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Sample records for solenoid operates underground

  1. ATLAS solenoid operates underground

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    A new phase for the ATLAS collaboration started with the first operation of a completed sub-system: the Central Solenoid. Teams monitoring the cooling and powering of the ATLAS solenoid in the control room. The solenoid was cooled down to 4.5 K from 17 to 23 May. The first current was established the same evening that the solenoid became cold and superconductive. 'This makes the ATLAS Central Solenoid the very first cold and superconducting magnet to be operated in the LHC underground areas!', said Takahiko Kondo, professor at KEK. Though the current was limited to 1 kA, the cool-down and powering of the solenoid was a major milestone for all of the control, cryogenic, power and vacuum systems-a milestone reached by the hard work and many long evenings invested by various teams from ATLAS, all of CERN's departments and several large and small companies. Since the Central Solenoid and the barrel liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter share the same cryostat vacuum vessel, this achievement was only possible in perfe...

  2. First Operation of the Central Solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Ruber, R.

    2006-01-01

    A new phase for the ATLAS collaboration started with the first operation of a completed sub-system: the Central Solenoid. It was cooled down from the 17th to 23th May 2006, and the first kA was put into it the same evening as it was cold and superconductive. That makes our solenoid the very first cold and superconducting magnet to be operated in the LHC underground areas. The Central Solenoid in its final position at the heart of ATLAS. The coil current (red line) and voltage (blue line) showing the operation at nominal current of 7.73 kA for a magnetic field of 2.0 T and the subsequent successful commissioning up to 8 kAT The cool down and powering of the solenoid was a major milestone for all control, cryogenic, power and vacuum systems and was achieved in perfect collaboration with the liquid argon detector with which it shares the Barrel Cryostat. Powering up to nominal current had to wait until the last week of July when the End-Cap Calorimeters were in closed position. The Tile Barrel and E...

  3. Operating experience feedback report - Solenoid-operated valve problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ornstein, H.L.

    1991-02-01

    This report highlights significant operating events involving observed or potential common-mode failures of solenoid-operated valves (SOVs) in US plants. These events resulted in degradation or malfunction of multiple trains of safety systems as well as of multiple safety systems. On the basis of the evaluation of these events, the Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concludes that the problems with solenoid-operated valves are an important issue that needs additional NRC and industry attention. This report also provides AEOD's recommendations for actions to reduce the occurrence of SOV common-mode failures. 115 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Sprag solenoid brake. [development and operations of electrically controlled brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, D. H. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The development and characteristics of an electrically operated brake are discussed. The action of the brake depends on energizing a solenoid which causes internally spaced sprockets to contact the inner surface of the housing. A spring forces the control member to move to the braking position when the electrical function is interrupted. A diagram of the device is provided and detailed operating principles are explained.

  5. Worchester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VAN KATWIJK, C.

    2000-01-01

    These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) to prevent MCO vent drain to either reduce air in-leakage or loss of He. The valves have couplings for transverse actuator mounting

  6. Worcester Solenoid-Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VAN KATWIJK, C.

    2000-01-01

    These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as Integral parts of the actuator that are used in different process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) for MCO isolation to either reduce air in leakage or loss of He. All valves have coupling for transverse actuator mounting

  7. D0 Central Tracking Solenoid Energization, Controls, Interlocks and Quench Protection Operating Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hance, R.

    1998-01-01

    This procedure is used when it is necessary to operate the solenoid energization, controls, interlocks and quench detection system. Note that a separate procedure exists for operating the solenoid 'cryogenic' systems. Only D0 Control Room Operators or the Project Electrical Engineer are qualified to execute these procedures or operate the solenoid system. This procedure assumes that the operator is familiar with using the Distributed Manufacturing Automation and Control Software (DMACS).

  8. Detection circuit of solenoid valve operation and control rod drive mechanism utilizing the circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Takehiko.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To detect the operation of a plunger and detect opening and closing operations of a solenoid valve driving device due to change in impedance of a coil for driving the solenoid valve to judge normality and abnormality of the solenoid valve, thereby increasing reliance and safety of drive and control apparatus of control rods. Structure: An arrangement comprises a drive and operation detector section wherein the operation of a solenoid driving device for controlling power supply to a coil for driving the solenoid valve to control opening and closing of the solenoid valve, and a plunger operation detector section for detecting change in impedance of the drive coil to detect that the plunger of the solenoid valve is either in the opening direction or closing direction, whereby a predetermined low voltage such as not to activate the solenoid valve even when the solenoid valve is open or closed is applied to detect a current flowing into the coil at that time, thus detecting an operating state of the plunger. (Yoshino, Y.)

  9. Inservice diagnostic methods for solenoid-operated valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryter, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    Solenoid-operated valves (SOVs) were studied at Oak Ridge National Laboratory as part of the USNRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. The primary objective of the study was to identify, evaluate, and recommend methods for inspection, surveillance, monitoring, and maintenance of SOVs that can help ensure their operational readiness-that is, their ability to perform required safety functions under all anticipated operating conditions, since failure of one of these small and relatively inexpensive devices could have serious consequences under certain circumstances. An earlier (Phase 1) NPAR program study described SOV failure modes and causes and had identified measurable parameters thought to be linked to the progression of everpresent degradation mechanisms that may ultimately result in functional failure of the valve. Using this earlier work as a guide, the present (Phase 11) study focused on devising and then demonstrating the effectiveness of techniques and equipment with which to measure performance parameters that show promise for detecting the presence and trending the progress of such degradations before they reach a critical stage. Intrusive techniques requiring the addition of magnetic or acoustic sensors or the application of special test signals were investigated briefly, but major emphasis was placed on the examination of condition-indicating techniques that can be applied with minimal cost and impact on plant operation. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the technical feasibility and practicality of the monitoring techniques assessed in the study, and recommendations for further work are provided

  10. Down with Physics: giant compact muon solenoid (CMS) magnet goes underground at CERN UCR physicists to participate in the international experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Scientists of the US CMS collaboration, which includes UC riverside physicists, joined colleagues around the world in announcing today that the heaviest piece of the Compact Muon Solenoid particle detector has begun te momentous journey into its experimenta cavern 100 meters underground." (2,5 pages)

  11. Ultimate Performance of the ATLAS Superconducting Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Ruber, R; Kawai, M; Kondo, Y; Doi, Y; Haruyama, T; Haug, F; Kate, H ten; Kondo, T; Pirotte, O; Metselaar, J; Mizumaki, S; Olesen, G; Sbrissa, E; Yamamoto, A

    2007-01-01

    A 2 tesla, 7730 ampere, 39 MJ, 45 mm thin superconducting solenoid with a 2.3 meters warm bore and 5.3 meters length, is installed in the center of the ATLAS detector and successfully commissioned. The solenoid shares its cryostat with one of the detector's calorimeters and provides the magnetic field required for the inner detectors to accurately track collision products from the LHC at CERN. After several years of a stepwise construction and test program, the solenoid integration 100 meters underground in the ATLAS cavern is completed. Following the on-surface acceptance test, the solenoid is now operated with its final cryogenic, powering and control system. A re-validation of all essential operating parameters is completed. The performance and test results of underground operation are reported and compared to those previously measured.

  12. A nonintrusive method for measuring the operating temperature of a solenoid-operated valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryter, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental data are presented to show that the in-service operating temperature of a solenoid-operated valve (SOV) can be interred simply and nondisruptively by using the copper winding of the solenoid coil as a self-indicating, permanently available resistance thermometer. The principal merits of this approach include (a) there is no need for an add-on temperature sensor, (b) the true temperature of a critical --- and likely the hottest --- part of the SOV (namely, the electrical coil) is measured directly, (c) temperature readout can be provided at any location at which the SOV electrical lead wires are accessible (even though remote from the valve), (d) the SOV need not be disturbed (whether normally energized or deenergized) to measure its temperature in situ, and (e) the method is applicable to all types of SOVs, large and small, ac- and dc-powered. Laboratory tests comparing temperatures measured both by coil resistance and by a conventional thermometer placed in contact with the external surface of the potted solenoid coil indicate that temperature within the coil may be on the order of 40 degree C higher than that measured externally, a fact that is important to life-expectancy calculations made on the basis of Arrhenius theory. Field practicality is illustrated with temperature measurements made using this method on a SOV controlling the flow of refrigerant in a large chilled-water air-conditioning system. 5 refs., 7 figs

  13. Assessment of nonintrusive methods for monitoring the operational readiness of solenoid-operated valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryter, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Solenoid-operated valves (SOVs) are being studied at Oak Ridge National Laboratory as part of the USNRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. The primary objective of the study is to identify and recommend methods for inspection, surveillance, and maintenance of SOVs that can ensure their operational readiness-- that is, their ability to perform required safety functions under all anticipated operating conditions. An earlier (Phase I) study described SOV failure modes and causes and identified measurable parameters that might be used to monitor the various degradations that lead to functional failure. The present (Phase II) study focuses on devising and then demonstrating the effectiveness of techniques and/or equipment with which to measure the previously identified performance parameters and thus detect and trend the progress of any degradation. Several nonintrusive techniques are currently under investigation. Recent experimental results which demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of the techniques being studied are presented. 4 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Worcester 1 Inch Solenoid-Actuated Gas-Operated VPS System Ball Valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VAN KATWIJK, C.

    2000-01-01

    1 inch Gas-operated full-port ball valve incorporates a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator. The valve is normally open and fails safe to the closed position. The associated valve position switch is class GS

  15. 40 CFR 280.230 - Operating an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... underground storage tank or underground storage tank system. (a) Operating an UST or UST system prior to...) Operating an UST or UST system after foreclosure. The following provisions apply to a holder who, through..., the purchaser must decide whether to operate or close the UST or UST system in accordance with...

  16. Sprag solenoid brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, P. H.

    1972-01-01

    Operation of solenoid braking mechanism is discussed. Illustrations of construction of the brake are provided. Device is used for braking low or medium speed shaft rotations and produces approximately ten times braking torque of similar solenoid brakes.

  17. Worcester 1 Inch Solenoid-Actuated Gas Operated SCHe System Valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VAN KATWIJK, C.

    2000-01-01

    1 inch Gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporate a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator. These valves are normally open and fail safe to the open position (GOV-1*02 and 1*06 fail closed) to provide a flow path of helium gas to the MCO under helium purge and off-normal conditions when the MCO is isolated

  18. Design of 95 GHz gyrotron based on continuous operation copper solenoid with water cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borodin, Dmitri; Ben-Moshe, Roey; Einat, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    The design work for 2nd harmonic 95 GHz, 50 kW gyrotron based on continuous operation copper solenoid is presented. Thermionic magnetron injection gun specifications were calculated according to the linear trade off equation, and simulated with CST program. Numerical code is used for cavity design using the non-uniform string equation as well as particle motion in the “cold” cavity field. The mode TE02 with low Ohmic losses in the cavity walls was chosen as the operating mode. The Solenoid is designed to induce magnetic field of 1.8 T over a length of 40 mm in the interaction region with homogeneity of ±0.34%. The solenoid has six concentric cylindrical segments (and two correction segments) of copper foil windings separated by water channels for cooling. The predicted temperature in continuous operation is below 93 °C. The parameters of the design together with simulation results of the electromagnetic cavity field, magnetic field, electron trajectories, and thermal analyses are presented

  19. Design of 95 GHz gyrotron based on continuous operation copper solenoid with water cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodin, Dmitri; Ben-Moshe, Roey; Einat, Moshe [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Ariel University, Ariel 40700 (Israel)

    2014-07-15

    The design work for 2nd harmonic 95 GHz, 50 kW gyrotron based on continuous operation copper solenoid is presented. Thermionic magnetron injection gun specifications were calculated according to the linear trade off equation, and simulated with CST program. Numerical code is used for cavity design using the non-uniform string equation as well as particle motion in the “cold” cavity field. The mode TE02 with low Ohmic losses in the cavity walls was chosen as the operating mode. The Solenoid is designed to induce magnetic field of 1.8 T over a length of 40 mm in the interaction region with homogeneity of ±0.34%. The solenoid has six concentric cylindrical segments (and two correction segments) of copper foil windings separated by water channels for cooling. The predicted temperature in continuous operation is below 93 °C. The parameters of the design together with simulation results of the electromagnetic cavity field, magnetic field, electron trajectories, and thermal analyses are presented.

  20. Proceedings of the 6th underground operators conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golosinski, T.S.

    1995-01-01

    This conference presents recent development in underground mining operations. A large number of papers reported on underground mining practice in the Eastern Goldfields area of Western Australia and in the traditional mining centres of Mount Isa and Broken Hill. These are supplemented by papers reporting on other underground mining developments all throughout Australia and in several overseas countries known for advanced mining expertise. Apart from papers dealing with metalliferous mining, a number of papers related to coal mining present recent developments related to the topic. The papers are grouped into sessions relating to ground control, rock mechanics, management and human resources, mining methods, mining equipment, control and communications, mine backfill, mining operations, drilling and blasting and coal mining. Relevant papers have been individually indexed/abstracted. Tabs., figs., refs

  1. Preventive maintenance basis: Volume 16 -- Power operated relief valves, solenoid actuated. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worledge, D.; Hinchcliffe, G.

    1997-07-01

    US nuclear plants are implementing preventive maintenance (PM) tasks with little documented basis beyond fundamental vendor information to support the tasks or their intervals. The Preventive Maintenance Basis project provides utilities with the technical basis for PM tasks and task intervals associated with 40 specific components such as valves, electric motors, pumps, and HVAC equipment. This report provides an overview of the PM Basis project and describes use of the PM Basis database. This volume 16 of the report provides a program of PM tasks suitable for application to power operated relief valves (PORV's) that are solenoid actuated. The PM tasks that are recommended provide a cost-effective way to intercept the causes and mechanisms that lead to degradation and failure. They can be used, in conjunction with material from other sources, to develop a complete PM program or to improve an existing program. Users of this information will be utility managers, supervisors, craft technicians, and training instructors responsible for developing, optimizing, or fine-tuning PM programs

  2. SSC detector solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast, R.W.; Grimson, J.H.; Kephart, R.D.; Krebs, H.J.; Stone, M.E.; Theriot, E.D.; Wands, R.H.

    1989-01-01

    A detector utilizing a superconducting solenoid is being discussed for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). A useful field volume of 8 m diameter x 16 m length at 1.5-2 T (--1 GJ at 2T) is required. It has been decided that all of the particle physics calorimetry will be inside the bore of the solenoid and that there is no need for the coil and cryostat to be ''thin'' in radiation lengths. An iron yoke will reduce the excitation required and will provide muon identification and a redundant momentum measurement of the muons. The authors have developed a conceptual design to meet these requirements. The magnet will use a copper-stabilized Nb-Ti conductor sized for a cryostable pool boiling heat flux --0.025 W/cm/sup 2/. A thermosiphon from a storage vessel above the cryostat will be used to prevent bubble stagnation in the liquid helium bath. The operating current, current density, coil subdivision and dump resistor have been chosen to guarantee that the coil will be undamaged should a quench occur. The axial electromagnetic force will be reacted by metallic support links; the stainless steel coil case will support the radial force. The 5000 metric tons of calorimetry will be supported from the iron yoke through a trussed cylindrical shell structure separate from the cryostat. The coil and case, radiation shield and stainless vacuum vessel would be fabricated and cryogenically tested as two 8-m sections. These would be lowered into the underground experimental hall and installed into the iron flux return yoke to provide the required 16-m length

  3. Control of spool position of on/off solenoid operated hydraulic valve by sliding-mode controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Hak; Hong, Hyun Wook; Park, Myeong Kwan [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Young Won [KHPS, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    The use of on/off solenoid operated hydraulic valves instead of proportional valves has been attracting the interest of many researchers and engineers. However, there exist difficulties in controlling the on/off valve because of highly nonlinear characteristics including hysteresis and saturation. This paper considers the application of on/off solenoid operated hydraulic valves to control position of a hydraulic cylinder with the aim of evaluating, feasibility and practicability of their implementation and understanding the potential benefits when they are used in existing hydraulic systems. Assuming that only the current is measured, a sliding mode observer is designed to estimate the spool position and velocity. To alleviate the aforementioned difficulties in controlling the spool position, a nonlinear observer-based controller of an on/off solenoid valve is designed, taking into account the estimated values, based on a nonlinear model including hysteresis and saturation. The control objective is to track a desired spool trajectory. Simulation and experimental results illustrate the efficiency of the designed controller. The proposed controller is validated again in a single-rod hydraulic actuator. Experimental results show that the fluid flow through the valve orifice by controlling the spool position was successfully controlled.

  4. Schrödinger and Dirac operators with the Aharonov-Bohm and magnetic-solenoid fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitman, D M; Tyutin, I V; Voronov, B L

    2012-01-01

    We construct all self-adjoint Schrödinger and Dirac operators (Hamiltonians) with both the pure Aharonov-Bohm (AB) field and the so-called magnetic-solenoid field (a collinear superposition of the AB field and a constant magnetic field). We perform a spectral analysis for these operators, which includes finding spectra and spectral decompositions, or inversion formulae. In constructing the Hamiltonians and performing their spectral analysis, we follow, respectively, the von Neumann theory of self-adjoint extensions of symmetric operators and the Krein method of guiding functionals. (paper)

  5. UNDERGROUND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1993-11-15

    Full text: Cossetted deep underground, sheltered from cosmic ray noise, has always been a favourite haunt of neutrino physicists. Already in the 1930s, significant limits were obtained by taking a geiger counter down in Holborn 'tube' station, one of the deepest in London's underground system. Since then, neutrino physicists have popped up in many unlikely places - gold mines, salt mines, and road tunnels deep under mountain chains. Two such locations - the 1MB (Irvine/ Michigan/Brookhaven) detector 600 metres below ground in an Ohio salt mine, and the Kamiokande apparatus 1000m underground 300 km west of Tokyo - picked up neutrinos on 23 February 1987 from the famous 1987A supernova. Purpose-built underground laboratories have made life easier, notably the Italian Gran Sasso Laboratory near Rome, 1.4 kilometres below the surface, and the Russian Baksan Neutrino Observatory under Mount Andyrchi in the Caucasus range. Gran Sasso houses ICARUS (April, page 15), Gallex, Borexino, Macro and the LVD Large Volume Detector, while Baksan is the home of the SAGE gallium-based solar neutrino experiment. Elsewhere, important ongoing underground neutrino experiments include Soudan II in the US (April, page 16), the Canadian Sudbury Neutrino Observatory with its heavy water target (January 1990, page 23), and Superkamiokande in Japan (May 1991, page 8)

  6. UNDERGROUND

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: Cossetted deep underground, sheltered from cosmic ray noise, has always been a favourite haunt of neutrino physicists. Already in the 1930s, significant limits were obtained by taking a geiger counter down in Holborn 'tube' station, one of the deepest in London's underground system. Since then, neutrino physicists have popped up in many unlikely places - gold mines, salt mines, and road tunnels deep under mountain chains. Two such locations - the 1MB (Irvine/ Michigan/Brookhaven) detector 600 metres below ground in an Ohio salt mine, and the Kamiokande apparatus 1000m underground 300 km west of Tokyo - picked up neutrinos on 23 February 1987 from the famous 1987A supernova. Purpose-built underground laboratories have made life easier, notably the Italian Gran Sasso Laboratory near Rome, 1.4 kilometres below the surface, and the Russian Baksan Neutrino Observatory under Mount Andyrchi in the Caucasus range. Gran Sasso houses ICARUS (April, page 15), Gallex, Borexino, Macro and the LVD Large Volume Detector, while Baksan is the home of the SAGE gallium-based solar neutrino experiment. Elsewhere, important ongoing underground neutrino experiments include Soudan II in the US (April, page 16), the Canadian Sudbury Neutrino Observatory with its heavy water target (January 1990, page 23), and Superkamiokande in Japan (May 1991, page 8)

  7. LCLS Gun Solenoid Design Considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmerge, John

    2010-01-01

    The LCLS photocathode rf gun requires a solenoid immediately downstream for proper emittance compensation. Such a gun and solenoid have been operational at the SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) for over eight years. Based on magnetic measurements and operational experience with the GTF gun solenoid multiple modifications are suggested for the LCLS gun solenoid. The modifications include adding dipole and quadrupole correctors inside the solenoid, increasing the bore to accommodate the correctors, decreasing the mirror plate thickness to allow the solenoid to move closer to the cathode, cutouts in the mirror plate to allow greater optical clearance with grazing incidence cathode illumination, utilizing pancake coil mirror images to compensate the first and second integrals of the transverse fields and incorporating a bipolar power supply to allow for proper magnet standardization and quick polarity changes. This paper describes all these modifications plus the magnetic measurements and operational experience leading to the suggested modifications.

  8. Method of operator safety assessment for underground mobile mining equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Działak, Paulina; Karliński, Jacek; Rusiński, Eugeniusz

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents a method of assessing the safety of operators of mobile mining equipment (MME), which is adapted to current and future geological and mining conditions. The authors focused on underground mines, with special consideration of copper mines (KGHM). As extraction reaches into deeper layers of the deposit it can activate natural hazards, which, thus far, have been considered unusual and whose range and intensity are different depending on the field of operation. One of the main hazards that affect work safety and can become the main barrier in the exploitation of deposits at greater depths is climate threat. The authors have analysed the phenomena which may impact the safety of MME operators, with consideration of accidents that have not yet been studied and are not covered by the current safety standards for this group of miners. An attempt was made to develop a method for assessing the safety of MME operators, which takes into account the mentioned natural hazards and which is adapted to current and future environmental conditions in underground mines.

  9. Method of operator safety assessment for underground mobile mining equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Działak Paulina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of assessing the safety of operators of mobile mining equipment (MME, which is adapted to current and future geological and mining conditions. The authors focused on underground mines, with special consideration of copper mines (KGHM. As extraction reaches into deeper layers of the deposit it can activate natural hazards, which, thus far, have been considered unusual and whose range and intensity are different depending on the field of operation. One of the main hazards that affect work safety and can become the main barrier in the exploitation of deposits at greater depths is climate threat. The authors have analysed the phenomena which may impact the safety of MME operators, with consideration of accidents that have not yet been studied and are not covered by the current safety standards for this group of miners. An attempt was made to develop a method for assessing the safety of MME operators, which takes into account the mentioned natural hazards and which is adapted to current and future environmental conditions in underground mines.

  10. from left to right : Mr Michel Della Negra (Last spokeperson of CMS), Prof. Tejinder ("Jim") Virdee (actual spokeperson of CMS), Mr Robert Aymar (CERN Director General) and Mr Sigurd Lettow (Chief Financial Officer of CERN) assist to the Lowering of the final element (YE-1) of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector into its underground experimental cavern.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    from left to right : Mr Michel Della Negra (Last spokeperson of CMS), Prof. Tejinder ("Jim") Virdee (actual spokeperson of CMS), Mr Robert Aymar (CERN Director General) and Mr Sigurd Lettow (Chief Financial Officer of CERN) assist to the Lowering of the final element (YE-1) of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector into its underground experimental cavern.

  11. Operating experience with decommissioning of underground components, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    In the USA there has over the years been widespread use of underground piping and tank storage systems, as well as use of other storage vaults and miscellaneous underground storage systems. In most instances these systems are associated with other operating facilities such as large nuclear facilities. There has been considerable experience over the last 60 years in the design, installation, operation and decommissioning of these radioactive waste handling and storage structures and systems. Legislation was enacted in the 1980s that required extensive upgrades to existing systems, with newly installed systems being required to meet stringent installation, operation and removal requirements. This has had an impact on the use of some of these underground systems. One major problem with many of these systems is to gauge the integrity of the systems after they have been in operation for many years and to accurately determine whether they have leaked or not. Depending on the results of these investigations, the next question is whether these systems even need to be excavated or if they can be dispositioned in place rather than expending a large amount of effort to excavate them and remove the materials in question to a disposal site for final dispositioning. In some areas this is possible while in others excavation is required. Over the years that nuclear facilities have been operational in the USA, advantage has been taken of the fact that the earth serves as a good location for emplacement of otherwise obtrusive (or even less aesthetically pleasing) structures. These structures are also still clearly able to support the useful mission they were always intended to fulfil. This arrangement also serves as a structural feature favourable to minimizing radiation exposure levels emanating from systems and components containing radioactive materials. In some cases, embedding of various components such as tanks, pits, vaults, pipes and ducting was an easy way to avoid these

  12. Development of a smart rock bolt for underground monitoring operations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moema, JS

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available of magnetic methods in measuring the stress or microstructural transformation in an individual bolt in both laboratory and underground environment. The corrosion performance of the smart bolt alloy was evaluated in synthetic mine water and compared...

  13. Hydrologic resources management program and underground test area operable unit fy 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D. F., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    This report present the results of FY 1997 technical studies conducted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area Operable Unit (UGTA). The HRMP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy to assess the environmental (radiochemical and hydrologic) consequences of underground nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site.

  14. Impact of ICRP-60 on the operation of underground mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, A.Z.; Hussein, M.I.

    2001-01-01

    Reduction of occupational exposure from: 50 mSv to 20 mSv per annum for uranium miners faces difficulties. For miners this affects the gamma radiation dose and ALI's except radon gas and its short lived daughters of Uranium and Thorium whereas the ICRP planned to review radon daughters exposure limits. New dose limits introduce other mines, e.g. phosphate mines, to be considered as occupational areas. Reclassification of radiation workers has to be done; control, licensing, cost, Gamma dose rate is influenced by the grade and type of ore body and the mining method. The primary mode of radionuclide intake in the mine environment is inhalation, however, ventilation is the principal control of airborne dust. The current average radon daughters dose rate in several underground mines among those are phosphate mines in Egypt is well above 20 mSv/a. Recorded values of Egyptian phosphate mines are more than 1 WL of radon daughters (1WL = 62 uSv/h) considering 2000 h/y, therefore, the annual dose = 124 mSv/a. Mining method dictated by location, size and shape of ore body, hydrology. Priority is given for conventional safety of work place, e.g. rock collapse as well as care of economics of the process and mine development. It is well defined that the control of gamma radiation dose is very much dependent upon the geometry of ore body. Shielding of ore trucks could not be justified (fuel consumption and its pollution). Bulk ore handling method may reduce gamma doses but it generates dust which may increase inhalation doses of long lived alpha emitters. Ventilation is the principal method to control inhalation hazards of dust and radon daughters, but high rates of ventilation has reverse effects of generating more dust and drying wet surfaces of ores. Accordingly, reduction in radon daughters exposure will result in high cost of production. In Egypt radon and thoron (risk/problems) are previously monitored in phosphate mines (upper Egypt). Values greater than 1 WL were

  15. Real time gamma monitoring for employees working in an operational underground copper / uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, Cameron E.

    2010-01-01

    For many years electronic devices have been available that are compact enough to utilise for personal gamma radiation monitoring. At BHP Billiton's Olympic Dam underground copper / uranium mine two different types of electronic gamma dosimeters are being used to assess and control exposure to gamma rays present in the underground operations. Canberra Dosicards are being used as part of a program that replaced the use of monthly issued Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) badges with quarterly issue for some work groups. Two types of Polimaster gamma watches have also been introduced to specific work groups to assist with the determination of sites that may require remedial controls for their level of gamma radiation. To date, both programs have been successfully implemented into the radiation monitoring program for the underground operation and have provided dramatic improvements for the control and determination of sources of gamma radiation in the underground environment.

  16. Catastrophic failure of a raise boring machine during underground reaming operations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    James, A

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available rights reserved. 1. INTRODUCTION The process of raise boring (or back reaming) has been in use for over 30 years, and has proved to be a very successful technique in underground mining operations. Its primary use... the overhaul, the equipment was moved from its underground location to the surface. All the drive head bolts were replaced. A cutaway diagram of the drive head installation, showing the relative positions of the cover, drive...

  17. US Department of Energy DOE Nevada Operations Office, Nevada Test Site: Underground safety and health standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    The Nevada Test Site Underground Safety and Health Standards Working Group was formed at the direction of John D. Stewart, Director, Nevada Test Site Office in April, 1990. The objective of the Working Group was to compile a safety and health standard from the California Tunnel Safety Orders and OSHA for the underground operations at the NTS, (excluding Yucca Mountain). These standards are called the NTS U/G Safety and Health Standards. The Working Group submits these standards as a RECOMMENDATION to the Director, NTSO. Although the Working Group considers these standards to be the most integrated and comprehensive standards that could be developed for NTS Underground Operations, the intent is not to supersede or replace any relevant DOE orders. Rather the intent is to collate the multiple safety and health references contained in DOE Order 5480.4 that have applicability to NTS Underground Operations into a single safety and heath standard to be used in the underground operations at the NTS. Each portion of the standard was included only after careful consideration by the Working Group and is judged to be both effective and appropriate. The specific methods and rationale used by the Working Group are outlined as follows: The letter from DOE/HQ, dated September 28, 1990 cited OSHA and the CTSO as the safety and health codes applicable to underground operations at the NTS. These mandated codes were each originally developed to be comprehensive, i.e., all underground operations of a particular type (e.g., tunnels in the case of the CTSO) were intended to be adequately regulated by the appropriate code. However, this is not true; the Working Group found extensive and confusing overlap in the codes in numerous areas. Other subjects and activities were addressed by the various codes in cursory fashion or not at all

  18. US Department of Energy DOE Nevada Operations Office, Nevada Test Site: Underground safety and health standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The Nevada Test Site Underground Safety and Health Standards Working Group was formed at the direction of John D. Stewart, Director, Nevada Test Site Office in April, 1990. The objective of the Working Group was to compile a safety and health standard from the California Tunnel Safety Orders and OSHA for the underground operations at the NTS, (excluding Yucca Mountain). These standards are called the NTS U/G Safety and Health Standards. The Working Group submits these standards as a RECOMMENDATION to the Director, NTSO. Although the Working Group considers these standards to be the most integrated and comprehensive standards that could be developed for NTS Underground Operations, the intent is not to supersede or replace any relevant DOE orders. Rather the intent is to collate the multiple safety and health references contained in DOE Order 5480.4 that have applicability to NTS Underground Operations into a single safety and heath standard to be used in the underground operations at the NTS. Each portion of the standard was included only after careful consideration by the Working Group and is judged to be both effective and appropriate. The specific methods and rationale used by the Working Group are outlined as follows: The letter from DOE/HQ, dated September 28, 1990 cited OSHA and the CTSO as the safety and health codes applicable to underground operations at the NTS. These mandated codes were each originally developed to be comprehensive, i.e., all underground operations of a particular type (e.g., tunnels in the case of the CTSO) were intended to be adequately regulated by the appropriate code. However, this is not true; the Working Group found extensive and confusing overlap in the codes in numerous areas. Other subjects and activities were addressed by the various codes in cursory fashion or not at all.

  19. Application of Three Existing Stope Boundary Optimisation Methods in an Operating Underground Mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Gamze; Yavuz, Mahmut

    2017-12-01

    The underground mine planning and design optimisation process have received little attention because of complexity and variability of problems in underground mines. Although a number of optimisation studies and software tools are available and some of them, in special, have been implemented effectively to determine the ultimate-pit limits in an open pit mine, there is still a lack of studies for optimisation of ultimate stope boundaries in underground mines. The proposed approaches for this purpose aim at maximizing the economic profit by selecting the best possible layout under operational, technical and physical constraints. In this paper, the existing three heuristic techniques including Floating Stope Algorithm, Maximum Value Algorithm and Mineable Shape Optimiser (MSO) are examined for optimisation of stope layout in a case study. Each technique is assessed in terms of applicability, algorithm capabilities and limitations considering the underground mine planning challenges. Finally, the results are evaluated and compared.

  20. Vehicle operation characteristic under different ramp entrance conditions in underground road: Analysis, simulation and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qiming; Liu, Shuo; Liu, Yang

    2018-05-01

    An experimental design was used to study the vehicle operation characteristics of different ramp entrance conditions in underground road. With driving simulator, the experimental scenarios include left or right ramp with first, second and third service level, respectively, to collect vehicle speed, acceleration, lateral displacement and location information at the ramp entrance section. By using paired t-test and ANOVA, the influence factors of vehicle operating characteristics are studied. The result shows that effects of ramp layout and mainline traffic environment on vehicle operation characteristics are significant. The regression model of vehicle traveling distance on acceleration lane is established. Suggestions are made for ramp entrance design of underground road.

  1. Industrial hygiene support of underground operations at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, P.F.

    1992-01-01

    The Industrial Hygiene Section of the Health Protection Department provides industrial hygiene support of underground operations at the Nevada Test Site. This report describes support operations and summarizes the industrial hygiene data collected from July 31, 1989 through June 30, 1991. Air quality data were collected by means of personnel sampling by active and passive techniques using various kinds of industrial hygiene instrumentation and through localized and general area monitoring. The data collected were used to evaluate underground air quality and quantity requirements; evaluate worker exposures to a variety of air contaminants; determine the applicability and effectiveness of personal protective equipment

  2. Mechanization of operations in underground workings in coal mines and research project trends. [Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reich, K; Skoczynski, W; Sikora, W

    1985-01-01

    Structure of black coal reserves of Poland, imported and Polish made equipment for underground mining, prospects for mechanization of selected operations in underground mines and research programs of the KOMAG Center for Mechanization of Mining are evaluated. Prospects for longwall mining with caving or stowing in thick coal seams (slice mining), thin (0.8 to 1.2 m), level or inclined coal seams and steep seams are analyzed. The following equipment for mechanization of underground mining is evaluated: integrated face systems, shearer loaders, chain conveyors, belt conveyors, coal plows, equipment for mine drivage, hoists, drive systems for mining equipment. The following research programs of the KOMAG Center are reviewed: modernization of face systems for coal seams with uncomplicated mining conditions, development of equipment for thin seam mining, development of types of mining equipment for coal seams from 1.5 to 3.0 m thick with dip angles to 25 degrees, modernization of equipment for thick seam mining, increasing efficiency of mine drivage (new types of heading machines, materials handling equipment for mine drivage), mechanization of auxiliary operations in underground coal mines, improving quality of mining equipment, development of equipment for coal preparation, increasing occupational safety in underground mining.

  3. First experiment with the double solenoid RIBRAS system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtenthaeler, R.; Condori, R. Pampa; Lepine-Szily, A.; Pires, K. C. C.; Morais, M. C.; Leistenschneider, E.; Scarduelli, V. B.; Gasques, L. R. [Instituto de Fisica da USP, Sao Paulo, Brazil, C.P. 66318, 05314-970 (Brazil); Faria, P. N. de; Mendes, D. R. Jr. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ, 24210-340 (Brazil); Shorto, J. M. B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Assuncao, M. [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Campus Diadema, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-05-06

    A description of the double solenoid system (RIBRAS) operating since 2004 in one of the beam lines of the Pelletron Laboratory of the Institute of Physics of the University of Sao Paulo is presented. The recent installation of the secondary scattering chamber after the second solenoid is reported and the first experiment in RIBRAS using both solenoids is described.

  4. Paradigms of underground gas storage operation; Paradigmas del funcionamiento de un almacenamiento subterraneo de gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonoris, Patricia; Vizcarra, Rodolfo; Buciak, Jorge [Companias Asociadas Petroleras S.A. (Argentina)

    2004-07-01

    The main objective of the study was to determine, for the underground storage of gas, the Current Useful Volume and Maximum Useful Current of operation, as well as have an acceptable interpretation that allows calculating the investment needed to reach this Maximum Usable Volume.

  5. Staff Technical Position on geological repository operations area underground facility design: Thermal loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nataraja, M.S.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of this Staff Technical Position (STP) is to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) with a methodology acceptable to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for demonstrating compliance with 10 CFR 60.133(i). The NRC staff's position is that DOE should develop and use a defensible methodology to demonstrate the acceptability of a geologic repository operations area (GROA) underground facility design. The staff anticipates that this methodology will include evaluation and development of appropriately coupled models, to account for the thermal, mechanical, hydrological, and chemical processes that are induced by repository-generated thermal loads. With respect to 10 CFR 60.133(i), the GROA underground facility design: (1) should satisfy design goals/criteria initially selected, by considering the performance objectives; and (2) must satisfy the performance objectives 10 CFR 60.111, 60.112, and 60.113. The methodology in this STP suggests an iterative approach suitable for the underground facility design

  6. ATLAS's superconducting solenoid takes up position

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS superconducting solenoid was moved to its final destination on 16 January. It has taken up position opposite the ATLAS liquid argon barrel cryostat, which will house the electromagnetic calorimeter. All that remains to do now is to slide it into the insulation vacuum, this will be done in the next few weeks. Built by Toshiba, under responsibility of KEK in Japan, the central solenoid is 2.4 metres in diameter, 5.3 metres long and weighs 5.5 tonnes. "It will provide an axial magnetic field of 2 Tesla that will deflect particles inside the inner detector," as Roger Ruber, on-site project coordinator, explains. The inner detector, which consists of three sub-detectors, will be installed inside the solenoid later. The solenoid during one of the transport operations. Securely attached to the overhead travelling crane, the solenoid is situated in front of the opening to the liquid argon calorimeter, it will be inserted soon.

  7. Intrusion resistant underground structure (IRUS) : design and operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    The safety case for the IRUS low-level radioactive waste disposal facility is based on the fact that IRUS will contain three specific types of wastes only. The types of these wastes are baled wastes, bituminized incinerator ash, and bituminized reverse osmosis concentrate. IRUS will be a below-ground vault consisting of an open bottom reinforced-concrete structure (approximate dimensions 30m x 20m x 8m) with a reinforced-concrete roof. This paper covers the vault design and construction and operational features. 2 tabs

  8. Embedded Solenoid Transformer for Power Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    A resonant power converter for operation in the radio frequency range, preferably in the VHF, comprises at least one PCB-embedded transformer. The transformer is configured for radio frequency operation and comprises a printed circuit board defining a horizontal plane, the printed circuit board...... comprising at least two horizontal conductive layers separated by an isolating layer, a first embedded solenoid forming a primary winding of the transformer and a second embedded solenoid being arranged parallel to the first solenoid and forming a secondary winding of the transformer, wherein the first...

  9. Wireless Underground Sensor Networks: Channel Modeling and Operation Analysis in the Terahertz Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Alper Akkaş

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless underground sensor networks (WUSNs are networks of sensor nodes operating below the ground surface, which are envisioned to provide real-time monitoring capabilities in the complex underground environments consisting of soil, water, oil, and other components. In this paper, we investigate the possibilities and limitations of using WUSNs for increasing the efficiency of oil recovery processes. To realize this, millimeter scale sensor nodes with antennas at the same scale should be deployed in the confined oil reservoir fractures. This necessitates the sensor nodes to be operating in the terahertz (THz range and the main challenge is establishing reliable underground communication despite the hostile environment which does not allow the direct use of most existing wireless solutions. The major problems are extremely high path loss, small communication range, and high dynamics of the electromagnetic (EM waves when penetrating through soil, sand, and water and through the very specific crude oil medium. The objective of the paper is to address these issues in order to propose a novel communication channel model considering the propagation properties of terahertz EM waves in the complex underground environment of the oil reservoirs and to investigate the feasible transmission distances between nodes for different water-crude-oil-soil-CO2 compositions.

  10. IE Information Notice No. 85-47: Potential effect of line-induced vibration on certain Target Rock solenoid-operated valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, E.L.

    1992-01-01

    On November 14, 1984, Arizona Public Services Company provided the NRC with a final report on a 10 CFR 50.55(e) reportable condition relating to qualification testing of certain TR (Target Rock), solenoid-operated valves. Four TR valves, procured by Combustion Engineering (CE) for use at Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station Unit 3, were tested to the requirements of NUREG-0588, Category 1. Test valves included two 1-inch TR valves, model 77L-001 and two 2-inch TR valves, model 77L-003. The qualification test involved irradiation to 50 megarads, thermal aging at 260 F for 635 hours, mechanical cycling, vibrational aging to represent normal service vibration, seismic testing, and finally, testing in a simulated LOCA environment. The licensee reported that during the qualification testing, a number of anomalies were identified, and the test was discontinued when the test valves failed to function for different reasons during the seismic testing. CE an TR appraised the overall safety significance of the observed test anomalies for the licensee. They considered the failure of the valve to open on demand as a result of solenoid lead shorting caused by line-induced vibrational wear to be a common mode of failure that, in a seismic event, could potentially disable several redundant valves at the same time. This failure of the valve to open on demand is the only observed test anomaly considered to have significant generic safety implications and is the subject of this information notice

  11. HB+ inserted into the CMS Solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Tejinder S. Virdee, CERN

    2006-01-01

    The first half of the barrel hadron calorimeter (HB+) has been inserted into the superconducting solenoid of CMS, in preparation for the magnet test and cosmic challenge. The operation went smoothly, lasting a couple of days.

  12. Effects of SF$_{6}$ on the avalanche mode operation of a real-sized double-gap resistive plate chamber for the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn Sung Hwan; Hong, B; Hong, S J; Ito, M; Kim, B I; Kim, J H; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y U; Koo, D G; Lee, H W; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S J; Lim, J K; Moon, D H; Nam, S K; Park, S; Park, W J; Rhee, J T; Ryu, M S; Shim, H H; Sim, K S; Kang, T I

    2005-01-01

    We present the design and the test, results for a real-sized prototype resistive plate chamber by using cosmic-ray muons for the forward region of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In particular, we investigate the effects of adding SF/sub 6/ to the gas mixture for the avalanche mode operation of a resistive plate chamber. A small fraction of SF/sub 6/ is very effective in suppressing streamer signals in a resistive plate chamber. The shapes of the muon detection efficiency and the muon cluster size remain similar, but are shifted to higher operating voltage by SF/sub 6/. The noise cluster rate and size are not influenced by SF/sub 6/.

  13. ATLAS Solenoid Integration

    CERN Multimedia

    Ruber, R

    Last month the central solenoid was installed in the barrel cryostat, which it shares with the liquid argon calorimeter. Figure 1: Some members of the solenoid and liquid argon teams proudly pose in front of the barrel cryosat, complete with detector and magnet. Some two years ago the central solenoid arrived at CERN after being manufactured and tested in Japan. It was kept in storage until last October when it was finally moved to the barrel cryostat integration area. Here a position survey of the solenoid (with respect to the cryostat's inner warm vessel) was performed. Figure 2: The alignment survey by Dirk Mergelkuhl and Aude Wiart. (EST-SU) At the start of the New Year the solenoid was moved to the cryostat insertion stand. Figure 3: The solenoid on the insertion stand, with Akira Yamamoto the solenoid designer and project leader. Figure 4: Taka Kondo, ATLAS Japan spokesperson, and Shoichi Mizumaki, Toshiba project engineer for the ATLAS solenoid, celebrate the insertion. Aft...

  14. Central Solenoid On-surface Test

    CERN Multimedia

    Ruber, R

    2004-01-01

    A full scale on-surface test of the central solenoid has been performed before its final installation in the ATLAS cavern starting in November. The successful integration of the central solenoid into the barrel cryostat, as reported in the March 2004 ATLAS eNews, was hardly finished when testing started. After a six-week period to cool down the LAr calorimeter, the solenoid underwent a similar procedure. Cooling it down to 4.6 Kelvin from room temperature took just over five and a half days. Cold and superconducting, it was time to validate the functionality of the control and safety systems. These systems were largely the same as the systems to be used in the final underground installation, and will be used not only for the solenoid and toroid magnets, but parts of it also for other LHC experiments. This solenoid test was the first occasion to test the system functionality in a real working environment. Several days were spent to fine tune the systems, especially the critical safety system, which turned out...

  15. Optimization of basic parameters of cyclic operation of underground gas storages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Віктор Олександрович Заєць

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of optimization of process parameters of cyclic operation of underground gas storages in gas mode is determined in the article. The target function is defined, expressing necessary capacity of compressor station for gas injection in the storage. Its minimization will find the necessary technological parameters, such as flow and reservoir pressure change over time. Limitations and target function are reduced to a linear form. Solution of problems is made by the simplex method

  16. The ICARUS T600 Liquid Argon Detector Operation in the Underground Gran Sasso Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Vignoli, C

    2014-01-01

    The ICARUS T600 Module is the largest liquid argon detector (760 t LAr mass) ever realized to study neutrino oscill ations and matter stability in the deep underground Gran Sasso Laboratory. One of t he key elements for the detector performance is the liquid argon purity: residual electronegative compounds in argon have to be kept as low as 0.1 part s per billion all over the detector run. The T600 Module design was finalized by the ICARUS Collaboration after years of R&D studies that brought to the viable and scalable industrial solutions necessary for sized experiments with severe safety prescriptions for the underground operation . We present the T600 Module successful commissioning and the 3-years efficient, stable and continuous operation with extraordinary LAr purity, high performance and zero dead time data taking . This result demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of activation and long-term run in safe conditions of sized cryogenic detectors even in a confined underground location and r...

  17. On the Suitability of a Solenoid Horn for the ESS Neutrino Superbeam

    CERN Document Server

    Olvegård, Maja; Ruber, R; Ziemann, R; Koutchouk, J -P

    2015-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS), now under construction in Lund, Sweden, offers unique opportunities for experimental physics, not only in neutron science but potentially in particle physics. The ESS neutrino superbeam project plans to use a 5 MW proton beam from the ESS linac to generate a high intensity neutrino superbeam, with the final goal of detecting leptonic CP-violation in an underground megaton Cherenkov water detector. The neutrino production requires a second target station and a complex focusing system for the pions emerging from the target. The normal-conducting magnetic horns that are normally used for these applications cannot accept the 2.86 ms long proton pulses of the ESS linac, which means that pulse shortening in an accumulator ring would be required. That, in turn, requires H- operation in the linac to accommodate the high intensity. As an attractive alternative, we investigate the possibility of using superconducting solenoids for the pion focusing. This solenoid horn system needs ...

  18. The CMS superconducting solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The huge solenoid that will generate the magnetic field for the CMS experiment at the LHC is shown stored in the assembly hall above the experimental cavern. The solenoid is made up of five pieces totaling 12.5 m in length and 6 m in diameter. It weighs 220 tonnes and will produce a 4 T magnetic field, 100 000 times the strength of the Earth's magnetic field, storing enough energy to melt 18 tonnes of gold.

  19. Giant Magnet goes underground at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    "At 5:00 am GMT, 28th February 2007, the heaviest piece of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) particle detector began a momentous journey into its experimental cavern, 100 metres underground at CERN, Geneva

  20. Operation and performance of the ICARUS-T600 cryogenic plant at Gran Sasso underground Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Antonello, M.; Baibussinov, B.; Boffelli, F.; Bubak, A.; Calligarich, E.; Canci, N.; Centro, S.; Cesana, A.; Cieślik, K.; Cline, D.B.; Cocco, A.G.; Dabrowska, A.; Dermenev, A.; Disdier, J.M.; Falcone, A.; Farnese, C.; Fava, A.; Ferrari, A.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Guglielmi, A.; Haranczyk, M.; Holeczek, J.; Ivashkin, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Kisiel, J.; Kochanek, I.; Lagoda, J.; Mania, S.; Menegolli, A.; Meng, G.; Montanari, C.; Otwinowski, S.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.; Plonski, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G.L.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, C.; Sala, P.R.; Scaramelli, A.; Segreto, E.; Sergiampietri, F.; Stefan, D.; Sulej, R.; Szarska, M.; Terrani, M.; Torti, M.; Varanini, F.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.; Wang, H.G.; Yang, X.; Zalewska, A.; Zani, A.; Zaremba, K.

    2015-12-04

    ICARUS T600 liquid argon time projection chamber is the first large mass electronic detector of a new generation able to combine the imaging capabilities of the old bubble chambers with the excellent calorimetric energy measurement. After the three months demonstration run on surface in Pavia during 2001, the T600 cryogenic plant was significantly revised, in terms of reliability and safety, in view of its long-term operation in an underground environment. The T600 detector was activated in Hall B of the INFN Gran Sasso Laboratory during Spring 2010, where it was operated without interruption for about three years, taking data exposed to the CERN to Gran Sasso long baseline neutrino beam and cosmic rays. In this paper the T600 cryogenic plant is described in detail together with the commissioning procedures that lead to the successful operation of the detector shortly after the end of the filling with liquid Argon. Overall plant performance and stability during the long-term underground operation are discusse...

  1. Solenoidal fusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linlor, W.I.

    1980-01-01

    This invention discloses apparatus and methods to produce nuclear fusion utilizing fusible material in the form of high energy ion beams confined in magnetic fields. For example, beams of deuterons and tritons are injected in the same direction relative to the axis of a vacuum chamber. The ion beams are confined by the magnetic fields of long solenoids. The products of the fusion reactions, such as neutrons and alpha particles, escape to the wall surrounding the vacuum chamber, producing heat. The momentum of the deuterons is approximately equal to the momentum of the tritons, so that both types of ions follow the same path in the confining magnetic field. The velocity of the deuteron is sufficiently greater than the velocity of the triton so that overtaking collisions occur at a relative velocity which produces a high fusion reaction cross section. Electrons for space charge neutralization are obtained by ionization of residual gas in the vacuum chamber, and additionally from solid material (Irradiated with ultra-violet light or other energetic radiation) adjacent to the confinement region. For start-up operation, injected high-energy molecular ions can be dissociated by intense laser beam, producing trapping via change of charge state. When sufficiently intense deuteron and triton beams have been produced, the laser beam can be removed, and subsequent change of charge state can be achieved by collisions

  2. Issues of Exploitation of Induction Motors in the Course of Underground Mining Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumula, Stanisław; Hudy, Wiktor; Piaskowska-Silarska, Malgorzata; Pytel, Krzysztof

    2017-09-01

    Mining industry is one of the most important customers of electric motors. The most commonly used in the contemporary mining industry is alternating current machines used for processing electrical energy into mechanical energy. The operating problems and the influence of qualitative interference acting on the inputs of individual regulators to field-oriented system in the course of underground mining operations has been presented in the publication. The object of controlling the speed is a slip-ring induction motor. Settings of regulators were calculated using an evolutionary algorithm. Examination of system dynamics was performed by a computer with the use of the MATLAB / Simulink software. According to analyzes, large distortion of input signals of regulators adversely affects the rotational speed that pursued by the control system, which may cause a large vibration of the whole system and, consequently, its much faster destruction. Designed system is characterized by a significantly better resistance to interference. The system is stable with the properly selected settings of regulators, which is particularly important during the operation of machinery used in underground mining.

  3. 30 CFR 937.784 - Underground mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 937.784 Section 937.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... reclamation and operation plan. Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes application to conduct...

