WorldWideScience

Sample records for solar variability influences

  1. The influence of solar system oscillation on the variability of the total solar irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yndestad, Harald; Solheim, Jan-Erik

    2017-02-01

    Total solar irradiance (TSI) is the primary quantity of energy that is provided to the Earth. The properties of the TSI variability are critical for understanding the cause of the irradiation variability and its expected influence on climate variations. A deterministic property of TSI variability can provide information about future irradiation variability and expected long-term climate variation, whereas a non-deterministic variability can only explain the past. This study of solar variability is based on an analysis of two TSI data series, one since 1700 A.D. and one since 1000 A.D.; a sunspot data series since 1610 A.D.; and a solar orbit data series from 1000 A.D. The study is based on a wavelet spectrum analysis. First, the TSI data series are transformed into a wavelet spectrum. Then, the wavelet spectrum is transformed into an autocorrelation spectrum to identify stationary, subharmonic and coincidence periods in the TSI variability. The results indicate that the TSI and sunspot data series have periodic cycles that are correlated with the oscillations of the solar position relative to the barycenter of the solar system, which is controlled by gravity force variations from the large planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. A possible explanation for solar activity variations is forced oscillations between the large planets and the solar dynamo. We find that a stationary component of the solar variability is controlled by the 12-year Jupiter period and the 84-year Uranus period with subharmonics. For TSI and sunspot variations, we find stationary periods related to the 84-year Uranus period. Deterministic models based on the stationary periods confirm the results through a close relation to known long solar minima since 1000 A.D. and suggest a modern maximum period from 1940 to 2015. The model computes a new Dalton-type sunspot minimum from approximately 2025 to 2050 and a new Dalton-type period TSI minimum from approximately 2040 to 2065.

  2. The influence of solar wind variability on magnetospheric ULF wave power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokhotelov, D.; Rae, I.J.; Mann, I.R.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetospheric ultra-low frequency (ULF) oscillations in the Pc 4-5 frequency range play an important role in the dynamics of Earth's radiation belts, both by enhancing the radial diffusion through incoherent interactions and through the coherent drift-resonant interactions with trapped radiation belt electrons. The statistical distributions of magnetospheric ULF wave power are known to be strongly dependent on solar wind parameters such as solar wind speed and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation. Statistical characterisation of ULF wave power in the magnetosphere traditionally relies on average solar wind-IMF conditions over a specific time period. In this brief report, we perform an alternative characterisation of the solar wind influence on magnetospheric ULF wave activity through the characterisation of the solar wind driver by its variability using the standard deviation of solar wind parameters rather than a simple time average. We present a statistical study of nearly one solar cycle (1996-2004) of geosynchronous observations of magnetic ULF wave power and find that there is significant variation in ULF wave powers as a function of the dynamic properties of the solar wind. In particular, we find that the variability in IMF vector, rather than variabilities in other parameters (solar wind density, bulk velocity and ion temperature), plays the strongest role in controlling geosynchronous ULF power. We conclude that, although time-averaged bulk properties of the solar wind are a key factor in driving ULF powers in the magnetosphere, the solar wind variability can be an important contributor as well. This highlights the potential importance of including solar wind variability especially in studies of ULF wave dynamics in order to assess the efficiency of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling.

  3. The influence of solar wind variability on magnetospheric ULF wave power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pokhotelov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetospheric ultra-low frequency (ULF oscillations in the Pc 4–5 frequency range play an important role in the dynamics of Earth's radiation belts, both by enhancing the radial diffusion through incoherent interactions and through the coherent drift-resonant interactions with trapped radiation belt electrons. The statistical distributions of magnetospheric ULF wave power are known to be strongly dependent on solar wind parameters such as solar wind speed and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF orientation. Statistical characterisation of ULF wave power in the magnetosphere traditionally relies on average solar wind–IMF conditions over a specific time period. In this brief report, we perform an alternative characterisation of the solar wind influence on magnetospheric ULF wave activity through the characterisation of the solar wind driver by its variability using the standard deviation of solar wind parameters rather than a simple time average. We present a statistical study of nearly one solar cycle (1996–2004 of geosynchronous observations of magnetic ULF wave power and find that there is significant variation in ULF wave powers as a function of the dynamic properties of the solar wind. In particular, we find that the variability in IMF vector, rather than variabilities in other parameters (solar wind density, bulk velocity and ion temperature, plays the strongest role in controlling geosynchronous ULF power. We conclude that, although time-averaged bulk properties of the solar wind are a key factor in driving ULF powers in the magnetosphere, the solar wind variability can be an important contributor as well. This highlights the potential importance of including solar wind variability especially in studies of ULF wave dynamics in order to assess the efficiency of solar wind–magnetosphere coupling.

  4. Solar Variability and Planetary Climates

    CERN Document Server

    Calisesi, Y; Gray, L; Langen, J; Lockwood, M

    2007-01-01

    Variations in solar activity, as revealed by variations in the number of sunspots, have been observed since ancient times. To what extent changes in the solar output may affect planetary climates, though, remains today more than ever a subject of controversy. In 2000, the SSSI volume on Solar Variability and Climate reviewed the to-date understanding of the physics of solar variability and of the associated climate response. The present volume on Solar Variability and Planetary Climates provides an overview of recent advances in this field, with particular focus at the Earth's middle and lower atmosphere. The book structure mirrors that of the ISSI workshop held in Bern in June 2005, the collection of invited workshop contributions and of complementary introductory papers synthesizing the current understanding in key research areas such as middle atmospheric processes, stratosphere-troposphere dynamical coupling, tropospheric aerosols chemistry, solar storm influences, solar variability physics, and terrestri...

  5. Understanding Solar Cycle Variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, R. H.; Schüssler, M., E-mail: cameron@mps.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2017-07-10

    The level of solar magnetic activity, as exemplified by the number of sunspots and by energetic events in the corona, varies on a wide range of timescales. Most prominent is the 11-year solar cycle, which is significantly modulated on longer timescales. Drawing from dynamo theory, together with the empirical results of past solar activity and similar phenomena for solar-like stars, we show that the variability of the solar cycle can be essentially understood in terms of a weakly nonlinear limit cycle affected by random noise. In contrast to ad hoc “toy models” for the solar cycle, this leads to a generic normal-form model, whose parameters are all constrained by observations. The model reproduces the characteristics of the variable solar activity on timescales between decades and millennia, including the occurrence and statistics of extended periods of very low activity (grand minima). Comparison with results obtained with a Babcock–Leighton-type dynamo model confirm the validity of the normal-mode approach.

  6. Experimental diagnosis of the influence of operational variables on the performance of a solar absorption cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venegas, M.; Rodriguez-Hidalgo, M.C.; Salgado, R.; Lecuona, A.; Rodriguez, P.; Gutierrez, G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of the performance of a solar cooling facility along one summer season using a commercial single-effect water-lithium bromide absorption chiller aiming at domestic applications. The facility works only with solar energy using flat plate collectors and it is located at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Spain. The statistical analysis performed with the gathered data shows the influence of five daily operational variables on the system performance. These variables are solar energy received along the day (H) and the average values, along the operating period of the solar cooling facility (from sunrise to the end of the cold-water production), of the ambient temperature (T -bar ), the wind velocity magnitude (V), the wind direction (θ) and the relative humidity (RH). First order correlation functions are given. The analysis of the data allows concluding that the most influential variables on the daily cooling energy produced and the daily averaged solar COP are H, V and θ. The period length of cold-water production is determined mainly by H and T -bar .

  7. Experimental diagnosis of the influence of operational variables on the performance of a solar absorption cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venegas, M.; Rodriguez-Hidalgo, M.C.; Lecuona, A.; Rodriguez, P.; Gutierrez, G. [Dpto. Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Salgado, R. [Dpto. Ingenieria Mecanica, Universidad Interamericana de Puerto Rico, Recinto de Bayamon, 500 Carretera Dr. John Will Harris Bayamon, PR 00957-6257 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    This paper presents the analysis of the performance of a solar cooling facility along one summer season using a commercial single-effect water-lithium bromide absorption chiller aiming at domestic applications. The facility works only with solar energy using flat plate collectors and it is located at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Spain. The statistical analysis performed with the gathered data shows the influence of five daily operational variables on the system performance. These variables are solar energy received along the day (H) and the average values, along the operating period of the solar cooling facility (from sunrise to the end of the cold-water production), of the ambient temperature (anti T), the wind velocity magnitude (V), the wind direction ({theta}) and the relative humidity (RH). First order correlation functions are given. The analysis of the data allows concluding that the most influential variables on the daily cooling energy produced and the daily averaged solar COP are H, V and {theta}. The period length of cold-water production is determined mainly by H and anti T. (author)

  8. Solar variability and clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkby, Jasper

    2000-01-01

    Satellite observations have revealed a surprising imprint of the 11- year solar cycle on global low cloud cover. The cloud data suggest a correlation with the intensity of Galactic cosmic rays. If this apparent connection between cosmic rays and clouds is real, variations of the cosmic ray flux caused by long-term changes in the solar wind could have a significant influence on the global energy radiation budget and the climate. However a direct link between cosmic rays and clouds has not been unambiguously established and, moreover, the microphysical mechanism is poorly understood. New experiments are being planned to find out whether cosmic rays can affect cloud formation, and if so how. (37 refs).

  9. 10Be and δ2H in polar ice cores as a probe of the solar variability's influence on climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisbeck, G.M.; Yiou, F.; Jouzel, J.; Domaine Univ., 38 - St-Martin-d'Heres; Petit, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    By using the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry, it is now possible to measure detailed profiles of cosmogenic (cosmic ray produced) 10 Be in polar ice cores. Recent work has demonstrated that these profiles contain information on solar activity, via its influence on the intensity of galactic cosmic rays arriving in the Earth's atmosphere. It has been known for some time that, as a result of temperature-dependent fractionation effects, the stable isotope profiles δ 2 O and δ 2 H in polar ice cores contain palaeoclimate information. Thus by comparing the 10 Be and stable isotope profiles in the same ice core, one can test the influence of solar variability on climate, and this independent of possible uncertainties in the absolute chronology of the records. We present here the results of such a comparison for two Antarctic ice cores; one from the South Pole, covering the past ca. 1000 years, and one from Dome C, covering the past ca. 3000 years. (author)

  10. Solar-cosmic-ray variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reedy, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    The maximum flux of particles from solar events that should be considered in designing the shielding for a space habitation is discussed. The activities of various radionuclides measured in the top few centimeters of lunar rocks are used to examine the variability of solar cosmic ray fluxes over the last five million years. 10 references

  11. Solar Variability Magnitudes and Timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Greg

    2015-08-01

    The Sun’s net radiative output varies on timescales of minutes to many millennia. The former are directly observed as part of the on-going 37-year long total solar irradiance climate data record, while the latter are inferred from solar proxy and stellar evolution models. Since the Sun provides nearly all the energy driving the Earth’s climate system, changes in the sunlight reaching our planet can have - and have had - significant impacts on life and civilizations.Total solar irradiance has been measured from space since 1978 by a series of overlapping instruments. These have shown changes in the spatially- and spectrally-integrated radiant energy at the top of the Earth’s atmosphere from timescales as short as minutes to as long as a solar cycle. The Sun’s ~0.01% variations over a few minutes are caused by the superposition of convection and oscillations, and even occasionally by a large flare. Over days to weeks, changing surface activity affects solar brightness at the ~0.1% level. The 11-year solar cycle has comparable irradiance variations with peaks near solar maxima.Secular variations are harder to discern, being limited by instrument stability and the relatively short duration of the space-borne record. Proxy models of the Sun based on cosmogenic isotope records and inferred from Earth climate signatures indicate solar brightness changes over decades to millennia, although the magnitude of these variations depends on many assumptions. Stellar evolution affects yet longer timescales and is responsible for the greatest solar variabilities.In this talk I will summarize the Sun’s variability magnitudes over different temporal ranges, showing examples relevant for climate studies as well as detections of exo-solar planets transiting Sun-like stars.

  12. A mechanism for solar ultraviolet flux variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatten, K.H.; Heath, D.F.

    1981-01-01

    Solar UV emission observed by a filter photometer on Nimbus IV from 1969 to 1973 is examined in an attempt to understand the short term (27 day) and secular variability. Two models are discussed to explain the variations - a calcium plage model and a chromospheric network (faculae and spicule) structure model. Both relate to the remnant magnetic fields of active regions. An association between UV brightenings and the large scale magnetic field has been found consistent with the network model. An increase in UV emittance can be achieved by raising the effective chromospheric temperature closer to a photospheric level. If the Sun's luminosity is constant on these time intervals the enhanced UV radiation could be partially offset by an overall decrease in photospheric temperature as measured by Livingston in visible photospheric profiles. Total solar luminosity may then show less variability, however, the UV to visible luminosity variation may have significant planetary influences. Lockwood and Thompson (1979) report a relation between solar activity and planetary albedos, and Schatten (1979) discussed a long-suspected relationship between solar activity and the Great Red Spot appearance. (orig.)

  13. Solar influences on global change

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Board on Global Change, National Research Council

    .... Important advances over the past decade in our knowledge of the Sun and of the terrestrial responses to solar variability provides the basis for answering this question with unprecedented surety...

  14. Solar influence on Earth's climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, N.; Svensmark, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    An increasing number of studies indicate that variations in solar activity have had a significant influence on Earth's climate. However, the mechanisms responsible for a solar influence are still not known. One possibility is that atmospheric transparency is influenced by changing cloud properties...... and thereby influence the radiative properties of clouds. If the GCR-Cloud link is confirmed variations in galactic cosmic ray flux, caused by changes in solar activity and the space environment, could influence Earth's radiation budget....... via cosmic ray ionisation (the latter being modulated by solar activity). Support for this idea is found from satellite observations of cloud cover. Such data have revealed a striking correlation between the intensity of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and low liquid clouds (

  15. The solar forcing on the ground 7 Be concentration variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talpos, S.; Borsan, D.H.

    2002-01-01

    7 Be, natural radionuclide, is produced by the interaction of cosmic radiation with oxygen and nitrogen molecules. 7 Be production in atmosphere depends on the intensity of cosmic radiation which is influenced by the Earth's magnetosphere. The magnetosphere shape depends on solar activity. This paper presents the influence of sunspots number (11 years period) on the ground 7 Be concentration variability. (authors)

  16. Long-Period Solar Variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GAUTHIER,JOHN H.

    2000-07-20

    Terrestrial climate records and historical observations of the Sun suggest that the Sun undergoes aperiodic oscillations in radiative output and size over time periods of centuries and millenia. Such behavior can be explained by the solar convective zone acting as a nonlinear oscillator, forced at the sunspot-cycle frequency by variations in heliomagnetic field strength. A forced variant of the Lorenz equations can generate a time series with the same characteristics as the solar and climate records. The timescales and magnitudes of oscillations that could be caused by this mechanism are consistent with what is known about the Sun and terrestrial climate.

  17. The effects of solar variability on climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffert, M.I.

    1990-01-01

    It has been hypothesized for at least a century that some of the observed variance in global temperature records arises from variations in solar output. Theories of solar-variability effects on climate could not be tested directly prior to satellite measurements because uncertainties in ground-based measurements of solar irradiance were larger than the solar variations themselves. Measurements by the Active Cavity Radiometer (ACRIM) onboard the Solar Max satellite and by the Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) instrument onboard Nimbus 6 are now available which indicate solar-constant variations are positively correlated with solar activity over an 11-yr solar cycle, and are of order ± 1.0 W m -2 relative to a mean solar constant of S 0 = 1,367 W m -2 , ΔS/S 0 ∼ ± 0.07%. For a typical climate sensitivity parameter of β = S 0 ∂T/∂S ∼ 100 C, the corresponding variations in radiative equilibrium temperature at the Earth's surface are ΔT e ∼ ± 0.07 C. The realized temperature variations from solar forcing, ΔT, can be significantly smaller because of thermal damping by the ocean. The author considers effects of solar variability on the observed and projected history of the global temperature record in light of this data using an upwelling-diffusion ocean model to assess the effect of ocean thermal inertia on the thermal response. The response to harmonic variations of the 11-yr sunspot cycle is of order ΔT ∼ ± 0.02 C, though the coupling between response and forcing is stronger for long-term variations in the envelope of the solar cycle which more nearly match the thermal response time of the deep ocean

  18. Solar influences on global change

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Board on Global Change, National Research Council

    ..., but significant uncertainties remain. This book addresses current monitoring and understanding of solar influences on both the climate system and the ozone layer and prioritizes the research effort that will be needed to provide a sound scientific basis for policymaking related to global change issues.

  19. Solar cycle modulation of ENSO variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodera, Kunihiko; Thiéblemont, Rémi

    2016-04-01

    Inspired by the work of Labitzke and van Loon on solar/QBO modulation in the stratosphere, Barnett (1989) conducted an investigation on the relationship between the the biannual component of the sea surface temperature (SST) in the equatorial eastern Pacific and the solar activity. He found that the amplitude of biannual component of the SST (BO) is modulated by the 11-year solar cycle: the amplitude of the BO is large during a period of low solar activity, but small during high solar activity. More than 25-years or two solar cycle has passed since his finding, but the relationship still holds. In order to get an insight into the mechanism of the solar modulation of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), here we have revisited this problem. Solar cycle modulation of the BO in the tropical SST is discernible since the end of the 19th centuries, but the amplitude modulation is particularly clear after 1960's. The composite analysis of the SST based on the amplitude of the BO during 1958-2012, indicates that the amplitude of BO is larger when the equatorial Pacific temperature anomalies are high in the central Pacific, but low in the eastern Pacific. Central Pacific anomalies extend to the northern hemisphere, while those in the central Pacific spread toward the southern hemisphere. In short, this anomalous SST pattern is similar to the El Niño modoki. In this connection, it should be noted that the solar signal in the tropical SST also exhibits a similar pattern. This suggests that the modulation of the ENSO variability by the solar cycle originates through a modulation of the El Niño Modoki rather than the canonical El Nino.

  20. Solar Radiation Forecasting, Accounting for Daily Variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Langella

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Radiation forecast accounting for daily and instantaneous variability was pursued by means of a new bi-parametric statistical model that builds on a model previously proposed by the same authors. The statistical model is developed with direct reference to the Liu-Jordan clear sky theoretical expression but is not bound by a specific clear sky model; it accounts separately for the mean daily variability and for the variation of solar irradiance during the day by means of two corrective parameters. This new proposal allows for a better understanding of the physical phenomena and improves the effectiveness of statistical characterization and subsequent simulation of the introduced parameters to generate a synthetic solar irradiance time series. Furthermore, the analysis of the experimental distributions of the two parameters’ data was developed, obtaining opportune fittings by means of parametric analytical distributions or mixtures of more than one distribution. Finally, the model was further improved toward the inclusion of weather prediction information in the solar irradiance forecasting stage, from the perspective of overcoming the limitations of purely statistical approaches and implementing a new tool in the frame of solar irradiance prediction accounting for weather predictions over different time horizons.

  1. About hidden influence of predictor variables: Suppressor and mediator variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovanović Boško

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper procedure for researching hidden influence of predictor variables in regression models and depicting suppressor variables and mediator variables is shown. It is also shown that detection of suppressor variables and mediator variables could provide refined information about the research problem. As an example for applying this procedure, relation between Atlantic atmospheric centers and air temperature and precipitation amount in Serbia is chosen. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 47007

  2. Solar Storage Tank Insulation Influence on the Solar Systems Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negoitescu Arina

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available For the storage tank of a solar system for domestic hot water production was analyzed the insulation thickness and material influence. To this end, it was considered a private house, occupied by 3 persons, located in zone I of thermal radiation, for which has been simulated the domestic hot water production process. The tank outlet hot water temperature was considered of 45°C. For simulation purposes, as insulation materials for the storage tank were taking into account glass wool and polyurethane with various thicknesses. Finally, was carried out the comparative analysis of two types of tanks, in terms of the insulation thickness influence on the solar fraction, annual solar contribution and solar annual productivity. It resulted that polyurethane is the most advantageous from all points of view.

  3. Variability of fractal dimension of solar radio flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Hitaishi; Sharma, Som Kumar; Trivedi, Rupal; Vats, Hari Om

    2018-04-01

    In the present communication, the variation of the fractal dimension of solar radio flux is reported. Solar radio flux observations on a day to day basis at 410, 1415, 2695, 4995, and 8800 MHz are used in this study. The data were recorded at Learmonth Solar Observatory, Australia from 1988 to 2009 covering an epoch of two solar activity cycles (22 yr). The fractal dimension is calculated for the listed frequencies for this period. The fractal dimension, being a measure of randomness, represents variability of solar radio flux at shorter time-scales. The contour plot of fractal dimension on a grid of years versus radio frequency suggests high correlation with solar activity. Fractal dimension increases with increasing frequency suggests randomness increases towards the inner corona. This study also shows that the low frequency is more affected by solar activity (at low frequency fractal dimension difference between solar maximum and solar minimum is 0.42) whereas, the higher frequency is less affected by solar activity (here fractal dimension difference between solar maximum and solar minimum is 0.07). A good positive correlation is found between fractal dimension averaged over all frequencies and yearly averaged sunspot number (Pearson's coefficient is 0.87).

  4. On the Origins of the Intercorrelations Between Solar Wind Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    2018-01-01

    It is well known that the time variations of the diverse solar wind variables at 1 AU (e.g., solar wind speed, density, proton temperature, electron temperature, magnetic field strength, specific entropy, heavy-ion charge-state densities, and electron strahl intensity) are highly intercorrelated with each other. In correlation studies of the driving of the Earth's magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system by the solar wind, these solar wind intercorrelations make determining cause and effect very difficult. In this report analyses of solar wind spacecraft measurements and compressible-fluid computer simulations are used to study the origins of the solar wind intercorrelations. Two causes are found: (1) synchronized changes in the values of the solar wind variables as the plasma types of the solar wind are switched by solar rotation and (2) dynamic interactions (compressions and rarefactions) in the solar wind between the Sun and the Earth. These findings provide an incremental increase in the understanding of how the Sun-Earth system operates.

  5. Solar Irradiance Variability is Caused by the Magnetic Activity on the Solar Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Kok Leng; Solanki, Sami K; Norris, Charlotte M; Beeck, Benjamin; Unruh, Yvonne C; Krivova, Natalie A

    2017-09-01

    The variation in the radiative output of the Sun, described in terms of solar irradiance, is important to climatology. A common assumption is that solar irradiance variability is driven by its surface magnetism. Verifying this assumption has, however, been hampered by the fact that models of solar irradiance variability based on solar surface magnetism have to be calibrated to observed variability. Making use of realistic three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar atmosphere and state-of-the-art solar magnetograms from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present a model of total solar irradiance (TSI) that does not require any such calibration. In doing so, the modeled irradiance variability is entirely independent of the observational record. (The absolute level is calibrated to the TSI record from the Total Irradiance Monitor.) The model replicates 95% of the observed variability between April 2010 and July 2016, leaving little scope for alternative drivers of solar irradiance variability at least over the time scales examined (days to years).

  6. The solar forcing on the 7Be-air concentration variability at ground level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talpos, Simona

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyses the correlation between the temporal and spatial variability of 7 Be-air concentration at ground level and the amount of precipitation. There were used the measured data from 26 stations distributed on North America, South America, Australia and Antarctica. The variability study was made using EOF and principal components analysis. The presented results show that the variability of 7 Be air concentration at ground level is simultaneously influenced by the solar cycle and some atmospheric processes like precipitation, turbulent transport, advection, etc. The solar forcing on the 7 Be variability at ground level was outlined for time-scales longer than 1 year and can be considered a global phenomenon. The atmospheric processes influence the 7 Be variability for scale shorter than one year and can be considered a local phenomenon. (author)

  7. Study of solar radiation prediction and modeling of relationships between solar radiation and meteorological variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Huaiwei; Zhao, Na; Zeng, Xiaofan; Yan, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigate relationships between solar radiation and meteorological variables. • A strong relationship exists between solar radiation and sunshine duration. • Daily global radiation can be estimated accurately with ARMAX–GARCH models. • MGARCH model was applied to investigate time-varying relationships. - Abstract: The traditional approaches that employ the correlations between solar radiation and other measured meteorological variables are commonly utilized in studies. It is important to investigate the time-varying relationships between meteorological variables and solar radiation to determine which variables have the strongest correlations with solar radiation. In this study, the nonlinear autoregressive moving average with exogenous variable–generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (ARMAX–GARCH) and multivariate GARCH (MGARCH) time-series approaches were applied to investigate the associations between solar radiation and several meteorological variables. For these investigations, the long-term daily global solar radiation series measured at three stations from January 1, 2004 until December 31, 2007 were used in this study. Stronger relationships were observed to exist between global solar radiation and sunshine duration than between solar radiation and temperature difference. The results show that 82–88% of the temporal variations of the global solar radiation were captured by the sunshine-duration-based ARMAX–GARCH models and 55–68% of daily variations were captured by the temperature-difference-based ARMAX–GARCH models. The advantages of the ARMAX–GARCH models were also confirmed by comparison of Auto-Regressive and Moving Average (ARMA) and neutral network (ANN) models in the estimation of daily global solar radiation. The strong heteroscedastic persistency of the global solar radiation series was revealed by the AutoRegressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity (ARCH) and Generalized Auto

  8. Solar variability observed through changes in solar figure and mean diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, H.A.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of the project is to detect and monitor climatically significant solar variability by accurate monitoring of the associated variability in solar shape and diameter. The observing program for this project was initiated in 1981. Solar diameter measurements have been taken and data reduction programs for these measurements have been developed. Theoretical analysis of the expected change in the intensity from the solar atmosphere to a given mechanial driving has progressed to the extent that changes in the solar diameter can be related to the associated change in the solar luminosity. An absolute calibration system for the telescope has been constructed and is currently being tested. A proposal is made for the continuation of the work in each of these areas

  9. Solar variability observed through changes in solar figure and mean diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    The work performed on solar variability during 1990 at SCLERA is reviewed. That portion of the SCLERA research program supported by the Department of Energy has been directed toward the detection and monitoring of climatically significant solar variability by accurate measurement of the variability in solar shape and diameter. Observations were obtained in 1990 and results from analysis of earlier observations obtained. The observational evidence of systematic long-term changes in the apparent solar diameter and/or radius has been detected, and these changes continue to strongly correlated with long-term changes in solar total irradiance. Additional evidence for internal gravity modes has been found which may be important to understanding the internal structure of the Sun. Each of these findings shows promise for anticipating future changes in the solar luminosity. Progress has been made in setting up an international network based on SCLERA-type instruments to improve the coverage and quality of the observations. A proposal is made for the continuation of support from the Department of Energy for further studies relevant to solar-variability forecasting

  10. The Solar Dynamics Observatory, Studying the Sun and Its Influence on Other Bodies in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, P. C.

    2011-01-01

    The solar photon output, which was once thought to be constant, varies over all time scales from seconds during solar flares to years due to the solar cycle. These solar variations cause significant deviations in the Earth and space environments on similar time scales, such as affecting the atmospheric densities and composition of particular atoms, molecules, and ions in the atmospheres of the Earth and other planets. Presented and discussed will be examples of unprecedented observations from NASA's new solar observatory, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Using three specialized instruments, SDO measures the origins of solar activity from inside the Sun, though its atmosphere, then accurately measuring the Sun's radiative output in X-ray and EUV wavelengths (0.1-121 nm). Along with the visually appealing observations will be discussions of what these measurements can tell us about how the plasma motions in all layers of the Sun modifies and strengthens the weak solar dipole magnetic field to drive large energy releases in solar eruptions. Also presented will be examples of how the release of the Sun's energy, in the form of photons and high energy particles, physically influence other bodies in the solar system such as Earth, Mars, and the Moon, and how these changes drive changes in the technology that we are becoming dependent upon. The presentation will continuously emphasize how SDO, the first satellite in NASA's Living with a Star program, improving our understanding of the variable Sun and its Heliospheric influence.

  11. Variability of the Lyman alpha flux with solar activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lean, J.L.; Skumanich, A.

    1983-01-01

    A three-component model of the solar chromosphere, developed from ground based observations of the Ca II K chromospheric emission, is used to calculate the variability of the Lyman alpha flux between 1969 and 1980. The Lyman alpha flux at solar minimum is required in the model and is taken as 2.32 x 10 11 photons/cm 2 /s. This value occurred during 1975 as well as in 1976 near the commencement of solar cycle 21. The model predicts that the Lyman alpha flux increases to as much as 5 x 10 11 photons/cm 2 /s at the maximum of the solar cycle. The ratio of the average fluxes for December 1979 (cycle maximum) and July 1976 (cycle minimum) is 1.9. During solar maximum the 27-day solar rotation is shown to cause the Lyman alpha flux to vary by as much as 40% or as little as 5%. The model also shows that the Lyman alpha flux varies over intermediate time periods of 2 to 3 years, as well as over the 11-year sunspot cycle. We conclude that, unlike the sunspot number and the 10.7-cm radio flux, the Lyman alpha flux had a variability that was approximately the same during each of the past three cycles. Lyman alpha fluxes calculated by the model are consistent with measurements of the Lyman alpha flux made by 11 of a total of 14 rocket experiments conducted during the period 1969--1980. The model explains satisfactorily the absolute magnitude, long-term trends, and the cycle variability seen in the Lyman alpha irradiances by the OSO 5 satellite experiment. The 27-day variability observed by the AE-E satellite experiment is well reproduced. However, the magntidue of the AE-E 1 Lyman alpha irradiances are higher than the model calculations by between 40% and 80%. We suggest that the assumed calibration of the AE-E irradiances is in error

  12. Solar variability observed through changes in solar figure and mean diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, H.A.; Bos, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the project is to detect and monitor climatically significant solar variability by studying the associated variability in solar shape and diameter. The observing program for this project was initiated in 1981, as was the requisite data reduction. These two activities are conducted simultaneously. Theoretical work has also progressed on matters relevant to the interpretation of observed changes in the indirect diagnostics in terms of changes in the solar luminosity. The success of the observing program over long time periods depends in part on the development of a technique to calibrate the scale in the telescope field, and work on this has progressed to the design and construction phase. A proposal is made for the continuation of the work in each of these areas

  13. Evidence in the auroral record for secular solar variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sicoe, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    The historial record of aurorae is continuous and usefully dense for at least the 2000 years. Revival of interest in the secular variability in solar activity motivates a review of the auroral record. The existence of secular variations in the auroral occurrence frequency has been known since the early 1700's, including the existence of a significant attenuation of auroral activity during the Maunder Minimum. Investigation of secular variations prior to the Maunder Minimum is now possible based on six auroral catalogs that have been published within the last 20 years. The catalogs cover the time period from the fifth century B.C. to the seventeenth century A.D. and combine both oriental and European obsertions. Features corresponding to the previously recognized Medieval Minimum, Medieval Maximum, and the Spoerer Minimum are clearly evident in both oriental and European records. The global synchronicity of anomalies in the auroral occurrence frequency is used to argue that they are caused by changes in the level or state of solar activity. The combined catalogs provide a sufficient number of events in the Middle Ages to resolve a quasi-80-year periodicity in the recorded auroral occurrence frequency. Also in the unusually rich intervals of the Middle Ages, clear quasi-10-year periodicities appear in the recorded occurrence frequency wave from. These are most reasonably interpreted as manifestations of the 11-year solar cycle and indicate that the solar cycle was then operative

  14. Solar flux variability in the Schumann-Runge continuum as a function of solar cycle 21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torr, M.R.; Torr, D.G.; Hinteregger, H.E.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of the solar flux in the Schumann-Runge continuum (1350-1750 A) by the Atmosphere Explorer satellites reveal a strong dependence on solar activity. Solar intensities over the rising phase of cycle 21, increase by more than a factor of two at the shorter wavelengths (1350 A), with a smaller change (approx.10%) at 1750 A. A significant 27 day variability is found to exist superimposed on the solar cycle variation. Because radiation in this portion of the spectum is important to the lower thermosphere in the photodissociation of 0 2 and the production of 0( 1 D), we use the unattenuated Schumann-Runge continuum dissociation frequency as a parameter to illustrate the magnitude and temporal characteristics of this variation. The values of this parameter, J/sub infinity/(0 2 )/sub SR/, range from 1.5 x 10 -6 s -1 for April 23, 1974, to 2.8 x 10 -6 s -1 for February 19, 1979. In studies of oxygen in the lower thermosphere, it is therefore necessary to use solar spectral intensities representative of the actual conditions for which the calculations are made. Both the J/sub infinity/(0 2 )/sub SR/ parameter and the solar flux at various wavelengths over the 1350 to 1750 A range can be expressed in terms of the F10.7 index to a reasonable approximation

  15. Investigation of superflares frequency variability of solar-type stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akopian, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Statistical study of the variability of the superflares frequency of 46 solar-type stars detected by orbital observatory 'Kepler' is presented. Two possible scenarios for changes in frequency are considered. In the first, the temporal sequence of superflares is regarded as a piecewise stationary Poissonian process. Statistically significant change in the frequency of superflares by several times is revealed at five stars. Moments of change of frequency are accompanied by sudden changes in the behavior of the star's brightness. Brightness of a star for a short time becomes irregular, with a significant decrease in the amplitude

  16. Solar dynamics influence on the atmospheric ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogosheva, T.; Grigorieva, V.; Mendeva, B.; Krastev, D.; Petkov, B.

    2007-01-01

    A response of the atmospheric ozone to the solar dynamics has been studied using the total ozone content data, taken from the satellite experiments GOME on ERS-2 and TOMS-EP together with data obtained from the ground-based spectrophotometer Photon operating in Stara Zagora, Bulgaria during the period 1999-2005. We also use data from surface ozone observations performed in Sofia, Bulgaria. The solar activity was characterized by the sunspot daily numbers W, the solar radio flux at 10.7 cm (F10.7) and the MgII wing-to-core ratio solar index. The impact of the solar activity on the total ozone has been investigated analysing the ozone response to sharp changes of these parameters. Some of the examined cases showed a positive correlation between the ozone and the solar parameters, however, a negative correlation in other cases was found. There were some cases when the sharp increases of the solar activity did not provoke any ozone changes. The solar radiation changes during an eclipse can be considered a particular case of the solar dynamics as this event causes a sharp change of irradiance within a comparatively short time interval. The results of both - the total and surface ozone measurements carried out during the eclipses on 11 August 1999, 31 May 2003 and 29 March 2006 are presented. It was found that the atmospheric ozone behavior shows strong response to the fast solar radiation changes which take place during solar eclipse. (authors)

  17. Interanual variability os solar radiation in Peninsula Iberica; Variabilidad interanual de la radiacion solar en la Peninsula Iberica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozo-Vazquez, D.; Tovar-Pescador, J.; Gamiz-Fortis, S.; Esteban-Parra, M.; Castro-Diez, Y.

    2004-07-01

    The NAO climatic phenomenon is the main responsible for the interanual cloud cover variability in Europe. We explore the relationship between the NAO and the solar radiation spatio-temporal variability in Europe during winter. Measured monthly sums of sunshine duration and short-wave downward solar flux reanalysis data have been used. Correlation analysis between the NAO index and the measured sunshine duration shows a maximum positive value (+0.75) over the Iberian Peninsula. Accordingly, solar radiation in this area undergoes an interanual variability that can reach up to 30%, with the derived consequences for a reliable solar energy resources evaluation. (Author)

  18. Contribution of solar radiation to decadal temperature variability over land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaicun; Dickinson, Robert E

    2013-09-10

    Global air temperature has become the primary metric for judging global climate change. The variability of global temperature on a decadal timescale is still poorly understood. This paper examines further one suggested hypothesis, that variations in solar radiation reaching the surface (Rs) have caused much of the observed decadal temperature variability. Because Rs only heats air during the day, its variability is plausibly related to the variability of diurnal temperature range (daily maximum temperature minus its minimum). We show that the variability of diurnal temperature range is consistent with the variability of Rs at timescales from monthly to decadal. This paper uses long comprehensive datasets for diurnal temperature range to establish what has been the contribution of Rs to decadal temperature variability. It shows that Rs over land globally peaked in the 1930s, substantially decreased from the 1940s to the 1970s, and changed little after that. Reduction of Rs caused a reduction of more than 0.2 °C in mean temperature during May to October from the 1940s through the 1970s, and a reduction of nearly 0.2 °C in mean air temperature during November to April from the 1960s through the 1970s. This cooling accounts in part for the near-constant temperature from the 1930s into the 1970s. Since then, neither the rapid increase in temperature from the 1970s through the 1990s nor the slowdown of warming in the early twenty-first century appear to be significantly related to changes of Rs.

  19. Costs of solar and wind power variability for reducing CO2 emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueken, Colleen; Cohen, Gilbert E; Apt, Jay

    2012-09-04

    We compare the power output from a year of electricity generation data from one solar thermal plant, two solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays, and twenty Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) wind farms. The analysis shows that solar PV electricity generation is approximately one hundred times more variable at frequencies on the order of 10(-3) Hz than solar thermal electricity generation, and the variability of wind generation lies between that of solar PV and solar thermal. We calculate the cost of variability of the different solar power sources and wind by using the costs of ancillary services and the energy required to compensate for its variability and intermittency, and the cost of variability per unit of displaced CO(2) emissions. We show the costs of variability are highly dependent on both technology type and capacity factor. California emissions data were used to calculate the cost of variability per unit of displaced CO(2) emissions. Variability cost is greatest for solar PV generation at $8-11 per MWh. The cost of variability for solar thermal generation is $5 per MWh, while that of wind generation in ERCOT was found to be on average $4 per MWh. Variability adds ~$15/tonne CO(2) to the cost of abatement for solar thermal power, $25 for wind, and $33-$40 for PV.

  20. The influence of planetary attractions on the solar tachocline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callebaut, D.K.; de Jager, C.; Duhau, S.

    2012-01-01

    We present a physical analysis of the occasionally forwarded hypothesis that solar variability, as shown in the various photospheric and outer solar layer activities, might be due to the Newtonian attraction by the planets. We calculate the planetary forces exerted on the tachocline and thereby not

  1. 8 years of Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability Observed from the ISS with the SOLAR/SOLSPEC Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damé, Luc; Bolsée, David; Meftah, Mustapha; Irbah, Abdenour; Hauchecorne, Alain; Bekki, Slimane; Pereira, Nuno; Cessateur, Marchand; Gäel; , Marion; et al.

    2016-10-01

    Accurate measurements of Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) are of primary importance for a better understanding of solar physics and of the impact of solar variability on climate (via Earth's atmospheric photochemistry). The acquisition of a top of atmosphere reference solar spectrum and of its temporal and spectral variability during the unusual solar cycle 24 is of prime interest for these studies. These measurements are performed since April 2008 with the SOLSPEC spectro-radiometer from the far ultraviolet to the infrared (166 nm to 3088 nm). This instrument, developed under a fruitful LATMOS/BIRA-IASB collaboration, is part of the Solar Monitoring Observatory (SOLAR) payload, externally mounted on the Columbus module of the International Space Station (ISS). The SOLAR mission, with its actual 8 years duration, will cover almost the entire solar cycle 24. We present here the in-flight operations and performances of the SOLSPEC instrument, including the engineering corrections, calibrations and improved know-how procedure for aging corrections. Accordingly, a SSI reference spectrum from the UV to the NIR will be presented, together with its variability in the UV, as measured by SOLAR/SOLSPEC for 8 years. Uncertainties on these measurements and comparisons with other instruments will be briefly discussed.

  2. Solar variability and climate change: An historical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Theodore S.

    There is nothing new about the debate over the Sun's influence on terrestrial climate.As early as the late 18th century, widespread concern for the deterioration of the Earth's climate led to speculation about the Sun's role in climate change [Feldman, 1993; Fleming, 1990]. Drawing analogies with variations in the brightness of stars, the British astronomer William Herschel suggested that greater sunspot activity would result in warmer terrestrial climates. Herschel supported his hypothesis by referring to price series for wheat published in Adam Smiths Wealth of Nations [Hufbauer, 1991]. Later, the eminent American physicist Joseph Henry demonstrated by thermopile measurements that, contrary to Herschel's assumption, sunspots were cooler than the unblemished portions of the solar disk.

  3. A study of variable thrust, variable specific impulse trajectories for solar system exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tadashi

    A study has been performed to determine the advantages and disadvantages of variable thrust and variable Isp (specific impulse) trajectories for solar system exploration. There have been several numerical research efforts for variable thrust, variable Isp, power-limited trajectory optimization problems. All of these results conclude that variable thrust, variable Isp (variable specific impulse, or VSI) engines are superior to constant thrust, constant Isp (constant specific impulse; or CSI) engines. However, most of these research efforts assume a mission from Earth to Mars, and some of them further assume that these planets are circular and coplanar. Hence they still lack the generality. This research has been conducted to answer the following questions: (1) Is a VSI engine always better than a CSI engine or a high thrust engine for any mission to any planet with any time of flight considering lower propellant mass as the sole criterion? (2) If a planetary swing-by is used for a VSI trajectory, is the fuel savings of a VSI swing-by trajectory better than that of a CSI swing-by or high thrust swing-by trajectory? To support this research, an unique, new computer-based interplanetary trajectory calculation program has been created. This program utilizes a calculus of variations algorithm to perform overall optimization of thrust, Isp, and thrust vector direction along a trajectory that minimizes fuel consumption for interplanetary travel. It is assumed that the propulsion system is power-limited, and thus the compromise between thrust and Isp is a variable to be optimized along the flight path. This program is capable of optimizing not only variable thrust trajectories but also constant thrust trajectories in 3-D space using a planetary ephemeris database. It is also capable of conducting planetary swing-bys. Using this program, various Earth-originating trajectories have been investigated and the optimized results have been compared to traditional CSI and high

  4. Elsaesser variable analysis of fluctuations in the ion foreshock and undisturbed solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labelle, James; Treumann, Rudolf A.; Marsch, Eckart

    1994-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) fluctuations in the solar wind have been investigated previously by use of Elsaesser variables. In this paper, we present a comparison of the spectra of Elsaesser variables in the undisturbed solar wind at 1 AU and in the ion foreshock in front of the Earth. Both observations take place under relatively strong solar wind flow speed conditions (approximately equal 600 km/s). In the undisturbed solar wind we find that outward propagating Alfven waves dominate, as reported by other observers. In the ion foreshock the situation is more complex, with neither outward nor inward propagation dominating over the entire range investigated (1-10 mHz). Measurements of the Poynting vectors associated with the fluctuations are consistent with the Elsaesser variable analysis. These results generally support interpretations of the Elsaesser variables which have been made based strictly on solar wind data and provide additional insight into the nature of the ion foreshock turbulence.

  5. Final Technical Report: Low-Cost Solar Variability Sensors for Ubiquitous Deployment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lave, Matthew Samuel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In this project, an integrated solution to measuring and collecting solar variability data called the solar variability datalogger (SVD) was developed, tested, and the value of its data to distribution grid integration studies was demonstrated. This work addressed the problem that high-frequency solar variability is rarely measured – due to the high cost and complex installation of existing solar irradiance measuring pyranometers – but is critical to the accurate determination of the impact of photovoltaics to electric grid operation. For example, up to a 300% difference in distribution grid voltage regulator tap change operations (a measure of the impact of PV) [1] has been observed due solely to different solar variability profiles.

  6. Critical variables in the performance of a productivity-enhanced solar still

    KAUST Repository

    Ayoub, George M.

    2013-12-01

    A new and sustainable modification has been introduced into the conventional solar still, considerably increasing its productivity. This enhancement in the solar still productivity is achieved without forsaking the basic features of the still such as low cost, ease of handling, sustainability, water quality, material availability, low maintenance and space conservation. The introduced modification is in the form of a slowly rotating hollow drum within the still cavity that allows the formation of thin water films, which evaporate rapidly. Several environmental and operational parameters attribute to the optimization of the new still design. Environmental factors refer primarily to weather conditions such as solar intensity, relative humidity, ambient temperature and wind speed and direction. Operational variables include drum speed, brine depth in the basin, cover cooling and other related parameters such as the materials used and the still configuration. The influence of these parameters is discussed and their impact on productivity is investigated in detailed order to identify existing correlations and optimize design and operation of the new system. An error analysis was conducted for all experimental data obtained from this study. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Spatially Resolved Images and Solar Irradiance Variability R ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The Sun is the primary source of energy that governs both the terrestrial climate and near-earth space environment. Variations in UV irradiances seen at earth are the sum of global (solar dynamo) to regional. (active region, plage, network, bright points and background) solar mag- netic activities that can be ...

  8. Influence of chemoreflexes on respiratory variability in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Aardweg, Joost G.; Karemaker, John M.

    2002-01-01

    The background of this study was the hypothesis that respiratory variability is influenced by chemoreflex regulation, In search for periodicities in the variability due to instability of the respiratory control system, spectral analysis was applied to breath-to-breath variables in 19 healthy

  9. Longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle variation in lunar tide influence on the equatorial electrojet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yizengaw

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been well documented that the lunar tidal waves can modulate the ionospheric electrodynamics and create a visible influence on the equatorial electrojet (EEJ. The lunar tide influence gets intensified around noon, primarily during new and full Moon periods. However, the longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle variability in the lunar tide influence on ionospheric current systems is not well understood yet. In order to investigate this, 17 years (1998–2014 of extensive magnetometer observations at four longitudinal sectors (western American, western and eastern African, and Asian have been analyzed. All observations performed during magnetically active periods (Kp>3 have been excluded for this study to eliminate storm contributions to the geomagnetic field variation at the geomagnetic equator. This study's quantitative analysis revealed significant longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle dependence of the lunar tide influence on the equatorial electrojet.

  10. Longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle variation in lunar tide influence on the equatorial electrojet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yizengaw, Endawoke [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States). Inst. for Scientific Research; Carter, Brett A. [RMIT Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia). SPACE Research Centre

    2017-07-01

    It has been well documented that the lunar tidal waves can modulate the ionospheric electrodynamics and create a visible influence on the equatorial electrojet (EEJ). The lunar tide influence gets intensified around noon, primarily during new and full Moon periods. However, the longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle variability in the lunar tide influence on ionospheric current systems is not well understood yet. In order to investigate this, 17 years (1998-2014) of extensive magnetometer observations at four longitudinal sectors (western American, western and eastern African, and Asian) have been analyzed. All observations performed during magnetically active periods (K{sub p}>3) have been excluded for this study to eliminate storm contributions to the geomagnetic field variation at the geomagnetic equator. This study's quantitative analysis revealed significant longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle dependence of the lunar tide influence on the equatorial electrojet.

  11. Longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle variation in lunar tide influence on the equatorial electrojet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yizengaw, Endawoke; Carter, Brett A.

    2017-01-01

    It has been well documented that the lunar tidal waves can modulate the ionospheric electrodynamics and create a visible influence on the equatorial electrojet (EEJ). The lunar tide influence gets intensified around noon, primarily during new and full Moon periods. However, the longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle variability in the lunar tide influence on ionospheric current systems is not well understood yet. In order to investigate this, 17 years (1998-2014) of extensive magnetometer observations at four longitudinal sectors (western American, western and eastern African, and Asian) have been analyzed. All observations performed during magnetically active periods (K p >3) have been excluded for this study to eliminate storm contributions to the geomagnetic field variation at the geomagnetic equator. This study's quantitative analysis revealed significant longitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle dependence of the lunar tide influence on the equatorial electrojet.

  12. Solar Cycle Variability Induced by Tilt Angle Scatter in a Babcock-Leighton Solar Dynamo Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Miesch, Mark

    2017-09-01

    We present results from a three-dimensional Babcock-Leighton (BL) dynamo model that is sustained by the emergence and dispersal of bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs). On average, each BMR has a systematic tilt given by Joy’s law. Randomness and nonlinearity in the BMR emergence of our model produce variable magnetic cycles. However, when we allow for a random scatter in the tilt angle to mimic the observed departures from Joy’s law, we find more variability in the magnetic cycles. We find that the observed standard deviation in Joy’s law of {σ }δ =15^\\circ produces a variability comparable to the observed solar cycle variability of ˜32%, as quantified by the sunspot number maxima between 1755 and 2008. We also find that tilt angle scatter can promote grand minima and grand maxima. The time spent in grand minima for {σ }δ =15^\\circ is somewhat less than that inferred for the Sun from cosmogenic isotopes (about 9% compared to 17%). However, when we double the tilt scatter to {σ }δ =30^\\circ , the simulation statistics are comparable to the Sun (˜18% of the time in grand minima and ˜10% in grand maxima). Though the BL mechanism is the only source of poloidal field, we find that our simulations always maintain magnetic cycles even at large fluctuations in the tilt angle. We also demonstrate that tilt quenching is a viable and efficient mechanism for dynamo saturation; a suppression of the tilt by only 1°-2° is sufficient to limit the dynamo growth. Thus, any potential observational signatures of tilt quenching in the Sun may be subtle.

  13. What variables can influence clinical reasoning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Ashoorion

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical reasoning is one of the most important competencies that a physician should achieve. Many medical schools and licensing bodies try to predict it based on some general measures such as critical thinking, personality, and emotional intelligence. This study aimed at providing a model to design the relationship between the constructs. Materials and Methods: Sixty-nine medical students participated in this study. A battery test devised that consist four parts: Clinical reasoning measures, personality NEO inventory, Bar-On EQ inventory, and California critical thinking questionnaire. All participants completed the tests. Correlation and multiple regression analysis consumed for data analysis. Results: There is low to moderate correlations between clinical reasoning and other variables. Emotional intelligence is the only variable that contributes clinical reasoning construct (r=0.17-0.34 (R 2 chnage = 0.46, P Value = 0.000. Conclusion: Although, clinical reasoning can be considered as a kind of thinking, no significant correlation detected between it and other constructs. Emotional intelligence (and its subscales is the only variable that can be used for clinical reasoning prediction.

  14. What variables can influence clinical reasoning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashoorion, Vahid; Liaghatdar, Mohammad Javad; Adibi, Peyman

    2012-12-01

    Clinical reasoning is one of the most important competencies that a physician should achieve. Many medical schools and licensing bodies try to predict it based on some general measures such as critical thinking, personality, and emotional intelligence. This study aimed at providing a model to design the relationship between the constructs. Sixty-nine medical students participated in this study. A battery test devised that consist four parts: Clinical reasoning measures, personality NEO inventory, Bar-On EQ inventory, and California critical thinking questionnaire. All participants completed the tests. Correlation and multiple regression analysis consumed for data analysis. There is low to moderate correlations between clinical reasoning and other variables. Emotional intelligence is the only variable that contributes clinical reasoning construct (r=0.17-0.34) (R(2) chnage = 0.46, P Value = 0.000). Although, clinical reasoning can be considered as a kind of thinking, no significant correlation detected between it and other constructs. Emotional intelligence (and its subscales) is the only variable that can be used for clinical reasoning prediction.

  15. Variability in foF2 at an equatorial station and the influence of magnetic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeniyi, J.O.; Radicella, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    Variability in foF2 is investigated for an equatorial station in the African region. Variability during the day time at high solar activity varies between 10 and 30 percent. It varies between 10 and 20 percent at high solar activity. Magnetic storms increase the variability at both solar activity periods. (author)

  16. Influence of solar UVA on erythemal irradiances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parisi, A V; Turnbull, D J; Kimlin, M G

    2006-01-01

    Many materials in everyday use such as window glass in homes and offices, glass in sunrooms and greenhouses, vehicle glass and some brands of sunscreens act as a barrier to the shorter UVB wavelengths while transmitting some of the longer UVA wavelengths. This paper reports on the erythemal exposures due to the UVA waveband encountered over a 12-month period for a solar zenith angle (SZA) range of 4 0 to 80 0 and the resulting times required for an erythemal exposure of one standard erythemal dose (SED) due to the erythemal exposures to the UVA wavelengths. The minimum time for an exposure of one SED due to the UVA wavelengths in winter is approximately double that what it is in summer. The time period of 40 to 60 min was the most frequent length of time for an exposure of one SED with 60 to 80 min the next frequent length of time required for a one SED exposure

  17. Natural and Anthropogenic Influences on Atmospheric Aerosol Variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asmi, A.

    2012-07-01

    Aerosol particles are everywhere in the atmosphere. They are a key factor in many important processes in the atmosphere, including cloud formation, scattering of incoming solar radiation and air chemistry. The aerosol particles have relatively short lifetimes in lower atmosphere, typically from days to weeks, and thus they have a high spatial and temporal variability. This thesis concentrates on the extent and reasons of sub-micron aerosol particle variability in the lower atmosphere, using both global atmospheric models and analysis of observational data. Aerosol number size distributions in the lower atmosphere are affected strongly by the new particle formation. Perhaps more importantly, a strong influence new particle formation is also evident in the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations, suggesting a major role of the sulphuric acid driven new particle formation in the climate system. In this thesis, the sub-micron aerosol number size distributions in the European regional background air were characterized for the first time from consistent, homogenized and comparable datasets. Some recent studies have suggested that differences in aerosol emissions between weekdays could also affect the weather via aerosol-cloud interactions. In this thesis, the weekday-to-weekday variation of CCN sized aerosol number concentrations in Europe were found to be much smaller than expected from earlier studies, based on particle mass measurements. This result suggests that a lack of week-day variability in meteorology is not necessarily a sign of weak aerosol-cloud interactions. An analysis of statistically significant trends in past decades of measured aerosol number concentrations from Europe, North America, Pacific islands and Antarctica generally show decreases in concentrations. The analysis of these changes show that a potential explanation for the decreasing trends is the general reduction of anthropogenic emissions, especially SO{sub 2}, although a combination of

  18. Role of solar influences on geomagnetosphere and upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Tripathi, Arvind

    The Earth's magnetosphere and upper atmosphere can be greatly perturbed by variations in the solar luminosity caused by disturbances on the solar surface. The state of near-Earth space environment is governed by the Sun and is very dynamic on all spatial and temporal scale. The geomagnetic field which protects the Earth from solar wind and cosmic rays is also essential to the evolution of life; its variations can have either direct or indirect effect on human physiology and health state even if the magnitude of the disturbance is small. Geomagnetic disturbances are seen at the surface of the Earth as perturbations in the components of the geomagnetic field, caused by electric currents flowing in the magnetosphere and upper atmosphere. Ionospheric and thermospheric storms also result from the redistribution of particles and fields. Global thermospheric storm winds and composition changes are driven by energy injection at high latitudes. These storm effects may penetrate downwards to the lower thermosphere and may even perturb the mesosphere. Many of the ionospheric changes at mid-latitude can be understood as a response to thermospheric perturbations. The transient bursts of solar energetic particles, often associated with large solar transients, have been observed to have effects on the Earth's middle and lower atmosphere, including the large-scale destruction of polar stratospheric and tropospheric ozone. In the present, we have discussed effect of solar influences on earth's magnetosphere and upper atmosphere that are useful to space weather and global warming, on the basis of various latest studies.

  19. The influence of socio-economic variables on adoption behaviour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of socio-economic variables on adoption behaviour towards Tadco improved rice parboiling technique among rice parboilers in Kura processing Areas ... Age and educational level were found to be associated with non adoption ...

  20. Variability of Power from Large-Scale Solar Photovoltaic Scenarios in the State of Gujarat: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, B.; Hummon, M.; Cochran, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; Batra, P.; Mehta, B.; Patel, D.

    2014-04-01

    India has ambitious goals for high utilization of variable renewable power from wind and solar, and deployment has been proceeding at a rapid pace. The western state of Gujarat currently has the largest amount of solar generation of any Indian state, with over 855 Megawatts direct current (MWDC). Combined with over 3,240 MW of wind, variable generation renewables comprise nearly 18% of the electric-generating capacity in the state. A new historic 10-kilometer (km) gridded solar radiation data set capturing hourly insolation values for 2002-2011 is available for India. We apply an established method for downscaling hourly irradiance data to one-minute irradiance data at potential PV power production locations for one year, 2006. The objective of this report is to characterize the intra-hour variability of existing and planned photovoltaic solar power generation in the state of Gujarat (a total of 1.9 gigawatts direct current (GWDC)), and of five possible expansion scenarios of solar generation that reflect a range of geographic diversity (each scenario totals 500-1,000 MW of additional solar capacity). The report statistically analyzes one year's worth of power variability data, applied to both the baseline and expansion scenarios, to evaluate diurnal and seasonal power fluctuations, different timescales of variability (e.g., from one to 15 minutes), the magnitude of variability (both total megawatts and relative to installed solar capacity), and the extent to which the variability can be anticipated in advance. The paper also examines how Gujarat Energy Transmission Corporation (GETCO) and the Gujarat State Load Dispatch Centre (SLDC) could make use of the solar variability profiles in grid operations and planning.

  1. Variability of Photovoltaic Power in the State of Gujarat Using High Resolution Solar Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummon, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cochran, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Weekley, A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lopez, A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Stoltenberg, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Parsons, B. [Evergreen Renewable Consulting, CO (United States); Batra, P. [Central Electricity Authority, New Delhi (India); Mehta, B. [Gujarat Energy Transmission Corporation Ltd., Vadodara (India); Patel, D. [Gujarat Energy Transmission Corporation Ltd., Vadodara (India)

    2014-03-01

    India has ambitious goals for high utilization of variable renewable power from wind and solar, and deployment has been proceeding at a rapid pace. The western state of Gujarat currently has the largest amount of solar generation of any Indian state, with over 855 Megawatts direct current (MWDC). Combined with over 3,240 MW of wind, variable generation renewables comprise nearly 18% of the electric-generating capacity in the state. A new historic 10-kilometer (km) gridded solar radiation data set capturing hourly insolation values for 2002-2011 is available for India. We apply an established method for downscaling hourly irradiance data to one-minute irradiance data at potential PV power production locations for one year, 2006. The objective of this report is to characterize the intra-hour variability of existing and planned photovoltaic solar power generation in the state of Gujarat (a total of 1.9 gigawatts direct current (GWDC)), and of five possible expansion scenarios of solar generation that reflect a range of geographic diversity (each scenario totals 500-1,000 MW of additional solar capacity). The report statistically analyzes one year's worth of power variability data, applied to both the baseline and expansion scenarios, to evaluate diurnal and seasonal power fluctuations, different timescales of variability (e.g., from one to 15 minutes), the magnitude of variability (both total megawatts and relative to installed solar capacity), and the extent to which the variability can be anticipated in advance. The paper also examines how Gujarat Energy Transmission Corporation (GETCO) and the Gujarat State Load Dispatch Centre (SLDC) could make use of the solar variability profiles in grid operations and planning.

  2. Frog eat frog: exploring variables influencing anurophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measey, G John; Vimercati, Giovanni; de Villiers, F André; Mokhatla, Mohlamatsane M; Davies, Sarah J; Edwards, Shelley; Altwegg, Res

    2015-01-01

    Background. Frogs are generalist predators of a wide range of typically small prey items. But descriptions of dietary items regularly include other anurans, such that frogs are considered to be among the most important of anuran predators. However, the only existing hypothesis for the inclusion of anurans in the diet of post-metamorphic frogs postulates that it happens more often in bigger frogs. Moreover, this hypothesis has yet to be tested. Methods. We reviewed the literature on frog diet in order to test the size hypothesis and determine whether there are other putative explanations for anurans in the diet of post-metamorphic frogs. In addition to size, we recorded the habitat, the number of other sympatric anuran species, and whether or not the population was invasive. We controlled for taxonomic bias by including the superfamily in our analysis. Results. Around one fifth of the 355 records included anurans as dietary items of populations studied, suggesting that frogs eating anurans is not unusual. Our data showed a clear taxonomic bias with ranids and pipids having a higher proportion of anuran prey than other superfamilies. Accounting for this taxonomic bias, we found that size in addition to being invasive, local anuran diversity, and habitat produced a model that best fitted our data. Large invasive frogs that live in forests with high anuran diversity are most likely to have a higher proportion of anurans in their diet. Conclusions. We confirm the validity of the size hypothesis for anurophagy, but show that there are additional significant variables. The circumstances under which frogs eat frogs are likely to be complex, but our data may help to alert conservationists to the possible dangers of invading frogs entering areas with threatened anuran species.

  3. Frog eat frog: exploring variables influencing anurophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. John Measey

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Frogs are generalist predators of a wide range of typically small prey items. But descriptions of dietary items regularly include other anurans, such that frogs are considered to be among the most important of anuran predators. However, the only existing hypothesis for the inclusion of anurans in the diet of post-metamorphic frogs postulates that it happens more often in bigger frogs. Moreover, this hypothesis has yet to be tested.Methods. We reviewed the literature on frog diet in order to test the size hypothesis and determine whether there are other putative explanations for anurans in the diet of post-metamorphic frogs. In addition to size, we recorded the habitat, the number of other sympatric anuran species, and whether or not the population was invasive. We controlled for taxonomic bias by including the superfamily in our analysis.Results. Around one fifth of the 355 records included anurans as dietary items of populations studied, suggesting that frogs eating anurans is not unusual. Our data showed a clear taxonomic bias with ranids and pipids having a higher proportion of anuran prey than other superfamilies. Accounting for this taxonomic bias, we found that size in addition to being invasive, local anuran diversity, and habitat produced a model that best fitted our data. Large invasive frogs that live in forests with high anuran diversity are most likely to have a higher proportion of anurans in their diet.Conclusions. We confirm the validity of the size hypothesis for anurophagy, but show that there are additional significant variables. The circumstances under which frogs eat frogs are likely to be complex, but our data may help to alert conservationists to the possible dangers of invading frogs entering areas with threatened anuran species.

  4. Drivers of solar radiation variability in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obryk, Maciej; Fountain, Andrew G.; Doran, Peter; Lyons, Berry; Eastman, Ryan

    2018-01-01

    Annually averaged solar radiation in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica has varied by over 20 W m−2 during the past three decades; however, the drivers of this variability are unknown. Because small differences in radiation are important to water availability and ecosystem functioning in polar deserts, determining the causes are important to predictions of future desert processes. We examine the potential drivers of solar variability and systematically eliminate all but stratospheric sulfur dioxide. We argue that increases in stratospheric sulfur dioxide increase stratospheric aerosol optical depth and decrease solar intensity. Because of the polar location of the McMurdo Dry Valleys (77–78°S) and relatively long solar ray path through the stratosphere, terrestrial solar intensity is sensitive to small differences in stratospheric transmissivity. Important sources of sulfur dioxide include natural (wildfires and volcanic eruptions) and anthropogenic emission.

  5. Observed solar near UV variability: A contribution to variations of the solar constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    London, J.; Pap, J.; Rottman, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    Continuous Measurements of the Solar UV have been made by an instrument on the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) since October 1981. The results for the wavelength interval 200 to 300 nm show an irradiance decrease to a minimum in early 1987 and a subsequent increase to mid-April 1989. The observed UV changes during part of solar cycles 21 to 22 represent approx. 35 percent (during the decreasing phase) and 25 percent (during the increasing phase) of the observed variations of the solar constant for the same time period as the SME measurements

  6. Variables that influence junior secondary school students‟ attitude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The positive relationship between the rate of learning, attitude to and achievement in science has been documented in literature. It is therefore pertinent to assess the variables that tend to influence students' attitude to Agricultural Science. The study assessed the influence of gender, location of school and sex composition ...

  7. Spatial and Temporal Variabilities of Solar and Longwave Radiation Fluxes below a Coniferous Forest in the French Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicart, J. E.; Ramseyer, V.; Lejeune, Y.; Essery, R.; Webster, C.; Rutter, N.

    2017-12-01

    At high altitudes and latitudes, snow has a large influence on hydrological processes. Large fractions of these regions are covered by forests, which have a strong influence on snow accumulation and melting processes. Trees absorb a large part of the incoming shortwave radiation and this heat load is mostly dissipated as longwave radiation. Trees shelter the snow surface from wind, so sub-canopy snowmelt depends mainly on the radiative fluxes: vegetation attenuates the transmission of shortwave radiation but enhances longwave irradiance to the surface. An array of 13 pyranometers and 11 pyrgeometers was deployed on the snow surface below a coniferous forest at the CEN-MeteoFrance Col de Porte station in the French Alps (1325 m asl) during the 2017 winter in order to investigate spatial and temporal variabilities of solar and infrared irradiances in different meteorological conditions. Sky view factors measured with hemispherical photographs at each radiometer location were in a narrow range from 0.2 to 0.3. The temperature of the vegetation was measured with IR thermocouples and an IR camera. In clear sky conditions, the attenuation of solar radiation by the canopy reached 96% and its spatial variability exceeded 100 W m-2. Longwave irradiance varied by 30 W m-2 from dense canopy to gap areas. In overcast conditions, the spatial variabilities of solar and infrared irradiances were reduced and remained closely related to the sky view factor. A simple radiative model taking into account the penetration through the canopy of the direct and diffuse solar radiation, and isotropic infrared emission of the vegetation as a blackbody emitter, accurately reproduced the dynamics of the radiation fluxes at the snow surface. Model results show that solar transmissivity of the canopy in overcast conditions is an excellent proxy of the sky view factor and the emitting temperature of the vegetation remained close to the air temperature in this typically dense Alpine forest.

