masses in the southeastern Arabian Sea during March-June 2003 · S S C Shenoi D Shankar G S Michael J Kurian K K Varma M R ...

  9. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. P K Gupta. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 114 Issue 5 October 2005 pp 523-531. Normalized impedance function and the straightforward inversion scheme for magnetotelluric data · Sri Niwas P K Gupta V K Gaur · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

  10. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. C B S Dutt. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 117 Issue S1 July 2008 pp 243-262. Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB): An overview · K Krishna Moorthy S K Satheesh S Suresh Babu C B S Dutt · More Details ...

  11. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. G Sasibhushana Rao. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 116 Issue 5 October 2007 pp 407-411. GPS satellite and receiver instrumental biases estimation using least squares method for accurate ionosphere modelling · G Sasibhushana Rao.

  12. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. M Venkat Ratnam. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 120 Issue 5 October 2011 pp 807-823. Long-term variations in outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR), convective available potential energy (CAPE) and temperature in the tropopause region over ...

  13. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. M Madhupratap. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 109 Issue 4 December 2000 pp 433-441. Physical control of primary productivity on a seasonal scale in the central and eastern Arabian Sea · S Prasanna kumar M Madhupratap M Dileep kumar M ...

  14. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Bhushan R Lamsoge. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 123 Issue 7 October 2014 pp 1541-1566. Impact of over-exploitation on groundwater quality: A case study from WR-2Watershed, India · Anil M Pophare Bhushan R Lamsoge Yashwant B ...

  15. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Dhruba Mukhopadhyay. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 109 Issue 1 March 2000 pp 22-38. Anasagar gneiss: A folded granitoid pluton in the Phanerozoic South Delhi Fold Belt, central Rajasthan · Dhruba Mukhopadhyay Tapas Bhattacharyya ...

  16. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. M Israil. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 117 Issue 3 June 2008 pp 189-200. Magnetotelluric investigations for imaging electrical structure of Garhwal Himalayan corridor, Uttarakhand, India · M Israil D K Tyagi P K Gupta Sri Niwas · More Details ...

  17. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Keqing Zong. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 127 Issue 3 April 2018 pp 43. Early Neoarchaean A-type granitic magmatism by crustal reworking in Singhbhum craton: Evidence from Pala Lahara area, Orissa · Abhishek Topno Sukanta Dey ...

  18. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Arka Rudra. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 123 Issue 5 July 2014 pp 935-941. Molecular composition and paleobotanical origin of Eocene resin from northeast India · Arka Rudra Suryendu Dutta Srinivasan V Raju · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

  19. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Vijaya. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 120 Issue 3 June 2011 pp 545-556. Fine-scale responses of phytoplankton to freshwater influx in a tropical monsoonal estuary following the onset of southwest monsoon · Suraksha M Pednekar S G Prabhu ...

  20. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Anup Saha. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 125 Issue 4 June 2016 pp 885-895. Effect of irregularity on torsional surface waves in an initially stressed anisotropic porous layer sandwiched between homogeneous and non-homogeneous half- ...

  1. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Santimoy Kundu. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 124 Issue 1 February 2015 pp 161-170. Influence of rigid boundary on the propagation of torsional surface wave in an inhomogeneous layer · Shishir Gupta Rehena Sultana Santimoy Kundu.

  2. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Rehena Sultana. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 124 Issue 1 February 2015 pp 161-170. Influence of rigid boundary on the propagation of torsional surface wave in an inhomogeneous layer · Shishir Gupta Rehena Sultana Santimoy Kundu.

  3. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. N K Thakur. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 118 Issue 1 February 2009 pp 11-26. Assessment of different topographic corrections in AWiFS satellite imagery of Himalaya terrain · V D Mishra J K Sharma K K Singh N K Thakur M Kumar.

  4. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Sharmistha De Sarkar. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 122 Issue 3 June 2013 pp 715-727. Arc parallel extension in Higher and Lesser Himalayas, evidence from western Arunachal Himalaya, India · Sharmistha De Sarkar George Mathew ...

  5. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. A Ganju. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 117 Issue 5 October 2008 pp 575-587. Mountain range specific analog weather forecast model for northwest Himalaya in India · D Singh A Ganju · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Mountain range ...

  6. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. J C Joshi. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 126 Issue 1 February 2017 pp 3. Optimisation of Hidden Markov Model using Baum–Welch algorithm for prediction of maximum and minimum temperature over Indian Himalaya · J C Joshi Tankeshwar ...

  7. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. P K Sikdar. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 120 Issue 3 June 2011 pp 435-446. Threat of land subsidence in and around Kolkata City and East Kolkata Wetlands, West Bengal, India · P Sahu P K Sikdar · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  8. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Saji Mohandas. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 117 Issue 5 October 2008 pp 603-620. Skills of different mesoscale models over Indian region during monsoon season: Forecast errors · Someshwar Das Raghavendra Ashrit Gopal Raman ...

  9. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. B P Rawat. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 110 Issue 1 March 2001 pp 63-76. Are Majhgawan-Hinota pipe rocks truly group-I kimberlite? Ravi Shanker S Nag A Ganguly A Absar B P Rawat G S Singh · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  10. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Rajdeep Roy. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 120 Issue 6 December 2011 pp 1145-1154. Identification of non-indigenous phytoplankton species dominated bloom off Goa using inverted microscopy and pigment (HPLC) analysis · P V Bhaskar ...

  11. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Evangelin Ramani Sujatha. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 121 Issue 5 October 2012 pp 1337-1350. Landslide susceptibility analysis using Probabilistic Certainty Factor Approach: A case study on Tevankarai stream watershed, India.

  12. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Parmanand Sharma. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 121 Issue 3 June 2012 pp 625-636. Chemical characterisation of meltwater draining from Gangotri Glacier, Garhwal Himalaya, India · Virendra Bahadur Singh A L Ramanathan Jose George ...

  13. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Umesh S Balpande. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 123 Issue 7 October 2014 pp 1501-1515. Morphometric analysis of Suketi river basin, Himachal Himalaya, India · Anil M Pophare Umesh S Balpande · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  14. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Tarun Solanki. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 127 Issue 1 February 2018 pp 9. Geomorphic investigation of the Late-Quaternary landforms in the southern Zanskar Valley, NW Himalaya · Shubhra Sharma Aadil Hussain Amit K Mishra Aasif Lone ...

  15. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. V S Dubey. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 114 Issue 5 October 2005 pp 515-522. Identification of groundwater prospective zones by using remote sensing and geoelectrical methods in Jharia and Raniganj coalfields, Dhanbad district, ...

  16. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. R Srinivasan. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 109 Issue 1 March 2000 pp 57-65. Sm-Nd Ages of Two Meta-Anorthosite Complexes Around Holenarsipur: Constraints on the Antiquity of Archean Supracrustal Rocks of the Dharwar Craton.

  17. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. A Geetha Selvarani. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 125 Issue 2 March 2016 pp 311-328. Groundwater resource exploration in Salem district, Tamil Nadu using GIS and remote sensing · G Maheswaran A Geetha Selvarani K Elangovan.

  18. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Ashwini Kulkarni. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 121 Issue 1 February 2012 pp 203-210. Impact of global warming on cyclonic disturbances over south Asian region · Savita Patwardhan Ashwini Kulkarni K Krishna Kumar · More Details Abstract ...

  19. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. P K Kunhikrishnan. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 113 Issue 3 September 2004 pp 353-363. Observations of the atmospheric surface layer parameters over a semi arid region during the solar eclipse of August 11th, 1999 · Praveena Krishnan ...

  20. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. David R Bridgland. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 120 Issue 3 June 2011 pp 503-530. Methods for determination of the age of Pleistocene tephra, derived from eruption of Toba, in central India · Rob Westaway Sheila Mishra Sushama Deo ...

  1. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. S D Kotal. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 117 Issue 2 April 2008 pp 157-168. A Statistical Cyclone Intensity Prediction (SCIP) model for the Bay of Bengal · S D Kotal S K Roy Bhowmik P K Kundu Ananda Kumar Das · More Details Abstract ...

  2. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Ali Asgari. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 123 Issue 2 March 2014 pp 365-379. Numerical evaluation of seismic response of shallow foundation on loose silt and silty sand · Ali Asgari Aliakbar Golshani Mohsen Bagheri · More Details Abstract ...

  3. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. J D Patil. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 125 Issue 2 March 2016 pp 301-310. Structural mapping of Chikotra River basin in the Deccan Volcanic Province of Maharashtra, India from ground magnetic data · S P Anand Vinit C Erram J D Patil N J ...

  4. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. A S Laxmi Prasad. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 114 Issue 6 December 2005 pp 725-731. Lunar ranging instrument for Chandrayaan-1 · J A Kamalakar K V S Bhaskar A S Laxmi Prasad R Ranjith K A Lohar R Venketeswaran T K Alex.

  5. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Ananda K Das. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 112 Issue 2 June 2003 pp 165-184. Circulation characteristics of a monsoon depression during BOBMEX-99 using high-resolution analysis · Ananda K Das U C Mohanty Someshwar Das M Mandal ...

  6. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Archana Tripathi. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 121 Issue 2 April 2012 pp 537-557. Stratigraphic status of coal horizon in Tatapani–Ramkola Coalfield, Chhattisgarh, India · Archana Tripathi Vijaya Srikanta Murthy B Chakarborty D K Das.

  7. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. V B Sumithranand. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 119 Issue 4 August 2010 pp 507-517. Variability of soil moisture and its relationship with surface albedo and soil thermal diffusivity at Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, south ...

  8. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. S P Anand. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 124 Issue 3 April 2015 pp 613-630. A relook into the crustal architecture of Laxmi Ridge, northeastern Arabian Sea from geopotential data · Nisha Nair S P Anand Mita Rajaram P Rama Rao.

  9. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Shantamoy Guha. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 126 Issue 2 March 2017 pp 21. Identification of drought in Dhalai river watershed using MCDM and ANN models · Sainath Aher Sambhaji Shinde Shantamoy Guha Mrinmoy Majumder.

  10. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. C K Unnikrishnan. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 125 Issue 4 June 2016 pp 677-689. Impact of high resolution land surface initialization in Indian summer monsoon simulation using a regional climate model · C K Unnikrishnan M Rajeevan S ...

  11. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. S Naseema Beegum. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 116 Issue 2 April 2007 pp 149-157. The role of low-frequency intraseasonal oscillations in the anomalous Indian summer monsoon rainfall of 2002 · S Sajani S Naseema Beegum K Krishna ...

  12. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Abdul Matin. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 118 Issue 4 August 2009 pp 379-390. Deformation mechanisms in the frontal Lesser Himalayan Duplex in Sikkim Himalaya, India · Abdul Matin Sweety Mazumdar · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  13. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Vishwas S Kale. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 117 Issue 6 December 2008 pp 959-971. Uplift along the western margin of the Deccan Basalt Province: Is there any geomorphometric evidence? Vishwas S Kale Nikhil Shejwalkar · More Details ...

  14. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. S Panigrahy. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 120 Issue 1 February 2011 pp 19-25. Simulation of at-sensor radiance over land for proposed thermal channels of Imager payload onboard INSAT-3D satellite using MODTRAN model · M R Pandya ...

  15. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Ratheesh Ramakrishnan. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 121 Issue 5 October 2012 pp 1201-1213. Simulation of suspended sediment transport initialized with satellite derived suspended sediment concentrations · Ratheesh Ramakrishnan A S ...

  16. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. J Barnes. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 115 Issue 4 August 2006 pp 451-460 Special Section on: Material exchanges at marine boundaries and surface ocean processes: Forcings and feedbacks. Spatial and temporal distribution of methane in ...

  17. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. G S Meena. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 115 Issue 3 June 2006 pp 333-347. Retrieval of stratospheric O3 and NO2 vertical profiles using zenith scattered light observations · G S Meena C S Bhosale D B Jadhav · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

  18. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. T N Krishnamurti. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 115 Issue 2 April 2006 pp 185-201. Transitions in the surface energy balance during the life cycle of a monsoon season · T N Krishnamurti Mrinal K Biswas · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  19. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Sukanta Dey. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 127 Issue 2 March 2018 pp 20. An approach of understanding acid volcanics and tuffaceous volcaniclastics from field studies: A case from Tadpatri Formation, Proterozoic Cuddapah basin, Andhra ...

  20. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. K Krishnamoorthy. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 111 Issue 4 December 2002 pp 425-435. Detection of marine aerosols with IRS P4-Ocean Colour Monitor · Indrani Das M Mohan K Krishnamoorthy · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  1. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. P C S Devara. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 112 Issue 2 June 2003 pp 205-221. Study of total column atmospheric aerosol optical depth, ozone and precipitable water content over Bay of Bengal during BOBMEX-99 · K K Dani R S ...

  2. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Sudhir Jain. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 121 Issue 2 April 2012 pp 345-353. Ionospheric irregularities at Antarctic using GPS measurements · Sunita Tiwari Amit Jain Shivalika Sarkar Sudhir Jain A K Gwal · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  3. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Keywords. Earth system model; Greenland; Antarctica; ice sheet; climate dynamics; surface mass balance. Abstract. Elaboration of a modern Earth system model (ESM) requires incorporation of ice sheet dynamics. Coupling of an ice sheet model (ICM) to an AOGCM is complicated by essential differences in spatial and ...

  4. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. D Twinkle. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 125 Issue 2 March 2016 pp 329-342. Crustal structure and rift tectonics across the Cauvery–Palar basin, Eastern Continental Margin of India based on seismic and potential field modelling · D Twinkle G ...

  5. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. R A Scrutton. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 123 Issue 1 February 2014 pp 33-47. Growth of the Afanasy Nikitin seamount and its relationship with the 85°E Ridge, northeastern Indian Ocean · K S Krishna J M Bull O Ishizuka R A Scrutton S ...

  6. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Rajeev Ranjan Kumar. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 121 Issue 5 October 2012 pp 1177-1184. Modelling near subsurface temperature with mixed type boundary condition for transient air temperature and vertical groundwater flow.

  7. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Younes Jedoui. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 122 Issue 1 February 2013 pp 15-28. Investigation of sulphate origins in the Jeffara aquifer, southeastern Tunisia: A geochemical approach · Samir Kamel Mohamed Ben Chelbi Younes Jedoui.

  8. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Rambhatla G Sastry. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 112 Issue 1 March 2003 pp 37-49. 2D Stabilised analytic signal method in DC pole-pole potential data interpretation · Paras R Pujari Rambhatla G Sastry · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  9. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Aavudai Anandhi. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 119 Issue 4 August 2010 pp 447-460. Assessing impact of climate change on season length in Karnataka for IPCC SRES scenarios · Aavudai Anandhi · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  10. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 110; Issue 4. Volume 110, Issue 4. December 2001, pages 267-463. Recent Researchers in Petrology and Geochemistry. pp 267-267. Preface · S Bhattacharya J Ganguly · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 269-285. Earth support systems: Threatened? Why? What can ...

  11. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Y Sadhuram. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 114 Issue 1 February 2005 pp 37-49. Seasonal variability of physico-chemical characteristics of the Haldia channel of Hooghly estuary, India · Y Sadhuram V V Sarma T V Ramana Murty B ...

  12. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. K Verma. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 127 Issue 2 March 2018 pp 21. Late Glacial–Holocene record of benthic foraminiferal morphogroups from the eastern Arabian Sea OMZ: Paleoenvironmental implications · K Verma S K Bharti A D Singh.

  13. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. T K Gundu Rao. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 111 Issue 2 June 2002 pp 103-113. Electron spin resonance dating of fault gouge from Desamangalam, Kerala: Evidence for Quaternary movement in Palghat gap shear zone · T K Gundu Rao C P ...

  14. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. K D Singh. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 122 Issue 1 February 2013 pp 93-106. A field technique for rapid lithological discrimination and ore mineral identification: Results from Mamandur Polymetal Deposit, India · D Ramakrishnan M Nithya ...

  15. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. A K Verma. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 114 Issue 1 February 2005 pp 75-86. A comparative study of ANN and Neuro-fuzzy for the prediction of dynamic constant of rockmass · T N Singh R Kanchan A K Verma K Saigal · More Details Abstract ...

  16. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Bhawanisingh G Desai. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 120 Issue 4 August 2011 pp 723-734. Discontinuity surfaces and event stratigraphy of Okha Shell Limestone Member: Implications for Holocene sea level changes, western India.

  17. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Monica Sharma. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 124 Issue 4 June 2015 pp 861-874. Evaluation of official tropical cyclone landfall forecast issued by India Meteorological Department · M Mohapatra D P Nayak Monica Sharma R P Sharma B K ...

  18. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. R S Rana. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 122 Issue 2 April 2013 pp 289-307. Palynostratigraphy and depositional environment of Vastan Lignite Mine (Early Eocene), Gujarat, western India · M R Rao Ashok Sahni R S Rana Poonam Verma.

  19. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Suresh Chandra Kandpal. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 120 Issue 5 October 2011 pp 873-883. Subsurface signatures and timing of extreme wave events along the southeast Indian coast · Rajesh R Nair Madhav K Murari C S Vijaya Lakshmi ...

  20. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Abbas Goli Jirandeh. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 122 Issue 2 April 2013 pp 349-369. Landslide susceptibility mapping using support vector machine and GIS at the Golestan Province, Iran · Hamid Reza Pourghasemi Abbas Goli Jirandeh ...

  1. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Rahul Choudhury. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 125 Issue 7 October 2016 pp 1365-1377. Thermogravimetric and model-free kinetic studies on CO2 gasification of low-quality, high-sulphur Indian coals · Tonkeswar Das Ananya Saikia ...

  2. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Sahadev Kumar. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 125 Issue 1 February 2016 pp 165-178. Coal fire mapping of East Basuria Colliery, Jharia coalfield using vertical derivative technique of magnetic data · S K Pal Jitendra Vaish Sahadev Kumar ...