  4. 30 CFR 903.784 - Underground mining permit applications-Minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 903.784 Section 903.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... for reclamation and operation plan. Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, applies to any person who submits an application...

  5. 30 CFR 910.784 - Underground mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 910.784 Section 910.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... for reclamation and operation plan. (a) Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes...

  6. 30 CFR 947.784 - Underground mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 947.784 Section 947.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... for reclamation and operation plan. (a) Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes...

  7. 30 CFR 942.784 - Underground mining permit applications-Minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 942.784 Section 942.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... for reclamation and operation plan. Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes application...

  8. 30 CFR 939.784 - Underground mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 939.784 Section 939.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes...

  9. 30 CFR 941.784 - Underground mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 941.784 Section 941.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes...

  10. 30 CFR 922.784 - Underground mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 922.784 Section 922.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... for reclamation and operation plan. Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes application...

  11. 30 CFR 905.784 - Underground mining permit applications-Minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 905.784 Section 905.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... for reclamation and operation plan. Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes application...

  12. 30 CFR 933.784 - Underground mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 933.784 Section 933.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes...

  13. 30 CFR 912.784 - Underground mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 912.784 Section 912.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... reclamation and operation plan. Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes application to conduct...

  14. 30 CFR 921.784 - Underground mining permit applications-minimum requirements for reclamation and operation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. 921.784 Section 921.784 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE... requirements for reclamation and operation plan. Part 784 of this chapter, Underground Mining Permit Applications—Minimum Requirements for Reclamation and Operation Plan, shall apply to any person who makes...

  15. Enhancement of organizational and technical solutions regarding anchoring of completed construction facilities of underground railway system to operating control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е. Г. Козин

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Stages of practical realization of measures prescribed by requirements documents regarding anchoring of capital structures of underground railway system to operating control are considered in the article. On the basis of algorithm structure analysis, which includes obtaining a permit for putting into operation and cadastre works execution a range of solutions was proposed concerning optimization of construction project owner and operating organization activities with the purpose of terms reduction of capital structures handover to operation. The results of work of a commission responsible for completed underground railway system objects acceptance and putting into operation were analyzed. Considering example of object «Second entrance hall area of «Sportivnaya» station the statistical data of revealed snagging items is consolidated and dynamics of corrective actions is provided.Proposed solutions laid the foundation for corrections of requirements documents and were accepted for realization in the process of works acceptance of Saint-Petersburg underground railway system objects.

  16. The Canfranc Underground Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amare, J.; Beltran, B.; Carmona, J.M.; Cebrian, S.; Garcia, E.; Irastorza, I.G.; Gomez, H.; Luzon, G.; Martinez, M.; Morales, J.; Ortiz de Solorzano, A.; Pobes, C.; Puimedon, J.; Rodriguez, A.; Ruz, J.; Sarsa, M.L.; Torres, L.; Villar, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the forthcoming enlargement of the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) which will allow to host new international Astroparticle Physics experiments and therefore to broaden the European underground research area. The new Canfranc Underground Laboratory will operate in coordination (through the ILIAS Project) with the Gran Sasso (Italy), Modane (France) and Boulby (UK) underground laboratories

  17. Operational safety assessment of underground test facilities for mined geologic waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elder, H.K.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the operational safety assessment for the underground facilities for the exploratory studies facility (ESF) at the Yucca Mountain Project. The systematic identification and evaluation of hazards related to the ESF is an integral part of the systems engineering process; whereby safety is considered during planning, design, testing, and construction. A largely qualitative approach based on the analysis of potential accidents was used since radiological safety analysis was not required. The risk assessment summarized credible accident scenarios and the design provides mitigation of the risks to a level that the facility can be constructed and operated with an adequate level of safety. The risk assessment also provides reasonable assurance that all identifiable major accident scenarios have been reviewed and design mitigation features provided to ensure an adequate level of safety

  18. Program of experiments for the operating phase of the Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, G.R.; Bilinsky, D.M.; Davison, C.C.; Gray, M.N.; Kjartanson, B.H.; Martin, C.D.; Peters, D.A.; Lang, P.A.

    1992-09-01

    The Underground Research Laboratory (URL) is one of the major research and development facilities that AECL Research has constructed in support of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. The URL is a unique geotechnical research facility constructed in previously undisturbed plutonic rock, which was well characterized before construction. The site evaluation and construction phases of the URL project have been completed and the operating phase is beginning. A program of operating phase experiments that address AECL's objectives for in situ testing has been selected. These experiments were subjected to an external peer review and a subsequent review by the URL Experiment Committee in 1989. The comments from the external peer review were incorporated into the experiment plans, and the revised experiments were accepted by the URL Experiment Committee. Summaries of both reviews are presented. The schedule for implementing the experiments and the quality assurance to be applied during implementation are also summarized. (Author) (9 refs., 11 figs.)

  19. ATLAS Solenoid Integration

    CERN Multimedia

    Ruber, R

    Last month the central solenoid was installed in the barrel cryostat, which it shares with the liquid argon calorimeter. Some two years ago the central solenoid arrived at CERN after being manufactured and tested in Japan. It was kept in storage until last October when it was finally moved to the barrel cryostat integration area. Here a position survey of the solenoid (with respect to the cryostat's inner warm vessel) was performed. At the start of the New Year the solenoid was moved to the cryostat insertion stand. After a test insertion on 6th February and a few weeks of preparation work it was finally inserted on 27th February. A couple of hectic 24-hours/7-day weeks followed in order to connect all services in the cryostat bulkhead. But last Monday, 15th March, both warm flanges of the cryostat could be closed. In another week's time we expect to finish the connection of the cryogenic cooling lines and the superconducting bus lines with the external services. Then the cool-down and test will commence... ...

  20. Environmental and ventilation benefits for underground mining operations using fuel cell powered production equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocsis, C.; Hardcastle, S.

    2007-01-01

    The benefits of replacing diesel engines with fuel cells in mine production equipment were discussed. The paper was part of a multi-year feasibility study conducted to evaluate the use of hydrogen fuel cell-powered equipment to replace diesel engine powered equipment in underground mining operations. The feasibility study demonstrated that fuel cells are capable of eliminating the unwanted by-products of combustion engines. However, the use of fuel cells also reduced the amount of ventilation that mines needed to supply, thereby further reducing energy consumption. This study examined the benefits of replacing diesel engines with fuel cells, and discussed the mitigating qualifiers that may limit ventilation energy savings. Solutions to retaining and maintaining additional ventilation in the event of hydrogen leaks from fuel cell stacks were also investigated. The analyses were conducted on 6 operating mines. Current operating costs were compared with future operating conditions using fuel cell powered production vehicles. Operating costs of the primary ventilation system were established with a mine ventilation simulator. The analysis considered exhaust shaft velocities, heating system air velocities, and levels of silica exposure. Canadian mine design criteria were reviewed. It was concluded that appropriate safeguards are needed along hydrogen distribution lines to lower the impacts of hydrogen leaks. Large financial commitments may also be required to ensure a spark-free environment. 20 refs., 6 tabs., 3 figs

  1. Central Solenoid Insert Technical Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martovetsky, Nicolai N [ORNL; Smirnov, Alexandre [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    The US ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for the ITER central solenoid (CS) contribution to the ITER project. The Central Solenoid Insert (CSI) project will allow ITER validation the appropriate lengths of the conductors to be used in the full-scale CS coils under relevant conditions. The ITER Program plans to build and test a CSI to verify the performance of the CS conductor. The CSI is a one-layer solenoid with an inner diameter of 1.48 m and a height of 4.45 m between electric terminal ends. The coil weight with the terminals is approximately 820 kg without insulation. The major goal of the CSI is to measure the temperature margin of the CS under the ITER direct current (DC) operating conditions, including determining sensitivity to load cycles. Performance of the joints, ramp rate sensitivity, and stability against thermal or electromagnetic disturbances, electrical insulation, losses, and instrumentation are addressed separately and therefore are not major goals in this project. However, losses and joint performance will be tested during the CSI testing campaign. The USIPO will build the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Naka, Japan. The industrial vendors (the Suppliers) will report to the USIPO (the Company). All approvals to proceed will be issued by the Company, which in some cases, as specified in this document, will also require the approval of the ITER Organization. Responsibilities and obligations will be covered by respective contracts between the USIPO, called Company interchangeably, and the industrial Prime Contractors, called Suppliers. Different stages of work may be performed by more than one Prime Contractor, as described in this specification. Technical requirements of the contract between the Company and the Prime Contractor will be covered by the Fabrication Specifications developed by the Prime Contractor based on this document and approved by

  2. Large eddy simulation of cooling flows in underground subway station according to different PSD operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Yong Jun; Kim, Jin Ho; Park, Sung Huk; Koo, Dong Hoe [Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Large eddy simulation (LES) method is applied to systematically investigate the cooling fluid flow and the temperature distribution under the operating of air conditioning in the deeply underground subway station. The Shin-Gum-Ho subway station in Seoul which is the 8{sup th} floor and 43.6 m deep is selected for this analysis. The entire station is covered for simulation. The ventilation mode for air conditioning is kept as ordinary state. Different operating conditions for Platform screen door (PSD) are applied. First one is PSD is completely close and second one is PSD is regularly open and close which imitate the actual circumstances in the platform. The ventilation diffusers are modeled as 95 square shapes in the lobby and 222 squares in the platform. The temperature variations and flow behaviors are numerically simulated after operating of air conditioning for the whole station and the calculated results are compared with experimental data. LES method solves the momentum and thermal equations. Werner-Wengle wall law is applied to viscous sub layers for near wall resolution. The total grid numbers are 7.5 million and the whole domain is divided to 22 blocks. Multi blocks are computed in parallel using MPI. The results show the temperature difference in the platform between PSD-close and PSD-regularly open and close cases is 3-4 .deg. C.

  3. Large eddy simulation of cooling flows in underground subway station according to different PSD operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Yong Jun; Kim, Jin Ho; Park, Sung Huk; Koo, Dong Hoe

    2015-01-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) method is applied to systematically investigate the cooling fluid flow and the temperature distribution under the operating of air conditioning in the deeply underground subway station. The Shin-Gum-Ho subway station in Seoul which is the 8"t"h floor and 43.6 m deep is selected for this analysis. The entire station is covered for simulation. The ventilation mode for air conditioning is kept as ordinary state. Different operating conditions for Platform screen door (PSD) are applied. First one is PSD is completely close and second one is PSD is regularly open and close which imitate the actual circumstances in the platform. The ventilation diffusers are modeled as 95 square shapes in the lobby and 222 squares in the platform. The temperature variations and flow behaviors are numerically simulated after operating of air conditioning for the whole station and the calculated results are compared with experimental data. LES method solves the momentum and thermal equations. Werner-Wengle wall law is applied to viscous sub layers for near wall resolution. The total grid numbers are 7.5 million and the whole domain is divided to 22 blocks. Multi blocks are computed in parallel using MPI. The results show the temperature difference in the platform between PSD-close and PSD-regularly open and close cases is 3-4 .deg. C

  4. CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The milestone workshops on LHC experiments in Aachen in 1990 and at Evian in 1992 provided the first sketches of how LHC detectors might look. The concept of a compact general-purpose LHC experiment based on a solenoid to provide the magnetic field was first discussed at Aachen, and the formal Expression of Interest was aired at Evian. It was here that the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) name first became public. Optimizing first the muon detection system is a natural starting point for a high luminosity (interaction rate) proton-proton collider experiment. The compact CMS design called for a strong magnetic field, of some 4 Tesla, using a superconducting solenoid, originally about 14 metres long and 6 metres bore. (By LHC standards, this warrants the adjective 'compact'.) The main design goals of CMS are: 1 - a very good muon system providing many possibilities for momentum measurement (physicists call this a 'highly redundant' system); 2 - the best possible electromagnetic calorimeter consistent with the above; 3 - high quality central tracking to achieve both the above; and 4 - an affordable detector. Overall, CMS aims to detect cleanly the diverse signatures of new physics by identifying and precisely measuring muons, electrons and photons over a large energy range at very high collision rates, while also exploiting the lower luminosity initial running. As well as proton-proton collisions, CMS will also be able to look at the muons emerging from LHC heavy ion beam collisions. The Evian CMS conceptual design foresaw the full calorimetry inside the solenoid, with emphasis on precision electromagnetic calorimetry for picking up photons. (A light Higgs particle will probably be seen via its decay into photon pairs.) The muon system now foresaw four stations. Inner tracking would use silicon microstrips and microstrip gas chambers, with over 10 7 channels offering high track finding efficiency. In the central CMS barrel, the tracking elements are

  5. Design and operation problems related to water curtain system for underground water-sealed oil storage caverns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongkui Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The underground water-sealed storage technique is critically important and generally accepted for the national energy strategy in China. Although several small underground water-sealed oil storage caverns have been built in China since the 1970s, there is still a lack of experience for large-volume underground storage in complicated geological conditions. The current design concept of water curtain system and the technical instruction for system operation have limitations in maintaining the stability of surrounding rock mass during the construction of the main storage caverns, as well as the long-term stability. Although several large-scale underground oil storage projects are under construction at present in China, the design concepts and construction methods, especially for the water curtain system, are mainly based on the ideal porosity medium flow theory and the experiences gained from the similar projects overseas. The storage projects currently constructed in China have the specific features such as huge scale, large depth, multiple-level arrangement, high seepage pressure, complicated geological conditions, and high in situ stresses, which are the challenging issues for the stability of the storage caverns. Based on years' experiences obtained from the first large-scale (millions of cubic meters underground water-sealed oil storage project in China, some design and operation problems related to water curtain system during project construction are discussed. The drawbacks and merits of the water curtain system are also presented. As an example, the conventional concept of “filling joints with water” is widely used in many cases, as a basic concept for the design of the water curtain system, but it is immature. In this paper, the advantages and disadvantages of the conventional concept are pointed out, with respect to the long-term stability as well as the safety of construction of storage caverns. Finally, new concepts and principles

  6. Preparedness of fire safety in underground train station: Comparison between train operators in Malaysia with other operators from the developed countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajedi, Noor Aqilah A.; Sukor, Nur Sabahiah A.; Ismail, Mohd Ashraf M.; Shamsudin, Shahrul A.

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the fire evacuation plan and preparation at the underground train stations in the different countries. The methodology for this study was using the extended questionnaire survey to investigate the Rapid Rail Sdn Bhd, Malaysia's fire safety plan and preparation at the underground train stations. There were four sections in the questionnaire which included (i) background of the respondents, (ii) the details on the train stations, safety instruction and fire evacuation exercises (iii) technical systems, installation and equipment at the underground stations and (iv) procedures and technical changes related to fire safety that had been applied by the operators. Previously, the respondents from the different train operator services in the developed countries had completed the questionnaires. This paper extends the response from the Rapid Rail Sdn Bhd to compare the emergency procedures and preparation for fire event with the developed countries. As a result, this study found that the equipment and facilities that provided at the underground train stations that operated by Rapid Rail are relevant for fire safety procedures and needs. The main advantage for Rapid Rail is the underground stations were designed with two or more entrances/exits that may perform better evacuation compare to one main entrance/exit train stations in the other developed countries.

  7. Electron beam solenoid reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, V.; Benford, J.; Cooper, R.; Dakin, D.; Ecker, B.; Lopez, O.; Putman, S.; Young, T.S.T.

    1977-01-01

    The electron Beam Heated Solenoid (EBHS) reactor is a linear magnetically confined fusion device in which the bulk or all of the heating is provided by a relativistic electron beam (REB). The high efficiency and established technology of the REB generator and the ability to vary the coupling length make this heating technique compatible with several radial and axial enery loss reduction options including multiple-mirrors, electrostatic and gas end-plug techniques. This paper addresses several of the fundamental technical issues and provides a current evaluation of the concept. The enhanced confinement of the high energy plasma ions due to nonadiabatic scattering in the multiple mirror geometry indicates the possibility of reactors of the 150 to 300 meter length operating at temperatures > 10 keV. A 275 meter EBHS reactor with a plasma Q of 11.3 requiring 33 MJ of beam eneergy is presented

  8. The use of contained nuclear explosions to create underground reservoirs, and experience of operating these for gas condensate storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kedrovskij, O.L.; Myasnikov, K.V.; Leonov, E.A.; Romadin, N.M.; Dorodnov, V.F.; Nikiforov, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations on the creation of underground reservoirs by means of nuclear explosions have been going on in the Soviet Union for many years. In this paper the authors consider three main kinds of sites or formations that can be used for constructing reservoirs by this method, namely, low-permeable rocks, worked-out mines and rock salt formations. Formulae are given for predicting the mechanical effect of an explosion in rocks, taking their strength characteristics into account. Engineering procedures are described for sealing and restoring the emplacement holes, so that they can be used for operating the underground reservoir. Experience with the contruction and operation of a 50 000 m 3 gas-condensate reservoir in a rock salt formation is described. In the appendix to the paper a method is presented for calculating the stability of spherical cavities created by nuclear explosions in rock salt, allowing for the development of elasto-plastic deformations and creep

  9. Quench protection and safety of the ATLAS central solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Makida, Y; Haruyama, T; ten Kate, H H J; Kawai, M; Kobayashi, T; Kondo, T; Kondo, Y; Mizumaki, S; Olesen, G; Sbrissa, E; Yamamoto, A; Yamaoka, H

    2002-01-01

    Fabrication of the ATLAS central solenoid was completed and the performance test has been carried out. The solenoid was successfully charged up to 8.4 kA, which is 10% higher than the normal operational current of 7.6 kA. Two methods for quench protection, pure aluminum strips accelerating quench propagation and quench protection heaters distributing normal zones, are applied in order to safely dissipate the stored energy. In this paper, quench characteristics and protection methods of the ATLAS central solenoid are described. (14 refs).

  10. The large superconducting solenoids for the g-2 muon storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunce, G.; Cullen, J.; Danby, G.

    1994-01-01

    The g-2 muon storage ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory consists of four large superconducting solenoids. The two outer solenoids, which are 15.1 meters in diameter, share a common cryostat. The two inner solenoids, which are 13.4 meters in diameter, are in separate cryostats. The two 24 turn inner solenoids are operated at an opposite polarity from the two 24 turn outer solenoids. This generates a dipole field between the inner and outer solenoids. The flux between the solenoids is returned through a C shaped iron return yoke that also shapes the dipole field. The integrated field around the 14 meter diameter storage ring must be good to about 1 part in one million over the 90 mm dia. circular cross section where the muons are stored, averaged over the azimuth. When the four solenoids carry their 5300 A design current, the field in the 18 centimeter gap between the poles is 1.45 T. When the solenoid operates at its design current 5.5 MJ is stored between the poles. The solenoids were wound on site at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The cryostats were built around the solenoid windings which are indirectly cooled using two-phase helium

  11. Blasting technologies in the underground uranium mining operations of AG/SDAG Wismut. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roschlau, H.

    1994-01-01

    This is a series of articles on selected problems: The step cut technique developed by Wismut; rock burst alarm systems; stress relief blasting to prevent rock burst; endogenous underground fires caused by self-ignition of rock strata; cooling of hot boreholes; block subsidence in slicing and caving; roadway drivage in sublevel steping with self-consolidating fill. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Underground laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettini, A., E-mail: Bettini@pd.infn.i [Padua University and INFN Section, Dipartimento di Fisca G. Galilei, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Laboratorio Subterraneo de Canfranc, Plaza Ayuntamiento n1 2piso, Canfranc (Huesca) (Spain)

    2011-01-21

    Underground laboratories provide the low radioactive background environment necessary to frontier experiments in particle and nuclear astrophysics and other disciplines, geology and biology, that can profit of their unique characteristics. The cosmic silence allows to explore the highest energy scales that cannot be reached with accelerators by searching for extremely rare phenomena. I will briefly review the facilities that are operational or in an advanced status of approval around the world.

  13. SUPERCONDUCTING SOLENOIDS FOR THE MUON COLLIDER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREEN,M.A.; EYSSA,Y.; KENNY,S.; MILLER,J.R.; PRESTEMON,S.; WEGGEL,R.J.

    2000-06-12

    The muon collider is a new idea for lepton colliders. The ultimate energy of an electron ring is limited by synchrotron radiation. Muons, which have a rest mass that is 200 times that of an electron can be stored at much higher energies before synchrotron radiation limits ring performance. The problem with muons is their short life time (2.1 {micro}s at rest). In order to operate a muon storage ring large numbers of muon must be collected, cooled and accelerated before they decay to an electron and two neutrinos. As the authors see it now, high field superconducting solenoids are an integral part of a muon collider muon production and cooling systems. This report describes the design parameters for superconducting and hybrid solenoids that are used for pion production and collection, RF phase rotations of the pions as they decay into muons and the muon cooling (reduction of the muon emittance) before acceleration.

  14. High intensity neutrino source superconducting solenoid cyrostat design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, T.M.; Nicol, T.H.; Feher, S.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is involved in the development of a 100 MeV superconducting linac. This linac is part of the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D Program. The initial beam acceleration in the front end section of the linac is achieved using room temperature spoke cavities, each of which is combined with a superconducting focusing solenoid. These solenoid magnets are cooled with liquid helium at 4.5K, operate at 250 A and have a maximum magnetic field strength of 7.5 T. The solenoid cryostat will house the helium vessel, suspension system, thermal shield, multilayer insulation, power leads, instrumentation, a vacuum vessel and cryogenic distribution lines. This paper discusses the requirements and detailed design of these superconducting solenoid cryostats.

  15. Inauguration of the CMS solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    In early 2005 the final piece of the CMS solenoid magnet arrived, marked by this ceremony held in the CMS assembly hall at Cessy, France. The solenoid is made up of five pieces totaling 12.5 m in length and 6 m in diameter. Weighing 220 tonnes, it will produce a 4 T magnetic field, 100 000 times the strength of the Earth's magnetic field and store enough energy to melt 18 tonnes of gold.

  16. Maintaining an effective and efficient control system for the Electromagnetic Calorimeter of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment during Long-Term Operations of CERN�??s Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Holme, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The sub-detectors of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) multi-purpose particle detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have been collecting physics data from particle collisions for almost three years. During this period, the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) Detector Control System (DCS) has contributed to the high level of availability of the experiment. This paper presents the current architecture of this distributed and heterogeneous control system alongside plans and developments for future improvements. To ensure that the system can efficiently operate and adapt to changes throughout the required operation lifetime of more than a decade, the potential legacy aspects of this kind of control system must be carefully managed. Such issues include evolving system requirements, turnover of staff members, potential benefits from new technologies and the need to follow release schedules of external software dependencies. The techniques and results of the work to continually maintain, improve and stre...

  17. Solenoid for Laser Induced Plasma Experiments at Janus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Sallee; Leferve, Heath; Kemp, Gregory; Mariscal, Derek; Rasmus, Alex; Williams, Jackson; Gillespie, Robb; Manuel, Mario; Kuranz, Carolyn; Keiter, Paul; Drake, R.

    2017-10-01

    Creating invariant magnetic fields for experiments involving laser induced plasmas is particularly challenging due to the high voltages at which the solenoid must be pulsed. Creating a solenoid resilient enough to survive through large numbers of voltage discharges, enabling it to endure a campaign lasting several weeks, is exceptionally difficult. Here we present a solenoid that is robust through 40 μs pulses at a 13 kV potential. This solenoid is a vast improvement over our previously fielded designs in peak magnetic field capabilities and robustness. Designed to be operated at small-scale laser facilities, the solenoid housing allows for versatility of experimental set-ups among diagnostic and target positions. Within the perpendicular field axis at the center there is 300 degrees of clearance which can be easily modified to meet the needs of a specific experiment, as well as an f/3 cone for transmitted or backscattered light. After initial design efforts, these solenoids are relatively inexpensive to manufacture.

  18. Dirac equation in magnetic-solenoid field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavrilov, S.P. [Dept. Fisica e Quimica, UNESP, Campus de Guaratingueta (Brazil); Gitman, D.M.; Smirnov, A.A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    We consider the Dirac equation in the magnetic-solenoid field (the field of a solenoid and a collinear uniform magnetic field). For the case of Aharonov-Bohm solenoid, we construct self-adjoint extensions of the Dirac Hamiltonian using von Neumann's theory of deficiency indices. We find self-adjoint extensions of the Dirac Hamiltonian and boundary conditions at the AB solenoid. Besides, for the first time, solutions of the Dirac equation in the magnetic-solenoid field with a finite radius solenoid were found. We study the structure of these solutions and their dependence on the behavior of the magnetic field inside the solenoid. Then we exploit the latter solutions to specify boundary conditions for the magnetic-solenoid field with Aharonov-Bohm solenoid. (orig.)

  19. Geomechanical Assessments of Simultaneous Operation in the Case of Transition from Open Pit to Underground Mine in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedbalski, Zbigniew; Nguyen, Phu Minh Vuong; Widzyk-Capehart, Eleonora

    2018-03-01

    Nowadays, for a number of reasons, many open pit mines are considering a transition from Open Pit (OP) to Underground (UG) to remain competitive. In OP-UG transition, UG operation is operated simultaneously with the OP operation for a certain period of time. Guidelines for the simultaneous operation of OP and UG are very difficult to establish, as there are very few case studies available. Yet, because of the OP-UG interactions; the operation has a higher safety, technical and management requirements than the OP or UG methods when considered separately. In Vietnam, Cao Son is one of many OP mines, which decided to change the operational system from OP to UG. Simultaneous operation started in 2015 and will be conducted until 2030 when the OP mine Cao Son ends its mining activities. In this paper, selected geomechanical considerations of the simultaneous operation are presented. A number of numerical modelling calculations using finitedifference software with code FLAC were carried out for calibration process, slope stability analysis and the OP-UG interaction analysis for the Cao Son - Khe Cham II-IV mine. Based on the results obtained from numerical modelling, the geomechanical assessments of simultaneous operation Cao Son - Khe Cham II-IV are discussed in this paper.

  20. Electromagnetic behaviour of the shield in turbogenerators with superconducting solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Vecchio, P.; Veca, G.M.; Sacerdoti, G.

    1975-11-01

    The structure of turbogenerators with superconducting solenoids is analyzed and the investigation of electromagnetic behaviour of the rotating shield is presented. The cases considered are: (a) An hypothetical operation with a single phase with nominal current; (b) Steady-state operation in inverse sequence with 10% of the nominal current; (c) A step variation of the magnetic field intensity in the shield

  1. A Cryogenic Test Stand for Large Superconducting Solenoid Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabehl, R. [Fermilab; Carcagno, R. [Fermilab; Nogiec, J. [Fermilab; Orris, D. [Fermilab; Soyars, W. [Fermilab; Sylvester, C. [Fermilab

    2013-01-01

    A new test stand for testing large superconducting solenoid magnets at the Fermilab Central Helium Liquifier (CHL) has been designed, and operated. This test stand has been used to test a coupling coil for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), and future uses include solenoids for the Fermilab mu2e experiment. This paper describes the test stand design and operation including controlled cool-down and warm-up. Overviews of the process controls system and the quench management system are also included.

  2. Automation of Underground Cable Laying Equipment Using PLC and Hmi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mal Kothari, Kesar; Samba, Vishweshwar; Tania, Kinza; Udayakumar, R., Dr; Karthikeyan, Ram, Dr

    2018-04-01

    Underground cable laying is an alternative for overhead cable laying of telecommunication and power transmission lines. It is becoming very popular in recent times because of some of its advantages over overhead cable laying. This type of cable laying is mostly practiced in developed countries because it is more expensive than overhead cable laying. Underground cable laying is more suitable when land is not available, and it also increases the aesthetics. This paper implements the automation on a manually operated cable pulling winch machine using programmable logic controller (PLC). Winch machines are useful in underground cable laying. The main aim of the project is to replace all the mechanical functions with electrical controls which are operated through a touch screen (HMI). The idea is that the machine should shift between parallel and series circuit automatically based on the pressure sensed instead of manually operating the solenoid valve. Traditional means of throttling the engine using lever and wire is replaced with a linear actuator. Sensors such as proximity, pressure and load sensor are used to provide the input to the system. The HMI used will display the speed, length and tension of the rope being winded. Ladder logic is used to program the PLC.

  3. Operational Efficiency Forecasting Model of an Existing Underground Mine Using Grey System Theory and Stochastic Diffusion Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Strbac Savic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Forecasting the operational efficiency of an existing underground mine plays an important role in strategic planning of production. Degree of Operating Leverage (DOL is used to express the operational efficiency of production. The forecasting model should be able to involve common time horizon, taking the characteristics of the input variables that directly affect the value of DOL. Changes in the magnitude of any input variable change the value of DOL. To establish the relationship describing the way of changing we applied multivariable grey modeling. Established time sequence multivariable response formula is also used to forecast the future values of operating leverage. Operational efficiency of production is often associated with diverse sources of uncertainties. Incorporation of these uncertainties into multivariable forecasting model enables mining company to survive in today’s competitive environment. Simulation of mean reversion process and geometric Brownian motion is used to describe the stochastic diffusion nature of metal price, as a key element of revenues, and production costs, respectively. By simulating a forecasting model, we imitate its action in order to measure its response to different inputs. The final result of simulation process is the expected value of DOL for every year of defined time horizon.

  4. Giant particle detector magnet goes underground at CERN's Large Hadron Collider accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Scientists of the US CMS collaboration joined colleagues around the world in announcing that the heaviest piece of the Compact Muon Solenoid particle detector has begun the momentous journey into its experimental cavern 100 meters underground." (1 page)

  5. Operational Plan for Underground Storage Tank 322 R2U2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-06-07

    This Operational Plan provides the operator of the tank system with guidelines relating to the safe and compliant operation and maintenance of the tank system. The tank system schematic and list of emergency contacts shall be posted near the tank so they are visible to tank personnel. This Operational Plan shall be kept on file by the Facility Supervisor. It should be understood when managing this tank system that it is used to store hazardous waste temporarily for 90 calendar days or less. The rinsewater handled in the tank system is considered hazardous and may exhibit the characteristic of toxicity.

  6. Stabilization of superconducting dry solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, M.; Maeda, H.

    1989-01-01

    Premature quenches in superconducting solenoids, wound with Formvar coated NbTi conductors, have been studied. Some model coils were tested wound with various winding tensions. The experimental results are discussed considering the calculated stress distribution for coil winding, cool-down to liquid helium temperature, and energization at 4.2 K. /Some mechanisms of premature quenches are classified by the winding tension. Some stabilization methods are presented based on these quench mechanisms

  7. Occupational Malfunctioning and Fatigue Related Work Stress Disorders (FRWSDs): An Emerging Issue in Indian Underground Mine (UGM) Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Shibaji Ch.; Dey, Netai Chandra; Sharma, Gourab Dhara

    2018-04-01

    Indian underground mining (UGM) transport system largely deals with different fore and back bearing work processes associated with different occupational disorders and fatigue related work stress disorders (FRWSDs). Therefore, this research study is specifically aimed to determine the fatigue related problems in general and determination of Recovery Heart Rate (Rec HR) pattern and exact cause of FRWSDs in particular. A group of twenty (N = 20) UGM operators are selected for the study. Heart rate profiles and work intensities of selected workforces have been recorded continuously during their regular mine operation and the same workforces are tested on a treadmill on surface with almost same work intensity (%Maximal Heart Rate) which was earlier observed in the mine. Recovery Heart Rate (Rec HR) in both the experiment zones is recorded. It is observed that with almost same work intensity, the recovery patterns of submaximal prolonged work in mine are different as compared to treadmill. This research study indicates that non-biomechanical muscle activity along with environmental stressors may have an influence on recovery pattern and FRWSDs.

  8. Concept design of the CFETR central solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Jinxing; Song, Yuntao; Liu, Xufeng; Li, Jiangang; Wan, Yuanxi; Wan, Baonian; Ye, Minyou; Wu, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Main concept design work including coil's geometry, superconductor and support structure has been carried out. • The maximum magnetic field of CS coil is 11.9 T which is calculated by the coils’ operation current based on plasma equilibrium configuration. • The stray field in plasma area is less than 20 Gs under the CS coils’ operation currents designed for the plasma-heating phase. - Abstract: China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) superconducting tokamak is a national scientific research project of China with major and minor radius is 5.7 m and 1.6 m respectively. The magnetic field at the center of plasma with radius as R = 5.7 m is set to be 5.0 T. The major objective of the project is to build a fusion engineering tokamak reactor with fusion power in the range of 50–200 MW and should be self-sufficient by blanket. Six central solenoid coils of CFETR with same structure are made of Nb 3 Sn superconductor. Besides, the stray field in plasma area should be less than 20 Gs with the operation current of CS coils for plasma heating phase. The maximum magnetic field of CS coil is 11.9 T. It is calculated by the coils’ operation current based on plasma equilibrium configuration. The central solenoid needs to have enough stability margin under the condition of high magnetic field and strain. This paper discusses the design parameters, electromagnetic distribution, structure and stability analysis of the CS superconducting magnet for CFETR

  9. Performance of a proximity cryogenic system for the ATLAS central solenoid magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Doi, Y; Makida, Y; Kondo, Y; Kawai, M; Aoki, K; Haruyama, T; Kondo, T; Mizumaki, S; Wachi, Y; Mine, S; Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Passardi, Giorgio; ten Kate, H H J

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS central solenoid magnet has been designed and constructed as a collaborative work between KEK and CERN for the ATLAS experiment in the LHC project The solenoid provides an axial magnetic field of 2 Tesla at the center of the tracking volume of the ATLAS detector. The solenoid is installed in a common cryostat of a liquid-argon calorimeter in order to minimize the mass of the cryostat wall. The coil is cooled indirectly by using two-phase helium flow in a pair of serpentine cooling line. The cryogen is supplied by the ATLAS cryogenic plant, which also supplies helium to the Toroid magnet systems. The proximity cryogenic system for the solenoid has two major components: a control dewar and a valve unit In addition, a programmable logic controller, PLC, was prepared for the automatic operation and solenoid test in Japan. This paper describes the design of the proximity cryogenic system and results of the performance test. (7 refs).

  10. Design of SC solenoid with high homogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiaoliang; Liu Zhong; Luo Min; Luo Guangyao; Kang Qiang; Tan Jie; Wu Wei

    2014-01-01

    A novel kind of SC (superconducting) solenoid coil is designed to satisfy the homogeneity requirement of the magnetic field. In this paper, we first calculate the current density distribution of the solenoid coil section through the linear programming method. Then a traditional solenoid and a nonrectangular section solenoid are designed to produce a central field up to 7 T with a homogeneity to the greatest extent. After comparison of the two solenoid coils designed in magnet field quality, fabrication cost and other aspects, the new design of the nonrectangular section of a solenoid coil can be realized through improving the techniques of framework fabrication and winding. Finally, the outlook and error analysis of this kind of SC magnet coil are also discussed briefly. (authors)

  11. Office building with an underground storage system. Operational experiences after one year; Buerogebaeude mit Erdspeicher. Betriebserfahrungen nach einem Jahr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Dorothee; Wehrli, Stefan [Basler und Hofmann AG, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    Self-sufficient heating and cooling - that was the principle of Basler paragraph Hofmann AG (Zuerich, Switzerland) and Stuecheli Architects (Zuerich, Switzerland) in the planning and constructing of a new office building in the Canton of Zuerich. For the first time an underground storage system was implemented in a commercial building. This underground storage refuels the solar energy in summer and supplies heating energy in winter. The office building was settled in in September, 2010. The pioneering project now delivers first empirical values with the underground storage system. These empirical values show: The concept comes up, but needs time.

  12. Quench simulation in the thin superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tominaka, T.; Takasaki, M.; Wake, M.; Yamada, R.

    1983-07-01

    The propagation velocities of a normal zone were calculated for a 1 mdiameter x 1 m superconducting solenoid and for a 3 mdiameter x 5 m thin solenoid based on a simple model using the one-dimensional thermal equation. The quench back effect can be observed in certain conditions. The quench of the large thin solenoid was also simulated by using the computer program 'QUENCH'. (author)

  13. Appraisal of the physical and dynamic state of the Mayak operations geological environment with a view to underground radwaste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velichkin, V.I.; Petrov, V.A.; Tarasov, N.N.; Poluektov, V.V.; Kochkin, B.T.; Asadulin, A.A.; Volkov, A.B.

    1995-01-01

    The results of the research into geological structure, geomorphology, paleotectonics, mineralogy and petrography, petrophysics and petrochemistry of the site occupied by the Mayak radiochemical operations are presented. The research was aimed at the identification of the site for underground disposal of solidified high-level radioactive wastes (HLW). Geotectonic position of the district in the regional structures is shown, and paragenesis of fold and fault structures formed at the various stages and under various conditions of strains in the geological environment are described. The internal structure, nature and rates of the development of the processes of metamorphic and hydrothermal-metasomatic transformation of the geological environment, as well as basic petrogeochemical features of the strata were brought out. Stress-strained state of the strata at the stage of Cenozoic deformations that is retained nowadays was simulated. Basic petrophysical characteristics of adjoining strata were identified. Non-uniformity of the development of fissure-pore systems in the profile of strata of volcanic and sedimentary origin and peculiarities of deformations were revealed. The given comprehensive research was recommended for the identification of geological blocks suitable in varying degrees for the HLW disposal to the district

  14. Surface motion near underground nuclear explosions in desert alluvium Operation Nougat I, Area 3, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perret, W.R.

    1978-05-01

    During Operation Nougat I, which was conducted in late 1961 and the first half of 1962, Sandia Laboratories measured surface motion in the vicinity of all contained underground nuclear explosions conducted by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site. This report presents and analyses most of the data derived from that study. Propagation velocities in the desert alluvium, 4440 ft/sec, and underlying tuff, 6020 ft/sec, are typical of those derived from later measurements. Motion attenuation data exhibit considerable scatter, in part because of early measurement and data reduction techniques but primarily because of differences in the characteristics of the geologic media which had not then been recognized. However, regression fits to the scaled data show attenuation of scaled acceleration at a rate 35% greater than that observed for Merlin event data (Merlin was conducted later in Area 3). The attenuation rate for particle velocity data from Nougat I events was 47% less than that for Merlin data, and the Nougat I scaled displacement data attenuation rate was 87% less than that for Merlin data. Analysis of data from a vertical string of gages extending to the surface above the Mink explosion has established a significant difference between normal spallation above contained explosions in competent rock and the reaction of uncemented alluvium to similar explosive loading

  15. Assessment of radiological status of Bagjata underground uranium mine operating in the east Singhbhum District of Jharkhand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, B.K.; Meena, J.S.; Thakur, V.K.; Sahoo, S.K.; Tripathi, R.M.; Puranik, V.D.

    2012-01-01

    Bagjata uranium mine deposits (22 °28’ 07”N and 86°29’ 36” E) is located in Dhalmugarh subdivision of East Singhbhum district of Jharkhand. This mine was commissioned in 2008 and presently it is operating with a production capacity of 500 tonne/day. The mining of uranium ores can lead to both internal and external exposures of workers. Internal exposure arises from the inhalation of radon gas and its decay products and radionuclides in ore dust. The contribution of respirable ore dust toward internal exposure has been reported to be insignificant in a low ore grade uranium mines by several authors. Radon gas is produced by the alpha decay of 226 Ra, which is a product of the long lived antecedent uranium ( 238 U), is present in the rocks, decays to a number of short-lived decay products that are themselves radioactive. Radon gas diffuses into the mine air through cracks and fissures present in the ore body, during blasting, mucking and fragmentation of ore body in mine. The short-lived daughters, 218 Po, 214 Pb, 214 Bi and 214 Po, are the principal contributor to internal exposure to mine workers. Radon has been recognized as a radiation hazard causing excess lung cancer among underground miners (NAS, 1988; ATSDR, 1990). 222 Rn concentration in the mine air was estimated by using a scintillation cell technique

  16. Hybrid electrical generation system utilizing wind, diesel and hydropower for operation of an underground zinc mine in southern Chile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gridley, Norman [Minera El Toqui (Chile); Banto, Marcelo [Seawind Chile (Chile)

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents a hybrid electrical generation system used for underground zinc mine operations that utilizes wind, diesel and hydropower. This mine is located in Coyhaique and had a total energy consumption of 32,567 MWh in 2010 which is anticipated to increase by 25% in 2011. Power generation in this mine is independent of the power grid. It consists of four main portals: ventilation, electrical and drainage systems and ramp access to all mining zones. The technical details for all the parts of the mine and the hybrid generation system are given. A tabular form shows the energy consumed every month from 2005-2010 for all three systems involved, namely wind power generation, diesel generation and the hydro generation system. Benefits of this hybrid system include stability and constant power generation under variable loads. This system can also be applied to other mines using a grid. From the study it can be concluded that the hybrid system is environmentally friendly, economical and sustainable.

  17. Solenoid System for PRISM and COMET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Makoto

    2008-01-01

    An experiment of searching for coherent neutrino-less conversion of muons to electron conversion in muonic atom, μ - +N(A,Z)→e - +N(A,Z), is powerful probe for new physics phenomena beyond the Standard Model. We offer the experiment at a sensitivity of B(μ - N→e - N) -16 with muon beamline consisting of high-field pion capture solenoids, curved solenoids to select beam momenta, and a curved solenoid spectrometer to detect μ - -e - conversion with low-counting-rate conditions. Design of superconducting solenoid magnets of pion capture and transport beam line has been studied and is described in this paper

  18. Progress in ATLAS central solenoid magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, A; Makida, Y; Tanaka, K; Haruyama, T; Yamaoka, H; Kondo, T; Mizumaki, S; Mine, S; Wada, K; Meguro, S; Sotoki, T; Kikuchi, K; ten Kate, H H J

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS central solenoid magnet is being developed to provide a magnetic field of 2 Tesla in the central tracking volume of the ATLAS detector under construction at the CERN/LHC project. The solenoid coil design features high-strength aluminum stabilized superconductor to make the coil thinnest while maintaining its stability and the pure-aluminum strip technique for quench protection and safety. The solenoid coil is installed in a common cryostat with the LAr calorimeter in order to minimize the cryostat wall. A transparency of 0.66 radiation length is achieved with these integrated efforts. The progress in the solenoid coil fabrication is reported. (8 refs).

  19. Laser-heated solenoid fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlases, G.C.

    1977-01-01

    Since the suggestion by Dawson, Hertzberg, and Kidder that high-energy CO 2 lasers could be used to heat magnetically confined plasma columns to thermonuclear temperatures, a great deal of theoretical and experimental work has been performed. In this paper we first review the experiments on the basic laser-plasma interaction phenomena, in which lasers with energies up to 1 kJ have been used to produce plasmas at n/sub e/ greater than 10 18 and T/sub e/ greater than 200 eV. The second part reviews fusion reactor studies based on the laser solenoid

  20. High field laser heated solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, A.L.

    1979-01-01

    A 10 kJ pulsed CO 2 laser and 3.8 cm bore, 15 T, 8 μs rise time, 1-m long fast solenoid facility has been constructed to demonstrate the feasibility of using long wavelength lasers to heat magnetically confined plasmas. The most critical physics requirement is the necessity of creating and maintaining an on-axis electron density minimum to trap the axially directed laser beam. Satisfaction of this requirement has been demonstrated by heating 1.5 Torr deuterium fill plasmas in 2.7 cm bore plasma tubes to line energies of approximately 1 kJ/m. (Auth.)

  1. Giant CMS magnet goes underground at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Scientists of the US CMS collaboration joined colleagues around the world in announcing today (February 28) that the heaviest piece of the Compact Muon Solenoid particle detector has begun the momentous journey into its experimental cavern 100 meters underground. A huge gantry crne is slowly lowering the CMS detector's preassembled central section into place in the Large Hadron Collider accelerator at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland." (1 page)

  2. 2 T superconducting detector solenoid for the PANDA target spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efremov, A.A.; Koshurnikov, E.K. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, High Energy Physics Laboratory, Joliot-Curie, 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Lobanov, Y.Y. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, High Energy Physics Laboratory, Joliot-Curie, 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)], E-mail: lobanov@jinr.ru; Makarov, A.F. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, High Energy Physics Laboratory, Joliot-Curie, 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Orth, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291, Darmstadt (Germany); Sissakian, A.N.; Vodopianov, A.S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, High Energy Physics Laboratory, Joliot-Curie, 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the JINR design of the large 2 T superconducting solenoid for the target spectrometer of the PANDA experiment at HESR (FAIR, GSI, Darmstadt, Germany). The solenoid coil has an inner radius of 1.08 m and a length of 2.90 m. This solenoid is non-centrally split providing a warm bore of 100 mm in diameter through the coil to accommodate sufficient space for the internal target installations. Maximally stored energy in the windings is 22.3 MJ. All tracking and calorimetric detectors surrounding the target point, with exception of a forward cone of 5{sup 0} opening, are placed inside the lqHe-cryostat. The main features of the design and technique are as follows: a copper stabilizer and soldering technique for the superconducting cable; a stainless steel cryostat; winding technique over a mandrel; coreless type of the coil; low operational current. The details of the PANDA solenoid design including the magnetic field and stress-strain calculations are covered.

  3. Design of a Solenoid Magnet for a Microwave Ion Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Sub; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Kim, Dae Il

    2011-01-01

    A microwave ion source has many advantages, such as long-life time, low emittance, high brightness, and compactness. Also it is a big merit that 2.45GHz rf systems are easily available and inexpensive. Due to the reasons microwave ion sources are very attractive for industrial applications. But microwave ion sources need a solenoid magnet which is usually an electromagnet with a DC current power supply. The electromagnet solenoids of microwave ion sources can be installed in two methods. The first method is to use isolation transformer to supply electrical power to DC current power supply for the magnets. In this case the magnet is compact because it has the same potential with the extraction voltage. The second method is to put an electrical insulator, such as G10, between ion sources and magnets. In this case the solenoid magnet is bigger than one in the first method, especially for higher extraction voltage, because the space for the insulator is required. Permanent magnets can be a good candidate to make microwave ion source more compact. But it is difficult to control the magnetic field profile and the magnetic flux density for the permanent magnet solenoids. Due to the reason, in the case that the best performances in many operating conditions should be achieved by adjusting the profile and strength of the solenoid, electromagnet is better than permanent magnet. But in the case of industrial applications where operating conditions is usually fixed and the compactness is required, permanent magnet is better choice to build an ion source

  4. Using one-dimensional modeling to analyze the influence of the use of biodiesels on the dynamic behavior of solenoid-operated injectors in common rail systems: Results of the simulations and discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador, F.J.; Gimeno, J.; De la Morena, J.; Carreres, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Effect of using diesel or biodiesel on injector hydraulic behavior has been analyzed. ► Single and main + post injections have been studied for different injection pressures. ► Higher viscosity affects needle dynamics, especially for low injection pressure. ► The post injection masses are lower for biodiesel fuel despite its higher density. ► Modified injector has been proposed to compensate the differences between the fuels. - Abstract: The influence of using biodiesel fuels on the hydraulic behavior of a solenoid operated common rail injection system has been explored by means of a one-dimensional model. This model has been previously obtained, including a complete characterization of the different components of the injector (mainly the nozzle, the injector holder and the electrovalve), and extensively validated by means of mass flow rate results under different conditions. After that, both single and multiple injection strategies have been analyzed, using a standard diesel fuel and rapeseed methyl ester (RME) as working fluids. Single long injections allowed the characterization of the hydraulic delay of the injector, the needle dynamics and the discharge capability of the couple injector-nozzle for the two fuels considered. Meanwhile, the effect of biodiesel on main plus post injection strategies has been evaluated in several aspects, such as the separation of the two injections or the effect of the main injection on the post injection fueling. Finally, a modification in the injector hardware has been proposed in order to have similar performances using biodiesel as the original injector configuration using standard diesel fuel.

  5. A general method, a la Transport, for evaluation of the perturbing effects of solenoidal inserts in storage ring interaction regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.J.

    1976-07-01

    It may be expected that solenoid magnets will be used in many storage ring experiments. Typically an insert would consist of a main solenoid at the interaction point with a symmetrical pair of compensating solenoids located somewhere between the main solenoid and the ends of the interaction region. The magnetic fields of such an insert may significantly affect storage ring performance. We suggest here a simple, systematic method for evaluation of the effects, which together with adequate design supervision and field measurements will help to prevent any serious operational problems that might result if significant perturbations went unnoticed. 5 refs

  6. CERN tests largest superconducting solenoid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "CERN's Compacts Muon Solenoid (CMS) - the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet - has reached full field in testing. The instrument is part of the proton-proton Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project, located in a giant subterranean chamber at Cessy on the Franco-Swiss border." (1 page)

  7. Slowly does it as giant magnet goes underground at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Ormrod, Gill

    2007-01-01

    "At 5:00 am GMT this morning (28th February 2007) the heaviest piece of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) particle detector began a momentous journey into its experimental cavern, 100 metres underground at CERN, Geneva." (1,5 page)

  8. Detailed design of the ITER central solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libeyre, P.; Mitchell, N.; Bessette, D.; Gribov, Y.; Jong, C.; Lyraud, C.

    2009-01-01

    The central solenoid (CS) of the ITER tokamak contributes to the inductive flux to drive the plasma, to the shaping of the field lines in the divertor region and to vertical stability control. It is made of 6 independent coils, using a Nb3Sn cable-in-conduit superconducting conductor, held together by a vertical precompression structure. This design enables ITER to access a wide operating window of plasma parameters, up to 17 MA and covering inductive and non-inductive operation. Each coil is based on a stack of multiple pancake winding units to minimise joints. A glass-polyimide electrical insulation, impregnated with epoxy resin, is giving a high voltage operating capability, tested up to 29 kV. The CS performance is fatigue driven mainly by the stress levels in the conductor jacket and in the precompression structure needed to keep the modules in contact during the repulsive forces which can arise in operation. A rigid connection to the TF coils provided at one end and a centering support at the other end allow to resist net vertical forces as well as unbalanced radial forces while avoiding torsion transmission from the TF Coils to the CS assembly.

  9. Application of underground microseismic monitoring for ground failure and secure longwall coal mining operation: A case study in an Indian mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, G. K.; Sivakumar, C.

