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Sample records for solar ultraviolet spectroradiometer

  1. Autonomous portable solar ultraviolet spectroradiometer (APSUS) - a new CCD spectrometer system for localized, real-time solar ultraviolet (280-400 nm) radiation measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, Rebecca; Pearson, Andy; O'Hagan, John

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation has significant implications for human health and increasing levels are a key concern regarding the impact of climate change. Monitoring solar UV radiation at the earth's surface is therefore of increasing importance. A new prototype portable CCD (charge-coupled device) spectrometer-based system has been developed that monitors UV radiation (280-400 nm) levels at the earth's surface. It has the ability to deliver this information to the public in real time. Since the instrument can operate autonomously, it is called the Autonomous Portable Solar Ultraviolet Spectroradiometer (APSUS). This instrument incorporates an Ocean Optics QE65000 spectrometer which is contained within a robust environmental housing. The APSUS system can gather reliable solar UV spectral data from approximately April to October inclusive (depending on ambient temperature) in the UK. In this study the new APSUS unit and APSUS system are presented. Example solar UV spectra and diurnal UV Index values as measured by the APSUS system in London and Weymouth in the UK in summer 2012 are shown. © 2014 Crown copyright. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology. This article is published with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Queen's Printer for Scotland and Public Health England.

  2. Quality assessment of solar UV irradiance measured with array spectroradiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, Luca; Gröbner, Julian; Hülsen, Gregor; Bachmann, Luciano; Blumthaler, Mario; Dubard, Jimmy; Khazova, Marina; Kift, Richard; Hoogendijk, Kees; Serrano, Antonio; Smedley, Andrew; Vilaplana, José-Manuel

    2016-04-01

    The reliable quantification of ultraviolet (UV) radiation at the earth's surface requires accurate measurements of spectral global solar UV irradiance in order to determine the UV exposure to human skin and to understand long-term trends in this parameter. Array spectroradiometers (ASRMs) are small, light, robust and cost-effective instruments, and are increasingly used for spectral irradiance measurements. Within the European EMRP ENV03 project "Solar UV", new devices, guidelines and characterization methods have been developed to improve solar UV measurements with ASRMs, and support to the end user community has been provided. In order to assess the quality of 14 end user ASRMs, a solar UV intercomparison was held on the measurement platform of the World Radiation Center (PMOD/WRC) in Davos, Switzerland, from 10 to 17 July 2014. The results of the blind intercomparison revealed that ASRMs, currently used for solar UV measurements, show a large variation in the quality of their solar UV measurements. Most of the instruments overestimate the erythema-weighted UV index - in particular at large solar zenith angles - due to stray light contribution in the UV-B range. The spectral analysis of global solar UV irradiance further supported the finding that the uncertainties in the UV-B range are very large due to stray light contribution in this wavelength range. In summary, the UV index may be detected by some commercially available ASRMs within 5 % compared to the world reference spectroradiometer, if well characterized and calibrated, but only for a limited range of solar zenith angles. Generally, the tested instruments are not yet suitable for solar UV measurements for the entire range between 290 and 400 nm under all atmospheric conditions.

  3. Solar ultraviolet hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azmah Ali

    1995-01-01

    The paper discussed the following subjects: the sources of ultraviolet radiation, solar ultraviolet radiation definition, effects of over exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation, exposure limits and radiation protection of this radiation

  4. Water vapour retrieval using the Precision Solar Spectroradiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raptis, Panagiotis-Ioannis; Kazadzis, Stelios; Gröbner, Julian; Kouremeti, Natalia; Doppler, Lionel; Becker, Ralf; Helmis, Constantinos

    2018-02-01

    The Precision Solar Spectroradiometer (PSR) is a new spectroradiometer developed at Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos - World Radiation Center (PMOD-WRC), Davos, measuring direct solar irradiance at the surface, in the 300-1020 nm spectral range and at high temporal resolution. The purpose of this work is to investigate the instrument's potential to retrieve integrated water vapour (IWV) using its spectral measurements. Two different approaches were developed in order to retrieve IWV: the first one uses single-channel and wavelength measurements, following a theoretical water vapour high absorption wavelength, and the second one uses direct sun irradiance integrated at a certain spectral region. IWV results have been validated using a 2-year data set, consisting of an AERONET sun-photometer Cimel CE318, a Global Positioning System (GPS), a microwave radiometer profiler (MWP) and radiosonde retrievals recorded at Meteorological Observatorium Lindenberg, Germany. For the monochromatic approach, better agreement with retrievals from other methods and instruments was achieved using the 946 nm channel, while for the spectral approach the 934-948 nm window was used. Compared to other instruments' retrievals, the monochromatic approach leads to mean relative differences up to 3.3 % with the coefficient of determination (R2) being in the region of 0.87-0.95, while for the spectral approach mean relative differences up to 0.7 % were recorded with R2 in the region of 0.96-0.98. Uncertainties related to IWV retrieval methods were investigated and found to be less than 0.28 cm for both methods. Absolute IWV deviations of differences between PSR and other instruments were determined the range of 0.08-0.30 cm and only in extreme cases would reach up to 15 %.

  5. Solar Indices - Solar Ultraviolet

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  6. Solar ultraviolet radiation cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfgren, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    Despite being a treatable disease, cataract is still the leading cause for blindness in the world. Solar ultraviolet radiation is epidemiologically linked to cataract development, while animal and in vitro studies prove a causal relationship. However, the pathogenetic pathways for the disease are not fully understood and there is still no perfect model for human age related cataract. This non-comprehensive overview focus on recent developments regarding effects of solar UV radiation wavebands on the lens. A smaller number of fundamental papers are also included to provide a backdrop for the overview. Future studies are expected to further clarify the cellular and subcellular mechanisms for UV radiation-induced cataract and especially the isolated or combined temporal and spatial effects of UVA and UVB in the pathogenesis of human cataract. Regardless of the cause for cataract, there is a need for advances in pharmaceutical or other treatment modalities that do not require surgical replacement of the lens. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. First performance results of two novel spectroradiometers developed for fast scanning of solar spectra UV irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feister, Uwe; Kaifel, Anton K.; Grewe, Rolf-Dieter; Kaptur, Jasmine; Reutter, Oliver; Wohlfart, Michael; Gericke, Klaus

    2003-11-01

    Two recently developed different types of fast spectroradiometers measuring solar UV irradiance have been compared in a field campaign: i) the UV spectroradiometer on filter model basis (UV-SPRAFIMO) and ii) the modified version of the spectroradiometer SPECTRO 320D by Instrument Systems. The all-weather UV-SPRAFIMO instrument combines a UV filter radiometer with 5 narrow-band (FBHM ~ 2.0 to 2.5 nm) filters centered within +/- 0.01 nm at 303.5, 309.0, 314.5, 327.0 and 387.0 nm, and an advanced neural network-based model. It allows up to 5 measurements per second to be taken that are averaged within time intervals between 5 and 30 s. The neural networks model that is embedded in the PC-based processing software converts the 5 measured irradiances into a full spectrum from 280 to 450 nm at small wavelength steps (>= 0.05 nm). These spectra can be convoluted with user-defined slit function and integrated to broad-band and action-spectra-weighted irradiance values. Users can access the data stored in the internal data logger by a serial RS232 interface or by a modem and display them on a PC-based Graphical User Interface. The spectroradiometer SPECTRO320D consists of a grating double monochromator with a cooled (-20°C) PMT receiver. The modified instrument version run by DWD uses a Schreder type cosine diffuser that directs the solar global irradiance via quartz fiber optics onto the spectroradiometer's entrance slit. The spectroradiometer used at the campaign was installed in a thermostatted (22 +/- 0.02)°C aluminum box. The modified instrument version performs a spectral scan over the whole UV region in two subsequent parts, with a lower speed in the UV-B than in the UV-A to account for the exponential changes of solar irradiance with increasing wavelengths in the UV-B and for the almost linear change in the UV-A region. In the configuration applied in the comparison, i.e. wavelength steps of 0.2 nm within the scan range from 290 nm to 450 nm, the resulting scan

  8. Evolution of solar ultraviolet luminosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahnle, K.J.; Walker, J.C.G.

    1982-01-01

    In view of the major role of the sun in defining the properties of planetary atmospheres, their evolution cannot be fully understood outside the context of an evolving sun. The ultraviolet radiation is especially interesting because of its strong interaction with planetary atmospheres. We use astronomical observation of stars that are analogous to the sun in order to reconstruct a tentative account of the evolution of solar UV luminosity. A wealth of evidence indicates that the young sun was a much more powerful source of energetic particles and radiation than it is today. While on the main sequence, solar activity has declined as an inverse power law of age (between t -5 and t/sup -1.2/) as a consequence of angular momentum loss to the solar wind. Recent IUE satellite observations of premain sequence stars suggest that before the sun reached the main sequence (at an age of about 50 m.y.), it may have emitted as much as 10 4 times as much ultraviolet radiation (γ<2000 A) than it does today. These results could impact our understanding of the photochemistry and escape of constituents of primordial planetary atmospheres

  9. Assessment and comparison of methods for solar ultraviolet radiation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leszczynski, K

    1995-06-01

    In the study, the different methods to measure the solar ultraviolet radiation are compared. The methods included are spectroradiometric, erythemally weighted broadband and multi-channel measurements. The comparison of the different methods is based on a literature review and assessments of optical characteristics of the spectroradiometer Optronic 742 of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) and of the erythemally weighted Robertson-Berger type broadband radiometers Solar Light models 500 and 501 of the Finnish Meteorological Institute and STUK. An introduction to the sources of error in solar UV measurements, to methods for radiometric characterization of UV radiometers together with methods for error reduction are presented. Reviews on experiences from world-wide UV monitoring efforts and instrumentation as well as on the results from international UV radiometer intercomparisons are also presented. (62 refs.).

  10. Assessment and comparison of methods for solar ultraviolet radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leszczynski, K.

    1995-06-01

    In the study, the different methods to measure the solar ultraviolet radiation are compared. The methods included are spectroradiometric, erythemally weighted broadband and multi-channel measurements. The comparison of the different methods is based on a literature review and assessments of optical characteristics of the spectroradiometer Optronic 742 of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) and of the erythemally weighted Robertson-Berger type broadband radiometers Solar Light models 500 and 501 of the Finnish Meteorological Institute and STUK. An introduction to the sources of error in solar UV measurements, to methods for radiometric characterization of UV radiometers together with methods for error reduction are presented. Reviews on experiences from world-wide UV monitoring efforts and instrumentation as well as on the results from international UV radiometer intercomparisons are also presented. (62 refs.)

  11. Solar ultraviolet radiation effects on biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffey, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    This extensive review discusses the topic under the following headings: ultraviolet climatology, molecular and cellular ultraviolet photobiology (absorption, photoproducts, repair), effects of solar UVR on aquatic life (phyto and zooplankton), plants and humans. The section on human effects includes tanning, photo-aging, non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers and the effects of solar UVR on the eye. (UK)

  12. Solar ultraviolet radiation effects on biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diffey, B.L. (Dryburn Hospital, Durham (UK). Regional Medical Physics Dept.)

    1991-03-01

    This extensive review discusses the topic under the following headings: ultraviolet climatology, molecular and cellular ultraviolet photobiology (absorption, photoproducts, repair), effects of solar UVR on aquatic life (phyto and zooplankton), plants and humans. The section on human effects includes tanning, photo-aging, non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers and the effects of solar UVR on the eye. (UK).

  13. Solar ultraviolet irradiance variations: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lean, J.

    1987-01-01

    Despite the geophysical importance of solar ultraviolet radiation, specific aspects of its temporal variations have not yet been adequately determined experimentally, nor are the mechanisms for the variability completely understood. Satellite observations have verified the reality of solar ultraviolet irradiance variations over time scales of days and months, and model calculations have confirmed the association of these short-term variations with the evolution and rotation of regions of enhanced magnetic activity on the solar disc. However, neither rocket nor satellite measurements have yet been made with sufficient accuracy and regularity to establish unequivocally the nature of the variability over the longer time of the 11-year solar cycle. The comparative importance for the long-term variations of local regions of enhanced magnetic activity and global scale activity perturbations is still being investigated. Solar ultraviolet irradiance variations over both short and long time scales are reviewed, with emphasis on their connection to solar magnetic activity. Correlations with ground-based measures of solar variability are examined because of the importance of the ground-based observations as historical proxies of ultraviolet irradiance variations. Current problems in understanding solar ultraviolet irradiance variations are discussed, and the measurements planned for solar cycle 22, which may resolve these problems, are briefly described. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  14. Adaption of an array spectroradiometer for total ozone column retrieval using direct solar irradiance measurements in the UV spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Ralf; Sperfeld, Peter; Riechelmann, Stefan; Nevas, Saulius; Sildoja, Meelis; Seckmeyer, Gunther

    2018-04-01

    A compact array spectroradiometer that enables precise and robust measurements of solar UV spectral direct irradiance is presented. We show that this instrument can retrieve total ozone column (TOC) accurately. The internal stray light, which is often the limiting factor for measurements in the UV spectral range and increases the uncertainty for TOC analysis, is physically reduced so that no other stray-light reduction methods, such as mathematical corrections, are necessary. The instrument has been extensively characterised at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. During an international total ozone measurement intercomparison at the Izaña Atmospheric Observatory in Tenerife, the high-quality applicability of the instrument was verified with measurements of the direct solar irradiance and subsequent TOC evaluations based on the spectral data measured between 12 and 30 September 2016. The results showed deviations of the TOC of less than 1.5 % from most other instruments in most situations and not exceeding 3 % from established TOC measurement systems such as Dobson or Brewer.

  15. Solar maximum ultraviolet spectrometer and polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Woodgate, B. E.; Brandt, J. C.; Chapman, R. D.; Hyder, C. L.; Michalitsianos, A. G.; Shine, R. A.; Athay, R. G.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, E. C.

    1979-01-01

    The objectives of the UVSP experiment are to study solar ultraviolet radiations, particularly from flares and active regions, and to measure constituents in the terrestrial atmosphere by the extinction of sunlight at satellite dawn and dusk. The instrument is designed to observe the Sun at a variety of spectral and spatial resolutions in the range from 1150 to 3600 A. A Gregorian telescope with effective focal length of 1.8 m is used to feed a 1 m Ebert-Fastie spectrometer. A polarimeter containing rotatable magnesium fluoride waveplates is included behind the spectrometer entrance slit and will allow all four Stokes parameters to be determined. Velocities on the Sun can also be measured. The instrument is controlled by a computer which can interact with the data stream to modify the observing program. The observing modes, including rasters, spectral scans, velocity measurements, and polarimetry, are also described along with plans for mission operations, data handling, and analysis of the observations.

  16. Solar ultraviolet radiation from cancer induction to cancer prevention: solar ultraviolet radiation and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuorkey, Muobarak J

    2015-09-01

    Although decades have elapsed, researchers still debate the benefits and hazards of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure. On the one hand, humans derive most of their serum 25-hydroxycholecalciferol [25(OH)D3], which has potent anticancer activity, from solar UVB radiation. On the other hand, people are more aware of the risk of cancer incidence associated with harmful levels of solar UVR from daily sunlight exposure. Epidemiological data strongly implicate UV radiation exposure as a major cause of melanoma and other cancers, as UVR promotes mutations in oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes. This review highlights the impact of the different mutagenic effects of solar UVR, along with the cellular and carcinogenic challenges with respect to sun exposure.

  17. Protection from solar ultraviolet radiation by clothing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pailthorpe, M. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The recently published Australia/New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 4399: l996 `Sun Protective Clothing - Evaluation and Classification` specifies an in vitro spectrophotometric method for the measurement of the ultraviolet (WR) transmission of textiles. Ultraviolet Protection Factors (UPF) are then calculated by convolving the UVR transmission data with standard CIE erythemal response data and ARL solar irradiance data. At the present time the scope of the standard is limited to loose fitting dry clothing. Virtually every textile parameter has an influence on the UPF of the finished garment and hence on the protection afforded to skin from the harmful effects of solar UVR radiation. Textile parameters such as fibre type, the method of spinning the yarn, fabric structure, cover factor, colorant, UVR absorbers and finishing methods determine the UPF of the fabric and hence must be controlled from batch to batch. Since garments generally shrink when washed, multiple wearing and washing cycles usually cause an increase in fabric UPF. Adventitious soiling of fabrics and the absorption of certain components of domestic laundry formulations, e g fluorescent whitening agents, increase fabric UPF ratings. Garments with a high degree of elasticity, e g nylon/lycra sportswear, that are stretched on to fit, will obviously have lower UPFs when stretched than when relaxed. In general fabrics worn in a wet state provide lower protection than when worn dry. On Australia`s most extreme summer day it has been estimated that there are 30 MEDs (minimal erythemal doses) in a dawn to dusk exposure. Thus outdoor workers should be provided with UPF 30 clothing, or better. Results from recent experiments using SK-II hairless mice dressed in UPF 50 `sunsuits` have shown that the mice developed no sun induced skin cancers on the skin areas protected by the UPF 50 fabric whereas multiple tumours developed on the unprotected skin.

  18. Protection from solar ultraviolet radiation by clothing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pailthorpe, M.

    1996-01-01

    The recently published Australia/New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 4399: l996 'Sun Protective Clothing - Evaluation and Classification' specifies an in vitro spectrophotometric method for the measurement of the ultraviolet (WR) transmission of textiles. Ultraviolet Protection Factors (UPF) are then calculated by convolving the UVR transmission data with standard CIE erythemal response data and ARL solar irradiance data. At the present time the scope of the standard is limited to loose fitting dry clothing. Virtually every textile parameter has an influence on the UPF of the finished garment and hence on the protection afforded to skin from the harmful effects of solar UVR radiation. Textile parameters such as fibre type, the method of spinning the yarn, fabric structure, cover factor, colorant, UVR absorbers and finishing methods determine the UPF of the fabric and hence must be controlled from batch to batch. Since garments generally shrink when washed, multiple wearing and washing cycles usually cause an increase in fabric UPF. Adventitious soiling of fabrics and the absorption of certain components of domestic laundry formulations, e g fluorescent whitening agents, increase fabric UPF ratings. Garments with a high degree of elasticity, e g nylon/lycra sportswear, that are stretched on to fit, will obviously have lower UPFs when stretched than when relaxed. In general fabrics worn in a wet state provide lower protection than when worn dry. On Australia's most extreme summer day it has been estimated that there are 30 MEDs (minimal erythemal doses) in a dawn to dusk exposure. Thus outdoor workers should be provided with UPF 30 clothing, or better. Results from recent experiments using SK-II hairless mice dressed in UPF 50 'sunsuits' have shown that the mice developed no sun induced skin cancers on the skin areas protected by the UPF 50 fabric whereas multiple tumours developed on the unprotected skin

  19. Biological Sensors for Solar Ultraviolet Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André P. Schuch

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Solar ultraviolet (UV radiation is widely known as a genotoxic environmental agent that affects Earth ecosystems and the human population. As a primary consequence of the stratospheric ozone layer depletion observed over the last decades, the increasing UV incidence levels have heightened the concern regarding deleterious consequences affecting both the biosphere and humans, thereby leading to an increase in scientific efforts to understand the role of sunlight in the induction of DNA damage, mutagenesis, and cell death. In fact, the various UV-wavelengths evoke characteristic biological impacts that greatly depend on light absorption of biomolecules, especially DNA, in living organisms, thereby justifying the increasing importance of developing biological sensors for monitoring the harmful impact of solar UV radiation under various environmental conditions. In this review, several types of biosensors proposed for laboratory and field application, that measure the biological effects of the UV component of sunlight, are described. Basically, the applicability of sensors based on DNA, bacteria or even mammalian cells are presented and compared. Data are also presented showing that on using DNA-based sensors, the various types of damage produced differ when this molecule is exposed in either an aqueous buffer or a dry solution. Apart from the data thus generated, the development of novel biosensors could help in evaluating the biological effects of sunlight on the environment. They also emerge as alternative tools for using live animals in the search for protective sunscreen products.

  20. Ultraviolet solar radiation and the prevention of erythema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tena, F.; Martinez-Lozano, J.A.; Utrillas, M.P.

    1998-01-01

    An ultraviolet index appropriate for its use in Spain is studied on the basis of those already available in other countries. The suitability of this index to characterise ultraviolet solar radiation and, particularly, the potential risks to human health are discussed. Finally, the main factors affecting this index are identified and their influence is studied. (Author) 43 refs

  1. Ratioing methods for in-flight response calibration of space-based spectro-radiometers, operating in the solar spectral region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobb, Dan

    2017-11-01

    One of the most significant problems for space-based spectro-radiometer systems, observing Earth from space in the solar spectral band (UV through short-wave IR), is in achievement of the required absolute radiometric accuracy. Classical methods, for example using one or more sun-illuminated diffusers as reflectance standards, do not generally provide methods for monitoring degradation of the in-flight reference after pre-flight characterisation. Ratioing methods have been proposed that provide monitoring of degradation of solar attenuators in flight, thus in principle allowing much higher confidence in absolute response calibration. Two example methods are described. It is shown that systems can be designed for relatively low size and without significant additions to the complexity of flight hardware.

  2. NIST Gonio-spectroradiometer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIST gonio-spectroradiometer is used to measure total spectral radiant flux (TSRF) of incandescent lamps. The instrument consists of a 3-axis scanning mechanism;...

  3. Solar ultraviolet radiation in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    The projected large increases in damaging ultraviolet radiation as a result of global emissions of ozone-depleting substances have been forestalled by the success of the Montreal Protocol. New challenges are now arising in relation to climate change. We highlight the complex inte...

  4. LED-based UV source for monitoring spectroradiometer properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sildoja, Meelis-Mait; Nevas, Saulius; Kouremeti, Natalia; Gröbner, Julian; Pape, Sven; Pendsa, Stefan; Sperfeld, Peter; Kemus, Fabian

    2018-06-01

    A compact and stable UV monitoring source based on state-of-the-art commercially available ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) has been developed. It is designed to trace the radiometric stability—both responsivity and wavelength scale—of array spectroradiometers measuring direct solar irradiance in the wavelength range between 300 nm and 400 nm. The spectral irradiance stability of the UV-LED-based light source observed in the laboratory after seasoning (burning-in) the individual LEDs was better than 0.3% over a 12 h period of continuous operation. The integral irradiance measurements of the source over a period of several months, where the UV-LED source was not operated continuously between the measurements, showed stability within 0.3%. In-field measurements of the source with an array spectroradiometer indicated the stability of the source to be within the standard uncertainty of the spectroradiometer calibration, which was within 1% to 2%.

  5. A mechanism for solar ultraviolet flux variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatten, K.H.; Heath, D.F.

    1981-01-01

    Solar UV emission observed by a filter photometer on Nimbus IV from 1969 to 1973 is examined in an attempt to understand the short term (27 day) and secular variability. Two models are discussed to explain the variations - a calcium plage model and a chromospheric network (faculae and spicule) structure model. Both relate to the remnant magnetic fields of active regions. An association between UV brightenings and the large scale magnetic field has been found consistent with the network model. An increase in UV emittance can be achieved by raising the effective chromospheric temperature closer to a photospheric level. If the Sun's luminosity is constant on these time intervals the enhanced UV radiation could be partially offset by an overall decrease in photospheric temperature as measured by Livingston in visible photospheric profiles. Total solar luminosity may then show less variability, however, the UV to visible luminosity variation may have significant planetary influences. Lockwood and Thompson (1979) report a relation between solar activity and planetary albedos, and Schatten (1979) discussed a long-suspected relationship between solar activity and the Great Red Spot appearance. (orig.)

  6. MgII Observations Using the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Edward; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken; Davis, John; Gary, Allen; Adams, Mitzi

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe the scientific goals of our sounding rocket program, the Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI). This paper will present a brief description of the optics that were developed to meet SUMI's scientific goals, discuss the spectral, spatial and polarization characteristics of SUMI s optics, describe SUMI's flight which was launched 7/30/2010, and discuss what we have learned from that flight.

  7. SUMO: Solar Ultraviolet Monitor and Ozone Nanosatellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damé, L.; Meftah, M.; Irbah, A.; Hauchecorne, A.; Keckhut, P.; Sarkissian, A.; Godin-Beekman, S.; Rogers, D. J.; Bove, P.; Lagage, P. O.; DeWitte, S.

    2014-12-01

    SUMO is an innovative proof-of-concept nanosatellite aiming to measure on the same platform the different components of the Earth radiation budget (ERB), the solar energy input and the energy reemitted at the top of the Earth atmosphere, with a particular focus on the far UV (FUV) part of the spectrum and on the ozone layer. The FUV is the only wavelength band with energy absorbed in the high atmosphere (stratosphere), in the ozone (Herzberg continuum, 200-220 nm) and oxygen bands, and its high variability is most probably at the origin of a climate influence (UV affects stratospheric dynamics and temperatures, altering interplanetary waves and weather patterns both poleward and downward to the lower stratosphere and tropopause). A simultaneous observation of incoming FUV and ozone production would bring an invaluable information on this process of solar-climate forcing. Space instruments have already measured the different components of the ERB but this is the first time that all instruments will operate on the same platform. This characteristic by itself guarantees original scientific results. SUMO is a 3.6 kg, 3W, 10x10x30 cm3 nanosatellite ("3U"), with a "1U" payload of definition has been completed (platform and payload AIT are possible in 24 months). SUMO is proposed for the nanosatellite program of Polytechnic School and CNES (following QB50) for a flight in 2018. Follow-up is 2 fold: on one part more complete measurements using SUMO miniaturized instruments on a larger satellite; on the other part, increase of the coverage in local time and latitude using a constellation of SUMO nanosatellites around the Earth to further geolocalize the Sun influence on our planet. Nanosatellites, with cost and risk limited, are also excellent platforms to evaluate technologies for future missions, e.g. nanotechnology ZnO protection barriers to limit contamination from solar panels in the UV and reduce reflection losses in the visible, or MgZnO solar blind detectors (R

  8. The Solar Ultraviolet Environment at the Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Curtis D; Diffey, Brian L

    2018-05-01

    Atmospheric and oceanic radiative transfer models were used to compute spectral radiances between 285 and 400 nm onto horizontal and vertical plane surfaces over water. The calculations kept track of the contributions by the sun's direct beam, by diffuse-sky radiance, by radiance reflected from the sea surface and by water-leaving radiance. Clear, hazy and cloudy sky conditions were simulated for a range of solar zenith angles, wind speeds and atmospheric ozone concentrations. The radiances were used to estimate erythemal exposures due to the sun and sky, as well as from radiation reflected by the sea surface and backscattered from the water column. Diffuse-sky irradiance is usually greater than direct-sun irradiance at wavelengths below 330 nm, and reflected and water-leaving irradiance accounts for 10 at depths down to two meters and >6 down to 5 m. © 2018 The American Society of Photobiology.

  9. Ultraviolet Radiation in the Solar System

    CERN Document Server

    Vázquez, M

    2006-01-01

    UV radiation is an important part in the electromagnetic spectrum since the energy of the photons is great enough to produce important chemical reactions in the atmospheres of planets and satellites of our Solar System, thereby affecting the transmission of this radiation to the ground and its physical properties. Scientists have used different techniques (balloons and rockets) to access to the information contained in this radiation, but the pioneering of this new frontier has not been free of dangers. The Sun is our main source of UV radiation and its description occupies the first two chapters of the book. The Earth is the only known location where life exists in a planetary system and therefore where the interaction of living organism with UV radiation can be tested through different epochs and on distinct species. The development of the human technology has affected the natural shield of ozone that protects complex lifeforms against damaging UV irradiation. The formation of the ozone hole and its consequ...

  10. Solar glint suppression in compact planetary ultraviolet spectrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Michael W.; Cook, Jason C.; Grava, Cesare; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Retherford, Kurt D.

    2015-08-01

    Solar glint suppression is an important consideration in the design of compact photon-counting ultraviolet spectrographs. Southwest Research Institute developed the Lyman Alpha Mapping Project for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (launch in 2009), and the Ultraviolet Spectrograph on Juno (Juno-UVS, launch in 2011). Both of these compact spectrographs revealed minor solar glints in flight that did not appear in pre-launch analyses. These glints only appeared when their respective spacecraft were operating outside primary science mission parameters. Post-facto scattered light analysis verifies the geometries at which these glints occurred and why they were not caught during ground testing or nominal mission operations. The limitations of standard baffle design at near-grazing angles are discussed, as well as the importance of including surface scatter properties in standard stray light analyses when determining solar keep-out efficiency. In particular, the scattered light analysis of these two instruments shows that standard "one bounce" assumptions in baffle design are not always enough to prevent scattered sunlight from reaching the instrument focal plane. Future builds, such as JUICE-UVS, will implement improved scattered and stray light modeling early in the design phase to enhance capabilities in extended mission science phases, as well as optimize solar keep out volume.

  11. Long-term visual health risks from solar ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waxler, M.

    1987-01-01

    Ocular exposure to the ultraviolet radiation (UV) contained in sunlight may result in long-term visual health problems. UV plays a role in the etiology of cataracts and possibly in the etiology of visual impairments associated with solar retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity, ocular aging, cystoid macular edema, retinitis pigmentosa, and senile macular degeneration. The exact does relationships between known UV bioeffects and these ocular problems is, however, uncertain. Thus, there are questions about the extent to which protective measures should be taken to reduce UV exposure of the eye. This paper identifies the long-term visual health problems potentially associated with ocular exposure to solar UV; proposes worst-case assumptions for the role of solar UV in these visual problems; and recommends protective measures based on damage thresholds and worst-case assumptions

  12. The role of solar ultraviolet radiation in 'natural' water purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calkins, J.; Buckles, J.D.; Moeller, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    The concentration of Eschericia coli in the input and output of a tertiary wastewater system (4 lagoons) has been monitored over an 11 month period. The integrated flux of biologically active solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation was measured during this period. By also determining (1) the effective temperature in the system, (2) the growth rate of E.coli at the effective temperature, (3) the penetration of the solar UV into the lagoons, (4) the dose-response relation for killing of E.coli by UV and (5) the retention time of water in the system, it is possible to compare the 'die off' expected from solar UV exposure to the actual 'die off' observed for different batches of water. The observed killing of E.coli was quite close to the values calculated, considering the numerous factors involved. Solar UV light would thus seem to be a very important factor in the natural purification of water. Because each successful species must possess characteristics (physiological or behavioral) which provide adequate resistance to solar UV, the ecological role of solar UV radiation has not been widely appreciated. (author)

  13. Role of solar ultraviolet radiation in 'natural' water purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calkins, J; Buckles, J D; Moeller, J R [Kentucky Univ., Lexington (USA)

    1976-07-01

    The concentration of Eschericia coli in the input and output of a tertiary wastewater system (4 lagoons) has been monitored over an 11 month period. The integrated flux of biologically active solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation was measured during this period. By also determining (1) the effective temperature in the system, (2) the growth rate of E.coli at the effective temperature, (3) the penetration of the solar UV into the lagoons, (4) the dose-response relation for killing of E.coli by UV and (5) the retention time of water in the system, it is possible to compare the 'die off' expected from solar UV exposure to the actual 'die off' observed for different batches of water. The observed killing of E.coli was quite close to the values calculated, considering the numerous factors involved. Solar UV light would thus seem to be a very important factor in the natural purification of water. Because each successful species must possess characteristics (physiological or behavioral) which provide adequate resistance to solar UV, the ecological role of solar UV radiation has not been widely appreciated.

  14. Making Ultraviolet Spectro-Polarimetry Polarization Measurements with the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Sounding Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Edward; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken; Davis, John; Gary, Allen

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe the Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) sounding rocket program. This paper will concentrate on SUMI's VUV optics, and discuss their spectral, spatial and polarization characteristics. While SUMI's first flight (7/30/2010) met all of its mission success criteria, there are several areas that will be improved for its second and third flights. This paper will emphasize the MgII linear polarization measurements and describe the changes that will be made to the sounding rocket and how those changes will improve the scientific data acquired by SUMI.

  15. The Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter on the Solar Maximum Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodgate, B. E.; Brandt, J. C.; Kalet, M. W.; Kenny, P. J.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E. A.; Bruner, E. C.; Beckers, J. M.; Henze, W.; Knox, E. D.; Hyder, C. L.

    1980-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter (UVSP) on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft is described, including the experiment objectives, system design, performance, and modes of operation. The instrument operates in the wavelength range 1150-3600 A with better than 2 arcsec spatial resolution, raster range 256 x 256 sq arcsec, and 20 mA spectral resolution in second order. Observations can be made with specific sets of four lines simultaneously, or with both sides of two lines simultaneously for velocity and polarization. A rotatable retarder can be inserted into the spectrometer beam for measurement of Zeeman splitting and linear polarization in the transition region and chromosphere.

  16. The ultraviolet spectrometer and polarimeter on the solar maximum mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodgate, B.E.; Brandt, J.C.; Kalet, M.W.; Kenny, P.J.; Beckers, J.M.; Henze, W.; Hyder, C.L.; Knox, E.D.

    1980-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter (UVSP) on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft is described, including the experiment objectives, system design. performance, and modes of operation. The instrument operates in the wavelength range 1150-3600 Angstreom with better than 2 arc sec spatial resolution, raster range 256 x 256 arc sec 2 , and 20 m Angstroem spectral resolution in second order. Observations can be made with specific sets of 4 lines simultaneously, or with both sides of 2 lines simultaneously for velocity and polarization. A rotatable retarder can be inserted into the spectrometer beam for measurement of Zeeman splitting and linear polarization in the transition region and chromosphere. (orig.)

  17. Solar ultraviolet radiation response of EBT2 Gafchromic, radiochromic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butson, Ethan T; Yu, Peter K N; Butson, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is an important aspect of dosimetry for the improved knowledge of UV exposure and its associated health related issues. EBT2 Gafchromic film has been designed by its manufacturers as an improved tool for ionizing radiation dosimetry. The film is stated as exhibiting a significant reduction in UV response. However, results have shown that when exposed to UV from the ‘bottom side’ i.e. from the thick laminate side, the film exhibits a sensitivity to solar UV radiation which is both measurable and accurate for UV dosimetry. Films were irradiated in this position to known solar UV exposures and results are quantified showing a reproducibility of measurement to within ±7% (1 SD) when compared to calibrated UV meters. With an exposure of 20 J cm −2 broad spectrum solar UV, the films net OD change was found to be 0.248 OD ± 0.021 OD when analysing the results using the red channel region of an Epson V700 desktop scanner. This was compared to 0.0294 OD ± 0.0053 OD change with exposure to the same UV exposure from the top side. This means that solar UV dosimetry can be performed using EBT2 Gafchromic film utilizing the underside of the film for dosimetry. The main advantages of this film type for measurement of UV exposure is the visible colour change and thus easy analysis using a desktop scanner as well as its uniformity in response and its robust physical strength for use in outside exposure situations. (note)

  18. Effects of solar ultraviolet radiation on tropical algal communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santas, R.

    1989-01-01

    This study assessed some of the effects of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation ion coral reef algal assemblages. The first part of the investigation was carried out under controlled laboratory conditions in the coral reef microcosm at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., while a field counterpart was completed at the Smithsonian Institution's marine station on Grand Turk, Turks and Caicos Islands, in the eastern Caribbean. The study attempted to separate the effects of UV-A from those of UV-B. In the laboratory, algal turf assemblages exposed to simulated solar UV radiation produced 55.1% less biomass than assemblages that were not exposed to UV. Assemblages not exposed to UV were dominated by Ectocarpus rhodochondroides, whereas in the assemblage developing under high UV radiation, Enteromorpha prolifera and eventually Schizothrix calcicola dominated. Lower UV-B irradiances caused a proportional reduction in biomass production and had less pronounced effects on species composition. UV-A did not have any significant effects on either algal turf productivity or community structure. In the field, assemblages exposed to naturally occurring solar UV supported a biomass 40% lower than that of assemblages protected from UV-B exposure. Once again, UV-A did not inhibit algal turf productivity

  19. Cutaneous solar ultraviolet exposure and clinical aspects of photodamage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Battie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar ultraviolet (UV radiation reaching the earth is a combination of UVB (290-320 nm and UVA (320-400 nm wavelengths. Since UVA is less energetic than UVB, UVB has long been thought to be the factor responsible for the damaging effects of solar radiation. But with modern tools such as in vitro models, it has been proven that UVA plays a major role. The objective of this review is to show how skin may be exposed to UV light and to highlight the clinical aspects of UV-induced skin damages with the respective contribution of UVB or UVA. Even if UVA is less energetic than UVB, it is more abundant and penetrates deeper into the skin, reaching as far as the dermis. Various factors also influence skin exposure to UV light: the latitude, season, and time of the day. Acute as well as chronic sun exposure induces short- and long-term clinical damages. Erythema and pigmentation are immediate responses of normal human skin exposed to UV radiation. The long-term effects are photoaging and photocarcinogenesis. In particular, UVA appears to play a major role in the deterioration of dermal structure leading to the photoaged appearance of the skin.

  20. Outdoor Exposure to Solar Ultraviolet Radiation and Legislation in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Abel A

    2016-06-01

    The total ozone column of 265 ± 11 Dobson Units in the tropical-equatorial zones and 283 ± 16 Dobson Units in the subtropics of Brazil are among the lowest on Earth, and as a result, the prevalence of skin cancer due to solar ultraviolet radiation is among the highest. Daily erythemal doses in Brazil can be over 7,500 J m. Erythemal dose rates on cloudless days of winter and summer are typically about 0.147 W m and 0.332 W m, respectively. However, radiation enhancement events yielded by clouds have been reported with erythemal dose rates of 0.486 W m. Daily doses of the diffuse component of erythemal radiation have been determined with values of 5,053 J m and diffuse erythemal dose rates of 0.312 W m. Unfortunately, Brazilians still behave in ways that lead to overexposure to the sun. The annual personal ultraviolet radiation ambient dose among Brazilian youths can be about 5.3%. Skin cancer in Brazil is prevalent, with annual rates of 31.6% (non-melanoma) and 1.0% (melanoma). Governmental and non-governmental initiatives have been taken to increase public awareness of photoprotection behaviors. Resolution #56 by the Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária has banned tanning devices in Brazil. In addition, Projects of Law (PL), like PL 3730/2004, propose that the Sistema Único de Saúde should distribute sunscreen to members of the public, while PL 4027/2012 proposes that employers should provide outdoor workers with sunscreen during professional outdoor activities. Similar laws have already been passed in some municipalities. These are presented and discussed in this study.

  1. NEW SOLAR EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIANCE OBSERVATIONS DURING FLARES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Hock, Rachel; Eparvier, Frank; Jones, Andrew R.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Klimchuk, James A.; Didkovsky, Leonid; Judge, Darrell; Mariska, John; Warren, Harry; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Webb, David F.; Bailey, Scott; Tobiska, W. Kent

    2011-01-01

    New solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance observations from the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment provide full coverage in the EUV range from 0.1 to 106 nm and continuously at a cadence of 10 s for spectra at 0.1 nm resolution and even faster, 0.25 s, for six EUV bands. These observations can be decomposed into four distinct characteristics during flares. First, the emissions that dominate during the flare's impulsive phase are the transition region emissions, such as the He II 30.4 nm. Second, the hot coronal emissions above 5 MK dominate during the gradual phase and are highly correlated with the GOES X-ray. A third flare characteristic in the EUV is coronal dimming, seen best in the cool corona, such as the Fe IX 17.1 nm. As the post-flare loops reconnect and cool, many of the EUV coronal emissions peak a few minutes after the GOES X-ray peak. One interesting variation of the post-eruptive loop reconnection is that warm coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI 33.5 nm) sometimes exhibit a second large peak separated from the primary flare event by many minutes to hours, with EUV emission originating not from the original flare site and its immediate vicinity, but rather from a volume of higher loops. We refer to this second peak as the EUV late phase. The characterization of many flares during the SDO mission is provided, including quantification of the spectral irradiance from the EUV late phase that cannot be inferred from GOES X-ray diagnostics.

  2. Advanced materials for multilayer mirrors for extreme ultraviolet solar astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogachev, S A; Chkhalo, N I; Kuzin, S V; Pariev, D E; Polkovnikov, V N; Salashchenko, N N; Shestov, S V; Zuev, S Y

    2016-03-20

    We provide an analysis of contemporary multilayer optics for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) solar astronomy in the wavelength ranges: λ=12.9-13.3  nm, λ=17-21  nm, λ=28-33  nm, and λ=58.4  nm. We found new material pairs, which will make new spaceborne experiments possible due to the high reflection efficiencies, spectral resolution, and long-term stabilities of the proposed multilayer coatings. In the spectral range λ=13  nm, Mo/Be multilayer mirrors were shown to demonstrate a better ratio of reflection efficiency and spectral resolution compared with the commonly used Mo/Si. In the spectral range λ=17-21  nm, a new multilayer structure Al/Si was proposed, which had higher spectral resolution along with comparable reflection efficiency compared with the commonly used Al/Zr multilayer structures. In the spectral range λ=30  nm, the Si/B4C/Mg/Cr multilayer structure turned out to best obey reflection efficiency and long-term stability. The B4C and Cr layers prevented mutual diffusion of the Si and Mg layers. For the spectral range λ=58  nm, a new multilayer Mo/Mg-based structure was developed; its reflection efficiency and long-term stability have been analyzed. We also investigated intrinsic stresses inherent for most of the multilayer structures and proposed possibilities for stress elimination.