  3. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. P Senthil Kumar. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 119 Issue 5 October 2010 pp 745-751. Soil-gas helium and surface-waves detection of fault zones in granitic bedrock · G K Reddy T Seshunarayana Rajeev Menon P Senthil Kumar · More Details ...

  4. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. George Mathew. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 111 Issue 2 June 2002 pp 103-113. Electron spin resonance dating of fault gouge from Desamangalam, Kerala: Evidence for Quaternary movement in Palghat gap shear zone · T K Gundu Rao ...

  5. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Pravin K Gupta. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 115 Issue 3 June 2006 pp 267-276. Fast computation of Hankel Transform using orthonormal exponential approximation of complex kernel function · Pravin K Gupta Sri Niwas Neeta Chaudhary.

  6. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Partha Pratim Chakraborty. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 115 Issue 1 February 2006 pp 23-36. Outcrop signatures of relative sea level fall on a siliciclastic shelf: Examples from Rewa Group of Proterozoic Vindhyan basin · Partha Pratim ...

  7. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Manideepa Roy Choudhury. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 125 Issue 5 July 2016 pp 1033-1040. Deformation of footwall rock of Phulad Shear Zone, Rajasthan: Evidence of transpressional shear zone · Manideepa Roy Choudhury Subhrajyoti ...

  8. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Christian Koeberl. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 121 Issue 1 February 2012 pp 91-108. Mineral chemistry of lava flows from Linga area of the Eastern Deccan Volcanic Province, India · Sohini Ganguly Jyotisankar Ray Christian Koeberl ...

  9. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. A P Dimri. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 121 Issue 2 April 2012 pp 329-344. Wintertime land surface characteristics in climatic simulations over the western Himalayas · A P Dimri · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Wintertime regional climate ...

  10. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. C S Jha. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 122 Issue 2 April 2013 pp 271-281. Landscape level assessment of critically endangered vegetation of Lakshadweep islands using geo-spatial techniques · C Sudhakar Reddy Bijan Debnath P Hari ...

  11. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Sankar Kumar Nath. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 117 Issue S2 November 2008 pp 649-670. Seismic hazard scenario and attenuation model of the Garhwal Himalaya using near-field synthesis from weak motion seismometry · Sankar Kumar ...

  12. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Ranjit Das. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 121 Issue 1 February 2012 pp 19-28. Temporal and spatial variations in the magnitude of completeness for homogenized moment magnitude catalogue for northeast India · Ranjit Das H R Wason M L ...

  13. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Anurag Tripathi. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 127 Issue 2 March 2018 pp 17. Lithologic boundaries from gravity and magnetic anomalies over Proterozoic Dalma volcanics · Pramod Kumar Yadav P K Adhikari Shalivahan Srivastava Ved P ...

  14. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Bibhuti Gogoi. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 123 Issue 5 July 2014 pp 959-987. Geochemical constraints on the evolution of mafic and felsic rocks in the Bathani volcanic and volcano-sedimentary sequence of Chotanagpur Granite Gneiss ...

  15. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. C Selvaraj. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 116 Issue 3 June 2007 pp 179-186. Fairweather atmospheric electricity at Antarctica during local summer as observed from Indian station, Maitri · C Panneerselvam C Selvaraj K Jeeva K U Nair C P ...

  16. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Aditi Singh. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 127 Issue 2 March 2018 pp 26. Prediction of fog/visibility over India using NWP Model · Aditi Singh John P George Gopal Raman Iyengar · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Frequent occurrence of fog ...

  17. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. J Dajkumar Sahayam. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 119 Issue 1 February 2010 pp 129-135. Distribution of arsenic and mercury in subtropical coastal beachrock, Gulf of Mannar, India · J Dajkumar Sahayam N Chandrasekar S Krishna Kumar ...

  18. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. J Senthilnath. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 122 Issue 3 June 2013 pp 559-572. Integration of speckle de-noising and image segmentation using Synthetic Aperture Radar image for flood extent extraction · J Senthilnath H Vikram Shenoy Ritwik ...

  19. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. K Mohankumar. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 127 Issue 2 March 2018 pp 30. On the dynamics of an extreme rainfall event in northern India in 2013 · Anu Xavier M G Manoj K Mohankumar · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. India experienced ...

  20. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Soumen Sarkar. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 114 Issue 3 June 2005 pp 303-323. Evidence of lacustrine sedimentation in the Upper Permian Bijori Formation, Satpura Gondwana basin: Palaeogeographic and tectonic implications.

  1. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. K K Osuri. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 125 Issue 3 April 2016 pp 475-498. Role of land state in a high resolution mesoscale model for simulating the Uttarakhand heavy rainfall event over India · P V Rajesh S Pattnaik D Rai K K Osuri U C ...

  2. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. P V Rajesh. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 125 Issue 4 June 2016 pp 691-708. Sensitivity of tropical cyclone characteristics to the radial distribution of sea surface temperature · Deepika Rai S Pattnaik P V Rajesh · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

  3. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Manish M John. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 114 Issue 2 April 2005 pp 143-158. Contrasting metamorphism across Cauvery Shear Zone, south India · Manish M John S Balakrishnan B K Bhadra · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  4. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Marian Marschalko. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 122 Issue 2 April 2013 pp 371-388. An assessment on the use of bivariate, multivariate and soft computing techniques for collapse susceptibility in GIS environ · Işık Yilmaz Marian Marschalko ...

  5. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. P N Preenu. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 126 Issue 5 July 2017 pp 76. Variability of the date of monsoon onset over Kerala (India) of the period 1870–2014 and its relation to sea surface temperature · P N Preenu P V Joseph P K Dineshkumar.

  6. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Samir M Zaid. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 126 Issue 4 June 2017 pp 50. Provenance of coastal dune sands along Red Sea, Egypt · Samir M Zaid · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Texture, mineralogy, and major and trace element ...

  7. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Sulochana Gadgil. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 112 Issue 4 December 2003 pp 529-558. On breaks of the Indian monsoon · Sulochana Gadgil P V Joseph · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. For over a century, the term break has been used ...

  8. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Harinder K Thakur. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 118 Issue 1 February 2009 pp 41-48. Aerosol optical depths at Mohal-Kullu in the northwestern Indian Himalayan high altitude station during ICARB · Jagdish C Kuniyal Alpana Thakur Harinder ...

  9. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. S Gurubaran. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 116 Issue 3 June 2007 pp 179-186. Fairweather atmospheric electricity at Antarctica during local summer as observed from Indian station, Maitri · C Panneerselvam C Selvaraj K Jeeva K U Nair C P ...

  10. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. K S Krishna. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 111 Issue 1 March 2002 pp 17-28. Formation of diapiric structure in the deformation zone, central Indian Ocean: A model from gravity and seismic reflection data · K S Krishna D Gopala Rao Yu P ...

  11. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. M Radhakrishna. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 120 Issue 4 August 2011 pp 605-615. Development of the negative gravity anomaly of the 85°E Ridge, northeastern Indian Ocean – A process oriented modelling approach · K M Sreejith M ...

  12. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Y Jaya Rao. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 113 Issue 1 March 2004 pp 103-116. Remote sensing of spectral signatures of tropospheric aerosols · M B Potdar S A Sharma V Y Parikh P C S Devara P E Raj Y K Tiwari R S Maheskumar K K Dani ...

  13. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Samadrita Mukherjee. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 122 Issue 3 June 2013 pp 869-886. Evaluation of topographic index in relation to terrain roughness and DEM grid spacing · Samadrita Mukherjee Sandip Mukherjee R D Garg A Bhardwaj ...

  14. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Shamsuddin Shahid. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 124 Issue 6 August 2015 pp 1325-1341. Multilayer perceptron neural network for downscaling rainfall in arid region: A case study of Baluchistan, Pakistan · Kamal Ahmed Shamsuddin Shahid ...

  15. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Journal of Earth System Science. Volumes & Issues. Volume 127. Issue 1. Feb 2018; Issue 2. Mar 2018; Issue 3. Apr 2018. Volume 126. Issue 1. Feb 2017; Issue 2. Mar 2017; Issue 3. Apr 2017; Issue 4. Jun 2017; Issue 5. Jul 2017; Issue 6. Aug 2017; Issue 7. Oct 2017 ...

  16. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. P Seetaramayya. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 112 Issue 2 June 2003 pp 283-293. Ocean-atmosphere interaction and synoptic weather conditions in association with the two contrasting phases of monsoon during BOBMEX-1999.

  17. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. B O Adebesin. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 123 Issue 4 June 2014 pp 751-765. Ionospheric foF2 morphology and response of F2 layer height over Jicamarca during different solar epochs and comparison with IRI-2012 model · B O Adebesin ...

  18. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. M Shyam Prasad. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 119 Issue 4 August 2010 pp 531-539. Correlation of the oldest Toba Tuff to sediments in the central Indian Ocean Basin · J N Pattan M Shyam Prasad E V S S K Babu · More Details Abstract ...

  19. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. B Spandana. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 117 Issue S1 July 2008 pp 421-427. Temporal characteristics of aerosol physical properties at Visakhapatnam on the east coast of India during ICARB – Signatures of transport onto Bay of Bengal.

  20. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. B S Marh. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 125 Issue 3 April 2016 pp 539-558. Post-glacial landform evolution in the middle Satluj River valley, India: Implications towards understanding the climate tectonic interactions · Shubhra Sharma S K ...

  1. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Santosh Kumar. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 117 Issue S1 July 2008 pp 303-313. Characteristics of spectral aerosol optical depths over India during ICARB · S Naseema Beegum K Krishna Moorthy Vijayakumar S Nair S Suresh Babu S K ...

  2. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. D B Shah. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 120 Issue 1 February 2011 pp 19-25. Simulation of at-sensor radiance over land for proposed thermal channels of Imager payload onboard INSAT-3D satellite using MODTRAN model · M R Pandya D B ...

  3. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Nitesh Patidar. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 127 Issue 2 March 2018 pp 19. Impact of LULC change on the runoff, base flow and evapotranspiration dynamics in eastern Indian river basins during 1985–2005 using variable infiltration capacity ...

  4. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Kanishk Gohil. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 126 Issue 7 October 2017 pp 94. The role of mid-level vortex in the intensification and weakening of tropical cyclones · Govindan Kutty Kanishk Gohil · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The present ...

  5. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. M Mandal. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 112 Issue 1 March 2003 pp 79-93. Impact of horizontal resolution on prediction of tropical cyclones over Bay of Bengal using a regional weather prediction model · M Mandal U C Mohanty K V J Potty A ...

  6. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. S Sarkar. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 114 Issue 1 February 2005 pp 87-96. Facies, dissolution seams and stable isotope compositions of the Rohtas Limestone (Vindhyan Supergroup) in the Son valley area, central India · S Banerjee S K ...

  7. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Mahabir Singh. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 113 Issue 2 June 2004 pp 235-246. Deformation of a layered half-space due to a very long tensile fault · Sarva Jit Singh Mahabir Singh · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The problem of the ...

  8. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Soumyajit Mukherjee. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 126 Issue 1 February 2017 pp 2. Shear heating by translational brittle reverse faulting along a single, sharp and straight fault plane · Soumyajit Mukherjee · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  9. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Prabir Dasgupta. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 114 Issue 3 June 2005 pp 287-302. Facies pattern of the middle Permian Barren Measures Formation, Jharia basin, India: The sedimentary response to basin tectonics · Prabir Dasgupta.

  10. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Ferid Dhahri. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 126 Issue 7 October 2017 pp 104. The role of E–W basement faults in the Mesozoic geodynamic evolution of the Gafsa and Chotts basins, south-central Tunisia · Dorra Tanfous Amri Ferid Dhahri ...

  11. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. G Pandithurai. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 113 Issue 1 March 2004 pp 103-116. Remote sensing of spectral signatures of tropospheric aerosols · M B Potdar S A Sharma V Y Parikh P C S Devara P E Raj Y K Tiwari R S Maheskumar K K Dani ...

  12. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. K Bigyapati Devi. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 121 Issue 2 April 2012 pp 405-438. Lower Oligocene bivalves of Ramanian Stage from Kachchh, Gujarat, India · R P Kachhara R L Jodhawat K Bigyapati Devi · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  13. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Charuta V Prabhu. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 109 Issue 2 June 2000 pp 267-277. Diurnal variability of upper ocean temperature and heat budget in the southern Bay of Bengal during October — November, 1998 (BOBMEX-Pilot).

  14. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. V Fernando. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 123 Issue 5 July 2014 pp 1045-1074. Observed intraseasonal and seasonal variability of the West India Coastal Current on the continental slope · P Amol D Shankar V Fernando A Mukherjee S G ...

  15. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. S W A Naqvi. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 121 Issue 3 June 2012 pp 769-779. Lime muds and their genesis off-Northwestern India during the late Quaternary · V Purnachandra Rao A Anil Kumar S W A Naqvi Allan R Chivas B Sekar Pratima M ...

  16. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. J U Chukudebelu. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 123 Issue 3 April 2014 pp 491-502. Evaluation of soil corrosivity and aquifer protective capacity using geoelectrical investigation in Bwari basement complex area, Abuja · A E Adeniji O V ...

  17. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. S Prasanna kumar. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 109 Issue 4 December 2000 pp 433-441. Physical control of primary productivity on a seasonal scale in the central and eastern Arabian Sea · S Prasanna kumar M Madhupratap M Dileep ...

  18. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. G Rajagopalan. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 109 Issue 1 March 2000 pp 153-156. Glacial-interglacial changes in the surface water characteristics of the Andaman Sea: Evidence from stable ratios of planktonic foraminifera · S M Ahmad D J ...

  19. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. B N Nath. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 109 Issue 1 March 2000 pp 153-156. Glacial-interglacial changes in the surface water characteristics of the Andaman Sea: Evidence from stable ratios of planktonic foraminifera · S M Ahmad D J Patil P S ...

  20. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. S C Arunchandra. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 117 Issue 6 December 2008 pp 911-923. On the measurement of the surface energy budget over a land surface during the summer monsoon · G S Bhat S C Arunchandra · More Details Abstract ...

  1. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Chandra Shekhar Jha. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 122 Issue 5 October 2013 pp 1259-1268. Analysis of carbon dioxide, water vapour and energy fluxes over an Indian teak mixed deciduous forest for winter and summer months using eddy ...

  2. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. G V Ravi Prasad. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 119 Issue 3 June 2010 pp 285-295. Shift in detrital sedimentation in the eastern Bay of Bengal during the late Quaternary · C Prakash Babu J N Pattan K Dutta N Basavaiah G V Ravi Prasad D K ...

  3. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Sohini Ganguly. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 119 Issue 5 October 2010 pp 675-699. Evaluation of phase chemistry and petrochemical aspects of Samchampi–Samteran differentiated alkaline complex of Mikir Hills, northeastern India.

  4. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Ju Wei. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 125 Issue 5 July 2016 pp 1021-1031. Tectonic stress accumulation in Bohai–Zhangjiakou Seismotectonic Zone based on 3D visco-elastic modelling · Ju Wei Sun Weifeng Ma Xiaojing Jiang Hui.

  5. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. V S N Murty. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 109 Issue 2 June 2000 pp 255-265. Thermohaline structure and circulation in the upper layers of the southern Bay of Bengal during BOBMEX-Pilot (October — November 1998) · V Ramesh Babu ...

  6. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. A K Singh. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 125 Issue 5 July 2016 pp 899-908. A study on precursors leading to geomagnetic storms using artificial neural network · Gaurav Singh A K Singh · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Space weather ...

  7. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Rajneesh Kumar. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 109 Issue 3 September 2000 pp 371-380. Plain strain problem of poroelasticity using eigenvalue approach · Rajneesh Kumar Aseem Miglani N R Garg · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  8. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Devesh Kumar Maurya. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 125 Issue 5 July 2016 pp 935-944. Validation of two gridded soil moisture products over India with in-situ observations · C K Unnikrishnan John P George Abhishek Lodh Devesh Kumar ...

  9. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Tapas Acharya. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 121 Issue 2 April 2012 pp 453-462. Analysis of lineament swarms in a Precambrian metamorphic rocks in India · Tapas Acharya Sukumar Basu Mallik · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  10. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. D K Das. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 121 Issue 2 April 2012 pp 537-557. Stratigraphic status of coal horizon in Tatapani–Ramkola Coalfield, Chhattisgarh, India · Archana Tripathi Vijaya Srikanta Murthy B Chakarborty D K Das · More Details ...

  11. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Izrar Ahmed. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 117 Issue 1 February 2008 pp 69-78. Implications of Kali–Hindon inter-stream aquifer water balance for groundwater management in western Uttar Pradesh · Rashid Umar M Muqtada A Khan Izrar ...

  12. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. V V S Gurunadha Rao. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 122 Issue 3 June 2013 pp 855-867. Hydrogeochemistry and groundwater quality assessment of Ranipet industrial area, Tamil Nadu, India · G Tamma Rao V V S Gurunadha Rao K ...

  13. Distribution of rare-earths in solid solution crandalita- goyazita of Sapucaia (Bonito-Para)

    Costa, M.L. da; Melo Costa, W.A. de

    1987-01-01

    The Crandallite are predominant in the lateritic phosphates of Sapucaia, in the form of the solid solution Crandallite (Cn)- Goyazite (Gz)-Florencite (Fl). The Crandallite-Goyazite is predominant, where the maximum proportion of Florencite is Cn 60 Cz 34.8 Fl 5.2 - This proportion of Florencite is relatively high for laterites, and for this case having up to 1,374% weight of TR 2 O 3 in the total sample. The light rare elements are predominant over the heavy ores, and are illustrated in the distribution curve normalized for the chondrites. This curve is partially comparable with the curve for Apatite presents slight negative anomaly for the element Europium, and slight positive anomaly for The elements Thulium. The geochemical caracteristics for the rare earths in this group allow the prediction for the original rock for the laterites. (author) [pt

  14. Integrated Solid Earth Science: the right place and time to discover the unexpected? (Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture)

    Cloetingh, Sierd

    2013-04-01

    go. Not only on a national level, such as pursued by the Netherlands Research School of Integrated Solid Earth Science (ISES), but also on a full European scale, such as the TOPO-EUROPE research program. This goes hand in hand with setting the stage for a pan-European research infrastructure for solid earth science by the European Plate Observing System (EPOS). Much of the unexpected remains to be discovered. The Holmes medal awarded by the European Geosciences Union, itself an example of the immense progress European earth scientists have made in joining forces, means a lot to me. I share it with my co-workers in my group, the close to 70 PhD students who worked with us, and other numerous colleagues and friends that all contributed immensely to the unexpected.