    2018-03-01

    Longwall mining technique has been widely used around the globe due to its safe mining process. However, mining operations are suspended when various problems arise like collapse of roof falls, cracks and fractures propagation in the roof and complexity in roof strata behaviors. To overcome these colossal problems, an underground real time microseismic monitoring technique has been implemented in the working panel-P2 in the Rajendra longwall underground coal mine at South Eastern Coalfields Limited (SECL), India. The target coal seams appears at the panel P-2 within a depth of 70 m to 76 m. In this process, 10 to 15 uniaxial geophones were placed inside a borehole at depth range of 40 m to 60 m located over the working panel-P2 with high rock quality designation value for better seismic signal. Various microseismic events were recorded with magnitude ranging from -5 to 2 in the Richter scale. The time-series processing was carried out to get various seismic parameters like activity rate, potential energy, viscosity rate, seismic moment, energy index, apparent volume and potential energy with respect to time. The used of these parameters helped tracing the events, understanding crack and fractures propagation and locating both high and low stress distribution zones prior to roof fall occurrence. In most of the cases, the events were divided into three stage processes: initial or preliminary, middle or building, and final or falling. The results of this study reveal that underground microseismic monitoring provides sufficient prior information of underground weighting events. The information gathered during the study was conveyed to the mining personnel in advance prior to roof fall event. This permits to take appropriate action for safer mining operations and risk reduction during longwall operation.

  10. ''Massless gaps'' for solenoid + calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marraffino, J.; Wu, W.; Beretvas, A.; Green, D.; Denisenko, K.; Para, A.

    1991-11-01

    The necessary existence of material in front of the first active element in a calorimeter will degrade the performance of that device. The question is by what factor. The follow up question is what can be done to minimize the damage. These questions are usually of primary importance for liquid argon calorimetry because of the necessity of containment dewars. However, the problem is universal. For example, the Solenoid Detector Collaboration, SDC, has proposed a superconducting coil which would be placed in front of the EM calorimeter. Although much effort has been made to minimize the depth of material in the coil, still the resolution and linearity must be optimized if the SDC goal of precision electromagnetic (EM) calorimetry is to be realized

  11. System of cylindrical drift chambers in a superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilleri, L.; Blumenfeld, B.J.; Dimcovski, Z.

    1978-01-01

    A superconducting solenoid at the CERN ISR was equipped with a system of high accuracy cylindrical drift chambers. This detector consists of eight layers of field shaped drift cells with a delay line opposite each sense wire to provide coupled two dimensional readout. The design, construction, and operation of this system are discussed. The resolution and performance of the delay lines and sense wires under ISR running conditions are shown

  12. HIE-ISOLDE CRYO-MODULE Assembly - Superconducting Solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Leclercq, Yann

    2016-01-01

    Assembly of the cryo-module components in SM18 cleanroom. The superconducting solenoid (housed inside its helium vessel) is cleaned, prepared then installed on the supporting frame of the cryo-module and connected to the helium tank, prior to the assembly of the RF cavities on the structure. The completed first 2 cryo-modules installed inside the HIE-ISOLDE-LINAC ready for beam operation is also shown.

  13. Indirectly cooled large thin superconducting CDF solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Kunitaka; Mori, Shigeki; Yoshizaki, Ryozo; Saito, Ryusei; Asano, Katsuhiko.

    1985-01-01

    The manufacturing technique of the indirectly cooled large thin superconducting solenoid for the collider detector facility (CDF solenoid) has been studied through cooperation of University of Tsukuba and the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics of the Ministry of Education of Japan, and the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in the U.S. Fabrication and testing of the solenoid has recently been completed by Hitachi. The CDF solenoid has a large-sized thin structure for meeting the requirement by experiments to be applied. Hitachi has thus developed a variety of new technologies including the design standard, coil cooling method, material selection, and manufacturing technique in accordance with experimental data, which were confirmed in a series of analyses and tests made on various prototypes. The CDF solenoid, built using Hitachi's new technologies, is of the world's top class among equipment of this type. This paper outlines the design criteria for the major components employed in the CDF solenoid and the test results of the solenoid. (author)

  14. The Compact Muon Solenoid Detector Control System

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a CERN multi-purpose experiment that exploits the physics of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The Detector Control System (DCS) ensures a safe, correct and efficient experiment operation, contributing to the recording of high quality physics data. The DCS is programmed to automatically react to the LHC changes. CMS sub-detector’s bias voltages are set depending on the machine mode and particle beam conditions. A protection mechanism ensures that the sub-detectors are locked in a safe mode whenever a potentially dangerous situation exists. The system is supervised from the experiment control room by a single operator. A small set of screens summarizes the status of the detector from the approximately 6M monitored parameters. Using the experience of nearly two years of operation with beam the DCS automation software has been enhanced to increase the system efficiency. The automation allows now for configuration commands that can be used to automatically pre-configure hardwar...

  15. Cryogenic testing of the TPC superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Smits, R.G.; Taylor, J.D.

    1983-06-01

    This report describes the results of a series of tests on the TPC superconducting magnet cryogenic system which occurred during the winter and spring of 1983. The tests occurred at interaction region 2 of the PEP colliding beam facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The TPC Magnet Cryogenic System which was tested includes the following major components: a remote helium compressor with a full flow liquid nitrogen purification station, 400 meters of high pressure supply and low pressure return lines; and locally a CTi Model 2800 refrigerator with two Sulzer gas bearing turbines, the TPC magnet control dewar, 70 meters of transfer lines, and the TPC thin superconducting solenoid magnet. In addition, there is a conditioner (liquid nitrogen heat exchangers and gas heaters) system for cooldown and warmup of the magnet. This report describes the local cryogenic system and describes the various steps in the cooldown and operation of the TPC magnet. The tests were successful in that they showed that the TPC magnet could be cooled down in 24 hours and the magnet could be operated on the refrigerator or a helium pump with adequate cooling margin. The tests identified problems with the cryogenic system and the 2800 refrigerator. Procedures for successful operation and quenching of the superconducting magnet were developed. 19 references

  16. Designing focusing solenoids for superconducting RF accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, G.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Page, T.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.; Wokas, T.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    The design of a focusing solenoid for use in a superconducting RF linac requires resolving a range of problems with conflicting requirements. Providing the required focusing strength contradicts the goal of minimizing the stray field on the surfaces of adjacent superconducting RF cavities. The requirement of a compact solenoid, able to fit into a gap between cavities, contradicts the need of mechanical support necessary to restrain electromagnetic forces that can result in coil motion and subsequent quenching. In this report we will attempt to address these and other issues arising during the development of focusing solenoids. Some relevant test data will also be presented.

  17. ITER Central Solenoid Module Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, John [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-09-23

    The fabrication of the modules for the ITER Central Solenoid (CS) has started in a dedicated production facility located in Poway, California, USA. The necessary tools have been designed, built, installed, and tested in the facility to enable the start of production. The current schedule has first module fabrication completed in 2017, followed by testing and subsequent shipment to ITER. The Central Solenoid is a key component of the ITER tokamak providing the inductive voltage to initiate and sustain the plasma current and to position and shape the plasma. The design of the CS has been a collaborative effort between the US ITER Project Office (US ITER), the international ITER Organization (IO) and General Atomics (GA). GA’s responsibility includes: completing the fabrication design, developing and qualifying the fabrication processes and tools, and then completing the fabrication of the seven 110 tonne CS modules. The modules will be shipped separately to the ITER site, and then stacked and aligned in the Assembly Hall prior to insertion in the core of the ITER tokamak. A dedicated facility in Poway, California, USA has been established by GA to complete the fabrication of the seven modules. Infrastructure improvements included thick reinforced concrete floors, a diesel generator for backup power, along with, cranes for moving the tooling within the facility. The fabrication process for a single module requires approximately 22 months followed by five months of testing, which includes preliminary electrical testing followed by high current (48.5 kA) tests at 4.7K. The production of the seven modules is completed in a parallel fashion through ten process stations. The process stations have been designed and built with most stations having completed testing and qualification for carrying out the required fabrication processes. The final qualification step for each process station is achieved by the successful production of a prototype coil. Fabrication of the first

  18. Test results of the g-2 superconducting solenoid magnet system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunce, G; Morse, WM; Benante, J; Cullen, MH; Danby, GT; Endo, K; Fedotovich, GV; Geller, J; Green, MA; Grossmann, A; GrossePerdckamp, M; Haeberlen, U; Hseuh, H; Hirabayashi, H; Hughes, VW; Jackson, JW; Jia, LX; Jungmann, K; Krienen, F; Larsen, R; Khazin, B; Kawall, D; Meng, W; Pai, C; Polk, T.; Prigl, R; Putlitz, GZ; Redin, S; Roberts, BL; Ryskulov, N; Semertzidas, Y; Shutt, R; Snydstrup, L; Tallerico, T; vonWalter, P; Woodle, K; Yamamoto, A

    The g-2 experiment dipole consists of a single 48 turn, 15.1 meter diameter outer solenoid and a pair of 24 turn inner solenoids, 13.4 meters in diameter. The inner solenoids are hooked in series and are run at a polarity that is opposite that of the outer solenoid, thus creating a dipole field in

  19. E-beam heated linear solenoid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benford, J.; Bailey, V.; Oliver, D.

    1976-01-01

    A conceptual design and system analysis shows that electron beam heated linear solenoidal reactors are attractive for near term applications which can use low gain fusion sources. Complete plant designs have been generated for fusion based breeders of fissile fuel over a wide range of component parameters (e.g., magnetic fields, reactor lengths, plasma densities) and design options (e.g., various radial and axial loss mechanisms). It appears possible that a reactor of 100 to 300 meters length operating at power levels of 1000 MWt can economically produce 2000 to 8000 kg/yr of 233 U to supply light water reactor fuel needs beyond 2000 A.D. Pure fusion reactors of 300 to 500 meter lengths are possible. Physics and operational features of reactors are described. Beam heating by classical and anomalous energy deposition is reviewed. The technology of the required beams has been developed to MJ/pulse levels, within a factor of 20 of that needed for full scale production reactors. The required repetitive pulsing appears practical

  20. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-01-01

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS

  1. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-09-01

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  2. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, M. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 2-12-1 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ikeda, S. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Romanelli, M. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States); Kumaki, M. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0072 (Japan); Fuwa, Y. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kanesue, T. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Hayashizaki, N. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 2-12-1 (Japan); Lambiase, R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Okamura, M. [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  3. Form coefficient of helical toroidal solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amelin, V.Z.; Kunchenko, V.B.

    1982-01-01

    For toroidal solenoids with continuous spiral coil, winded according to the laws of equiinclined and simple cylindrical spirals with homogeneous, linearly increasing to the coil periphery and ''Bitter'' distribution of current density, the analytical expressions for the dependence between capacity consumed and generated magnetic field, expressions for coefficients of form similar to Fabry coefficient for cylindrical solenoids are obtained and dependence of the form coefficient and relative volume of solenoid conductor on the number of revolutions of screw line per one circumvention over the large torus radius is also investigated. Analytical expressions of form coefficients and graphical material permit to select the optimum geometry as to capacity consumed both for spiral (including ''force-free'') and conventional toroidal solenoids of magnetic systems in thermonulear installations

  4. Compact muon solenoid magnet reaches full field

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Scientist of the U.S. Department of Energy in Fermilab and collaborators of the US/CMS project announced that the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet has reached full field in tests at CERN. (1 apge)

  5. Laser solenoid fusion--fission design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Taussig, R.T.

    1976-01-01

    The dependence of breeding performance on system engineering parameters is examined for laser solenoid fusion-fission reactors. Reactor performance is found to be relatively insensitive to most of the engineering parameters, and compact designs can be built based on reasonable technologies. Point designs are described for the prototype series of reactors (mid-term technologies) and for second generation systems (advanced technologies). It is concluded that the laser solenoid has a good probability of timely application to fuel breeding needs

  6. Advances in laser solenoid fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Quimby, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    The laser solenoid is an alternate fusion concept based on a laser-heated magnetically-confined plasma column. The reactor concept has evolved in several systems studies over the last five years. We describe recent advances in the plasma physics and technology of laser-plasma coupling. The technology advances include progress on first walls, inner magnet design, confinement module design, and reactor maintenance. We also describe a new generation of laser solenoid fusion and fusion-fission reactor designs

  7. Deeper underground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brearley, D. [Pantek Ltd. (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-01

    The paper describes how efficient data gathering has led to production and uptime improvements in UK Coal's Daw Mill colliery in Warwickshire. Software called FactorySuite A{sup 2} from Wonderware is being used to control and monitor all underground production and conveying. 3 photos.

  8. Lessons Learned for the MICE Coupling Solenoid from the MICE Spectrometer Solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, Xinglong; Li, S.Y.; Zheng, S.X.; Virostek, Steve P.; DeMello, Allen J.; Li, Derun; Trillaud, Frederick; Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Tests of the spectrometer solenoids have taught us some important lessons. The spectrometer magnet lessons learned fall into two broad categories that involve the two stages of the coolers that are used to cool the magnets. On the first spectrometer magnet, the problems were centered on the connection of the cooler 2nd-stage to the magnet cold mass. On the first test of the second spectrometer magnet, the problems were centered on the cooler 1st-stage temperature and its effect on the operation of the HTS leads. The second time the second spectrometer magnet was tested; the cooling to the cold mass was still not adequate. The cryogenic designs of the MICE and MuCOOL coupling magnets are quite different, but the lessons learned from the tests of the spectrometer magnets have affected the design of the coupling magnets.

  9. Rokibaar Underground = Rock bar Underground

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Rokibaari Underground (Küütri 7, Tartu) sisekujundus, mis pälvis Eesti Sisearhitektide Liidu 2007. a. eripreemia. Sisearhitekt: Margus Mänd (Tammat OÜ). Margus Männist, tema tähtsamad tööd. Plaan, 5 värv. vaadet, foto M. Männist

  10. Superconducting solenoids for an international muon cooling experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Rey, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The international muon ionization cooling experiment MICE will consist of two focusing cooling cells and a pair of uniform field solenoids used for particle identification and emittance measurements. The 2.75-meter long cooling cells have a pair of field flip coils and a coupling coil. The 0.52-meter diameter field flip coils surround an absorber that removes transverse and longitudinal momentum from the muons to be cooled. The beam in the absorber is at a minimum beta point so that scattering of the muons is minimized. The 1.7-meter diameter coupling coils are outside of conventional 201.25 MHz RF cavities that accelerate the muons putting longitudinal momentum into the muons without putting back the transverse momentum into the beam. A third set of flip coils helps the muon beam transition from and to the experimental solenoids. The 0.6-meter diameter experimental solenoids have a uniform field region (good to about 1 part in 1000) that is 1.3-meters long. The MICE experiment magnets must operate as a single unit so that the field profile will produce the maximum muon cooling

  11. Design and characterization of permanent magnetic solenoids for REGAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hachmann, M.; Flöttmann, K.; Gehrke, T.; Mayet, F.

    2016-01-01

    REGAE is a small electron linear accelerator at DESY. In order to focus short and low charged electron bunches down to a few μm permanent magnetic solenoids were designed, assembled and field measurements were done. Due to a shortage of space close to the operation area an in-vacuum solution has been chosen. Furthermore a two-ring design made of wedges has been preferred in terms of beam dynamic issues. To keep the field quality of a piecewise built magnet still high a sorting algorithm for the wedge arrangement including a simple magnetic field model has been developed and used for the construction of the magnets. The magnetic field of these solenoids has been measured with high precision and compared to simulations. - Highlights: • presenting a two-ring radially magnetized permanent magnetic solenoid design. • development of a analytical field description and field quality factor. • development of a sorting algorithm for permanent magnetic pieces to form a magnet. • performing a high-precision field measurement of a high gradient field.

  12. Synchrotron oscillation effects on an rf-solenoid spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benati, P.; Chiladze, D.; Dietrich, J.; Gaisser, M.; Gebel, R.; Guidoboni, G.; Hejny, V.; Kacharava, A.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kulessa, P.; Lehrach, A.; Lenisa, P.; Lorentz, B.; Maier, R.; Mchedlishvili, D.; Morse, W. M.; Öllers, D.; Pesce, A.; Polyanskiy, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Rathmann, F.; Semertzidis, Y. K.; Stephenson, E. J.; Stockhorst, H.; Ströher, H.; Talman, R.; Valdau, Yu.; Weidemann, Ch.; Wüstner, P.

    2012-12-01

    New measurements are reported for the time dependence of the vertical polarization of a 0.97GeV/c deuteron beam circulating in a storage ring and perturbed by an rf solenoid. The storage ring is the cooler synchrotron (COSY) located at the Forschungszentrum Jülich. The beam polarization was measured continuously using a 1.5 cm thick carbon target located at the edge of the circulating deuteron beam and the scintillators of the EDDA detector. An rf solenoid mounted on the ring was used to generate fields at and near the frequency of the 1-Gγ spin resonance. Measurements were made of the vertical beam polarization as a function of time with the operation of the rf solenoid in either fixed or continuously variable frequency mode. Using rf-solenoid strengths as large as 2.66×10-5revolutions/turn, slow oscillations (˜1Hz) were observed in the vertical beam polarization. When the circulating beam was continuously electron cooled, these oscillations completely reversed the polarization and showed no sign of diminishing in amplitude. But for the uncooled beam, the oscillation amplitude was damped to nearly zero within a few seconds. A simple spin-tracking model without the details of the COSY ring lattice was successful in reproducing these oscillations and demonstrating the sensitivity of the damping to the magnitude of the synchrotron motion of the beam particles. The model demonstrates that the characteristic features of measurements made in the presence of large synchrotron oscillations are distinct from the features of such measurements when made off resonance. These data were collected in preparation for a study of the spin coherence time, a beam property that needs to become long to enable a search for an electric dipole moment using a storage ring.

  13. Regulated underground storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    This guidance package is designed to assist DOE Field operations by providing thorough guidance on the underground storage tank (UST) regulations. [40 CFR 280]. The guidance uses tables, flowcharts, and checklists to provide a ''roadmap'' for DOE staff who are responsible for supervising UST operations. This package is tailored to address the issues facing DOE facilities. DOE staff should use this guidance as: An overview of the regulations for UST installation and operation; a comprehensive step-by-step guidance for the process of owning and operating an UST, from installation to closure; and a quick, ready-reference guide for any specific topic concerning UST ownership or operation

  14. Experiments with a double solenoid system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pampa Condori, R.; Lichtenthaeler Filho, R.; Faria, P.N. de; Lepine-Szily, A.; Mendes Junior, D.R.; Pires, K.C.C.; Assuncao, M.; Scarduelli, V.B.; Leistenschneider, E.; Morais, M.C.; Shorto, J.M.B.; Gasques, L. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: RIBRAS [1] is presently the only experimental equipment in South America capable of producing secondary beams of rare isotopes. It consists of two superconducting solenoids, installed in one of the beam lines of the 8 MV Pelletron Tandem accelerator of the University of Sao Paulo. The exotic nuclei are produced in the collision between the primary beam of the Pelletron Accelerator and the primary target. The secondary beam is selected by the in-flight technique and is usually contaminated with particles coming from scattering and reactions in the primary target such as {sup 7}Li, alpha and other light particles as protons, deuterons and tritons. Solenoids are selectors with large acceptance and the double solenoid system provides ways to improve the quality of the secondary beam by using a degrador in the midst of the two solenoids. The main contamination of the secondary beam comes from {sup 7}Li{sup 2+} particles coming from the primary beam. A degrador placed between the two solenoids is able to separate those particles from the {sup 6}He beam providing an additional charge exchange {sup 7}Li{sup 2+-→}3{sup +}. In addition, the differential energy loss in the degrador provides further selection of the light particles as protons, deuterons, tritons and and alpha particles by the second solenoid. Here we present the results of the first experiment performed at RIBRAS using both solenoids. A pure {sup 6}He beam was produced and the reaction {sup 6}He+p was measured using a thick CH{sub 2} target. 1. R. Lichtenthaeler et al., Eur. Phys. J. A 25,s01,733 (2005) and Nucl. Phys. News 15, 25 (2005). (author)

  15. Underground Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galis, Vasilis; Summerton, Jane

    Public spaces are often contested sites involving the political use of sociomaterial arrangements to check, control and filter the flow of people (see Virilio 1977, 1996). Such arrangements can include configurations of state-of-the-art policing technologies for delineating and demarcating borders...... status updates on identity checks at the metro stations in Stockholm and reports on locations and time of ticket controls for warning travelers. Thus the attempts by authorities to exert control over the (spatial) arena of the underground is circumvented by the effective developing of an alternative...... infrastructural "underground" consisting of assemblages of technologies, activists, immigrants without papers, texts and emails, homes, smart phones and computers. Investigating the embedded politics of contested spatial arrangements as characteristic of specific societies one can discover not only the uses...

  16. The cryogenic system for the superconducting solenoid magnet of the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Delikaris, D; Passardi, Giorgio; Lottin, J C; Lottin, J P; Lyraud, C

    1998-01-01

    The design concept of the CMS experiment, foreseen for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project at CERN, is based on a superconducting solenoid magnet. The large coil will be made of a four layers winding generating the 4 T uniform magnetic induction required by the detector. The length of the solenoid is 13 m with an inner diameter of 5.9 m. The mass kept at liquid helium temperature totals 220 t and the electromagnetic stored energy is 2.7 GJ. The windings are indirectly cooled with a liquid helium flow driven by a thermosyphon effect. The external cryogenic system consists of a 1.5 kW at 4.5 K (entropy equivalent) cryoplant including an additional liquid nitrogen precooling unit and a 5000 litre liquid helium buffer. The whole magnet and cryogenic system will be tested at the surface by 2003 before final installation in the underground area of LHC.

  17. Field Mapping System for Solenoid Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, K. H.; Jung, Y. K.; Kim, D. E.; Lee, H. G.; Park, S. J.; Chung, C. W.; Kang, B. K.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional Hall probe mapping system for measuring the solenoid magnet of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun has been developed. It can map the solenoid field either in Cartesian or in cylindrical coordinate system with a measurement reproducibility better than 5 × 10-5 T. The system has three axis motors: one for the azimuthal direction and the other two for the x and z direction. This architecture makes the measuring system simple in fabrication. The magnetic center was calculated using the measured axial component of magnetic field Bz in Cartesian coordinate system because the accuracy of magnetic axis measurement could be improved significantly by using Bz, instead of the radial component of magnetic field Br. This paper describes the measurement system and summarizes the measurement results for the solenoid magnetic of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun.

  18. Underground storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1965-06-10

    A procedure is described for making an underground storage cavity in a soluble formation. Two holes are drilled, and fluid is pumped into the first hole. This fluid is a non-solute for the formation material. Then pressure is applied to the fluid until the formation is fractured in the direction of the second hole. More non-solute fluid is injected to complete the fracture between the 2 holes. A solute fluid is then circulated between the 2 holes, which results in removal of that part of the formation next to the fracture and the forming of a chamber.

  19. Evaluation results of TMI-2 solenoids AH-V6 and AH-V74

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soberano, F.T.

    1984-01-01

    Two Class 1E solenoid operators were removed from the Three Mile Island unit 2 Reactor Building and examined to determine whether they had degraded as a result of accident and post-accident conditions. Both units were functional during post-accident operation. This report discusses the examination, findings, causes of the anomalies, and recommendations for system improvement

  20. Remote Operated Vehicle geophysical surveys on land (underground), air and submarine archaeology: General peculiarities of processing and interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppelbaum, Lev

    2016-04-01

    The last Remote Operation Vehicles (ROV) generation - small and maneuvering vehicles with different geophysical sensors - can fly at levels of a few meters (and even tens of centimeters) over the earth's surface, to move on the earth's surface and in the inaccessible underground areas and to explore in underwater investigations (e.g., Mindel and Bingham, 2001; Rowlands and Sarris, 2006; Wilson et al., 2006; Rigaud, 2007; Eppelbaum, 2008; Patterson and Brescia, 2008; Sarris, 2008; Wang et al., 2009; Wu and Tian, 2010; Stall, 2011; Tezkan et al., 2011; Winn et al., 2012; El-Nahhas, 2013; Hadjimitsis et al., 2013; Hajiyev and Vural, 2013; Hugenholtz et al., 2013; Petzke et al., 2013; Pourier et al., 2013; Casana et al., 2014; Silverberg and Bieber, 2014). Such geophysical investigations should have an extremely low exploitation cost and can observe surface practically inaccessible archaeological sites (swampy areas, dense vegetation, rugged relief, over the areas of world recognized religious and cultural artifacts (Eppelbaum, 2010), etc.). Finally, measurements of geophysical fields at different observation levels could provide a new unique geological-geophysical information (Eppelbaum and Mishne, 2011). Let's consider ROV airborne magnetic measurements as example. The modern magnetometric equipment enables to carry out magnetic measurements with a frequency of 50 times per second (and more) that taking into account the low ROV flight speed provides a necessary density of observations. For instance, frequency of observation of 50 times per second by ROV velocity of 40 km/hour gives density of observation about 0.2 m. It is obvious that the calculated step between observation points is more than sufficient one. Such observations will allow not only reduce the influence of some small artificial sources of noise, but also to obtain some additional data necessary for quantitative analysis (some interpretation methodologies need to have observations at two levels; upward

  1. Gas-mixing system for drift chambers using solenoid valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, W.E.; Sugano, K.; Trentlage, D.B.

    1983-04-01

    We describe an inexpensive system for mixing argon and ethane drift chamber gas which is used for the E-605 experiment at Fermilab. This system is based on the idea of intermittent mixing of gases with fixed mixing flow rates. A dual-action pressure switch senses the pressure in a mixed gas reservoir tank and operates solenoid valves to control mixing action and regulate reservoir pressure. This system has the advantages that simple controls accurately regulate the mixing ratio and that the mixing ratio is nearly flow rate independent. We also report the results of the gas analysis of various samplings, and the reliability of the system in long-term running

  2. Solenoid fringe field compensation for the Cluster Klystron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.; Fernow, R.C.; Kirk, H.G.; Palmer, R.B.; Zhao, Y.

    1996-04-01

    Optimization of the solenoid pancake currents so as to have a uniform axial magnetic field over an extended volume, is very important for the successful operation of the Cluster Klystron. By boosting the first and the last pancake currents by 35%, a uniform field Br/Bz ≤ 0.1% at radius R ≤ 2 cm can be extended from ± 7 cm to ± 16 cm. The result confirms simulations and the requirements for a 3-beam Cluster Klystron Experiment are achieved

  3. Mechanical design of a 250 kilogauss solenoidal magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonanos, P.

    1975-12-01

    The mechanical design and construction of a 5 cm bore, 23 cm long solenoidal magnet operated at 250 kilogauss is described. The magnet provides confining field for a plasma heated by a CO 2 laser. Radial diagnostic ports with a clear aperture of 0.41 cm allow viewing access near the magnet midplane. The on-axis field homogeneity is within 5 percent over a central length of 12 cm. The magnet sustained 500 to 1000 pulses at the highest field levels before catastrophic failure

  4. HB+ prepares for insertion into the CMS solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Dave Barney, CERN

    2006-01-01

    With calibration of the first half of the barrel Hadron Calorimeter (HB+) complete (using a radioactive source), preparations begin for its insertion into the solenoid for the Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC). It was moved out of its alcove at the beginning of March - a non-trivial (but completely successful) operation due to the proximity of one of the barrel yoke rings (YB+1). The other half of the barrel Hadron Calorimeter (HB-) and one of the endcaps (HE+) should also be calibrated before the MTCC.

  5. Some options for the muon collider capture and decay solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1995-11-01

    This report discusses some of the problems associated with using solenoid magnets to capture the secondary particles that are created when an intense beam of 8 to 10 GeV protons interacts with the target at the center of the capture region. Hybrid capture solenoids with inductions of 28 T and a 22T are described. The first 14 to 15 T of the solenoid induction will be generated by a superconducting magnet. The remainder of the field will be generated by a Bitter type of water cooled solenoid. The capture solenoids include a transition section from the high field solenoid to a 7 T decay channel where pions and kaons that come off of the target decay into muons. A short 7 T solenoidal decay channel between the capture solenoid system and the phase rotation system is described. A concept for separation of negative and positive pions and kaons is briefly discussed

  6. Compensation of oscillation coupling induced by solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelinskij, A.Yu.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Shcherbakov, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Methods for construction of various schemes of oscillation coupling compensation, induced by solenoids in charged particle storage rings, are described. Peculiarities of magnetic structure, enabling to localize oscillation coupling in wide energy range are discussed. Results of calculation of compensation schemes for design of NR-2000 storage ring spin rotation are presented

  7. Successful mapping of the solenoid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Aleksa, M.

    The ATLAS solenoid coil is about 5.3m long, has a diameter of 2.5m and is designed to deliver a magnetic field of approximately 2T for the ATLAS inner detector. The superconducting solenoid coil has been integrated inside the LAr barrel cryostat and was installed at its final position inside the cavern in November 2005. This summer - after completion of the extended barrel calorimeters and before the installation of the inner detector - the end cap calorimeters (LAr end caps and Tile extended barrels) were moved for the first time into their final position in order to create conditions as close as possible to final for the solenoid tests and for mapping the field inside the solenoid bore. Design and construction of the mapping machine The requirement on the absolute precision of the field measurements are 0.05% on the field integrals seen by particles; if this is achieved the momentum error coming from insufficient knowledge of the magnetic field will be negligible compared to the error stemming from the inn...

  8. Error field generation of solenoid magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Many applications for large solenoids and solenoidal arrays depend on the high precision of the axial field profile. In cases where requirements of ΔB/B for nonaxial fields are on the order of 10 -4 , the actual winding techniques of the solenoid need to be considered. Whereas an ideal solenoid consisting of current loops would generate no radial fields along the axis, in reality, the actual current-carrying conductors must follow spiral or helical paths. A straightforward method for determining the radial error fields generated by coils wound with actual techniques employed in magnet fabrication has been developed. The method devised uses a computer code which models a magnet by sending a single, current-carrying filament along the same path taken by the conductor during coil winding. Helical and spiral paths are simulated using small, straight-line current segments. This technique, whose results are presented in this paper, was used to predict radial field errors for the Elmo Bumpy Torus-Proof of Principle magnet. These results include effects due to various winding methods, not only spiral/helical and layer-to-layer transitions, but also the effects caused by worst-case tolerance conditions both from the conductor and the winding form (bobbin). Contributions made by extraneous circuitry (e.g., overhead buswork and incoming leads) are also mentioned

  9. Flowfield Analysis of a Pneumatic Solenoid Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheam-Chyun Lin

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatic solenoid valve has been widely used in the vehicle control systems for meeting the rapid-reaction demand triggered by the dynamic conditions encountered during the driving course of vehicle. For ensuring the safety of human being, the reliable and effective solenoid valve is in great demand to shorten the reaction time and thus becomes the topic of this research. This numerical study chooses a commercial 3/2-way solenoid valve as the reference valve for analysing its performance. At first, CFD software Fluent is adopted to simulate the flow field associated with the valve configuration. Then, the comprehensive flow visualization is implemented to identify the locations of adverse flow patterns. Accordingly, it is found that a high-pressure region exists in the zone between the nozzle exit and the top of iron core. Thereafter, the nozzle diameter and the distance between nozzle and spool are identified as the important design parameters for improving the pressure response characteristics of valve. In conclusion, this work establishes a rigorous and systematic CFD scheme to evaluate the performance of pneumatic solenoid valve.

  10. Growth techniques for monolithic YBCO solenoidal magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scruggs, S.J.; Putman, P.T.; Fang, H.; Alessandrini, M.; Salama, K.

    2006-01-01

    The possibility of growing large single domain YBCO solenoids by the use of a large seed has been investigated. There are two known methods for producing a similar solenoid. This first is a conventional top seeded melt growth process followed by a post processing machining step to create the bore. The second involves using multiple seeds spaced around the magnet bore. The appeal of the new technique lies in decreasing processing time compared to the single seed technique, while avoiding alignment problems found in the multiple seeding technique. By avoiding these problems, larger diameter monoliths can be produced. Large diameter monoliths are beneficial because the maximum magnetic field produced by a trapped field magnet is proportional to the radius of the sample. Furthermore, the availability of trapped field magnets with large diameter could enable their use in applications that traditionally have been considered to require wound electromagnets, such as beam bending magnets for particle accelerators or electric propulsion. A comparison of YBCO solenoids grown by the use of a large seed and grown by the use of two small seeds simulating multiple seeding is made. Trapped field measurements as well as microstructure evaluation were used in characterization of each solenoid. Results indicate that high quality growth occurs only in the vicinity of the seeds for the multiple seeded sample, while the sample with the large seeded exhibited high quality growth throughout the entire sample

  11. Growth techniques for monolithic YBCO solenoidal magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scruggs, S.J. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)]. E-mail: Sscruggs2@uh.edu; Putman, P.T. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Fang, H. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Alessandrini, M. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Salama, K. [Texas Center for Superconductivity at University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)

    2006-10-01

    The possibility of growing large single domain YBCO solenoids by the use of a large seed has been investigated. There are two known methods for producing a similar solenoid. This first is a conventional top seeded melt growth process followed by a post processing machining step to create the bore. The second involves using multiple seeds spaced around the magnet bore. The appeal of the new technique lies in decreasing processing time compared to the single seed technique, while avoiding alignment problems found in the multiple seeding technique. By avoiding these problems, larger diameter monoliths can be produced. Large diameter monoliths are beneficial because the maximum magnetic field produced by a trapped field magnet is proportional to the radius of the sample. Furthermore, the availability of trapped field magnets with large diameter could enable their use in applications that traditionally have been considered to require wound electromagnets, such as beam bending magnets for particle accelerators or electric propulsion. A comparison of YBCO solenoids grown by the use of a large seed and grown by the use of two small seeds simulating multiple seeding is made. Trapped field measurements as well as microstructure evaluation were used in characterization of each solenoid. Results indicate that high quality growth occurs only in the vicinity of the seeds for the multiple seeded sample, while the sample with the large seeded exhibited high quality growth throughout the entire sample.

  12. Effect of the solenoid in various conditions of the laser ion source at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, S.; Kumaki, M.; Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M.

    2016-02-01

    In the laser ion source (LIS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a solenoid is used to guide the laser ablation plasma and modulate the extracted beam current. Many types of ion species are guided. In some cases, the plasma plume is injected into the solenoid away from the solenoidal axis. To investigate the effects of the solenoid on the beam extracted from the plasma that has different properties, the beam current was measured in the setup of the LIS at the BNL. The beam current of Li, Al, Si, Fe, and Au increased when the magnetic field was applied. For most of the species the peak current and the total charge within a single beam pulse increased around 10 times with a magnetic field less than 100 G. In addition, for some species the rate of increase of the peak currents became smaller when the magnetic flux densities were larger than certain values depending on the species. In this case, the current waveforms were distorted. At the same magnetic field value, the field was more effective on lighter species than on heavier ones. When plasma was injected offset from the axis of the solenoid, peak current and total charge became half of those without offset. The experimental data are useful for the operation of the LIS at the BNL.

  13. Effect of the solenoid in various conditions of the laser ion source at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, S.; Kumaki, M.; Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the laser ion source (LIS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a solenoid is used to guide the laser ablation plasma and modulate the extracted beam current. Many types of ion species are guided. In some cases, the plasma plume is injected into the solenoid away from the solenoidal axis. To investigate the effects of the solenoid on the beam extracted from the plasma that has different properties, the beam current was measured in the setup of the LIS at the BNL. The beam current of Li, Al, Si, Fe, and Au increased when the magnetic field was applied. For most of the species the peak current and the total charge within a single beam pulse increased around 10 times with a magnetic field less than 100 G. In addition, for some species the rate of increase of the peak currents became smaller when the magnetic flux densities were larger than certain values depending on the species. In this case, the current waveforms were distorted. At the same magnetic field value, the field was more effective on lighter species than on heavier ones. When plasma was injected offset from the axis of the solenoid, peak current and total charge became half of those without offset. The experimental data are useful for the operation of the LIS at the BNL

  14. Effect of the solenoid in various conditions of the laser ion source at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, S., E-mail: ikeda.s.ae@m.titech.ac.jp [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 216-8502 (Japan); Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0108 (Japan); Kumaki, M. [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0108 (Japan); Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    In the laser ion source (LIS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a solenoid is used to guide the laser ablation plasma and modulate the extracted beam current. Many types of ion species are guided. In some cases, the plasma plume is injected into the solenoid away from the solenoidal axis. To investigate the effects of the solenoid on the beam extracted from the plasma that has different properties, the beam current was measured in the setup of the LIS at the BNL. The beam current of Li, Al, Si, Fe, and Au increased when the magnetic field was applied. For most of the species the peak current and the total charge within a single beam pulse increased around 10 times with a magnetic field less than 100 G. In addition, for some species the rate of increase of the peak currents became smaller when the magnetic flux densities were larger than certain values depending on the species. In this case, the current waveforms were distorted. At the same magnetic field value, the field was more effective on lighter species than on heavier ones. When plasma was injected offset from the axis of the solenoid, peak current and total charge became half of those without offset. The experimental data are useful for the operation of the LIS at the BNL.

  15. Experimental study on coil of direct action solenoid valve with temperature increasing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lu; Liu Qianfeng; Bo Hanliang

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic control rod drive technology (HCRDT) is a newly invented patent and Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University owns HCRDT's independent intellectual property rights. The integrated valve which is made up of three direct action solenoid valves is the key part of this technology, so the performance of the solenoid valve directly affects the function of the integrated valve and the HCRDT. Based on the conditions occurring in the operation of the control rod hydraulic drive system, the coil of the direct action solenoid valve with temperature increasing was studied by the experiment and analyzed by ANSYS code. The result shows that the temperature of the coil for the solenoid valve increases with the current increasing firstly. The temperature of the inner wall of the coil is higher than that of the exterior wall. The temperature of the middle coil is higher than that of the edge of the coil. The design of the direct action solenoid valve can be optimized. (authors)

  16. Bent solenoids for spectrometers and emittance exchange sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.

    1999-01-01

    Bent solenoids can be used to transport low energy beams as they provide both confinement and dispersion of particle orbits. Solenoids are being considered both as emittance exchange sections and spectrometers in the muon cooling system as part of the study of the muon collider. They present the results of a study of bent solenoids which considers the design of coupling sections between bent solenoids to straight solenoids, drift compensation fields, aberrations, and factors relating to the construction, such as field ripple, stored energy, coil forces and field errors

  17. Reference Design of the Mu2e Detector Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Feher, S; Brandt,, J; Cheban, S; Coleman, R; Dhanaraj, N; Fang, I; Lamm, M; Lombardo, V; Lopes, M; Miller, J; Ostojic, R ,; Orris, D; Page, T; Peterson, T; Tang, Z; Wands, R

    2014-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab has been approved by the Department of Energy to proceed developing the preliminary design. Integral to the success of Mu2e is the superconducting solenoid system. One of the three major solenoids is the Detector Solenoid that houses the stopping target and the detectors. The goal of the Detector Solenoid team is to produce detailed design specifications that are sufficient for vendors to produce the final design drawings, tooling and fabrication procedures and proceed to production. In this paper we summarize the Reference Design of the Detector Solenoid.

  18. Comparative performance analysis of a dual-solenoid mechanical oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, V C C; Lee, H V; Harno, H G; Woo, K C

    2015-01-01

    An innovative dual-solenoid electro-mechanical-vibro-impact system has been constructed and experimentally studied. Comparative studies against a mechanical spring system and a permanent magnet system have been performed, where it is shown that the dual-solenoid system is able to produce oscillations better than the permanent magnet system and more energy efficiently. Comparison with a higher-powered dual solenoid system has also been conducted where a stationary solenoid has shown to be a more dominant parameter. In addition, it is also discovered that a mechanical oscillator in the dual-solenoid system is independent of the angular frequency. (paper)

  19. Form factor of some types of toroidal solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koryavko, V.I.; Litvinenko, Yu.A.

    1979-01-01

    Obtained were the type of dependence between consumed power and formed field for toroidal helical-wound solenoids and the expression for the form factor analogous to the Fabry coefficient for cylindrical solenoids. Determined were optimum dimensions of the helical winding of ''forceless'' toroidal solenoids satisfying the condition of the formation of maximum field at minimum consumed power. Investigations also covered some types of conventional toroidal solenoids. Presented in the paper diagrams permitted to chose dimensions of the considered toroidal solenoids according to their consumed power and winding material volume

  20. A New Facility for Testing Superconducting Solenoid Magnets with Large Fringe Fields at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orris, D. [Fermilab; Carcagno, R. [Fermilab; Nogiec, J. [Fermilab; Rabehl, R. [Fermilab; Sylvester, C. [Fermilab; Tartaglia, M. [Fermilab

    2013-09-01

    Testing superconducting solenoid with no iron flux return can be problematic for a magnet test facility due to the large magnetic fringe fields generated. These large external fields can interfere with the operation of equipment while precautions must be taken for personnel supporting the test. The magnetic forces between the solenoid under test and the external infrastructure must also be taken under consideration. A new test facility has been designed and built at Fermilab specifically for testing superconducting magnets with large external fringe fields. This paper discusses the test stand design, capabilities, and details of the instrumentation and controls with data from the first solenoid tested in this facility: the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) coupling coil.

  1. A study of ISO Solenoid Valve with static and dynamic characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Y. S.; Ju, M. J.; Oh, Y. C.; Kim, D. S.

    2009-01-01

    The technology of ISO Solenoid Valves is now considered as a core technology in the fields of the production line of semi-conductor chips and the ISO fluid chips for medical applications. And ISO Solenoid Valves, which operate by compressed air, are characterized by high speed response, great repeatability and that the pressure on the cross sectional area of poppet is kept constant regardless of the fluctuation of the pressure exerted on the ports. The primary objective of this study is to compare the optimally designed Solenoid Valve with the actually produced one and to design a power saving circuit which can highly improve the efficiency by providing optimal current according to mechanical load.

  2. Solenoidal Fields for Ion Beam Transport and Focusing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edward P.; Leitner, Matthaeus

    2007-11-01

    numerical results obtained with it are also presented. Details of design, fabrication, installation, and operation of magnet systems are not included; here we are concerned with calculations that precede or supplement detailed design. Mathematical derivations are presented with only a moderate number of steps. While there is no claim of originality, except for various numerical approximations and a conceptual induction module design in section 20, many of the results and discussions are not readily available elsewhere. Our primary topic is axisymmetric solenoidal systems with no magnetic materials. These simplifying features allow useful analytical calculations, which occupy sections 2-13. Deviations from axisymmetry are considered in sections 14, 15, 21, 22, and 23 and the effects of magnetic materials are treated in sections 16-20. Since magnetic aberrations are mixed with geometric aberrations in computing ion orbits, section 22 on the ion equations of motion in an arbitrary field is included.

  3. Solenoidal Fields for Ion Beam Transport and Focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Edward P.; Leitner, Matthaeus

    2007-01-01

    results obtained with it are also presented. Details of design, fabrication, installation, and operation of magnet systems are not included; here we are concerned with calculations that precede or supplement detailed design. Mathematical derivations are presented with only a moderate number of steps. While there is no claim of originality, except for various numerical approximations and a conceptual induction module design in section 20, many of the results and discussions are not readily available elsewhere. Our primary topic is axisymmetric solenoidal systems with no magnetic materials. These simplifying features allow useful analytical calculations, which occupy sections 2-13. Deviations from axisymmetry are considered in sections 14, 15, 21, 22, and 23 and the effects of magnetic materials are treated in sections 16-20. Since magnetic aberrations are mixed with geometric aberrations in computing ion orbits, section 22 on the ion equations of motion in an arbitrary field is included.

  4. Water underground

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Inge

    2015-04-01

    The world's largest assessable source of freshwater is hidden underground, but we do not know what is happening to it yet. In many places of the world groundwater is abstracted at unsustainable rates: more water is used than being recharged, leading to decreasing river discharges and declining groundwater levels. It is predicted that for many regions of the world unsustainable water use will increase, due to increasing human water use under changing climate. It would not be long before shortage causes widespread droughts and the first water war begins. Improving our knowledge about our hidden water is the first step to stop this. The world largest aquifers are mapped, but these maps do not mention how much water they contain or how fast water levels decline. If we can add a third dimension to the aquifer maps, so a thickness, and add geohydrological information we can estimate how much water is stored. Also data on groundwater age and how fast it is refilled is needed to predict the impact of human water use and climate change on the groundwater resource.

  5. Investigation, development and verification of printed circuit board embedded air-core solenoid transformers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønster, Jakob Døllner; Madsen, Mickey Pierre; Pedersen, Jeppe Arnsdorf

    2015-01-01

    A new printed circuit board embedded air-core transformer/coupled inductor is proposed and presented. The transformer is intended for use in power converter applications operating at very high frequency between 30 MHz to 300 MHz. The transformer is based on two or more solenoid structures...

  6. ATLAS superconducting solenoid on-surface test

    CERN Document Server

    Ruber, Roger J M Y; Doi, Y; Haruyama, T; Haug, F; ten Kate, H H J; Kawai, M; Kondo, T; Kondo, Y; Makida, Y; Mizumaki, S; Olesen, G; Pavlov, O V; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Sbrissa, E; Yamamoto, A

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS detector is presently under construction as one of the five LHC experiment set-ups. It relies on a sophisticated magnet system for the momentum measurement of charged particle tracks. The superconducting solenoid is at the center of the detector, the magnet system part nearest to the proton-proton collision point. It is designed for a 2 Tesla strong axial magnetic field at the collision point, while its thin-walled construction of 0.66 radiation lengths avoids degradation of energy measurements in the outer calorimeters. The solenoid and calorimeter have been integrated in their common cryostat, cooled down and tested on-surface. We review the on-surface set-up and report the performance test results.

  7. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro

    2014-01-01

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 10 11 , which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator

  8. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanesue, Takeshi, E-mail: tkanesue@bnl.gov; Okamura, Masahiro [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Fuwa, Yasuhiro [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-7501 (Japan); RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kondo, Kotaro [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2014-11-10

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 10{sup 11}, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  9. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-11-01

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  10. Cross section of the CMS solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Tejinder S. Virdee, CERN

    2005-01-01

    The pictures show a cross section of the CMS solenoid. One can see four layers of the superconducting coil, each of which contains the superconductor (central part, copper coloured - niobium-titanium strands in a copper coating, made into a "Rutherford cable"), surrounded by an ultra-pure aluminium as a magnetic stabilizer, then an aluminium alloy as a mechanical stabilizer. Besides the four layers there is an aluminium mechanical piece that includes pipes that transport the liquid helium.

  11. Bistable (latching) solenoid actuated propellant isolation valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, H.; Deboi, H. H.

    1979-01-01

    The design, fabrication, assembly and test of a development configuration bistable (latching) solenoid actuated propellant isolation valve suitable for the control hydrazine and liquid fluorine to an 800 pound thrust rocket engine is described. The valve features a balanced poppet, utilizing metal bellows, a hard poppet/seat interface and a flexure support system for the internal moving components. This support system eliminates sliding surfaces, thereby rendering the valve free of self generated particles.

  12. Design verification methodology for a solenoid valve for industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chang Dae; Lim, Byung Ju; Chun, Kyung Yul

    2015-01-01

    Solenoid operated valves (SOV) are widely used in many applications due to their fast dynamic responses, cost effectiveness, and less contamination sensitive characteristics. In this paper, we tried to provide a convenient method of design verification of SOV to design engineers who depend on their experiences and experiment during design and development process of SOV. First, we summarize a detailed procedure for designing SOVs for industrial applications. All of the design constraints are defined in the first step of the design, and then the detail design procedure is presented based on design experiences as well as various physical and electromagnetic relationships. Secondly, we have suggested a verification method of this design using theoretical relationships, which enables optimal design of SOV from a point of view of safety factor of design attraction force. Lastly, experimental performance tests using several prototypes manufactured based on this design method show that the suggested design verification methodology is appropriate for designing new models of solenoids. We believe that this verification process is novel logic and useful to save time and expenses during development of SOV because verification tests with manufactured specimen may be substituted partly by this verification methodology.

  13. Evaluation of advanced turbomachinery for underground pumped hydroelectric storage. Part 3. Multistage unregulated pump/turbines for operating heads of 1000 to 1500 m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frigo, A.A.; Pistner, C.

    1980-08-01

    This is the final report in a series of three on studies of advanced hydraulic turbomachinery for underground pumped hydroelectric storage. All three reports address Francis-type, reversible pump/turbines. The first report covered single-stage regulated units; the second report covered two-stage regulated units; the present report covers multistage unregulated units. Multistage unregulated pump/turbines offer an economically attractive option for heads of 1000 to 1500 m. The feasibility of developing such machines for capacities up to 500 MW and operating heads up to 1500 m has been evaluated. Preliminary designs have been generated for six multistage pump/turbines. The designs are for nominal capacities of 350 and 500 MW and for operating heads of 1000, 1250, and 1500 m. Mechanical, hydraulic, and economic analyses indicate that these machines will behave according to the criteria used to design them and that they can be built at a reasonable cost with no unsolvable problems. Efficiencies of 85.8% and 88.5% in the generating and pumping modes, respectively, can be expected for the 500-MW, 1500-m unit. Performances of the other five machines are at least comparable, and usually better. Over a 1000 to 1500-m head range, specific $/kW costs of the pump/turbines in mid-1978 US dollars vary from 19.0 to 23.1 for the 500-MW machines, and from 21.0 to 24.1 for the 350-MW machines.

  14. Evaluation of the risk to underground mine personnel due to the rockmass response to continuous mining operations.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Aswegen, G

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available rockmass response to mining. This helps to understand how the time of day distribution of seismic events can be affected by changes in mining operations. The literature survey did not contribute to the development of particular procedures for the difference...

  15. Capital Subsidies and the Underground Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busato, Francesco; Chiarini, Bruno; Angelis, Pasquale de

    In this paper we investigate the effects of different fiscal policies on the firm choice to produce underground. We consider a tax evading firm operating simultaneously both in the regular and in the underground economy. We suggest that such a kind of firm, referred to as moonlighting firm, is able...... allocation in the underground production. In fact, a strong and inverse relationship is found, and tax reduction is the best policy to reduce the convenience to produce underground. Wealso confirm the depressing effect on investment of taxation (see, for instance, Summers,1981), so that tax reduction has...