  8. Solar activity influence on air temperature regimes in caves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeva, Penka; Mikhalev, Alexander; Stoev, Alexey

    Cave atmospheres are generally included in the processes that happen in the external atmosphere as circulation of the cave air is connected with the most general circulation of the air in the earth’s atmosphere. Such isolated volumes as the air of caves are also influenced by the variations of solar activity. We discuss cave air temperature response to climate and solar and geomagnetic activity for four show caves in Bulgaria studied for a period of 46 years (1968 - 2013). Everyday noon measurements in Ledenika, Saeva dupka, Snezhanka and Uhlovitsa cave have been used. Temperatures of the air in the zone of constant temperatures (ZCT) are compared with surface temperatures recorded at meteorological stations situated near about the caves - in the towns of Vratsa, Lovech, Peshtera and Smolyan, respectively. For comparison, The Hansen cave, Middle cave and Timpanogos cave from the Timpanogos Cave National Monument, Utah, USA situated nearly at the same latitude have also been examined. Our study shows that the correlation between cave air temperature time series and sunspot number is better than that between the cave air temperature and Apmax indices; that t°ZCT is rather connected with the first peak in geomagnetic activity, which is associated with transient solar activity (CMEs) than with the second one, which is higher and connected with the recurrent high speed streams from coronal holes. Air temperatures of all examined show caves, except the Ledenika cave, which is ice cave show decreasing trends. On the contrary, measurements at the meteorological stations show increasing trends in the surface air temperatures. The trend is decreasing for the Timpanogos cave system, USA. The conclusion is that surface temperature trends depend on the climatic zone, in which the cave is situated, and there is no apparent relation between temperatures inside and outside the caves. We consider possible mechanism of solar cosmic rays influence on the air temperatures in caves

  9. On the nature of the solar influence on climate and its contribution to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, L. A.; da Silva, L. A.; Guarnieri, F.; Echer, E.; Dal Lago, A.; Wrasse, C. M.; Schuch, N.

    2007-05-01

    The influence of solar magnetic variability on the lower atmospheric regions has been observed on different atmospheric parameters in different time scales, but a plausible mechanism to explain these observations remains unclear. It is also indistinguishable whether or not the variability on the solar-terrestrial coupling drives the present climate change. New observations suggested that the existence of a geomagnetic signal in climate data would support a direct link between solar variability and their effects on climate. Usoskin and colleagues compared 1000-year reconstructions of sunspot numbers and cosmic ray flux, derived from cosmogenic isotope dates, with air temperature history in the Northern hemisphere. They observed higher temperatures during periods of intense solar activity. In addition, they report that three different statistical tests consistently indicate that the long-term trends in the temperature correlate better with cosmic rays than with sunspot numbers. Vieira and Da Silva observed that the clouds effects on the radiative flux in the atmosphere in the southern Pacific are related to the intensity of the geomagnetic field. They have also observed a cosmic rays modulation of the variability of the long wavelength radiative flux in the atmosphere. More recently, Vieira and colleagues reported that a correlation between increasing sea-level pressure in the tropical Pacific, and decreasing magnetic field intensity is observed. This indicates that the physical processes in the magnetosphere, ionosphere and upper atmosphere are mapped downward to the Earth's surface. It was suggested that that the coupling mechanism may be linked to the ozone depletion in the lower mesosphere, and in the upper stratosphere of the auroral region, and/or the southern hemisphere magnetic anomaly region. The depletion is caused by high energy protons produced during solar proton events (SPEs) released during large solar storms. Variations in solar irradiance, and ozone

  10. Influence of the Solar Cycle on Turbulence Properties and Cosmic-Ray Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.-L.; Adhikari, L.; Zank, G. P.; Hu, Q.; Feng, X. S.

    2018-04-01

    The solar cycle dependence of various turbulence quantities and cosmic-ray (CR) diffusion coefficients is investigated by using OMNI 1 minute resolution data over 22 years. We employ Elsässer variables z ± to calculate the magnetic field turbulence energy and correlation lengths for both the inwardly and outwardly directed interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). We present the temporal evolution of both large-scale solar wind (SW) plasma variables and small-scale magnetic fluctuations. Based on these observed quantities, we study the influence of solar activity on CR parallel and perpendicular diffusion using quasi-linear theory and nonlinear guiding center theory, respectively. We also evaluate the radial evolution of the CR diffusion coefficients by using the boundary conditions for different solar activity levels. We find that in the ecliptic plane at 1 au (1), the large-scale SW temperature T, velocity V sw, Alfvén speed V A , and IMF magnitude B 0 are positively related to solar activity; (2) the fluctuating magnetic energy density , residual energy E D , and corresponding correlation functions all have an obvious solar cycle dependence. The residual energy E D is always negative, which indicates that the energy in magnetic fluctuations is larger than the energy in kinetic fluctuations, especially at solar maximum; (3) the correlation length λ for magnetic fluctuations does not show significant solar cycle variation; (4) the temporally varying shear source of turbulence, which is most important in the inner heliosphere, depends on the solar cycle; (5) small-scale fluctuations may not depend on the direction of the background magnetic field; and (6) high levels of SW fluctuations will increase CR perpendicular diffusion and decrease CR parallel diffusion, but this trend can be masked if the background IMF changes in concert with turbulence in response to solar activity. These results provide quantitative inputs for both turbulence transport models and CR

  11. Evaluation of Factors that Influence Residential Solar Panel Installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, April M. [ORNL; Omitaomu, Olufemi A. [ORNL; Kotikot, Susan M. [ORNL; Held, Elizabeth L. [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L. [ORNL

    2018-03-01

    Though rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems are the fastest growing source of distributed generation, detailed information about where they are located and who their owners are is often known only to installers and utility companies. This lack of detailed information is a barrier to policy and financial assessment of solar energy generation and use. To bridge the described data gap, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis (EPSA) to create an automated approach for detecting and characterizing buildings with installed solar panels using high-resolution overhead imagery. Additionally, ORNL was tasked with using machine learning techniques to classify parcels on which solar panels were automatically detected in the Washington, DC, and Boston areas as commercial or residential, and then providing a list of recommended variables and modeling techniques that could be combined with these results to identify attributes that motivate the installation of residential solar panels. This technical report describes the methodology, results, and recommendations in greater detail, including lessons learned and future work.

  12. Solar induced inter-annual variability of ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fytterer, Tilo; Nieder, Holger; Perot, Kristell; Sinnhuber, Miriam; Stiller, Gabriele; Urban, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    Measurements by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding instrument on board the ENVIromental SATellite from 2005 - 2011 are used to investigate the impact of solar and geomagnetic activity on O3 in the stratosphere and mesosphere inside the Antarctic polar vortex. It is known from observations that energetic particles, mainly originating from the sun, precipitate in the Earth atmosphere and produce odd nitrogen NOx (N + NO + NO2) in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, which is transported downwards into the stratosphere during polar winter. Results from global chemistry-transport models suggest that this leads to a depletion of O3 down to ~30 km at high latitudes during winter. Therefore it appears promising to search for a link between high energetic particles and O3 in actual data sets. Thus in this study, correlation analysis between a 26 days average centred around 1 Apr, 1 May and 1 Jun of several solar/geomagnetic indices (Ap index, F10.7 cm solar radio flux, Lyman-alpha, 2 MeV electrons flux) and 26 day running means from 1 Apr - 1 Nov of O3 in the altitude range from 20 - 70 km were performed. The results reveal negative correlation coefficients propagating downwards throughout the polar winter, at least for the Ap index and the 2 MeV electrons flux. Comparisons with TIMED/SABER and Odin/SMR O3 data are in moderate agreement, also showing a descending negative signal in either indices, but only for the correlation with 1 Apr.

  13. Solar variability observed through changes in solar figure and mean diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, H.A.

    1985-01-01

    A program to monitor solar luminosity variations through diameter measurements has been operation at SCLERA since 1981. The solar diameter is currently measured at multiple angles from the equator. Measurements at these different angles have the advantage that, not only can the solar oblateness be accurately measured, but, also, systematic errors, introduced by atmospheric refraction, can be reduced to a minimum. The primary emphasis during the last year has been on data analysis and interpretation. An extension of theoretical work relevant to the relationship between the solar diameter and luminosity for long-period oscillations has been extended to include 160 min period oscillations, and several tests have been completed. An absolute calibration system for the telescope field has been constructed and is being tested. A review of this work is presented

  14. Solar variability observed through changes in solar figure and mean diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    A program to monitor solar luminosity variations through diameter measurements has been in operation at SCLERA since 1981. The solar diameter is measured at multiple angles from the equator. Measurements at these different angles have the advantage that not only can the solar oblateness be accurately measured, but also, a systematic errors introduced by atmospheric refraction can be reduced to a minimum. An improved theoretical treatment relevant to the relationship between the solar diameter and luminosity for long period oscilations has been successfully developed, and testing is currently underway. The construction of an absolute calibration system for the telescope field has been conducted and will soon be operational. A review of this work is presented

  15. Crossing safety barriers: influence of children's morphological and functional variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordovil, Rita; Vieira, Filomena; Barreiros, João

    2012-05-01

    Thirty-three children between 3 and 6 years of age were asked to climb four different types of safety barriers. Morphological and functional variables of the children, which were expected to influence climbing or passing through skills, were collected. The influence of those variables on children's success rate and time to cross was tested. No barrier offered a total restraining efficacy. The horizontal bars barrier was crossed by 97% of the children. In the group of children that succeeded in crossing the four barriers, mean time to cross the most difficult barrier was 15 s. Age was the best predictor for success in crossing most barriers but morphology and strength were important predictors of time to cross. The influence of anthropometric variables in time to cross was dependent upon the characteristics of the barrier. A good design of safety barriers should consider children's age, morphology and strength. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Variable solar control using thermotropic core/shell particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehling, Olaf; Seeboth, Arno; Ruhmann, Ralf; Potechius, Elvira; Vetter, Renate [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research (IAP), Department of Chromogenic Polymers, Volmerstr. 7B, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Haeusler, Tobias [Brandenburg University of Technology (BTU Cottbus), Chair of Applied Physics/Thermophysics, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    Subject of our recent investigations is the utilization of a reversible thermotropic material for a self-regulating sun protection glazing that controls the solar energy input in order to avoid overheating. Based on the well-established UV curing technology for laminated glass a superior thermotropic material with tunable switching characteristics and of low material costs was developed. The polymer layer contains core/shell particles homogeneously dispersed in a UV-cured resin. The particle core in turn consists of an n-alkane mixture that is responsible for the temperature-induced clear/opaque switching. To obtain particles of well-defined size and with a narrow size distribution, the miniemulsion polymerization technique was used. The visible and solar optical properties (normal-normal, normal-hemispherical, and normal-diffuse transmittance) in the off (clear) and in the on state (opaque) were determined by UV/Vis/NIR spectroscopy. Samples containing particles of high median diameter (>800 nm) primarily scatter in the forward direction. However, with smaller particles (300-600 nm) a higher backscattering (reflection) efficiency was achieved. The largest difference in the normal-hemispherical transmittance could be found with a particle amount of 6% and a median scattering domain diameter of {proportional_to}380 nm. (author)

  17. Topographic variability influences the carbon sequestration potential of arable soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chirinda, Ngoni; Elsgaard, Lars; Thomsen, Ingrid Kaag

    2012-01-01

    There is presently limited knowledge on the influence of field spatial variability on the carbon (C) sink-source relationships in arable landscapes. This is accompanied by the fact that our understanding of soil profile C dynamics is also limited. This study aimed at investigating how spatial...... results indicated that variability across arable landscapes makes footslope soils both a larger sink of buried soil C and a bigger potential CO2 source than upslope soils....

  18. A solar reserve methodology for renewable energy integration studies based on sub-hourly variability analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibanez, Eduardo; Brinkman, Gregory; Hummon, Marissa [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lew, Debra

    2012-07-01

    Increasing penetration of wind and solar energy are raising concerns among electric system operators because of the variability and uncertainty associated with the power sources. Previous work focused on the quantification of reserves for systems with wind power. This paper presents a new methodology that allows the determination of necessary reserves for high penetrations of photovoltaic power and compares it to the wind-based methodology. The solar reserve methodology was applied to Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study. A summary of the results is included. (orig.)

  19. Relative Influence Of Sociodemographic Variables On Oral Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports the results of a study to investigate the relative influence of some sociodemographic variables on oral hygiene and health of primary school children in Ibadan, Nigeria. The pupils were from two different socioeconomic strata of the society and their ages ranged between 7 and 16 years. They were ...

  20. Influence of environmental factors on birth weight variability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present investigation was carried out to study the influence of environmental factors on the birth weight variability of two breeds of sheep. Animals used in this research were taken from the Pirot and Svrljig indigenous sheep breeds. The data were collected from 1999 to 2009 and were analyzed to determine the effect of ...

  1. The Influence of Independent and Intervening Variables on Adoption ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that each investigated intervening variable has influence on adoption of ... testing of the model in different social cultural settings and crops to see its ...... Mexico. Crook, T. R., Tood, S.Y., Combs, J. G., Woehr,. D. J. and Ketchen, D. J. (2011).

  2. Variability in estuarine water temperature gradients and influence on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Structure and variability of water temperature gradients and potential influence on distribution of two tropical zooplankters (the mysid Mesopodopsis africana and the copepod Acartia natalensis) and their temperate congenerics (M. wooldridgei and A. longipatella) was investigated over a 10-year period in the Mgazi Estuary, ...

  3. Solar cycle variability of nonmigrating tides in the infrared cooling of the thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nischal, N.; Oberheide, J.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Marsh, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    Nitric Oxide (NO) at 5.3 μm and Carbon dioxide (CO2) at 15 μm are the major infrared emissions responsible for the radiative cooling of the thermosphere. We study the impact of two important diurnal nonmigrating tides, the DE2 and DE3, on NO and CO2 infrared emissions over a complete solar cycle (2002-2013) by (i) analyzing NO and CO2 cooling rate data from SABER and (ii) photochemical modeling using dynamical tides from a thermospheric empirical tidal model, CTMT. Both observed and modeled results show that the NO cooling rate amplitudes for DE2 and DE3 exhibit strong solar cycle dependence. NO 5.3 μm cooling rate tides are relatively unimportant for the infrared energy budget during solar minimum but important during solar maximum. On the other hand DE2 and DE3 in CO2 show comparatively small variability over a solar cycle. CO2 15 μm cooling rate tides remain, to a large extent, constant between solar minimum and maximum. This different responses by NO and CO2 emissions to the DE2 and DE3 during a solar cycle comes form the fact that the collisional reaction rate for NO is highly sensitive to the temperature comparative to that for CO2. Moreover, the solar cycle variability of these nonmigrating tides in thermospheric infrared emissions shows a clear QBO signals substantiating the impact of tropospheric weather system on the energy budget of the thermosphere. The relative contribution from the individual tidal drivers; temperature, density and advection to the observed DE2 and DE3 tides does not vary much over the course of the solar cycle, and this is true for both NO and CO2 emissions.

  4. Solar variability as a factor in planetary change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A theory is presented which accounts for the composition of the moon, the high density of Mercury and the absence of water on Venus. It envisages the sun as being older than the currently accepted age of 4.5-5.0 billion years. Available information is consistent with an episode of increased luminosity in a pre-existing sun accompanied by planets ancestral to the present ones. The result was widespread melting and vaporization of material in the inner solar system. The crust and outer mantle of Mercury was vaporized and driven out into space where it recondensed. Part of this material accreted into a body that was to become the earth's moon; part of it formed planetesimals which impacted on the inner planets to produce craters that are still in evidence on the moon, Mars and Mercury. Venus is seen as having once possessed substantial quantities of water which were driven away by the heat. Some loss of water might also have occurred from the earth, but it would not have been as complete due to its greater distance from the sun. The present CO 2 atmosphere of Venus resulted from thermal decomposition of carbonate rocks in the crust. (Auth.)

  5. The influence of climate variables on dengue in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Edna; Coelho, Micheline; Oliver, Leuda; Massad, Eduardo

    2011-12-01

    In this work we correlated dengue cases with climatic variables for the city of Singapore. This was done through a Poisson Regression Model (PRM) that considers dengue cases as the dependent variable and the climatic variables (rainfall, maximum and minimum temperature and relative humidity) as independent variables. We also used Principal Components Analysis (PCA) to choose the variables that influence in the increase of the number of dengue cases in Singapore, where PC₁ (Principal component 1) is represented by temperature and rainfall and PC₂ (Principal component 2) is represented by relative humidity. We calculated the probability of occurrence of new cases of dengue and the relative risk of occurrence of dengue cases influenced by climatic variable. The months from July to September showed the highest probabilities of the occurrence of new cases of the disease throughout the year. This was based on an analysis of time series of maximum and minimum temperature. An interesting result was that for every 2-10°C of variation of the maximum temperature, there was an average increase of 22.2-184.6% in the number of dengue cases. For the minimum temperature, we observed that for the same variation, there was an average increase of 26.1-230.3% in the number of the dengue cases from April to August. The precipitation and the relative humidity, after analysis of correlation, were discarded in the use of Poisson Regression Model because they did not present good correlation with the dengue cases. Additionally, the relative risk of the occurrence of the cases of the disease under the influence of the variation of temperature was from 1.2-2.8 for maximum temperature and increased from 1.3-3.3 for minimum temperature. Therefore, the variable temperature (maximum and minimum) was the best predictor for the increased number of dengue cases in Singapore.

  6. Variables influencing medical student learning in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwind, Cathy J; Boehler, Margaret L; Rogers, David A; Williams, Reed G; Dunnington, Gary; Folse, Roland; Markwell, Stephen J

    2004-02-01

    The operating room (OR) is an important venue where surgeons do much of medical student teaching and yet there has been little work evaluating variables that influence learning in this unique environment. We designed this study to identify variables that affected medical student learning in the OR. We developed a questionnaire based on surgery faculty observations of learning in the OR. The medical students completed the questionnaire on 114 learning episodes in the OR. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to establish the strength of association between various variables and the student's overall perception of learning. The students evaluated 27 variables that might impact their learning in the OR. Strong correlations were identified between the attending physician's attitude, interactions and teaching ability in the OR and the environment being conducive to learning. Surgical faculty behavior is a powerful determinant of student perceptions of what provides for a favorable learning environment in the OR.

  7. Long-Term Variability of the Sun in the Context of Solar-Analog Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, Ricky

    2018-06-01

    The Sun is the best observed object in astrophysics, but despite this distinction the nature of its well-ordered generation of magnetic field in 11-year activity cycles remains a mystery. In this work, we place the solar cycle in a broader context by examining the long-term variability of solar analog stars within 5% of the solar effective temperature, but varied in rotation rate and metallicity. Emission in the Fraunhofer H & K line cores from singly-ionized calcium in the lower chromosphere is due to magnetic heating, and is a proven proxy for magnetic flux on the Sun. We use Ca H & K observations from the Mount Wilson Observatory HK project, the Lowell Observatory Solar Stellar Spectrograph, and other sources to construct composite activity time series of over 100 years in length for the Sun and up to 50 years for 26 nearby solar analogs. Archival Ca H & K observations of reflected sunlight from the Moon using the Mount Wilson instrument allow us to properly calibrate the solar time series to the S-index scale used in stellar studies. We find the mean solar S-index to be 5–9% lower than previously estimated, and the amplitude of activity to be small compared to active stars in our sample. A detailed look at the young solar analog HD 30495, which rotates 2.3 times faster than the Sun, reveals a large amplitude ~12-year activity cycle and an intermittent short-period variation of 1.7 years, comparable to the solar variability time scales despite its faster rotation. Finally, time series analyses of the solar analog ensemble and a quantitative analysis of results from the literature indicate that truly Sun-like cyclic variability is rare, and that the amplitude of activity over both long and short timescales is linearly proportional to the mean activity. We conclude that the physical conditions conducive to a quasi-periodic magnetic activity cycle like the Sun’s are rare in stars of approximately the solar mass, and that the proper conditions may be restricted

  8. Solar Irradiance Variability and Its Impacts on the Earth Climate System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, J. W.; Woods, T. N.

    The Sun plays a vital role in the evolution of the climates of terrestrial planets. Observations of the solar spectrum are now routinely made that span the wavelength range from the X-ray portion of the spectrum (5 nm) into the infrared to about 2400 nm. Over this very broad wavelength range, accounting for about 97% of the total solar irradiance, the intensity varies by more than 6 orders of magnitude, requiring a suite of very different and innovative instruments to determine both the spectral irradiance and its variability. The origins of solar variability are strongly linked to surface magnetic field changes, and analysis of solar images and magnetograms show that the intensity of emitted radiation from solar surface features in active regions has a very strong wavelength and magnetic field strength dependence. These magnetic fields produce observable solar surface features such as sunspots, faculae, and network structures that contribute in different ways to the radiated output. Semi-empirical models of solar spectral irradiance are able to capture much of the Sun's output, but this topic remains an active area of research. Studies of solar structures in both high spectral and spatial resolution are refining this understanding. Advances in Earth observation systems and high-quality three-dimensional chemical climate models provide a sound methodology to study the mechanisms of the interaction between Earth's atmosphere and the incoming solar radiation. Energetic photons have a profound effect on the chemistry and dynamics of the thermosphere and ionosphere, and these processes are now well represented in upper atmospheric models. In the middle and lower atmosphere the effects of solar variability enter the climate system through two nonexclusive pathways referred to as the top-down and bottom-up mechanisms. The top-down mechanism proceeds through the alteration of the photochemical rates that establish the middle atmospheric temperature structure and

  9. Review on the solar spectral variability in the EUV for space weather purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lilensten

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The solar XUV-EUV flux is the main energy source in the terrestrial diurnal thermosphere: it produces ionization, dissociation, excitation and heating. Accurate knowledge of this flux is of prime importance for space weather. We first list the space weather applications that require nowcasting and forecasting of the solar XUV-EUV flux. We then review present models and discuss how they account for the variability of the solar spectrum. We show why the measurement of the full spectrum is difficult, and why it is illusory to retrieve it from its atmospheric effects. We then address the problem of determining a set of observations that are adapted for space weather purposes, in the frame of ionospheric studies. Finally, we review the existing and future space experiments that are devoted to the observation of the solar XUV-EUV spectrum.

  10. Influence of Cognitive Variables in the Iowa Gambling Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marino D., Julián C.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to analyze the influence of cognitive and personality variables in the Decision Making (DM construct, evaluated by the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT. For this propose, a battery of neuropsychological tests was applied to 116 individuals of both genders between 18 and 35 years olds. The results showed that the IGT performance was not associated to the cognitive variables evaluated, only it has been found moderated relationship between working memory and DM. These outcomes suggest that DM seems to be an independent construct of the “cool” cognitive functions and could be influenced for the emotional or motivational aspects related to “hot” cognitive process. Finally, the DM process seems to be more associated to the ability to avoid punishment than the capacity of evaluate long term benefits.

  11. Influence of climate variability on large rivers runoff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Nurtaev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with IPCC Report the influence of climate change on the water cycle will increase hydrologic variability by means of changing of precipitation patterns, melting of ice and change of runoff. Precipitation has increased in high northern latitudes and decreased in southern latitudes. This study presents an analysis of river runoffs trends in different climatic zones of the world in condition of climate change.

  12. Solar light induced removal of arsenic from contaminated groundwater: the interplay of solar energy and chemical variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M.G.; D' Hiriart, J.; Giullitti, J.; Hidalgo, M. del V. [Universidad Nacional de Tucaman (Argentina). Centro de Investigaciones y Transferencia en Quimica Aplicada; Lin, H.; Custo, G.; Litter, M.I. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Unidad de Actividad Quimica; Blesa, M.A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Unidad de Actividad Quimica; Universidad Nacional de General San Martin (Argentina)

    2004-11-01

    The removal of arsenic by solar oxidation in individual units (SORAS) is currently being explored as a possible economic and simple technology to treat groundwater in Bangladesh and India. Hydroarsenicism affects also large regions of America, especially Argentina, Chile, Mexico and Peru. In this paper, the efficiency of arsenic removal by solar oxidation coupled with precipitation of iron (hydr)oxide, was assessed under various experimental conditions, both on samples of synthetic water and of groundwater of the province of Tucuman (Argentina). The results demonstrate that the underlying chemistry is very complex, and the efficiency is affected often in unpredictable ways by changes in the chemical matrix, or by changes in the operative conditions. Oxides generated from ferrous salts are more efficient than solids formed by hydrolysis of Fe(III); alkalinity contents (bicarbonate) is also important to permit the adequate precipitation. Addition of small amounts of citric acid (lemon juice) is beneficial, but at larger concentrations the effect is negative, probably because of interference in the formation of the solid. The effect of solar irradiation is variable, depending on the other experimental conditions. Although it is possible to remove As partially without solar irradiation under certain special conditions, a procedure versatile enough to cope with waters of different compositions must be based in the use of solar energy. Light plays the role of accelerating the oxidation of As(III) to As(V), and also affects the nature of the solid and, hence, its sorptive properties. The rationale of the effect of light is therefore appreciably more complex than in the case of heterogeneous photocatalysis with TiO{sub 2}. (Author)

  13. Center-to-Limb Variability of Hot Coronal EUV Emissions During Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, E. M. B.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Eparvier, F. G.; Epp, L.

    2018-02-01

    It is generally accepted that densities of quiet-Sun and active region plasma are sufficiently low to justify the optically thin approximation, and this is commonly used in the analysis of line emissions from plasma in the solar corona. However, the densities of solar flare loops are substantially higher, compromising the optically thin approximation. This study begins with a radiative transfer model that uses typical solar flare densities and geometries to show that hot coronal emission lines are not generally optically thin. Furthermore, the model demonstrates that the observed line intensity should exhibit center-to-limb variability (CTLV), with flares observed near the limb being dimmer than those occurring near disk center. The model predictions are validated with an analysis of over 200 flares observed by the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), which uses six lines, with peak formation temperatures between 8.9 and 15.8 MK, to show that limb flares are systematically dimmer than disk-center flares. The data are then used to show that the electron column density along the line of sight typically increases by 1.76 × 10^{19} cm^{-2} for limb flares over the disk-center flare value. It is shown that the CTLV of hot coronal emissions reduces the amount of ionizing radiation propagating into the solar system, and it changes the relative intensities of lines and bands commonly used for spectral analysis.

  14. Solar spectral irradiance variability of some chromospheric emission lines through the solar activity cycles 21-23

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göker Ü.D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of variations of solar spectral irradiance (SSI in the wave-length ranges 121.5 nm-300.5 nm for the period 1981-2009 is presented. We used various data for ultraviolet (UV spectral lines and international sunspot number (ISSN from interactive data centers such as SME (NSSDC, UARS (GDAAC, SORCE (LISIRD and SIDC, respectively. We reduced these data by using the MATLsoftware package. In this respect, we revealed negative correlations of intensities of UV (289.5 nm-300.5 nm spectral lines originating in the solar chromosphere with the ISSN index during the unusually prolonged minimum between the solar activity cycles (SACs 23 and 24. We also compared our results with the variations of solar activity indices obtained by the ground-based telescopes. Therefore, we found that plage regions decrease while facular areas are increasing in SAC 23. However, the decrease in plage regions is seen in small sunspot groups (SGs, contrary to this, these regions in large SGs are comparable to previous SACs or even larger as is also seen in facular areas. Nevertheless, negative correlations between ISSN and SSI data indicate that these variations are in close connection with the classes of sunspots/SGs, faculae and plage regions. Finally, we applied the time series analysis of spectral lines corresponding to the wavelengths 121.5 nm-300.5 nm and made comparisons with the ISSN data. We found an unexpected increase in the 298.5 nm line for the Fe II ion. The variability of Fe II ion 298.5 nm line is in close connection with the facular areas and plage regions, and the sizes of these solar surface indices play an important role for the SSI variability, as well. So, we compared the connection between the sizes of faculae and plage regions, sunspots/SGs, chemical elements and SSI variability. Our future work will be the theoretical study of this connection and developing of a corresponding model.

  15. Analysis of solar radiation and other variables for the evaluation of locations of thermo solar power stations; Analisis de radiacion solar y otras vairables para la evaluacion de emplazamientos de centrales termosolares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montero, I.; Miranda, M. T.; Rojas, S.; Bolinaga, B.; Tierra, C.; Pico, J. del

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents the characteristics of various measuring weather stations located in future CCP thermal plants, showing the different systems they are equipped with, among others, pyrheliometer, pyrano meter, anemometers, thermo-hygrometer and data transmission system. Some results of solar radiation and other climate variables obtained in these stations are presented and analyzed in relation to existing data in the area, taking into account different external parameters that can influence the direct radiation obtained and, therefore, the future operation of the thermal plant. (Author)

  16. Performance optimization for a variable throat ejector in a solar refrigeration system

    KAUST Repository

    Yen, R.H.; Huang, B.J.; Chen, C.Y.; Shiu, T.Y.; Cheng, C.W.; Chen, S.S.; Shestopalov, K.

    2013-01-01

    In a solar vapor ejector refrigeration system, the solar heat supply may vary because of variations in solar irradiation intensity, making it difficult to maintain a steady generator temperature. To improve ejector performance, this study proposes a variable throat ejector (VTEJ) and analyzes its performance using CFD simulations. The following conclusions can be drawn. An ejector with a greater throat area and larger solar collector allows a wider operating range of generator temperatures, but may be overdesigned and expensive. Conversely, decreasing the throat area limits the operating range of generator temperatures. Thus the ejector with a fixed throat area may be unsuitable to use solar energy as a heat source. For a VTEJ, this study derives a curve-fitting relationship between the optimum throat area ratio and the operating temperatures. Using this relationship to adjust the throat area ratio, the ejector can consistently achieve optimal and stable performances under a varying solar heat supply. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and IIR. All rights reserved.

  17. Performance optimization for a variable throat ejector in a solar refrigeration system

    KAUST Repository

    Yen, R.H.

    2013-08-01

    In a solar vapor ejector refrigeration system, the solar heat supply may vary because of variations in solar irradiation intensity, making it difficult to maintain a steady generator temperature. To improve ejector performance, this study proposes a variable throat ejector (VTEJ) and analyzes its performance using CFD simulations. The following conclusions can be drawn. An ejector with a greater throat area and larger solar collector allows a wider operating range of generator temperatures, but may be overdesigned and expensive. Conversely, decreasing the throat area limits the operating range of generator temperatures. Thus the ejector with a fixed throat area may be unsuitable to use solar energy as a heat source. For a VTEJ, this study derives a curve-fitting relationship between the optimum throat area ratio and the operating temperatures. Using this relationship to adjust the throat area ratio, the ejector can consistently achieve optimal and stable performances under a varying solar heat supply. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and IIR. All rights reserved.

  18. Variable Emittance Electrochromics Using Ionic Electrolytes and Low Solar Absorptance Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Prasanna

    2011-01-01

    One of the last remaining technical hurdles with variable emittance devices or skins based on conducting polymer electrochromics is the high solar absorptance of their top surfaces. This high solar absorptance causes overheating of the skin when facing the Sun in space. Existing technologies such as mechanical louvers or loop heat pipes are virtually inapplicable to micro (solar absorption to Alpha(s) of between 0.30 and 0.46. Coupled with the emittance properties of the variable emittance skins, this lowers the surface temperature of the skins facing the Sun to between 30 and 60 C, which is much lower than previous results of 100 C, and is well within acceptable satellite operations ranges. The performance of this technology is better than that of current new technologies such as microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), electrostatics, and electrophoretics, especially in applications involving micro and nano spacecraft. The coatings are deposited inside a high vacuum, layering multiple coatings onto the top surfaces of variable emittance skins. They are completely transparent in the entire relevant infrared region (about 2 to 45 microns), but highly reflective in the visible-NIR (near infrared) region of relevance to solar absorptance.

  19. Influence of attrition variables on iron ore flotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Fonseca Fortes

    Full Text Available Abstract The presence of slimes is harmful to the flotation process: the performance and consumption of reagents are negatively affected. Traditionally, the desliming stage has been responsible for removing slimes. However, depending on the porosity of the mineral particles, desliming may not be sufficient to maximize the concentration results. An attrition process before the desliming operation can improve the removal of slime, especially when slimes cover the surface and/or are confined to the cavities/pores of the mineral particles. Attrition is present in the flowcharts of the beneficiation process of phosphate and industrial sand (silica sand. Research has been undertaken for its application to produce pre-concentrates of zircon and iron ore. However, there is still little knowledge of the influence of the attrition variables on the beneficiation process of iron ore. This study presents a factorial design and analysis of the effects of these variables on the reverse flotation of iron ore. The standard of the experimental procedures for all tests included the attrition of pulp, under the conditions of dispersion, desliming and flotation. The parameter analysed (variable response was the metallurgical recovery in reverse flotation tests. The planning and analysis of the full factorial experiment indicated that with 95% reliability, the rotation speed of the attrition cell impeller was the main variable in the attrition process of the iron ore. The percentage of solid variables in the pulp and the time of the attrition, as well as their interactions, were not indicated to be significant.

  20. Solar events and their influence on the interplanetary medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joselyn, Jo Ann

    The Workshop on Solar Events and Their Influence on the Interplanetary Medium very successfully met its goal “to foster interactions among colleagues, leading to an improved understanding of the unified relationship between solar events and interplanetary disturbances.” Organized by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Space Environment Laboratory and funded by the national Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Solar Maximum Mission Principal Investigators and the Space Environment Laboratory, this meeting was held held September 8—11, 1986, in Estes Park, Colo. A total of 94 scientists, including representatives from Argentina, Germany, Japan, France, Scotland, England, Australia, Poland, Israel, Greece, China and the United States attended. A novel meeting schedule was adopted, with no formal presentations other than a keynote address by Rainer Schwenn of the Max Planck Institut fur Aeronomie (Federal republic of Germany), entitled “Transients on the Sun and Their Effects on the Interplanetary Medium: An Interdisciplinary Challenge” a Gordon A. Newkirk Memorial talk on “Early History of the Coronagraph” by John Eddy of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Office of Interdisciplinary Earth Studies (Boulder, Colo.); and introductory and summary statements by working group leaders. Instead, there were three working groups, which met either independently or with one of the other groups according to a prearranged plan. Suggested roundtable discussion topics were distributed in advance to the members of each group, but primarily, each group was expected to think of questions for the other groups and respond to requests for information from them. As may be expected, for some topics there was group consensus. Other topics were contentious.

  1. An examination of the variables influencing the fuel retail industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sartorius

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose/objectives: The objective of the study is to contribute to a better understanding of the key variables that influence the profitability of this sector, as well as to develop a reliable model to predict retail fuel sales volumes in an urban setting. Problem investigated: South African fuel retail outlets are confronted by a wide range of variables that constrain profit and a significant number of outlets are not profitable. In the event of further deregulation, it is conceivable that many fuel stations will go out of business. Methodology: A combination of a quantitative and a case study methodology, in conjunction with a literature review, was used to test the principal research questions. Findings/implications: The results suggest that location significantly influences urban retail fuel sales volumes whilst fuel station size and the fuel price play a lesser role. Other significant factors, however, also influence fuel station profitability. The demand for petrol appears to be relatively inelastic in the short term and more elastic over the long term. Conversely, the demand for diesel appears to be completely inelastic. Value: The article promotes a better understanding of the cost dynamics of the fuel industry. In this regard, the model constructed to predict urban fuel station turnover indicated high levels of reliability. Furthermore, few comparable studies have been published in accounting journals. Conclusion: The study concludes that urban petrol stations selling more than 370 000 liters of fuel per month are likely to be profitable and that location is a key variable influencing sales. In the event of deregulation, many operators are likely to be eliminated because of high levels of competition and low profit margins. An even greater number of fuel stations, therefore, will be reliant on non forecourt activities to survive.

  2. Cytogenetic variability in pinus sylvestris L. populations experiencing anthropogenic influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudalova, A.; Geras'kin, S.; Vasiliev, D.; Dikarev, V.

    2004-01-01

    Techno-genic pollution has become one of the most significant ecological factors determining biosphere existence and development. An analysis of genetic consequences of the radiation accidents in the South Urals and Chernobyl has shown that mutation and recombination processes are considerably accelerated in plant and animal's populations experiencing techno-genic influence. This implies that there are complicated adaptation processes leading to changes in genetic structure of populations and increasing genetic load. Pinus sylvestris L. populations growing at the territory of the 'radon' Leningrad regional radioactive waste reprocessing enterprise and Sosnovy Bor town were monitored 6 years (1997-2002) by a set of cyto-genetical and morphological tests. Cytogenetic damage levels within intercalary meristem of needle as well as in root meristem of seedlings were found to significantly exceed corresponding controls. A higher radioresistance of the Scots pine seeds analyzed was demonstrated with an acute γ-radiation that also revealed a selection process directed at an enhancement of repair efficiency and resulting in a shift of mean values of radioresistance in populations towards higher values. An enlargement of variance of studied cytogenetic parameters was found in the populations experiencing techno-genic influence. This indicates, with an account of phenomenon of the enhanced radioresistance, that there are processes of cyto-genetical adaptation in the investigated regions. An analysis of the structure of ecological-genetical variability was carried out with the purpose of separating two components in the inter-population variability - the first is engaged to the genetically determined variability of biological characteristics intrinsic for this species, and the second is responsible for the variability originating from anthropogenic contamination of the natural habitat. Changes of these two types of variability were studied in dependence on time and techno

  3. Cytogenetic variability in pinus sylvestris L. populations experiencing anthropogenic influence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oudalova, A.; Geras' kin, S.; Vasiliev, D.; Dikarev, V. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    Techno-genic pollution has become one of the most significant ecological factors determining biosphere existence and development. An analysis of genetic consequences of the radiation accidents in the South Urals and Chernobyl has shown that mutation and recombination processes are considerably accelerated in plant and animal's populations experiencing techno-genic influence. This implies that there are complicated adaptation processes leading to changes in genetic structure of populations and increasing genetic load. Pinus sylvestris L. populations growing at the territory of the 'radon' Leningrad regional radioactive waste reprocessing enterprise and Sosnovy Bor town were monitored 6 years (1997-2002) by a set of cyto-genetical and morphological tests. Cytogenetic damage levels within intercalary meristem of needle as well as in root meristem of seedlings were found to significantly exceed corresponding controls. A higher radioresistance of the Scots pine seeds analyzed was demonstrated with an acute {gamma}-radiation that also revealed a selection process directed at an enhancement of repair efficiency and resulting in a shift of mean values of radioresistance in populations towards higher values. An enlargement of variance of studied cytogenetic parameters was found in the populations experiencing techno-genic influence. This indicates, with an account of phenomenon of the enhanced radioresistance, that there are processes of cyto-genetical adaptation in the investigated regions. An analysis of the structure of ecological-genetical variability was carried out with the purpose of separating two components in the inter-population variability - the first is engaged to the genetically determined variability of biological characteristics intrinsic for this species, and the second is responsible for the variability originating from anthropogenic contamination of the natural habitat. Changes of these two types of variability were studied in dependence on

  4. Studies of the Solar Radiations' Influence About Geomembranes Used in Ecological Landfill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiluta, Petre; Cofaru, Ileana Ioana; Cofaru, Nicolae Florin; Popa, Dragos Laurentiu

    2017-12-01

    The study shown in this paper presents the behavior of geomembranes used at the ecological landfills. The influences of the solar radiations has a great importance regarding the correct mounting of the geomembranes. The mathematical model developed for the determination anytime and anywhere in the world for the next values and parameters: apparent solar time, solar declination, solar altitude, solar azimuth and incidence angle, zone angle, angle of sun elevation, solar declination, solar constant, solar flux density, diffuse solar radiation, global radiation, soil albedo, total radiant flux density and relational links of these values. The results of this model was used for creations an AutoCAD subroutines useful for choosing the correct time for correct mounting anywhere of the geomembranes

  5. The influence of weather on the thermal performance of solar heating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, Simon; Shah, Louise Jivan

    2003-01-01

    . The investigation is based on calculations with validated models. Solar heating systems with different solar collector types, heat storage volumes and solar fractions are included in the investigation. The yearly solar radiation varies with approximately 20 % in the period from 1990 until 2002. The calculations......The influence of weather on the thermal performance of solar combi systems, solar domestic hot water systems and solar heating plants is investigated. The investigation is based on weather data from the Danish Design Reference Year, DRY and weather data measured for a period from 1990 until 2002...... show that the thermal performance of the investigated systems varies due to the weather variation. The variation of the yearly thermal performance of a solar heating plant is about 40 % while the variation of the yearly thermal performance of a solar domestic hot water system is about 30...

  6. Instrumented Impact Testing: Influence of Machine Variables and Specimen Position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucon, E.; McCowan, C. N.; Santoyo, R. A.

    2008-09-15

    An investigation has been conducted on the influence of impact machine variables and specimen positioning on characteristic forces and absorbed energies from instrumented Charpy tests. Brittle and ductile fracture behavior has been investigated by testing NIST reference samples of low, high and super-high energy levels. Test machine variables included tightness of foundation, anvil and striker bolts, and the position of the center of percussion with respect to the center of strike. For specimen positioning, we tested samples which had been moved away or sideways with respect to the anvils. In order to assess the influence of the various factors, we compared mean values in the reference (unaltered) and altered conditions; for machine variables, t-test analyses were also performed in order to evaluate the statistical significance of the observed differences. Our results indicate that the only circumstance which resulted in variations larger than 5 percent for both brittle and ductile specimens is when the sample is not in contact with the anvils. These findings should be taken into account in future revisions of instrumented Charpy test standards.

  7. Instrumented Impact Testing: Influence of Machine Variables and Specimen Position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucon, E.; McCowan, C. N.; Santoyo, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted on the influence of impact machine variables and specimen positioning on characteristic forces and absorbed energies from instrumented Charpy tests. Brittle and ductile fracture behavior has been investigated by testing NIST reference samples of low, high and super-high energy levels. Test machine variables included tightness of foundation, anvil and striker bolts, and the position of the center of percussion with respect to the center of strike. For specimen positioning, we tested samples which had been moved away or sideways with respect to the anvils. In order to assess the influence of the various factors, we compared mean values in the reference (unaltered) and altered conditions; for machine variables, t-test analyses were also performed in order to evaluate the statistical significance of the observed differences. Our results indicate that the only circumstance which resulted in variations larger than 5 percent for both brittle and ductile specimens is when the sample is not in contact with the anvils. These findings should be taken into account in future revisions of instrumented Charpy test standards.

  8. The influence of lower leg configurations on muscle force variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofori, Edward; Shim, Jaeho; Sosnoff, Jacob J

    2018-04-11

    The maintenance of steady contractions is required in many daily tasks. However, there is little understanding of how various lower limb configurations influence the ability to maintain force. The purpose of the current investigation was to examine the influence of joint angle on various lower-limb constant force contractions. Nineteen adults performed knee extension, knee flexion, and ankle plantarflexion isometric force contractions to 11 target forces, ranging from 2 to 95% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) at 2 angles. Force variability was quantified with mean force, standard deviation, and the coefficient of variation of force output. Non-linearities in force output were quantified with approximate entropy. Curve fitting analyses were performed on each set of data from each individual across contractions to further examine whether joint angle interacts with global functions of lower-limb force variability. Joint angle had significant effects on the model parameters used to describe the force-variability function for each muscle contraction (p force output were more explained by force level in smaller angle conditions relative to the larger angle conditions (p force production. Biomechanical factors, such as joint angle, along with neurophysiological factors should be considered together in the discussion of the dynamics of constant force production. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of economical variables on a supercritical biodiesel production process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchetti, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Biodiesel production from supercritical process. • Economical analysis. • Influence of market variables. - Abstract: Biodiesel has becoming more and more relevant in today’s society and economy due to its environmental advantages such as biodegradability, lower CO and CO 2 emissions as well as less particulate pollutants. In this work the study of market and economic variables is presented and their effects compared when biodiesel is being produced using a supercritical technology. The production process is based on a supercritical technology with no catalyst and no co-solvent. Price for the raw materials, such as price for the alcohol as well as the oil has been studied. Also, selling price for biodiesel as well as glycerin has been analyzed and compared with prices from other biodiesel production technologies. Economic decisions such as percentage of failure in the production process, investment in research and development, and advertisement have been evaluated; also it has been considered the influence of the tax incentives on the global economy of the production process. Small variations on some of the major market variables would produce significant effects over the global economy of the plant, making it non profitable in some cases

  10. DEMOGRAPHIC VARIABLES INFLUENCING INDIVIDUAL ENTREPRENEURIAL ORIENTATION AND STRATEGIC THINKING CAPABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Jelenc

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Strategic thinking capability is interesting part of the cognitive development of each entrepreneur. This paper develops on notion that there a number of demographic variables that shape the behavior of each particular elements of entrepreneurial orientation and strategic component of each entrepreneur. The demographic variable that have significant role will take the role of moderator in further research. Since both constructs are multidimensional, the demographic variables are not influencing them in the same way. The empirical research has been performed on IT firms in Croatia in 2014. Individual entrepreneurial orientation is measured by the construct developed by Bolton and Lane’s (2012 individual entrepreneurial orientation instrument. The instrument is grounded in the seminal work of Miller (1983, Covin and Slevin (1986; 1988; 1989, Lumpkin and Dess (1996 and Covin and Wales (2011; consisting of three dimensions – risk-taking, innovation, and proactiveness. Strategic thinking was measured by Pisapia’s (2009 Strategic thinking questionnaire (STQ. The STQ asked respondents to rate how often they use systems thinking, reframing, and reflecting skills. Within the framework of individual entrepreneurial orientation the following demographic variables shape the trends: age, gender, education abroad and previous experience. Entrepreneurs between 40-60 years old are less prone to risk, female entrepreneurs are more proactive than men, education abroad provides with the additional proactiveness and the entrepreneur with previous experience is prone to higher risk, proactiveness and innovativeness. Within the framework of strategic thinking capability the following demographic variables shape the trends: age, gender, education and experience. Entrepreneurs older than 60 score high on system thinking as well as females, females also score higher on reframing. Entrepreneurs with PhD degree score lower on reframing, while managers working more

  11. Decoupling Solar Variability and Instrument Trends Using the Multiple Same-Irradiance-Level (MuSIL) Analysis Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Eparvier, Francis G.; Harder, Jerald; Snow, Martin

    2018-05-01

    The solar spectral irradiance (SSI) dataset is a key record for studying and understanding the energetics and radiation balance in Earth's environment. Understanding the long-term variations of the SSI over timescales of the 11-year solar activity cycle and longer is critical for many Sun-Earth research topics. Satellite measurements of the SSI have been made since the 1970s, most of them in the ultraviolet, but recently also in the visible and near-infrared. A limiting factor for the accuracy of previous solar variability results is the uncertainties for the instrument degradation corrections, which need fairly large corrections relative to the amount of solar cycle variability at some wavelengths. The primary objective of this investigation has been to separate out solar cycle variability and any residual uncorrected instrumental trends in the SSI measurements from the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) mission and the Thermosphere, Mesosphere, Ionosphere, Energetic, and Dynamics (TIMED) mission. A new technique called the Multiple Same-Irradiance-Level (MuSIL) analysis has been developed, which examines an SSI time series at different levels of solar activity to provide long-term trends in an SSI record, and the most common result is a downward trend that most likely stems from uncorrected instrument degradation. This technique has been applied to each wavelength in the SSI records from SORCE (2003 - present) and TIMED (2002 - present) to provide new solar cycle variability results between 27 nm and 1600 nm with a resolution of about 1 nm at most wavelengths. This technique, which was validated with the highly accurate total solar irradiance (TSI) record, has an estimated relative uncertainty of about 5% of the measured solar cycle variability. The MuSIL results are further validated with the comparison of the new solar cycle variability results from different solar cycles.

  12. Solar Cycle Variability and Grand Minima Induced by Joy's Law Scatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Miesch, Mark S.

    2017-08-01

    The strength of the solar cycle varies from one cycle to another in an irregular manner and the extreme example of this irregularity is the Maunder minimum when Sun produced only a few spots for several years. We explore the cause of these variabilities using a 3D Babcock--Leighton dynamo. In this model, based on the toroidal flux at the base of the convection zone, bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs) are produced with flux, tilt angle, and time of emergence all obtain from their observed distributions. The dynamo growth is limited by a tilt quenching.The randomnesses in the BMR emergences make the poloidal field unequal and eventually cause an unequal solar cycle. When observed fluctuations of BMR tilts around Joy's law, i.e., a standard deviation of 15 degrees, are considered, our model produces a variation in the solar cycle comparable to the observed solar cycle variability. Tilt scatter also causes occasional Maunder-like grand minima, although the observed scatter does not reproduce correct statistics of grand minima. However, when we double the tilt scatter, we find grand minima consistent with observations. Importantly, our dynamo model can operate even during grand minima with only a few BMRs, without requiring any additional alpha effect.

  13. [The influence of physical exercise on heart rate variability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, Jacek; Zyśko, Dorota; Negrusz-Kawecka, Marta; Halawa, Bogumił

    2003-03-01

    Heart rate variability is controlled by the influence of autonomic nervous system, whereas one part of the system modulates the activity of the other. There is evidence of increased sympathetic activity in patients (pts) with essential hypertension. The aim of the study was to assess the persisting influence of increased sympathetic activity 30 min after moderate physical exercise on heart rate variability in patients with arterial hypertension. The study was performed in 19 patients (10 women, mean age 52.7 +/- 9.5 years and 9 men, mean age 37.7 +/- 8.8 years) with stage I (6 pts) and stage II (13 pts) arterial hypertension. All studied pts had sinus rhythm, were free of diabetes, coronary heart disease and congestive heart failure. 24-hour Holter monitoring was performed and for 30 min before the exercise test the pts stayed in supine rest. The exercise tests were performed between 10 and 11 a.m. Immediately after the exercise all pts stayed in supine position for 30 min. The heart rate variability parameters were studied using Holter monitoring system Medilog Optima Jet and were then analysed statistically. The mean energy expenditure during the exercise was 5.8 +/- 1.1 METs and the maximal heart rate was 148.1 +/- 20.3 bpm. All studied HRV parameters were significantly different in the assessed time period compared to the baseline values (p < 0.001). Significant correlation was found between the age of the studied patients and the mean RR interval, what can be considered as a hyperkinetic (hyperadrenergic) circulatory status and shorter RR interval in younger pts. Significant negative correlation between the age and SDNN parameter (r = -0.65, p < 0.001), 30 min after the exercise mirrors the prolonged adrenergic influence in older pts. The present study shows that the influence of moderate physical exercise on heart rate variability in pts with essential hypertension is extended over 30 min period after exercise and is more pronounced in older pts. The studies

  14. Evidence for Solar Cycle Influence on the Infrared Energy Budget and Radiative Cooling of the Thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Martin-Torres, F. Javier; Marshall, B. Thomas; Thompson, R. Earl; Williams, Joshua; Turpin, TImothy; Kratz, D. P.; Russell, James M.; Woods, Tom; Gordley, Larry L.

    2007-01-01

    We present direct observational evidence for solar cycle influence on the infrared energy budget and radiative cooling of the thermosphere. By analyzing nearly five years of data from the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument, we show that the annual mean infrared power radiated by the nitric oxide (NO) molecule at 5.3 m has decreased by a factor of 2.9. This decrease is correlated (r = 0.96) with the decrease in the annual mean F10.7 solar index. Despite the sharp decrease in radiated power (which is equivalent to a decrease in the vertical integrated radiative cooling rate), the variability of the power as given in the standard deviation of the annual means remains approximately constant. A simple relationship is shown to exist between the infrared power radiated by NO and the F10.7 index, thus providing a fundamental relationship between solar activity and the thermospheric cooling rate for use in thermospheric models. The change in NO radiated power is also consistent with changes in absorbed ultraviolet radiation over the same time period.

  15. On the influence of solar activity on the mid-latitude sporadic E layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzopane, Michael; Pignalberi, Alessio; Pietrella, Marco

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the influence of solar cycle variability on the sporadic E layer (Es), hourly measurements of the critical frequency of the Es ordinary mode of propagation, foEs, and of the blanketing frequency of the Es layer, fbEs, recorded from January 1976 to December 2009 at the Rome (Italy) ionospheric station (41.8° N, 12.5° E), were examined. The results are: (1) a high positive correlation between the F10.7 solar index and foEs as well as between F10.7 and fbEs, both for the whole data set and for each solar cycle separately, the correlation between F10.7 and fbEs being much higher than the one between F10.7 and foEs; (2) a decreasing long-term trend of the F10.7, foEs and fbEs time series, with foEs decreasing more rapidly than F10.7 and fbEs; (3) clear and statistically significant peaks at 11 years in the foEs and fbEs time series, inferred from Lomb-Scargle periodograms.

  16. Glazed ceramic roof tiles: influence of surface features in the solar reflectance index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortoli, Leitcia Silva de; Stapait, Camila Cristina; Marinoski, Deivis Luis; Fredel, Marcio Celso; Schabbach, Luciana M.

    2016-01-01

    In this study the influence of surface features of ceramic roof tiles in the solar reflectance index were evaluated. Two glazed ceramic roof tiles (type stoneware) with the same color (ivory) but with different appearance (matte and brilliant) were the focus of the analysis. The Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) of the roofs tiles were determined by the solar reflectance values (UV-VIS-NIR) and emittance, measured in laboratory. The samples showed SRI> 39 in accordance with LEED certification criteria (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), contributing to minimizing the Heat Island Effects. Although the matte roof tile shows a slightly higher SRI value (82) than the brilliant one (78), the results for the variables that composes the SRI value (reflectance and emittance) were very similar. Analysis of XRD, SEM and EDS performed on the surfaces of the two roofs indicated for the matte glaze the presence of microcrystals (with barium and zinc) that can contribute to the slightly highest value of SRI. The roughness (optical interferometer white light) and the brightness (brightness meter) of the samples were also measured. (author)

  17. Seasonal and interannual variability of solar radiation at Spirit, Opportunity and Curiosity landing sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente-Retortillo, A.; Lemmon, M.T.; Martinez, G.; Valero, F.; Vazquez, L.; Martin, M.L.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we characterize the radiative environment at the landing sites of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover (MER) and Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) missions. We use opacity values obtained at the surface from direct imaging of the Sun and our radiative transfer model COMIMART to analyze the seasonal and interannual variability of the daily irradiation at the MER and MSL landing sites. In addition, we analyze the behavior of the direct and diffuse components of the solar radiation at these landing sites. (Author)

  18. Influence of solar activity and environment on 10Be in recent natural archives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berggren, Ann-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the link between the Sun and climate is vital in the current incidence of global climate change, and 10 Be in natural archives constitutes an excellent tracer for this purpose. As cosmic rays enter the atmosphere, cosmogenic isotopes like 10 Be and 14 C are formed. Variations in solar activity modulate the amount of incoming cosmic rays, and thereby cosmogenic isotope production. Atmospherically produced 10 Be enters natural archives such as sediments and glaciers by wet and dry deposition within about a year of production. 10 Be from natural archives therefore provides information on past solar activity, and because these archives also contain climate information, solar activity and climate can be linked. One remaining question is to what degree 10 Be in natural archives reflects production, and to what extent the local and regional environment overprints the production signal. To explore this, 10 Be was measured at annual resolution over the last 600 years in a Greenland ice core. Measurement potentials for these samples benefited from the development of a new laboratory method of co-precipitating 10 Be with niobium. To diversify geographic location and archive media type, a pioneer study of measuring 10 Be with annual resolution in varved lake sediments from Finland was conducted, with samples from the entire 20th century. Pathways of 10 Be into lake sediments are more complex than into glacial ice, inferring that contemporary atmospheric conditions may not be recorded. Here, it is shown for the first time that tracing the 11-year solar cycle through lake sediment 10 Be variations is possible. Results also show that on an annual basis, 10 Be deposition in ice and sediment archives is affected by local environmental conditions. On a slightly longer timescale, however, diverse 10 Be records exhibit similar trends and a negative correlation with solar activity. Cyclic variability of 10 Be deposition persisted throughout past grand solar minima, when

  19. The economics of wind and solar variability. How the variability of wind and solar power affects their marginal value, optimal deployment, and integration costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirth, Lion

    2014-11-14

    Variable renewable energy sources (VRE) for electricity generation, such as wind and solar power, are subject to inherent output fluctuations. This variability has significant impacts on power system and electricity markets if VRE are deployed at large scale. While on global average, wind and solar power currently supply only a minor share of electricity, they are expected to play a much larger role in the future - such that variability will become a major issue (which it already is in some regions). This thesis contributes to the literature that assesses these impacts the ''system and market integration'' literature. This thesis aims at answering the question: What is the impact of wind and solar power variability on the economics of these technologies? It will be laid out that the impact can be expressed in (at least) three ways: as reduction of value, as increase of cost, or as decrease of optimal deployment. Translating between these perspectives is not trivial, as evidenced by the confusion around the concept of ''integration costs''. Hence, more specifically: How does variability impact the marginal economic value of these power sources, their optimal deployment, and their integration costs? This is the question that this thesis addresses. This study comprises six papers, of which two develop a valuation framework that accounts for the specific characteristics of the good electricity, and the specific properties of wind and solar power versus ''dispatchable'' power plants. Three articles then assess quantitative questions and estimate marginal value, optimal deployment, and integration costs. These estimates stem from a newly developed numerical power market model, EMMA, market data, and quantitative literature reviews. The final paper addresses market design. In short, the principal findings of this thesis are as follows. Electricity is a peculiar economic good, being at the same time perfectly

  20. The economics of wind and solar variability. How the variability of wind and solar power affects their marginal value, optimal deployment, and integration costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirth, Lion

    2014-01-01

    Variable renewable energy sources (VRE) for electricity generation, such as wind and solar power, are subject to inherent output fluctuations. This variability has significant impacts on power system and electricity markets if VRE are deployed at large scale. While on global average, wind and solar power currently supply only a minor share of electricity, they are expected to play a much larger role in the future - such that variability will become a major issue (which it already is in some regions). This thesis contributes to the literature that assesses these impacts the ''system and market integration'' literature. This thesis aims at answering the question: What is the impact of wind and solar power variability on the economics of these technologies? It will be laid out that the impact can be expressed in (at least) three ways: as reduction of value, as increase of cost, or as decrease of optimal deployment. Translating between these perspectives is not trivial, as evidenced by the confusion around the concept of ''integration costs''. Hence, more specifically: How does variability impact the marginal economic value of these power sources, their optimal deployment, and their integration costs? This is the question that this thesis addresses. This study comprises six papers, of which two develop a valuation framework that accounts for the specific characteristics of the good electricity, and the specific properties of wind and solar power versus ''dispatchable'' power plants. Three articles then assess quantitative questions and estimate marginal value, optimal deployment, and integration costs. These estimates stem from a newly developed numerical power market model, EMMA, market data, and quantitative literature reviews. The final paper addresses market design. In short, the principal findings of this thesis are as follows. Electricity is a peculiar economic good, being at the same time perfectly

  1. Influence of solvents on properties of solar selective coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Solar selective coatings for solar thermal flat-plate collectors consisting of crystalline copper oxides and amorphous nickel oxide composites were obtained by robotic spray pyrolyzed deposition. The parameters were optimized for increased spectral selectivity (): high solar absorptance and low thermal emittance.

  2. Amino acid metabolic signaling influences Aedes aegypti midgut microbiome variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M Short

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The mosquito midgut microbiota has been shown to influence vector competence for multiple human pathogens. The microbiota is highly variable in the field, and the sources of this variability are not well understood, which limits our ability to understand or predict its effects on pathogen transmission. In this work, we report significant variation in female adult midgut bacterial load between strains of A. aegypti which vary in their susceptibility to dengue virus. Composition of the midgut microbiome was similar overall between the strains, with 81-92% of reads coming from the same five bacterial families, though we did detect differences in the presence of some bacterial families including Flavobacteriaceae and Entobacteriaceae. We conducted transcriptomic analysis on the two mosquito strains that showed the greatest difference in bacterial load, and found that they differ in transcript abundance of many genes implicated in amino acid metabolism, in particular the branched chain amino acid degradation pathway. We then silenced this pathway by targeting multiple genes using RNA interference, which resulted in strain-specific bacterial proliferation, thereby eliminating the difference in midgut bacterial load between the strains. This suggests that the branched chain amino acid (BCAA degradation pathway controls midgut bacterial load, though the mechanism underlying this remains unclear. Overall, our results indicate that amino acid metabolism can act to influence the midgut microbiota. Moreover, they suggest that genetic or physiological variation in BCAA degradation pathway activity may in part explain midgut microbiota variation in the field.

  3. Global solar magetic field organization in the extended corona: influence on the solar wind speed and density over the cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réville, V.; Velli, M.; Brun, S.

    2017-12-01

    The dynamics of the solar wind depends intrinsically on the structure of the global solar magnetic field, which undergoes fundamental changes over the 11yr solar cycle. For instance, the wind terminal velocity is thought to be anti-correlated with the expansion factor, a measure of how the magnetic field varies with height in the solar corona, usually computed at a fixed height (≈ 2.5 Rȯ, the source surface radius which approximates the distance at which all magnetic field lines become open). However, the magnetic field expansion affects the solar wind in a more detailed way, its influence on the solar wind properties remaining significant well beyond the source surface: we demonstrate this using 3D global MHD simulations of the solar corona, constrained by surface magnetograms over half a solar cycle (1989-2001). For models to comply with the constraints provided by observed characteristics of the solar wind, namely, that the radial magnetic field intensity becomes latitude independent at some distance from the Sun (Ulysses observations beyond 1 AU), and that the terminal wind speed is anti-correlated with the mass flux, they must accurately describe expansion beyond the solar wind critical point (even up to 10Rȯ and higher in our model). We also show that near activity minimum, expansion in the higher corona beyond 2.5 Rȯ is actually the dominant process affecting the wind speed. We discuss the consequences of this result on the necessary acceleration profile of the solar wind, the location of the sonic point and of the energy deposition by Alfvén waves.

  4. Evidence for a possible modern and mid-Holocene solar influence on climate from Lake Titicaca, South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theissen, K. M.; Dunbar, R. B.

    2005-12-01

    In tropical regions, there are few paleoclimate archives with the necessary resolution to investigate climate variability at interannual-to-decadal timescales prior to the onset of the instrumental record. Interannual variability associated with the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is well documented in the instrumental record and the importance of the precessional forcing of millennial variability has been established in studies of tropical paleoclimate records. In contrast, decade-to-century variability is still poorly understood. Here, we examine interannual to decadal variability in the northern Altiplano of South America using digital image analysis of a floating interval of varved sediments of middle Holocene age (~6160-6310 yr BP) from Lake Titicaca. Multi-taper method (MTM) and wavelet frequency-domain analyses were performed on a time series generated from a gray-scaled digital image of the mm-thick laminations. Our results indicate significant power at a decadal periodicity (10-12 years) associated with the Schwabe cycle of solar activity. Frequency-domain analysis also indicates power at 2-2.5 year periodicities associated with ENSO. Similarly, spectral analysis of a 75 year instrumental record of Titicaca lake level shows significant power at both solar and ENSO periodicities. Although both of the examined records are short, our results imply that during both the mid-Holocene and modern times, solar and ENSO variability may have contributed to high frequency climate fluctuations over the northern Altiplano. We suspect that solar influence on large-scale atmospheric circulation features may account for the decadal variability in the mid-Holocene and present-day water balance of the Altiplano.

  5. Bilingualism and age are continuous variables that influence executive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incera, Sara; McLennan, Conor T

    2018-05-01

    We analyzed the effects of bilingualism and age on executive function. We examined these variables along a continuum, as opposed to dichotomizing them. We investigated the impact that bilingualism and age have on two measures of executive control (Stroop and Flanker). The mouse-tracking paradigm allowed us to examine the continuous dynamics of the responses as participants completed each trial. First, we found that the Stroop effect was reduced with younger age and higher levels of bilingualism; however, no Bilingualism by Age interaction emerged. Second, after controlling for baseline, the Flanker effect was not influenced by bilingualism or age. These results support the notion that bilingualism is one way of enhancing some aspects of executive function - specifically those related to the Stroop task - across the adult life span. In sum, different levels of bilingualism, and different ages, result in varying degrees of executive function as measured by the Stroop task.

  6. On the intrinsic timescales of temporal variability in measurements of the surface solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengulescu, Marc; Blanc, Philippe; Wald, Lucien

    2018-01-01

    This study is concerned with the intrinsic temporal scales of the variability in the surface solar irradiance (SSI). The data consist of decennial time series of daily means of the SSI obtained from high-quality measurements of the broadband solar radiation impinging on a horizontal plane at ground level, issued from different Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) ground stations around the world. First, embedded oscillations sorted in terms of increasing timescales of the data are extracted by empirical mode decomposition (EMD). Next, Hilbert spectral analysis is applied to obtain an amplitude-modulation-frequency-modulation (AM-FM) representation of the data. The time-varying nature of the characteristic timescales of variability, along with the variations in the signal intensity, are thus revealed. A novel, adaptive null hypothesis based on the general statistical characteristics of noise is employed in order to discriminate between the different features of the data, those that have a deterministic origin and those being realizations of various stochastic processes. The data have a significant spectral peak corresponding to the yearly variability cycle and feature quasi-stochastic high-frequency variability components, irrespective of the geographical location or of the local climate. Moreover, the amplitude of this latter feature is shown to be modulated by variations in the yearly cycle, which is indicative of nonlinear multiplicative cross-scale couplings. The study has possible implications on the modeling and the forecast of the surface solar radiation, by clearly discriminating the deterministic from the quasi-stochastic character of the data, at different local timescales.

  7. Variability in muscle dysmorphia symptoms: the influence of weight training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Liam S; Tod, David A; Lavallee, David E

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of a weight training session on muscle dysmorphia symptoms in young men who regularly weight trained. Using a within-subjects crossover design, 30 men (mean ± SD; 20.93 ± 2.60 years, 86.87 ± 10.59 kg, and 1.76 ± 0.01 m) were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 groups, and completed the Muscle Dysmorphic Disorder Inventory twice, once each on 2 separate days. One day 1, group 1 completed the questionnaire after a weight training session and group 2 on a rest day. One day 2, group 1 completed the questionnaire on a rest day and group 2 after a weight training session. The mean score for drive for size was significantly higher on a rest day (18.00) than on a training day (15.87; p = 0.001, d = 1.03). The mean score for appearance intolerance was significantly higher on a rest day (10.10) compared with that on a training day (8.97; p = 0.001, d = 0.69). The mean score for functional impairment was significantly higher on a rest day (10.20) than on a training day (9.47; p = 0.037, d = 0.40). These results provide evidence that muscle dysmorphia symptoms have state-like properties and may be influenced by situational variables. The results may indicate that strength and conditioning specialists and mental health professionals need to observe clients over time and take into account environmental variables before making decisions about the presence or absence of the condition.