  15. The interaction of the cretaceous-tertiary extinction bolide with the atmosphere, ocean, and solid earth

    Okeefe, J. D.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    A number of investigations, including those reported by Orth et al. (1981), have provided physical evidence for the impact of an extraterrestrial object on earth 65 million years ago. This time corresponds to the end of the cretaceous period. This impact could, therefore, be responsible for the observed extinction of biological species at the end of the Mesozoic era. Among the species becoming extinct are found also flying and walking dinosaurs, which include all land animals that had masses greater than 25 kg. The present investigation is concerned with a study of the possibilities for the collision of earth with 10 km-size object, and the consequences produced by such a collision. It is found that the penetration of the atmosphere by the bolide creates a temporary hole in the atmosphere. The resulting flow fields can inject melt droplets and finely commuted solid particles into the atmosphere. Short-term effects of heating, followed by dust induced worldwide cooling, may provide several mechanisms for the observed extinction of the species.

  16. Elaboration of building materials from industrial waste from solid granular diatomaceous earth

    Del Angel S, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this work the initial characterization of granular solid industrial waste from diatomaceous earth was carried out using techniques of Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Diffraction. In a second stage leaching of the material was undertaken to the US Patent Number 5, 376,000 and 5, 356,601 obtaining the samples M1-S ph 2, M1-L ph, M1-S ph 10 and M1-L ph 10. In the third stage a new characterization of the samples obtained with the techniques of Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Diffraction and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry was performed, the latter in order to determine the efficiency percentage of the leaching process. In the fourth stage the specimens for performing mechanical, physical and chemical tests were manufactured, using molds as PVC pipes of 1 inch in diameter and 2 inches in length, with a composition of 50% of diatomaceous earth and 50% of cement produced in each. Finally, in the fifth stage mechanical testing (compression resistance), physical (moisture absorption rate) and chemical (composition and structure of the material) are performed. In the last stage, when conducting mechanical testing with the test specimens, the presence of bubbles enclosed in each obtaining erroneous results noted, so it was necessary to develop the specimens again, obtaining in this occasion concentrations of 20:80, 40:60, 60:40 and 80:20 of diatomaceous earth with the cement. These results were analyzed to determine if the used material is suitable for the production of building materials such as bricks or partitions, being demonstrated by the tests carried out if they are eligible. (Author)

  17. Unusual seeding mechanism for enhanced performance in solid-phase magnetic extraction of Rare Earth Elements

    Polido Legaria, Elizabeth; Rocha, Joao; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Kessler, Vadim G.; Seisenbaeva, Gulaim A.

    2017-03-01

    Due to the increasing demand of Rare Earth Elements (REE or RE), new and more efficient techniques for their extraction are necessary, suitable for both mining and recycling processes. Current techniques such as solvent extraction or solid adsorbents entail drawbacks such as using big volumes of harmful solvents or limited capacity. Hybrid nanoadsorbents based on SiO2 and highly stable γ-Fe2O3-SiO2 nanoparticles, proved recently to be very attractive for adsorption of REE, yet not being the absolute key to solve the problem. In the present work, we introduce a highly appealing new approach in which the nanoparticles, rather than behaving as adsorbent materials, perform as inducers of crystallization for the REE in the form of hydroxides, allowing their facile and practically total removal from solution. This induced crystallization is achieved by tuning the pH, offering an uptake efficiency more than 20 times higher than previously reported (up to 900 mg RE3+/g vs. 40 mg RE3+/g). The obtained phases were characterized by SEM-EDS, TEM, STEM and EFTEM and 13C and 29Si solid state NMR. Magnetic studies showed that the materials possessed enough magnetic properties to be easily removed by a magnet, opening ways for an efficient and industrially applicable separation technique.

  18. The Earth Observing System (EOS) nickel-hydrogen battery

    Bennett, Charles W.

    1992-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form on the Earth Observing System (EOS) nickel hydrogen battery. Information is given on the life evaluation test, cell characteristics, acceptance and characterization tests, and the battery system description.

  19. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 122; Issue 2 ... (SVM); geographical information systems (GIS); remote sensing; Golestan province; Iran. ... Department of Watershed Management Engineering, College of Natural ...

  20. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 114; Issue 5 ... a Geographical Information System (GIS)based hydrogeomorphic approach in the ... The integrated study helps design a suitable groundwater management plan for a ...

  1. Terra - the Earth Observing System flagship observatory

    Thome, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Terra platform enters its teenage years with an array of accomplishments but also with the potential to do much more. Efforts continue to extend the Terra data record to build upon its array of accomplishments and make its data more valuable by creating a record length that allows examination of inter annual variability, observe trends on the decadal scale, and gather statistics relevant to the define climate metrics. Continued data from Terra's complementary instruments will play a key role in creating the data record needed for scientists to develop an understanding of our climate system. Terra's suite of instruments: ASTER (contributed by the Japanese Ministry of Economy and Trade and Industry with a JPL-led US Science Team), CERES (NASA LaRC - PI), MISR (JPL - PI), MODIS (NASA GSFC), and MOPITT (sponsored by Canadian Space Agency with NCAR-led Science Team) are providing an unprecedented 81 core data products. The annual demand for Terra data remains with >120 million files distributed in 2011 and >157 million in 2012. More than 1,100 peer-reviewed publications appeared in 2012 using Terra data bringing the lifetime total >7,600. Citation numbers of 21,000 for 2012 and over 100,000 for the mission's lifetime. The broad range of products enable the community to provide answers to the overarching question, 'How is the Earth changing and what are the consequences for life on Earth?' Terra continues to provide data that: (1) Extend the baseline of morning-orbit collections; (2) Enable comparison of measurements acquired from past high-impact events; (3) Add value to recently-launched and soon-to-be launched missions, and upcoming field programs. Terra data continue to support monitoring and relief efforts for natural and man-made disasters that involve U.S. interests. Terra also contributes to Applications Focus Areas supporting the U.S. National Objectives for agriculture, air quality, climate, disaster management, ecological forecasting, public health, water

  2. Precipitation from Space: Advancing Earth System Science

    Kucera, Paul A.; Ebert, Elizabeth E.; Turk, F. Joseph; Levizzani, Vicenzo; Kirschbaum, Dalia; Tapiador, Francisco J.; Loew, Alexander; Borsche, M.

    2012-01-01

    Of the three primary sources of spatially contiguous precipitation observations (surface networks, ground-based radar, and satellite-based radar/radiometers), only the last is a viable source over ocean and much of the Earth's land. As recently as 15 years ago, users needing quantitative detail of precipitation on anything under a monthly time scale relied upon products derived from geostationary satellite thermal infrared (IR) indices. The Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) passive microwave (PMW) imagers originated in 1987 and continue today with the SSMI sounder (SSMIS) sensor. The fortunate longevity of the joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is providing the environmental science community a nearly unbroken data record (as of April 2012, over 14 years) of tropical and sub-tropical precipitation processes. TRMM was originally conceived in the mid-1980s as a climate mission with relatively modest goals, including monthly averaged precipitation. TRMM data were quickly exploited for model data assimilation and, beginning in 1999 with the availability of near real time data, for tropical cyclone warnings. To overcome the intermittently spaced revisit from these and other low Earth-orbiting satellites, many methods to merge PMW-based precipitation data and geostationary satellite observations have been developed, such as the TRMM Multisatellite Precipitation Product and the Climate Prediction Center (CPC) morphing method (CMORPH. The purpose of this article is not to provide a survey or assessment of these and other satellite-based precipitation datasets, which are well summarized in several recent articles. Rather, the intent is to demonstrate how the availability and continuity of satellite-based precipitation data records is transforming the ways that scientific and societal issues related to precipitation are addressed, in ways that would not be

  3. Climate Change Education in Earth System Science

    Hänsel, Stephanie; Matschullat, Jörg

    2013-04-01

    The course "Atmospheric Research - Climate Change" is offered to master Earth System Science students within the specialisation "Climate and Environment" at the Technical University Bergakademie Freiberg. This module takes a comprehensive approach to climate sciences, reaching from the natural sciences background of climate change via the social components of the issue to the statistical analysis of changes in climate parameters. The course aims at qualifying the students to structure the physical and chemical basics of the climate system including relevant feedbacks. The students can evaluate relevant drivers of climate variability and change on various temporal and spatial scales and can transform knowledge from climate history to the present and the future. Special focus is given to the assessment of uncertainties related to climate observations and projections as well as the specific challenges of extreme weather and climate events. At the end of the course the students are able to critically reflect and evaluate climate change related results of scientific studies and related issues in media. The course is divided into two parts - "Climate Change" and "Climate Data Analysis" and encompasses two lectures, one seminar and one exercise. The weekly "Climate change" lecture transmits the physical and chemical background for climate variation and change. (Pre)historical, observed and projected climate changes and their effects on various sectors are being introduced and discussed regarding their implications for society, economics, ecology and politics. The related seminar presents and discusses the multiple reasons for controversy in climate change issues, based on various texts. Students train the presentation of scientific content and the discussion of climate change aspects. The biweekly lecture on "Climate data analysis" introduces the most relevant statistical tools and methods in climate science. Starting with checking data quality via tools of exploratory

  4. Systems and methods for monitoring a solid-liquid interface

    Stoddard, Nathan G; Lewis, Monte A.; Clark, Roger F

    2013-06-11

    Systems and methods are provided for monitoring a solid-liquid interface during a casting process. The systems and methods enable determination of the location of a solid-liquid interface during the casting process.

  5. The Crew Earth Observations Experiment: Earth System Science from the ISS

    Stefanov, William L.; Evans, Cynthia A.; Robinson, Julie A.; Wilkinson, M. Justin

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of Astronaut Photography (AP) as taken from the International Space Station (ISS) in Earth System Science (ESS). Included are slides showing basic remote sensing theory, data characteristics of astronaut photography, astronaut training and operations, crew Earth observations group, targeting sites and acquisition, cataloging and database, analysis and applications for ESS, image analysis of particular interest urban areas, megafans, deltas, coral reefs. There are examples of the photographs and the analysis.

  6. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 122; Issue 5 .... Atmospheric correction of Earth-observation remote sensing images by Monte Carlo method ... Decision tree approach for classification of remotely sensed satellite data ... Analysis of carbon dioxide, water vapour and energy fluxes over an Indian ...

  7. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 122; Issue 6. Volume 122, Issue 6. December 2013, pages 1435-1637. pp 1435-1453. The South India Precambrian crust and shallow lithospheric mantle: Initial results from the India Deep Earth Imaging Experiment (INDEX) · S S Rai Kajaljyoti Borah Ritima Das ...

  8. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    pp 485-498. Determination of rare earth and refractory trace element abundances in early solar system objects by ion microprobe · S Sahijpal K K Marhas J N Goswami · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Experimental and analytical procedures devised for measurement of rare earth element (REE) abundances using a ...

  9. Dynamics of the Sun-Earth-Moon System

    The dynamics of the Sun-Earth-Moon system is discussed with special attention to the effects of. Sun's perturbations on the Moon's orbit around the Earth. Important secular effects are the re- gression of the nodes, the advance of the perigee and the increase in the Moon's mean longitude. We discuss the relationship of the ...

  10. The computational challenges of Earth-system science.

    O'Neill, Alan; Steenman-Clark, Lois

    2002-06-15

    The Earth system--comprising atmosphere, ocean, land, cryosphere and biosphere--is an immensely complex system, involving processes and interactions on a wide range of space- and time-scales. To understand and predict the evolution of the Earth system is one of the greatest challenges of modern science, with success likely to bring enormous societal benefits. High-performance computing, along with the wealth of new observational data, is revolutionizing our ability to simulate the Earth system with computer models that link the different components of the system together. There are, however, considerable scientific and technical challenges to be overcome. This paper will consider four of them: complexity, spatial resolution, inherent uncertainty and time-scales. Meeting these challenges requires a significant increase in the power of high-performance computers. The benefits of being able to make reliable predictions about the evolution of the Earth system should, on their own, amply repay this investment.

  11. GRACE, time-varying gravity, Earth system dynamics and climate change

    Wouters, B.; Bonin, J. A.; Chambers, D. P.; Riva, R. E. M.; Sasgen, I.; Wahr, J.

    2014-11-01

    Continuous observations of temporal variations in the Earth's gravity field have recently become available at an unprecedented resolution of a few hundreds of kilometers. The gravity field is a product of the Earth's mass distribution, and these data—provided by the satellites of the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE)—can be used to study the exchange of mass both within the Earth and at its surface. Since the launch of the mission in 2002, GRACE data has evolved from being an experimental measurement needing validation from ground truth, to a respected tool for Earth scientists representing a fixed bound on the total change and is now an important tool to help unravel the complex dynamics of the Earth system and climate change. In this review, we present the mission concept and its theoretical background, discuss the data and give an overview of the major advances GRACE has provided in Earth science, with a focus on hydrology, solid Earth sciences, glaciology and oceanography.

  12. GRACE, time-varying gravity, Earth system dynamics and climate change

    Wouters, B; Bonin, J A; Chambers, D P; Riva, R E M; Sasgen, I; Wahr, J

    2014-01-01

    Continuous observations of temporal variations in the Earth's gravity field have recently become available at an unprecedented resolution of a few hundreds of kilometers. The gravity field is a product of the Earth's mass distribution, and these data—provided by the satellites of the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE)—can be used to study the exchange of mass both within the Earth and at its surface. Since the launch of the mission in 2002, GRACE data has evolved from being an experimental measurement needing validation from ground truth, to a respected tool for Earth scientists representing a fixed bound on the total change and is now an important tool to help unravel the complex dynamics of the Earth system and climate change. In this review, we present the mission concept and its theoretical background, discuss the data and give an overview of the major advances GRACE has provided in Earth science, with a focus on hydrology, solid Earth sciences, glaciology and oceanography. (review article)

  13. Systems for production of polymer encapsuated solids

    Bourcier, William L.; Aines, Roger D.; Baker, Sarah E.; Duoss, Eric B.; Maiti, Amitesh; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Stolaroff, Joshuah K.; Vericella, John J.; Lewis, Jennifer A.; Hardin, IV, James O.; Floyd, III, William C.

    2017-11-21

    Encapsulated solids are made by first encapsulating precursor materials in a polymer shell. The precursors are some combination of solids, liquids, gases, and/or gels. The precursors are then transformed into solids by emplacement of the capsule in an environment where gas or fluid transport into or out of the polymer shell causes transformation into solids.

  14. WHERE TO FIND HABITABLE ''EARTHS'' IN CIRCUMBINARY SYSTEMS

    Liu Huigen; Zhang Hui; Zhou Jilin

    2013-01-01

    Six P-type planets have been found thus far around five binary systems, i.e., Kepler-16b, 34b, 35b, 38b, and 47b and c, which are all Neptune- or Jupiter-like planets. The stability of planets and the habitable zones are influenced by the gravitational and radiative perturbations of binary companions. In this Letter, we check the stability of an additional habitable Earth-mass planet in each system. Based on our simulations in 10 Myr, a habitable ''Earth'' is hardly stable in Kepler-16, while a stable ''Earth'' in Kepler-47 close to the boundaries of the habitable zone is possible. In contrast, Kepler-34, 35, and 38 seem to have high probabilities of being able to tolerante a stable ''Earth'' in their habitable zones. The affects of transit time variations are quite small due to the small mass of an undetected ''Earth,'' except that of Kepler-16b. With a time precision of 10 –3 day (∼88 s), an ''Earth'' in the corotational resonance with Kepler-16b can be detected in three years, while habitable ''Earths'' in the Kepler-34 and 38 systems can be detected in 10 yr. Habitable ''Earths'' in Kepler-35 and 47 are not likely to be detected in 10 yr under this precision.

  15. The Pilgram's Progress: Reflections on the journey building Australia's solid earth information infrastructure (Invited)

    Woodcock, R.

    2013-12-01

    Australia's AuScope provides world class research infrastructure as a framework for understanding the structure and evolution of the Australian continent. Since it conception in 2005, Data Scientists have led the Grid and Interoperability component of AuScope. The AuScope Grid is responsible for the effective management, curation, preservation and analysis of earth science data across the many organisations collaborating in AuScope. During this journey much was learned about technology and architectures but even more about organisations and people, and the role of Data Scientists in the science ecosystem. With the AuScope Grid now in operation and resulting techniques and technologies now underpinning Australian Government initiatives in solid earth and environmental information, it is beneficial to reflect upon the journey and observe what has been learned in order to make data science routine. The role of the Data Scientist is a hybrid one, of not quite belonging and yet highly valued. With the skills to support domain scientists with data and computational needs and communicate across domains, yet not quite able to do the domain science itself. A bridge between two worlds, there is tremendous satisfaction from a job well done, but paradoxically it is also best when it is unnoticeable. In the years since AuScope started much has changed for the Data Scientist. Initially misunderstood, Data Scientists are now a recognisable part of the science landscape in Australia. Whilst the rewards and incentives are still catching up, there is wealth of knowledge on the technical and soft skills required and recognition of the need for Data Scientists. These will be shared from the AuScope journey so other pilgrims may progress well.