  16. Stable particle motion in a linear accelerator with solenoid focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadlinger, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    The equation governing stable particle motion in a linear ion accelerator containing discrete rf and either discrete or continuous solenoid focusing was derived. It was found for discrete solenoid focusing that: cos μ = (1 + dΔ) cos theta/2 + (lΔ/theta - dtheta/2l - thetaΔd 2 /4l) sin theta/2, Δ = 1/f and l + 2d = βlambda, where μ, theta, f, l, and d are the phase advance per cell, precession angle in the solenoid, focal length of the rf lens, length of the solenoid in one cell, and the drift distance between the center of the rf gap and the effective edge of the solenoid. The relation for a continuous solenoid is found by setting d equal to zero. The boundaries of the stability region for theta vs Δ with fixed l and d are obtained when cos μ =+-1

  17. Survey of the laser-solenoid fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amherd, N.A.

    1975-09-01

    This report surveys the prospects for a laser-solenoid fusion reactor. A sample reactor and scaling laws are used to describe the concept's characteristics. Experimental results are reviewed, and the laser and magnet technologies that undergird the laser-solenoid concept are analyzed. Finally, a systems analysis of fusion power reactors is given, including a discussion of direct conversion and fusion-fission effects, to ascertain the system attributes of the laser-solenoid configuration

  18. Functional and genomic analyses of alpha-solenoid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, David; Palidwor, Gareth A; Shcherbinin, Sergey; Szengel, Angelika; Schaefer, Martin H; Perez-Iratxeta, Carol; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-solenoids are flexible protein structural domains formed by ensembles of alpha-helical repeats (Armadillo and HEAT repeats among others). While homology can be used to detect many of these repeats, some alpha-solenoids have very little sequence homology to proteins of known structure and we expect that many remain undetected. We previously developed a method for detection of alpha-helical repeats based on a neural network trained on a dataset of protein structures. Here we improved the detection algorithm and updated the training dataset using recently solved structures of alpha-solenoids. Unexpectedly, we identified occurrences of alpha-solenoids in solved protein structures that escaped attention, for example within the core of the catalytic subunit of PI3KC. Our results expand the current set of known alpha-solenoids. Application of our tool to the protein universe allowed us to detect their significant enrichment in proteins interacting with many proteins, confirming that alpha-solenoids are generally involved in protein-protein interactions. We then studied the taxonomic distribution of alpha-solenoids to discuss an evolutionary scenario for the emergence of this type of domain, speculating that alpha-solenoids have emerged in multiple taxa in independent events by convergent evolution. We observe a higher rate of alpha-solenoids in eukaryotic genomes and in some prokaryotic families, such as Cyanobacteria and Planctomycetes, which could be associated to increased cellular complexity. The method is available at http://cbdm.mdc-berlin.de/~ard2/.

  19. Approximate theory the electromagnetic energy of solenoid in special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prastyaningrum, I; Kartikaningsih, S.

    2017-01-01

    Solenoid is a device that is often used in electronic devices. A solenoid is electrified will cause a magnetic field. In our analysis, we just focus on the electromagnetic energy for solenoid form. We purpose to analyze by the theoretical approach in special relativity. Our approach is begun on the Biot Savart law and Lorentz force. Special theory relativity can be derived from the Biot Savart law, and for the energy can be derived from Lorentz for, by first determining the momentum equation. We choose the solenoid form with the goal of the future can be used to improve the efficiency of the electrical motor. (paper)

  20. Calculus of the Cryebis 2 supraconductor solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, G.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the design of the superconducting solenoid CRYEBIS 2. With the prescribed parameters (5 Teslas central field, 120mm for inner diameter, 1600 mm for length), one determinates the dimensions of coil, its energy, the conductor, the working point of the magnet with its critical limits (intensity, field, temperature). The superconducting switch is calculated in the same manner. The study of a quench shows the good behaviour of the coil which is always safe even the detection system is in failure. In final, the mechanical stresses are verified lower than yield strength [fr

  1. Superconducting solenoid model magnet test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carcagno, R.; Dimarco, J.; Feher, S.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Hess, C.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Terechkine, I.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    Superconducting solenoid magnets suitable for the room temperature front end of the Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (formerly known as Proton Driver), an 8 GeV superconducting H- linac, have been designed and fabricated at Fermilab, and tested in the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility. We report here results of studies on the first model magnets in this program, including the mechanical properties during fabrication and testing in liquid helium at 4.2 K, quench performance, and magnetic field measurements. We also describe new test facility systems and instrumentation that have been developed to accomplish these tests.

  2. Superconducting solenoid model magnet test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcagno, R.; Dimarco, J.; Feher, S.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Hess, C.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.C.; Wokas, T.; Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    Superconducting solenoid magnets suitable for the room temperature front end of the Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (formerly known as Proton Driver), an 8 GeV superconducting H- linac, have been designed and fabricated at Fermilab, and tested in the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility. We report here results of studies on the first model magnets in this program, including the mechanical properties during fabrication and testing in liquid helium at 4.2 K, quench performance, and magnetic field measurements. We also describe new test facility systems and instrumentation that have been developed to accomplish these tests

  3. ITER central solenoid manufacturing R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jay Jayakumar, R.; Tsuji, H.; Ohsaki, O.

    2001-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Engineering Design Activity (EDA) includes the development of high performance superconductors, high current joints between superconducting cables and insulating materials. Also in the EDA, the resulting products of this R and D are incorporated in a Central Solenoid Model Coil which utilizes full size conductors. The manufacturing of the model coil and components has led to the development of the design, materials, tooling and process which are fully applicable to the manufacture of the ITER relevant CS coil. The R and D is essentially complete and final stages of the CS Model Coil manufacturing are underway. (author)

  4. ITER central solenoid manufacturing R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, R.J.; Tsuji, H.; Ohsaki, O.

    1999-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Engineering Design Activity (EDA) includes the development of high performance superconductors, high current joints between superconducting cables and insulating materials. Also in the EDA, the resulting products of this R and D are incorporated in a Central Solenoid Model Coil which utilizes full size conductors. The manufacturing of the model coil and components has led to the development of the design, materials, tooling and process which are fully applicable to the manufacture of the ITER relevant CS coil. The R and D is essentially complete and final stages of the CS Model Coil manufacturing are underway. (author)

  5. Conceptual design of a 20 Tesla pulsed solenoid for a laser solenoid fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolan, J.J.; Averill, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    Design considerations are described for a strip wound solenoid which is pulsed to 20 tesla while immersed in a 20 tesla bias field so as to achieve within the bore of the pulsed solenoid at net field sequence starting at 20 tesla and going first down to zero, then up to 40 tesla, and finally back to 20 tesla in a period of about 5 x 10 -3 seconds. The important parameters of the solenoid, e.g., aperture, build, turns, stored and dissipated energy, field intensity and powering circuit, are given. A numerical example for a specific design is presented. Mechanical stresses in the solenoid and the subsequent choice of materials for coil construction are discussed. Although several possible design difficulties are not discussed in this preliminary report of a conceptual magnet design, such as uniformity of field, long-term stability of insulation under neutron bombardment and choice of structural materials of appropriate tensile strength and elasticity to withstand magnetic forces developed, these questions are addressed in detail in the complete design report and in part in reference one. Furthermore, the authors feel that the problems encountered in this conceptual design are surmountable and are not a hindrance to the construction of such a magnet system

  6. Quench protection analysis of the Mu2e production solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashikhin, Vadim; Ambrosio, Giorgio; Andreev, Nikolai; Lamm, Michael; Nicol, Thomas; Orris, Darryl; Page, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The Muon-to-Electron conversion experiment (Mu2e), under development at Fermilab, seeks to detect direct muon to electron conversion to provide evidence for a process violating muon and electron lepton number conservation that cannot be explained by the Standard Model of particle physics. The Mu2e magnet system consists of three large superconducting solenoids. In case of a quench, the stored magnetic energy is extracted to an external dump circuit. However, because of the fast current decay, a significant fraction of the energy dissipates inside of the cryostat in the coil support shells made of structural aluminum, and in the radiation shield. A 3D finite-element model of the complete cold-mass was created in order to simulate the quench development and understand the role of the quench-back. The simulation results are reported at the normal and non-standard operating conditions

  7. Quench protection analysis of the Mu2e production solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashikhin, Vadim; Ambrosio, Giorgio; Andreev, Nikolai; Lamm, Michael; Nicol, Thomas; Orris, Darryl; Page, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The Muon-to-Electron conversion experiment (Mu2e), under development at Fermilab, seeks to detect direct muon to electron conversion to provide evidence for a process violating muon and electron lepton number conservation that cannot be explained by the Standard Model of particle physics. The Mu2e magnet system consists of three large superconducting solenoids. In case of a quench, the stored magnetic energy is extracted to an external dump circuit. However, because of the fast current decay, a significant fraction of the energy dissipates inside of the cryostat in the coil support shells made of structural aluminum, and in the radiation shield. A 3D finite-element model of the complete cold-mass was created in order to simulate the quench development and understand the role of the quench-back. The simulation results are reported at the normal and non-standard operating conditions.

  8. Behaviour of large cylindrical drift chambers in a superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, W. de; Fues, W.; Grindhammer, G.; Kotthaus, R.; Lierl, H.; Moss, L.

    1980-04-01

    We describe the construction and behaviour of a set of cylindrical drift chambers operating inside a superconducting solenoid with a central magnetic field of 1.3 T. The chambers are part of the 4 π detector CELLO at the e + e - storage ring PETRA in Hamburg. The chambers were designed without field shaping to keep them as simple as possible. In order to parametrize accurately the nonlinear space-time relation, we used a computer simulation of the drift process in inhomogenous electric and magnetic fields. With such a parametrization we achieved a resolution of 210 μm, averaged over the whole drift cell and angles of incidence up to 30 0 . (orig.)

  9. Alternative connections for the large MFTF-B solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.; Wang, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    The MFTF-B central-cell solenoids are a set of twelve closely coupled, large superconducting magnets with similar but not exactly equal currents. Alternative methods of connecting them to their power supplies and dump resistors are investigated. The circuits are evaluated for operating conditions and fault conditions. The factors considered are the voltage to ground during a dump, short circuits, open circuits, quenches, and failure of the protection system to detect a quench. Of particular interest are the current induced in coils that remain superconducting when one or more coils quench. The alternative connections include separate power supplies, combined power supplies, individual dump resistors, series dump resistors and combinations of these. A new circuit that contains coupling resistors is proposed. The coupling resistors do not affect normal fast dumps but reduce the peak induced currents while also reducing the energy rating of the dump resistors. Another novel circuit, the series circuit with diodes, is discussed in detail

  10. Construction of compact FEM using solenoid-induced helical wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohigashi, N.; Tsunawaki, Y.; Fujita, M.; Imasaki, K.; Mima, K.; Nakai, S.

    2003-01-01

    A prototype of compact Free-Electron Maser (FEM) has been designed for the operation in a usual small laboratory which does not have electric source capacity available enough. The electron energy is 60-120 keV. As it is lower, stronger guiding magnetic field is necessary in addition to wiggler field. To fulfil this condition a solenoid-induced helical wiggler is applied from the viewpoint of saving the electric power of restricted source capacity. The wiggler, for example, with the period of 12 mm creates the field of 92 G in the guiding field of 3.2 kG. The whole system of FEM has been just constructed in a small-scale laboratory. It is so small to occupy the area of 0.7x2.9 m 2

  11. Underground Layout Configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A. Linden

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to develop an underground layout to support the license application (LA) design effort. In addition, the analysis will be used as the technical basis for the underground layout general arrangement drawings

  12. Underground disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This report is an overview document for the series of IAEA reports dealing with underground waste disposal to be prepared in the next few years. It provides an introduction to the general considerations involved in implementing underground disposal of radioactive wastes. It suggests factors to be taken into account for developing and assessing waste disposal concepts, including the conditioned waste form, the geological containment and possible additional engineered barriers. These guidelines are general so as to cover a broad range of conditions. They are generally applicable to all types of underground disposal, but the emphasis is on disposal in deep geological formations. Some information presented here may require slight modifications when applied to shallow ground disposal or other types of underground disposal. Modifications may also be needed to reflect local conditions. In some specific cases it may be that not all the considerations dealt with in this book are necessary; on the other hand, while most major considerations are believed to be included, they are not meant to be all-inclusive. The book primarily concerns only underground disposal of the wastes from nuclear fuel cycle operations and those which arise from the use of isotopes for medical and research activities

  13. Underground pipeline corrosion

    CERN Document Server

    Orazem, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Underground pipelines transporting liquid petroleum products and natural gas are critical components of civil infrastructure, making corrosion prevention an essential part of asset-protection strategy. Underground Pipeline Corrosion provides a basic understanding of the problems associated with corrosion detection and mitigation, and of the state of the art in corrosion prevention. The topics covered in part one include: basic principles for corrosion in underground pipelines, AC-induced corrosion of underground pipelines, significance of corrosion in onshore oil and gas pipelines, n

  14. Underground gasification in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-11-21

    A paper in Pravda by the Deputy Chief Engineer of the Underground Gasification Department indicates that there are at least three or four pilot plants in operation; one plant near Moscow has operated for 14 years and one in the Donbas for 8 years. The first plant has a daily output of gas corresponding to 400 tons of coal a day and produces a gas of low calorific value. A plant opened in 1956 in the Kuzbas to produce gas of a higher quality. A plant, being built near Moscow in conjunction with a gas turbine electrical power station, will produce gas equivalent in heating value to 220,000 tons of coal a year. A larger plant, being built at Angren in central Asia, will produce gas equivalent in heating value to 700,000 tons of coal a year.

  15. Underground laboratories in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coccia, E

    2006-01-01

    The only clear evidence today for physics beyond the standard model comes from underground experiments and the future activity of underground laboratories appears challenging and rich. I review here the existing underground research facilities in Europe. I present briefly the main characteristics, scientific activity and perspectives of these Laboratories and discuss the present coordination actions in the framework of the European Union

  16. First detector installed inside the ALICE solenoid...

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    ALICE's emblematic red magnet welcomed its first detector on 23 September, when the array of seven Cherenkov detectors, named HMPID, was successfully installed. ALICE team members standing in front of the completed HMPID detector.The red magnet, viewed from its front opening. The HMPID unit, seen from the back (top right corner of photo) is placed on a frame and lifted onto a platform during the installation. After the installation of the ACORDE scintillator array and the muon trigger and tracking chambers, the ALICE collaboration fitted the first detector inside the solenoid. The HMPID, for High Momentum Particle Identification, was installed at the 2 o'clock position in the central and most external region of the space frame, just below the solenoid yoke. It will be used to extend the hadron identification capability of the ALICE experiment up to 5 GeV/c, thus complementing the reach of the other particle identification systems (ITS, TPC and TOF). The HMPID is a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector in a...

  17. Design of permanent magnetic solenoids for REGAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrke, Tim

    2013-10-15

    The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) is a small linear accelerator at DESY in Hamburg, which produces short, low emittance electron bunches. It is originally designed and built for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) within the framework of the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL). Additionally, two future experiments are planned at REGAE. First, an external injection experiment for Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWA) will be performed in the framework of the LAOLA collaboration (LAboratory fOr Laser- and beam-driven plasma Acceleration). This experiment will provide a method for the reconstruction of the electric field distribution within a linear plasma wakefield. Second, a time resolving high energy Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) will be implemented. Among others it is designed to allow for living cell imaging. Both experiments require strong focusing magnets inside the new target chamber at REGAE. Permanent magnetic solenoids (PMSs) can provide the needed focusing strength due to their enormous surface current density, while having compact dimensions at the same time. The present thesis deals with the design of such strong focusing PMSs. Since short and strong solenoids, as required for REGAE, exhibit a distinct non-linearity, the induced emittance growth is relatively large. This emittance growth is investigated and minimized for different set-ups with axially and radially magnetized annular magnets. Furthermore a magnetic shielding is developed. Together with a mechanical lifting system it assures that magnetic leakage fields do not disturb experiments, where the PMSs are removed from the beamline.

  18. Report of the large solenoid detector group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.G.; Mori, S.; Pondrom, L.G.

    1987-09-01

    This report presents a conceptual design of a large solenoid for studying physics at the SSC. The parameters and nature of the detector have been chosen based on present estimates of what is required to allow the study of heavy quarks, supersymmetry, heavy Higgs particles, WW scattering at large invariant masses, new W and Z bosons, and very large momentum transfer parton-parton scattering. Simply stated, the goal is to obtain optimum detection and identification of electrons, muons, neutrinos, jets, W's and Z's over a large rapidity region. The primary region of interest extends over +-3 units of rapidity, although the calorimetry must extend to +-5.5 units if optimal missing energy resolution is to be obtained. A magnetic field was incorporated because of the importance of identifying the signs of the charges for both electrons and muons and because of the added possibility of identifying tau leptons and secondary vertices. In addition, the existence of a magnetic field may prove useful for studying new physics processes about which we currently have no knowledge. Since hermeticity of the calorimetry is extremely important, the entire central and endcap calorimeters were located inside the solenoid. This does not at the moment seem to produce significant problems (although many issues remain to be resolved) and in fact leads to a very effective muon detector in the central region

  19. The D0 solenoid NMR magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sten Uldall Hansen; Terry Kiper; Tom Regan; John Lofgren

    2002-01-01

    A field monitoring system for the 2 Tesla Solenoid of the D0 detector is described. It is comprised of a very small NMR probe cabled to a DSP based signal processing board. The design magnetic field range is from 1.0 to 2.2 Tesla, corresponding to an RF frequency range of 42.57 to 93.67 MHz. The desired an accuracy is one part in 10 5 . To minimize material in the interaction region of the D0 detector, the overall thickness of the NMR probe is 4 mm, including its mounting plate, and its width is 10 mm. To minimize cable mass, 4mm diameter IMR-100A cables are used for transmitting the RF signals from a nearby patch panel 25 meters to each of four probes mounted within the bore of the solenoid. RG213U cables 45 meters long are used to send the RF from the movable counting house to the patch panel. With this setup, the detector signal voltage at the moving counting room is in the range of 250-400 mV

  20. Design of permanent magnetic solenoids for REGAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrke, Tim

    2013-10-01

    The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) is a small linear accelerator at DESY in Hamburg, which produces short, low emittance electron bunches. It is originally designed and built for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) within the framework of the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL). Additionally, two future experiments are planned at REGAE. First, an external injection experiment for Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWA) will be performed in the framework of the LAOLA collaboration (LAboratory fOr Laser- and beam-driven plasma Acceleration). This experiment will provide a method for the reconstruction of the electric field distribution within a linear plasma wakefield. Second, a time resolving high energy Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) will be implemented. Among others it is designed to allow for living cell imaging. Both experiments require strong focusing magnets inside the new target chamber at REGAE. Permanent magnetic solenoids (PMSs) can provide the needed focusing strength due to their enormous surface current density, while having compact dimensions at the same time. The present thesis deals with the design of such strong focusing PMSs. Since short and strong solenoids, as required for REGAE, exhibit a distinct non-linearity, the induced emittance growth is relatively large. This emittance growth is investigated and minimized for different set-ups with axially and radially magnetized annular magnets. Furthermore a magnetic shielding is developed. Together with a mechanical lifting system it assures that magnetic leakage fields do not disturb experiments, where the PMSs are removed from the beamline.

  1. Optimization of the Mu2e Production Solenoid Heat and Radiation Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronskikh, V. S.; Coleman, R.; Glenzinski, D.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Mokhov, N. V.

    2014-03-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab is designed to study the conversion of a negative muon to electron in the field of a nucleus without emission of neutrinos. Observation of this process would provide unambiguous evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model, and can point to new physics beyond the reach of the LHC. The main parts of the Mu2e apparatus are its superconducting solenoids: Production Solenoid (PS), Transport Solenoid (TS), and Detector Solenoid (DS). Being in the vicinity of the beam, PS magnets are most subjected to the radiation damage. In order for the PS superconducting magnet to operate reliably, the peak neutron flux in the PS coils must be reduced by 3 orders of magnitude by means of sophisticatedly designed massive Heat and Radiation Shield (HRS), optimized for the performance and cost. An issue with radiation damage is related to large residual electrical resistivity degradation in the superconducting coils, especially its Al stabilizer. A detailed MARS15 analysis and optimization of the HRS has been carried out both to satisfy the Mu2e requirements to the radiation quantities (such as displacements per atom, peak temperature and power density in the coils, absorbed dose in the insulation, and dynamic heat load) and cost. Results of MARS15 simulations of these radiation quantities are reported and optimized HRS models are presented; it is shown that design levels satisfy all requirements.

  2. Development of large high current density superconducting solenoid magnets for use in high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1977-05-01

    The development of a unique type of large superconducting solenoid magnet, characterized by very high current density windings and a two-phase helium tubular cooling system is described. The development of the magnet's conceptual design and the construction of two test solenoids are described. The successful test of the superconducting coil and its tubular cooling refrigeration system is presented. The safety, environmental and economic impacts of the test program on future developments in high energy physics are shown. Large solid angle particle detectors for colliding beam physics will analyze both charged and neutral particles. In many cases, these detectors will require neutral particles, such as gamma rays, to pass through the magnet coil with minimum interaction. The magnet coils must be as thin as possible. The use of superconducting windings allows one to minimize radiation thickness, while at the same time maximizing charged particle momentum resolution and saving substantial quantities of electrical energy. The results of the experimental measurements show that large high current density solenoid magnets can be made to operate at high stored energies. The superconducting magnet development described has a positive safety and environmental impact. The use of large high current density thin superconducting solenoids has been proposed in two high energy physics experiments to be conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and Cornell University as a result of the successful experiments described

  3. Plasma confinement apparatus using solenoidal and mirror coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.; Condit, W.C.

    1979-01-01

    A plasma confinement apparatus is described, wherein multiple magnetic mirror cells are linked by magnetic field lines inside of a solenoid with the mirroring regions for adjacent magnetic mirror cells each formed by a separate mirror coil inside of the solenoid. The magnetic mirror cells may be field reversed

  4. Plasma confinement apparatus using solenoidal and mirror coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, T. Kenneth; Condit, William C.

    1979-01-01

    A plasma confinement apparatus, wherein multiple magnetic mirror cells are linked by magnetic field lines inside of a solenoid with the mirroring regions for adjacent magnetic mirror cells each formed by a separate mirror coil inside of the solenoid. The magnetic mirror cells may be field reversed.

  5. Improving underground ventilation conditions in coal mines

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyer, CF

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available projects could be initiated by miningtek in co-operation with different mines. This report deals with the findings of this project and also deals with the future of research within Miningtek with regard to underground ventilation....

  6. The Design Parameters for the MICE Tracker Solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.; Chen, C.Y.; Juang, Tiki; Lau, Wing W.; Taylor, Clyde; Virostek, Steve P.; Wahrer, Robert; Wang, S.T.; Witte, Holger; Yang, Stephanie Q.

    2006-01-01

    The first superconducting magnets to be installed in the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) will be the tracker solenoids. The tracker solenoid module is a five coil superconducting solenoid with a 400 mm diameter warm bore that is used to provide a 4 T magnetic field for the experiment tracker module. Three of the coils are used to produce a uniform field (up to 4 T with better than 1 percent uniformity) in a region that is 300 mm in diameter and 1000 mm long. The other two coils are used to match the muon beam into the MICE cooling channel. Two 2.94-meter long superconducting tracker solenoid modules have been ordered for MICE. The tracker solenoid will be cooled using two-coolers that produce 1.5 W each at 4.2 K. The magnet system is described. The decisions that drive the magnet design will be discussed in this report

  7. Pressure control valve using proportional electro-magnetic solenoid actuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, So Nam; Ham, Young Bog; Park, Pyoung Won

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental characteristics of electro-hydraulic proportional pressure control valve. In this study, poppet and valve body which are assembled into the proportional solenoid were designed and manufactured. The constant force characteristics of proportional solenoid actuator in the control region should be independent of the plunger position in order to be used to control the valve position in the fluid flow control system. The stroke-force characteristics of the proportional solenoid actuator is determined by the shape (or parameters) of the control cone. In this paper, steady state and transient characteristics of the solenoid actuator for electro-hydraulic proportional valve are analyzed using finite element method and it is confirmed that the proportional solenoid actuator has a constant attraction force in the control region independently on the stroke position. The effects of the parameters such as control cone length, thickness and taper length are also discussed

  8. High Temperature Superconducting Underground Cable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, Roger A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this Project was to design, build, install and demonstrate the technical feasibility of an underground high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable installed between two utility substations. In the first phase two HTS cables, 320 m and 30 m in length, were constructed using 1st generation BSCCO wire. The two 34.5 kV, 800 Arms, 48 MVA sections were connected together using a superconducting joint in an underground vault. In the second phase the 30 m BSCCO cable was replaced by one constructed with 2nd generation YBCO wire. 2nd generation wire is needed for commercialization because of inherent cost and performance benefits. Primary objectives of the Project were to build and operate an HTS cable system which demonstrates significant progress towards commercial progress and addresses real world utility concerns such as installation, maintenance, reliability and compatibility with the existing grid. Four key technical areas addressed were the HTS cable and terminations (where the cable connects to the grid), cryogenic refrigeration system, underground cable-to-cable joint (needed for replacement of cable sections) and cost-effective 2nd generation HTS wire. This was the worlds first installation and operation of an HTS cable underground, between two utility substations as well as the first to demonstrate a cable-to-cable joint, remote monitoring system and 2nd generation HTS.

  9. Comparison analysis of superconducting solenoid magnet systems for ECR ion source based on the evolution strategy optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Shao Qing; Lee, Sang Jin [Uiduk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is an essential component of heavy-ion accelerator. For a given design, the intensities of the highly charged ion beams extracted from the source can be increased by enlarging the physical volume of ECR zone. Several models for ECR ion source were and will be constructed depending on their operating conditions. In this paper three simulation models with 3, 4 and 6 solenoid system were built, but it's not considered anything else except the number of coils. Two groups of optimization analysis are presented, and the evolution strategy (ES) is adopted as an optimization tool which is a technique based on the ideas of mutation, adaptation and annealing. In this research, the volume of ECR zone was calculated approximately, and optimized designs for ECR solenoid magnet system were presented. Firstly it is better to make the volume of ECR zone large to increase the intensity of ion beam under the specific confinement field conditions. At the same time the total volume of superconducting solenoids must be decreased to save material. By considering the volume of ECR zone and the total length of solenoids in each model with different number of coils, the 6 solenoid system represented the highest coil performance. By the way, a certain case, ECR zone volume itself can be essential than the cost. So the maximum ECR zone volume for each solenoid magnet system was calculated respectively with the same size of the plasma chamber and the total magnet space. By comparing the volume of ECR zone, the 6 solenoid system can be also made with the maximum ECR zone volume.

  10. Superconducting Solenoid for Superfast THz Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragin, A. V.; Khrushchev, S. V.; Kubarev, V. V.; Mezencev, N. A.; Tsukanov, V. M.; Sozinov, G. I.; Shkaruba, V. A.

    This project is related to new spectroscopy method in little-developed THz range. The method is founded on using of a free electron laser (NovoFEL) with high spectral power radiation which can be smoothly tuned in desirable range of spectrum. The objects of research of this method are fast processes in physics, chemical and biological reactions. Uniform magnetic field of 6 T value in the research area can considerably increase possibilities of this method. The magnetic field will modulate radiation of free molecules induction on characteristic frequencies of the Zeeman splitting that gives more possibilities of identification of molecules having even weak magnetic momentum. Moreover, the use of magnetic field allows essentially increase sensitivity of this method due to almost complete separation of weak measuring signals from powerful radiation of the laser. A superconducting solenoid was developed for this method. Its design and peculiarities are described in this paper.

  11. View through the CMS detector during the cooldown of the solenoid on February 2006

    CERN Multimedia

    Richard Breedon, UC Davis

    2006-01-01

    Image looking along the beam direction through CMS. One can see, from the inside out: the patch panels and cables for the Preshower and ECAL; the front of the endcap HCAL; some cathode strip chambers (CSCs) for detecting muons; the sealed solenoid (the first circular silver-coloured ring) currently being cooled to operating temperature and held by the central barrel yoke ring (red and orange); one of the other barrel yoke rings installed with many muon chambers (silver rectangular boxes).

  12. A superconducting solenoid and press for permanent magnet fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulcahy, T. M.; Hull, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    For the first time, a superconducting solenoid (SCM) was used to increase the remnant magnetization of sintered NdFeB permanent magnets (PMs). In particular, improved magnetic alignment of commercial-grade PM powder was achieved, as it was axial die pressed into 12.7-mm diameter cylindrical compacts in the 76.2-mm warm bore of a 9-T SCM. The press used to compact the powder is unique and was specifically designed for use with the SCM. Although the press was operated in the batch mode for this proof of concept study, its design is intended to enable automated production. In operation, a simple die and punch set made of nonmagnetic materials was filled with powder and loaded into a nonmagnetic press tube. The cantilevered press tube was inserted horizontally, on a carrier manually advanced along a track, into the SCM. The robustness of the mechanical components and the SCM, in its liquid helium dewar, were specifically designed to allow for insertion and extraction of the magnetic powder and compacts, while operating at 9 T. Compaction was achieved by pressing the punches between the closed end of the press tube and the hydraulic cylinder mounted on the opposite end. Improvements up to 10% in magnetization and 20% in energy products of the permanent magnets were obtained, as the alignment fields were increased above the 2-T maximum field of the electromagnets used in industry. Increases in magnetization of 3% are significant in the mature sintered magnet industry

  13. Validation of Quench Simulation and Simulation of the TWIN Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Pots, Rosalinde Hendrika

    2015-01-01

    For the Future Circular Collider at CERN a multi-purpose detector is proposed. The 6T TWIN Solenoid, a very large magnet system with a stored energy of 53 GJ, is being designed. It is important to protect the magnet against quenches in the system. Therefore several existing quench protection systems are evaluated and simulations have be performed on quenches in the TWIN Solenoid. The simulations on quenches in the TWIN Solenoid have been performed with promising results; the hotspot temperatures do not exceed 120 K and layer to layer voltages stay below 500 V. Adding quench heaters to the system might improve the quench protection system further.

  14. A superconducting focusing solenoid for the neutrino factory linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.; Lebedev, V.; Strauss, B.P.

    2001-01-01

    The proposed linear Accelerator that accelerates muons from 190 MeV to 2.45 GeV will use superconducting solenoids for focusing the muon beam. The accelerator will use superconducting RF cavities. These cavities are very sensitive to stay magnetic field from the focusing magnets. Superconducting solenoids can produce large stray fields. This report describes the 201.25 MHz acceleration system for the neutrino factory. This report also describes a focusing solenoid that delivers almost no stray field to a neighboring superconducting RF cavity

  15. Underground laboratories in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Shin Ted; Yue, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Deep underground laboratories in Asia have been making huge progress recently because underground sites provide unique opportunities to explore the rare-event phenomena for the study of dark matter searches, neutrino physics and nuclear astrophysics as well as the multi-disciplinary researches based on the low radioactive environments. The status and perspectives of Kamioda underground observatories in Japan, the existing Y2L and the planned CUP in Korea, India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) in India and China JinPing Underground Laboratory (CJPL) in China will be surveyed

  16. Underground laboratories in Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Shin Ted, E-mail: linst@mails.phys.sinica.edu.tw [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 China (China); Yue, Qian, E-mail: yueq@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging (Ministry of Education) and Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 China (China)

    2015-08-17

    Deep underground laboratories in Asia have been making huge progress recently because underground sites provide unique opportunities to explore the rare-event phenomena for the study of dark matter searches, neutrino physics and nuclear astrophysics as well as the multi-disciplinary researches based on the low radioactive environments. The status and perspectives of Kamioda underground observatories in Japan, the existing Y2L and the planned CUP in Korea, India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) in India and China JinPing Underground Laboratory (CJPL) in China will be surveyed.

  17. Underground ventilation remote monitoring and control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strever, M.T.; Wallace, K.G. Jr.; McDaniel, K.H.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the design and installation of an underground ventilation remote monitoring and control system at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This facility is designed to demonstrate safe underground disposal of U.S. defense generated transuranic nuclear waste. To improve the operability of the ventilation system, an underground remote monitoring and control system was designed and installed. The system consists of 15 air velocity sensors and 8 differential pressure sensors strategically located throughout the underground facility providing real-time data regarding the status of the ventilation system. In addition, a control system was installed on the main underground air regulators. The regulator control system gives indication of the regulator position and can be controlled either locally or remotely. The sensor output is displayed locally and at a central surface location through the site-wide Central Monitoring System (CMS). The CMS operator can review all sensor data and can remotely operate the main underground regulators. Furthermore, the Virtual Address Extension (VAX) network allows the ventilation engineer to retrieve real-time ventilation data on his personal computer located in his workstation. This paper describes the types of sensors selected, the installation of the instrumentation, and the initial operation of the remote monitoring system

  18. Adjustment of Adiabatic Transition Magnetic Field of Solenoid-Induced Helicla Wiggler

    CERN Document Server

    Tsunawaki, Y

    2005-01-01

    We have been constructed a solenoid-induced helical wiggler for a compact free electron maser operated in a usual small laboratory which does not have electric source capacity available enough. It consists of two staggered-iron arrays inserted perpendicularly to each other in a solenoid electromagnet. In order to lead/extract an electron beam into/from the wiggler, adiabatic transition (AT) field is necessary at both ends of the wiggler. In this work the AT field was produced by setting staggered-nickel plates with different thickness in the five periods. The thickness of each nickel plate was decided by the field analysis using the MAGTZ computational code based on a magnetic moment method. Exact thickness was, however, found by the precise measurement of the field distribution with the greatest circumspection to obtain a homogeneous increment of the AT field. The change of AT field distribution was studied by referring to an equivalent electric circuit of the wiggler.

  19. Design of new central solenoid for SST-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Upendra; Pradhan, Subrata; Ghate, Mahesh; Raj, Piyush; Tanna, V. L.; Khan, Ziauddin; Roy, Swati; Santra, Prosenjit; Biswas, Prabal; Sharma, A. N.; Khristi, Yohan; Kanaber, Deven; Varmora, Pankaj

    2017-04-01

    The key role of central solenoid (CS) magnet of a Tokamak is for gas breakdown, ramp up and maintaining of plasma current. The magnetic flux change in CS along with other PF coils generates magnetic null and induces electric field in toroidal direction. The induced toroidal electric field accelerates the residual electrons which collide with the neutrals and an avalanche takes place which led to the net plasma in the vacuum vessel of a Tokamak. In order to maximize the CS volt-sec capability, the higher magnetic field with a greater magnetic flux linkage is necessary. In order to facilitate all these requirements of SST-1 a new superconducting CS has been designed for SST-1. The design of new central solenoid has two bases; first one is physics and second is smart engineering in limited bore diameter of ∼ 655 mm. The physics basis of the design includes volt-sec storage capacity of ∼ 0.8 volt-sec, magnetic field null around 0.2 m over major radius of 1.1 m and toroidal electric field of ∼ 0.3 volt/m. The engineering design of new CS consists of Nb3Sn cable in conduit conductor (CICC) of operating current of 14 kA @ 4.5 K at 6 T, consolidated winding pack, smart quench detection system, protection system, housing cryostat and conductor terminations and joint design. The winding pack consists of 576 numbers of turns distributed in four layers with 0.75 mm FRP tape soaked with cyanide Easter based epoxy resin turn insulation and 3 mm of ground insulation. The interlayer low resistance (∼1 nΩ) terminal praying hand joints at 14 kA at 4.5 K has been designed for making winding pack continuous. The total height of winding pack is 2500 mm. The stored energy of this winding pack is ∼ 3 MJ at 14 kA of operating current. The expected heat load at cryogenic temperature is ∼ 10 W per layer, which requires helium mass flow rate of 1.4 g/s at 1.4 bars @ 4.5 K. The typical diameter and height of housing cryostat are 650 mm and 2563 mm with 80 K shield respectively

  20. Design of new central solenoid for SST-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Upendra; Pradhan, Subrata; Ghate, Mahesh; Raj, Piyush; Tanna, V L; Khan, Ziauddin; Roy, Swati; Santra, Prosenjit; Biswas, Prabal; Sharma, A N; Khristi, Yohan; Kanaber, Deven; Varmora, Pankaj

    2017-01-01

    The key role of central solenoid (CS) magnet of a Tokamak is for gas breakdown, ramp up and maintaining of plasma current. The magnetic flux change in CS along with other PF coils generates magnetic null and induces electric field in toroidal direction. The induced toroidal electric field accelerates the residual electrons which collide with the neutrals and an avalanche takes place which led to the net plasma in the vacuum vessel of a Tokamak. In order to maximize the CS volt-sec capability, the higher magnetic field with a greater magnetic flux linkage is necessary. In order to facilitate all these requirements of SST-1 a new superconducting CS has been designed for SST-1. The design of new central solenoid has two bases; first one is physics and second is smart engineering in limited bore diameter of ∼ 655 mm. The physics basis of the design includes volt-sec storage capacity of ∼ 0.8 volt-sec, magnetic field null around 0.2 m over major radius of 1.1 m and toroidal electric field of ∼ 0.3 volt/m. The engineering design of new CS consists of Nb3Sn cable in conduit conductor (CICC) of operating current of 14 kA @ 4.5 K at 6 T, consolidated winding pack, smart quench detection system, protection system, housing cryostat and conductor terminations and joint design. The winding pack consists of 576 numbers of turns distributed in four layers with 0.75 mm FRP tape soaked with cyanide Easter based epoxy resin turn insulation and 3 mm of ground insulation. The interlayer low resistance (∼1 nΩ) terminal praying hand joints at 14 kA at 4.5 K has been designed for making winding pack continuous. The total height of winding pack is 2500 mm. The stored energy of this winding pack is ∼ 3 MJ at 14 kA of operating current. The expected heat load at cryogenic temperature is ∼ 10 W per layer, which requires helium mass flow rate of 1.4 g/s at 1.4 bars @ 4.5 K. The typical diameter and height of housing cryostat are 650 mm and 2563 mm with 80 K shield respectively

  1. Design of new superconducting central solenoid of SST-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Upendra; Pradhan, Subrata; Ghate, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    The key role of the central solenoid (CS) magnet of a Tokamak is for gas breakdown, ramp up and maintaining of plasma current for longer duration. The magnetic flux change in CS along with other PF coils generates magnetic null and induces electric field in toroidal direction. The induced toroidal electric field accelerates the residual electrons which collide with the neutrals and an avalanche takes place which led to the net plasma in the vacuum vessel of a Tokamak. In order to maximize the CS volt-sec capability, the higher magnetic field with a greater magnetic flux linkage is necessary. In order to facilitate all these requirements of SST-1 a new superconducting CS has been designed for SST-1. The design of new central solenoid has two bases; first one is physics and second is smart engineering in limited bore diameter of ∼655 mm. The physics basis of the design includes volt-sec storage capacity of ∼0.8 volt-sec, magnetic field null around 0.2 m over major radius of 1.1 m and toroidal electric field of ∼0.3 volt/m.The engineering design of new CS consists of Nb 3 Sn cable in conduit conductor (CICC) of operating current of 14 kA @ 4.5 K at 6 T, consolidated winding pack, smart quench detection system, protection system, housing cryostat and conductor terminations and joint design. The winding pack consists of 576 numbers of turns distributed in four layers with 0.75 mm FRP tape soaked with cyanide Easter based epoxy resin turn insulation and 3 mm of ground insulation. The inter-layer low resistance (∼1 nΩ) at 14 kA @ 4.5 K terminal praying hand joints has been designed for making winding pack continuous. The total height of winding pack is 2500 mm. The stored energy of this winding pack is ∼3 MJ at 14 kA of operating current. The expected heat load at cryogenic temperature is ∼10 W per layer, which requires helium mass flow rate of 1.4 g/s at 1.4 bars @ 4.5 K. The typical diameter and height of housing cryostat are 650 mm and 2563 mm with 80 K

  2. Research on prognostics and health management of underground pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangdi; Yang, Meng; Yang, Fan; Ni, Na

    2018-04-01

    With the development of the city, the construction of the underground pipeline is more and more complex, which has relation to the safety and normal operation of the city, known as "the lifeline of the city". First of all, this paper introduces the principle of PHM (Prognostics and Health Management) technology, then proposed for fault diagnosis, prognostics and health management in view of underground pipeline, make a diagnosis and prognostics for the faults appearing in the operation of the underground pipeline, and then make a health assessment of the whole underground pipe network in order to ensure the operation of the pipeline safely. Finally, summarize and prospect the future research direction.

  3. The Cold Mass Support System and the Helium Cooling System for the MICE Focusing Solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Stephanie Q.; Green, Michael A.; Lau, Wing W.; Senanayake, Rohan S.; Witte, Holger

    2006-01-01

    The heart of the absorber focus coil (AFC) module for the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) is the two-coil superconducting solenoid that surrounds the muon absorber. The superconducting magnet focuses the muons that are cooled using ionization cooling, in order to improve the efficiency of cooling. The coils of the magnet may either be run in the solenoid mode (both coils operate at the same polarity) or the gradient (the coils operate at opposite polarity). The AFC magnet cold mass support system is designed to carry a longitudinal force up to 700 kN. The AFC module will be cooled using three pulse tube coolers that produce 1.5 W of cooling at 4.2 K. One of the coolers will be used to cool the liquid (hydrogen or helium) absorber used for ionization cooling. The other two coolers will cool the superconducting solenoid. This report will describe the MICE AFC magnet. The cold mass supports will be discussed. The reasons for using a pulsed tube cooler to cool this superconducting magnet will also be discussed

  4. Solenoid hammer valve developed for quick-opening requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrench, E. H.

    1967-01-01

    Quick-opening lightweight solenoid hammer valve requires a low amount of electrical energy to open, and closes by the restoring action of the mechanical springs. This design should be applicable to many quick-opening requirements in fluid systems.

  5. Low-energy nuclear reactions with double-solenoid- based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    solenoids to produce low-energy radioactive nuclear beams. In these systems the ... For many years, the disadvantage in these investigations ... fusion or breakup reaction, preferred with large forward-peaked cross-sections. To transfer the ...

  6. The solenoidal detector collaboration silicon detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziock, H.J.; Gamble, M.T.; Miller, W.O.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Thompson, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    Silicon tracking systems (STS) will be fundamental components of the tracking systems for both planned major SSC experiments. The STS is physically a small part of the central tracking system and the calorimeter of the detector being proposed by the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC). Despite its seemingly small size, it occupies a volume of more than 5 meters in length and 1 meter in diameter and is an order of magnitude larger than any silicon detector system previously built. The STS will consist of silicon microstrip detectors and possibly silicon pixel detectors. The other two components are an outer barrel tracker, which will consist of straw tubes or scintillating fibers; and an outer intermediate angle tracker, which will consist of gas microstrips. The components are designed to work as an integrated system. Each componenet has specific strengths, but is individually incapable of providing the overall performance required by the physics goals of the SSC. The large particle fluxes, the short times between beam crossing, the high channel count, and the required very high position measurement accuracy pose challenging problems that must be solved. Furthermore, to avoid degrading the measurements, the solutions must be achieved using only a minimal amount of material. An additional constraint is that only low-Z materials are allowed. If that were not difficlut enough, the solutions must also be affordable

  7. A solenoidal and monocusp ion source (SAMIS) (abstract)ab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, E.J.; Brainard, J.P.; Draper, C.H.; Ney, R.H.; Leung, K.N.; Perkins, L.T.; Williams, M.D.; Wilde, S.B.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a new magnetic monocusp ion source for single aperture applications such as neutron generators. Coupling solenoidal magnetic fields on both sides of a monocusp magnetic field has generated over 70% atomic deuterium ions at pressures as low as 0.4 Pa (3 mTorr). This article describes the performance and characteristics of the solenoidal and monocusp ion source. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  8. An Inexpensive Toroidal Solenoid for an Investigative Student Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferstl, Andrew; Broberg, John

    2008-09-01

    Magnetism and Ampère's law is a common subject in most calculus-based introductory physics courses. Many textbooks offer examples to calculate the magnetic field produced by a symmetric current by using Ampère's law. These examples include the solenoid and the toroidal solenoid (sometimes called a torus; see Fig. 1), which are used in many applications, including the study of plasmas.

  9. FAST goes underground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fridlund, P.S.

    1985-01-01

    The FAST-M Cost Estimating Model is a parametric model designed to determine the costs associated with mining and subterranean operations. It is part of the FAST (Freiman Analysis of Systems Techniques) series of parametric models developed by Freiman Parametric Systems, Inc. The rising cost of fossil fuels has created a need for a method which could be used to determine and control costs in mining and subterranean operations. FAST-M fills this need and also provides scheduling information. The model works equally well for a variety of situations including underground vaults for hazardous waste storage, highway tunnels, and mass transit tunnels. In addition, costs for above ground structures and equipment can be calculated. The input for the model may be on a macro or a micro level. This allows the model to be used at various stages in a project. On the macro level, only general conditions and specifications need to be known. On the micro level, the smallest details may be included. As with other FAST models, reference cases are used to more accurately predict costs and scheduling. This paper will address how the model can be used for a variety of subterranean purposes

  10. Solenoid-free plasma startup in NSTX using transient CHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, R.; Jarboe, T.R.; Nelson, B.A.; Mueller, D.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.; Gates, D.; Gerhardt, S.; Hosea, J.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Menard, J.; Ono, M.; Paul, S.; Roquemore, L.; Maingi, R.; Maqueda, R.; Nagata, M.; Sabbagh, S.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments in NSTX have now demonstrated the coupling of toroidal plasmas produced by the technique of coaxial helicity injection (CHI) to inductive sustainment and ramp-up of the toroidal plasma current. In these discharges, the central Ohmic transformer was used to apply an inductive loop voltage to discharges with a toroidal current of about 100 kA created by CHI. The coupled discharges have ramped up to >700 kA and transitioned into an H-mode demonstrating compatibility of this startup method with conventional operation. The electron temperature in the coupled discharges reached over 800 eV and the resulting plasma had low inductance, which is preferred for long-pulse high-performance discharges. These results from NSTX in combination with the previously obtained record 160 kA non-inductively generated startup currents in an ST or tokamak in NSTX demonstrate that CHI is a viable solenoid-free plasma startup method for future STs and tokamaks.

  11. Conceptual design report for the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) will search for signatures of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation and investigate the behavior of strongly interacting matter at high energy density. The emphasis win be the correlation of many observables on an event-by-event basis. In the absence of definitive signatures for the QGP, it is imperative that such correlations be used to identify special events and possible signatures. This requires a flexible detection system that can simultaneously measure many experimental observables. The physics goals dictate the design of star and it's experiment. To meet the design criteria, tracking, momentum analysis, and particle identification of most of the charged particles at midrapidity are necessary. The tracking must operate in conditions at higher than the expected maximum charged particle multiplicities for central Au + Au collisions. Particle identification of pions/kaons for p < 0.7 GeV/c and kaons/protons for p < 1 GeV/c, as well as measurement of decay particles and reconstruction of secondary vertices will be possible. A two-track resolution of 2 cm at 2 m radial distance from, the interaction is expected. Momentum resolution of Δp/p ∼ 0.02 at p = 0.1 GeV/c is required to accomplish the physics, and,Δp/p of several percent at p = 10 GeV/c is sufficient to accurately measure the rapidly failing spectra at high Pt and particles from mini-jets and jets

  12. Conceptual design report for the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The STAR Collaboration

    1992-06-15

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) will search for signatures of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation and investigate the behavior of strongly interacting matter at high energy density. The emphasis win be the correlation of many observables on an event-by-event basis. In the absence of definitive signatures for the QGP, it is imperative that such correlations be used to identify special events and possible signatures. This requires a flexible detection system that can simultaneously measure many experimental observables. The physics goals dictate the design of star and it`s experiment. To meet the design criteria, tracking, momentum analysis, and particle identification of most of the charged particles at midrapidity are necessary. The tracking must operate in conditions at higher than the expected maximum charged particle multiplicities for central Au + Au collisions. Particle identification of pions/kaons for p < 0.7 GeV/c and kaons/protons for p < 1 GeV/c, as well as measurement of decay particles and reconstruction of secondary vertices will be possible. A two-track resolution of 2 cm at 2 m radial distance from, the interaction is expected. Momentum resolution of {Delta}p/p {approximately} 0.02 at p = 0.1 GeV/c is required to accomplish the physics, and,{Delta}p/p of several percent at p = 10 GeV/c is sufficient to accurately measure the rapidly failing spectra at high Pt and particles from mini-jets and jets.

  13. Underground storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental contamination from leaking underground storage tanks poses a significant threat to human health and the environment. An estimated five to six million underground storage tanks containing hazardous substances or petroleum products are in use in the US. Originally placed underground as a fire prevention measure, these tanks have substantially reduced the damages from stored flammable liquids. However, an estimated 400,000 underground tanks are thought to be leaking now, and many more will begin to leak in the near future. Products released from these leaking tanks can threaten groundwater supplies, damage sewer lines and buried cables, poison crops, and lead to fires and explosions. As required by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA), the EPA has been developing a comprehensive regulatory program for underground storage tanks. The EPA proposed three sets of regulations pertaining to underground tanks. The first addressed technical requirements for petroleum and hazardous substance tanks, including new tank performance standards, release detection, release reporting and investigation, corrective action, and tank closure. The second proposed regulation addresses financial responsibility requirements for underground petroleum tanks. The third addressed standards for approval of state tank programs

  14. The LASS [Larger Aperture Superconducting Solenoid] spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aston, D.; Awaji, N.; Barnett, B.

    1986-04-01

    LASS is the acronym for the Large Aperture Superconducting Solenoid spectrometer which is located in an rf-separated hadron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This spectrometer was constructed in order to perform high statistics studies of multiparticle final states produced in hadron reactions. Such reactions are frequently characterized by events having complicated topologies and/or relatively high particle multiplicity. Their detailed study requires a spectrometer which can provide good resolution in momentum and position over almost the entire solid angle subtended by the production point. In addition, good final state particle identification must be available so that separation of the many kinematically-overlapping final states can be achieved. Precise analyses of the individual reaction channels require high statistics, so that the spectrometer must be capable of high data-taking rates in order that such samples can be acquired in a reasonable running time. Finally, the spectrometer must be complemented by a sophisticated off-line analysis package which efficiently finds tracks, recognizes and fits event topologies and correctly associates the available particle identification information. This, together with complicated programs which perform specific analysis tasks such as partial wave analysis, requires a great deal of software effort allied to a very large computing capacity. This paper describes the construction and performance of the LASS spectrometer, which is an attempt to realize the features just discussed. The configuration of the spectrometer corresponds to the data-taking on K + and K - interactions in hydrogen at 11 GeV/c which took place in 1981 and 1982. This constitutes a major upgrade of the configuration used to acquire lower statistics data on 11 GeV/c K - p interactions during 1977 and 1978, which is also described briefly

  15. The LASS (Larger Aperture Superconducting Solenoid) spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aston, D.; Awaji, N.; Barnett, B.; Bienz, T.; Bierce, R.; Bird, F.; Bird, L.; Blockus, D.; Carnegie, R.K.; Chien, C.Y.