  8. Thin-film fixed-bed reactor for solar photocatalytic inactivation of Aeromonas hydrophila: influence of water quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Sadia J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Controlling fish disease is one of the major concerns in contemporary aquaculture. The use of antibiotics or chemical disinfection cannot provide a healthy aquaculture system without residual effects. Water quality is also important in determining the success or failure of fish production. Several solar photocatalytic reactors have been used to treat drinking water or waste water without leaving chemical residues. This study has investigated the impact of several key aspects of water quality on the inactivation of the pathogenic bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila using a pilot-scale thin-film fixed-bed reactor (TFFBR system. Results The level of inactivation of Aeromonas hydrophila ATCC 35654 was determined using a TFFBR with a photocatalytic area of 0.47 m2 under the influence of various water quality variables (pH, conductivity, turbidity and colour under high solar irradiance conditions (980–1100 W m-2, at a flow rate of 4.8 L h-1 through the reactor. Bacterial enumeration were obtained through conventional plate count using trypticase soy agar media, cultured in conventional aerobic conditions to detect healthy cells and under ROS-neutralised conditions to detect both healthy and sub-lethally injured (oxygen-sensitive cells. The results showed that turbidity has a major influence on solar photocatalytic inactivation of A. hydrophila. Humic acids appear to decrease TiO2 effectiveness under full sunlight and reduce microbial inactivation. pH in the range 7–9 and salinity both have no major effect on the extent of photoinactivation or sub-lethal injury. Conclusions This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the TFFBR in the inactivation of Aeromonas hydrophila under the influence of several water quality variables at high solar irradiance, providing an opportunity for the application of solar photocatalysis in aquaculture systems, as long as turbidity remains low.

  9. Solar harvesting by a heterostructured cell with built-in variable width quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, W.; Wang, H.; Mil'shtein, S.

    2018-02-01

    We propose cascaded heterostructured p-i-n solar cells, where inside of the i-region is a set of Quantum Wells (QWs) with variable thicknesses to enhance absorption of different photonic energies and provide quick relaxation for high energy carriers. Our p-i-n heterostructure carries top p-type and bottom n-type 11.3 Å thick AlAs layers, which are doped by acceptors and donor densities up to 1019/cm3. The intrinsic region is divided into 10 segments where each segment carries ten QWs of the same width and the width of the QWs in each subsequent segment gradually increases. The top segment consists of 10 QWs with widths of 56.5Å, followed by a segment with 10 wider QWs with widths of 84.75Å, followed by increasing QW widths until the last segment has 10 QWs with widths of 565Å, bringing the total number of QWs to 100. The QW wall height is controlled by alternating AlAs and GaAs layers, where the AlAs layers are all 11.3Å thick, throughout the entire intrinsic region. Configuration of variable width QWs prescribes sets of energy levels which are suitable for absorption of a wide range of photon energies and will dissipate high electron-hole energies rapidly, reducing the heat load on the solar cell. We expect that the heating of the solar cell will be reduced by 8-11%, enhancing efficiency. The efficiency of the designed solar cell is 43.71%, the Fill Factor is 0.86, the density of short circuit current (ISC) will not exceed 338 A/m2 and the open circuit voltage (VOC) is 1.51V.

  10. Predicting the La Niña of 2020-21: Termination of Solar Cycles and Correlated Variance in Solar and Atmospheric Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leamon, R. J.; McIntosh, S. W.

    2017-12-01

    Establishing a solid physical connection between solar and tropospheric variability has posed a considerable challenge across the spectrum of Earth-system science. Over the past few years a new picture to describe solar variability has developed, based on observing, understanding and tracing the progression, interaction and intrinsic variability of the magnetized activity bands that belong to the Sun's 22-year magnetic activity cycle. The intra- and extra-hemispheric interaction of these magnetic bands appear to explain the occurrence of decadal scale variability that primarily manifests itself in the sunspot cycle. However, on timescales of ten months or so, those bands posses their own internal variability with an amplitude of the same order of magnitude as the decadal scale. The latter have been tied to the existence of magnetized Rossby waves in the solar convection zone that result in surges of magnetic flux emergence that correspondingly modulate our star's radiative and particulate output. One of the most important events in the progression of these bands is their (apparent) termination at the solar equator that signals a global increase in magnetic flux emergence that becomes the new solar cycle. We look at the particulate and radiative implications of these termination points, their temporal recurrence and signature, from the Sun to the Earth, and show the correlated signature of solar cycle termination events and major oceanic oscillations that extend back many decades. A combined one-two punch of reduced particulate forcing and increased radiative forcing that result from the termination of one solar cycle and rapid blossoming of another correlates strongly with a shift from El Niño to La Niña conditions in the Pacific Ocean. This shift does not occur at solar minima, nor solar maxima, but at a particular, non-periodic, time in between. The failure to identify these termination points, and their relative irregularity, have inhibited a correlation to be

  11. Factors influencing the performance and efficiency of solar water pumping systems:  a review

    OpenAIRE

    Gouws, Rupert; Lukhwareni, Thendo

    2012-01-01

    The world is having an energy crisis and currently there is a strong drive towards renewable energy. A renewable energy option is solar energy, where by means of photovoltaic (PV) modules electrical energy can be produced. A residential as well as industrial application for these PV modules is solar water pumping systems. Disadvantages of solar water pumping systems are low performance and low energy efficiency. This paper provides a review on the factors that influence the performance and ef...

  12. Non-photic solar associations of heart rate variability and myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornélissen, Germaine; Halberg, Franz; Breus, Tamara; Syutkina, Elena V.; Baevsky, Roman; Weydahl, Andi; Watanabe, Yoshihiko; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Siegelova, Jarmila; Fiser, Bohumil; Bakken, Earl E.

    2002-03-01

    Alignment of serial epidemiological, physiological, including electrocardiographic data with variations in galactic cosmic rays, geomagnetic activity, and atmospheric pressure suggests the possibility of links among these physical environmental variations and health risks, such as myocardial infarctions and ischemic strokes, among others. An increase in the incidence of myocardial infarction in association with magnetic storms, reported by several investigators from Russia, Israel, Italy and Mexico, accounts in Minnesota for a 5% (220cases/year) increase in mortality during years of maximal solar activity by comparison with years of minimal solar activity. Magnetic storms are also found to decrease heart rate variability (HRV), indicating a possible mechanism since a reduced HRV is a prognostic factor for coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction. Longitudinal electrocardiographic monitoring for a week or much longer spans in different geographic locations, notably in the auroral oval, further suggests that the decrease in HRV affects spectral regions other than that around 3.6s (0.15-0.40Hz), reportedly associated with the parasympathetic nervous system. Differences in some associations are observed from solar cycle to solar cycle, and as a function of solar cycle stage, a finding resolving controversies. Coordinated physiological and physical monitoring, the scope of an international project on the Biosphere and the Cosmos, seeks reference values for a better understanding of environmental effects on human health and for testing the merit of space weather reports that could prompt countermeasures in space and on earth. Physiological data being collected systematically worldwide and morbidity/mortality statistics from causes such as myocardial infarction and stroke constitute invaluable data bases for assessing changes within the physiological range, for detecting environmental effects and for recognizing endogenous as well as exogenous disease

  13. Dropouts, spreading, and squeezing of solar particle distributions and space weather variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Seripienlert, A.; Tooprakai, P.; Chuychai, P.

    2015-12-01

    In the past 15 years, observations and theories concerning dropouts of solar energetic particles have made it clear that the lateral spread of field lines and particles from a given location near the Sun is not a purely diffusive process. Particles of low energy from impulsive solar events exhibit abrupt changes in flux (dropouts) due to filamentation of magnetic connection from the Sun, indicating that magnetic flux tube-like structures at least partially persist to Earth orbit. Our simulations based on a corresponding spherical two-component model of Alfvénic (slab) and 2D magnetic fluctuations indicate that such particles mostly follow field lines, which spread over ˜25° at Earth orbit, and exhibit dropout features. On the other hand, gradual solar events are of practical interest because they can produce greatly enhanced high-energy ion fluxes, which can cause radiation damage to satellites, spacecraft, and astronauts. While gradual events do not exhibit dropouts in the above sense, we show that the distribution of high-energy (E≥1 GeV) protons is squeezed toward magnetic flux tube-like structures with a specific polarity due to the structures' conical shape. Since it is difficult to observationally determine what polarity of flux structure the Earth is in at a given time, this transport phenomenon contributes to event-to-event variability in ground level enhancements of GeV-range ions from solar storms, presenting a fundamental uncertainty in space weather prediction. Partially supported by the Thailand Research Fund (Grant BRG5880009), a Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, a Research Fellowship from the Faculty of Science at Mahidol University, the U.S. NSF (AGS-1063439 and SHINE AGS-1156094), NASA (Heliophysics Theory NNX14AI63G, and LWS NNX15AB88G), and the Solar Probe Plus/ISIS project (D99031L).

  14. Implications of Wide-Area Geographic Diversity for Short- Term Variability of Solar Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan

    2010-08-23

    Worldwide interest in the deployment of photovoltaic generation (PV) is rapidly increasing. Operating experience with large PV plants, however, demonstrates that large, rapid changes in the output of PV plants are possible. Early studies of PV grid impacts suggested that short-term variability could be a potential limiting factor in deploying PV. Many of these early studies, however, lacked high-quality data from multiple sites to assess the costs and impacts of increasing PV penetration. As is well known for wind, accounting for the potential for geographic diversity can significantly reduce the magnitude of extreme changes in aggregated PV output, the resources required to accommodate that variability, and the potential costs of managing variability. We use measured 1-min solar insolation for 23 time-synchronized sites in the Southern Great Plains network of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program and wind speed data from 10 sites in the same network to characterize the variability of PV with different degrees of geographic diversity and to compare the variability of PV to the variability of similarly sited wind. The relative aggregate variability of PV plants sited in a dense 10 x 10 array with 20 km spacing is six times less than the variability of a single site for variability on time scales less than 15-min. We find in our analysis of wind and PV plants similarly sited in a 5 x 5 grid with 50 km spacing that the variability of PV is only slightly more than the variability of wind on time scales of 5-15 min. Over shorter and longer time scales the level of variability is nearly identical. Finally, we use a simple approximation method to estimate the cost of carrying additional reserves to manage sub-hourly variability. We conclude that the costs of managing the short-term variability of PV are dramatically reduced by geographic diversity and are not substantially different from the costs for managing the short-term variability of similarly sited wind in

  15. Influence of thermosiphonic flow with the height tank relative to a flat solar collector; Influencia del flujo termosifonico con la altura del termotanque relativo a un colector solar plano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera C, Enrique; Arias T, Jorge E; Lugo L, Raul; Cano M, Francisco J [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    In this work the effect of the height of the storage tank, with respect to a solar collector is studied. In order to obtain an adequate operation of the thermosiphonic flow system, the storage tank must be located above the upper part of the solar collector, although the height it has not been specified. In order to study this aspect, we studied the operation of a flat solar collector, in thermosiphonic regime, heated with a source of artificial energy (solar simulator based on tungsten lamps). The temperature profiles of storage deposit (temperature stratification) were analyzed as a function of different storage tank heights, which influence the storage tank temperatures profile and the inlet and outlet water temperature of the solar collector. These experiments also affect the thermosiphonic flow and, therefore the efficiency of the solar collector. In each experiment the same solar radiation level was used, which let us make sensitive comparisons regarding just the parameters of interest. The results obtained are reported. [Spanish] En este trabajo, se estudia el efecto de la altura del deposito de almacenamiento, respecto de un colector solar. Se sabe que para que se obtenga un funcionamiento adecuado de un sistema de flujo termosifonico, el deposito debe situarse por encima del colector solar, aunque no se ha especificado, cual puede ser una mejor altura. Con el fin de estudiar esta problematica en el presente trabajo se investigo el funcionamiento de un colector solar plano, en regimen termosifonico, accionado con una fuente de energia artificial (simulador solar basado en lamparas de tungsteno); se analizan los perfiles de temperatura del deposito de almacenamiento como funcion de las diferentes alturas estudiadas, los cuales son claves en el perfil de temperatura del agua de entrada y salida del colector solar, del flujo termosifonico alcanzado y por tanto de la eficiencia del colector solar. En cada experimento realizado, se utilizo el mismo nivel de

  16. On the influence of total solar irradiance on global land temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varonov, Albert; Shopov, Yavor

    2014-01-01

    Using statistical analysis, correlation between the variations of the total solar irradiance and of the annual-mean land temperatures was found. An unknown time lag between both data sets was expected to be present due to the complexity of the Earth’s climate system leading to a delayed response to changes in influencing factors. We found the best correlation with coefficient over 90% for a 14-year shift of the annual mean land temperature record ahead with data until 1970, while the same comparison with data until 2006 yields 61% correlation. These results show substantially higher influence of total solar irradiance on global land temperatures until 1970. The decline of this influence during the last 40 years could be attributed to the increasing concentration of anthropogenic greenhouse gases in the Earth’s atmosphere. Key words: total solar irradiance, solar variations, solar forcing, climate change

  17. Spectral Kernel Approach to Study Radiative Response of Climate Variables and Interannual Variability of Reflected Solar Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhonghai; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Loukachine, Constantin; Charlock, Thomas P.; Young, David; Noeel, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The radiative kernel approach provides a simple way to separate the radiative response to different climate parameters and to decompose the feedback into radiative and climate response components. Using CERES/MODIS/Geostationary data, we calculated and analyzed the solar spectral reflectance kernels for various climate parameters on zonal, regional, and global spatial scales. The kernel linearity is tested. Errors in the kernel due to nonlinearity can vary strongly depending on climate parameter, wavelength, surface, and solar elevation; they are large in some absorption bands for some parameters but are negligible in most conditions. The spectral kernels are used to calculate the radiative responses to different climate parameter changes in different latitudes. The results show that the radiative response in high latitudes is sensitive to the coverage of snow and sea ice. The radiative response in low latitudes is contributed mainly by cloud property changes, especially cloud fraction and optical depth. The large cloud height effect is confined to absorption bands, while the cloud particle size effect is found mainly in the near infrared. The kernel approach, which is based on calculations using CERES retrievals, is then tested by direct comparison with spectral measurements from Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography (SCIAMACHY) (a different instrument on a different spacecraft). The monthly mean interannual variability of spectral reflectance based on the kernel technique is consistent with satellite observations over the ocean, but not over land, where both model and data have large uncertainty. RMS errors in kernel ]derived monthly global mean reflectance over the ocean compared to observations are about 0.001, and the sampling error is likely a major component.

  18. The Influence of Solar Activity on the Rainfall over India: Cycle-to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Influence of Solar Activity on the Rainfall over India: Cycle-to-Cycle Variations. K. M. Hiremath. Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560 034, India. e-mail: hiremath@iiap.res.in. Abstract. We use 130 years data for studying correlative effects due to solar cycle and activity phenomena on the occurrence of rainfall ...

  19. Seasonal and interannual variability of solar radiation at Spirit, Opportunity and Curiosity landing sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente-Retortillo, A.; Lemmon, M.T.; Martinez, G.; Valero, F.; Vazquez, L.; Martin, M.L.

    2016-07-01

    In this article we characterize the radiative environment at the landing sites of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover (MER) and Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) missions. We use opacity values obtained at the surface from direct imaging of the Sun and our radiative transfer model COMIMART to analyze the seasonal and interannual variability of the daily irradiation at the MER and MSL landing sites. In addition, we analyze the behavior of the direct and diffuse components of the solar radiation at these landing sites. (Author)

  20. Tropical influence on Euro-Asian autumn rainfall variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariotti, A. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); ENEA, Rome (Italy); Ballabrera-Poy, J. [University of Maryland, ESSIC, College Park, MD (United States); Zeng, N. [University of Maryland, ESSIC, College Park, MD (United States); University of Maryland, Department of Meteorology,, College Park, MD (United States)

    2005-04-01

    The connection between autumn rainfall variability in the Euro-Asian domain and tropical climate is documented using state-of-the-art global observational datasets and re-analyses. Results suggest a robust statistical relationship between the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and autumn rainfall in parts of southwest Europe, northern Africa and southwest Asia. The correlation between area-mean anomalies over this region (P{sub ea}) and the NINO3.4 index is 0.68, stationary over the last 50 years. Global ENSO-like tropical climate anomalies are observed in conjunction with P{sub ea} anomalies confirming the relationship found with the NINO3.4 index. Overall, the connection with Indo-Pacific variability is stronger than that with the eastern Pacific.While rainfall anomalies in southwest Europe and southwest Asia appear to largely co-vary as one pattern under the influence of ENSO, our results suggest that different mechanisms may be contributing to the observed anomalies. In the North Atlantic/European region, it is speculated that while a PNA-like mode maybe the prevailing teleconnection mechanism for high P{sub ea}, for low P{sub ea} tropical Atlantic ENSO related SST anomalies may be playing a more relevant role forcing northeastward propagating Rossby waves. Over southwest Asia, a more direct connection to the Indo-Pacific region is suggested by the upper air anomaly observed over southern Asia, possibly the Rossby wave response to enhanced heating in the Indian Ocean. (orig.)

  1. Influences of misprediction costs on solar flare prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Wang, HuaNing; Dai, XingHua

    2012-10-01

    The mispredictive costs of flaring and non-flaring samples are different for different applications of solar flare prediction. Hence, solar flare prediction is considered a cost sensitive problem. A cost sensitive solar flare prediction model is built by modifying the basic decision tree algorithm. Inconsistency rate with the exhaustive search strategy is used to determine the optimal combination of magnetic field parameters in an active region. These selected parameters are applied as the inputs of the solar flare prediction model. The performance of the cost sensitive solar flare prediction model is evaluated for the different thresholds of solar flares. It is found that more flaring samples are correctly predicted and more non-flaring samples are wrongly predicted with the increase of the cost for wrongly predicting flaring samples as non-flaring samples, and the larger cost of wrongly predicting flaring samples as non-flaring samples is required for the higher threshold of solar flares. This can be considered as the guide line for choosing proper cost to meet the requirements in different applications.

  2. A cone-like enhancement of polar solar corona plasma and its influence on heliospheric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzedzielski, Stan; Sokół, Justyna M.

    2017-04-01

    We will present results of the study of the properties of the solar wind plasma due to rotation of the polar solar corona. We focus in our study on the solar minimum conditions, when the polar coronal holes are well formed and the magnetic field in the solar polar corona exhibit almost regular "ray-like" structure. The solar rotation twists the magnetic field lines of the expanding fast polar solar wind and the resulting toroidal component of the field induces a force directed towards the rotation axis. This phenomenon is tantamount to a (weak) zeta pinch, known also in other astrophysical contexts (e.g. like in AGN jets). The pinch compresses the polar solar corona plasma and forms a cone-like enhancement of the solar wind density aligned with the rotation axis in the spherically symmetric case. The effect is likely very dynamic due to fast changing conditions in the solar corona, however in the study presented here, we assume a time independent description to get an order-of-magnitude estimate. The weak pinch is treated as a first-order perturbation to the zeroth-order radial flow. Following the assumptions based on the available knowledge about the plasma properties in the polar solar corona we estimated the most typical density enhancements. The cone like structure may extend as far from the Sun as tens of AU and thus will influence the heliospheric particles inside the heliosphere. An increase of the solar wind density in the polar region may be related with a decrease of the solar wind speed. Such changes of the solar wind plasma at high latitudes may modify the charge-exchange and electron impact ionization rates of heliospheric particles in interplanetary space. We will present their influence on the interstellar neutral gas and energetic neutral atoms observed by IBEX.

  3. Variable structure TITO fuzzy-logic controller implementation for a solar air-conditioning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lygouras, J.N.; Pachidis, Th. [Laboratory of Electronics, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, GR-67100 Xanthi (Greece); Kodogiannis, V.S. [Centre for Systems Analysis, School of Computer Science, University of Westminster, London HA1 3TP (United Kingdom); Tarchanidis, K.N. [Department of Petroleum Technology, Technological Education Institute of Kavala, GR-65404, Kavala (Greece); Koukourlis, C.S. [Laboratory of Telecommunications, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, GR-67100 Xanthi (Greece)

    2008-04-15

    The design and implementation of a Two-Input/Two-Output (TITO) variable structure fuzzy-logic controller for a solar-powered air-conditioning system is described in this paper. Two DC motors are used to drive the generator pump and the feed pump of the solar air-conditioner. The first affects the temperature in the generator of the solar air-conditioner, while the second, the pressure in the power loop. The difficulty of Multi-Input/Multi-Output (MIMO) systems control is how to overcome the coupling effects among each degree of freedom. First, a traditional fuzzy-controller has been designed, its output being one of the components of the control signal for each DC motor driver. Secondly, according to the characteristics of the system's dynamics coupling, an appropriate coupling fuzzy-controller (CFC) is incorporated into a traditional fuzzy-controller (TFC) to compensate for the dynamic coupling among each degree of freedom. This control strategy simplifies the implementation problem of fuzzy control, but can also improve the control performance. This mixed fuzzy controller (MFC) can effectively improve the coupling effects of the systems, and this control strategy is easy to design and implement. Experimental results from the implemented system are presented. (author)

  4. Past and present variability of the solar-terrestrial system: measurement, data analysis and theoretical models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cini Castagnoli, G.; Provenzale, A. [eds.

    1997-12-31

    The course Past and present variability of the solar-terrestrial system: measurement, data analysis and theoretical models is explicitly devoted to these issues. A solar cycle ago, in summer 1985, G. Cini organized a similar school, in a time when this field was in a very early stage of development and definitely fewer high-quality measurements were available. After eleven years, the field has grown toward becoming a robust scientific discipline, new data have been obtained, and new ideas have been proposed by both solar physicists and climate dynamicists. For this reason, the authors felt that it was the right time to organize a new summer school, with the aim of formalizing the developments that have taken place during these years, and also for speculating and maybe dreaming of new results that will be achieved in the upcoming years. The papers of the lectures have now been collected in this volume. First, in order to know what the authors talking about, they need to obtain reliable data from terrestrial archives,and to properly date the records that have been measured. To these crucial aspects is devoted the first part of the book, dealing with various types of proxy data and with the difficult issue of the dating of the records.

  5. Ion Mediated Nucleation: how is it Influenced by Changes in the Solar Activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Auria, R.; Turco, R. P.

    2003-12-01

    Recently it has been pointed out that tropospheric cloudiness can be correlated with the galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) intensity [Svensmark and Friis-Christensen, 1997]. A possible explanation for such a correlation relies on the fact that GCRs are the main ionization source in the upper troposphere, hence, throughout ionic mediated nucleation, they could possibly influence the global cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) formation [e.g., Yu, 2001; Dickinson, 1975]. Because the GCRs are modulated by the interaction between the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere and their intensity generally decreases with increasing solar activity, subtle changes in the solar activity could indirectly affect the Earth's climate. We have been studying the very first steps of ionic nucleation considering the molecular species of atmospheric interest (e.g.,water, nitric acid, sulfuric acid, ammonia etc.). In our approach the formation and evolution of ionic clusters is followed by resolving the time dependent kinetic aggregation process and considering the ions sources (ultimately the atmospheric ionization of neutral species) and sinks. We show how in typical atmospheric conditions stable populations of molecular ions forms. The novelty of our work consists in the determination of the kinetic parameters that govern the molecular ions growth (i.e., the forward and reverse clustering reaction constants for each cluster type and size) at a microscopic level. In fact a thermochemistry data base is built for the species of interest by integrating laboratory measurements, quantum mechanical calculations and, when appropriate, results from the macroscopic liquid droplet model [Thomson, 1928]. Such database is than used to retrieve the reverse clustering reaction coefficients for the molecular ion type and size and for the environmental conditions (pressure and temperature) of interest. The forward reaction is instead determined by calculating the ionic-neutral collisional rate or is assumed

  6. Application of dynamic model to predict some inside environment variables in a semi-solar greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Mohammadi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Greenhouses are one of the most effective cultivation methods with a yield per cultivated area up to 10 times more than free land cultivation but the use of fossil fuels in this production field is very high. The greenhouse environment is an uncertain nonlinear system which classical modeling methods have some problems to solve it. There are many control methods, such as adaptive, feedback and intelligent control and they require a precise model. Therefore, many modeling methods have been proposed for this purpose; including physical, transfer function and black-box modeling. The objective of this paper is to modeling and experimental validation of some inside environment variables in an innovative greenhouse structure (semi-solar greenhouse. For this propose, a semi-solar greenhouse was designed and constructed at the North-West of Iran in Azerbaijan Province (38°10′N and 46°18′E with elevation of 1364 m above the sea level. The main inside environment factors include inside air temperature (Ta and inside soil temperature (Ts were collected as the experimental data samples. The dynamic heat transfer model used to estimate the temperature in two different points of semi-solar greenhouse with initial values. The results showed that dynamic model can predict the inside temperatures in two different points (Ta and Ts with RMSE, MAPE and EF about 5.3 °C, 10.2% and 0.78% and 3.45 °C, 7.7% and 0.86%, respectively. Keywords: Semi-solar greenhouse, Dynamic model, Commercial greenhouse

  7. SOLAR CYCLE VARIABILITY AND SURFACE DIFFERENTIAL ROTATION FROM Ca II K-LINE TIME SERIES DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Worden, Simon P. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, 94035 (United States); Keil, Stephen L. [National Solar Observatory, P.O. Box 57, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Analysis of over 36 yr of time series data from the NSO/AFRL/Sac Peak K-line monitoring program elucidates 5 components of the variation of the 7 measured chromospheric parameters: (a) the solar cycle (period {approx} 11 yr), (b) quasi-periodic variations (periods {approx} 100 days), (c) a broadband stochastic process (wide range of periods), (d) rotational modulation, and (e) random observational errors, independent of (a)-(d). Correlation and power spectrum analyses elucidate periodic and aperiodic variation of these parameters. Time-frequency analysis illuminates periodic and quasi-periodic signals, details of frequency modulation due to differential rotation, and in particular elucidates the rather complex harmonic structure (a) and (b) at timescales in the range {approx}0.1-10 yr. These results using only full-disk data suggest that similar analyses will be useful for detecting and characterizing differential rotation in stars from stellar light curves such as those being produced by NASA's Kepler observatory. Component (c) consists of variations over a range of timescales, in the manner of a 1/f random process with a power-law slope index that varies in a systematic way. A time-dependent Wilson-Bappu effect appears to be present in the solar cycle variations (a), but not in the more rapid variations of the stochastic process (c). Component (d) characterizes differential rotation of the active regions. Component (e) is of course not characteristic of solar variability, but the fact that the observational errors are quite small greatly facilitates the analysis of the other components. The data analyzed in this paper can be found at the National Solar Observatory Web site http://nsosp.nso.edu/cak{sub m}on/, or by file transfer protocol at ftp://ftp.nso.edu/idl/cak.parameters.

  8. Low cloud properties influenced by cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh; Svensmark

    2000-12-04

    The influence of solar variability on climate is currently uncertain. Recent observations have indicated a possible mechanism via the influence of solar modulated cosmic rays on global cloud cover. Surprisingly the influence of solar variability is strongest in low clouds (climate on Earth.

  9. The Influence of Volcanic and Solar forcings on the Freshwater Budget of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, F. J.; Goosse, H.; Renssen, H.

    2012-04-01

    these long-term forcings, we are able to assess to what extent solar and volcanic forcings influence the variability of the Arctic freshwater budget. Time-series analysis will be applied to the output of the different experiments to evaluate the changes in the different frequency domains. Goosse, H., Brovkin, V., Fichefet, T., Haarsma, R., Huybrechts, P., Jongma, J., Mouchet, A., Selten, F., Barriat, P-Y., Campin, J-M., Deleersnijder, E., Driesschaert, E., Goelzer, H., Janssens, I., Loutre, M-F., Morales Maqueda, M.A., Opsteegh, T., Mathieu, P-P., Munhoven, G., Pettersson., E.J., Renssen, H., Roche, D.M., Schaeffer, M., Tartinville, B., Timmermann, A., Weber, S.L. (2010) Description of the Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity LOVECLIM Version 1.2, Geoscientific Model Development, 3:603-633 doi: 10.5194/gmd-3-603-2010.

  10. Variables influencing the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veijgen, N.K.; Masen, Marc Arthur; van der Heide, Emile

    2013-01-01

    In the past decades, skin friction research has focused on determining which variables are important to affect the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin. Until now, there is still limited knowledge on these variables. This study has used a large dataset to identify the effect of variables on

  11. Variables influencing the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veijgen, N.K.; Masen, M.A.; Heide, E. van der

    2013-01-01

    In the past decades, skin friction research has focused on determining which variables are important to affect the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin. Until now, there is still limited knowledge on these variables.This study has used a large dataset to identify the effect of variables on the

  12. Modeling the variability of solar radiation data among weather stations by means of principal components analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarzo, Manuel; Marti, Pau

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: →Principal components analysis was applied to R s data recorded at 30 stations. → Four principal components explain 97% of the data variability. → The latent variables can be fitted according to latitude, longitude and altitude. → The PCA approach is more effective for gap infilling than conventional approaches. → The proposed method allows daily R s estimations at locations in the area of study. - Abstract: Measurements of global terrestrial solar radiation (R s ) are commonly recorded in meteorological stations. Daily variability of R s has to be taken into account for the design of photovoltaic systems and energy efficient buildings. Principal components analysis (PCA) was applied to R s data recorded at 30 stations in the Mediterranean coast of Spain. Due to equipment failures and site operation problems, time series of R s often present data gaps or discontinuities. The PCA approach copes with this problem and allows estimation of present and past values by taking advantage of R s records from nearby stations. The gap infilling performance of this methodology is compared with neural networks and alternative conventional approaches. Four principal components explain 66% of the data variability with respect to the average trajectory (97% if non-centered values are considered). A new method based on principal components regression was also developed for R s estimation if previous measurements are not available. By means of multiple linear regression, it was found that the latent variables associated to the four relevant principal components can be fitted according to the latitude, longitude and altitude of the station where data were recorded from. Additional geographical or climatic variables did not increase the predictive goodness-of-fit. The resulting models allow the estimation of daily R s values at any location in the area under study and present higher accuracy than artificial neural networks and some conventional approaches

  13. Influence of anthropogenic aerosol on solar radiation in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ten Brink, H M

    1993-12-01

    Backscatter of solar radiation by aerosol and the cooling thus induced, is the single largest uncertainty factor in assessing the climate effect of the greenhouse gases. The dominant reason for the uncertainty in the aerosol effect is its local nature. Therefore it is only via localized efforts that estimates can be improved. It is the aim of the present study to better assess the amount of solar radiation intercepted by aerosol, especially that of aerosol of anthropogenic origin in Europe. The assessment is realized along three interconnected approaches. First, empirical factors stemming from measurements in the US and used in the present estimates of the reflection of solar radiation by anthropogenic aerosol are checked for their validity in the European domain. Secondly, historical data on solar flux in Europe are related to the historic trend in aerosol loading. Finally, a sophisticated aerosol and cloud (radiation) module is developed for incorporation in a climate model. The radiation module uses aerosol characteristics as measured in the field and is validated via solar radiation measurements. The concerted investigation started in January 1993. The data obtained in the first phase of the study formed the basis for the definite detailed approach and will therefore be reported in this text. 1 fig., 9 refs.

  14. The influence of meteorological factors on solar ultraviolet radiation over Pretoria, South Africa for the year 2012

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Makgabutlane, M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pretoria receives a fair amount of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Certain meteorological factors affect the amount of solar UVR that reaches the ground. The most dominant influencing meteorological factors are stratospheric ozone, cloud cover...

  15. How the relative permittivity of solar cell materials influences solar cell performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crovetto, Andrea; Huss-Hansen, Mathias K.; Hansen, Ole

    2017-01-01

    of the materials permittivity on the physics and performance of the solar cell by means of numerical simulation supported by analytical relations. We demonstrate that, depending on the specific solar cell configuration and materials properties, there are scenarios where the relative permittivity has a major......The relative permittivity of the materials constituting heterojunction solar cells is usually not considered as a design parameter when searching for novel combinations of heterojunction materials. In this work, we investigate the validity of such an approach. Specifically, we show the effect...... the heterojunction partner has a high permittivity, solar cells are consistently more robust against several non-idealities that are especially likely to occur in early-stage development, when the device is not yet optimized....

  16. EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH OF THE INFLUENCE OF VARIOUS TYPES OF SOLAR COLLECTORS FOR PERFORMANCE SOLAR DESALINATION PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhmatulin I.R.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the possibility of using renewable energy for water purification. Results of analysis of a preferred energy source for a water purification using installed in places where fresh water shortages and a lack of electrical energy. The possibility of desalination of salt water using solar energy for regions with temperate climate. Presented desalination plant working on energy vacuum solar collectors, principles of action developed by the desalination plant. The experimental results of a constructed distiller when working with vacuum glass tubes and vacuum tubes with copper core inside. Conclusions about the possibility of using solar collectors for water desalination, are tips and tricks to improve the performance of solar desalination plant.

  17. Glazed ceramic roof tiles: influence of surface features in the solar reflectance index; Influencia das caracteristicas da superficie no indice de refletancia solar de telhas ceramicas esmaltadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bortoli, Leitcia Silva de; Stapait, Camila Cristina; Marinoski, Deivis Luis; Fredel, Marcio Celso; Schabbach, Luciana M., E-mail: luciana.maccarini@ufsc.br [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Blumenau, SC (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    In this study the influence of surface features of ceramic roof tiles in the solar reflectance index were evaluated. Two glazed ceramic roof tiles (type stoneware) with the same color (ivory) but with different appearance (matte and brilliant) were the focus of the analysis. The Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) of the roofs tiles were determined by the solar reflectance values (UV-VIS-NIR) and emittance, measured in laboratory. The samples showed SRI> 39 in accordance with LEED certification criteria (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), contributing to minimizing the Heat Island Effects. Although the matte roof tile shows a slightly higher SRI value (82) than the brilliant one (78), the results for the variables that composes the SRI value (reflectance and emittance) were very similar. Analysis of XRD, SEM and EDS performed on the surfaces of the two roofs indicated for the matte glaze the presence of microcrystals (with barium and zinc) that can contribute to the slightly highest value of SRI. The roughness (optical interferometer white light) and the brightness (brightness meter) of the samples were also measured. (author)

  18. Are particle rest masses variable: Theory and constraints from solar system experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekenstein, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    Particle rest mass variation in spacetime is considered. According to Dicke, if this is the case various null experiments indicate that all masses vary in the same way. Their variation relative to the Planck-Wheeler mass defines a universal scalar rest-mass field. We construct the relativistic dynamics for this field based on very general assumptions. In addition, we assume Einstein's equations to be valid in Planck-Wheeler units. A special case of the theory coincides with Dicke's reformulation of Brans-Dicke theory as general relativity with variable rest masses. In the general case the rest-mass field is some power r of a scalar field which obeys an ordinary scalar equation with coupling to the curvature of strength q. The r and q are the only parameters of the theory. Comparison with experiment is facilitated by recasting the theory into units in which rest masses are constant, the Planck-Wheeler mass varies, and the metric satisfies the equations of a small subset of the scalar-tensor theories of gravitation. The results of solar system experiments, usually used to test general relativity, are here used to delimit the acceptable values of r and q. We conclude that if cosmological considerations are not invoked, then the solar system experiments do not rule out the possibility of rest-mass variability. That is, there are theories which agree with all null and solar system experiments, and yet contradict the strong equivalence principle by allowing rest masses to vary relative to the Planck-Wheeler mass. We show that the field theory of the rest-mass field can be quantized and interpreted in terms of massless scalar quanta which interact very weakly with matter. This explains why they have not turned up in high-energy experiments. In future reports we shall investigate the implications of various cosmological and astrophysical data for the theory of variable rest masses. The ultimate goal is a firm decision on whether rest masses vary or not

  19. A Survey of U.S. Atlanta and Nagano Olympians: Variables Perceived to Influence Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Daniel; Greenleaf, Christy; Chung, Yongchul; Guinan, Diane

    2002-01-01

    Examined the frequency and magnitude of specific variables perceived to have affected U.S. Olympic athletes' performance. Respondents perceived that performance was influenced by: performance variables (e.g., preparation for distraction); team variables (e.g., strong cohesion); coaching variables (e.g., coaching expectations); family-friend…

  20. Glacial Influences on Solar Radiation in a Subarctic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding macroscale processes controlling solar radia­tion in marine systems will be important in interpreting the potential effects of global change from increasing ultraviolet radiation (UV) and glacial retreat. This study provides the first quantitative assessment of UV i...

  1. Influence of solar irradiation on power transformer thermal balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorgan, B.; Notingher, P.V.; Wetzer, J.M.; Verhaart, H.F.A.; Wouters, P.A.A.F.; Schijndel, van A.

    2012-01-01

    In countries with a high ambient temperature and strong solar irradiation, transformer winding hot-spot temperature may increase over its maximum permissible limit. This can considerably reduce the insulation life of the transformer by enhanced degradation of the paper insulation. According to

  2. Variability of the Magnetic Field Power Spectrum in the Solar Wind at Electron Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Owen Wyn; Alexandrova, O.; Kajdič, P.; Turc, L.; Perrone, D.; Escoubet, C. P.; Walsh, A.

    2017-12-01

    At electron scales, the power spectrum of solar-wind magnetic fluctuations can be highly variable and the dissipation mechanisms of the magnetic energy into the various particle species is under debate. In this paper, we investigate data from the Cluster mission’s STAFF Search Coil magnetometer when the level of turbulence is sufficiently high that the morphology of the power spectrum at electron scales can be investigated. The Cluster spacecraft sample a disturbed interval of plasma where two streams of solar wind interact. Meanwhile, several discontinuities (coherent structures) are seen in the large-scale magnetic field, while at small scales several intermittent bursts of wave activity (whistler waves) are present. Several different morphologies of the power spectrum can be identified: (1) two power laws separated by a break, (2) an exponential cutoff near the Taylor shifted electron scales, and (3) strong spectral knees at the Taylor shifted electron scales. These different morphologies are investigated by using wavelet coherence, showing that, in this interval, a clear break and strong spectral knees are features that are associated with sporadic quasi parallel propagating whistler waves, even for short times. On the other hand, when no signatures of whistler waves at ∼ 0.1{--}0.2{f}{ce} are present, a clear break is difficult to find and the spectrum is often more characteristic of a power law with an exponential cutoff.

  3. Regional softwood sawmill processing variables as influenced by productive capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. H. Steele; F. G. Wagner; K. E. Skog

    The relationship between annual softwood sawmill production and lumber processing variables was examined using data from Sawmill Improvement Program (SIP) studies of 650 softwood mills. The variables were lumber recovery factor (LRF); headrig and resaw kerf width; total sawing variation, rough green size, and oversizing-undersizing for 4/4 and 8/4 lumber; planer...

  4. SOLAR VARIABILITY FROM 240 TO 1750 nm IN TERMS OF FACULAE BRIGHTENING AND SUNSPOT DARKENING FROM SCIAMACHY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagaran, J.; Weber, M.; Burrows, J.

    2009-01-01

    The change of spectral decomposition of the total radiative output on various timescales of solar magnetic activity is of large interest to terrestrial and solar-stellar atmosphere studies. Starting in 2002, SCIAMACHY was the first satellite instrument to observe daily solar spectral irradiance (SSI) continuously from 230 nm (UV) to 1750 nm (near-infrared; near-IR). In order to address the question of how much UV, visible (vis), and IR spectral regions change on 27 day and 11 year timescales, we parameterize short-term SSI variations in terms of faculae brightening (Mg II index) and sunspot darkening (photometric sunspot index) proxies. Although spectral variations above 300 nm are below 1% and, therefore, well below the accuracy of absolute radiometric calibration, relative accuracy for short-term changes is shown to be in the per mill range. This enables us to derive short-term spectral irradiance variations from the UV to the near-IR. During Halloween solar storm in 2003 with a record high sunspot area, we observe a reduction of 0.3% in the near-IR to 0.5% in the vis and near-UV. This is consistent with a 0.4% reduction in total solar irradiance (TSI). Over an entire 11 year solar cycle, SSI variability covering simultaneously the UV, vis, and IR spectral regions have not been directly observed so far. Using variations of solar proxies over solar cycle 23, solar cycle spectral variations have been estimated using scaling factors that best matched short-term variations of SCIAMACHY. In the 300-400 nm region, which strongly contributes to TSI solar cycle change, a contribution of 34% is derived from SCIAMACHY observations, which is lower than the reported values from SUSIM satellite data and the empirical SATIRE model. The total UV contribution (below 400 nm) to TSI solar cycle variations is estimated to be 55%.

  5. Latitude dependence of the solar wind speed: Influence of the coronal magnetic field geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pneuman, G.W.

    1976-01-01

    The dependence of solar wind speed on latitude as influenced by the magnetic field configuration of the inner corona is studied. It is found that in general, a dipolelike field geometry characteristic of a minimum-type corona tends to produce a solar wind speed distribution which increases with heliographic latitude, in accordance with observations. At very high coronal base densities and temperatures, however, this effect is minimal or even inverted. Physically, the field affects the wind speed through its area divergence, a larger divergence resulting in correspondingly lower speeds. During solar minimum, eclipse photographs suggest that the field divergence increases from pole to equator, a characteristic not apparent during solar maximum. Hence we expect the latitudinal increase in speed to be most pronounced at the minimum phase of solar activity

  6. Stratospheric and solar cycle effects on long-term variability of mesospheric ice clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübken, F.-J.; Berger, U.; Baumgarten, G.

    2009-11-01

    Model results of mesospheric ice layers and background conditions at 69°N from 1961 to 2008 are analyzed. The model nudges to European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts data below ˜45 km. Greenhouse gas concentrations in the mesosphere are kept constant. At polar mesospheric cloud (PMC) altitudes (83 km) temperatures decrease until the mid 1990s by -0.08 K/yr resulting in trends of PMC brightness, occurrence rates, and, to a lesser extent, in PMC altitudes (-0.0166 km/yr). Ice layer trends are consistent with observations by ground-based and satellite instruments. Water vapor increases at PMC heights and decreases above due to increased freeze-drying caused by the temperature trend. Temperature trends in the mesosphere mainly come from shrinking of the stratosphere and from dynamical effects. A solar cycle modulation of H2O is observed in the model consistent with satellite observations. The effect on ice layers is reduced because of redistribution of H2O by freeze-drying. The accidental coincidence of low temperatures and solar cycle minimum in the mid 1990s leads to an overestimation of solar effects on ice layers. A strong correlation between temperatures and PMC altitudes is observed. Applied to historical measurements this gives negligible temperature trends at PMC altitudes (˜0.01-0.02 K/yr). Strong correlations between PMC parameters and background conditions deduced from the model confirm the standard scenario of PMC formation. The PMC sensitivity on temperatures, water vapor, and Ly-α is investigated. PMC heights show little variation with background parameters whereas brightness and occurrence rates show large variations. None of the background parameters can be ignored regarding its influence on ice layers.

  7. Influence of ion bombardment on microcrystalline silicon material quality and solar cell performances

    OpenAIRE

    Bugnon, G; Feltrin, A; Sculati-Meillaud, F; Bailat, J; Ballif, C

    2008-01-01

    Microcrystalline hydrogenated silicon growth with VHF-PECVD was examined in an industrial type parallel plate KAITM reactor. The influence of pressure on material quality was studied in single junction solar cells. Solar cells with their intrinsic layer prepared at higher pressures exhibit remarkable improvements, reaching 8.2% efficiency at 3.5 mbar. Further analyzes showed that μc- Si:H intrinsic layers grown at higher pressures have a significantly lower defect density. These results are a...

  8. Influence of environmental factors on birth weight variability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-05-30

    May 30, 2011 ... significant (P < 0.05). Type of birth also had effect on the body weight of lambs at birth in both Pirot and ... Key words: Environmental factors, birth weight variability, indigenous sheep. ... breeding plans to improve production.

  9. ASSESSING THE INFLUENCE OF THE SOLAR ORBIT ON TERRESTRIAL BIODIVERSITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, F.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.

    2013-01-01

    The terrestrial record shows a significant variation in the extinction and origination rates of species during the past half-billion years. Numerous studies have claimed an association between this variation and the motion of the Sun around the Galaxy, invoking the modulation of cosmic rays, gamma rays, and comet impact frequency as a cause of this biodiversity variation. However, some of these studies exhibit methodological problems, or were based on coarse assumptions (such as a strict periodicity of the solar orbit). Here we investigate this link in more detail, using a model of the Galaxy to reconstruct the solar orbit and thus a predictive model of the temporal variation of the extinction rate due to astronomical mechanisms. We compare these predictions as well as those of various reference models with paleontological data. Our approach involves Bayesian model comparison, which takes into account the uncertainties in the paleontological data as well as the distribution of solar orbits consistent with the uncertainties in the astronomical data. We find that various versions of the orbital model are not favored beyond simpler reference models. In particular, the distribution of mass extinction events can be explained just as well by a uniform random distribution as by any other model tested. Although our negative results on the orbital model are robust to changes in the Galaxy model, the Sun's coordinates, and the errors in the data, we also find that it would be very difficult to positively identify the orbital model even if it were the true one. (In contrast, we do find evidence against simpler periodic models.) Thus, while we cannot rule out there being some connection between solar motion and biodiversity variations on the Earth, we conclude that it is difficult to give convincing positive conclusions of such a connection using current data.

  10. Age and sex influences on running mechanics and coordination variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Katherine A; Freedman Silvernail, Julia; Hamill, Joseph

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of age on running mechanics separately for male and female runners and to quantify sex differences in running mechanics and coordination variability for older runners. Kinematics and kinetics were captured for 20 younger (10 male) and 20 older (10 male) adults running overground at 3.5 m · s -1 . A modified vector coding technique was used to calculate segment coordination variability. Lower extremity joint angles, moments and segment coordination variability were compared between age and sex groups. Significant sex-age interaction effects were found for heel-strike hip flexion and ankle in/eversion angles and peak ankle dorsiflexion angle. In older adults, mid-stance knee flexion angle, ankle inversion and abduction moments and hip abduction and external rotation moments differed by sex. Older compared with younger females had reduced coordination variability in the thigh-shank transverse plane couple but greater coordination variability for the shank rotation-foot eversion couple in early stance. These results suggest there may be a non-equivalent aging process in the movement mechanics for males and females. The age and sex differences in running mechanics and coordination variability highlight the need for sex-based analyses for future studies examining injury risk with age.

  11. Evaluation of heat transfer mathematical models and multiple linear regression to predict the inside variables in semi-solar greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Taki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Controlling greenhouse microclimate not only influences the growth of plants, but also is critical in the spread of diseases inside the greenhouse. The microclimate parameters were inside air, greenhouse roof and soil temperature, relative humidity and solar radiation intensity. Predicting the microclimate conditions inside a greenhouse and enabling the use of automatic control systems are the two main objectives of greenhouse climate model. The microclimate inside a greenhouse can be predicted by conducting experiments or by using simulation. Static and dynamic models are used for this purpose as a function of the metrological conditions and the parameters of the greenhouse components. Some works were done in past to 2015 year to simulation and predict the inside variables in different greenhouse structures. Usually simulation has a lot of problems to predict the inside climate of greenhouse and the error of simulation is higher in literature. The main objective of this paper is comparison between heat transfer and regression models to evaluate them to predict inside air and roof temperature in a semi-solar greenhouse in Tabriz University. Materials and Methods In this study, a semi-solar greenhouse was designed and constructed at the North-West of Iran in Azerbaijan Province (geographical location of 38°10′ N and 46°18′ E with elevation of 1364 m above the sea level. In this research, shape and orientation of the greenhouse, selected between some greenhouses common shapes and according to receive maximum solar radiation whole the year. Also internal thermal screen and cement north wall was used to store and prevent of heat lost during the cold period of year. So we called this structure, ‘semi-solar’ greenhouse. It was covered with glass (4 mm thickness. It occupies a surface of approximately 15.36 m2 and 26.4 m3. The orientation of this greenhouse was East–West and perpendicular to the direction of the wind prevailing

  12. Experimental Study of a Novel Direct-Expansion Variable Frequency Finned Solar/Air-Assisted Heat Pump Water Heater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Qin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel direct expansion variable frequency finned solar/air-assisted heat pump water heater was fabricated and tested in the enthalpy difference lab with a solar simulator. A solar/air source evaporator-collector with an automatic lifting glass cover plate was installed on the system. The system could be operated in three modes, namely, air, solar, and dual modes. The effects of the ambient temperature, solar irradiation, compressor frequency, and operating mode on the performance of this system were studied in this paper. The experimental results show that the ambient temperature, solar irradiation, and operating mode almost have no effect on the energy consumption of the compressor. When the ambient temperature and the solar irradiation were increased, the COP was found to increase with decreasing heating time. Also, when the compressor frequency was increased, an increase in the energy consumption of the compressor and the heat gain of the evaporator were noted with a decrease in the heating time.

  13. ({The) Solar System Large Planets influence on a new Maunder Miniμm}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yndestad, Harald; Solheim, Jan-Erik

    2016-04-01

    In 1890´s G. Spörer and E. W. Maunder (1890) reported that the solar activity stopped in a period of 70 years from 1645 to 1715. Later a reconstruction of the solar activity confirms the grand minima Maunder (1640-1720), Spörer (1390-1550), Wolf (1270-1340), and the minima Oort (1010-1070) and Dalton (1785-1810) since the year 1000 A.D. (Usoskin et al. 2007). These minimum periods have been associated with less irradiation from the Sun and cold climate periods on Earth. An identification of a three grand Maunder type periods and two Dalton type periods in a period thousand years, indicates that sooner or later there will be a colder climate on Earth from a new Maunder- or Dalton- type period. The cause of these minimum periods, are not well understood. An expected new Maunder-type period is based on the properties of solar variability. If the solar variability has a deterministic element, we can estimate better a new Maunder grand minimum. A random solar variability can only explain the past. This investigation is based on the simple idea that if the solar variability has a deterministic property, it must have a deterministic source, as a first cause. If this deterministic source is known, we can compute better estimates the next expected Maunder grand minimum period. The study is based on a TSI ACRIM data series from 1700, a TSI ACRIM data series from 1000 A.D., sunspot data series from 1611 and a Solar Barycenter orbit data series from 1000. The analysis method is based on a wavelet spectrum analysis, to identify stationary periods, coincidence periods and their phase relations. The result shows that the TSI variability and the sunspots variability have deterministic oscillations, controlled by the large planets Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune, as the first cause. A deterministic model of TSI variability and sunspot variability confirms the known minimum and grand minimum periods since 1000. From this deterministic model we may expect a new Maunder type sunspot

  14. Critical variables in the performance of a productivity-enhanced solar still

    KAUST Repository

    Ayoub, George M.; Malaeb, Lilian; Saikaly, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    A new and sustainable modification has been introduced into the conventional solar still, considerably increasing its productivity. This enhancement in the solar still productivity is achieved without forsaking the basic features of the still

  15. Influence of job frustration, narcissism and demographic variables ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examines the hypothesised relationship among job frustration, narcissism, demographic variables and professional ethical behaviour among Nigerian Police officers. One hundred policemen drawn from four police divisions of Benin Area Command of Edo State participated in the study. There were 18 females ...

  16. Influence of Variable Fluid Properties and Radiative Heat loss on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Consequently, comparative analysis is also performed on the wall shear stress and local heat transfer of the present study with the available results.The results show that the inclusion variable viscosity and thermal conductivity, and radiative heat loss mechanism cause significant effects on the fluid flow velocity, temperature ...

  17. Genetic influence on inflammation variables in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Maat, Moniek P M; Bladbjerg, Else Marie; Hjelmborg, Jacob v. B.

    2004-01-01

    factors, and the aim of this study was to determine the heritability of these inflammation variables and of the acute phase regulating cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) at older ages. METHODS AND RESULTS: The heritability of CRP, fibrinogen, sICAM-1, IL-6, and TNF...

  18. Sub-hour solar data for power system modeling from static spatial variability analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummon, Marissa R.; Ibanez, Eduardo; Brinkman, Gregory; Lew, Debra [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2012-07-01

    High penetration renewable integration studies need high quality solar power data with spatial-temporal correlations that are representative of a real system. For instance, as additional solar power sites are added, the relative amount of variability should decrease due to spatial averaging of localized irradiance fluctuations. This presentation will summarize the research relating sequential point-source sub-hour global horizontal irradiance (GHI) values to static, spatially distributed GHI values. This research led to the development of an algorithm for generating coherent sub-hour datasets that span distances ranging from 10 km to 4,000 km. The algorithm, in brief, generates synthetic GHI values at an interval of one minute, for a specific location, using SUNY/Clean Power Research, satellite-derived, hourly irradiance values for the nearest grid cell to that location and grid cells within 40 km. During each hour, the observed GHI value for the grid cell of interest and the surrounding grid cells is related, via probability distributions, to one of live temporal cloud coverage classifications (class I, II, III, IV, V). Synthesis algorithms are used to select one-minute time step GHI values based on the classification of the grid cell of interest in a particular hour. Three primary statistical measures of the dataset are demonstrated: reduction in ramps as a function of aggregation; coherence of GHI values across sites ranging from 6 to 400 km apart over time scales from one minute to three hours; and ramp magnitude and duration distributions as a function of time of day and day of year. (orig.)

  19. Influence of solar activity on the state of the wheat market in medieval England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustil'Nik, Lev A.; Din, Gregory Yom

    2004-09-01

    The database of professor Rogers (1887), which includes wheat prices in England in the Middle Ages, was used to search for a possible influence of solar activity on the wheat market. Our approach was based on the following: (1) Existence of the correlation between cosmic ray flux entering the terrestrial atmosphere and cloudiness of the atmosphere. (2) Cosmic ray intensity in the solar system changes with solar activity, (3) Wheat production depends on weather conditions as a nonlinear function with threshold transitions. (4) A wheat market with a limited supply (as it was in medieval England) has a highly nonlinear sensitivity to variations in wheat production with boundary states, where small changes in wheat supply could lead to bursts of prices or to prices falling. We present a conceptual model of possible modes for sensitivity of wheat prices to weather conditions, caused by solar cycle variations, and compare expected price fluctuations with price variations recorded in medieval England. We compared statistical properties of the intervals between wheat price bursts during the years 1249-1703 with statistical properties of the intervals between the minima of solar cycles during the years 1700-2000. We show that statistical properties of these two samples are similar, both for characteristics of the distributions and for histograms of the distributions. We analyze a direct link between wheat prices and solar activity in the 17th century, for which wheat prices and solar activity data (derived from 10Be isotope) are available. We show that for all 10 time moments of the solar activity minima the observed prices were higher than prices for the corresponding time moments of maximal solar activity (100% sign correlation, on a significance level < 0.2%). We consider these results a direct evidence of the causal connection between wheat prices bursts and solar activity.

  20. Global Solar Magnetic Field Organization in the Outer Corona: Influence on the Solar Wind Speed and Mass Flux Over the Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réville, Victor; Brun, Allan Sacha

    2017-11-01

    The dynamics of the solar wind depends intrinsically on the structure of the global solar magnetic field, which undergoes fundamental changes over the 11-year solar cycle. For instance, the wind terminal velocity is thought to be anti-correlated with the expansion factor, a measure of how the magnetic field varies with height in the solar corona, usually computed at a fixed height (≈ 2.5 {R}⊙ , the source surface radius that approximates the distance at which all magnetic field lines become open). However, the magnetic field expansion affects the solar wind in a more detailed way, its influence on the solar wind properties remaining significant well beyond the source surface. We demonstrate this using 3D global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the solar corona, constrained by surface magnetograms over half a solar cycle (1989-2001). A self-consistent expansion beyond the solar wind critical point (even up to 10 {R}⊙ ) makes our model comply with observed characteristics of the solar wind, namely, that the radial magnetic field intensity becomes latitude independent at some distance from the Sun, and that the mass flux is mostly independent of the terminal wind speed. We also show that near activity minimum, the expansion in the higher corona has more influence on the wind speed than the expansion below 2.5 {R}⊙ .

  1. Variable selection in multiple linear regression: The influence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    provide an indication of whether the fit of the selected model improves or ... and calculate M(−i); quantify the influence of case i in terms of a function, f(•), of M and ..... [21] Venter JH & Snyman JLJ, 1997, Linear model selection based on risk ...

  2. Variables That Influence the Environmental Behavior of Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Anat; Orion, Nir; Leshem, Yossi

    2018-01-01

    This study focuses on understanding the factors that encourage adults' environmental behavior. This mixed approach methodology study used 10 Likert type questionnaires to collect data about nine cognitive and affective components that might influence environmental behavior. The qualitative data was collected through open questions and interviews.…

  3. The influence of cultural norms and customs variables on birth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study established the influence of social pressure on women to prove their fertility, breastfeeding practices, postpartum abstinence practices and preferences for male children on birth spacing practices. A total of two hundred and thirty teachers and nurses randomly selected from state schools and hospitals in Ibadan ...

  4. Influence of Surface Roughness on Optical Characteristics of Multilayer Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubomir Scholtz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing efficiency of solar cells is still a discussed problem. Even if it is well-known that specially formed substrates as Asahi U-type for solar cells are produced, there is still a continuing attention given to the applications of surface roughness to achieve better light trapping and absorptance in solar cells. It was found out the even an exact interface morphology can play an important role in light trapping. In this paper we focused on the issue how final absorptance of a solar cell structure could be affected and possibly increased. The goal of this article is to show which of interfaces has the greatest influence on specular absorptance of the whole structure.

  5. Influence of electron-donating polymer addition on the performance of polymer solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Youngkyoo; Shin, Minjung; Kim, Hwajeong; Ha, Youri; Ha, Chang-Sik

    2008-01-01

    Here we report the influence of electron-donating polymer addition on the performance of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) : 1-(3-methoxycarbonyl)-propyl-1-phenyl-(6,6)C 61 (PCBM) solar cells. Poly[2-methoxy-5-(3',7'-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MDMO-PPV) was chosen as the electron-donating polymer to improve the open circuit voltage (V OC ) due to its higher level of the highest occupied molecular orbital energy compared with P3HT. Results showed that the MDMO-PPV addition led to an improved V OC for ternary blend (P3HT : MDMO-PPV : PCBM) solar cells. In particular, after thermal annealing at 110 deg. C, the short circuit current density of ternary blend solar cells was greatly improved, close to that of comparative binary blend (P3HT : PCBM) solar cells.

  6. Influence of nanomaterials on properties of latent heat solar thermal energy storage materials – A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raam Dheep, G.; Sreekumar, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Classification of phase change materials. • Studies on phase change properties of various phase change materials. • Influence of nanomaterials on properties of phase change materials. - Abstract: Thermal energy storage system plays a critical role in developing an efficient solar energy device. As far as solar thermal devices are concerned, there is always a mismatch between supply and demand due to intermittent and unpredictable nature of solar radiation. A well designed thermal energy storage system is capable to alleviate this demerit by providing a constant energy delivery to the load. Many research works is being carried out to determine the suitability of thermal energy storage system to integrate with solar thermal gadgets. This review paper summarizes the numerous investigations on latent heat thermal energy storage using phase change materials (PCM) and its classification, properties, selection criteria, potential research areas and studies involved to analyze the thermal–physical properties of PCM

  7. Recent Variability Observations of Solar System Giant Planets: Fresh Context for Understanding Exoplanet and Brown Dwarf Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Mark Scott

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years a number of high cadence photometric observations of solar system giant planets have been acquired by various platforms. Such observations are of interest as they provide points of comparison to the already expansive set of brown dwarf variability observations and the small, but growing, set of exoplanet variability observations. By measuring how rapidly the integrated light from solar system giant planets can evolve, variability observations of substellar objects that are unlikely to ever be resolved can be placed in a fuller context. Examples of brown dwarf variability observations include extensive work from the ground (e.g., Radigen et al. 2014), Spitzer (e.g., Metchev et al. 2015), Kepler (Gizis et al. 2015), and HST (Yang et al. 2015).Variability has been measured on the planetary mass companion to the brown dwarf 2MASS 1207b (Zhou et al. 2016) and further searches are planned in thermal emission for the known directly imaged planets with ground based telescopes (Apai et al. 2016) and in reflected light with future space based telescopes. Recent solar system variability observations include Kepler monitoring of Neptune (Simon et al. 2016) and Uranus, Spitzer observations of Neptune (Stauffer et al. 2016), and Cassini observations of Jupiter (West et al. in prep). The Cassini observations are of particular interest as they measured the variability of Jupiter at a phase angle of approximately 60 deg, comparable to the viewing geometry expected for space based direct imaging of cool extrasolar Jupiters in reflected light. These solar system analog observations capture many of the characteristics seen in brown dwarf variability, including large amplitudes and rapid light curve evolution on timescales as short as a few rotation periods. Simon et al. (2016) attribute such variations at Neptune to a combination of large scale, stable cloud structures along with smaller, more rapidly varying, cloud patches. The observed brown dwarf and

  8. Consequences of Neglecting the Interannual Variability of the Solar Resource: A Case Study of Photovoltaic Power Among the Hawaiian Islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brancucci Martinez-Anido, Carlo [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bryce, Richard [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Losada Carreno, Ignacio [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kumler, Andrew [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hodge, Brian S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Roberts, Billy J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-04-05

    The interannual variability of the solar irradiance and meteorological conditions are often ignored in favor of single-year data sets for modeling power generation and evaluating the economic value of photovoltaic (PV) power systems. Yet interannual variability significantly impacts the generation from one year to another of renewable power systems such as wind and PV. Consequently, the interannual variability of power generation corresponds to the interannual variability of capital returns on investment. The penetration of PV systems within the Hawaiian Electric Companies' portfolio has rapidly accelerated in recent years and is expected to continue to increase given the state's energy objectives laid out by the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative. We use the National Solar Radiation Database (1998-2015) to characterize the interannual variability of the solar irradiance and meteorological conditions across the State of Hawaii. These data sets are passed to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's System Advisory Model (SAM) to calculate an 18-year PV power generation data set to characterize the variability of PV power generation. We calculate the interannual coefficient of variability (COV) for annual average global horizontal irradiance (GHI) on the order of 2% and COV for annual capacity factor on the order of 3% across the Hawaiian archipelago. Regarding the interannual variability of seasonal trends, we calculate the COV for monthly average GHI values on the order of 5% and COV for monthly capacity factor on the order of 10%. We model residential-scale and utility-scale PV systems and calculate the economic returns of each system via the payback period and the net present value. We demonstrate that studies based on single-year data sets for economic evaluations reach conclusions that deviate from the true values realized by accounting for interannual variability.

  9. Spatiotemporal variability and modeling of the solar irradiance transmissivity through a boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, D.; Isabelle, P. E.; Asselin, M. H.; Parent, A. C.; Jutras, S.; Anctil, F.

    2017-12-01

    Solar irradiance is the largest driver of land-surface exchanges of energy, water and trace gases. Its absorption by a forest canopy generates considerable sensible and latent heat fluxes as well as tree temperature changes. A fraction of the irradiance gets transmitted through the canopy and powers another layer of energy fluxes, which can reach substantial values. Transmitted radiation is also of particular relevance to understory vegetation photosynthesis, snowpack energetics and soil temperature dynamics. Boreal forest canopy transmissivity needs to be quantified to properly reproduce land-atmosphere interactions in the circumpolar boreal biome, but its high spatiotemporal variability makes it a challenging task. The objective of this study is to characterize the spatiotemporal variability in under-canopy radiation and to evaluate the performance of various models in representing plot-scale observations. The study site is located in Montmorency Forest (47°N, 71°W), in southern Quebec, Canada. The vegetation includes mostly juvenile balsam firs, up to 6 to 8 m tall. Since January 2016, a 15-m flux tower measures the four components of radiation, as well as other relevant fluxes and meteorological variables, on a ≈10° northeast-facing slope. In summer 2016, 20 portable weather stations were mounted in a 150 m x 200 m grid around the flux tower. These stations were equipped with silicon-cell pyranometers and provided measurements of downwelling irradiance at a height of 2 m. This setup allowed us to compute irradiance transmissivity and to assess its spatiotemporal variability at the site. First, we show that the average of daily incoming energy varies tremendously across the sites, from 1 MJ/m2 to nearly 9 MJ/m2, due to large variations in canopy structure over short distances. Using a regression tree analysis, we show that transmissivity mostly depends on sun elevation, diffuse fraction of radiation, sky and sun view fraction and wind speed above canopy. We

  10. Seasonal Evolution and Interannual Variability of the Local Solar Energy Absorbed by the Arctic Sea Ice-Ocean System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovich, Donald K.; Nghiem, Son V.; Markus, Thorsten; Schwieger, Axel

    2007-01-01

    The melt season of the Arctic sea ice cover is greatly affected by the partitioning of the incident solar radiation between reflection to the atmosphere and absorption in the ice and ocean. This partitioning exhibits a strong seasonal cycle and significant interannual variability. Data in the period 1998, 2000-2004 were analyzed in this study. Observations made during the 1997-1998 SHEBA (Surface HEat Budget of the Arctic Ocean) field experiment showed a strong seasonal dependence of the partitioning, dominated by a five-phase albedo evolution. QuikSCAT scatterometer data from the SHEBA region in 1999-2004 were used to further investigate solar partitioning in summer. The time series of scatterometer data were used to determine the onset of melt and the beginning of freezeup. This information was combined with SSM/I-derived ice concentration, TOVS-based estimates of incident solar irradiance, and SHEBA results to estimate the amount of solar energy absorbed in the ice-ocean system for these years. The average total solar energy absorbed in the ice-ocean system from April through September was 900 MJ m(sup -2). There was considerable interannual variability, with a range of 826 to 1044 MJ m(sup -2). The total amount of solar energy absorbed by the ice and ocean was strongly related to the date of melt onset, but only weakly related to the total duration of the melt season or the onset of freezeup. The timing of melt onset is significant because the incident solar energy is large and a change at this time propagates through the entire melt season, affecting the albedo every day throughout melt and freezeup.