  16. Advancing coupled human-earth system models: The integrated Earth System Model Project

    Thomson, A. M.; Edmonds, J. A.; Collins, W.; Thornton, P. E.; Hurtt, G. C.; Janetos, A. C.; Jones, A.; Mao, J.; Chini, L. P.; Calvin, K. V.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Shi, X.

    2012-12-01

    As human and biogeophysical models develop, opportunities for connections between them evolve and can be used to advance our understanding of human-earth systems interaction in the context of a changing climate. One such integration is taking place with the Community Earth System Model (CESM) and the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). A multi-disciplinary, multi-institution team has succeeded in integrating the GCAM integrated assessment model of human activity into CESM to dynamically represent the feedbacks between changing climate and human decision making, in the context of greenhouse gas mitigation policies. The first applications of this capability have focused on the feedbacks between climate change impacts on terrestrial ecosystem productivity and human decisions affecting future land use change, which are in turn connected to human decisions about energy systems and bioenergy production. These experiments have been conducted in the context of the RCP4.5 scenario, one of four pathways of future radiative forcing being used in CMIP5, which constrains future human-induced greenhouse gas emissions from energy and land activities to stabilize radiative forcing at 4.5 W/m2 (~650 ppm CO2 -eq) by 2100. When this pathway is run in GCAM with the climate feedback on terrestrial productivity from CESM, there are implications for both the land use and energy system changes required for stabilization. Early findings indicate that traditional definitions of radiative forcing used in scenario development are missing a critical component of the biogeophysical consequences of land use change and their contribution to effective radiative forcing. Initial full coupling of the two global models has important implications for how climate impacts on terrestrial ecosystems changes the dynamics of future land use change for agriculture and forestry, particularly in the context of a climate mitigation policy designed to reduce emissions from land use as well as energy systems

  17. Towards a community Earth System Model

    Blackmon, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Community Climate System Model, version 2 (CCSM2), was released in June 2002. CCSM2 has several new components and features, which I will discuss briefly. I will also show a few results from a multi-century equilibrium run with this model, emphasizing the improvements over the earlier simulation using the original CSM. A few flaws and inadequacies in CCSM2 have been identified. I will also discuss briefly work underway to improve the model and present results, if available. CCSM2, with improvements, will be the basis for the development of a Community Earth System Model (CESM). The highest priority for expansion of the model involves incorporation of biogeosciences into the coupled model system, with emphasis given to the carbon, nitrogen and iron cycles. The overall goal of the biogeosciences project within CESM is to understand the regulation of planetary energetics, planetary ecology, and planetary metabolism through exchanges of energy, momentum, and materials among atmosphere, land, and ocean, and the response of the climate system through these processes to changes in land cover and land use. In particular, this research addresses how biogeochemical coupling of carbon, nitrogen, and iron cycles affects climate and how human perturbations of these cycles alter climate. To accomplish these goals, the Community Land Model, the land component of CCSM2, is being developed to include river routing, carbon and nitrogen cycles, emissions of mineral aerosols and biogenic volatile organic compounds, dry deposition of various gases, and vegetation dynamics. The carbon and nitrogen cycles are being implemented using parameterizations developed as part of a state-of-the-art ecosystem biogeochemistry model. The primary goal of this research is to provide an accurate net flux of CO2 between the land and the atmosphere so that CESM can be used to study the dynamics of the coupled climate-carbon system. Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds are also based on a

  18. Women in EPOS: the role of women in a large pan-European Research Infrastructure for Solid Earth sciences

    Calignano, Elisa; Freda, Carmela; Baracchi, Laura

    2017-04-01

    Women are outnumbered by men in geosciences senior research positions, but what is the situation if we consider large pan-European Research Infrastructures? With this contribution we want to show an analysis of the role of women in the implementation of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS): a planned research infrastructure for European Solid Earth sciences, integrating national and transnational research infrastructures to enable innovative multidisciplinary research. EPOS involves 256 national research infrastructures, 47 partners (universities and research institutes) from 25 European countries and 4 international organizations. The EPOS integrated platform demands significant coordination between diverse solid Earth disciplinary communities, national research infrastructures and the policies and initiatives they drive, geoscientists and information technologists. The EPOS architecture takes into account governance, legal, financial and technical issues and is designed so that the enterprise works as a single, but distributed, sustainable research infrastructure. A solid management structure is vital for the successful implementation and sustainability of EPOS. The internal organization relies on community-specific Working Packages (WPs), Transversal WPs in charge of the overall EPOS integration and implementation, several governing, executive and advisory bodies, a Project Management Office (PMO) and the Project Coordinator. Driven by the timely debate on gender balance and commitment of the European Commission to promote gender equality in research and innovation, we decided to conduct a mapping exercise on a project that crosses European national borders and that brings together diverse geoscience disciplines under one management structure. We present an analysis of women representation in decision-making positions in each EPOS Working Package (WP Leader, proxy, legal, financial and IT contact persons), in the Boards and Councils and in the PMO

  19. Using the earth system for integrating the science curriculum

    Mayer, Victor J.

    Content and process instruction from the earth sciences has gone unrepresented in the world's science curricula, especially at the secondary level. As a result there is a serious deficiency in public understanding of the planet on which we all live. This lack includes national and international leaders in politics, business, and science. The earth system science effort now engaging the research talent of the earth sciences provides a firm foundation from the sciences for inclusion of earth systems content into the evolving integrated science curricula of this country and others. Implementing integrated science curricula, especially at the secondary level where potential leaders often have their only exposure to science, can help to address these problems. The earth system provides a conceptual theme as opposed to a disciplinary theme for organizing such integrated curricula, absent from prior efforts. The end of the cold war era is resulting in a reexamination of science and the influence it has had on our planet and society. In the future, science and the curricula that teach about science must seriously address the environmental and social problems left in the wake of over 100 years of preparation for military and economic war. The earth systems education effort provides one such approach to the modernization of science curricula. Earth science educators should assume leadership in helping to establish such curricula in this country and around the world.

  20. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 125; Issue 5 ... affects the shallow groundwaterproductivity in terms of quantity and quality. ... a sustainable groundwater management strategy toreduce long-terms drought risks.

  1. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 124; Issue 5 ... was conducted through seasonal water quality monitoring in the year 2011. ... National Centre for Sustainable Coastal Management, MOEF, Chennai 600 025, India.

  2. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 118; Issue 3 ... demand and also to formulate future development and management strategies. ... gives an early signal of deterioration in groundwater quality in the peripheral parts of ...

  3. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 126; Issue 3 ... Withregard to the lack of quality information and data in watersheds, it is of high ... Department of Watershed Management Engineering, Faculty of Agriculture, Lorestan ...

  4. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 115; Issue 6 ... Is the outcrop topology of dolerite dikes of the Precambrian Singhbhum Craton fractal? ... Plane strain deformation of a multi-layered poroelastic half-space by surface ...

  5. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 120; Issue 4 ... DEM; cell size; sink; fractal dimension; entropy; semivariogram. ... These methods were applied to determine the level artifacts (interpolation error) in DEM surface as ...

  6. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 124; Issue 7. Volume 124 ... 1377-1387. Regional biomass burning trends in India: Analysis of satellite fire data .... Spatio-temporal variations of b-value in and around north Pakistan.

  7. A new program in earth system science education

    Huntress, Wesley; Kalb, Michael W.; Johnson, Donald R.

    1990-01-01

    A program aimed at accelerating the development of earth system science curricula at the undergraduate level and at seeding the establishment of university-based mechanisms for cooperative research and education among universities and NASA has been initiated by the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) in conjunction with NASA. Proposals were submitted by 100 U.S. research universities which were selected as candidates to participate in a three-year pilot program to develop undergraduate curricula in earth system science. Universities were then selected based upon peer review and considerations of overall scientific balance among proposed programs. The program will also aim to integrate a number of universities with evolving earth system programs, linking them with a cooperative curriculum, shared faculty, and NASA scientists in order to establish a stronger base for earth systems related education and interdisciplinary research collaboration.

  8. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 117; Issue 6 ... oxidation of methane in coastal sediment from Guishan Island (Pearl River Estuary), South China Sea ... National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.

  9. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 126; Issue 8 ... Isotope fingerprinting of precipitation associated with western disturbances and .... of desert margin in western India using improved luminescence dating protocols.

  10. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Enrichment characteristics of radioelements in various types of rock from Sambalpur district, Orissa, ... Radiometric analysis; uranium; ternary diagram; rock type; quartzofeldspathic breccia; granite. ... Journal of Earth System Science | News.

  11. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Monitoring of fire incidences in vegetation types and Protected Areas of India: Implications on carbon emissions ... Forest fire; forest type; Protected Area; conservation; remote sensing; AWiFS; India. ... Journal of Earth System Science | News.

  12. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 120; Issue 1 ... formed by various processes, in the present area the association of these structures, ... scale) are thought to have been responsible for the soft-sediment deformations.

  13. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 121; Issue 3 ... The failure of atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) forced by ... Centre for Mathematical Modelling and Computer Simulation, Bangalore 560 037, India.

  14. NASA's Earth Science Data Systems Standards Endorsement Process

    Ullman, Richard E; Enloe, Yonsook

    2005-01-01

    Starting in January 2004, NASA instituted a set of internal working groups to develop ongoing recommendations for the continuing broad evolution of Earth Science Data Systems development and management within NASA...

  15. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 126; Issue 4 ... no matter how the upper channel adjusts, the main stream shows little change, providing ... drastic bank collapse and sandbar shrinking should be urgently controlled to ...

  16. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 124; Issue 7 ... mining; sediment dynamic; suspended sediment; watershed management. ... from a hillslope or channel, mirrors the watershed health, which needs to be quantified.

  17. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Earth systems; sustainability; world views; stewardship; Deep Ecology ... but has become widespread and even inescapable for many with massive control of ... meaning of different world views, whether founded in the world religions or in ...

  18. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 119; Issue 5 ... Miocene; western India; sesquiterpenoids; geochemistry; geology; biogeosciences. ... These sesquiterpenoids which are commonly detected in many SE Asian crude ...

  19. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 109; Issue 1 ... Crustal evolution; granites; Phanerozoic; Sr-Nd isotopes; east-central Asia. ... Department of Geology, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun ...

  20. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 113; Issue 3. The vorticity and angular momentum budgets of Asian summer monsoon ... School of Geography and Geology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4K1.

  1. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 127; Issue 2 ... GMPEs; PGA; uniform hazard spectra; spectrum-compatible natural accelerograms. ... from National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA 2010), in terms of PGA and ...

  2. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 122; Issue 4 ... in urban rivers using multivariate analysis: Implications for river management ... in the post-monsoon and pre-monsoon seasons during the time period 2008–2010.

  3. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 120; Issue 1 ... Results from time course experiments with both 15N and 13C tracers suggest ... Faculty of Natural Resources Management, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, ON, ...

  4. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 118; Issue 1 ... are essential for qualitative and quantitative analysis of snow cover applications. ... This study also suggests that the suitability of topographic models can not be ...

  5. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 113; Issue 3 ... in an area presently devoid of drainage bespeaks of occasional high-energy fluvial regime, ... The present studies indicate that aeolian dust or rainwater are minor ...

  6. Earth System Research Laboratory Long-Term Surface Aerosol Measurements

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aerosol measurements began at the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) Global Monitoring Division (GMD) baseline observatories in the mid-1970's with the...

  7. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 123; Issue 8 ... (SF) receivers has the advantages of stand-alone, absolute positioning and cost efficiency. ... College of Informatics, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, ...

  8. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 120; Issue 4 ... a human adjustment scenario, which assumes future improvements in water conservation ... Similarly, a severe drought would lead to a total streamflow loss of < 80%.

  9. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    ... belt typically occurs in elastico-frictional (EF) or quasi-plastic (QP) regimes at ... In contrast, the hanging wall schists and quartzites of the Ramgarh thrust exhibit quasi-plastic deformation structures. ... Journal of Earth System Science | News.

  10. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    The main crystal plastic deformation and fluid enhanced reaction softening was concentrated along the margin ... Low-T crystal plastic deformation of quartz was effected at a late stage of cooling and ... Journal of Earth System Science | News.

  11. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    . Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 126 Issue 8 December 2017 pp 109. GIS-based bivariate statistical techniques for groundwater potential analysis (an example of Iran) · Ali Haghizadeh Davoud Davoudi ...

  12. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 111; Issue 3 ... support the well-known fact that oceanic eddies are distributed worldwide in the ocean. ... The classification of typical vortical features in the ocean detected in remote ...

  13. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 125; Issue 5 ... ozone concentrations in the east of Croatia using nonparametric Neural Network Models ... to develop, for the first time, accurate ozone prediction models, onefor urban ...

  14. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Implication of surface modified NZVI particle retention in the porous media: Assessment with the help ... to evaluate the effect of particle retention on the porous media properties and its implication on ... Journal of Earth System Science | News.

  15. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    ... have a great influence on the accuracy of the migrated image in anisotropic media, and ignoring any one ... can obtain more accurate seismic images of subsurface structures in anisotropic media. ... Journal of Earth System Science | News.

  16. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 126; Issue 5 ... pairs of benthic foraminifera from the Krishna–Godavari basin and Peru offshore to ... Department of Applied Geology, Indian Institute of Technology (Indian School of ...

  17. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 121; Issue 5 ... owing to rugged terrain at high altitude, high frequency of intense rainfall and rapidly ... School of Civil Engineering, SASTRA University, Thanjavur, Tamilnadu, India.

  18. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 116; Issue 3 ... proposed to reconstruct the ionospheric images with high resolution and high efficiency. ... Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100 039, China.

  19. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 125; Issue 5 ... In the upper layer, themaximum shear stress is high in the Zhangjiakou area, whereas in the ... School of Resources and Geoscience, China University of Mining and ...

  20. Collaborative Project. Mode and Intermediate Waters in Earth System Models

    Sarmiento, Jorge L. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Dufour, Carolina [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Rodgers, Keith B. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2015-12-16

    The focus of this grant was on diagnosing the physical mechanisms controlling upper ocean water mass formation and carbon distribution in Earth System Models (ESMs), with the goal of improving the physics that controls their formation.

  1. Laurel Clark Earth Camp: Building a Framework for Teacher and Student Understanding of Earth Systems

    Colodner, D.; Buxner, S.; Schwartz, K.; Orchard, A.; Titcomb, A.; King, B.; Baldridge, A.; Thomas-Hilburn, H.; Crown, D. A.

    2013-04-01

    Laurel Clark Earth Camp is designed to inspire teachers and students to study their world through field experiences, remote sensing investigations, and hands on exploration, all of which lend context to scientific inquiry. In three different programs (for middle school students, for high school students, and for teachers) participants are challenged to understand Earth processes from the perspectives of both on-the ground inspection and from examination of satellite images, and use those multiple perspectives to determine best practices on both a societal and individual scale. Earth Camp is a field-based program that takes place both in the “natural” and built environment. Middle School Earth Camp introduces students to a variety of environmental science, engineering, technology, and societal approaches to sustainability. High School Earth Camp explores ecology and water resources from southern Arizona to eastern Utah, including a 5 day rafting trip. In both camps, students compare environmental change observed through repeat photography on the ground to changes observed from space. Students are encouraged to utilize their camp experience in considering their future course of study, career objectives, and lifestyle choices. During Earth Camp for Educators, teachers participate in a series of weekend workshops to explore relevant environmental science practices, including water quality testing, biodiversity surveys, water and light audits, and remote sensing. Teachers engage students, both in school and after school, in scientific investigations with this broad based set of tools. Earth Stories from Space is a website that will assist in developing skills and comfort in analyzing change over time and space using remotely sensed images. Through this three-year NASA funded program, participants will appreciate the importance of scale and perspective in understanding Earth systems and become inspired to make choices that protect the environment.

  2. Technical Note: The Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy - a new approach towards Earth System Modeling

    P. Jöckel

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a comprehensive Earth System Model (ESM to study the interactions between chemical, physical, and biological processes, requires coupling of the different domains (land, ocean, atmosphere, .... One strategy is to link existing domain-specific models with a universal coupler, i.e. an independent standalone program organizing the communication between other programs. In many cases, however, a much simpler approach is more feasible. We have developed the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy. It comprises (1 a modular interface structure to connect to a , (2 an extendable set of such for miscellaneous processes, and (3 a coding standard. MESSy is therefore not a coupler in the classical sense, but exchanges data between a and several within one comprehensive executable. The internal complexity of the is controllable in a transparent and user friendly way. This provides remarkable new possibilities to study feedback mechanisms (by two-way coupling. Note that the MESSy and the coupler approach can be combined. For instance, an atmospheric model implemented according to the MESSy standard could easily be coupled to an ocean model by means of an external coupler. The vision is to ultimately form a comprehensive ESM which includes a large set of submodels, and a base model which contains only a central clock and runtime control. This can be reached stepwise, since each process can be included independently. Starting from an existing model, process submodels can be reimplemented according to the MESSy standard. This procedure guarantees the availability of a state-of-the-art model for scientific applications at any time of the development. In principle, MESSy can be implemented into any kind of model, either global or regional. So far, the MESSy concept has been applied to the general circulation model ECHAM5 and a number of process boxmodels.

  3. The Role and Evolution of NASA's Earth Science Data Systems

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2015-01-01

    One of the three strategic goals of NASA is to Advance understanding of Earth and develop technologies to improve the quality of life on our home planet (NASA strategic plan 2014). NASA's Earth Science Data System (ESDS) Program directly supports this goal. NASA has been launching satellites for civilian Earth observations for over 40 years, and collecting data from various types of instruments. Especially since 1990, with the start of the Earth Observing System (EOS) Program, which was a part of the Mission to Planet Earth, the observations have been significantly more extensive in their volumes, variety and velocity. Frequent, global observations are made in support of Earth system science. An open data policy has been in effect since 1990, with no period of exclusive access and non-discriminatory access to data, free of charge. NASA currently holds nearly 10 petabytes of Earth science data including satellite, air-borne, and ground-based measurements and derived geophysical parameter products in digital form. Millions of users around the world are using NASA data for Earth science research and applications. In 2014, over a billion data files were downloaded by users from NASAs EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS), a system with 12 Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) across the U. S. As a core component of the ESDS Program, EOSDIS has been operating since 1994, and has been evolving continuously with advances in information technology. The ESDS Program influences as well as benefits from advances in Earth Science Informatics. The presentation will provide an overview of the role and evolution of NASAs ESDS Program.