    1986-04-01

    LASS is the acronym for the Large Aperture Superconducting Solenoid spectrometer which is located in an rf-separated hadron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This spectrometer was constructed in order to perform high statistics studies of multiparticle final states produced in hadron reactions. Such reactions are frequently characterized by events having complicated topologies and/or relatively high particle multiplicity. Their detailed study requires a spectrometer which can provide good resolution in momentum and position over almost the entire solid angle subtended by the production point. In addition, good final state particle identification must be available so that separation of the many kinematically-overlapping final states can be achieved. Precise analyses of the individual reaction channels require high statistics, so that the spectrometer must be capable of high data-taking rates in order that such samples can be acquired in a reasonable running time. Finally, the spectrometer must be complemented by a sophisticated off-line analysis package which efficiently finds tracks, recognizes and fits event topologies and correctly associates the available particle identification information. This, together with complicated programs which perform specific analysis tasks such as partial wave analysis, requires a great deal of software effort allied to a very large computing capacity. This paper describes the construction and performance of the LASS spectrometer, which is an attempt to realize the features just discussed. The configuration of the spectrometer corresponds to the data-taking on K and K interactions in hydrogen at 11 GeV/c which took place in 1981 and 1982. This constitutes a major upgrade of the configuration used to acquire lower statistics data on 11 GeV/c K p interactions during 1977 and 1978, which is also described briefly.

  16. Superconducting solenoids for suspension of high-speed overhead transportation facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omel' yanenko, V I [Kharkov Polytechnical Inst., USSR; Bocharov, V I; Dolgosheev, E A; Usichenko, Y G

    1977-08-01

    A superconducting solenoid is the most important component of a suspension for overhead transportation facilities operating on the repulsion principle. Its design is aimed at producing an adequate magnetic field within the active zone, to ensure a high ratio of lifting force to braking force, the necessary speed dependence of both forces, and a high ratio of lifting force to solenoid mass. The design must also be both technologically and economically feasible. For safety considerations, the magnetic field intensity inside the passenger compartment must be minimum. A survey of existing designs indicates a preference for race track solenoids of quasi-rectangular shape. While all designers already agree on a coil width within 0.25 to 0.6 m, the optimum coil length has not yet been established. Intrinsic stabilization of superconductors by stranding and twisting has pushed the maximum allowable current density to 200 A/mm/sup 2/ and the energy storing capacity of magnets to 100 kJ, a capacity of 1 MJ being within reach. The recommended coil dimensions for laboratory models are 1 m length and 0.3 m width, to carry magnetizing currents up to 0.3 MA.

  17. Large high current density superconducting solenoids for use in high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Eberhard, P.H.; Taylor, J.D.

    1976-05-01

    Very often the study of high energy physics in colliding beam storage-rings requires a large magnetic field volume in order to detect and analyze charged particles which are created from the collision of two particle beams. Large superconducting solenoids which are greater than 1 meter in diameter are required for this kind of physics. In many cases, interesting physics can be done outside the magnet coil, and this often requires that the amount of material in the magnet coil be minimized. As a result, these solenoids should have high current density (up to 10 9 A m -2 ) superconducting windings. The methods commonly used to stabilize large superconducting magnets cannot be employed because of this need to minimize the amount of material in the coils. A description is given of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory program for building and testing prototype solenoid magnets which are designed to operate at coil current densities in excess of 10 9 A m -2 with magnetic stored energies which are as high as 1.5 Megajoules per meter of solenoid length. The coils use intrinsically stable multifilament Nb--Ti superconductors. Control of the magnetic field quench is achieved by using a low resistance aluminum bore tube which is inductively coupled to the coil. The inner cryostat is replaced by a tubular cooling system which carries two phase liquid helium. The magnet coil, the cooling tubes, and aluminum bore tube are cast in epoxy to form a single unified magnet and cryogenic system which is about 2 centimeters thick. The results of the magnet coil tests are discussed

  18. Silicon subsystem mechanical engineering work for the solenoidal detector collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.O.; Barney, M.; Byrd, D.; Christensen, R.W.; Dransfield, G.; Elder, M.; Gamble, M.; Crastataro, C.; Hanlon, J.; Jones, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    The silicon tracking system (STS) for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) represented an order of magnitude increase in size over any silicon system that had been previously built or even planned. In order to meet its performance requirements, it could not simply be a linear scaling of earlier systems, but instead required completely new concepts. The small size of the early systems made it possible to simply move the support hardware and services largely outside the active volume of the system. For a system five meters long, that simply is not an option. The design of the STS for the SDC experiment was the result of numerous compromises between the capabilities required to do the physics and the limitations imposed by cost, material properties, and silicon strip detector characteristics. From the point of view of the physics, the silicon system should start as close to the interaction point as possible. In addition, the detectors should measure the position of particles passing through them with no errors, and should not deflect or interact with the particles in any way. However, cost, radiation damage, and other factors limiting detector performance dictated, other, more realistic values. Radiation damage limited the inner radius of the silicon detectors to about 9 cm, whereas cost limited the outer radius of the detectors to about 50 cm. Cost also limits the half length of the system to about 250 cm. To control the effects of radiation damage on the detectors required operating the system at a temperature of 0 degrees C or below, and maintaining that temperature throughout life of the system. To summarize, the physics and properties of the silicon strip detectors requires that the detectors be operated at or below 0 degrees C, be positioned very accurately during assembly and remain positionally stable throughout their operation, and that all materials used be radiation hard and have a large thickness for one radiation length

  19. Silicon subsystem mechanical engineering work for the solenoidal detector collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, W.O.; Barney, M.; Byrd, D.; Christensen, R.W.; Dransfield, G.; Elder, M.; Gamble, M.; Crastataro, C.; Hanlon, J.; Jones, D.C. [and others

    1995-02-01

    The silicon tracking system (STS) for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) represented an order of magnitude increase in size over any silicon system that had been previously built or even planned. In order to meet its performance requirements, it could not simply be a linear scaling of earlier systems, but instead required completely new concepts. The small size of the early systems made it possible to simply move the support hardware and services largely outside the active volume of the system. For a system five meters long, that simply is not an option. The design of the STS for the SDC experiment was the result of numerous compromises between the capabilities required to do the physics and the limitations imposed by cost, material properties, and silicon strip detector characteristics. From the point of view of the physics, the silicon system should start as close to the interaction point as possible. In addition, the detectors should measure the position of particles passing through them with no errors, and should not deflect or interact with the particles in any way. However, cost, radiation damage, and other factors limiting detector performance dictated, other, more realistic values. Radiation damage limited the inner radius of the silicon detectors to about 9 cm, whereas cost limited the outer radius of the detectors to about 50 cm. Cost also limits the half length of the system to about 250 cm. To control the effects of radiation damage on the detectors required operating the system at a temperature of 0{degrees}C or below, and maintaining that temperature throughout life of the system. To summarize, the physics and properties of the silicon strip detectors requires that the detectors be operated at or below 0{degrees}C, be positioned very accurately during assembly and remain positionally stable throughout their operation, and that all materials used be radiation hard and have a large thickness for one radiation length.

  20. The underground macroeconomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin Dinu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Like Physics, which cannot yet explain 96% of the substance in the Universe, so is Economics, unprepared to understand and to offer a rational explicative model to the underground economy.

  1. Locating underground uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felice, P.E.

    1979-01-01

    Underground uranium deposits are located by placing wires of dosimeters each about 5 to 18 mg/cm 2 thick underground in a grid pattern. Each dosimeter contains a phosphor which is capable of storing the energy of alpha particles. In each pair one dosimeter is shielded from alpha particles with more than 18 mg/cm 2 thick opaque material but not gamma and beta rays and the other dosimeter is shielded with less than 1 mg/cm 2 thick opaque material to exclude dust. After a period underground the dosimeters are heated which releases the stored energy as light. The amount of light produced from the heavily shielded dosimeter is subtracted from the amount of light produced from the thinly shielded dosimeter to give an indication of the location and quantity of uranium underground

  2. Design Criteria for Wireless Mesh Communications in Underground Coal Mines

    OpenAIRE

    Griffin, Kenneth Reed

    2009-01-01

    The Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response (MINER) Act of 2006 was enacted in response to several coal mining accidents that occurred in the beginning of 2006. The MINER Act does not just require underground mines to integrate wireless communication and tracking systems, but aims to overall enhance health and safety in mining at both surface and underground operations. In 2006, the underground communication technologies available to the mining industry had inherent problems that limited ...

  3. Orpheus in the Underground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puskás Dániel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In my study I deal with descents to the underworld and hell in literature in the 20th century and in contemporary literature. I will focus on modem literary reinterpretations of the myth of Orpheus, starting with Rilke’s Orpheus. Eurydice. Hermes. In Seamus Heaney’s The Underground. in the Hungarian Istvan Baka’s Descending to the Underground of Moscow and in Czesław Miłosz’s Orpheus and Eurydice underworld appears as underground, similarly to the contemporary Hungarian János Térey’s play entitled Jeramiah. where underground will also be a metaphorical underworld which is populated with the ghosts of the famous deceased people of Debrecen, and finally, in Péter Kárpáti’s Everywoman the grave of the final scene of the medieval Everyman will be replaced with a contemporary underground station. I analyse how an underground station could be parallel with the underworld and I deal with the role of musicality and sounds in the literary works based on the myth of Orpheus.

  4. Construction and maintenance of underground mine roads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, A.S.; Seedsman, R.W. [Coffey Partners International Pty. Ltd. (Australia)

    1995-12-31

    Good roads are essential in moving men and materials to and from the underground workplace. An underground coal industry funded project was recently completed on underground mine road construction and maintenance. This paper discusses practical approaches to construction and maintenance of underground mine roads using transferable civil technologies and innovative techniques. Mine pavements are generally low-cost (relative to civil roads), constructed to varying standards using locally available materials to best meet the mobility needs of the mine. Performance of pavements is thus largely dependent on the environmental conditions, quality of the available road making materials, maintenance policies and available resources. This paper explains the causes of bad roads in various underground environments. It details available management strategies, construction and water control techniques, road maintenance and vehicle considerations. It concludes that the trend to larger rubber tires mining equipment needs to be matched with construction and maintenance of high quality road surfaces. For large operations, the total cost due to poor roads may equate to in excess of $A1 million per annum. The strategies outlined in this paper provide the basis for construction and maintenance of underground mine roads to help achieve desired production targets. (author). 2 tabs., 4 figs., 7 refs.

  5. Underground storage of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, J.E.

    1977-06-01

    The objective of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program is to provide facilities in various deep geologic formations at multiple locations in the United States which will safely dispose of commerical radioactive waste. The NWTS Program is being administered for the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) by the Office of Waste Isolation (OWI), Union Carbide Corporation, Nuclear Division. OWI manages projects that will lead to the location, construction, and operation of repositories, including all surface and underground engineering and facility design projects and technical support projects. 7 refs., 5 figs

  6. Intensive use of diesels underground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, R W

    1980-07-01

    At a US mine, coal is extracted by room and pillar mining. Tyred diesel vehicles are used to transport men and materials, to spread gravel on the roadway, and to tow and provide hydraulic power to rock dusting machines. Hydraulic power take-offs from the vehicles are used to operate equipment such as drills and chain saws. A deisel ambulance is kept underground, and diesel lubrication units and maintenance tracks are used. A diesel generator provides electrical power when or where no permanent electricity supply is available e.g. for tramming continuous miners in to or out of the mine.

  7. Underground storage of nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, J E

    1977-12-01

    The objective of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program is to provide facilities in various deep geologic formations at multiple locations in the United States which will safely dispose of commercial radioactive waste. The NWTS Program is being administered for the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) by the Office of Waste Isolation (OWI), Union Carbide Corporation, Nuclear Division. OWI manages projects that will lead to the location, construction, and operation of repositories, including all surface and underground engineering and facility design projects and technical support projects.

  8. Dispersion in a bent-solenoid channel with symmetric focusing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chun-xi [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2001-08-21

    Longitudinal ionization cooling of a muon beam is essential for muon colliders and will be useful for neutrino factories. Bent-solenoid channels with symmetric focusing has been considered for beam focusing and for generating the required dispersion in the ``emittance exchange'' scheme of longitudinal cooling. In this paper, we derive the Hamiltonian that governs the linear beam dynamics of a bent-solenoid channel, solve the single-particle dynamics, and give equations for determining the lattice functions, in particular, the dispersion functions.

  9. Laser solenoid: an alternate use of lasers in fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, P.H.

    1977-01-01

    A unique laser assisted fusion approach is under development at Mathematical Sciences Northwest, Inc. (MSNW). This approach captures one of the most developed aspects of high energy laser technology, the efficient, large, scalable, pulsed electron beam initiated, electric discharge, CO 2 infrared laser. This advanced technology is then combined with the simple geometry of a linear magnetic confinement system. The laser solenoid concept will be described, current work and experimental progress will be discussed, and the technological problems of building such a system will be assessed. Finally a comparison will be made of the technology and economics for the laser solenoid and alternative fusion approaches

  10. The Compact Muon Solenoid Heavy Ion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yepes, Pablo

    2005-01-01

    The Pb-Pb center of mass energy at the LHC will exceed that of Au-Au collisions at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) by nearly a factor of 30, providing exciting opportunities for addressing unique physics issues in a completely new energy domain. The interest of the Heavy Ion (HI) Physics at LHC is discussed in more detail in the LHC-USA white paper and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Heavy Ion proposal. A few highlights are presented in this document. Heavy ion collisions at LHC energies will explore regions of energy and particle density significantly beyond those reachable at RHIC. The energy density of the thermalized matter created at the LHC is estimated to be 20 times higher than at RHIC, implying an initial temperature, which is greater than at RHIC by more than a factor of two. The higher density of produced partons also allows a faster thermalization. As a consequence, the ratio of the quark-gluon plasma lifetime to the thermalization time increases by a factor of 10 over RHIC. Thus the hot, dense systems created in HI collisions at the LHC spend most of the time in a purely partonic state. The longer lifetime of the quark-gluon plasma state widens significantly the time window available to probe it experimentally. RHIC experiments have reported evidence for jet production in HI collisions and for suppression of high p T particle production. Those results open a new field of exploration of hot and dense nuclear matter. Even though RHIC has already broken ground, the production rates for jets with p T > 30 GeV are several orders of magnitude larger at the LHC than at RHIC, allowing for systematic studies with high statistics in a clean kinematic region. High p T quark and gluon jets can be used to study the hot hadronic medium produced in HI interactions. The larger Q 2 causes jets to materialize very soon after the collision. They are thus embedded in and propagate through the dense environment as it forms and evolves. Through their interactions

  11. Underground openings production line 2012. Design, production and initial state of the underground openings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-08-01

    The Underground Openings Line Production Line report describes the design requirements, the design principles, the methods of construction and the target properties for the underground rooms required for the final repository. It is one of five Production Line reports, namely the: Underground Openings Line report, Canister report, Buffer report, Backfill report, Closure report. Together, these reports cover the lifespan of the underground phases of the final repository from the start of construction of the underground rooms to their closure. Posiva has developed reference methods for constructing the underground rooms. Tunnels will be constructed using the drill and blast technique, shafts will be constructed using raise boring and the deposition holes will be constructed by reverse down reaming. Underground openings will be made safe by reinforcement by using rock bolts, net or shotcrete, depending on which type of opening is being considered, and groundwater inflows will be limited by grouting. Posiva's requirements management system (VAHA) sets out the specifications for the enactment of the disposal concept at Olkiluoto under five Levels - 1 to 5, from the most generic to the most specific. In this report, the focus is on Level 4 and 5 requirements, which provide practical guidance for the construction of the underground openings. The design requirements are presented in Level 4 and the design specification in Level 5 In addition to the long-term safety-related requirements included in VAHA, there are additional requirements regarding the operation of underground openings, e.g. space requirements due to the equipment used and its maintenance, operational and fire safety. The current reference design for the disposal facility is presented based on the design requirements and design specifications. During the lifespan of the repository the reference design will be revised and updated according to the design principles as new information is available. Reference

  12. Conceptual design report for the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-15

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) will search for signatures of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation and investigate the behavior of strongly interacting matter at high energy density. The emphasis win be the correlation of many observables on an event-by-event basis. In the absence of definitive signatures for the QGP, it is imperative that such correlations be used to identify special events and possible signatures. This requires a flexible detection system that can simultaneously measure many experimental observables. The physics goals dictate the design of star and it's experiment. To meet the design criteria, tracking, momentum analysis, and particle identification of most of the charged particles at midrapidity are necessary. The tracking must operate in conditions at higher than the expected maximum charged particle multiplicities for central Au + Au collisions. Particle identification of pions/kaons for p < 0.7 GeV/c and kaons/protons for p < 1 GeV/c, as well as measurement of decay particles and reconstruction of secondary vertices will be possible. A two-track resolution of 2 cm at 2 m radial distance from, the interaction is expected. Momentum resolution of {Delta}p/p {approximately} 0.02 at p = 0.1 GeV/c is required to accomplish the physics, and,{Delta}p/p of several percent at p = 10 GeV/c is sufficient to accurately measure the rapidly failing spectra at high Pt and particles from mini-jets and jets.

  13. Permanent Closure of the TAN-664 Underground Storage Tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley K. Griffith

    2011-12-01

    This closure package documents the site assessment and permanent closure of the TAN-664 gasoline underground storage tank in accordance with the regulatory requirements established in 40 CFR 280.71, 'Technical Standards and Corrective Action Requirements for Owners and Operators of Underground Storage Tanks: Out-of-Service UST Systems and Closure.'

  14. Energy losses in the D0 β solenoid cryostat caused by current changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, A.T.

    1993-11-01

    The proposed D0 β solenoid is a superconducting solenoid mounted inside an aluminum tube which supports the solenoid winding over it's full length. This aluminum support tube, also called bobbin, is therefore very tightly coupled to magnetic flux changes caused by solenoid current variations. These current changes in the solenoid, will cause answer currents to flow in the resistive bobbin wall and therefore cause heat losses. The insertion of an external dump resistor in the solenoid current loop reduces energy dissipation inside the cryostat during a quench and will shorten the discharge time constant. This note presents a simple electrical model for the coupled bobbin and solenoid and makes it easier to understand the circuit behavior and losses. Estimates for the maximum allowable rate of solenoid current changes, based on the maximum permissible rate of losses can be made using this model

  15. Dynamic Underground Stripping Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aines, R.; Newmark, R.; McConachie, W.; Udell, K.; Rice, D.; Ramirez, A.; Siegel, W.; Buettner, M.; Daily, W.; Krauter, P.; Folsom, E.; Boegel, A.J.; Bishop, D.; Udell, K.

    1992-01-01

    LLNL is collaborating with the UC Berkeley College of Engineering to develop and demonstrate a system of thermal remediation and underground imaging techniques for use in rapid cleanup of localized underground spills. Called ''Dynamic Stripping'' to reflect the rapid and controllable nature of the process, it will combine steam injection, direct electrical heating, and tomographic geophysical imaging in a cleanup of the LLNL gasoline spill. In the first 8 months of the project, a Clean Site engineering test was conducted to prove the field application of the techniques before moving the contaminated site in FY 92

  16. Structure design of the central solenoid in JT-60SA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakawa, Shuji; Tsuchiya, Katsuhiko; Kuramochi, Masaya; Yoshida, Kiyoshi

    2009-09-01

    The upgrade of JT-60U magnet system to superconducting coils (JT-60SA: JT-60 Super Advanced) has been decided by parties of Japanese government (JA) and European commission (EU) in the framework of the Broader Approach (BA) agreement. The magnet system for JT-60SA consists of a central solenoid (CS), equilibrium field(EF) coils, toroidal field(TF) coils. The central solenoid consists the four winding pack modules. In order to counteract the thermal contraction as well as the electric magnetic repulsion and attraction together with other forces generated in each module, it is necessary to apply pre-loading to the support structure of the solenoid and to pursue a structure which is capable of sustaining such loading. In the present report, the structural design of the supporting structure of the solenoid and the jackets of the modules is verified analytically, and the results indicate that the structural design satisfies the 'Codes for Fusion Facilities - Rules on Superconducting Magnet Structure -'. (author)

  17. Improved focus solenoid design for linear induction accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zentler, J.M.; Van Maren, R.D.; Nexsen, W.E.

    1992-08-01

    Our FXR linear induction accelerator produces a 2 KA, 17 MeV electron beam of 60 ns duration. The beam is focused on a tantalum target to produce x-rays for radiography. The FWHM spot size of the focused beam is currently 2.2 mm. We strive to reduce the spot size by 30% by improving the field characteristics of focusing solenoids housed in each of 50 induction cells along the beamline. Tilts in the magnetic axis of the existing solenoids range up to 12 mrad (0.7 degrees). We are building new solenoid assemblies which include ferromagnetic homogenizer rings. These dramatically reduce field errors. A field tilt of under 0.5 mrad has been achieved. Mechanical alignment of the rings is critical. We developed a novel construction method in which the rings are wound with 4 mil thick Si-Fe ribbon into grooves on an aluminum cylinder. The cylinder then becomes the winding mandrel for the focus solenoids. This forms a more accurate and compact assembly than the standard practice of pressing individual solid rings onto a tube

  18. Modeling plasma flow in straight and curved solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boercker, D.B.; Sanders, D.M.; Storer, J.; Falabella, S.

    1991-01-01

    The ''flux-tube'' model originated by Morozov is a very simple and numerically efficient method for simulating ion motion in plasma filters. In order to test its utility as a design tool, we compare the predictions of the model to recent experimental measurements of plasma flow in both straight and curved solenoids

  19. Completion of the ITER central solenoid model coils installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, H.

    1999-01-01

    The short article details how dozens of problems, regarding the central solenoid model coils installation, were faced and successfully overcome one by one at JAERI-Naga. A black and white photograph shows K. Kwano, a staff member of the JAERI superconducting magnet laboratory, to be still inside the vacuum tank while the lid is already being brought down..

  20. Low-energy nuclear reactions with double-solenoid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The University of Notre Dame, USA (Becchetti et al, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Res. A505, 377 (2003)) and later the University of São Paulo, Brazil (Lichtenthaler et al, Eur. Phys. J. A25, S-01, 733 (2005)) adopted a system based on superconducting solenoids to produce low-energy radioactive nuclear beams. In these systems ...

  1. Insulating process for HT-7U central solenoid model coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Yimin; Pan Wanjiang; Wu Songtao; Wan Yuanxi

    2003-01-01

    The HT-7U superconducting Tokamak is a whole superconducting magnetically confined fusion device. The insulating system of its central solenoid coils is critical to its properties. In this paper the forming of the insulating system and the vacuum-pressure-impregnating (VPI) are introduced, and the whole insulating process is verified under the super-conducting experiment condition

  2. Design of 9 tesla superconducting solenoid for VECC RIB facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Chiranjib; Ghosh, Siddhartha; Fatma, Tabassum; Dey, Malay Kanti; Bhunia, Uttam; Bandyopadhyay, Arup; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2013-01-01

    An ISOL post-accelerator type of RIB facility is being developed at our centre. The post acceleration scheme of a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) followed by five IH LINAC cavities will provide energy of about 1.05 MeV/u. For further accelerating up to 2 MeV/u Superconducting Quarter Wave Resonators (SCQWR) will be used. The radial defocusing of the beam bunch during the acceleration using SCQWRs will be taken care of by a Superconducting Solenoid (SCS) within the same cryostat. In this report the electromagnetic design of an SCS will be discussed. A 9 T SCS having effective length of 340 mm has been designed with the special requirement that the fringing field should fall sharply to a value less than 100 mT at the surfaces of the adjacent superconducting cavities. The designed solenoid comprise of two co-axial split solenoid conductors surrounded by iron shields and a pair of bucking coils. Optimizations have been carried out for the total current sharing of the main coils and the bucking coils as well as for the relative orientation and dimension of each component of the solenoid. (author)

  3. Design of 9 tesla superconducting solenoid for VECC RIB facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Chiranjib; Ghosh, Siddhartha; Fatma, Tabassum; Dey, Malay Kanti; Bhunia, Uttam; Bandyopadhyay, Arup; Chakrabarti, Alok [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata (India)

    2013-07-01

    An ISOL post-accelerator type of RIB facility is being developed at our centre. The post acceleration scheme of a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) followed by five IH LINAC cavities will provide energy of about 1.05 MeV/u. For further accelerating up to 2 MeV/u Superconducting Quarter Wave Resonators (SCQWR) will be used. The radial defocusing of the beam bunch during the acceleration using SCQWRs will be taken care of by a Superconducting Solenoid (SCS) within the same cryostat. In this report the electromagnetic design of an SCS will be discussed. A 9 T SCS having effective length of 340 mm has been designed with the special requirement that the fringing field should fall sharply to a value less than 100 mT at the surfaces of the adjacent superconducting cavities. The designed solenoid comprise of two co-axial split solenoid conductors surrounded by iron shields and a pair of bucking coils. Optimizations have been carried out for the total current sharing of the main coils and the bucking coils as well as for the relative orientation and dimension of each component of the solenoid. (author)

  4. Fabrication, Testing and Modeling of the MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virostek, S.P.; Green, M.A.; Trillaud, F.; Zisman, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), an international collaboration sited at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, will demonstrate ionization cooling in a section of realistic cooling channel using a muon beam. A five-coil superconducting spectrometer solenoid magnet will provide a 4 tesla uniform field region at each end of the cooling channel. Scintillating fiber trackers within the 400 mm diameter magnet bore tubes measure the emittance of the beam as it enters and exits the cooling channel. Each of the identical 3-meter long magnets incorporates a three-coil spectrometer magnet section and a two-coil section to match the solenoid uniform field into the other magnets of the MICE cooling channel. The cold mass, radiation shield and leads are currently kept cold by means of three two-stage cryocoolers and one single-stage cryocooler. Liquid helium within the cold mass is maintained by means of a re-condensation technique. After incorporating several design changes to improve the magnet cooling and reliability, the fabrication and acceptance testing of the spectrometer solenoids have proceeded. The key features of the spectrometer solenoid magnets, the development of a thermal model, the results of the recently completed tests, and the current status of the project are presented.

  5. Design, fabrication, and characterization of a solenoid system to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    system to generate magnetic field for an ECR proton source. S K JAIN .... The bore of the solenoid coils was fabricated using high voltage glass epoxy. Each ... sure drop and flow, the inlet and outlet connections were provided. ... stability of an ECR plasma source, as any small change in the distribution of the axial magnetic.

  6. Three dimensional multilayer solenoid microcoils inside silica glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangwei; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Shan, Chao; Liu, Keyin; Li, Yanyang; Bian, Hao; Si, Jinhai; Hou, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) solenoid microcoils could generate uniform magnetic field. Multilayer solenoid microcoils are highly pursued for strong magnetic field and high inductance in advanced magnetic microsystems. However, the fabrication of the 3D multilayer solenoid microcoils is still a challenging task. In this paper, 3D multilayer solenoid microcoils with uniform diameters and high aspect ratio were fabricated in silica glass. An alloy (Bi/In/Sn/Pb) with high melting point was chosen as the conductive metal to overcome the limitation of working temperature and improve the electrical property. The inductance of the three layers microcoils was measured, and the value is 77.71 nH at 100 kHz and 17.39 nH at 120 MHz. The quality factor was calculated, and it has a value of 5.02 at 120 MHz. This approach shows an improvement method to achieve complex 3D metal microstructures and electronic components, which could be widely integrated in advanced magnetic microsystems.

  7. Underground storage tank management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Underground Storage Tank (UST) Management Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was established to locate UST systems in operation at the facility, to ensure that all operating UST systems are free of leaks, and to establish a program for the removal of unnecessary UST systems and upgrade of UST systems that continue to be needed. The program implements an integrated approach to the management of UST systems, with each system evaluated against the same requirements and regulations. A common approach is employed, in accordance with Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) regulations and guidance, when corrective action is mandated. This Management Plan outlines the compliance issues that must be addressed by the UST Management Program, reviews the current UST inventory and compliance approach, and presents the status and planned activities associated with each UST system. The UST Management Plan provides guidance for implementing TDEC regulations and guidelines for petroleum UST systems. (There are no underground radioactive waste UST systems located at Y-12.) The plan is divided into four major sections: (1) regulatory requirements, (2) implementation requirements, (3) Y-12 Plant UST Program inventory sites, and (4) UST waste management practices. These sections describe in detail the applicable regulatory drivers, the UST sites addressed under the Management Program, and the procedures and guidance used for compliance with applicable regulations

  8. Underground storage tank management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    The Underground Storage Tank (UST) Management Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was established to locate UST systems in operation at the facility, to ensure that all operating UST systems are free of leaks, and to establish a program for the removal of unnecessary UST systems and upgrade of UST systems that continue to be needed. The program implements an integrated approach to the management of UST systems, with each system evaluated against the same requirements and regulations. A common approach is employed, in accordance with Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) regulations and guidance, when corrective action is mandated. This Management Plan outlines the compliance issues that must be addressed by the UST Management Program, reviews the current UST inventory and compliance approach, and presents the status and planned activities associated with each UST system. The UST Management Plan provides guidance for implementing TDEC regulations and guidelines for petroleum UST systems. (There are no underground radioactive waste UST systems located at Y-12.) The plan is divided into four major sections: (1) regulatory requirements, (2) implementation requirements, (3) Y-12 Plant UST Program inventory sites, and (4) UST waste management practices. These sections describe in detail the applicable regulatory drivers, the UST sites addressed under the Management Program, and the procedures and guidance used for compliance with applicable regulations.

  9. Underground siting of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, S.; Telleschi, P.

    1978-10-01

    Two of the main underground siting alternatives, the rock cavity plant and the pit siting, have been investigated in detail and two layouts, developed for specific sites, have been proposed. The influence of this type of siting on normal operating conditions and during abnormal occurences have been investigated. (Auth.)

  10. Underground Storage Tanks in Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Underground storage tank (UST) sites which store petroleum in Iowa. Includes sites which have been reported to DNR, and have active or removed underground storage...

  11. Underground gasification in Britain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1952-08-29

    A report of the discussion held on the paper Underground Gasification in Britain, by C.A. Masterman (Iron and Coal Trades Rev., Vol. 165, Aug. 22, 1952, pp. 413-422). The water question, preheating the air, controlling the gas, using the product, choosing the site, thickness of seam and faulted areas are discussed.

  12. Underground nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hideo.

    1997-01-01

    In an underground-type nuclear power plant, groups of containing cavities comprising a plurality of containing cavities connected in series laterally by way of partition walls are disposed in parallel underground. Controlled communication tunnels for communicating the containing cavities belonging to a control region to each other, and non-controlled communication tunnels for communicating containing cavities belonging to a non-controlled area to each other are disposed underground. A controlled corridor tunnel and a non-controlled corridor tunnel extended so as to surround the containing cavity groups are disposed underground, and the containing cavities belonging to the controlled area are connected to the controlled corridor tunnel respectively, and the containing cavities belonging to the non-controlled area are connected to the non-controlled corridor tunnel respectively. The excavating amount of earth and sand upon construction can be reduced by disposing the containing cavity groups comprising a plurality of containing cavities connected in series laterally. The time and the cost for the construction can be reduced, and various excellent effects can be provided. (N.H.)

  13. Underground neutrino astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1983-02-01

    A review is made of possible astronomical neutrino sources detectable with underground facilities. Comments are made about solar neutrinos and gravitational-collapse neutrinos, and particular emphasis is placed on ultra-high-energy astronomical neutrino sources. An appendix mentions the exotic possibility of monopolonium

  14. The Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider The Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Delepine

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Compact Muon Solenoid experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider will study protonproton collisions at unprecedented energies and luminosities. In this article we providefi rst a brief general introduction to particle physics. We then explain what CERN is. Thenwe describe the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the most powerful particle acceleratorever built. Finally we describe the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment, its physics goals,construction details, and current status.El experimento Compact Muon Solenoid en el Large Hadron Collider del CERN estudiarácolisiones protón protón a energías y luminosidades sin precedente. En este artículo presentamos primero una breve introducción general a la física de partículas. Despuésexplicamos lo que es el CERN. Luego describimos el Large Hadron Collider, el más potente acelerador de partículas construido por el hombre, en el CERN. Finalmente describimos el experimento Compact Muon Solenoid, sus objetivos en física, los detalles de su construcción,y su situación presente.

  15. Underground nuclear astrophysics at the Dresden Felsenkeller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bemmerer, Daniel; Ilgner, Christoph; Junghans, Arnd R.; Mueller, Stefan; Rimarzig, Bernd; Schwengner, Ronald; Szuecs, Tamas; Wagner, Andreas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany); Cowan, Thomas E.; Gohl, Stefan; Grieger, Marcel; Reinicke, Stefan; Roeder, Marko; Schmidt, Konrad; Stoeckel, Klaus; Takacs, Marcell P.; Wagner, Louis [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany); Reinhardt, Tobias P.; Zuber, Kai [Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Favored by the low background underground, accelerator-based experiments are an important tool to study nuclear astrophysics reactions involving stable charged particles. This technique has been used with great success at the 0.4 MV LUNA accelerator in the Gran Sasso laboratory in Italy. However, the nuclear reactions of helium and carbon burning and the neutron source reactions for the astrophysical s-process require higher beam energies, as well as the continuation of solar fusion studies. As a result, NuPECC strongly recommended the installation of one or more higher-energy underground accelerators. Such a project is underway in Dresden. A 5 MV Pelletron accelerator is currently being refurbished by installing an ion source on the high voltage terminal, enabling intensive helium beams. The preparation of the underground site is funded, and the civil engineering project is being updated. The science case, operational strategy and project status are reported.

  16. Location of leaks in pressurized underground pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckert, E.G.; Maresca, J.W. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Millions of underground storage tanks (UST) are used to store petroleum and other chemicals. The pressurized underground pipelines associated with USTs containing petroleum motor fuels are typically 2 in. in diameter and 50 to 200 ft in length. These pipelines typically operate at pressures of 20 to 30 psi. Longer lines, with diameters up to 4 in., are found in some high-volume facilities. There are many systems that can be used to detect leaks in pressurized underground pipelines. When a leak is detected, the first step in the remediation process is to find its location. Passive-acoustic measurements, combined with advanced signal-processing techniques, provide a nondestructive method of leak location that is accurate and relatively simple, and that can be applied to a wide variety of pipelines and pipeline products

  17. Global Pursuits: The Underground Railroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Arts: The Art Education Magazine for Teachers, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This brief article describes Charles T. Webber's oil on canvas painting, "The Underground Railroad, 1893." The subject of this painting is the Underground Railroad, which today has become an American legend. The Underground Railroad was not a systematic means of transportation, but rather a secretive process that allowed fugitive slaves…

  18. Solenoid Driven Pressure Valve System: Toward Versatile Fluidic Control in Paper Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taehoon H; Hahn, Young Ki; Lee, Jungmin; van Noort, Danny; Kim, Minseok S

    2018-02-20

    As paper-based diagnostics has become predominantly driven by more advanced microfluidic technology, many of the research efforts are still focused on developing reliable and versatile fluidic control devices, apart from improving sensitivity and reproducibility. In this work, we introduce a novel and robust paper fluidic control system enabling versatile fluidic control. The system comprises a linear push-pull solenoid and an Arduino Uno microcontroller. The precisely controlled pressure exerted on the paper stops the flow. We first determined the stroke distance of the solenoid to obtain a constant pressure while examining the fluidic time delay as a function of the pressure. Results showed that strips of grade 1 chromatography paper had superior reproducibility in fluid transport. Next, we characterized the reproducibility of the fluidic velocity which depends on the type and grade of paper used. As such, we were able to control the flow velocity on the paper and also achieve a complete stop of flow with a pressure over 2.0 MPa. Notably, after the actuation of the pressure driven valve (PDV), the previously pressed area regained its original flow properties. This means that, even on a previously pressed area, multiple valve operations can be successfully conducted. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of an active and repetitive valve operation in paper microfluidics. As a proof of concept, we have chosen to perform a multistep detection system in the form of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with mouse IgG as the target analyte.

  19. The Solenoidal Detector Collaboration silicon detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziock, H.J.; Gamble, M.T.; Miller, W.O.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Thompson, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    Silicon tracking systems will be fundamental components of the tracking systems for both planned major SSC experiments. Despite its seemingly small size, it occupies a volume of more than 5 meters in length and 1 meter in diameter and is an order of magnitude larger than any silicon detector system previously built. This report discusses its design and operation

  20. Earthquake damage to underground facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, H.R.; Hustrulid, W.A.; Stephenson, D.E.

    1978-11-01

    The potential seismic risk for an underground nuclear waste repository will be one of the considerations in evaluating its ultimate location. However, the risk to subsurface facilities cannot be judged by applying intensity ratings derived from the surface effects of an earthquake. A literature review and analysis were performed to document the damage and non-damage due to earthquakes to underground facilities. Damage from earthquakes to tunnels, s, and wells and damage (rock bursts) from mining operations were investigated. Damage from documented nuclear events was also included in the study where applicable. There are very few data on damage in the subsurface due to earthquakes. This fact itself attests to the lessened effect of earthquakes in the subsurface because mines exist in areas where strong earthquakes have done extensive surface damage. More damage is reported in shallow tunnels near the surface than in deep mines. In mines and tunnels, large displacements occur primarily along pre-existing faults and fractures or at the surface entrance to these facilities.Data indicate vertical structures such as wells and shafts are less susceptible to damage than surface facilities. More analysis is required before seismic criteria can be formulated for the siting of a nuclear waste repository

  1. Results from a model system of superconducting solenoids and phase shifting bridge for pulsed power studies for proposed tokamak EF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuja, R.E.; Kustom, R.L.; Smith, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    A matched pair of superconducting solenoids and a phase-shifting bridge circuit has been constructed to study energy storage and transfer for application to tokamak EF coils. The intrinsically stable solenoids, each with 4 H self-inductance, incorporate sufficient cooling to allow charging at several hundred volts, corresponding to B approximately equal 1 T/sec. The three-phase inductor-convertor capacitive bridge network operating at up to 150 V rms transfers energy reversibly and at controllable rates from the storage coil to the load coil

  2. Results from a model system of superconducting solenoids and phase shifting bridge for pulsed power studies for proposed tokamak EF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuja, R.E.; Kustom, R.L.; Smith, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    A matched pair of superconducting solenoids and a phase-shifting bridge circuit has been constructed to study energy storage and transfer for application to tokamak EF coils. The intrinsically stable solenoids, each with 4 H self-inductance, incorporate sufficient cooling to allow charging at several hundred volts, corresponding to B = 1 T/sec. The three-phase inductor-convertor capacitive bridge network operating at up to 150 V rms transfers energy reversibly and at controllable rates from the storage coil to the load coil

  3. A conduction-cooled, 680-mm-long warm bore, 3-T Nb3Sn solenoid for a Cerenkov free electron laser

    OpenAIRE

    Wessel, Wilhelm A.J.; den Ouden, A.; Krooshoop, Hendrikus J.G.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.; Wieland, J.; van der Slot, Petrus J.M.

    1999-01-01

    A compact, cryocooler cooled Nb3Sn superconducting magnet system for a Cerenkov free electron laser has been designed, fabricated and tested. The magnet is positioned directly behind the electron gun of the laser system. The solenoidal field compresses and guides a tube-shaped 100 A, 500 kV electron beam. A two-stage GM cryocooler, equipped with a first generation ErNi5 regenerator, cools the epoxy impregnated solenoid down to the operating temperature of about 7.5 K. This leaves a conservati...

  4. IE Information Notice No. 85-17, Supplement 1: Possible sticking of ASCO solenoid valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, E.L.

    1992-01-01

    This notice is to inform recipients of the results of follow up investigations regarding the reasons for sticking of Automatic Switch Company (ASCO) solenoid valves used to shut main steam isolation valves (MSIVs) under accident conditions. GE has recommend that the licensee replace the potentially contaminated MSIV solenoid valves and institute a periodic examination and cleaning of the MSIV solenoid valves. Grand Gulf has replaced the eight MSIV HTX832320V dual solenoid valves with fully environmentally qualified ASCO Model NP 8323A20E dual solenoid valves. The environmentally qualified valve Model NP 8323A20E was included in a control sample placed in the test ovens with the solenoid valves that stuck at Grand Gulf. The environmentally qualified model did not stick under the test conditions that cause sticking in the other solenoid valves

  5. Focusing solenoid for the front end of a linear RF accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terechkine, I.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Page, T.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    A prototype of a superconducting focusing solenoid for use in an RF linac has been built and tested at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The solenoid is comprised of the main coil, two bucking coils, two dipole corrector windings, and a low carbon steel flux return. At the excitation current of 250 A, the magnetic field reaches 7.2 T in the center of the solenoid and is less than 5 G on the axis at a distance of 150 mm from the center. The length of the solenoid is 150 mm; the length of a cryovessel for the solenoid with a 20 mm diameter 'warm' bore is 270 mm. This paper presents the main design features of the focusing solenoid and discusses results from tests of the solenoid.

  6. ORPUS 1: a pulsed superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwall, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    A recent series of reference designs for Tokamak Experimental Power Reactors (EPR's) has indicated that superconducting poloidal field (PF) coils will be necessary for successful operation of these devices. It would also be desirable to use superconducting PF coils in earlier tokamak fusion devices if such coils could be developed quickly enough. The PF coil performance requirements are briefly reviewed and some implications for the coil design are developed. A small coil (stored energy 14 kJ) has been built using construction techniques similar to those which could be employed for PF coils. The coil has been charged at rates up to 2 T/sec. Both maximum field and charging rate were limited by available power supplies. Loss measurements were carried out during pulsed operation and data for hysteretic and eddy current loss are presented. The loss measurement system used allows considerable insight into the effects of conductor motion and training

  7. Applications of radio frequency identification systems in underground mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knights, P F; Kairouz, J; Daneshmend, L K; Pathak, J [McGill University, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Canadian Centre for Automation and Robotics in Mining

    1994-12-31

    The paper describes the application of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) systems in underground hardrock mines. The operating principles and some of the applications of RDIF systems are described. The system operates by the exchange of information between transponder tags and an antenna and controller device. The suitability of RFID systems for process control, inventory control, materials handling, control of access, security, and transportation in underground coal and hardrock mines is discussed. An ore tonnage tracking system is under development that uses RDIF transponder tags to locate vehicles in an underground mine. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Underground nuclear energy complexes - technical and economic advantages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Carl W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kunze, Jay F [IDAHO STATE UNIV; Giraud, Kellen M [BABECOCK AND WILCOX; Mahar, James M [IDAHO STATE UNIV

    2010-01-01

    Underground nuclear power plant parks have been projected to be economically feasible compared to above ground instalIations. This paper includes a thorough cost analysis of the savings, compared to above ground facilities, resulting from in-place entombment (decommissioning) of facilities at the end of their life. reduced costs of security for the lifetime of the various facilities in the underground park. reduced transportation costs. and reduced costs in the operation of the waste storage complex (also underground). compared to the fair share of the costs of operating a national waste repository.

  9. submitter Physical Properties of a High-Strength Austenitic Stainless Steel for the Precompression Structure of the ITER Central Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Sgobba, Stefano; Arauzo, Ana; Roussel, Pascal; Libeyre, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The ITER central solenoid (CS) consists of six independent coils kept together by a precompression support structure that must react vertical tensile loads and provide sufficient preload to maintain coil-to-coil contact when the solenoid is energized. The CS precompression system includes tie plates, lower and upper key blocks, load distribution and isolation plates and other attachment, support and insulating hardware. The tie plates operating at 4 K are manufactured starting from forgings in a high-strength austenitic stainless steel (FXM-19) with a stringent specification. Moreover, forged components for the lower and upper key blocks have to be provided in the same FXM-19 grade with comparably strict requirements. FXM-19 is a high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel, featuring high strength and toughness, ready weldability, and forgeability. It features as well higher integral thermal contraction down to 4 K compared with the very high Mn steel grade selected for the CS coil jackets, hence providing an ad...

  10. Competition of electron-cyclotron maser and free-electron laser modes with combined solenoidal and longitudinal wiggler fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, A.T.; Lin, C.

    1986-01-01

    A relativistic electron beam with a finite transverse dc momentum (β/sub perpendicular/ = 1/γ 0 ) passing through a region of combined uniform solenoidal and longitudinal wiggler magnetic fields is observed to convert 25% of its kinetic energy into coherent radiation at frequency ω = γ 2 0 (k/sub w/V 0 +Ω/sub c//γ 0 ) if the phase velocity of the generated wave is slightly above the speed of light. In this situation, the bunchings of the slow electron-cyclotron mode and free-electron laser modes with combined solenoidal and longitudinal wiggler fields (lowbitron) are observed to compensate each other, which gives rise to a finite threshold for lowbitron operation. In order to attain high efficiency, the wiggler strength of a lowbitron must substantially exceed the threshold

  11. The underground research laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    This educational booklet is a general presentation of the selected sites for the installation of underground research laboratories devoted to the feasibility studies of deep repositories for long-life radioactive wastes. It describes the different type of wastes and their management, the management of long life radioactive wastes, the site selection and the 4 sites retained, the preliminary research studies, and the other researches carried out in deep disposal facilities worldwide. (J.S.)

  12. Nuclear plant undergrounding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.C.; Bastidas, C.P.

    1978-01-01

    Under Section 25524.3 of the Public Resources Code, the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission (CERCDC) was directed to study ''the necessity for '' and the effectiveness and economic feasibility of undergrounding and berm containment of nuclear reactors. The author discusses the basis for the study, the Sargent and Lundy (S and L) involvement in the study, and the final conclusions reached by S and L

  13. Completeness for coherent states in a magnetic–solenoid field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagrov, V G; Gavrilov, S P; Gitman, D M; Górska, K

    2012-01-01

    This paper completes our study of coherent states in the so-called magnetic–solenoid field (a collinear combination of a constant uniform magnetic field and Aharonov–Bohm solenoid field) presented in Bagrov et al (2010 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 43 354016, 2011 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 44 055301). Here, we succeeded in proving nontrivial completeness relations for non-relativistic and relativistic coherent states in such a field. In addition, we solve here the relevant Stieltjes moment problem and present a comparative analysis of our coherent states and the well-known, in the case of pure uniform magnetic field, Malkin–Man’ko coherent states. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Coherent states: mathematical and physical aspects’. (paper)

  14. Conceptual design of the CMS 4 Tesla solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baze, J.M.; Desportes, H.; Duthil, R.; Lesmond, C.; Lottin, J.C.; Pabot, Y.

    1992-02-01

    A large and important meeting 'Toward the LHC experimental programme' is due to be held at EVIAN-les-BAINS, on 5-8 March 1992. The major goal accurate measurement of muon momenta makes necessary, for the detectors, the use of large and powerful magnetic system producing high bending power. The CMS experiment is based on a solenoidal magnetic configuration. It has been designed to produce a high magnetic induction (4 T) in a 14 m long, 5.9 m bore cylindrical volume surrounding the interaction point. The diameter has been fixed to the maximum dimension compatible with road transportation to CERN. This long solenoid with its 12 500 ton iron yoke is a fully shielded magnet. The paper presents the conceptual design of the superconducting coil and its technical characteristics

  15. H- beam neutralization measurements in a solenoidal beam transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, J.; Pitcher, E.; Stevens, R.; Allison, P.

    1992-01-01

    H minus beam space-charge neutralization is measured for 65-mA, 35-keV beams extracted from a circular-aperture Penning surface-plasma source, the small-angle source. The H minus beam is transported to a RFQ matchpoint by a two-solenoid magnet system. Beam noise is typically ±4%. A four-grid analyzer is located in a magnetic-field-free region between the two solenoid magnets. H minus potentials are deduced from kinetic energy measurements of particles (electrons and positive ions) ejected radially from the beam channel by using a griddled energy analyzer. Background neutral gas density is increased by the introduction of additional Xe and Ar gases, enabling the H minus beam to become overneutralized

  16. Design of High Field Solenoids made of High Temperature Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartalesi, Antonio; /Pisa U.

    2010-12-01

    This thesis starts from the analytical mechanical analysis of a superconducting solenoid, loaded by self generated Lorentz forces. Also, a finite element model is proposed and verified with the analytical results. To study the anisotropic behavior of a coil made by layers of superconductor and insulation, a finite element meso-mechanic model is proposed and designed. The resulting material properties are then used in the main solenoid analysis. In parallel, design work is performed as well: an existing Insert Test Facility (ITF) is adapted and structurally verified to support a coil made of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, a High Temperature Superconductor (HTS). Finally, a technological winding process was proposed and the required tooling is designed.

  17. Effect of solenoidal magnetic field on drifting laser plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazumasa; Okamura, Masahiro; Sekine, Megumi; Cushing, Eric; Jandovitz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    An ion source for accelerators requires to provide a stable waveform with a certain pulse length appropriate to the application. The pulse length of laser ion source is easy to control because it is expected to be proportional to plasma drifting distance. However, current density decay is proportional to the cube of the drifting distance, so large current loss will occur under unconfined drift. We investigated the stability and current decay of a Nd:YAG laser generated copper plasma confined by a solenoidal field using a Faraday cup to measure the current waveform. It was found that the plasma was unstable at certain magnetic field strengths, so a baffle was introduced to limit the plasma diameter at injection and improve the stability. Magnetic field, solenoid length, and plasma diameter were varied in order to find the conditions that minimize current decay and maximize stability.

  18. Transverse emittance measurement at REGAE via a solenoid scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachmann, Max

    2012-12-15

    The linear accelerator REGAE at DESY produces short and low charged electron bunches, on the one hand to resolve the excitation transitions of atoms temporally by pump probe electron diffraction experiments and on the other hand to investigate principal mechanisms of laser plasma acceleration. For both cases a high quality electron beam is required. A quantity to rate the beam quality is the beam emittance. In the course of this thesis transverse emittance measurements by a solenoid scan could be realized and beyond that an improved theoretical description of a solenoid was successful. The foundation of emittance measurements are constituted by theoretical models which describe the envelope of a beam. Two different models were derived. The first is an often used model to determine the transverse beam emittance without considering space charge effects. More interesting and challenging was the development of an envelope model taking space charge effects into account. It is introduced and cross checked with measurements and simulations.