  11. Biofilm diatom community structure: Influence of temporal and substratum variability

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, J.S.; Anil, A.C.

    ). The structure and composition of the fouling com- munity exhibit wide temporal and regional varia- tions, which are also influenced by the substratum. Dona Paula Bay, the site of this investigation, is highly dynamic in terms of its physico...-off and nutrient loading in coastal environments. In general, the waters are highly disturbed during the monsoon (June–September) and calm during the pre-monsoon (February–May) and post-monsoon (October–January) periods. Such changes are instrumental...

  12. Student understanding of control of variables: Deciding whether or not a variable influences the behavior of a system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreaux, Andrew; Shaffer, Peter S.; Heron, Paula R. L.; McDermott, Lillian C.

    2008-02-01

    The ability of adult students to reason on the basis of the control of variables was the subject of an extended investigation. This paper describes the part of the study that focused on the reasoning required to decide whether or not a given variable influences the behavior of a system. The participants were undergraduates taking introductory Physics and K-8 teachers studying physics and physical science in inservice institutes and workshops. Although most of the students recognized the need to control variables, many had significant difficulty with the underlying reasoning. The results indicate serious shortcomings in the preparation of future scientists and in the education of a scientifically literate citizenry. There are also strong implications for the professional development of teachers, many of whom are expected to teach control of variables to young students.

  13. Influence of Velocity on Variability in Gait Kinematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Sylvia X M; Larsen, Peter K; Alkjær, Tine

    2014-01-01

    the concurrence of joint angles throughout a gait cycle at three different velocities (3.0, 4.5, 6.0 km/h). Six datasets at each velocity were collected from 16 men. A variability range VR throughout the gait cycle at each velocity for each joint angle for each person was calculated. The joint angles at each...... velocity were compared pairwise, and whenever this showed values within the VR of this velocity, the case was positive. By adding the positives throughout the gait cycle, phases with high and low concurrences were located; peak concurrence was observed at mid-stance phase. Striving for the same velocity...

  14. Influence of geomagnetic activity and atmospheric pressure on human arterial pressure during the solar cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azcárate, T.; Mendoza, B.; Levi, J. R.

    2016-11-01

    We performed a study of the systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) arterial blood pressure behavior under natural variables such as the atmospheric pressure (AtmP) and the horizontal geomagnetic field component (H). We worked with a sample of 304 healthy normotense volunteers, 152 men and 152 women, with ages between 18 and 84 years in Mexico City during the period 2008-2014, corresponding to the minimum, ascending and maximum phases of the solar cycle 24. The data was divided by gender, age and day/night cycle. We studied the time series using three methods: Correlations, bivariate and superposed epochs (within a window of three days around the day of occurrence of a geomagnetic storm) analysis, between the SBP and DBP and the natural variables (AtmP and H). The correlation analysis indicated correlation between the SBP and DBP and AtmP and H, being the largest during the night. Furthermore, the correlation and bivariate analysis showed that the largest correlations are between the SBP and DBP and the AtmP. The superposed epoch analysis found that the largest number of significant SBP and DBP changes occurred for women. Finally, the blood pressure changes are larger during the solar minimum and ascending solar cycle phases than during the solar maximum; the storms of the minimum were more intense than those of the maximum and this could be the reason of behavior of the blood pressure changes along the solar cycle.

  15. Araucaria growth response to solar and climate variability in South Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestes, Alan; Klausner, Virginia; Rojahn da Silva, Iuri; Ojeda-González, Arian; Lorensi, Caren

    2018-05-01

    In this work, the Sun-Earth-climate relationship is studied using tree growth rings of Araucaria angustifolia (Bertol.) O. Kuntze collected in the city of Passo Fundo, located in the state of Rio Grande do Sul (RS), Brazil. These samples were previously studied by Rigozo et al. (2008); however, their main interest was to search for the solar periodicities in the tree-ring width mean time series without interpreting the rest of the periodicities found. The question arises as to what are the drivers related to those periodicities. For this reason, the classical method of spectral analysis by iterative regression and wavelet methods are applied to find periodicities and trends present in each tree-ring growth, in Southern Oscillation Index (SOI), and in annual mean temperature anomaly between the 24 and 44° S. In order to address the aforementioned question, this paper discusses the correlation between the growth rate of the tree rings with temperature and SOI. In each tree-ring growth series, periods between 2 and 7 years were found, possibly related to the El Niño/La Niña phenomena, and a ˜ 23-year period was found, which may be related to temperature variation. These novel results might represent the tree-ring growth response to local climate conditions during its lifetime, and to nonlinear coupling between the Sun and the local climate variability responsible to the regional climate variations.

  16. Kelvin wave coupling from TIMED and GOCE: Inter/intra-annual variability and solar activity effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, Federico; Forbes, Jeffrey M.; Doornbos, Eelco N.; Bruinsma, Sean L.

    2018-06-01

    The primary mechanism through which energy and momentum are transferred from the lower atmosphere to the thermosphere is through the generation and propagation of atmospheric waves. It is becoming increasingly evident that a few waves from the tropical wave spectrum preferentially propagate into the thermosphere and contribute to modify satellite drag. Two of the more prominent and well-established tropical waves are Kelvin waves: the eastward-propagating 3-day ultra-fast Kelvin wave (UFKW) and the eastward-propagating diurnal tide with zonal wave number 3 (DE3). In this work, Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) temperatures at 110 km and Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) neutral densities and cross-track winds near 260 km are used to demonstrate vertical coupling in this height regime due to the UFKW and DE3. Significant inter- and intra-annual variability is found in DE3 and the UFKW, with evidence of latitudinal broadening and filtering of the latitude structures with height due to the effect of dissipation and mean winds. Additionally, anti-correlation between the vertical penetration of these waves to the middle thermosphere and solar activity level is established and explained through the effect of molecular dissipation.

  17. Study of Formulation Variables Influencing Polymeric Microparticles by Experimental Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra B. Naik

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to prepare diclofenac sodium loaded microparticles by single emulsion [oil-in-water (o/w] solvent evaporation method. The 22 experimental design methodology was used to evaluate the effect of two formulation variables on microspheres properties using the Design-Expert® software and evaluated for their particle size, morphology, and encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release. The graphical and mathematical analysis of the design showed that the independent variables were a significant effect on the encapsulation efficiency and drug release of microparticles. The low magnitudes of error and significant values of R2 prove the high prognostic ability of the design. The microspheres showed high encapsulation efficiency with an increase in the amount of polymer and decrease in the amount of PVA in the formulation. The particles were found to be spherical with smooth surface. Prolonged drug release and enhancement of encapsulation efficiency of polymeric microparticles can be successfully obtained with an application of experimental design technique.

  18. Influence of wavelength on transient short-circuit current in polycrystalline silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ba, B.; Kane, M.

    1993-10-01

    The influence of the wavelength of a monochromatic illumination on transient short-circuit current in an n/p polycrystalline silicon part solar cell junction is investigated. A wavelength dependence in the initial part of the current decay is observed in the case of cells with moderate grain boundary effects. This influence is attenuated in polycrystalline cells with strong grain boundary activity. (author). 10 refs, 6 figs

  19. Influences of variables on ship collision probability in a Bayesian belief network model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hänninen, Maria; Kujala, Pentti

    2012-01-01

    The influences of the variables in a Bayesian belief network model for estimating the role of human factors on ship collision probability in the Gulf of Finland are studied for discovering the variables with the largest influences and for examining the validity of the network. The change in the so-called causation probability is examined while observing each state of the network variables and by utilizing sensitivity and mutual information analyses. Changing course in an encounter situation is the most influential variable in the model, followed by variables such as the Officer of the Watch's action, situation assessment, danger detection, personal condition and incapacitation. The least influential variables are the other distractions on bridge, the bridge view, maintenance routines and the officer's fatigue. In general, the methods are found to agree on the order of the model variables although some disagreements arise due to slightly dissimilar approaches to the concept of variable influence. The relative values and the ranking of variables based on the values are discovered to be more valuable than the actual numerical values themselves. Although the most influential variables seem to be plausible, there are some discrepancies between the indicated influences in the model and literature. Thus, improvements are suggested to the network.

  20. The Long-term Middle Atmospheric Influence of Very Large Solar Proton Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Marsh, Daniel R.; Vitt, Francis M.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Randall, Cora E.; Fleming, Eric L.; Frith, Stacey M.

    2008-01-01

    Long-term variations in ozone have been caused by both natural and humankind related processes. The humankind or anthropogenic influence on ozone originates from the chlorofluorocarbons and halons (chlorine and bromine) and has led to international regulations greatly limiting the release of these substances. Certain natural ozone influences are also important in polar regions and are caused by the impact of solar charged particles on the atmosphere. Such natural variations have been studied in order to better quantify the human influence on polar ozone. Large-scale explosions on the Sun near solar maximum lead to emissions of charged particles (mainly protons and electrons), some of which enter the Earth's magnetosphere and rain down on the polar regions. "Solar proton events" have been used to describe these phenomena since the protons associated with these solar events sometimes create a significant atmospheric disturbance. We have used the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) to study the long-term (> few months) influences of solar proton events from 1963 through 2004 on stratospheric ozone and temperature. There were extremely large solar proton events in 1972, 1989,2000,2001, and 2003. These events caused very distinctive polar changes in layers of the Earth's atmosphere known as the stratosphere (12-50 km; -7-30 miles) and mesosphere (50-90 km; 30-55 miles). The solar protons connected with these events created hydrogen- and nitrogen-containing compounds, which led to the polar ozone destruction. The nitrogen-containing compounds, called odd nitrogen, lasted much longer than the hydrogen-containing compounds and led to long-lived stratospheric impacts. An extremely active period for these events occurred in the five-year period, 2000- 2004, and caused increases in odd nitrogen which lasted for several months after individual events. Associated stratospheric ozone decreases of >lo% were calculated

  1. Influencing variables on life satisfaction of Korean elders in institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Ki-Wol

    2003-12-01

    The number of elders in institutions has increased as family supporting systems have changed in Korea. The purpose of this study were to understand the life satisfaction among elders in institutions and to identify the factors influencing on life satisfaction. The instruments used were Yun(1982)'s scale modified Memorial University of Newfoundland Scale for Happiness(MUNSH) in life satisfaction, ADL and IADL in activity level, Self-rating Depression Scale(SDS) in depression and Norbeck Social Support Questionnaire(NSSQ) scale in social support. Also, Perceived health status was measured by Visual Graphic Rating Scale. The subject of this study is 107 cognitively intact and ambulatory elders in 7 institutions in Daegu city and Kyungpook province. The data have been collected from May 1 to June 30, 2001. For the analysis of collected data, frequency analysis, mean, standard deviation, Pearson's correlation and stepwise multiple regression analysis were used for statistical analysis by SPSSwin(version 9.0) program. Life satisfaction for the elders in institutions showed negative correlation with SDS, and positive correlation with activity level. The regression form of the stepwise multiple regression analysis to investigate the influencing factors of life satisfaction for the elders in institutions was expressed by y = 90.988-0.733x1-0.188x2-0.069x3-0.565x4 (x1: SDS x2: Social support x3: Activity level x4: Monthly pocket Money) and 57.9% of variance in life satisfaction was explained by the model. The factors influencing on life satisfaction among the elders in institutions were SDS, social support, activity level and monthly pocket money. According to the results of this study, depression, social support and activity level are considered the prime causal factors for life satisfaction.

  2. Influence of Climate Variability on US Regional Homicide Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harp, R. D.; Karnauskas, K. B.

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies have found consistent evidence of a relationship between temperature and criminal behavior. However, despite agreement in the overall relationship, little progress has been made in distinguishing between two proposed explanatory theories. The General Affective Aggression Model (GAAM) suggests that high temperatures create periods of higher heat stress that enhance individual aggressiveness, whereas the Routine Activities Theory (RAT) theorizes that individuals are more likely to be outdoors interacting with others during periods of pleasant weather with a resulting increase in both interpersonal interactions and victim availability. Further, few studies have considered this relationship within the context of climate change in a quantitative manner. In an effort to distinguish between the two theories, and to examine the statistical relationships on a broader spatial scale than previously, we combined data from the Supplementary Homicide Report (SHR—compiled by the Federal Bureau of Investigation) and the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR—compiled by the National Centers for Environmental Protection, a branch of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). US homicide data described by the SHR was compared with seven relevant observed climate variables (temperature, dew point, relative humidity, accumulated precipitation, accumulated snowfall, snow cover, and snow depth) provided by the NARR atmospheric reanalysis. Relationships between homicide rates and climate variables, as well as reveal regional spatial patterns will be presented and discussed, along with the implications due to future climate change. This research lays the groundwork for the refinement of estimates of an oft-overlooked climate change impact, which has previously been estimated to cause an additional 22,000 murders between 2010 and 2099, including providing important constraints for empirical models of future violent crime incidences in the face of global

  3. Total electron count variability and stratospheric ozone effects on solar backscatter and LWIR emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-10

    heating occur. This method is achieved though measuring the intensity ratio of sky- scattered sunlight at a pair of UV wavelengths at solar zenith angles...cause impacts to direct-sun, UV, and zenith measurements . OOB light can affect the low intensity spectrum of solar light, which is not fully removed by...several key spectral properties that are pertinent to its measurement . Ozone is greenhouse gas that plays a primary role in the absorption of solar UV

  4. Wavelength Dependence of Solar Flare Irradiation and its Influence on the Thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanshi; Richmond, Arthur D.; Deng, Yue; Qian, L.; Solomon, S.; Chamberlin, P.

    2012-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of solar flare enhancement is one of the important factors determining how the Thermosphere-Ionosphere (T-I) system response to flares. To investigate the wavelength dependence of solar flare, the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) has been run for 34 X-class flares. The results show that the percentage increases of solar irradiance at flare peak comparing to pre-flare condition have a clear wavelength dependence. In the wavelength range between 0 - 195 nm, it can vary from 1% to 10000%. The solar irradiance enhancement is largest ( 1000%) in the XUV range (0 - 25 nm), and is about 100% in EUV range (25 - 120 nm). The influence of different wavebands on the T-I system during the October 28th, 2003 flare (X17.2-class) has also been examined using the latest version of National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Thermosphere- Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM). While the globally integrated solar energy deposition is largest in the 0 - 14 nm waveband, the impact of solar irradiance enhancement on the thermosphere at 400 km is largest for 25 - 105 nm waveband. The effect of 122 - 195 nm is small in magnitude, but it decays slowly.

  5. The influence of psychosocial variables on adolescent suicidal ideation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Ancel; van den Berg, Henriette S

    2012-07-01

    Increased rates of suicide among adolescents aged 15-24 years have led to suicides becoming the third leading cause of death in the Unites States. South African statistics show an equally worrying trend as suicide constitutes 11.5% of the total deaths for the age group 11-20 years (Stark et al. 2010). A national youth risk behaviour survey done in South Africa has re-emphasised the need for concern, as adolescent suicidal behaviour increased between 2002 and 2008 (Reddy et al. 2010). The objective was to investigate the influence of risk and protective factors (psychosocial and individual factors) on suicidal ideation. The Integrated Stress and Coping Process model was used as guiding theory for the inclusion of personal and contextual stressors and resources including coping strategies as potential risk and protective factors, in their relationship to suicidal ideation. A purposive, stratified sampling technique was used to study 381 adolescents in the Northern Cape Province. The instruments used were a suicidal ideation questionnaire; a biographical questionnaire; a self-esteem scale; and a survey examining stressors and resources relevant to adolescents. Suicidal ideation was significantly higher in the South African sample than in an American sample. Avoidant coping strategies (denial, emotional venting and restraint coping), negative life events and stressful romantic relationships contributed to higher levels of suicidal ideation while self-esteem and adaptive coping (acceptance and seeking social support for instrumental reasons) reduced these levels. A lack of self-esteem, ineffective coping and particular stressors contributed significantly to the vulnerability of adolescents. Future studies should explore a wider range of dispositional factors that influence effective coping and adjustment in addressing adolescent suicidal ideation.

  6. Soft X-ray variability over the present minimum of solar activity as observed by SphinX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gburek, S.; Siarkowski, M.; Kepa, A.; Sylwester, J.; Kowalinski, M.; Bakala, J.; Podgorski, P.; Kordylewski, Z.; Plocieniak, S.; Sylwester, B.; Trzebinski, W.; Kuzin, S.

    2011-04-01

    Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) is an instrument designed to observe the Sun in X-rays in the energy range 0.85-15.00 keV. SphinX is incorporated within the Russian TESIS X and EUV telescope complex aboard the CORONAS-Photon satellite which was launched on January 30, 2009 at 13:30 UT from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome, northern Russia. Since February, 2009 SphinX has been measuring solar X-ray radiation nearly continuously. The principle of SphinX operation and the content of the instrument data archives is studied. Issues related to dissemination of SphinX calibration, data, repository mirrors locations, types of data and metadata are discussed. Variability of soft X-ray solar flux is studied using data collected by SphinX over entire mission duration.

  7. Do isolated packaging variables influence consumers' attention and preferences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Madariaga, Jesús; Blasco López, Maria-Francisca; Burgos, Ingrit Moya; Virto, Nuria Recuero

    2018-04-25

    Developments in neuroscience have provided the opportunity to know unconscious consumer reactions and acknowledge direct measures of cognitive constructs like attention. Given the ever-increasing concern over packaging's contribution to creating a positive first impression, the current research seeks to examine consumers' attention and declarative preferences regarding the three main different packaging attributes as isolated variables: images, texts and colours. The experiment exposed participants (N = 40) to 63 stimuli, which were based on modifications of the three main packaging attributes of three products of three different food categories. This study used electroencephalogram (EEG) and eye-tracking (ET) to measure attention, and a declarative test was employed to examine preference. First, the results presented herein show that the presence of visual elements, either images or texts on packages, increased the participants' level of attention. Second, the results reveal that colour modifications do not have a significant effect on participants' neurophysiological attention levels. Third, the results demonstrated that the neurophysiological effects among the participants do not necessarily coincide with their subjective evaluations of preference. Hence, this study increases awareness of the relevance of combining traditional market research tools that rely on explicit consumer responses with neuroscientific techniques. These findings indicate, first of all, that more research is needed to ascertain the extent to which consumers' neurophysiological outcomes correspond to their declarative preferences and second, that neurophysiological methods should be given more attention in research. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Breath acetone concentration; biological variability and the influence of diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Španěl, Patrik; Dryahina, Kseniya; Rejšková, Alžběta; Chippendale, Thomas W E; Smith, David

    2011-01-01

    Previous measurements of acetone concentrations in the exhaled breath of healthy individuals and the small amount of comparable data for individuals suffering from diabetes are briefly reviewed as a prelude to the presentation of new data on the sporadic and wide variations of breath acetone that occur in ostensibly healthy individuals. Data are also presented which show that following a ketogenic diet taken by eight healthy individuals their breath acetone concentrations increased up to five times over the subsequent 6 h. Similarly, the breath acetone increased six and nine times when a low carbohydrate diet was taken by two volunteers and remained high for the several days for which the diet was continued. These new data, together with the previous data, clearly indicate that diet and natural intra-individual biological and diurnal variability result in wide variations in breath acetone concentration. This places an uncertainty in the use of breath acetone alone to monitor blood glucose and glycaemic control, except and unless the individual acts as their own control and is cognizant of the need for dietary control. (note)

  9. Temperature Distribution and Influence Mechanism on Large Reflector Antennas under Solar Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. S.; Yuan, S.; Liu, X.; Xu, Q.; Wang, M.; Zhu, M. B.; Chen, G. D.; Duan, Y. H.

    2017-10-01

    The solar impact on antenna must be lessened for the large reflector antenna operating at high frequencies to have great electromagnetic performances. Therefore, researching the temperature distribution and its influence on large reflector antenna is necessary. The variation of solar incidence angle is first calculated. Then the model is simulated by the I-DEAS software, with the temperature, thermal stress, and thermal distortion distribution through the day obtained. In view of the important influence of shadow on antenna structure, a newly proposed method makes a comprehensive description of the temperature distribution on the reflector and its influence through the day by dividing a day into three different periods. The sound discussions and beneficial summary serve as the scientific foundation for the engineers to compensate the thermal distortion and optimize the antenna structure.

  10. Influence of nutritional variables and obesity on health and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Fernanda Reis de; Brito, Bruna Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a recurring theme in current scientific literature. This can easily be explained by its exponential increase in all layers of society. The popularity of this subject has also given rise to associated questions, which have achieved greater prominence in health-related publications. In order to assess what has been studied in the field of obesity and nutrition, an overview of all articles published on these subjects in some of the main Brazilian scientific journals over the past two years was performed. Among the subthemes selected for this study, those related to childhood obesity attracted attention due to their greater frequency. These were subdivided into: prevalence, intrauterine and breastfeeding influences that may lead to the development of this condition, impact on quality of life, cardiovascular system and metabolism, and possible prevention strategies. Furthermore, issues related to obesity in adults were explored, such as risk factors and new strategies for prevention, with special attention given to the many studies evaluating different aspects of bariatric surgery. Finally, the subject of malnutrition and the impact of the deficiency of specific micronutrients such as selenium, vitamin D, and vitamin B12 were assessed. Based on the results, it was possible to assess the actual importance of obesity and nutrition in health maintenance, and also the several lines of research regarding these issues. Thus, it is essential to create new methods, which must be quick and efficient, to update health professionals involved in the treatment of obesity.

  11. The Influence of trisomy 21 on facial form and variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbuck, John M; Cole, Theodore M; Reeves, Roger H; Richtsmeier, Joan T

    2017-11-01

    Triplication of chromosome 21 (trisomy 21) results in Down syndrome (DS), the most common live-born human aneuploidy. Individuals with DS have a unique facial appearance that can include form changes and altered variability. Using 3D photogrammatic images, 3D coordinate locations of 20 anatomical landmarks, and Euclidean Distance Matrix Analysis methods, we quantitatively test the hypothesis that children with DS (n = 55) exhibit facial form and variance differences relative to two different age-matched (4-12 years) control samples of euploid individuals: biological siblings of individuals with DS (n = 55) and euploid individuals without a sibling with DS (n = 55). Approximately 36% of measurements differ significantly between DS and DS-sibling samples, whereas 46% differ significantly between DS and unrelated control samples. Nearly 14% of measurements differ significantly in variance between DS and DS sibling samples, while 18% of measurements differ significantly in variance between DS and unrelated euploid control samples. Of those measures that showed a significant difference in variance, all were relatively increased in the sample of DS individuals. These results indicate that faces of children with DS are quantitatively more similar to their siblings than to unrelated euploid individuals and exhibit consistent, but slightly increased variation with most individuals falling within the range of normal variation established by euploid samples. These observations provide indirect evidence of the strength of the genetic underpinnings of the resemblance between relatives and the resistance of craniofacial development to genetic perturbations caused by trisomy 21, while underscoring the complexity of the genotype-phenotype map. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Transmission components of solar radiation in pine stands in relation to climatic and stand variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Muller

    1971-01-01

    In a new approach, transmission was studied by relating to stand biomass the ratio of incoming solar radiation beneath tree crowns to that within the atmosphere. Several assumptions were used to estimate analytically the various ways in which solar radiation penetrates through crowns of three pine species in northern California. Sunflecks accounted for much of the...

  13. The influence of the solar radiation model on the calcutated solar radiation from a horizontal surface to a tilted surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa; Lund, Hans; Furbo, Simon

    2004-01-01

    Measured solar radiation data are most commonly available as total solar radiation on a horizontal surface. When using solar radiation measured on horizontal to calculate the solar radiation on tilted surfaces and thereby the thermal performance of different applications such as buildings and solar...... heating systems, different solar radiation models can be used. The calculation of beam radiation from a horizontal surface to a tilted surface can be done exactly whereas different solar radiation models can calculate the sky diffuse radiation. The sky diffuse radiation can either be assumed evenly...... in the calculation. The weather data are measured at the solar radiation measurement station, SMS at the Department of Civil Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark. In this study the weather data are combined with solar collector calculations based on solar collector test carried out at Solar Energy...

  14. Mathematical model for thermal solar collectors by using magnetohydrodynamic Maxwell nanofluid with slip conditions, thermal radiation and variable thermal conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif Mahmood

    Full Text Available Solar energy is the cleanest, renewable and most abundant source of energy available on earth. The main use of solar energy is to heat and cool buildings, heat water and to generate electricity. There are two types of solar energy collection system, the photovoltaic systems and the solar thermal collectors. The efficiency of any solar thermal system depend on the thermophysical properties of the operating fluids and the geometry/length of the system in which fluid is flowing. In the present research a simplified mathematical model for the solar thermal collectors is considered in the form of non-uniform unsteady stretching surface. The flow is induced by a non-uniform stretching of the porous sheet and the uniform magnetic field is applied in the transverse direction to the flow. The non-Newtonian Maxwell fluid model is utilized for the working fluid along with slip boundary conditions. Moreover the high temperature effect of thermal radiation and temperature dependent thermal conductivity are also included in the present model. The mathematical formulation is carried out through a boundary layer approach and the numerical computations are carried out for cu-water and TiO2-water nanofluids. Results are presented for the velocity and temperature profiles as well as the skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number and the discussion is concluded on the effect of various governing parameters on the motion, temperature variation, velocity gradient and the rate of heat transfer at the boundary. Keywords: Solar energy, Thermal collectors, Maxwell-nanofluid, Thermal radiation, Partial slip, Variable thermal conductivity

  15. Magnetic Field Diagnostics and Spatio-Temporal Variability of the Solar Transition Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, H.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic field diagnostics of the transition region from the chromosphere to the corona faces us with the problem that one has to apply extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectro-polarimetry. While for the coronal diagnostics techniques already exist in the form of infrared coronagraphy above the limb and radio observations on the disk, one has to investigate EUV observations for the transition region. However, so far the success of such observations has been limited, but various current projects aim to obtain spectro-polarimetric data in the extreme UV in the near future. Therefore it is timely to study the polarimetric signals we can expect from these observations through realistic forward modeling. We employ a 3D magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) forward model of the solar corona and synthesize the Stokes I and Stokes V profiles of C iv (1548 Å). A signal well above 0.001 in Stokes V can be expected even if one integrates for several minutes to reach the required signal-to-noise ratio, and despite the rapidly changing intensity in the model (just as in observations). This variability of the intensity is often used as an argument against transition region magnetic diagnostics, which requires exposure times of minutes. However, the magnetic field is evolving much slower than the intensity, and therefore the degree of (circular) polarization remains rather constant when one integrates in time. Our study shows that it is possible to measure the transition region magnetic field if a polarimetric accuracy on the order of 0.001 can be reached, which we can expect from planned instrumentation.

  16. Environmental influences on the performance of thin film solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschalg, Ralph

    2001-01-01

    The response of thin film photovoltaic devices to changes in the environment is not well understood. There are a large number of conflicting reports, reflecting largely the superimposed nature of the environmental effects. A separation of the effects is not often attempted mainly because of the lack of appropriate spectral data. An experimental system has been designed and operated to facilitate the separation of the environmental effects, including spectral effects. This involves measurements in a controlled laboratory environment as well as outdoor monitoring. Furthermore, a number of analysis tools have been developed and tested for their suitability. In order to develop a system model, the applicability of parametric models for thin film devices is probed. The thermal variation of the underlying physical parameters is investigated and problems of describing thin film devices with parametric models are discussed. It is shown that the magnitude of the spectral effects for thin film devices is potentially much more significant than for conventional crystalline silicon devices. This analysis is centred on the primary spectral effect, i.e. it is conducted purely on the basis of available light and does not consider any absorption profiles or device structures. It is also shown that there is a strong daily and seasonal variation in the fraction of the useful light for devices employing a larger band gap. Environmental effects are observed directly from outdoor measurements. It is apparent that many of the reported idiosyncrasies occurring during the operation of thin film devices can be explained simply by including spectral effects. It is possible to show the secondary spectral effect for multi-junction devices, i.e. an effect that depends on the composition of the solar irradiance and not purely on the magnitude of spectrally useful irradiance. This effect impacts mainly on the short circuit current and to some extent on the fill factor. Finally, the findings of

  17. Disentangling the effects of genetic, prenatal and parenting influences on children's cortisol variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marceau, Kristine; Ram, Nilam; Neiderhiser, Jenae M; Laurent, Heidemarie K; Shaw, Daniel S; Fisher, Phil; Natsuaki, Misaki N; Leve, Leslie D

    2013-11-01

    Developmental plasticity models hypothesize the role of genetic and prenatal environmental influences on the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and highlight that genes and the prenatal environment may moderate early postnatal environmental influences on HPA functioning. This article examines the interplay of genetic, prenatal and parenting influences across the first 4.5 years of life on a novel index of children's cortisol variability. Repeated measures data were obtained from 134 adoption-linked families, adopted children and both their adoptive parents and birth mothers, who participated in a longitudinal, prospective US domestic adoption study. Genetic and prenatal influences moderated associations between inconsistency in overreactive parenting from child age 9 months to 4.5 years and children's cortisol variability at 4.5 years differently for mothers and fathers. Among children whose birth mothers had high morning cortisol, adoptive fathers' inconsistent overreactive parenting predicted higher cortisol variability, whereas among children with low birth mother morning cortisol adoptive fathers' inconsistent overreactive parenting predicted lower cortisol variability. Among children who experienced high levels of prenatal risk, adoptive mothers' inconsistent overreactive parenting predicted lower cortisol variability and adoptive fathers' inconsistent overreactive parenting predicted higher cortisol variability, whereas among children who experienced low levels of prenatal risk there were no associations between inconsistent overreactive parenting and children's cortisol variability. Findings supported developmental plasticity models and uncovered novel developmental, gene × environment and prenatal × environment influences on children's cortisol functioning.

  18. Environmental Literacy in Madeira Island (Portugal): The Influence of Demographic Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinola, Hélder

    2016-01-01

    Demographic factors are among those that influence environmental literacy and, particularly, environmentally responsible behaviours, either directly or due to an aggregation effect dependent on other types of variables. Present study evaluates a set of demographic variables as predictors for environmental literacy among 9th grade students from…

  19. Variability in urban soils influences the health and growth of native tree seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clara C. Pregitzer; Nancy F. Sonti; Richard A. Hallett

    2016-01-01

    Reforesting degraded urban landscapes is important due to the many benefits urban forests provide. Urban soils are highly variable, yet little is known about how this variability in urban soils influences tree seedling performance and survival. We conducted a greenhouse study to assess health, growth, and survival of four native tree species growing in native glacial...

  20. (Tele)Connectivity in climate variability at different spatial/temporal scales in relation to solar and geomagnetic activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paluš, Milan; Hartman, David; Vejmelka, Martin; Novotná, Dagmar

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, - (2011), s. 9579 ISSN 1607-7962. [European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2011. 03.04.2011-08.04.2011, Vienna] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300420805 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504; CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : climate variability * phase coherence * synchronization * North Atlantic Oscillation * solar activity Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  1. Key variables influencing patterns of lava dome growth and collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, T.; Elsworth, D.; Voight, B.; Mattioli, G. S.; Jansma, P. E.

    2013-12-01

    transition in the growth pattern, while a decrease in infusion rate results in larger crystals causing the material to stiffen leading to formation of spines. Material stiffness controls the growth direction of the viscous plug in the lava dome interior. Material strength and stiffness controled by rate of infusion influence lava dome growth more significantly than coefficient of frictional of the talus.

  2. Influence of electron transport on the efficiency of polymer-based solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuxhaus, Viktor; Jaiser, Frank; Neher, Dieter [Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University Potsdam (Germany); Voges, Frank [Merck KGaA, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Recently, we showed that the mobility of electrons in polymer-based solar cells has a large influence on the overall performance of such devices. Here, we investigate the correlation between electron mobility and charge generation efficiency in organic bilayer solar cells for a series of electron transporting materials (ETMs) with comparable HOMO and LUMO levels. The electron mobility was measured by transient electroluminescence. Here, a thin M3EH-PPV was used as a sensing layer. The interface between M3EH-PPV and ETM acted as a recombination zone of electrons transported through the ETM layer and holes that are blocked at the interface. Therefore, the electron mobility can easily be determined from the onset of M3EH-PPV emission which is spectrally well separated from the ETM emission. To determine the charge generation efficiency, the different ETMs were combined in bilayer solar cell with PFB as donator.

  3. Behavior of hybrid concentrated photovoltaic-thermoelectric generator under variable solar radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmoudi Nezhad, Sajjad; Rezaniakolaei, Alireza; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup

    2018-01-01

    diversely versus changing the solar radiation and module temperature. Moreover, the thermal response of the TEG stabilizes temperature fluctuation of the hybrid module when the solar radiation rapidly changes. In this work, impact of the thermal contact resistance on the temperature profile and system...... and solved by finite volume algorithm. In spite of temperatures profile in the hybrid CPV-TEG module, as results of variation of solar irradiation, power generation and efficiency of the CPV and TEG under the transient condition are presented. The results show that efficiency of the TEG and CPV varies...

  4. Long-term influence of asteroids on planet longitudes and chaotic dynamics of the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woillez, E.; Bouchet, F.

    2017-11-01

    Over timescales much longer than an orbital period, the solar system exhibits large-scale chaotic behavior and can thus be viewed as a stochastic dynamical system. The aim of the present paper is to compare different sources of stochasticity in the solar system. More precisely we studied the importance of the long term influence of asteroids on the chaotic dynamics of the solar system. We show that the effects of asteroids on planets is similar to a white noise process, when those effects are considered on a timescale much larger than the correlation time τϕ ≃ 104 yr of asteroid trajectories. We computed the timescale τe after which the effects of the stochastic evolution of the asteroids lead to a loss of information for the initial conditions of the perturbed Laplace-Lagrange secular dynamics. The order of magnitude of this timescale is precisely determined by theoretical argument, and we find that τe ≃ 104 Myr. Although comparable to the full main-sequence lifetime of the sun, this timescale is considerably longer than the Lyapunov time τI ≃ 10 Myr of the solar system without asteroids. This shows that the external sources of chaos arise as a small perturbation in the stochastic secular behavior of the solar system, rather due to intrinsic chaos.

  5. Influence of the solar wind and IMF on Jupiter's magnetosphere: Results from global MHD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkango, Y.; Jia, X.; Toth, G.; Hansen, K. C.

    2017-12-01

    Due to its large size, rapid rotation and presence of substantial internal plasma sources, Jupiter's magnetosphere is fundamentally different from that of the Earth. How and to what extent do the external factors, such as the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), influence the internally-driven magnetosphere is an open question. In this work, we solve the 3D semi-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations using a well-established code, BATSRUS, to model the Jovian magnetosphere and study its interaction with the solar wind. Our global model adopts a non-uniform mesh covering the region from 200 RJ upstream to 1800 RJ downstream with the inner boundary placed at a radial distance of 2.5 RJ. The Io plasma torus centered around 6 RJ is generated in our model through appropriate mass-loading terms added to the set of MHD equations. We perform systematic numerical experiments in which we vary the upstream solar wind properties to investigate the impact of solar wind events, such as interplanetary shock and IMF rotation, on the global magnetosphere. From our simulations, we extract the location of the magnetopause boundary, the bow shock and the open-closed field line boundary (OCB), and determine their dependence on the solar wind properties and the IMF orientation. For validation, we compare our simulation results, such as density, temperature and magnetic field, to published empirical models based on in-situ measurements.

  6. Influence which masses of clouds have on the global solar radiation at Salamanca (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pablo-Davila, F. de; Labajo, J.L.; Tomas-Sanchez, C.

    1991-01-01

    It has been shown the influence which masses of clouds, (and more specifically for each group of cloud types: high, middle and low clauds), has on the global solar radiation recorded at Matacan (Salamanca), within the period 1977-1985. For this purpose, cloud observation were made every three hours; daily records of sunshine and solar radiation were continually taken too. It has also been, both graphically and numerically, the influence of each cloud type for monthly and seasonal periods. Futhermore, different statistical parameters have been presented in order to describe the method developed. Finally, the results have been analysed and evaluated. They have been explaines according to the composition, structure and radiative properties of clouds.(Author)

  7. Dose uncertainties for large solar particle events: Input spectra variability and human geometry approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.; Zapp, E. Neal

    1999-01-01

    The true uncertainties in estimates of body organ absorbed dose and dose equivalent, from exposures of interplanetary astronauts to large solar particle events (SPEs), are essentially unknown. Variations in models used to parameterize SPE proton spectra for input into space radiation transport and shielding computer codes can result in uncertainty about the reliability of dose predictions for these events. Also, different radiation transport codes and their input databases can yield significant differences in dose predictions, even for the same input spectra. Different results may also be obtained for the same input spectra and transport codes if different spacecraft and body self-shielding distributions are assumed. Heretofore there have been no systematic investigations of the variations in dose and dose equivalent resulting from these assumptions and models. In this work we present a study of the variability in predictions of organ dose and dose equivalent arising from the use of different parameters to represent the same incident SPE proton data and from the use of equivalent sphere approximations to represent human body geometry. The study uses the BRYNTRN space radiation transport code to calculate dose and dose equivalent for the skin, ocular lens and bone marrow using the October 1989 SPE as a model event. Comparisons of organ dose and dose equivalent, obtained with a realistic human geometry model and with the oft-used equivalent sphere approximation, are also made. It is demonstrated that variations of 30-40% in organ dose and dose equivalent are obtained for slight variations in spectral fitting parameters obtained when various data points are included or excluded from the fitting procedure. It is further demonstrated that extrapolating spectra from low energy (≤30 MeV) proton fluence measurements, rather than using fluence data extending out to 100 MeV results in dose and dose equivalent predictions that are underestimated by factors as large as 2

  8. The northern edge of the band of solar wind variability: Ulysses at ∼4.5AU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosling, J.T.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.; McComas, D.J.; Riley, P.; Goldstein, B.E.; Neugebauer, M.

    1997-01-01

    Ulysses observations reveal that the northern edge of the low-latitude band of solar wind variability at ∼4.5AU was located at N30 degree in the latter part of 1996 when solar activity was at a minimum. This edge latitude is intermediate between edge latitudes found during previous encounters with the band edge along different portions of Ulysses close-quote polar orbit about the Sun. Corotating interaction regions, CIRs, near the northern edge of the band were tilted in such a manner that the forward and reverse shocks bounding the CIRs were propagating equatorward and poleward, respectively, providing definite confirmation that CIRs have opposed tilts in the opposite solar hemispheres. No shocks or coronal mass ejections, CMEs, were detected during the ∼1.5y traverse of the northern, high-latitude northern hemisphere; however, at the northern edge of the band of variability an expanding CME was observed that was driving a shock into the high-speed wind.copyright 1997 American Geophysical Union

  9. Influence of an absorbers GEMPEHD thermal properties on the propagation of heat in a solar sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassim Baba Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study to measure some physic-chemical properties of a high-density polyethylene geomembane (GEMPEHD in a temperature range from 300 K to 400 K. The results will yield a dependency between temperature and its properties in order to study an energy and process the thermal aging GEMPEHD on the solar collector. In the energy study, we solve the nonlinear equation of unsteady heat with as main non linearity influence of different properties GEMPEHD on the solar collector and one notes that the GEMPEHD presented a maximum exchange Thermal characterized by high absorption and low reflection. Thus, increasing the power absorbed by the GEMPEHD increases its temperature and the useful power received by the air and then the air temperature. Overall losses increase with the increase of the temperature difference between the GEMPEHD and windows and this increases the efficiency of the solar collector and minimize the entropy of the system. Then the study of thermal aging is dedicated to the interpretation of various analyses on GEMPEHD before and after its use in the solar collector. The thermal aging GEMPEHD in the air is a physical loss and chemical consumption immediately followed by a brutal oxidation of the polymer. The losses would be governed primarily by the chemical consumption of antioxidants. After various tests, we conclude that the value of using the GEMPEHD as absorber in the solar collector is doubly beneficial. First, given its very attractive cost compared to other as efficient absorbers (such as metals gives good thermal performance of the solar collector even reaching 72%. While the life of the GEMPEHD is rather long (several years.

  10. Investigating a solar influence on cloud cover using the North American Regional Reanalysis data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krahenbuhl Daniel Scott

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The controversial connection between cosmic rays, solar activity, and cloud cover is investigated using a climatological reconstructed reanalysis product: the North American Regional Reanalysis which provides high-resolution, low, mid-level, high, and total cloud cover data over a Lambert conformal conic projection permitting land/ocean discrimination. Pearson’s product-moment regional correlations were obtained between monthly cloud cover data and solar variability indicators, cosmic ray neutron monitors, several climatological indices, including the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO, and between cloud layers. Regions of the mid-latitude oceans exhibited a positive correlation with cosmic ray flux. Additionally, this maritime low cloud cover exhibits the only failed correlation significance with other altitudes. The cross correlation reveals that cloud cover is positively correlated everywhere but for ocean low cloud cover, supporting the unique response of the marine layer. The results of this investigation suggest that with the assumption that solar forcing does impact cloud cover, measurements of solar activity exhibits a slightly higher correlation than GCRs. The only instance where GCRs exhibit a positive regional correlation with cloud cover is for maritime low clouds. The AMO exerts the greatest control of cloud cover in the NARR domain.

  11. Environmental variables influencing the expression of morphological characteristics in clones of the forage cactus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Lúcia Barbosa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The environmental factors that affect the morphological characteristics of different genera of cacti are little known. The aim of this study therefore was to analyse the contribution of environmental variables to growth in cladodes and plant of forage cactus clones of the genera Nopalea and Opuntia. The data used in this study were obtained from an experiment conducted in Serra Talhada, Pernambuco, Brazil, between 2012 and 2013, where the clones 'IPA Sertânia' (Nopalea, 'Miúda' (Nopalea and 'Orelha de Elefante Mexicana' (Opuntia were submitted to different irrigation depths (2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 mm and fixed irrigation intervals (7, 14 and 28 days. Morphological characteristics of the cladodes and plants and weather variables were obtained over time. Pearson's correlation, followed by multicollinearity, canonical and path analysis were applied. The minimum temperature, maximum and minimum relative humidity, wind speed and solar radiation were the variables that most affected growth in the cactus. The genus Opuntia showed less sensitivity to variations in air temperature compared to the genus Nopalea. The higher intensities of global solar radiation affected clones of the genus Nopalea more than the genus Opuntia. It can be concluded that there are different environmental requirements between forage cacti of the genera Nopalea and Opuntia.

  12. A comparison of methods to estimate daily global solar irradiation from other climatic variables on the Canadian prairies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, A.G.; McGinn, S.M.; Cheng, S.B.

    1996-01-01

    Historic estimates of daily global solar irradiation are often required for climatic impact studies. Regression equations with daily global solar irradiation, H, as the dependent variable and other climatic variables as the independent variables provide a practical way to estimate H at locations where it is not measured. They may also have potential to estimate H before 1953, the year of the first routine H measurements in Canada. This study compares several regression equations for calculating H on the Canadian prairies. Simple linear regression with daily bright sunshine duration as the dependent variable accounted for 90% of the variation of H in summer and 75% of the variation of H in winter. Linear regression with the daily air temperature range as the dependent variable accounted for 45% of the variation of H in summer and only 6% of the variation of H in winter. Linear regression with precipitation status (wet or dry) as the dependent variable accounted for only 35% of the summer-time variation in H, but stratifying other regression analyses into wet and dry days reduced their root-mean-squared errors. For periods with sufficiently dense bright sunshine observations (i.e. after 1960), however, H was more accurately estimated from spatially interpolated bright sunshine duration than from locally observed air temperature range or precipitation status. The daily air temperature range and precipitation status may have utility for estimating H for periods before 1953, when they are the only widely available climatic data on the Canadian prairies. Between 1953 and 1989, a period of large climatic variation, the regression coefficients did not vary significantly between contrasting years with cool-wet, intermediate and warm-dry summers. They should apply equally well earlier in the century. (author)

  13. Numerical simulation of variance of solar radiation and its influence on wheat growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuefen; Wang, Chunyi; Du, Zixuan; Zhai, Wei

    2007-09-01

    The growth of crops is directly related to solar radiation whose variances influence the photosynthesis of crops and the growth momentum thereof. This dissertation has Zhengzhou, which located in the Huanghuai Farmland Ecological System of China, as an example to analyze the rules of variances of total solar radiation, direct radiation and diffusive radiation. With the help of linear trend fitting, it is identified that total radiation (TR) drops as a whole at a rate of 1.6482J/m2. Such drop has been particularly apparent in recent years with a period of 7 to 16 years; diffusive radiation (DF) tends to increase at a rate of 15.149 J/m2 with a period of 20 years; direct radiation (DR) tends to drop at a rate of 15.843 J/m2 without apparent period. The total radiation has been on the decrease ever since 1980 during the growth period of wheat. Having modified relevant Parameter in the Carbon and Nitrogen Biogeochemistry in Agroecosystems Model (DNDC) model and simulated the influence of solar radiation variances on the development phase, leaf area index (LAI), grain weight, etc during the growth period of wheat, it is found that solar radiation is in positive proportion to LAI and grain weight (GRNWT) but not apparently related to development phase (DP). The change of total radiation delays the maximization of wheat LAI, reduces wheat LAI before winter but has no apparent effect in winter and decreases wheat LAI from jointing period to filling period; it has no apparent influence on grain formation at the early stage of grain formation, slows down the weight increase of grains during the filling period and accelerates the weight increase of grains at the end of filling period. Variance of radiations does not affect the DP of wheat much.

  14. The influence of solar active region evolution on solar wind streams, coronal hole boundaries and geomagnetic storms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.E.; Dodson-Prince, H.W.; Hedeman, E.R.; Roelof, E.C.

    1982-01-01

    We have studied solar and interplanetary data by identification of the heliographic longitudes of the coronal source regions of high speed solar wind streams and by mapping the velocities measured near earth back to the sun using the approximation of constant radial velocity. Interplay of active regions and solar wind were studied

  15. Environmental variables measured at multiple spatial scales exert uneven influence on fish assemblages of floodplain lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembkowski, Daniel J.; Miranda, Leandro E.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the interaction between environmental variables measured at three different scales (i.e., landscape, lake, and in-lake) and fish assemblage descriptors across a range of over 50 floodplain lakes in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley of Mississippi and Arkansas. Our goal was to identify important local- and landscape-level determinants of fish assemblage structure. Relationships between fish assemblage structure and variables measured at broader scales (i.e., landscape-level and lake-level) were hypothesized to be stronger than relationships with variables measured at finer scales (i.e., in-lake variables). Results suggest that fish assemblage structure in floodplain lakes was influenced by variables operating on three different scales. However, and contrary to expectations, canonical correlations between in-lake environmental characteristics and fish assemblage structure were generally stronger than correlations between landscape-level and lake-level variables and fish assemblage structure, suggesting a hierarchy of influence. From a resource management perspective, our study suggests that landscape-level and lake-level variables may be manipulated for conservation or restoration purposes, and in-lake variables and fish assemblage structure may be used to monitor the success of such efforts.

  16. Modeling of a solar photovoltaic water pumping system under the influence of panel cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinathambi Gopal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the performance of a solar photovoltaic water pumping system was improved by maintaining the cell temperature in the range between 30°C and 40°C. Experiments have been conducted on a laboratory experimental set-up installed with 6.4 m2 solar panel (by providing air cooling either on the top surface or over the beneath surface of the panel to operate a centrifugal pump with a rated capacity of 0.5 HP. The performance characteristics of the photovoltaic panel (such as, cell temperature, photovoltaic panel output, and photovoltaic efficiency, pump performance characteristics (such as pump efficiency and discharge, and system performance characteristics are observed with reference to solar irradiation, ambient temperature and wind velocity. A thermal model has been developed to predict the variations of photovoltaic cell temperature based on the measured glass and tedlar temperatures. The influences of cell temperature and solar irradiation on the performance of the system are described. The results concluded that cooling of photovoltaic panel on beneath surface has maintained the cell temperature in the range between 30°C and 40°C and improved the overall efficiency by about 1.8% when compared to the system without panel cooling.

  17. Farmers' Perceptions of Climate Variability and Factors Influencing Adaptation: Evidence from Anhui and Jiangsu, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibue, Grace Wanjiru; Liu, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Jufeng; Zhang, Xuhui; Pan, Genxing; Li, Lianqing; Han, Xiaojun

    2016-05-01

    Impacts of climate variability and climate change are on the rise in China posing great threat to agriculture and rural livelihoods. Consequently, China is undertaking research to find solutions of confronting climate change and variability. However, most studies of climate change and variability in China largely fail to address farmers' perceptions of climate variability and adaptation. Yet, without an understanding of farmers' perceptions, strategies are unlikely to be effective. We conducted questionnaire surveys of farmers in two farming regions, Yifeng, Jiangsu and Qinxi, Anhui achieving 280 and 293 responses, respectively. Additionally, we used climatological data to corroborate the farmers' perceptions of climate variability. We found that farmers' were aware of climate variability such that were consistent with climate records. However, perceived impacts of climate variability differed between the two regions and were influenced by farmers' characteristics. In addition, the vast majorities of farmers were yet to make adjustments in their farming practices as a result of numerous challenges. These challenges included socioeconomic and socio-cultural barriers. Results of logit modeling showed that farmers are more likely to adapt to climate variability if contact with extension services, frequency of seeking information, household heads' education, and climate variability perceptions are improved. These results suggest the need for policy makers to understand farmers' perceptions of climate variability and change in order to formulate policies that foster adaptation, and ultimately protect China's agricultural assets.

  18. Influence of spectral solar radiation to the generating power of photovoltaic module; Taiyo denchi shutsuryoku eno taiyoko supekutoru eno eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minaki, S.; Ishihara, Y.; Todaka, T.; Harada, K. [Doshisha University, Kyoto (Japan); Oshiro, T.; Nakamura, H. [Japan quality Assurance Organization, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    As to the influence of spectral solar radiation to generating power of solar cells, a study was conducted from the aspects of season, time zone, intensity of solar radiation, etc. In the study, spectral responsive variation correction coefficients were introduced as evaluation values expressing the influence of spectral solar radiation. For the spectral distribution, an all sky spectral pyranometer by wavelength was used, and data were used which were obtained in the measurement in experimental facilities of the solar techno center. Concerning solar cell relative spectral sensitivity values, used were relative spectral sensitivity values of monocrystal and amorphous standard solar cells to the short-circuit current. Spectral response variation correction coefficients are coefficients correcting variations in conversion efficiency of solar cells due to changes in the spectral distribution. The changes of spectral responsive variation correction coefficients were studied using data obtained during April 1994 and March 1996. As a result, it was found that the coefficients showed large changes in summer and small ones in winter and that amorphous solar cells indicate this trend conspicuously. 3 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. The Influence of Solar Power Plants on Microclimatic Conditions and the Biotic Community in Chilean Desert Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suuronen, Anna; Muñoz-Escobar, Christian; Lensu, Anssi; Kuitunen, Markku; Guajardo Celis, Natalia; Espinoza Astudillo, Pablo; Ferrú, Marcos; Taucare-Ríos, Andrés; Miranda, Marcelo; Kukkonen, Jussi V. K.

    2017-10-01

    The renewable energy sector is growing at a rapid pace in northern Chile and the solar energy potential is one of the best worldwide. Therefore, many types of solar power plant facilities are being built to take advantage of this renewable energy resource. Solar energy is considered a clean source of energy, but there are potential environmental effects of solar technology, such as landscape fragmentation, extinction of local biota, microclimate changes, among others. To be able to minimize environmental impacts of solar power plants, it is important to know what kind of environmental conditions solar power plants create. This study provides information about abiotic and biotic conditions in the vicinity of photovoltaic solar power plants. Herein, the influence of these power plants as drivers of new microclimate conditions and arthropods diversity composition in the Atacama Desert was evaluated. Microclimatic conditions between panel mounts was found to be more extreme than in the surrounding desert yet beneath the panels temperature is lower and relative humidity higher than outside the panel area. Arthropod species composition was altered in fixed-mount panel installations. In contrast, solar tracking technology showed less influence on microclimate and species composition between Sun and Shade in the power plant. Shady conditions provided a refuge for arthropod species in both installation types. For example, Dipterans were more abundant in the shade whereas Solifugaes were seldom present in the shade. The presented findings have relevance for the sustainable planning and construction of solar power plants.

  20. The Influence of Solar Power Plants on Microclimatic Conditions and the Biotic Community in Chilean Desert Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suuronen, Anna; Muñoz-Escobar, Christian; Lensu, Anssi; Kuitunen, Markku; Guajardo Celis, Natalia; Espinoza Astudillo, Pablo; Ferrú, Marcos; Taucare-Ríos, Andrés; Miranda, Marcelo; Kukkonen, Jussi V K

    2017-10-01

    The renewable energy sector is growing at a rapid pace in northern Chile and the solar energy potential is one of the best worldwide. Therefore, many types of solar power plant facilities are being built to take advantage of this renewable energy resource. Solar energy is considered a clean source of energy, but there are potential environmental effects of solar technology, such as landscape fragmentation, extinction of local biota, microclimate changes, among others. To be able to minimize environmental impacts of solar power plants, it is important to know what kind of environmental conditions solar power plants create. This study provides information about abiotic and biotic conditions in the vicinity of photovoltaic solar power plants. Herein, the influence of these power plants as drivers of new microclimate conditions and arthropods diversity composition in the Atacama Desert was evaluated. Microclimatic conditions between panel mounts was found to be more extreme than in the surrounding desert yet beneath the panels temperature is lower and relative humidity higher than outside the panel area. Arthropod species composition was altered in fixed-mount panel installations. In contrast, solar tracking technology showed less influence on microclimate and species composition between Sun and Shade in the power plant. Shady conditions provided a refuge for arthropod species in both installation types. For example, Dipterans were more abundant in the shade whereas Solifugaes were seldom present in the shade. The presented findings have relevance for the sustainable planning and construction of solar power plants.

  1. The Influence of Entrepreneurship Subject on Students’ Interest in Entrepreneurship by Hidden Curriculum as Intervening Variable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Kuncoro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to know the influence of entrepreneurship subject on students’ interest in entrepreneurship at Institute of Mathaliul Falah (IPMAFA in Pati by hidden curriculum as intervening variable. The research used WarpsPls analysis to test model directly and directly. Samples of the study were 30 Islamic banking students who got entrepreneurship subject and Islamic community development who did not get the entrepreneurship subject. Findings show that the entrepreneurship subject influences students’ interest in entrepreneurship and the second model test results showed that hidden curriculum is not able to become the intervening variable for students’ interest in entrepreneurship subject on students’ interest in entrepreneurship.

  2. Understanding the Influence of Interface Morphology on the Performance of Perovskite Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Salado

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, organo-halide perovskite solar cells have garnered a surge of interest due to their high performance and low-cost fabrication processing. Owing to the multilayer architecture of perovskite solar cells, interface not only has a pivotal role to play in performance, but also influences long-term stability. Here we have employed diverse morphologies of electron selective layer (ESL to elucidate charge extraction behavior in perovskite solar cells. The TiO2 mesoporous structure (three-dimensional having varied thickness, and nanocolumns (1-dimensional with tunable length were employed. We found that a TiO2 electron selective layer with thickness of about c.a. 100 nm, irrespective of its microstructure, was optimal for efficient charge extraction. Furthermore, by employing impedance spectroscopy at different excitation wavelengths, we studied the nature of recombination and its dependence on the charge generation profile, and results showed that, irrespective of the wavelength region, the fresh devices do not possess any preferential recombination site, and recombination process is governed by the bulk of the perovskite layer. Moreover, depending on the type of ESL, a different recombination mechanism was observed that influences the final behavior of the devices.

  3. Analysis of influence on the solar simulator light source off-focus to the spot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayu ZHANG

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at focusing-type solar simulator, the paper researches the relationship between the defocusing amount and the facula irradiance. With the optical system of focusing-type solar simulator as research object, simulation is conducted based on a short-arc xenon lamps and its ellipsoidal condenser. According to the xenon lamp energy distribution figure and its distribution curve flux, the luminous body is simplified to cylindrical luminous light which emits light only on the flank. Model for the simplified luminous light and its ellipsoidal condenser are established in the optical simulation software TracePro, and the impact of axial and radial deviation on the facula is simulated. The results show that light off-focus has little influence on the average of facula irradiance, but has great influence on the maximum value and the distribution of facula irradiance as well as the facula area. The result provides a theoretical reference for the design and alignment of solar simulator focusing system.

  4. Spatial interpolation of climate variables in Northern Germany—Influence of temporal resolution and network density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Berndt

    2018-02-01

    New hydrological insights: Geostatistical techniques provide a better performance for all climate variables compared to simple methods Radar data improves the estimation of rainfall with hourly temporal resolution, while topography is useful for weekly to yearly values and temperature in general. No helpful information was found for cloudiness, sunshine duration, and wind speed, while interpolation of humidity benefitted from additional temperature data. The influences of temporal resolution, spatial variability, and additional information appear to be stronger than station density effects. High spatial variability of hourly precipitation causes the highest error, followed by wind speed, cloud coverage and sunshine duration. Lowest errors occur for temperature and humidity.

  5. Variables influencing the use of derivatives in South Africa – the development of a conceptual model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Schwegler

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper, which is the first in a two-part series, sets out the development of a conceptual model on the variables influencing investors’ decisions to use derivatives in their portfolios. Investor-specific variables include: the investor’s needs, goals and return expectations, the investor’s knowledge of financial markets, familiarity with different asset classes including derivative instruments, and the investor’s level of wealth and level of risk tolerance. Market-specific variables include: the level of volatility, standardisation, regulation and liquidity in a market, the level of information available on derivatives, the transparency of price determination, taxes, brokerage costs and product availability.

  6. Can the possibility of some linkage of monsoonal precipitation with solar variability be ignored? Indications from foraminiferal proxy records

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khare, N.; Nigam, R

    of monsoonal precipitation by the sunspot minima has been explored in the past through var i ous studies across the world 11 ? 14 . Several important and inte r- esting papers on the role of solar variability over climatic cha nges have prompted renewed... inte r vals up to 80 cm (representing the last ~720 years). All samples were i m- mediately transferred to polythene bags and sealed. A po r tion of these core samples from different levels was dried at 60 ?C and washed through a 230 mesh (63...

  7. Simulated solar wind plasma interaction with the Martian exosphere: influence of the solar EUV flux on the bow shock and the magnetic pile-up boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Modolo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The solar wind plasma interaction with the Martian exosphere is investigated by means of 3-D multi-species hybrid simulations. The influence of the solar EUV flux on the bow shock and the magnetic pile-up boundary is examined by comparing two simulations describing the two extreme states of the solar cycle. The hybrid formalism allows a kinetic description of each ions species and a fluid description of electrons. The ionization processes (photoionization, electron impact and charge exchange are included self-consistently in the model where the production rate is computed locally, separately for each ionization act and for each neutral species. The results of simulations are in a reasonable agreement with the observations made by Phobos 2 and Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. The position of the bow shock and the magnetic pile-up boundary is weakly dependent of the solar EUV flux. The motional electric field creates strong asymmetries for the two plasma boundaries.

  8. Influence of hole transport material/metal contact interface on perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Lei; Zhang, Shude; Yang, Songwang; Li, Xiaomin; Yu, Yu; Wei, Qingzhu; Ni, Zhichun; Li, Ming

    2018-06-01

    Interfaces have a significant impact on the performance of perovskite solar cells. This work investigated the influence of hole transport material/metal contact interface on photovoltaic behaviours of perovskite solar devices. Different hole material/metal contact interfaces were obtained by depositing the metal under different conditions. High incident kinetic energy metal particles were proved to penetrate and embed into the hole transport material. These isolated metal particles in hole transport materials capture holes and increase the apparent carrier transport resistance of the hole transport layer. Sample temperature was found to be of great significance in metal deposition. Since metal vapour has a high temperature, the deposition process accumulated a large amount of heat. The heat evaporated the additives in the hole transport layer and decreased the hole conductivity. On the other hand, high temperature may cause iodization of the metal contact.

  9. Research on temperature control and influence of the vacuum tubes with inserted tubes solar heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, L. X.; He, Y. T.; Hua, J. Q.

    2017-11-01

    A novel snake-shape vacuum tube with inserted tubes solar collector is designed in this paper, the heat transfer characteristics of the collector are analyzed according to its structural characteristics, and the influence of different working temperature on thermal characteristics of the collector is studied. The solar water heater prototype consisting of 14 vacuum tubes with inserted tubes is prepared, and the hot water storage control subsystem is designed by hysteresis comparison algorithm. The heat characteristic of the prototype was experimentally studied under hot water output temperature of 40-45°C, 50-55°C and 60-65°C. The daily thermal efficiency was 64%, 50% and 46%, respectively. The experimental results are basically consistent with the theoretical analysis.

  10. Influence of the mechanical properties of sputtered Mo solar cell back contacts on laser scribing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Christof; Schuele, Manuel; Quaschning, Volker; Stegemann, Bert; Fink, Frank [University of Applied Sciences (HTW) Berlin, Wilhelminenhofstr. 75A, 12459 Berlin (Germany); Endert, Heinrich [Newport Spectra-Physics GmbH, Ruhlsdorfer Strasse 95, 14532 Stahnsdorf (Germany); Bonse, Joern [BAM Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung, Berlin (Germany); Rau, Bjoern; Schlatmann, Rutger [PVcomB - Competence Centre Thin-Film and Nanotechnology for Photovoltaics Berlin, Schwarzschildstr. 3, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    In thin-film photovoltaics complete laser structuring of the solar modules is aimed to perform appropriate monolithic serial interconnection. We have studied the laser ablation behavior of sputtered molybdenum back contacts for chalcopyrite solar cells. The properties of these Mo layer are sensitive to the sputter conditions. The process pressure influences the mechanical layer properties and, thus, contributes directly to the quality of the laser scribes. Precise, reliable and reproducible laser scribing requires the proper adaptation of the laser parameters to the material properties. In our study it was achieved by comprehensive analysis of the laser matter interaction and by detailed determination of the ablation thresholds as a function of the Mo layer thickness and ductility for different laser wavelengths and pulse durations, accompanied by thermal modeling.

  11. Tropospheric weather influenced by solar wind through atmospheric vertical coupling downward control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prikryl, Paul; Bruntz, Robert; Tsukijihara, Takumi; Iwao, Koki; Muldrew, Donald B.; Rušin, Vojto; Rybanský, Milan; Turňa, Maroš; Šťastný, Pavel

    2018-06-01

    Occurrence of severe weather in the context of solar wind coupling to the magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere (MIA) system is investigated. It is observed that significant snowfall, wind and heavy rain, particularly if caused by low pressure systems in winter, tend to follow arrivals of high-speed solar wind. Previously published statistical evidence that explosive extratropical cyclones in the northern hemisphere tend to occur within a few days after arrivals of high-speed solar wind streams from coronal holes (Prikryl et al., 2009, 2016) is corroborated for the southern hemisphere. Cases of severe weather events are examined in the context of the magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere (MIA) coupling. Physical mechanism to explain these observations is proposed. The leading edge of high-speed solar wind streams is a locus of large-amplitude magneto-hydrodynamic waves that modulate Joule heating and/or Lorentz forcing of the high-latitude lower thermosphere generating medium-scale atmospheric gravity waves that propagate upward and downward through the atmosphere. Simulations of gravity wave propagation in a model atmosphere using the Transfer Function Model (Mayr et al., 1990) reveal that propagating waves originating in the lower thermosphere can excite a spectrum of gravity waves in the lower atmosphere. In spite of significantly reduced amplitudes but subject to amplification upon reflection in the upper troposphere, these gravity waves can provide a lift of unstable air to release instabilities in the troposphere and initiate convection to form cloud/precipitation bands. It is primarily the energy provided by release of latent heat that leads to intensification of storms. These results indicate that vertical coupling in the atmosphere exerts downward control from solar wind to the lower atmospheric levels influencing tropospheric weather development.

  12. Low cloud properties influenced by cosmic rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Nigel; Svensmark, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    The influence of solar variability on climate is currently uncertain. Recent observations have indicated a possible mechanism via the influence of solar modulated cosmic rays on global cloud cover. Surprisingly the influence of solar variability is strongest in low clouds (less than or equal to3 km......), which points to a microphysical mechanism involving aerosol formation that is enhanced by ionization due to cosmic rays. If confirmed it suggests that the average state of the heliosphere is important for climate on Earth....

  13. Temporal Variability in Vertical Groundwater Fluxes and the Effect of Solar Radiation on Streambed Temperatures Based on Vertical High Resolution Distributed Temperature Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebok, E.; Karan, S.; Engesgaard, P. K.; Duque, C.

    2013-12-01

    Due to its large spatial and temporal variability, groundwater discharge to streams is difficult to quantify. Methods using vertical streambed temperature profiles to estimate vertical fluxes are often of coarse vertical spatial resolution and neglect to account for the natural heterogeneity in thermal conductivity of streambed sediments. Here we report on a field investigation in a stream, where air, stream water and streambed sediment temperatures were measured by Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) with high spatial resolution to; (i) detect spatial and temporal variability in groundwater discharge based on vertical streambed temperature profiles, (ii) study the thermal regime of streambed sediments exposed to different solar radiation influence, (iii) describe the effect of solar radiation on the measured streambed temperatures. The study was carried out at a field site located along Holtum stream, in Western Denmark. The 3 m wide stream has a sandy streambed with a cobbled armour layer, a mean discharge of 200 l/s and a mean depth of 0.3 m. Streambed temperatures were measured with a high-resolution DTS system (HR-DTS). By helically wrapping the fiber optic cable around two PVC pipes of 0.05 m and 0.075 m outer diameter over 1.5 m length, temperature measurements were recorded with 5.7 mm and 3.8 mm vertical spacing, respectively. The HR-DTS systems were installed 0.7 m deep in the streambed sediments, crossing both the sediment-water and the water-air interface, thus yielding high resolution water and air temperature data as well. One of the HR-DTS systems was installed in the open stream channel with only topographical shading, while the other HR-DTS system was placed 7 m upstream, under the canopy of a tree, thus representing the shaded conditions with reduced influence of solar radiation. Temperature measurements were taken with 30 min intervals between 16 April and 25 June 2013. The thermal conductivity of streambed sediments was calibrated in a 1D flow

  14. Variable Emissivity Electrochromics Using Ionic Electrolytes and Low Solar Absorptance Coatings, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In recent work, this firm developed a highly promising, patented variable emittance technology based on electrochromic Conducting Polymers, with: (1) Thin ( 105...