  4. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. D S V V D Prasad. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 114 Issue 4 August 2005 pp 437-441. Geomagnetic activity control on VHF scintillations over an Indian low latitude station, Waltair (17.7°N, 83.3°E, 20°N dip) · D S V V D Prasad P V S Rama Rao ...

  5. Marine Aerosol Precursor Emissions for Earth System Models

    Maltrud, Mathew Einar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-25

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is generated by marine ecosystems and plays a major role in cloud formation over the ocean. Currently, Earth System Models use imposed flux of DMS from the ocean to the atmosphere that is independent of the climate state. We have added DMS as a prognostic variable to the Community Earth System Model (CESM) that depends on the distribution of phytoplankton species, and thus changes with climate.

  6. Energy Exascale Earth System Model (E3SM) Project Strategy

    Bader, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-18

    The E3SM project will assert and maintain an international scientific leadership position in the development of Earth system and climate models at the leading edge of scientific knowledge and computational capabilities. With its collaborators, it will demonstrate its leadership by using these models to achieve the goal of designing, executing, and analyzing climate and Earth system simulations that address the most critical scientific questions for the nation and DOE.

  7. Syllabus for Weizmann Course: Earth System Science 101

    Wiscombe, Warren J.

    2011-01-01

    This course aims for an understanding of Earth System Science and the interconnection of its various "spheres" (atmosphere, hydrosphere, etc.) by adopting the view that "the microcosm mirrors the macrocosm". We shall study a small set of microcosims, each residing primarily in one sphere, but substantially involving at least one other sphere, in order to illustrate the kinds of coupling that can occur and gain a greater appreciation of the complexity of even the smallest Earth System Science phenomenon.

  8. Incorporating Geoethics in Introductory Earth System Science Courses

    Schmitt, J.

    2014-12-01

    The integrative nature of Earth System Science courses provides extensive opportunities to introduce students to geoethical inquiry focused on globally significant societal issues. Geoscience education has traditionally lagged in its efforts to increase student awareness of the significance of geologic knowledge to understanding and responsibly confronting causes and possible solutions for emergent, newly emerging, and future problems of anthropogenic cause and consequence. Developing an understanding of the human impact on the earth system requires early (lower division) and for geoscience majors, repeated (upper division) curricular emphasis on the interactions of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, biosphere, and pedosphere across space and through time. Capturing the interest of university students in globally relevant earth system issues and their ethical dimensions while first learning about the earth system is an important initial step in bringing geoethical deliberation and awareness to the next generation of geoscientists. Development of a new introductory Earth System Science course replacing a traditional introductory Physical Geology course at Montana State University has involved abandonment of concept-based content organization in favor of a place-based approach incorporating examination of the complex interactions of earth system components and emergent issues and dilemmas deriving from the unique component interactions that characterize each locale. Thirteen different place-based week-long modules (using web- and classroom-based instruction) were developed to ensure cumulative broad coverage across the earth geographically and earth system components conceptually. Each place-based instructional module contains content of societal relevance requiring synthesis, critical evaluation, and reflection by students. Examples include making linkages between deforestation driven by economics and increased seismicity in Haiti, agriculture and development

  9. Inversion of Solid Earth's Varying Shape 2: Using Self-Consistency to Infer Static Ocean Topography

    Blewitt, G.; Clarke, P. J.

    2002-12-01

    We have developed a spectral approach to invert for the redistribution of mass on the Earth's surface given precise global geodetic measurements of the solid Earth's geometrical shape. We used the elastic load Love number formalism to characterize the redistributed mass as a spherical harmonic expansion, truncated at some degree and order n. [Clarke and Blewitt, this meeting]. Here we incorporate the additional physical constraint that the sea surface in hydrostatic equilibrium corresponds to an equipotential surface, to infer the non-steric component of static ocean topography. Our model rigorously accounts for self-gravitation of the ocean, continental surface mass, and the deformed solid Earth, such that the sea surface adopts a new equipotential surface consistent with ocean-land mass exchange, deformation of the geoid, deformation of the sea floor, and the geographical configuration of the oceans and continents. We develop a self-consistent spectral inversion method to solve for the distribution of continental surface mass that would generate geographic variations in relative mean sea level such that the total (ocean plus continental) mass distribution agrees with the original geodetic estimates to degree and order n. We apply this theory to study the contribution of seasonal inter-hemispheric (degree-1) mass transfer to seasonal variation in static ocean topography, using a published empirical seasonal model for degree-1 surface loading derived using GPS coordinate time series from the global IGS network [Blewitt et al., Science 294, 2,342-2,345, 2001]. The resulting predictions of seasonal variations of relative sea level strongly depend on location, with peak variations ranging from 3 mm to 19 mm. The largest peak variations are predicted in mid-August around Antarctica and the southern hemisphere in general; the lowest variations are predicted in the northern hemisphere. Corresponding maximum continental loading occurs in Canada and Siberia at the water

  10. The application of micro-column solid phase extraction techniques for the determination of rare earth elements in actinide containing matrices

    Carney, K.P.; Cummings, D.G.

    1995-01-01

    The design and characterization of an argon segmented-solid phase extraction system is described. A 200 ul volume micro-column has been constructed for the preconcentration of rare earth elements (REEs) from salt matrices containing uranium. An inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer has been utilized for simultaneous detection of Sr, Y and the REEs (namely Ce, Eu, La, Nd, Pr, Sm) at levels ranging from 5- to 2000 ppm in LiCl/KCl samples containing U. Preconcentration factors of 100 fold have been demonstrated. The precision, linear dynamic range and column performance of the system will be presented. (author). 5 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Earth System Grid and EGI interoperability

    Raciazek, J.; Petitdidier, M.; Gemuend, A.; Schwichtenberg, H.

    2012-04-01

    The Earth Science data centers have developed a data grid called Earth Science Grid Federation (ESGF) to give the scientific community world wide access to CMIP5 (Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project 5) climate data. The CMIP5 data will permit to evaluate the impact of climate change in various environmental and societal areas, such as regional climate, extreme events, agriculture, insurance… The ESGF grid provides services like searching, browsing and downloading of datasets. At the security level, ESGF data access is protected by an authentication mechanism. An ESGF trusted X509 Short-Lived EEC certificate with the correct roles/attributes is required to get access to the data in a non-interactive way (e.g. from a worker node). To access ESGF from EGI (i.e. by earth science applications running on EGI infrastructure), the security incompatibility between the two grids is the challenge: the EGI proxy certificate is not ESGF trusted nor it contains the correct roles/attributes. To solve this problem, we decided to use a Credential Translation Service (CTS) to translate the EGI X509 proxy certificate into the ESGF Short-Lived EEC certificate (the CTS will issue ESGF certificates based on EGI certificate authentication). From the end user perspective, the main steps to use the CTS are: the user binds his two identities (EGI and ESGF) together in the CTS using the CTS web interface (this steps has to be done only once) and then request an ESGF Short-Lived EEC certificate every time is needed, using a command-line tools. The implementation of the CTS is on-going. It is based on the open source MyProxy software stack, which is used in many grid infrastructures. On the client side, the "myproxy-logon" command-line tools is used to request the certificate translation. A new option has been added to "myproxy-logon" to select the original certificate (in our case, the EGI one). On the server side, MyProxy server operates in Certificate Authority mode, with a new module

  12. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Systems PVL Line

    Shearer, Susan; Rush, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    In July 2010, Stark State College (SSC), received Grant DE-EE0003229 from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Golden Field Office, for the development of the electrical and control systems, and mechanical commissioning of a unique 20kW scale high-pressure, high temperature, natural gas fueled Stack Block Test System (SBTS). SSC worked closely with subcontractor, Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) over a 13 month period to successfully complete the project activities. This system will be utilized by RRFCS for pre-commercial technology development and training of SSC student interns. In the longer term, when RRFCS is producing commercial products, SSC will utilize the equipment for workforce training. In addition to DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies program funding, RRFCS internal funds, funds from the state of Ohio, and funding from the DOE Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program have been utilized to design, develop and commission this equipment. Construction of the SBTS (mechanical components) was performed under a Grant from the State of Ohio through Ohio's Third Frontier program (Grant TECH 08-053). This Ohio program supported development of a system that uses natural gas as a fuel. Funding was provided under the Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-state Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program for modifications required to test on coal synthesis gas. The subject DOE program provided funding for the electrical build, control system development and mechanical commissioning. Performance testing, which includes electrical commissioning, was subsequently performed under the DOE SECA program. Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems is developing a megawatt-scale solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stationary power generation system. This system, based on RRFCS proprietary technology, is fueled with natural gas, and operates at elevated pressure. A critical success factor for development of the full scale system is the capability to

  13. Distributed Space Missions for Earth System Monitoring

    2013-01-01

    A key addition to Springer's Space Technology Library series, this edited volume features the work of dozens of authors and offers a wealth of perspectives on distributed Earth observation missions. In sum, it is an eloquent synthesis of the fullest possible range of current approaches to a fast-developing field characterized by growing membership of the 'space club' to include nations formerly regarded as part of the Third World. The volume's four discrete sections focus on the topic's various aspects, including the key theoretical and technical issues arising from the division of payloads onto different satellites. The first is devoted to analyzing distributed synthetic aperture radars, with bi- and multi-static radars receiving separate treatment. This is followed by a full discussion of relative dynamics, guidance, navigation and control. Here, the separate topics of design; establishment, maintenance and control; and measurements are developed with relative trajectory as a reference point, while the dis...

  14. Rare earth germanates

    Bondar', I.A.; Vinogradova, N.V.; Dem'yanets, L.N.

    1983-01-01

    Rare earth germanates attract close attention both as an independent class of compounds and analogues of a widely spread class of natural and synthetic minerals. The methods of rare earth germanate synthesis (solid-phase, hydrothermal) are considered. Systems on the basis of germanium and rare earth oxides, phase diagrams, phase transformations are studied. Using different chemical analysese the processes of rare earth germanate formation are investigated. IR spectra of alkali and rare earth metal germanates are presented, their comparative analysis being carried out. Crystal structures of the compounds, lattice parameters are studied. Fields of possible application of rare earth germanates are shown

  15. Connecting Earth Systems: Developing Holistic Understanding through the Earth-System-Science Model

    Gagnon, Valoree; Bradway, Heather

    2012-01-01

    For many years, Earth science concepts have been taught as thematic units with lessons in nice, neat chapter packages complete with labs and notes. But compartmentalized Earth science no longer exists, and implementing teaching methods that support student development of holistic understandings can be a time-consuming and difficult task. While…

  16. Retrofitting and operation solid radwaste system Dresden Station, Units 2 and 3

    Testa, J.; Homer, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    Units 2 and 3 at Dresden Station are twin 794 MW (net) BWR units that became operational in 1970 and 1971. The waste streams are typical of BWR stations, namely, bead resin and filter sludge (powdered resins and diatomaceous earth), evaporator concentrate containing approximately 25% dissolved solids and dry active waste. The original solid radwaste system utilized cement for solidification in open top 55 gallon drums. Remote handling was provided by means of a monorail with moving platforms supporting the drums. A relatively light-weight compactor was used to compact DAW into 55 gallon drums. Difficulties were experienced with this system

  17. Solid lipid nanoparticles: A drug carrier system

    Rashmi R Kokardekar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN are a type of nanoparticles. They are submicron colloidal carriers which are composed of physiological lipids, dispersed in water or in aqueous surfactant solutions. SLN have wide range of advantages over other types of nanoparticles. These include availability of large-scale production methods and no signs of cytotoxicity, which are main hindrances in the application of other types of nanoparticles. Hot and cold homogenization techniques are mainly employed for its production. They are mainly evaluated on the basis of their drug release profile and particle internal structure. The products based on SLN are under development. They have a very wide range of applications in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. They can be applied for any purpose, for which nanoparticles have a distinct advantage. Thus, SLN can be used extensively as an alternative to the existing drug carrier systems, providing more flexibility with respect to the area of applications and also aspects for commercialization.

  18. 2012 Community Earth System Model (CESM) Tutorial - Proposal to DOE

    Holland, Marika [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Bailey, David A [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2013-03-18

    The Community Earth System Model (CESM) is a fully-coupled, global climate model that provides state-of-the-art computer simulations of the Earth's past, present, and future climate states. This document provides the agenda and list of participants for the conference. Web materials for all lectures and practical sessions available from: http://www.cesm.ucar.edu/events/tutorials/073012/ .

  19. Orbital Noise in the Earth System and Climate Fluctuations

    Liu, Han-Shou; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Frequency noise in the variations of the Earth's obliquity (tilt) can modulate the insolation signal for climate change. Including this frequency noise effect on the incoming solar radiation, we have applied an energy balance climate model to calculate the climate fluctuations for the past one million years. Model simulation results are in good agreement with the geologically observed paleoclimate data. We conclude that orbital noise in the Earth system may be the major cause of the climate fluctuation cycles.

  20. Discover Earth: an earth system science program for libraries and their communities

    Dusenbery, P.

    2011-12-01

    The view from space has deepened our understanding of Earth as a global, dynamic system. Instruments on satellites and spacecraft, coupled with advances in ground-based research, have provided us with astonishing new perspectives of our planet. Now more than ever, enhancing the public's understanding of Earth's physical and biological systems is vital to helping citizens make informed policy decisions especially when they are faced with the consequences of global climate change. While the focus for education reform is on school improvement, there is considerable research that supports the role that out-of-school experiences can play in student achievement. Libraries provide an untapped resource for engaging underserved youth and their families in fostering an appreciation and deeper understanding of science and technology topics. The Space Science Institute's National Center for Interactive Learning (NCIL) in partnership with the American Library Association (ALA), the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI), and the National Girls Collaborative Project (NGCP) have received funding from NSF to develop a national project called the STAR Library Education Network: a hands-on learning program for libraries and their communities (or STAR-Net for short). STAR stands for Science-Technology, Activities and Resources. STAR-Net includes two exhibitions: Discover Earth and Discover Tech. The Discover Earth exhibition will focus on local earth science topics-such as weather, water cycle, and ecosystem changes-as well as a global view of our changing planet. The main take-away message (or Big Idea) for this exhibition is that the global environment changes - and is changed by - the host community's local environment. The project team is testing whether this approach will be a good strategy for engaging the public, especially in rural America. This presentation will provide an overview of the Discover Earth project and how it is integrating climate change ideas into the exhibit

  1. A fluid Foucault pendulum: the impossibility of achieving solid-body rotation on Earth

    Blum, Robert; Zimmerman, Daniel; Triana, Santiago; Lathrop, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Rotating fluid dynamics is key to our understanding of the Earth's atmosphere, oceans, and core, along with a plethora of astrophysical objects. Laboratory study of these natural systems often involves spinning experimental devices, which are assumed to tend to rigid rotation when unstirred. We present results showing that even at the tabletop scale, there is a measurable oscillatory flow driven by the precession of the experiment's axis as the earth rotates. We measure this flow in a rotating cylinder with an adjustable aspect ratio. The horizontal flow in the rotating frame is measured using particle tracking. The steady state is well-described by an inertial mode whose amplitude is maximum when the height to diameter ratio is 0.995, which matches theoretical predictions. We also quantify the resonant amplitude of the inertial mode in the cylinder and estimate the amplitude in other devices. We compare our results to similar studies done in spherical devices. [Triana et al., JGR, 117 (2012), B04103][Boisson et al., EPL, 98 (2012), 59002].

  2. The Earth System Science Education Experience: Personal Vignettes

    Ruzek, M.; Aron, J.; Maranto, G.; Reider, D.; Wake, C.

    2006-12-01

    Colleges and universities across the country and around the world have embraced the Earth system approach to gain deeper understanding of the interrelationships of processes that define the home planet. The Design Guide for Undergraduate Earth System Science Education, a product of the NASA/USRA Earth System Science Education for the 21st Century Program (ESSE 21), represents a synthesis of community understanding of the content and process of teaching and learning about Earth as a system. The web-based Design Guide serves faculty from multiple disciplines who wish to adopt an ESS approach in their own courses or programs. Illustrating the nine topical sections of the Design Guide are a series of short vignettes telling the story of how ESS is being used in the classroom, how ESS has contributed to institutional change and personal professional development, how ESS is being implemented at minority serving institutions, and the impact of ESS education on student research. Most vignettes are written from a personal perspective and reflect a direct experience with Earth System Science Education. Over forty vignettes have been assembled aiming to put a face on the results of the systemic reform efforts of the past fifteen years of the ESSE programs, documenting the sometimes intangible process of education reform to be shared with those seeking examples of ESS education. The vignettes are a vital complement to the Design Guide sections, and are also available as a separate collection on the Design Guide and ESSE 21 web sites.

  3. Earth System Stability Through Geologic Time

    Rothman, D.; Bowring, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Five times in the past 500 million years, mass extinctions haveresulted in the loss of greater than three-fourths of living species.Each of these events is associated with significant environmentalchange recorded in the carbon-isotopic composition of sedimentaryrocks. There are also many such environmental events in the geologicrecord that are not associated with mass extinctions. What makes themdifferent? Two factors appear important: the size of theenvironmental perturbation, and the time scale over which it occurs.We show that the natural perturbations of Earth's carbon cycle during thepast 500 million years exhibit a characteristic rate of change overtwo orders of magnitude in time scale. This characteristic rate isconsistent with the maximum rate that limits quasistatic (i.e., nearsteady-state) evolution of the carbon cycle. We identify this rate withmarginal stability, and show that mass extinctions occur on the fast,unstable side of the stability boundary. These results suggest thatthe great extinction events of the geologic past, and potentially a"sixth extinction" associated with modern environmental change, arecharacterized by common mechanisms of instability.