  19. Effect of solenoidal magnetic field on drifting laser plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kazumasa; Sekine, Megumi; Okamura, Masahiro; Cushing, Eric; Jandovitz, Peter

    2013-01-01

    An ion source for accelerators requires to provide a stable waveform with a certain pulse length appropriate to the application. The pulse length of laser ion source is easy to control because it is expected to be proportional to plasma drifting distance. However, current density decay is proportional to the cube of the drifting distance, so large current loss will occur under unconfined drift. We investigated the stability and current decay of a Nd:YAG laser generated copper plasma confined by a solenoidal field using a Faraday cup to measure the current waveform. It was found that the plasma was unstable at certain magnetic field strengths, so a baffle was introduced to limit the plasma diameter at injection and improve the stability. Magnetic field, solenoid length, and plasma diameter were varied in order to find the conditions that minimize current decay and maximize stability.

  20. Effect of solenoidal magnetic field on drifting laser plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Kazumasa; Sekine, Megumi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Okamura, Masahiro [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States) and RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (United States); Cushing, Eric [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Jandovitz, Peter [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    An ion source for accelerators requires to provide a stable waveform with a certain pulse length appropriate to the application. The pulse length of laser ion source is easy to control because it is expected to be proportional to plasma drifting distance. However, current density decay is proportional to the cube of the drifting distance, so large current loss will occur under unconfined drift. We investigated the stability and current decay of a Nd:YAG laser generated copper plasma confined by a solenoidal field using a Faraday cup to measure the current waveform. It was found that the plasma was unstable at certain magnetic field strengths, so a baffle was introduced to limit the plasma diameter at injection and improve the stability. Magnetic field, solenoid length, and plasma diameter were varied in order to find the conditions that minimize current decay and maximize stability.

  1. Magnetic Alignment of Pulsed Solenoids Using the Pulsed Wire Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbelaez, D.; Madur, A.; Lipton, T.M.; Waldron, W.L.; Kwan, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    A unique application of the pulsed-wire measurement method has been implemented for alignment of 2.5 T pulsed solenoid magnets. The magnetic axis measurement has been shown to have a resolution of better than 25 (micro)m. The accuracy of the technique allows for the identification of inherent field errors due to, for example, the winding layer transitions and the current leads. The alignment system is developed for the induction accelerator NDCX-II under construction at LBNL, an upgraded Neutralized Drift Compression experiment for research on warm dense matter and heavy ion fusion. Precise alignment is essential for NDCX-II, since the ion beam has a large energy spread associated with the rapid pulse compression such that misalignments lead to corkscrew deformation of the beam and reduced intensity at focus. The ability to align the magnetic axis of the pulsed solenoids to within 100 pm of the induction cell axis has been demonstrated.

  2. Thermal analysis of the cold mass of the 2T solenoid for the PANDA detector at FAIR

    CERN Document Server

    Rolando, G; Dudarev, A; Pais Da Silva, H; Vodopyanov, A; Schmitt, L

    2015-01-01

    The superconducting solenoid of the PANDA experiment at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt (Germany) is designed to provide a magnetic field of 2 T over a length of about 4 m in a bore of 1.9 m. To allow a warm target feed pipe oriented transversely to the solenoid axis and penetrating through the cryostat and solenoid cold mass, the magnet is split into 3 inter-connected coils fitted in a common support cylinder. During normal operation, cooling of the cold mass to the working temperature of 4.5 K will be achieved through the circulation by natural convection of two-phase helium in cooling pipes attached to the Al-alloy support cylinder. Pure aluminium strips acting as heat drains and glued to the inner surface of the three coils and thermally bonded to the cooling pipes allow minimizing the temperature gradient across the 6-layers coils. In this paper the thermal design of the cold mass during normal operation and current ramps up and down is validated using an analytical appro...

  3. Monitoring underground movements

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    On 16 September 2015 at 22:54:33 (UTC), an 8.3-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of Chile. 11,650 km away, at CERN, a new-generation instrument – the Precision Laser Inclinometer (PLI) – recorded the extreme event. The PLI is being tested by a JINR/CERN/ATLAS team to measure the movements of underground structures and detectors.   The Precision Laser Inclinometer during assembly. The instrument has proven very accurate when taking measurements of the movements of underground structures at CERN.    The Precision Laser Inclinometer is an extremely sensitive device capable of monitoring ground angular oscillations in a frequency range of 0.001-1 Hz with a precision of 10-10 rad/Hz1/2. The instrument is currently installed in one of the old ISR transfer tunnels (TT1) built in 1970. However, its final destination could be the ATLAS cavern, where it would measure and monitor the fine movements of the underground structures, which can affect the precise posi...

  4. Electron Beam Size Measurements in a Cooling Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Kroc, Thomas K; Burov, Alexey; Seletsky, Sergey; Shemyakin, Alexander V

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab Electron Cooling Project requires a straight trajectory and constant beam size to provide effective cooling of the antiprotons in the Recycler. A measurement system was developed using movable appertures and steering bumps to measure the beam size in a 20 m long, nearly continuous, solenoid. This paper discusses the required beam parameters, the implimentation of the measurement system and results for our application.

  5. Underground siting of nuclear power plants: potential benefits and penalties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allensworth, J.A.; Finger, J.T.; Milloy, J.A.; Murfin, W.B.; Rodeman, R.; Vandevender, S.G.

    1977-08-01

    The potential for improving nuclear power safety is analyzed by siting plants underground in mined cavities or by covering plants with fill earth after construction in an excavated cut. Potential benefits and penalties of underground plants are referenced to analogous plants located on the surface. Three representative regional sites having requisite underground geology were used to evaluate underground siting. The major factors which were evaluated for all three sites were: (1) containment of radioactive materials, (2) transport of groundwater contamination, and (3) seismic vulnerability. External protection, plant security, feasibility, operational considerations, and cost were evaluated on a generic basis. Additionally, the national availability of sites having the requisite geology for both underground siting concepts was determined

  6. Strain-based quench detection for a solenoid superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xingzhe; Guan Mingzhi; Ma Lizhen

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a non-electric quench detection method based on the strain gauge measurement of a superconducting solenoid magnet at cryogenic temperature under an intense magnetic field. Unlike the traditional voltage measurement of quench detection, the strain-based detection method utilizes low-temperature strain gauges, which evidently reduce electromagnetic noise and breakdown, to measure the magneto/thermo-mechanical behavior of the superconducting magnet during excitation. The magnet excitation, quench tests and trainings were performed on a prototype 5 T superconducting solenoid magnet. The transient strains and their abrupt changes were compared with the current, magnetic field and temperature signals collected during excitation and quench tests to indicate that the strain gauge measurements can detect the quench feature of the superconducting magnet. The proposed method is expected to be able to detect the quench of a superconducting coil independently or utilized together with other electrical methods. In addition, the axial quench propagation velocity of the solenoid is evaluated by the quench time lags among different localized strains. The propagation velocity is enhanced after repeated quench trainings. (paper)

  7. Control of radon daughters in underground mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swent, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses technical developments that may enable uranium mine operators to improve engineering controls of radon daughter concentrations in mines, and developments in regulatory controls. The origin of radon daughters in underground mines is explained. The procedure for sampling and determining the concentration of alpha radiation in sampled air is reviewed. The principal technical development in the last few years has been the perfection and use of a class of meters which determine radon daughter concentrations in an air sample in a matter of two or three minutes without any aging period. A number of underground uranium mine operators are now using ''instant'' type meters and the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) has approved their use in a number of mines. The difficulty experienced by uranium mine operators in complying with a MSHA regulation which requires that no person be exposed to radon daughter concentrations exceeding 1 Working Level (WL) in any active working place is discussed

  8. Review of underground siting of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    A review of the potential for the underground siting of nuclear power generating plants has been undertaken. The review comprised a survey and assessment of relevant published documents currently available, together with discussions with Government sponsored agencies and other bodies, to evaluate the current status of technology related to the design and construction of underground nuclear power plants. It includes a review of previous work related to the underground siting of power plants and other facilities; a preliminary evaluation of the relative merits of the various concepts of undergrounding which have been proposed or constructed; a review of current technology as it relates to the requirements for the design, construction and operation of underground nuclear power plants; an examination of the safety and environmental aspects; and the identification of areas of further study which will be required if the underground is to be established as a fully viable alternative to surface siting. No attempt has been made to draw final conclusions at this stage. Nothing has been found to suggest that the underground siting concept could not provide a viable alternative to the surface concept. It is also apparent that no major technological developments are required. It is not clear, however, whether the improvements in safety and containment postulated for the underground can be realized at an economic cost; or even whether any additional cost is in fact involved. The problem is essentially site dependent and requires further study for which recommendations are made. (auth)

  9. Environment Of Underground Water And Pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jeong Sang

    1998-02-15

    This book deals with environment of underground water and pollution, which introduces the role of underground water in hydrology, definition of related study of under water, the history of hydro-geology, basic conception of underground water such as origin of water, and hydrogeologic characteristic of aquifers, movement of underground water, hydrography of underground water and aquifer test analysis, change of an underground water level, and water balance analysis and development of underground water.

  10. Underground siting of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, F.

    1982-01-01

    The symposium gave the opportunity for an international exchange of views on the concepts of underground nuclear power plants, which are presently world wide under consideration. The results of investigations into the advantages and disadvantages with regard to the technical safety aspects of the underground plants in comparison to plants on the surface led to open and sometimes controversal discussions. As a result of the symposium (32 contributions) a general agreement can be stated on the judgement concerning the advantages and the disadvantages of underground nuclear power plants (nnp). The advantages are: increased protection against external events; delayed release of fission products in accident situations, if the closures operate properly. The disadvantages are: increased costs of the construction of underground and restrictions to such sites where either large caverns or deep pits can be constructed, which also requires that certain technical problems must be solved beforehand. Also, additional safety certificates related to the site will be required within the licensing procedures. The importance of these advantages and disadvantages was in some cases assessed very differently. The discussions also showed, that there are a number of topics where some questions have not been finally answered yet. (orig./HP) [de

  11. Underground engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordyke, M D [Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1969-07-01

    Developments of any underground engineering application utilizing nuclear explosives involve answering the same questions one encounters in any new area of technology: What are the characteristics of the new tool? How is it applicable to the job to be done? Is it safe to use? and, most importantly, is its use economically acceptable? The many facets of the answers to these questions will be explored. The general types of application presently under consideration will also be reviewed, with particular emphasis on those specific projects actively being worked on by commercial interests and by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. (author)

  12. Underground engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordyke, M.D.

    1969-01-01

    Developments of any underground engineering application utilizing nuclear explosives involve answering the same questions one encounters in any new area of technology: What are the characteristics of the new tool? How is it applicable to the job to be done? Is it safe to use? and, most importantly, is its use economically acceptable? The many facets of the answers to these questions will be explored. The general types of application presently under consideration will also be reviewed, with particular emphasis on those specific projects actively being worked on by commercial interests and by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. (author)

  13. Underground water stress release models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Dang, Shenjun; Lü, Shaochuan

    2011-08-01

    The accumulation of tectonic stress may cause earthquakes at some epochs. However, in most cases, it leads to crustal deformations. Underground water level is a sensitive indication of the crustal deformations. We incorporate the information of the underground water level into the stress release models (SRM), and obtain the underground water stress release model (USRM). We apply USRM to the earthquakes occurred at Tangshan region. The analysis shows that the underground water stress release model outperforms both Poisson model and stress release model. Monte Carlo simulation shows that the simulated seismicity by USRM is very close to the real seismicity.

  14. Underground laboratories: Cosmic silence, loud science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coccia, Eugenio, E-mail: coccia@lngs.infn.i [Department of Physics, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' and INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory (Italy)

    2010-01-01

    Underground laboratories provide the low radioactive background environment necessary to host key experiments in the field of particle and astroparticle physics, nuclear astrophysics and other disciplines that can profit of their characteristics and of their infrastructures. The cosmic silence condition existing in these laboratories allows the search for extremely rare phenomena and the exploration of the highest energy scales that cannot be reached with accelerators. I briefly describe all the facilities that are presently in operation around the world.

  15. A simple formula for emittance growth due to spherical aberration in a solenoid lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.; Phadte, D.; Patidar, C.B.

    2011-01-01

    We analyse the beam dynamics in a solenoid without the paraxial approximation, including up to the fifth order term in the radial displacement. We use this analysis to derive expressions for the coefficients of spherical aberration in terms of the on-axis field profile of the solenoid. Under the thin lens approximation, a simple formula is derived for the growth of rms emittance resulting due to spherical aberration in a solenoid. (author)

  16. Generation of ten kilotesla longitudinal magnetic fields in ultraintense laser-solenoid target interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, K. D.; Zhou, C. T.; Zhang, H.; Huang, T. W.; Li, R.; Qiao, B.; Cao, J. M.; Cai, T. X.; Ruan, S. C.; He, X. T.

    2018-01-01

    Production of the huge longitudinal magnetic fields by using an ultraintense laser pulse irradiating a solenoid target is considered. Through three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, it is shown that the longitudinal magnetic field up to ten kilotesla can be observed in the ultraintense laser-solenoid target interactions. The finding is associated with both fast and return electron currents in the solenoid target. The huge longitudinal magnetic field is of interest for a number of impo...

  17. Design of an elliptical solenoid magnet for transverse beam matching to the spiral inflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Pandit, V.S.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we present the design study of an elliptical solenoid magnet to be used for transverse beam matching at the input of a spiral inflector for efficient transmission. We have studied the dependence of axial field and gradients in the transverse directions of the elliptical solenoid magnet with ellipticity of the aperture. Using the beam envelope equations we have studied the feasibility of using an elliptical solenoid for transverse beam matching to the acceptance of a spiral inflector. (author)

  18. RP delves underground

    CERN Document Server

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    The LHC’s winter technical stop is rapidly approaching. As in past years, technical staff in their thousands will be flocking to the underground areas of the LHC and the Linac2, Booster, PS and SPS injectors. To make sure they are protected from ionising radiation, members of the Radiation Protection Group will perform an assessment of the levels of radioactivity in the tunnels as soon as the beams have stopped.   Members of the Radiation Protection Group with their precision instruments that measure radioactivity. At 7-00 a.m. on 8 December the LHC and all of the upstream accelerators will begin their technical stop. At 7-30 a.m., members of the Radiation Protection Group will enter the tunnel to perform a radiation mapping, necessary so that the numerous teams can do their work in complete safety. “Before we proceed underground, we always check first to make sure that the readings from the induced radioactivity monitors installed in the tunnels are all normal,&rdqu...

  19. Multinational underground nuclear parks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, C.W. [Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS F650, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Giraud, K.M. [Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corporation, 1550 Oxen Lane NE, P.O. Box 411, Burlington, KS 66839-0411 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Newcomer countries expected to develop new nuclear power programs by 2030 are being encouraged by the International Atomic Energy Agency to explore the use of shared facilities for spent fuel storage and geologic disposal. Multinational underground nuclear parks (M-UNPs) are an option for sharing such facilities. Newcomer countries with suitable bedrock conditions could volunteer to host M-UNPs. M-UNPs would include back-end fuel cycle facilities, in open or closed fuel cycle configurations, with sufficient capacity to enable M-UNP host countries to provide for-fee waste management services to partner countries, and to manage waste from the M-UNP power reactors. M-UNP potential advantages include: the option for decades of spent fuel storage; fuel-cycle policy flexibility; increased proliferation resistance; high margin of physical security against attack; and high margin of containment capability in the event of beyond-design-basis accidents, thereby reducing the risk of Fukushima-like radiological contamination of surface lands. A hypothetical M-UNP in crystalline rock with facilities for small modular reactors, spent fuel storage, reprocessing, and geologic disposal is described using a room-and-pillar reference-design cavern. Underground construction cost is judged tractable through use of modern excavation technology and careful site selection. (authors)

  20. Going Underground in Singapore

    CERN Multimedia

    John Osborne (GS/SEM)

    2010-01-01

    Singapore has plans to build a massive Underground Science City (USC) housing R&D laboratories and IT data centres. A delegation involved in the planning to build the subterranean complex visited CERN on 18 October 2010 to learn from civil engineers and safety experts about how CERN plans and constructs its underground facilities.   The delegation from Singapore. The various bodies and corporations working on the USC project are currently studying the feasibility of constructing up to 40 caverns (60 m below ground) similar in size to an LHC experiment hall, in a similar type of rock. Civil engineering and geotechnical experts are calculating the maximum size of the cavern complex that can be safely built. The complex could one day accommodate between 3000 and 5000 workers on a daily basis, so typical issues of size and number of access shafts need to be carefully studied. At first glance, you might not think the LHC has much in common with the USC project; as Rolf Heuer pointed out: &ldq...

  1. CASPAR - Nuclear Astrophysics Underground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senarath, Chamaka; Caspar Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The CASPAR mainly focuses on Stellar Nucleosynthesis, its impact on the production of heavy elements and study the strength of stellar neutron sources that propels the s-process, 13C(α,n)16O and 22Ne(α,n)25Mg. Currently, implementation of a 1MV fully refurbished Van de Graaff accelerator that can provide a high intensity Î+/- beam, is being done at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF). The accelerator is built among a collaboration of South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, University of Notre Dame and Colorado School of Mines. It is understood that cosmic ray neutron background radiation hampers experimental Nucleosynthesis studies, hence the need to go underground in search for a neutron free environment, to study these reactions at low energies is evident. The first beam was produced in the middle of summer 2017. The entire accelerator will be run before the end of this year. A detailed overview of goals of CASPAR will be presented. NFS Grant-1615197.

  2. Underground storage tank program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.W.

    1994-01-01

    Underground storage tanks, UST'S, have become a major component of the Louisville District's Environmental Support Program. The District's Geotechnical and Environmental Engineering Branch has spear-headed an innovative effort to streamline the time, effort and expense for removal, replacement, upgrade and associated cleanup of USTs at military and civil work installations. This program, called Yank-A-Tank, creates generic state-wide contracts for removal, remediation, installation and upgrade of storage tanks for which individual delivery orders are written under the basic contract. The idea is to create a ''JOC type'' contract containing all the components of work necessary to remove, reinstall or upgrade an underground or above ground tank. The contract documents contain a set of generic specifications and unit price books in addition to the standard ''boiler plate'' information. Each contract requires conformance to the specific regulations for the state in which it is issued. The contractor's bid consists of a bid factor which in the multiplier used with the prices in the unit price book. The solicitation is issued as a Request for Proposal (RPP) which allows the government to select a contractor based on technical qualification an well as bid factor. Once the basic contract is awarded individual delivery orders addressing specific areas of work are scoped, negotiated and awarded an modifications to the original contract. The delivery orders utilize the prepriced components and the contractor's factor to determine the value of the work

  3. The arrangement of the seismic design method of the underground facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanai, Kenji; Horita, Masakuni; Dewa, Katsuyuki; Gouke, Mitsuo

    2002-03-01

    Earthquake resistance for the underground structure is higher than the ground structure. Therefore, the case of examining the earthquake resistance of underground structure was little. However, it carries out the research on the aseismic designing method of underground structure, since the tunnel was struck by Hyogo-ken Nanbu Earthquake, and it has obtained a much knowledge. However, an object of the most study was behavior at earthquake of the comparatively shallow underground structure in the alluvial plain board, and it not carry out the examination on behavior at earthquake of underground structure in the deep rock mass. In the meantime, underground disposal facility of the high level radioactive waste constructs in the deep underground, and it carries out the operation in these tunnels. In addition, it has made almost the general process of including from the construction start to the backfilling to be about 60 years (Japan Nuclear Fuel Cycle Development Institute, 1999). During these periods, it is necessary to also consider the earthquake resistance as underground structure from the viewpoint of the safety of facilities. Then, it extracted future problem as one of the improvement of the basis information for the decision of the safety standard and guideline of the country on earthquake-resistant design of the underground disposal facility, while it carried out investigation and arrangement of earthquake-resistant design cases, guidelines and analysis method on existing underground structure, etc. And, the research items for the earthquake resistance assessment of underground structure as case study of the underground research laboratory. (author)

  4. Design and fabrication of the PDX poloidal field solenoid utilizing fiberglass reinforced epoxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, K.S.C.

    1975-11-01

    This paper discusses the basic design of the Poloidal Field Solenoid Coil. It will be mainly concerned with the more unique features of the Solenoid such as the copper coil windings and the design of the epoxy-glass structural support mandrels. The center solenoid coil of the PDX machine consists of five different coil systems (OH No. 8, No. 9; NF No. 11; DF No. 7; EF Solenoid and CF No. 9). Three concentric fiberglass reinforced epoxy cylinders fabricated in-house will act as mandrels to support and to house the coils that will result as an integral unit

  5. Beam dynamics of the interaction region solenoid in a linear collider due to a crossing angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tenenbaum

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Future linear colliders may require a nonzero crossing angle between the two beams at the interaction point (IP. This requirement in turn implies that the beams will pass through the strong interaction region solenoid with an angle, and thus that the component of the solenoidal field perpendicular to the beam trajectory is nonzero. The interaction of the beam and the solenoidal field in the presence of a crossing angle will cause optical effects not observed for beams passing through the solenoid on axis; these effects include dispersion, deflection of the beam, and synchrotron radiation effects. For a purely solenoidal field, the optical effects which are relevant to luminosity exactly cancel at the IP when the influence of the solenoid’s fringe field is taken into account. Beam size growth due to synchrotron radiation in the solenoid is proportional to the fifth power of the product of the solenoidal field, the length of the solenoid, and the crossing angle. Examples based on proposed linear collider detector solenoid configurations are presented.

  6. Analysis of electromagnetic field of direct action solenoid valve with current changing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qianfeng; Bo Hanliang; Qin Benke

    2009-01-01

    Control rod hydraulic drive mechanism(CRHDM) is a newly invented patent of Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University. The direct action solenoid valve is the key part of this technology, so the performance of the solenoid valve directly affects the function of the CRHDM. With the current and the air gap changing,the electromagnetic field of the direct action solenoid valve was analyzed using the ANSYS software,which was validated by the experiment. The result shows that the electromagnetic force of the solenoid valve increases with the current increasing or the gap between the two armatures decreasing. Further more, the working current was confirmed. (authors)

  7. What caused the failures of the solenoid valve screws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassallo, T.P.; Mumford, J.R.; Hossain, F.

    2001-01-01

    At Seabrook Station on May 5,1998 following a lengthy purge of the pressurizer steam space through Containment isolation sample valve 1-RC-FV-2830, the UL status light associated with this solenoid valve did not come on when the valve was closed from the plant's main control board. The UL status light is used to confirm valve closure position to satisfy the plant's Technical Specification requirements. The incorrect valve position indication on the main control board was initially believed to have resulted from excessive heat from a failed voltage control module that did not reduce the voltage to the valve's solenoid coil. This conclusion was based on a similar event that occurred in November of 1996. Follow-up in-plant testing of the valve determined that the voltage control module had not failed and was functioning satisfactorily. Subsequent investigations determined the root cause of the event to be excessive heat-up of the valve caused by high process fluid temperature and an excessively long purge of the pressurizer. The excessive heat-up of the valve from the high temperature process fluid weakened the magnetic field strength of the valve stem magnet to the extent that the UL status light reed switch would not actuate when the valve was closed. Since the voltage control module was tested and found to be functioning properly it was not replaced. Only the UL status light reed switch was replaced with a more sensitive reed that would respond better to a reduced magnetic field strength that results from a hot magnet. During reed switch replacement, three terminal block screws in the valve housing were found fractured and three other terminal block screws fractured during determination of the electrical conductors. This paper describes the initial plant event and ensuing laboratory tests and examinations that were performed to determine the root cause of the failure of the terminal block screws from the Containment isolation sample solenoid valve. (author)

  8. Test Results for HINS Focusing Solenoids at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tartaglia, M.A.; Orris, D.F.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.C.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    A focusing lens R&D program is close to completion and industrial production of magnets has begun. Two types of magnets are being built for use in the room temperature RF section at the front end of a superconducting H-minus linac of a High Intensity Neutrino Source. All of the magnets are designed as a solenoid with bucking coils to cancel the field in the vicinity of adjacent RF cavities, and one type incorporates steering dipole corrector coils. We present a summary of the predicted and measured quench and magnetic properties for both R&D and production device samples that have been tested at Fermilab.

  9. A spectrometer using one or two superconducting coaxial solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schapira, J.P.; Gales, S.; Laurent, J.P.

    1979-06-01

    A set of two superconducting solenoidal coils which are presently under construction at the Orsay I.P.N. is described. Because of its optical properties, the system can be used as spectrometer: focusing properties with small geometrical aberrations allowing large solid angles to be used together with good transmission and isochronism. Various types of experiments can be envisaged with such a device: angular correlation at zero degree, study of rare events like exotic reactions, time of flight for mass identification and rapid (much less than 1 μs) and efficient collection of radioactive nuclei for subsequent spectroscopy measurements [fr

  10. The Mechanical Design Optimization of a High Field HTS Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalitha, SL; Gupta, RC

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the conceptual design optimization of a large aperture, high field (24 T at 4 K) solenoid for a 1.7 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage device. The magnet is designed to be built entirely of second generation (2G) high temperature superconductor tape with excellent electrical and mechanical properties at the cryogenic temperatures. The critical parameters that govern the magnet performance are examined in detail through a multiphysics approach using ANSYS software. The analysis results formed the basis for the performance specification as well as the construction of the magnet.

  11. An earthworm-like actuator using segmented solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Bu Hyun; Choi, Seung-Wook; Lee, Seung-Yop; Bang, Young-Bong

    2011-01-01

    A biomimetic actuator is developed using four segmented solenoids mimicking earthworm locomotion. The proposed actuator not only has a simple structure composed of cores and coils, but also enables bi-directional actuation and high speed locomotion regardless of friction conditions. We have implemented theoretical analysis to design the optimal profiles of input current signal for maximum speed and predict the output force and stroke. Experiments using a prototype show that the earthworm-like actuator travels with a speed above 60 mm s −1 regardless of friction conditions

  12. Structural analysis of a superconducting central solenoid for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, T.G.; Heim, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) concept design uses superconducting coils to accomplish magnetic confinement. The central solenoid (CS) magnet is divided vertically into 8 equal segments which are powered independently. The eddy current heating from the pulsed operation is too high for a case type construction; therefore, a open-quotes no caseclose quotes design has been chosen. This open-quotes no caseclose quotes design uses the conductor conduit as the primary structure and the electrical insulation as a structural adhesive. This electrical insulation is the open-quotes weak linkclose quotes in the coil winding pack structure and needs to be modeled in detail. A global finite element model with smeared winding pack properties was used to study the CS magnet structural behavior. The structural analysis results and peak stresses will be presented

  13. A 4.7 tesla metre solenoid for a partial Siberian snake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratner, L.; Leonhardt, W.; Otter, A.; Ellstrom, L.

    1993-11-01

    We describe the engineering design of a 4.7 T-m solenoid magnet which will be installed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS for a partial Siberian Snake Experiment which is an interlaboratory collaboration. The magnet has an overall length of 2.5 m, a clear bore of 15 cm and operates at a peak field of 2 T. It is pulsed at 3 second intervals with a peak current of 9500 A dc driven from a 150 V power supply. The construction uses conventional hollow copper coils but the return flux yokes are made from 1/8 inch plates bolted together. On assembly the flux yokes and endplates are clamped tightly to the coil to prevent any movement during the current pulse. The fabrication experience and test data will be presented. The magnet was installed in the summer of 1993. (author). 3 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  14. A 4.7 tesla metre solenoid for a partial Siberian snake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratner, L; Leonhardt, W [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Otter, A; Ellstrom, L

    1993-11-01

    We describe the engineering design of a 4.7 T-m solenoid magnet which will be installed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS for a partial Siberian Snake Experiment which is an interlaboratory collaboration. The magnet has an overall length of 2.5 m, a clear bore of 15 cm and operates at a peak field of 2 T. It is pulsed at 3 second intervals with a peak current of 9500 A dc driven from a 150 V power supply. The construction uses conventional hollow copper coils but the return flux yokes are made from 1/8 inch plates bolted together. On assembly the flux yokes and endplates are clamped tightly to the coil to prevent any movement during the current pulse. The fabrication experience and test data will be presented. The magnet was installed in the summer of 1993. (author). 3 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  15. The upgrade and re-validation of the Compact Muon Solenoid Electromagnetic Calorimeter Control System

    CERN Multimedia

    Holme, Oliver; Di Calafiori, Diogo; Dissertori, Günther; Djambazov, Lubomir; Jovanovic, Dragoslav; Lustermann, Werner; Zelepoukine, Serguei

    2013-01-01

    The Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) is one of the sub-detectors of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The Detector Control System (DCS) that has been developed and implemented for the CMS ECAL was deployed in accordance with the LHC schedule and has been supporting the CMS data-taking since LHC physics runs started in 2009. During these years, the control system has been regularly adapted according to operational experience and new requirements, always respecting the constraints imposed on significant changes to a running system. Several hardware and software upgrades and system extensions were therefore deferred to the first LHC Long Shutdown (LS1). This paper presents the main architectural differences between the system that supported the CMS ECAL during its first years and the new design for the coming physics runs after LS1. Details on the upgrade planning, including the certification methods performed in the CMS ECAL DCS laboratory facilities, repor...

  16. Improving Code Quality of the Compact Muon Solenoid Electromagnetic Calorimeter Control Software to Increase System Maintainability

    CERN Multimedia

    Holme, Oliver; Dissertori, Günther; Djambazov, Lubomir; Lustermann, Werner; Zelepoukine, Serguei

    2013-01-01

    The Detector Control System (DCS) software of the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN is designed primarily to enable safe and efficient operation of the detector during Large Hadron Collider (LHC) data-taking periods. Through a manual analysis of the code and the adoption of ConQAT [1], a software quality assessment toolkit, the CMS ECAL DCS team has made significant progress in reducing complexity and improving code quality, with observable results in terms of a reduction in the effort dedicated to software maintenance. This paper explains the methodology followed, including the motivation to adopt ConQAT, the specific details of how this toolkit was used and the outcomes that have been achieved. [1] ConQAT, Continuous Quality Assessment Toolkit; https://www.conqat.org/

  17. Regulating and Combating Underground Banking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgers, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    In combating and regulating underground banking, a choice can be made of roughly two models, the risk model and the assimilation model. The risk model comes down to a complete prohibition of underground banking combined with an active investigation and prosecution policy. In the assimilation model,

  18. Underground reactor containments: An option for the future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Kress, T.

    1997-01-01

    Changing world conditions and changing technologies suggest that serious consideration should be given to siting of nuclear power plants underground. Underground siting is not a new concept. Multiple research reactors, several weapons production reactors, and one power reactor have been built underground. What is new are the technologies and incentives that may now make underground siting a preferred option. The conditions and technologies, along with their implications, are discussed herein. Underground containments can be constructed in mined cavities or pits that are then backfilled with thick layers of rock and soil. Conventional above-ground containments resist assaults and accidents because of the strength of their construction materials and the effectiveness of their safety features that are engineered to reduce loads. However, underground containments can provide even more resistance to assaults and accidents because of the inertia of the mass of materials over the reactor. High-technology weapons or some internal accidents can cause existing strong-material containments to fail, but only very-high energy releases can move large inertial masses associated with underground containments. New methods of isolation may provide a higher confidence in isolation that is independent of operator action

  19. The underground economy in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Veronica LITRA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims at covering issues related to the underground economy, activities that compound this phenomenon, its magnitude in Romania and reported to the European average. Underground economy in Romania consists of undeclared work (2/3 from the total and unreported income; it decreased from 33.6% of GDP in 2003 to 28% in 2014, but remained over EU-28 average with about 10 p.p. Among EU-28 countries, only Bulgaria exceeds the size of the underground economy of Romania. The underground economy is a challenge for the leadership of the state which must act simultaneously to stop illegal activities, and to discourage non-declaration of the legal activities. Corruption favours maintaining the underground economy, delays economic development, obstructs democratic processes and affects justice and the law state.

  20. Underground risk management information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuyama, S.; Inoue, M.; Sakai, T.

    2006-03-15

    JCOAL has conducted Joint Research on an Underground Communication and Risk Management Information System with CSIRO of Australia under a commissioned study project for the promotion of coal use starting in fiscal 2002. The goal of this research project is the establishment of a new Safety System focusing on the comprehensive risk management information system by the name of Nexsys. The main components of the system are the Ethernet type underground communication system that represents the data communication base, and the risk management information system that permits risk analysis in real-time and provides decision support based on the collected data. The Nexsys is an open system and is a core element of the underground monitoring system. Using a vast amount of underground data, it is capable of accommodating a wide range of functions that were not available in the past. Because of it, it is possible to construct an advanced underground safety system. 14 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Underground transmission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geibka, C.

    1990-01-01

    Several underground tomographic transmission surveys have been carried out. Targets were cavities, ore veins and fault zones. Examples from measurements in a german heavy/fluor spar mine a lead/zinc mine and a rock laboratory of the Swiss National Cooperative for the Storage of Radioactive waste are presented. Measurements were carried out between boreholes and road ways. The recording equipment was the intrinsically safe SEAMEX85 system built and sold by WBK. Receivers were mounted in a chain of 6 two-component probes. Sources were an inhole hammer a sledge hammer a sparker and explosives from a single detonator to 180 g depending on the distance and absorption of the rock material. Cavities showed very distinct velocity reductions between 30 and 50%. Different vein material showed velocity reduction as well as velocity increase relative to the surrounding rock

  2. Underground layout tradeoff study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the results of a technical and economic comparative study of four alternative underground layouts for a nuclear waste geologic repository in salt. The four alternatives considered in this study are (1) separate areas for spent fuel (SF) and commercial high-level waste (CHLW); (2) panel alternation, in which SF and CHLW are emplaced in adjacent panels of rooms; (3) room alternation, in which SF and CHLW are emplaced in adjacent rooms within each panel; and (4) intimate mixture, in which SF and CHLW are emplaced in random order within each storage room. The study concludes that (1) cost is not an important factor; (2) the separate-areas and intimate-mixture alternatives appear, technically, to be more desirable than the other alternatives; and (3) the selection between the separate-areas and intimate mixture alternatives depends upon future resolution of site-specific and reprocessing questions. 5 refs., 6 figs., 12 tabs

  3. Underground space planning in Helsinki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilkka Vähäaho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives insight into the use of underground space in Helsinki, Finland. The city has an underground master plan (UMP for its whole municipal area, not only for certain parts of the city. Further, the decision-making history of the UMP is described step-by-step. Some examples of underground space use in other cities are also given. The focus of this paper is on the sustainability issues related to urban underground space use, including its contribution to an environmentally sustainable and aesthetically acceptable landscape, anticipated structural longevity and maintaining the opportunity for urban development by future generations. Underground planning enhances overall safety and economy efficiency. The need for underground space use in city areas has grown rapidly since the 21st century; at the same time, the necessity to control construction work has also increased. The UMP of Helsinki reserves designated space for public and private utilities in various underground areas of bedrock over the long term. The plan also provides the framework for managing and controlling the city's underground construction work and allows suitable locations to be allocated for underground facilities. Tampere, the third most populated city in Finland and the biggest inland city in the Nordic countries, is also a good example of a city that is taking steps to utilise underground resources. Oulu, the capital city of northern Finland, has also started to ‘go underground’. An example of the possibility to combine two cities by an 80-km subsea tunnel is also discussed. A new fixed link would generate huge potential for the capital areas of Finland and Estonia to become a real Helsinki-Tallinn twin city.

  4. Analysis of an adjustable field permanent magnet solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris-Mog, T.; Burns, M.; Chavez, A.; Schillig, J.

    2017-10-01

    A feasibility study has been performed on an adjustable-field permanent magnet (PM) solenoid concept in an effort to reduce the dependence that linear induction accelerators have on large direct current power supplies and associated cooling systems. The concept relies on the ability to reorient sections of the PMs and thus redirect their magnetization vector to either add to or subtract from the on-axis magnetic field. This study concentrated on the focal strengths and emittance growths for two different designs, both with 19 cm bore diameters extending 53 cm in length. The first design is expected to produce peak magnetic fields ranging from 260 to 900 G (0.026 to 0.09 T) while the second design is expected to produce peak magnetic fields ranging from 580 to 2100 G (0.058 to 0.21 T). Although the PM configuration generates a variable magnetic field and the torques acting on PMs within the assembly appear manageable, the emittance growth is larger than that of a DC solenoid.

  5. Laser heated solenoid as a neutron source facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Rose, P.H.

    1975-01-01

    Conceptual designs are presented for a radiation test facility based on a laser heated plasma confined in a straight solenoid. The thin plasma column, a few meters in length and less than a centimeter in diameter, serves as a line source of neutrons. Test samples are located within or just behind the plasma tube, at a radius of 1-2 cm from the axis. The plasma is heated by an axially-directed powerful long-wavelength laser beam. The plasma is confined radially in the intense magnetic field supplied by a pulsed solenoid surrounding the plasma tube. The facility is pulsed many times a second to achieve a high time-averaged neutron flux on the test samples. Based on component performance achievable in the near term (e.g., magnetic field, laser pulse energy) and assuming classical physical processes, it appears that average fluxes of 10 13 to 10 14 neutrons/cm 2 -sec can be achieved in such a device. The most severe technical problems in such a facility appear to be rapid pulsing design and lifetime of some electrical and laser components

  6. The Sanford Underground Research Facility at Homestake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heise, J.

    2015-01-01

    The former Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota, has been transformed into a dedicated facility to pursue underground research in rare-process physics, as well as offering research opportunities in other disciplines such as biology, geology and engineering. A key component of the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) is the Davis Campus, which is in operation at the 4850-foot level (4300 m.w.e.) and currently hosts two main physics projects: the LUX dark matter experiment and the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment. In addition, two low-background counters currently operate at the Davis Campus in support of current and future experiments. Expansion of the underground laboratory space is underway at the 4850L Ross Campus in order to maintain and enhance low-background assay capabilities as well as to host a unique nuclear astrophysics accelerator facility. Plans to accommodate other future experiments at SURF are also underway and include the next generation of direct-search dark matter experiments and the Fermilab-led international long-baseline neutrino program. Planning to understand the infrastructure developments necessary to accommodate these future projects is well advanced and in some cases have already started. SURF is a dedicated research facility with significant expansion capability

  7. The Sanford Underground Research Facility at Homestake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heise, J

    2015-01-01

    The former Homestakegold mine in Lead, South Dakota has been transformed into a dedicated facility to pursue underground research in rare-process physics, as well as offering research opportunities in other disciplines such as biology, geology and engineering. A key component of the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) is the Davis Campus, which is in operation at the 4850-foot level (4300 m.w.e.) and currently hosts two main physics projects: the LUX dark matter experiment and the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR neutrinolessdouble-beta decay experiment. In addition, two low-background counters currently operate at the Davis Campus in support of current and future experiments. Expansion of the underground laboratory space is underway at the 4850L Ross Campus in order to maintain and enhance low- background assay capabilities as well as to host a unique nuclear astrophysics accelerator facility. Plans to accommodate other future experiments at SURF are also underway and include the next generation of direct-search dark matter experiments and the Fermilab-led international long- baseline neutrino program. Planning to understand the infrastructure developments necessary to accommodate these future projects is well advanced and in some cases have already started. SURF is a dedicated research facility with significant expansion capability. (paper)

  8. The Sanford underground research facility at Homestake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heise, J.

    2014-01-01

    The former Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota is being transformed into a dedicated laboratory to pursue underground research in rare-process physics, as well as offering research opportunities in other disciplines such as biology, geology and engineering. A key component of the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) is the Davis Campus, which is in operation at the 4850-foot level (4300 m.w.e) and currently hosts three projects: the LUX dark matter experiment, the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment and the CUBED low-background counter. Plans for possible future experiments at SURF are well underway and include long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments, future dark matter experiments as well as nuclear astrophysics accelerators. Facility upgrades to accommodate some of these future projects have already started. SURF is a dedicated facility with significant expansion capability

  9. Underground storage of natural gas and LPG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Symposium attended by over 200 participants from 23 member countries of the Economic Commission for Europe (ECE), representatives from Australia, Iraq, Israel, Kuwait as well as from 5 international organizations, provided an opportunity for existing and prospective gas markets in the ECE region to exchange experience and information on current trends and developments in natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas underground storage, especially in technical and regulatory matters, including economic, market and social considerations, that influence the planning, development and operations of gas storage facilities. Environmental and safety factors associated with such operations were also examined. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the presented papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  10. Derivation of magnetic Coulomb's law for thin, semi-infinite solenoids

    OpenAIRE

    Kitano, Masao

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that the magnetic force between thin, semi-infinite solenoids obeys a Coulomb-type law, which corresponds to that for magnetic monopoles placed at the end points of each solenoid. We derive the magnetic Coulomb law from the basic principles of electromagnetism, namely from the Maxwell equations and the Lorentz force.

  11. Plasma heating in a long solenoid by a laser or a relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.

    1975-01-01

    Advances in the technology of a large energy laser and/or relativistic electron beam (REB) generator have made it possible to seriously consider a long solenoid reactor concept. This concept has been reviewed. The physical problems in the plasma heating of the long solenoid by a laser or a REB are studied

  12. Design, construction and initial state of the underground openings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-12-15

    The report is included in a set of Production reports, presenting how the KBS-3 repository is designed, produced and inspected. The set of reports is included in the safety report for the KBS-3 repository and repository facility. The report provides input on the initial state of the underground openings for the assessment of the long-term safety, SR-Site. The initial state refers to the properties of the underground openings at final disposal, backfilling or closure. In addition, the report provides input to the operational safety report, SR-Operation, on how the underground openings shall be constructed and inspected. The report presents the design premises and the methodology applied to design the underground openings and adapt them the to the site conditions so that they conform to the design premises. It presents the reference design at Forsmark and its conformity to the design premises. It also describes the reference methods to be applied to construct and inspect the different kinds of underground openings. Finally, the initial state of the underground openings and its conformity to the design premises is presented

  13. Design, construction and initial state of the underground openings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-12-01

    The report is included in a set of Production reports, presenting how the KBS-3 repository is designed, produced and inspected. The set of reports is included in the safety report for the KBS-3 repository and repository facility. The report provides input on the initial state of the underground openings for the assessment of the long-term safety, SR-Site. The initial state refers to the properties of the underground openings at final disposal, backfilling or closure. In addition, the report provides input to the operational safety report, SR-Operation, on how the underground openings shall be constructed and inspected. The report presents the design premises and the methodology applied to design the underground openings and adapt them the to the site conditions so that they conform to the design premises. It presents the reference design at Forsmark and its conformity to the design premises. It also describes the reference methods to be applied to construct and inspect the different kinds of underground openings. Finally, the initial state of the underground openings and its conformity to the design premises is presented

  14. SAFE AND FAST QUENCH RECOVERY OF LARGE SUPERCONDUCTING SOLENOIDS COOLED BY FORCED TWO-PHASE HELIUM FLOW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, L.X.

    1999-01-01

    The cryogenic characteristics in energy extraction of the four fifteen-meter-diameter superconducting solenoids of the g-2 magnet are reported in this paper. The energy extraction tests at full-current and half-current of its operating value were deliberately carried out for the quench analyses and evaluation of the cryogenic system. The temperature profiles of each coil mandrel and pressure profiles in its helium cooling tube during the energy extraction are discussed. The low peak temperature and pressure as well as the short recovery time indicated the desirable characteristics of the cryogenic system

  15. A large superconducting thin solenoid for the STAR experiment at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1992-06-01

    This Report describes the 4.4 meter, warm bore diameter, thin superconducting solenoid, for the proposed STAR experiment at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The STAR solenoid will generate a very uniform central magnetic induction of 0.5 T within a space which is 4.0 meters in diameter by 4.2 meters long. The solenoid and its cryostat will be 0.7 radiation lengths thick over a length of 5.45 meters, about the center of the magnet making it the largest solenoid less than one radiation length to be built. This report describes a proposed design for the solenoid and cryostat, its flux return iron, its cryogenic system and its power supply and quench protection system

  16. Detector solenoid compensation in the PEP-II B-Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosochkov, Y.; Cai, Y.; Irwin, J.; Sullivan, M.

    1995-01-01

    The PEP-II experimental detector includes a strong 1.5 T solenoid field in the interaction region (IR). With the fringe fields, the solenoid extends over a range of 6 m. Additional complications are that (1) it is displaced longitudinally from the interaction point (IP) by about 40 cm, (2) neither beam is parallel to the solenoid axis, and (3) the solenoid overlaps a dipole and a quadrupole on either side of the IP. In each half IR the correction system includes a set of skew quadrupoles, dipole correctors and normal quadrupoles to independently compensate the coupling, orbit perturbation, dispersion and focusing effect produced by the solenoid. The correction schemes for the Low Energy Ring (LER) and for the High Energy Ring (HER) are described, and the impact on the dynamic aperture is evaluated

  17. Silicon subsystem mechanical engineering closeout report for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, J.; Christensen, R.W.; Hayman, G.; Jones, D.C.; Ross, R.; Wilds, W.; Yeamans, S.; Ziock, H.J.

    1995-01-01

    The authors group at Los Alamos National Laboratory was responsible for the mechanical engineering of the silicon tracking system of the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) experiment of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project. The responsibility included the overall design of the system from the mechanical point of view, development and integration of the cooling system, which was required to remove the heat generated by the front-end electronics, assembly of the system to extremely tight tolerances, and verification that the construction and operational stability and alignment tolerances would be met. A detailed description of the concepts they developed and the work they performed can be found in a report titled ''Silicon Subsystem Mechanical Engineering Work for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration'' which they submitted to the SSC Laboratory. In addition to the mechanical engineering work, they also performed activation, background, and shielding studies for the SSC program. Much of the work they performed was potentially useful for other future high energy physics (HEP) projects. This report describes the closeout work that was performed for the Los Alamos SDC project. Four major tasks were identified for completion: (1) integration of the semi-automated assembly station being developed and construction of a precision part to demonstrate solutions to important general assembly problems (the station was designed to build precision silicon tracker subassemblies); (2) build a state-of-the-art TV holography (TVH) system to use for detector assembly stability tests; (3) design, build, and test a water based cooling system for a full silicon shell prototype; and (4) complete and document the activation, background, and shielding studies, which is covered in a separate report

  18. Silicon subsystem mechanical engineering closeout report for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanlon, J.; Christensen, R.W.; Hayman, G.; Jones, D.C.; Ross, R.; Wilds, W.; Yeamans, S.; Ziock, H.J.

    1995-02-01

    The authors group at Los Alamos National Laboratory was responsible for the mechanical engineering of the silicon tracking system of the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) experiment of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project. The responsibility included the overall design of the system from the mechanical point of view, development and integration of the cooling system, which was required to remove the heat generated by the front-end electronics, assembly of the system to extremely tight tolerances, and verification that the construction and operational stability and alignment tolerances would be met. A detailed description of the concepts they developed and the work they performed can be found in a report titled ``Silicon Subsystem Mechanical Engineering Work for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration`` which they submitted to the SSC Laboratory. In addition to the mechanical engineering work, they also performed activation, background, and shielding studies for the SSC program. Much of the work they performed was potentially useful for other future high energy physics (HEP) projects. This report describes the closeout work that was performed for the Los Alamos SDC project. Four major tasks were identified for completion: (1) integration of the semi-automated assembly station being developed and construction of a precision part to demonstrate solutions to important general assembly problems (the station was designed to build precision silicon tracker subassemblies); (2) build a state-of-the-art TV holography (TVH) system to use for detector assembly stability tests; (3) design, build, and test a water based cooling system for a full silicon shell prototype; and (4) complete and document the activation, background, and shielding studies, which is covered in a separate report.

  19. Design study of underground facility of the Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hibiya, Keisuke; Akiyoshi, Kenji; Ishizuka, Mineo; Anezaki, Susumu

    1998-03-01

    Geoscientific research program to study deep geological environment has been performed by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC). This research is supported by 'Long-Term Program for Research, Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy'. An Underground Research Laboratory is planned to be constructed at Shoma-sama Hora in the research area belonging to PNC. A wide range of geoscientific research and development activities which have been previously studied at the Tono Area is planned in the laboratory. The Underground Research Laboratory is consisted of Surface Laboratory and Underground Research Facility located from the surface down to depth between several hundreds and 1,000 meters. Based on the results of design study in last year, the design study performed in this year is to investigate the followings in advance of studies for basic design and practical design: concept, design procedure, design flow and total layout. As a study for the concept of the underground facility, items required for the facility are investigated and factors to design the primary form of the underground facility are extracted. Continuously, design methods for the vault and the underground facility are summarized. Furthermore, design procedures of the extracted factors are summarized and total layout is studied considering the results to be obtained from the laboratory. (author)

  20. Dynamic underground stripping demonstration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newmark, R.L.

    1992-04-01

    LLNL is collaborating with the UC Berkeley College of Engineering to develop and demonstrate a system of thermal remediation techniques for rapid cleanup of localized underground spills. Called dynamic stripping to reflect the rapid and controllable nature of the process, it will combine steam injection, direct electrical heating, and tomographic geophysical imaging in a cleanup of the LLNL gasoline spill. In the first eight months of the project, a Clean Site engineering test was conducted to prove the field application of the techniques. Tests then began on the contaminated site in FY 1992. This report describes the work at the Clean Site, including design and performance criteria, test results, interpretations, and conclusions. We fielded 'a wide range of new designs and techniques, some successful and some not. In this document, we focus on results and performance, lessons learned, and design and operational changes recommended for work at the contaminated site. Each section focuses on a different aspect of the work and can be considered a self-contained contribution

  1. Underground Facilities, Technological Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Spooner, N

    2010-01-01

    This report gives a summary overview of the status of international under- ground facilities, in particular as relevant to long-baseline neutrino physics and neutrino astrophysics. The emphasis is on the technical feasibility aspects of creating the large underground infrastructures that will be needed in the fu- ture to house the necessary detectors of 100 kton to 1000 kton scale. There is great potential in Europe to build such a facility, both from the technical point of view and because Europe has a large concentration of the necessary engi- neering and geophysics expertise. The new LAGUNA collaboration has made rapid progress in determining the feasibility for a European site for such a large detector. It is becoming clear in fact that several locations are technically fea- sible in Europe. Combining this with the possibility of a new neutrino beam from CERN suggests a great opportunity for Europe to become the leading centre of neutrino studies, combining both neutrino astrophysics and neutrino beam stu...