  15. Variable Emissivity Electrochromics using Ionic Electrolytes and Low Solar Absorptance Coatings, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This work further developed a highly promising variable emissivity technology for spacecraft thermal control, based on unique conducting polymer (CP) electrochromics...

  16. Temporal variability of fish larvae assemblages: influence of natural and anthropogenic disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Reynalte-Tataje

    Full Text Available Natural and induced disturbances greatly influence the temporal distribution of ichthyoplankton abundance. This study assesses and compares the temporal variability of fish larvae assemblages in controlled and free environments to determine the influence of environment variables on the main taxa in these systems. The study was conducted at the Chapecó (without dam impact and Ligeiro (with dam impact river mouths, which are located in the upper Uruguay River. Samples were made between October 2001 and March 2004 during three reproductive periods. The larvae assemblages were composed of small and medium-sized Characiformes and Siluriformes. The variation in the distribution of larvae was mainly temporal (>85%. When the three reproductive periods were compared, it was observed in the second period, characterized by a larger water flow and a lower temperature, that there was a reduction in abundance, a lower number of taxa, an absence of stages in post-flexion and a high dissimilarity in larvae assemblage structure. In general, the environmental variables of water flow and temperature most influenced the distribution of egg and larvae abundance. In the studied area, a smaller temporal variability was observed in the structure of larvae assemblages at the sampling sites in the Chapecó River mouth than in in the Ligeiro River mouth under the influence of dams.

  17. The Influence of Matching Populations on Kinematic and Kinetic Variables in Runners with Iliotibial Band Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Stefan; Maiwald, Christian; Krauss, Inga; Axmann, Detlef; Horstmann, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess how participant matching influences biomechanical variables when comparing healthy runners and runners with iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS). We examined 52 healthy runners (CO) and 18 with ITBS, using three-dimensional kinematics and pressure distribution. The study population was matched in three ways and…

  18. Variables Influencing Stimulus Overselectivity and "Tunnel Vision" in Developmentally Delayed Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincover, Arnold; Ducharme, Joseph M.

    1987-01-01

    Three variables (diagnosis, location of cues, and mental age of learners) influencing stimulus control and stimulus overselectivity were assessed with eight autistic children (mean age 12 years) and eight average children matched for mean age. Among results were that autistic subjects tended to respond overselectively only in the extra-stimulus…

  19. Integration Costs Revisited – An economic framework for wind and solar variability

    OpenAIRE

    Hirth, Lion (Prof. Dr.); Ueckerdt, Falko (Dr.); Edenhofer, Ottmar (Prof. Dr.)

    2015-01-01

    The integration of wind and solar generators into power systems causes “integration costs” – for grids, balancing services, more flexible operation of thermal plants, and reduced utilization of the capital stock embodied in infrastructure, among other things. This paper proposes a framework to analyze and quantify these costs. We propose a definition of integration costs based on the marginal economic value of electricity, or market value – as such a definition can be more easily used in econ...

  20. Variability of solar radiation and CDOM in surface coastal waters of the northwestern Mediterranean sea

    OpenAIRE

    Sempéré, Richard; Para, J.; Tedetti, Marc; Charriere, B.; Mallet, M.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric and in-water solar radiation, including UVR-B, UVR-A and PAR, as well as chromophoric dissolved organic matter absorption [a(CDOM)()] in surface waters were monthly measured from November 2007 to December 2008 at a coastal station in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea (Bay of Marseilles, France). Our results showed that the UVR-B/UVR-A ratio followed the same trend in the atmosphere and at 2m depth in the water (P

  1. Simple roll coater with variable coating and temperature control for printed polymer solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Henrik Friis; Krebs, Frederik C

    2012-01-01

    of solution, enabling roll coating testing of new polymers where only small amounts are often available. We demonstrate the formation of >50 solar cells (each with an active area of 1 cm2) with printed metal back electrodes using as little as 0.1 mL of active layer solution. This approach outperforms spin...... coating with respect to temperature control, ink usage, speed and is directly compatible with industrial processing and upscaling....

  2. Influence of short-term solar disturbances on the fair weather conduction current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhalel Gal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fair weather atmospheric electrical current (Jz couples the ionosphere to the lower atmosphere and thus provides a route by which changes in solar activity can modify processes in the lower troposphere. This paper examines the temporal variations and spectral characteristics of continuous measurements of Jz conducted at the Wise Observatory in Mitzpe-Ramon, Israel (30°35′ N, 34°45′ E, during two large CMEs, and during periods of increased solar wind density. Evidence is presented for the effects of geomagnetic storms and sub-storms on low latitude Jz during two coronal mass ejections (CMEs, on 24–25th October 2011 and 7–8th March 2012, when the variability in Jz increased by an order of magnitude compared to normal fair weather conditions. The dynamic spectrum of the increased Jz fluctuations exhibit peaks in the Pc5 frequency range. Similar low frequency characteristics occur during periods of enhanced solar wind proton density. During the October 2011 event, the periods of increased fluctuations in Jz lasted for 7 h and coincided with fluctuations of the inter-planetary magnetic field (IMF detected by the ACE satellite. We suggest downward mapping of ionospheric electric fields as a possible mechanism for the increased fluctuations.

  3. Influence of sleep apnea severity on blood pressure variability of patients with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhorst, Ana P; Gonçalves, Sandro C; Oliveira, Ana T; Massierer, Daniela; Gus, Miguel; Fuchs, Sandra C; Moreira, Leila B; Martinez, Denis; Fuchs, Flávio D

    2014-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a risk factor for the development of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Apnea overloads the autonomic cardiovascular control system and may influence blood pressure variability, a risk for vascular damage independent of blood pressure levels. This study investigates the hypothesis that blood pressure variability is associated with OSA. In a cross-sectional study, 107 patients with hypertension underwent 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and level III polysomnography to detect sleep apnea. Pressure variability was assessed by the first derivative of blood pressure over time, the time rate index, and by the standard deviation of blood pressure measurements. The association between the apnea-hypopnea index and blood pressure variability was tested by univariate and multivariate methods. The 57 patients with apnea were older, had higher blood pressure, and had longer duration of hypertension than the 50 patients without apnea. Patients with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥ 10 had higher blood pressure variability assessed by the standard deviation than patients with AHI variability assessed by the time rate index presented a trend for association during sleep (P = 0.07). Daytime blood pressure variability was not associated with the severity of sleep apnea. Sleep apnea increases nighttime blood pressure variability in patients with hypertension and may be another pathway linking sleep abnormalities to cardiovascular disease.

  4. Atlantic multidecadal oceanic variability and its influence on the atmosphere in a climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Msadek, Rym; Frankignoul, Claude [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris 6, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris (France)

    2009-07-15

    The mechanisms controlling the decadal to multidecadal variability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) and its influence on the atmosphere are investigated using a control simulation with the IPSL-CM4 climate model. The multidecadal fluctuations of the MOC are mostly driven by deep convection in the subpolar gyre, which occurs south of Iceland in the model. The latter is primarily influenced by the anomalous advection of salinity due to changes in the East Atlantic Pattern (EAP), which is the second mode of atmospheric variability in the North Atlantic region. The North Atlantic Oscillation is the dominant mode, but it plays a secondary role in the MOC fluctuations. During summer, the MOC variability is shown to have a significant impact on the atmosphere in the North Atlantic-European sector. The MOC influence is due to an interhemispheric sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly with opposite signs in the two hemispheres but largest amplitude in the northern one. The SST pattern driven by the MOC mostly resembles the model Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and bears some similarity with the observed one. It is shown that the AMO reflects both the MOC influence and the local atmospheric forcing. Hence, the MOC influence on climate is best detected using lagged relations between climatic fields. The atmospheric response resembles the EAP, in a phase that might induce a weak positive feedback on the MOC. (orig.)

  5. The influence of morphology on charge transport/recombination dynamics in planar perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Man; Wang, Yi; Wang, Hao-Yi; Han, Jun; Qin, Yujun; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Ai, Xi-Cheng

    2016-10-01

    The photovoltaic performance of planar perovskite solar cell is significantly influenced by the morphology of perovskite film. In this work, five kinds of devices with different perovskite film morphologies were prepared by varying the concentration of CH3NH3Cl in precursor solutions. We found that best morphology of perovskite film results in the excellent photovoltaic performance with an average efficiency of 15.52% and a champion efficiency of 16.38%. Transient photovoltage and photocurrent measurements are performed to elucidate the mechanism of photoelectric conversion processes, which shows that the charge recombination is effectively suppressed and the charge transport is obviously promoted by optimized morphology.

  6. MODELING AND SIMULATION OF RELIEF INFLUENCE ON EUCALYPTUS FORESTS: INTERACTION BETWEEN SOLAR IRRADIANCE AND PRODUCTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yhasmin Paiva Rody

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to verify the differences in radiation intensity as a function of distinct relief exposure surfaces and to quantify these effects on the leaf area index (LAI and other variables expressing eucalyptus forest productivity for simulations in a process-based growth model. The study was carried out at two contrasting edaphoclimatic locations in the Rio Doce basin in Minas Gerais, Brazil. Two stands with 32-year-old plantations were used, allocating fixed plots in locations with northern and southern exposure surfaces. The meteorological data were obtained from two automated weather stations located near the study sites. Solar radiation was corrected for terrain inclination and exposure surfaces, as it is measured based on the plane, perpendicularly to the vertical location. The LAI values collected in the field were used. For the comparative simulations in productivity variation, the mechanistic 3PG model was used, considering the relief exposure surfaces. It was verified that during most of the year, the southern surfaces showed lower availability of incident solar radiation, resulting in up to 66% losses, compared to the same surface considered plane, probably related to its geographical location and higher declivity. Higher values were obtained for the plantings located on the northern surface for the variables LAI, volume and mean annual wood increase, with this tendency being repeated in the 3PG model simulations.

  7. Rainfall variability and its influence on surface flow regimes. Examples from the central highlands of Ethiopia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, M. [Debre Zeit (Ethiopia); Sauerborn, P. [Seminar fuer Geographie und ihre Didaktik, Univ. zu Koeln, Koeln (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    The article shows results of an international and interdisciplinary project with the title 'Rainfall and its Erosivity in Ethiopia'. Rainfall variability affects the water resource management of Ethiopia. The influence of rainfall variability on flow regimes was investigated using five gauging stations with data availability from 1982-1997. It was confirmed that the variability in rainfall has a direct implication for surface runoff. Surface runoff declined at most of the gauging stations investigated. Therefore, effective water resource management is recommended for the study area. Future research should focus on watershed management which includes land-use and land cover. The question posed here is whether the variability in rainfall significantly affected surface flow in the study area. (orig.)

  8. Influence of winter NAO pattern on variable renewable energies potential in Europe over the 20th century

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Baptiste; Raynaud, Damien; Hingray, Benoit; Creutin, Jean-Dominique

    2017-04-01

    Integration of Variable Renewable Energy (VRE) sources in the electricity system is a challenge because of temporal and spatial fluctuations of their power generation resulting from their driving weather variables (i.e. solar radiation wind speed, precipitation, and temperature). Very few attention was paid to low frequency variability (i.e. from annual to decades) even though it may have significant impact on energy system and energy market Following the current increase in electricity supplied by VRE generation, one could ask the question about the risk of ending up in a situation in which the level of production of one or more VRE is exceptionally low or exceptionally high for a long period of time and/or over a large area. What would be the risk for an investor if the return on investment has been calculated on a high energy production period? What would be the cost in term of carbon emission whether the system manager needs to turn on coal power plant to satisfy the demand? Such dramatic events would definitely impact future stakeholder decision to invest in a particular energy source or another. Weather low frequency variability is mainly governed by large-scale teleconnection patterns impacting the climate at global scale such as El Niño - Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the tropics and in North America or the North Atlantic Oscillation (hereafter, NAO) in North America and Europe. Teleconnection pattern's influence on weather variability cascades to VRE variability and ends up by impacting electricity system. The aim of this study is to analysis the impact of the NAO on VRE generation in Europe during the winter season. The analysis is carried out over the twentieth century (i.e. from 1900 to 2010), in order to take into account climate low frequency variability, and for a set of 12 regions covering a large range of climates in Europe. Weather variable time series are obtained by using the ERA20C reanalysis and the SCAMP model (Sequential Constructive

  9. Simulation with an O-AGCM of the influence of variations of the solar constant on the global climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cubasch, U. [Deutsches Klimarechenzentrum (DKRZ), Hamburg (Germany); Hegerl, G.C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); Voss, R. [Deutsches Klimarechenzentrum (DKRZ), Hamburg (Germany); Waszkewitz, J. [Deutsches Klimarechenzentrum (DKRZ), Hamburg (Germany); Crowley, T.J. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Oceanography

    1996-07-01

    Two simulations have been carried out with a global coupled ocean-atmosphere circulation model to study the potential impact of solar variability on climate. The Hoyt and Schatten estimate of solar variability from 1700 to 1992 has been used to force the model. Results indicate that the near-surface temperature simulated by the model is dominated by the long periodic solar fluctuations (Gleissberg cycle), with global mean temperatures varying by about 0.5 K. Further results indicate that solar variability induces a similar pattern of surface temperature change as the increase of greenhouse gases, i.e. an increase of the land-sea contrast. However, the solarinduced warming pattern over the ocean during northern hemispheric summer is more centered over the northern hemisphere subtropics, compared to a more uniform warming associated with the increase in greenhouse gases. Finally, the magnitude of the estimated solar warming during the 20th century is not sufficient to explain the observed warming. The recent observed 30-year trends are inconsistent with the solar forcing simulation at an estimated 90% significance level. Also, the observed trend pattern agrees better with the greenhouse warming pattern. (orig.)

  10. Is tropospheric weather influenced by solar wind through atmospheric vertical coupling downward control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prikryl, Paul; Tsukijihara, Takumi; Iwao, Koki; Muldrew, Donald B.; Bruntz, Robert; Rušin, Vojto; Rybanský, Milan; Turňa, Maroš; Šťastný, Pavel; Pastirčák, Vladimír

    2017-04-01

    (Prikryl et al., Ann. Geophys., 27, 31-57, 2009). It is primarily the energy provided by release of latent heat that leads to intensification of storms. These results indicate that vertical coupling in the atmosphere exerts downward control from solar wind to the lower atmospheric levels influencing tropospheric weather development.

  11. Mesospheric Na Variability and Dependence on Geomagnetic and Solar Activity over Arecibo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, K.; Raizada, S.; Brum, C. G. M.

    2017-12-01

    The Sodium (Na) resonance lidars located at the Arecibo Observatory offer an excellent opportunity to study the mesosphere/lower thermosphere(MLT) region. Different metals like Fe, Mg, Na, K, Ca and their ions are deposited in the 80 - 120 km altitude range due to the ablation of meteors caused by frictional heating during their entry into the Earth's atmosphere. We present an investigation of the neutral mesospheric Na atom layers over Arecibo. Data on the Na concentrations was collected using a resonance lidar tuned to the of Na wavelength at 589 nm. This wavelength is achieved with a dye-laser pumped by the second harmonic (532 nm) generated from a state-of-the-art commercial Nd:YAG laser. The backscattered signal is received on a 0.8 m (diameter) Cassegrain telescope. The study is based on this data acquired from 1998-2017 and its relation to variations in geomagnetic and solar conditions. We also investigate seasonal and long term trends in the data. The nightly-averaged altitude profiles were modeled as Gaussian curves. From this modeled data we obtain parameters such as the peak, abundance, centroid and width of the main Na layer. Preliminary results show that the Na abundance is more sensitive to changes in geomagnetic and solar variations as compared to the width and centroid height. The seasonal variation exhibits higher peak densities during the local summer and has a secondary maximum during the winter [as shown in the attached figure]. Our analysis demonstrates a decrease in the peak and the abundance of Na atoms with the increase of solar and geomagnetic activity.

  12. Analysis of variability and predictability challenges of wind and solar power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de J.E.S.; Virag, A.; Kling, W.L.

    2013-01-01

    In power systems, reserves are essential to ensure system security, certainly when challenges of predictability (inaccurate forecast) and variability (imperfect correlation of renewable generation and system load) are causing power imbalances. Different techniques can be used to size and allocate

  13. VARIABLES THAT INFLUENCE STUDENTS’ CHOICE OF DISTANCE EDUCATION LATO SENSU GRADUATE BUSINESS PROGRAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Mendes Nascimento

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on Scriven’s User-Focused Evaluation Theory, the general objective in this study was to identify and analyze the degree of importance Brazilian students attribute to the variables that influence them when choosing distance education lato sensu graduate business programs. The research is classified as descriptive and an electronic questionnaire was used to survey the data, involving 354 students from distance education lato sensu graduate business programs distributed across different Brazilian locations. The questionnaire included 16 variables, which the students were expected to score from 0 to 10. The results indicated that 04 variables obtained a mean score superior to 9, and that flexibility was the main factor the respondents considered in the choice of a distance education program. This evidences that the possibility to structure the program according to their available time is fundamental for the students. Nevertheless, having a trained teaching staff (second most influential variable and a curriculum appropriate to their pedagogical needs (fourth are also essential characteristics. Finally, the respondents indicated the cost as the third most important variable. Some authors even consider it decisive in the students’ choice as distance education programs are frequently cheaper than in-class programs. In addition, it was verified that women score the investigated internal variables higher than men. In addition, the location of the support hub appeared as a determinant variable in the choice of the program.

  14. Influence of base pressure and atmospheric contaminants on a-Si:H solar cell properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woerdenweber, J.; Schmitz, R.; Mueck, A.; Zastrow, U.; Niessen, L.; Gordijn, A.; Carius, R.; Beyer, W.; Rau, U.; Merdzhanova, T.; Stiebig, H.

    2008-01-01

    The influence of atmospheric contaminants oxygen and nitrogen on the performance of thin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at 13.56 MHz was systematically investigated. The question is addressed as to what degree of high base pressures (up to 10 -4 Torr) are compatible with the preparation of good quality amorphous silicon based solar cells. The data show that for the intrinsic a-Si:H absorber layer exists critical oxygen and nitrogen contamination levels (about 2x10 19 atoms/cm 3 and 4x10 18 atoms/cm 3 , respectively). These levels define the minimum impurity concentration that causes a deterioration in solar cell performance. This critical concentration is found to depend little on the applied deposition regime. By enhancing, for example, the flow of process gases, a higher base pressure (and leak rate) can be tolerated before reaching the critical contamination level. The electrical properties of the corresponding films show that increasing oxygen and nitrogen contamination results in an increase in dark conductivity and photoconductivity, while activation energy and photosensitivity are decreased. These effects are attributed to nitrogen and oxygen induced donor states, which cause a shift of the Fermi level toward the conduction band and presumably deteriorate the built-in electric field in the solar cells. Higher doping efficiencies are observed for nitrogen compared to oxygen. Alloying effects (formation of SiO x ) are observed for oxygen contaminations above 10 20 atoms/cm 3 , leading to an increase in the band gap

  15. Influence of variables on the consolidation and unconfined compressive strength of crushed salt: Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeifle, T.W.; Senseny, P.E.; Mellegard, K.D.

    1987-01-01

    Eight hydrostatic compression creep tests were performed on crushed salt specimens fabricated from Avery Island dome salt. Following the creep test, each specimen was tested in unconfined compression. The experiments were performed to assess the influence of the following four variables on the consolidation and unconfined strength of crushed salt: grain size distribution, temperature, time, and moisture content. The experiment design comprised a half-fraction factorial matrix at two levels. The levels of each variable investigated were grain size distribution, uniform-graded and well-graded (coefficient of uniformity of 1 and 8); temperature 25 0 C and 100 0 C; time, 3.5 x 10 3 s and 950 x 10 3 s (approximately 60 minutes and 11 days, respectively); and moisture content, dry and wet (85% relative humidity for 24 hours). The hydrostatic creep stress was 10 MPa. The unconfined compression tests were performed at an axial strain rate of 1 x 10 -5 s -1 . Results show that the variables time and moisture content have the greatest influence on creep consolidation, while grain size distribution and, to a somewhat lesser degree, temperature have the greatest influence on total consolidation. Time and moisture content and the confounded two-factor interactions between either grain size distribution and time or temperature and moisture content have the greatest influence on unconfined strength. 7 refs., 7 figs., 11 tabs

  16. What variables influence the ability of an AFO to improve function and when are they indicated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malas, Bryan S

    2011-05-01

    Children with spina bifida often present with functional deficits of the lower limb associated with neurosegmental lesion levels and require orthotic management. The most used orthosis for children with spina bifida is the ankle-foot orthosis (AFO). The AFO improves ambulation and reduces energy cost while walking. Despite the apparent benefits of using an AFO, limited evidence documents the influence of factors predicting the ability of an AFO to improve function and when they are indicated. These variables include AFO design, footwear, AFO-footwear combination, and data acquisition. When these variables are not adequately considered in clinical decision-making, there is a risk the AFO will be abandoned prematurely or the patient's stability, function, and safety compromised. The purposes of this study are to (1) describe the functional deficits based on lesion levels; (2) identify and describe variables that influence the ability of an AFO to control deformities; and (3) describe what variables are indicated for the AFO to control knee flexion during stance, hyperpronation, and valgus stress at the knee. A selective literature review was undertaken searching MEDLINE and Cochrane databases using terms related to "orthosis" and "spina bifida." Based on previous studies and gait analysis data, suggestions can be made regarding material selection/geometric configuration, sagittal alignment, footplate length, and trim lines of an AFO for reducing knee flexion, hyperpronation, and valgus stress at the knee. Further research is required to determine what variables allow an AFO to improve function.

  17. Playing up and playing down cultural identity: Introducing cultural influence and cultural variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Gail M; Nguyen, Jacqueline; Iturbide, Maria I

    2017-01-01

    Cultural variability (CV) is introduced as an overlooked dimension of cultural identity development pertaining to emphasizing and de-emphasizing the influence of a single cultural identity (i.e., cultural influence [CI]) on daily interactions and behaviors. The Cultural IDentity Influence Measure (CIDIM) is introduced as a novel measure of CI and CV, and hypothesis-driven validation is conducted in two samples along with exploration of associations between CV and well-being. A multicultural sample of 242 emerging adults participated in a daily diary study (Mage = 19.95 years, SDage = 1.40) by completing up to eight daily online surveys containing the CIDIM, criterion measures (ethnic identity, other group orientation, ethnic identity salience and daily variability in salience, social desirability), and measures of personal and interpersonal well-being. A second validation sample (n = 245) completed a 1-time survey with the CIDIM and a subset of criterion measures. Results using both samples show evidence of CI and CV and demonstrate the validity, reliability, and domain-sensitivity of the CIDIM. Further, CV made unique and positive contributions to predicting interaction quality after accounting for ethnic salience and variability in ethnic salience. An analytic approach utilizing standard deviations produced near-identical results to multilevel modeling and is recommended for parsimony. Ethnic minority and majority individuals make daily adjustments to play up and play down the influence of cultural identity on their social interactions and behaviors, and these adjustments predict interpersonal well-being. Cultural influence and cultural variability contribute to our emerging understanding of cultural identity as dynamic and agentic. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Use of Solar and Wind as a Physical Hedge against Price Variability within a Generation Portfolio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkin, T.; Diakov, V.; Drury, E.; Bush, B.; Denholm, P.; Milford, J.; Arent, D.; Margolis, R.; Byrne, R.

    2013-08-01

    This study provides a framework to explore the potential use and incremental value of small- to large-scale penetration of solar and wind technologies as a physical hedge against the risk and uncertainty of electricity cost on multi-year to multi-decade timescales. Earlier studies characterizing the impacts of adding renewable energy (RE) to portfolios of electricity generators often used a levelized cost of energy or simplified net cash flow approach. In this study, we expand on previous work by demonstrating the use of an 8760 hourly production cost model (PLEXOS) to analyze the incremental impact of solar and wind penetration under a wide range of penetration scenarios for a region in the Western U.S. We do not attempt to 'optimize' the portfolio in any of these cases. Rather we consider different RE penetration scenarios, that might for example result from the implementation of a Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) to explore the dynamics, risk mitigation characteristics and incremental value that RE might add to the system. We also compare the use of RE to alternative mechanisms, such as the use of financial or physical supply contracts to mitigate risk and uncertainty, including consideration of their effectiveness and availability over a variety of timeframes.

  19. Installation of a variable-angle spectrometer system for monitoring diffuse and global solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormachea, O.; Abrahamse, A.; Tolavi, N.; Romero, F.; Urquidi, O.; Pearce, J. M.; Andrews, R.

    2013-11-01

    We report on the design and installation of a spectrometer system for monitoring solar radiation in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Both the light intensity and the spectral distribution affect the power produced by a photovoltaic device. Local variations in the solar spectrum (especially compared to the AM1.5 standard) may have important implications for device optimization and energy yield estimation. The spectrometer system, based on an Ocean Optics USB4000 (300-900nm) spectrometer, was designed to increase functionality. Typically systems only record the global horizontal radiation. Our system moves a fiber-optic cable 0-90 degrees and takes measurements in 9 degree increments. Additionally, a shadow band allows measurement of the diffuse component of the radiation at each position. The electronic controls utilize an Arduino UNO microcontroller to synchronizes the movement of two PAP bipolar (stepper) motors with the activation of the spectrometer via an external trigger. The spectrometer was factory calibrated for wavelength and calibrated for absolute irradiance using a Sellarnet SL1-Cal light source. We present preliminary results from data taken March-June, 2013, and comment on implications for PV devices in Cochabamba.

  20. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF THE INFLUENCING EFFECTS OF GEOMAGNETIC SOLAR STORMS ON EARTHQUAKES IN ANATOLIAN PENINSULA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesugey Sadik Cengiz

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Earthquakes are tectonic events that take place within the fractures of the earth's crust, namely faults. Above certain scale, earthquakes can result in widespread fatalities and substantial financial loss. In addition to the movement of tectonic plates relative to each other, it is widely discussed that there are other external influences originate outside earth that can trigger earthquakes. These influences are called "triggering effects". The purpose of this article is to present a statistical view to elaborate if the solar geomagnetic storms trigger earthquakes.As a model, the research focuses on the Anatolian peninsula, presenting 41 years of historical data on magnetic storms and earthquakes collated from national and international resources. As a result of the comparative assessment of the data, it is concluded that the geomagnetic storms do not trigger earthquakes.

  1. Influence of Variable Acceleration on Parametric Roll Motion of a Container Ship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre PEŞMAN

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ship operators increase or decrease thrust force of ships to avoid parametric roll motion. These operations cause varying acceleration values. In this study, influence of variable acceleration and deceleration of ships on roll motion is investigated in longitudinal waves. The method which is referred as simple model is utilized for analysis. Simple Model is one degree of freedom nonlinear parametric roll motion equation which contains changing velocity and restoring moment in waves with respect to time. Ship velocities in waves are predicted by XFlow software for various thrust forces. Results indicate that variable acceleration has significant effect on parametric roll phenomenon.

  2. Influence of stain etching on low minority carrier lifetime areas of multicrystalline silicon for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montesdeoca-Santana, A. [Departamento de Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez, 38206 La Laguna (Spain); Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Laboratory and Servicecenter Gelsenkirchen, Auf der Reihe 2, 45884 Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Gonzalez-Diaz, B. [Departamento de Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez, 38206 La Laguna (Spain); Departamento de Energia Fotovoltaica, Instituto Tecnologico y de Energias Renovables. Poligono Industrial de Granadilla s/n, 38600 San Isidro-Granadilla de Abona (Spain); Jimenez-Rodriguez, E. [Departamento de Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez, 38206 La Laguna (Spain); Ziegler, J. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Laboratory- and Servicecenter Gelsenkirchen. Auf der Reihe 2, 45884 Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Velazquez, J.J. [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental y Experimental, Electronica y Sistemas, Universidad de La Laguna. Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez, 38206 La Laguna (Spain); Hohage, S.; Borchert, D. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Laboratory and Servicecenter Gelsenkirchen. Auf der Reihe 2, 45884 Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Guerrero-Lemus, R., E-mail: rglemus@ull.es [Departamento de Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, Avda. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez, 38206 La Laguna (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > An enhanced minority carrier lifetime at extended defects in multicrystalline silicon is observed with the use of HF/HNO{sub 3} stain etching to texture the surface. > FTIR analysis shows no influence of oxide passivation in this effect. > SEM images show a preferential etching at extended defects suggesting smoothing at defects as one of the causes for the reduced recombination activity. > LBIC images show a reduction in IQE at extended defects in HF/HNO{sub 3} textured multicrystalline solar cells. - Abstract: In this work the use of HF/HNO{sub 3} solutions for texturing silicon-based solar cell substrates by stain etching and the influence of texturing on minority carrier lifetimes are studied. Stain etching is currently used to decrease the reflectance and, subsequently improve the photogenerated current of the cells, but also produces nanostructures on the silicon surface. In the textured samples it has been observed that an improvement on the minority carrier lifetime with respect to the samples treated with a conventional saw damage etching process is produced on grain boundaries and defects, and the origin of this effect has been discussed.

  3. Influence of stain etching on low minority carrier lifetime areas of multicrystalline silicon for solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montesdeoca-Santana, A.; Gonzalez-Diaz, B.; Jimenez-Rodriguez, E.; Ziegler, J.; Velazquez, J.J.; Hohage, S.; Borchert, D.; Guerrero-Lemus, R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → An enhanced minority carrier lifetime at extended defects in multicrystalline silicon is observed with the use of HF/HNO 3 stain etching to texture the surface. → FTIR analysis shows no influence of oxide passivation in this effect. → SEM images show a preferential etching at extended defects suggesting smoothing at defects as one of the causes for the reduced recombination activity. → LBIC images show a reduction in IQE at extended defects in HF/HNO 3 textured multicrystalline solar cells. - Abstract: In this work the use of HF/HNO 3 solutions for texturing silicon-based solar cell substrates by stain etching and the influence of texturing on minority carrier lifetimes are studied. Stain etching is currently used to decrease the reflectance and, subsequently improve the photogenerated current of the cells, but also produces nanostructures on the silicon surface. In the textured samples it has been observed that an improvement on the minority carrier lifetime with respect to the samples treated with a conventional saw damage etching process is produced on grain boundaries and defects, and the origin of this effect has been discussed.

  4. On the Influence of Collector Size on the Solar Chimneys Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Azawiey Sundus S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance of solar chimney power plant system is highly influenced by the design geometries. The collector size is logically enhances the solar chimney performance, but the trend of enhancement is not yet investigated. In the present work, experimental and numerical investigations have been carried out to ascertain, in terms of qualitative and quantitative evaluation, the effect of the collector diameter. Daily thermal efficiency has been determined at four different collector diameter. Two different collector diameters, 3.0 and 6.0 m, have been investigated experimentally, and then scaled up, to 9.0 and 12.0 m, by numerical simulation using ANSYS-FLUENT®15 software. Results demonstrated that collector diameter has effectively influenced the system performance. Larger collector diameter imposed increase in the velocity, temperature and the daily average thermal efficiency of the system. From the experimental results, increasing the collector diameter from 3.0 to 6.0 m has increased the daily average thermal efficiency of the collector from 9.81 to 12.8. Simulation results at 800 W/m2 irradiation revealed that the velocity in the chimney have increased from 1.66 m/s at 3.0 m collector diameter to 2.34, 2.47 and 2.63 m/s for 6.0, 9.0 and 12.0 m collector diameters, respectively.

  5. CONTROLLING INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELD ON SOLAR WIND OUTFLOW: AN INVESTIGATION USING CURRENT SHEET SOURCE SURFACE MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poduval, B., E-mail: bpoduval@spacescience.org [Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

    2016-08-10

    This Letter presents the results of an investigation into the controlling influence of large-scale magnetic field of the Sun in determining the solar wind outflow using two magnetostatic coronal models: current sheet source surface (CSSS) and potential field source surface. For this, we made use of the Wang and Sheeley inverse correlation between magnetic flux expansion rate (FTE) and observed solar wind speed (SWS) at 1 au. During the period of study, extended over solar cycle 23 and beginning of solar cycle 24, we found that the coefficients of the fitted quadratic equation representing the FTE–SWS inverse relation exhibited significant temporal variation, implying the changing pattern of the influence of FTE on SWS over time. A particularly noteworthy feature is an anomaly in the behavior of the fitted coefficients during the extended minimum, 2008–2010 (CRs 2073–2092), which is considered due to the particularly complex nature of the solar magnetic field during this period. However, this variation was significant only for the CSSS model, though not a systematic dependence on the phase of the solar cycle. Further, we noticed that the CSSS model demonstrated better solar wind prediction during the period of study, which we attribute to the treatment of volume and sheet currents throughout the corona and the more accurate tracing of footpoint locations resulting from the geometry of the model.

  6. Analysis on Corporate Governance Influences toward Banking Efficiency with Bank Category as Moderator Variable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidiyawati Lidiyawati

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Corporate governance system of Sharia financial institution that based on Islamic law may result more  variables principles then conventional owns. The restriction of usury are highly speculative transaction, embedded prohibited matter are main features in Sharia business institution. Sharia Supervisory Board, as board that supervises banking practices conforms to Sharia stipulations, hold strong important role within Islamic banking. Both important points above had direct effects on efficiency which attained by Islamic banking compared with conventional banking. This study examines the influence of corporate governance implementation toward efficiency banking sector with bank category as moderator variable. This study hypothesize that corporate governance has significant influences toward bank’s efficiencies, the influence of corporate governance toward Islamic bank efficiencies is higher than conventional bank, and level of Islamicbank efficiencies is higher than conventional bank. Measurement of efficiencies is using Stochastic Frontier Approach program, and then using SPSS in procces hypothetical model. The results of the study do not support the hypothesis. Examined result shows that statically corporate governance is not influenced by bank efficiency achievement. Corporate governance influences over Islamic bank has not show higher significance than conventional and Islamic bank efficiencies remain steady. Data limitations, complexity of the efficiency measures and the complexity of the operation of Islamic banks may explain the finding.

  7. Influence of solar radiation absorbed by phytoplankton on the thermal structure and circulation of the tropical Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouin, Robert; Ueyoshi, Kyozo; Kampel, Milton

    2007-09-01

    Numerical experiments conducted with an ocean general ocean circulation model reveal the potential influence of solar radiation absorbed by phytoplankton on the thermal structure and currents of the Tropical Atlantic Ocean. In the model, solar radiation penetration is parameterized explicitly as a function of chlorophyll-a concentration, the major variable affecting water turbidity in the open ocean. Two types of runs are performed, a clear water (control) run with a constant minimum chlorophyll-a concentration of 0.02 mgm -3, and a turbid water (chlorophyll) run with space- and time-varying chlorophyll-a concentration from satellite data. The difference between results from the two runs yields the biological effects. In the chlorophyll run, nutrients and biology production are implicitly taken into account, even though biogeochemical processes are not explicitly included, since phytoplankton distribution, prescribed from observations, is the result of those processes. Due to phytoplankton-radiation forcing, the surface temperature is higher by 1-2 K on average annually in the region of the North Equatorial current, the Northern part of the South Equatorial current, and the Caribbean system, and by 3-4 K in the region of the Guinea current. In this region, upwelling is reduced, and heat trapped in the surface layers by phytoplankton is not easily removed. The surface temperature is lower by 1 K in the Northern region of the Benguela current, due to increased upwelling. At depth, the equatorial Atlantic is generally cooler, as well as the eastern part of the tropical basin (excluding the region of the sub-tropical gyres). The North and South equatorial currents, as well as the Equatorial undercurrent, are enhanced by as much as 3-4 cms -1, and the circulation of the subtropical gyres is increased. Pole-ward heat transport is slightly reduced North of 35°N, suggesting that phytoplankton, by increasing the horizontal return flow in the subtropical region, may exert a

  8. Bacterial Active Community Cycling in Response to Solar Radiation and Their Influence on Nutrient Changes in a High-Altitude Wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Verónica; Hernández, Klaudia; Dorador, Cristina; Eissler, Yoanna; Hengst, Martha; Pérez, Vilma; Harrod, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Microbial communities inhabiting high-altitude spring ecosystems are subjected to extreme changes in solar irradiance and temperature throughout the diel cycle. Here, using 16S rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing (cDNA) we determined the composition of actively transcribing bacteria from spring waters experimentally exposed through the day (morning, noon, and afternoon) to variable levels of solar radiation and light quality, and evaluated their influence on nutrient recycling. Solar irradiance, temperature, and changes in nutrient dynamics were associated with changes in the active bacterial community structure, predominantly by Cyanobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Proteobacteria, and 35 other Phyla, including the recently described Candidate Phyla Radiation (e.g., Parcubacteria, Gracilibacteria, OP3, TM6, SR1). Diversity increased at noon, when the highest irradiances were measured (3.3-3.9 H', 1125 W m -2 ) compared to morning and afternoon (0.6-2.8 H'). This shift was associated with a decrease in the contribution to pyrolibraries by Cyanobacteria and an increase of Proteobacteria and other initially low frequently and rare bacteria phyla (solar radiation. In addition, the percentage contribution of cyanobacterial sequences in the afternoon was similar to those recorded in the morning. The shifts in the contribution by Cyanobacteria also influenced the rate of change in nitrate, nitrite, and phosphate, highlighted by a high level of nitrate accumulation during hours of high radiation and temperature associated with nitrifying bacteria activity. We did not detect ammonia or nitrite oxidizing bacteria in situ , but both functional groups ( Nitrosomona and Nitrospira ) appeared mainly in pyrolibraries generated from dark incubations. In total, our results reveal that both the structure and the diversity of the active bacteria community was extremely dynamic through the day, and showed marked shifts in composition that influenced nutrient recycling, highlighting how abiotic

  9. The influence of solar wind on extratropical cyclones – Part 1: Wilcox effect revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rybanský

    2009-01-01

    mean VAI response to SBP associated with the north-to-south reversal of BZ is leading by up to 2 days the mean VAI response to SBP associated with the south-to-north reversal of BZ. For the latter, less geoeffective events, the VAI minimum deepens (with the above exception of the Northern Hemisphere low-aerosol 500-mb VAI and the VAI maximum is delayed. The phase shift between the mean VAI responses obtained for these two subsets of SBP events may explain the reduced amplitude of the overall Wilcox effect. In a companion paper, Prikryl et al. (2009 propose a new mechanism to explain the Wilcox effect, namely that solar-wind-generated auroral atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs influence the growth of extratropical cyclones. It is also observed that severe extratropical storms, explosive cyclogenesis and significant sea level pressure deepenings of extratropical storms tend to occur within a few days of the arrival of high-speed solar wind. These observations are discussed in the context of the proposed AGW mechanism as well as the previously suggested atmospheric electrical current (AEC model (Tinsley et al., 1994, which requires the presence of stratospheric aerosols for a significant (Wilcox effect.

  10. The influence of environmental variables on platelet concentration in horse platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinnovati, Riccardo; Romagnoli, Noemi; Gentilini, Fabio; Lambertini, Carlotta; Spadari, Alessandro

    2016-07-04

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) commonly refers to blood products which contain a higher platelet (PLT) concentration as compared to normal plasma. Autologous PRP has been shown to be safe and effective in promoting the natural processes of soft tissue healing or reconstruction in humans and horses. Variability in PLT concentration has been observed in practice between PRP preparations from different patients or from the same individual under different conditions. A change in PLT concentration could modify PRP efficacy in routine applications. The aim of this study was to test the influence of environmental, individual and agonistic variables on the PLT concentration of PRP in horses. Six healthy Standardbred mares were exposed to six different variables with a one-week washout period between variables, and PRP was subsequently obtained from each horse. The variables were time of withdrawal during the day (morning/evening), hydration status (overhydration/dehydration) treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs and training periods on a treadmill. The platelet concentration was significantly higher in horses treated with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (P = 0.03). The leukocyte concentration increased 2-9 fold with respect to whole blood in the PRP which was obtained after exposure to all the variable considered. Environmental variation in platelet concentration should be taken into consideration during PRP preparation.

  11. Influence of process variables on permeability and anisotropy of Biso-coated HTGR fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinton, D.P.; Lackey, W.J.; Thiele, B.A.

    1977-11-01

    The effect of several important process variables on the fraction of defective particles and anisotropy of the low-temperature isotropic (LTI) coating layer was determined for Biso-coated HTGR fuel particles. Process variables considered are deposition temperature, hydrocarbon type, diluent type, and percent diluent. The effect of several other variables such as coating rate and density that depend on the process variables were also considered in this analysis. The fraction of defective particles was controlled by the dependent variables coating rate and LTI density. Coating rate was also the variable controlling the anisotropy of the LTI layer. Diluent type and diluent concentration had only a small influence on the deposition rate of the LTI layer. High-quality particles in terms of anisotropy and permeability can be produced by use of a porous plate gas distributor if the coating rate is between 3 and 5 μm/min and the coating density is between about 1.75 and 1.95 g/cm 3

  12. Influence of flexibility and variability of working hours on health and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Giovanni; Sartori, Samantha; Akerstedt, Torbjorn

    2006-01-01

    Flexible working hours can have several meanings and can be arranged in a number of ways to suit the worker and/or employer. Two aspects of "flexible" arrangement of working hours were considered: one more subjected to company control and decision (variability) and one more connected to individual discretion and autonomy (flexibility). The aim of the study was to analyze these two dimensions in relation to health and well-being, taking into consideration the interaction with some relevant background variables related to demographics plus working and social conditions. The dataset of the Third European Survey on working conditions, conducted in 2000 and involving 21,505 workers, was used. Nineteen health disorders and four psycho-social conditions were tested by means of multiple logistic regression analysis, in which mutually adjusted odds ratios were calculated for age, gender, marital status, number of children, occupation, mode of employment, shift work, night work, time pressure, mental and physical workload, job satisfaction, and participation in work organization. The flexibility and variability of working hours appeared inversely related to health and psycho-social well-being: the most favorable effects were associated with higher flexibility and lower variability. The analysis of the interactions with the twelve intervening variables showed that physical work, age, and flexibility are the three most important factors affecting health and well-being. Flexibility resulted as the most important factor to influence work satisfaction; the second to affect family and social commitment and the ability to do the same job when 60 years old, as well as trauma, overall fatigue, irritability, and headache; and the third to influence heart disease, stomachache, anxiety, injury, and the feeling that health being at risk because of work. Variability was the third most important factor influencing family and social commitments. Moreover, shift and night work confirmed to

  13. Variables Influencing Credit Card Balances of Students at a Midwestern University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, Lucretia; Sahlhoff, Kathleen; Blackstone, Judith; Peden, Blaine; Nahm, Abraham Y.

    2004-01-01

    This research used a Web-based survey of students at a Midwest regional university to measure the extent of credit card use by first-year students and seniors. The results indicate that the variables influencing credit card use and the carrying of a balance from one month to the next include the number of cards held by the student, the student's…

  14. The influence of solar active region evolution on solar wind streams, coronal hole boundaries and geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, R. E.; Dodson-Prince, H. W.; Hedeman, E. R.; Roelof, E. C.

    1982-01-01

    Solar and interplanetary data are examined, taking into account the identification of the heliographic longitudes of the coronal source regions of high speed solar wind (SW) streams by Nolte and Roelof (1973). Nolte and Roelof have 'mapped' the velocities measured near earth back to the sun using the approximation of constant radial velocity. The 'Carrington carpet' for rotations 1597-1616 is shown in a graph. Coronal sources of high speed streams appear in the form of solid black areas. The contours of the stream sources are laid on 'evolutionary charts' of solar active region histories for the Southern and Northern Hemispheres. Questions regarding the interplay of active regions and solar wind are investigated, giving attention to developments during the years 1973, 1974, and 1975.

  15. Environmental Variables That Influence Patient Satisfaction: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAllister, Lorissa; Zimring, Craig; Ryherd, Erica

    2016-10-01

    Patient's perception of care-referred to as patient satisfaction-is of great interest in the healthcare industry, as it becomes more directly tied to the revenue of the health system providers. The perception of care has now become important in addition to the actual health outcome of the patient. The known influencers for the patient perception of care are the patient's own characteristics as well as the quality of service received. In patient surveys, the physical environment is noted as important for being clean and quiet but is not considered a critical part of patient satisfaction or other health outcomes. Patient perception of care is currently measured as patient satisfaction, a systematic collection of perceptions of social interactions from an individual person as well as their interaction with the environment. This exploration of the literature intends to explore the rigorous, statistically tested research conducted that has a spatial predictor variable and a health or behavior outcome, with the intent to begin to further test the relationships of these variables in the future studies. This literature review uses the patient satisfaction framework of components of influence and identifies at least 10 known spatial environmental variables that have been shown to have a direct connection to the health and behavior outcome of a patient. The results show that there are certain features of the spatial layout and environmental design in hospital or work settings that influence outcomes and should be noted in the future research. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Progression paths in children's problem solving: The influence of dynamic testing, initial variability, and working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resing, Wilma C M; Bakker, Merel; Pronk, Christine M E; Elliott, Julian G

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigated developmental trajectories of analogical reasoning performance of 104 7- and 8-year-old children. We employed a microgenetic research method and multilevel analysis to examine the influence of several background variables and experimental treatment on the children's developmental trajectories. Our participants were divided into two treatment groups: repeated practice alone and repeated practice with training. Each child received an initial working memory assessment and was subsequently asked to solve figural analogies on each of several sessions. We examined children's analogical problem-solving behavior and their subsequent verbal accounts of their employed solving processes. We also investigated the influence of verbal and visual-spatial working memory capacity and initial variability in strategy use on analogical reasoning development. Results indicated that children in both treatment groups improved but that gains were greater for those who had received training. Training also reduced the influence of children's initial variability in the use of analogical strategies with the degree of improvement in reasoning largely unrelated to working memory capacity. Findings from this study demonstrate the value of a microgenetic research method and the use of multilevel analysis to examine inter- and intra-individual change in problem-solving processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of variables and their influence on the human resources planning in the territorial level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez Vivar, R.; Sánchez Rodríguez, A.; Pérez Campdesuñer, R.; García Vidal, G.

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this paper lies in the use of experimental way through empirical tools for identification of the set of variables and their interrelationships and influences on the human resources planning at the territorial level. The methodology used to verify the existence of the variables that affect the planning of human resources at the territorial level consists of two phases: a qualitative study of the variables that influence the planning of human resources, where the explicit variables are measured and / or implied raised in the literature analyzing the main contributions and limitations expressed by each of the authors consulted. Then it proceeds to confirmatory phase (quantitative) to prove the existence of the dimensions of the planning of human resources in the territorial level through the use of multivariate statistics through the combination of expert analysis and techniques of factorial grouping. Identification is achieved by using empirical methods, variables that affect human resources planning at the territorial level, as well as their grouping essential dimensions, while the description of a theoretical model that integrates the dimensions is made essential and relationships that affect human resource planning at the regional level, which is characterized by the existence of systemic and prospective nature. The literature shows two streams that address a wide range of approaches to human resources planning. The first is oriented from the business object and the second part of the management in highlighting a limited territorial level to address this latest theoretical development, an element that has contributed to the fragmented treatment of human resources planning and management in general at this level. The originality of this paper is part of the creation and adaptation, on a scientific basis of a theoretical model developed from the conceptual contribution of this process at the territorial level where the key variables that affect this

  18. The Morphology of the Solar Wind Magnetic Field Draping on the Dayside of Mars and Its Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaohua; Ma, Yingjuan; Luhmann, Janet; Dong, Yaxue; Brain, David; Hurley, Dana; Dong, Chuanfei; Lee, Christina O.; Jakosky, Bruce

    2018-04-01

    The magnetic field draping pattern in the magnetosheath of Mars is of interest for what it tells us about both the solar wind interaction with the Mars obstacle and the use of the field measured there as a proxy for the upstream interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) clock angle. We apply a time-dependent, global magnetohydrodynamic model toward quantifying the spatial and temporal variations of the magnetic field draping direction on the Martian dayside above 500-km altitude. The magnetic field and plasma are self-consistently solved over one Mars rotation period, with the dynamics of the field morphology considered as the result of the rotation of the crustal field orientation. Our results show how the magnetic field direction on the plane perpendicular to the solar wind flow direction gradually departs from the IMF as the solar wind penetrates toward the obstacle and into the tail region. This clock angle departure occurs mainly inside the magnetic pileup region and tailward of the terminator plane, exhibiting significant dawn-dusk and north-south asymmetries. Inside the dayside sheath region, the field direction has the greatest departure from the IMF-perpendicular component direction downstream of the quasi-parallel bow shock, which for the nominal Parker spiral is over the dawn quadrant. Thus, the best region to obtain an IMF clock angle proxy is within the dayside magnetosheath at sufficiently high altitudes, particularly over subsolar and dusk sectors. Our results illustrate that the crustal field has only a mild influence on the magnetic field draping direction within the magnetosheath region.

  19. How does complex terrain influence responses of carbon and water cycle processes to climate variability and climate change? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, B. J.; Peterson, K.; McKane, R.; Lajtha, K.; Quandt, D. J.; Allen, S. T.; Sell, S.; Daly, C.; Harmon, M. E.; Johnson, S. L.; Spies, T.; Sollins, P.; Abdelnour, A. G.; Stieglitz, M.

    2010-12-01

    We are pursuing the ambitious goal of understanding how complex terrain influences the responses of carbon and water cycle processes to climate variability and climate change. Our studies take place in H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, an LTER (Long Term Ecological Research) site situated in Oregon’s central-western Cascade Range. Decades of long-term measurements and intensive research have revealed influences of topography on vegetation patterns, disturbance history, and hydrology. More recent research has shown surprising interactions between microclimates and synoptic weather patterns due to cold air drainage and pooling in mountain valleys. Using these data and insights, in addition to a recent LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) reconnaissance and a small sensor network, we are employing process-based models, including “SPA” (Soil-Plant-Atmosphere, developed by Mathew Williams of the University of Edinburgh), and “VELMA” (Visualizing Ecosystems for Land Management Alternatives, developed by Marc Stieglitz and colleagues of the Georgia Institute of Technology) to focus on two important features of mountainous landscapes: heterogeneity (both spatial and temporal) and connectivity (atmosphere-canopy-hillslope-stream). Our research questions include: 1) Do fine-scale spatial and temporal heterogeneity result in emergent properties at the basin scale, and if so, what are they? 2) How does connectivity across ecosystem components affect system responses to climate variability and change? Initial results show that for environmental drivers that elicit non-linear ecosystem responses on the plot scale, such as solar radiation, soil depth and soil water content, fine-scale spatial heterogeneity may produce unexpected emergent properties at larger scales. The results from such modeling experiments are necessarily a function of the supporting algorithms. However, comparisons based on models such as SPA and VELMA that operate at much different spatial scales

  20. Photoelectric properties of variably RTP processed CIGS{sub 2} solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riediger, Julia; Ohland, Joerg; Knipper, Martin; Parisi, Juergen; Riedel, Ingo [Energy and Semiconductor Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oldenburg (Germany); Mainz, Roland; Merdes, Saoussen; Klaer, Joachim [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The open circuit voltage V{sub oc} of CuInS{sub 2} solar cells was found to improve via incorporation of gallium. The Cu(In,Ga)S{sub 2} absorber of the samples studied in this work was prepared by sputtering (Cu,Ga) and In precursors subsequently sulfurized via rapid thermal processing (RTP) in sulfur vapor. Distinctive top/bottom CuInS{sub 2}/CuGaS{sub 2} segregation has been observed which extent depends on the substrate temperature and holding time of the temperature during RTP-process. The insufficient gallium accumulation at the surface impedes high values of V{sub oc}.We studied the consequences of RTP-process parameter variation in regard of the interdiffusion of CuInS{sub 2} and CuGaS{sub 2}. Quantum efficiency (QE) and temperature-/illumination-dependent current-voltage (IV) profiling have been carried out for differently processed samples. These measurements provide the minimum band gap E{sub g} of the graded absorber layer, the temperature dependent V{sub oc} and the activation energy E{sub a} for carrier recombination. Drive level capacitance (DLCP) profiling reveals the spatially resolved in-depth variation of the doping/defect concentration close to the space charge region.

  1. Variability of Solar Radiation and CDOM in Surface Coastal Waters of the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sempéré, Richard; Para, Julien; Tedetti, Marc; Charrière, Bruno; Mallet, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric and in-water solar radiation, including UVR-B, UVR-A and PAR, as well as chromophoric dissolved organic matter absorption [aCDOM (λ)] in surface waters were monthly measured from November 2007 to December 2008 at a coastal station in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea (Bay of Marseilles, France). Our results showed that the UVR-B/UVR-A ratio followed the same trend in the atmosphere and at 2 m depth in the water (P CDOM contributed to UVR attenuation in the UVA domain, but also played a significant role in PAR attenuation. Mean UV doses received in the mixed layer depth were higher by a factor 1.4-33 relative to doses received at fixed depths (5 and 10 m) in summer (stratified period), while the inverse pattern was found in winter (mixing period). This shows the importance of taking into account the vertical mixing in the evaluation of UVR effects on marine organisms. © 2015 The American Society of Photobiology.

  2. The Influence of Output Variability from Renewable Electricity Generation on Net Energy Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Kunz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One key approach to analyzing the feasibility of energy extraction and generation technologies is to understand the net energy they contribute to society. These analyses most commonly focus on a simple comparison of a source’s expected energy outputs to the required energy inputs, measured in the form of energy return on investment (EROI. What is not typically factored into net energy analysis is the influence of output variability. This omission ignores a key attribute of biological organisms and societies alike: the preference for stable returns with low dispersion versus equivalent returns that are intermittent or variable. This biologic predilection for stability, observed and refined in academic financial literature, has a direct relationship to many new energy technologies whose outputs are much more variable than traditional energy sources. We investigate the impact of variability on net energy metrics and develop a theoretical framework to evaluate energy systems based on existing financial and biological risk models. We then illustrate the impact of variability on nominal energy return using representative technologies in electricity generation, with a more detailed analysis on wind power, where intermittence and stochastic availability of hard-to-store electricity will be factored into theoretical returns.

  3. Influence which masses of clouds have on the global solar radiation at Salamanca (Spain). Estudio de la interaccin nubosidad-radiacion solar en Salamanca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pablo-Davila, F. de, Labajo, J.L.; Tomas-Sanchez, C

    1991-01-01

    It has been shown the influence which masses of clouds, (and more specifically for each group of cloud types: high, middle and low clauds), has on the global solar radiation recorded at Matacan (Salamanca), within the period 1977-1985. For this purpose, cloud observation were made every three hours; daily records of sunshine and solar radiation were continually taken too. It has also been, both graphically and numerically, the influence of each cloud type for monthly and seasonal periods. Futhermore, different statistical parameters have been presented in order to describe the method developed. Finally, the results have been analysed and evaluated. They have been explaines according to the composition, structure and radiative properties of clouds.(Author)

  4. Development of Power Supply Management Module for Radio Signal Repeaters of Automatic Metering Reading System in Variable Solar Density Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratjevs, K.; Zabasta, A.; Selmanovs-Pless, V.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, there has been significant research focus that revolves around harvesting and minimising energy consumption by wireless sensor network nodes. When a sensor node is depleted of energy, it becomes unresponsive and disconnected from the network that can significantly influence the performance of the whole network. The purpose of the present research is to create a power supply management module in order to provide stable operating voltage for autonomous operations of radio signal repeaters, sensors or gateways of WSN. The developed management module is composed of a solar panel, lithium battery and power supply management module. The novelty of the research is the management module, which ensures stable and uninterrupted operations of electronic equipment in various power supply modes in different situations, simultaneously ensuring energy protection and sustainability of the module components. The management module is able to provide power supply of 5 V for electronics scheme independently, without power interruption switching between power sources and power flows in different directions.

  5. The influence of passivation and photovoltaic properties of α-Si:H coverage on silicon nanowire array solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays for radial p-n junction solar cells offer potential advantages of light trapping effects and quick charge collection. Nevertheless, lower open circuit voltages (Voc) lead to lower energy conversion efficiencies. In such cases, the performance of the solar cells depends critically on the quality of the SiNW interfaces. In this study, SiNW core-shell solar cells have been fabricated by growing crystalline silicon (c-Si) nanowires via the metal-assisted chemical etching method and by depositing hydrogenated amorphous silicon (α-Si:H) via the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method. The influence of deposition parameters on the coverage and, consequently, the passivation and photovoltaic properties of α-Si:H layers on SiNW solar cells have been analyzed. PMID:24059343

  6. 1990-2016 surface solar radiation variability and trend over the Piedmont region (northwest Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, Veronica; Bassi, Manuela; Brunetti, Michele; Cagnazzi, Barbara; Maugeri, Maurizio

    2018-05-01

    A new surface solar radiation database of 74 daily series is set up for the Piedmont region (northwest Italy) for the 1990-2016 period. All the series are subjected to a detailed quality control, homogenization and gap-filling procedure and are transformed into relative annual/seasonal anomaly series. Finally, a gridded version (0.5°×0.5°) of the database is generated. The resulting series show an increasing tendency of about + 2.5% per decade at annual scale, with strongest trend in autumn (+ 4% per decade). The only exception is winter, showing a negative but not significant trend. Considering the plain and mountain mean series, the trends are more intense for low than for high elevations with a negative vertical gradient of about - 0.03% per decade per 100 m at annual scale and values up to - 0.07% per decade per 100 m in spring. Focusing on clear days only (selected by CM SAF ClOud fractional cover dataset from METeosat first and second generation—Edition 1 satellite data over the 1991-2015 period), trend significance strongly increases and both low and high elevation records exhibit a positive trend in all seasons. However, the trends result slightly lower than for all-sky days (with the only exception of winter). The differences observed under clear-sky conditions between low and high elevations are more pronounced in winter, where the trend shows a negative vertical gradient of about - 0.1% per decade every 100 m. Overall, this paper shows how a high station density allows performing a more detailed quality control thanks to the higher performances in detecting the inhomogeneities with higher data availability and capturing regional peculiarities otherwise impossible to observe.

  7. Solar rotation and activity in the past and their possible influence upon the evolution of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geyer, E.H.

    1981-01-01

    It is proposed that the rotational angular momentum of the lower Main Sequence stars determines the intensity of their magnetic spot activity. As a consequence of this feedback coupling, the stellar rotation and the activity decay exponentially by magnetic braking of the induced stellar flare- and wind-activity. Therefore, the Sun should have rotated much faster and must have shown a very enhanced activity in its early history. This strong solar activity in the past could have influenced the evolution of terrestrial life, and may explain the stagnation of maritime life for about 2 x 10 9 yr, the diversification of species during the Cambrian formation, and the land conquest by life in the upper Silurian system. (Auth.)

  8. Solar rotation and activity in the past and their possible influence upon the evolution of life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geyer, E H [Bonn Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Sternwarte

    1981-06-01

    It is proposed that the rotational angular momentum of the lower Main Sequence stars determines the intensity of their magnetic spot activity. As a consequence of this feedback coupling, the stellar rotation and the activity decay exponentially by magnetic braking of the induced stellar flare- and wind-activity. Therefore, the Sun should have rotated much faster and must have shown a very enhanced activity in its early history. This strong solar activity in the past could have influenced the evolution of terrestrial life, and may explain the stagnation of maritime life for about 2 x 10/sup 9/ yr, the diversification of species during the Cambrian formation, and the land conquest by life in the upper Silurian system.

  9. Parameterizing the Variability and Uncertainty of Wind and Solar in CEMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frew, Bethany

    2016-07-11

    We present current and improved methods for estimating the capacity value and curtailment impacts from variable generation (VG) in capacity expansion models (CEMs). The ideal calculation of these variability metrics is through an explicit co-optimized investment-dispatch model using multiple years of VG and load data. Because of data and computational limitations, existing CEMs typically approximate these metrics using a subset of all hours from a single year and/or using statistical methods, which often do not capture the tail-event impacts or the broader set of interactions between VG, storage, and conventional generators. In our proposed new methods, we use hourly generation and load values across all hours of the year to characterize the (1) contribution of VG to system capacity during high load hours, (2) the curtailment level of VG, and (3) the reduction in VG curtailment due to storage and shutdown of select thermal generators. Using CEM model outputs from a preceding model solve period, we apply these methods to exogenously calculate capacity value and curtailment metrics for the subsequent model solve period. Preliminary results suggest that these hourly methods offer improved capacity value and curtailment representations of VG in the CEM from existing approximation methods without additional computational burdens.

  10. Spatial patterns of North Atlantic Oscillation influence on mass balance variability of European glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Marzeion

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present and validate a set of minimal models of glacier mass balance variability. The most skillful model is then applied to reconstruct 7735 individual time series of mass balance variability for all glaciers in the European Alps and Scandinavia. Subsequently, we investigate the influence of atmospheric variability associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO on the glaciers' mass balances.

    We find a spatial coherence in the glaciers' sensitivity to NAO forcing which is caused by regionally similar mechanisms relating the NAO forcing to the mass balance: in southwestern Scandinavia, winter precipitation causes a correlation of mass balances with the NAO. In northern Scandinavia, temperature anomalies outside the core winter season cause an anti-correlation between NAO and mass balances. In the western Alps, both temperature and winter precipitation anomalies lead to a weak anti-correlation of mass balances with the NAO, while in the eastern Alps, the influences of winter precipitation and temperature anomalies tend to cancel each other, and only on the southern side a slight anti-correlation of mass balances with the NAO prevails.

  11. The influence of talker and foreign-accent variability on spoken word identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, Tessa; Holt, Rachael Frush

    2013-03-01

    In spoken word identification and memory tasks, stimulus variability from numerous sources impairs performance. In the current study, the influence of foreign-accent variability on spoken word identification was evaluated in two experiments. Experiment 1 used a between-subjects design to test word identification in noise in single-talker and two multiple-talker conditions: multiple talkers with the same accent and multiple talkers with different accents. Identification performance was highest in the single-talker condition, but there was no difference between the single-accent and multiple-accent conditions. Experiment 2 further explored word recognition for multiple talkers in single-accent versus multiple-accent conditions using a mixed design. A detriment to word recognition was observed in the multiple-accent condition compared to the single-accent condition, but the effect differed across the language backgrounds tested. These results demonstrate that the processing of foreign-accent variation may influence word recognition in ways similar to other sources of variability (e.g., speaking rate or style) in that the inclusion of multiple foreign accents can result in a small but significant performance decrement beyond the multiple-talker effect.

  12. Influences of rainfall variables and antecedent discharge on urban effluent concentrations and loads in wet weather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zuxin; Xiong, Lijun; Li, Huaizheng; Liao, Zhengliang; Yin, Hailong; Wu, Jun; Xu, Jin; Chen, Hao

    2017-04-01

    For storm drainages inappropriately connected with sewage, wet weather discharge is a major factor that adversely affects receiving waters. A study of the wet weather influences of rainfall-discharge variables on storm drainages connected with sewage was conducted in the downtown Shanghai area (374 ha). Two indicators, event mean concentration (EMC) and event pollutant load per unit area (EPL), were used to describe the pollution discharge during 20 rain events. The study showed that the total rainfall and discharge volume were important factors that affect the EMCs and EPLs of the chemical oxygen demand, total phosphorus, and especially those of NH 4 + -N. The pollutant concentrations at the beginning of the discharge and the discharge period were also major factors that influence the EMCs of these three pollutants. Regression relationships between the rainfall-discharge variables and discharge volume/ EPLs (R 2 = 0.824-0.981) were stronger than the relationships between the rainfall-discharge variables and EMCs. These regression equations can be considered reliable in the system, with a relative validation error of less than ±10% for the discharge volume, and less than ±20% for the EPLs. The results presented in this paper provide guidance for effectively controlling pollution in similar storm drainages.

  13. The influence of meteorological variables on the development of deep venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Helen K; Simpson, A John; Murchison, John T

    2009-10-01

    The influence of weather on deep venous thrombosis (DVT) incidence remains controversial. We aimed to characterize the temporal association between DVT and meteorological variables including atmospheric pressure. Data relating to hospital admissions with DVT in Scotland were collected retrospectively for a 20 year period for which corresponding meteorological recordings were available. Weather variables were calculated as weighted daily averages to adjust for variations in population density. Seasonal variation in DVT and short-term effects of weather variables on the relative risk of developing DVT were assess using Poisson regression modelling. The models allowed for the identification of lag periods between variation in the weather and DVT presentation. A total of 37,336 cases of DVT were recorded. There was significant seasonal variation in DVT with a winter peak. Seasonal variation in wind speed and temperature were significantly associated with seasonal variation in DVT. When studying more immediate meteorological influences, low atmospheric pressure, high wind speed and high rainfall were significantly associated with an increased risk of DVT approximately 9-10 days later. The effect was most strikingly demonstrated for atmospheric pressure, every 10 millibar decrease in pressure being associated with a 2.1% increase in relative risk of DVT. Alterations in weather have a small but significant impact upon the incidence of DVT. DVT is particularly associated with reduction in atmospheric pressure giving weight to the hypothesis that reduced cabin pressure in long haul flights contributes to DVT. These findings have implications for our understanding of the pathogenesis of DVT.