  4. Multidisciplinary projects and investigations on the solid earth geophysics; Metodi e prospettive per una maggiore conoscenza della crosta terrestre

    Slejko, D. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Gruppo Nazionale di Geofisica della Terra Solida, Trieste (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    Physical phenomena that occur in the solid part of the Earth are investigated by Solid Earth Geophysics together with problems related to the shape, location, and characteristics of the different parts that constitute the Earth. Repeated measurements lead the scientists to model the past evolution of the various processes as well as to forecast the future ones. Various disciplines refer to Solid Earth Geophysics, they are: Seismology, Gravimetry, Magnetometry, Geothermics, Geodesy, Geo electromagnetism, and Seismic Exploration. A special citation is due to Applied Geophysics, which are devoted to the identification of minerals, energetic and natural resources. The National Group of Solid Earth Geophysics was constituted in 1978 by CNR for promoting, developing, and coordinating researches related to Solid Earth Geophysics. The limited annual financial budget has conditioned the realisation of relevant multi-disciplinary projects. Nevertheless, important results were obtained in all different fields of Geophysics and were disseminated during the annual conference of the Group. A summary review of the main topics treated during the last conference is given here and some ideas for future research projects are presented. [Italian] La Geofisica della Terra Solida e' quella branca delle scienze e delle tecnologie che prende in considerazione dei fenomeni connessi con le caratteristiche fisiche della parte solida della Terra. La complessita' della costituzione della Terra e della sua evoluzione nel tempo implica che vengano prese in considerazione tutte le fenomenologie che si riescono a misurare e che costituiscono branche diverse della Geofisica: la Sismologia, la Gravimetria, la Magnetometria, la Geotermia, la Geodesia, il Geoelettromagnetismo, la Geofisica applicata. Ognuna di queste branche della Geofisica ha avuto in passato uno sviluppo quasi del tutto indipendente con collaborazioni o integrazioni dirtte ad obiettivi specifici, limitati anche nel tempo

  5. Mathematical modeling of earth's dynamical systems a primer

    Slingerland, Rudy

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical Modeling of Earth's Dynamical Systems gives earth scientists the essential skills for translating chemical and physical systems into mathematical and computational models that provide enhanced insight into Earth's processes. Using a step-by-step method, the book identifies the important geological variables of physical-chemical geoscience problems and describes the mechanisms that control these variables. This book is directed toward upper-level undergraduate students, graduate students, researchers, and professionals who want to learn how to abstract complex systems into sets of dynamic equations. It shows students how to recognize domains of interest and key factors, and how to explain assumptions in formal terms. The book reveals what data best tests ideas of how nature works, and cautions against inadequate transport laws, unconstrained coefficients, and unfalsifiable models. Various examples of processes and systems, and ample illustrations, are provided. Students using this text should be f...

  6. Simulating the Earth System Response to Negative Emissions

    Jackson, R. B.; Milne, J.; Littleton, E. W.; Jones, C.; Canadell, J.; Peters, G. P.; van Vuuren, D.; Davis, S. J.; Jonas, M.; Smith, P.; Ciais, P.; Rogelj, J.; Torvanger, A.; Shrestha, G.

    2016-12-01

    The natural carbon sinks of the land and oceans absorb approximately half the anthropogenic CO2 emitted every year. The CO2 that is not absorbed accumulates in the Earth's atmosphere and traps the suns rays causing an increase in the global mean temperature. Removing this left over CO2 using negative emissions technologies (NETs) has been proposed as a strategy to lessen the accumulating CO2 and avoid dangerous climate change. Using CMIP5 Earth system model simulations this study assessed the impact on the global carbon cycle, and how the Earth system might respond, to negative emissions strategies applied to low emissions scenarios, over different times horizons from the year 2000 to 2300. The modeling results suggest that using NETs to remove atmospheric CO2 over five 50-year time horizons has varying effects at different points in time. The effects of anthropogenic and natural sources and sinks, can result in positive or negative changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration. Results show that historic emissions and the current state of the Earth System have impacts on the behavior of atmospheric CO2, as do instantaneous anthropogenic emissions. Indeed, varying background scenarios seemed to have a greater effect on atmospheric CO2 than the actual amount and timing of NETs. These results show how NETs interact with the physical climate-carbon cycle system and highlight the need for more research on earth-system dynamics as they relate to carbon sinks and sources and anthropogenic perturbations.

  7. "New Space Explosion" and Earth Observing System Capabilities

    Stensaas, G. L.; Casey, K.; Snyder, G. I.; Christopherson, J.

    2017-12-01

    This presentation will describe recent developments in spaceborne remote sensing, including introduction to some of the increasing number of new firms entering the market, along with new systems and successes from established players, as well as industry consolidation reactions to these developments from communities of users. The information in this presentation will include inputs from the results of the Joint Agency Commercial Imagery Evaluation (JACIE) 2017 Civil Commercial Imagery Evaluation Workshop and the use of the US Geological Survey's Requirements Capabilities and Analysis for Earth Observation (RCA-EO) centralized Earth observing systems database and how system performance parameters are used with user science applications requirements.

  8. Electromagnetic Calculation of Combined Earthing System with Ring Earth Electrode and Vertical Rods for Wind Turbine

    Fujii, Toshiaki; Yasuda, Yoh; Ueda, Toshiaki

    With the worldwide spread of wind turbine installations, various problems such as landscape issues, bird strikes and grid connections have arisen. Protection of wind turbines from lightning is cited as one of the main problems. Wind turbines are often struck by lightning because of their open-air locations, such as in mountainous areas, and their special configuration and very-high construction. Especially, low-voltage and control circuits can fail or suffer burnout while blades can incur serious damage if struck by lightning. Wind turbine failures caused by lightning strikes account for approximately 25% of all failures. The problem is regarded as a global one that needs immediate resolution. It is important to understand the impedance characteristics of wind turbine earthing systems from the viewpoint of lightning protection. A report from IEC TR61400-24 recommends a “ring earth electrode”. This was originally defined in IEC 61024 (currently revised and re-numbered as IEC 62305), where such an electrode is recommended to reduce touch and step voltages in households and buildings. IEC TR61400-24 also recommended additional electrodes of vertical or horizontal rods. However, these concepts have not been fully discussed from the viewpoint of its application to wind turbines. To confirm the effect of a combination of a ring earth electrode and additional vertical rods for protection of a wind turbine, this report uses the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method to present an electromagnetic transient analysis on such a wind turbine earthing system. The results show that an optimal combination can be arranged from viewpoints of lightning protection and construction cost. Thus, this report discusses how to establish a quantitative design methodology of the wind turbine earthing system to provide effective lightning protection.

  9. RITD - Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    Haukka, H.; Heilimo, J.; Harri, A.-M.; Aleksashkin, S.; Koryanov, V.; Arruego, I.; Schmidt, W.; Finchenko, V.; Martynov, M.; Ponomarenko, A.; Kazakovtsev, V.; Martin, S.

    2015-10-01

    We have developed an atmospheric re-entry and descent system concept based on inflatable hypersonic decelerator techniques that were originally developed for Mars. The ultimate goal of this EU-funded RITD-project (Re-entry: Inflatable Technology Development) was to assess the benefits of this technology when deploying small payloads from low Earth orbits to the surface of the Earth with modest costs. The principal goal was to assess and develop a preliminary EDLS design for the entire relevant range of aerodynamic regimes expected to be encountered in Earth's atmosphere during entry, descent and landing. Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and even Lunar applications envisaged include the use of the EDLS approach in returning payloads of 4-8 kg down to the surface.

  10. Calculated solubility isotherm of a system of alkaline earth sulfates and hydroxides in water

    MOshinskii, A.S.; TIkomirova, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    Tis paper examines the calculation of the isothermal solubility diagram of a system of alkaline earth sulfates and hydroxides in water which makes it possible to substantiate, to a considerable extent, the natural physicochemical mineralization of natural waters, in particular water from geochemical sources. The present paper investigates the solubility of the equilibrium solid phases of a system of alkaline earth sulfates and hydroxides in water. A projection is shown of the composition prism of the quinary reciprocal system with demarcation of the crystallization areas of each sulfate and hydroxide of the component subsystems. The computational formulas for calculating solubility were derived from the solubility product principle, with allowance for ion activity coefficients in saturated hydroxide solutions

  11. EPOS-WP16: A coherent and collaborative network of Solid Earth Multi-scale laboratories

    Calignano, Elisa; Rosenau, Matthias; Lange, Otto; Spiers, Chris; Willingshofer, Ernst; Drury, Martyn; van Kan-Parker, Mirjam; Elger, Kirsten; Ulbricht, Damian; Funiciello, Francesca; Trippanera, Daniele; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Tesei, Telemaco; Winkler, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    Laboratory facilities are an integral part of Earth Science research. The diversity of methods employed in such infrastructures reflects the multi-scale nature of the Earth system and is essential for the understanding of its evolution, for the assessment of geo-hazards and for the sustainable exploitation of geo-resources. In the frame of EPOS (European Plate Observing System), the Working Package 16 represents a developing community of European Geoscience Multi-scale laboratories. The participant and collaborating institutions (Utrecht University, GFZ, RomaTre University, INGV, NERC, CSIC-ICTJA, CNRS, LMU, C4G-UBI, ETH, CNR*) embody several types of laboratory infrastructures, engaged in different fields of interest of Earth Science: from high temperature and pressure experimental facilities, to electron microscopy, micro-beam analysis, analogue tectonic and geodynamic modelling and paleomagnetic laboratories. The length scales encompassed by these infrastructures range from the nano- and micrometre levels (electron microscopy and micro-beam analysis) to the scale of experiments on centimetres-sized samples, and to analogue model experiments simulating the reservoir scale, the basin scale and the plate scale. The aim of WP16 is to provide two services by the year 2019: first, providing virtual access to data from laboratories (data service) and, second, providing physical access to laboratories (transnational access, TNA). Regarding the development of a data service, the current status is such that most data produced by the various laboratory centres and networks are available only in limited "final form" in publications, many data remain inaccessible and/or poorly preserved. Within EPOS the TCS Multi-scale laboratories is collecting and harmonizing available and emerging laboratory data on the properties and process controlling rock system behaviour at all relevant scales, in order to generate products accessible and interoperable through services for supporting

  12. Sun, the Earth, and Near-Earth Space: A Guide to the Sun-Earth System

    Eddy, John A.

    2010-01-01

    In a world of warmth and light and living things we soon forget that we are surrounded by a vast universe that is cold and dark and deadly dangerous, just beyond our door. On a starry night, when we look out into the darkness that lies around us, the view can be misleading in yet another way: for the brightness and sheer number of stars, and their chance groupings into familiar constellations, make them seem much nearer to each other, and to us, that in truth they are. And every one of them--each twinkling, like a diamond in the sky--is a white-hot sun, much like our own. The nearest stars in our own galaxy--the Milky Way-- are more than a million times further away from us than our star, the Sun. We could make a telephone call to the Moon and expect to wait but a few seconds between pieces of a conversation, or but a few hours in calling any planet in our solar system.

  13. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 122 Issue 4 August 2013 pp 899-933. Tidal variations in the Sundarbans Estuarine System, India · Meenakshi Chatterjee D ... 5 July 2014 pp 1045-1074. Observed intraseasonal and seasonal variability of the West India Coastal Current on the continental slope.

  14. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 125; Issue 8 ... in conformity with their relation to (earthquake induced) shear system evolution in this terrain. ... Sanjoy Mahato1 Arka Ranjan Jana1 P B Maithani3 P V Ramesh Babu3.

  15. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 122; Issue 4. Volume ... Tidal variations in the Sundarbans Estuarine System, India ... The tidal asymmetry and stand have implications for human activity in the Sundarbans. ..... zonation in urban rivers using multivariate analysis: Implications for river management.

  16. Coupling population dynamics with earth system models: the POPEM model.

    Navarro, Andrés; Moreno, Raúl; Jiménez-Alcázar, Alfonso; Tapiador, Francisco J

    2017-09-16

    Precise modeling of CO 2 emissions is important for environmental research. This paper presents a new model of human population dynamics that can be embedded into ESMs (Earth System Models) to improve climate modeling. Through a system dynamics approach, we develop a cohort-component model that successfully simulates historical population dynamics with fine spatial resolution (about 1°×1°). The population projections are used to improve the estimates of CO 2 emissions, thus transcending the bulk approach of existing models and allowing more realistic non-linear effects to feature in the simulations. The module, dubbed POPEM (from Population Parameterization for Earth Models), is compared with current emission inventories and validated against UN aggregated data. Finally, it is shown that the module can be used to advance toward fully coupling the social and natural components of the Earth system, an emerging research path for environmental science and pollution research.

  17. Introduction to modern Fortran for the Earth system sciences

    Chirila, Dragos B

    2014-01-01

    This work provides a short "getting started" guide to Fortran 90/95. The main target audience consists of newcomers to the field of numerical computation within Earth system sciences (students, researchers or scientific programmers). Furthermore, readers accustomed to other programming languages may also benefit from this work, by discovering how some programming techniques they are familiar with map to Fortran 95. The main goal is to enable readers to quickly start using Fortran 95 for writing useful programs. It also introduces a gradual discussion of Input/Output facilities relevant for Earth system sciences, from the simplest ones to the more advanced netCDF library (which has become a de facto standard for handling the massive datasets used within Earth system sciences). While related works already treat these disciplines separately (each often providing much more information than needed by the beginning practitioner), the reader finds in this book a shorter guide which links them. Compared to other book...

  18. Earth Orbiting Support Systems for commercial low Earth orbit data relay: Assessing architectures through tradespace exploration

    Palermo, Gianluca; Golkar, Alessandro; Gaudenzi, Paolo

    2015-06-01

    As small satellites and Sun Synchronous Earth Observation systems are assuming an increased role in nowadays space activities, including commercial investments, it is of interest to assess how infrastructures could be developed to support the development of such systems and other spacecraft that could benefit from having a data relay service in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), as opposed to traditional Geostationary relays. This paper presents a tradespace exploration study of the architecture of such LEO commercial satellite data relay systems, here defined as Earth Orbiting Support Systems (EOSS). The paper proposes a methodology to formulate architectural decisions for EOSS constellations, and enumerate the corresponding tradespace of feasible architectures. Evaluation metrics are proposed to measure benefits and costs of architectures; lastly, a multicriteria Pareto criterion is used to downselect optimal architectures for subsequent analysis. The methodology is applied to two case studies for a set of 30 and 100 customer-spacecraft respectively, representing potential markets for LEO services in Exploration, Earth Observation, Science, and CubeSats. Pareto analysis shows how increased performance of the constellation is always achieved by an increased node size, as measured by the gain of the communications antenna mounted on EOSS spacecraft. On the other hand, nonlinear trends in optimal orbital altitude, number of satellites per plane, and number of orbital planes, are found in both cases. An upward trend in individual node memory capacity is found, although never exceeding 256 Gbits of onboard memory for both cases that have been considered, assuming the availability of a polar ground station for EOSS data downlink. System architects can use the proposed methodology to identify optimal EOSS constellations for a given service pricing strategy and customer target, thus identifying alternatives for selection by decision makers.

  19. The Sun/Earth System and Space Weather

    Poland, Arthur I.; Fox, Nicola; Lucid, Shannon

    2003-01-01

    Solar variability and solar activity are now seen as significant drivers with respect to the Earth and human technology systems. Observations over the last 10 years have significantly advanced our understanding of causes and effects in the Sun/Earth system. On a practical level the interactions between the Sun and Earth dictate how we build our systems in space (communications satellites, GPS, etc), and some of our ground systems (power grids). This talk will be about the Sun/Earth system: how it changes with time, its magnetic interactions, flares, the solar wind, and how the Sun effects human systems. Data will be presented from some current spacecraft which show, for example, how we are able to currently give warnings to the scientific community, the Government and industry about space storms and how this data has improved our physical understanding of processes on the Sun and in the magnetosphere. The scientific advances provided by our current spacecraft has led to a new program in NASA to develop a 'Space Weather' system called 'Living With a Star'. The current plan for the 'Living With a Star' program will also be presented.

  20. Syndication of the earth system: the future of geoscience?

    Elliott, Scott M.; Hanson, Howard P.

    2003-01-01

    Current global change policy debate reverberates around the polarized extremes of civilization-level cooperation through treaties as a mitigation tactic, on the one hand, and a wait-and-see approach that may lead to a climatic tragedy of the commons, on the other. Meanwhile, energy technology research is rapidly generating a perception that it will be possible to tune the earth system via carbon sequestration and other types of biogeochemical engineering. The consequences of this potential for planetary management, based on provincial self-interest, include the transition of the earth sciences into a security industry involving proprietary scientific knowledge bases of biogeochemical cycling and the evolution of a climate-design brokerage dominated by military/industrial interests. As the dominant political powers perceive the potential for planetary engineering and consider implementation, the global economy will adjust to exploit new opportunities, perceptions of which will be determined by the quality of system simulations. The growth of a viable international climate-design community will profoundly influence the trajectory of the earth system by providing either the illusion or the reality of predictability. Although this process will be chaotic at first, the probability of stabilization will ultimately be enhanced because the vast resources of the military/industrial sector will become involved. These concepts are disturbingly familiar in that they acknowledge the pervasion of competition and conflict in human technological affairs. However, they are consistent with approaches used in thermodynamics, ecological energetics, behavioral evolution, economics, and interdisciplinary climate science to describe collectively the evolution of the earth system. This paper argues that the perception that the climate can be regulated inexpensively will create an economic driving force for international cartel-style management of the total earth system. That is, the earth

  1. Using Interactive Visualization to Analyze Solid Earth Data and Geodynamics Models

    Kellogg, L. H.; Kreylos, O.; Billen, M. I.; Hamann, B.; Jadamec, M. A.; Rundle, J. B.; van Aalsburg, J.; Yikilmaz, M. B.