  2. Radiometric surveys in underground environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochiolo, Massimo; Chiozzi, Paolo; Verdoya, Massimo; Pasquale, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    Due to their ability to travel through the air for several metres, gamma-rays emitted from natural radioactive elements can be successfully used in surveys carried out both with airborne and ground equipments. Besides the concentration of the radio-elements contained in rocks and soils and the intrinsic characteristics of the gamma-ray detector, the detected count rate depends on the solid angle around the spectrometer. On a flat outcrop, ground spectrometry detects the radiation ideally produced by a cylindrical mass of rock of about two metres in diameter and thickness of about half a meter. Under these geometrical conditions, the natural radioactivity can be easily evaluated. With operating conditions different from the standard ones, such as at the edge of an escarpment, the count rate halves because of the missing material, whereas in the vicinity of a rock wall the count rate will increase. In underground environment, the recorded count rate may even double and the in situ assessment of the concentration of radio-elements may be rather difficult, even if the ratios between the different radio-elements may not be affected. We tested the applicability of gamma-ray spectrometry for rapid assessment of the potential hazard levels related to radon and radiation dose rate in underground environment. A mine shaft, located in a zone of uranium enrichment in Liguria (Italy), has been investigated. A preliminary ground radiometric survey was carried out to define the extent of the ore deposit. Then, the radiometric investigation was focussed on the mine shaft. Due to rock mass above the shaft vault, the background gamma radiation can be considered of negligible influence on measurements. In underground surveys, besides deviations from a flat geometry, factors controlling radon exhalation, emanation and stagnation, such as fractures, water leakage and the presence of ventilation, should be carefully examined. We attempted to evaluate these control factors and collected

  3. Underground storage of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, D.N.

    1977-01-01

    An introductory survey of the underground disposal of radioactive wastes is given. Attention is paid to various types of radioactive wastes varying from low to highly active materials, as well as mining techniques and salt deposits

  4. Performance of Nb3Sn multifilamentary superconductors in solenoidal magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampson, W.B.; Suenaga, M.; Robins, K.E.

    High current Nb 3 Sn multifilamentary conductors have been formed by heat treating cables braided from three types of composite wire. In the simplest configuration, these wires contain niobium filaments in a pure copper matrix. After braiding the conductor is coated with a layer of tin which diffuses through the copper during heat treatment to form Nb 3 S n filaments. The second configuration is made from wires containing niobium filaments in a copper-tin alloy and requires only heat treatment to form the Nb 3 Sn filaments. The third type of braid has wires which consist of groups of niobium filaments in the bronze matrix which are in turn in a copper matrix. Tantalum barriers surround each group of filaments to prevent the tin from contaminating the pure copper matrix. The cables have been wound into solenoids after heat treatment and the effect of mechanical handling was studied by monitoring the resistive voltage distribution in the coils. (U.S.)

  5. submitter Starting Manufacture of the ITER Central Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Libeyre, P; Dolgetta, N; Gaxiola, E; Jong, C; Lyraud, C; Mitchell, N; Journeaux, J Y; Vollmann, T; Evans, D; Sgobba, S; Langeslag, S; Reiersen, W; Martovetsky, N; Everitt, D; Hatfield, D; Rosenblad, P; Litherland, S; Freudenberg, K; Myatt, L; Smith, J; Brazelton, C; Abbott, R; Daubert, J; Rackers, K; Nentwich, T

    2016-01-01

    The central solenoid (CS) is a key component of the ITER magnet system to provide the magnetic flux swing required to drive induced plasma current up to 15 MA. The manufacture of its different subcomponents has now started, following completion of the design analyses and achievement of the qualification of the manufacturing procedures. A comprehensive set of analyses has been produced to demonstrate that the CS final design meets all requirements. This includes in particular structural analyses carried out with different finite-element models and addressing normal and fault conditions. Following the Final Design Review, held in November 2013, and the subsequent design modifications, the analyses were updated for consistency with the final design details and provide evidence that the Magnet Structural Design Criteria are fully met. Before starting any manufacturing activity of a CS component, a corresponding dedicated qualification program has been carried out. This includes manufacture of mockups using the re...

  6. Testing of the superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab collider detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast, R.W.; Holmes, C.N.; Kephart, R.D.

    1985-07-01

    The 3 m phi x 5 m long x 1.5 T superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab Collider Detector has been installed at Fermilab and was tested in early 1985 with a dedicated refrigeration system. The refrigerator and 5.6-Mg magnet cold mass were cooled to 5 K in 210 hours. After testing at low currents, the magnet was charged to the design current of 5 kA in 5-MJ steps. During a 390 A/min charge a spontaneous quench occurred at 4.5 kA due to insufficient liquid helium flow. Three other quenches occurred during ''slow'' discharges which were nevertheless fast enough to cause high eddy current heating in the outer support cylinder. Quench behavior is well understood and the magnet is now quite reliable

  7. Start-up of spherical tokamak without a center solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Takashi; Nagata, Masayoshi

    2012-01-01

    For low-aspect tokamak reactors, spherical tokamak reactors, ST-type FESF/CTFs, it is essential to remove or minimize a central solenoid (CS). Even with the minimized CS, non-inductive start up of the plasma current is required. Rapid increase in the spontaneous plasma current at the final stage of current start-up drives ignition. At the initial stage, formation of plasma and magnetic surfaces are required. As non-inductive plasma start-up scenarios, ECH/ECCD, LHCD, HHFW, DC HELICITY injection, plasma merging and NBI have been studied. In the present article, the present status and future prospect of experimental and theoretical works on these subjects. (author)

  8. Design of the pancake-winding central solenoid coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Nishi, Masataka; Tsuji, Hirosi

    1995-01-01

    There was a debate over whether a pancake-winding or layer-winding technique is more appropriate for the Central Solenoid (CS) coil for ITER superconducting magnet. The layer-winding CS has the advantage of homogeneous winding supporting the TF centering force without weak joints, but has many difficulties during manufacturing and quality control. On other hand, the pancake-winding has the advantage of better quality control during manufacturing and module testing but has difficulties with joints and feeders, and pipes located in the load path of the bucking force from the toroidal field coils. The compact joints, reinforcement by preformed amour, sharp bending, and double seals are applied to the design of pancake-winding CS coil and demonstrated by hardware developments. The pancake-winding CS coil by using modified existing technology is compatible with the bucking concept of the ITER magnet system. (author)

  9. Conceptual fusion reactor designs based on the laser heat solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of the laser heated solenoid (LHS) as an approach to fusion and fusion-fission commercial power generation has been examined. The LHS concept is based on magnetic confinement of a long slender plasma column which is partly heated by the axially directed beam from a powerful long wavelength laser. As a pure fusion concept, the LHS configurations studied so far are characterized by fairly difficult engineering constraints, particularly on the magnet, a large laser, and a marginally acceptable system energy balance. As a fusion-fission system, however, the LHS is capable of a very attractive energy balance, has much more relaxed engineering constraints, requires a relatively modest laser, and as such holds great potential as a power generator and fissile fuel breeding scheme

  10. Fusion--fission hybrid reactors based on the laser solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Taussig, R.T.; Quimby, D.C.

    1976-01-01

    Fusion-fission reactors, based on the laser solenoid concept, can be much smaller in scale than their pure fusion counterparts, with moderate first-wall loading and rapid breeding capabilities (1 to 3 tonnes/yr), and can be designed successfully on the basis of classical plasma transport properties and free-streaming end-loss. Preliminary design information is presented for such systems, including the first wall, pulse coil, blanket, superconductors, laser optics, and power supplies, accounting for the desired reactor performance and other physics and engineering constraints. Self-consistent point designs for first and second generation reactors are discussed which illustrate the reactor size, performance, component parameters, and the level of technological development required

  11. Underground treatment of combustible minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarapuu, E

    1954-10-14

    A process is described for treating oil underground, consisting in introducing several electrodes spaced one from the other in a bed of combustibles underground so that they come in electric contact with this bed of combustibles remaining insulated from the ground, and applying to the electrodes a voltage sufficient to produce an electric current across the bed of combustibles, so as to heat it and create an electric connection between the electrodes on traversing the bed of combustibles.

  12. Numerical analysis of modified Central Solenoid insert design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodak, Andrei, E-mail: akhodak@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Martovetsky, Nicolai; Smirnov, Aleksandre [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Titus, Peter [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Modified design of coil for testing ITER superconducting cable is presented. • Numerical analysis allowed design verification. • Three-dimensional current sharing temperature distributions are obtained from the results. - Abstract: The United States ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for fabrication of the Central Solenoid (CS) for ITER project. The ITER machine is currently under construction by seven parties in Cadarache, France. The CS Insert (CSI) project should provide a verification of the conductor performance in relevant conditions of temperature, field, currents and mechanical strain. The US IPO designed the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at JAEA, Naka. To validate the modified design three-dimensional numerical simulations were performed using coupled solver for simultaneous structural, thermal and electromagnetic analysis. Thermal and electromagnetic simulations supported structural calculations providing necessary loads and strains. According to current analysis design of the modified coil satisfies ITER magnet structural design criteria for the following conditions: (1) room temperature, no current, (2) temperature 4 K, no current, (3) temperature 4 K, current 60 kA direct charge, and (4) temperature 4 K, current 60 kA reverse charge. Fatigue life assessment analysis is performed for the alternating conditions of: temperature 4 K, no current, and temperature 4 K, current 45 kA direct charge. Results of fatigue analysis show that parts of the coil assembly can be qualified for up to 1 million cycles. Distributions of the Current Sharing Temperature (TCS) in the superconductor were obtained from numerical results using parameterization of the critical surface in the form similar to that proposed for ITER. Special ADPL scripts were developed for ANSYS allowing one-dimensional representation of TCS along the cable, as well as three-dimensional fields of TCS in superconductor

  13. [The Research Advancement and Conception of the Deep-underground Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, He-Ping; Liu, Ji-Feng; Gao, Ming-Zhong; Wan, Xue-Hong; Liu, Shi-Xi; Zou, Jian; Wu, Jiang; Ma, Teng-Fei; Liu, Yi-Lin; Bu, Hong; Li, Wei-Min

    2018-03-01

    The 21th century is the century of exploring and utilizing the underground space. In the future, more and more people will spend more and more time living or/and working in the underground space. However,we know little about the effect on the health of human caused by the underground environment. Herein,we systematically put forward the strategic conception of the deep-underground medicine,in order to reveal relative effects and mechanism of the potential factors in the deep underground space on human's physiological and psychological healthy,and to work out the corresponding countermeasures. The original deep-underground medicine includes the following items. ①To model different depth of underground environment according to various parameters (such as temperature,radiation,air pressure, rock,microorganism), and to explore their quantitative character and effects on human health and mechanism. ② To study the psychological change, maintenance of homeostasis and biothythm of organism in the deep underground space. ③ To learn the association between psychological healthy of human and the depth, structure, physical environment and working time of underground space. ④ To investigate the effect of different terrane and lithology on healthy of human and to deliberate their contribution on organism growth. ⑤ To research the character and their mechanism of growth,metabolism,exchange of energy,response of growth, aging and adaptation of cells living in deep underground space. ⑥ To explore the physiological feature,growth of microbiome and it's interaction with host in the deep underground space. ⑦ To develop deep-underground simulation space, the biologically medical technology and equipments. As a research basis,a deep-underground medical lab under a rock thickness of about 1 470 m has been built,which aims to operate the research of the effect on living organism caused by different depth of underground environment. Copyright© by Editorial Board of Journal

  14. Potential Advantages of Underground Nuclear Parks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Carl W.; Elkins, Ned Z.; Kunze, Jay F.; Mahar, James M.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we argue that an underground nuclear park (UNP) could potentially lead to lower capital and operating cost for the reactors installed in the UNP compared to the traditional approach, which would be to site the reactors at the earth's surface at distributed locations. The UNP approach could also lead to lower waste management cost. A secondary benefit would be the increased margins of safety and security that would be realized simply as a consequence of siting the reactors underground. Lowered capital and operating cost for a UNP relative to traditional reactor siting is possible through the aggregate effect of the elimination of containment structures, in-place decommissioning, reduced physical security costs, reduced weather-related costs, reduced cost of liability insurance and reduced unit-cost for the nth reactor made possible through the continuous construction of multiple reactors at the same underground location. Other cost reductions might be possible through the transfer of the capital cost for part of the underground construction from the reactor owners to the owners of the UNP. Lower waste management cost is possible by siting the UNP at a location where there are geological and hydrological conditions suitable for hosting both the reactors and the repository for the waste from those reactors. After adequate storage and cooling, and assuming direct disposal, this would enable the spent fuel from the reactors to be transported directly to the repository and remain entirely underground during the transport process. Community concerns and transportation costs would be significantly reduced relative to current situations where the reactors are separated from the repository by long distances and populated areas. The concept for a UNP in bedded salt is used to develop a rough order of magnitude cost estimate for excavation of the reactor array portion of a UNP. Excavation costs appear to be only a small fraction of the overall power plant costs

  15. Proximity detection system underground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denis Kent [Mine Site Technologies (Australia)

    2008-04-15

    Mine Site Technologies (MST) with the support ACARP and Xstrata Coal NSW, as well as assistance from Centennial Coal, has developed a Proximity Detection System to proof of concept stage as per plan. The basic aim of the project was to develop a system to reduce the risk of the people coming into contact with vehicles in an uncontrolled manner (i.e. being 'run over'). The potential to extend the developed technology into other areas, such as controls for vehicle-vehicle collisions and restricting access of vehicle or people into certain zones (e.g. non FLP vehicles into Hazardous Zones/ERZ) was also assessed. The project leveraged off MST's existing Intellectual Property and experience gained with our ImPact TRACKER tagging technology, allowing the development to be fast tracked. The basic concept developed uses active RFID Tags worn by miners underground to be detected by vehicle mounted Readers. These Readers in turn provide outputs that can be used to alert a driver (e.g. by light and/or audible alarm) that a person (Tag) approaching within their vicinity. The prototype/test kit developed proved the concept and technology, the four main components being: Active RFID Tags to send out signals for detection by vehicle mounted receivers; Receiver electronics to detect RFID Tags approaching within the vicinity of the unit to create a long range detection system (60 m to 120 m); A transmitting/exciter device to enable inner detection zone (within 5 m to 20 m); and A software/hardware device to process & log incoming Tags reads and create certain outputs. Tests undertaken in the laboratory and at a number of mine sites, confirmed the technology path taken could form the basis of a reliable Proximity Detection/Alert System.

  16. Study of a microstrip gas detector for the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment; Etude d`un detecteur a micropistes pour l`experience Compact Muon Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clergeau, J F [Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire

    1997-06-19

    The micro-strip gas chambers (MSGC) were realized due to the technological advances in the field of micro-electronics. The wire of usual gas counters is replaced in these detectors by metallic stripes as a periodic sequence of electrodes (anodes and cathodes) spaced by around 200 {mu}m. At a distance of 3 mm above the strip containing substrate, a metallic plane is placed, thus defining the gaseous room where the passage of a charged particle produces by ionization a primary electron signal collected by the detector anodes. Due to its granularity a MSGC can operate under very high particle fluxes since charge can be collected very rapidly. Also, the impact parameters can be determined with high accuracy due to the high space and time resolutions. The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) or the MSGC detectors planned to equip one of the experiments proposed for LHC should detect, in extreme operational conditions, the particle impacts in a 4 Tesla magnetic field, for around ten years and for a particle flux of around 10{sup 4} Hz/mm{sup 2}. The CMS detector is described in chapter 2. The operation principle and the problems encountered in the development of MSGC detectors are summarized in chapter 3. The chapter 4 is dedicated to the study of the performances of MSGCs in magnetic fields. In the chapters 5 to 7 the processing of the signal from detectors of this type is described, particularly, the performances of various ways of treat the signal in terms of detection efficiency and counting loads are presented.The chapter 8 presents the results obtained with the prototype obtained at IPNL while the chapter 9 gives the conclusions of the performed works. (author) 55 refs.

  17. THE INFLUENCE OF INSTITUTIONAL STRATEGIES ON THE UNDERGROUND ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciprian Tudurachi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The fight against shadow economy must be addressed not only as a permanent concern of economic analysts and decision-makers, but rather as a problematic ethical-moral nature affecting economic and interpersonal relations, as strategic and operational object. The authors attempt outline an institutional management strategy geared towards underground economy combating has as objective the strands establishment without having exhaustiveness claim. We make a case for extending the implementation of a coherent program, strategic and operational, and its adoption as a way of institutional management in the context it really wants to launch a concerted offensive to combat the underground economy.

  18. Underground Milling of High-Grade Uranium Ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, C., E-mail: chuck.edwards@amec.com [AMEC Americas Limited, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    There are many safety and technical issues involved in the mining and progressing of high grade uranium ores such as those exploited in Northern Canada at present. With more of this type of mine due to commence production in the near future, operators have been looking at ways to better manage the situation. The paper describes underground milling of high-grade uranium ore as a means of optimising production costs and managing safety issues. In addition the paper presents some examples of possible process flowsheets and plant layouts that could be applicable to such operations. Finally an assessment of potential benefits from underground milling from a variety of viewpoints is provided. (author)

  19. Orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in the NICA collider with solenoid Siberian snakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, A D; Butenko, A V; Kekelidze, V D; Mikhaylov, V A; Kondratenko, M A; Filatov, Yu N; Kondratenko, A M

    2016-01-01

    Two solenoid Siberian snakes are required to obtain ion polarization in the “spin transparency” mode of the NICA collider. The field integrals of the solenoid snakes for protons and deuterons at maximum momentum of 13.5 GeV/c are equal to 2×50 T·m and 2×160 T·m respectively. The snakes introduce strong betatron oscillation coupling. The calculations of orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in NICA collider with solenoid snakes are presented. (paper)

  20. Spin Transparency Mode in the NICA Collider with Solenoid Siberian Snakes for Proton and Deuteron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, A. D.; Butenko, A. V.; Mikhaylov, V. A.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Kondratenko, A. M.; Filatov, Yu N.

    2017-12-01

    Two solenoid Siberian Snakes are required to obtain ion polarization in spin transparency mode of the NICA collider. The snake solenoids with a total field integral of 2×50 T·m are placed into the straight sections of the NICA collider. It allows one to control polarization of protons and deuterons up to 13.5 GeV/c and 4 GeV/c respectively. The snakes introduce a strong betatron oscillation coupling. The calculations of orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in the NICA collider with solenoid Snakes are presented.

  1. Computer simulations of quench properties of thin, large superconducting solenoid magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Takeshi; Mori, Shigeki; Noguchi, Masaharu

    1983-01-01

    Measured quench data of a 1 m diameter x 1 m thin superconducting solenoid magnet with a single layer aluminum-stabilized NbTi/Cu superconductor of 269 turns were fitted by computer simulations using the one-dimensional approximation. Parameters obtained were used to study quench properties of a 3 m diameter x 5 m (1.5 Tesla) thin superconducting solenoid magnet with a stored magnetic energy of 30 x 10 6 J. Conductor dimensions with which the solenoid could be built substantially safe for the full field quench were optimized. (author)

  2. LIL-W: Positron conversion target and solenoid (pictures 01 and 04).

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1997-01-01

    In the direction of the beam, from right to left: a steering dipole (DHZ.25); the arm, at 45 deg, of a wire scanner which measures beam size; the conversion target, housed in the small tank with a window, where positrons are produced; immediately afterwards, invisible inside the vacuum chamber, is a pulsed solenoid to focus the emerging positrons; finally, a large solenoid, consisting of 3 pancakes, further focuses the positrons. Towards the left, the linac LIL-W, its accelerating structure hidden under a continuous outer solenoid mantle.

  3. Operating Cigeo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Launeau, F.

    2016-01-01

    The CIGEO facility dedicated to the geological disposal of high- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes will be composed of 2 parts: an underground facility at a depth of 500 m to dispose the waste packages in tunnels and a surface facility to take delivery of the wastes and prepare the packages. The underground facility will be built progressively and will cover a surface of 15 km 2 at the end of Cigeo operating-life. A large part of the surface facility (located a few km away from the waste reception place) will be dedicated to the works led deep underground to build the tunnels and will receive drilling cuttings. The article describes also the ramp and carts to lead waste packages underground. Most of the operations will be automated. The definitive closure of the tunnels will be made with swelling clay and concrete plugs. (A.C.)

  4. The hazardous nature of small scale underground mining in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.J. Bansah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Small scale mining continues to contribute significantly to the growth of Ghana's economy. However, the sector poses serious dangers to human health and the environment. Ground failures resulting from poorly supported stopes have led to injuries and fatalities in recent times. Dust and fumes from drilling and blasting of ore present health threats due to poor ventilation. Four prominent small scale underground mines were studied to identify the safety issues associated with small scale underground mining in Ghana. It is recognized that small scale underground mining in Ghana is inundated with unsafe acts and conditions including stope collapse, improper choice of working tools, absence of personal protective equipment and land degradation. Inadequate monitoring of the operations and lack of regulatory enforcement by the Minerals Commission of Ghana are major contributing factors to the environmental, safety and national security issues of the operations.

  5. Studies on muon showers underground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergamasco, L; Castagnoli, C; Dardo, M; D' Ettorre Piazzoli, B; Mannocchi, G [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Turin (Italy). Lab. di Cosmo-Geofisica; Picchi, P; Visentin, R [Comitato Nazionale per l' Energia Nucleare, Frascati (Italy). Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati; Sitte, K [Freiburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Fakultaet fuer Physik

    1976-08-21

    The 4 m/sup 2/ spark chamber telescope array of the Mt. Cappuccini Laboratory, Torino, At 40 m w.e. underground was operated for about 830 h recording muon showers. The data were analysed with respect to the multiplicity distribution of the shower particles, and to local interactions initiated in the chamber absorbers. Regarding the multiplicity analysis a semi-empirical expression for the likely shower size dependence of a structure function of the analytical form proposed by Vernov et al., was derived and applied with systematically varied parameters. The comparison of the observed rates of multiples with those calculated with a variety of parameters showed that a satisfactory agreement can be attained only if one admits a variation with the shower size of the parameters, and an enhanced muon/electron ratio at the lower primary energies, possibly indicative of an increased abundance of primary heavy nuclei. This would conform with the idea of a two-component primary composition in which a pulsar-produced fraction, enriched in heavy nuclei, dominated only at medium energies. The records on multiplicative interactions, and on large-angle scattering, were analysed by comparing their rates observed for shower particles with those found in single-muon check runs. The results are consistent with the assumption that all shower particle interactions are electromagnetic in nature, and that nonconventional components like mandelas are absent. Only making extreme allowances for statistical fluctuations the data can be made compatible with a mandela flux as large as that suggested by Baruch et al., provided that the mandela attenuation length is less than 1 500g/cm/sup 2/ of rock.

  6. Studies on muon showers underground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergamasco, L.; Castagnoli, C.; Dardo, M.; D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; Mannocchi, G.; Picchi, P.; Visentin, R.; Sitte, K.

    1976-01-01

    The 4 m 2 spark chamber telescope array of the Mt. Cappuccini Laboratory, Torino, At 40 m w.e. underground was operated for about 830 h recording muon showers. The data were analysed with respect to the multiplicity distribution of the shower particles, adn to local interactions initiated in the chamber absorbers. Regarding the multiplicity analysis a semi-empirical expression for the likely shower size dependence of a structure function of the analytical form proposed by Vernov et al., was derived and applied with systematically varied parameters. The comparison of the observed rates of multiples with those calculated with a variety of parameters showed that a satisfactory agreement can be attained only if one admits a variation with the shower size of the parameters, and an enhanced muon/electron ratio at the lower primary energies, possibly indicative of an increased abundance of primary heavy nuclei. This would conform with the idea of a two-component primary composition in which a pulsar-produced fraction, enriched in heavy nuclei, dominated only at medium energies. The records on multiplicative interactions, and on large-angle scattering, were analysed by comparing their rates observed for shower particles with those found in single-muon check runs. The results are consistent with the assumption that all shower particle interactions are electromagnetic in nature, and that nonconventional components like mandelas are absent. Only making extreme allowances for statistical fluctuations the data can be made compatible with a mandela flux as large as that suggested by Baruch et al., provided that the mandela attenuation length is less than 1 500g/cm 2 of rock

  7. Evaluation method of radon preventing effect in underground construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Shaodong; Deng Yuequan; Dong Faqin; Qu Ruixue; Xie Zhonglei

    2014-01-01

    Background: It's difficult to evaluate the radon prevention effect because of the short operating time of measuring instrument under the circumstances of high humidity in underground construction. Purpose: A new rapid method to evaluate the radon prevention efficiency of underground construction was introduced. Methods: The radon concentrations before and after shielding operation were determined, and according to the regularity of radon decay, the shielding rate can be calculated. Results: The results showed that radon shielding rate in underground construction remains generally stable with variation of time, and the actual relatively standard deviation was 3.95%. So the rapid determination and evaluation of radon preventing effect under special conditions in underground construction can be realized by taking shielding rate in a short time for the final shielding rate. Compared with those by the local static method in ground lab, the results were similar. Conclusion: This paper provided a prompt, accurate and practicable way for the evaluation of radon prevention in underground construction, having a certain reference value. (authors)

  8. Reflection Phenomena in Underground Pumped Storage Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pummer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Energy storage through hydropower leads to free surface water waves in the connected reservoirs. The reason for this is the movement of water between reservoirs at different elevations, which is necessary for electrical energy storage. Currently, the expansion of renewable energies requires the development of fast and flexible energy storage systems, of which classical pumped storage plants are the only technically proven and cost-effective technology and are the most used. Instead of classical pumped storage plants, where reservoirs are located on the surface, underground pumped storage plants with subsurface reservoirs could be an alternative. They are independent of topography and have a low surface area requirement. This can be a great advantage for energy storage expansion in case of environmental issues, residents’ concerns and an unusable terrain surface. However, the reservoirs of underground pumped storage plants differ in design from classical ones for stability and space reasons. The hydraulic design is essential to ensure their satisfactory hydraulic performance. The paper presents a hybrid model study, which is defined here as a combination of physical and numerical modelling to use the advantages and to compensate for the disadvantages of the respective methods. It shows the analysis of waves in ventilated underground reservoir systems with a great length to height ratio, considering new operational aspects from energy supply systems with a great percentage of renewable energies. The multifaceted and narrow design of the reservoirs leads to complex free surface flows; for example, undular and breaking bores arise. The results show excessive wave heights through wave reflections, caused by the impermeable reservoir boundaries. Hence, their knowledge is essential for a successful operational and constructive design of the reservoirs.

  9. 76 FR 54163 - Proximity Detection Systems for Continuous Mining Machines in Underground Coal Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    ... Detection Systems for Continuous Mining Machines in Underground Coal Mines AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health... (except full-face continuous mining machines) with proximity detection systems. Miners working near..., each underground coal mine operator would be required to install proximity detection systems on...

  10. Permanent Closure of MFC Biodiesel Underground Storage Tank 99ANL00013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerry L. Nisson

    2012-10-01

    This closure package documents the site assessment and permanent closure of the Materials and Fuels Complex biodiesel underground storage tank 99ANL00013 in accordance with the regulatory requirements established in 40 CFR 280.71, “Technical Standards and Corrective Action Requirements for Owners and Operators of Underground Storage Tanks: Out-of-Service UST Systems and Closure.”

  11. Solenoid pick-up problem in the CREN-K Triga Mark 2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malu wa Kalenga; Kobakozete Itono; Diazengwa Mpaka; Mampaka Mana Mouiny; Itio Momba

    1981-01-01

    During a lazy susan forty irradiation tube inspection with the specimen lifting device, the solenoid-operated specimen pick-up tool happened to be locked in the number fourteen position loading tube. The present paper describes the successful experiment which was carried out to solve a potential damaging situation for the safe and useful operation of the reactor. The first step in the investigation process was to ascertain what has indeed occurred in the reactor core to avoid any ill advised step which will worsen the situation. The alternatives were the following: a) The specimen tube was not lined with the loading tube; b) The lazy susan was not working properly due example to the fact that a roll pin in a drive shaft coupling inside the drive shaft tube has been broken; c) The pick-up tool has produced through the cleanout hole in the bottom of the specimen tube and engage the hole; d) The pick-up tool might have slided most of the way between the lazy susan and its housing. By moving up and down the pick-up tool and rotating back and forth the lazy susan it was possible to come to the conclusion that alternative c) was the most likely. It was not possible to release the pick-up tool because its engaging arms could not be activated as was often the case when lifting aluminium container

  12. Solenoid pick-up problem in the CREN-K Triga Mark 2 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malu wa Kalenga; Kobakozete Itono; Diazengwa Mpaka; Mampaka Mana Mouiny; Itio Momba (Commissariat des Sciences Nucleaires, Kinshasa (Zaire). Centre Regional d' Etudes Nucleaires)

    1981-01-01

    During a lazy susan forty irradiation tube inspection with the specimen lifting device, the solenoid-operated specimen pick-up tool happened to be locked in the number fourteen position loading tube. The present paper describes the successful experiment which was carried out to solve a potential damaging situation for the safe and useful operation of the reactor. The first step in the investigation process was to ascertain what has indeed occurred in the reactor core to avoid any ill advised step which will worsen the situation. The alternatives were the following: a) The specimen tube was not lined with the loading tube; b) The lazy susan was not working properly due example to the fact that a roll pin in a drive shaft coupling inside the drive shaft tube has been broken; c) The pick-up tool has produced through the cleanout hole in the bottom of the specimen tube and engage the hole; d) The pick-up tool might have slided most of the way between the lazy susan and its housing. By moving up and down the pick-up tool and rotating back and forth the lazy susan it was possible to come to the conclusion that alternative c) was the most likely. It was not possible to release the pick-up tool because its engaging arms could not be activated as was often the case when lifting aluminium container.

  13. Local Helicity Injection Systems for Non-solenoidal Startup in the PEGASUS Toroidal Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. M.; Barr, J. L.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Hinson, E. T.; Lewicki, B. T.; Redd, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    Local helicity injection is being developed in the PEGASUS Toroidal Experiment for non-solenoidal startup in spherical tokamaks. The effective loop voltage due to helicity injection scales with the area of the injectors, requiring the development of electron current injectors with areas much larger than the 2 cm2 plasma arc injectors used to date. Solid and gas-effused metallic electrodes were found to be unusable due to reduced injector area utilization from localized cathode spots and narrow operational regimes. An integrated array of 8 compact plasma arc sources is thus being developed for high current startup. It employs two monolithic power systems, for the plasma arc sources and the bias current extraction system. The array effectively eliminates impurity fueling from plasma-material interaction by incorporating a local scraper-limiter and conical-frustum bias electrodes to mitigate the effects of cathode spots. An energy balance model of helicity injection indicates that the resulting 20 cm2 of total injection area should provide sufficient current drive to reach 0.3 MA. At that level, helicity injection drive exceeds that from poloidal induction, which is the relevant operational regime for large-scale spherical tokamaks. Future placement of the injector array near an expanded boundary divertor region will test simultaneous optimization of helicity drive and the Taylor relaxation current limit. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  14. The influence of the iron shield of the solenoid on spin tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toprek Dragan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the iron shield of the solenoid on spin tracking is studied in this paper. In the case of the 200 MeV proton, the study has been numerically done in the ZGOUBI code. The distribution of the magnetic field was done by POISSON. We have come to the conclusion that the influence of the solenoid’s shielding on spin tracking is the same at its entrance and exit and that is directly proportional to the intensity of the magnetic induction B on the axis of the solenoid. We have also determined that the influence of the solenoid’s shielding is much stronger on transversal components of the spin than on its longitudinal component. The differences between components of the spin for the shielded and not-shielded solenoid diminish with the in crease in the distance from the solenoid.

  15. The electromagnetic calorimeter for the solenoidal tracker at RHIC. A Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beddo, M.E.; Bielick, E.; Dawson, J.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others; The STAR EMC Collaboration

    1993-09-22

    This report discusses the following on the electromagnetic calorimeter for the solenoidal tracker at RHIC: conceptual design; the physics of electromagnetic calorimetry in STAR; trigger capability; integration into STAR; and cost, schedule, manpower, and funding.

  16. Proceedings of the international workshop on solenoidal detectors for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Fumio; Hasegawa, Katsuo

    1990-07-01

    This issue is the collection of the papers presented at the International Workshop on solenoidal detectors for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The 48 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  17. Applications of a superconducting solenoidal separator in the experimental investigation of nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinde, D J; Carter, I P; Dasgupta, M; Simpson, E C; Cook, K J; Kalkal, Sunil; Luong, D H; Williams, E

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes applications of a novel superconducting solenoidal separator, with magnetic fields up to 8 Tesla, for studies of nuclear reactions using the Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility at the Australian National University. (paper)

  18. Design features of the solenoid magnets for the central cell of the MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohlwend, J.W.; Tatro, R.E.; Ring, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    The 14 superconducting solenoid magnets which form the central cell of the MFTF-B are being designed and fabricated by General Dynamics for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Each solenoid coil has a mean diameter of five meters and contains 600 turns of a proven conductor type. Structural loading resulting from credible fault events, cooldown and warmup requirements, and manufacturing processes consistent with other MFTF-B magnets have been considered in the selection of 304 LN as the structural material for the magnet. The solenoid magnets are connected by 24 intercoil beams and 20 solid struts which resist the longitudinal seismic and electromagnetic attractive forces and by 24 hanger/side supports which react magnet dead weight and seismic loads. A modular arrangement of two solenoid coils within a vacuum vessel segment allow for sequential checkout and installation

  19. Impact of detector solenoid on the Compact Linear Collider luminosity performance

    CERN Document Server

    Inntjore Levinsen, Y.; Tomás, Rogelio; Schulte, Daniel

    2014-05-27

    In order to obtain the necessary luminosity with a reasonable amount of beam power, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) design includes an unprecedented collision beam size of {\\sigma} = 1 nm vertically and {\\sigma} = 45 nm horizontally. Given the small and very flat beams, the luminosity can be significantly degraded from the impact of the experimental solenoid field in combination with a large crossing angle. Main effects include y-x'-coupling and increase of vertical dispersion. Additionally, Incoherent Synchrotron Radiation (ISR) from the orbit deflection created by the solenoid field, increases the beam emittance. A detailed study of the impact from a realistic solenoid field and the associated correction techniques for the CLIC Final Focus is presented. In particular, the impact of techniques to compensate the beam optics distortions due to the detector solenoid main field and its overlap with the final focus magnets are shown. The unrecoverable luminosity loss due to ISR has been evaluated, and found to...

  20. Beam collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons by a solenoid field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harres, K; Alber, I; Guenther, M; Nuernberg, F; Otten, A; Schuetrumpf, J; Roth, M [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Schlossgartenstrasse 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Tauschwitz, A; Bagnoud, V [GSI - Hemholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Plasmaphysik and PHELIX, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Daido, H; Tampo, M [Photo Medical Research Center, JAEA, 8-1 Umemidai, Kizugawa-city, Kyoto, 619-0215 (Japan); Schollmeier, M, E-mail: k.harres@gsi.d [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque NM 87185 (United States)

    2010-08-01

    A pulsed high field solenoid was used in a laser-proton acceleration experiment to collimate and transport the proton beam that was generated at the irradiation of a flat foil by a high intensity laser pulse. 10{sup 12} particles at an energy of 2.3 MeV could be caught and transported over a distance of more than 240 mm. Strong space charge effects occur, induced by the high field of the solenoid that forces all co-moving electrons down the the solenoid's axis, building up a strong negative space charge that interacts with the proton beam. This leads to an aggregation of the proton beam around the solenoid's axis and therefore to a stronger focusing effect. The collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons is the first step to provide these unique beams for further applications like post-acceleration by conventional accelerator structures.

  1. Beam collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons by a solenoid field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harres, K; Alber, I; Guenther, M; Nuernberg, F; Otten, A; Schuetrumpf, J; Roth, M; Tauschwitz, A; Bagnoud, V; Daido, H; Tampo, M; Schollmeier, M

    2010-01-01

    A pulsed high field solenoid was used in a laser-proton acceleration experiment to collimate and transport the proton beam that was generated at the irradiation of a flat foil by a high intensity laser pulse. 10 12 particles at an energy of 2.3 MeV could be caught and transported over a distance of more than 240 mm. Strong space charge effects occur, induced by the high field of the solenoid that forces all co-moving electrons down the the solenoid's axis, building up a strong negative space charge that interacts with the proton beam. This leads to an aggregation of the proton beam around the solenoid's axis and therefore to a stronger focusing effect. The collimation and transport of laser-accelerated protons is the first step to provide these unique beams for further applications like post-acceleration by conventional accelerator structures.

  2. Confinement of laser plasma by solenoidal field for laser ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, M.; Kanesue, T.; Kondo, K.; Dabrowski, R.

    2010-01-01

    A laser ion source can provide high current, highly charged ions with a simple structure. However, it was not easy to control the ion pulse width. To provide a longer ion beam pulse, the plasma drift length, which is the distance between laser target and extraction point, has to be extended and as a result the plasma is diluted severely. Previously, we applied a solenoid field to prevent reduction of ion density at the extraction point. Although a current enhancement by a solenoid field was observed, plasma behavior after a solenoid magnet was unclear because plasma behavior can be different from usual ion beam dynamics. We measured a transverse ion distribution along the beam axis to understand plasma motion in the presence of a solenoid field.

  3. Non-inductive Solenoid-less Plasma Current Start-up in NSTX Using Transient CHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, R.; Mueller, D.; Jarboe, T.R.; Nelson, B.A.; Bell, M.G.; Ono, M.; Bigelow, T.; Kaita, R.; LeBlanc, B.; Lee, K.C.; Maqueda, R.; Menard, J.; Paul, S.; Roquemore, L.

    2007-01-01

    Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) has been successfully used in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) for a demonstration of closed flux current generation without the use of the central solenoid. The favorable properties of the Spherical Torus (ST) arise from its very small aspect ratio. However, small aspect ratio devices have very restricted space for a substantial central solenoid. Thus methods for initiating the plasma current without relying on induction from a central solenoid are essential for the viability of the ST concept. CHI is a promising candidate for solenoid-free plasma startup in a ST. The method has now produced closed flux current up to 160 kA verifying the high current capability of this method in a large ST built with conventional tokamak components.

  4. Dynamic Underground Stripping Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aines, R.; Newmark, R.; McConachie, W.; Rice, D.; Ramirez, A.; Siegel, W.; Buettner, M.; Daily, W.; Krauter, P.; Folsom, E.; Boegel, A.J.; Bishop, D.; udel, K.

    1992-03-01

    LLNL is collaborating with the UC Berkeley College of Engineering to develop and demonstrate a system of thermal remediation and underground imaging techniques for use in rapid cleanup of localized underground spills. Called ''Dynamic Stripping'' to reflect the rapid and controllable nature of the process, it will combine steam injection, direct electrical heating, and tomographic geophysical imaging in a cleanup of the LLNL gasoline spill. In the first 8 months of the project, a Clean Site engineering test was conducted to prove the field application of the techniques before moving to the contaminated site in FY 92

  5. Logistics background study: underground mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanslovan, J. J.; Visovsky, R. G.

    1982-02-01

    Logistical functions that are normally associated with US underground coal mining are investigated and analyzed. These functions imply all activities and services that support the producing sections of the mine. The report provides a better understanding of how these functions impact coal production in terms of time, cost, and safety. Major underground logistics activities are analyzed and include: transportation and personnel, supplies and equipment; transportation of coal and rock; electrical distribution and communications systems; water handling; hydraulics; and ventilation systems. Recommended areas for future research are identified and prioritized.

  6. Testing of ITER central solenoid coil insulation in an array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, R.; Martovetsky, N.N.; Perfect, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    A glass-polyimide insulation system has been proposed by the US team for use in the Central Solenoid (CS) coil of the international Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) machine and it is planned to use this system in the CS model coil inner module. The turn insulation will consist of 2 layers of combined prepreg and Kapton. Each layer is 50% overlapped with a butt wrap of prepreg and an overwrap of S glass. The coil layers will be separated by a glass-resin composite and impregnated in a VPI process. Small scale tests on the various components of the insulation are complete. It is planned to fabricate and test the insulation in a 4 x 4 insulated CS conductor array which will include the layer insulation and be vacuum impregnated. The conductor array will be subjected to 20 thermal cycles and 100000 mechanical load cycles in a Liquid Nitrogen environment. These loads are similar to those seen in the CS coil design. The insulation will be electrically tested at several stages during mechanical testing. This paper will describe the array configuration, fabrication: process, instrumentation, testing configuration, and supporting analyses used in selecting the array and test configurations

  7. A solenoidal and monocusp ion source (SAMIS) (abstract){sup a}{sup b}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, E.J.; Brainard, J.P.; Draper, C.H.; Ney, R.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0516 (United States); Leung, K.N.; Perkins, L.T.; Williams, M.D.; Wilde, S.B. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1996-03-01

    We have developed a new magnetic monocusp ion source for single aperture applications such as neutron generators. Coupling solenoidal magnetic fields on both sides of a monocusp magnetic field has generated over 70{percent} atomic deuterium ions at pressures as low as 0.4 Pa (3 mTorr). This article describes the performance and characteristics of the solenoidal and monocusp ion source. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Fourier Bessel transform method for efficiently calculating the magnetic field of solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nachamkin, J.; Maggiore, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical procedure for calculating the magnetic field of a selenoid is derived. Based on the properties of Bessel functions, the procedure is shown to be convergent everywhere, including within the windings of the solenoid. The most critical part of the procedure is detailed in the main text. A simple method is used to ensure numerical significance while allowing economical computational times. In the appendix the procedure is generalized to universal convergence by appropriate partitioning of the solenoid windings

  9. A new scheme for critical current measurements on straight superconducting cables in a large solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, L.; Volpini, G.

    1991-01-01

    The precision of I c measurement of straight superconducting cables in solenoids can be limited by the magnetic field inhomogeneity. A solution in order to improve the field homogeneity based on iron shims is presented here. A conceptual design for the experimental lay-out of a test station to be used in connection with the SOLEMI-I solenoid at the Milan INFN Section (LASA Laboratory) is given

  10. Short-circuited coil in a solenoid circuit of a pulse magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivshik, A.F.; Dubrovin, V.Yu.

    1976-01-01

    A short-circuited coil at the end of a long pulse solenoid attenuates the dissipation field by 3-5 times. A plug-configuration field is set up in the middle portion of the pulse solenoid incorporating the short-circuited coils. Shunting of the coils with the induction current by resistor Rsub(shunt) provides for the adjustment of the plug ratio γ

  11. Performance of solenoids versus quadrupoles in focusing and energy selection of laser accelerated protons

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Using laser accelerated protons or ions for various applications—for example in particle therapy or short-pulse radiographic diagnostics—requires an effective method of focusing and energy selection. We derive an analytical scaling for the performance of a solenoid compared with a doublet/triplet as function of the energy, which is confirmed by TRACEWIN simulations. Generally speaking, the two approaches are equivalent in focusing capability, if parameters are such that the solenoid length ap...

  12. Detecting the position of the moving-iron solenoid by non-displacement sensor based on parameter identification of flux linkage characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuping; Quan, Long; Xiong, Guangyu

    2013-11-01

    Currently, most researches use signals, such as the coil current or voltage of solenoid, to identify parameters; typically, parameter identification method based on variation rate of coil current is applied for position estimation. The problem exists in these researches that the detected signals are prone to interference and difficult to obtain. This paper proposes a new method for detecting the core position by using flux characteristic quantity, which adds a new group of secondary winding to the coil of the ordinary switching electromagnet. On the basis of electromagnetic coupling theory analysis and simulation research of the magnetic field regarding the primary and secondary winding coils, and in accordance with the fact that under PWM control mode varying core position and operating current of windings produce different characteristic of flux increment of the secondary winding. The flux increment of the electromagnet winding can be obtained by conducting time domain integration for the induced voltage signal of the extracted secondary winding, and the core position from the two-dimensional fitting curve of the operating winding current and flux-linkage characteristic quantity of solenoid are calculated. The detecting and testing system of solenoid core position is developed based on the theoretical research. The testing results show that the flux characteristic quantity of switching electromagnet magnetic circuit is able to effectively show the core position and thus to accomplish the non-displacement transducer detection of the said core position of the switching electromagnet. This paper proposes a new method for detecting the core position by using flux characteristic quantity, which provides a new theory and method for switch solenoid to control the proportional valve.

  13. Underground coal mining technology - the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lama, R P [Kembla Coal and Coke Pty Limited, Wollongong, NSW (Australia)

    1989-01-01

    Discusses development of underground coal mining in Australia in the last four decades. The following aspects are reviewed: technology for underground mining (longwall mining, unidirectional cutting, bidirectional cutting, operation of more than one shearer on a working face, optimum dimensions of longwall blocks), longwall productivity (productivity increase will depend on increasing the availability factor of equipment, reducing failures due to human errors, organizational models, improving on-site decision making, improving monitoring, maintenance, planning and scheduling, concept of 'Transparent Mine'), roadway development systems (types of heading machines, standard systems for mine drivage and roof bolting and their productivity), size of coal mines, man and material transport systems (20,000-30,000 t/d from a single longwall face, mine shafts with a diameter 9-10 m), mine layout design (layout of longwall blocks, main intakes and returns situated in rock layers), mine environmental systems (ventilation systems, gas control), management, training and interpersonal relationships. Future coal mines will be developed with an integral capacity of 8-10 Mt/a from a single longwall operation with main development arteries placed in rocks. Development of gate roadways will require novel solutions with continuous cutting, loading and bolting. Information technology, with the concept of 'transparent mine', will form the backbone of decision making.

  14. An Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadrel, M.J.; Hunter, V.L.; Young, J.K.; Lini, D.C.; Goldberg, C.

    1993-04-01

    The Waste Characterization Data and Technology Development Needs Assessment provides direct support to the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID). Key users of the study's products may also include individuals and programs within the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (EM-50), the Office of Waste Operations (EM-30), and the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40). The goal of this work is to provide the UST-ID with a procedure for allocating funds across competing characterization technologies in a timely and defensible manner. It resulted in three primary products: 1. It organizes and summarizes information on underground storage tank characterization data needs. 2. It describes current technology development activity related to each need and flags areas where technology development may be beneficial. 3. It presents a decision process, with supporting software, for evaluating, prioritizing, and integrating possible technology development funding packages. The data presented in this document can be readily updated as the needs of the Waste Operations and Environmental Restoration programs mature and as new and promising technology development options emerge

  15. Specific features of auxiliary water supply at underground NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pergamenshchik, B.K.; Pavlov, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    Specific features of auxiliary water supply systems for underground NPPs related to peculiarities of NPP basis equipment arrangement, are considered. Circulation water supply scheme, in which water cooling storage basin (cooling towers) with operational area corresponding to NPP power is on the surface and has traditional design, is proposed. Sufficiently high efficiency of the arrangement proposed is proved

  16. Effect of repository underground ventilation on emplacement drift temperature control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, H.; Sun, Y.; McKenzie, D.G.; Bhattacharyya, K.K.

    1996-01-01

    The repository advanced conceptual design (ACD) is being conducted by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System, Management ampersand Operating Contractor. Underground ventilation analyses during ACD have resulted in preliminary ventilation concepts and design methodologies. This paper discusses one of the recent evaluations -- effects of ventilation on emplacement drift temperature management

  17. Assessment of the mechanical stability of underground excavations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroki, Shigemori; Taniguchi, Wataru

    1999-01-01

    Each tunnel in the underground high level radioactive waste repository must be mechanically stable to maintain safety throughout the construction, emplacement operations and closure phase. The mechanical stability of underground excavations were assessed using a theoretical analysis and a finite element method taking a wide range of geological environment in Japan into consideration to establish confidence in the construction of disposal facilities. The results show that it is possible to maintain the mechanical stability with adequate tunnel spacing and disposal pit pitch and proper mechanical support. The procedure used for the analysis of the mechanical stability in the H12 report and the results are described in this report. (author)

  18. Slavery and the Underground Railroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nancy Comfort

    2000-01-01

    Presents a bibliography of sources to help children understand slavery and the Underground Railroad and recommends a combination of fiction and nonfiction for a better understanding. Includes picture books, biographies of people who played prominent roles during the time of slavery, nonfiction books for older readers, and videotape. (LRW)

  19. Uranium extraction from underground deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, C.R.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium is extracted from underground deposits by passing an aqueous oxidizing solution of carbon dioxide over the ore in the presence of calcium ions. Complex uranium carbonate or bicarbonate ions are formed which enter the solution. The solution is forced to the surface and the uranium removed from it

  20. Earthquake damage to underground facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, H.R.; Stephenson, D.E.; Zandt, G.; Bouchon, M.; Hustrulid, W.A.

    1980-01-01

    In order to assess the seismic risk for an underground facility, a data base was established and analyzed to evaluate the potential for seismic disturbance. Substantial damage to underground facilities is usually the result of displacements primarily along pre-existing faults and fractures, or at the surface entrance to these facilities. Evidence of this comes from both earthquakes and large explosions. Therefore, the displacement due to earthquakes as a function of depth is important in the evaluation of the hazard to underground facilities. To evaluate potential displacements due to seismic effects of block motions along pre-existing or induced fractures, the displacement fields surrounding two types of faults were investigated. Analytical models were used to determine relative displacements of shafts and near-surface displacement of large rock masses. Numerical methods were used to determine the displacement fields associated with pure strike-slip and vertical normal faults. Results are presented as displacements for various fault lengths as a function of depth and distance. This provides input to determine potential displacements in terms of depth and distance for underground facilities, important for assessing potential sites and design parameters

  1. Status and prospects of a deep underground laboratory in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, K J; Cheng, J P; Li, Y J; Yue, Q; Chen, Y H; Shen, M B; Wu, S Y

    2010-01-01

    An excellent candidate location for a deep underground laboratory with more than 2500 m of rock overburden has been identified at Sichuan Province in China. It can be accessed through a road tunnel of length 17.5 km, and is supported by services and amenities near the entrance provided by the local Ertan Hydropower Plant. The particle physics community in China is actively pursuing the construction of an underground laboratory at this location, under the leadership of Tsinghua University. Memorandum has been signed with Ertan Hydropower Plant which permits access to and construction of the underground laboratory - China JinPing Deep Underground Laboratory (CJPL). The basic features of this underground site, as well as the status and schedules of the construction of the first laboratory cavern are presented. The immediate goal is to have the first experiment operational in 2010, deploying an Ultra-Low-Energy Germanium detector for WIMP dark matter searches, with emphasis on the mass range of 1-10 GeV. The conceptual design of the experiment, as well as the future plans and prospects of the laboratory, will be surveyed.