  14. Multi-taxa integrated landscape genetics for zoonotic infectious diseases: deciphering variables influencing disease emergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Sarah S T; Gonzalez, Andrew; Millien, Virginie

    2016-05-01

    Zoonotic disease transmission systems involve sets of species interacting with each other and their environment. This complexity impedes development of disease monitoring and control programs that require reliable identification of spatial and biotic variables and mechanisms facilitating disease emergence. To overcome this difficulty, we propose a framework that simultaneously examines all species involved in disease emergence by integrating concepts and methods from population genetics, landscape ecology, and spatial statistics. Multi-taxa integrated landscape genetics (MTILG) can reveal how interspecific interactions and landscape variables influence disease emergence patterns. We test the potential of our MTILG-based framework by modelling the emergence of a disease system across multiple species dispersal, interspecific interaction, and landscape scenarios. Our simulations showed that both interspecific-dependent dispersal patterns and landscape characteristics significantly influenced disease spread. Using our framework, we were able to detect statistically similar inter-population genetic differences and highly correlated spatial genetic patterns that imply species-dependent dispersal. Additionally, species that were assigned coupled-dispersal patterns were affected to the same degree by similar landscape variables. This study underlines the importance of an integrated approach to investigating emergence of disease systems. MTILG is a robust approach for such studies and can identify potential avenues for targeted disease management strategies.

  15. Changes of extreme precipitation and nonlinear influence of climate variables over monsoon region in China

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Tao

    2017-07-19

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO) are well understood to be major drivers for the variability of precipitation extremes over monsoon regions in China (MRC). However, research on monsoon extremes in China and their associations with climate variables is limited. In this study, we examine the space-time variations of extreme precipitation across the MRC, and assess the time-varying influences of the climate drivers using Bayesian dynamic linear regression and their combined nonlinear effects through fitting generalized additive models. Results suggest that the central-east and south China is dominated by less frequent but more intense precipitation. Extreme rainfalls show significant positive trends, coupled with a significant decline of dry spells, indicating an increasing chance of occurrence of flood-induced disasters in the MRC during 1960–2014. Majority of the regional indices display some abrupt shifts during the 1990s. The influences of climate variables on monsoon extremes exhibit distinct interannual or interdecadal variations. IOD, ENSO and AMO have strong impacts on monsoon and extreme precipitation, especially during the 1990s, which is generally consistent with the abrupt shifts in precipitation regimes around this period. Moreover, ENSO mainly affects moderate rainfalls and dry spells, while IOD has a more significant impact on precipitation extremes. These findings could be helpful for improving the forecasting of monsoon extremes in China and the evaluations of climate models.

  16. Thermoeconomic analysis of storage systems for solar heating and cooling systems: A comparison between variable-volume and fixed-volume tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonomano, Annamaria; Calise, Francesco; Ferruzzi, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    The paper investigates different control strategies for the thermal storage management in SHC (Solar Heating and Cooling) systems. The SHC system under investigation is based on a field of evacuated solar collectors coupled with a single-stage LiBr–H 2 O absorption chiller; auxiliary thermal energy is supplied by a gas-fired boiler. The SHC is also equipped with a novel thermal storage system, consisting in a variable volume storage tank. It includes three separate tanks and a number of mixers and diverters managed by novel control strategies, based on combinations of series/parallel charging and discharging approaches. The aim of this component is to vary the thermal storage capacity as a function of the combinations of solar radiation availability and user thermal/cooling energy demands. The system allows one to increase the number of active tanks when the time shift between solar energy and user demand is high. Conversely, when this time shift is low, the number of active tanks is automatically reduced. In addition, when the solar energy in excess cannot be stored in such tanks, a heat exchanger is also used in the solar loop for producing DHW (Domestic Hot Water). The analysis is carried out by means of a zero-dimensional transient simulation model, developed by using the TRNSYS software. In order to assess the operating and capital costs of the systems under analysis, an economic model is also proposed. In addition, in order to determine the set of the synthesis/design variables which maximize the system profitability, a parametric analysis was implemented. The novel variable-volume storage system, in both the proposed configurations, was also compared with a constant-volume storage system from the energy and economic points of view. The results showed that the presented storage system allows one to save up to 20% of the natural gas used by the auxiliary boiler only for very high solar fractions. In all the other cases, marginal savings are achieved by the

  17. Tidal influences on vertical diffusion and diurnal variability of ozone in the mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjarnason, Gudmundur G.; Solomon, Susan; Garcia, Rolando R.

    1987-01-01

    Possible dynamical influences on the diurnal behavior of ozone are investigated. A time dependent one-dimensional photochemical model is developed for this purpose; all model calculations are made at 70 deg N during summer. It is shown that the vertical diffusion can vary as much as 1 order of magnitude within a day as a result of large changes in the zonal wind induced by atmospheric thermal tides. It is found that by introducing a dissipation time scale for turbulence produced by breaking gravity waves, the agreement with Poker Flat echo data is improved. Comparisons of results from photochemical model calculations, where the vertical diffusion is a function of height only, with those in which the vertical diffusion coefficient is changing in time show large differences in the diurnal behavior of ozone between 70 and 90 km. By including the dynamical effect, much better agreement with the Solar Mesosphere Explorers data is obtained. The results are, however, sensitive to the background zonally averaged wind. The influence of including time-varying vertical diffusion coefficient on the OH densities is also large, especially between 80 and 90 km. This suggests that dynamical effects are important in determining the diurnal behavior of the airglow emission from the Meinel bands.

  18. Perceptions of variability in facial emotion influence beliefs about the stability of psychological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbuch, Max; Grunberg, Rebecca L; Slepian, Michael L; Ambady, Nalini

    2016-10-01

    Beliefs about the malleability versus stability of traits (incremental vs. entity lay theories) have a profound impact on social cognition and self-regulation, shaping phenomena that range from the fundamental attribution error and group-based stereotyping to academic motivation and achievement. Less is known about the causes than the effects of these lay theories, and in the current work the authors examine the perception of facial emotion as a causal influence on lay theories. Specifically, they hypothesized that (a) within-person variability in facial emotion signals within-person variability in traits and (b) social environments replete with within-person variability in facial emotion encourage perceivers to endorse incremental lay theories. Consistent with Hypothesis 1, Study 1 participants were more likely to attribute dynamic (vs. stable) traits to a person who exhibited several different facial emotions than to a person who exhibited a single facial emotion across multiple images. Hypothesis 2 suggests that social environments support incremental lay theories to the extent that they include many people who exhibit within-person variability in facial emotion. Consistent with Hypothesis 2, participants in Studies 2-4 were more likely to endorse incremental theories of personality, intelligence, and morality after exposure to multiple individuals exhibiting within-person variability in facial emotion than after exposure to multiple individuals exhibiting a single emotion several times. Perceptions of within-person variability in facial emotion-rather than perceptions of simple diversity in facial emotion-were responsible for these effects. Discussion focuses on how social ecologies shape lay theories. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Influence of PAHs among other coastal environmental variables on total and PAH-degrading bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauret, Caroline; Tedetti, Marc; Guigue, Catherine; Dumas, Chloé; Lami, Raphaël; Pujo-Pay, Mireille; Conan, Pascal; Goutx, Madeleine; Ghiglione, Jean-François

    2016-03-01

    We evaluated the relative impact of anthropogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) among biogeochemical variables on total, metabolically active, and PAH bacterial communities in summer and winter in surface microlayer (SML) and subsurface seawaters (SSW) across short transects along the NW Mediterranean coast from three harbors, one wastewater effluent, and one nearshore observatory reference site. At both seasons, significant correlations were found between dissolved total PAH concentrations and PAH-degrading bacteria that formed a gradient from the shore to nearshore waters. Accumulation of PAH degraders was particularly high in the SML, where PAHs accumulated. Harbors and wastewater outfalls influenced drastically and in a different way the total and active bacterial community structure, but they only impacted the communities from the nearshore zone (PAH concentrations on the spatial and temporal dynamic of total and active communities in this area, but this effect was putted in perspective by the importance of other biogeochemical variables.

  20. Influence of management history and landscape variables on soil organic carbon and soil redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venteris, E.R.; McCarty, G.W.; Ritchie, J.C.; Gish, T.

    2004-01-01

    Controlled studies to investigate the interaction between crop growth, soil properties, hydrology, and management practices are common in agronomy. These sites (much as with real world farmland) often have complex management histories and topographic variability that must be considered. In 1993 an interdisiplinary study was started for a 20-ha site in Beltsville, MD. Soil cores (271) were collected in 1999 in a 30-m grid (with 5-m nesting) and analyzed as part of the site characterization. Soil organic carbon (SOC) and 137Cesium (137Cs) were measured. Analysis of aerial photography from 1992 and of farm management records revealed that part of the site had been maintained as a swine pasture and the other portion as cropped land. Soil properties, particularly soil redistribution and SOC, show large differences in mean values between the two areas. Mass C is 0.8 kg m -2 greater in the pasture area than in the cropped portion. The pasture area is primarily a deposition site, whereas the crop area is dominated by erosion. Management influence is suggested, but topographic variability confounds interpretation. Soil organic carbon is spatially structured, with a regionalized variable of 120 m. 137Cs activity lacks spatial structure, suggesting disturbance of the profile by animal activity and past structures such as swine shelters and roads. Neither SOC nor 137Cs were strongly correlated to terrain parameters, crop yields, or a seasonal soil moisture index predicted from crop yields. SOC and 137Cs were weakly correlated (r2 ???0.2, F-test P-value 0.001), suggesting that soil transport controls, in part, SOC distribution. The study illustrates the importance of past site history when interpreting the landscape distribution of soil properties, especially those strongly influenced by human activity. Confounding variables, complex soil hydrology, and incomplete documentation of land use history make definitive interpretations of the processes behind the spatial distributions

  1. Possible Noise Nature of Elsässer Variable z- in Highly Alfvénic Solar Wind Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Tu, C.-Y.; He, J.-S.; Wang, L.-H.; Yao, S.; Zhang, L.

    2018-01-01

    It has been a long-standing debate on the nature of Elsässer variable z- observed in the solar wind fluctuations. It is widely believed that z- represents inward propagating Alfvén waves and interacts nonlinearly with z+ (outward propagating Alfvén waves) to generate energy cascade. However, z- variations sometimes show a feature of convective structures. Here we present a new data analysis on autocorrelation functions of z- in order to get some definite information on its nature. We find that there is usually a large drop on the z- autocorrelation function when the solar wind fluctuations are highly Alfvénic. The large drop observed by Helios 2 spacecraft near 0.3 AU appears at the first nonzero time lag τ = 81 s, where the value of the autocorrelation coefficient drops to 25%-65% of that at τ = 0 s. Beyond the first nonzero time lag, the autocorrelation coefficient decreases gradually to zero. The drop of z- correlation function also appears in the Wind observations near 1 AU. These features of the z- correlation function may suggest that z- fluctuations consist of two components: high-frequency white noise and low-frequency pseudo structures, which correspond to flat and steep parts of z- power spectrum, respectively. This explanation is confirmed by doing a simple test on an artificial time series, which is obtained from the superposition of a random data series on its smoothed sequence. Our results suggest that in highly Alfvénic fluctuations, z- may not contribute importantly to the interactions with z+ to produce energy cascade.

  2. Influence of magnet eddy current on magnetization characteristics of variable flux memory machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Lin, Heyun; Zhu, Z. Q.; Lyu, Shukang

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, the magnet eddy current characteristics of a newly developed variable flux memory machine (VFMM) is investigated. Firstly, the machine structure, non-linear hysteresis characteristics and eddy current modeling of low coercive force magnet are described, respectively. Besides, the PM eddy current behaviors when applying the demagnetizing current pulses are unveiled and investigated. The mismatch of the required demagnetization currents between the cases with or without considering the magnet eddy current is identified. In addition, the influences of the magnet eddy current on the demagnetization effect of VFMM are analyzed. Finally, a prototype is manufactured and tested to verify the theoretical analyses.

  3. Influences of bulk and surface recombinations on the power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Ziang; Sun, Shuren; Yan, Yu; Wang, Wei; Qin, Laixiang; Qin, G G

    2016-01-01

    For a novel kind of solar cell (SC) material, it is critical to estimate how far the power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of the SCs made of it can go. In 2010 Han and Chen proposed the equation for the ultimate efficiency of SCs without considering the carrier recombination η un . η un is capable of estimating the theoretical upper limits of the SC efficiencies and has attracted much attention. However, carrier recombination, which is one of the key factors influencing the PCEs of the SCs, is ignored in the equation for η un . In this paper, we develop a novel equation to calculate the ultimate efficiency for the SCs, η ur , which considers both the bulk and the surface carrier recombinations. The novel equation for η ur can estimate how much the bulk and the surface carrier recombinations influence the PCEs of the SCs. Moreover, with η ur we can estimate how much PCE improvement space can be gained only by reducing the influence of the carrier recombination to the least. The perovskite organometal trihalide SCs have attracted tremendous attention lately. For the planar CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 SCs, in the material depth range from 31.25–2000 nm, we apply the equation of η ur to investigate how the bulk and the surface carrier recombinations affect PCE. From a typically reported PCE of 15% for the planar CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 SC, using the equation of η ur , it is concluded that by reducing the influence of carrier recombination to the least the improvement of PCE is in the range of 17–30%. (paper)

  4. Aggregation of Organic Semiconductors and Its Influence on Carrier Transport and Solar Cell Performance

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Hanlin

    2017-01-01

    Photovoltaic technology based on solution-processable organic solar cells (OSCs) provides a promising route towards a low-cost strategy to address the sharply increasing energy demands worldwide. However, up to date, the vast majority of solar cell

  5. Physical activity levels of community-dwelling older adults are influenced by winter weather variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G R; Brandon, C; Gill, D P

    2017-07-01

    Winter weather conditions may negatively influence participation of older adults in daily physical activity (PA). Assess the influence of winter meteorological variables, day-time peak ambient temperature, windchill, humidity, and snow accumulation on the ground to accelerometer measured PA values in older adults. 50 community-dwelling older adults (77.4±4.7yrs; range 71-89; 12 females) living in Southwestern Ontario (Latitude 42.9°N Longitude 81.2° W) Canada, wore a waist-borne accelerometer during active waking hours (12h) for 7 consecutive days between February and April 2007. Hourly temperature, windchill, humidity, and snowfall accumulation were obtained from meteorological records and time locked to hourly accelerometer PA values. Regression analysis revealed significant relationships between time of day, ambient daytime high temperature and a humidity for participation in PA. Windchill temperature added no additional influence over PA acclamation already influenced by ambient day-time temperature and the observed variability in PA patterns relative to snow accumulation over the study period was too great to warrant its inclusion in the model. Most PA was completed in the morning hours and increased as the winter month's transitioned to spring (February through April). An equation was developed to adjust for winter weather conditions using temperature, humidity and time of day. Accurate PA assessment during the winter months must account for the ambient daytime high temperatures, humidity, and time of day. These older adults were more physically active during the morning hours and became more active as the winter season transitioned to spring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Increasing work-time influence: consequences for flexibility, variability, regularity and predictability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Garde, Anne Helene; Aust, Birgit; Diderichsen, Finn

    2012-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study investigated how an intervention aiming at increasing eldercare workers' influence on their working hours affected the flexibility, variability, regularity and predictability of the working hours. We used baseline (n = 296) and follow-up (n = 274) questionnaire data and interviews with intervention-group participants (n = 32). The work units in the intervention group designed their own intervention comprising either implementation of computerised self-scheduling (subgroup A), collection of information about the employees' work-time preferences by questionnaires (subgroup B), or discussion of working hours (subgroup C). Only computerised self-scheduling changed the working hours and the way they were planned. These changes implied more flexible but less regular working hours and an experience of less predictability and less continuity in the care of clients and in the co-operation with colleagues. In subgroup B and C, the participants ended up discussing the potential consequences of more work-time influence without actually implementing any changes. Employee work-time influence may buffer the adverse effects of shift work. However, our intervention study suggested that while increasing the individual flexibility, increasing work-time influence may also result in decreased regularity of the working hours and less continuity in the care of clients and co-operation with colleagues.

  7. The QBO as potential amplifier and conduit to lower altitudes of solar cycle influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. G. Mayr

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In several papers, the solar cycle (SC effect in the lower atmosphere has been linked observationally to the Quasi-biennial Oscillation (QBO of the zonal circulation. Salby and Callaghan (2000 in particular analyzed the QBO wind measurements, covering more than 40 years, and discovered that they contain a large SC signature at 20 km. We present here the results from a study with our 3-D Numerical Spectral Model (NSM, which relies primarily on parameterized gravity waves (GW to describe the QBO. In our model, the period of the SC is taken to be 10 years, and the relative amplitude of radiative forcing varies exponentially with height, i.e., 0.2% at the surface, 2% at 50 km, and 20% at 100 km and above. Applying spectral analysis to identify the SC signature, the model generates a relatively large modulation of the QBO, which reproduces the observations qualitatively. The numerical results demonstrate that the QBO modulation, closely tracking the phase of the SC, is robust and persists at least for 70 years. The question is what causes the SC effect, and our analysis shows that four interlocking processes are involved: (1 In the mesosphere at around 60 km, the solar UV variations generate in the zonal winds a SC modulation of the 12-month annual oscillation, which is hemispherically symmetric and confined to equatorial latitudes like the QBO. (2 Although the amplitude of this equatorial annual oscillation (EAO is relatively small, its SC modulation is large and extends into the lower stratosphere under the influence of, and amplified by, wave forcing. (3 The amplitude modulations of both EAO and QBO are essentially in phase with the imposed SC heating for the entire time span of the model simulation. This indicates that, due to positive feedback in the wave mechanism, the EAO apparently provides the pathway and pacemaker for the SC modulation of the QBO. (4 Our analysis demonstrates that the SC modulations of the QBO and EAO are amplified by

  8. Indications for solar influence on radon signal in the subsurface of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinitz, G.; Piatibratova, O.; Martin-Luis, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Radon at two locations in Tenerife is investigated. The MM-0 site is located in a bunker near Teide volcano. Daily radon (DR) signals are dominated by a 12-hour (S2) periodicity. Continuous wavelet transform (CWT) analysis of day-time and night-time series results in a day-night differentiation, which does not occur in the coeval temperature and pressure. This indicates that the radon system is directly affected by the rotation of Earth around its axis, and not via the pressure and/or temperature pattern. San Fernando sites are in an underground gallery, located at 2.1 and 3 km from the entrance. Alpha and gamma time series show DR signals having an S1 and a strong S2 periodicity. Sidebands occur around the S1 periodicity. The lower sideband is close to 0.9972696 cycles per day (CPD; = sidereal frequency) and the upper sideband at a symmetric frequency above. They reflect a driver containing two waveforms having periodicities of rotation of Earth around its axis and around the Sun that influences radon in a non-linear fashion, leading to the sidebands around the S1 periodicity. Observation in Tenerife of sidebands and day-night phenomena substantiates the notion that the periodic components in the diurnal and annual frequency band of radon time series are due to the influence of a component in solar radiation. (authors)

  9. Impact of inter-seasonal solar variability on the association of lower troposphere and cold point tropopause in the tropics: Observations using RO data from COSMIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V.; Dhaka, S. K.; Ho, Shu-Peng; Singh, Narendra; Singh, Vir; Reddy, K. K.; Chun, H.-Y.

    2017-12-01

    Association of lower tropospheric variations with the cold point tropopause (CPT) is examined on inter-seasonal basis over the tropical region (30°N-30°S) during 2007-2010 using COSMIC/FORMOST-3 Radio Occultation (RO) data. Temperature analyses for this association are shown over different regions of the globe having contrast topography namely over Western Pacific sector, Indian sector, and African sector. Correlation coefficient (r), taken as a measurement of association, show specific longitudinal differences between the lower troposphere (from 1 km to 5 km height) and the CPT. The northern and southern hemispheres show contrast coupling of temperature variation between lower tropospheric region and the CPT. Land and ocean effects are found to contribute in a different way to the correlation coefficient. Analyses show symmetrical structure of 'r' on both sides of the equator over the African region, as data include mostly land region on both side of equator. Data represent positive correlation (r 0.5) over 15°-20° latitudes on either side of the equator over the African region, suggesting strong hold of the inter-seasonal variation of solar diabatic heating influence over the tropic of Cancer and tropic of Capricorn. On the other hand, there is a contrast behaviour over the Indian region, 'r' is nearly negative ( - 1.0) each year in the southern hemisphere (SH) and positive ( 0.4) in the northern hemisphere (NH) with a maxima near tropic of Cancer. Western Pacific region is found to display a linear increase in 'r' from negative ( - 1.0) in SH to positive ( 0.8) in NH. In general, 'r' (positive) maximizes over the land region around 15°-20° latitudes, suggesting a control of in phase inter-seasonal solar heating on the coupling of boundary layer/lower troposphere and CPT region, whereas it turns negative over water body. Analyses suggest that variabilities in CPT over different regions of globe show significant inter-seasonal association with the lower

  10. Influence of Flat-Panel Fluoroscopic Equipment Variables on Cardiac Radiation Doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickoloff, Edward L.; Lu Zhengfeng; Dutta, Ajoy; So, James; Balter, Stephen; Moses, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the influence of physician-selectable equipment variables on the potential radiation dose reductions during cardiac catheterization examinations using modern imaging equipment. Materials. A modern bi-plane angiography unit with flat-panel image receptors was used. Patients were simulated with 15-30 cm of acrylic plastic. The variables studied were: patient thickness, fluoroscopy pulse rates, record mode frame rates, image receptor field-of-view (FoV), automatic dose control (ADC) mode, SID/SSD geometry setting, automatic collimation, automatic positioning, and others. Results. Patient radiation doses double for every additional 3.5-4.5 cm of soft tissue. The dose is directly related to the imaging frame rate; a decrease from 30 pps to 15 pps reduces the dose by about 50%. The dose is related to [(FoV) -N ] where 2.0 < N < 3.0. Suboptimal positioning of the patient can nearly double the dose. The ADC system provides three selections that can vary the radiation level by 50%. For pediatric studies (2-5 years old), the selection of equipment variables can result in entrance radiation doses that range between 6 and 60 cGy for diagnostic cases and between 15 and 140 cGy for interventional cases. For adult studies, the equipment variables can produce entrance radiation doses that range between 13 and 130 cGy for diagnostic cases and between 30 and 400 cGy for interventional cases. Conclusions. Overall dose reductions of 70-90% can be achieved with pediatric patients and about 90% with adult patients solely through optimal selection of equipment variables

  11. Parameters Influencing the Growth of ZnO Nanowires as Efficient Low Temperature Flexible Perovskite-Based Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Dymshits

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite has proved to be a superior material for photovoltaic solar cells. In this work we investigate the parameters influencing the growth of ZnO nanowires (NWs for use as an efficient low temperature photoanode in perovskite-based solar cells. The structure of the solar cell is FTO (SnO2:F-glass (or PET-ITO (In2O3·(SnO2 (ITO on, polyethylene terephthalate (PET/ZnAc seed layer/ZnO NWs/CH3NH3PbI3/Spiro-OMeTAD/Au. The influence of the growth rate and the diameter of the ZnO NWs on the photovoltaic performance were carefully studied. The ZnO NWs perovskite-based solar cell demonstrates impressive power conversion efficiency of 9.06% on a rigid substrate with current density over 21 mA/cm2. In addition, we successfully fabricated flexible perovskite solar cells while maintaining all fabrication processes at low temperature, achieving power conversion efficiency of 6.4% with excellent stability for over 75 bending cycles.

  12. Solar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The solar collectors shown are elements of domestic solar hot water systems produced by Solar One Ltd., Virginia Beach, Virginia. Design of these systems benefited from technical expertise provided Solar One by NASA's Langley Research Center. The company obtained a NASA technical support package describing the d e sign and operation of solar heating equipment in NASA's Tech House, a demonstration project in which aerospace and commercial building technology are combined in an energy- efficient home. Solar One received further assistance through personal contact with Langley solar experts. The company reports that the technical information provided by NASA influenced Solar One's panel design, its selection of a long-life panel coating which increases solar collection efficiency, and the method adopted for protecting solar collectors from freezing conditions.

  13. Short-Term Environmental Effects and Their Influence on Spatial Homogeneity of Organic Solar Cell Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Huei-Ting; Zach, Peter W; Friedel, Bettina

    2017-08-23

    In this study, we focus on the induced degradation and spatial inhomogeneity of organic photovoltaic devices under different environmental conditions, uncoupled from the influence of any auxiliary hole-transport (HT) layer. During testing of the corresponding devices comprising the standard photoactive layer of poly(3-hexylthiophene) as donor, blended with phenyl-C 61 -butyric acid methyl ester as acceptor, a comparison was made between the nonencapsulated devices upon exposure to argon in the dark, dry air in the dark, dry air with illumination, and humid air in the dark. The impact on the active layer's photophysics is discussed, along with the device physics in terms of integral solar cell performance and spatially resolved photocurrent distribution with point-to-point analysis of the diode characteristics to determine the origin of the observed integrated organic photovoltaic device behavior. The results show that even without the widely used hygroscopic HT layer, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate), humidity is still a major factor in the short-term environmental degradation of organic solar cells with this architecture, and not only oxygen or light, as is often reported. Different from previous reports where water-induced device degradation was spatially homogeneous and formation of Al 2 O 3 islands was only seen for oxygen permeation through pinholes in aluminum, we observed insulating islands merely after humidity exposure in the present study. Further, we demonstrated with laser beam induced current mapping and point-to-point diode analysis that the water-induced performance losses are a result of the exposed device area comprising regions with entirely unaltered high output and intact diode behavior and those with severe degradation showing detrimentally lowered output and voltage-independent charge blocking, which is essentially insulating behavior. It is suggested that this is caused by transport of water through pinholes to the

  14. Influence of partial ionization and scattering states on the solar interior structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, R.K.

    1982-01-01

    The equation of state for the solar interior is normally assumed to be a fully ionized gas corrected by the Debye-Hueckel Coulomb interaction, partial degeneracy, and radiation pressure. The assumption of full ionization is dropped in this paper, and the influence of scattering states is included. The theory of scattering states appears to be new to astrophysics. This theory has been developed by Larkin and is discussed thoroughly by Ebeling, Kraft, and Kremp. The effect of scattering states eliminates the need to invoke a process of ''pressure ionization'' for which no satisfactory theory exists. Six solar models which include varying forms of the equation of state are discussed. The Saha equation without scattering states gives a neutrino counting rate of 7.41 SNU for the 37 Cl experiment, while assumed ionization for T>3 x 10 5 K gives 8.87 SNU, and the Saha equation with the lowest order effect of scattering states (Planck-Larkin equation) gives 8.83 SNU. Inclusion of the second virial coefficient due to scattering states brings the result to 9.02 SNU. The changes of quantities such as central temperature and the temperature at the base of the convective envelope are small and bear a similar relationship among the models. The initial hydrogen abundance of the model including the second virial coefficient due to scattering states is in good agreement with that found for the Orion nebula and B stars, i.e., log (N/sub He//N/sub H/)+12 = 10.97

  15. Influence of carrier concentration on the performance of CIAS solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kinjal; Ray, Jaymin

    2018-05-01

    Photovoltaic research has moved beyond the use of single crystalline materials such as Group IV elemental Si and Group III-V compounds like GaAs to much more complex compounds of the Group I-III-VI2 with chalcopyrite structure. The ternary ABC2 chalcopyrites (A=Cu; B=In, Ga or Al; C= S, Se or Te) form a large group of semiconducting materials with diverse structural and electrical properties. These materials are attractive for thin film photovoltaic application for a number of reasons. The bandgap of CuInSe2 is relatively low, 1.04 eV, but it can be adjusted to better match the solar spectrum either by substituting part of In by Ga or part of Se by S. Most reported and popular Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) is one of its derivative. Efficiency of the CIGS devices with Eg >1.3 eV is reduced by the degradation of the electronic properties of the absorber leading to losses in the fill-factor and the open-circuit voltage. Alternatively, the performance can be improved by the addition of Al to form CuInAlSe2 (CIAS) absorber layers with an increase in the bandgap energy, which matches closely with the solar spectrum. In the present work an effort was made in the direction of improving the conversion efficiency by studying the influence of carrier concentration. SCAPS simulation program is used to simulate the CIAS structure numerically. The obtained results intended the significant variation in the values of conversion efficiency. Variation in the efficiency can be considered because of the relation optical absorption and carrier concentration. Observed highest efficiency is 10 %, which can be further improved by considering actual parameters of the device as well as the operating condition.

  16. Influence of coronal mass ejections on parameters of high-speed solar wind: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugay, Yulia; Slemzin, Vladimir; Rodkin, Denis; Yermolaev, Yuri; Veselovsky, Igor

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the case of disagreement between predicted and observed in-situ parameters of the recurrent high-speed solar wind streams (HSSs) existing for Carrington rotation (CR) 2118 (December 2011) in comparison with CRs 2117 and 2119. The HSSs originated at the Sun from a recurrent polar coronal hole (CH) expanding to mid-latitudes, and its area in the central part of the solar disk increased with the rotation number. This part of the CH was responsible for the equatorial flank of the HSS directed to the Earth. The time and speed of arrival for this part of the HSS to the Earth were predicted by the hierarchical empirical model based on EUV-imaging and the Wang-Sheeley-Arge ENLIL semi-empirical replace model and compared with the parameters measured in-situ by model. The predicted parameters were compared with those measured in-situ. It was found, that for CR 2117 and CR 2119, the predicted HSS speed values agreed with the measured ones within the typical accuracy of ±100 km s-1. During CR 2118, the measured speed was on 217 km s-1 less than the value predicted in accordance with the increased area of the CH. We suppose that at CR 2118, the HSS overtook and interacted with complex ejecta formed from three merged coronal mass ejections (CMEs) with a mean speed about 400 km s-1. According to simulations of the Drag-based model, this complex ejecta might be created by several CMEs starting from the Sun in the period between 25 and 27 December 2011 and arriving to the Earth simultaneously with the HSS. Due to its higher density and magnetic field strength, the complex ejecta became an obstacle for the equatorial flank of the HSS and slowed it down. During CR 2117 and CR 2119, the CMEs appeared before the arrival of the HSSs, so the CMEs did not influence on the HSSs kinematics.

  17. The Influence of ENSO to the Rainfall Variability in North Sumatra Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwandi, H.; Pusparini, N.; Ariantono, J. Y.; Kurniawan, R.; Tari, C. A.; Sudrajat, A.

    2018-04-01

    The El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a global phenomenon that affects the variability of rainfall in North Sumatra. The influence of ENSO will be different for each region. This review will analyse the influence of ENSO activity on seasonal and annual rainfall variability. In this research, North Sumatra Province will be divided into 4 (four) regions based on topographical conditions, such as: East Coast (EC), East Slope (ES), Mountains (MT), and West Coast (WC). The method used was statistical and descriptive analysis. Data used in this research were rainfall data from 15 stations / climate observation posts which spread in North Sumatera region and also anomaly data of Nino 3.4 region from period 1981-2016. The results showed that the active El Niño had an effect on the decreasing the rainfall during the period of DJF, JJA and SON in East Coast, East Slope, and Mountains with the decreasing of average percentage of annual rainfall up to 7%. On the contrary, the active La Nina had an effect on the addition of rainfall during the period DJF and JJA in the East Coast and Mountains with the increasing of average percentage of annual rainfall up to 6%.

  18. The influence of Seychelles Dome on the large scale Tropical Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manola, Iris; Selten, Frank; Hazeleger, Wilco

    2013-04-01

    The Seychelles Dome (SD) is the thermocline ridge just South of the equator in the Western Indian Ocean basin. It is characterized by strong atmospheric convection and a shallow thermocline and is associated with large intraseasonal convection and SST variability (Harrison and Vecchi 2001). The SD is influenced by surface and subsurface processes, such as air-sea fluxes, Ekman upwelling from wind stress curl, ocean dynamics (vertical mixing) and oceanic Rossby waves from southeastern Indian Ocean. The favoring season for a strong SD is the boreal winter, where the thermocline is most shallow. Then the southeasterly trade winds converge with the northwesterly monsoonal winds over the intertropical convergence zone and cause cyclonic wind stress curl that drives Ekman divergence and a ridging of the thermocline. It is found that the subseasonal and interranual variability of the SD is influenced by large scale events, such as the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), the ENSO and the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) (Tozuka et al., 2010, Lloyd and Vecchi, 2010). The SD is enhanced by cooling events in the Western Indian Ocean and easterly winds that raise the thermocline and increase the upwelling. This can be associated with a strong Walker circulation, like negative IOD conditions or La Nina-like conditions. So far the studies focus on the origins of the SD variability, but the influence of the SD itself on regional or large scale climate is largely unknown. In this study we focus on the influence of the SD variations on the large scale tropical circulation. We analyze the covariance of the SD variations and the tropical circulation in a 200 year control imulation of the climate model EC-EARTH and perform idealized SST forced simulations to study the character of the atmospheric response and its relation to ENSO, IOD and MJO. References -Harrison, D. E. and G. A. Vecchi, 2001: January 1999 Indian Ocean cooling event. Geophys. Res. Lett., 28, 3717-3720. -Lloyd, I. D., and G. A

  19. Variability in Migration Routes Influences Early Marine Survival of Juvenile Salmon Smolts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan B Furey

    Full Text Available Variability in animal migratory behavior is expected to influence fitness, but few empirical examples demonstrating this relationship exist. The initial marine phase in the migration of juvenile salmon smolts has been identified as a potentially critical life history stage to overall population productivity, yet how fine-scale migration routes may influence survival are unknown. Large-scale acoustic telemetry studies have estimated survival rates of outmigrant Pacific salmon smolts through the Strait of Georgia (SOG along the British Columbian coastline to the Pacific Ocean, but these data have not been used to identify and characterize fine-scale movements. Data collected on over 850 sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka and steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss smolts detected at an array in the Strait of Georgia in 2004-2008 and 2010-2013 were analyzed to characterize migration routes and link movements to subsequent survival at an array 250 km further along the marine migration pathway. Both species exhibited disproportionate use of the most eastern route in the Strait of Georgia (Malaspina Strait. While many smolts moved across the northern Strait of Georgia acoustic array with no indication of long-term milling or large-scale east-to-west movements, large proportions (20-40% of sockeye and 30-50% of steelhead exhibited a different behavior, apparently moving in a westward or counterclockwise pattern. Variability in migratory behavior for both species was linked to subsequent survival through the Strait of Georgia. Survival for both species was influenced by initial east-to-west location, and sockeye were further influenced by migration timing and duration of time spent near the northern Strait of Georgia array. Westward movements result in a net transport of smolts from Malaspina Strait to the Strait of Georgia, particularly for steelhead. Counterclockwise movements may be due to the currents in this area during the time of outmigration, and the

  20. Influence of gender and types of sports training on QT variables in young elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omiya, Kazuto; Sekizuka, Hiromitsu; Kida, Keisuke; Suzuki, Kengo; Akashi, Yoshihiro J; Ohba, Haruo; Musha, Haruki

    2014-01-01

    Influence of gender and sports training on QT variables such as QT interval and dispersion (QT dispersion: QTD) in young elite athletes were evaluated. Subjects included 104 male and 97 female Japanese elite athletes (mean age 21.6 years). Sports included basketball, fencing, gymnastics, judo, swimming, tennis, track and field and volleyball. Age-matched healthy non-athletes (32 men and 20 women) were enrolled as controls. QT measurements were manually obtained from a 12-lead resting electrocardiogram and QTD was calculated as the difference between the longest and shortest QT intervals. A corrected QT interval (QTc) was obtained using Bazett's formula. Subjects were divided into two groups; an endurance training group and a static training group on the basis of their training types. Maximum and minimum QTc were significantly longer in female athletes than in male athletes (max: 414.2 vs. 404.5 ms, min: 375.1 vs. 359.2 ms, pgender and different characteristics of sports training may affect QT variables even in young elite athletes. Vigorous static exercise training may independently prolong QT variables.

  1. Progranulin gene variability influences the risk for bipolar I disorder, but not bipolar II disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimberti, Daniela; Prunas, Cecilia; Paoli, Riccardo A; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Fenoglio, Chiara; Villa, Chiara; Palazzo, Carlotta; Cigliobianco, Michela; Camuri, Giulia; Serpente, Maria; Scarpini, Elio; Altamura, A Carlo

    2014-11-01

    Recent data have shown that genetic variability in the progranulin (GRN) gene may contribute to the susceptibility to developing bipolar disorder (BD). However, in regard to patients with BD, no information is available on the role of genetic variability and plasma progranulin levels in different types of this disorder. In this study, we performed an association analysis of GRN in an Italian population consisting of 134 patients with BD and 232 controls to evaluate progranulin plasma levels. The presence of the polymorphic variant of the rs5848 single nucleotide polymorphism is protective for the development of bipolar I disorder (BD-I) (odds ratio = 0.55, 95% confidence interval: 0.33-0.93; p = 0.024) but not bipolar II disorder (BD-II) (p > 0.05). In addition, plasma progranulin levels are significantly decreased in BD [mean ± standard deviation (SD) 112 ± 35 versus 183 ± 93 ng/mL in controls; p < 0.001]. Regarding the influence of GRN variability on BD susceptibility, the predisposing genetic background differs between BD-I and BD-II, possibly implying that pathogenic mechanisms differ between the two subtypes of BD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. [Pain and workplace. Sociodemographic variables influence in therapeutic response and labor productivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Herrero, M T; López-González, Á A; Ramírez Iñiguez de la Torre, M V; Capdevila García, L M; Terradillos García, M J; Aguilar Jiménez, E

    2016-09-01

    Pain is a major cause of medical consultation. The complexity of managing it is due to its long duration and intensity, and it sometimes requires a combination of multiple drugs. The objective of this study is to assess the use of drugs for pain in workers, the clinical response obtained, its influence on estimating work productivity, its relationship to sociodemographic variables, and the type of drug used. A cross-sectional study on 1,080 workers, aged 18-65 years, during periodic surveys to monitor their health in companies in the service sector in Spain. Treatments used, clinical efficacy, influence on work productivity and sociodemographic variables (age, gender) are evaluated. The Brief Pain Inventory questionnaire, validated for Spain, was used to assess pain, and the SPSS(®) 20.0 package for the statistical analysis. NSAIDs and simple analgesics have higher percentages of improvement in pain (P=.032 and P<.0001, respectively). Men respond better to NSAIDs, and women to simple analgesics. Improved productivity is higher in men than in women (P=.042). No significant differences were observed for age, pain improvement or productivity, except in those over 55 years. The analgesic prescription pain conditions must consider the age and gender of the patient, as well as the type of drug. The choice of drug should be based on the aetiology and aspects unrelated to the clinical variables, such as sociodemographic, work or psychosocial. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Variability of skin autofluorescence measurement over 6 and 12 weeks and the influence of benfotiamine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirban, Alin; Pop, Alexandra; Fischer, Annelie; Heckermann, Sascha; Tschoepe, Diethelm

    2013-09-01

    Measurements of skin autofluorescence (SAF) allow for a simple and noninvasive quantification of tissue advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), a marker linked to the risk of diabetes complications. The aim of this study was to test the repeatability of SAF over 6 and 12 weeks and to test whether benfotiamine, a thiamine prodrug suggested to reduce AGEs formation under hyperglycemic conditions, is able to attenuate SAF when administered over 6 weeks. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, crossover study, 22 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) received 900 mg/day benfotiamine or placebo for 6 weeks (washout period of 6 weeks between). At the beginning and at the end of each treatment period, SAF was assessed in the fasting state, as well as 2, 4, and 6 h following a mixed test meal. The respective intra-individual and inter-individual variability of fasting SAF was 6.9% and 24.5% within 6 weeks and 10.9% and 23.1% within 12 weeks. The respective variability calculated for triplicate comparisons was 9.9% and 27.7%. A short-term therapy with benfotiamine did not influence SAF significantly, nor did we find a significant postprandial SAF increase. In patients with T2DM, repeated, timely spaced SAF measurements have an intra-subject variability of below 11%. Using these data, sample sizes were calculated for interventional studies aiming at reducing SAF. Benfotiamine treatment for 6 weeks did not significantly influence SAF; for this, a longer-term therapy is probably needed.

  4. A database of 10 min average measurements of solar radiation and meteorological variables in Ostrava, Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Opálková

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A database containing 10 min means of solar irradiance measured on a horizontal plane in several ultraviolet and visible bands from July 2014 to December 2016 at three stations in the area of the city of Ostrava (Czech Republic is presented. The database contains time series of 10 min average irradiances or photosynthetic photon flux densities measured in the following spectral bands: 280–315 nm (UVB; 315–380 nm (UVA; and 400–700 nm (photosynthetically active radiation, PAR; 510–700 nm; 600–700 nm; 610–680 nm; 690–780 nm; 400–1100 nm. A series of meteorological variables including relative air humidity and air temperature at surface is also provided at the same 10 min time step at all three stations, and precipitation is provided for two stations. Air pressure, wind speed, wind direction, and concentrations of air pollutants PM10, SO2, NOx, NO, NO2 were measured at the 1 h time step at the fourth station owned by the Public Health Institute of Ostrava. The details of the experimental sites and instruments used for the measurements are given. Special attention is given to the data quality, and the original approach to the data quality which was established is described in detail. About 130 000 records for each of the three stations are available in the database. This database offers a unique ensemble of variables having a high temporal resolution and it is a reliable source for radiation in relation to environment and vegetation in highly polluted areas of industrial cities in the of northern mid-latitudes. The database has been placed on the PANGAEA repository (https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.879722 and contains individual data files for each station.

  5. A database of 10 min average measurements of solar radiation and meteorological variables in Ostrava, Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opálková, Marie; Navrátil, Martin; Špunda, Vladimír; Blanc, Philippe; Wald, Lucien

    2018-04-01

    A database containing 10 min means of solar irradiance measured on a horizontal plane in several ultraviolet and visible bands from July 2014 to December 2016 at three stations in the area of the city of Ostrava (Czech Republic) is presented. The database contains time series of 10 min average irradiances or photosynthetic photon flux densities measured in the following spectral bands: 280-315 nm (UVB); 315-380 nm (UVA); and 400-700 nm (photosynthetically active radiation, PAR); 510-700 nm; 600-700 nm; 610-680 nm; 690-780 nm; 400-1100 nm. A series of meteorological variables including relative air humidity and air temperature at surface is also provided at the same 10 min time step at all three stations, and precipitation is provided for two stations. Air pressure, wind speed, wind direction, and concentrations of air pollutants PM10, SO2, NOx, NO, NO2 were measured at the 1 h time step at the fourth station owned by the Public Health Institute of Ostrava. The details of the experimental sites and instruments used for the measurements are given. Special attention is given to the data quality, and the original approach to the data quality which was established is described in detail. About 130 000 records for each of the three stations are available in the database. This database offers a unique ensemble of variables having a high temporal resolution and it is a reliable source for radiation in relation to environment and vegetation in highly polluted areas of industrial cities in the of northern mid-latitudes. The database has been placed on the PANGAEA repository (https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.879722" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.879722) and contains individual data files for each station.

  6. Fatiguing exercise intensity influences the relationship between parameters reflecting neuromuscular function and postural control variables.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Boyas

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of fatiguing exercise intensity on the nature and extent of fatigue-induced changes in neuromuscular function and postural stability in quiet standing. We also explored the contribution of selected neuromuscular mechanisms involved in force production to postural stability impairment observed following fatigue using an approach based on multivariate regressions. Eighteen young subjects performed 30-s postural trials on one leg with their eyes closed. Postural trials were performed before and after fatiguing exercises of different intensities: 25, 50 and 75% of maximal isometric plantarflexor torque. Fatiguing exercises consisted of sustaining a plantarflexor isometric contraction at the target intensity until task failure. Maximal isometric plantarflexor torque, electromyographic activity of plantarflexor and dorsiflexor muscles, activation level (twitch interpolation technique and twitch contractile properties of plantarflexors were used to characterize neuromuscular function. The 25% exercise was associated with greater central fatigue whereas the 50 and 75% exercises involved mostly peripheral fatigue. However, all fatiguing exercises induced similar alterations in postural stability, which was unexpected considering previous literature. Stepwise multiple regression analyses showed that fatigue-related changes in selected parameters related to neuromuscular function could explain more than half (0.51≤R(2≤0.82 of the changes in postural variables for the 25% exercise. On the other hand, regression models were less predictive (0.17≤R(2≤0.73 for the 50 and 75% exercises. This study suggests that fatiguing exercise intensity does not influence the extent of postural stability impairment, but does influence the type of fatigue induced and the neuromuscular function predictors explaining changes in postural variables.

  7. Environmental and management influences on temporal variability of near saturated soil hydraulic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodner, G; Scholl, P; Loiskandl, W; Kaul, H-P

    2013-08-01

    Structural porosity is a decisive property for soil productivity and soil environmental functions. Hydraulic properties in the structural range vary over time in response to management and environmental influences. Although this is widely recognized, there are few field studies that determine dominant driving forces underlying hydraulic property dynamics. During a three year field experiment we measured temporal variability of soil hydraulic properties by tension infiltrometry. Soil properties were characterized by hydraulic conductivity, effective macroporosity and Kosugi's lognormal pore size distribution model. Management related influences comprised three soil cover treatment (mustard and rye vs. fallow) and an initial mechanical soil disturbance with a rotary harrow. Environmental driving forces were derived from meteorological and soil moisture data. Soil hydraulic parameters varied over time by around one order of magnitude. The coefficient of variation of soil hydraulic conductivity K(h) decreased from 69.5% at saturation to 42.1% in the more unsaturated range (- 10 cm pressure head). A slight increase in the Kosugi parameter showing pore heterogeneity was observed under the rye cover crop, reflecting an enhanced structural porosity. The other hydraulic parameters were not significantly influenced by the soil cover treatments. Seedbed preparation with a rotary harrow resulted in a fourfold increase in macroporosity and hydraulic conductivity next to saturation, and homogenized the pore radius distribution. Re-consolidation after mechanical loosening lasted over 18 months until the soil returned to its initial state. The post-tillage trend of soil settlement could be approximated by an exponential decay function. Among environmental factors, wetting-drying cycles were identified as dominant driving force explaining short term hydraulic property changes within the season (r 2  = 0.43 to 0.59). Our results suggested that beside considering average

  8. Familial influences on the full range of variability in attention and activity levels during adolescence: A longitudinal twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chun-Zi; Grant, Julia D; Heath, Andrew C; Reiersen, Angela M; Mulligan, Richard C; Anokhin, Andrey P

    2016-05-01

    To investigate familial influences on the full range of variability in attention and activity across adolescence, we collected maternal ratings of 339 twin pairs at ages 12, 14, and 16, and estimated the transmitted and new familial influences on attention and activity as measured by the Strengths and Weaknesses of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms and Normal Behavior Scale. Familial influences were substantial for both traits across adolescence: genetic influences accounted for 54%-73% (attention) and 31%-73% (activity) of the total variance, and shared environmental influences accounted for 0%-22% of the attention variance and 13%-57% of the activity variance. The longitudinal stability of individual differences in attention and activity was largely accounted for by familial influences transmitted from previous ages. Innovations over adolescence were also partially attributable to familial influences. Studying the full range of variability in attention and activity may facilitate our understanding of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder's etiology and intervention.

  9. A novel approach for evaluating the impact of fixed variables on photovoltaic (PV) solar installations using enhanced meta data analysis among higher education institutions in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Hoyos, Diane N.

    The global demand for electric energy has continuously increased over the last few decades. Some mature, alternative generation methods are wind, power, photovoltaic panels, biogas and fuel cells. In order to find alternative sources of energy to aid in the reduction of our nation's dependency on non-renewable fuels, energy sources include the use of solar energy panels. The intent of these initiatives is to provide substantial energy savings and reduce dependence on the electrical grid and net metering savings during the peak energy-use hours. The focus of this study explores and provides a clearer picture of the adoption of solar photovoltaic technology in institutions of higher education. It examines the impact of different variables associated with a photovoltaic installation in an institutions of higher education in the United States on the production generations for universities. Secondary data was used with permission from the Advancement of Suitability in Higher Education (AASHE). A multiple regression analysis was performed to determine the impact of different variables on the energy generation production. A Meta Data transformation analysis offered a deeper investigation into the impact of the variables on the photovoltaic installations. Although a review of a significant number of journal articles, dissertations and thesis in the area of photovoltaic solar installations are available, there were limited studies of actual institutions of higher education with the significant volume of institutions. However a study where the database included a significant number of data variables is unique and provides a researcher the opportunity to investigate different facets of a solar installation. The data of the installations ranges from 1993-2015. Included in this observation are the researcher's experience both in the procurement industry and as a team member of a solar institution of higher education in the southern portion of the United States.

  10. Influence of orbital forcing and solar activity on water isotopes in precipitation during the mid- and late Holocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dietrich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigate the impact of mid- and late Holocene orbital forcing and solar activity on variations of the oxygen isotopic composition in precipitation. The investigation is motivated by a recently published speleothem δ18O record from the well-monitored Bunker Cave in Germany. The record reveals some high variability on multi-centennial to millennial scales that does not linearly correspond to orbital forcing. Our model study is based on a set of novel climate simulations performed with the atmosphere general circulation model ECHAM5-wiso enhanced by explicit water isotope diagnostics. From the performed model experiments, we derive the following major results: (1 the response of both orbital and solar forcing lead to changes in surface temperatures and δ18O in precipitation with similar magnitudes during the mid- and late Holocene. (2 Past δ18O anomalies correspond to changing temperatures in the orbital driven simulations. This does not hold true if an additional solar forcing is added. (3 Two orbital driven mid-Holocene experiments, simulating the mean climate state approximately 5000 and 6000 yr ago, yield very similar results. However, if an identical additional solar activity-induced forcing is added, the simulated changes of surface temperatures as well as δ18O between both periods differ. We conclude from our simulation results that non-linear effects and feedbacks of the orbital and solar activity forcing substantially alter the δ18O in precipitation pattern and its relation to temperature change.

  11. Solar activity influence on climatic variations of stratosphere and mesosphere in mid-latitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taubenheim, J.; Entzian, G.; Voncossart, G.

    1989-01-01

    The direct modulation of temperature of the mid-latitude mesosphere by the solar-cycle EUV variation, which leads to greater heat input at higher solar activity, is well established. Middle atmosphere temperature modulation by the solar cycle is independently confirmed by the variation of reflection heights of low frequency radio waves in the lower ionosphere, which are regularly monitored over about 30 years. As explained elsewhere in detail, these reflection heights depend on the geometric altitude of a certain isobaric surface (near 80 k), and on the solar ionizing Lyman-alpha radiation flux. Knowing the solar cycle variation of Lyman-alpha how much the measured reflection heights would be lowered with the transition from solar minimum to maximum can be calculated, if the vertical baric structure of the neutral atmosphere would remain unchanged. Any discrepancy between expected and observed height change must be explained by an uplifting of the isobaric level from solar minimum to maximum, caused by the temperature rise in the mesosphere. By integrating the solar cycle temperature changes over the height region of the middle atmosphere, and assuming that the lower boundary (tropopause) has no solar cycle variation, the magnitude of this uplifting can be estimated. It is given for the Lidar-derived and for the rocket-measured temperature variations. Comparison suggests that the real amplitude of the solar cycle temperature variation in the mesosphere is underestimated when using the rocket data, but probably overestimated with the Lidar data

  12. Solar variations and their influence on trends in upper stratospheric ozone and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuebbles, D.J.; Kinnison, D.E.; Lean, J.L.

    1990-10-01

    Over the past decade, knowledge of the magnitude and temporal structure of the variations in the sun's ultraviolet irradiance has increased steadily. A number of theoretical modeling studies have shown that changes in the solar ultraviolet flux during the 11-year solar cycle can have a significant effect on stratospheric ozone concentrations. With the exception of Brasseur et al., who examined a very broad range of solar flux variations, all of these studies assumed much larger changes in the ultraviolet flux than measurements now indicate. These studies either calculated the steady-state effect at solar maximum and solar minimum or assumed sinusoidal variations in the solar flux changes with time. It is now possible to narrow the uncertainty range of the expected effects on upper stratospheric ozone and temperature resulting from the 11-year solar cycle. A more accurate representation of the solar flux changes with time is used in this analysis, as compared to previous published studies. This study also evaluates the relative roles of solar flux variations and increasing concentrations of long-lived trace gases in determining the observed trends in upper stratospheric ozone and temperature. The LLNL two-dimensional chemical-radiative-transport model of the global atmosphere is used to evaluate the combined effects on the stratosphere from changes in solar ultraviolet irradiances and trace gas concentrations over the last several decades. Derived trends in upper stratospheric ozone concentrations and temperature are then compared with available analyses of ground-based and satellite measurements over this time period

  13. Influence of structural variations in push-pull zinc porphyrins on photovoltaic performance of dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chenyi; Giordano, Fabrizio; Cevey-Ha, Ngoc-Le; Tsao, Hoi Nok; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grätzel, Michael

    2014-04-01

    We designed and synthesized two new zinc porphyrin dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Subtle molecular structural variation in the dyes significantly influenced the performance of the DSC devices. By utilizing these dyes in combination with a cobalt-based redox electrolyte using a photoanode made of mesoporous TiO2 , we achieved a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of up to 12.0 % under AM 1.5 G (100 mW cm(-2)) simulated solar light. Moreover, we obtained a high PCE of 6.4 % for solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells by using 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenylamine)-9,9'-spirobifluorene as a hole-transporting material. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Influence of the spectral distribution of a solar simulator and of the outer diffuse radiation in the estimation of the optical yield of a thermal solar receiver; Influencia de la distribucion espectral de un simulador solar y de la radiacion difusa exterior en la estimacion del rendimiento optico de un captador solar termico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sallaberry, F.; Garcia de Jalon, A.; Ramirez, L.; Olano, X.; Bernad, I.; Erice, R.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we will show the results of the analysis of factors that influence the estimation of optical efficiency of solar thermal collectors testes according to the European standard UNE-EN 12975-2. Indoor tests with solar simulator involve control of the spectrum of its lamps to ensure that the difference with the Sun one does not change the optical efficiency {eta}{sub 0} of the collector. For outdoor tests, the diffuse radiation should be control as well. In the laboratory (LCS) of CENER, solar collectors tests are done according to part 6.1 of the standard UNE{sub E}N 12975-2 in continuous solar simulator. This study estimated the spectral correction applied to the estimation of optical efficiency of some solar collectors, with different selective materials. Likewise, we will weight the influence of terms related to diffuse radiation and spectral distribution. (Author)

  15. Development of Power Supply Management Module for Radio Signal Repeaters of Automatic Metering Reading System in Variable Solar Density Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondratjevs K.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been significant research focus that revolves around harvesting and minimising energy consumption by wireless sensor network nodes. When a sensor node is depleted of energy, it becomes unresponsive and disconnected from the network that can significantly influence the performance of the whole network. The purpose of the present research is to create a power supply management module in order to provide stable operating voltage for autonomous operations of radio signal repeaters, sensors or gateways of WSN. The developed management module is composed of a solar panel, lithium battery and power supply management module. The novelty of the research is the management module, which ensures stable and uninterrupted operations of electronic equipment in various power supply modes in different situations, simultaneously ensuring energy protection and sustainability of the module components. The management module is able to provide power supply of 5 V for electronics scheme independently, without power interruption switching between power sources and power flows in different directions.

  16. Influence of misalignments on the performance of externally occulted solar coronagraphs. Application to PROBA-3/ASPIICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestov, S. V.; Zhukov, A. N.

    2018-05-01

    Context. The ASPIICS instrument is a novel externally occulted coronagraph that will be launched on board the PROBA-3 mission of the European Space Agency. The external occulter will be placed on one satellite 150 m ahead of the second satellite that will carry an optical instrument. During 6 h out of 19.38 h of orbit, the satellites will fly in a precise (accuracy around a few millimeters) formation, constituting a giant externally occulted coronagraph. The large distance between the external occulter and the primary objective will allow observations of the white-light solar corona starting from extremely low heights 1.1R⊙. Aims: We intend to analyze influence of shifts of the satellites and misalignments of optical elements on the ASPIICS performance in terms of diffracted light. Based on the quantitative influence of misalignments on diffracted light, we provide a recipe for choosing the size of the internal occulter (IO) to achieve a trade-off between the minimal height of observations and sustainability to possible misalignments. Methods: We considered different types of misalignments and analyzed their influence from optical and computational points of view. We implemented a numerical model of the diffracted light and its propagation through the optical system and computed intensities of diffracted light throughout the instrument. Our numerical approach is based on a model from the literature that considered the axisymmetrical case. Here we extend the model to include nonsymmetrical cases and possible misalignments. Results: The numerical computations fully confirm the main properties of the diffracted light that we obtained from semi-analytical consideration. We obtain that relative influences of various misalignments are significantly different. We show that the internal occulter with RIO = 1.694 mm = 1.1R⊙ is large enough to compensate possible misalignments expected to occur in PROBA-3/ASPIICS. Besides that we show that apodizing the edge of the

  17. Influence of the layer parameters on the performance of the CdTe solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddout, Assiya; Raidou, Abderrahim; Fahoume, Mounir

    2018-03-01

    Influence of the layer parameters on the performances of the CdTe solar cells is analyzed by SCAPS-1D. The ZnO: Al film shows a high efficiency than SnO2:F. Moreover, the thinner window layer and lower defect density of CdS films are the factor in the enhancement of the short-circuit current density. As well, to increase the open-circuit voltage, the responsible factors are low defect density of the absorbing layer CdTe and high metal work function. For the low cost of cell production, ultrathin film CdTe cells are used with a back surface field (BSF) between CdTe and back contact, such as PbTe. Further, the simulation results show that the conversion efficiency of 19.28% can be obtained for the cell with 1-μm-thick CdTe, 0.1-μm-thick PbTe and 30-nm-thick CdS.

  18. Influence of an Inorganic Interlayer on Exciton Separation in Hybrid Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that in hybrid polymer–inorganic photovoltaic devices not all the photogenerated excitons dissociate at the interface immediately, but can instead exist temporarily as bound charge pairs (BCPs). Many of these BCPs do not contribute to the photocurrent, as their long lifetime as a bound species promotes various charge carrier recombination channels. Fast and efficient dissociation of BCPs is therefore considered a key challenge in improving the performance of polymer–inorganic cells. Here we investigate the influence of an inorganic energy cascading Nb2O5 interlayer on the charge carrier recombination channels in poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT)–TiO2 and PbSe colloidal quantum dot–TiO2 photovoltaic devices. We demonstrate that the additional Nb2O5 film leads to a suppression of BCP formation at the heterojunction of the P3HT cells and also a reduction in the nongeminate recombination mechanisms in both types of cells. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the reduction in nongeminate recombination in the P3HT–TiO2 devices is due in part to the passivation of deep midgap trap states in the TiO2, which prevents trap-assisted Shockley–Read–Hall recombination. Consequently a significant increase in both the open-circuit voltage and the short-circuit current was achieved, in particular for P3HT-based solar cells, where the power conversion efficiency increased by 39%. PMID:26548399

  19. The Influence of Substituent Orientation on the Photovoltaic Performance of Phthalocyanine-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejerina, Lara; Martínez-Díaz, M Victoria; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Torres, Tomas

    2016-03-18

    Phthalocyanines (Pcs) are used as sensitizers in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) because of their stability and intense absorption in the red and near-IR regions. Impressive progress has been made in photovoltaic efficiencies by introduction of bulky peripheral substituents to help suppress macrocycle aggregation. To reach benchmark efficiencies reported for other related dyes, new designs need to be explored. Single carboxy-ZnPc regioisomers substituted at the non-peripheral positions by rigid aryl groups have now been studied, which has shed light on the influence of steric hindrance and/or orientation of the substituent around the anchoring group on the photovoltaic response. The regioisomer bearing the aryl group far away from the anchoring group produces a more effective sensitization of the TiO2 films and higher short-circuit photocurrent density (Jsc). Taking advantage of the good photovoltaic performance in the near-IR region of this ZnPc, it was combined with another appropriate dye for panchromatic sensitization of the mesoporous photoelectrode and an increase of the overall device efficiency. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Influence of Humic Acid on 1-Aminopyrene Ecotoxicity During Solar Photolysis Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huey-Min Hwang

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: 1-Aminopyrene (1-AP, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH compound, is a major metabolite during biotransformation of 1-nitropyrene by microflora in natural environment and in the guts of animals and humans. Under UV-A irradiation, 1-AP has been shown to cause light-induced DNA single strand cleavage. Humic acids (HA in aquatic ecosystems can influence the bioavailability, toxicity, and fate of organic xenobiotics. Therefore, photochemical fate and effect of PAH in natural aquatic environment may differ significantly across sites. The objectives of this study are to assess the time course (TC; 18 and 90 minutes influence of HA (0, 20, and 60 ppm on microbial ecotoxicity of 1-AP (0 and 10 μM during solar photolysis process (PP. Microbial ecotoxicity of 1-AP during different time courses in the presence and absence of HA was measured with spread plate counting and microbial mineralization of 14C-D-glucose. The experimental results were analyzed as factorial arrangements of treatment in a complete randomized design using General Linear Model by SAS. LSMEANS was used to separate means or combination of means. Significant effect on glucose mineralization was found by the following treatment interactions 1-AP*TC, 1-AP*PP, TC*PP, HA*1-AP*TC, HA*1-AP*PP, and HA*1-AP*TC*PP. The treatment interaction HA*1-AP was the only one affecting spread plate counting. In the groups exposed to 1-AP (10 μM, microbial heterotrophic mineralization of 14C-D-glucose was significantly inhibited in the presence of HA in light and in darkness. Exposure to HA in light and darkness, however, did not necessarily inhibit bacterial viability at the HA concentration range assayed. Therefore, inhibition on microbial activity could have been caused by multiple factors, instead of toxicity of HA alone.

  1. The influence of grazing on surface climatological variables of tallgrass prairie. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seastedt, T.R.; Dyer, M.I.; Turner, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    Mass and energy exchange between most grassland canopies and the atmosphere are mediated by grazing activities. Ambient temperatures can be increased or decreased by grazers. Data have been assembled from simulated grazing experiments on Konza Prairie Research Natural Area and observations on adjacent pastures grazed by cattle show significant changes in primary production, nutrient content, and bidirectional reflectance characteristics as a function of grazing intensity. The purpose of this research was to provide algorithms that would allow incorporation of grazing effects into models of energy budgets using remote sensing procedures. The approach involved: (1) linking empirical measurements of plant biomass and grazing intensities to remotely sensed canopy reflectance, and (2) using a higher resolution, mechanistic grazing model to derive plant ecophysiological parameters that influence reflectance and other surface climatological variables

  2. Design of cycler trajectories and analysis of solar influences on radioactive decay rates during space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Blake A.

    This thesis investigates the design of interplanetary missions for the continual habitation of Mars via Earth-Mars cyclers and for the detection of variations in nuclear decay rates due to solar influences. Several cycler concepts have been proposed to provide safe and comfortable quarters for astronauts traveling between the Earth and Mars. However, no literature has appeared to show how these massive vehicles might be placed into their cycler trajectories. Trajectories are designed that use either Vinfinity leveraging or low thrust to establish cycler vehicles in their desired orbits. In the cycler trajectory cases considered, the use of Vinfinity leveraging or low thrust substantially reduces the total propellant needed to achieve the cycler orbit compared to direct orbit insertion. In the case of the classic Aldrin cycler, the propellant savings due to Vinfinity leveraging can be as large as a 24 metric ton reduction for a cycler vehicle with a dry mass of 75 metric tons, and an additional 111 metric ton reduction by instead using low thrust. The two-synodic period cyclers considered benefit less from Vinfinity leveraging, but have a smaller total propellant mass due to their lower approach velocities at Earth and Mars. It turns out that, for low-thrust establishment, the propellant required is approximately the same for each of the cycler trajectories. The Aldrin cycler has been proposed as a transportation system for human missions between Earth and Mars. However, the hyperbolic excess velocity values at the planetary encounters for these orbits are infeasibly large, especially at Mars. In a new version of the Aldrin cycler, low thrust is used in the interplanetary trajectories to reduce the encounter velocities. Reducing the encounter velocities at both planets reduces the propellant needed by the taxis (astronauts use these taxis to transfer between the planetary surfaces and the cycler vehicle) to perform hyperbolic rendezvous. While the propellant

  3. Seasonal and tidal influence on the variability of nitrous oxide in the Tagus estuary, Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Gonçalves

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate seasonal and tidal influence on the variability of dissolved nitrous oxide (N2O in the Tagus estuary, Portugal, water sampling was carried out along the salinity gradient (May and November 2006 and during several tidal cycles (February and April 2007 at a fixed site. N2O and other relevant environmental parameters, temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and inorganic nitrogen forms (nitrate, nitrite and ammonium were measured. Dissolved N2O concentrations showed strong tidal and seasonal variability, with the highest values occurring in February 2007 (13.7 nM, spring tide and November 2006 (18.4 nM, upper estuary, apparently related to major Tagus river discharge. The existence of N2O sources was noticed in middle estuary. During spring tide, the input from external sources may be augmented by water column nitrification, making this process a contributor to the enhancement of N2O concentration in the estuary. Estimated N2O air-sea fluxes to the atmosphere reached a maximum value of ~10.4 μmol m-2 d-1 in February 2007 during spring tide and in May 2006 in the upper and lower (left bank estuary. Although the Tagus estuary behaves predominantly as a source of atmospheric N2O, it appears to be a weaker source than other, more eutrophic estuaries.