  3. Changes in ground-based solar ultraviolet radiation during fire episodes: a case study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wright, CY

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) levels are affected by airborne aerosols, such as particles and gases released during biomass burning events. Two large-scale fires in South Africa were identified and selected based on their proximity to solar UVR...

  4. Preliminary observations and results obtained with the ultraviolet spectrometer and polarimeter. [for Solar Maximum Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandberg-Hassen, E.; Cheng, C. C.; Athay, R. G.; Beckers, J. M.; Brandt, J. C.; Chapman, R. D.; Bruner, E. C.; Henze, W.; Hyder, C. L.; Gurman, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    New observation with the Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter (UVSP) of a number of manifestations of solar activity obtained during the first three months of Solar Maximum Mission operations are presented. Attention is given to polarimetry in sunspots, oscillations above sunspots, density diagnostics of transition-zone plasmas in active regions, and the eruptive prominence - coronal transient link.

  5. Solar minimum Lyman alpha sky background observations from Pioneer Venus orbiter ultraviolet spectrometer - Solar wind latitude variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajello, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of interplanetary H I Lyman alpha over a large portion of the celestial sphere were made at the recent solar minimum by the Pioneer Venus orbiter ultraviolet spectrometer. These measurements were performed during a series of spacecraft maneuvers conducted to observe Halley's comet in early 1986. Analysis of these data using a model of the passage of interstellar wind hydrogen through the solar system shows that the rate of charge exchange with solar wind protons is 30 percent less over the solar poles than in the ecliptic. This result is in agreement with a similar experiment performed with Mariner 10 at the previous solar minimum.

  6. AUMENTO DEL ÍNDICE SOLAR ULTRAVIOLETA CON LA ALTURA SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET INDEX INCREASE WITH ALTITUDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Rivas A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se presentan los resultados obtenidos al realizar comparaciones entre mediciones experimentales de Índice solar ultravioleta (IUV obtenido a partir de datos experimentales y también de resultados teóricos proveniente del cálculo del IUV mediante el modelo TUV (modelo ultravioleta troposféricol. En especial se destacan los aumentos de la irradianza solar ultravioleta B (UVB 280-320 nm que se reciben a nivel del suelo debido a los aumentos de la altitud del lugar sobre el nivel del mar (efecto altitudinal. Los cálculos mediante el modelo TUV se realizaron en un período comprendido entre los años 1996-2003, introduciendo los parámetros de los lugares geográficos en que se hicieron las mediciones experimentales. Dado que una de las variables importantes de la que depende el IUV es la altitud sobre el nivel del mar y considerando que la zona norte de Chile es un lugar con características especiales para realizar este tipo de estudios, es que se han realizado experimentos para medir la irradianza solar UVB entre 0-3.200 m de altura, y a partir de estos datos se ha obtenido el IUV. La importancia de estos resultados radica en el hecho que a partir de ellos se pueden cuantificar el incremento de la irradianza UVB por cada 1.000 m de altitud sobre el nivel del mar. Un número creciente de personas se desplazan continuamente entre el nivel del mar y altitudes cercanas a los 5.000 m, debido a trabajos relacionados con: minería, turismo, transporte. En todos estos casos estas personas reciben importantes incrementos de irradianza solar UV, que pueden afectar gravemente su salud si no se informan de los riesgos para que puedan tomar precauciones.In this work we present results from ultraviolet solar index (IUV comparisons between values obtained from experimental measurements, with theoretical results obtained from tropospherical ultraviolet model (TUV. It is important to emphasise the observed increase in solar ultraviolet B (UVB

  7. Solar ultraviolet irradiance measurements, instrumentation, intercomparisons and interpretations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorseth, Trond Morten

    2000-01-01

    The thesis reports studies of stabile instruments that are capable of detecting small alterations in ultraviolet irradiation over a long period. A central theme in the work has been to improve the measuring systems for continuous research based monitoring of natural variations in the ultraviolet irradiation from the sun. Methods for controlling the stability and continually secure the quality of the collected data. The causes of measuring errors are mapped and methods for the correction of collected data are developed. The methods and measuring systems for collecting the data have been adapted to the Norwegian climate and geography. The work has lead to an increased understanding of the natural variation in the ultraviolet radiation from the sun and what factors in the atmosphere that influences the process. The collected data and the developed methods for the quality control have increased the understanding of the ultraviolet irradiation climate in Europe

  8. Solar ultraviolet irradiance measurements, instrumentation, intercomparisons and interpretations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorseth, Trond Morten

    2000-07-01

    The thesis reports studies of stabile instruments that are capable of detecting small alterations in ultraviolet irradiation over a long period. A central theme in the work has been to improve the measuring systems for continuous research based monitoring of natural variations in the ultraviolet irradiation from the sun. Methods for controlling the stability and continually secure the quality of the collected data. The causes of measuring errors are mapped and methods for the correction of collected data are developed. The methods and measuring systems for collecting the data have been adapted to the Norwegian climate and geography. The work has lead to an increased understanding of the natural variation in the ultraviolet radiation from the sun and what factors in the atmosphere that influences the process. The collected data and the developed methods for the quality control have increased the understanding of the ultraviolet irradiation climate in Europe.

  9. The influence of meteorological factors on solar ultraviolet radiation over Pretoria, South Africa for the year 2012

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Makgabutlane, M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pretoria receives a fair amount of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Certain meteorological factors affect the amount of solar UVR that reaches the ground. The most dominant influencing meteorological factors are stratospheric ozone, cloud cover...

  10. Solar Maximum Mission Experiment - Ultraviolet Spectroscopy and Polarimetry on the Solar Maximum Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Cheng, C. C.; Woodgate, B. E.; Brandt, J. C.; Chapman, R. D.; Athay, R. G.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, E. C.; Gurman, J. B.; Hyder, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft is described. It is pointed out that the instrument, which operates in the wavelength range 1150-3600 A, has a spatial resolution of 2-3 arcsec and a spectral resolution of 0.02 A FWHM in second order. A Gregorian telescope, with a focal length of 1.8 m, feeds a 1 m Ebert-Fastie spectrometer. A polarimeter comprising rotating Mg F2 waveplates can be inserted behind the spectrometer entrance slit; it permits all four Stokes parameters to be determined. Among the observing modes are rasters, spectral scans, velocity measurements, and polarimetry. Examples of initial observations made since launch are presented.

  11. Development of moored oceanographic spectroradiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Charles R.; Mitchell, B. Greg; Holm-Hansen, O.

    1987-01-01

    Biospherical Instruments has successfully completed a NASA sponsored SBIR (Small Business Innovational Research Program) project to develop spectroradiometers capable of being deployed in the ocean for long periods of time. The completion of this project adds a valuable tool for the calibration of future spaceborne ocean color sensors and enables oceanographers to extend remote sensing optical techniques beyond the intermittent coverage of spaceborne sensors. Highlights of the project include two moorings totalling 8 months generating extensive sets of optical, biological, and physical data sets in the ocean off La Jolla, California, and a 70 day operational deployment of the resulting commercial product by the ONR and NASA sponsored BIOWATT program. Based on experience gained in these moorings, Biospherical Instruments has developed a new line of spectroradiometers designed to support the oceanographic remote sensing missions of NASA, the Navy, and various oceanographers.

  12. Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer (RSS) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiedron, P; Schlemmer, J; Klassen, M

    2005-01-01

    The rotating shawdowband spectroradiometer (RSS) implements the same automated shadowbanding technique used by the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR), and so it too provides spectrally-resolved, direct-normal, diffuse-horizontal, and total-horizontal irradiances, and can be calibrated in situ via Langley regression. The irradiance spectra are measured simultaneously at all spectral elements (pixels) in 360-nm to 1050-nm range.

  13. Spectroradiometer Intercomparison and Impact on Characterizing Photovoltaic Device Performance: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, A.; Andreas, A.; Ottoson, L.; Gueymard, C.; Fedor, G.; Fowler, S.; Peterson, J.; Naranen, E.; Kobashi, T.; Akiyama, A.; Takagi, S.

    2014-11-01

    Indoor and outdoor testing of photovoltaic (PV) device performance requires the use of solar simulators and natural solar radiation, respectively. This performance characterization requires accurate knowledge of spectral irradiance distribution that is incident on the devices. Spectroradiometers are used to measure the spectral distribution of solar simulators and solar radiation. On September 17, 2013, a global spectral irradiance intercomparison using spectroradiometers was organized by the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This paper presents highlights of the results of this first intercomparison, which will help to decrease systematic inter-laboratory differences in the measurements of the outputs or efficiencies of PV devices and harmonize laboratory experimental procedures.

  14. Pairing of near-ultraviolet solar cells with electrochromic windows for smart management of the solar spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, Nicholas C.; Sezen-Edmonds, Melda; Gao, Jia; Lin, Xin; Liu, Amy; Yao, Nan; Kahn, Antoine; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2017-08-01

    Current smart window technologies offer dynamic control of the optical transmission of the visible and near-infrared portions of the solar spectrum to reduce lighting, heating and cooling needs in buildings and to improve occupant comfort. Solar cells harvesting near-ultraviolet photons could satisfy the unmet need of powering such smart windows over the same spatial footprint without competing for visible or infrared photons, and without the same aesthetic and design constraints. Here, we report organic single-junction solar cells that selectively harvest near-ultraviolet photons, produce open-circuit voltages eclipsing 1.6 V and exhibit scalability in power generation, with active layers (10 cm2) substantially larger than those typical of demonstration organic solar cells (0.04-0.2 cm2). Integration of these solar cells with a low-cost, polymer-based electrochromic window enables intelligent management of the solar spectrum, with near-ultraviolet photons powering the regulation of visible and near-infrared photons for natural lighting and heating purposes.

  15. Spectral irradiance measurements using a novel spectroradiometer

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desa, E.S.; Desa, B.A.E.; DeSa, E.J.; Desai, R.G.P.

    A novel design of a spectroradiometer has been implemented and tested in the sea to measure underwater optical and physical properties. The spectroradiometer has two high resolution diffraction-based spectrographs assembled back to back in a...

  16. Solar-blind ultraviolet band-pass filter based on metal—dielectric multilayer structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Tian-Jiao; Xu Wei-Zong; Lu Hai; Ren Fang-Fang; Chen Dun-Jun; Zhang Rong; Zheng You-Dou

    2014-01-01

    Solar-blind ultraviolet (UV) band-pass filter has significant value in many scientific, commercial, and military applications, in which the detection of weak UV signal against a strong background of solar radiation is required. In this work, a solar-blind filter is designed based on the concept of “transparent metal”. The filter consisting of Al/SiO 2 multilayers could exhibit a high transmission in the solar-blind wavelength region and a wide stopband extending from near-ultraviolet to infrared wavelength range. The central wavelength, bandwidth, Q factor, and rejection ratio of the passband are numerically studied as a function of individual layer thickness and multilayer period. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  17. Solar ultraviolet radiation induced variations in the stratosphere and mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, L. L.

    1987-01-01

    The detectability and interpretation of short-term solar UV induced responses of middle atmospheric ozone, temperature, and dynamics are reviewed. The detectability of solar UV induced perturbations in the middle atmosphere is studied in terms of seasonal and endogenic dynamical variations. The interpretation of low-latitude ozone and possible temperature responses on the solar rotation time scale is examined. The use of these data to constrain or test photochemical model predictions is discussed.

  18. Solar Activity, Ultraviolet Radiation and Consequences in Birds in Mexico City, 2001- 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, M.; Velasco, V.

    2008-12-01

    Anomalous behavior in commercial and pet birds in Mexico City was reported during 2002 by veterinarians at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. This was attributed to variations in the surrounding luminosity. The solar components, direct, diffuse, global, ultraviolet band A and B, as well as some meteorological parameters, temperature, relative humidity, and precipitation, were then analyzed at the Solar Radiation Laboratory. Although the total annual radiance of the previously mentioned radiation components did not show important changes, ultraviolet Band-B solar radiation did vary significantly. During 2001 the total annual irradiance , 61.05 Hjcm² to 58.32 Hjcm², was 1.6 standard deviations lower than one year later, in 2002 and increased above the mean total annual irradiance, to 65.75 Hjcm², 2.04 standard deviations, giving a total of 3.73 standard deviations for 2001-2002. Since these differences did not show up clearly in the other solar radiation components, daily extra-atmosphere irradiance was analyzed and used to calculate the total annual extra-atmosphere irradiance, which showed a descent for 2001. Our conclusions imply that Ultraviolet Band-B solar radiation is representative of solar activity and has an important impact on commercial activity related with birds.

  19. DNA damage and photosynthetic inhibition induced by solar ultraviolet radiation in tropical phytoplankton (Lake Titicaca, Bolivia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helbling, EW; Villafane, VE; Buma, AGJ; Andrade, M; Zaratti, F

    Experiments were conducted during October 1998 in Lake Titicaca, Bolivia (16 degrees S, 68 degrees W, 3810 m a.s.l), to determine the effects of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) on phytoplankton photosynthetic rates and DNA damage. Water samples were taken daily and incubated ir? situ or in

  20. Measurement of solar ultraviolet radiation intensity type A and B in Qazvin (2013-14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAR. Babaee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR is considered one of the most important biological risk factors in the world. Most health damages from solar ultraviolet radiation at ground level are mainly caused by UVA and UVB spectrums. Objective: The aim of this study was to Measure the solar ultraviolet radiation intensity type A and B in Qazvin city. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the intensity of solar ultraviolet radiation type A and B was measured in Qazvin on years of 2013-14 (during one year every monthly at three times, in the morning, afternoon and evening by using a UV Radiometer. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Findings: The maximum average intensity of UVA and UVB rays during the one year with 28.36±1.88 W/m2 and 0.156±0.035 W/m2 respectively was in Tir month (June 22–July 22 and the minimum average intensity of UVA and UVB rays with 10.36±0.83 W/m2 and 0.041±0.010 W/m2 respectively was in Dai month (December 22–January 20. Conclusion: With regards to the results, it is recommended that individuals were less exposed to exposure time with direct sunshine and use appropriate protective measures such as; wear appropriate clothing, sunglasses, and sunscreen.

  1. ACCURATELY CALCULATING THE SOLAR ORIENTATION OF THE TIANGONG-2 ULTRAVIOLET FORWARD SPECTROMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Liu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The Ultraviolet Forward Spectrometer is a new type of spectrometer for monitoring the vertical distribution of atmospheric trace gases in the global middle atmosphere. It is on the TianGong-2 space laboratory, which was launched on 15 September 2016. The spectrometer uses a solar calibration mode to modify its irradiance. Accurately calculating the solar orientation is a prerequisite of spectral calibration for the Ultraviolet Forward Spectrometer. In this paper, a method of calculating the solar orientation is proposed according to the imaging geometric characteristics of the spectrometer. Firstly, the solar orientation in the horizontal rectangular coordinate system is calculated based on the solar declination angle algorithm proposed by Bourges and the solar hour angle algorithm proposed by Lamm. Then, the solar orientation in the sensor coordinate system is achieved through several coordinate system transforms. Finally, we calculate the solar orientation in the sensor coordinate system and evaluate its calculation accuracy using actual orbital data of TianGong-2. The results show that the accuracy is close to the simulation method with STK (Satellite Tool Kit, and the error is not more than 2 %. The algorithm we present does not need a lot of astronomical knowledge, but only needs some observation parameters provided by TianGong-2.

  2. Assessment of integrated solar ultraviolet radiation by PM-355 detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-Jarad, F.; Al-Jarallah, M.I.; Elhadidy, M.A.; Shaahid, S.M.; Fazal-ur-Rehman

    2000-01-01

    The increase in environmental solar UV radiation due to depletion of ozone layer is a recent challenge to human health (skin cancer and eye effects) in countries having clear skies. Therefore, applying integrated, passive and inexpensive techniques to assess solar UV radiation is very much essential. Measurements of environmental solar UV radiation in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia area were carried out for a period of two months in the summer period in 1996 using two techniques in parallel namely: passive nuclear track detectors and active solar UV radiometers. Some of the nuclear track detectors were mounted in different conditions such as: under shadow band, on solar tracking mechanism following the solar rays. Others were mounted on perpendicular, tilted and horizontal surfaces in sunlight. All detectors were attached to a wooden background of the same thickness (0.5 cm) to eliminate interference of the heat effect of various support materials and have uniformity of the support materials. The assessment was carried out for different periods extending from two to nine weeks continuously. The investigated period covered the hottest months in Saudi Arabia (July and August) when the sky was clear of clouds. The results indicate linear correlation between alpha track diameters and the integrated exposure to solar UV as measured by the solar UV radiometer for all nuclear track detector positions and orientations. The highest slope has been observed for the detectors placed on solar tracking mechanism following the solar rays and the lowest from detectors oriented under the shadow band on horizontal position (measuring the diffused UV radiation only). The results show that most of the measured UV radiation (60%) were from the diffused UV radiation. The characteristics of the upper layer of the detectors are changed after chemical etching very quickly, with increase in the exposure time to UV solar radiation at certain orientation. The results encourage the use of nuclear track

  3. Assessment of integrated solar ultraviolet radiation by PM-355 detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Jarad, F.; Al-Jarallah, M.I.; Elhadidy, M.A.; Shaahid, S.M.; Fazal-ur-Rehman

    2000-06-01

    The increase in environmental solar UV radiation due to depletion of ozone layer is a recent challenge to human health (skin cancer and eye effects) in countries having clear skies. Therefore, applying integrated, passive and inexpensive techniques to assess solar UV radiation is very much essential. Measurements of environmental solar UV radiation in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia area were carried out for a period of two months in the summer period in 1996 using two techniques in parallel namely: passive nuclear track detectors and active solar UV radiometers. Some of the nuclear track detectors were mounted in different conditions such as: under shadow band, on solar tracking mechanism following the solar rays. Others were mounted on perpendicular, tilted and horizontal surfaces in sunlight. All detectors were attached to a wooden background of the same thickness (0.5 cm) to eliminate interference of the heat effect of various support materials and have uniformity of the support materials. The assessment was carried out for different periods extending from two to nine weeks continuously. The investigated period covered the hottest months in Saudi Arabia (July and August) when the sky was clear of clouds. The results indicate linear correlation between alpha track diameters and the integrated exposure to solar UV as measured by the solar UV radiometer for all nuclear track detector positions and orientations. The highest slope has been observed for the detectors placed on solar tracking mechanism following the solar rays and the lowest from detectors oriented under the shadow band on horizontal position (measuring the diffused UV radiation only). The results show that most of the measured UV radiation (60%) were from the diffused UV radiation. The characteristics of the upper layer of the detectors are changed after chemical etching very quickly, with increase in the exposure time to UV solar radiation at certain orientation. The results encourage the use of nuclear track

  4. Measurements of Solar Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure at Work and at Leisure in Danish Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandahl, Kasper; Eriksen, Paul; Ibler, Kristina Sophie; Bonde, Jens Peter; Mortensen, Ole Steen

    2018-03-30

    Exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation is the main cause of skin cancer and may well present an occupational health and safety problem. In Denmark, skin cancer is a common disease in the general population, but detailed data on solar ultraviolet radiation exposure among outdoor workers are lacking. The aim of this study was to provide objective measurements of solar ultraviolet radiation exposure on working days and at leisure and compare levels of exposure between groups of mainly outdoor, equal-parts-outdoor-and-indoor and indoor workers. To this end, UV-B dosimeters with an aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) photodiode detector were used to measure the solar ultraviolet radiation exposure of 457 workers in the Danish summer season. Presented as semi-annual standard erythemal dose (SED) on working days, respectively, at leisure, the results are for mainly outdoor workers 214.2 SED and 64.8 SED, equal-parts-outdoor-and-indoor workers 131.4 SED and 64.8 SED, indoor workers 55.8 SED and 57.6 SED. The daily SED by month is significantly different (α = 0.05) between mainly outdoor, equal-parts-outdoor-and-indoor and indoor workers and across professional groups; some of which are exposed at very high levels that is roofers 361.8 SED. These findings substantiate that exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation is indeed an occupational health and safety problem in Denmark. © 2018 The Authors. Photochemistry and Photobiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Photobiology.

  5. Estimation of hourly ultraviolet solar irradiance in the semi-arid northeast region of Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Ricardo C. de; Tiba, Chigueru [Dept. de Energia Nuclear da Univ. Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Two computational codes, SPCTRAL2 and SMARTS2, were used for estimating ultraviolet solar irradiance in a locality of the semi-arid region of the Northeast of Brazil. The softwares presented simplicity of use, precision and relative ease in obtaining the input variables: zenith angle, atmospheric pressure in relation to sea level, relative humidity of the air, amount of precipitable water, total ozone and the aerosol optic depths (AOD). All these variables are measured in conventional meteorological stations, except for the aerosol optic depth. The AOD was measured with an apparatus that was constructed with a narrow band LED sensor, centered in 555nm which measures the monochromatic radiation transmission through the terrestrial atmosphere, which can be described by Beer's law. The measurements for obtaining the AOD were carried out during the months of December, 2006 and January, 2007 for Pesqueira-PE (Longitude -36.77 and Latitude 8.4 ) semi-arid region of Pernambuco, at intervals of 10 and 10 minutes, simultaneously. The ultraviolet solar irradiation was measured with a TURV (Total Ultraviolet Radiometer) Eppley Pyranometer on a minute scale. The computational simulations with SPCTRAL2 and SMARTS2 were made considering the following cases: (a) obtention of daily AOD, or be it, coming from the linear extrapolation of all the data along the day (b) obtention of hourly AOD, or be it the linearization by parts (piecewise). In the first case, the results of the simulations of ultraviolet solar irradiance and ultraviolet radiation index show an error of 4% and 13% for solar midday, and 78% at end of afternoon, when compared with the values measured with the TURV pyranometer. These results were significantly improved when using the AOD obtained on hourly bases: an error of 6.7 % for solar midday, a maximum error of 10% between 11 and 13 h, a maximum error of 20% between 10 and 14h and finally a maximum error of 30% between 9 and 15h. (orig.)

  6. Solar ultraviolet radiation and the risk of infectious disease: summary of a workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, R.S.; Cooper, K.D.; De Faro, E.C.

    1995-01-01

    This invited review summarizes papers presented in a workshop on solar radiation and the risk of infectious disease. Nine reviewers cover the current state of knowledge in the following relevant fields:-ultraviolet climatology, infectious disease in humans, effects of U.V. from artificial light sources on animal and human immune systems, the influence of solar U.V. on animal and human immune systems, (lab, field, and clinical studies), biological consequences of unrepaired solar induced human DNA damage, and epidemiological considerations. Group discussions preceded the preparation of summary statements on each topic. Extensive bibliography. (UK)

  7. Spectral signature of ultraviolet solar irradiance in Zacatecas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinedo V, J. L; Mireles G, F; Rios M, C; Quirino T, L. L; Davila R, J. I [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Zacatecas, Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2006-10-15

    This study presents an analysis of the global ultraviolet spectral irradiance (290-400 nm) registered in Zacatecas, a city near the Tropic of Cancer, located at 2500 m above sea level, latitude of 22 degrees N and longitude of 102 degrees W. The spectra have been measured using a Bentham radiometer with a 0.5 nm step in wavelength. The measurements show relatively high levels of ultraviolet irradiance (UV), which may be characteristic of areas close to the Tropic of Cancer. Faced with an increase of the incidence of skin cancer among the population of Zacatecas, these measurements highlight that a damage prevention plan is required. [Spanish] En este trabajo se presenta un analisis de la radiacion espectral global ultravioleta (290-400 nm) registrada en Zacatecas, una ciudad vecina al tropico de cancer, situada a 2500 m sobre el nivel del mar, latitud de 22 grados N y longitud de 102 grados O. Los espectros correspondientes han sido medidos mediante un espectroradiometro Bentham con un paso de 0.5 nm de longitud de onda. Las mediciones muestran niveles de radiacion ultravioleta (UV) relativamente elevados, que pueden ser caracteristicos de las zonas vecinas al tropico de cancer. Frente al aumento de incidencia de cancer en la piel en la poblacion del estado de Zacatecas, estas mediciones ponen en relieve la necesidad de formular un plan preventivo de danos.

  8. Solar Electromagnetic Radiation Study for Solar Cycle 22: Solar Ultraviolet Irradiance, 120 to 300 NM: Report of Working Groups 2 and 3 of SOLERS 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottman, G. J.; Cebula, R. P.; Gillotay, D.; Simon, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of Working Group 2 and Working Group 3 of the SOLax Electromagnetic Radiation Study for Solar Cycle 22 (SOLERS22) Program. The international (SOLERS22) is Project 1.2 of the Solar-Terrestrial Energy Program (STEP) sponsored by SCOSTEP, a committee of the International Council of Scientific Unions). SOLERS22 is comprised of five Working Groups, each concentrating on a specific wave-length range: WG-1 - visible and infrared, WG-2 - mid-ultraviolet (200 solar irradiance values in the specified wavelength ranges, 2) consider the evolving solar structures as the cause of temporal variations, and 3) understand the underlying physical processes driving these changes.

  9. Exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation: a hot topic?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernez, David; Backes, Claudine; Milon, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    The Sun can be harmful to human health, about a certain threshold. More than occasional exposures, it is chronic exposures that are responsible for the majority of the UV-related skin cancers that affect numerous outdoor workers. Solar exposure should not merely be a public health issue, it should also be raised in the working world. (authors)

  10. Solar photocatalytic generation of hydrogen under ultraviolet-visible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    solar energy has been regarded as an attractive solution to resolve the global energy ... simultaneous hydrogen production and H2S decomposi- tion is a highly ... of CdCO3 and ZnCO3 in dilute acetic acid at 60–70°C. Mixing slowly the hot ...

  11. Solar ultraviolet photodegradation of DOC may stimulate freshwater food webs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, de H.J.; Morris, D.P.; Williamson, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    The UV component in solar radiation increased the availability of DOC for bacterial growth, and led to an increase in bacterial and bacterivore abundance in laboratory plankton cultures. UV radiation may thus stimulate ecosystem productivity by increasing dissolved organic carbon lability and

  12. An echelle spectrograph for middle ultraviolet solar spectroscopy from rockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tousey, R; Purcell, J D; Garrett, D L

    1967-03-01

    An echelle grating spectrograph is ideal for use in a rocket when high resolution is required becaus itoccupies a minimum of space. The instrument described covers the range 4000-2000 A with a resolution of 0.03 A. It was designed to fit into the solar biaxial pointing-control section of an Aerobee-150 rocket. The characteristics of the spectrograph are illustrated with laboratory spectra of iron and carbon are sources and with solar spectra obtained during rocket flights in 1961 and 1964. Problems encountered in analyzing the spectra are discussed. The most difficult design problem was the elimination of stray light when used with the sun. Of the several methods investigated, the most effective was a predispersing system in the form of a zero-dispersion double monochromator. This was made compact by folding the beam four times.

  13. SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET EXPOSURE AND MORTALITY FROM SKIN TUMORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berwick, Marianne; Pestak, Claire; Thomas, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Solar UV radiation (UVR) exposure is clearly associated with increased mortality from nonmelanoma skin cancer—usually squamous cell carcinoma. However, the association with cutaneous melanoma is unclear from the evidence in ecologic studies and several analytic studies have conflicting results regarding the effect of high levels of intermittent UV exposure prior to diagnosis on mortality. Understanding this conundrum is critical to present coherent public health messages and to improve the mortality rates from melanoma. PMID:25207375

  14. ASSESSMENT OF THE RISK OF SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION TO AMPHIBIANS: III. PREDICTION OF IMPACTS IN SELECTED NORTHERN MIDWESTERN WETLANDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The deleterious effects of solar ultraviolet radiation, especially the UV-B portion of sunlight, have been hypothesized to reduce survival, increase the frequency of malformations, and contribute to the apparent worldwide decline of many amphibian species.

  15. [Analysis of the cumulative solar ultraviolet radiation in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanedo-Cázares, Juan Pablo; Torres-Álvarez, Bertha; Portales-González, Bárbara; Martínez-Rosales, Karla; Hernández-Blanco, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of skin cancer has increased in Mexico in recent years. Ultraviolet radiation is the main risk factor associated. Due to the need to develop strategies to prevent skin cancer, the aim of the study was to estimate the UV intensity in several representative regions of Mexico, the average annual UV dose of these populations, and the potential benefit of applying sunscreen at different ages. The intensity of UV radiation was quantified by remote and terrestrial radiometry. The dose of UV exposure was measured in minimal erythema doses using validated models for face and arms. The benefit of using a sunscreen was calculated with the use of a sunscreen with SPF 15 from birth to age 70. The UV radiation is lower in December and greater in the period from May to July. The region with a lower annual dose is Tijuana; and the higher annual dose is in the Mexico City area. The annual difference between these regions was 58 %. Through life, a low SPF sunscreen can reduce up to 66 % of the received UV dose. The geographical location is a risk factor for accumulation of UV radiation in Mexico. Since childhood, people receive high amounts of it; however, most of this dose can be reduced using any commercially available sunscreen, if applied strategically.

  16. New advances in protection against solar ultraviolet radiation in textiles for summer clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, José; de Gálvez, María Victoria; Sánchez-Roldán, Cristina; Herrera-Ceballos, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Clothing is considered one of the most important tools for photoprotection against harmful solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). The standard for sun-protective clothing is based on erythema despite other biological effects of UVR on the skin. We analyzed the potential protection against UVR in fabrics destined for summer clothing based on several action spectra. We examined 50 garments classified by type of fabric composition, structure of the fiber yarn and color. The ultraviolet protection factor was calculated based on fabric ultraviolet transmittance corrected for erythema according to the EU standard E-13758 as well as the UVA transmittance of fabrics. UVR protection was also analyzed in base of different action spectra as for previtamin D3, nonmelanoma skin cancer, photoimmunosuppression and photoaging. Most knitted fabrics used for sports T-shirts offered excellent ratings for ultraviolet protection while normal shirts showed very low ratings, particularly against photoaging. The cover is the most influential variable in fabric photoprotection, having an exponential relationship with the UPF. The relation between cover and UVA protection was linearly negative. Information about ultraviolet protection in textiles used for summer clothing should be included in labeling as some types of fabrics, especially those used for shirts, offer very low UVR protection. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  17. A NOISE ADAPTIVE FUZZY EQUALIZATION METHOD FOR PROCESSING SOLAR EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET IMAGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druckmueller, M., E-mail: druckmuller@fme.vutbr.cz [Institute of Mathematics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2013-08-15

    A new image enhancement tool ideally suited for the visualization of fine structures in extreme ultraviolet images of the corona is presented in this paper. The Noise Adaptive Fuzzy Equalization method is particularly suited for the exceptionally high dynamic range images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. This method produces artifact-free images and gives significantly better results than methods based on convolution or Fourier transform which are often used for that purpose.

  18. MgII Linear Polarization Measurements Using the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Edward; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayahsi, Ken; Davis, John; Gary, Allen; Adams, Mitzi

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe the Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph (SUMI) sounding rocket program, with emphasis on the polarization characteristics of the VUV optics and their spectral, spatial and polarization resolution. SUMI's first flight (7/30/2010) met all of its mission success criteria and this paper will describe the data that was acquired with emphasis on the MgII linear polarization measurements.

  19. SimUVEx v2 : a numeric tool to predict anatomical solar ultraviolet exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Religi, Arianna; Moccozet, Laurent; Farahmand, Meghdad; Vuilleumier, L.aurent; Vernez, David; Milon, Antoine; Backes, Claudine; Bulliard, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation has a dual effect on human health: low UV doses promote the photosynthesis of vitamin D and regulate calcium and phosphorus metabolism, while an excessive UV exposure is the main cause of skin cancer, along with eye diseases and premature skin ageing. The link between UV radiation levels and UV exposure is not fully understood since exposure data are limited and individual anatomical variations in UV doses are significant. SimUVEx is a numeric simulation tool ...

  20. Effects of increased solar ultraviolet radiation on biogeochemical cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zepp, R.G.; Callaghan, T.V.; Erickson, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Increases in solar UV radiation could affect terrestrial and aquatic biogeochemical cycles thus altering both sources and sinks of greenhouse and chemically important trace gases (e.g., carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), carbonyl sulfide (COS). In terrestrial ecosystems, increased UV-B could modify both the production and decomposition of plant matter with concomitant changes in the uptake and release of atmospherically important trace gases. Decomposition processes can be accelerated when UV-B photodegrades surface litter, or retarded when the dominant effect involves changes in the chemical composition of living tissues that reduce the biodegradability of buried litter. These changes in decomposition can affect microbial production of CO2 and other trace gases and also may affect the availability of nutrients essential for plant growth. Primary production can be reduced by enhanced UV-B, but the effect is variable between species and even cultivars of some crops. Likewise, the effects of enhanced UV-B on photoproduction of CO from plant matter is species-dependent and occurs more efficiently from dead than from living matter. Aquatic ecosystems studies in several different locations have shown that reductions in current levels of solar UV-B result in enhanced primary production, and Antarctic experiments under the ozone hole demonstrated that primary production is inhibited by enhanced UV-B. In addition to its effects on primary production, solar UV radiation can reduce bacterioplankton growth in the upper ocean with potentially important effects on marine biogeochemical cycles. Decomposition processes can be retarded when bacterial activity is suppressed by enhanced UV-B radiation or stimulated when solar UV radiation photodegrades aquatic dissolved organic matter. Photodegradation of DOM results in loss of UV absorption and formation of dissolved inorganic carbon, CO, and organic substrates that are readily mineralized or taken up by aquatic

  1. Rapid modulation of ultraviolet shielding in plants is influenced by solar ultraviolet radiation and linked to alterations in flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Paul W; Tobler, Mark A; Keefover-Ring, Ken; Flint, Stephan D; Barkley, Anne E; Ryel, Ronald J; Lindroth, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of ultraviolet (UV)-absorbing compounds (flavonoids and related phenylpropanoids) and the resultant decrease in epidermal UV transmittance (TUV ) are primary protective mechanisms employed by plants against potentially damaging solar UV radiation and are critical components of the overall acclimation response of plants to changing solar UV environments. Whether plants can adjust this UV sunscreen protection in response to rapid changes in UV, as occurs on a diurnal basis, is largely unexplored. Here, we use a combination of approaches to demonstrate that plants can modulate their UV-screening properties within minutes to hours, and these changes are driven, in part, by UV radiation. For the cultivated species Abelmoschus esculentus, large (30-50%) and reversible changes in TUV occurred on a diurnal basis, and these adjustments were associated with changes in the concentrations of whole-leaf UV-absorbing compounds and several quercetin glycosides. Similar results were found for two other species (Vicia faba and Solanum lycopersicum), but no such changes were detected in Zea mays. These findings reveal a much more dynamic UV-protection mechanism than previously recognized, raise important questions concerning the costs and benefits of UV-protection strategies in plants and have practical implications for employing UV to enhance crop vigor and quality in controlled environments. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Rocksalt MgS solar blind ultra-violet detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hoi Lai

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies using in-situ Auger electron spectroscopy and reflection high energy electron diffraction, and ex-situ high resolution X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction reveal that a MgS thin film grown directly on a GaAs (100 substrate by molecular beam epitaxy adopts its most stable phase, the rocksalt structure, with a lattice constant of 5.20 Å. A Au/MgS/n+-GaAs (100 Schottky-barrier photodiode was fabricated and its room temperature photoresponse was measured to have a sharp fall-off edge at 235 nm with rejection of more than three orders at 400 nm and higher than five orders at 500 nm, promising for various solar-blind UV detection applications.

  3. Higher plant acclimation to solar ultraviolet-B radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robberecht, R.

    1981-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) the relationship between plant sensitivity and epidermal uv attenuation, (2) the effect of phenotypic changes in the leaf epidermis, resulting from uv-B exposure, on plant sensitivity to uv radiation, and (3) the platicity of these changes in the epidermis leading to plant acclimation to uv-B radiation. A mechanism of uv-B attenuation, possibly involving the biosynthesis of uv-absorbing flavonoid compounds in the epidermis and mesophyll under the stress of uv-B radiation, and a subsequent increase in the uv-B attenuation capacity of the epidermis, is suggested. The degree of plant sensitivity and acclimation to natural and intensified solar uv-B radiation may involve a dynamic balance between the capacity for uv-B attenuation and uv-radiation-repair mechanisms in the leaf

  4. Improving Assessment of Lifetime Solar Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure in Epidemiologic Studies: Comparison of Ultraviolet Exposure Assessment Methods in a Nationwide United States Occupational Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Mark P; Tatalovich, Zaria; Linet, Martha S; Fang, Michelle; Kendall, Gerald M; Kimlin, Michael G

    2018-06-13

    Solar ultraviolet radiation is the primary risk factor for skin cancers and sun-related eye disorders. Estimates of individual ambient ultraviolet irradiance derived from ground-based solar measurements and from satellite measurements have rarely been compared. Using self-reported residential history from 67,189 persons in a nationwide occupational US radiologic technologists cohort, we estimated ambient solar irradiance using data from ground-based meters and noontime satellite measurements. The mean distance-moved from city of longest residence in childhood increased from 137.6 km at ages 13-19 to 870.3 km at ages ≥65, with corresponding increases in absolute latitude-difference moved. At ages 20/40/60/80, the Pearson/Spearman correlation coefficients of ground-based and satellite-derived solar potential ultraviolet exposure, using irradiance and cumulative radiant-exposure metrics, were high (=0.87-0.92). There was also moderate correlation (Pearson/Spearman correlation coefficients=0.51-0.60) between irradiance at birth and at last-known address, for ground-based and satellite data. Satellite-based lifetime estimates of ultraviolet radiation were generally 14-15% lower than ground-based estimates, albeit with substantial uncertainties, possibly because ground-based estimates incorporate fluctuations in cloud and ozone, which are incompletely incorporated in the single noontime satellite-overpass ultraviolet value. If confirmed elsewhere, the findings suggest that ground-based estimates may improve exposure-assessment accuracy and potentially provide new insights into ultraviolet-radiation-disease relationships in epidemiologic studies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of increased solar ultraviolet radiation on terrestrial plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, M.M.; Teramura, A.H.; Tevini, M.; Bornman, J.F.; Björn, L.O.; Kulandaivelu, G.

    1995-01-01

    Physiological and developmental processes of plants are affected by UV-B radiation, even by the amount of UV-B in present-day sunlight. Plants also have several mechanisms to ameliorate or repair these effects and may acclimate to a certain extent to increased levels of UV-B. Nevertheless, plant growth can be directly affected by UV-B radiation. Response to UV-B also varies considerably among species and also cultivars of the same species. In agriculture, this may necessitate using more UV-B-tolerant cultivars and breeding new ones. In forests and grasslands, this will likely result in changes in species composition; therefore there are implications for the biodiversity in different ecosystems. Indirect changes caused by UV-B-such as changes in plant form, biomass allocation to parts of the plant, timing of developmental phases and secondary metabolism-may be equally, or sometimes more important than damaging effects of UV-B. These changes can have important implications for plant competitive balance, herbivory, plant pathogens, and biogeochemical cycles. These ecosystem-level effects can be anticipated, but not easily predicted or evaluated. Research at the ecosystem level for solar UV-B is barely beginning. Other factors, including those involved in climate change such as increasing CO2, also interact with UV-B. Such reactions are not easily predicted, but are of obvious importance in both agriculture and in nonagricultural ecosystems

  6. CAN A NANOFLARE MODEL OF EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIANCES DESCRIBE THE HEATING OF THE SOLAR CORONA?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajfirouze, E.; Safari, H. [Department of Physics, University of Zanjan, P.O. Box 45195-313, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-01-10

    Nanoflares, the basic units of impulsive energy release, may produce much of the solar background emission. Extrapolation of the energy frequency distribution of observed microflares, which follows a power law to lower energies, can give an estimation of the importance of nanoflares for heating the solar corona. If the power-law index is greater than 2, then the nanoflare contribution is dominant. We model a time series of extreme-ultraviolet emission radiance as random flares with a power-law exponent of the flare event distribution. The model is based on three key parameters: the flare rate, the flare duration, and the power-law exponent of the flare intensity frequency distribution. We use this model to simulate emission line radiance detected in 171 A, observed by Solar Terrestrial Relation Observatory/Extreme-Ultraviolet Imager and Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. The observed light curves are matched with simulated light curves using an Artificial Neural Network, and the parameter values are determined across the active region, quiet Sun, and coronal hole. The damping rate of nanoflares is compared with the radiative losses cooling time. The effect of background emission, data cadence, and network sensitivity on the key parameters of the model is studied. Most of the observed light curves have a power-law exponent, {alpha}, greater than the critical value 2. At these sites, nanoflare heating could be significant.