  2. THE GENERATING AND COMPLEMENTARY EFFECTS OF THE UNDERGROUND ECONOMY PHENOMENON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corneliu Sorin BAICU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For a comprehensive understanding of the informal sector, an analysis addressing the relationships and links between the morphology and etiology of the underground economy, on the one hand, and its effects on the economic, social or legal, on the other hand is required. The double identity, that of cause phenomenon and effect phenomenon, that the underground economy has, gives it a special status in explaining certain phenomena which vitiates the economic and social life. The generating and complementary effects of the underground area covered in this study are analyzed in terms of the following vectors of analysis: tax evasion, illegal work and money laundering. Tax evasion represents the central core of the underground economy and faithfully expresses the fiscal monetary policies ,the fiscal mortality and the degree of compliance of the taxpayer. Undeclared work is an indicator of the labor market in the informal economy and is a good barometer for analyzing the demand and supply of labor in the visible economy. Money laundering defines the level of economic and financial crime and reflects the level of illegal use of capital on the black market. Tax evasion, money laundering and illegal work can only develop on a framework provided by illicit markets for goods, services and labor. Beyond the, unidirectional or bidirectional relationships between phenomena, the paper consists in a plea for an interdependent, multi-causal analysis of the phenomena and operating mechanisms of the relationships within and outside the underground economy.

  3. Performance of underground coal mines during the 1976 Tangshan earthquake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.F.

    1987-01-01

    The Tangshan earthquake of 1976 costs 242 000 lives and was responsible for 164 000 serious injuries and structural damage of immense proportion. The area has eight coal mines, which together form the largest underground coal mining operation in China. Approximately 10 000 miners were working underground at the time of the earthquake. With few exceptions they survived and returned safely to the surface, only to find their families and belongings largely destroyed. Based on a comprehensive survey of the miners' observations, subsurface intensity profiles were drawn up. The profiles clearly indicated that seismic damage in the underground mines was far less severe than at the surface. 16 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Homestake surface-underground scintillators: Initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherry, M.L.; Corbato, S.; Daily, T.; Fenyves, E.J.; Kieda, D.; Lande, K.; Lee, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    The first 70 tons of the 140-ton Large Area Scintillation Detector (LASD) have been operating since Jan. 1985 at a depth of 4850 ft. (4200 m.w.e.) in the Homestake Gold Mine, Lead, S.D. A total of 4 x 10(4) high-energy muons (E sub mu is approx. 2.7 TeV at the surface) have been detected. The remainder of the detector is scheduled to be in operation by the Fall of 1985. In addition, a surface air shower array is under construction. The first 27 surface counters, spaced out over an area of 270' x 500', began running in June, 1985. The LASD performance, the potential of the combined shower array and underground muon experiment for detecting point sources, and the initial results of a search for periodic emission from Cygnus X-3 are discussed

  5. Experimental study of a laser-heated solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, H.L.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the interaction of an intense CO 2 laser beam with a column of initially uv-ionized hydrogen immersed in a steady magnetic field of up to 100 kG. Under the intense laser radiation, the gas becomes ionized and heated to temperatures as high as 150 eV (1.6 x 10 6 0 K). The primary purpose of the investigation was to determine the properties of the dense, hot plasma formed in this manner. Time and space resolved measurements of the plasma electron density were made using holographic interferometry along the axis and Mach--Zehnder interferometry across the column. The temperature was determined by measuring the decay rate of a line from CV in the quartz uv. These measurements were supplemented by streak photography to provide data on the development of the luminosity of the plasma column, radially and axially, as a function of time. From these various diagnostic techniques, it was possible to determine that a density minimum is formed on-axis within a few tens of nanoseconds after initiation of the laser pulse. This effectively produces a light pipe which traps the beam, and suggests that long columns can be formed by laser irradiation. The beam energy was efficiently absorbed and plasma loss rates appeared to be those expected from classical MHD modelling. While a completely unambiguous answer as to the mode of laser discharge propagation occurring in the experiment was not obtained, the bulk of the evidence suggests a ''bleaching wave'' rather than a laser driven detonator. In summary, the experiment was successful in demonstrating the creation of dense, slender columns by laser breakdown, in support of the ''laser-heated solenoid'' fusion concept

  6. Research on application of mobile diesel equipment in underground mines (IV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This research commenced in 1994 for the purpose of providing safety and environmental measures of underground mines where the mobile diesel equipment are operating. In this last research year, researches on filtering of diesel particulate matter, design of underground layout and disaster prevention have been carried out. 1) A study to reduce DPM(Diesel Particulate Matter) emission: It was known that water scrubber is only one practical way to reduce DPM emission as of now. There are several kinds of the sophisticated DPM filters, but it is not practical yet to be used in underground equipment due to the many adverse effects of the devices such as tremendous increase of SOx, NOx and back pressure etc. 2) Design of underground layout and their maintenance: Layout of underground structure has to be designed based on rock mechanical analysis and the concept of active support has to be adopted considering the large openings are requested to accommodate heavy duty diesel equipment in underground. Rock bolt and shotcrete will be the most applicable method to support such a large dimensional tunnels. 3) A study for disaster prevention in the case of the underground fire: There are two categories of possible disaster or hazard in workings where diesel equipment are operating. One is the disasters by exhaust pollutants and the other is the underground fire. (author). 35 refs., 27 tabs., 56 figs.

  7. Study of a microstrip gas detector for the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clergeau, J. F.

    1997-01-01

    The micro-strip gas chambers (MSGC) were realized due to the technological advances in the field of micro-electronics. The wire of usual gas counters is replaced in these detectors by metallic stripes as a periodic sequence of electrodes (anodes and cathodes) spaced by around 200 μm. At a distance of 3 mm above the strip containing substrate, a metallic plane is placed, thus defining the gaseous room where the passage of a charged particle produces by ionization a primary electron signal collected by the detector anodes. Due to its granularity a MSGC can operate under very high particle fluxes since charge can be collected very rapidly. Also, the impact parameters can be determined with high accuracy due to the high space and time resolutions. The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) or the MSGC detectors planned to equip one of the experiments proposed for LHC should detect, in extreme operational conditions, the particle impacts in a 4 Tesla magnetic field, for around ten years and for a particle flux of around 10 4 Hz/mm 2 . The CMS detector is described in chapter 2. The operation principle and the problems encountered in the development of MSGC detectors are summarized in chapter 3. The chapter 4 is dedicated to the study of the performances of MSGCs in magnetic fields. In the chapters 5 to 7 the processing of the signal from detectors of this type is described, particularly, the performances of various ways of treat the signal in terms of detection efficiency and counting loads are presented.The chapter 8 presents the results obtained with the prototype obtained at IPNL while the chapter 9 gives the conclusions of the performed works. (author)

  8. Sanford Underground Research Facility - The United State's Deep Underground Research Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardiman, D.

    2012-12-01

    The 2.5 km deep Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) is managed by the South Dakota Science and Technology Authority (SDSTA) at the former Homestake Mine site in Lead, South Dakota. The US Department of Energy currently supports the development of the facility using a phased approach for underground deployment of experiments as they obtain an advanced design stage. The geology of the Sanford Laboratory site has been studied during the 125 years of operations at the Homestake Mine and more recently as part of the preliminary geotechnical site investigations for the NSF's Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory project. The overall geology at DUSEL is a well-defined stratigraphic sequence of schist and phyllites. The three major Proterozoic units encountered in the underground consist of interbedded schist, metasediments, and amphibolite schist which are crosscut by Tertiary rhyolite dikes. Preliminary geotechnical site investigations included drift mapping, borehole drilling, borehole televiewing, in-situ stress analysis, laboratory analysis of core, mapping and laser scanning of new excavations, modeling and analysis of all geotechnical information. The investigation was focused upon the determination if the proposed site rock mass could support the world's largest (66 meter diameter) deep underground excavation. While the DUSEL project has subsequently been significantly modified, these data are still available to provide a baseline of the ground conditions which may be judiciously extrapolated throughout the entire Proterozoic rock assemblage for future excavations. Recommendations for facility instrumentation and monitoring were included in the preliminary design of the DUSEL project design and include; single and multiple point extensometers, tape extensometers and convergence measurements (pins), load cells and pressure cells, smart cables, inclinometers/Tiltmeters, Piezometers, thermistors, seismographs and accelerometers, scanners (laser

  9. Supplement No. 79-01A to IE Bulletin No. 79-01: Environmental qualification of Class 1E equipment (Deficiencies in the environmental qualification of ASCO solenoid valves)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, a noncompliance report under 10 CFR Part 21 was received by the NRC from the Henry Pratt Company, manufacturer of butterfly valves which are installed in the primary containment at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Station. These butterfly valves are used for purge and exhaust purposes and are required to operate during accident conditions. The report discusses the use of an unqualified solenoid valve for a safety-related valve function which requires operation under accident conditions. The solenoid valve in question is Catalogue No. HT-8331A45, manufactured by the Automatic Switch Company (ASCO) of Florham Park, New Jersey. This pilot valve is used to pilot control the pneumatic valve actuators which are installed on the containment ventilation butterfly valves at this facility. The deficiency in these solenoid valves identified in the Part 21 Report concerns the parts made of acetal plastic material. The acetal disc holder assembly and bottom plug in the pilot valve assembly are stated by ASCO to have a maximum service limit of 400,000 Rad integrated dosage and 200 degrees F temperature. According to ASCO, exposure of these acetal plastic parts to specified maximum environmental conditions may render the solenoid pilot valve inoperable which would cause the associated butterfly valve to malfunction

  10. Innovation application to underground mining; Innovacion aplicada a la explotacion de canteras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    In this article is presented the pilot test initiated in the quarry of limestone aggregated located in Apario (Bilbao, Spain), in order to prolong its operating life by means of the application of the methods of the underground mining. (Author)

  11. Eves government invests $9.3 million to establish new facility for underground science in Sudbury

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory Institute (SNO), in co-operation with a number of private and public sector partners, will establish the International Facility for Underground Science at Creighton Mine in Sudbury (1 page)

  12. Underground storage of heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despois, J.; Nougarede, F.

    1976-01-01

    The interest laying in heat storage is envisaged taking account of the new energy context, with a view to optimizing the use of production means of heat sources hardly modulated according to the demand. In such a way, a natural medium, without any constructions cost but only an access cost is to be used. So, porous and permeable rocky strata allowing the use of a pressurized water flow as a transfer fluid are well convenient. With such a choice high temperatures (200 deg C) may be obtained, that are suitable for long transmissions. A mathematical model intended for solving the conservation equations in the case of heat storage inside a confined water layer is discussed. An approach of the operating conditions of storage may involve either a line-up arrangement (with the hot drilling at the center, the cold drillings being aligned on both sides) or a radial arrangement (with cold drillings at the peripheral edge encircling the hot drilling at the center of the layer). The three principal problems encountered are: starting drilling, and the circuit insulation and control [fr

  13. 40 CFR 280.220 - Ownership of an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... tank or underground storage tank system or facility or property on which an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system is located. 280.220 Section 280.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... underground storage tank or underground storage tank system or facility or property on which an underground...

  14. Underground spaces/cybernetic spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaž Novljan

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A modern city space is a space where in the vertical and horizontal direction dynamic, non-linear processes exist, similar as in nature. Alongside the “common” city surface, cities have underground spaces as well that are increasingly affecting the functioning of the former. It is the space of material and cybernetic communication/transport. The psychophysical specifics of using underground places have an important role in their conceptualisation. The most evident facts being their limited volume and often limited connections to the surface and increased level of potential dangers of all kinds. An efficient mode for alleviating the effects of these specific features are artistic interventions, such as: shape, colour, lighting, all applications of the basic principles of fractal theory.

  15. Study of underground radon transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csige, I.; Hakl, J.; Lenart, L.

    1990-01-01

    The soil gas radon content measurements with solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) are widely used in geoscience, for instance in uranium exploration and earthquake prediction. In these applications the radon frequently is used as a natural tracer of underground fluid transport processes. Obviously, to get the soil radon measuring method more and more effective the study of these transport processes in deeper part of the Earth is fundamental. The Track Detector Group in the Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Debrecen has been performing environmental radon activity concentration measurements since 1977 with alpha sensitive SSNTDs. These types of measurements were initiated and widely used by the late head of the group Dr. G. Somogyi, who devoted his life to better understanding of the nature. The measurements in caves, springs and drilled wells proved to be effective to study these underground radon transport processes. We are glad to present some results of our investigations. 7 refs, 7 figs

  16. The Underground Economy in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleopatra Sendroiu

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Underground economic activities exist in most countries around the world, and they usually have the same causes: inadequate tax systems, excessive state interference in the economy and the lack of coordination in establishing economic policies. Through this paper, we aim to offer certain recommendations, which, in our opinion, would lead to solving the issue of inadequate allocation of resources and would also contribute to restoration of the worldwide economy.

  17. Manufacture and Test of a Small Ceramic-Insulated Nb$_{3}$Sn Split Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Bordini, B; Rossi, L; Tommasini, D

    2008-01-01

    A small split solenoid wound with high-Jc Nb$_{3}$Sn conductor, constituted by a 0.8 mm Rod Re-stack Process (RRP®) strand, was built and tested at CERN in order to study the applicability of: 1) ceramic wet glass braid insulation without epoxy impregnation of the magnet; 2) a new heat treatment devised at CERN and particularly suitable for reacting RRP® Nb$_{3}$Sn strands. This paper briefly describes the solenoid and the experimental results obtained during 4.4 K and 1.9 K tests. The split solenoid consists of two coils (25 mm inner diameter, 51.1 mm outer diameter, 12.9 mm height). The coils were initially separately tested, in an iron mirror configuration, and then tested together in split solenoid configuration. In all the tests at 4.4 K the coils reached a current higher than 95 % of their short sample limits at the first quench; in split solenoid configuration the maximum field values in the coils and in the aperture were respectively 10.7 T and 12.5 T. At 1.9 K the coils had premature quenches due ...

  18. Hybrid design method for air-core solenoid with axial homogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li; Lee, Sang Jin [Uiduk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Suk Jin [Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, a hybrid method is proposed to design an air-core superconducting solenoid system for 6 T axial uniform magnetic field using Niobium Titanium (NbTi) superconducting wire. In order to minimize the volume of conductor, the hybrid optimization method including a linear programming and a nonlinear programming was adopted. The feasible space of solenoid is divided by several grids and the magnetic field at target point is approximated by the sum of magnetic field generated by an ideal current loop at the center of each grid. Using the linear programming, a global optimal current distribution in the feasible space can be indicated by non-zero current grids. Furthermore the clusters of the non-zero current grids also give the information of probable solenoids in the feasible space, such as the number, the shape, and so on. Applying these probable solenoids as the initial model, the final practical configuration of solenoids with integer layers can be obtained by the nonlinear programming. The design result illustrates the efficiency and the flexibility of the hybrid method. And this method can also be used for the magnet design which is required the high homogeneity within several ppm (parts per million)

  19. Limits on the field of ohmic heating solenoids, applied to a tokamak TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.

    1977-01-01

    If the ohmic heating solenoid for the TNS or other large tokamak is an ungraded cryostable superconducting solenoid, with NbTi at 4.2 K as the superconductor, then the smallest outer diameter is not achieved at the highest attainable field. There is a lower optimum field which minimizes the outer diameter for a given volt-second requirement. At higher fields the mean diameter decreases; but the high fields require more superconductor, more copper stabilizer, more stainless steel for support, and more liquid helium coolant. For the GA-ANL design for TNS, the optimum field is 7.55 T and the minimum outside diameter for the solenoid is 2.15 m. If, on the other hand, the solenoid is graded, with more NbTi, copper, and stainless steel on the inner turns where the field is higher, than the volt-seconds can always be increased, for a given outer diameter, by adding more turns at a higher field inside until either the critical field is reached or the solenoid bore is filled. However, the material and money required to add a few more volt-seconds increases rapidly with field

  20. Limits on the field of ohmic heating solenoids, applied to a tokamak TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.

    1978-01-01

    If the ohmic heating solenoid for the TNS or other large tokamak is an ungraded cryostable superconducting solenoid, with NbTi at 4.2 K as the superconductor, then the smallest outer diameter is not achieved at the highest attainable field. There is a lower optimum field which minimizes the outer diameter for a given volt-second requirement. At higher fields the mean diameter decreases; but the high fields require more superconductor, more copper stabilizer, more stainless steel for support, and more liquid helium coolant. For the GA-ANL design for TNS, the optimum field is 7.55 T and the minimum outside diameter for the solenoid is 2.15 m. If, on the other hand, the solenoid is graded, with more NbTi, copper, and stainless steel on the inner turns where the field is higher, then the volt-seconds can always be increased, for a given outer diameter, by adding more turns at a higher field inside until either the critical field is reached or the solenoid bore is filled. However, the material and money required to add a few more volt-seconds increases rapidly with field

  1. Solenoidal magnetic field influences the beam neutralization by a background plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, I.

    2004-01-01

    An analytical electron fluid model has been developed to describe the plasma response to a propagating ion beam. The model predicts very good charge neutralization during quasi-steady-state propagation, provided the beam pulse duration is much longer than the electron plasma period. In the opposite limit, the beam pulse excites large-amplitude plasma waves. Figure 1 shows the influence of a solenoidal magnetic field on charge and current neutralization. Analytical studies show that the solenoidal magnetic field begins to influence the radial electron motion when ω ce > βω pe . Here, ω ce is the electron gyrofrequency, ω pe is the electron plasma frequency, and β = V b /c is the ion beam velocity. If a solenoidal magnetic field is not applied, plasma waves do not propagate. In contrast, in the presence of a solenoidal magnetic field, whistler waves propagate ahead of the beam and can perturb the plasma ahead of the beam pulse. In the limit ω ce >> βω pe , the electron current completely neutralizes the ion beam current and the beam self magnetic field greatly diminishes. Application of an external solenoidal magnetic field clearly makes the collective processes of ion beam-plasma interactions rich in physics content. Many results of the PIC simulations remain to be explained by analytical theory. Four new papers have been published or submitted describing plasma neutralization of an intense ion beam pulse

  2. The stress and underground environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chama, A.

    2009-04-01

    Currently,the program of prevention in occupational health needs mainly to identify occupational hazards and strategy of their prevention.Among these risks,the stress represents an important psycho-social hazard in mental health,which unfortunately does not spare no occupation.My Paper attempts to highlight and to develop this hazard in its different aspects even its regulatory side in underground environment as occupational environment.In the interest of better prevention ,we consider "the information" about the impact of stress as the second prevention efficient and no expensive to speleologists,hygienists and workers in the underground areas. In this occasion of this event in Vienna,we also highlight the scientific works on the stress of the famous viennese physician and endocrinologist Doctor Hans Selye (1907-1982),nicknamed "the father of stress" and note on relation between biological rhythms in this underground area and psychological troubles (temporal isolation) (Jurgen Aschoff’s works and experiences out-of time).

  3. First ATLAS Events Recorded Underground

    CERN Multimedia

    Teuscher, R

    As reported in the CERN Bulletin, Issue No.30-31, 25 July 2005 The ATLAS barrel Tile calorimeter has recorded its first events underground using a cosmic ray trigger, as part of the detector commissioning programme. This is not a simulation! A cosmic ray muon recorded by the barrel Tile calorimeter of ATLAS on 21 June 2005 at 18:30. The calorimeter has three layers and a pointing geometry. The light trapezoids represent the energy deposited in the tiles of the calorimeter depicted as a thick disk. On the evening of June 21, the ATLAS detector, now being installed in the underground experimental hall UX15, reached an important psychological milestone: the barrel Tile calorimeter recorded the first cosmic ray events in the underground cavern. An estimated million cosmic muons enter the ATLAS cavern every 3 minutes, and the ATLAS team decided to make good use of some of them for the commissioning of the detector. Although only 8 of the 128 calorimeter slices ('superdrawers') were included in the trigg...

  4. Radionuclides in an underground environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    In the 100 years since Becquerel recognized radioactivity, mankind has been very successful in producing large amounts of radioactive materials. We have been less successful in reaching a consensus on how to dispose of the billions of curies of fission products and transuranics resulting from nuclear weapons testing, electrical power generation, medical research, and a variety of other human endeavors. Many countries, including the United States, favor underground burial as a means of disposing of radioactive wastes. There are, however, serious questions about how such buried wastes may behave in the underground environment and particularly how they might eventually contaminate water, air and soil resources on which we are dependent. This paper describes research done in the United States in the state of Nevada on the behavior of radioactive materials placed underground. During the last thirty years, a series of ''experiments'' conducted for other purposes (testing of nuclear weapons) have resulted in a wide variety of fission products and actinides being injected in rock strata both above and below the water table. Variables which seem to control the movement of these radionuclides include the physical form (occlusion versus surface deposition), the chemical oxidation state, sorption by mineral phases of the host rock, and the hydrologic properties of the medium. The information gained from these studies should be relevant to planning for remediation of nuclear facilities elsewhere in the world and for long-term storage of nuclear wastes

  5. Underground storage of carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Shoichi [Univ. of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku (Japan)

    1993-12-31

    Desk studies on underground storage of CO{sub 2} were carried out from 1990 to 1991 fiscal years by two organizations under contract with New Energy and Indestrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO). One group put emphasis on application of CO{sub 2} EOR (enhanced oil recovery), and the other covered various aspects of underground storage system. CO{sub 2} EOR is a popular EOR method in U.S. and some oil countries. At present, CO{sub 2} is supplied from natural CO{sub 2} reservoirs. Possible use of CO{sub 2} derived from fixed sources of industries is a main target of the study in order to increase oil recovery and storage CO{sub 2} under ground. The feasibility study of the total system estimates capacity of storage of CO{sub 2} as around 60 Gton CO{sub 2}, if worldwide application are realized. There exist huge volumes of underground aquifers which are not utilized usually because of high salinity. The deep aquifers can contain large amount of CO{sub 2} in form of compressed state, liquefied state or solution to aquifer. A preliminary technical and economical survey on the system suggests favorable results of 320 Gton CO{sub 2} potential. Technical problems are discussed through these studies, and economical aspects are also evaluated.

  6. Underground disposal of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1979-08-15

    Disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes by shallow land burial, emplacement in suitable abandoned mines, or by deep well injection and hydraulic fracturing has been practised in various countries for many years. In recent years considerable efforts have been devoted in most countries that have nuclear power programmes to developing and evaluating appropriate disposal systems for high-level and transuranium-bearing waste, and to studying the potential for establishing repositories in geological formations underlaying their territories. The symposium, organized jointly by the IAEA and OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency in cooperation with the Geological Survey of Finland, provided an authoritative account of the status of underground disposal programmes throughout the world in 1979. It was evidence of the experience that has been gained and the comprehensive investigations that have been performed to study various options for the underground disposal of radioactive waste since the last IAEA/NEA symposium on this topic (Disposal of Radioactive Waste into the Ground) was held in 1967 in Vienna. The 10 sessions covered the following topics: National programme and general studies, Disposal of solid waste at shallow depth and in rock caverns, underground disposal of liquid waste by deep well injection and hydraulic fracturing, Disposal in salt formations, Disposal in crystalline rocks and argillaceous sediments, Thermal aspects of disposal in deep geological formations, Radionuclide migration studies, Safety assessment and regulatory aspects.

  7. Reducing lighting electricity use in underground metro stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casals, Miquel; Gangolells, Marta; Forcada, Núria; Macarulla, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Lighting systems are big energy consumers in underground metro stations. • An adaptive lighting system strategy is developed for underground stations. • Dimming controls are based on station occupancy levels and maintenance cycles. • The k-means clustering technique is used to identify stations’ occupancy patterns. • Savings were found to amount to 255.47 MW h in 2 years for a case study metro network. - Abstract: Lighting systems are usually one of the largest electrical end-uses in underground metro stations. Taking into account that budget restrictions in publicly owned companies hinder energy efficiency retrofit projects that require high initial investments, affordable energy saving strategies are needed. This paper presents a low-cost approach for reducing lighting electricity use in underground stations, without affecting passengers’ comfort or the metro operator’s service. For this purpose, an adaptive lighting strategy of dimming the illuminance levels of artificial light sources has been developed. Dimming controls are based on the occupancy of the station, and the preventive maintenance and cleaning cycles of the luminaires. The stations’ monthly occupancy patterns are defined through the k-means clustering technique. To illustrate its effectiveness, the method was applied to 115 underground stations of the Barcelona metro network. The results revealed overall electricity savings of 255.47 MW h on a biannual basis, which represents 36.22% of the stations’ baseline lighting consumption. Individual energy savings were found to range from 25 to 87.5 MW h/year in the stations of the Barcelona metro network, depending on the number and profile of station users. The research findings will undoubtedly be useful for the future energy efficiency project plans of worldwide metro operators and managers of other underground spaces.

  8. Ground engineering principles and practices for underground coal mining

    CERN Document Server

    Galvin, J M

    2016-01-01

    This book teaches readers ground engineering principles and related mining and risk management practices associated with underground coal mining. It establishes the basic elements of risk management and the fundamental principles of ground behaviour and then applies these to the essential building blocks of any underground coal mining system, comprising excavations, pillars, and interactions between workings. Readers will also learn about types of ground support and reinforcement systems and their operating mechanisms. These elements provide the platform whereby the principles can be applied to mining practice and risk management, directed primarily to bord and pillar mining, pillar extraction, longwall mining, sub-surface and surface subsidence, and operational hazards. The text concludes by presenting the framework of risk-based ground control management systems for achieving safe workplaces and efficient mining operations. In addition, a comprehensive reference list provides additional sources of informati...

  9. Radiological criteria for underground nuclear tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, J.S.; Brownlee, R.R.; Costa, C.F.; Mueller, H.F.; Newman, R.W.

    1981-04-01

    The radiological criteria for the conduct of nuclear tests have undergone many revisions with the current criteria being 0.17 rad for uncontrolled populations and 0.5 rad for controllable populations. Their effect upon operations at the Nevada Test Site and the current off-site protective plans are reviewed for areas surrounding the Site. The few accidental releases that have occurred are used to establish estimates of probability of release and of hazard to the population. These are then put into context by comparing statistical data on other accidents and cataclysms. The guidelines established by DOE Manual Chapter MC-0524 have never been exceeded during the entire underground nuclear test program. The probability of real hazard to off-site populations appears to be sufficiently low as not to cause undue concern to the citizenry

  10. Radiological criteria for underground nuclear tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, J.S.; Brownlee, R.R.; Costa, C.F.; Mueller, H.F.; Newman, R.W.

    1981-04-01

    The radiological criteria for the conduct of nuclear tests have undergone many revisions with the current criteria being 0.17 rad for uncontrolled populations and 0.5 rad for controllable populations. Their effect upon operations at the Nevada Test Site and the current off-site protective plans are reviewed for areas surrounding the Site. The few accidental releases that have occurred are used to establish estimates of probability of release and of hazard to the population. These are then put into context by comparing statistical data on other accidents and cataclysms. The guidelines established by DOE Manual Chapter MC-0524 have never been exceeded during the entire underground nuclear test program. The probability of real hazard to off-site populations appears to be sufficiently low as not to cause undue concern to the citizenry.

  11. A Seemingly Simple Task: Filling a Solenoid Volume in Vacuum with Dense Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Roy, Prabir; Oks, Efim

    2010-01-01

    Space-charge neutralization of a pulsed, high-current ion beam is required to compress and focus the beam on a target for warm dense matter physics or heavy ion fusion experiments. We described attempts to produce dense plasma in and near the final focusing solenoid through which the ion beam travels, thereby providing an opportunity for the beam to acquire the necessary charge-compensating electrons. Among the options are plasma injection from four pulsed vacuum arc sources located outside the solenoid, and using a high current (> 4 kA) pulsed vacuum arc plasma from a ring cathode near the edge of the solenoid. The plasma distribution is characterized by photographic means and by an array of movable Langmuir probes. The plasma is produced at several cathode spots distributed azimuthally on the ring cathode. Beam neutralization and compression are accomplished, though issues of density, uniformity, and pulse-to-pulse reproducibly remain to be solved.

  12. Coherent states of non-relativistic electron in the magnetic-solenoid field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagrov, V G; Gavrilov, S P; Filho, D P Meira; Gitman, D M

    2010-01-01

    In the present work we construct coherent states in the magnetic-solenoid field, which is a superposition of the Aharonov-Bohm field and a collinear uniform magnetic field. In the problem under consideration there are two kinds of coherent states, those which correspond to classical trajectories which embrace the solenoid and those which do not. The constructed coherent states reproduce exactly classical trajectories, maintain their form under the time evolution and form a complete set of functions, which can be useful in semiclassical calculations. In the absence of the solenoid field these states are reduced to the well known in the case of uniform magnetic field Malkin-Man'ko coherent states.

  13. Coherent states of non-relativistic electron in the magnetic-solenoid field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrov, V G [Department of Physics, Tomsk State University, 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Gavrilov, S P; Filho, D P Meira [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gitman, D M, E-mail: bagrov@phys.tsu.r, E-mail: gavrilovsergeyp@yahoo.co, E-mail: gitman@dfn.if.usp.b, E-mail: dmeira@dfn.if.usp.b [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, CP 66318, CEP 05315-970 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-09-03

    In the present work we construct coherent states in the magnetic-solenoid field, which is a superposition of the Aharonov-Bohm field and a collinear uniform magnetic field. In the problem under consideration there are two kinds of coherent states, those which correspond to classical trajectories which embrace the solenoid and those which do not. The constructed coherent states reproduce exactly classical trajectories, maintain their form under the time evolution and form a complete set of functions, which can be useful in semiclassical calculations. In the absence of the solenoid field these states are reduced to the well known in the case of uniform magnetic field Malkin-Man'ko coherent states.

  14. Electrons in a positive-ion beam with solenoid or quadrupole magnetic transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Cohen, R.; Coleman, J.; Sharp, W.; Bieniosek, F.; Friedman, A.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.M.; Faltens, A.; Vay, J.L.; Prost, L.

    2007-01-01

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) is used to study beam transport and accumulation of electrons in quadrupole magnets and the Neutralized Drift-Compression Experiment (NDCX) to study beam transport through and accumulation of electrons in magnetic solenoids. We find that both clearing and suppressor electrodes perform as intended, enabling electron cloud densities to be minimized. Then, the measured beam envelopes in both quadrupoles and solenoids agree with simulations, indicating that theoretical beam current transport limits are reliable, in the absence of electrons. At the other extreme, reversing electrode biases with the solenoid transport effectively traps electrons; or, in quadrupole magnets, grounding the suppressor electrode allows electron emission from the end wall to flood the beam, in both cases producing significant degradation in the beam

  15. Novel MEMS-based fabrication technology of micro solenoid-type inductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, S; Yang, Z Q; Takagi, H; Itoh, T; Maeda, R; Zhang, Y; Toda, A; Hayase, M

    2013-01-01

    Solenoid configuration of micro inductor, which has advantages of high quality factor and low loss, is needed in micro energy and power electronics applications but it is difficult to prepare using conventional microfabrication processes. In this work, we present a new microelectromechanical systems-based technology of micro solenoid-type inductor by a newly developed cylindrical projection photolithography method. Direct electroplating process of copper film on coil patterns was also successfully developed for achieving thick windings so that thick photoresist-based electroplating molds are not needed. Micro solenoid-type inductor prototypes of the winding pitch of about 40 µm, the winding number of 20 and 50, and the winding thickness of about 14 µm, were successfully fabricated on a 1 mm diameter glass capillary. The prepared 20-turn and 50-turn micro inductors were of inductance of 69 and 205 nH at 30 MHz, respectively. (paper)

  16. Dynamic analysis of fast-acting solenoid valves using finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Ki Tae; Han, Hwa Taik

    2001-01-01

    It is intended to develop an algorithm for dynamic simulation of fast-acting solenoid valves. The coupled equations of the electric, magnetic, and mechanical systems should be solved simultaneously in a transient nonlinear manner. The transient nonlinear electromagnetic field is analyzed by the Finite Element Method (FEM), which is coupled with nonlinear electronic circuitry. The dynamic movement of the solenoid valve is analyzed at every time step from the force balances acting on the plunger, which include the electromagnetic force calculated from the finite element analysis as well as the elastic force by a spring and the hydrodynamic pressure force along the flow passage. Dynamic responses of the solenoid valves predicted by this algorithm agree well the experimental results including bouncing effects

  17. Behavior of moving plasma in solenoidal magnetic field in a laser ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, S.; Takahashi, K.; Okamura, M.; Horioka, K.

    2016-01-01

    In a laser ion source, a solenoidal magnetic field is useful to guide the plasma and to control the extracted beam current. However, the behavior of the plasma drifting in the magnetic field has not been well understood. Therefore, to investigate the behavior, we measured the plasma ion current and the total charge within a single pulse in the solenoid by changing the distance from the entrance of the solenoid to a detector. We observed that the decrease of the total charge along the distance became smaller as the magnetic field became larger and then the charge became almost constant with a certain magnetic flux density. The results indicate that the transverse spreading speed of the plasma decreased with increasing the field and the plasma was confined transversely with the magnetic flux density. We found that the reason of the confinement was not magnetization of ions but an influence induced by electrons

  18. A feasibility study of a linear laser heated solenoid fusion reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.

    1976-02-01

    This report examines the feasibility of a laser heated solenoid as a fusion or fusion-fission reactor system. The objective of this study, was an assessment of the laser heated solenoid reactor concept in terms of its plasma physics, engineering design, and commercial feasibility. Within the study many pertinent reactor aspects were treated including: physics of the laser-plasma interaction; thermonuclear behavior of a slender plasma column; end-losses under reactor conditions; design of a modular first wall, a hybrid (both superconducting and normal) magnet, a large CO 2 laser system; reactor blanket; electrical storage elements; neutronics; radiation damage, and tritium processing. Self-consistent reactor configurations were developed for both pure fusion and fusion-fission designs, with the latter designed both to produce power and/or fissile fuels for conventional fission reactors. Appendix A is a bibliography with commentary of theoretical and experimental studies that have been directed at the laser heated solenoid

  19. Behavior of moving plasma in solenoidal magnetic field in a laser ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, S., E-mail: ikeda.s.ae@m.titech.ac.jp [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502 (Japan); Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0108 (Japan); Takahashi, K. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2137 (Japan); Okamura, M. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States); Horioka, K. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    In a laser ion source, a solenoidal magnetic field is useful to guide the plasma and to control the extracted beam current. However, the behavior of the plasma drifting in the magnetic field has not been well understood. Therefore, to investigate the behavior, we measured the plasma ion current and the total charge within a single pulse in the solenoid by changing the distance from the entrance of the solenoid to a detector. We observed that the decrease of the total charge along the distance became smaller as the magnetic field became larger and then the charge became almost constant with a certain magnetic flux density. The results indicate that the transverse spreading speed of the plasma decreased with increasing the field and the plasma was confined transversely with the magnetic flux density. We found that the reason of the confinement was not magnetization of ions but an influence induced by electrons.

  20. GigaGauss solenoidal magnetic field inside bubbles excited in under-dense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lécz, Zs.; Konoplev, I. V.; Seryi, A.; Andreev, A.

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel and effective method for generating GigaGauss level, solenoidal quasi-static magnetic fields in under-dense plasma using screw-shaped high intensity laser pulses. This method produces large solenoidal fields that move with the driving laser pulse and are collinear with the accelerated electrons. This is in contrast with already known techniques which rely on interactions with over-dense or solid targets and generates radial or toroidal magnetic field localized at the stationary target. The solenoidal field is quasi-stationary in the reference frame of the laser pulse and can be used for guiding electron beams. It can also provide synchrotron radiation beam emittance cooling for laser-plasma accelerated electron and positron beams, opening up novel opportunities for designs of the light sources, free electron lasers, and high energy colliders based on laser plasma acceleration.

  1. Behavior of moving plasma in solenoidal magnetic field in a laser ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, S.; Takahashi, K.; Okamura, M.; Horioka, K.

    2016-02-01

    In a laser ion source, a solenoidal magnetic field is useful to guide the plasma and to control the extracted beam current. However, the behavior of the plasma drifting in the magnetic field has not been well understood. Therefore, to investigate the behavior, we measured the plasma ion current and the total charge within a single pulse in the solenoid by changing the distance from the entrance of the solenoid to a detector. We observed that the decrease of the total charge along the distance became smaller as the magnetic field became larger and then the charge became almost constant with a certain magnetic flux density. The results indicate that the transverse spreading speed of the plasma decreased with increasing the field and the plasma was confined transversely with the magnetic flux density. We found that the reason of the confinement was not magnetization of ions but an influence induced by electrons.

  2. UNDERGROUND-1: ICARUS prepares to fly; UNDERGROUND-2: New Soudan detector nears completion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Operating at CERN since 1991 is a 3-tonne liquid argon time projection chamber, a detector breakthrough which combines the visual advantages of bubble chamber tracks with the flexibility of fully electronic data acquisition. The 3-tonne chamber is a prototype for a much larger configuration for the ICARUS* solar neutrino and proton decay detector to be installed in the Italian Gran Sasso underground laboratory. ICARUS (Imaging Cosmic And Rare Underground Signals) is built around the cryogenic imaging chamber idea initially proposed by Carlo Rubbia in 1977. With electrons drifting for a relatively long time (several milliseconds) and with sensitive amplifiers picking up the ionization from just a few millimetres of track, events can be imaged inside the cryogenic volume. A special arrangement of readout wires provides drift time measurements and ensures simultaneous imaging in several different views. The prototype has shown that the challenges of obtaining ultra-pure argon and operating readout techniques for large sensitive volumes have been met. The full ICARUS detector (with three liquid argon modules each containing 5,000 tonnes) will be able to detect low energy electrons (down to a few MeV) emerging from solar neutrino interactions, proton decays, or other rare events over a large volume

  3. UNDERGROUND-1: ICARUS prepares to fly; UNDERGROUND-2: New Soudan detector nears completion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1993-04-15

    Operating at CERN since 1991 is a 3-tonne liquid argon time projection chamber, a detector breakthrough which combines the visual advantages of bubble chamber tracks with the flexibility of fully electronic data acquisition. The 3-tonne chamber is a prototype for a much larger configuration for the ICARUS* solar neutrino and proton decay detector to be installed in the Italian Gran Sasso underground laboratory. ICARUS (Imaging Cosmic And Rare Underground Signals) is built around the cryogenic imaging chamber idea initially proposed by Carlo Rubbia in 1977. With electrons drifting for a relatively long time (several milliseconds) and with sensitive amplifiers picking up the ionization from just a few millimetres of track, events can be imaged inside the cryogenic volume. A special arrangement of readout wires provides drift time measurements and ensures simultaneous imaging in several different views. The prototype has shown that the challenges of obtaining ultra-pure argon and operating readout techniques for large sensitive volumes have been met. The full ICARUS detector (with three liquid argon modules each containing 5,000 tonnes) will be able to detect low energy electrons (down to a few MeV) emerging from solar neutrino interactions, proton decays, or other rare events over a large volume.

  4. Development of a permanent magnet alternative for a solenoidal ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, J.; Fahy, A.; Barr, M. [Centre for Organic Electronics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Jardine, A.; Allison, W. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Dastoor, P.C., E-mail: Paul.Dastoor@newcastle.edu.au [Centre for Organic Electronics, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)

    2014-12-01

    The most sensitive desktop-sized ionizer utilising electron bombardment is currently the solenoidal ion source. We present an alternate design for such an ion source whereby the solenoidal windings of the electromagnet are replaced by a shaped cylindrical permanent magnet in order to reduce the complexity and running costs of the instrument. Through finite element modelling of the magnetic field in COMSOL and experimental measurements on a small-scale prototype magnet stack, we demonstrate the required shape of the permanent magnet in order to generate the needed field, and the necessity of soft iron collars to smooth fluctuations along the central axis.

  5. Conceptual design of the Mu2e production solenoid cold mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, V.V.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Lamm, M.; Mokhov, N.V.; Nicol, T.H.; Page, T.M.; Pronskikh, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    The Muon-to-Electron conversion experiment (Mu2e), under development at Fermilab, seeks to detect direct muon to electron conversion to provide evidence for a process violating muon and electron lepton number conservation that cannot be explained by the Standard Model of particle physics. The required magnetic field is produced by a series of superconducting solenoids of various apertures and lengths. This paper describes the conceptual design of the 5 T, 4 m long solenoid cold mass with 1.67 m bore with the emphasis on the magnetic, radiation and thermal analyses.

  6. ASME XI stroke time testing of solenoid valves at Connecticut Yankee Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, C.W.

    1996-12-01

    Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company has developed the capability of measuring the stroke times of AC and DC solenoid valves. This allows the station to measure the stroke time of any solenoid valve in the plant, even those valves which do not have valve stem position indicators. Connecticut Yankee has adapted the ITI MOVATS Checkmate 3 system, using a signal input from a Bruel and Kjaer (B&K) Model 4382 acoustic accelerometer and the Schaumberg Campbell Associates (SCA) Model SCA-1148 dual sensor, which is a combined accelerometer and gaussmeter.

  7. Fabrication of a solenoid-type inductor with Fe-based soft magnetic core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Chong; Zhou Yong; Gao Xiaoyu; Ding Wen; Cao Ying; Choi, Hyung; Won, Jonghwa

    2007-01-01

    A solenoid-type inductor was fabricated by MEMS (Microelectromechanical systems) technique. The fabrication process uses UV-LIGA, dry etching, fine polishing, and electroplating technique to achieve high performance of the solenoid-type inductor. Fe-based soft magnetic thin film was sputtered as the magnetic core, and polyimide was used as the insulation materials. The inductor was in size of 4x4 mm with coil width of 20 μm and space of 35 μm. The inductance is 1.61 μH at a frequency of 5 MHz with the maximum quality factor of 1.42

  8. Design of wide flat-topped low transverse field solenoid magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Xiaobing; Chen Nan; Li Qin

    2010-01-01

    A wide flat-topped low transverse error field solenoid magnet design for linear induction accelerator is presented. The design features non-uniform winding to reduce field fluctuation due to the magnets' gap, and homogenizer rings within the solenoid to greatly reduce the effects of winding errors. Numerical modeling of several designs for 12 MeV linear induction accelerator (LIA) in China Academy of Engineering Physics has demonstrated that by using these two techniques the magnetic field fluctuations in the accelerator gap can be reduced by 70% and the transverse error field can be reduced by 96.5%. (authors)

  9. Force characteristics of solenoid electromagnet with ferromagnetic disc in the coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueorgiev, Vultchan; Yatchev, Ivan; Alexandrov, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents the construction and characteristics of a solenoid electromagnet with ferromagnetic disc placed in the coil. The presence if the disc leads to change of the force characteristic compared with conventional solenoid electromagnets - increasing the force at large air gaps and decreasing the force at small air gaps. This could be very useful for some actuators. It has been studied how the force characteristic depend on disc size, position and material. Finite element method has been used for field and force calculations of the electromagnet. (Author)

  10. Development of solenoid-induced helical wiggler with four poles per period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohigashi, N.; Tsunawaki, Y.; Kiyochi, M.; Nakao, N.; Fujita, M.; Imasaki, K.; Nakai, S.; Mima, K.

    1999-01-01

    A new type of helical wiggler consisting of two staggered-iron arrays inserted into a solenoid field has been developed. The field measured by a test wiggler showed linear increment with the period. It was seen that 24% of the solenoid field contributed to the induced wiggler field when the gap length and the period of the wiggler were 16 and 24 mm, respectively. This wiggler would be useful for an FEL with a low-energy electron beam propagating in a strong axial guiding field

  11. ASME XI stroke time testing of solenoid valves at Connecticut Yankee Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company has developed the capability of measuring the stroke times of AC and DC solenoid valves. This allows the station to measure the stroke time of any solenoid valve in the plant, even those valves which do not have valve stem position indicators. Connecticut Yankee has adapted the ITI MOVATS Checkmate 3 system, using a signal input from a Bruel and Kjaer (B ampersand K) Model 4382 acoustic accelerometer and the Schaumberg Campbell Associates (SCA) Model SCA-1148 dual sensor, which is a combined accelerometer and gaussmeter

  12. CO2-laser--produced plasma columns in a solenoidal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offenberger, A.A.; Cervenan, M.R.; Smy, P.R.

    1976-01-01

    A 1-GW CO 2 laser pulse has been used to produce extended column breakdown of hydrogen at low pressure in a 20-cm-long solenoid. Magnetic fields of up to 110 kG were used to inhibit radial losses of the plasma column. A differential pumping scheme was devised to prevent formation of an opaque absorption wave travelling out of the solenoid back toward the focusing lens. Target burns give direct evidence for trapped laser beam propagation along the plasma column

  13. Development of solenoid-induced helical wiggler with four poles per period

    CERN Document Server

    Ohigashi, N; Kiyochi, M; Nakao, N; Fujita, M; Imasaki, K; Nakai, S; Mima, K

    1999-01-01

    A new type of helical wiggler consisting of two staggered-iron arrays inserted into a solenoid field has been developed. The field measured by a test wiggler showed linear increment with the period. It was seen that 24% of the solenoid field contributed to the induced wiggler field when the gap length and the period of the wiggler were 16 and 24 mm, respectively. This wiggler would be useful for an FEL with a low-energy electron beam propagating in a strong axial guiding field.

  14. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Yamamoto, T; Sekine, M; Okamura, M

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (∼100 μA) with high charge (∼10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  15. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, K.; Okamura, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Sekine, M.

    2012-01-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (∼100 μA) with high charge (∼10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  16. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion sourcea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Sekine, M.; Okamura, M.

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (˜100 μA) with high charge (˜10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  17. Construction experiences from underground works at Oskarshamn. Compilation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, Anders (Vattenfall Power Consultant AB, Stockholm (SE)); Christiansson, Rolf (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (SE))

    2007-12-15

    The main objective with this report is to compile experiences from the underground works carried out at Oskarshamn, primarily construction experiences from the tunnelling of the cooling water tunnels of the Oskarshamn nuclear power units 1,2 and 3, from the underground excavations of Clab 1 and 2 (Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel), and Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. In addition, an account is given of the operational experience of Clab 1 and 2 and of the Aespoe HRL on primarily scaling and rock support solutions. This report, as being a compilation report, is in its substance based on earlier published material as presented in the list of references. Approximately 8,000 m of tunnels including three major rock caverns with a total volume of about 550,000 m3 have been excavated. The excavation works of the various tunnels and rock caverns were carried out during the period of 1966-2000. In addition, minor excavation works were carried out at the Aespoe HRL in 2003. The depth location of the underground structures varies from near surface down to 450 m. As an overall conclusion it may be said that the rock mass conditions in the area are well suited for underground construction. This conclusion is supported by the experiences from the rock excavation works in the Simpevarp and Aespoe area. These works have shown that no major problems occurred during the excavation works; nor have any stability or other rock engineering problems of significance been identified after the commissioning of the Oskarshamn nuclear power units O1, O2 and O3, BFA, Clab 1 and 2, and Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. The underground structures of these facilities were built according to plan, and since than been operated as planned. Thus, the quality of the rock mass within the construction area is such that it lends itself to excavation of large rock caverns with a minimum of rock support

  18. Construction experiences from underground works at Oskarshamn. Compilation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, Anders; Christiansson, Rolf

    2007-12-01

    The main objective with this report is to compile experiences from the underground works carried out at Oskarshamn, primarily construction experiences from the tunnelling of the cooling water tunnels of the Oskarshamn nuclear power units 1,2 and 3, from the underground excavations of Clab 1 and 2 (Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel), and Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. In addition, an account is given of the operational experience of Clab 1 and 2 and of the Aespoe HRL on primarily scaling and rock support solutions. This report, as being a compilation report, is in its substance based on earlier published material as presented in the list of references. Approximately 8,000 m of tunnels including three major rock caverns with a total volume of about 550,000 m 3 have been excavated. The excavation works of the various tunnels and rock caverns were carried out during the period of 1966-2000. In addition, minor excavation works were carried out at the Aespoe HRL in 2003. The depth location of the underground structures varies from near surface down to 450 m. As an overall conclusion it may be said that the rock mass conditions in the area are well suited for underground construction. This conclusion is supported by the experiences from the rock excavation works in the Simpevarp and Aespoe area. These works have shown that no major problems occurred during the excavation works; nor have any stability or other rock engineering problems of significance been identified after the commissioning of the Oskarshamn nuclear power units O1, O2 and O3, BFA, Clab 1 and 2, and Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. The underground structures of these facilities were built according to plan, and since than been operated as planned. Thus, the quality of the rock mass within the construction area is such that it lends itself to excavation of large rock caverns with a minimum of rock support

  19. A Psychosocial Approach to Understanding Underground Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun H. Lee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available With a growing need for usable land in urban areas, subterranean development has been gaining attention. While construction of large underground complexes is not a new concept, our understanding of various socio-cultural aspects of staying underground is still at a premature stage. With projected emergence of underground built environments, future populations may spend much more of their working, transit, and recreational time in underground spaces. Therefore, it is essential to understand the challenges and advantages that such environments have to improve the future welfare of users of underground spaces. The current paper discusses various psycho-social aspects of underground spaces, the impact they can have on the culture shared among the occupants, and possible solutions to overcome some of these challenges.

  20. Design of underground layout and their maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bok Youn; Kang, Chang Hee; Jo, Young Do; Lim, Sang Taek [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    Layout of underground structure has to be designed based on rock mechanical analysis and the concept of active support has to be adopted considering the large openings are requested to accommodate heavy duty diesel equipment in underground. Rock bolt and shotcrete will be the most applicable method to support such a large dimensional tunnels. 1) Direction: The main haulage way of the mines where diesel equipment are operating is ramp way system. For optimizing safety measures, and minimizing maintenance cost of the tunnels, it is strongly recommended that all the tunnels including ramp way, rooms and sublevels should be designed in parallel to the direction of principal stress and perpendicular to the direction of major discontinuity. 2) Inclination: Basically, the inclination of the ramp way depends on the specification of the equipment, but 10-15% is usual. The steep inclination needs less initial investment but there will be an adverse effects such as higher operating and maintenance costs. 3) Profile (Cross section): The maximum dimension of the equipment operating in local mines appeared 12.8m long, 3.705m wide and 3.68m high. Considering the dimension, the requested profile simply can be calculated to 4m x 4m, but it should be decided according to the regulated minimum clearances from the walls and roof. The minimum inner curvature radius of the tunnels should be more than 5.2m, and in this case, the tunnel width of the curved zone should be more than 5.5m. 4) Sight distance and braking distance: For the safe operation of the equipment, the sight distance must be longer than braking distance, so that the driver can hold up the equipment safely after finding the obstacles in front of him. The maximum braking distance without heating of brake shoe is 60m. 5) Support and maintenance: Due to the large dimensional tunnels where diesel equipment are operating, the conventional supporting system is not applicable. Therefore, the active support concept should be