  4. Influences of Social and Style Variables on Adult Usage of African American English Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Holly K.; Grogger, Jeffrey T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In this study, the authors examined the influences of selected social (gender, employment status, educational achievement level) and style variables (race of examiner, interview topic) on the production of African American English (AAE) by adults. Method Participants were 50 African American men and women, ages 20–30 years. The authors used Rapid and Anonymous Survey (RAS) methods to collect responses to questions on informal situational and formal message-oriented topics in a short interview with an unacquainted interlocutor. Results Results revealed strong systematic effects for academic achievement, but not gender or employment status. Most features were used less frequently by participants with higher educational levels, but sharp declines in the usage of 5 specific features distinguished the participants differing in educational achievement. Strong systematic style effects were found for the 2 types of questions, but not race of addressee. The features that were most commonly used across participants—copula absence, variable subject–verb agreement, and appositive pronouns—were also the features that showed the greatest style shifting. Conclusions The findings lay a foundation with mature speakers for rate-based and feature inventory methods recently shown to be informative for the study of child AAE and demonstrate the benefits of the RAS. PMID:22361105

  5. Influence of school-level and family-level variables on Chinese college students' aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiawei; Yang, Jiarun; Yu, Yunmiao; Wang, Lin; Han, Dong; Zhu, Xiongzhao; He, Jincai; Qiu, Xiaohui; Yang, Xiuxian; Qiao, Zhengxue; Sui, Hong; Yang, Yanjie

    2017-08-01

    With the frequent occurrence of campus violence, scholars have devoted increasing attention to college students' aggression. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of aggression in Chinese university students and identify factors that could influence their aggression. We can thus find methods to reduce the incidence of college students' aggression in the future. A multi-stage stratified sampling procedure was used to select university students (N = 4565) aged 16-25 years in Harbin. The Aggression Questionnaire, the Adolescent Self-Rating Life Events Checklist and the Social Support Revalued Scale were used to collect data. Females reported lower levels of aggression than males (p aggression, and the model was highly significant (R 2  = .233, Ad R 2  = .230, p aggression is affected by gender, family-level and school-level variables. Aggression scores are significantly correlated with not only family-level or school-level variables independently, but their combination as well. We find that the risk factors for aggression include a dissatisfying profession, higher levels of study pressure, poor parental relationships, poor interpersonal relationships, the presence of siblings, punishment, health maladjustment, less subjective support, and lower levels of utilization of social support.

  6. Influence of psychological variables in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery after 24 months of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Hurtado, José; Ferrer-Márquez, Manuel; Fontalba-Navas, Andrés; García-Torrecillas, Juan Manuel; Olvera-Porcel, M Carmen

    Bariatric surgery is considered a more effective means of achieving weight loss than non-surgical options in morbid obesity. Rates of failure or relapse range from 20 to 30%. The study aims to analyse the influence of psychological variables (self-esteem, social support, coping strategies and personality) in the maintenance of weight loss after bariatric surgery. A cohort study was conducted involving 64 patients undergoing bariatric surgery for 24 months. At the end of the follow-up period, patients were divided into 2sub-cohorts classified as successes or failures. Success or favorable development was considered when the value of percent excess weight loss was 50 or higher. No statistically significant differences were observed between the 2groups in any variable studied. All patients had high self-esteem (87,3 those who failed and 88,1 those who are successful) and social support (90,2 and 90,9). Patients who succeed presented higher scores for cognitive restructuring (57,1) and were more introverted (47,1), while those who failed scored more highly in desiderative thinking (65,7) and were more prone to aggression (50,7) and neuroticism (51,7). High self-esteem and social support does not guarantee successful treatment. The groups differed in how they coped with obesity but the data obtained do not justify the weight evolution. In the absence of psychopathology, personality trait variability between patients is insufficient to predict the results. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Sex and family history of cardiovascular disease influence heart rate variability during stress among healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Charles F; Stoney, Catherine M; Thayer, Julian F; Williams, DeWayne; Bodine, Andrew

    2018-07-01

    Studies of sex differences in heart rate variability (HRV) typically have not accounted for the influence of family history (FH) of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study evaluated sex differences in HRV response to speech stress among men and women (age range 30-49 years) with and without a documented FH of CVD. Participants were 77 adults (mean age = 39.8 ± 6.2 years; range: 30-49 years; 52% female) with positive FH (FH+, n = 32) and negative FH (FH-, n = 45) of CVD, verified with relatives of participants. Cardiac activity for all participants was recorded via electrocardiogram during a standardized speech stress task with three phases: 5-minute rest, 5-minute speech, and 5-minute recovery. Outcomes included time domain and frequency domain indicators of HRV and heart rate (HR) at rest and during stress. Data were analyzed with repeated measures analysis of variance, with sex and FH as between subject variables and time/phase as a within subject variable. Women exhibited higher HR than did men and greater HR reactivity in response to the speech stress. However, women also exhibited greater HRV in both the time and frequency domains. FH+ women generally exhibited elevated HRV, despite the elevated risk of CVD associated with FH+. Although women participants exhibited higher HR at rest and during stress, women (both FH+ and FH-) also exhibited elevated HRV reactivity, reflecting greater autonomic control. Thus, enhanced autonomic function observed in prior studies of HRV among women is also evident among FH+ women during a standardized stress task. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Solar Variability Controls on Rainfall in the Last Millennia: Evidence from a Highly Resolved Stalagmite Record from DeSoto Caverns (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharon, P.; Lambert, W.; Hellstrom, J.

    2009-12-01

    Moisture transport from the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) inland has a considerable influence on both regional and continental rainfall patterns. Recent episodes of drought in the Southeastern USA exposed the vulnerability of the regional infrastructure to climate changes and gave rise to inter-state “water wars”. In order to better understand the cause of these periodic droughts and their controlling climate factors we have initiated a study of stalagmites from the DeSoto Caverns (Alabama, USA) that intersect the moisture flow from GOM. Combination of unusually high growth rates (up to 2 mm/decade), prominent dark and light seasonal layers, pristine aragonite mineralogy, precise U/Th dates acquired from mg-size samples and tight sampling (n=195) afforded generation of biannual (δ18O and δ13C of exceptional clarity spanning the last 700 yrs. The stalagmite (DSSG1) top yields isotope values (δ18O=-5.5 per-mill VPDB; δ13C=-10.1 per-mill VPDB) that are in good agreement with the predicted equilibrium isotope values. The oxygen and carbon isotope records exhibit a number of alternating negative and positive phase changes of correspond exactly with the Sun quiescence periods known as Dalton, Maunder, Spörer and Wolf Minima, and are corroborated by agreement with the positive shifts in atmospheric radiocarbon levels. Using a forward model we interpret the positive and negative δ18O and δ13C shifts during solar maxima and minima, respectively, as being primarily an expression of rapid shifts in rainfall sourced from GOM moisture and alternating between low and high rainfall intervals. The low and high rainfall intervals discerned in the stalagmite correspond to contemporaneous SST rise and fall in GOM and the Caribbean of about 1 oC amplitude. We suggest that small but measurable SST changes in the Western Hemisphere Warm Pool (WHWP), controlled by solar radiation changes between maxima and minima cycles, have a pronounced effect on the continental rainfall pattern. The

  9. INFLUENCE OF THE AMBIENT SOLAR WIND FLOW ON THE PROPAGATION BEHAVIOR OF INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temmer, Manuela; Rollett, Tanja; Moestl, Christian; Veronig, Astrid M. [Kanzelhoehe Observatory-IGAM, Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Vrsnak, Bojan [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb, Kaciceva 26, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Odstrcil, Dusan [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2011-12-20

    We study three coronal mass ejection (CME)/interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) events (2008 June 1-6, 2009 February 13-18, and 2010 April 3-5) tracked from Sun to 1 AU in remote-sensing observations of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Heliospheric Imagers and in situ plasma and magnetic field measurements. We focus on the ICME propagation in interplanetary (IP) space that is governed by two forces: the propelling Lorentz force and the drag force. We address the question: which heliospheric distance range does the drag become dominant and the CME adjust to the solar wind flow. To this end, we analyze speed differences between ICMEs and the ambient solar wind flow as a function of distance. The evolution of the ambient solar wind flow is derived from ENLIL three-dimensional MHD model runs using different solar wind models, namely, Wang-Sheeley-Arge and MHD-Around-A-Sphere. Comparing the measured CME kinematics with the solar wind models, we find that the CME speed becomes adjusted to the solar wind speed at very different heliospheric distances in the three events under study: from below 30 R{sub Sun }, to beyond 1 AU, depending on the CME and ambient solar wind characteristics. ENLIL can be used to derive important information about the overall structure of the background solar wind, providing more reliable results during times of low solar activity than during times of high solar activity. The results from this study enable us to obtain greater insight into the forces acting on CMEs over the IP space distance range, which is an important prerequisite for predicting their 1 AU transit times.

  10. INFLUENCE OF THE AMBIENT SOLAR WIND FLOW ON THE PROPAGATION BEHAVIOR OF INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temmer, Manuela; Rollett, Tanja; Möstl, Christian; Veronig, Astrid M.; Vršnak, Bojan; Odstrčil, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    We study three coronal mass ejection (CME)/interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) events (2008 June 1-6, 2009 February 13-18, and 2010 April 3-5) tracked from Sun to 1 AU in remote-sensing observations of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Heliospheric Imagers and in situ plasma and magnetic field measurements. We focus on the ICME propagation in interplanetary (IP) space that is governed by two forces: the propelling Lorentz force and the drag force. We address the question: which heliospheric distance range does the drag become dominant and the CME adjust to the solar wind flow. To this end, we analyze speed differences between ICMEs and the ambient solar wind flow as a function of distance. The evolution of the ambient solar wind flow is derived from ENLIL three-dimensional MHD model runs using different solar wind models, namely, Wang-Sheeley-Arge and MHD-Around-A-Sphere. Comparing the measured CME kinematics with the solar wind models, we find that the CME speed becomes adjusted to the solar wind speed at very different heliospheric distances in the three events under study: from below 30 R ☉ , to beyond 1 AU, depending on the CME and ambient solar wind characteristics. ENLIL can be used to derive important information about the overall structure of the background solar wind, providing more reliable results during times of low solar activity than during times of high solar activity. The results from this study enable us to obtain greater insight into the forces acting on CMEs over the IP space distance range, which is an important prerequisite for predicting their 1 AU transit times.

  11. Influence diagram of physiological and environmental factors affecting heart rate variability: an extended literature overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Fatisson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV corresponds to the adaptation of the heart to any stimulus. In fact, among the pathologies affecting HRV the most, there are the cardiovascular diseases and depressive disorders, which are associated with high medical cost in Western societies. Consequently, HRV is now widely used as an index of health.In order to better understand how this adaptation takes place, it is necessary to examine which factors directly influence HRV, whether they have a physiological or environmental origin. The primary objective of this research is therefore to conduct a literature review in order to get a comprehensive overview of the subject.The system of these factors affecting HRV can be divided into the following five categories: physiological and pathological factors, environmental factors, lifestyle factors, non-modifiable factors and effects. The direct interrelationships between these factors and HRV can be regrouped into an influence diagram. This diagram can therefore serve as a basis to improve daily clinical practice as well as help design even more precise research protocols.

  12. IMP-8 observations of the spectra, composition, and variability of solar heavy ions at high energies relevant to manned space missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tylka, Allan J.; Dietrich, William F.

    1999-01-01

    In more than 25 years of almost continuous observations, the University of Chicago's Cosmic Ray Telescope (CRT) on IMP-8 has amassed a unique database on high-energy solar heavy ions of potential relevance to manned spaceflight. In the very largest particle events, IMP-8/CRT has even observed solar Fe ions above the Galactic cosmic ray background up to ∼800 MeV/nucleon, an energy sufficiently high to penetrate nearly 25 g/cm 2 of shielding. IMP-8/CRT observations show that high-energy heavy-ion spectra are often surprisingly hard power laws, without the exponential roll-offs suggested by stochastic acceleration fits to lower energy measurements alone. Also, in many solar particle events the Fe/O ratio grows with increasing energy, contrary to the notion that ions with higher mass-to-charge ratios should be less abundant at higher energies. Previous studies of radiation hazards for manned spaceflight have often assumed heavy-ion composition and steeply-falling energy spectra inconsistent with these observations. Conclusions based on such studies should therefore be re-assessed. The significant event-to-event variability observed in the high-energy solar heavy ions also has important implications for strategies in building probabilistic models of solar particle radiation hazards

  13. How Ocean Color Influences the Interplay Between Annual and Interannual Tropical Pacific Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammann, A. C.; Gnanadesikan, A.

    2010-12-01

    While the basic mechanisms responsible for ENSO have long been known, many details still evade our understanding. Since the behavior of the real climate system appears to be highly sensitive to such details, however, our ability to model, let alone predict it with any confidence has so far been rather restricted. Not only can small perturbations in many state variables lead to strongly amplified responses, but also do spatial and temporal scales of variability rarely occur in isolation from each other. Both points are born out in the study by Anderson et al. (2009), who removed surface chlorophyll in different regions of the tropical (but mostly off-equatorial) Pacific in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land-ice model. Different removal patterns lead to large differences in the amplitudes of both ENSO and the equatorial annual cycle. Anderson et al.’s analysis focuses on ENSO and reveals that the transmission of off-equatorial perturbations to the equator happens mainly through a changed atmospheric response to SST anomalies. Here, we analyze the same data with respect to the annual cycle and how it interacts with ENSO. Guilyardi (2006) reports that observations and models alike show a zero-sum-type behavior of annual and ENSO-scale variability; increased spectral power in the annual band means decreased power in the ENSO band and vice versa. This is not the case for the different patterns of chlorophyll removal in our model, and hence it appears that this removal changes a fundamental part of its mean state. The dynamics of the annual cycle are likely influenced by oceanic meridional temperature advection, which provides another possible route for off-to-equatorial signal propagation. A common aspect of the tropical annual cycle in most coupled climate models is the presence of a double ITCZ instead of a single north-shifted one. Even though this appears to be unrelated to (albeit influenced by) the changes in ocean color, our model exhibits a much improved

  14. Environmental and management influences on temporal variability of near saturated soil hydraulic properties☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodner, G.; Scholl, P.; Loiskandl, W.; Kaul, H.-P.

    2013-01-01

    Structural porosity is a decisive property for soil productivity and soil environmental functions. Hydraulic properties in the structural range vary over time in response to management and environmental influences. Although this is widely recognized, there are few field studies that determine dominant driving forces underlying hydraulic property dynamics. During a three year field experiment we measured temporal variability of soil hydraulic properties by tension infiltrometry. Soil properties were characterized by hydraulic conductivity, effective macroporosity and Kosugi's lognormal pore size distribution model. Management related influences comprised three soil cover treatment (mustard and rye vs. fallow) and an initial mechanical soil disturbance with a rotary harrow. Environmental driving forces were derived from meteorological and soil moisture data. Soil hydraulic parameters varied over time by around one order of magnitude. The coefficient of variation of soil hydraulic conductivity K(h) decreased from 69.5% at saturation to 42.1% in the more unsaturated range (− 10 cm pressure head). A slight increase in the Kosugi parameter showing pore heterogeneity was observed under the rye cover crop, reflecting an enhanced structural porosity. The other hydraulic parameters were not significantly influenced by the soil cover treatments. Seedbed preparation with a rotary harrow resulted in a fourfold increase in macroporosity and hydraulic conductivity next to saturation, and homogenized the pore radius distribution. Re-consolidation after mechanical loosening lasted over 18 months until the soil returned to its initial state. The post-tillage trend of soil settlement could be approximated by an exponential decay function. Among environmental factors, wetting-drying cycles were identified as dominant driving force explaining short term hydraulic property changes within the season (r2 = 0.43 to 0.59). Our results suggested that beside considering average

  15. Variability and trends of downward surface global solar radiation over the Iberian Peninsula based on ERA-40 reanalysis

    KAUST Repository

    Perdigão, João Carlos

    2016-01-26

    © 2016 Royal Meteorological Society. A climate study of the incidence of downward surface global solar radiation (SSRD) in the Iberian Peninsula (IP) based primarily on ERA-40 reanalysis is presented. NCEP/NCAR reanalysis and ground-based records from several Portuguese and Spanish stations have been also considered. The results show that reanalysis can capture a similar inter-annual variability as compared to ground-based observations, especially on a monthly basis, even though annual ERA-40 (NCEP/NCAR) values tend to underestimate (overestimate) the observations with a mean relative difference of around 20Wm-2 (40Wm-2). On the other hand, ground-based measurements in Portuguese stations during the period 1964-1989 show a tendency to decrease until the mid-1970s followed by an increase up to the end of the study period, in line with the dimming/brightening phenomenon reported in the literature. Nevertheless, there are different temporal behaviours as a greater increase since the 1970s is observed in the south and less industrialized regions. Similarly, the ERA-40 reanalysis shows a noticeable decrease until the early 1970s followed by a slight increase up to the end of the 1990s, suggesting a dimming/brightening transition around the early 1970s, earlier in the south and centre and later in the north of the IP. Although there are slight differences in the magnitude of the trends as well as the turning year of the dimming/brightening periods, the decadal changes of ERA-40 fairly agree with the ground-based observations in Portugal and Spain, in contrast to most of the literature for other regions of the world, and is used in the climatology of the SSRD in the study area. NCEP/NCAR reanalysis does not capture the decadal variations of SSRD in the IP. The results show that part of the decadal variability of the global radiation in the IP is related to changes in cloud cover (represented in ERA-40).

  16. Variability and trends of downward surface global solar radiation over the Iberian Peninsula based on ERA-40 reanalysis

    KAUST Repository

    Perdigã o, Joã o Carlos; Salgado, Rui; Costa, Maria Joã o; Dasari, Hari Prasad; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 Royal Meteorological Society. A climate study of the incidence of downward surface global solar radiation (SSRD) in the Iberian Peninsula (IP) based primarily on ERA-40 reanalysis is presented. NCEP/NCAR reanalysis and ground-based records from several Portuguese and Spanish stations have been also considered. The results show that reanalysis can capture a similar inter-annual variability as compared to ground-based observations, especially on a monthly basis, even though annual ERA-40 (NCEP/NCAR) values tend to underestimate (overestimate) the observations with a mean relative difference of around 20Wm-2 (40Wm-2). On the other hand, ground-based measurements in Portuguese stations during the period 1964-1989 show a tendency to decrease until the mid-1970s followed by an increase up to the end of the study period, in line with the dimming/brightening phenomenon reported in the literature. Nevertheless, there are different temporal behaviours as a greater increase since the 1970s is observed in the south and less industrialized regions. Similarly, the ERA-40 reanalysis shows a noticeable decrease until the early 1970s followed by a slight increase up to the end of the 1990s, suggesting a dimming/brightening transition around the early 1970s, earlier in the south and centre and later in the north of the IP. Although there are slight differences in the magnitude of the trends as well as the turning year of the dimming/brightening periods, the decadal changes of ERA-40 fairly agree with the ground-based observations in Portugal and Spain, in contrast to most of the literature for other regions of the world, and is used in the climatology of the SSRD in the study area. NCEP/NCAR reanalysis does not capture the decadal variations of SSRD in the IP. The results show that part of the decadal variability of the global radiation in the IP is related to changes in cloud cover (represented in ERA-40).

  17. Solar wind and seasonal influence on ionospheric currents from Swarm and CHAMP measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laundal, K. M.; Finlay, C. C.; Olsen, N.

    2018-01-01

    the ionosphere with the magnetosphere. The model provides ionospheric current values at any location as continuous functions of solar wind speed, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), dipole tilt angle, and the F10.7 index of solar flux. Geometric distortions due to variations in the Earth's main magnetic field...

  18. Perylenes as sensitizers in hybrid solar cells : how molecular size influences performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Chen; Liu, Zhihong; Schoneboom, Jan; Eickemeyer, Felix; Pschirer, Neil G.; Erk, Peter; Herrmann, Andreas; Mullen, Klaus; Schöneboom, Jan; Grätzel, Michael; Janssen, René

    2009-01-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs), one kind of hybrid solar cells, are being intensively developed due to their high efficiency and low cost. One of the main factors to improve the efficiency is the minimization of the recombination of holes and electrons at the TiO(2)/dye/electrolyte interface. To

  19. The influence of radiative transfer on the turbulent flow inside solar absorbers operating with supercritical CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pecnik, R.; Smit, S.H.H.J.; Patel, A.; Roekaerts, D.J.E.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate and compare two dierent solar receiver technologies for concentrated solar power plants operating with supercritical CO2. The rst receiver is based on conventional surface absorbers, while the second receiver is based on an innovative idea to use volumetric receivers

  20. The influence of spatial variability of lithological and morphometric characters on drainage network arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coco, Laura; Buccolini, Marcello

    2015-04-01

    calculated drainage density (D) computed by the ratio between total drainage length and basin area. We used National and Regional Geological Map as source of lithological characters. The data were analyzed via statistics in terms of average trend and fluctuations. We split the basins into two groups according to the prevalent lithology. The first group included the basins prevalently made up of clays and sandy clays, the second includes the ones mainly constituted by conglomerates on surface. A Regression Analysis revealed that the influence of MSI on D was driven by the lithology. Indeed, we individuated two logarithmic trends of the MSI-D interpolators corresponding to the lithological groups. This finding demonstrated the great influence of lithology not only on D and MSI, but especially on their relation, depending on the different lithotechnical properties of the lithologies under study. Further enhancements will focus on evaluating the influence of spatial variability of lithology and morphology on the evolution of the current drainage network. We intend to investigate the future development of the fluvial dynamic starting from the current DEM (instead of the pre-incision one) and considering other variables that are generally deemed as drivers of the fluvial dynamic (e.g. land use, land cover).

  1. The influence of annealing temperature and time on the efficiency of pentacene: PTCDI organic solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Biber

    Full Text Available In this study, fabrication of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon/Perylene Tetracarboxylic Di-Imide (PTCDI, donor/acceptor solar cells are presented using physical vapour deposition technique in a 1000 class glove box. An ITO/PEDOT:PSS/Pentacene/PTCDI/Al (ITO = Indium Tin Oxide and PEDOT:PSS = poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene polystyrene sulfonate solar cell has been obtained and the power conversion efficiency, PCE (η of about 0.33% has been obtained under simulated solar illumination of 300 W/m2. Furthermore, the effects of annealing temperatures (at 100 and 150 °C and of annealing (at 100 °C times for 5 and 10 min. on the power conversion efficiency, η of the solar cells have also been investigated. In general, it has been seen that the thermal annealing deteriorated the characteristics parameters of Pentacene/PTCDI solar cell such that both fill factor, FF and η decreased after annealing and with increase of annealing time. Atomic force microscopy (AFM images showed that the phase segregation and grain size increased and the surface roughness of Pentacene film decreased and these effects reduced the η value. The η values of the solar cell have been determined as 0.33%, 0.12% and 0.06% for pre-annealing, annealing at 100 and 150 °C, respectively. Keywords: Organic solar cells, PTCDI, Pentacene, Annealing

  2. Does geographical variability influence five-year MACCE rates in the multicentre SYNTAX revascularisation trial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Andrew K; Chevalier, Bernard; Lefèvre, Thierry; Louvard, Yves; Segurado, Ricardo; Sawaya, Fadi; Spaziano, Marco; Neylon, Antoinette; Serruys, Patrick A; Dawkins, Keith D; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Colombo, Antonio; Feldman, Ted; Morice, Marie-Claude

    2017-09-20

    The use of multiple geographical sites for randomised cardiovascular trials may lead to important heterogeneity in treatment effects. This study aimed to determine whether treatment effects from different geographical recruitment regions impacted significantly on five-year MACCE rates in the SYNTAX trial. Five-year SYNTAX results (n=1,800) were analysed for geographical variability by site and country for the effect of treatment (CABG vs. PCI) on MACCE rates. Fixed, random, and linear mixed models were used to test clinical covariate effects, such as diabetes, lesion characteristics, and procedural factors. Comparing five-year MACCE rates, the pooled odds ratio (OR) between study sites was 0.58 (95% CI: 0.47-0.71), and countries 0.59 (95% CI: 0.45-0.73). By homogeneity testing, no individual site (X2=93.8, p=0.051) or country differences (X2=25.7, p=0.080) were observed. For random effects models, the intraclass correlation was minimal (ICC site=5.1%, ICC country=1.5%, p<0.001), indicating minimal geographical heterogeneity, with a hazard ratio of 0.70 (95% CI: 0.59-0.83). Baseline risk (smoking, diabetes, PAD) did not influence regional five-year MACCE outcomes (ICC 1.3%-5.2%), nor did revascularisation of the left main vs. three-vessel disease (p=0.241), across site or country subgroups. For CABG patients, the number of arterial (p=0.49) or venous (p=0.38) conduits used also made no difference. Geographic variability has no significant treatment effect on MACCE rates at five years. These findings highlight the generalisability of the five-year outcomes of the SYNTAX study.

  3. Crop-ecology and nutritional variability influence growth and secondary metabolites of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Probir Kumar; Kumar, Rajender; Guleria, Vipan; Mahajan, Mitali; Prasad, Ramdeen; Pathania, Vijaylata; Gill, Baljinder Singh; Singh, Devinder; Chand, Gopi; Singh, Bikram; Singh, Rakesh Deosharan; Ahuja, Paramvir Singh

    2015-02-27

    Plant nutrition and climatic conditions play important roles on the growth and secondary metabolites of stevia (Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni); however, the nutritional dose is strongly governed by the soil properties and climatic conditions of the growing region. In northern India, the interactive effects of crop ecology and plant nutrition on yield and secondary metabolites of stevia are not yet properly understood. Thus, a field experiment comprising three levels of nitrogen, two levels of phosphorus and three levels of potassium was conducted at three locations to ascertain whether the spatial and nutritional variability would dominate the leaf yield and secondary metabolites profile of stevia. Principal component analysis (PCA) indicates that the applications of 90 kg N, 40 kg P2O5 and 40 kg K2O ha-1 are the best nutritional conditions in terms of dry leaf yield for CSIR-IHBT (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research- Institute Himalayan Bioresource Technology) and RHRS (Regional Horticultural Research Station) conditions. The spatial variability also exerted considerable effect on the leaf yield and stevioside content in leaves. Among the three locations, CSIR-IHBT was found most suitable in case of dry leaf yield and secondary metabolites accumulation in leaves. The results suggest that dry leaf yield and accumulation of stevioside are controlled by the environmental factors and agronomic management; however, the accumulation of rebaudioside-A (Reb-A) is not much influenced by these two factors. Thus, leaf yield and secondary metabolite profiles of stevia can be improved through the selection of appropriate growing locations and proper nutrient management.

  4. On the Variability of the East Australian Current: Jet Structure, Meandering, and Influence on Shelf Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Matthew R.; Roughan, Moninya; Keating, Shane R.; Schaeffer, Amandine

    2017-11-01

    Given the importance of western boundary currents over a wide range of scales in the ocean, it is crucial that we understand their dynamics to accurately predict future changes. For this, we need detailed knowledge of their structure and variability. Here we investigate the jet structure of the East Australian Current (EAC), using observations from HF radars and moorings deployed at 30°S-31°S. Meandering, core velocity, width, and eddy kinetic energy (EKE) are quantified from 4 years of hourly 1.5 km resolution surface current maps (2012-2016), to obtain the most detailed representation of the surface EAC jet to date. The EAC flows predominantly over the ˜1,500 m isobath 50 km offshore but makes large amplitude displacements eastward every 65-100 days—the time scale associated with mesoscale eddy shedding at the EAC separation. Smaller-amplitude, higher-frequency meanders occur every 20-45 days. Using a coordinate frame that follows the jet, we show core velocity and EKE exhibit seasonality in both magnitude and variance, being maximum in summer (1.55 m s-1 mean core velocity), minimum in winter (0.8 m s-1). However, it is the eddy-shedding time scale that dominates jet variability. As the EAC moves shoreward, shelf temperature and along-stream velocity vary linearly with jet movement, within ˜35 km of the core. The EAC is within this range 75% of the time, demonstrating its importance to the shelf circulation. Temperature and velocity fluctuations at the 70 m (100 m) isobath are more influenced by wind (EAC encroachment), with the strongest response occurring when wind and EAC act constructively.

  5. Lhermitte's sign: Incidence and treatment variables influencing risk after irradiation of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fein, D.A.; Marcus, R.B. Jr.; Parsons, J.T.; Mendenhall, W.M.; Million, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    Lhermitte's sign is a relatively infrequent sequela of irradiation of the cervical spinal cord. In this study, the authors sought to determine whether various treatment parameters influenced the likelihood of developing Lhermitte's sign. Between October 1964 and December 1987, 2901 patients with malignancies of the upper respiratory tract were treated at the University of Florida. The dose of radiation to the cervical spinal cord was calculated for those patients who had a minimum 1-year follow-up. A total of 1112 patients who received a minimum of 3000 cGy to at least 2 cm of cervical spinal cord were included in this analysis. Forty patients (3.6%) developed Lhermitte's sign. The mean time to development of Lhermitte's sign after irradiation was 3 months, and the mean duration of symptoms was 6 months. No patient with Lhermitte's sign developed transverse myelitis. Several variables were examined in a univariate analysis, including total dose to the cervical spinal cord, length of cervical spinal cord irradiated, dose per fraction, continuous-course compared with split-course radiotherapy, and once-daily compared with twice-daily irradiation. Only two variables proved to be significant. Six (8%) of 75 patients who received > 5000 cGy to the cervical spinal cord developed Lhermitte's sign compared with 34 (3.3%) of 1037 patients who received < 5000 cGy (p = .04). For patients treated with once-daily fractionation, 28 (3.4%) of 821 patients who received < 200 cGy per fraction developed Lhermitte's sign compared with 6 (10%) of 58 patients who received ≥ 200 cGy (p = .02). An increased risk of developing Lhermitte's sign was demonstrated for patients who received either ≥ 200 cGy per fraction (one fraction per day) or ≥ 5000 cGy total dose to the cervical spinal cord. 29 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  6. Final Report: The Influence of Novel Behavioral Strategies in Promoting the Diffusion of Solar Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillingham, Kenneth [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Bollinger, Bryan [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    2017-08-30

    This is the final report for a systematic, evidence-based project using an unprecedented series of large-scale field experiments to examine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of novel approaches to reduce the soft costs of solar residential photovoltaics. The approaches were based around grassroots marketing campaigns called ‘Solarize’ campaigns, that were designed to lower costs and increase adoption of solar technology. This study quantified the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the Solarize programs and tested new approaches to further improve the model.

  7. Influence of Production Variables on Eco-Friendly Briquettes from Coconut and Bambara Nut Shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Sotannde

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the influence of production variables on the properties of molasses-induced fuel briquettes from Coconut (Cocos nucifera L. and Bambara nut (Vigna subterranea L. Verdc. shells. The milled samples of both raw materials were mixed with molasses at ratios 100:20, 100:25, 100:30 and 100:35 by weight respectively, and briquetted using a Jack press at an average pressure of 1.2KN/m2. A 3x4 factorial experiment in completely randomized design was used. The briquettes produced were subjected to both physical and combustion tests. The tests revealed that majority of the variations in briquette properties were largely influenced by the type of biomass residues used while molasses’ content also contributed significant effect atp < 0.05. Coconut shell briquettes had higher compressed density though lower in relaxed form (0.80 g·cm-3vs 0.78 g·cm-3 when compared to Bambara nut shell briquettes (0.77 g.cm-3vs0.75 g.cm-3. Both physical and combustion properties were significantly improved when both bio-residue mixtures were used. Briquettes from the mixtures had the highest average fixed carbon and heating values of 85.21% and 32.80 MJ·kg-1 respectively, though it was 83.83% and 32.12 MJ·kg-1for coconut shell briquette and 82.18% and 32.03 MJ·kg-1for Bambara nut shell briquette. Therefore, based on physical and combustion characteristics, the best Bambara nut briquettes and its mixture with coconut shell were produced when molasses content was 30%. In contrast, the best coconut shell briquette was produced when molasses content was 35%. These two level are therefore recommended for production of quality briquettes from these agro-residues.

  8. Influence of weather variables and plant communities on grasshopper density in the Southern Pampas, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wysiecki, María Laura; Arturi, Marcelo; Torrusio, Sandra; Cigliano, María Marta

    2011-01-01

    temperature had no significant effect on total grasshopper density, these weather variables and plant communities had differential influence on the dominant grasshopper species.

  9. Tidal variability of nutrients in a coastal coral reef system influenced by groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guizhi; Wang, Shuling; Wang, Zhangyong; Jing, Wenping; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Zhouling; Tan, Ehui; Dai, Minhan

    2018-02-01

    To investigate variation in nitrite, nitrate, phosphate, and silicate in a spring-neap tide in a coral reef system influenced by groundwater discharge, we carried out a time-series observation of these nutrients and 228Ra, a tracer of groundwater discharge, in the Luhuitou fringing reef at Sanya Bay in the South China Sea. The maximum 228Ra, 45.3 dpm 100 L-1, appeared at low tide and the minimum, 14.0 dpm 100 L-1, appeared during a flood tide in the spring tide. The activity of 228Ra was significantly correlated with water depth and salinity in the spring-neap tide, reflecting the tidal-pumping feature of groundwater discharge. Concentrations of all nutrients exhibited strong diurnal variation, with a maximum in the amplitude of the diel change for nitrite, nitrate, phosphate, and silicate in the spring tide of 0.46, 1.54, 0.12, and 2.68 µM, respectively. Nitrate and phosphate were negatively correlated with water depth during the spring tide but showed no correlation during the neap tide. Nitrite was positively correlated with water depth in the spring and neap tide due to mixing of nitrite-depleted groundwater and nitrite-rich offshore seawater. They were also significantly correlated with salinity (R2 ≥ 0.9 and P reef system was closely related with biological processes during both tidal periods, but the biological influence appeared to be less dominant, as inferred from the less significant correlations (R2 = 0.16) during the spring tide when groundwater discharge was more prominent. Thus, the variability of nutrients in the coral reef system was regulated mainly by biological uptake and release in a spring-neap tide and impacted by mixing of tidally driven groundwater and offshore seawater during spring tide.

  10. Picophytoplankton variability: Influence of winter convective mixing and advection in the northeastern Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemal, Suchandan; Anil, Arga Chandrashekar; Shankar, D.; Remya, R.; Roy, Rajdeep

    2018-04-01

    The deepening of mixed layer and ensuing changes in optical and physicochemical properties of euphotic zone can influence phytoplankton community dynamics in the northeastern Arabian Sea during winter monsoon. The response of picophytoplankton community to such changes during winter convective mixing is not well understood. Herein, we have compared variations in the picophytoplankton community structure during early (November-December 2012), peak (end-January 2014) and late (mid-February 2015) winter monsoon from three separate cruises in the southern northeastern Arabian Sea. The higher Synechococcus abundance owing to entrainment of nutrients in mixed layer was observed during peak winter monsoon, while the concomitant changes in nitrate concentration, light and oxygen environment restricted Prochlorococcus growth resulting in lower abundance during the same period. This highlights the diverse responses of picophytoplankton groups to physicochemical changes of water column during winter convective mixing. The divinyl chlorophyll b/a ratio (marker for Prochlorococcus ecotypes) indicated prevalence of one low-light adapted ecotype (sensitive to light shock) in sub-surface water, one high-light adapted ecotype in surface water during early winter monsoon and both disappeared during intense mixing period in peak winter monsoon. Subsequently, a distinct low-light adapted ecotype, capable to tolerate light shock, was noticed during late winter monsoon and we argue that this ecotype is introduced to southern northeastern Arabian Sea through advection from north by sub-surface circulation. The total picophytoplankton biomass available to microbial loop is restored during late winter monsoon, when stratification begins, with a higher abundance of Synechococcus and the re-occurrence of Prochlorococcus population in the region. These inferences indicate that variability in picophytoplankton community structure and their contribution to the microbial loop are driven by

  11. Electromagnetic fields produced by incubators influence heart rate variability in newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellieni, C V; Acampa, M; Maffei, M; Maffei, S; Perrone, S; Pinto, I; Stacchini, N; Buonocore, G

    2008-07-01

    Incubators are largely used to preserve preterm and sick babies from postnatal stressors, but their motors produce high electromagnetic fields (EMFs). Newborns are chronically exposed to these EMFs, but no studies about their effects on the fragile developing neonatal structure exist. To verify whether the exposure to incubator motor electric power may alter autonomous nervous system activity in newborns. Heart rate variability (HRV) of 43 newborns in incubators was studied. The study group comprised 27 newborns whose HRV was studied throughout three 5-minute periods: with incubator motor on, off, and on again, respectively. Mean HRV values obtained during each period were compared. The control group comprised 16 newborns with constantly unrecordable EMF and exposed to changes in background noise, similar to those provoked by the incubator motor. Mean (SD) total power and the high-frequency (HF) component of HRV increased significantly (from 87.1 (76.2) ms2 to 183.6 (168.5) ms2) and the mean low-frequency (LF)/HF ratio decreased significantly (from 2.0 (0.5) to 1.5 (0.6)) when the incubator motor was turned off. Basal values (HF = 107.1 (118.1) ms2 and LF/HF = 1.9 (0.6)) were restored when incubators were turned on again. The LF spectral component of HRV showed a statistically significant change only in the second phase of the experiment. Changes in background noise did not provoke any significant change in HRV. EMFs produced by incubators influence newborns' HRV, showing an influence on their autonomous nervous system. More research is needed to assess possible long-term consequences, since premature newborns may be exposed to these high EMFs for months.

  12. Expression patterns of the aquaporin gene family during renal development: influence of genetic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreira, Kleber S; Debaix, Huguette; Cnops, Yvette; Geffers, Lars; Devuyst, Olivier

    2009-08-01

    High-throughput analyses have shown that aquaporins (AQPs) belong to a cluster of genes that are differentially expressed during kidney organogenesis. However, the spatiotemporal expression patterns of the AQP gene family during tubular maturation and the potential influence of genetic variation on these patterns and on water handling remain unknown. We investigated the expression patterns of all AQP isoforms in fetal (E13.5 to E18.5), postnatal (P1 to P28), and adult (9 weeks) kidneys of inbred (C57BL/6J) and outbred (CD-1) mice. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), we evidenced two mRNA patterns during tubular maturation in C57 mice. The AQPs 1-7-11 showed an early (from E14.5) and progressive increase to adult levels, similar to the mRNA pattern observed for proximal tubule markers (Megalin, NaPi-IIa, OAT1) and reflecting the continuous increase in renal cortical structures during development. By contrast, AQPs 2-3-4 showed a later (E15.5) and more abrupt increase, with transient postnatal overexpression. Most AQP genes were expressed earlier and/or stronger in maturing CD-1 kidneys. Furthermore, adult CD-1 kidneys expressed more AQP2 in the collecting ducts, which was reflected by a significant delay in excreting a water load. The expression patterns of proximal vs. distal AQPs and the earlier expression in the CD-1 strain were confirmed by immunoblotting and immunostaining. These data (1) substantiate the clustering of important genes during tubular maturation and (2) demonstrate that genetic variability influences the regulation of the AQP gene family during tubular maturation and water handling by the mature kidney.

  13. Mathematical model for thermal solar collectors by using magnetohydrodynamic Maxwell nanofluid with slip conditions, thermal radiation and variable thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Asif; Aziz, Asim; Jamshed, Wasim; Hussain, Sajid

    Solar energy is the cleanest, renewable and most abundant source of energy available on earth. The main use of solar energy is to heat and cool buildings, heat water and to generate electricity. There are two types of solar energy collection system, the photovoltaic systems and the solar thermal collectors. The efficiency of any solar thermal system depend on the thermophysical properties of the operating fluids and the geometry/length of the system in which fluid is flowing. In the present research a simplified mathematical model for the solar thermal collectors is considered in the form of non-uniform unsteady stretching surface. The flow is induced by a non-uniform stretching of the porous sheet and the uniform magnetic field is applied in the transverse direction to the flow. The non-Newtonian Maxwell fluid model is utilized for the working fluid along with slip boundary conditions. Moreover the high temperature effect of thermal radiation and temperature dependent thermal conductivity are also included in the present model. The mathematical formulation is carried out through a boundary layer approach and the numerical computations are carried out for cu-water and TiO2 -water nanofluids. Results are presented for the velocity and temperature profiles as well as the skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number and the discussion is concluded on the effect of various governing parameters on the motion, temperature variation, velocity gradient and the rate of heat transfer at the boundary.

  14. Spike Pattern Structure Influences Synaptic Efficacy Variability Under STDP and Synaptic Homeostasis. I: Spike Generating Models on Converging Motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zedong eBi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In neural systems, synaptic plasticity is usually driven by spike trains. Due to the inherent noises of neurons and synapses as well as the randomness of connection details, spike trains typically exhibit variability such as spatial randomness and temporal stochasticity, resulting in variability of synaptic changes under plasticity, which we call efficacy variability. How the variability of spike trains influences the efficacy variability of synapses remains unclear. In this paper, we try to understand this influence under pair-wise additive spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP when the mean strength of plastic synapses into a neuron is bounded (synaptic homeostasis. Specifically, we systematically study, analytically and numerically, how four aspects of statistical features, i.e. synchronous firing, burstiness/regularity, heterogeneity of rates and heterogeneity of cross-correlations, as well as their interactions influence the efficacy variability in converging motifs (simple networks in which one neuron receives from many other neurons. Neurons (including the post-synaptic neuron in a converging motif generate spikes according to statistical models with tunable parameters. In this way, we can explicitly control the statistics of the spike patterns, and investigate their influence onto the efficacy variability, without worrying about the feedback from synaptic changes onto the dynamics of the post-synaptic neuron. We separate efficacy variability into two parts: the drift part (DriftV induced by the heterogeneity of change rates of different synapses, and the diffusion part (DiffV induced by weight diffusion caused by stochasticity of spike trains. Our main findings are: (1 synchronous firing and burstiness tend to increase DiffV, (2 heterogeneity of rates induces DriftV when potentiation and depression in STDP are not balanced, and (3 heterogeneity of cross-correlations induces DriftV together with heterogeneity of rates. We anticipate our

  15. Variability and condition of common minnow (Phoxinus phoxinus, Cyprinidae, Cypriniformes) on the Semipalatinsk range and out of its influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitrofanov, I.V.; Matmuratov, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    Populations of common minnow (Phoxinus phoxinus) from five rivers of Irtysh and Balkhash basins were investigated. Population from the Shagan river situated inside area of Semipalatinsk Range influence. This population has normal sexual structure and high growth rate. Condition factor of all fishes is high. Population from Semipalatinsk Range has increased variability of characteristics due to increasing of stochastic part of general variability. Abnormalities of external fish morphology are not observed in this area. Asymmetry of bilateral characteristics is low. (author)

  16. Topographic effects on solar radiation distribution in mountainous watersheds and their influence on reference evapotranspiration estimates at watershed scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Aguilar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Distributed energy and water balance models require time-series surfaces of the climatological variables involved in hydrological processes. Among them, solar radiation constitutes a key variable to the circulation of water in the atmosphere. Most of the hydrological GIS-based models apply simple interpolation techniques to data measured at few weather stations disregarding topographic effects. Here, a topographic solar radiation algorithm has been included for the generation of detailed time-series solar radiation surfaces using limited data and simple methods in a mountainous watershed in southern Spain. The results show the major role of topography in local values and differences between the topographic approximation and the direct interpolation to measured data (IDW of up to +42% and −1800% in the estimated daily values. Also, the comparison of the predicted values with experimental data proves the usefulness of the algorithm for the estimation of spatially-distributed radiation values in a complex terrain, with a good fit for daily values (R2 = 0.93 and the best fits under cloudless skies at hourly time steps. Finally, evapotranspiration fields estimated through the ASCE-Penman-Monteith equation using both corrected and non-corrected radiation values address the hydrologic importance of using topographically-corrected solar radiation fields as inputs to the equation over uniform values with mean differences in the watershed of 61 mm/year and 142 mm/year of standard deviation. High speed computations in a 1300 km2 watershed in the south of Spain with up to a one-hour time scale in 30 × 30 m2 cells can be easily carried out on a desktop PC.

  17. Simplex optimization of the variables influencing the determination of pefloxacin by time-resolved chemiluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo Pulgarín, José A.; Alañón Molina, Aurelia; Jiménez García, Elisa

    2018-03-01

    A new chemiluminescence (CL) detection system combined with flow injection analysis (FIA) for the determination of Pefloxacin is proposed. The determination is based on an energy transfer from Pefloxacin to terbium (III). The metal ion enhances the weak CL signal produced by the KMnO4/H2SO3/Pefloxacin system. A modified simplex method was used to optimize chemical and instrumental variables. The influence of the interaction of the permanganate, Tb (III), sodium sulphite and sulphuric acid concentrations, flow rate and injected sample volume was thoroughly investigated by using a modified simplex optimization procedure. The results revealed a strong direct relationship between flow rate and CL intensity throughout the studied range that was confirmed by a gamma test. The response factor for the CL emission intensity was used to assess performance in order to identify the optimum conditions for maximization of the response. Under such conditions, the CL response was proportional to the Pefloxacin concentration over a wide range. The detection limit as calculated according to Clayton's criterion 13.7 μg L- 1. The analyte was successfully determined in milk samples with an average recovery of 100.6 ± 9.8%.

  18. Biotic and abiotic variables influencing plant litter breakdown in streams: a global study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Richard G.; Hui, Cang; Gessner, Mark O.; Pérez, Javier; Alexandrou, Markos A.; Graça, Manuel A. S.; Cardinale, Bradley J.; Albariño, Ricardo J.; Arunachalam, Muthukumarasamy; Barmuta, Leon A.; Boulton, Andrew J.; Bruder, Andreas; Callisto, Marcos; Chauvet, Eric; Death, Russell G.; Dudgeon, David; Encalada, Andrea C.; Ferreira, Verónica; Figueroa, Ricardo; Flecker, Alexander S.; Gonçalves, José F.; Helson, Julie; Iwata, Tomoya; Jinggut, Tajang; Mathooko, Jude; Mathuriau, Catherine; M'Erimba, Charles; Moretti, Marcelo S.; Pringle, Catherine M.; Ramírez, Alonso; Ratnarajah, Lavenia; Rincon, José; Yule, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Plant litter breakdown is a key ecological process in terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Streams and rivers, in particular, contribute substantially to global carbon fluxes. However, there is little information available on the relative roles of different drivers of plant litter breakdown in fresh waters, particularly at large scales. We present a global-scale study of litter breakdown in streams to compare the roles of biotic, climatic and other environmental factors on breakdown rates. We conducted an experiment in 24 streams encompassing latitudes from 47.8° N to 42.8° S, using litter mixtures of local species differing in quality and phylogenetic diversity (PD), and alder (Alnus glutinosa) to control for variation in litter traits. Our models revealed that breakdown of alder was driven by climate, with some influence of pH, whereas variation in breakdown of litter mixtures was explained mainly by litter quality and PD. Effects of litter quality and PD and stream pH were more positive at higher temperatures, indicating that different mechanisms may operate at different latitudes. These results reflect global variability caused by multiple factors, but unexplained variance points to the need for expanded global-scale comparisons. PMID:27122551

  19. Influence of age, sexual maturation, anthropometric variables and body composition on flexibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keila Donassolo Santos

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Since flexibility is an important component of health-related physical fitness at all ages, this parameter should be evaluated in chi ldren and adolescent s because the abi l ity to acquire and maintain levels of flexibility is greater in this age group. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate body weight, height, BMI and flexibility according to chronological age and sexual maturat ion and to determine the influence of these var iables on flexibi l ity in student s f rom publ ic and private schools. A cross-sectional descriptive and analytical study was conducted. The sample consisted of 2604 girls aged 8 to 17 years. Body weight, height, BMI, sexual maturation, and flexibility were evaluated. The data were analyzed descriptively using the following inferential tests: two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by the Tukey post-hoc test, Pearson’s and Spearman’s simple correlation coefficients, and stepwise multiple regression analysis. The SPSS® 13.0 program was used for all statistical analyses, with a level of significance of p<0.05. Significant differences with increasing age and maturation stage were observed for the variables body weight, height and BMI when compared to the subsequent year. In conclusion, body wei-ght and height increased with increasing age, especially between 8 and 13 years, and flexibility remained stable throughout childhood and adolescence.

  20. Assessment of skin pigmentation by confocal microscopy: Influence of solar exposure and protection habits on cutaneous hyperchromias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Ana Paula M; Mercurio, Daiane G; Maia Campos, Patrícia M B G

    2017-09-01

    Cutaneous hyperchromias are disorders of skin pigmentation involving an increase of melanin production and its irregular accumulation in skin cells. It is known that the use of sunscreens helps to prevent changes in the skin pigmentation pattern, but the structural and morphological alterations that occur in the different types of hyperpigmentations need better elucidation. To assess the influence of solar exposure and protection habits on the pattern of skin pigmentation using reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM). Forty volunteers aged 18-39 years with skin hyperpigmentation participated in the study. Skin characterization was performed by imaging techniques and by assessing the habits of solar exposure and protection by applying questionnaires to the volunteers. RCM was used to record sequences of confocal sections at areas of interest and to examine cell shape and brightness in the basal cell layer of the lesion and in normal perilesional skin. Furthermore, high-resolution images were obtained for analysis of the spots. Sunlight influences the number and location of spots as the face of volunteers with higher solar exposure was covered with spots, whereas volunteers with less exposure had fewer spots located in the nose and cheeks region due to greater exposure of these areas to the sun. The data showed the importance of sun protection for preventing changes in the pattern of skin pigmentation, and RCM proved to be an important tool for skin characterization. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. OBSERVATIONS OF FIVE-MINUTE SOLAR OSCILLATIONS IN THE CORONA USING THE EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROPHOTOMETER (ESP) ON BOARD THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET VARIABILITY EXPERIMENT (SDO/EVE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didkovsky, L.; Judge, D.; Wieman, S.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Woods, T.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the detection of oscillations in the corona in the frequency range corresponding to five-minute acoustic modes of the Sun. The oscillations have been observed using soft X-ray measurements from the Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer (ESP) of the Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The ESP zeroth-order channel observes the Sun as a star without spatial resolution in the wavelength range of 0.1-7.0 nm (the energy range is 0.18-12.4 keV). The amplitude spectrum of the oscillations calculated from six-day time series shows a significant increase in the frequency range of 2-4 mHz. We interpret this increase as a response of the corona to solar acoustic (p) modes and attempt to identify p-mode frequencies among the strongest peaks. Due to strong variability of the amplitudes and frequencies of the five-minute oscillations in the corona, we study how the spectrum from two adjacent six-day time series combined together affects the number of peaks associated with the p-mode frequencies and their amplitudes. This study shows that five-minute oscillations of the Sun can be observed in the corona in variations of the soft X-ray emission. Further investigations of these oscillations may improve our understanding of the interaction of the oscillation modes with the solar atmosphere, and the interior-corona coupling, in general.

  2. Introduction to solar cell production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gyeong Hae; Lee, Jun Sin

    2009-08-01

    This book introduces solar cell production. It is made up eight chapters, which are summary of solar cell with structure and prospect of the business, special variable of solar cell on light of the sun and factor causing variable of solar cell, production of solar cell with surface texturing, diffusion, metal printing dry and firing and edge isolation, process of solar cell on silicone wafer for solar cell, forming of electrodes, introduction of thin film solar cell on operating of solar cell, process of production and high efficiency of thin film solar cell, sorting of solar cell and production with background of silicone solar cell and thin film solar cell, structure and production of thin film solar cell and compound solar cell, introduction of solar cell module and the Industrial condition and prospect of solar cell.

  3. The influence of riparian woodland on the spatial and temporal variability of stream water temperatures in an upland salmon stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Malcolm

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatio-temporal variability of stream water temperatures was investigated at six locations on the Girnock Burn (30km2 catchment, Cairngorms, Scotland over three hydrological years between 1998 and 2002. The key site-specific factors affecting the hydrology and climatology of the sampling points were investigated as a basis for physical process inference. Particular emphasis was placed on assessing the effects of riparian forest in the lower catchment versus the heather moorland riparian zones that are spatially dominant in the upper catchment. The findings were related to river heat budget studies that provided process detail. Gross changes in stream temperature were affected by the annual cycle of incoming solar radiation and seasonal changes in hydrological and climatological conditions. Inter-annual variation in these controlling variables resulted in inter-annual variability in thermal regime. However, more subtle inter-site differences reflected the impact of site-specific characteristics on various components of the river energy budget. Inter-site variability was most apparent at shorter time scales, during the summer months and for higher stream temperatures. Riparian woodland in the lower catchment had a substantial impact on thermal regime, reducing diel variability (over a period of 24 hours and temperature extremes. Observed inter-site differences are likely to have a substantial effect on freshwater ecology in general and salmonid fish in particular. Keywords: temperature, thermal regime, forest, salmon, hydrology, Girnock Burn, Cairngorm

  4. A contribution to the study of the influence of the energy of solar wind upon the atmospheric processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Milan M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the satellite observing of solar wind, and as well according the development of certain weather conditions it is realized that their interactive connections could have important role on the development of atmospheric processes. In this paper is given several of such situations. We have tried to point to a very important significance of new methodological approach in understanding development of meteorological conditions. Researching the influence of the solar wind on the changes of conditions in the atmosphere could develop in several ways but in any case for the further steps a multidiscipline approach is needed. Karen Labitske in Germany has done a lot of research in this area. "The physics is still highly speculative at this point though".

  5. Influence of intermediate layers on the surface condition of laser crystallized silicon thin films and solar cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Höger, Ingmar, E-mail: ingmar.hoeger@ipht-jena.de; Gawlik, Annett; Brückner, Uwe; Andrä, Gudrun [Leibniz-Institut für Photonische Technologien, PF 100239, 07702 Jena (Germany); Himmerlich, Marcel; Krischok, Stefan [Institut für Mikro-und Nanotechnologien, Technische Universität Ilmenau, PF 100565, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2016-01-28

    The intermediate layer (IL) between glass substrate and silicon plays a significant role in the optimization of multicrystalline liquid phase crystallized silicon thin film solar cells on glass. This study deals with the influence of the IL on the surface condition and the required chemical surface treatment of the crystallized silicon (mc-Si), which is of particular interest for a-Si:H heterojunction thin film solar cells. Two types of IL were investigated: sputtered silicon nitride (SiN) and a layer stack consisting of silicon nitride and silicon oxide (SiN/SiO). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements revealed the formation of silicon oxynitride (SiO{sub x}N{sub y}) or silicon oxide (SiO{sub 2}) layers at the surface of the mc-Si after liquid phase crystallization on SiN or SiN/SiO, respectively. We propose that SiO{sub x}N{sub y} formation is governed by dissolving nitrogen from the SiN layer in the silicon melt, which segregates at the crystallization front during crystallization. This process is successfully hindered, when additional SiO layers are introduced into the IL. In order to achieve solar cell open circuit voltages above 500 mV, a removal of the formed SiO{sub x}N{sub y} top layer is required using sophisticated cleaning of the crystallized silicon prior to a-Si:H deposition. However, solar cells crystallized on SiN/SiO yield high open circuit voltage even when a simple wet chemical surface treatment is applied. The implementation of SiN/SiO intermediate layers facilitates the production of mesa type solar cells with open circuit voltages above 600 mV and a power conversion efficiency of 10%.

  6. Influence of interface preparation on minority carrier lifetime for low bandgap tandem solar cell materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, Nadine; Sagol, B. Erol; Seidel, Ulf; Schwarzburg, Klaus; Hannappel, Thomas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    III-V semiconductor compounds grown by MOVPE are implemented in todays state-of-the-art third generation multi-junction solar cells. The current record multi junction solar cell grown on germanium, having Ge, Ga(In)As and GaInP as subcells, reached a record efficiency of 41.6%. The efficiency of these multi junction solar cells could be significantly increased, if its low bandgap Ge subcell would be replaced by a more efficient tandem. For this purpose the low bandgap materials InGaAs and InGaAsP are suitable. The bandgap composition of these materials allows a better yield of the solar spectrum. Based on InGaAs/InGaAsP absorber materials we have developed a low bandgap tandem solar cell with optimized bandgaps. Results of time resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) for the IR-bandgap compounds InGaAsP (1.03 eV)/InGaAs (0.73 eV) are presented. The lifetime of minority carriers is one of the most important properties of solar cell absorber materials. We show on the example of the low band gap tandem cell how the choice of the materials, the quality of the bulk, the optimization of the band gap energies and the preparation of the critical interfaces are essential to build a high efficiency solar cell. The quality of the bulk and the preparation of the critical interfaces are essential for the growth of the double heterostructure (DHS).

  7. Solar Sprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Richard; Anderson, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    In the "Solar Sprint" activity, students design, test, and race a solar-powered car built with Legos. The use of ratios is incorporated to simulate the actual work of scientists and engineers. This method encourages fourth-grade students to think about multiple variables and stimulates their curiosity when an activity doesn't come out as…

  8. Influence of nanofluids on the efficiency of Flat-Plate Solar Collectors (FPSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejad, Marjan B.; Mohammed, H. A.; Sadeghi, O.; Zubeer, Swar A.

    2017-11-01

    A numerical investigation is performed using finite volume method to study the laminar heat transfer in a three-dimensional flat-plate solar collector using different nanofluids as working fluids. Three nanofluids with different types of nanoparticles (Ag, MWCNT and Al2O3 dispersed in water) with 1-2 wt% volume fractions are analyzed. A constant heat flux, equivalent to solar radiation absorbed by the collector, is applied at the top surface of the absorber plate. In this study, several parameters including boundary conditions (different volume flow rates, different fluid inlet temperatures and different solar irradiance at Skudai, Malaysia), different types of nanoparticles, and different solar collector tilt angles are investigated to identify their effects on the heat transfer performance of FPSC. The numerical results reveal that the three types of nanofluid enhance the thermal performance of solar collector compared to pure water and FPSC with Ag nanofluid has the best thermal performance enhancement. For all the cases, the collector efficiency increased with the increase of volume flow rate while fluid outlet temperature decreased. It is found that FPSC with tilt angle of 10° and fluid inlet temperature of 301.15 K has the best thermal performance.

  9. [The influence of variable and constant magnetic fields on biota and biological activity of ordinary chernozem soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisova, T V; Kazeev, K Sh

    2007-01-01

    In model experiments on influence variable magnetic fields of industrial frequency (50 Hz) an induction of 1500 and of 6000 mkTl and the constant magnetic field an induction of 6000 mkTl and of 15000 mkTl during 5 days of exposure on biological properties of chernozem ordinary is shown, that the soil microflora is more sensitive to magnetic fields, than enzymes activity. Bacteria are more sensitive, than microscopic mushrooms. Dehydrogenase it is steady against influence of all variants. Constant magnetic field by the induction of 15000 mkTl rendered practically identical authentic overwhelming influence on catalase and saccharase activity - on 51 and 47% accordingly.

  10. The influence of climatic variability on local population dynamics of Cercidium microphyllum (foothill paloverde)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Janice E.; Turner, R.M.

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated correlations among climatic variability, population age structure, and seedling survival of a dominant Sonoran Desert tree, Cercidium microphyllum (foothill paloverde), at Tucson, Arizona, USA. A major goal was to determine whether wet years promote seedling establishment and thereby determine population structure. Plant age was estimated from basal circumference for a sample of 980 living and dead trees in twelve 0.5-ha plots. Ages ranged from 1 to 181 years. Age frequency distribution showed that the population is in decline. Most (51.2%) of the 814 living trees were 40-80 years old; only 6.5% were younger than 20 years. The average age of the 166 dead trees was 78 years. Fifty-nine percent of dead trees were aged 60-100 years. Survival of newly emerged seedlings was monitored for 7 years in a 557-m2 permanent plot. Mean survival in the 1st year of life was 1.7%. Only 2 of 1,008 seedlings lived longer than 1 year. Length of survival was not correlated with rainfall. Residual regeneration, an index of the difference between predicted and observed cohort size, showed that regeneration was high during the first half of the twentieth century and poor after the mid-1950s. Trends in regeneration did not reflect interannual variation in seasonal temperature or rain before 1950, that is, in the years before urban warming. Taken together, the seedling study and the regeneration analysis suggest that local population dynamics reflect biotic factors to such an extent that population age structure might not always be a reliable clue to past climatic influences.

  11. Influence of processing variables on the mechanical behavior of HDPE/clay nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Barbosa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites were processed using the technique of melt intercalation, starting from a concentrated polar compatibilizer/organoclay (PE-g-MA/organoclay prepared in an internal mixer. The concentrate was incorporated into the matrix of HDPE by two methods: I counter-rotating twin-screw extruder and II co-rotating twin-screw extruder, using two screw profiles (ROS and 2KB90. After extrusion, the specimens of the extruded composites were injection molded. The X-ray diffraction (XRD technique was used to analyze the degree of expansion of the prepared clays. To analyze the degree of exfoliation of obtained nanocomposites, XRD and TEM (transmission electron microscopy were used. The influence of processing variables on mechanical properties was studied through the behavior of the modulus and tensile strength of nanocomposite systems. By XRD and TEM, it was seen that the clay was well dispersed in the matrix and the presence of intercalated and partially exfoliated hybrid structure for nanocomposites was observed when the systems were prepared in counter-rotating twin-screw extruder. A similar behavior was observed in the use of screws (2KB90 or ROS of the nanocomposites, with a reduction in modulus and tensile strength. Although the mixing process by extruding be the most common industrial practice, and also it is the preferred strategy for the preparation of polymer nanocomposites, much of the literature was directed to the study of chemical modification of clay, type and level of compatibilizer, in order to maximize the compatibility between clay and the polymeric matrix. On the other hand, studies about the role of the processing and configurations of screws are relatively scarce. The main motivation of this work was to expand and to contribute to spread a better understanding of the effects of processing to obtain polymer nanocomposites.

  12. On the functional form of particle number size distributions: influence of particle source and meteorological variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugerone, Katia; De Michele, Carlo; Ghezzi, Antonio; Gianelle, Vorne; Gilardoni, Stefania

    2018-04-01

    Particle number size distributions (PNSDs) have been collected periodically in the urban area of Milan, Italy, during 2011 and 2012 in winter and summer months. Moreover, comparable PNSD measurements were carried out in the rural mountain site of Oga-San Colombano (2250 m a.s.l.), Italy, during February 2005 and August 2011. The aerosol data have been measured through the use of optical particle counters in the size range 0.3-25 µm, with a time resolution of 1 min. The comparison of the PNSDs collected in the two sites has been done in terms of total number concentration, showing higher numbers in Milan (often exceeding 103 cm-3 in winter season) compared to Oga-San Colombano (not greater than 2×102 cm-3), as expected. The skewness-kurtosis plane has been used in order to provide a synoptic view, and select the best distribution family describing the empirical PNSD pattern. The four-parameter Johnson system-bounded distribution (called Johnson SB or JSB) has been tested for this aim, due to its great flexibility and ability to assume different shapes. The PNSD pattern has been found to be generally invariant under site and season changes. Nevertheless, several PNSDs belonging to the Milan winter season (generally more than 30 %) clearly deviate from the standard empirical pattern. The seasonal increase in the concentration of primary aerosols due to combustion processes in winter and the influence of weather variables throughout the year, such as precipitation and wind speed, could be considered plausible explanations of PNSD dynamics.

  13. ENSO influence on the interannual variability of the Red Sea convergence zone and associated rainfall

    KAUST Repository

    Dasari, Hari Prasad

    2017-07-18

    The Red Sea convergence zone (RSCZ) is formed by opposite surface winds blowing from northwest to southeast directions at around 18°-19°N between October and January. A reverse-oriented, low-level monsoon trough at 850hPa, known as the Red Sea trough (RST), transfers moisture from the southern Red Sea to RSCZ. The positions of the RSCZ and RST and the intensity of the RST have been identified as important factors in modulating weather and climatic conditions across the Middle East. Here, we investigate the influence of the El Niño southern oscillation (ENSO) on the interannual variability of RSCZ, RST, and regional rainfall during winter months. Our results indicate that El Niño (warm ENSO phase) favours a shift of the RSCZ to the north and a strengthening of the RST in the same direction. Conversely, during November and December of La Niña periods (cold ENSO phase), the RSCZ shift to the south and the RST strengthens in the same direction. During El Niño periods, southeasterly wind speeds increase (20-30%) over the southern Red Sea and northwesterly wind speeds decrease (10-15%) over the northern Red Sea. Noticeable increases in the number of rainy days and the intensity of rain events are observed during El Niño phases. These increases are associated with colder than normal air intrusion at lower levels from the north combined with warm air intrusion from the south over the RSCZ. Our analysis suggests that during El Niño winters, warmer sea surface temperatures and higher convective instability over the Red Sea favour local storms conditions and increase rainfall over the Red Sea and adjoining regions.

  14. Does Set for Variability Mediate the Influence of Vocabulary Knowledge on the Development of Word Recognition Skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunmer, William E.; Chapman, James W.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that vocabulary influences word recognition skills indirectly through "set for variability", the ability to determine the correct pronunciation of approximations to spoken English words. One hundred forty children participating in a 3-year longitudinal study were administered reading and…

  15. Regional and hemispheric influences on temporal variability in baseline carbon monoxide and ozone over the Northeast US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interannual variability in baseline carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone (O3), defined as mixing ratios under minimal influence of recent and local emissions, was studied for seven rural sites in the Northeast US over 2001–2010. Annual baseline CO exhibited statistically signific...

  16. Influence from genetic variability on opioid use for cancer pain: a European genetic association study of 2294 cancer pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klepstad, P; Fladvad, T; Skorpen, F

    2011-01-01

    variability with opioid doses in a large population using a confirmatory validation population was warranted. We recruited 2294 adult European patients using a World Health Organization (WHO) step III opioid and analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes with a putative influence on opioid...

  17. Influence of variable heat transfer coefficient of fireworks and crackers on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Zerong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the effect of variable heat transfer coefficient of fireworks and crackers on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition, considering the heat transfer coefficient as the power function of temperature, mathematical thermal explosion steady state and unsteady-state model of finite cylindrical fireworks and crackers with complex shell structures are established based on two-dimensional steady state thermal explosion theory. The influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition are analyzed. When heat transfer coefficient is changing with temperature and in the condition of natural convection heat transfer, critical ambient temperature lessen, thermal explosion time to ignition shorten. If ambient temperature is close to critical ambient temperature, the influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on time to ignition become large. For firework with inner barrel in example analysis, the critical ambient temperature of propellant is 463.88 K and the time to ignition is 4054.9s at 466 K, 0.26 K and 450.8s less than without considering the change of heat transfer coefficient respectively. The calculation results show that the influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on thermal explosion time to ignition is greater in this example. Therefore, the effect of variable heat transfer coefficient should be considered into thermal safety evaluation of fireworks to reduce potential safety hazard.