    2008-12-01

    The geological sciences are challenged to manage and interpret increasing volumes of data as observations and simulations increase in size and complexity. Major projects such as EarthScope and GeoEarthScope are producing the data needed to characterize the structure and kinematics of Earth's surface and interior at unprecedented resolution. At the same time, high-performance computing enables high-precision and fine- detail simulation of geodynamics processes, complementing the observational data. To facilitate interpretation and analysis of these datasets, to evaluate models, and to drive future calculations, we have developed methods of interactive visualization with a special focus on using immersive virtual reality (VR) environments to interact with models of Earth's surface and interior. VR has traditionally been used primarily as a presentation tool allowing active navigation through data. Reaping the full intellectual benefits of immersive VR as a tool for accelerated scientific analysis requires building on the method's strengths, that is, using both 3D perception and interaction with observed or simulated data. Our approach to VR takes advantage of the specialized skills of geoscientists who are trained to interpret geological and geophysical data generated from field observations. Interactive tools allow the scientist to explore and interpret geodynamic models, tomographic models, and topographic observations, while feature extraction tools support quantitative measurement of structures that emerge from numerical simulations or field observations. The use of VR technology enables us to improve our interpretation of crust and mantle structure and of geodynamical processes. Mapping tools based on computer visualization allow virtual "field studies" in inaccessible regions, and an interactive tool allows us to construct digital fault models for use in numerical models. Using the interactive tools on a high-end platform such as an immersive virtual reality

  2. Effects of primitive photosynthesis on Earth's early climate system

    Ozaki, Kazumi; Tajika, Eiichi; Hong, Peng K.; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Reinhard, Christopher T.

    2018-01-01

    The evolution of different forms of photosynthetic life has profoundly altered the activity level of the biosphere, radically reshaping the composition of Earth's oceans and atmosphere over time. However, the mechanistic impacts of a primitive photosynthetic biosphere on Earth's early atmospheric chemistry and climate are poorly understood. Here, we use a global redox balance model to explore the biogeochemical and climatological effects of different forms of primitive photosynthesis. We find that a hybrid ecosystem of H2-based and Fe2+-based anoxygenic photoautotrophs—organisms that perform photosynthesis without producing oxygen—gives rise to a strong nonlinear amplification of Earth's methane (CH4) cycle, and would thus have represented a critical component of Earth's early climate system before the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis. Using a Monte Carlo approach, we find that a hybrid photosynthetic biosphere widens the range of geochemical conditions that allow for warm climate states well beyond either of these metabolic processes acting in isolation. Our results imply that the Earth's early climate was governed by a novel and poorly explored set of regulatory feedbacks linking the anoxic biosphere and the coupled H, C and Fe cycles. We suggest that similar processes should be considered when assessing the potential for sustained habitability on Earth-like planets with reducing atmospheres.

  3. NASA's Earth Science Data Systems Standards Process Experiences

    Ullman, Richard E.; Enloe, Yonsook

    2007-01-01

    NASA has impaneled several internal working groups to provide recommendations to NASA management on ways to evolve and improve Earth Science Data Systems. One of these working groups is the Standards Process Group (SPC). The SPG is drawn from NASA-funded Earth Science Data Systems stakeholders, and it directs a process of community review and evaluation of proposed NASA standards. The working group's goal is to promote interoperability and interuse of NASA Earth Science data through broader use of standards that have proven implementation and operational benefit to NASA Earth science by facilitating the NASA management endorsement of proposed standards. The SPC now has two years of experience with this approach to identification of standards. We will discuss real examples of the different types of candidate standards that have been proposed to NASA's Standards Process Group such as OPeNDAP's Data Access Protocol, the Hierarchical Data Format, and Open Geospatial Consortium's Web Map Server. Each of the three types of proposals requires a different sort of criteria for understanding the broad concepts of "proven implementation" and "operational benefit" in the context of NASA Earth Science data systems. We will discuss how our Standards Process has evolved with our experiences with the three candidate standards.

  4. Multi-objective optimization of GENIE Earth system models.

    Price, Andrew R; Myerscough, Richard J; Voutchkov, Ivan I; Marsh, Robert; Cox, Simon J

    2009-07-13

    The tuning of parameters in climate models is essential to provide reliable long-term forecasts of Earth system behaviour. We apply a multi-objective optimization algorithm to the problem of parameter estimation in climate models. This optimization process involves the iterative evaluation of response surface models (RSMs), followed by the execution of multiple Earth system simulations. These computations require an infrastructure that provides high-performance computing for building and searching the RSMs and high-throughput computing for the concurrent evaluation of a large number of models. Grid computing technology is therefore essential to make this algorithm practical for members of the GENIE project.

  5. Embodying Earth's Place in the Solar System

    Plummer, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Elementary students find it difficult to connect the apparent motion of objects in the sky with how celestial objects actually move in the solar system. As a university astronomy education researcher, the author has been investigating methods to help children learn astronomy through workshops and summer camps at science museums and planetariums.…

  6. evaluation of municipal solid waste management system

    eobe

    Keywords: solid waste, household, waste bin, willingness to pay, municipal. 1. INTRODUCTION .... significant differences between WTP and household ... Gender. Income of Household. Education Status. House Type. Household Size. Male.

  7. Evolution of NASA's Earth Science Digital Object Identifier Registration System

    Wanchoo, Lalit; James, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project has implemented a fully automated system for assigning Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) to Earth Science data products being managed by its network of 12 distributed active archive centers (DAACs). A key factor in the successful evolution of the DOI registration system over last 7 years has been the incorporation of community input from three focus groups under the NASA's Earth Science Data System Working Group (ESDSWG). These groups were largely composed of DOI submitters and data curators from the 12 data centers serving the user communities of various science disciplines. The suggestions from these groups were formulated into recommendations for ESDIS consideration and implementation. The ESDIS DOI registration system has evolved to be fully functional with over 5,000 publicly accessible DOIs and over 200 DOIs being held in reserve status until the information required for registration is obtained. The goal is to assign DOIs to the entire 8000+ data collections under ESDIS management via its network of discipline-oriented data centers. DOIs make it easier for researchers to discover and use earth science data and they enable users to provide valid citations for the data they use in research. Also for the researcher wishing to reproduce the results presented in science publications, the DOI can be used to locate the exact data or data products being cited.

  8. The Journal of Earth System Science Education: Peer Review for Digital Earth and Digital Library Content

    Johnson, D.; Ruzek, M.; Weatherley, J.

    2001-05-01

    The Journal of Earth System Science Education is a new interdisciplinary electronic journal aiming to foster the study of the Earth as a system and promote the development and exchange of interdisciplinary learning resources for formal and informal education. JESSE will serve educators and students by publishing and providing ready electronic access to Earth system and global change science learning resources for the classroom and will provide authors and creators with professional recognition through publication in a peer reviewed journal. JESSE resources foster a world perspective by emphasizing interdisciplinary studies and bridging disciplines in the context of the Earth system. The Journal will publish a wide ranging variety of electronic content, with minimal constraints on format, targeting undergraduate educators and students as the principal readership, expanding to a middle and high school audience as the journal matures. JESSE aims for rapid review and turn-around of resources to be published, with a goal of 12 weeks from submission to publication for resources requiring few changes. Initial publication will be on a quarterly basis until a flow of resource submissions is established to warrant continuous electronic publication. JESSE employs an open peer review process in which authors and reviewers discuss directly the acceptability of a resource for publication using a software tool called the Digital Document Discourse Environment. Reviewer comments and attribution will be available with the resource upon acceptance for publication. JESSE will also implement a moderated peer commentary capability where readers can comment on the use of a resource or make suggestions. In the development phase, JESSE will also conduct a parallel anonymous review of content to validate and ensure credibility of the open review approach. Copyright of materials submitted remains with the author, granting JESSE the non-exclusive right to maintain a copy of the resource

  9. EarthCube - Earth System Bridge: Spanning Scientific Communities with Interoperable Modeling Frameworks

    Peckham, S. D.; DeLuca, C.; Gochis, D. J.; Arrigo, J.; Kelbert, A.; Choi, E.; Dunlap, R.

    2014-12-01

    In order to better understand and predict environmental hazards of weather/climate, ecology and deep earth processes, geoscientists develop and use physics-based computational models. These models are used widely both in academic and federal communities. Because of the large effort required to develop and test models, there is widespread interest in component-based modeling, which promotes model reuse and simplified coupling to tackle problems that often cross discipline boundaries. In component-based modeling, the goal is to make relatively small changes to models that make it easy to reuse them as "plug-and-play" components. Sophisticated modeling frameworks exist to rapidly couple these components to create new composite models. They allow component models to exchange variables while accommodating different programming languages, computational grids, time-stepping schemes, variable names and units. Modeling frameworks have arisen in many modeling communities. CSDMS (Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System) serves the academic earth surface process dynamics community, while ESMF (Earth System Modeling Framework) serves many federal Earth system modeling projects. Others exist in both the academic and federal domains and each satisfies design criteria that are determined by the community they serve. While they may use different interface standards or semantic mediation strategies, they share fundamental similarities. The purpose of the Earth System Bridge project is to develop mechanisms for interoperability between modeling frameworks, such as the ability to share a model or service component. This project has three main goals: (1) Develop a Framework Description Language (ES-FDL) that allows modeling frameworks to be described in a standard way so that their differences and similarities can be assessed. (2) Demonstrate that if a model is augmented with a framework-agnostic Basic Model Interface (BMI), then simple, universal adapters can go from BMI to a

  10. Cratering record in the inner solar system: Implications for earth

    Barlow, N.G.

    1988-01-01

    Internal and external processes have reworked the Earth's surface throughout its history. In particular, the effect of meteorite impacts on the early history of the earth is lost due to fluvial, aeolian, volcanic and plate tectonic action. The cratering record on other inner solar system bodies often provides the only clue to the relative cratering rates and intensities that the earth has experienced throughout its history. Of the five major bodies within the inner solar system, Mercury, Mars, and the Moon retain scars of an early episode of high impact rates. The heavily cratered regions on Mercury, Mars, and the Moon show crater size-frequency distribution curves similar in shape and crater density, whereas the lightly cratered plains on the Moon and Mars show distribution curves which, although similar to each other, are statistically different in shape and density from the more heavily cratered units. The similarities among crater size-frequency distribution curves for the Moon, Mercury, and Mars suggest that the entire inner solar system was subjected to the two populations of impacting objects but Earth and Venus have lost their record of heavy bombardment impactors. Thus, based on the cratering record on the Moon, Mercury, and Mars, it can be inferred that the Earth experienced a period of high crater rates and basin formation prior to about 3.8 BY ago. Recent studies have linked mass extinctions to large terrestrial impacts, so life forms were unable to establish themselves until impact rates decreased substantially and terrestrial conditions became more benign. The possible periodicity of mass extinctions has led to the theory of fluctuating impact rates due to comet showers in the post heavy bombardment period. The active erosional environment on the Earth complicates attempts to verify these showers by erasing geological evidence of older impact craters

  11. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 125; Issue 1. Favourable uranium–phosphate exploration trends guided by the application of statistical factor analysis technique on the aerial gamma spectrometric data in Syrian desert (Area-1), Syria. J Asfahani R Al-Hent M Aissa. Volume 125 Issue 1 February ...

  12. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 115; Issue 5. Volume 115, Issue 5. October 2006, pages 485-613. pp 485-528. Discriminating four tectonic settings: Five new geochemical diagrams for basic and ultrabasic volcanic rocks based on log–ratio transformation of major-element data · Surendra P Verma ...

  13. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 123; Issue 7 ... Net short wave and long wave radiative fluxes substantially varied with cloud dynamics, season, .... Impact of over-exploitation on groundwater quality: A case study from .... using large scale climate variables and downscaling models – A case study.

  14. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 123; Issue 1 .... Liquefaction-induced settlement, site effects and damage in the vicinity of Yalova ... Climatic control on extreme sediment transfer from Dokriani Glacier during monsoon, ... India that has been noticed in several global and regional climate models.

  15. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 126; Issue 2 ... Variable influence on the equatorial troposphere associated with SSW using ERA- ... Identification of drought in Dhalai river watershed using MCDM and ANN models ..... Study of the global and regional climatic impacts of ENSO magnitude using ...

  16. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 118; Issue 5 ... Impact of vegetation on the simulation of seasonal monsoon rainfall over the Indian .... On the diurnal ranges of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) in the north Indian Ocean ... Groundwater flow modelling of Yamuna–Krishni interstream, a part of central ...

  17. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science ... Cloud Motion Wind (CMW) data of METEOSAT satellite and SSM/I surface wind data ... Skills of different mesoscale models over Indian region during monsoon season: Forecast errors ... Impact of vegetation on the simulation of seasonal monsoon rainfall over the Indian ...

  18. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 119; Issue 5 ... Use of objective analysis to estimate winter temperature and precipitation at ... Numerical study for production of space charge within the stratiform cloud .... Estimates of source parameters of 4.9 Kharsali earthquake using waveform modelling.

  19. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 124; Issue 5 ... water cycles and predict the effect of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems, it is ... Application of ANN and fuzzy logic algorithms for streamflow modelling of Savitri .... Influence of nutrient input on the trophic state of a tropical brackish water lagoon.

  20. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 115; Issue 3 ... Modeling of groundwater flow for Mujib aquifer, Jordan ... a cloudburst event with attention to horizontal resolution and the cloud microphysics parameterization. ... Global surface temperature in relation to northeast monsoon rainfall over Tamil Nadu.

  1. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 123; Issue 5 .... Current products based on Ocean General Circulation Models like ECCO2 ... An assessment of wind forcing impact on a spectral wave model for the Indian Ocean .... variability over India and its subregions using a regional climate model (RegCM3).

  2. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 120; Issue 1 ... with a parametric study of the effect of four hydrometeors (cloud liquid water, cloud ice, ... Impact of additional surface observation network on short range weather forecast ... Doppler SODAR observations of the temperature structure parameter during ...

  3. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 121; Issue 4 ... Monsoon sensitivity to aerosol direct radiative forcing in the community atmosphere model .... Influences of the boundary layer evolution on surface ozone variations at a .... and its comparison with global geopotential models and GPS-levelling data.

  4. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 121; Issue 2 ... Impact of continental meteorology and atmospheric circulation in the ... Rainfall and temperature scenarios for Bangladesh for the middle of 21st century using RegCM ..... Statistical models of interoccurrence times of Iranian earthquakes on the basis ...

  5. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 125; Issue 8. Formation and evolution of yardangs activated by Late Pleistocene tectonic movement in Dunhuang, Gansu Province of China. Yanjie Wang Fadong Wu Xujiao Zhang Peng Zeng Pengfei Ma Yuping Song Hao Chu. Volume 125 Issue 8 December ...

  6. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 117; Issue 5. Variational method for objective analysis of scalar variable and its derivative. S G Narkhedkar S K Sinha ... It is found that the new scheme (variational)is able to extract the better parts of both triangle and standard methods.The results of this study will ...

  7. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 109; Issue 4. Volume 109, Issue 4. December 2000, pages 393-551. pp 393-394. Editorial · V K Gaur · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 395-405. Analysis of pathfinder SST algorithm for global and regional conditions · Ajoy Kumar P Minnett G Podesta R Evans K ...

  8. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 109; Issue 3. Volume 109, Issue 3. September 2000, pages 315-391. pp 315-328. Ocean circulation in the tropical Indo-Pacific during early Pliocene (5.6 - 4.2 Ma): Paleobiogeographic and isotopic evidence · M S Srinivasan D K Sinha · More Details Abstract ...

  9. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 118; Issue 2. Volume 118, Issue 2. April 2009, pages 115-180. pp 115-121. Energetics of lower tropospheric ultra-long waves: A key to intra-seasonal variability of Indian monsoon · S M Bawiskar M D Chipade P V Puranik · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  10. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 119; Issue 3. Volume 119, Issue 3. June 2010, pages 229-396. pp 229-247. Active and break spells of the Indian summer monsoon · M Rajeevan Sulochana Gadgil Jyoti Bhate · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. In this paper, we suggest criteria for the ...

  11. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 114; Issue 3. Significance of transition between Talchir Formation and Karharbari Formation in Lower Gondwana basin evolution — A study in West Bokaro Coal basin, Jharkhand, India. H N Bhattacharya Abhijit Chakraborty Biplab Bhattacharya. Volume 114 Issue ...

  12. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 123; Issue 7 ... less than 5000 mg/l is recommended in this area, at flow rate less than 10m3/hr/well. In other words, one can expect that the brackish water is probably found where the ...

  13. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Journal of Earth System Science. Current Issue : Vol. 127, Issue 2. Current Issue Volume 127 | Issue 2. March 2018. Home · Volumes & Issues · Special Issues · Forthcoming Articles · Search · Editorial Board · Information for Authors · Subscription ...

  14. Advanced system for separation of rare-earth fission products

    Baker, J.D.; Gehrke, R.J.; Greenwood, R.C.; Meikrantz, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    A microprocessor-controlled radiochemical separation system has been further advanced to separate individual rare-earth elements from mixed fission products in times of a few minutes. The system was composed of an automated chemistry system fed by two approximately 300 μg 252 Cf sources coupled directly by a He-jet to transport the fission products. Chemical separations were performed using two high performance liquid chromatography columns coupled in series. The first column separated the rare-earth group by extraction chromatography using dihexyldiethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP) adsorbed on Vydac C 8 resin. The second column isolated the individual rare-earth elements by cation exchange chromatography using Aminex A-9 resin with α-hydroxyisobutyric acid (α-HIBA) as the eluent. Significant results, which have been obtained to date with this advanced system, are the identification of several new neutron-rich rare-earth isotopes including 155 Pm (T=48+-4 s) and 163 Gd (T=68+-3 s). In addition, a half-life of 41+-4 s is reported for 160 Eu. (author)

  15. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 124; Issue 8. Gravitational attraction of a vertical pyramid model of flat top-and-bottom with depth-wise parabolic density variation. Anand P Gokula Rambhatla G Sastry. Volume 124 Issue 8 December 2015 pp 1735-1744 ...