  7. EIT: Solar corona synoptic observations from SOHO with an Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaboudiniere, J. P.; Gabriel, A. H.; Artzner, G. E.; Michels, D. J.; Dere, K. P.; Howard, R. A.; Catura, R.; Stern, R.; Lemen, J.; Neupert, W.

    1988-01-01

    The Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) of SOHO (solar and heliospheric observatory) will provide full disk images in emission lines formed at temperatures that map solar structures ranging from the chromospheric network to the hot magnetically confined plasma in the corona. Images in four narrow bandpasses will be obtained using normal incidence multilayered optics deposited on quadrants of a Ritchey-Chretien telescope. The EIT is capable of providing a uniform one arc second resolution over its entire 50 by 50 arc min field of view. Data from the EIT will be extremely valuable for identifying and interpreting the spatial and temperature fine structures of the solar atmosphere. Temporal analysis will provide information on the stability of these structures and identify dynamical processes. EIT images, issued daily, will provide the global corona context for aid in unifying the investigations and in forming the observing plans for SOHO coronal instruments.

  8. Assessment of the impact of increased solar ultraviolet radiation upon marine ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrest, R. C.; Vandyke, H.

    1978-01-01

    Reduction of the earth's ozone layer, with a resultant increase in transmission of solar ultraviolet radiation in the 290 to 320nm waveband (UV-B), via space shuttle operations through the stratosphere is considered. It is shown that simulated solar ultraviolet radiation can, under experimental conditions, detrimentally affect the marine organisms that form the base of the food web of oceanic and estuarine ecosystems. Whether a small increase in biologically harmful ultraviolet radiation might overwhelm these mechanisms and produce changes that will have damaging consequences to the biosphere is discussed. The potential for irreversible damage to the productivity, structure and/or functioning of a model estuarine ecosystem by increased UV-B radiation and whether these ecosystems are highly stable or amenable to adaptive change is studied. Data are provided to assess the potential impact upon marine ecosystems if space shuttle operations contribute to a reduction of the stratospheric ozone layer and the sensitivity of key community components to increased UV-B radiation is examined.

  9. Solar ultraviolet radiation measurements at South African and Reunion Island Coastal Sites: An indicator of public sun protection

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wright, CY

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has the potential to cause biological harm to humans. Intensity of solar UVR at the Earth’s surface depends on several factors, such as total column ozone and cloud cover, and temporal trends are usually dependent...

  10. Solar Electromagnetic Radiation Study for Solar Cycle 22: Solar Ultraviolet Irradiance, 120 to 300 NM: Report of Working Groups 2 and 3 of SOLERS 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottman, G. J.; Cebula, R. P.; Gillotay, D.; Simon, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of Working Group 2 and Working Group 3 of the SOLax Electromagnetic Radiation Study for Solar Cycle 22 (SOLERS22) Program. The international (SOLERS22) is Project 1.2 of the Solar-Terrestrial Energy Program (STEP) sponsored by SCOSTEP, a committee of the International Council of Scientific Unions). SOLERS22 is comprised of five Working Groups, each concentrating on a specific wave-length range: WG-1 - visible and infrared, WG-2 - mid-ultraviolet (200 < A < 300 nm), WG-3 - Far-ultraviolet (lambda greater than 100 and lambda less than 200 nanometers), WG-4 - extreme-ultraviolet (lambda greater than 10 and lambda less than 100 nm), and WG-5 - X-ray (lambda greater than 1 and lambda less than 10 nano meters). The overarching goals of SOLERS22 are to: 1) establish daily solar irradiance values in the specified wavelength ranges, 2) consider the evolving solar structures as the cause of temporal variations, and 3) understand the underlying physical processes driving these changes.

  11. Real-time measurement of outdoor worker's exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation in Pretoria, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mmathapelo Makgabutlane

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The city of Pretoria in South Africa receives considerable solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR because of its low latitude (22–35°S and relatively clear skies. Certain meteorological factors affect the amount of solar UVR that reaches the ground; the most dominant factors being stratospheric ozone, cloud cover and solar zenith angle. It is known that overexposure to solar UVR may lead to the development of adverse health conditions, the most significant being skin cancer. Outdoor workers spend a significant amount of time outside and are thus susceptible to this risk. In this case study, we estimated, for the first time, the real-time solar UVR exposure of an outdoor worker in Pretoria. Measurements were made on 27 and 28 May 2013 using a handheld ultraviolet index (UVI meter calibrated against a science-grade biometer at the South African Weather Service in Pretoria. Personal exposure estimation was used to discern the pattern in diurnal and annual sunburn risk for the outdoor worker. Ambient UVR levels ranged from 0 UVI to 4.66 UVI and the outdoor worker’s potential exposure estimates regularly exceeded 80% of these levels depending on the time of day. The risk of sunburn was evident; however, actual incidents would depend on individual skin photosensitivity and melanin content, as well as sun protection used. Further research is needed to determine the personal exposure estimations of outdoor workers in other provinces in which solar UVR levels may be equally high, or higher than those in Pretoria.

  12. Ultraviolet spectrometer and polarimeter (UVSP) software development and hardware tests for the solar maximum mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, M. E.; Haisch, B. M.

    1986-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Spectrometer/Polarimeter Instrument (UVSP) for the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) was based on the re-use of the engineering model of the high resolution ultraviolet spectrometer developed for the OSO-8 mission. Lockheed assumed four distinct responsibilities in the UVSP program: technical evaluation of the OSO-8 engineering model; technical consulting on the electronic, optical, and mechanical modifications to the OSO-8 engineering model hardware; design and development of the UVSP software system; and scientific participation in the operations and analysis phase of the mission. Lockheed also provided technical consulting and assistance with instrument hardware performance anomalies encountered during the post launch operation of the SMM observatory. An index to the quarterly reports delivered under the contract are contained, and serves as a useful capsule history of the program activity.

  13. Trends of solar ultraviolet irradiance at Barrow, Alaska, and the effect of measurement uncertainties on trend detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bernhard

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Spectral ultraviolet (UV irradiance has been observed near Barrow, Alaska (71° N, 157° W between 1991 and 2011 with an SUV-100 spectroradiometer. The instrument was historically part of the US National Science Foundation's UV Monitoring Network and is now a component of NSF's Arctic Observing Network. From these measurements, trends in monthly average irradiance and their uncertainties were calculated. The analysis focuses on two quantities, the UV Index (which is affected by atmospheric ozone concentrations and irradiance at 345 nm (which is virtually insensitive to ozone. Uncertainties of trend estimates depend on variations in the data due to (1 natural variability, (2 systematic and random errors of the measurements, and (3 uncertainties caused by gaps in the time series. Using radiative transfer model calculations, systematic errors of the measurements were detected and corrected. Different correction schemes were tested to quantify the sensitivity of the trend estimates on the treatment of systematic errors. Depending on the correction method, estimates of decadal trends changed between 1.5% and 2.9%. Uncertainties in the trend estimates caused by error sources (2 and (3 were set into relation with the overall uncertainty of the trend determinations. Results show that these error sources are only relevant for February, March, and April when natural variability is low due to high surface albedo. This method of addressing measurement uncertainties in time series analysis is also applicable to other geophysical parameters. Trend estimates varied between −14% and +5% per decade and were significant (95.45% confidence level only for the month of October. Depending on the correction method, October trends varied between −11.4% and −13.7% for irradiance at 345 nm and between −11.7% and −14.1% for the UV Index. These large trends are consistent with trends in short-wave (0.3–3.0 μm solar irradiance measured with pyranometers at NOAA

  14. Very short-term reactive forecasting of the solar ultraviolet index using an extreme learning machine integrated with the solar zenith angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Ravinesh C; Downs, Nathan; Parisi, Alfio V; Adamowski, Jan F; Quilty, John M

    2017-05-01

    Exposure to erythemally-effective solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) that contributes to malignant keratinocyte cancers and associated health-risk is best mitigated through innovative decision-support systems, with global solar UV index (UVI) forecast necessary to inform real-time sun-protection behaviour recommendations. It follows that the UVI forecasting models are useful tools for such decision-making. In this study, a model for computationally-efficient data-driven forecasting of diffuse and global very short-term reactive (VSTR) (10-min lead-time) UVI, enhanced by drawing on the solar zenith angle (θ s ) data, was developed using an extreme learning machine (ELM) algorithm. An ELM algorithm typically serves to address complex and ill-defined forecasting problems. UV spectroradiometer situated in Toowoomba, Australia measured daily cycles (0500-1700h) of UVI over the austral summer period. After trialling activations functions based on sine, hard limit, logarithmic and tangent sigmoid and triangular and radial basis networks for best results, an optimal ELM architecture utilising logarithmic sigmoid equation in hidden layer, with lagged combinations of θ s as the predictor data was developed. ELM's performance was evaluated using statistical metrics: correlation coefficient (r), Willmott's Index (WI), Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient (E NS ), root mean square error (RMSE), and mean absolute error (MAE) between observed and forecasted UVI. Using these metrics, the ELM model's performance was compared to that of existing methods: multivariate adaptive regression spline (MARS), M5 Model Tree, and a semi-empirical (Pro6UV) clear sky model. Based on RMSE and MAE values, the ELM model (0.255, 0.346, respectively) outperformed the MARS (0.310, 0.438) and M5 Model Tree (0.346, 0.466) models. Concurring with these metrics, the Willmott's Index for the ELM, MARS and M5 Model Tree models were 0.966, 0.942 and 0.934, respectively. About 57% of the ELM model

  15. Optical Characteristics of the Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, E. A.; Porter, J. G.; Davis, J. M.; Gary, G. A.; Adams, M.; Smith, S.; Hraba, J. F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will describe the scientific objectives of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) and the optical components that have been developed to meet those objectives. In order to test the scientific feasibility of measuring magnetic fields in the UV, a sounding rocket payload is being developed. This paper will discuss: (1) the scientific measurements that will be made by the SUMI sounding rocket program, (2) how the optics have been optimized for simultaneous measurements of two magnetic lines CIV (1550 Angstroms) and MgII (2800 Angstroms), and (3) the optical, reflectance, transmission and polarization measurements that have been made on the SUMI telescope mirror and polarimeter.

  16. Protective mechanisms and acclimation to solar ultraviolet-B radiation in Oenothera stricta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robberecht, R.; Caldwell, M. M.

    1981-01-01

    Plant adaptations ameliorating or repairing the damaging effects of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation on plant tissue were investigated. The degree of phenotype plasticity in UV protective mechanisms and acclimation in relation to the natural solar UV-B radiation flux and in an enhanced UV-B irradiance environment was also examined. Mechanisms by which plants avoid radiation, adaptations altering the path of radiation incident on the leaf, and repair processes were considered. Attenuation of UV-B by tissues, UV-B irradiation into the leaf, and the effects of UV-B on photosynthesis were investigated.

  17. Protective mechanisms and acclimation to solar ultraviolet-b radiation in oenothera stricta. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robberecht, R.; Caldwell, M.M.

    1981-12-01

    Plant adaptations ameliorating or repairing the damaging effects of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation on plant tissue were investigated. The degree of phenotype plasticity in UV protective mechanisms and acclimation in relation to the natural solar UV-B radiation flux and in an enhanced UV-B irradiance environment was also examined. Mechanisms by which plants avoid radiation, adaptations altering the path of radiation incident on the leaf, and repair processes were considered. Attenuation of UV-B by tissues, UV-B irradiation into the leaf, and the effects of UV-B on photosynthesis were investigated

  18. New high-resolution rocket-ultraviolet filtergrams of the solar disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, B.; Bonnet, R.-M.; Bruner, M.

    1986-01-01

    A rocket-borne solar ultraviolet telescope named Transition Region Camera was launched successfully for the third on July 13, 1982. High quality calibrated photographic images of the sun were obtained at Lyman alpha and in the continuum at 160 nm and 220 nm. The angular resolution achieved is better than one arcsec. A flare, active regions, sunspots, the 8 Mm mesostructure, the chromospheric network, bright UV grains and coronal loops were observed during the flight. The results are presented and the evolution with height in the solar atmosphere of the various structures observed is followed from one wavelength to the other, showing distinct differences. The value of the field's intensity of magnetic flux tubes is deduced from the observations.

  19. A comparison of photospheric electric current and ultraviolet and X-ray emission in a solar active region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisch, B. M.; Bruner, M. E.; Hagyard, M. J.; Bonnet, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an extensive set of coordinated observations of a solar active region, taking into account spectroheliograms obtained with the aid of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) Ultraviolet Spectrometer Polarimeter (UVSP) instrument, SMM soft X-ray polychromator (XRP) raster maps, and high spatial resolution ultraviolet images of the sun in Lyman-alpha and in the 1600 A continuum. These data span together the upper solar atmosphere from the temperature minimum to the corona. The data are compared to maps of the inferred photospheric electric current derived from the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) vector magnetograph observations. Some empirical correlation is found between regions of inferred electric current density and the brightest features in the ultraviolet continuum and to a lesser extent those seen in Lyman-alpha within an active region.

  20. Comparison of photospheric electric current and ultraviolet and x-ray emission in a solar active region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisch, B.M.; Bruner, M.E.; Hagyard, M.J.; Bonnet, R.M.; NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL; ESA, Paris, France)

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an extensive set of coordinated observations of a solar active region, taking into account spectroheliograms obtained with the aid of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) Ultraviolet Spectrometer Polarimeter (UVSP) instrument, SMM soft x-ray polychromator (XRP) raster maps, and high spatial resolution ultraviolet images of the sun in Lyman-alpha and in the 1600 A continuum. These data span together the upper solar atmosphere from the temperature minimum to the corona. The data are compared to maps of the inferred photospheric electric current derived from the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) vector magnetograph observations. Some empirical correlation is found between regions of inferred electric current density and the brightest features in the ultraviolet continuum and to a lesser extent those seen in Lyman-alpha within an active region. 29 references

  1. The solar ultraviolet B radiation protection provided by shading devices with regard to its diffuse component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudish, Avraham I; Harari, Marco; Evseev, Efim G

    2011-10-01

    The composition of the incident solar global ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation with regard to its beam and diffuse radiation fractions is highly relevant with regard to outdoor sun protection. This is especially true with respect to sun protection during leisure-time outdoor sun exposure at the shore and pools, where people tend to escape the sun under shade trees or different types of shading devices, e.g., umbrellas, overhangs, etc., believing they offer protection from the erythemal solar radiation. The degree of sun protection offered by such devices is directly related to the composition of the solar global UVB radiation, i.e., its beam and diffuse fractions. The composition of the incident solar global UVB radiation can be determined by measuring the global UVB (using Solar Light Co. Inc., Model 501A UV-Biometer) and either of its components. The beam component of the UVB radiation was determined by measuring the normal incidence beam radiation using a prototype, tracking instrument consisting of a Solar Light Co. Inc. Model 501A UV-Biometer mounted on an Eppley Solar Tracker Model St-1. The horizontal beam component of the global UVB radiation was calculated from the measured normal incidence using a simple geometric correlation and the diffuse component is determined as the difference between global and horizontal beam radiations. Horizontal and vertical surfaces positioned under a horizontal overhang/sunshade or an umbrella are not fully protected from exposure to solar global UVB radiation. They can receive a significant fraction of the UVB radiation, depending on their location beneath the shading device, the umbrella radius and the albedo (reflectance) of the surrounding ground surface in the case of a vertical surface. Shading devices such as an umbrella or horizontal overhang/shade provide relief from the solar global radiation and do block the solar global UVB radiation to some extent; nevertheless, a significant fraction of the solar global UVB

  2. The minimal melanogenesis dose/minimal erythema dose ratio declines with increasing skin pigmentation using solar simulator and narrowband ultraviolet B exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnbak, Mette H; Philipsen, Peter A; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the relation between pre-exposure skin pigmentation and the minimal melanogenesis dose (MMD)/minimal erythema dose (MED) ratio after a single narrowband ultraviolet B (nUVB) and solar simulator (Solar) exposure.......To investigate the relation between pre-exposure skin pigmentation and the minimal melanogenesis dose (MMD)/minimal erythema dose (MED) ratio after a single narrowband ultraviolet B (nUVB) and solar simulator (Solar) exposure....

  3. Ion beam sputtered aluminum based multilayer mirrors for extreme ultraviolet solar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziani, A. [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, Institut d' Optique, CNRS, Univ Paris Sud, 2 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau cedex France (France); Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES), 18 Avenue E. Belin, 31401 Toulouse (France); Delmotte, F., E-mail: Franck.Delmotte@InstitutOptique.fr [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, Institut d' Optique, CNRS, Univ Paris Sud, 2 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau cedex France (France); Le Paven-Thivet, C. [Institut d' Electronique et de Télécommunications de Rennes (IETR) UMR-CNRS 6164, Université de Rennes 1, UEB, IUT Saint Brieuc, 18 rue Henri Wallon, 22004 Saint Brieuc cedex France (France); Meltchakov, E.; Jérome, A. [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, Institut d' Optique, CNRS, Univ Paris Sud, 2 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau cedex France (France); Roulliay, M. [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay UMR 8214, Univ Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay France (France); Bridou, F. [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, Institut d' Optique, CNRS, Univ Paris Sud, 2 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau cedex France (France); Gasc, K. [Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES), 18 Avenue E. Belin, 31401 Toulouse (France)

    2014-02-03

    In this paper, we report on the design, synthesis and characterization of extreme ultraviolet interferential mirrors for solar imaging applications in the spectral range 17 nm–34 nm. This research is carried out in the context of the preparation of the European Space Agency Solar Orbiter mission. The purpose of this study consists in optimizing the deposition of Al-based multilayers by ion beam sputtering according to several parameters such as the ion beam current and the sputtering angle. After optimization of Al thin films, several kinds of Al-based multilayer mirrors have been compared. We have deposited and characterized bi-material and also tri-material periodic multilayers: aluminum/molybdenum [Al/Mo], aluminum/molybdenum/boron carbide [Al/Mo/B{sub 4}C] and aluminum/molybdenum/silicon carbide [Al/Mo/SiC]. Best experimental results have been obtained on Al/Mo/SiC samples: we have measured reflectivity up to 48% at 17.3 nm and 27.5% at 28.2 nm on a synchrotron radiation source. - Highlights: • Design and synthesis of extreme ultraviolet interferential mirrors. • Optimization of aluminum thin films by adjusting several deposition parameters. • Comparison of results obtained with different types of Al-based multilayer mirrors. • Reflectivity up to 48% at 17.3 nm on a synchrotron radiation source.

  4. Ion beam sputtered aluminum based multilayer mirrors for extreme ultraviolet solar imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziani, A.; Delmotte, F.; Le Paven-Thivet, C.; Meltchakov, E.; Jérome, A.; Roulliay, M.; Bridou, F.; Gasc, K.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the design, synthesis and characterization of extreme ultraviolet interferential mirrors for solar imaging applications in the spectral range 17 nm–34 nm. This research is carried out in the context of the preparation of the European Space Agency Solar Orbiter mission. The purpose of this study consists in optimizing the deposition of Al-based multilayers by ion beam sputtering according to several parameters such as the ion beam current and the sputtering angle. After optimization of Al thin films, several kinds of Al-based multilayer mirrors have been compared. We have deposited and characterized bi-material and also tri-material periodic multilayers: aluminum/molybdenum [Al/Mo], aluminum/molybdenum/boron carbide [Al/Mo/B 4 C] and aluminum/molybdenum/silicon carbide [Al/Mo/SiC]. Best experimental results have been obtained on Al/Mo/SiC samples: we have measured reflectivity up to 48% at 17.3 nm and 27.5% at 28.2 nm on a synchrotron radiation source. - Highlights: • Design and synthesis of extreme ultraviolet interferential mirrors. • Optimization of aluminum thin films by adjusting several deposition parameters. • Comparison of results obtained with different types of Al-based multilayer mirrors. • Reflectivity up to 48% at 17.3 nm on a synchrotron radiation source

  5. An inexpensive setup for assessing the impact of ambient solar ultraviolet radiation on seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamse, P.; Reed, H.E.; Krizek, D.T.; Britz, S.J.; Mirecki, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    Because of reductions in stratospheric ozone levels due to chlorofluoromethanes and other trace gases, there has been growing concern about the impact of possible increases in ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation. Until recently, most studies have focused on the effects of enhanced UV-B levels, however, these have inherent technical difficulties. Ultraviolet-B exclusion studies afford the investigator a rapid means of assessing the effects of present levels of solar UV-B radiation. Unlike UV-B enhancement, UV-B exclusion studies use the sun as the source of UV-B radiation and selective filters to transmit or absorb this portion of sunlight. This article describes a simple, inexpensive system that was used over a 3-yr period to determine seedling response of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.), and New Zealand spinach ((Tetragonia tetragonoides (Pallas) Kuntze) to UV-B exclusion. Plants of all three species grown outdoors under UV-B absorbing polyester showed an increase in leaf enlargement and biomass accumulation in comparison to those grown under UV-B transmitting cellulose acetate filters. The bask materials used consist of plastic window boxes, plastic filters that transmit or absorb in the UV-B region, wire supports, and binder clips. This setup can be used to demonstrate bask principles of photobiology and stress physiology. It is ideal for students interested in conducting short-term science projects on the effects of solar UV radiation

  6. Slowly varying component of extreme ultraviolet solar radiation and its relation to solar radio radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, R. D.; Neupert, W. M.

    1974-01-01

    A study of the correlations between solar EUV line fluxes and solar radio fluxes has been carried out. A calibration for the Goddard Space Flight Center EUV spectrum is suggested. The results are used to obtain an equation for the absolute EUV flux for several lines in the 150- to 400-A region and the total flux of 81 intense lines in the region, the 2800-MHz radio flux being used as independent variable.

  7. Ultraviolet Plasmonic Aluminium Nanoparticles for Highly Efficient Light Incoupling on Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinan Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic metal nanoparticles supporting localized surface plasmon resonances have attracted a great deal of interest in boosting the light absorption in solar cells. Among the various plasmonic materials, the aluminium nanoparticles recently have become a rising star due to their unique ultraviolet plasmonic resonances, low cost, earth-abundance and high compatibility with the complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS manufacturing process. Here, we report some key factors that determine the light incoupling of aluminium nanoparticles located on the front side of silicon solar cells. We first numerically study the scattering and absorption properties of the aluminium nanoparticles and the influence of the nanoparticle shape, size, surface coverage and the spacing layer on the light incoupling using the finite difference time domain method. Then, we experimentally integrate 100-nm aluminium nanoparticles on the front side of silicon solar cells with varying silicon nitride thicknesses. This study provides the fundamental insights for designing aluminium nanoparticle-based light trapping on solar cells.

  8. A study of ultraviolet solar radiation at Cairo urban area, Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robaa, S.M. [Cairo Univ., Giza (Egypt). Dept. of Astronomy and Meterology

    2004-07-01

    The monthly mean values of global, G, and ultraviolet, UV, solar radiation incident on a horizontal surface at Cairo urban area during the two different periods (1969-1973) and (1993-1997) are presented, analyzed and compared. The effect of urbanization processes on the solar radiation components is investigated and discussed. It was found that the total radiation of the two components, G and UV received at the urban area of Cairo during the period (1969-1973) highly exceeds the radiation received during the period (1993-1997) for all months of the year. The mean relative reduction of G and UV reached 17.4% and 27.4% respectively. A significant correlation between G and UV radiation has been established and the recommended correlation equation has been stated to estimate the values of UV radiation that are difficult to measure at any site in the zone of Lower Egypt. Also, a comparative study of the two radiation components, G and UV, at urban (Cairo) and rural (Bahtim) areas during the period (1993-1997) revealed that the urban area always has values of G and UV radiation distinctly lower than that found in rural area for all months of the year. Urban-rural mean reduction of G and UV reached 7.0% and 17.9% respectively. The ratio of the ultraviolet to global radiation (UV/G) are calculated and compared with other sites in the Arabian Peninsula. The effect of atmospheric dust on the measured solar radiation components is also investigated and discussed. (author)

  9. On the Importance of the Flare's Late Phase for the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Eparvier, Frank; Jones, Andrew R.; Hock, Rachel; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Klimchuk, James A.; Didkovsky, Leonid; Judge, Darrell; Mariska, John; Bailey, Scott; hide

    2011-01-01

    The new solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance observations from NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) have revealed a new class of solar flares that are referred to as late phase flares. These flares are characterized by the hot 2-5 MK coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI 33.5 nm) showing large secondary peaks that appear many minutes to hours after an eruptive flare event. In contrast, the cool 0.7-1.5 MK coronal emissions (e.g., Fe IX 17.1 nm) usually dim immediately after the flare onset and do not recover until after the delayed second peak of the hot coronal emissions. We refer to this period of 1-5 hours after the fl amrea sin phase as the late phase, and this late phase is uniquely different than long duration flares associated with 2-ribbon flares or large filament eruptions. Our analysis of the late phase flare events indicates that the late phase involves hot coronal loops near the flaring region, not directly related to the original flaring loop system but rather with the higher post-eruption fields. Another finding is that space weather applications concerning Earth s ionosphere and thermosphere need to consider these late phase flares because they can enhance the total EUV irradiance flare variation by a factor of 2 when the late phase contribution is included.

  10. Solid laboratory calibration of a nonimaging spectroradiometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaepman, M E; Dangel, S

    2000-07-20

    Field-based nonimaging spectroradiometers are often used in vicarious calibration experiments for airborne or spaceborne imaging spectrometers. The calibration uncertainties associated with these ground measurements contribute substantially to the overall modeling error in radiance- or reflectance-based vicarious calibration experiments. Because of limitations in the radiometric stability of compact field spectroradiometers, vicarious calibration experiments are based primarily on reflectance measurements rather than on radiance measurements. To characterize the overall uncertainty of radiance-based approaches and assess the sources of uncertainty, we carried out a full laboratory calibration. This laboratory calibration of a nonimaging spectroradiometer is based on a measurement plan targeted at achieving a spectroradiometer bands.

  11. Online educative activities for solar ultraviolet radiation based on measurements of cloud amount and solar exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, A V; Downs, N; Turner, J; Amar, A

    2016-09-01

    A set of online activities for children and the community that are based on an integrated real-time solar UV and cloud measurement system are described. These activities use the functionality of the internet to provide an educative tool for school children and the public on the influence of cloud and the angle of the sun above the horizon on the global erythemal UV or sunburning UV, the diffuse erythemal UV, the global UVA (320-400nm) and the vitamin D effective UV. Additionally, the units of UV exposure and UV irradiance are investigated, along with the meaning and calculation of the UV index (UVI). This research will help ensure that children and the general public are better informed about sun safety by improving their personal understanding of the daily and the atmospheric factors that influence solar UV radiation and the solar UV exposures of the various wavebands in the natural environment. The activities may correct common misconceptions of children and the public about UV irradiances and exposure, utilising the widespread reach of the internet to increase the public's awareness of the factors influencing UV irradiances and exposures in order to provide clear information for minimizing UV exposure, while maintaining healthy, outdoor lifestyles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Measurement of the solar ultraviolet radiation at ground level in Bangi, Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aljawi, Ohoud; Gopir, Geri; Duay, Abdul Basit [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia. ohoud-aljawi@hotmail.com (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    Understanding the amount of ultraviolet (UV) radiation received by human, plant, and animal organisms near the earth’s surface is important to a wide range of fields such as cancer research, agriculture and forestry. The solar ultraviolet spectral irradiance at ground level was measured using the Avantes spectrometer for the period of January to March 2014 at Bangi (2°55´N, 101°46´E, 50 m above sea level) in Malaysia. These data were used to estimate the diurnal variation of UV irradiance (300 – 400 nm). The maximum irradiance of UV radiation was 45 W m{sup −2} on horizontal surface. The maximum irradiance of UV received in the local noon time, and the minimum values of UV irradiance was received in the local morning time. It is found a bigger value of UV radiation was observed on clear sky in January. The estimation of daily flux average of UV irradiance was (921± 91) kJ m{sup −2}.

  13. Extreme Ultraviolet Solar Images Televised In-Flight with a Rocket-Borne SEC Vidicon System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tousey, R; Limansky, I

    1972-05-01

    A TV image of the entire sun while an importance 2N solar flare was in progress was recorded in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation band 171-630 A and transmitted to ground from an Aerobee-150 rocket on 4 November 1969 using S-band telemetry. The camera tube was a Westinghouse Electric Corporation SEC vidicon, with its fiber optic faceplate coated with an XUV to visible conversion layer of p-quaterphenyl. The XUV passband was produced by three 1000-A thick aluminum filters in series together with the platinized reflecting surface of the off-axis paraboloid that imaged the sun. A number of images were recorded with integration times between 1/30 see and 2 sec. Reconstruction of pictures was enhanced by combining several to reduce the noise.

  14. Solar ultraviolet radiation in Syria measurements and relationship with skin cancer incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, I; Baydon, S.A.; Dawood, S.

    1994-11-01

    Seasonal variations of solar UVB (285-320) and UVA (320-400) were measured in three sites in Syria (33-37 N sup O) for two years: 1992-1993. UVB measurements were performed using polysulphone films and Robertson-Berger meter, while UVA measurements were done by NVA intensity meter. Two sets of measurements were carried out : - Maximal daily doses three times a week (every other day) - Diurnal variations from sun-rise to sun-set every two hours twice a month (every fortnight). The biological consequences of ultraviolet radiation withreference to some epidemiological data of skin cancer incidence in Syria since 1980 were discussed .(author). 36 refs., 21 figs., 11 tabs

  15. How does solar ultraviolet-B radiation improve drought tolerance of silver birch (Betula pendula Roth.) seedlings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, T Matthew; Hartikainen, Saara M; Aphalo, Pedro J

    2015-05-01

    We hypothesized that solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation would protect silver birch seedlings from the detrimental effects of water stress through a coordinated suite of trait responses, including morphological acclimation, improved control of water loss through gas exchange and hydraulic sufficiency. To better understand how this synergetic interaction works, plants were grown in an experiment under nine treatment combinations attenuating ultraviolet-A and ultraviolet-B (UVB) from solar radiation together with differential watering to create water-deficit conditions. In seedlings under water deficit, UV attenuation reduced height growth, leaf production and leaf length compared with seedlings receiving the full spectrum of solar radiation, whereas the growth and morphology of well-watered seedlings was largely unaffected by UV attenuation. There was an interactive effect of the treatment combination on water relations, which was more apparent as a change in the water potential at which leaves wilted or plants died than through differences in gas exchange. This suggests that changes occur in the cell wall elastic modulus or accumulation of osmolites in cells under UVB. Overall, the strong negative effects of water deficit are partially ameliorated by solar UV radiation, whereas well-watered silver birch seedlings are slightly disadvantaged by the solar UV radiation they receive. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Solar Simulated Ultraviolet Radiation Induces Global Histone Hypoacetylation in Human Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoru; Kluz, Thomas; Gesumaria, Lisa; Matsui, Mary S; Costa, Max; Sun, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) from sunlight is the primary effector of skin DNA damage. Chromatin remodeling and histone post-translational modification (PTM) are critical factors in repairing DNA damage and maintaining genomic integrity, however, the dynamic changes of histone marks in response to solar UVR are not well characterized. Here we report global changes in histone PTMs induced by solar simulated UVR (ssUVR). A decrease in lysine acetylation of histones H3 and H4, particularly at positions of H3 lysine 9, lysine 56, H4 lysine 5, and lysine 16, was found in human keratinocytes exposed to ssUVR. These acetylation changes were highly associated with ssUVR in a dose-dependent and time-specific manner. Interestingly, H4K16ac, a mark that is crucial for higher order chromatin structure, exhibited a persistent reduction by ssUVR that was transmitted through multiple cell divisions. In addition, the enzymatic activities of histone acetyltransferases were significantly reduced in irradiated cells, which may account for decreased global acetylation. Moreover, depletion of histone deacetylase SIRT1 in keratinocytes rescued ssUVR-induced H4K16 hypoacetylation. These results indicate that ssUVR affects both HDAC and HAT activities, leading to reduced histone acetylation.

  17. Solar ultraviolet irradiation induces decorin degradation in human skin likely via neutrophil elastase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Xia, Wei; Liu, Ying; Remmer, Henriette A; Voorhees, John; Fisher, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of human skin to solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induces matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) activity, which degrades type I collagen fibrils. Type I collagen is the most abundant protein in skin and constitutes the majority of skin connective tissue (dermis). Degradation of collagen fibrils impairs the structure and function of skin that characterize skin aging. Decorin is the predominant proteoglycan in human dermis. In model systems, decorin binds to and protects type I collagen fibrils from proteolytic degradation by enzymes such as MMP-1. Little is known regarding alterations of decorin in response to UV irradiation. We found that solar-simulated UV irradiation of human skin in vivo stimulated substantial decorin degradation, with kinetics similar to infiltration of polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells. Proteases that were released from isolated PMN cells degraded decorin in vitro. A highly selective inhibitor of neutrophil elastase blocked decorin breakdown by proteases released from PMN cells. Furthermore, purified neutrophil elastase cleaved decorin in vitro and generated fragments with similar molecular weights as those resulting from protease activity released from PMN cells, and as observed in UV-irradiated human skin. Cleavage of decorin by neutrophil elastase significantly augmented fragmentation of type I collagen fibrils by MMP-1. Taken together, these data indicate that PMN cell proteases, especially neutrophil elastase, degrade decorin, and this degradation renders collagen fibrils more susceptible to MMP-1 cleavage. These data identify decorin degradation and neutrophil elastase as potential therapeutic targets for mitigating sun exposure-induced collagen fibril degradation in human skin.

  18. Mode Conversion of a Solar Extreme-ultraviolet Wave over a Coronal Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zong, Weiguo [Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Center for Space Weather, China Meteorological Administration, Beijing 100081 (China); Dai, Yu, E-mail: ydai@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics (Nanjing University), Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2017-01-10

    We report on observations of an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave event in the Sun on 2011 January 13 by Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory and Solar Dynamics Observatory in quadrature. Both the trailing edge and the leading edge of the EUV wave front in the north direction are reliably traced, revealing generally compatible propagation velocities in both perspectives and a velocity ratio of about 1/3. When the wave front encounters a coronal cavity near the northern polar coronal hole, the trailing edge of the front stops while its leading edge just shows a small gap and extends over the cavity, meanwhile getting significantly decelerated but intensified. We propose that the trailing edge and the leading edge of the northward propagating wave front correspond to a non-wave coronal mass ejection component and a fast-mode magnetohydrodynamic wave component, respectively. The interaction of the fast-mode wave and the coronal cavity may involve a mode conversion process, through which part of the fast-mode wave is converted to a slow-mode wave that is trapped along the magnetic field lines. This scenario can reasonably account for the unusual behavior of the wave front over the coronal cavity.

  19. Measuring and prediction of global solar ultraviolet radiation (0295-0385 μ m) under clear and cloudless skies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, Jaime

    2008-01-01

    Values of global solar ultraviolet radiation were measured with an ultraviolet radiometer and also predicted with a atmospheric spectral model. The values obtained with the atmospheric spectral model, based physically, were analyzed and compared with experimental values measured in situ. Measurements were performed for different zenith angles in conditions of clear skies in Heredia, Costa Rica. The necessary input data include latitude, altitude, surface albedo, Earth-Sun distance, as well as atmospheric characteristics: atmospheric turbidity, precipitable water and atmospheric ozone. The comparison between measured and predicted values have been successful. (author) [es

  20. Investigation of potential integration of spectroradiometer data with GIS technology: The Spectro-GIS tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salleh, S A; Hamid, J R A; Ariffin, I M

    2014-01-01

    The Earth's surface consists of different ground cover types. The spectral signature of these ground cover targets is unique and can be determined in the field through quantitative measurement of radiance and reflectance response by portable spectroradiometers. In this study, a field portable spectroradiometer, the GER 1500, covering the Ultraviolet, Visible and Near-infrared wavelengths from 350 nm to 1050 nm was used to record the spectral response reading of different ground cover types. The measurements were made at the time when the Sun was at several instant positions to find out the influences and impacts on the spectroradiometer observations. These instant positions of the Sun were determined via spherical computation. The outcome from the measurements made against selected target features by the spectroradiometer is an output file containing signature plot data that was generated in .sig and/or ASCII format. The attempt of the study was to convert that spectroradiometer data into a GIS-enable format. The development of a Spectro-GIS tool was customized using Visual Basic. Net programming language that enables the tools to run independently and automate the process of the conversion and generation of spectral library of the surface targets is highlighted. The results of this study will be benefited to the earth observation community in a way of providing alternative automation of spatial data archiving as well as the data integration and fusion of the land spectral signatures

  1. Impact of solar ultraviolet radiation on atopic dermatitis symptoms in young children: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Min; Kim, Jihyun; Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Minji; Kim, Hyunmi; Jung, Kwon; Eo, Soomi; Ahn, Mijin; Ahn, Kangmo

    2017-09-01

    There are controversial data about the effects of sun exposure on atopic dermatitis (AD). We evaluated the association between solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure and AD symptoms in children. Eighty-two children under 6 years (48 boys and 34 girls) with AD living in Seoul, Korea, were enrolled and followed for 12 months between September 2013 and August 2014. Daily symptoms were recorded to describe the degree of itching, sleep disturbance, erythema, dryness, oozing, and edema. We assessed solar UVR by measuring radiation heat flux over the 290-400 nm wavelength range using thermopiles. A generalized linear mixed model and a generalized additive mixed model were used to evaluate the effects of UVR exposure on AD symptoms after adjusting for age, sex, outdoor temperature, outdoor humidity, and ambient air pollution. Symptom records of 12 915 person-days were analyzed. UVR showed a significantly positive relationship with AD symptoms. Over the study period, an increase in UVR by 10 W/cm 2 was associated with a 1.46% increase in AD symptoms (95% CI: 0.85-2.07) on the exposure day. An increase in the 6-day average level of UVR of the previous 5 days and the current day by 10 W/cm 2 was associated with a 3.58% (95% CI: 2.60-4.56) increase in AD symptoms. UVR exposure significantly increased AD symptoms in autumn, but decreased them in winter. Atopic dermatitis symptoms in children are likely to be affected by exposure to solar UVR with a cumulative effect, and this effect is different according to season. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  2. Ultraviolet and solar photocatalytic ozonation of municipal wastewater: Catalyst reuse, energy requirements and toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecha, Achisa C; Onyango, Maurice S; Ochieng, Aoyi; Momba, Maggy N B

    2017-11-01

    The present study evaluated the treatment of municipal wastewater containing phenol using solar and ultraviolet (UV) light photocatalytic ozonation processes to explore comparative performance. Important aspects such as catalyst reuse, mineralization of pollutants, energy requirements, and toxicity of treated wastewater which are crucial for practical implementation of the processes were explored. The activity of the photocatalysts did not change significantly even after three consecutive uses despite approximately 2% of the initial quantity of catalyst being lost in each run. Analysis of the change in average oxidation state (AOS) demonstrated the formation of more oxidized degradation products (ΔAOS values of 1.0-1.7) due to mineralization. The energy requirements were determined in terms of electrical energy per order (E EO ) and the collector area per order (A CO ). The E EO (kWh m -3  Order -1 ) values were 26.2 for ozonation, 38-47 for UV photocatalysis and 7-22 for UV photocatalytic ozonation processes. On the other hand, A CO (m 2  m -3  order -1 ) values were 31-69 for solar photocatalysis and 8-13 for solar photocatalytic ozonation. Thus photocatalytic ozonation processes required less energy input compared to the individual processes. The cytotoxicity of the wastewater was analysed using the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay with Vero cells. The cell viability increased from 28.7% in untreated wastewater to 80% in treated wastewater; thus showing that the treated wastewater was less toxic. The effectiveness of photocatalytic ozonation, recovery and reusability of the photocatalysts, as well as detoxification of the wastewater make this low energy consumption process attractive for wastewater remediation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A First Comparison of Millimeter Continuum and Mg ii Ultraviolet Line Emission from the Solar Chromosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastian, T. S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Chintzoglou, G.; De Pontieu, B.; Schmit, D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, Org. A021S, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Shimojo, M. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Leenaarts, J. [Institute for Solar Physics, Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Loukitcheva, M., E-mail: tbastian@nrao.edu [Center For Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2017-08-20

    We present joint observations of the Sun by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ). Both millimeter/submillimeter- λ continuum emission and ultraviolet (UV) line emission originate from the solar chromosphere and both have the potential to serve as powerful and complementary diagnostics of physical conditions in this enigmatic region of the solar atmosphere. The observations were made of a solar active region on 2015 December 18 as part of the ALMA science verification effort. A map of the Sun’s continuum emission was obtained by ALMA at a wavelength of 1.25 mm (239 GHz). A contemporaneous map was obtained by IRIS in the Mg ii h doublet line at 2803.5 Å. While a clear correlation between the 1.25 mm brightness temperature T{sub B} and the Mg ii h line radiation temperature T {sub rad} is observed, the slope is <1, perhaps as a result of the fact that these diagnostics are sensitive to different parts of the chromosphere and that the Mg ii h line source function includes a scattering component. There is a significant difference (35%) between the mean T{sub B} (1.25 mm) and mean T {sub rad} (Mg ii). Partitioning the maps into “sunspot,” “quiet areas,” and “plage regions” we find the relation between the IRIS Mg ii h line T {sub rad} and the ALMA T {sub B} region-dependent. We suggest this may be the result of regional dependences of the formation heights of the IRIS and ALMA diagnostics and/or the increased degree of coupling between the UV source function and the local gas temperature in the hotter, denser gas in plage regions.