  18. Influence of Nano-Fluid and Receiver Modification in Solar Parabolic Trough Collector Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharani Kumar, M.; Yuvaraj, G.; Balaji, D.; Pravinraj, R.; shanmugasundaram, Prabhu

    2018-02-01

    Utilization of natural renewal sources in India is very high over the past decades. Solar power is a prime source of energy available plenty in the world. In this work solar energy is modified into thermal energy by using copper absorber tube with fins. Due to low heat transfer coefficient results leading to higher thermal losses and lower thermal efficiency. In order to increase the heat transfer coefficient copper receiver tube with fins is used and as well as solid has higher thermal conductivity compare to fluid (Tio2) nano fluid is used to improve the heat transfer rate. The analyses have been carried out and take the account of parameters such as solar radiation with time variation, mass flow rate of water, temperatures.

  19. The concept of attributes and preventions of the variables that influence the pipeline risk in the Muhlbauer Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, Alexandro G. [Universidade Federal do Pampa (UNIPAMPA), Bage, RS (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    There are several methods for the risk assessment and risk management applied to pipelines, among them the Muhlbauer's Method. Muhlbauer is an internationally recognized authority on pipeline risk management. The purpose of this model is to evaluate the public exposure to the risk and identify ways for management that risk in fact. The assessment is made by the attribution of quantitative values to the several items that influences in the pipeline risk. Because the ultimate goal of the risk assessment is to provide a means of risk management, it is sometimes useful to make a distinction between two types of risk variables. The risk evaluator can categorize each index risk variable as either an attribute or a prevention. This paper approaches the subject of the definition of attributes and preventions in the Muhlbauer basic model of risk assessment and also presents a classification of the variables that influence the risk in agreement with those two categories. (author)

  20. Heliospheric pick-up ions influencing thermodynamics and dynamics of the distant solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Fahr

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutral interstellar H-atoms penetrate into the inner heliosphere and upon the event of ionization are converted into pick-up ions (PUIs. The magnetized solar wind flow incorporates these ions into the plasma bulk and enforces their co-motion. By nonlinear interactions with wind-entrained Alfvén waves, these ions are then processed in the comoving velocity space. The complete pick-up process is connected with forces acting back to the original solar wind ion flow, thereby decelerating and heating the solar wind plasma. As we show here, the resulting deceleration cannot be treated as a pure loading effect, but requires adequate consideration of the action of the pressure of PUI-scattered waves operating by the PUI pressure gradient. Hereby, it is important to take into proper account the stochastic acceleration which PUIs suffer from at their convection out of the inner heliosphere by quasi-linear interactions with MHD turbulences. Only then can the presently reported VOYAGER observations of solar wind decelerations and heatings in the outer heliosphere be understood in view of the most likely values of interstellar gas parameters, such as an H-atom density of 0.12 cm-3 . Solar wind protons (SWPs appear to be globally heated in their motion to larger solar distances. Ascribing the needed heat transfer to the action of suprathermal PUIs, which drive MHD waves that are partly absorbed by SWPs, in order to establish the observed SWP polytropy, we can obtain a quantitative expression for the solar wind proton pressure as a function of solar distance. This expression clearly shows the change from an adiabatic to a quasi-polytropic SWP behaviour with a decreasing polytropic index at increasing distances. This also allows one to calculate the average percentage of initial pick-up energy fed into the thermal proton energy. In a first order evaluation of this expression, we can estimate that about 10% of the initial PUI injection energy is eventually

  1. Short- and long-term variability of spectral solar UV irradiance at Thessaloniki, Greece: effects of changes in aerosols, total ozone and clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Fountoulakis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we discuss the short- and the long-term variability of spectral UV irradiance at Thessaloniki, Greece, using a long, quality-controlled data set from two Brewer spectrophotometers. Long-term changes in spectral UV irradiance at 307.5, 324 and 350 nm for the period 1994–2014 are presented for different solar zenith angles and discussed in association with changes in total ozone column (TOC, aerosol optical depth (AOD and cloudiness observed in the same period. Positive changes in annual mean anomalies of UV irradiance, ranging from 2 to 6 % per decade, have been detected both for clear- and all-sky conditions. The changes are generally greater for larger solar zenith angles and for shorter wavelengths. For clear-skies, these changes are, in most cases, statistically significant at the 95 % confidence limit. Decreases in the aerosol load and weakening of the attenuation by clouds lead to increases in UV irradiance in the summer, of 7–9 % per decade for 64° solar zenith angle. The increasing TOC in winter counteracts the effect of decreasing AOD for this particular season, leading to small, statistically insignificant, negative long-term changes in irradiance at 307.5 nm. Annual mean UV irradiance levels are increasing from 1994 to 2006 and remain relatively stable thereafter, possibly due to the combined changes in the amount and optical properties of aerosols. However, no statistically significant corresponding turning point has been detected in the long-term changes of AOD. The absence of signatures of changes in AOD in the short-term variability of irradiance in the UV-A may have been caused by changes in the single scattering albedo of aerosols, which may counteract the effects of changes in AOD on irradiance. The anti-correlation between the year-to-year variability of the irradiance at 307.5 nm and TOC is clear and becomes clearer as the AOD decreases.

  2. Atomic layer deposition precursor step repetition and surface plasma pretreatment influence on semiconductor–insulator–semiconductor heterojunction solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talkenberg, Florian, E-mail: florian.talkenberg@ipht-jena.de; Illhardt, Stefan; Schmidl, Gabriele; Schleusener, Alexander; Sivakov, Vladimir [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Radnóczi, György Zoltán; Pécz, Béla [Centre for Energy Research, Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Konkoly-Thege Miklós u. 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Dikhanbayev, Kadyrjan; Mussabek, Gauhar [Department of Physics and Engineering, al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 al-Farabi Ave., 050040 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Gudovskikh, Alexander [Nanotechnology Research and Education Centre, St. Petersburg Academic University, Russian Academy of Sciences, Hlopina Str. 8/3, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    Semiconductor–insulator–semiconductor heterojunction solar cells were prepared using atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. The silicon surface was treated with oxygen and hydrogen plasma in different orders before dielectric layer deposition. A plasma-enhanced ALD process was applied to deposit dielectric Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the plasma pretreated n-type Si(100) substrate. Aluminum doped zinc oxide (Al:ZnO or AZO) was deposited by thermal ALD and serves as transparent conductive oxide. Based on transmission electron microscopy studies the presence of thin silicon oxide (SiO{sub x}) layer was detected at the Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface. The SiO{sub x} formation depends on the initial growth behavior of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and has significant influence on solar cell parameters. The authors demonstrate that a hydrogen plasma pretreatment and a precursor dose step repetition of a single precursor improve the initial growth behavior of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and avoid the SiO{sub x} generation. Furthermore, it improves the solar cell performance, which indicates a change of the Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface states.

  3. Influence of angle of inclination on power of solar module; Taiyo denchi module no keisha kakudo to shutsuryoku tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsutsumi, K.; Nishitani, M. [Dai Ichi University, College of Technology, Kagoshima (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    Experiment/study were conducted on the influence of angle of inclination on output of solar modules. In the experiment, changing the angle of inclination of the photovoltaic module installed on the top of school building to 0, 30, 60 and 90 degC, the global radiation on an inclined surface was measured by pyranometer equipped with the module, and at the same time output characteristics were measured by I-V curve tracer. In the I-V curve tracer, voltage, current, and output capability diagram are illustrated automatically changing bias voltage to get the maximum output. The global radiation on an inclined surface and the maximum output indicated an almost proportional relation and were expressed in a recursion method. Moreover, measurement of the global radiation is usually conducted using the amount of global radiation on a horizontal surface, and the global radiation on an inclined surface is calculated as a sum of the direct solar radiation amount and the sky solar radiation amount after determining a penetration rate by the relational equation. By calculating the global radiation on an inclined surface, it becomes possible to calculate the maximum output of photovoltaic modules by this recursion method. 1 ref., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. The influence of wall orientation and exterior surface solar absorptivity on time lag and decrement factor in the Greek region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontoleon, K.J.; Eumorfopoulou, E.A. [Department of Civil Engineering, Laboratory of Building Construction and Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (A.U.Th.), Gr-541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2008-07-15

    The aim of this study is to determine how time lag and decrement factor are affected by wall orientation and exterior surface solar absorptivity, for specific climatic conditions. Their influence forms a non-sinusoidal periodical forcing function that simulates suitably the outdoor temperature fluctuations. This novel approach, allows the predictability of building's thermal response in an efficient way. The investigation is carried out for various insulated opaque wall formations comprising typical material elements, during the summer period in the mild Greek region. This study that allows proper building planning procedures, at the very early stages of the envelope design, presents great importance. The analysed configurations are assumed to have an orientation that corresponds to each compass point. In addition, the solar absorptivity of surface coatings is assumed to be varying from 0 to 1. The transient thermal analysis is obtained via a thermal circuit that models accurately the fundamental heat transfer mechanisms on both boundaries and through the multi-layered wall configurations. Moreover, the mathematical formulation and solution of this lumped model is achieved in discrete time steps by adopting the non-linear nodal method. The simulation results are focused on the single and combined effects of orientation and solar absorptivity on the dynamic thermal characteristics of various wall configurations. (author)

  5. Can a soda-lime glass be used to demonstrate how patterns of strength dependence are influenced by pre-cementation and resin-cementation variables?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hooi, Paul

    2013-01-01

    To determine how the variability in biaxial flexure strength of a soda-lime glass analogue for a PLV and DBC material was influenced by precementation operative variables and following resin-cement coating.

  6. Influence of ITO deposition and post annealing on HIT solar cell structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, D.; Tavakoliyaraki, A.; Wu, Y.; Van Swaaij, R.A.C.M.M.; Zeman, M.

    2011-01-01

    Heterojunction silicon with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) solar cells that combine advanced thin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and crystalline silicon (c-Si) technologies are promising because of the high performance at low cost. Due to the low conductivity of a-Si:H, indium tin oxide

  7. A Solar Volumetric Receiver: Influence of Absorbing Cells Configuration on Device Thermal Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Shuja, S. Z.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal performance of a solar volumetric receiver incorporating the different cell geometric configurations is investigated. Triangular, hexagonal, and rectangular absorbing cells are incorporated in the analysis. The fluid volume fraction, which is the ratio of the volume of the working fluid over the total volume of solar volumetric receiver, is introduced to assess the effect of cell size on the heat transfer rates in the receiver. In this case, reducing the fluid volume fraction corresponds to increasing cell size in the receiver. SiC is considered as the cell material, and air is used as the working fluid in the receiver. The Lambert's Beer law is incorporated to account for the solar absorption in the receiver. A finite element method is used to solve the governing equation of flow and heat transfer. It is found that the fluid volume fraction has significant effect on the flow field in the solar volumetric receiver, which also modifies thermal field in the working fluid. The triangular absorbing cell gives rise to improved effectiveness of the receiver and then follows the hexagonal and rectangular cells. The second law efficiency of the receiver remains high when hexagonal cells are used. This occurs for the fluid volume fraction ratio of 0.5.

  8. Influences mass concentration of P3HT and PCBM to application of organic solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supriyanto, A.; Maya; Iriani, Y.; Ramelan, A. H.; Nurosyid, F; Rosa, E. S.

    2016-01-01

    Poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6, 6] -phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) are used for the organic solar cell applications. P3HT and PCBM act as donors and acceptors, respectively. In this study the efficiency of the P3HT: PCBM organic solar cells as function of the mass concentration of the blend P3HT: PCBM with 1, 2, 8, 16 mg/ml. Deposition P3HT:PCBM film using spin coating with a rotary speed of 2500 rpm for 10 seconds. Optical properties of absorption spectra characteristic using a UV-Visible Spectrometer Lambda 25 and electrical properties of I-V characteristic using Keithley 2602 instrument. The results of absoption spectra for P3HT:PCBM within different mass concentration obtained 500-600 nm wavelengths. The Energy-gap obtained about 1.9eV. The organic solar cells device performance were investigated using I-V cahractyeristic. For mass concentration of 1, 2, 8 and 16 mg/ml P3HT:PCBM were obtained 0.5×10 -3 %, 2.2×10 -3 %, 5.9×10 -3 %, and 6.1×10 -3 % efficiency of organics solar cells respectively. (paper)

  9. Influence of injected charge carriers on photocurrents in polymer solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wehenkel, D.J.; Koster, L.J.A.; Wienk, M.M.; Janssen, R.A.J.

    2012-01-01

    We determine and analyze the photocurrent Jph in polymer solar cells under conditions where, no, one, or two different charge carriers can be injected by choosing appropriate electrodes and compare the experimental results to simulations based on a drift-diffusion device model that accounts for

  10. Perovskite Solar Cells: Influence of Hole Transporting Materials on Power Conversion Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameen, Sadia; Rub, Malik Abdul; Kosa, Samia A; Alamry, Khalid A; Akhtar, M Shaheer; Shin, Hyung-Shik; Seo, Hyung-Kee; Asiri, Abdullah M; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2016-01-08

    The recent advances in perovskite solar cells (PSCs) created a tsunami effect in the photovoltaic community. PSCs are newfangled high-performance photovoltaic devices with low cost that are solution processable for large-scale energy production. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of such devices experienced an unprecedented increase from 3.8 % to a certified value exceeding 20 %, demonstrating exceptional properties of perovskites as solar cell materials. A key advancement in perovskite solar cells, compared with dye-sensitized solar cells, occurred with the replacement of liquid electrolytes with solid-state hole-transporting materials (HTMs) such as 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene (Spiro-OMeTAD), which contributed to enhanced PCE values and improved the cell stability. Following improvements in the perovskite crystallinity to produce a smooth, uniform morphology, the selective and efficient extraction of positive and negative charges in the device dictated the PCE of PSCs. In this Review, we focus mainly on the HTMs responsible for hole transport and extraction in PSCs, which is one of the essential components for efficient devices. Here, we describe the current state-of-the-art in molecular engineering of hole-transporting materials that are used in PSCs and highlight the requisites for market-viability of this technology. Finally, we include an outlook on molecular engineering of new functional HTMs for high efficiency PSCs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Influence of ancient solar-proton events in the evolution of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, G.C.; Isaksen, I.S.A.; Crutzen, P.J.; Holzer, T.E.

    1976-01-01

    It is stated that there is mounting evidence that past extinctions of faunal species have occurred in near coincidence with reversals in polarity of the geomagnetic field. Could the link lie in catastrophic depletions of stratospheric ozone caused by solar-proton irradiation over a reduced geomagnetic field. (author)

  12. Cognitive functioning in elderly people and the influence of the socio-educative variables - Results from the ELES Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Feli González

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive functioning changes in elderly people. The degree of decline varies across different cognitive abilities and other variables, such as educational level and life-time professional activity, can slow down this process. This study investigates the pattern of cognitive performance in people over 50 years old, taking into account the influence of educational level and profession. Research data were collected during the pilot study of the Longitudinal Aging Study in Spain (ELES in which a representative sample of non-institutionalized Spanish older people was assessed. The following cognitive variables were evaluated: general cognitive functioning, verbal memory, working memory span, visuomotor speed, and language. Differences were found in all cognitive variables in the different age groups, and according to educational level and profession. These differences remained after controlling for the age variable. Population studies provide a global perspective of cognitive performance in older people and help to identify the role of the different associated factors.

  13. The influence of solar wind on extratropical cyclones – Part 2: A link mediated by auroral atmospheric gravity waves?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Prikryl

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cases of mesoscale cloud bands in extratropical cyclones are observed a few hours after atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs are launched from the auroral ionosphere. It is suggested that the solar-wind-generated auroral AGWs contribute to processes that release instabilities and initiate slantwise convection thus leading to cloud bands and growth of extratropical cyclones. Also, if the AGWs are ducted to low latitudes, they could influence the development of tropical cyclones. The gravity-wave-induced vertical lift may modulate the slantwise convection by releasing the moist symmetric instability at near-threshold conditions in the warm frontal zone of extratropical cyclones. Latent heat release associated with the mesoscale slantwise convection has been linked to explosive cyclogenesis and severe weather. The circumstantial and statistical evidence of the solar wind influence on extratropical cyclones is further supported by a statistical analysis of high-level clouds (<440 mb extracted from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP D1 dataset. A statistically significant response of the high-level cloud area index (HCAI to fast solar wind from coronal holes is found in mid-to-high latitudes during autumn-winter and in low latitudes during spring-summer. In the extratropics, this response of the HCAI to solar wind forcing is consistent with the effect on tropospheric vorticity found by Wilcox et al. (1974 and verified by Prikryl et al. (2009. In the tropics, the observed HCAI response, namely a decrease in HCAI at the arrival of solar wind stream followed by an increase a few days later, is similar to that in the northern and southern mid-to-high latitudes. The amplitude of the response nearly doubles for stream interfaces associated with the interplanetary magnetic field BZ component shifting southward. When the IMF BZ after the stream interface shifts northward, the autumn-winter effect weakens or shifts to lower (mid latitudes

  14. Theoretical analysis of the influence of defect parameters on photovoltaic performances of composition graded InGaN solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorge, V.; Migan-Dubois, A.; Djebbour, Z.; Pantzas, K.; Gautier, S.; Moudakir, T.; Suresh, S.; Ougazzaden, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We have modeled a p–i–n InGaN-based solar cell with gradual bandgap layers. ► InGaN defects have been modeled by two band tails and one localized energy level. ► Energetic position and band tail widths have a low effect on device efficiency. ► The localized defect FWHM has a significant impact on performance. ► The efficiency drops radically when the defect density is higher than the P-doping. - Abstract: In this paper, we have used simulations to evaluate the impact of the distribution of electrically active defects on the photovoltaic performances of InGaN-based solar cell. The simulations were carried out using Silvaco's ATLAS software. We have modeled a P-GaN/Grad-InGaN/i-In 0.53 Ga 0.47 N/Grad-InGaN/N-ZnO where Grad-InGaN corresponds to an InGaN layer with a graded composition. This layer is inserted to eliminate the band discontinuities at the interface between InGaN and the GaN and ZnO layers. The defects were modeled through the introduction of band tails and a Gaussian distribution of defects in i-InGaN material. We have evaluated the influence of band tail widths as well as the parameters of the Gaussian distribution (i.e. defect density, mean position and standard deviation) on the short-circuit current, the open-circuit voltage and the fill-factor (efficiency) of the solar cell. These results have allowed us to identify key structural parameters useful for the optimization of InGaN solar cells, as well as to give realistic estimates of the performances of such cells.

  15. Theoretical analysis of the influence of defect parameters on photovoltaic performances of composition graded InGaN solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorge, V.; Migan-Dubois, A. [LGEP, UMR 8507, CNRS, SUPELEC, UPMC, Universite Paris-Sud 11, 11 rue Joliot-Curie, Plateau de Moulon, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Djebbour, Z., E-mail: zakaria.djebbour@uvsq.fr [LGEP, UMR 8507, CNRS, SUPELEC, UPMC, Universite Paris-Sud 11, 11 rue Joliot-Curie, Plateau de Moulon, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Department of Physics and Engineering Science, University of Versailles UVSQ, 45 Av. Des Etats Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Pantzas, K. [Georgia Institute of Technology, GT-Lorraine, 2 rue Marconi, 57 070 Metz (France); UMI 2958 Georgia Tech, CNRS, 2 rue Marconi, 57 070 Metz (France); Gautier, S. [UMI 2958 Georgia Tech, CNRS, 2 rue Marconi, 57 070 Metz (France); LMOPS, UMR 7132, CNRS, University of Metz, Supelec, 2 rue E. Belin, 57 070 Metz (France); Moudakir, T.; Suresh, S. [UMI 2958 Georgia Tech, CNRS, 2 rue Marconi, 57 070 Metz (France); Ougazzaden, A. [Georgia Institute of Technology, GT-Lorraine, 2 rue Marconi, 57 070 Metz (France); UMI 2958 Georgia Tech, CNRS, 2 rue Marconi, 57 070 Metz (France)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have modeled a p-i-n InGaN-based solar cell with gradual bandgap layers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer InGaN defects have been modeled by two band tails and one localized energy level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energetic position and band tail widths have a low effect on device efficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The localized defect FWHM has a significant impact on performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The efficiency drops radically when the defect density is higher than the P-doping. - Abstract: In this paper, we have used simulations to evaluate the impact of the distribution of electrically active defects on the photovoltaic performances of InGaN-based solar cell. The simulations were carried out using Silvaco's ATLAS software. We have modeled a P-GaN/Grad-InGaN/i-In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}N/Grad-InGaN/N-ZnO where Grad-InGaN corresponds to an InGaN layer with a graded composition. This layer is inserted to eliminate the band discontinuities at the interface between InGaN and the GaN and ZnO layers. The defects were modeled through the introduction of band tails and a Gaussian distribution of defects in i-InGaN material. We have evaluated the influence of band tail widths as well as the parameters of the Gaussian distribution (i.e. defect density, mean position and standard deviation) on the short-circuit current, the open-circuit voltage and the fill-factor (efficiency) of the solar cell. These results have allowed us to identify key structural parameters useful for the optimization of InGaN solar cells, as well as to give realistic estimates of the performances of such cells.

  16. Influence of bladder and rectal volume on spatial variability of a bladder tumor during radical radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pos, Floris J.; Koedooder, Kees; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Gonzalez Gonzalez, Dionisio

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the spatial variability of a bladder tumor relative to the planning target volume boundaries during radical radiotherapy, and furthermore to develop strategies to reduce spatial variability. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with solitary T2-T4N0M0 bladder cancer were treated with a technique delivering 40 Gy/2 Gy in 20 fractions to the whole bladder with a concomitant boost to the bladder tumor of 20 Gy in 1 Gy fractions in an overall time of 4 weeks. CT scans were made weekly, immediately after treatment, and matched with the planning CT scan. Spatial variability of the tumor, as well as bladder volume and rectal diameter, were scored for each patient each week. Results: In 65% of patients, a part of the tumor appeared outside the planning target volume boundaries at least one time during the course of radiotherapy. No consistent relation of this variability with time was found. Bladder volumes and rectal diameters showed marked variability during the course of treatment. A large initial bladder volume and rectal diameter predicted a large volume variation and a large tumor spatial variability. Conclusion: In this study, a margin of 1.5 to 2 cm seemed to be inadequate in 65% of the patients with respect to spatial variability. Bladder volume and rectal diameter were found to be predictive for spatial variability of a bladder tumor during concomitant boost radiotherapy

  17. Influence of bladder and rectal volume on spatial variability of a bladder tumor during radical radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pos, Floris J; Koedooder, Kees; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Gonzalez Gonzalez, Dionisio

    2003-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the spatial variability of a bladder tumor relative to the planning target volume boundaries during radical radiotherapy, and furthermore to develop strategies to reduce spatial variability. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with solitary T2-T4N0M0 bladder cancer were treated with a technique delivering 40 Gy/2 Gy in 20 fractions to the whole bladder with a concomitant boost to the bladder tumor of 20 Gy in 1 Gy fractions in an overall time of 4 weeks. CT scans were made weekly, immediately after treatment, and matched with the planning CT scan. Spatial variability of the tumor, as well as bladder volume and rectal diameter, were scored for each patient each week. Results: In 65% of patients, a part of the tumor appeared outside the planning target volume boundaries at least one time during the course of radiotherapy. No consistent relation of this variability with time was found. Bladder volumes and rectal diameters showed marked variability during the course of treatment. A large initial bladder volume and rectal diameter predicted a large volume variation and a large tumor spatial variability. Conclusion: In this study, a margin of 1.5 to 2 cm seemed to be inadequate in 65% of the patients with respect to spatial variability. Bladder volume and rectal diameter were found to be predictive for spatial variability of a bladder tumor during concomitant boost radiotherapy.

  18. THE INFLUENCE OF EUROPEAN CLIMATE VARIABILITY MECHANISM ON AIR TEMPERATURE IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. MATEI

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present paper is to analyze the temporal and spatial variability of air-temperature in Romania, by using mean air-temperature values provided by the ECA&D project (http://eca.knmi.nl/. These data sets will be filtered by means of the EOF (Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis, which describes various modes of space variability and time coefficient series (PC series. The EOF analysis will also be used to identify the main way of action of the European climate variability mechanism, by using multiple variables in grid points, provided by the National Centre of Atmospheric Research (NCAR, USA. The variables considered here are: sea level pressure (SLP, geopotential height at 500 mb (H500 and air temperature at 850 mb (T850, for the summer and winter seasons. The linear trends and shift points of considered variables are then assessed by means of the Mann-Kendall and Pettitt non-parametric tests. By interpreting the results, we can infer that there is causal relationship between the large-scale analyzed parameters and temperature variability in Romania. These results are consistent with those presented by Busuioc et al., 2010, where the main variation trends of the principal European variables are shown.

  19. Influence of climate variability on anchovy reproductive timing off northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Reyes, Javier E.; Canales, T. Mariella; Rojas, Pablo M.

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the relationship between environmental variables and the Gonadosomatic Monthly Mean (GMM) index of anchovy (Engraulis ringens) to understand how the environment affects the dynamics of anchovy reproductive timing. The data examined corresponds to biological information collected from samples of the landings off northern Chile (18°21‧S, 24°00‧S) during the period 1990-2010. We used the Humboldt Current Index (HCI) and the Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI), which combine several physical-oceanographic factors in the Tropical and South Pacific regions. Using the GMM index, we studied the dynamics of anchovy reproductive timing at different intervals of length, specifically females with a length between 11.5 and 14 cm (medium class) and longer than 14 cm (large class). Seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Mobile Average (SARIMA) was used to predict missing observations. The trends of the environment and reproductive indexes were explored via the Breaks For Additive Season and Trend (BFAST) statistical technique and the relationship between these indexes via cross-correlation functions (CCF) analysis. Our results showed that the habitat of anchovy switched from cool to warm condition, which also influenced gonad development. This was revealed by two and three significant changes (breaks) in the trend of the HCI and MEI indexes, and two significant breaks in the GMM of each time series of anchovy females (medium and large). Negative cross-correlation between the MEI index and GMM of medium and large class females was found, indicating that as the environment gets warmer (positive value of MEI) a decrease in the reproductive activity of anchovy can be expected. Correlation between the MEI index and larger females was stronger than with medium females. Additionally, our results indicate that the GMM index of anchovy for both length classes reaches two maximums per year; the first from August to September and the second from December to January. The

  20. Influence of acute normobaric hypoxia on physiological variables and lactate turn point determination in trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofner, Michael; Wonisch, Manfred; Frei, Mario; Tschakert, Gerhard; Domej, Wolfgang; Kröpfl, Julia M; Hofmann, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the response of physiological variables to acute normobaric hypoxia compared to normoxia and its influence on the lactate turn point determination according to the three-phase model of energy supply (Phase I: metabolically balanced at muscular level; Phase II: metabolically balanced at systemic level; Phase III: not metabolically balanced) during maximal incremental exercise. Ten physically active (VO2max 3.9 [0.49] l·min(-1)), healthy men (mean age [SD]: 25.3 [4.6] yrs.), participated in the study. All participants performed two maximal cycle ergometric exercise tests under normoxic as well as hypoxic conditions (FiO2 = 14%). Blood lactate concentration, heart rate, gas exchange data, and power output at maximum and the first and the second lactate turn point (LTP1, LTP2), the heart rate turn point (HRTP) and the first and the second ventilatory turn point (VETP1, VETP2) were determined. Since in normobaric hypoxia absolute power output (P) was reduced at all reference points (max: 314 / 274 W; LTP2: 218 / 184 W; LTP1: 110 / 96 W), as well as VO2max (max: 3.90 / 3.23 l·min(-1); LTP2: 2.90 / 2.43 l·min(-1); LTP1: 1.66 / 1.52 l·min(-1)), percentages of Pmax at LTP1, LTP2, HRTP and VETP1, VETP2 were almost identical for hypoxic as well as normoxic conditions. Heart rate was significantly reduced at Pmax in hypoxia (max: 190 / 185 bpm), but no significant differences were found at submaximal control points. Blood lactate concentration was not different at maximum, and all reference points in both conditions. Respiratory exchange ratio (RER) (max: 1.28 / 1.08; LTP2: 1.13 / 0.98) and ventilatory equivalents for O2 (max: 43.4 / 34.0; LTP2: 32.1 / 25.4) and CO2 (max: 34.1 / 31.6; LTP2: 29.1 / 26.1) were significantly higher at some reference points in hypoxia. Significant correlations were found between LTP1 and VETP1 (r = 0.778; p better the performance of the athletes the higher is the effect of hypoxiaThe HRTP and LTP2 are

  1. Tidal variability of nutrients in a coastal coral reef system influenced by groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wang

    2018-02-01

    nutrients in the water column, 5.43 (R2  =  0.27 and 14.2 (R2  =  0.76, respectively. This similarity indicates that the composition of nutrients in the water column of the reef system was closely related with biological processes during both tidal periods, but the biological influence appeared to be less dominant, as inferred from the less significant correlations (R2  =  0.16 during the spring tide when groundwater discharge was more prominent. Thus, the variability of nutrients in the coral reef system was regulated mainly by biological uptake and release in a spring–neap tide and impacted by mixing of tidally driven groundwater and offshore seawater during spring tide.

  2. Numerical analysis of the influence of spherical turbulence generators on heat transfer enhancement of flat plate solar air heater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manjunath, M.S.; Karanth, K.Vasudeva; Sharma, N.Yagnesh

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the influence of spherical turbulence generators on thermal efficiency and thermohydraulic performance of flat plate solar air heater. The analysis is carried out for the Reynolds number range of 4000–25000. The thermal performance is investigated for various diameter (D) of sphere consisting of 5,10,15,20 and 25 mm and relative roughness pitch (P/D) of 3, 6 and 12. The simulation is carried out using solar insolation as heat input at 12 noon conditions for the global position of Manipal (74.786°E, 13.343°N) obtained through the solar load model, a feature available in the software tool used for the analysis and Discrete Ordinates radiation model is used to compute the radiation heat interactions within the computational domain. The CFD results for the base model are validated against experimental results and are found to have good agreement. The thermal efficiency is found to increase with increasing sphere diameter and reducing relative roughness pitch. The maximum average percentage increase in thermal efficiency is found to be about 23.4% as compared to the base model for D = 25 mm and P/D = 3. The highest increase in the Nusselt number is found to be 2.5 times higher as compared to the base model for D = 25 mm and P/D = 3 at Re = 23560. The analysis shows that the relative roughness pitch and size of the spherical turbulator have significant influence on the thermohydraulic performance of solar air heater. - Highlights: • Spherical turbulators used create intense turbulent mixing in the vicinity of absorber. • Nusselt number peaks on the upstream surface of spherical turbulators. • Peak thermal efficiency occurs at lower pitch and higher diameter conditions. • Higher diameter and lower pitch values also impose greater pumping power penalty. • Diameter and pitch of spherical turbulator strongly influence the effective efficiency.

  3. Environmental variable influence in the process of suppliers choice: a study in agribusiness in the microregion of Assis-SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edenis Cesar Oliveira

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The global market characterized by competition, has demanded of new placements organizations, particularly as to how implement and develop relations with its trading partners. The Supply Chain Management emerges as a tool that provides organizations with the most effective management of the consequences of these relations. The incorporation of environmental issues in the organizational context reflected directly across chain. Organizations began to consider sustainability as a major factor in relations with its stakeholders, justifying the emergence of Sustainable Management of Supply Chain. The study aims to analyze the influence of environmental variable introduced in decisions and selection of suppliers of sugarcane agro-industries located in the micro-region of Assis-SP. Was held from Multiple Case Study in six agribusinesses, collecting data through semi-structured interviews, applied to sixteen actors directly involved with the subject matter, in addition to document analysis to support the interviews. For data analysis, applied to content analysis with the help of ATLAS.ti software. The results showed that, of the six surveyed companies, in agribusiness AGR2, FOR1 and for2 the environmental variable has a weak influence in the selection of its suppliers; in AGR1 the influence is average and only in AGR3 and AGR4 agribusinesses environmental variable has a strong influence.

  4. The Influence of Conjugated Polymer Side Chain Manipulation on the Efficiency and Stability of Polymer Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heckler, Ilona Maria; Kesters, Jurgen; Defour, Maxime

    2016-01-01

    ]thiazole (TzTz) acceptor units, were selected toward effective device scalability by roll-coating. The influence of the partial exchange (5% or 10%) of the solubilizing 2-hexyldecyloxy by alternative 2-phenylethoxy groups on efficiency and stability was investigated. With an increasing 2-phenylethoxy ratio...... studies under constant sun irradiance showed a diminishing initial degradation rate for the BT-based devices upon including the alternative side chains, whereas the (more stable) TzTz-based devices degraded at a faster rate from the start of the experiment upon partly exchanging the side chains. No clear......The stability of polymer solar cells (PSCs) can be influenced by the introduction of particular moieties on the conjugated polymer side chains. In this study, two series of donor-acceptor copolymers, based on bis(thienyl)dialkoxybenzene donor and benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole (BT) or thiazolo[5,4-d...

  5. 2D simulation and performance evaluation of bifacial rear local contact c-Si solar cells under variable illumination conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Katsaounis, Theodoros

    2017-09-18

    A customized 2D computational tool has been developed to simulate bifacial rear local contact PERC type PV structures based on the numerical solution of the transport equations through the finite element method. Simulations were performed under various device material parameters and back contact geometry configurations in order to optimize bifacial solar cell performance under different simulated illumination conditions. Bifacial device maximum power output was also compared with the monofacial equivalent one and the industrial standard Al-BSF structure. The performance of the bifacial structure during highly diffused irradiance conditions commonly observed in the Middle East region due to high concentrations of airborne dust particles was also investigated. Simulation results demonstrated that such conditions are highly favorable for the bifacial device because of the significantly increased diffuse component of the solar radiation which enters the back cell surface.

  6. 2D simulation and performance evaluation of bifacial rear local contact c-Si solar cells under variable illumination conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Katsaounis, Theodoros; Kotsovos, Konstantinos; Gereige, Issam; Al-Saggaf, Ahmed; Tzavaras, Athanasios

    2017-01-01

    A customized 2D computational tool has been developed to simulate bifacial rear local contact PERC type PV structures based on the numerical solution of the transport equations through the finite element method. Simulations were performed under various device material parameters and back contact geometry configurations in order to optimize bifacial solar cell performance under different simulated illumination conditions. Bifacial device maximum power output was also compared with the monofacial equivalent one and the industrial standard Al-BSF structure. The performance of the bifacial structure during highly diffused irradiance conditions commonly observed in the Middle East region due to high concentrations of airborne dust particles was also investigated. Simulation results demonstrated that such conditions are highly favorable for the bifacial device because of the significantly increased diffuse component of the solar radiation which enters the back cell surface.

  7. The potential influence of short-term environmental variability on the composition of testate amoeba communities in Sphagnum peatlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Maura E; Booth, Robert K

    2011-07-01

    Testate amoebae are a group of moisture-sensitive, shell-producing protozoa that have been widely used as indicators of changes in mean water-table depth within oligotrophic peatlands. However, short-term environmental variability (i.e., sub-annual) also probably influences community composition. The objective of this study was to assess the potential influence of short-term environmental variability on the composition of testate amoeba communities in Sphagnum-dominated peatlands. Testate amoebae and environmental conditions, including hourly measurements of relative humidity within the upper centimeter of the peatland surface, were examined throughout the 2008 growing season at 72 microsites within 11 peatlands of Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, USA. Relationships among testate amoeba communities, vegetation, depth to water table, pH, and an index of short-term environmental variability (EVI), were examined using nonmetric multidimensional scaling and correlation analysis. Results suggest that EVI influences testate amoeba communities, with some taxa more abundant under highly variable conditions (e.g., Arcella discoides, Difflugia pulex, and Hyalosphenia subflava) and others more abundant when environmental conditions at the peatland surface were relatively stable (e.g., Archerella flavum and Bullinularia indica). The magnitude of environmental variability experienced at the peatland surface appears to be primarily controlled by vegetation composition and density. In particular, sites with dense Sphagnum cover had lower EVI values than sites with loose-growing Sphagnum or vegetation dominated by vascular plants and/or non-Sphagnum bryophytes. Our results suggest that more environmental information may be inferred from testate amoebae than previously recognized. Knowledge of relationships between testate amoebae and short-term environmental variability should lead to more detailed and refined environmental inferences.

  8. Influence of the iron source on the solar photo-Fenton degradation of different classes of organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, R.F.P.; Silva, M.R.A.; Trovo, A.G. [UNESP, Sao Paulo State University, Institute of Chemistry of Araraquara, P.O. Box 355, 14800-970, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2005-10-01

    In this work the influence of two different iron sources, Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and complexed ferrioxalate (FeOx), on the degradation efficiency of 4-chlorophenol (4CP), malachite green, formaldehyde, dichloroacetic acid (DCA) and the commercial products of the herbicides diuron and tebuthiuron was studied. The oxidation of 4CP, DCA, diuron and tebuthiuron shows a strong dependence on the iron source. While the 4CP degradation is favored by the use of Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, the degradation of DCA and the herbicides diuron and tebuthiuron is most efficient when ferrioxalate is used. On the other hand, the degradation of malachite green and formaldehyde is not very influenced by the iron source showing only a slight improvement when ferrioxalate is used. In the case of formaldehyde, DCA, diuron and tebuthiuron, despite of the additional carbon introduced by the use of ferrioxalate, higher mineralization percentages were observed, confirming the beneficial effect of ferrioxalate on the degradation of these compounds. The degradation of tebuthiuron was studied in detail using a shallow pond type solar flow reactor of 4.5L capacity and 4.5cm solution depth. Solar irradiation of tebuthiuron at a flow rate of 9Lh{sup -1}, in the presence of 10.0mmolL{sup -1} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and 1.0mmolL{sup -1} ferrioxalate resulted in complete conversion of this herbicide and 70% total organic carbon removal. (author)

  9. The Influence of Conjugated Polymer Side Chain Manipulation on the Efficiency and Stability of Polymer Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckler, Ilona M; Kesters, Jurgen; Defour, Maxime; Madsen, Morten V; Penxten, Huguette; D'Haen, Jan; Van Mele, Bruno; Maes, Wouter; Bundgaard, Eva

    2016-03-09

    The stability of polymer solar cells (PSCs) can be influenced by the introduction of particular moieties on the conjugated polymer side chains. In this study, two series of donor-acceptor copolymers, based on bis(thienyl)dialkoxybenzene donor and benzo[ c ][1,2,5]thiadiazole (BT) or thiazolo[5,4- d ]thiazole (TzTz) acceptor units, were selected toward effective device scalability by roll-coating. The influence of the partial exchange (5% or 10%) of the solubilizing 2-hexyldecyloxy by alternative 2-phenylethoxy groups on efficiency and stability was investigated. With an increasing 2-phenylethoxy ratio, a decrease in solar cell efficiency was observed for the BT-based series, whereas the efficiencies for the devices based on the TzTz polymers remained approximately the same. The photochemical degradation rate for PSCs based on the TzTz polymers decreased with an increasing 2-phenylethoxy ratio. Lifetime studies under constant sun irradiance showed a diminishing initial degradation rate for the BT-based devices upon including the alternative side chains, whereas the (more stable) TzTz-based devices degraded at a faster rate from the start of the experiment upon partly exchanging the side chains. No clear trends in the degradation behavior, linked to the copolymer structural changes, could be established at this point, evidencing the complex interplay of events determining PSCs' lifetime.

  10. The Influence of Conjugated Polymer Side Chain Manipulation on the Efficiency and Stability of Polymer Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona M. Heckler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The stability of polymer solar cells (PSCs can be influenced by the introduction of particular moieties on the conjugated polymer side chains. In this study, two series of donor-acceptor copolymers, based on bis(thienyldialkoxybenzene donor and benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole (BT or thiazolo[5,4-d]thiazole (TzTz acceptor units, were selected toward effective device scalability by roll-coating. The influence of the partial exchange (5% or 10% of the solubilizing 2-hexyldecyloxy by alternative 2-phenylethoxy groups on efficiency and stability was investigated. With an increasing 2-phenylethoxy ratio, a decrease in solar cell efficiency was observed for the BT-based series, whereas the efficiencies for the devices based on the TzTz polymers remained approximately the same. The photochemical degradation rate for PSCs based on the TzTz polymers decreased with an increasing 2-phenylethoxy ratio. Lifetime studies under constant sun irradiance showed a diminishing initial degradation rate for the BT-based devices upon including the alternative side chains, whereas the (more stable TzTz-based devices degraded at a faster rate from the start of the experiment upon partly exchanging the side chains. No clear trends in the degradation behavior, linked to the copolymer structural changes, could be established at this point, evidencing the complex interplay of events determining PSCs’ lifetime.

  11. Relative influence of age, resting heart rate and sedentary life style in short-term analysis of heart rate variability

    OpenAIRE

    E.R. Migliaro; P. Contreras; S. Bech; A. Etxagibel; M. Castro; R. Ricca; K. Vicente

    2001-01-01

    In order to assess the relative influence of age, resting heart rate (HR) and sedentary life style, heart rate variability (HRV) was studied in two different groups. The young group (YG) consisted of 9 sedentary subjects aged 15 to 20 years (YG-S) and of 9 nonsedentary volunteers (YG-NS) also aged 15 to 20. The elderly sedentary group (ESG) consisted of 16 sedentary subjects aged 39 to 82 years. HRV was assessed using a short-term procedure (5 min). R-R variability was calculated in the time-...

  12. Genetic Influence on Slope Variability in a Childhood Reflexive Attention Task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Lundwall

    Full Text Available Individuals are not perfectly consistent, and interindividual variability is a common feature in all varieties of human behavior. Some individuals respond more variably than others, however, and this difference may be important to understanding how the brain works. In this paper, we explore genetic contributions to response time (RT slope variability on a reflexive attention task. We are interested in such variability because we believe it is an important part of the overall picture of attention that, if understood, has the potential to improve intervention for those with attentional deficits. Genetic association studies are valuable in discovering biological pathways of variability and several studies have found such associations with a sustained attention task. Here, we expand our knowledge to include a reflexive attention task. We ask whether specific candidate genes are associated with interindividual variability on a childhood reflexive attention task in 9-16 year olds. The genetic makers considered are on 11 genes: APOE, BDNF, CHRNA4, COMT, DRD4, HTR4, IGF2, MAOA, SLC5A7, SLC6A3, and SNAP25. We find significant associations with variability with markers on nine and we discuss the results in terms of neurotransmitters associated with each gene and the characteristics of the associated measures from the reflexive attention task.

  13. On the influence of cloud fraction diurnal cycle and sub-grid cloud optical thickness variability on all-sky direct aerosol radiative forcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Min; Zhang, Zhibo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to understand how cloud fraction diurnal cycle and sub-grid cloud optical thickness variability influence the all-sky direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF). We focus on the southeast Atlantic region where transported smoke is often observed above low-level water clouds during burning seasons. We use the CALIOP observations to derive the optical properties of aerosols. We developed two diurnal cloud fraction variation models. One is based on sinusoidal fitting of MODIS observations from Terra and Aqua satellites. The other is based on high-temporal frequency diurnal cloud fraction observations from SEVIRI on board of geostationary satellite. Both models indicate a strong cloud fraction diurnal cycle over the southeast Atlantic region. Sensitivity studies indicate that using a constant cloud fraction corresponding to Aqua local equatorial crossing time (1:30 PM) generally leads to an underestimated (less positive) diurnal mean DARF even if solar diurnal variation is considered. Using cloud fraction corresponding to Terra local equatorial crossing time (10:30 AM) generally leads overestimation. The biases are a typically around 10–20%, but up to more than 50%. The influence of sub-grid cloud optical thickness variability on DARF is studied utilizing the cloud optical thickness histogram available in MODIS Level-3 daily data. Similar to previous studies, we found the above-cloud smoke in the southeast Atlantic region has a strong warming effect at the top of the atmosphere. However, because of the plane-parallel albedo bias the warming effect of above-cloud smoke could be significantly overestimated if the grid-mean, instead of the full histogram, of cloud optical thickness is used in the computation. This bias generally increases with increasing above-cloud aerosol optical thickness and sub-grid cloud optical thickness inhomogeneity. Our results suggest that the cloud diurnal cycle and sub-grid cloud variability are important factors

  14. Influence of encapsulated electron active molecules of single walled-carbon nanotubes on superstrate-type Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jungwoo [Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); CRD Laboratory, LG Chem. Research Park, Daejeon 305-738 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Wonjoo [Department of Defense Ammunitions, Daeduk College, Daejeon 305-715 (Korea, Republic of); Shrestha, Nabeen K.; Lee, Deok Yeon; Lim, Iseul [Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Soon Hyung [Department of Chemistry Education, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Nah, Yoon-Chae [School of Energy, Materials, and Chemical Engineering, Korea University of Technology and Education, Cheonan 330-708 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soo-Hyoung, E-mail: shlee66@jbnu.ac.kr [School of Semiconductor and Chemical Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Whikun, E-mail: wkyi@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sung-Hwan, E-mail: shhan@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-01

    Chemical functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can strongly affect the efficiency of solar cells due to change of three factors viz. electronic energy structures, interfacial resistance, and electrical field. Therefore, it is worthwhile to investigate the influence of these three factors on the solar cells based on the functionalization of various active molecules in CNTs. In the present study, we investigate the influence of the three factors in the efficiency of superstrate-type Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells [i.e. F-doped SnO{sub 2}/CNTs/CdS/CIGS/Au] by encapsulation of electron withdrawing and donating organic molecules inside CNTs. The CIGS solar cell was characterized using the electronic diagram, electrochemical impendence spectroscopy, reverse field emission currents, and currents–voltages curves. - Highlights: • We investigated the three effects of CNTs in superstrate-type CIGS solar cells. • Chemical functionalization of CNTs strongly affect the efficiency of solar cells. • The electrical field of solar cell was characterized using the reverse FE-currents.

  15. Hypocretin measurement: shelf age of radioimmunoassay kit, but not freezer time, influences assay variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Glenda; Bliwise, Donald L; Saini, Prabhjyot; Rye, David B; Trotti, Lynn Marie

    2017-09-01

    The hypothalamic peptide hypocretin 1 (orexin A) may be assayed in cerebrospinal fluid to diagnose narcolepsy type 1. This testing is not commercially available, and factors contributing to assay variability have not previously been comprehensively explored. In the present study, cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin concentrations were determined in duplicate in 155 patient samples, across a range of sleep disorders. Intra-assay variability of these measures was analyzed. Inter-assay correlation between samples tested at Emory and at Stanford was high (r = 0.79, p hypocretin values, such that kits closer to expiration exhibit significantly more variability.

  16. Exploring the role of social capital influence variables on travel behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Ciommo, Floridea; Comendador, Julio; Eugenia Lopez-Lambas, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the potential role of individual trip characteristics and social capital network variables in the choice of transport mode. A sample of around 100 individuals living or working in one suburb of Madrid (i.e. Las Rosas district of Madrid) participated in a smartphone short panel......, the model incorporated two "social capital network" variables: participation in voluntary activities and receiving help for various tasks (i.e. child care, housekeeping, etc.). Both variables improved the capacity of the model to explain transport mode shifts. Further, our results confirm that the shift...

  17. Influence of the size of facets on point focus solar concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riveros-Rosas, David [Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, Col. Copilco, Coyoacan, CP 04510 DF (Mexico); Sanchez-Gonzalez, Marcelino [Centro Nacional de Energias Renovables, c/Somera 7-9, CP 28026 Madrid (Spain); Arancibia-Bulnes, Camilo A.; Estrada, Claudio A. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Priv. Xochicalco s/n, Morelos (Mexico)

    2011-03-15

    It is a common practice in the development of point focus solar concentrators to use multiple identical reflecting facets, as a practical and economic alternative for the design and construction of large systems. This kind of systems behaves in a different manner than continuous paraboloidal concentrators. A theoretical study is carried out to understand the effect of the size of facets and of their optical errors in multiple facet point focus solar concentrating systems. For this purpose, a ray tracing program was developed based on the convolution technique, in which the brightness distribution of the sun and the optical errors of the reflecting surfaces are considered. The study shows that both the peak of concentration and the optimal focal distance of the system strongly depend on the size of the facets, and on their optical errors. These results are useful to help concentrator developers to have a better understanding of the relationship between manufacturing design restrictions and final optical behavior. (author)

  18. Influence of polar solvents on photovoltaic performance of Monascusred dye-sensitized solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Wook; Kim, Tae Young; Ko, Hyun Seok; Han, Shin; Lee, Suk-Ho; Park, Kyung Hee

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were assembled using natural dyes extracted from Monascus red pigment as a sensitizer. In this work, we studied the adsorption characteristics for harvesting sunlight and the electrochemical behavior for electron transfer in Monascus red DSSC using different solvents. The effect of polar aprotic and protic solvents including water, ethanol, and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) used in the sensitization process was investigated for the improvement in conversion efficiency of a cell. As for the Monascus red dye-sensitized electrode in DMSO solvent, the solar cell yields a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 1.23 mA/cm2, a photovoltage (Voc) of 0.75 V, and a fill factor of 0.72, corresponding to an energy conversion efficiency (η) of 0.66%.

  19. Electromagnetic Spectrum Analysis and Its Influence on the Photoelectric Conversion Efficiency of Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kexiang; Ding, Enjie; Wangyang, Peihua; Wang, Qingkang

    2016-06-01

    The electromagnetic spectrum and the photoelectric conversion efficiency of the silicon hexagonal nanoconical hole (SiHNH) arrays based solar cells is systematically analyzed according to Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) and Modal Transmission Line (MTL) theory. An ultimate efficiency of the optimized SiHNH arrays based solar cell is up to 31.92% in consideration of the absorption spectrum, 4.52% higher than that of silicon hexagonal nanoconical frustum (SiHNF) arrays. The absorption enhancement of the SiHNH arrays is due to its lower reflectance and more supported guided-mode resonances, and the enhanced ultimate efficiency is insensitive to bottom diameter (D(bot)) of nanoconical hole and the incident angle. The result provides an additional guideline for the nanostructure surface texturing fabrication design for photovoltaic applications.

  20. Charge Generation Dynamics in Efficient All-Polymer Solar Cells: Influence of Polymer Packing and Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Bhoj R; Lee, Changyeon; Younts, Robert; Lee, Wonho; Danilov, Evgeny; Kim, Bumjoon J; Gundogdu, Kenan

    2015-12-23

    All-polymer solar cells exhibit rapid progress in power conversion efficiency (PCE) from 2 to 7.7% over the past few years. While this improvement is primarily attributed to efficient charge transport and balanced mobility between the carriers, not much is known about the charge generation dynamics in these systems. Here we measured exciton relaxation and charge separation dynamics using ultrafast spectroscopy in polymer/polymer blends with different molecular packing and morphology. These measurements indicate that preferential face-on configuration with intermixed nanomorphology increases the charge generation efficiency. In fact, there is a direct quantitative correlation between the free charge population in the ultrafast time scales and the external quantum efficiency, suggesting not only the transport but also charge generation is key for the design of high performance all polymer solar cells.

  1. Influence of polar solvents on photovoltaic performance of Monascusred dye-sensitized solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Wook; Kim, Tae Young; Ko, Hyun Seok; Han, Shin; Lee, Suk-Ho; Park, Kyung Hee

    2014-05-21

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were assembled using natural dyes extracted from Monascus red pigment as a sensitizer. In this work, we studied the adsorption characteristics for harvesting sunlight and the electrochemical behavior for electron transfer in Monascus red DSSC using different solvents. The effect of polar aprotic and protic solvents including water, ethanol, and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) used in the sensitization process was investigated for the improvement in conversion efficiency of a cell. As for the Monascus red dye-sensitized electrode in DMSO solvent, the solar cell yields a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 1.23mA/cm(2), a photovoltage (Voc) of 0.75V, and a fill factor of 0.72, corresponding to an energy conversion efficiency (η) of 0.66%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of Hybrid Perovskite Fabrication Methods on Film Formation, Electronic Structure, and Solar Cell Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnier, Tobias; Emara, Jennifer; Olthof, Selina; Meerholz, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid organic/inorganic halide perovskites have lately been a topic of great interest in the field of solar cell applications, with the potential to achieve device efficiencies exceeding other thin film device technologies. Yet, large variations in device efficiency and basic physical properties are reported. This is due to unintentional variations during film processing, which have not been sufficiently investigated so far. We therefore conducted an extensive study of the morphology and electronic structure of a large number of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite where we show how the preparation method as well as the mixing ratio of educts methylammonium iodide and lead(II) iodide impact properties like film formation, crystal structure, density of states, energy levels, and ultimately the solar cell performance. PMID:28287555

  3. Chromospheric Variability: Analysis of 36 years of Time Series from the National Solar Observatory/Sacramento Peak Ca II K-line Monitoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Keil, Stephen L.; Worden, Simon P.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of more than 36 years of time series of seven parameters measured in the NSO/AFRL/Sac Peak K-line monitoring program elucidates five elucidates five components of the variation: (1) the solar cycle (period approx. 11 years), (2) quasi-periodic variations (periods approx 100 days), (3) a broad band stochastic process (wide range of periods), (4) rotational modulation, and (5) random observational errors. Correlation and power spectrum analyses elucidate periodic and aperiodic variation of the chromospheric parameters. Time-frequency analysis illuminates periodic and quasi periodic signals, details of frequency modulation due to differential rotation, and in particular elucidates the rather complex harmonic structure (1) and (2) at time scales in the range approx 0.1 - 10 years. These results using only full-disk data further suggest that similar analyses will be useful at detecting and characterizing differential rotation in stars from stellar light-curves such as those being produced by NASA's Kepler observatory. Component (3) consists of variations over a range of timescales, in the manner of a 1/f random noise process. A timedependent Wilson-Bappu effect appears to be present in the solar cycle variations (1), but not in the stochastic process (3). Component (4) characterizes differential rotation of the active regions, and (5) is of course not characteristic of solar variability, but the fact that the observational errors are quite small greatly facilitates the analysis of the other components. The recent data suggest that the current cycle is starting late and may be relatively weak. The data analyzed in this paper can be found at the National Solar Observatory web site http://nsosp.nso.edu/cak_mon/, or by file transfer protocol at ftp://ftp.nso.edu/idl/cak.parameters.

  4. Needs for Flexibility Caused by the Variability and Uncertainty in Wind and Solar Generation in 2020, 2030 and 2050 Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koivisto, Matti Juhani; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar; Maule, Petr

    The growing share of variable renewable energy sources (VRE) in Nordic and Baltic countries is expected to increase the need for flexibility in the energy systems. VRE generation is highly variable because it is determined by weather conditions, and it is uncertain due to forecasting errors. Both...

  5. Higher latitude and lower solar radiation influence on anaphylaxis in Chilean children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyos-Bachiloglu, Rodrigo; Morales, Pamela S; Cerda, Jaime; Talesnik, Eduardo; González, Gilberto; Camargo, Carlos A; Borzutzky, Arturo

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies suggest an association between higher latitude, a proxy of vitamin D (VD) status, and allergic diseases. Chile provides an ideal setting to study this association due to its latitude span and high rates of VD deficiency in southern regions. The aim of this study is to explore the associations of latitude and solar radiation with anaphylaxis admission rates. We reviewed anaphylaxis admissions in Chile's hospital discharge database between 2001 and 2010 and investigated associations with latitude and solar radiation. 2316 anaphylaxis admissions were registered. Median age of patients was 41 yr; 53% were female. National anaphylaxis admission rate was 1.41 per 100,000 persons per year. We observed a strong north-south increasing gradient of anaphylaxis admissions (β 0.04, p = 0.01), with increasing rates south of latitude 34°S. A significant association was also observed between solar radiation and anaphylaxis admissions (β -0.11, p = 0.009). Latitude was associated with food-induced (β 0.05, p = 0.02), but not drug-induced (β -0.002, p = 0.27), anaphylaxis. The association between latitude and food-induced anaphylaxis was significant in children (β 0.01, p = 0.006), but not adults (β 0.003, p = 0.16). Anaphylaxis admissions were not associated with regional sociodemographic factors like poverty, rurality, educational level, ethnicity, or physician density. Anaphylaxis admission rates in Chile are highest at higher latitudes and lower solar radiation, used as proxies of VD status. The associations appear driven by food-induced anaphylaxis. Our data support a possible role of VD deficiency as an etiological factor in the high anaphylaxis admission rates found in southern Chile. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. On the factors influencing the performance of solar reactors for water disinfection with photosensitized singlet oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjón, Francisco; Villén, Laura; García-Fresnadillo, David; Orellana, Guillermo

    2008-01-01

    Two solar reactors based on compound parabolic collectors (CPCs) were optimized for water disinfection by photosensitized singlet oxygen (1O2) production in the heterogeneous phase. Sensitizing materials containing Ru(II) complexes immobilized on porous silicone were produced, photochemically characterized, and successfully tested for the inactivation of up to 10(4) CFU mL(-1) of waterborne Escherichia coli (gram-negative) or Enterococcus faecalis (gram-positive) bacteria. The main factors determining the performance of the solar reactors are the type of photosensitizing material, the sensitizer loading, the CPC collector geometry (fin- vs coaxial-type), the fluid rheology, and the balance between concurrent photothermal--photolytic and 1O2 effects on the microorganisms' inactivation. In this way, at the 40 degrees N latitude of Spain, water can be disinfected on a sunny day (0.6-0.8 MJ m(-2) L(-1) accumulated solar radiation dose in the 360-700 nm range, typically 5-6 h of sunlight) with a fin-type reactor containing 0.6 m2 of photosensitizing material saturated with tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline)ruthenium(II) (ca. 2.0 g m(-2)). The optimum rheological conditions require laminar-to-transitional water flow in both prototypes. The fin-type system showed better inactivation efficiency than the coaxial reactor due to a more important photolytic contribution. The durability of the sensitizing materials was tested and the operational lifetime of the photocatalyst is at least three months without any reduction in the bacteria inactivation efficiency. Solar water disinfection with 1O2-generating films is demonstrated to be an effective technique for use in isolated regions of developing countries with high yearly average sunshine.

  7. Solar radiation as a factor influencing the raid spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus) during spring swarming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezei, P.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring of spruce bark beetle in nature reserve Fabova hola Mountain in the Slovenske Rudohorie Mountains at an altitude of 1.100-1.440 meters was conducted from 2006 to 2009. Slovenske Rudohorie Mountains was affected by two windstorms (2004 and 2007) followed by a gradation of bark beetles. This article has examined the dependence between amount of solar radiation and trapping of spruce bark beetle into pheromone traps.

  8. The Influence of Solvent Additive on Polymer Solar Cells Employing Fullerene and Non-Fullerene Acceptors

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Xin

    2017-11-27

    Small-molecule-based non-fullerene acceptors (NFAs) are emerging as a new field in organic photovoltaics, due to their structural versatility, the tunability of their energy levels, and their ease of synthesis. High-efficiency polymer donors have been tested with these non-fullerene acceptors in order to further boost the efficiency of organic solar cells. Most of the polymer:fullerene systems are optimized with solvent additives for high efficiency, while little attention has been paid to NFA-based solar cells so far. In this report, the effect of the most common additive, 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO), on PTB7-Th:PC71BM solar cells is investigated and it is compared with non-fullerene acceptor 3,9-bis(2-methylene-(3-(1,1-dicyanomethylene)-indanone))-5,5,11,11-tetrakis(4-hexylphenyl)-dithieno[2,3-d:2′,3′-d′]-s-indaceno-[1,2-b:5,6b′]di-thiophene (ITIC) devices. It is interesting that the high boiling solvent additive does have a negative impact on the power conversion efficiency when PTB7-Th is blended with ITIC acceptor. The solar cell devices are studied in terms of their optical, photophysical, and morphological properties and find out that PTB7-Th:ITIC devices with DIO results in coarser domains, reduced absorption strength, and slightly lower mobility, while DIO improves the absorption strength of the PTB7-Th:PC71BM blend film and increase the aggregation of PC71BM in the blend, resulting in higher fill factor and Jsc.

  9. The Influence of Solvent Additive on Polymer Solar Cells Employing Fullerene and Non-Fullerene Acceptors

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Xin; Gasparini, Nicola; Baran, Derya

    2017-01-01

    Small-molecule-based non-fullerene acceptors (NFAs) are emerging as a new field in organic photovoltaics, due to their structural versatility, the tunability of their energy levels, and their ease of synthesis. High-efficiency polymer donors have been tested with these non-fullerene acceptors in order to further boost the efficiency of organic solar cells. Most of the polymer:fullerene systems are optimized with solvent additives for high efficiency, while little attention has been paid to NFA-based solar cells so far. In this report, the effect of the most common additive, 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO), on PTB7-Th:PC71BM solar cells is investigated and it is compared with non-fullerene acceptor 3,9-bis(2-methylene-(3-(1,1-dicyanomethylene)-indanone))-5,5,11,11-tetrakis(4-hexylphenyl)-dithieno[2,3-d:2′,3′-d′]-s-indaceno-[1,2-b:5,6b′]di-thiophene (ITIC) devices. It is interesting that the high boiling solvent additive does have a negative impact on the power conversion efficiency when PTB7-Th is blended with ITIC acceptor. The solar cell devices are studied in terms of their optical, photophysical, and morphological properties and find out that PTB7-Th:ITIC devices with DIO results in coarser domains, reduced absorption strength, and slightly lower mobility, while DIO improves the absorption strength of the PTB7-Th:PC71BM blend film and increase the aggregation of PC71BM in the blend, resulting in higher fill factor and Jsc.

  10. Spike Pattern Structure Influences Synaptic Efficacy Variability Under STDP and Synaptic Homeostasis. II: Spike Shuffling Methods on LIF Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zedong Bi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Synapses may undergo variable changes during plasticity because of the variability of spike patterns such as temporal stochasticity and spatial randomness. Here, we call the variability of synaptic weight changes during plasticity to be efficacy variability. In this paper, we investigate how four aspects of spike pattern statistics (i.e., synchronous firing, burstiness/regularity, heterogeneity of rates and heterogeneity of cross-correlations influence the efficacy variability under pair-wise additive spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP and synaptic homeostasis (the mean strength of plastic synapses into a neuron is bounded, by implementing spike shuffling methods onto spike patterns self-organized by a network of excitatory and inhibitory leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF neurons. With the increase of the decay time scale of the inhibitory synaptic currents, the LIF network undergoes a transition from asynchronous state to weak synchronous state and then to synchronous bursting state. We first shuffle these spike patterns using a variety of methods, each designed to evidently change a specific pattern statistics; and then investigate the change of efficacy variability of the synapses under STDP and synaptic homeostasis, when the neurons in the network fire according to the spike patterns before and after being treated by a shuffling method. In this way, we can understand how the change of pattern statistics may cause the change of efficacy variability. Our results are consistent with those of our previous study which implements spike-generating models on converging motifs. We also find that burstiness/regularity is important to determine the efficacy variability under asynchronous states, while heterogeneity of cross-correlations is the main factor to cause efficacy variability when the network moves into synchronous bursting states (the states observed in epilepsy.

  11. Conceptual model for millennial climate variability: a possible combined solar-thermohaline circulation origin for the {proportional_to}1,500-year cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dima, Mihai [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany); University of Bucharest, Department of Atmospheric Physics, Faculty of Physics, P.O. Box 11440, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Lohmann, Gerrit [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany)

    2009-02-15

    Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events are the most pronounced climatic changes over the last 120,000 years. Although many of their properties were derived from climate reconstructions, the associated physical mechanisms are not yet fully understood. These events are paced by a {proportional_to}1,500-year periodicity whose origin remains unclear. In a conceptual model approach, we show that this millennial variability can originate from rectification of an external (solar) forcing, and suggest that the thermohaline circulation, through a threshold response, could be the rectifier. We argue that internal threshold response of the thermohaline circulation (THC) to solar forcing is more likely to produce the observed DO cycles than amplification of weak direct {proportional_to}1,500-year forcing of unknown origin, by THC. One consequence of our concept is that the millennial variability is viewed as a derived mode without physical processes on its characteristic time scale. Rather, the mode results from the linear representation in the Fourier space of nonlinearly transformed fundamental modes. (orig.)

  12. A first look into the influence of triathlon wetsuit on resting blood pressure and heart rate variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Prado

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of wearing a wetsuit on resting cardiovascular measures (blood pressure (BP, heart rate variability (HRV. The influence of position (upright, prone and wetsuit size were also explored. Participants (n=12 males, 33.3±12.1 years had BP and HRV measured during six resting conditions: standing or prone while not wearing a wetsuit (NWS, wearing the smallest (SWS, or largest (LWS wetsuit (based upon manufacturer guidelines. Heart rate was recorded continuously over 5-mins; BP was measured three times per condition. HRV was represented by the ratio of low (LF and high (HF frequency (LF/HF ratio; mean arterial pressure (MAP was calculated. Each dependent variable was analyzed using a 2 (position x 3 (wetsuit repeated measures ANOVA (α=0.05. Neither HRV parameter was influenced by position x wetsuit condition interaction (p>0.05 and MAP was not influenced by position (p=0.717. MAP and LF/HF ratio were both influenced by wetsuit condition (p<0.05 with higher during SWS than NWS (p=0.026 while LF/HF ratio was lower during SWS compared to NWS (p=0.032. LF/HF ratio was influenced by position being greater during standing vs. prone (p=0.001. It was concluded that during resting while on land (i.e., not submerged in water, wearing a small, tight-fitting wetsuit subtlety altered cardiovascular parameters for healthy, normotensive subjects.

  13. On the influence of the magnetization of a model solar wind on a laboratory magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, H.U.; Yur, G.; White, R.S.; Birn, J.; Wessel, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    The interaction of a magnetized plasma beam with a stationary dipole field, analogous to the interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere, is explored in a laboratory experiment. Experimental parameters are chosen to scale qualitatively similar to the parameters in the Earth's magnetosphere. The authors find that the magnetization of the laboratory solar wind, generated by injecting a plasma across a preexisting magnetic field, requires a certain minimum magnetic field strength. Differences between the resulting magnetospheres for northward and southward solar<