  16. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 126; Issue 5. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 126, Issue 5. July 2017. Article ID 62. Meteorological features associated with unprecedented precipitation over India during 1st week of March 2015 · Naresh Kumar M Mohapatra A K Jaswal · More Details Abstract ...

  17. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 116 Issue 1 February 2007 pp 73-79. Long range prediction of Indian summer monsoon ... Volume 121 Issue 1 February 2012 pp 203-210. Impact of global warming on cyclonic disturbances over south Asian region · Savita Patwardhan Ashwini Kulkarni K Krishna ...

  18. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    . Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 124 Issue 1 February 2015 pp 269-281. Climate change and its role in forecasting energy demand in buildings: A case study of Douala City, Cameroon · Modeste Kameni ...

  19. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 126; Issue 4. Deep learning for predicting the monsoon over the homogeneous regions of India. Moumita Saha Pabitra Mitra ... Keywords. Feature learning; stacked autoencoder; monsoon predictor; ensemble of regression trees; regional Indian summer monsoon.

  20. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 124; Issue 3 .... Assessment of the regional water balance of the limestone subaquifers of Cyprus ... characterized by its small watersheds and the lack of ephemeral surface water resources. .... Optimization method for quantitative calculation of clay minerals in soil.

  1. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 111; Issue 4. Volume 111, Issue 4. December 2002, pages 379-510. pp 379-390. Isotopic and sedimentological clues to productivity change in Late Riphean Sea: A case study from two intracratonic basins of India · P P Chakraborty A Sarkar S K Bhattacharya P ...

  2. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 110; Issue 3. Scattering of a spherical pulse from a small inhomogeneity: Dilation and rotation. M D Sharma. Volume 110 Issue 3 September 2001 pp 205-213 ... Keywords. Scattering; inhomogeneity; spherical pulse; perturbations; dilatation; rotation ...

  3. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 121; Issue 3. Chemical characterisation of meltwater draining from Gangotri Glacier, Garhwal Himalaya, India. Virendra Bahadur Singh A L Ramanathan Jose George Pottakkal Parmanand Sharma Anurag Linda Mohd Farooq Azam C Chatterjee. Volume 121 Issue ...

  4. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 109; Issue 2 ... Bay of Bengal Monsoon Experiment (BOBMEX) — A component of the Indian .... Diurnal variability of upper ocean temperature and heat budget in the ... While the former facilitates the trapping of radiation (greenhouse effect) the latter works in the ...

  5. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 121; Issue 1 .... Middle Siwalik sediments in Tista valley, Darjiling District, Eastern Himalaya, India ... Hydrochemistry of surface water and groundwater from a fractured carbonate aquifer .... Impact of global warming on cyclonic disturbances over south Asian region.

  6. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Information for Authors ... A manuscript must present results of original, unpublished work. ... At this stage, JESS does not accept separate BibTeX files and does not provi de a bst file for ...

  7. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 116; Issue 6. Volume 116, Issue 6. December 2007, pages 465-597. pp 465-467. Editorial · T N Narasimhan · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 469-495. Late Devonian and Triassic basalts from the southern continental margin of the East European Platform, tracers of ...

  8. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 115; Issue 1. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 115, Issue 1. February 2006, pages 1-183. Vindhyan Geology: Status and Perspectives. pp 1-2. Preface · J S Ray C Chakraborty · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 3-22. Proterozoic intracontinental basin: The Vindhyan ...

  9. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 121; Issue 2. Impact of continental meteorology and atmospheric circulation in the modulation of Aerosol Optical Depth over the Arabian Sea. Sandhya K Nair S Sijikumar S S Prijith. Volume 121 Issue 2 April 2012 pp 263-272 ...

  10. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 116; Issue 5. Volume 116, Issue 5. October 2007, pages 369-463. pp 369-384. Current status of multimodel superensemble and operational NWP forecast of the Indian summer monsoon · Akhilesh Kumar Mishra T N Krishnamurti · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF.

  11. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Journal of Earth System Science. Current Issue : Vol. 127, Issue 3 · Current Issue Volume 127 | Issue 3. April 2018. Home · Volumes & Issues · Special Issues · Forthcoming Articles · Search · Editorial Board · Information for Authors · Subscription ...

  12. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 117; Issue 4. Spatial distribution of atmospheric carbon monoxide over Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea: Measurements during pre-monsoon period of 2006. V R Aneesh G Mohankumar S Sampath. Volume 117 Issue 4 August 2008 pp 449-455 ...

  13. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 122; Issue 1. Contribution of some ozone depleting substances (ODS) and greenhouse gases (GHGs) on total column zone growth at Srinagar (34°N, 74.8°), India. P K Jana D K Saha D Sarkar. Volume 122 Issue 1 February 2013 pp 239-252 ...

  14. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    ... Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 115; Issue 4. Section Title Page. Special Section on: Material exchanges at marine boundaries and surface ocean processes: Forcings and feedbacks Volume 115 Issue 4 August 2006 pp 429- ...

  15. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 124; Issue 6 ... and ongoing seismicity of northeastern Kumaun Himalaya, Uttarakhand, India ... areas of hazard prone and also planning and designing of the socio-economic projects. ... from Darjeeling, eastern Himalaya: Textural relationship and P–T conditions.

  16. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 116; Issue 1. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 116, Issue 1. February 2007, pages 1-79. pp 1-1. Editorial · More Details Fulltext PDF. pp 3-13. Platinum group elements and gold in ferromanganese crusts from Afanasiy–Nikitin seamount, equatorial Indian Ocean: ...

  17. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 113; Issue 1. Identification of a surface layer structure and analysis of humidity data in two weather situations at Jodhpur (26° 18′N, 73° 04′E), India, during MONTBLEX 1990. N Das M Bose U K De. Volume 113 Issue 1 March 2004 pp 73-87 ...

  18. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 120; Issue 5. Impact of Ganges–Brahmaputra interannual discharge variations on Bay of Bengal salinity and temperature during 1992–1999 period. Fabien Durand Fabrice Papa Atiqur Rahman Sujit Kumar Bala. Volume 120 Issue 5 October 2011 pp 859-872 ...

  19. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    The Russian Luna-Glob project has been conceived with a view to understand the origin of the Earth –Moon system.The objectives and main features of the Luna-Glob mission,which will mainly study the internal structure of the Moon by seismic instruments,are described in the context of the past and current program of ...

  20. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 123; Issue 3. Evaluation of regional fracture properties for groundwater development using hydrolithostructural domain approach in variably fractured hard rocks of Purulia district, West Bengal, India. Tapas Acharya Rajesh Prasad S Chakrabarti. Volume 123 Issue ...

  1. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 124; Issue 6. Multilayer perceptron neural network for downscaling rainfall in arid region: A case study of Baluchistan, Pakistan. Kamal Ahmed Shamsuddin Shahid Sobri Bin Haroon Wang Xiao-Jun. Volume 124 Issue 6 August 2015 pp 1325-1341 ...

  2. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 119; Issue 2. Volume 119, Issue 2. April 2010, pages 137-228. pp 137-145. Effect of co-operative fuzzy c-means clustering on estimates of three parameters AVA inversion · Rajesh R Nair Suresh Ch Kandpal · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. We determine the ...

  3. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 121; Issue 1. A fruit wing of Shorea Roxb. from the Early Miocene ... A new fossil fruit wing of Shorea Roxb. belonging to the family Dipterocarpaceae is described from the Early Miocene sediments of Kachchh, Gujarat. It resembles best the extant species Shorea ...

  4. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 126; Issue 5. First discovery of fossil winged seeds of Pinus L. (family Pinaceae) from the Indian Cenozoic and its palaeobiogeographic significance. Mahasin Ali Khan Subir Bera. Volume 126 Issue 5 July 2017 Article ID 63 ...

  5. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 119 Issue 2 April 2010 pp 137-145. Effect of co-operative fuzzy .... The efficacy of support vector machines (SVM) in robust determination of earthquake early warning magnitudes in central Japan · Ramakrushna Reddy Rajesh R Nair · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

  6. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 125; Issue 1. Reconstruction of the paleo-coastline of Santorini island (Greece), after the 1613 BC volcanic eruption: A GIS-based quantitative methodology. Dimitrios Oikonomidis Konstantinos Albanakis Spyridon Pavlides Michael Fytikas. Volume 125 Issue 1 ...

  7. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 118 Issue 4 August 2009 pp 405-412. Magnetic anomalies of offshore Krishna-Godavari Basin, eastern continental margin of India · K V Swamy I V Radhakrishna Murthy K S Krishna K S R Murthy A S Subrahmanyam M M Malleswara Rao · More Details Abstract ...

  8. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 122; Issue 2 ... Predictors for Bangladesh summer monsoon (June–September) rainfall were identified ... After carrying out a detailed analysis of various global climate datasets; three ... Department of Physics, Bangladesh University of Engineering & Technology ...

  9. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 122; Issue 1. Evaluation of OSCAR ocean surface current product in the tropical Indian Ocean using in situ data. Rajesh Sikhakolli Rashmi Sharma Sujit Basu B S Gohil Abhijit Sarkar K V S R Prasad. Volume 122 Issue 1 February 2013 pp 187-199 ...

  10. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 112; Issue 1. Volume 112, Issue 1 ... Effects of galvanic distortions on magnetotelluric data: Interpretation and its correction using deep electrical data · Jimmy Stephen S G ... pp 37-49. 2D Stabilised analytic signal method in DC pole-pole potential data interpretation.

  11. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 115; Issue 5. Discriminating four tectonic settings: Five new geochemical diagrams for basic and ultrabasic volcanic rocks based on log–ratio transformation of major-element data. Surendra P Verma Mirna Guevara Salil Agrawal. Volume 115 Issue 5 October 2006 ...

  12. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 124; Issue 7. Spectroscopy of olivine basalts using FieldSpec and ASTER data: A case study from Wadi Natash volcanic field, south Eastern Desert, Egypt. Ahmed Madani. Volume 124 Issue 7 October 2015 pp 1475-1486 ...

  13. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 121; Issue 5. Glacier fluctuation using Satellite Data in Beas basin, 1972–2006, Himachal Pradesh, India. Shruti Dutta A L Ramanathan ... Anurag Linda1. Glacier Research Group, School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India.

  14. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 115; Issue 1. Mesoproterozoic diamondiferous ultramafic pipes at Majhgawan and Hinota, Panna area, central India: Key to the nature of sub-continental lithospheric mantle beneath the Vindhyan basin. N V Chalapathi Rao. Volume 115 Issue 1 February 2006 pp ...

  15. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 114; Issue 6 ... using an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (LEX),sensitive in the energy range of 1 –10 ... (SIR-2),similar to that used on the Smart-1 mission,in collaboration with ESA.

  16. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 122; Issue 5. Monitoring subsurface coal fires in Jharia coalfield using observations of land subsidence from differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (DInSAR). Nishant Gupta Tajdarul H Syed Ashiihrii Athiphro. Volume 122 Issue 5 October 2013 pp 1249- ...

  17. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 123; Issue 4 .... Hydrologic modelling of the effect of snowmelt and temperature on a ... Spatial control of groundwater contamination, using principal component analysis ..... Forthcoming Articles · Search · Editorial Board · Information for Authors · Subscription ...

  18. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    ... Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 127; Issue 3. Pedotransfer functions to estimate soil water content at field capacity and permanent wilting point in hot Arid Western India. Priyabrata Santra Mahesh Kumar R N Kumawat D K Painuli K M Hati G B M Heuvelink N H Batjes. Volume 127 Issue 3 April 2018 Article ID 35 ...

  19. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 116; Issue 1. The effects of attenuation and site on the spectra of microearthquakes in the Jubilee Hills region of Hyderabad, India. Saurabh Baruah Devajit Hazarika Naba K Gogoi P Solomon Raju. Volume 116 Issue 1 February 2007 pp 37-47 ...

  20. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 113; Issue 3. Volume 113, Issue 3. September 2004, pages 259-515. pp 259-267. Delineation of structures favourable to groundwater occurrence employing seismic refraction method — A case study from Tiruvuru, Krishna district, Andhra Pradesh · N Sundararajan ...

  1. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 125; Issue 8 ... On a model simulating lack of hydraulic connection between a man-made reservoir and the ... Depth of water in the reservoir varies as H'+h cos(ωt). ..... exchanges via riverbank filtration by hydrochemical and biological indicators, Assiut, Egypt.

  2. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 117; Issue 4. Simultaneous transport of water and solutes under transient unsaturated flow conditions – A case study ... Keywords. Hydraulic conductivity; infiltration; leaching; Malaprabha; modeling; permeability; salinity; solute transport; SWIM model; water flow.

  3. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 113; Issue 2. Volume 113, Issue 2. June 2004, pages 129-257. pp 129-138. The evaporation of the charged and uncharged water drops suspended in a wind tunnel · Rohini V Bhalwankar A B Sathe A K Kamra · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. A laboratory ...

  4. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 116; Issue 5. Polyphase deformation and garnet growth in politic schists of Sausar Group in Ramtek area, Maharashtra, India: A study of porphyroblast–matrix relationship. A Chattopadhyay N Ghosh. Volume 116 Issue 5 October 2007 pp 423-432 ...

  5. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 112; Issue 3. Volume 112 ... pp 315-329. Flexure of the Indian plate and intraplate earthquakes .... Four major NW-SE trending active faults are mapped in the Kutch region. They define .... Behaviour of masonry structures during the Bhuj earthquake of January 2001.

  6. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    T M Balakrishnan Nair. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 115 Issue 4 August 2006 pp 461-472 Special Section on: Material exchanges at marine boundaries and surface ocean processes: Forcings and feedbacks. Monsoon control on trace metal fluxes in the deep Arabian Sea · T M Balakrishnan ...

  7. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 126; Issue 5 ... They are mainly of high-K calc-alkaline series with indistinct Eu anomalies, enriched in ... School of Geosciences and Info-Physics, Central South University, Changsha ...

  8. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 125; Issue 1. Simulation of CO2 concentrations at Tsukuba tall tower using WRF-CO2 tracer transport model. Srabanti Ballav Prabir K Patra Yousuke Sawa Hidekazu Matsueda Ahoro Adachi Shigeru Onogi Masayuki Takigawa Utpal K De. Volume 125 Issue 1 ...

  9. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 122; Issue 3. An experimental set-up for carbon isotopic analysis of atmospheric CO2 and an example of ecosystem response during solar eclipse 2010. Tania Guha Prosenjit Ghosh. Volume 122 Issue 3 June 2013 pp 623-638 ...

  10. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 126; Issue 8. Application of environmental isotopes and hydrochemistry in the identification of source of seepage and likely connection with lake water in Lesser Himalaya, Uttarakhand, India. Shive Prakash Rai Dharmaveer Singh Ashwani Kumar Rai Bhishm ...

  11. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 126; Issue 5. Assessment of large aperture scintillometry for large-area surface energy fluxes over an irrigated cropland in north India. Abhishek Danodia V K Sehgal N R Patel R Dhakar J Mukherjee S K Saha A Senthil Kumar. Volume 126 Issue 5 July 2017 Article ...

  12. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 122; Issue 3. Characterization of weathering profile in granites and volcanosedimentary rocks in West Africa under humid tropical climate conditions. Case of the Dimbokro Catchment (Ivory Coast). M Koita H Jourde K J P Koffi K S Da Silveira A Biaou. Volume 122 ...

  13. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 110; Issue 3. Volume 110, Issue 3. September 2001, pages 185-265. pp 185-190. Ar-Ar age of carbonatite-alkaline magmatism in Sung Valley, Maghalaya, India · Jyotiranjan S Ray Kanchan Pande · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. 40Ar-39Ar analyses of one ...

  14. Educator Perspectives on Earth System Science Literacy: Challenges and Priorities

    LaDue, Nicole; Clark, Scott K.

    2012-01-01

    The challenges and priorities of defining and achieving Earth System Science (ESS) literacy are examined through surveys of geoscience educators attending a professional geological meeting. Two surveys with Likert-style and free-response questions were distributed to geoscientists and K-12 teachers to elicit what instructors think are important…

  15. Accountability and legitimacy in earth system governance: A research framework

    Biermann, F.; Gupta, A.

    2011-01-01

    Along with concerns over the effectiveness of earth system governance, ways of enhancing its accountability and legitimacy are increasingly coming to the fore in both scholarly debate and political practice. Concerns over accountability and legitimacy pertain to all levels of governance, from the

  16. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 123; Issue 2 ... Trend analysis and change point detection of annual and seasonal .... Numerical evaluation of seismic response of shallow foundation on loose silt and silty sand ... complex interactions can be a valuable tool to gain new insights for improved seismic ...

  17. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 126; Issue 3 ... Decomposition of wind speed fluctuations at different time scales .... Bayesian inversion of synthetic AVO data to assess fluid and shale content in sand-shale media ... Geochemical characteristics of sandstones from Cretaceous Garudamangalam ...

  18. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 110; Issue 4. Evolution of the Bhandara-Balaghat granulite belt along the southern margin of the Sausar Mobile Belt of central India. H M Ramachandra Abhinaba Roy. Volume 110 Issue 4 December 2001 pp 351-368 ...

  19. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 111; Issue 3 ... () based optical classification of IRS-P3 MOS-B satellite ocean colour data ... water leaving radiances in blue and green channels of 412, 443, 490 and 550 nm.

  20. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 111; Issue 1. Records of climatic changes and volcanic events in an ice core from Central Dronning Maud Land (East Antarctica) during the past century. V N Nijampurkar D K Rao H B Clausen M K Kaul A Chaturvedi. Volume 111 Issue 1 March 2002 pp 39-49 ...