  4. A First Comparison of Millimeter Continuum and Mg ii Ultraviolet Line Emission from the Solar Chromosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastian, T. S.; Chintzoglou, G.; De Pontieu, B.; Schmit, D.; Shimojo, M.; Leenaarts, J.; Loukitcheva, M.

    2017-01-01

    We present joint observations of the Sun by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ). Both millimeter/submillimeter- λ continuum emission and ultraviolet (UV) line emission originate from the solar chromosphere and both have the potential to serve as powerful and complementary diagnostics of physical conditions in this enigmatic region of the solar atmosphere. The observations were made of a solar active region on 2015 December 18 as part of the ALMA science verification effort. A map of the Sun’s continuum emission was obtained by ALMA at a wavelength of 1.25 mm (239 GHz). A contemporaneous map was obtained by IRIS in the Mg ii h doublet line at 2803.5 Å. While a clear correlation between the 1.25 mm brightness temperature T_B and the Mg ii h line radiation temperature T _r_a_d is observed, the slope is <1, perhaps as a result of the fact that these diagnostics are sensitive to different parts of the chromosphere and that the Mg ii h line source function includes a scattering component. There is a significant difference (35%) between the mean T_B (1.25 mm) and mean T _r_a_d (Mg ii). Partitioning the maps into “sunspot,” “quiet areas,” and “plage regions” we find the relation between the IRIS Mg ii h line T _r_a_d and the ALMA T _B region-dependent. We suggest this may be the result of regional dependences of the formation heights of the IRIS and ALMA diagnostics and/or the increased degree of coupling between the UV source function and the local gas temperature in the hotter, denser gas in plage regions.

  5. Mapping the solar wind HI outflow velocity in the inner heliosphere by coronagraphic ultraviolet and visible-light observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolei, S.; Susino, R.; Sasso, C.; Bemporad, A.; Andretta, V.; Spadaro, D.; Ventura, R.; Antonucci, E.; Abbo, L.; Da Deppo, V.; Fineschi, S.; Focardi, M.; Frassetto, F.; Giordano, S.; Landini, F.; Naletto, G.; Nicolini, G.; Nicolosi, P.; Pancrazzi, M.; Romoli, M.; Telloni, D.

    2018-05-01

    We investigated the capability of mapping the solar wind outflow velocity of neutral hydrogen atoms by using synergistic visible-light and ultraviolet observations. We used polarised brightness images acquired by the LASCO/SOHO and Mk3/MLSO coronagraphs, and synoptic Lyα line observations of the UVCS/SOHO spectrometer to obtain daily maps of solar wind H I outflow velocity between 1.5 and 4.0 R⊙ on the SOHO plane of the sky during a complete solar rotation (from 1997 June 1 to 1997 June 28). The 28-days data sequence allows us to construct coronal off-limb Carrington maps of the resulting velocities at different heliocentric distances to investigate the space and time evolution of the outflowing solar plasma. In addition, we performed a parameter space exploration in order to study the dependence of the derived outflow velocities on the physical quantities characterising the Lyα emitting process in the corona. Our results are important in anticipation of the future science with the Metis instrument, selected to be part of the Solar Orbiter scientific payload. It was conceived to carry out near-sun coronagraphy, performing for the first time simultaneous imaging in polarised visible-light and ultraviolet H I Lyα line, so providing an unprecedented view of the solar wind acceleration region in the inner corona. The movie (see Sect. 4.2) is available at https://www.aanda.org

  6. Flares on dMe stars: IUE and optical observations of At Mic, and comparison of far-ultraviolet stellar and solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromage, G.E.; Phillips, K.J.H.; Dufton, P.L.; Kingston, A.E.

    1986-01-01

    The paper concerns observations of a large flare event on the dMe star At Mic, detected by the International Ultraviolet Explorer. The far-ultraviolet spectra of the flare is compared with those of other stellar flares, and also with a large solar flare recorded by the Skylab mission in 1973. The quiescent-phase optical and ultraviolet spectrum of the same dMe flare star is discussed. (U.K.)

  7. Lunar dusty plasma: A result of interaction of the solar wind flux and ultraviolet radiation with the lunar surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisin, E A; Tarakanov, V P; Petrov, O F; Popel, S I

    2015-01-01

    One of the main problems of future missions to the Moon is associated with lunar dust. Solar wind flux and ultraviolet radiation interact with the lunar surface. As a result, there is a substantial surface change and a near-surface plasma sheath. Dust particles from the lunar regolith, which turned in this plasma because of any mechanical processes, can levitate above the surface, forming dust clouds. In preparing of the space experiments “Luna-Glob” and “Luna-Resource” particle-in-cell calculations of the near-surface plasma sheath parameters are carried out. Here we present some new results of particle-in-cell simulation of the plasma sheath formed near the surface of the moon as a result of interaction of the solar wind and ultraviolet radiation with the lunar surface. The conditions of charging and stable levitation of dust particles in plasma above the lunar surface are also considered. (paper)

  8. Solar Flare Prediction Model with Three Machine-learning Algorithms using Ultraviolet Brightening and Vector Magnetograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizuka, N.; Sugiura, K.; Kubo, Y.; Den, M.; Watari, S.; Ishii, M.

    2017-02-01

    We developed a flare prediction model using machine learning, which is optimized to predict the maximum class of flares occurring in the following 24 hr. Machine learning is used to devise algorithms that can learn from and make decisions on a huge amount of data. We used solar observation data during the period 2010-2015, such as vector magnetograms, ultraviolet (UV) emission, and soft X-ray emission taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite. We detected active regions (ARs) from the full-disk magnetogram, from which ˜60 features were extracted with their time differentials, including magnetic neutral lines, the current helicity, the UV brightening, and the flare history. After standardizing the feature database, we fully shuffled and randomly separated it into two for training and testing. To investigate which algorithm is best for flare prediction, we compared three machine-learning algorithms: the support vector machine, k-nearest neighbors (k-NN), and extremely randomized trees. The prediction score, the true skill statistic, was higher than 0.9 with a fully shuffled data set, which is higher than that for human forecasts. It was found that k-NN has the highest performance among the three algorithms. The ranking of the feature importance showed that previous flare activity is most effective, followed by the length of magnetic neutral lines, the unsigned magnetic flux, the area of UV brightening, and the time differentials of features over 24 hr, all of which are strongly correlated with the flux emergence dynamics in an AR.

  9. Occupational exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation and the risk of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Cheryl E; Demers, Paul A; Kalia, Sunil; Hystad, Perry; Villeneuve, Paul J; Nicol, Anne-Marie; Kreiger, Nancy; Koehoorn, Mieke W

    2016-11-01

    Preventable risk factors for prostate cancer are poorly understood; sun exposure is a possible protective factor. The goal of this study was to investigate prostate cancer risk in outdoor workers, a population with high sun exposure. Prostate cancer cases and controls from a large study (conducted between 1994 and 1997) were used for this analysis. A job exposure matrix (JEM) was used to assign solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) at work as moderate (2 to hours outside/day) or high (≥6 hours). Average daily satellite UV-B measures were linked to the latitude/longitude of the residences of each participant. Several other exposure metrics were also examined, including ever/never exposed and standard erythemal dose by years (SED×years). Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between solar UVR exposure and the odds of prostate cancer. A total of 1638 cases and 1697 controls were included. Men of Indian and Asian descent had reduced odds of prostate cancer (ORs 0.17 (0.08 to 0.35) and 0.25 (0.15 to 0.41), respectively) compared with Caucasian men, as did single men (OR 0.76 (0.58 to 0.98)) compared with married men. Overall, no statistically significant associations were observed between sun exposure and prostate cancer with 1 exception. In the satellite-enhanced JEM that considered exposure in high category jobs only, prostate cancer odds in the highest quartile of cumulative exposure was decreased compared with unexposed men (OR 0.68 (0.51 to 0.92)). This study found limited evidence for an association with prostate cancer, with the exception of 1 statistically significant finding of a decreased risk among workers with the longest term and highest sun exposure. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Solar Flare Prediction Model with Three Machine-learning Algorithms using Ultraviolet Brightening and Vector Magnetograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishizuka, N.; Kubo, Y.; Den, M.; Watari, S.; Ishii, M. [Applied Electromagnetic Research Institute, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, 4-2-1, Nukui-Kitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8795 (Japan); Sugiura, K., E-mail: nishizuka.naoto@nict.go.jp [Advanced Speech Translation Research and Development Promotion Center, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (Japan)

    2017-02-01

    We developed a flare prediction model using machine learning, which is optimized to predict the maximum class of flares occurring in the following 24 hr. Machine learning is used to devise algorithms that can learn from and make decisions on a huge amount of data. We used solar observation data during the period 2010–2015, such as vector magnetograms, ultraviolet (UV) emission, and soft X-ray emission taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite . We detected active regions (ARs) from the full-disk magnetogram, from which ∼60 features were extracted with their time differentials, including magnetic neutral lines, the current helicity, the UV brightening, and the flare history. After standardizing the feature database, we fully shuffled and randomly separated it into two for training and testing. To investigate which algorithm is best for flare prediction, we compared three machine-learning algorithms: the support vector machine, k-nearest neighbors (k-NN), and extremely randomized trees. The prediction score, the true skill statistic, was higher than 0.9 with a fully shuffled data set, which is higher than that for human forecasts. It was found that k-NN has the highest performance among the three algorithms. The ranking of the feature importance showed that previous flare activity is most effective, followed by the length of magnetic neutral lines, the unsigned magnetic flux, the area of UV brightening, and the time differentials of features over 24 hr, all of which are strongly correlated with the flux emergence dynamics in an AR.

  11. An Extreme-ultraviolet Wave Generating Upward Secondary Waves in a Streamer-like Solar Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Chen, Yao; Feng, Shiwei; Wang, Bing; Song, Hongqiang

    2018-05-01

    Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) waves, spectacular horizontally propagating disturbances in the low solar corona, always trigger horizontal secondary waves (SWs) when they encounter the ambient coronal structure. We present the first example of upward SWs in a streamer-like structure after the passing of an EUV wave. This event occurred on 2017 June 1. The EUV wave happened during a typical solar eruption including a filament eruption, a coronal mass ejection (CME), and a C6.6 flare. The EUV wave was associated with quasi-periodic fast propagating (QFP) wave trains and a type II radio burst that represented the existence of a coronal shock. The EUV wave had a fast initial velocity of ∼1000 km s‑1, comparable to high speeds of the shock and the QFP wave trains. Intriguingly, upward SWs rose slowly (∼80 km s‑1) in the streamer-like structure after the sweeping of the EUV wave. The upward SWs seemed to originate from limb brightenings that were caused by the EUV wave. All of the results show that the EUV wave is a fast-mode magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shock wave, likely triggered by the flare impulses. We suggest that part of the EUV wave was probably trapped in the closed magnetic fields of the streamer-like structure, and upward SWs possibly resulted from the release of slow-mode trapped waves. It is believed that the interplay of the strong compression of the coronal shock and the configuration of the streamer-like structure is crucial for the formation of upward SWs.

  12. Solar Flare Prediction Model with Three Machine-learning Algorithms using Ultraviolet Brightening and Vector Magnetograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizuka, N.; Kubo, Y.; Den, M.; Watari, S.; Ishii, M.; Sugiura, K.

    2017-01-01

    We developed a flare prediction model using machine learning, which is optimized to predict the maximum class of flares occurring in the following 24 hr. Machine learning is used to devise algorithms that can learn from and make decisions on a huge amount of data. We used solar observation data during the period 2010–2015, such as vector magnetograms, ultraviolet (UV) emission, and soft X-ray emission taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite . We detected active regions (ARs) from the full-disk magnetogram, from which ∼60 features were extracted with their time differentials, including magnetic neutral lines, the current helicity, the UV brightening, and the flare history. After standardizing the feature database, we fully shuffled and randomly separated it into two for training and testing. To investigate which algorithm is best for flare prediction, we compared three machine-learning algorithms: the support vector machine, k-nearest neighbors (k-NN), and extremely randomized trees. The prediction score, the true skill statistic, was higher than 0.9 with a fully shuffled data set, which is higher than that for human forecasts. It was found that k-NN has the highest performance among the three algorithms. The ranking of the feature importance showed that previous flare activity is most effective, followed by the length of magnetic neutral lines, the unsigned magnetic flux, the area of UV brightening, and the time differentials of features over 24 hr, all of which are strongly correlated with the flux emergence dynamics in an AR.

  13. Multi-channel near infrared spectroradiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, G.B.; Biddles, B.J.; D'silva, R.A.; Picot, A.J.; Ackerman, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    A multichannel spectroradiometer has been developed by Sira Ltd. for the study of rapidly varying events in the near infrared. The instrument is being used in the examination of gun flashes, rocket motor exhaust efflux analysis and ordnance or pyrotechnic flash studies. The spectral range of about 1.4 to 5.2 microns is covered in two bands with the first order dispersion from a pair of ruled blazed gratings being imaged onto a pair of detector arrays. Data may be logged at a rate of 1000 complete spectra per second

  14. Solar ultraviolet radiation: properties, characteristics and amounts observed in Brazil and South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Marcelo de Paula

    2015-01-01

    The beneficial and harmful effects of human exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UV-R) are topics that arouse great interest not only among physicians and scientists, but also the general public and the media. Currently, discussions on vitamin D synthesis (beneficial effect) are confronted with the high and growing number of new cases of non-melanoma skin cancer and other diseases of the skin and eyes (harmful effect) diagnosed each year in Brazil. However, the lack of scientific knowledge on the UV-R in Brazil and South America leads to adoption of protective measures based on studies conducted in Europe and USA, where the amounts of UV-R available at surface and the sun-exposure habits and characteristics of the population are significantly different from those observed in Brazil. In order to circumvent this problem, the Brazilian Society of Dermatology recently published the Brazilian Consensus of Photoprotection based on recent studies performed locally. The main goal of this article is to provide detailed educational information on the main properties and characteristics of UV-R and UV index in a simple language. It also provides: a) a summary of UV-R measurements recently performed in Brazil; b) a comparison with those performed in Europe; and, c) an evaluation to further clarify the assessment of potential harm and health effects owing to chronic exposures.

  15. Solar ultraviolet radiation: properties, characteristics and amounts observed in Brazil and South America*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Marcelo de Paula

    2015-01-01

    The beneficial and harmful effects of human exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UV-R) are topics that arouse great interest not only among physicians and scientists, but also the general public and the media. Currently, discussions on vitamin D synthesis (beneficial effect) are confronted with the high and growing number of new cases of non-melanoma skin cancer and other diseases of the skin and eyes (harmful effect) diagnosed each year in Brazil. However, the lack of scientific knowledge on the UV-R in Brazil and South America leads to adoption of protective measures based on studies conducted in Europe and USA, where the amounts of UV-R available at surface and the sun-exposure habits and characteristics of the population are significantly different from those observed in Brazil. In order to circumvent this problem, the Brazilian Society of Dermatology recently published the Brazilian Consensus of Photoprotection based on recent studies performed locally. The main goal of this article is to provide detailed educational information on the main properties and characteristics of UV-R and UV index in a simple language. It also provides: a) a summary of UV-R measurements recently performed in Brazil; b) a comparison with those performed in Europe; and, c) an evaluation to further clarify the assessment of potential harm and health effects owing to chronic exposures. PMID:26131858

  16. Norathyriol Suppresses Skin Cancers Induced by Solar Ultraviolet Radiation by Targeting ERK Kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jixia; Malakhova, Margarita; Mottamal, Madhusoodanan; Reddy, Kanamata; Kurinov, Igor; Carper, Andria; Langfald, Alyssa; Oi, Naomi; Kim, Myoung Ok; Zhu, Feng; Sosa, Carlos P.; Zhou, Keyuan; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang (Cornell); (Guangdong); (UMM)

    2012-06-27

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is the leading factor in the development of skin cancer, prompting great interest in chemopreventive agents for this disease. In this study, we report the discovery of norathyriol, a plant-derived chemopreventive compound identified through an in silico virtual screening of the Chinese Medicine Library. Norathyriol is a metabolite of mangiferin found in mango, Hypericum elegans, and Tripterospermum lanceolatum and is known to have anticancer activity. Mechanistic investigations determined that norathyriol acted as an inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 activity to attenuate UVB-induced phosphorylation in mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling cascades. We confirmed the direct and specific binding of norathyriol with ERK2 through a cocrystal structural analysis. The xanthone moiety in norathyriol acted as an adenine mimetic to anchor the compound by hydrogen bonds to the hinge region of the protein ATP-binding site on ERK2. Norathyriol inhibited in vitro cell growth in mouse skin epidermal JB6 P+ cells at the level of G{sub 2}-M phase arrest. In mouse skin tumorigenesis assays, norathyriol significantly suppressed solar UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Further analysis indicated that norathyriol mediates its chemopreventive activity by inhibiting the ERK-dependent activity of transcriptional factors AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B during UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. Taken together, our results identify norathyriol as a safe new chemopreventive agent that is highly effective against development of UV-induced skin cancer.

  17. Solar Ultraviolet-B Radiation Increases Phenolic Content and Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power in Avena sativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher T. Ruhland

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We examined the influence of solar ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B; 280-320 nm on the maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm, bulk-soluble phenolic concentrations, ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP and growth of Avena sativa. Treatments involved placing filters on frames over potted plants that reduced levels of biologically effective UV-B by either 71% (reduced UV-B or by 19% (near-ambient UV-B over the 52 day experiment (04 July - 25 August 2002. Plants growing under near-ambient UV-B had 38% less total biomass than those under reduced UV-B. The reduction in biomass was mainly the result of a 24% lower leaf elongation rate, resulting in shorter leaves and less total leaf area than plants under reduced UV-B. In addition, plants growing under near-ambient UV-B had up to 17% lower Fv/Fm values early in the experiment, and this effect declined with plant age. Concentrations of bulk-soluble phenolics and FRAP values were 17 and 24% higher under near-ambient UV-B than under reduced UV-B, respectively. There was a positive relationship between bulk-soluble phenolic concentrations and FRAP values. There were no UV-B effects on concentrations of carotenoids (carotenes + xanthophylls.

  18. ADA-07 Suppresses Solar Ultraviolet-Induced Skin Carcinogenesis by Directly Inhibiting TOPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ge; Zhang, Tianshun; Wang, Qiushi; Reddy, Kanamata; Chen, Hanyong; Yao, Ke; Wang, Keke; Roh, Eunmiri; Zykova, Tatyana; Ma, Weiya; Ryu, Joohyun; Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara; Alberts, David; Dickinson, Sally E; Bode, Ann M; Xing, Ying; Dong, Zigang

    2017-09-01

    Cumulative exposure to solar ultraviolet (SUV) irradiation is regarded as the major etiologic factor in the development of skin cancer. The activation of the MAPK cascades occurs rapidly and is vital in the regulation of SUV-induced cellular responses. The T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK), an upstream activator of MAPKs, is heavily involved in inflammation, DNA damage, and tumor development. However, the chemopreventive and therapeutic effects of specific TOPK inhibitors in SUV-induced skin cancer have not yet been elucidated. In the current study, ADA-07, a novel TOPK inhibitor, was synthesized and characterized. Pull-down assay results, ATP competition, and in vitro kinase assay data revealed that ADA-07 interacted with TOPK at the ATP-binding pocket and inhibited its kinase activity. Western blot analysis showed that ADA-07 suppressed SUV-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, and JNKs and subsequently inhibited AP-1 activity. Importantly, topical treatment with ADA-07 dramatically attenuated tumor incidence, multiplicity, and volume in SKH-1 hairless mice exposed to chronic SUV. Our findings suggest that ADA-07 is a promising chemopreventive or potential therapeutic agent against SUV-induced skin carcinogenesis that acts by specifically targeting TOPK. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(9); 1843-54. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Solar ultraviolet radiation is necessary to enhance grapevine fruit ripening transcriptional and phenolic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell-Bejerano, Pablo; Diago, Maria-Paz; Martínez-Abaigar, Javier; Martínez-Zapater, José M; Tardáguila, Javier; Núñez-Olivera, Encarnación

    2014-07-09

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation modulates secondary metabolism in the skin of Vitis vinifera L. berries, which affects the final composition of both grapes and wines. The expression of several phenylpropanoid biosynthesis-related genes is regulated by UV radiation in grape berries. However, the complete portion of transcriptome and ripening processes influenced by solar UV radiation in grapes remains unknown. Whole genome arrays were used to identify the berry skin transcriptome modulated by the UV radiation received naturally in a mid-altitude Tempranillo vineyard. UV radiation-blocking and transmitting filters were used to generate the experimental conditions. The expression of 121 genes was significantly altered by solar UV radiation. Functional enrichment analysis of altered transcripts mainly pointed out that secondary metabolism-related transcripts were induced by UV radiation including VvFLS1, VvGT5 and VvGT6 flavonol biosynthetic genes and monoterpenoid biosynthetic genes. Berry skin phenolic composition was also analysed to search for correlation with gene expression changes and UV-increased flavonols accumulation was the most evident impact. Among regulatory genes, novel UV radiation-responsive transcription factors including VvMYB24 and three bHLH, together with known grapevine UV-responsive genes such as VvMYBF1, were identified. A transcriptomic meta-analysis revealed that genes up-regulated by UV radiation in the berry skin were also enriched in homologs of Arabidopsis UVR8 UV-B photoreceptor-dependent UV-B -responsive genes. Indeed, a search of the grapevine reference genomic sequence identified UV-B signalling pathway homologs and among them, VvHY5-1, VvHY5-2 and VvRUP were up-regulated by UV radiation in the berry skin. Results suggest that the UV-B radiation-specific signalling pathway is activated in the skin of grapes grown at mid-altitudes. The biosynthesis and accumulation of secondary metabolites, which are appreciated in winemaking and

  20. Solar Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure of South African Marathon Runners During Competition Marathon Runs and Training Sessions: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurse, Victoria; Wright, Caradee Y; Allen, Martin; McKenzie, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Marathon runners spend considerable time in outdoor training for and participating in marathons. Outdoor runners may experience high solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure. South Africa, where running is popular, experiences high ambient solar UVR levels that may be associated with adverse health effects. This feasibility study explores the use of personal dosimeters to determine solar UVR exposure patterns and possible related acute health risks of four marathon runners during marathons and training sessions in Cape Town and Pretoria. Runners running marathons that started early in the day, and that did not exceed 4 hours, yielded low total solar UVR exposure doses (mean 0.093 SED per exposure period run, median 0.088 SED, range 0.062-0.136 SED; average of 16.54% of ambient solar UVR). Training sessions run during early morning and late afternoon presented similar results. Several challenges hindered analysis including accounting for anatomical position of personal dosimeter and natural shade. To assess health risks, hazard quotients (HQs) were calculated using a hypothetical runner's schedule. Cumulative, annual solar UVR exposure-calculated acute health risks were low (HQ = 0.024) for training sessions and moderate (HQ = 4.922) for marathon runs. While these data and calculations are based on 18 person-days, one can measure marathon runners' personal solar UVR exposure although several challenges must be overcome. © 2015 The American Society of Photobiology.

  1. Applying spaceborne reflectivity measurements for calculation of the solar ultraviolet radiation at ground level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. den Outer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Long-term analysis of cloud effects on ultraviolet (UV radiation on the ground using spaceborne observations requires the use of instruments that have operated consecutively. The longest data record can be built from the reflectivity measurements produced by the instruments Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometers (TOMS flown on Nimbus 7 from 1979 to 1992, TOMS on Earth Probe from 1996 to 2005, and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI flown on EOS Aura since 2004. The reflectivity data produced by TOMS on Earth Probe is only included until 2002. A comparison is made with cloud effects inferred from ground-based pyranometer measurements at over 83 World Radiation Data Centre stations. Modelled UV irradiances utilizing the standard reflectivity are compared with measurements of UV irradiances at eight European low-elevation stations. The reflectivity data of the two TOMS instruments shows a consistent agreement, and the required corrections are of low percentage, i.e. 2–3%. In contrast, the reflectivity product of OMI requires correction of 7–10%, and a solar angle dependency therein is more pronounced. These corrections were inferred from a comparison with pyranometer data, and tested using the UV measurements. The average reduction of UV radiation due to clouds for all sites together indicates a small trend: a diminishing cloudiness, in line with ground-based UV observations. Uncorrected implementation of the reflectivity data would have indicated the opposite.

    An optimal area was established for reflectivity data for the calculation of daily sums of UV radiation. It measures approximately 1.25° in latitudinal direction for square-shaped areas overhead the ground-based UV stations. Such an area can be traversed within 5 to 7 h at the average wind speeds found for the West European continent.

  2. An extreme ultraviolet wave associated with a failed eruption observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, R.; Jiang, Y.; Yang, J.; Bi, Y.; Hong, J.; Yang, B.; Yang, D.

    2012-05-01

    Aims: Taking advantage of the high temporal and spatial resolution of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observations, we present an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with a failed filament eruption that generated no coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2011 March 1. We aim at understanding the nature and origin of this EUV wave. Methods: Combining the high-quality observations in the photosphere, the chromosphere, and the corona, we studied the characteristics of the wave and its relations to the associated eruption. Results: The event occurred at an ephemeral region near a small active region. The continuous magnetic flux cancelation in the ephemeral region produced pre-eruption brightenings and two EUV jets, and excited the filament eruption, accompanying it with a microflare. After the eruption, the filament material appeared far from the eruption center, and the ambient loops seemed to be intact. It was evident that the filament eruption had failed and was not associated with a CME. The wave happened just after the north jet arrived, and apparently emanated ahead of the north jet, far from the eruption center. The wave propagated at nearly constant velocities in the range of 260-350 km s-1, with a slight negative acceleration in the last phase. Remarkably, the wave continued to propagate, and a loop in its passage was intact when wave and loop met. Conclusions: Our analysis confirms that the EUV wave is a true wave, which we interpret as a fast-mode wave. In addition, the close temporal and spatial relationship between the wave and the jet provides evidence that the wave was likely triggered by the jet when the CME failed to happen. Three movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. OBSERVATIONS OF FIVE-MINUTE SOLAR OSCILLATIONS IN THE CORONA USING THE EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROPHOTOMETER (ESP) ON BOARD THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET VARIABILITY EXPERIMENT (SDO/EVE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didkovsky, L.; Judge, D.; Wieman, S.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Woods, T.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the detection of oscillations in the corona in the frequency range corresponding to five-minute acoustic modes of the Sun. The oscillations have been observed using soft X-ray measurements from the Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer (ESP) of the Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The ESP zeroth-order channel observes the Sun as a star without spatial resolution in the wavelength range of 0.1-7.0 nm (the energy range is 0.18-12.4 keV). The amplitude spectrum of the oscillations calculated from six-day time series shows a significant increase in the frequency range of 2-4 mHz. We interpret this increase as a response of the corona to solar acoustic (p) modes and attempt to identify p-mode frequencies among the strongest peaks. Due to strong variability of the amplitudes and frequencies of the five-minute oscillations in the corona, we study how the spectrum from two adjacent six-day time series combined together affects the number of peaks associated with the p-mode frequencies and their amplitudes. This study shows that five-minute oscillations of the Sun can be observed in the corona in variations of the soft X-ray emission. Further investigations of these oscillations may improve our understanding of the interaction of the oscillation modes with the solar atmosphere, and the interior-corona coupling, in general.

  4. Characteristics of photocurrent generation in the near-ultraviolet region in Si quantum-dot sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Giichiro; Sato, Muneharu; Seo, Hyunwoong; Kamataki, Kunihiro; Itagaki, Naho; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2013-01-01

    We have studied photocurrent generation in Si quantum-dot (QD) sensitized solar cells, where QD thin films composed of Si nanoparticles were deposited using the double multi-hollow discharge plasma chemical vapor deposition process in an SiH 4 /H 2 and CH 4 or N 2 gas mixture. The short-circuit current density of the Si QD sensitized solar cells increases by a factor of 2.5 by using Si nanoparticles prepared by irradiation of CH 4 or N 2 plasma onto the Si nanoparticle surface. We have measured incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) in the near-ultraviolet range using quartz-glass front panels of the QD sensitized solar cells. With decreasing the wavelength of irradiation light, IPCE gradually increases upon light irradiation in a wavelength range less than about 600 nm, and then steeply increases below 300 nm, corresponding to 2.2 times the optical band-gap energy of Si QD film. - Highlights: • We have developed on Si quantum-dot sensitized solar cells using Si particles. • Current of solar cells increases by surface-termination of Si particles. • Incident photo-to-current conversion efficiency increases below 300 nm

  5. Characteristics of photocurrent generation in the near-ultraviolet region in Si quantum-dot sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Giichiro, E-mail: uchida@ed.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Sato, Muneharu; Seo, Hyunwoong [Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Kamataki, Kunihiro [Faculty of Arts and Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Itagaki, Naho [Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu [Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2013-10-01

    We have studied photocurrent generation in Si quantum-dot (QD) sensitized solar cells, where QD thin films composed of Si nanoparticles were deposited using the double multi-hollow discharge plasma chemical vapor deposition process in an SiH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} or N{sub 2} gas mixture. The short-circuit current density of the Si QD sensitized solar cells increases by a factor of 2.5 by using Si nanoparticles prepared by irradiation of CH{sub 4} or N{sub 2} plasma onto the Si nanoparticle surface. We have measured incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) in the near-ultraviolet range using quartz-glass front panels of the QD sensitized solar cells. With decreasing the wavelength of irradiation light, IPCE gradually increases upon light irradiation in a wavelength range less than about 600 nm, and then steeply increases below 300 nm, corresponding to 2.2 times the optical band-gap energy of Si QD film. - Highlights: • We have developed on Si quantum-dot sensitized solar cells using Si particles. • Current of solar cells increases by surface-termination of Si particles. • Incident photo-to-current conversion efficiency increases below 300 nm.

  6. Stable Solar-Blind Ultraviolet III-Nitride Photocathode for Astronomy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Lloyd

    In this effort, we propose to develop a new type of cesium-free photocathode using III- nitride materials (GaN, AlN, and their alloys) to achieve highly efficient, solar blind, and stable ultraviolet (UV) response. Currently, detectors used in UV instruments utilize a photocathode to convert UV photons into electrons that are subsequently detected by microchannel plate or CCD. The performance of these detectors critically depends on the efficiency and stability of their photocathodes. In particular, photocathode instability is responsible for many of the fabrication difficulties commonly experienced with this class of detectors. In recent years, III-nitride (in particular GaN) photocathodes have been demonstrated with very high quantum efficiency (>50%) in parts of UV spectral range; however, these photocathodes still rely on cesiation for activation. The proposed photocathode structure will achieve activation through methods for band structure engineering such as delta- doping and polarization field engineering. Compared to the current state-of-the-art in flight-ready microchannel plate/Cs2Te sealed tubes, photocathodes based on III-nitride materials will increase the quantum efficiency by nearly an order of magnitude and significantly enhance both fabrication yield and reliability, since they will not require cesium or other highly reactive materials for activation. This performance will enable a next-generation UV spectroscopic and imaging mission that is of high scientific priority for NASA. This photocathode uses near-surface band-structure engineering to create a permanently activated surface, with high efficiency and air-stable UV response. We will combine this III-nitride structure with our unique III-nitride processing technology to optimize the efficiency and uniformity of the photocathode. In addition, through our design, growth, and processing techniques, we will extend the application of these photocathodes into far UV for both semitransparent and

  7. Solar ultraviolet and the occupational radiant exposure of Queensland school teachers: A comparative study between teaching classifications and behavior patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Nathan J; Harrison, Simone L; Chavez, Daniel R Garzon; Parisi, Alfio V

    2016-05-01

    Classroom teachers located in Queensland, Australia are exposed to high levels of ambient solar ultraviolet as part of the occupational requirement to provide supervision of children during lunch and break times. We investigated the relationship between periods of outdoor occupational radiant exposure and available ambient solar radiation across different teaching classifications and schools relative to the daily occupational solar ultraviolet radiation (HICNIRP) protection standard of 30J/m(2). Self-reported daily sun exposure habits (n=480) and personal radiant exposures were monitored using calibrated polysulphone dosimeters (n=474) in 57 teaching staff from 6 different schools located in tropical north and southern Queensland. Daily radiant exposure patterns among teaching groups were compared to the ambient UV-Index. Personal sun exposures were stratified among teaching classifications, school location, school ownership (government vs non-government), and type (primary vs secondary). Median daily radiant exposures were 15J/m(2) and 5J/m(2)HICNIRP for schools located in northern and southern Queensland respectively. Of the 474 analyzed dosimeter-days, 23.0% were found to exceed the solar radiation protection standard, with the highest prevalence found among physical education teachers (57.4% dosimeter-days), followed by teacher aides (22.6% dosimeter-days) and classroom teachers (18.1% dosimeter-days). In Queensland, peak outdoor exposure times of teaching staff correspond with periods of extreme UV-Index. The daily occupational HICNIRP radiant exposure standard was exceeded in all schools and in all teaching classifications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Solar ultraviolet radiation in Africa: a systematic review and critical evaluation of the health risks and use of photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Robyn M; Norval, Mary; Wright, Caradee Y

    2016-01-01

    Most information on the harmful health effects of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been obtained in populations in which the majority has fair skin. Here a systematic review of evidence on diseases related to solar UVR in Africa was undertaken, and the appropriateness of effective photoprotection for these people considered. There are few population-based studies on UV-induced skin cancers (melanoma, squamous and basal cell carcinomas) in Africa, although limited reports indicated that they occur, even in people with deeply pigmented skin. The incidence of melanoma is particularly high in the white population living in the Western Cape of South Africa and has increased significantly in recent years. Cataract is extremely common in people of all skin colours and is a frequent cause of blindness, particularly in the elderly. For both skin cancer and cataract, the proportion of the disease risk that is attributable to exposure to solar UVR in African populations, and therefore the health burden caused by UV irradiation is unclear. There was little published information on the use of sun protection in Africa. The potential disease burden attributable to solar UVR exposure of Africans is high, although accurate data to quantify this are sparse. Information is required on the incidence, prevalence and mortality for the range of UV-related diseases in different populations living throughout Africa. Photoprotection is clearly required, at least for those subpopulations at particularly high risk, but may be limited by cost and cultural acceptability.

  9. A spectroscopic study on the effect of ultra-violet solar radiation in Antarctica on the human skin fibroblast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuyuki Yamamoto

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A study on the effect of the solar ultra-violet radiation on the human skin fibroblast cells revealed that the production of matrix metalloproteinase-2 was inhibited by the radiation. A CO2 incubator connected by optical fibers to a reflector telescope for collecting the solar light was built at Syowa station by the 49th Japanese Antarctica Research Expedition. The direction of the telescope was continuously controlled by a sun-tracker to follow the movement of the Sun automatically. The intensity of the collected light was monitored by a portable spectrophotometer housed inside. The human skin fibroblast cells were incubated in the CO2 chamber to investigate the effect of the solar radiation at Syowa station and were compared with those reference experiments at a laboratory in Japan. The results showed cell damage by strong UV radiation. The production of matrix metalloproteinase-2 was prompted by the moderate UV-B, but was inhibited by the strong UV-B radiation, as studied under laboratory conditions in Japan. The effect of strong solar radiation at Syowa station involving the radiation of UV-B region was estimated to be of the same extent of the radiation caused by an artificial UV-B light with the intensity more than 50 mJ/cm2.

  10. NEW Fe IX LINE IDENTIFICATIONS USING SOLAR AND HELIOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY/SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET MEASUREMENT OF EMITTED RADIATION AND HINODE/EIS JOINT OBSERVATIONS OF THE QUIET SUN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landi, E.; Young, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we study joint observations of Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation of Fe IX lines emitted by the same level of the high energy configuration 3s 2 3p 5 4p. The intensity ratios of these lines are dependent on atomic physics parameters only and not on the physical parameters of the emitting plasma, so that they are excellent tools to verify the relative intensity calibration of high-resolution spectrometers that work in the 170-200 A and 700-850 A wavelength ranges. We carry out extensive atomic physics calculations to improve the accuracy of the predicted intensity ratio, and compare the results with simultaneous EIS-SUMER observations of an off-disk quiet Sun region. We were able to identify two ultraviolet lines in the SUMER spectrum that are emitted by the same level that emits one bright line in the EIS wavelength range. Comparison between predicted and measured intensity ratios, wavelengths and energy separation of Fe IX levels confirms the identifications we make. Blending and calibration uncertainties are discussed. The results of this work are important for cross-calibrating EIS and SUMER, as well as future instrumentation.

  11. SIMULATED SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION EFFECTS ON 5 SPECIES OF SCLERACTINIAN CORALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The impact of global climate change factors such as increased temperature and ultraviolet radiation (UVR) on coral bleaching are of continued interest to the USEPA. Coral bleaching occurs when symbiotic zooxanthellae and/or their pigments are depleted in response to stressors suc...

  12. Solar ultraviolet radiation in Australia. Results from network measurements and their use in public education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, C.R.; Gies, H.P.; Lokan, K.H.

    1993-01-01

    Growing evidence of global depletion of stratospheric ozone has given additional support to the ultraviolet radiation (UVR) network established by ARL in Australia and Antarctica. The data produced is necessary to increase our knowledge of atmospheric change, human health studies and for public education. (4 figs., 1 tab.)

  13. Terrestrial ecosystems, increased solar ultraviolet radiation, and interactions with other climate change factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, M M; Bornman, J F; Ballaré, C L; Flint, S D; Kulandaivelu, G

    2007-03-01

    as growth, DNA damage, oxidative damage and induction of changes in secondary chemicals. Thus, use of a single BSWF for plant or ecosystem response is not appropriate. This brief review emphasizes progress since the previous report toward the understanding of solar ultraviolet radiation effects on terrestrial systems as it relates to ozone column reduction and the interaction of climate change factors.

  14. High Quantum Efficiency Back-Illuminated AlGaN-Based Solar-Blind Ultraviolet p—i—n Photodetectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guo-Sheng; Lu Hai; Xie Feng; Chen Dun-Jun; Ren Fang-Fang; Zhang Rong; Zheng You-Dou

    2012-01-01

    AlGaN-based back-illuminated solar-blind ultraviolet (UV) p—i—n photodetectors (PDs) with high quantum efficiency are fabricated on sapphire substrates. To improve the overall performance of the PD, a series of structural design considerations and growth procedures are implemented in the epitaxy process. A distinct wavelength-selective photo-response peak of the PD is obtained in the solar-blind region. When operating in photovoltaic mode, the PD exhibits a solar-blind/UV rejection ratio of up to 4 orders of magnitude and a peak responsivity of ∼113.5 mA/W at 270 nm, which corresponds to an external quantum efficiency of ∼52%. Under a reverse bias of −5 V, the PD shows a low dark current of ∼1.8 pA and an enhanced peak quantum efficiency of ∼64%. The thermal noise limited detectivity is estimated to be ∼ 3.3 × 10 13 cm·Hz 1/2 W −1

  15. A Powerful Mitochondria-Targeted Iron Chelator Affords High Photoprotection against Solar Ultraviolet A Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Reelfs, Olivier; Abbate, Vincenzo; Hider, Robert C.; Pourzand, Charareh

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are the principal destination for labile iron, making these organelles particularly susceptible to oxidative damage on exposure to ultraviolet A (UVA, 320?400 nm), the oxidizing component of sunlight. The labile iron-mediated oxidative damage caused by UVA to mitochondria leads to necrotic cell death via adenosine triphosphate depletion. Therefore, targeted removal of mitochondrial labile iron via highly specific tools from these organelles may be an effective approach to protect...

  16. An efficient fast response and high-gain solar-blind flexible ultraviolet photodetector employing hybrid geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Amreen A.; Pal, Arup R.; Patil, Dinkar S.

    2014-05-01

    We report high performance flexible hybrid ultraviolet photodetector with solar-blind sensitivity using nanocomposite film of plasma polymerized aniline-titanium dioxide. A facile solvent-free plasma technique is used to synthesize superior quality hybrid material with high yield. The hybrid photodetector exhibited high photoconductive gain of the order of ˜105 and fast speed with response and recovery time of 22.87 ms and 34.23 ms. This is an excellent result towards getting a balance in the response speed and photoconductive gain trade-off of the photodetectors reported so far. In addition, the device has the advantages of enhanced photosensitivity ((Ilight - Idark)/Idark) of the order of ˜102 and high responsivity of ˜104 AW-1. All the merits substantiates that, to prepare hybrid material, plasma based method holds potential to be an easy way for realizing large scale nanostructured photodetectors for practical applications.

  17. Solar ultraviolet-B exposure and cancer incidence and mortality in the United States, 1993–2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boscoe Francis P

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An inverse relationship between solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B exposure and non-skin cancer mortality has long been reported. Vitamin D, acquired primarily through exposure to the sun via the skin, is believed to inhibit tumor development and growth and reduce mortality for certain cancers. Methods We extend the analysis of this relationship to include cancer incidence as well as mortality, using higher quality and higher resolution data sets than have typically been available. Over three million incident cancer cases between 1998 and 2002 and three million cancer deaths between 1993 and 2002 in the continental United States were regressed against daily satellite-measured solar UV-B levels, adjusting for numerous confounders. Relative risks of reduced solar UV-B exposure were calculated for thirty-two different cancer sites. Results For non-Hispanic whites, an inverse relationship between solar UV-B exposure and cancer incidence and mortality was observed for ten sites: bladder, colon, Hodgkin lymphoma, myeloma, other biliary, prostate, rectum, stomach, uterus, and vulva. Weaker evidence of an inverse relationship was observed for six sites: breast, kidney, leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, pancreas, and small intestine. For three sites, inverse relationships were seen that varied markedly by sex: esophagus (stronger in males than females, gallbladder (stronger in females than males, and thyroid (only seen in females. No association was found for bone and joint, brain, larynx, liver, nasal cavity, ovary, soft tissue, male thyroid, and miscellaneous cancers. A positive association between solar UV-B exposure and cancer mortality and incidence was found for anus, cervix, oral cavity, melanoma, and other non-epithelial skin cancer. Conclusion This paper adds to the mounting evidence for the influential role of solar UV-B exposure on cancer, particularly for some of the less-well studied digestive cancers. The relative risks for cancer

  18. Solar ultraviolet-B exposure and cancer incidence and mortality in the United States, 1993–2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boscoe, Francis P; Schymura, Maria J

    2006-01-01

    An inverse relationship between solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) exposure and non-skin cancer mortality has long been reported. Vitamin D, acquired primarily through exposure to the sun via the skin, is believed to inhibit tumor development and growth and reduce mortality for certain cancers. We extend the analysis of this relationship to include cancer incidence as well as mortality, using higher quality and higher resolution data sets than have typically been available. Over three million incident cancer cases between 1998 and 2002 and three million cancer deaths between 1993 and 2002 in the continental United States were regressed against daily satellite-measured solar UV-B levels, adjusting for numerous confounders. Relative risks of reduced solar UV-B exposure were calculated for thirty-two different cancer sites. For non-Hispanic whites, an inverse relationship between solar UV-B exposure and cancer incidence and mortality was observed for ten sites: bladder, colon, Hodgkin lymphoma, myeloma, other biliary, prostate, rectum, stomach, uterus, and vulva. Weaker evidence of an inverse relationship was observed for six sites: breast, kidney, leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, pancreas, and small intestine. For three sites, inverse relationships were seen that varied markedly by sex: esophagus (stronger in males than females), gallbladder (stronger in females than males), and thyroid (only seen in females). No association was found for bone and joint, brain, larynx, liver, nasal cavity, ovary, soft tissue, male thyroid, and miscellaneous cancers. A positive association between solar UV-B exposure and cancer mortality and incidence was found for anus, cervix, oral cavity, melanoma, and other non-epithelial skin cancer. This paper adds to the mounting evidence for the influential role of solar UV-B exposure on cancer, particularly for some of the less-well studied digestive cancers. The relative risks for cancer incidence are similar to those for cancer mortality for most

  19. A Semitransparent Inorganic Perovskite Film for Overcoming Ultraviolet Light Instability of Organic Solar Cells and Achieving 14.03% Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijie; Zhang, Jingwen; Xu, Guiying; Xue, Rongming; Li, Yaowen; Zhou, Yinhua; Hou, Jianhui; Li, Yongfang

    2018-05-01

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) can be unstable under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. To address this issue and enhance the power conversion efficiency (PCE), an inorganic-perovskite/organic four-terminal tandem solar cell (TSC) based on a semitransparent inorganic CsPbBr 3 perovskite solar cell (pero-SC) as the top cell and an OSC as bottom cell is constructed. The high-quality CsPbBr 3 photoactive layer of the planar pero-SC is prepared with a dual-source vacuum coevaporation method, using stoichiometric precursors of CsBr and PbBr 2 with a low evaporation rate. The resultant opaque planar pero-SC exhibits an ultrahigh open-circuit voltage of 1.44 V and the highest reported PCE of 7.78% for a CsPbBr 3 -based planar pero-SC. Importantly, the devices show no degradation after 120 h UV light illumination. The related semitransparent pero-SC can almost completely filter UV light and well maintain photovoltaic performance; it additionally shows an extremely high average visible transmittance. When it is used to construct a TSC, the top pero-SC acting as a UV filter can utilize UV light for photoelectric conversion, avoiding the instability problem of UV light on the bottom OSC that can meet the industrial standards of UV-light stability for solar cells, and leading to the highest reported PCE of 14.03% for the inorganic-perovskite/organic TSC. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Data on solar sunburning ultraviolet (UVB radiation at an urban Mediterranean climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina G. Pantavou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article describes data on the intensity of ultraviolet B (UVB radiation collected during field questionnaire-based surveys in Athens, Greece. The surveys were conducted over 11 days of July and October 2010 at three different urban, outdoor sites. A total of 1104 interviews were conducted. The participants were asked to report whether they felt they got a sunburn at the moment of the interview. Questions related to personal characteristics including skin type and exposure time (visit duration at the interview site were also included in the questionnaire.

  1. Mechanisms of plant resistance to increased solar ultraviolet-B radiation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teramura, A.H.; Sullivan, J.H.

    1988-05-01

    Since the major conclusions of the project are being disseminated via the scientific literature, the final report consists of a compilation of 11 articles and manuscripts on the effects of ultraviolet-B radiation (UVB) on soybean growth and yield, stress interactions with UVB, and effects of UVB on seedling growth in conifers (the Pinaceae). The effects of UVB on soybeans under field and greenhouse conditions, and under water stress, drought stress and phosphorus deficiency were studied. Soybean yields, seed quality, and physiology, including seed fatty acid and sterol composition, were determined

  2. Photodamage to human skin by suberythemal exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation can be attenuated by sunscreens: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seité, S; Fourtanier, A; Moyal, D; Young, A R

    2010-11-01

    The effects of acute or repeated suberythemal solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure on human skin have been insufficiently investigated. Such exposure almost certainly has important long-term consequences that include skin ageing and skin cancer. This review summarizes the published data on the biological effects of suberythemal exposure using a wide range of clinical, cellular and molecular endpoints, some of which may be considered as biomarkers for skin cancer and photoageing. We also include some recent unpublished results from our laboratories. The effects of UVA (320-400 nm), UVB (290-320 nm) and total solar UVR (290-400 nm) are compared. We demonstrate that avoiding sunburn does not prevent many indicators of cutaneous biological damage and that use of low sun protection factor (SPF) sunscreen can inhibit much of the damages induced by suberythemal exposure to UVR. However, even when applied correctly, sunscreen use will result in suberythemal exposure. The degree and spectral quality of such exposure will depend on the SPF and absorption spectrum of the sunscreen, but nonetheless it may contribute to cumulative photodamage. This review may help to determine the level of photoprotection required in sunscreens and daily use products, as well as the ideal ratio of UVB/UVA protection, to improve long-term photoprotection outcomes. © 2010 The Authors. BJD © 2010 British Association of Dermatologists.

  3. Partial inhibition of in vitro pollen germination by simulated solar ultraviolet-B radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flint, S.D.; Caldwell, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Pollen from four temperate-latitude taxa were treated with UV radiation in a portion of the UV-B (280-320 nm) waveband during in vitro germination. Inhibition of germination was noted in this pollen compared to samples treated identically except for the exclusion of the UV-B portion of the spectrum. Levels similar to maximum solar UV-B found in temperate-latitude areas failed to inhibit pollen germination significantly, while levels similar to maximum solar UV-B found in equatorial alpine locations caused partial inhibition of germination in three of the four taxa examined

  4. The impact of solar ultraviolet radiation on human health in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caradee Y. Wright

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Photoprotection messages and ‘SunSmart’ programmes exist mainly to prevent skin cancers and, more recently, to encourage adequate personal sun exposure to elicit a vitamin D response for healthy bone and immune systems. Several developed countries maintain intensive research networks and monitor solar UV radiation to support awareness campaigns and intervention development. The situation is different in sub-Saharan Africa. Adequate empirical evidence of the impact of solar UV radiation on human health, even for melanomas and cataracts, is lacking, and is overshadowed by other factors such as communicable diseases, especially HIV, AIDS and tuberculosis. In addition, the established photoprotection messages used in developed countries have been adopted and implemented in a limited number of sub-Saharan countries but with minimal understanding of local conditions and behaviours. In this review, we consider the current evidence for sun-related effects on human health in sub-Saharan Africa, summarise published research and identify key issues. Data on the prevalence of human diseases affected by solar UV radiation in all subpopulations are not generally available, financial support is insufficient and the infrastructure to address these and other related topics is inadequate. Despite these limitations, considerable progress may be made regarding the management of solar UV radiation related health outcomes in sub-Saharan Africa, provided researchers collaborate and resources are allocated appropriately.

  5. Design of nanophotonic, hot-electron solar-blind ultraviolet detectors with a metal-oxide-semiconductor structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Xiaoxin; Liu, Jifeng

    2014-01-01

    Solar-blind ultraviolet (UV) detection refers to photon detection specifically in the wavelength range of 200 nm–320 nm. Without background noises from solar radiation, it has broad applications from homeland security to environmental monitoring. The most commonly used solid state devices for this application are wide band gap (WBG) semiconductor photodetectors (Eg > 3.5 eV). However, WBG semiconductors are difficult to grow and integrate with Si readout integrated circuits (ROICs). In this paper, we design a nanophotonic metal-oxide-semiconductor structure on Si for solar-blind UV detectors. Instead of using semiconductors as the active absorber, we use Sn nano-grating structures to absorb UV photons and generate hot electrons for internal photoemission across the Sn/SiO 2 interfacial barrier, thereby generating photocurrent between the metal and the n-type Si region upon UV excitation. Moreover, the transported hot electron has an excess kinetic energy >3 eV, large enough to induce impact ionization and generate another free electron in the conduction band of n-Si. This process doubles the quantum efficiency. On the other hand, the large metal/oxide interfacial energy barrier (>3.5 eV) also enables solar-blind UV detection by blocking the less energetic electrons excited by visible photons. With optimized design, ∼75% UV absorption and hot electron excitation can be achieved within the mean free path of ∼20 nm from the metal/oxide interface. This feature greatly enhances hot electron transport across the interfacial barrier to generate photocurrent. The simple geometry of the Sn nano-gratings and the MOS structure make it easy to fabricate and integrate with Si ROICs compared to existing solar-blind UV detection schemes. The presented device structure also breaks through the conventional notion that photon absorption by metal is always a loss in solid-state photodetectors, and it can potentially be extended to other active metal photonic devices. (paper)

  6. The effect of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR on induction of skin cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Pacholczyk

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet radiation is a physical mutagenic and cancerogenic factor. About 95% of ultraviolet A (UVA (320–400 nm and 5% of UVB (280–320 nm reach the Earth’s surface. Melanin is a natural skin protective factor against UV radiation. Skin cancers associated with long-term exposure to UV radiation are: basal cell carcinoma (BCC, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC and cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM. The high risk of BCC development is related to acute and repeated exposure to UV causing sunburn. Molecular studies of BBC demonstrated disorders in sonic hedgehog (SHH cell signaling regulation pathway, associated with the suppressor protein patched homolog 1 gene (PTCH1 mutations. The risk of the BCC development is related to the polymorphism of melanokortin-1 receptor gene (MC1R. Tumor P53 gene mutations observed in BCC cells has been classified as secondary genetic changes. In SCC cells UV-induced mutations were mostly related to P53 gene. Increased expression of cyclooxigenase- 2 gene (COX-2 plays a significant role in the development of SCC. Other pathogenetic factors include intensification of the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, interleukin-1 α (IL-1α, IL-1β and IL-6. Currently, the role of UVB has been recognized in the pathogenesis of CMM. In CMM cells the following gene mutations were noted: cyclindependent kinase inhibitor 2A INK4A (p16INK4A, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4, Ras, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN and proto-oncogene B-Raf (BRAF. The BRAF gene mutations were observed in ~50% of CMM cases. Mutations of P53 gene are not characteristic of CMM cells. Med Pr 2016;67(2:255–266

  7. Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diner, David J. (Principal Investigator)

    planet, and the reasons for these changes, so we are better equipped to anticipate and prepare for the future. The MISR instrument is a part of EOS. Its role is to measure the amount of sunlight scattered in different directions under natural conditions. These measurements will help quantify the amount of solar energy that heats the Earth's surface and atmosphere, and the changes that occur in them over the lifetime of the MISR instrument. From the MISR observations, we are also learning more about those components of the Earth's environment that scatter sunlight: particles in the atmosphere, the planet's surface, and clouds. MISR monitors changes in surface reflection properties, in atmospheric aerosol content and composition, and in cloudiness. Scientists use these data to study land use changes, air pollution, volcanic eruptions, as well as processes such as desertification, deforestation, and soil erosion. As part of the EOS program, computer models that predict future climate will be improved by the results of these studies. [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=2000-02-24; Stop_Date=] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180].

  8. Thermoluminescent monitoring of the solar ultraviolet radiation with KCl: Eu2+ crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernov, V.; Melendrez, R.; Barboza F, M.

    2000-01-01

    In this work it has been investigating the Tl properties of KCl: Eu 2+ subjected to solar direct radiation. Also it was realized irradiation with the Deuterium and Xenon lamps. It was used a set of filters and a Katos monochromator 0.25 M to determine the spectral response to Tl peaks and a study of them with respect to the duration of the Sun irradiation. After of the Sun irradiation the Tl curves show several peaks between the ambient temperature and 673 K. The relation between peaks depends strongly of the irradiation time and the different solar light wavelength. It is possible to divide the Tl peaks in two groups. The first one (T 473 K) is not too sensitive but is more stable under optical whitening. Here the obtained results are discussed with respect to UV dosemeters development for environment which facilitate to obtain direct measurements of the UV index. (Author)

  9. Note: Calibration of EBT3 radiochromic film for measuring solar ultraviolet radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, S. L. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Yu, P. K. N., E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2014-10-01

    Solar (UVA + UVB) exposure was assessed using the Gafchromic EBT3 film. The coloration change was represented by the net reflective optical density (Net ROD). Through calibrations against a UV-tube lamp, operational relationships were obtained between Net ROD and the (UVA + UVB) exposures (in J cm⁻²p or J m⁻²). The useful range was from ~0.2 to ~30 J cm⁻². The uniformity of UV irradiation was crucial for an accurate calibration. For solar exposures ranging from 2 to 11 J cm⁻², the predicted Net ROD agreed with the recorded values within 9%, while the predicted exposures agreed with the recorded values within 15%.

  10. Estimating solar ultraviolet irradiance (290-385 nm by means of the spectral parametric models: SPCTRAL2 and SMARTS2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Foyo-Moreno

    2000-11-01

    considered as urban. Although SMARTS2 provide slightly worse results, both models give estimates of solar ultraviolet irradiance with mean bias deviation below 5%, and root mean square deviation close to experimental errors.Key words: Atmospheric composition and structure (transmission and scattering of radiation - Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (radiative process

  11. Estimating solar ultraviolet irradiance (290-385 nm by means of the spectral parametric models: SPCTRAL2 and SMARTS2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Foyo-Moreno

    considered as urban. Although SMARTS2 provide slightly worse results, both models give estimates of solar ultraviolet irradiance with mean bias deviation below 5%, and root mean square deviation close to experimental errors.

    Key words: Atmospheric composition and structure (transmission and scattering of radiation - Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (radiative process

  12. Knowledge, attitude and practice regarding solar ultraviolet exposure among medical university students in Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qian; Liu, Guangcong; Liu, Yang

    2014-11-01

    To assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding the health effects of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and sun exposure among medical university students in Northeast China, 385 subjects were investigated on October 2013 using a self-administered multiple-choice questionnaire. Most of the subjects knew the effects of UVR on skin cancer (95.6%) and sunburn (92.2%), but fewer knew of the eye damage that can result from UVR (27.8% cataract and 3.1% pterygium). Correspondingly, the main purpose of adopting sun protection was considered to be 'preventing sunburn' (55.4%), but 'preventing eye damage' was the least (1.8%). In actual behaviour, the eyes received the least protection as well. Although knowing the effects of UVR on vitamin D synthesis (87.3%), 66.8% of participants never or seldom increased sun exposure. Compared to men, women were more likely to reduce sun exposure (Pattractive. Considering the response variability to UVR in people with different skin colours, different sun protection programs should be provided. In China, especially in the North, the public should be educated to moderately increase sun exposure to maintain adequate vitamin D status while also protecting against eye damage from UVR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A Powerful Mitochondria-Targeted Iron Chelator Affords High Photoprotection against Solar Ultraviolet A Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reelfs, Olivier; Abbate, Vincenzo; Hider, Robert C; Pourzand, Charareh

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are the principal destination for labile iron, making these organelles particularly susceptible to oxidative damage on exposure to ultraviolet A (UVA, 320-400 nm), the oxidizing component of sunlight. The labile iron-mediated oxidative damage caused by UVA to mitochondria leads to necrotic cell death via adenosine triphosphate depletion. Therefore, targeted removal of mitochondrial labile iron via highly specific tools from these organelles may be an effective approach to protect the skin cells against the harmful effects of UVA. In this work, we designed a mitochondria-targeted hexadentate (tricatechol-based) iron chelator linked to mitochondria-homing SS-like peptides. The photoprotective potential of this compound against UVA-induced oxidative damage and cell death was evaluated in cultured primary skin fibroblasts. Our results show that this compound provides unprecedented protection against UVA-induced mitochondrial damage, adenosine triphosphate depletion, and the ensuing necrotic cell death in skin fibroblasts, and this effect is fully related to its potent iron-chelating property in the organelle. This mitochondria-targeted iron chelator has therefore promising potential for skin photoprotection against the deleterious effects of the UVA component of sunlight. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Solar ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in aquatic organisms: potential environmental impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeder, Donat-P.; Sinha, Rajeshwar P.

    2005-01-01

    Continuing depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increases in deleterious ultraviolet (UV) radiation at the Earth's surface have fueled the interest in its ecological consequences for aquatic ecosystems. The DNA is certainly one of the key targets for UV-induced damage in a variety of aquatic organisms. UV radiation induces two of the most abundant mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA lesions, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4PPs) and their Dewar valence isomers. However, aquatic organisms have developed a number of repair and tolerance mechanisms to counteract the damaging effects of UV on DNA. Photoreactivation with the help of the enzyme photolyase is one of the most important and frequently occurring repair mechanisms in a variety of organisms. Excision repair, which can be distinguished into base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide excision repair (NER), also play an important role in DNA repair in several organisms with the help of a number of glycosylases and polymerases, respectively. In addition, mechanisms such as mutagenic repair or dimer bypass, recombinational repair, cell-cycle checkpoints, apoptosis and certain alternative repair pathways are also operative in various organisms. This review deals with the UV-induced DNA damage and repair in a number of aquatic organisms as well as methods of detecting DNA damage

  15. Nrf2 Activation Protects against Solar-Simulated Ultraviolet Radiation in Mice and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knatko, Elena V; Ibbotson, Sally H; Zhang, Ying; Higgins, Maureen; Fahey, Jed W; Talalay, Paul; Dawe, Robert S; Ferguson, James; Huang, Jeffrey T-J; Clarke, Rosemary; Zheng, Suqing; Saito, Akira; Kalra, Sukirti; Benedict, Andrea L; Honda, Tadashi; Proby, Charlotte M; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T

    2015-06-01

    The transcription factor Nrf2 determines the ability to adapt and survive under conditions of electrophilic, oxidative, and inflammatory stress by regulating the expression of elaborate networks comprising nearly 500 genes encoding proteins with versatile cytoprotective functions. In mice, disruption of Nrf2 increases susceptibility to carcinogens and accelerates disease pathogenesis. Paradoxically, Nrf2 is upregulated in established human tumors, but whether this upregulation drives carcinogenesis is not known. Here we show that the incidence, multiplicity, and burden of solar-simulated UV radiation-mediated cutaneous tumors that form in SKH-1 hairless mice in which Nrf2 is genetically constitutively activated are lower than those that arise in their wild-type counterparts. Pharmacologic Nrf2 activation by topical biweekly applications of small (40 nmol) quantities of the potent bis(cyano enone) inducer TBE-31 has a similar protective effect against solar-simulated UV radiation in animals receiving long-term treatment with the immunosuppressive agent azathioprine. Genetic or pharmacologic Nrf2 activation lowers the expression of the pro-inflammatory factors IL6 and IL1β, and COX2 after acute exposure of mice to UV radiation. In healthy human subjects, topical applications of extracts delivering the Nrf2 activator sulforaphane reduced the degree of solar-simulated UV radiation-induced skin erythema, a quantifiable surrogate endpoint for cutaneous damage and skin cancer risk. Collectively, these data show that Nrf2 is not a driver for tumorigenesis even upon exposure to a very potent and complete carcinogen and strongly suggest that the frequent activation of Nrf2 in established human tumors is a marker of metabolic adaptation. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Determination of daily solar ultraviolet radiation using statistical models and artificial neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Barbero

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two different methodologies are used to develop two models for estimating daily solar UV radiation. The first is based on traditional statistical techniques whereas the second is based on artificial neural network methods. Both models use daily solar global broadband radiation as the only measured input. The statistical model is derived from a relationship between the daily UV and the global clearness indices but modulated by the relative optical air mass. The inputs to the neural network model were determined from a large number of radiometric and atmospheric parameters using the automatic relevance determination method, although only the daily solar global irradiation, daily global clearness index and relative optical air mass were shown to be the optimal input variables. Both statistical and neural network models were developed using data measured at Almería (Spain, a semiarid and coastal climate, and tested against data from Table Mountain (Golden, CO, USA, a mountainous and dry environment. Results show that the statistical model performs adequately in both sites for all weather conditions, especially when only snow-free days at Golden were considered (RMSE=4.6%, MBE= –0.1%. The neural network based model provides the best overall estimates in the site where it has been trained, but presents an inadequate performance for the Golden site when snow-covered days are included (RMSE=6.5%, MBE= –3.0%. This result confirms that the neural network model does not adequately respond on those ranges of the input parameters which were not used for its development.

  17. Spectral properties of plant leaves pertaining to urban landscape design of broad-spectrum solar ultraviolet radiation reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Haruka; Zhu, Hui; Wu, Yunying; Ma, Ruijun

    2010-03-01

    Human exposure to harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation has important public health implications. Actual human exposure to solar UV radiation depends on ambient UV irradiance, and the latter is influenced by ground reflection. In urban areas with higher reflectivity, UV exposure occurs routinely. To discover the solar UV radiation regulation mechanism of vegetation, the spectral reflectance and transmittance of plant leaves were measured with a spectrophotometer. Typically, higher plants have low leaf reflectance (around 5%) and essentially zero transmittance throughout the UV region regardless of plant species and seasonal change. Accordingly, incident UV radiation decreases to 5% by being reflected and is reduced to zero by passing through a leaf. Therefore, stratified structures of vegetation are working as another terminator of UV rays, protecting whole terrestrial ecosystems, while vegetation at waterfronts contributes to protect aquatic ecosystems. It is possible to protect the human population from harmful UV radiation by urban landscape design of tree shade and the botanical environment. Even thin but uniformly distributed canopy is effective in attenuating UV radiation. To intercept diffuse radiation, UV screening by vertical structures such as hedges should be considered. Reflectivity of vegetation is around 2%, as foliage surfaces reduce incident UV radiation via reflection, while also eliminating it by transmittance. Accordingly, vegetation reduces incident UV radiation to around 2% by reflection. Vegetation influence on ambient UV radiation is broad-spectrum throughout the UV region. Only trees provide cool UV protective shade. Urban landscapes aimed at abating urban heat islands integrated with a reduction of human UV over-exposure would contribute to mitigation of climate change.

  18. Non-Gaussian Velocity Distributions in Solar Flares from Extreme Ultraviolet Lines: A Possible Diagnostic of Ion Acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Labrosse, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    In a solar flare, a large fraction of the magnetic energy released is converted rapidly to the kinetic energy of non-thermal particles and bulk plasma motion. This will likely result in non-equilibrium particle distributions and turbulent plasma conditions. We investigate this by analyzing the profiles of high temperature extreme ultraviolet emission lines from a major flare (SOL2014-03-29T17:44) observed by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode . We find that in many locations the line profiles are non-Gaussian, consistent with a kappa distribution of emitting ions with properties that vary in space and time. At the flare footpoints, close to sites of hard X-ray emission from non-thermal electrons, the κ index for the Fe xvi 262.976 Å line at 3 MK takes values of 3–5. In the corona, close to a low-energy HXR source, the Fe xxiii 263.760 Å line at 15 MK shows κ values of typically 4–7. The observed trends in the κ parameter show that we are most likely detecting the properties of the ion population rather than any instrumental effects. We calculate that a non-thermal ion population could exist if locally accelerated on timescales ≤0.1 s. However, observations of net redshifts in the lines also imply the presence of plasma downflows, which could lead to bulk turbulence, with increased non-Gaussianity in cooler regions. Both interpretations have important implications for theories of solar flare particle acceleration.

  19. Solar ultraviolet continuum radiation: The photosphere, the low chromosphere, and the temperature-minimum region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samain, D.

    1980-01-01

    A comparison of solar disk-center intensity measurements with theoretical values calculated for atmospheric models derived from the temperature distributions found by J. Vernazza and his colleagues indicates that generally good agreement is found with an atmospheric model having a minimum temperature of about 4150 K or possibly higher. Empirical opacity values including LTE departures and absorption coefficients which best represent the radiation field in the range 1460 A-2100 A are given. Precise values are obtained for the required opacity distribution, presumably due to lines, longward of 1682 A. It is found that a contribution to the opacity from Fe I almost equal to the Si I opacity allows to explain the observed center-to-limb contrast between 1525 A and 1570 A and its fast change through 1570 A. However, the strong measured limb-darkening as compared with the calculated variation from 1600 A to 1682 A cannot completely be accounted for in terms of opacity, and still preserve the agreement with the absolute center intensities. These differences might be interpreted as having been caused by solar inhomogeneities. Alternatively the differences may indicate that the UV continuum is closer to LTE than current theoretical calculations indicate. If so, our Sun center data would imply a minimum temperature higher than 4150 K

  20. Ultraviolet laser ablation of fluorine-doped tin oxide thin films for dye-sensitized back-contact solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Huan [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, 430074 (China); Fu, Dongchuan [ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, Department of Materials Engineering and School of Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Jiang, Ming [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, 430074 (China); Duan, Jun, E-mail: duans@hust.edu.cn [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, 430074 (China); Zhang, Fei; Zeng, Xiaoyan [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, 430074 (China); Bach, Udo [ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, Department of Materials Engineering and School of Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton Victoria, 3800 (Australia)

    2013-03-01

    In this study, laser ablation of a fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) thin film on a glass substrate was conducted using a 355 nm Nd:YVO{sub 4} ultraviolet (UV) laser to obtain a 4 × 4 mm microstructure. The microstructure contains a symmetric set of interdigitated FTO finger electrodes of a monolithic back-contact dye-sensitized solar cell (BC-DSC) on a common substrate. The effects of UV laser ablation parameters (such as laser fluence, repetition frequency, and scanning speed) on the size precision and quality of the microstructure were investigated using a 4 × 4 orthogonal design and an assistant experimental design. The incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency and the current–voltage characteristics of the BC-DSC base of the interdigitated FTO finger electrodes were also determined. The experimental results show that an FTO film microstructure with high precision and good quality can be produced on a glass substrate via laser ablation with high scanning speed, high repetition frequency, and appropriate laser fluence. - Highlights: ► The ablation width and depth generally depend on the laser fluence. ► The scanning speed and the repetition frequency must match each other. ► Slight ablation of the glass substrate can completely remove F-doped tin oxide.

  1. Solar-Iss a New Solar Reference Spectrum Covering the Far UV to the Infrared (165 to 3088 Nm) Based on Reanalyzed Solar/solspec Cycle 24 Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damé, L.; Meftah, M.; Irbah, A.; Hauchecorne, A.; Bekki, S.; Bolsée, D.; Pereira, N.; Sluse, D.; Cessateur, G.

    2017-12-01

    Since April 5, 2008 and until February 15, 2017, the SOLSPEC (SOLar SPECtrometer) spectro-radiometer of the SOLAR facility on the International Space Station performed accurate measurements of Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) from the far ultraviolet to the infrared (165 nm to 3088 nm). These measurements, unique by their large spectral coverage and long time range, are of primary importance for a better understanding of solar physics and of the impact of solar variability on climate (via Earth's atmospheric photochemistry), noticeably through the "top-down" mechanism amplifying ultraviolet (UV) solar forcing effects on the climate (UV affects stratospheric dynamics and temperatures, altering interplanetary waves and weather patterns both poleward and downward to the lower stratosphere and troposphere regions). SOLAR/SOLSPEC, with almost 9 years of observations covering the essential of the unusual solar cycle 24 from minimum in 2008 to maximum, allowed to establish new reference solar spectra from UV to IR (165 to 3088 nm) at minimum (beginning of mission) and maximum of activity. The complete reanalysis was possible thanks to revised engineering corrections, improved calibrations and advanced procedures to account for thermal, aging and pointing corrections. The high quality and sensitivity of SOLSPEC data allow to follow temporal variability in UV but also in visible along the cycle. Uncertainties on these measurements are evaluated and results, absolute reference spectra and variability, are compared with other measurements (WHI, ATLAS-3, SCIAMACHY, SORCE/SOLSTICE, SORCE/SIM) and models (SATIRE-S, NRLSSI, NESSY)

  2. Solar Ultraviolet-B radiation monitoring in Khorram Abad city in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gholami, M.; Yoosefi, L.

    2009-01-01

    The increasing evidences show that global depletion of stratospheric ozone layer is caused by pollutant and growing incidence of the skin cancer and cataract is related to the amounts of solar UV radiation reaching the earth's surface. Therefore, the main driving force behind such efforts has been the lack of an appropriate network in scope monitoring of the terrestrial UV radiation. Materials and Methods: The present work was performed at Khorram Abad province, Lorestan, Iran. Khorram Abad (48 d egree ' ,21' E and 30 d egree , 23' N) is approximately 1171m above the mean sea level. UV radiation was measured using a UV-Biometer Model 501, from November 2005 till November 2006. Results: Hourly average UV- index, the effective power and other parameters such as effective UV dose have been m oderate f rom April until the end of August 2006 and very low from November till January 2006. However, in some days, the maximum UVI was in the range of H igh , especially in May. Conclusion: It was observed that the monthly average hourly UV index values in Khorram Abad were never at the extreme range. Chronic UVB exposure could be the major cause of eye's and skin disease in months from April to August, during which most people's activities were performed outdoor in the province of Lorestan.

  3. Personal exposure distribution of solar erythemal ultraviolet radiation in tree shade over summer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parisi, A.V.; Wong, J.C.F.

    2000-01-01

    The personal radiant exposure distribution of solar erythemal UV in tree shade for an upright posture was measured, with measurements over the whole summer for a total of 17 trees. For each tree, the personal radiant exposure distribution was measured for both the morning and afternoon periods. The exposure ratios averaged over all the trees and over the morning and afternoon periods ranged from 0.16 to 0.49 for the different anatomical sites. A numerical model was employed to estimate the UV radiant exposure to humans in tree shade over the entire summer. The body sites with the higher exposure ratios in the tree shade were the vertex of the head, shoulders and forearms with radiant exposures over the summer of 1300 MED to the vertex of the head and 1100 MED to the shoulders and forearms. These radiant exposures in the shade are substantially higher than the ambient erythemal UV measured in full sun on a horizontal plane over a full summer at a more temperate northern hemisphere latitude. The average radiant exposures per day to each anatomical site for a complete day in the tree shade ranged from 4.6 to 14.6 MED. This research has provided new data that is essential to quantify human UV exposure during outdoor activities. (author)

  4. The angular distributions of ultraviolet spectral irradiance at different solar elevation angles under clear sky conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Hu, LiWen; Wang, Fang; Gao, YanYan; Zheng, Yang; Wang, Yu; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the angular distributions of UVA, UVB, and effective UV for erythema and vitamin D (vitD) synthesis, the UV spectral irradiances were measured at ten inclined angles (from 0° to 90°) and seven azimuths (from 0° to 180°) at solar elevation angle (SEA) that ranged from 18.8° to 80° in Shanghai (31.22° N, 121.55° E) under clear sky and the albedo of ground was 0.1. The results demonstrated that in the mean azimuths and with the back to the sun, the UVA, UVB, and erythemally and vitD-weighted irradiances increased with the inclined angles and an increase in SEA. When facing toward the sun at 0°-60° inclined angles, the UVA first increased and then decreased with an increase in SEA; at other inclined angles, the UVA increased with SEA. At 0°-40° inclined angles, the UVB and erythemally and vitD-weighted irradiances first increased and then decreased with an increase in SEA, and their maximums were achieved at SEA 68.7°; at other inclined angles, the above three irradiances increased with an increase in SEA. The maximum UVA, UVB, and erythemally and vitD-weighted irradiances were achieved at an 80° inclined angle at SEA 80° (the highest in our measurements); the cumulative exposure of the half day achieved the maximum at a 60° inclined angle, but not on the horizontal. This study provides support for the assessment of human skin sun exposure.

  5. Solar ultraviolet light potentiates stannous chloride effects as a DNA damaging agent: a spectrophotometrical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattos, J.C.P. de; Bernardo-Filho, M.; Leitao, A.C.; Caldeira-de-Araujo, A.; Lage, C.; Leitao, A.C.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Stannous chloride (Sn Cl 2 ) is a reducing agent widely used to reduce 99m Tc in several radio pharmaceuticals compounds. In spite of being used in nuclear medicine, its genotoxic effects are under investigation in our laboratory. In E. coli, Sn Cl 2 has been shown to have lethal and mutagenic effects, which are thought to occur mainly via active oxygen species. In order to detect some possible direct influence of Sn Cl 2 on nucleic acid, DNA, nucleotides and isolated bases were allowed to react with S N Cl 2 in an in vitro system and the effects analyzed spectro photometrically. Since Sn Cl 2 absorbs light in the UV region, we expected that UV could modify the Sn Cl 2 effects on DNA. Our results indicate that: a. Sn Cl 2 or UV (312 nm, 10 5 J/m 2 ) alone caused only slight alterations in the 260-nm absorption peak of supercoiled plasmid DNA (p U C 9.1); b. Sn Cl 2 + UV (312 nm, 10 5 J/m 2 ) led DNA (p U C 9.1) to a complete loss of its characteristic absorption in the 260-nm region; and c. when reacting with isolated A T P or T T P, Sn Cl 2 + UV (312 nm, 5 x 10 4 J/m 2 ) caused a significant decrease in their 260-nm absorption peaks, as compared to Sn CL 2 alone. Put together, our results indicate that Sn Cl 2 effects are potentiated by the action of solar UV light

  6. Minimum exposure limits and measured relationships between the vitamin D, erythema and international commission on non-ionizing radiation protection solar ultraviolet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Nathan; Parisi, Alfio; Butler, Harry; Turner, Joanna; Wainwright, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) has established guidelines for exposure to ultraviolet radiation in outdoor occupational settings. Spectrally weighted ICNIRP ultraviolet exposures received by the skin or eye in an 8 h period are limited to 30 J m(-2). In this study, the time required to reach the ICNIRP exposure limit was measured daily in 10 min intervals upon a horizontal plane at a subtropical Australian latitude over a full year and compared with the effective Vitamin D dose received to one-quarter of the available skin surface area for all six Fitzpatrick skin types. The comparison of measured solar ultraviolet exposures for the full range of sky conditions in the 2009 measurement period, including a major September continental dust event, show a clear relationship between the weighted ICNIRP and the effective vitamin D dose. Our results show that the horizontal plane ICNIRP ultraviolet exposure may be used under these conditions to provide minimum guidelines for the healthy moderation of vitamin D, scalable to each of the six Fitzpatrick skin types. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  7. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) skin permeation rates change with simultaneous exposures to solar ultraviolet radiation (UV-S).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopf, Nancy B; Spring, Philipp; Hirt-Burri, Nathalie; Jimenez, Silvia; Sutter, Benjamin; Vernez, David; Berthet, Aurelie

    2018-05-01

    Road construction workers are simultaneously exposed to two carcinogens; solar ultraviolet (UV-S) radiation and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in bitumen emissions. The combined exposure may lead to photogenotoxicity and enhanced PAH skin permeation rates. Skin permeation rates (J) for selected PAHs in a mixture (PAH-mix) or in bitumen fume condensate (BFC) with and without UV-S co-exposures were measured with in vitro flow-through diffusion cells mounted with human viable skin and results compared. Possible biomarkers were explored. Js were greater with UV-S for naphthalene, anthracene, and pyrene in BFC (0.08-0.1 ng/cm 2 /h) compared to without (0.02-0.26 ng/cm 2 /h). This was true for anthracene, pyrene, and chrysene in the PAH-mix. Naphthalene and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) in the PAH-mix had greater Js without (0.97-13.01 ng/cm 2 /h) compared to with UV-S (0.40-6.35 ng/cm 2 /h). Time until permeation (T lags ) in the PAH-mix were generally shorter compared to the BFC, and they ranged from 1 to 13 h. The vehicle matrix could potentially be the reason for this discrepancy as BFC contains additional not identified substances. Qualitative interpretation of p53 suggested a dose-response with UV-S, and somewhat with the co-exposures. MMP1, p65 and cKIT were not exploitable. Although not statistically different, PAHs permeate human viable skin faster with simultaneous exposures to UV. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Solar ultraviolet radiation alters alder and birch litter chemistry that in turn affects decomposers and soil respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotilainen, Titta; Haimi, Jari; Tegelberg, Riitta; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Vapaavuori, Elina; Aphalo, Pedro Jose

    2009-10-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV)-A and UV-B radiation were excluded from branches of grey alder (Alnus incana) and white birch (Betula pubescens) trees in a field experiment. Leaf litter collected from these trees was used in microcosm experiments under laboratory conditions. The aim was to evaluate the effects of the different UV treatments on litter chemical quality (phenolic compounds, C, N and lignin) and the subsequent effects of these changes on soil fauna and decomposition processes. We measured the decomposition rate of litter, growth of woodlice (Porcellio scaber), soil microbial respiration and abundance of nematodes and enchytraeid worms. In addition, the chemical quality of woodlice feces was analyzed. The exclusion of both UV-A and UV-B had several effects on litter chemistry. Exclusion of UV-B radiation decreased the C content in litter in both tree species. In alder litter, UV exclusion affected concentration of phenolic groups variably, whereas in birch litter there were no significant differences in phenolic compounds. Moreover, further effects on microbial respiration and chemical quality of woodlice feces were apparent. In both tree species, microbial CO(2) evolution was lower in soil with litter produced under exclusion of both UV-A and UV-B radiation when compared to soil with control litter. The N content was higher in the feces of woodlice eating alder litter produced under exclusion of both UV-A and UV-B compared to the control. In addition, there were small changes in the concentration of individual phenolic compounds analyzed from woodlice feces. Our results demonstrate that both UV-A and UV-B alter litter chemistry which in turn affects decomposition processes.

  9. Solar ultraviolet-B radiation affects seedling emergence, DNA integrity, plant morphology, growth rate, and attractiveness to herbivore insects in Datura ferox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballare, C.L.; Scopel, A.L.; Stapleton, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    To study functional relationships between the effects of solar ultraviolet-B radiation (UV0B) on different aspects of the physiology of a wild plant, we carried out exclusion experiments in the field with the summer annual Datura ferrox L. Solar UV-B incident over Buenos Aires reduced daytime seedling emergence, inhibited stem elongation and leaf expansion, and tended to reduce biomass accumulation during early growth. However, UV-B had no effect on calculated net assimilation rate. Using a monoclonal antibody specific to the cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimer (CPD), we found that plants receiving full sunlight had more CPDs per unit of DNA than plants shielded from solar UV-B, but the positive correlation between UV-B and CPD burden tended to level off at high (near solar) UV-B levels. At our field site, Datura plants were consumed by leaf beetles (Coleoptera), and the proportion of plants attacked by insects declined with the amount of UV-B received during growth. Field experiments showed that plant exposure to solar UV-B reduced the likelihood of leaf beetle attack by one-half. Our results highlight the complexities associated with scaling plant responses to solar UV-B, because they show: (a) a lack of correspondence between UV-B effects on net assimilation rate and whole-plant growth rate, (b) nonlinear UV-B dose-response curves, and (c) UV-B effects of plant attractiveness to natural herbivores. 56 refs., 7 figs

  10. Spectral and Broad Band Ultraviolet Measurements in Valencia (Spain): A Preliminary Comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tena, F.; Marin, M.J.; Martinez-Lozano, J.A.; Utrillas, M.P.; Gomez, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Solar Radiation Group of the University of Valencia, in collaboration with the National Institute of Meteorology (INM), recently began a database of erythemal UV irradiance measurements. Such measurements are obtained by a YES UVB-1 pyranometer (280-330 nm) that measures continuously, integrates the values and stores them in a database. The measured values are being compared with those obtained by the integration of the data registered by an Optronic OL 754 spectroradiometer (250-800 nm) considering clear days and different solar zenith angles. For the present study only the data corresponding to the summer (1999) are being considered because these are the days of the year with the higher erythemal values and also the season when people enjoy sunbathing. The results are used to deduce the ultraviolet index (UVI) related to the erythemal doses and the sunburn time. (author)

  11. Spectral and Broad Band Ultraviolet Measurements in Valencia (Spain): A Preliminary Comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tena, F.; Marin, M.J.; Martinez-Lozano, J.A.; Utrillas, M.P.; Gomez, J.L

    2000-07-01

    The Solar Radiation Group of the University of Valencia, in collaboration with the National Institute of Meteorology (INM), recently began a database of erythemal UV irradiance measurements. Such measurements are obtained by a YES UVB-1 pyranometer (280-330 nm) that measures continuously, integrates the values and stores them in a database. The measured values are being compared with those obtained by the integration of the data registered by an Optronic OL 754 spectroradiometer (250-800 nm) considering clear days and different solar zenith angles. For the present study only the data corresponding to the summer (1999) are being considered because these are the days of the year with the higher erythemal values and also the season when people enjoy sunbathing. The results are used to deduce the ultraviolet index (UVI) related to the erythemal doses and the sunburn time. (author)

  12. 8 years of Solar Spectral Irradiance Observations from the ISS with the SOLAR/SOLSPEC Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damé, L.; Bolsée, D.; Meftah, M.; Irbah, A.; Hauchecorne, A.; Bekki, S.; Pereira, N.; Cessateur, G.; Marchand, M.; Thiéblemont, R.; Foujols, T.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate measurements of Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) are of primary importance for a better understanding of solar physics and of the impact of solar variability on climate (via Earth's atmospheric photochemistry). The acquisition of a top of atmosphere reference solar spectrum and of its temporal and spectral variability during the unusual solar cycle 24 is of prime interest for these studies. These measurements are performed since April 2008 with the SOLSPEC spectro-radiometer from the far ultraviolet to the infrared (166 nm to 3088 nm). This instrument, developed under a fruitful LATMOS/BIRA-IASB collaboration, is part of the Solar Monitoring Observatory (SOLAR) payload, externally mounted on the Columbus module of the International Space Station (ISS). The SOLAR mission, with its actual 8 years duration, will cover almost the entire solar cycle 24. We present here the in-flight operations and performances of the SOLSPEC instrument, including the engineering corrections, calibrations and improved know-how procedure for aging corrections. Accordingly, a SSI reference spectrum from the UV to the NIR will be presented, together with its UV variability, as measured by SOLAR/SOLSPEC. Uncertainties on these measurements and comparisons with other instruments will be briefly discussed.

  13. Solar ultraviolet-B radiation and vitamin D: a cross-sectional population-based study using data from the 2007 to 2009 Canadian Health Measures Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Jamie A; Park, Philip S; Farahani, Ellie; Malik, Suneil; Vieth, Reinhold; McFarlane, Norman A; Shepherd, Theodore G; Knight, Julia A

    2012-08-15

    Exposure to solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation is a major source of vitamin D3. Chemistry climate models project decreases in ground-level solar erythemal UV over the current century. It is unclear what impact this will have on vitamin D status at the population level. The purpose of this study was to measure the association between ground-level solar UV-B and serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) using a secondary analysis of the 2007 to 2009 Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS). Blood samples collected from individuals aged 12 to 79 years sampled across Canada were analyzed for 25(OH)D (n = 4,398). Solar UV-B irradiance was calculated for the 15 CHMS collection sites using the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible Radiation Model. Multivariable linear regression was used to evaluate the association between 25(OH)D and solar UV-B adjusted for other predictors and to explore effect modification. Cumulative solar UV-B irradiance averaged over 91 days (91-day UV-B) prior to blood draw correlated significantly with 25(OH)D. Independent of other predictors, a 1 kJ/m² increase in 91-day UV-B was associated with a significant 0.5 nmol/L (95% CI 0.3-0.8) increase in mean 25(OH)D (P = 0.0001). The relationship was stronger among younger individuals and those spending more time outdoors. Based on current projections of decreases in ground-level solar UV-B, we predict less than a 1 nmol/L decrease in mean 25(OH)D for the population. In Canada, cumulative exposure to ambient solar UV-B has a small but significant association with 25(OH)D concentrations. Public health messages to improve vitamin D status should target safe sun exposure with sunscreen use, and also enhanced dietary and supplemental intake and maintenance of a healthy body weight.

  14. The high-resolution extraterrestrial solar spectrum (QASUMEFTS determined from ground-based solar irradiance measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gröbner

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A high-resolution extraterrestrial solar spectrum has been determined from ground-based measurements of direct solar spectral irradiance (SSI over the wavelength range from 300 to 500 nm using the Langley-plot technique. The measurements were obtained at the Izaña Atmospheric Research Centre from the Agencia Estatal de Meteorología, Tenerife, Spain, during the period 12 to 24 September 2016. This solar spectrum (QASUMEFTS was combined from medium-resolution (bandpass of 0.86 nm measurements of the QASUME (Quality Assurance of Spectral Ultraviolet Measurements in Europe spectroradiometer in the wavelength range from 300 to 500 nm and high-resolution measurements (0.025 nm from a Fourier transform spectroradiometer (FTS over the wavelength range from 305 to 380 nm. The Kitt Peak solar flux atlas was used to extend this high-resolution solar spectrum to 500 nm. The expanded uncertainties of this solar spectrum are 2 % between 310 and 500 nm and 4 % at 300 nm. The comparison of this solar spectrum with solar spectra measured in space (top of the atmosphere gave very good agreements in some cases, while in some other cases discrepancies of up to 5 % were observed. The QASUMEFTS solar spectrum represents a benchmark dataset with uncertainties lower than anything previously published. The metrological traceability of the measurements to the International System of Units (SI is assured by an unbroken chain of calibrations leading to the primary spectral irradiance standard of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt in Germany.

  15. Effects of thermal treatment on the MgxZn1−xO films and fabrication of visible-blind and solar-blind ultraviolet photodetectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Chunguang; Jiang, Dayong; Tan, Zhendong; Duan, Qian; Liu, Rusheng; Sun, Long; Qin, Jieming; Hou, Jianhua; Gao, Shang; Liang, Qingcheng; Zhao, Jianxun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Single-phase wurtzite/cubic Mg x Zn 1−x O films were grown by RF magnetron sputtering technique. • We focus on the red-shift caused by annealing the Mg x Zn 1−x O films. • MSM-structured visible-blind and solar-blind UV photodetectors were fabricated. - Abstract: A series of single-phase Mg x Zn 1−x O films with different Mg contents were prepared on quartz substrates by RF magnetron sputtering technique using different MgZnO targets, and annealed under the atmospheric environment. The absorption edges of Mg x Zn 1−x O films can cover the whole near ultraviolet and even the whole solar-blind spectra range, and the solar-blind wurtzite/cubic Mg x Zn 1−x O films have been realized successfully by the same method. In addition, the absorption edges of annealed films shift to a long wavelength, which is caused by the diffusion of Zn atoms gathering at the surface during the thermal treatment process. Finally, the truly solar-blind metal-semiconductor-metal structured photodetectors based on wurtzite Mg 0.445 Zn 0.555 O and cubic Mg 0.728 Zn 0.272 O films were fabricated. The corresponding peak responsivities are 17 mA/W at 275 nm and 0.53 mA/W at 250 nm under a 120 V bias, respectively

  16. The effects of solar ultraviolet-B radiation on the growth and yield of barley are accompanied by increased DNA damage and antioxidant responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazza, C.A.; Battista, D.; Zima, A.M.; Szwarcberg-Bracchitta, M.; Giordano, C.V.; Acevedo, A.; Scopel, A.L.; Ballare, C.L.

    1999-01-01

    There is limited information on the impacts of present-day solar ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B) on biomass and grain yield of field crops and on the mechanisms that confer tolerance to UV-B radiation under field conditions. We investigated the effects of solar UV-B on aspects of the biochemistry, growth and yield of barley crops using replicated field plots and two barley strains, a catalase (CAT)-deficient mutant (RPr 79/4) and its wild-type mother line (Maris Mink). Solar UV-B reduced biomass accumulation and grain yield in both strains. The effects on crop biomass accumulation tended to be more severe in RPr 79/4 (≈ 32% reduction) than in the mother line (≈ 20% reduction). Solar UV-B caused measurable DNA damage in leaf tissue, in spite of inducing a significant increase in UV-absorbing sunscreens in the two lines. Maris Mink responded to solar UV-B with increased CAT and ascorbate peroxidase (APx) activity. No effects of UV-B on total superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were detected. Compared with the wild type, RPr 79/4 had lower CAT activity, as expected, but higher APx activity. Neither of these activities increased in response to UV-B in RPr 79/4. These results suggest that growth inhibition by solar UV-B involves DNA damage and oxidative stress, and that constitutive and UV-B-induced antioxidant capacity may play an important role in UV-B tolerance. (author)

  17. 8 years of Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability Observed from the ISS with the SOLAR/SOLSPEC Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damé, Luc; Bolsée, David; Meftah, Mustapha; Irbah, Abdenour; Hauchecorne, Alain; Bekki, Slimane; Pereira, Nuno; Cessateur, Marchand; Gäel; , Marion; et al.

    2016-10-01

    Accurate measurements of Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) are of primary importance for a better understanding of solar physics and of the impact of solar variability on climate (via Earth's atmospheric photochemistry). The acquisition of a top of atmosphere reference solar spectrum and of its temporal and spectral variability during the unusual solar cycle 24 is of prime interest for these studies. These measurements are performed since April 2008 with the SOLSPEC spectro-radiometer from the far ultraviolet to the infrared (166 nm to 3088 nm). This instrument, developed under a fruitful LATMOS/BIRA-IASB collaboration, is part of the Solar Monitoring Observatory (SOLAR) payload, externally mounted on the Columbus module of the International Space Station (ISS). The SOLAR mission, with its actual 8 years duration, will cover almost the entire solar cycle 24. We present here the in-flight operations and performances of the SOLSPEC instrument, including the engineering corrections, calibrations and improved know-how procedure for aging corrections. Accordingly, a SSI reference spectrum from the UV to the NIR will be presented, together with its variability in the UV, as measured by SOLAR/SOLSPEC for 8 years. Uncertainties on these measurements and comparisons with other instruments will be briefly discussed.

  18. Ultraviolet photovoltaics: Share the spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliron, Delia J.

    2017-08-01

    Electrically controlled windows require power to switch between transparent and tinted states. Now, an ultraviolet light-harvesting solar cell can power smart windows without compromising their control over heat and light.

  19. Psoriasis and ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farber, E.M.; Nall, L.

    1993-01-01

    Prevention and detection screening programs as a public health service in curtailing the ever-increasing incidence of all forms of skin cancer are reviewed. The effect of solar and artificial ultraviolet radiation on the general population and persons with psoriasis is examined. 54 refs

  20. Probing the Production of Extreme-ultraviolet Late-phase Solar Flares Using the Model Enthalpy-based Thermal Evolution of Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yu; Ding, Mingde

    2018-04-01

    Recent observations in extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths reveal an EUV late phase in some solar flares that is characterized by a second peak in warm coronal emissions (∼3 MK) several tens of minutes to a few hours after the soft X-ray (SXR) peak. Using the model enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops (EBTEL), we numerically probe the production of EUV late-phase solar flares. Starting from two main mechanisms of producing the EUV late phase, i.e., long-lasting cooling and secondary heating, we carry out two groups of numerical experiments to study the effects of these two processes on the emission characteristics in late-phase loops. In either of the two processes an EUV late-phase solar flare that conforms to the observational criteria can be numerically synthesized. However, the underlying hydrodynamic and thermodynamic evolutions in late-phase loops are different between the two synthetic flare cases. The late-phase peak due to a long-lasting cooling process always occurs during the radiative cooling phase, while that powered by a secondary heating is more likely to take place in the conductive cooling phase. We then propose a new method for diagnosing the two mechanisms based on the shape of EUV late-phase light curves. Moreover, from the partition of energy input, we discuss why most solar flares are not EUV late flares. Finally, by addressing some other factors that may potentially affect the loop emissions, we also discuss why the EUV late phase is mainly observed in warm coronal emissions.

  1. Inconstant sun: how solar evolution has affected cosmic and ultraviolet radiation exposure over the history of life on Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, P Andrew

    2003-03-01

    Four billion years ago, sea-level UV exposure was more than 400 times as intense as today, the dose from solar cosmic rays was five times present levels, and galactic cosmic rays accounted for only about 10% their current contribution to sea-level radiation doses. Exposure to cosmic radiation accounts for about 10% of natural background radiation exposure today and includes dose from galactic cosmic rays and solar charged particles. There is little exposure to ionizing wavelengths of UV due to absorption by ozone. The sun has evolved significantly over its life; in the past there were higher levels of particulate radiation and lower UV emissions from the sun, and a stronger solar wind reduced radiation dose in the inner solar system from galactic cosmic rays. Finally, since the early atmosphere contained little to no oxygen, surface levels of UV radiation were far higher in the past.

  2. Snow and Ice Products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Salomonson, Vincent V.; Riggs, George A.; Klein, Andrew G.

    2003-01-01

    Snow and sea ice products, derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument, flown on the Terra and Aqua satellites, are or will be available through the National Snow and Ice Data Center Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The algorithms that produce the products are automated, thus providing a consistent global data set that is suitable for climate studies. The suite of MODIS snow products begins with a 500-m resolution, 2330-km swath snow-cover map that is then projected onto a sinusoidal grid to produce daily and 8-day composite tile products. The sequence proceeds to daily and 8-day composite climate-modeling grid (CMG) products at 0.05 resolution. A daily snow albedo product will be available in early 2003 as a beta test product. The sequence of sea ice products begins with a swath product at 1-km resolution that provides sea ice extent and ice-surface temperature (IST). The sea ice swath products are then mapped onto the Lambert azimuthal equal area or EASE-Grid projection to create a daily and 8-day composite sea ice tile product, also at 1 -km resolution. Climate-Modeling Grid (CMG) sea ice products in the EASE-Grid projection at 4-km resolution are planned for early 2003.

  3. SWAP OBSERVATIONS OF THE LONG-TERM, LARGE-SCALE EVOLUTION OF THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET SOLAR CORONA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaton, Daniel B.; De Groof, Anik; Berghmans, David; Nicula, Bogdan [Royal Observatory of Belgium-SIDC, Avenue Circulaire 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Shearer, Paul [Department of Mathematics, 2074 East Hall, University of Michigan, 530 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1043 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The Sun Watcher with Active Pixels and Image Processing (SWAP) EUV solar telescope on board the Project for On-Board Autonomy 2 spacecraft has been regularly observing the solar corona in a bandpass near 17.4 nm since 2010 February. With a field of view of 54 × 54 arcmin, SWAP provides the widest-field images of the EUV corona available from the perspective of the Earth. By carefully processing and combining multiple SWAP images, it is possible to produce low-noise composites that reveal the structure of the EUV corona to relatively large heights. A particularly important step in this processing was to remove instrumental stray light from the images by determining and deconvolving SWAP's point-spread function from the observations. In this paper, we use the resulting images to conduct the first-ever study of the evolution of the large-scale structure of the corona observed in the EUV over a three year period that includes the complete rise phase of solar cycle 24. Of particular note is the persistence over many solar rotations of bright, diffuse features composed of open magnetic fields that overlie polar crown filaments and extend to large heights above the solar surface. These features appear to be related to coronal fans, which have previously been observed in white-light coronagraph images and, at low heights, in the EUV. We also discuss the evolution of the corona at different heights above the solar surface and the evolution of the corona over the course of the solar cycle by hemisphere.

  4. Ultraviolet spectral distribution and erythema-weighted irradiance from indoor tanning devices compared with solar radiation exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, Yolanda; Baeza, David; Gómez, Miguel; Lorente, Jerónimo

    2016-08-01

    Concern regarding the impact of indoor tanning devices on human health has led to different regulations and recommendations, which set limits on erythema-weighted irradiance. Here, we analyze spectral emissions from 52 tanning devices in Spanish facilities and compare them with surface solar irradiance for different solar zenith angles. Whereas most of the devices emitted less UV-B radiation than the midday summer sun, the unweighted UV-A irradiance was 2-6 times higher than solar radiation. Moreover, the spectral distributions of indoor devices were completely different from that of solar radiation, differing in one order of magnitude at some UV-A wavelengths, depending on the lamp characteristics. In 21% of the devices tested, the erythema-weighted irradiance exceeded 0.3Wm(-2): the limit fixed by the European standard and the Spanish regulation. Moreover, 29% of the devices fall within the UV type 4 classification, for which medical advice is required. The high variability in erythema-weighted irradiance results in a wide range of exposure times to reach 1 standard erythemal dose (SED: 100Jm(-2)), with 62% of devices requiring exposures of UV-A dose during this time period would be from 1.4 to 10.3 times more than the solar UV-A dose. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Seasonal variations of U.S. mortality rates: Roles of solar ultraviolet-B doses, vitamin D, gene exp ression, and infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, William B; Bhattoa, Harjit Pal; Boucher, Barbara J

    2017-10-01

    Death rates in the U.S. show a pronounced seasonality. The broad seasonal variation shows about 25% higher death rates in winter than in summer with an additional few percent increase associated with the Christmas and New Year's holidays. A pronounced increase in death rates also starts in mid-September, shortly after the school year begins. The causes of death with large contributions to the observed seasonality include diseases of the circulatory system; the respiratory system; the digestive system; and endocrine, nutritional, and metabolic diseases. Researchers have identified several factors showing seasonal variation that could possibly explain the seasonal variations in mortality rate. These factors include seasonal variations in solar ultraviolet-B(UVB) doses and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations, gene expression, ambient temperature and humidity, UVB effects on environmental pathogen load, environmental pollutants and allergens, and photoperiod (or length of day). The factors with the strongest support in this analysis are seasonal variations in solar UVB doses and 25(OH)D concentrations. In the U.S., population mean 25(OH)D concentrations range from 21ng/mL in March to 28ng/mL in August. Measures to ensure that all people had 25(OH)D concentrations >36ng/mL year round would probably reduce death rates significantly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A broad-spectrum sunscreen prevents cumulative damage from repeated exposure to sub-erythemal solar ultraviolet radiation representative of temperate latitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seité, S; Christiaens, F; Bredoux, C; Compan, D; Zucchi, H; Lombard, D; Fourtanier, A; Young, A R

    2010-02-01

    We have previously shown the detrimental effects of 19 sub-erythemal exposures to daily ultraviolet radiation (DUVR, which mimics non-extreme exposure conditions), delivered over 4 weeks to volunteers. This source had UVA (320-400 nm) to UVB (290-320 nm) irradiance ratio of 25, instead of that close to 10 that is typically the case with solar-simulated radiation (SSR) that represents summer global sunlight with a clear sky and quasi-zenith solar irradiance. Here, we report on an extension of this previous study, in which we evaluated the photoprotection afforded by a broad-spectrum daily-care product with a low-sun protection factor (SPF 8, UVA-PF 7 and 3* rated UVA protection). We assessed cellular and molecular markers of photodamage that are relevant to skin cancer and photoageing. This study shows that biological effects of repeated exposure to DUVR can be prevented by a broad-spectrum daily-care product and that the level of protection afforded varies with the studied endpoint. Efficient daily UVR protection, as provided by a broad-spectrum daily-care product, is necessary to prevent the 'silent' sub-erythemal cumulative effects of UVR from inadvertent sun exposure.

  7. Multiple Roles for UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 in Regulating Gene Expression and Metabolite Accumulation in Arabidopsis under Solar Ultraviolet Radiation1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Luis O.; Brosché, Mikael; Vainonen, Julia; Jenkins, Gareth I.; Wargent, Jason J.; Sipari, Nina; Strid, Åke; Lindfors, Anders V.; Tegelberg, Riitta; Aphalo, Pedro J.

    2013-01-01

    Photomorphogenic responses triggered by low fluence rates of ultraviolet B radiation (UV-B; 280–315 nm) are mediated by the UV-B photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8). Beyond our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of UV-B perception by UVR8, there is still limited information on how the UVR8 pathway functions under natural sunlight. Here, wild-type Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and the uvr8-2 mutant were used in an experiment outdoors where UV-A (315–400 nm) and UV-B irradiances were attenuated using plastic films. Gene expression, PYRIDOXINE BIOSYNTHESIS1 (PDX1) accumulation, and leaf metabolite signatures were analyzed. The results show that UVR8 is required for transcript accumulation of genes involved in UV protection, oxidative stress, hormone signal transduction, and defense against herbivores under solar UV. Under natural UV-A irradiance, UVR8 is likely to interact with UV-A/blue light signaling pathways to moderate UV-B-driven transcript and PDX1 accumulation. UVR8 both positively and negatively affects UV-A-regulated gene expression and metabolite accumulation but is required for the UV-B induction of phenolics. Moreover, UVR8-dependent UV-B acclimation during the early stages of plant development may enhance normal growth under long-term exposure to solar UV. PMID:23250626

  8. Solar-simulated ultraviolet irradiation induces selective influx of CD4+ T lymphocytes in normal human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Nuzzo, S.; de Rie, M. A.; van der Loos, C. M.; Bos, J. D.; Teunissen, M. B.

    1996-01-01

    The proportion and composition of the human cutaneous CD3+ T lymphocyte population was determined in situ following a single exposure to physiological, erythema-inducing doses of simulated solar radiation, mainly consisting of UV radiation. Biopsies were taken 1, 2 and 7 days after local irradiation

  9. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) solar spectral irradiance (SSI) for ionospheric application - history and contemporary state-of-art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, G.; Jacobi, Ch.; Nikutowski, B.; Erhardt, Ch.

    2014-11-01

    After a historical survey of space related EUV measurements in Germany and the role of Karl Rawer in pursuing this work, we describe present developments in EUV spectroscopy and provide a brief outlook on future activities. The group of Karl Rawer has performed the first scientific space project in Western Europe on 19th October 1954. Then it was decided to include the field of solar EUV spectroscopy in ionospheric investigations. Starting in 1957 an intensified development of instrumentation was going on to explore solar EUV radiation, atmospheric airglow and auroral emissions until the institute had to stop space activities in the early nineteen-eighties. EUV spectroscopy was continued outside of the institute during eight years. This area of work was supported again by the institute developing the Auto-Calibrating Spectrometers (SolACES) for a mission on the International Space Station (ISS). After more than six years in space the instrument is still in operation. Meanwhile the work on the primary task also to validate EUV data available from other space missions has made good progress. The first results of validating those data and combine them into one set of EUV solar spectral irradiance are very promising. It will be recommended for using it by the science and application community. Moreover, a new low-cost type of an EUV spectrometer is presented for monitoring the solar EUV radiation. It shall be further developed for providing EUV-TEC data to be applied in ionospheric models replacing the Covington index F10.7. Applying these data for example in the GNSS signal evaluation a more accurate determination of GNSS receiver positions is expected for correcting the propagation delays of navigation signals traveling through the ionosphere from space to earth. - Latest results in the field of solar EUV spectroscopy are discussed, too.

  10. Observations of the 1980 April 30 limb flare by the ultraviolet spectrometer and polarimeter on the Solar Maximum Mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodgate, B.W.; Shine, R.A.; Brandt, J.C.; Chapman, R.D.; Michalitsianos, A.G.; Kenny, P.J.; Bruner, E.C.; Rehse, R.A.; Schoolman, S.A.; Cheng, C.C.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Athay, R.G.; Beckers, J.M.; Gurman, J.B.; Henze, W.; Hyder, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of the M2 limb flare of 1980 April 30 by the Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter in the C IV 1548 A line are described and compared with observations from other SMM instruments and with ground-based Hα data. Events observed during the 18 minutes leading up to the flare impulsive phase include the filling of a small loop with material moving at about 20 km s -1 , followed by a rapid brightening in C IV, Hα, and hard X-rays, with a subsequent brightening of a higher set of loops. The rapid brightening appears to be at the junction of the small loop with the overlying magnetic structures, which suggests the flare may be caused by their interaction

  11. Observations of the 1980 April 30 limb flare by the ultraviolet spectrometer and polarimeter on the Solar Maximum Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodgate, B. E.; Shine, R. A.; Brandt, J. C.; Chapman, R. D.; Michalitsianos, A. G.; Kenny, P. J.; Bruner, E. C.; Rehse, R. A.; Schoolman, S. A.; Cheng, C. C.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of the M2 limb flare of 1980 April 30 by the ultraviolet spectrometer and polarimeter in the C IV 1548 A line are described and compared with observations from other SMM instruments and with ground-based H-alpha data. Events observed during the 18 minutes leading up to the flare impulsive phase include the filling of a small loop with material moving at about 20 km/s, followed by a rapid brightening in C IV, H-alpha, and hard X-rays, with a subsequent brightening of a higher set of loops. The rapid brightening appears to be at the junction of the small loop with the overlying magnetic structures, which suggests the flare may be caused by their interaction.

  12. Comparison of GOME total ozone data with ground data from the Spanish Brewer spectroradiometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Antón

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares total ozone measurements from five Brewer spectroradiometers located at the Iberian Peninsula with satellite observations given by the GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment sensor. The analyzed period covers simultaneous ozone values from July 1995 until December 2004. The regression analysis shows an excellent agreement between Brewer-GOME values in the five locations; the coefficient of correlation is always higher than 0.92 and the root mean square error is about 3%. Moreover, the comparison shows that the satellite retrieval accuracy is within the uncertainty of current ground-based instruments. In addition, the effects of several variables, such as cloudiness, solar zenith angle (SZA, effective temperature and total ozone values in Brewer-GOME differences are analyzed. The results indicate that clouds induce a minor dependence of GOME values on the SZA. For example, during heavy cloudy conditions in Madrid station, GOME observations overestimate ground-based Brewer data for low AMF (low SZA values by 2% while for high AMF (high SZA values the satellite underestimates ground-based ozone values by 1%. Moreover, the dependence of Brewer-GOME differences with respect to SZA for cloud-free conditions may be due to the variability of effective temperature. This fact could indicate that the effective temperature estimated by GOME does not fully reflect the actual atmospheric temperature variability. Finally, GOME ozone observations slightly underestimate the highest values measured by the Brewer spectrophotometers and overestimates the lowest ground-based measurements.

  13. High performance CaS solar-blind ultraviolet photodiodes fabricated by seed-layer-assisted growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Qing Lin; Lai, Ying Hoi; Sou, Iam Keong; Liu, Yi; Beltjens, Emeline; Qi, Jie

    2015-01-01

    CaS, with a direct bandgap of 5.38 eV, is expected to be a strong candidate as the active-layer of high performance solar-blind UV photodiodes that have important applications in both civilian and military sectors. Here, we report that a seed-layer-assisted growth approach via molecular beam epitaxy can result in high crystalline quality rocksalt CaS thin films on zincblende GaAs substrates. The Au/CaS/GaAs solar-blind photodiodes demonstrated , more than five orders in its visible rejection power, a photoresponse of 36.8 mA/w at zero bias and a corresponding quantum efficiency as high as 19% at 235 nm

  14. First ultraviolet observations of the transition regions of X-ray bright solar-type stars in the Pleiades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillault, J.-P.; Vilhu, O.; Linsky, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    Results are reported from A UV study of the transition regions of two X-ray-bright solar-type stars from the Pleiades, in an attempt to extend the main sequence age baseline for the transition-region activity-age relation over more than two orders of magnitude. However, no emission lines were detected from either star; the upper limits to the fluxes are consistent with previously determined saturation levels, but do not help to further constrain evolutionary models.

  15. Thermoluminescent monitoring of the solar ultraviolet radiation with KCl: Eu{sup 2+} crystals; Monitoreo termoluminiscente de la radiacion solar ultravioleta con cristales de KCl: Eu{sup 2+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernov, V.; Melendrez, R.; Barboza F, M. [Centro de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, A.P. 5-88, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    In this work it has been investigating the Tl properties of KCl: Eu{sup 2+} subjected to solar direct radiation. Also it was realized irradiation with the Deuterium and Xenon lamps. It was used a set of filters and a Katos monochromator 0.25 M to determine the spectral response to Tl peaks and a study of them with respect to the duration of the Sun irradiation. After of the Sun irradiation the Tl curves show several peaks between the ambient temperature and 673 K. The relation between peaks depends strongly of the irradiation time and the different solar light wavelength. It is possible to divide the Tl peaks in two groups. The first one (T<473 K) is very sensitive to ultraviolet radiation but it is strongly affected by visible light. The second one (T>473 K) is not too sensitive but is more stable under optical whitening. Here the obtained results are discussed with respect to UV dosemeters development for environment which facilitate to obtain direct measurements of the UV index. (Author)

  16. Ultraviolet-ozone surface modification for non-wetting hole transport materials based inverted planar perovskite solar cells with efficiency exceeding 18%

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiuwen; Ma, Chunqing; Cheng, Yuanhang; Xie, Yue-Min; Yi, Xueping; Gautam, Bhoj; Chen, Shengmei; Li, Ho-Wa; Lee, Chun-Sing; So, Franky; Tsang, Sai-Wing

    2017-08-01

    Non-wetting hole transport materials (HTMs) have great potential in facilitating large-sized perovskite crystal growth and enhancing device stability by opposing moisture ingress, However, the severe non-wetting issue limits the wide application of these materials in low-temperature solution-processed inverted planar perovskite solar cells (PVSCs), and corresponding devices are rarely reported. Here, a facile ultraviolet-ozone (UVO) modification method is demonstrated to overcome this issue. By carefully controlling the UVO modification time, the surface wettability of poly-TPD can be tuned without affecting the bulk properties of the film, hence perovskite films with desired grain size and excellent coverage can be deposited via a one-step spin-coating method. Benefiting from the high-quality perovskite, well-matched energy level alignment and hydrophobic property of poly-TPD, the resulting PVSCs show a champion power conversion efficiency of 18.19% with significantly enhanced stability as compared to the PEDOT:PSS counterparts. Moreover, the UVO modification approach also demonstrates its validity when being extended to other hydrophobic HTMs. This work not only provides a general strategy to broaden the selection pool of HTMs for solution-processed inverted planar PVSCs, but also may triggers the exploration of more advanced strategies to make non-wetting HTMs applicable in solution-processed inverted planar PVSCs.

  17. Solar ultraviolet radiation induces biological alterations in human skin in vitro: Relevance of a well-balanced UVA/UVB protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Bernerd

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous damages such as sunburn, pigmentation, and photoaging are known to be induced by acute as well as repetitive sun exposure. Not only for basic research, but also for the design of the most efficient photoprotection, it is crucial to understand and identify the early biological events occurring after ultraviolet (UV exposure. Reconstructed human skin models provide excellent and reliable in vitro tools to study the UV-induced alterations of the different skin cell types, keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and melanocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Using different in vitro human skin models, the effects of UV light (UVB and UVA were investigated. UVB-induced damages are essentially epidermal, with the typical sunburn cells and DNA lesions, whereas UVA radiation-induced damages are mostly located within the dermal compartment. Pigmentation can also be obtained after solar simulated radiation exposure of pigmented reconstructed skin model. Those models are also highly adequate to assess the potential of sunscreens to protect the skin from UV-associated damage, sunburn reaction, photoaging, and pigmentation. The results showed that an effective photoprotection is provided by broad-spectrum sunscreens with a potent absorption in both UVB and UVA ranges.

  18. Daily, seasonal, and latitudinal variations in solar ultraviolet A and B radiation in relation to vitamin D production and risk for skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigalavicius, Mantas; Moan, Johan; Dahlback, Arne; Juzeniene, Asta

    2016-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation varies with latitude, time of day, and season. Both spectral UV composition and ambient UV dose lead to different health outcomes at different latitudes. Finding the optimal time for sun exposure, whereby the positive effects of UV exposure (vitamin D) are facilitated and the negative effects (skin cancer, photoimmunosuppression) avoided are the most important consideration in modern skin cancer prevention programs. This paper focuses on the latitude dependency of UVB, UVA, vitamin D production, and skin cancer risk in Caucasians. Biologically effective UVB (280-315 nm) and UVA (315-400 nm) doses were calculated using radiative transfer models with appropriate climatologic data for selected locations. Incidences of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and cutaneous melanoma (CM) were retrieved from cancer registries and published articles. Annual doses of UVA radiation decrease much less with increasing latitude than annual doses of UVB. Incidences of CM also decrease less steeply with increasing latitude than incidences of SCC. As SCC is caused mainly by UVB, these observations support the assumption that UVA plays an important role in the development of CM. The variations in UVA (relevant to CM) and UVB (relevant to vitamin D production) over 1 day differ: the UVB : UVA ratio is maximal at noon. The best way to obtain a given dose of vitamin D with minimal carcinogenic risk is through a non-burning exposure in the middle of the day, rather than in the afternoon or morning. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  19. Solar ultraviolet radiation induces biological alterations in human skin in vitro: relevance of a well-balanced UVA/UVB protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernerd, Francoise; Marionnet, Claire; Duval, Christine

    2012-06-01

    Cutaneous damages such as sunburn, pigmentation, and photoaging are known to be induced by acute as well as repetitive sun exposure. Not only for basic research, but also for the design of the most efficient photoprotection, it is crucial to understand and identify the early biological events occurring after ultraviolet (UV) exposure. Reconstructed human skin models provide excellent and reliable in vitro tools to study the UV-induced alterations of the different skin cell types, keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and melanocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Using different in vitro human skin models, the effects of UV light (UVB and UVA) were investigated. UVB-induced damages are essentially epidermal, with the typical sunburn cells and DNA lesions, whereas UVA radiation-induced damages are mostly located within the dermal compartment. Pigmentation can also be obtained after solar simulated radiation exposure of pigmented reconstructed skin model. Those models are also highly adequate to assess the potential of sunscreens to protect the skin from UV-associated damage, sunburn reaction, photoaging, and pigmentation. The results showed that an effective photoprotection is provided by broad-spectrum sunscreens with a potent absorption in both UVB and UVA ranges.

  20. NASA's Potential Contributions for Using Solar Ultraviolet Radiation in Conjunction with Photocatalysis for Urban Air Pollution Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, robert E.; Underwood, Lauren W.

    2007-01-01

    More than 75 percent of the U.S. population lives in urban communities where people are exposed to levels of smog or pollution that exceed the EPA (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency) safety standards. Urban air quality presents a unique problem because of a number of complex variables, including traffic congestion, energy production, and energy consumption activities, all of which can contribute to and affect air pollution and air quality in this environment. In environmental engineering, photocatalysis is an area of research whose potential for environmental clean-up is rapidly developing popularity and success. Photocatalysis, a natural chemical process, is the acceleration of a photoreaction in the presence of a catalyst. Photocatalytic agents are activated when exposed to near UV (ultraviolet) light (320-400 nm) and water. In recent years, surfaces coated with photocatalytic materials have been extensively studied because pollutants on these surfaces will degrade when the surfaces are exposed to near UV light. Building materials, such as tiles, cement, glass, and aluminum sidings, can be coated with a thin film of a photocatalyst. These coated materials can then break down organic molecules, like air pollutants and smog precursors, into environmentally friendly compounds. These surfaces also exhibit a high affinity for water when exposed to UV light. Therefore, not only are the pollutants decomposed, but this superhydrophilic nature makes the surface self-cleaning, which helps to further increase the degradation rate by allowing rain and/or water to wash byproducts away. According to the Clean Air Act, each individual state is responsible for implementing prevention and regulatory programs to control air pollution. To operate an air quality program, states must adopt and/or develop a plan and obtain approval from the EPA. Federal approval provides a means for the EPA to maintain consistency among different state programs and ensures that they comply with the

  1. Measurement errors in the assessment of exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation and its impact on risk estimates in epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadvand, Payam; Basagaña, Xavier; Barrera-Gómez, Jose; Diffey, Brian; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark

    2011-07-01

    To date, many studies addressing long-term effects of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure on human health have relied on a range of surrogates such as the latitude of the city of residence, ambient UVR levels, or time spent outdoors to estimate personal UVR exposure. This study aimed to differentiate the contributions of personal behaviour and ambient UVR levels on facial UVR exposure and to evaluate the impact of using UVR exposure surrogates on detecting exposure-outcome associations. Data on time-activity, holiday behaviour, and ambient UVR levels were obtained for adult (aged 25-55 years old) indoor workers in six European cities: Athens (37°N), Grenoble (45°N), Milan (45°N), Prague (50°N), Oxford (52°N), and Helsinki (60°N). Annual UVR facial exposure levels were simulated for 10,000 subjects for each city, using a behavioural UVR exposure model. Within-city variations of facial UVR exposure were three times larger than the variation between cities, mainly because of time-activity patterns. In univariate models, ambient UVR levels, latitude and time spent outdoors, each accounted for less than one fourth of the variation in facial exposure levels. Use of these surrogates to assess long-term exposure to UVR resulted in requiring more than four times more participants to achieve similar statistical power to the study that applied simulated facial exposure. Our results emphasise the importance of integrating both personal behaviour and ambient UVR levels/latitude in exposure assessment methodologies.

  2. Photoprotection, photosynthesis and growth of tropical tree seedlings under near-ambient and strongly reduced solar ultraviolet-B radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, G Heinrich; Jahns, Peter; Virgo, Aurelio; García, Milton; Aranda, Jorge; Wellmann, Eckard; Winter, Klaus

    2007-10-01

    Seedlings of two late-successional tropical rainforest tree species, Tetragastris panamensis (Engler) O. Kuntze and Calophyllum longifolium (Willd.), were field grown for 3-4 months at an open site near Panama City (9 degrees N), Panama, under plastic films that either transmitted or excluded most solar UV-B radiation. Experiments were designed to test whether leaves developing under bright sunlight with strongly reduced UV-B are capable of acclimating to near-ambient UV-B conditions. Leaves of T. panamensis that developed under near-ambient UV-B contained higher amounts of UV-absorbing substances than leaves of seedlings grown under reduced UV-B. Photosynthetic pigment composition, content of alpha-tocopherol, CO(2) assimilation, potential photosystem II (PSII) efficiency (evaluated by F(v)/F(m) ratios) and growth of T. panamensis and C. longifolium did not differ between seedlings developed under near-ambient and reduced solar UV-B. When seedlings were transferred from the reduced UV-B treatment to the near-ambient UV-B treatment, a pronounced inhibition of photosynthetic capacity was observed initially in both species. UV-B-mediated inhibition of photosynthetic capacity nearly fully recovered within 1 week of the transfer in C. longifolium, whereas in T. panamensis an about 35% reduced capacity of CO(2) uptake was maintained. A marked increase in UV-absorbing substances was observed in foliage of transferred T. panamensis seedlings. Both species exhibited enhanced mid-day photoinhibition of PSII immediately after being transferred from the reduced UV-B to the near-ambient UV-B treatment. This effect was fully reversible within 1d in T. panamensis and within a few days in C. longifolium. The data show that leaves of these tropical tree seedlings, when developing in full-spectrum sunlight, are effectively protected against high solar UV-B radiation. In contrast, leaves developing under conditions of low UV-B lacked sufficient UV protection. They experienced a

  3. Effects of solar ultraviolet-B radiation, temperature and CO2 on growth and physiology of sunflower and maize seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, U.; Tevini, M.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of solar UV-B radiation, in combination with elevated temperature (4 °C) and CO 2 (680 μL L -1 ) concentration, on sunflower and maize seedlings were studied from May to August in 1991 at the research station Quinta de São Pedro in Portugal (38.7°N). The ambient solar radiation of Portugal was reduced to levels of Central European latitudes by using the ozone filter technique. This radiation served as control, while the ambient solar radiation of Portugal was to simulate intense UV-B treatment (+30%). All plants were grown up to 18 days in 4 climate controlled growth chambers simulating a daily course of temperature with T max = 28 °C or 32 °C, resp., and ambient CO 2 concentrations (340 μL L -1 ); in one chamber the CO 2 concentration was twice as high (680 μL L-1). Under intense UV-B and at 28 °C (T max ) all growth parameters (height, leaf area, fresh and dry weight, stem elongation rate, relative growth rate) of sunflower and maize seedlings were reduced down to 35% as compared to controls. An increase in growing temperature by 4 °C, alone or in combination with doubled CO 2 , compensated or even overcompensated the UV-B effect so that the treated plants were comparable to controls. Chlorophyll content, on a leaf area basis, increased under intense UV-B radiation. This increase was compensated by lower leaf areas, resulting in comparable chlorophyll contents. Similar to growth, also the net photosynthetic rates of sunflower and maize seedlings were reduced down to 29% by intense UV-B calculated on a chlorophyll basis. This reduction was compensated by an increased temperature. Doubling of CO 2 concentration had effects only on sunflower seedlings in which the photosynthetic rates were higher than in the controls. Dark respiration rates of the seedlings were not influenced by any experimental condition. Transpiration and water use efficiency (wue) were not influenced by intense UV-B. Higher temperatures led to higher transpiration rates and

  4. Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Diffuse Attenuation Coefficient for Downwelling Irradiance (KD) Global Mapped Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MODIS (or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) is a key instrument aboard the Terra (EOS AM) and Aqua (EOS PM) satellites. Terra's orbit around the Earth...

  5. Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Chlorophyll (CHL) Global Mapped Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MODIS (or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) is a key instrument aboard the Terra (EOS AM) and Aqua (EOS PM) satellites. Terra's orbit around the Earth...

  6. Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index Land Reflectance Global Binned Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MODIS (or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) is a key instrument aboard the Terra (EOS AM) and Aqua (EOS PM) satellites. Terra's orbit around the Earth...

  7. Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Photosynthetically Available Radiation (PAR) Global Binned Data, reprocesing v2018

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MODIS (or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) is a key instrument aboard the Terra (EOS AM) and Aqua (EOS PM) satellites. Terra's orbit around the Earth...

  8. Ultraviolet Extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Side-by-Side Comparison Click on image for larger view This ultraviolet image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows the Southern Pinwheel galaxy, also know as Messier 83 or M83. It is located 15 million light-years away in the southern constellation Hydra. Ultraviolet light traces young populations of stars; in this image, young stars can be seen way beyond the main spiral disk of M83 up to 140,000 light-years from its center. Could life exist around one of these far-flung stars? Scientists say it's unlikely because the outlying regions of a galaxy are lacking in the metals required for planets to form. The image was taken at scheduled intervals between March 15 and May 20, 2007. It is one of the longest-exposure, or deepest, images ever taken of a nearby galaxy in ultraviolet light. Near-ultraviolet light (or longer-wavelength ultraviolet light) is colored yellow, and far-ultraviolet light is blue. What Lies Beyond the Edge of a Galaxy The side-by-side comparison shows the Southern Pinwheel galaxy, or M83, as seen in ultraviolet light (right) and at both ultraviolet and radio wavelengths (left). While the radio data highlight the galaxy's long, octopus-like arms stretching far beyond its main spiral disk (red), the ultraviolet data reveal clusters of baby stars (blue) within the extended arms. The ultraviolet image was taken by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer between March 15 and May 20, 2007, at scheduled intervals. Back in 2005, the telescope first photographed M83 over a shorter period of time. That picture was the first to reveal far-flung baby stars forming up to 63,000 light-years from the edge of the main spiral disk. This came as a surprise to astronomers because a galaxy's outer territory typically lacks high densities of star-forming materials. The newest picture of M83 from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer is shown at the right, and was taken over a longer period of time. In fact, it is one of the

  9. Topical application of green and white tea extracts provides protection from solar-simulated ultraviolet light in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camouse, Melissa M; Domingo, Diana Santo; Swain, Freddie R; Conrad, Edward P; Matsui, Mary S; Maes, Daniel; Declercq, Lieve; Cooper, Kevin D; Stevens, Seth R; Baron, Elma D

    2009-06-01

    Tea polyphenols have been found to exert beneficial effects on the skin via their antioxidant properties. We sought to determine whether topical application of green tea or white tea extracts would prevent simulated solar radiation-induced oxidative damages to DNA and Langerhans cells that may lead to immune suppression and carcinogenesis. Skin samples were analysed from volunteers or skin explants treated with white tea or green tea after UV irradiation. In another group of patients, the in vivo immune protective effects of green and white tea were evaluated using contact hypersensitivity to dinitrochlorobenzene. Topical application of green and white tea offered protection against detrimental effects of UV on cutaneous immunity. Such protection is not because of direct UV absorption or sunscreen effects as both products showed a sun protection factor of 1. There was no significant difference in the levels of protection afforded by the two agents. Hence, both green tea and white tea are potential photoprotective agents that may be used in conjunction with established methods of sun protection.

  10. Efficient and ultraviolet durable planar perovskite solar cells via a ferrocenecarboxylic acid modified nickel oxide hole transport layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiankai; Luo, Hui; Xie, Weijia; Lin, Xuanhuai; Hou, Xian; Zhou, Jianping; Huang, Sumei; Ou-Yang, Wei; Sun, Zhuo; Chen, Xiaohong

    2018-03-28

    Planar perovskite solar cells (PSCs) that use nickel oxide (NiO x ) as a hole transport layer have recently attracted tremendous attention because of their excellent photovoltaic efficiencies and simple fabrication. However, the electrical conductivity of NiO x and the interface contact properties of the NiO x /perovskite layer are always limited for the NiO x layer fabricated at a relatively low annealing temperature. Ferrocenedicarboxylic acid (FDA) was firstly introduced to modify a p-type NiO x hole transport layer in PSCs, which obviously improves the crystallization of the perovskite layer and hole transport and collection abilities and reduces carrier recombination. PSCs with a FDA modified NiO x layer reached a PCE of 18.20%, which is much higher than the PCE (15.13%) of reference PSCs. Furthermore, PSCs with a FDA interfacial modification layer show better UV durability and a hysteresis-free effect and still maintain the original PCE value of 49.8%after being exposed to UV for 24 h. The enhanced performance of the PSCs is attributed to better crystallization of the perovskite layer, the passivation effect of FDA, superior interface contact at the NiO x /perovskite layers and enhancement of the electrical conductivity of the FDA modified NiO x layer. In addition, PSCs with FDA inserted at the interface of the perovskite/PCBM layers can also improve the PCE to 16.62%, indicating that FDA have dual functions to modify p-type and n-type carrier transporting layers.

  11. Ultraviolet sterilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenck, G.O.

    1987-01-01

    Artificial ultraviolet radiation sources can supply bactericidal energy in such a high dosage that in less than a second a higher degree of disinfection is accomplished than by sun irradiation in hours. Bacteria, viruses, phages, and organic micropollutants can be degraded by photochemical wet combustion down to and below detection limits of organic carbon. There are no known ultraviolet-resistant microorganisms. There are limitations to ultraviolet treatment which can often be overcome by adequate technical measures. Unlike other water purification processes, ultraviolet irradiation only exterminates living organisms. The radiation must be able to penetrate to the objects of the kill; in a dose large enough to kill, and long enough to kill and prevent new growth. Contrary to filters, ultraviolet flow-through reactors do not restrict free flow significantly. In contrast to distillation, ultraviolet irradiation imposes no phase changes to the water. Used as a sequence in ultrapure water systems, maintenance requirements are virtually nonexistent; because of the absence of dissolved and particulate matter in purified water, mechanical cleaning of the photoreactor chambers is not essential. The process is highly economical; energy consumption is low and supervision minimal. 103 refs., 45 figs., 15 tabs

  12. Ni-doped α-Fe 2 O 3 as electron transporting material for planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells with improved efficiency, reduced hysteresis and ultraviolet stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Ying; Liu, Tao; Wang, Ning; Luo, Qiang; Lin, Hong; Li, Jianbao; Jiang, Qinglong; Wu, Lili; Guo, Zhanhu

    2017-08-01

    We report on high-efficiency planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells (PSCs) employing Ni-doped alpha-Fe2O3 as electron-transporting layer (ETL). The suitable addition of nickel (Ni) dopant could enhance the electron conductivity as well as induce downward shift of the conduction band minimum for alpha-Fe2O3, which facilitate electrons injection and transfer from the conduction band of the perovskite. As a consequence, a substantial reduction in the charge accumulation at the perovskite/ETL interface makes the device much less sensitive to scanning rate and direction, i.e., lower hysteresis. With a reverse scan for the optimized PSC under standard AM-1.5 sunlight illumination, it generates a competitive power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 14.2% with a large short circuit current (J(sc)) of 22.35 mA/cm(2), an open circuit photovoltage (V-oc) of 0.92 V and a fill factor (FF) of 69.1%. Due to the small J-V hysteresis behavior, a higher stabilized PCE up to 11.6% near the maximum power point can be reached for the device fabricated with 4 mol% Ni-doped alpha-Fe2O3 ETL compared with the undoped alpha-Fe2O3 based cell (9.2%). Furthermore, a good stability of devices with exposure to ambient air and high levels of ultraviolet (UV)-light can be achieved. Overall, our results demonstrate that the simple solution-processed Ni-doped alpha-Fe2O3 can be a good candidate of the n-type collection layer for commercialization of PSCs.

  13. Stray light correction on array spectroradiometers for optical radiation risk assessment in the workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlier-Salsi, A

    2014-01-01

    The European directive 2006/25/EC requires the employer to assess and, if necessary, measure the levels of exposure to optical radiation in the workplace. Array spectroradiometers can measure optical radiation from various types of sources; however poor stray light rejection affects their accuracy. A stray light correction matrix, using a tunable laser, was developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). As tunable lasers are very expensive, the purpose of this study was to implement this method using only nine low power lasers; other elements of the correction matrix being completed by interpolation and extrapolation. The correction efficiency was evaluated by comparing CCD spectroradiometers with and without correction and a scanning double monochromator device as reference. Similar to findings recorded by NIST, these experiments show that it is possible to reduce the spectral stray light by one or two orders of magnitude. In terms of workplace risk assessment, this spectral stray light correction method helps determine exposure levels, with an acceptable degree of uncertainty, for the majority of workplace situations. The level of uncertainty depends upon the model of spectroradiometers used; the best results are obtained with CCD detectors having an enhanced spectral sensitivity in the UV range. Thus corrected spectroradiometers require a validation against a scanning double monochromator spectroradiometer before using them for risk assessment in the workplace. (paper)

  14. Stray light correction on array spectroradiometers for optical radiation risk assessment in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlier-Salsi, A

    2014-12-01

    The European directive 2006/25/EC requires the employer to assess and, if necessary, measure the levels of exposure to optical radiation in the workplace. Array spectroradiometers can measure optical radiation from various types of sources; however poor stray light rejection affects their accuracy. A stray light correction matrix, using a tunable laser, was developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). As tunable lasers are very expensive, the purpose of this study was to implement this method using only nine low power lasers; other elements of the correction matrix being completed by interpolation and extrapolation. The correction efficiency was evaluated by comparing CCD spectroradiometers with and without correction and a scanning double monochromator device as reference. Similar to findings recorded by NIST, these experiments show that it is possible to reduce the spectral stray light by one or two orders of magnitude. In terms of workplace risk assessment, this spectral stray light correction method helps determine exposure levels, with an acceptable degree of uncertainty, for the majority of workplace situations. The level of uncertainty depends upon the model of spectroradiometers used; the best results are obtained with CCD detectors having an enhanced spectral sensitivity in the UV range. Thus corrected spectroradiometers require a validation against a scanning double monochromator spectroradiometer before using them for risk assessment in the workplace.

  15. Solar storms; Tormentas solares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collaboration: Pereira Cuesta, S.; Pereira Pagan, B.

    2016-08-01

    Solar storms begin with an explosion, or solar flare, on the surface of the sun. The X-rays and extreme ultraviolet radiation from the flare reach the Earths orbit minutes later-travelling at light speed. The ionization of upper layers of our atmosphere could cause radio blackouts and satellite navigation errors (GPS). Soon after, a wave of energetic particles, electrons and protons accelerated by the explosion crosses the orbit of the Earth, and can cause real and significant damage. (Author)

  16. Comparison of Five Modeling Approaches to Quantify and Estimate the Effect of Clouds on the Radiation Amplification Factor (RAF) for Solar Ultraviolet Radiation

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ultraviolet Radiation (UV) data collected at 21 US Environmental Protection Agency sites throughout the continental US, Alaska, Hawaii, and the US Virgin Islands...

  17. Altmetric: 165More detailArticle | OPENClimate change-induced increases in precipitation are reducing the potential for solar ultraviolet radiation to inactivate pathogens in surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climate change is accelerating the release of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to inland and coastal waters through increases in precipitation, thawing of permafrost, and changes in vegetation. Our modeling approach suggests that the selective absorption of ultraviolet radiation (U...

  18. Cytogenetic, cellular, and developmental responses in antarctic sea urchins (Sterechinus neumayeri) following laboratory ultraviolet-B and ambient solar radiation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, S.; Hoffman, J.; Wild, G.; Bosch, I.; Karentz, D.

    1993-01-01

    Increasing ultraviolet-B radiation as a consequence of springtime ozone depletion, could harm antarctic ecosystems. This study uses several techniques for studying genotoxic effects to evaluate UV-B effects in sea urchins from Antarctica. 6 refs., 2 figs

  19. Columnar characteristics of aerosols by spectroradiometer measurements in the maritime area of the Cadiz Gulf (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergaz, Ricardo; Cachorro, Victoria E.; de Frutos, Ángel M.; Vilaplana, José M.; de La Morena, Benito A.

    2005-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosol characteristics represented by the spectral aerosol optical depth AOD) and the Ångström turbidity parameter were determined in the coastal area of the Gulf of Cádiz, (southwest of Spain). The columnar aerosol properties presented here correspond to the 1996-1999 period, and were obtained by solar direct irradiance measurements carried out by a Licor1800 spectroradiometer. The performance of this type of medium-spectral resolution radiometric system is analysed over the measured period. The detailed spectral information of these irradiance measurements enabled the use of selected non-absorption gases spectral windows to determine the columnar spectral AOD that was modelled by Ångström formula to obtain the coefficient. Temporal evolutions of instantaneous values together with a general statistical analysis represented by seasonal values, frequency distributions and some representative correlations for the AOD and the derived Ångström coefficient gave us the first insight of aerosol characteristics in this coastal area. Special attention was paid to the analysis of these aerosol properties at the nominal wavelengths of 440 nm, 670 nm, 870 nm and 1020 nm for the near-future comparisons with the Cimel sun-photometer data. However, taking the most representative aerosol wavelength of 500 nm, the variability of the AOD ranges from 0.005 to 0.53, with a mean of 0.12 (s.d = 0.07) and that of the parameter is given by a mean value of 0.93 (s.d. = 0.58) falling inside the range of marine aerosols. A quantitative discrimination of aerosol types was conducted on the basis of the spectral aerosol properties and air mass back trajectory analysis, which resulted in a mixed type because of the specificity of this area, given by very frequent desert dust episodes, continental and polluted local influences. This study represents the first extended data characterization about columnar properties of aerosols in Spain which has been continued by Cimel

  20. Calibration of the solar UV radiometers in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leszczynski, K.; Jokela, K.; Visuri, R.; Ylianttila, L. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland). Non-Ionizing Radiation Lab.

    1996-12-31

    In this report, the main emphasis is given to (1) the problems associated with the basic calibration of the spectroradiometer and (2) the year-to-year variability of the calibrations of the solar UV network radiometers. Also, the results from intercomparisons of the Brewer and OL 742 spectroradiometers are included

  1. Calibration of the solar UV radiometers in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leszczynski, K; Jokela, K; Visuri, R; Ylianttila, L [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland). Non-Ionizing Radiation Lab.

    1997-12-31

    In this report, the main emphasis is given to (1) the problems associated with the basic calibration of the spectroradiometer and (2) the year-to-year variability of the calibrations of the solar UV network radiometers. Also, the results from intercomparisons of the Brewer and OL 742 spectroradiometers are included

  2. Comparison of Coincident Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Aerosol Optical Depths over Land and Ocean Scenes Containing Aerosol Robotic Network Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, Wedad A.; Diner, David J.; Martonchik, John V.; Bruegge, Carol J.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Gaitley, Barbara J.; Crean, Kathleen A.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Holben, Brent

    2005-01-01

    The Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), launched on 18 December 1999 aboard the Terra spacecraft, are making global observations of top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances. Aerosol optical depths and particle properties are independently retrieved from these radiances using methodologies and algorithms that make use of the instruments corresponding designs. This paper compares instantaneous optical depths retrieved from simultaneous and collocated radiances measured by the two instruments at locations containing sites within the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). A set of 318 MISR and MODIS images, obtained during the months of March, June, and September 2002 at 62 AERONET sites, were used in this study. The results show that over land, MODIS aerosol optical depths at 470 and 660 nm are larger than those retrieved from MISR by about 35% and 10% on average, respectively, when all land surface types are included in the regression. The differences decrease when coastal and desert areas are excluded. For optical depths retrieved over ocean, MISR is on average about 0.1 and 0.05 higher than MODIS in the 470 and 660 nm bands, respectively. Part of this difference is due to radiometric calibration and is reduced to about 0.01 and 0.03 when recently derived band-to-band adjustments in the MISR radiometry are incorporated. Comparisons with AERONET data show similar patterns.

  3. Comparison of Sun-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence Estimates Obtained from Four Portable Field Spectroradiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julitta, Tommaso; Corp, Lawrence A.; Rossini, Micol; Burkart, Andreas; Cogliati, Sergio; Davies, Neville; Hom, Milton; Mac Arthur, Alasdair; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Rascher, Uwe; hide

    2016-01-01

    Remote Sensing of Sun-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence (SIF) is a research field of growing interest because it offers the potential to quantify actual photosynthesis and to monitor plant status. New satellite missions from the European Space Agency, such as the Earth Explorer 8 FLuorescence EXplorer (FLEX) mission-scheduled to launch in 2022 and aiming at SIF mapping-and from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) such as the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) sampling mission launched in July 2014, provide the capability to estimate SIF from space. The detection of the SIF signal from airborne and satellite platform is difficult and reliable ground level data are needed for calibration/validation. Several commercially available spectroradiometers are currently used to retrieve SIF in the field. This study presents a comparison exercise for evaluating the capability of four spectroradiometers to retrieve SIF. The results show that an accurate far-red SIF estimation can be achieved using spectroradiometers with an ultrafine resolution (less than 1 nm), while the red SIF estimation requires even higher spectral resolution (less than 0.5 nm). Moreover, it is shown that the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) plays a significant role in the precision of the far-red SIF measurements.

  4. Ultraviolet radiation and cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Rajesh Prasad; Sinha, Rajeshwar P; Moh, Sang Hyun; Lee, Taek Kyun; Kottuparambil, Sreejith; Kim, Youn-Jung; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Choi, Eun-Mi; Brown, Murray T; Häder, Donat-Peter; Han, Taejun

    2014-12-01

    Cyanobacteria are the dominant photosynthetic prokaryotes from an ecological, economical, or evolutionary perspective, and depend on solar energy to conduct their normal life processes. However, the marked increase in solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) caused by the continuous depletion of the stratospheric ozone shield has fueled serious concerns about the ecological consequences for all living organisms, including cyanobacteria. UV-B radiation can damage cellular DNA and several physiological and biochemical processes in cyanobacterial cells, either directly, through its interaction with certain biomolecules that absorb in the UV range, or indirectly, with the oxidative stress exerted by reactive oxygen species. However, cyanobacteria have a long history of survival on Earth, and they predate the existence of the present ozone shield. To withstand the detrimental effects of solar UVR, these prokaryotes have evolved several lines of defense and various tolerance mechanisms, including avoidance, antioxidant production, DNA repair, protein resynthesis, programmed cell death, and the synthesis of UV-absorbing/screening compounds, such as mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) and scytonemin. This study critically reviews the current information on the effects of UVR on several physiological and biochemical processes of cyanobacteria and the various tolerance mechanisms they have developed. Genomic insights into the biosynthesis of MAAs and scytonemin and recent advances in our understanding of the roles of exopolysaccharides and heat shock proteins in photoprotection are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of thermal treatment on the Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O films and fabrication of visible-blind and solar-blind ultraviolet photodetectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Chunguang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China); Jiang, Dayong, E-mail: dayongjiangcust@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China); Tan, Zhendong [The Metrology Technology Institute of Jilin, Changchun 132013 (China); Duan, Qian; Liu, Rusheng; Sun, Long; Qin, Jieming; Hou, Jianhua; Gao, Shang; Liang, Qingcheng; Zhao, Jianxun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Single-phase wurtzite/cubic Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O films were grown by RF magnetron sputtering technique. • We focus on the red-shift caused by annealing the Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O films. • MSM-structured visible-blind and solar-blind UV photodetectors were fabricated. - Abstract: A series of single-phase Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O films with different Mg contents were prepared on quartz substrates by RF magnetron sputtering technique using different MgZnO targets, and annealed under the atmospheric environment. The absorption edges of Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O films can cover the whole near ultraviolet and even the whole solar-blind spectra range, and the solar-blind wurtzite/cubic Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O films have been realized successfully by the same method. In addition, the absorption edges of annealed films shift to a long wavelength, which is caused by the diffusion of Zn atoms gathering at the surface during the thermal treatment process. Finally, the truly solar-blind metal-semiconductor-metal structured photodetectors based on wurtzite Mg{sub 0.445}Zn{sub 0.555}O and cubic Mg{sub 0.728}Zn{sub 0.272}O films were fabricated. The corresponding peak responsivities are 17 mA/W at 275 nm and 0.53 mA/W at 250 nm under a 120 V bias, respectively.

  6. Ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawk, J.

    1986-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) from the sun or artificial sources is reflected or transmitted at the surface of the skin, about 5% of normally incident rays being directly reflected. The transmitted fraction is scattered, photochemically absorbed or dissipated as heat within the skin, or passes from it to contribute to the variable total amount of reflected and transmitted radiation. The UVR absorbers in skin are not definitely known, but DNA is a definite target and probably lipoprotein membranes, RNA, proteins, mucopolysaccharides, elastin and collagen. Photochemical or free radical damage to absorber or nearby organelles leads to pharmacological, ultrastructural, histological and clinical changes. Most frequent DNA damage is pyrimidine dimer formation, apparently inhibiting cell function and replication. This is largely enzymatically repaired in man in the dark by excision repair, post-replication repair and possible other enzymatic mechanisms, and at least in some organisms by light-induced photoreactivation repair. UVR exposure causes well recognized acute and chronic clinical syndromes in man. These are discussed in this paper

  7. Accelerated Solar-UV Test Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A.; Laue, E. G.

    1984-01-01

    Medium-pressure mercury-vapor lamps provide high ratio of ultraviolet to total power. Chamber for evaluating solar-ultraviolet (UV) radiation damage permits accelerated testing without overheating test specimens.

  8. Variations of Global Terrestrial Primary Production Observed by Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) From 2000 to 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, M.; Running, S.; Heinsch, F. A.

    2006-12-01

    Since the first Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite Terra was launched in December 1999 and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor onboard Terra began to provide data in February 2000, we have had six-year MODIS global 1-km terrestrial Gross and Net Primary Production (GPP &NPP) datasets. In this article, we present the variations (seasonality and inter-annual variability) of global GPP/NPP from the latest improved Collection 4.8 (C4.8) MODIS datasets for the past six-year (2000 - 2005), as well as improvements of the algorithm, validations of GPP and NPP. Validation results show that the C4.8 data have higher accuracy and quality than the previous version. Analyses of the variations in GPP/NPP show that GPP not only can reflect strong seasonality of photosynthesis activities by plants in mid- and high-latitude, but importantly, can reveal enhanced growth of Amazon rainforests during dry season, consistent with the reports by Huete et al. (2006) on GRL. Spatially, plants over mid- and high-latitude (north to 22.5°N) are the major contributor of global GPP seasonality. Inter-annual variability of MODIS NPP for 2000 - 2005 reveals the negative effects of major droughts on carbon sequestration at the regional and continental scales. A striking phenomenon is that the severe drought in 2005 over Amazon reduced NPP, indicating water availability becomes the dominant limiting factor rather than solar radiation under normal conditions. GMAO and NCEP driven global total NPPs have the similar interannual anomalies, and they generally follow the inverted CO2 growth rate anomaly with correlation of 0.85 and 0.91, respectively, which are higher than the correlation of 0.7 found by Nemani et al. (2003) on Science. Though there are only 6 years of MODIS data, results show that global NPP decreased from 2000 to 2005, and spatially most decreased NPP areas are in tropic and south hemisphere.

  9. Comparison of GOME-2/MetOp total ozone data with Brewer spectroradiometer data over the Iberian Peninsula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anton, M.; Serrano, A. [Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain). Dept. de Fisica; Loyola, D.; Zimmer, W. [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Wessling (DE). Remote Sensing Technology Inst. (IMF); Lopez, M.; Banon, M. [Agencia Estatal de Meteorologia (AEMet), Madrid (Spain); Vilaplana, J.M. [Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA), Huelva (Spain). Estacion de Sondeos Atmosferico ' ' El Arenosillo' '

    2009-07-01

    The main objective of this article is to compare the total ozone data from the new Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment instrument (GOME-2/MetOp) with reliable ground-based measurement recorded by five Brewer spectroradiometers in the Iberian Peninsula. In addition, a similar comparison for the predecessor instrument GOME/ERS-2 is described. The period of study is a whole year from May 2007 to April 2008. The results show that GOME-2/MetOp ozone data already has a very good quality, total ozone columns are on average 3.05% lower than Brewer measurements. This underestimation is higher than that obtained for GOME/ERS-2 (1.46%). However, the relative differences between GOME-2/MetOp and Brewer measurements show significantly lower variability than the differences between GOME/ERS-2 and Brewer data. Dependencies of these relative differences with respect to the satellite solar zenith angle (SZA), the satellite scan angle, the satellite cloud cover fraction (CF), and the ground-based total ozone measurements are analyzed. For both GOME instruments, differences show no significant dependence on SZA. However, GOME-2/MetOp data show a significant dependence on the satellite scan angle (+1.5%). In addition, GOME/ERS-2 differences present a clear dependence with respect to the CF and ground-based total ozone; such differences are minimized for GOME-2/MetOp. The comparison between the daily total ozone values provided by both GOME instruments shows that GOME-2/MetOp ozone data are on average 1.46% lower than GOME/ERS-2 data without any seasonal dependence. Finally, deviations of a priori climatological ozone profile used by the satellite retrieval algorithm from the true ozone profile are analyzed. Although excellent agreement between a priori climatological and measured partial ozone values is found for the middle and high stratosphere, relative differences greater than 15% are common for the troposphere and lower stratosphere. (orig.)

  10. Ultraviolet radiation in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taalas, P.; Koskela, T.; Damski, J.; Supperi, A. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland). Section of Ozone and UV Research; Kyroe, E. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Sodankylae (Finland). Sodankylae Observatory

    1996-12-31

    Solar ultraviolet radiation is damaging for living organisms due to its high energy pro each photon. The UV radiation is often separated into three regions according to the wavelength: UVC (200-280 nm), UVB (280-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm). The most hazardous part, UVC is absorbed completely in the upper atmosphere by molecular oxygen. UVB radiation is absorbed by atmospheric ozone partly, and it is reaching Earth`s surface, as UVA radiation. Besides atmospheric ozone, very important factors in determining the intensity of UVB radiation globally are the solar zenith angle and cloudiness. It may be calculated from global ozone changes that the clear-sky UVB doses may have enhanced by 10-15 % during spring and 5-10 % during summer at the latitudes of Finland, following the decrease of total ozone between 1979-90. The Finnish ozone and UV monitoring activities have become a part of international activities, especially the EU Environment and Climate Programme`s research projects. The main national level effort has been the Finnish Academy`s climatic change programme, SILMU 1990-95. This presentation summarises the scientific results reached during the SILMU project

  11. Ultraviolet radiation in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taalas, P; Koskela, T; Damski, J; Supperi, A [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland). Section of Ozone and UV Research; Kyroe, E [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Sodankylae (Finland). Sodankylae Observatory

    1997-12-31

    Solar ultraviolet radiation is damaging for living organisms due to its high energy pro each photon. The UV radiation is often separated into three regions according to the wavelength: UVC (200-280 nm), UVB (280-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm). The most hazardous part, UVC is absorbed completely in the upper atmosphere by molecular oxygen. UVB radiation is absorbed by atmospheric ozone partly, and it is reaching Earth`s surface, as UVA radiation. Besides atmospheric ozone, very important factors in determining the intensity of UVB radiation globally are the solar zenith angle and cloudiness. It may be calculated from global ozone changes that the clear-sky UVB doses may have enhanced by 10-15 % during spring and 5-10 % during summer at the latitudes of Finland, following the decrease of total ozone between 1979-90. The Finnish ozone and UV monitoring activities have become a part of international activities, especially the EU Environment and Climate Programme`s research projects. The main national level effort has been the Finnish Academy`s climatic change programme, SILMU 1990-95. This presentation summarises the scientific results reached during the SILMU project

  12. Simultaneous measurement of spectral sky radiance by a non-scanning multidirectional spectroradiometer (MUDIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riechelmann, Stefan; Schrempf, Michael; Seckmeyer, Gunther

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel non-scanning multidirectional spectroradiometer (MUDIS) measuring the spectral sky radiance as a function of zenith and azimuth angle with a high spectral and temporal resolution. The instrument is based on a hyperspectral imager and measures spectral sky radiance in the wavelength range of 250–600 nm at 113 different directions simultaneously. MUDIS has been intercalibrated with a sky scanning CCD spectroradiometer (SCCD). Sky radiance measurements have been performed with both instruments under cloudless and overcast sky. The spectral actinic irradiance derived from those measurements agrees within 8% for wavelengths higher than 320 nm. The bias between synchronous MUDIS and SCCD sky radiance measurements during cloudless and overcast sky is below 5% for 320 and 500 nm with a 1σ standard deviation of less than 10%. MUDIS enables us to perform more than 220 000 spectral sky radiance measurements instead of approximately 6000 SCCD spectral sky radiance measurements per day and to measure spatial variations of spectral sky radiance simultaneously. (paper)

  13. The correlation and quantification of airborne spectroradiometer data to turbidity measurements at Lake Powell, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merry, C. J.

    1979-01-01

    A water sampling program was accomplished at Lake Powell, Utah, during June 1975 for correlation to multispectral data obtained with a 500-channel airborne spectroradiometer. Field measurements were taken of percentage of light transmittance, surface temperature, pH and Secchi disk depth. Percentage of light transmittance was also measured in the laboratory for the water samples. Analyses of electron micrographs and suspended sediment concentration data for four water samples located at Hite Bridge, Mile 168, Mile 150 and Bullfrog Bay indicated differences in the composition and concentration of the particulate matter. Airborne spectroradiometer multispectral data were analyzed for the four sampling locations. The results showed that: (1) as the percentage of light transmittance of the water samples decreased, the reflected radiance increased; and (2) as the suspended sediment concentration (mg/l) increased, the reflected radiance increased in the 1-80 mg/l range. In conclusion, valuable qualitative information was obtained on surface turbidity for the Lake Powell water spectra. Also, the reflected radiance measured at a wavelength of 0.58 micron was directly correlated to the suspended sediment concentration.

  14. Pollen and spores as biological recorders of past ultraviolet irradiance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jardine, P.E.; Fraser, W.T.; Lomax, B.H.; Sephton, M.A.; Shanahan, T.M.; Miller, C.S.; Gosling, W.D.

    2016-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiance is a key driver of climatic and biotic change. Ultraviolet irradiance modulates stratospheric warming and ozone production, and influences the biosphere from ecosystem-level processes through to the largest scale patterns of diversification and extinction. Yet our

  15. High Data Rate Optical Wireless Communications Based on Ultraviolet Band

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Xiaobin

    2017-01-01

    Optical wireless communication systems based on ultraviolet (UV)-band has a lot inherent advantages, such as low background solar radiation, low device dark noise. Besides, it also has small restrictive requirements for PAT (pointing, acquisition

  16. Effects of enhanced solar ultraviolet B radiation due to atmospheric pollutants on the cultivated plant yield (FKW 22). First experimental year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esser, G.; Franz, D.; Haeser, M.; Hugemann, B.; Schaaf, H.

    1979-02-01

    The study examined the effects of enhanced ultraviolet B radiation on the yield of cultivated plants. Preparatory studies have shown the intensity margin within which effects are observable in the plants. The experimental conditions cover four different u.v. B intensities, namely e, f, g, h; corresponding to a given percentage of atmospheric ozone reduction (eapprox.=40 p.c., fapprox.=25 p.c., gapprox.=15 p.c., and happrox.=10 p.c.). The plants for the experiments are potatoes, spring wheat, winter rape-seed, lettuce, and kohlrabi, which have been cultivated under experimental conditions over the whole growth period, except for lattuce and kohlrabi. The irradiation periods are 10 h a day. All four u.v. intensities proved to have an effect on plant yield. In potatoes and spring wheat irradiation corresponding to category h conditions enhanced the yield as compared to non-irradiated controls, whereas intensities corresponding to category e had a yield reducing effect. The starch content of potato nodules was 97 p.c. under g and h conditions, 77 p.c. under condition f, and 68 p.c. under condition e. In lettuce, the yield in fresh weight for category h was 97 p.c., for g 86 p.c., for f 83 p.c., and for e 55 p.c. In kohlrabi plants, yield increases were obtained in the low intensity ranges. In winter rape-seed, radiation of all four categories retarded germination. Another item investigated was the infection of spring wheat with Erisyphe graninis and possible radiation effects on this process. The experiments showed that already low doses ultraviolet B radiation reduced the number of conidiophores on the leaves, without damage to be observed in the plants. (orig./MG) [de

  17. Preliminary observations and results obtained with the ultraviolet spectrometer and polarimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Athay, R.G.; Beckers, J.M.; Brandt, J.C.; Bruner, E.C.; Chapman, R.D.; Cheng, C.C.; Burman, J.G.; Henze, W.; Hyder, C.L.; Michalitsianos, A.G.; Shine, R.A.; Schoolman, S.A.; Woodgate, B.E.

    1981-01-01

    We present new observations with the Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter (UVSP) of a number of manifestations of solar activity obtained during the first 3 months of Solar Maximum Mission operations

  18. Ultraviolet radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    UVR can be classified into UV-A, UV-B, and UV-C regions. A long period of UVR deficiency may have a harmful effect on the human body. The best known manifestation of UVR deficiency is the development of vitamin D deficiency and rickets in children because of a disturbance in the phosphorus and calcium metabolism. The acute effects of UVR on the eyes consist of the development of photokeratitis and photoconjunctivitis. Acute effects on the skin consist of solar erythema sunburn. Chronic effects on the eye consist of the development of pterygium and squamous cell cancer of the conjunctiva and perhaps cataracts. Chronic skin changes due to UVR consist of aging and the induction of premalignant changes and malignant skin tumours. Criteria for occupational exposure levels in work places have been proposed. It must be recognized that significant nonoccupational exposure to UVR occurs from exposure to sunlight. Thus, exposure limits for the general population are difficult to recommend. Finally, the document describes existing protection and control measures such as the containment of UVR sources, and methods for personal protection including the use of sunscreen preparations, clothing, transparent material for eye and skin protection, and behavioural modifications.

  19. Ultraviolet spectrophotometer for measuring columnar atmospheric ozone from aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanser, F. A.; Sellers, B.; Briehl, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    An ultraviolet spectrophotometer (UVS) to measure downward solar fluxes from an aircraft or other high altitude platform is described. The UVS uses an ultraviolet diffuser to obtain large angular response with no aiming requirement, a twelve-position filter wheel with narrow (2-nm) and broad (20-nm) bandpass filters, and an ultraviolet photodiode. The columnar atmospheric ozone above the UVS (aircraft) is calculated from the ratios of the measured ultraviolet fluxes. Comparison with some Dobson station measurements gives agreement to 2%. Some UVS measured ozone profiles over the Pacific Ocean for November 1976 are shown to illustrate the instrument's performance.

  20. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation: recommendations for cosmetic use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, C.; Carvalho, F.R.S.

    2000-01-01

    The beginning of the so-called tanning industry made possible the acquisition of a tanned skin independently of the available solar radiation. The tan is produced by ultraviolet radiation and, as well as in solar exposure, there are additional risks on the use of the so-called sun-beds. The damaging effects of ultraviolet exposure are well documented and reasonably quantified. The objective of this paper is to inform the potential effects of ultraviolet radiation exposure in sun-beds and to provide recommendations in order to reduce the associated risks. These recommendations are adapted for cosmetics use only (author)

  1. Correlation between endogenous glutathione content and sensitivity of cultured human skin cells to radiation at defined wavelengths in the solar ultraviolet range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyrrell, R.M.; Pidoux, M.

    1988-01-01

    Glutathione depletion of cultured human skin fibroblasts by treatment with buthionine-S.R.-sulfoximine (BSO) sensitises them to solar UV radiation. We now show that there is a close quantitative correlation between cellular glutathione content and sensitivity to radiation at 365 nm. A weaker correlation is observed when cells are depleted of glutathione using diethylmaleimide. Both fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes derived from the same foreskin biopsy are sensitised to radiation at 313 nm by glutathione depletion. At low to intermediate fluence levels, 10 mM cysteamine present during irradiation at 302 nm is able to almost completely reverse the sensitising effects of glutathione depletion suggesting that the endogenous thiol protects against radiation at this wavelength by a free radical scavenging mechanism. At 313 nm, the sensitisation is not reversed by cysteamine suggesting that glutathione plays a more specific role in protection against radiation at longer wavelengths. Xeroderma pigmentosum group A fibroblasts (excision deficient) are also sensitised to radiation at 313 and 365 nm by depletion of glutathione. The results provide further evidence that endogenous glutathione is involved in protecting human skin cells against a wide range of solar radiation damage. (author)

  2. β-Ga2O3 solar-blind deep-ultraviolet photodetector based on a four-terminal structure with or without Zener diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. X. Qian

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A four-terminal photodetector was fabricated on the ( 2 ¯ 01 -dominant β-Ga2O3 thin film which was deposited in a plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy system. The suitability of this film for solar-blind DUV detection was proved by its transmission spectra. Moreover, the device operating in a specific voltage-current mode can accurately detect the DUV radiation both qualitatively and quantitatively. Accordingly, a dark/photo voltage ratio of 15 was achieved, which is comparable to that of previously-reported β-Ga2O3 interdigital metal-semiconductor-metal photoconductor. More importantly, the aperture ratio of our proposed device exceeds 80%, nearly doubling that of the conventional interdigital metal-semiconductor-metal devices including photoconductor and Schottky-type photodiode, which can intensively benefit the detection efficiency. Furthermore, it was found the dark/photo voltage ratio was nearly trebled with the assistance of two Zener diodes, and further enhancement can be expected by increasing the operating current and/or adopting Zener diodes with smaller Zener voltage. Therefore, this work provides a promising alternative for solar-blind DUV detection.

  3. Visible-blind and solar-blind ultraviolet photodiodes based on (In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}){sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhipeng; Wenckstern, Holger von; Lenzner, Jörg; Lorenz, Michael; Grundmann, Marius [Institut für Experimentelle Physik II, Fakultät für Physik und Geowissenschaften, Universität Leipzig, Linnéstraße 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-03-21

    UV and deep-UV selective photodiodes from visible-blind to solar-blind were realized based on a Si-doped (In{sub x}Ga{sub 1–x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film with a monotonic lateral variation of 0.0035 < x < 0.83. Such layer was deposited by employing a continuous composition spread approach relying on the ablation of a single segmented target in pulsed-laser deposition. The photo response signal is provided from a metal-semiconductor-metal structure upon backside illumination. The absorption onset was tuned from 4.83 to 3.22 eV for increasing x. Higher responsivities were observed for photodiodes fabricated from indium-rich part of the sample, for which an internal gain mechanism could be identified.

  4. Forest canopy height from Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) assessed with high resolution discrete return lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Chopping; Anne Nolin; Gretchen G. Moisen; John V. Martonchik; Michael Bull

    2009-01-01

    In this study retrievals of forest canopy height were obtained through adjustment of a simple geometricoptical (GO) model against red band surface bidirectional reflectance estimates from NASA's Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), mapped to a 250 m grid. The soil-understory background contribution was partly isolated prior to inversion using regression...

  5. Exploring field-of-view non-uniformities produced by a hand-held spectroradiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamir Caras

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The shape of a spectroradiometer’s field of view (FOV affects the way spectral measurements are acquired. Knowing this property is a prerequisite for the correct use of the spectrometer. If the substrate is heterogeneous, the ability to accurately know what is being measured depends on knowing the FOV location, shape, spectral and spatial sensitivity. The GER1500 is a hand-held spectrometer with a fixed lens light entry slit and has a laser guide that allows control over the target by positioning the entire unit. In the current study, the FOV of the GER1500 was mapped and analysed. The spectral and spatial non-uniformities of the FOV were examined and were found to be spectrally independent. The relationship between the FOV and the built-in laser guide was tested and found to have a linear displacement dependent on the distance to the target. This allows an accurate prediction of the actual FOV position. A correction method to improve the agreement between the expected and measured reflectance over heterogeneous targets was developed and validated. The methods described are applicable and may be of use with other hand-held spectroradiometers.

  6. Moderate Imaging Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieval for Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmat, A.; Jalal, K. A.; Ahmad, N.

    2018-02-01

    The present study uses the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) retrieved from Moderate Imaging Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data for the period from January 2011 until December 2015 over an urban area in Kuching, Sarawak. The results show the minimum AOD value retrieved from MODIS is -0.06 and the maximum value is 6.0. High aerosol loading with high AOD value observed during dry seasons and low AOD monitored during wet seasons. Multi plane regression technique used to retrieve AOD from MODIS (AODMODIS) and different statistics parameter is proposed by using relative absolute error for accuracy assessment in spatial and temporal averaging approach. The AODMODIS then compared with AOD derived from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Sunphotometer (AODAERONET) and the results shows high correlation coefficient (R2) for AODMODIS and AODAERONET with 0.93. AODMODIS used as an input parameters into Santa Barbara Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model to estimate urban radiative forcing at Kuching. The observed hourly averaged for urban radiative forcing is -0.12 Wm-2 for top of atmosphere (TOA), -2.13 Wm-2 at the surface and 2.00 Wm-2 in the atmosphere. There is a moderate relationship observed between urban radiative forcing calculated using SBDART and AERONET which are 0.75 at the surface, 0.65 at TOA and 0.56 in atmosphere. Overall, variation in AOD tends to cause large bias in the estimated urban radiative forcing.

  7. Perceived color shift of ceramics according to the change of illuminating light with spectroradiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyun-Suk; Yu, Bin

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Perceived color of ceramics changes by the spectral power distribution of ambient light. This study aimed to quantify the amount of shifts in color and color coordinates of clinically simulated seven all-ceramics due to the switch of three ambient light sources using a human vision simulating spectroradiometer. MATERIALS AND METHODS CIE color coordinates, such as L*, a* and b*,of ceramic specimens were measured under three light sources, which simulate the CIE standard illuminant D65 (daylight), A (incandescent lamp), and F9 (fluorescent lamp). Shifts in color and color coordinate by the switch of lights were determined. Influence of the switched light (D65 to A, or D65 to F9), shade of veneer ceramics (A2 or A3), and brand of ceramics on the shifts was analyzed by a three-way ANOVA. RESULTS Shifts in color and color coordinates were influenced by three factors (P 5.5). When switched to A, CIE a* increased (Δa*: 5.6 to 7.6), however, CIE b* increased (Δb*: 4.9 to 7.8) when switched to F9. CONCLUSION Clinically simulated ceramics demonstrated clinically unacceptable color shifts according to the switches in ambient lights based on spectroradiometric readings. Therefore, shade matching and compatibility evaluation should be performed considering ambient lighting conditions and should be done under most relevant lighting condition. PMID:24049567

  8. Modified vegetation indices for Ganoderma disease detection in oil palm from field spectroradiometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafri, Helmi Z. M.; Anuar, M. Izzuddin; Saripan, M. Iqbal

    2009-10-01

    High resolution field spectroradiometers are important for spectral analysis and mobile inspection of vegetation disease. The biggest challenges in using this technology for automated vegetation disease detection are in spectral signatures pre-processing, band selection and generating reflectance indices to improve the ability of hyperspectral data for early detection of disease. In this paper, new indices for oil palm Ganoderma disease detection were generated using band ratio and different band combination techniques. Unsupervised clustering method was used to cluster the values of each class resultant from each index. The wellness of band combinations was assessed by using Optimum Index Factor (OIF) while cluster validation was executed using Average Silhouette Width (ASW). 11 modified reflectance indices were generated in this study and the indices were ranked according to the values of their ASW. These modified indices were also compared to several existing and new indices. The results showed that the combination of spectral values at 610.5nm and 738nm was the best for clustering the three classes of infection levels in the determination of the best spectral index for early detection of Ganoderma disease.

  9. Photodetector of ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorogan, V.; Branzari, V.; Vieru, T.; Manole, M.; Canter, V.

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to photodetectors on base of semiconductors of ultraviolet radiation and may be used in optoelectronic system for determining the intensity and the dose of ultraviolet radiation emitted by the Sun or other sources. Summary of the invention consists in the fact that in the photodetector of ultraviolet radiation the superficial potential barrier is divided into two identical elements, electrically isolated each of the other, one of them being covered with a layer of transparent material for visible and infrared radiation and absorption the ultra violet radiation. The technical result consists in mutual compensation of visible and infrared components of the radiation spectrum

  10. New observations of the solar ultraviolet chromosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, E. C., Jr.; Parker, R. W.; Chipman, E.; Stevens, R.

    1973-01-01

    We present some of the results of a rocket flight which obtained a stigmatic spectrum of the sun in the region 1190 to 1320A. The experiment achieved a spectral resolution of 0.01A throughout this range, and the effective angular resolution was about 20 sec. Lines which are formed in the chromosphere and transition zone show strong fluctuations with position on the disk. The correspondence between the H Lyman-alpha profile and chromospheric details seen in the Ca K-line is demonstrated.

  11. Exposure of Finnish population to ultraviolet radiation and radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoikkala, M.; Lappalainen, J.; Leszczynski, K.; Paile, W.

    1990-01-01

    This report is based on a survey of the literature on radiation risks involved in sunbathing and the use of solaria. The purpose of the report is to provide background information for the development of regulations on solaria and for informing the public about the risks posed by solaria and the sun. The report gives an overview of the properties and biological effects of ultraviolet radiation. The most important regulations and recommendations issued in various countries are presented. The connection between ultraviolet radiation and the risks of skin cancer is examined both on a general level and in reference to information obtained from the Finnish Cancer Registry. In Finland, the incidence of melanomas nearly tripled between 1960 and 1980. The most important cause is considered to be the population's increased exposure to the su's ultraviolet radiation. There are no reliable data on the connection between the use of solaria and the risks of skin cancer. It is estimated, however, that solaria account for less than 10 per cent of the skin cancer risk of the whole population. There are some difficult physical problems associated with the measurement of ultraviolet radiation emitted by both natural sources and solaria. A preliminary study of these problems has been undertaken by means of a survey of the available literature, supplemented by a review of measurements performed by the Finnish Centre For Radiation and Nuclear Safety. The estimated inaccuracy of the Optronic 742 spectroradiometer used by the Centre in the measurement of ultraviolet radiation emitted by the sun and solaria is about +-14%

  12. The Physics and Diagnostic Potential of Ultraviolet Spectropolarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo Bueno, Javier; Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio; Belluzzi, Luca

    2017-09-01

    The empirical investigation of the magnetic field in the outer solar atmosphere is a very important challenge in astrophysics. To this end, we need to identify, measure and interpret observable quantities sensitive to the magnetism of the upper chromosphere, transition region and corona. This paper provides an overview of the physics and diagnostic potential of spectropolarimetry in permitted spectral lines of the ultraviolet solar spectrum, such as the Mg ii h and k lines around 2800 Å, the hydrogen Lyman-α line at 1216 Å, and the Lyman-α line of He ii at 304 Å. The outer solar atmosphere is an optically pumped vapor and the linear polarization of such spectral lines is dominated by the atomic level polarization produced by the absorption and scattering of anisotropic radiation. Its modification by the action of the Hanle and Zeeman effects in the inhomogeneous and dynamic solar atmosphere needs to be carefully understood because it encodes the magnetic field information. The circular polarization induced by the Zeeman effect in some ultraviolet lines (e.g., Mg ii h & k) is also of diagnostic interest, especially for probing the outer solar atmosphere in plages and more active regions. The few (pioneering) observational attempts carried out so far to measure the ultraviolet spectral line polarization produced by optically pumped atoms in the upper chromosphere, transition region and corona are also discussed. We emphasize that ultraviolet spectropolarimetry is a key gateway to the outer atmosphere of the Sun and of other stars.

  13. Aerosol climatology over South Africa based on 10 years of Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tesfaye, M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available ; Eck et al., 2003; Freiman and Piketh, 2003; Ichoku et al., 2003; Ross et al., 2003; Liu, 2005; Winkler et al., 2008; Queface et al., 2011]. Those studies focused on a limited time scale, dur- ing biomass�burning seasons, and on the northern parts... to provide further information on particle size distribution of aerosols in the solar spectrum. Several authors have discussed how the spectral variation of a can provide information about the aerosol size distribution [e.g., Nakajima et al., 1986...

  14. Modification of UV absorption profile of polymer film reflectors to increase solar-weighted reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Gary; Gee, Randall C.; White, David

    2017-05-02

    Provided are reflective thin film constructions including a reduced number of layers, which provides for increased solar-weighted hemispherical reflectance and durability. Reflective films include those comprising an ultraviolet absorbing abrasion resistant coating over a metal layer. Also provided are ultraviolet absorbing abrasion resistant coatings and methods for optimizing the ultraviolet absorption of an abrasion resistant coating. Reflective films disclosed herein are useful for solar reflecting, solar collecting, and solar concentrating applications, such as for the generation of electrical power.

  15. GHRSST Level 2P Global Skin Sea Surface Temperature from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the NASA Terra satellite (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is a scientific instrument (radiometer) launched by NASA in 1999 on board the Terra satellite platform (a...

  16. GHRSST Level 2P Global Skin Sea Surface Temperature from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the NASA Aqua satellite (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is a scientific instrument (radiometer) launched by NASA in 2002 on board the Aqua satellite platform (a...

  17. Novel photoinducible protective system in the Candida Guilliermondii under mid-ultraviolet radiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frajkin, G.Ya.; Pinyaskina, E.V.; Strakhovskaya, M.G.

    1995-01-01

    Resistance of the Candida guilliermondii cells to ultraviolet radiation (290-320 nm, 400-750 nm) is studied. Presence of previously unknown photoinducible protective mechanism in yeasts, providing for increase in cell stability to mid-ultraviolet radiation, biologically most active in the solar radiation spectrum, is revealed. 9 refs.; 3 figs

  18. Influence of surface layer removal of shade guide tabs on the measured color by spectrophotometer and spectroradiometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Cheol; Yu, Bin; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2008-12-01

    To determine the changes in color parameters of Vitapan 3D-Master shade guide tabs by a spectrophotometer (SP) or a spectroradiometer (SR), and by the removal of the surface layer of the tabs that was performed to make a flat measuring surface for the SP color measurement. Color of the shade tabs was measured before and after removing the surface layer of the tabs using SP and SR. Correlations between the color parameters between the original (OR) and the surface layer removed (RM) tabs and between the SP and the SR measurements were determined (alpha=0.05). Based on SP, the lightness, chroma, CIE a* and b* values measured after the surface layer removal were higher than those of the original tabs except a few cases. Based on SR, the chroma and CIE a* and b* values measured after surface layer removal were higher than those of the original tabs except a few cases; however, in case of the lightness, the changes varied by the shade designation. Type of instrument influenced the changes in color parameters based on paired t-test (pspectrophotometer or a spectroradiometer, measurement protocols should be specified because color difference by the surface layer removal and the instrument was high.

  19. Effect of ultraviolet-B radiation on biochemical and antioxidant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The stratospheric ozone depletion and enhanced solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) ... mechanism produced by enzymatic antioxidant such as catalase, peroxidase, ... absorb UV-B and prevent it from penetrating into the leaf mosophyll cells. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of UV-B radiation on Indigofera tinctoria ...

  20. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate on Melanogenesis in Ultraviolet A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    compared to blank (control) which was neither treated by UVA nor by EGCG. TEM showed that UVA induced the formation of ... Biological Engineering Technology Co., Ltd,. (Shanghai, China). PA102 Bradford protein assay kit ..... Sliney DH. Estimating the solar ultraviolet radiation exposure to an intraocular eye implant.

  1. Analysis and design of the ultraviolet warning optical system based on interference imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-cong; Hu, Hui-jun; Jin, Dong-dong; Chu, Xin-bo; Shi, Yu-feng; Song, Juan; Liu, Jin-sheng; Xiao, Ting; Shao, Si-pei

    2017-10-01

    Ultraviolet warning technology is one of the important methods for missile warning. It provides a very effective way to detect the target for missile approaching alarm. With the development of modern technology, especially the development of information technology at high speed, the ultraviolet early warning system plays an increasingly important role. Compared to infrared warning, the ultraviolet warning has high efficiency and low false alarm rate. In the modern warfare, how to detect the threats earlier, prevent and reduce the attack of precision-guided missile has become a new challenge of missile warning technology. Because the ultraviolet warning technology has high environmental adaptability, the low false alarm rate, small volume and other advantages, in the military field applications it has been developed rapidly. For the ultraviolet warning system, the optimal working waveband is 250 nm 280 nm (Solar Blind UV) due to the strong absorption of ozone layer. According to current application demands for solar blind ultraviolet detection and warning, this paper proposes ultraviolet warning optical system based on interference imaging, which covers solar blind ultraviolet (250nm-280nm) and dual field. This structure includes a primary optical system, an ultraviolet reflector array, an ultraviolet imaging system and an ultraviolet interference imaging system. It makes use of an ultraviolet beam-splitter to achieve the separation of two optical systems. According to the detector and the corresponding application needs of two visual field of the optical system, the calculation and optical system design were completed. After the design, the MTF of the two optical system is more than 0.8@39lp/mm.A single pixel energy concentration is greater than 80%.

  2. Ultraviolet radiation and immunosuppression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, G M

    2009-11-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a complete carcinogen. The effects of UV radiation are mediated via direct damage to cellular DNA in the skin and suppression of image surveillance mechanisms. In the context of organ transplantation, addiction of drugs which suppress the immune system add greatly to the carcinogenicity of UV radiation. This review considers the mechanisms of such effects.

  3. Stellar extreme ultraviolet astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cash, W.C. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The design, calibration, and launch of a rocket-borne imaging telescope for extreme ultraviolet astronomy are described. The telescope, which employed diamond-turned grazing incidence optics and a ranicon detector, was launched November 19, 1976, from the White Sands Missile Range. The telescope performed well and returned data on several potential stellar sources of extreme ultraviolet radiation. Upper limits ten to twenty times more sensitive than previously available were obtained for the extreme ultraviolet flux from the white dwarf Sirius B. These limits fall a factor of seven below the flux predicted for the star and demonstrate that the temperature of Sirius B is not 32,000 K as previously measured, but is below 30,000 K. The new upper limits also rule out the photosphere of the white dwarf as the source of the recently reported soft x-rays from Sirius. Two other white dwarf stars, Feige 24 and G191-B2B, were observed. Upper limits on the flux at 300 A were interpreted as lower limits on the interstellar hydrogen column densities to these stars. The lower limits indicate interstellar hydrogen densitites of greater than .02 cm -3 . Four nearby stars (Sirius, Procyon, Capella, and Mirzam) were observed in a search for intense low temperature coronae or extended chromospheres. No extreme ultraviolet radiation from these stars was detected, and upper limits to their coronal emisson measures are derived

  4. Ultraviolet fire detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnage, J. E.; Linford, R. M. F.; Cornish, S. D.

    1976-01-01

    System is capable of detecting ultraviolet light emitted by match size flame at distance of 10 ft. System is not affected by high energy or particulate radiation and is therefore particularly suited for applications around nuclear plants and X-ray equipment.

  5. Solar cataract: A clinical report | Ahuama | Journal of Health and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Solar Ultraviolet radiation is caractogenic, as there is increasing evidence implicating ultraviolet radiation as a risk factor in the aetiology of cataracts. Through absorption from sunlight exposure especially into the violet and of the visible range of the solar spectrum, cataract formation may occur due to physiochemical ...

  6. Solar ultraviolet radiation affects the activity of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase and the composition of photosynthetic and xanthophyll cycle pigments in the intertidal green alga Ulva lactuca L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischof, K; Krabs, G; Wiencke, C; Hanelt, D

    The effect of solar UV radiation on the physiology of the intertidal green macroalga Ulva lactuca L. was investigated. A natural Ulm community at the shore of Helgoland was covered with screening foils, excluding UV-B or UV-B + UV-A from the solar spectrum. In the sampled material, changes in the

  7. The Relationship between Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure and Vitamin D Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Engelsen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the main factors influencing the synthesis of vitamin D, with particular focus on ultraviolet radiation exposure. On the global level, the main source of vitamin D is the sun. The effect of solar radiation on vitamin D synthesis depends to some extent on the initial vitamin D levels. At moderate to high latitudes, diet becomes an increasingly important source of vitamin D due to decreased solar intensity and cold temperatures, which discourage skin exposure. During the mid-winter season, these factors result in decreased solar radiation exposure, hindering extensively the synthesis of vitamin D in these populations.

  8. Spectro-radiometers ASTER and MODIS - character of data, their accessibility and exploitability in area of environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hlasny, T.; Bucha, T.; Rasi, R.

    2005-01-01

    In this presentation some basic information about spectro-radiometers ASTER and MODIS are presented. Relative wide opportunities of exploitation of these products in area of environment, their high spectral and in case of MODIS time resolution are discussed. These parameters create starting-point for building-up of regional monitoring systems of different biophysical characteristics of terrestrial ecosystems and monitoring of time and spatial variability. Next effort in this area should be aimed on development and optimisation of regional models based on monitoring of time and spatial changes of vegetable and foliar indexes (NDVI, EVI, LAI), photosynthetically active part of radiation absorbed by vegetation (FPAR) and likewise, as well as detail analyses of these data in context of global climatic changes. Perspectives of remote sensing earth in the Slovak republic are discussed

  9. Ultraviolet-B-effects on plants: Spectra of harmful effects, primary damage and UV protective mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellmann, E.; Beggs, C.; Moehle, B.; Schneider-Ziebert, U.; Steinmetz, V.; Koch, U.

    1986-01-01

    In two model systems of higher plants, damage caused by ultraviolet-B-radiation was analysed as to its mechanism of action and the spectral quantum efficiency. These investigations were to provide information on the relevance of such UV effects in cases of increased ultraviolet-B-irradiation owing to the destruction of ozone. The results indicate the very high tolerance of the plants to ultraviolet-B-radiation which obviously is the result of very effective protective mechanisms, and show at the same time that potential damage must already be reckoned with, given the current share of ultraviolet-B-radiation in solar radiation. Should ultraviolet-B-radiation be increased, then indirect damage to the plant from the destruction of ultraviolet protective mechanisms through UV-B-radiation will probably constitute a particular risk. (orig./MG) [de

  10. Vacuum-Ultraviolet Photovoltaic Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Lin, Richeng; Ran, Junxue; Zhang, Zhaojun; Ji, Xu; Huang, Feng

    2018-01-23

    Over the past two decades, solar- and astrophysicists and material scientists have been researching and developing new-generation semiconductor-based vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) detectors with low power consumption and small size for replacing traditional heavy and high-energy-consuming microchannel-detection systems, to study the formation and evolution of stars. However, the most desirable semiconductor-based VUV photovoltaic detector capable of achieving zero power consumption has not yet been achieved. With high-crystallinity multistep epitaxial grown AlN as a VUV-absorbing layer for photogenerated carriers and p-type graphene (with unexpected VUV transmittance >96%) as a transparent electrode to collect excited holes, we constructed a heterojunction device with photovoltaic detection for VUV light. The device exhibits an encouraging VUV photoresponse, high external quantum efficiency (EQE) and extremely fast tempera response (80 ns, 10 4 -10 6 times faster than that of the currently reported VUV photoconductive devices). This work has provided an idea for developing zero power consumption and integrated VUV photovoltaic detectors with ultrafast and high-sensitivity VUV detection capability, which not only allows future spacecraft to operate with longer service time and lower launching cost but also ensures an ultrafast evolution of interstellar objects.

  11. The Ultraviolet Index: a useful tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, J P; Long, C S

    2000-09-01

    The Ultraviolet Index was developed in the United States in 1994 following successful use of ultraviolet (UV) alerts in other countries. This daily National Weather Service prediction is a calculation which integrates five data elements to yield the amount of UV radiation impacting the surface (1m2) at solar noon in 58 of the largest US population centers. This simple numeric prediction is then categorized by the Environmental Protection Agency into five "exposure levels" with protective actions recommended for each level. This information is disseminated through the media. Daily reminders seem to affect awareness and behavior in Canada, but US surveys indicate the need for better understanding through educational graphics. Comparing the UV Index to a precipitation prediction has merit in that it links a familiar daily prediction with implied appropriate protective measures. Graphics link the ideas that "when it rains it pours and when it shines it radiates." Beginning in schools, camps, and dermatology meetings, using the rain/shine analogy, a wider exposure to the Ultraviolet Index is proposed.

  12. Extreme ultraviolet spectral irradiance measurements since 1946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, G.

    2015-03-01

    In the physics of the upper atmosphere the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation plays a dominant role controlling most of the thermospheric/ionospheric (T/I) processes. Since this part of the solar spectrum is absorbed in the thermosphere, platforms to measure the EUV fluxes became only available with the development of rockets reaching altitude levels exceeding 80 km. With the availability of V2 rockets used in space research, recording of EUV spectra started in 1946 using photographic films. The development of pointing devices to accurately orient the spectrographs toward the sun initiated intense activities in solar-terrestrial research. The application of photoelectric recording technology enabled the scientists placing EUV spectrometers aboard satellites observing qualitatively strong variability of the solar EUV irradiance on short-, medium-, and long-term scales. However, as more measurements were performed more radiometric EUV data diverged due to the inherent degradation of the EUV instruments with time. Also, continuous recording of the EUV energy input to the T/I system was not achieved. It is only at the end of the last century that there was progress made in solving the serious problem of degradation enabling to monitore solar EUV fluxes with sufficient radiometric accuracy. The data sets available allow composing the data available to the first set of EUV data covering a period of 11 years for the first time. Based on the sophisticated instrumentation verified in space, future EUV measurements of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) are promising accuracy levels of about 5% and less. With added low-cost equipment, real-time measurements will allow providing data needed in ionospheric modeling, e.g., for correcting propagation delays of navigation signals from space to earth. Adding EUV airglow and auroral emission monitoring by airglow cameras, the impact of space weather on the terrestrial T/I system can be studied with a spectral terrestrial

  13. Extreme ultraviolet observations of coronal holes. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohlin, J.D.; Sheeley, N.R. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Extreme-ultraviolet Skylab and ground-based solar magnetic field data have been combined to study the origin and evolution of coronal holes. It is shown that holes exist only within the large-scale unipolar magnetic cells into which the solar surface is divided at any given time. A well-defined boundary zone usually exists between the edge of a hole and the neutral line which marks the edge of its magnetic cell. This boundary zone is the region across which a cell is connected by magnetic arcades with adjacent cells of opposite polarity. Three pieces of observational evidence are offered to support the hypothesis that the magnetic lines of force from a hole are open. Kitt Peak magnetograms are used to show that, at least on a relative scale, the average field strengths within holes are quite variable, but indistinguishable from the field strengths in other quiet parts of the Sun's surface. Finally it is shown that the large, equatorial holes characteristic of the declining phase of the last solar cycle during Skylab (1973-74) were all formed as a result of the mergence of bipolar magnetic regions (BMR's), confirming an earlier hypothesis by Timothy et al. (1975). Systematic application of this model to the different aspects of the solar cycle correctly predicts the occurrence of both large, equatorial coronal holes (the 'M-regions' which cause recurrent geomagnetic storms) and the polar cap holes. (Auth.)

  14. The Lockheed OSO-8 program. Task 2: Analysis of data from the high resolution ultraviolet spectrometer experiment. [carbon 4 and silicon 4 line and emission spectra from solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, E. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The complete set of C 4 time sequences generated by the University of Colorado high resolution ultraviolet spectrometer experiment on OSO-8 were examined in a comprehensive and systematic fashion. As a result a new limit is placed on the acoustic flux passing through the transition zone of the Sun's atmosphere. It is found to be three orders of magnitude too small to heat the corona, and is consistent with zero. In collaborative efforts, the properties of transient C 4 brightenings were examined in considerable detail.

  15. Occupational applications of ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, P.

    1987-01-01

    A large population of workers are exposed to ultraviolet radiation in various occupational environments which often necessitates protection. Since ultraviolet radiation may create other environmental problems an occupational hazard- and protection evaluation can be complicated. Threshold Limit Values adopted by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) on ultraviolet radiation are used in most countries as guidelines for risk assessment and control measures. This review addresses the levels of ultraviolet radiation met in occupational environments, its measurement and evaluation, and discusses different protection methods. Ultraviolet lasers are beginning to find their way into industrial processes but are still limited in number and they will not be covered here. Emphasis is on broad band incoherent radiation in high risk environments such as welding, and on the evaluation of protective eyewear, see-through curtains and plastics. Other occupational risks associated with the emission of ultraviolet radiation are discussed

  16. Experimental study of the ultraviolet global radiation in San Jose, Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, J.

    1996-01-01

    The ultraviolet global radiation and the global solar radiation at San Jose, Costa Rica (latitude: 9 0 56', longitude: 84 0 54', altitude: 1.172 m.) during the period October 1993 to January 1995 were analyzed with respect to their seasonal variations and their independence. The dependence between the ultraviolet radiation and the clearness index of the skies was also investigated. A poor correlation was found between the quotient of the ultraviolet radiation (Hv/Hg) and between the global solar radiation and the extraterrestrial solar radiation (Hg/Ho). The correlation coefficient found between Hv/Hg and Hg/Ho was not greater than 0.25 for four categories of clearness index, i.e., covered skies, clear skies, and two intermediate conditions. This demonstrates that the ultraviolet radiation is not only associated with other atmospheric transmission conditions. A regression analysis between the hourly values of the ultraviolet and global radiation yielded a linear relationship with a determination coefficient greater than 98%. Thus a simple linear regression is reliable for the estimation of the ultraviolet in San Jose from global solar radiation data. (author) [es

  17. Transparent ultraviolet photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xun; Shan, Chong-Xin; Lu, Ying-Jie; Xie, Xiu-Hua; Li, Bing-Hui; Wang, Shuang-Peng; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Shen, De-Zhen

    2016-02-15

    Photovoltaic cells have been fabricated from p-GaN/MgO/n-ZnO structures. The photovoltaic cells are transparent to visible light and can transform ultraviolet irradiation into electrical signals. The efficiency of the photovoltaic cells is 0.025% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions, while it can reach 0.46% under UV illumination. By connecting several such photovoltaic cells in a series, light-emitting devices can be lighting. The photovoltaic cells reported in this Letter may promise the applications in glass of buildings to prevent UV irradiation and produce power for household appliances in the future.

  18. Sua Pan surface bidirectional reflectance: a validation experiment of the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) during SAFARI 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, Wedad A.; Pilorz, Stuart H.; Helmlinger, Mark C.; Diner, David J.; Conel, James E.; Martonchik, John V.; Gatebe, Charles K.; King, Michael D.; Hobbs, Peter V.

    2004-01-01

    The Southern Africa Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000) dray deason campaign was carried out during August and September 2000 at the peak of biomass burning. The intensive ground-based and airborne measurements in this campaign provided a unique opportunity to validate space sensors, such as the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), onboard NASA's EOS Terra platform.

  19. Status of the Multi-Angle SpectroRadiometer Instrument for EOS- AM1 and Its Application to Remote Sensing of Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diner, D. J.; Abdou, W. A.; Bruegge, C. J.; Conel, J. E.; Kahn, R. A.; Martonchik, J. V.; Paradise, S. R.; West, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    The Multi-Angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) is being developed at JPL for the AM1 spacecraft in the Earth Observing System (EOS) series. This paper reports on the progress of instrument fabrication and testing, and it discusses the strategy to use the instrument for studying tropospheric aerosols.

  20. Climatology of the Aerosol Optical Depth by Components from the Multi-Angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and Chemistry Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Huikyo; Kalashnikova, Olga V.; Suzuki, Kentaroh; Braverman, Amy; Garay, Michael J.; Kahn, Ralph A.

    2016-01-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) Joint Aerosol (JOINT_AS) Level 3 product has provided a global, descriptive summary of MISR Level 2 aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol type information for each month over 16+ years since March 2000. Using Version 1 of JOINT_AS, which is based on the operational (Version 22) MISR Level 2 aerosol product, this study analyzes, for the first time, characteristics of observed and simulated distributions of AOD for three broad classes of aerosols: spherical nonabsorbing, spherical absorbing, and nonspherical - near or downwind of their major source regions. The statistical moments (means, standard deviations, and skew-nesses) and distributions of AOD by components derived from the JOINT_AS are compared with results from two chemistry transport models (CTMs), the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) and SPectral RadIatioN-TrAnSport (SPRINTARS). Overall, the AOD distributions retrieved from MISR and modeled by GOCART and SPRINTARS agree with each other in a qualitative sense. Marginal distributions of AOD for each aerosol type in both MISR and models show considerable high positive skewness, which indicates the importance of including extreme AOD events when comparing satellite retrievals with models. The MISR JOINT_AS product will greatly facilitate comparisons between satellite observations and model simulations of aerosols by type.

  1. Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) Global Aerosol Optical Depth Validation Based on 2 Years of Coincident Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Gaitley, Barbara J.; Martonchik, John V.; Diner, David J.; Crean, Kathleen A.; Holben, Brent

    2005-01-01

    Performance of the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) early postlaunch aerosol optical thickness (AOT) retrieval algorithm is assessed quantitatively over land and ocean by comparison with a 2-year measurement record of globally distributed AERONET Sun photometers. There are sufficient coincident observations to stratify the data set by season and expected aerosol type. In addition to reporting uncertainty envelopes, we identify trends and outliers, and investigate their likely causes, with the aim of refining algorithm performance. Overall, about 2/3 of the MISR-retrieved AOT values fall within [0.05 or 20% x AOT] of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). More than a third are within [0.03 or 10% x AOT]. Correlation coefficients are highest for maritime stations (approx.0.9), and lowest for dusty sites (more than approx.0.7). Retrieved spectral slopes closely match Sun photometer values for Biomass burning and continental aerosol types. Detailed comparisons suggest that adding to the algorithm climatology more absorbing spherical particles, more realistic dust analogs, and a richer selection of multimodal aerosol mixtures would reduce the remaining discrepancies for MISR retrievals over land; in addition, refining instrument low-light-level calibration could reduce or eliminate a small but systematic offset in maritime AOT values. On the basis of cases for which current particle models are representative, a second-generation MISR aerosol retrieval algorithm incorporating these improvements could provide AOT accuracy unprecedented for a spaceborne technique.

  2. Translucency and color match with a shade guide of esthetic brackets with the aid of a spectroradiometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Keun; Bin, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Since the color of esthetic brackets should match that of teeth, the aims of this study were to determine the color and translucency of esthetic brackets by means of the clinically relevant use of a spectroradiometer, and to compare the color of brackets with that of a commercial shade guide. The color of central and tie-wing regions of four plastic and four ceramic brackets was measured according to the CIE L*a*b* color scale over white and black backgrounds. Brackets were classified into five groups based on their composition. The color of Vitapan Classical Shade Guide tabs was also measured. Translucency parameter (TP) and contrast ratio (CR) were calculated to determine translucency. Color differences between brackets and the shade guide tabs were 10.4 - 34.5 ∆E*ab units. TP and CR values for the central region were 16.4 - 27.7 and 0.38 - 0.58, whereas for the tie-wings they were 24.0 - 39.9 and 0.25 - 0.45, respectively. The color coordinates, TP and CR values were significantly influenced by bracket composition and brand (p brackets investigated herein showed unacceptable color differences (∆E*ab > 5.5) compared with the shade guide tabs. Differences in the translucency of brackets by brand were within the visually perceptible range (∆CR > 0.07). Therefore, brackets showing the best matching performance for each case should be selected considering esthetic and functional demands.

  3. Ultraviolet radiation penetrating vehicle glass: a field based comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimlin, M.G.; Parisi, A.V.

    1999-01-01

    The solar UV transmitted through automobile glass was measured in the field in two cars using a spectroradiometer. The two cars were identical except that one of the cars had all of the windows (except the windshield) tinted. The measured spectral erythemal UV on a horizontal plane with the windows fully closed was reduced in the tinted car by a factor of 42 when compared with the erythemal UV measured in the untinted car. The ambient UVA irradiances at various locations within four different makes of car and a tractor were also measured with a broad band UVA hand-held meter. The average normalized daily UVA exposure (measured with a broad band UVA meter) was 1.3 times higher in a large family sedan when compared with that in a small hatchback and the UVA exposure in a car with tinted windows was 3.8 times less than in a similar untinted car. (author)

  4. Ultraviolet radiation penetrating vehicle glass: a field based comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimlin, M. G.; Parisi, A. V.

    1999-04-01

    The solar UV transmitted through automobile glass was measured in the field in two cars using a spectroradiometer. The two cars were identical except that one of the cars had all of the windows (except the windshield) tinted. The measured spectral erythemal UV on a horizontal plane with the windows fully closed was reduced in the tinted car by a factor of 42 when compared with the erythemal UV measured in the untinted car. The ambient UVA irradiances at various locations within four different makes of car and a tractor were also measured with a broad band UVA hand-held meter. The average normalized daily UVA exposure (measured with a broad band UVA meter) was 1.3 times higher in a large family sedan when compared with that in a small hatchback and the UVA exposure in a car with tinted windows was 3.8 times less than in a similar untinted car.

  5. GLOBAL SIMULATION OF AN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING TELESCOPE WAVE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J. M.; Ofman, L.

    2010-01-01

    We use the observation of an Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) wave in the lower solar corona, seen with the two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft in extreme ultraviolet light on 2007 May 19, to model the same event with a three-dimensional (3D) time-depending magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code that includes solar coronal magnetic fields derived with Wilcox Solar Observatory magnetogram data, and a solar wind outflow accelerated with empirical heating functions. The model includes a coronal mass ejection (CME) of Gibson and Low flux rope type above the reconstructed active region with parameters adapted from observations to excite the EIT wave. We trace the EIT wave running as circular velocity enhancement around the launching site of the CME in the direction tangential to the sphere produced by the wave front, and compute the phase velocities of the wave front. We find that the phase velocities are in good agreement with theoretical values for a fast magnetosonic wave, derived with the physical parameters of the model, and with observed phase speeds of an incident EIT wave reflected by a coronal hole and running at about the same location. We also produce in our 3D MHD model the observed reflection of the EIT wave at the coronal hole boundary, triggered by the magnetic pressure difference between the wave front hitting the hole and the boundary magnetic fields of the coronal hole, and the response of the coronal hole, which leads to the generation of secondary reflected EIT waves radiating away in different directions than the incident EIT wave. This is the first 3D MHD model of an EIT wave triggered by a CME that includes realistic solar magnetic field, with results comparing favorably to STEREO Extreme Ultraviolet Imager observations.

  6. Dependence on Solar Phase Angle and Grain Size of the Spectral Reflectance of the Railroad Valley Playa for GOSAT/GOSAT-2 Vicarious Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, T.; Matsunaga, T.

    2017-12-01

    GOSAT and the next generation GOSAT-2 satellites estimate the concentration of greenhouse gasses, and distribution of aerosol and cloud to observe solar light reflection and radiation from surface and atmosphere of the Earth. Precise information of the surface and the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) are required for the estimation because the surface reflectance of solar light varies with the observation geometry and the surface condition. The purpose of this study is to search an appropriate BRDF model of the GOSAT calibration site (Railroad Valley playa). In 2017, JAXA, NIES, and NASA/OCO-2 teams collaboratively performed 9th vicarious experiments by the simultaneous observation with GOSAT, OCO-2, and ground-based equipment (Kuze et al., 2014) at the Railroad Valley from June 25 to 30. We performed the BRDF measurement to observe solar light reflection by varying with observed angles using a spectroradiometer (FieldSpec4, ASD Inc.) mounted on a one-axis goniometer. The surface sand was shifted to several sizes of grain (75, 125, 250, 500, and 1000 μm), which was measured for the limited area of 5mm diameter with a collimating lens (74-UV, OceanOptics). The BRDF parameters for the observed reflectance were determined by the least squares fitting with the free parameters of a single scattering albedo and an asymmetric factor (Hapke, 2012) for the ultraviolet to near infrared wavelength bands of GOSAT. The resulting value of the single scattering albedo increased with decreasing the grain size of the sands. The observed reflectance of the fine grain sands (below 250 μm) is not varied with observed phase angles (solar incident light - surface sand - detector) as a Lambertian reflectance, but the spectra of coarse grain sands (above 500 μm) are varied with the observation angles. Therefore, a priori information of the target surface such as grain size is required for the determination of the precise reflectance of the target.

  7. Frontier of solar observation. Solar activity observed by 'HINODE' mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tetsuya

    2008-01-01

    After launched in September 2006, solar observation satellite 'HINODE' has been a solar observatory on orbit with the scientific instruments well operated and its continuous observation was conducted steadily on almost all solar atmospheres from photosphere to corona. 'HINODE' was equipped with the solar optical telescope, extreme-ultraviolet imaging spectrometer and x-ray telescope and aimed at clarifying the mystery of solar physics related with coronal heating and magnetic reconnection. Present state of 'HINODE' was described from observations made in initial observation results, which have made several discoveries, such as Alfven waves in the corona, unexpected dynamics in the chromosphere and photosphere, continuous outflowing plasma as a possible source of solar wind, and fine structures of magnetic field in sunspots and solar surface. (T. Tanaka)

  8. Ultraviolet radiation response of two heterotropy Antarctic marine bacterial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, Edgardo A.; Ferreyra, Gustavo A.; Mac Cormack, Walter P.

    2004-01-01

    Two Antarctic marine bacterial strains, were exposed to different irradiance of ultraviolet (UV) solar radiation using several experimental protocols and interferential filters. Results showed that both, UV-A and UV-B radiation produce deleterious effects on two tested bacterial strains. The mortality values under UVB treatments were higher than those observed under UVA treatments. UVvi strain proved to be more resistant to UV radiation than the UVps strain. (author) [es

  9. Ultraviolet - status of knowledge on exposure and health risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dervault, Anne Marie; Secretan, Beatrice; Guinot, Christiane; Bazex, Jacques; Donadieu, Jean; Dore, Jean Francois; Cesarini, Jean Pierre; Aleth Richard, Marie; Leccia, Marie Therese; Autier, Philippe; Cesarini, Jean Pierre; Beani, Jean Claude; Grob, Jean Jacques; Wald, Lucien; Dore, Jean Francois; Casiniere, Alain de la; Dixsaut, Gilles; Guenel, Pascal; Choulika, Sophie; Pirard, Philippe; Bastuji-Garin, S.; Beani, J.C.; Brin, A.J.; Cadet, J.; Corre, M.F.; Frelon, J.H.; Grob, Jean Jacques; Jeanmougin, M.; Martini-Morel, M.C.; Meunier, L.; Marty, J.P.; Revuz, J.; Reynier, J.P.; Roelands, R.; Stoebner, A.; Vian, L.

    2005-05-01

    After having recalled some physical aspects of ultraviolet radiations (presence in solar radiation, artificial UV radiation, measurement, metrology, UV index, boundary limits), this report describes the biological and health effects of UV radiations (analysis methodology, recall of previous expert reports, biological effects, health effects), addresses human behaviour with respect to UV radiation and exposure to UV radiation, discusses the relationship between cosmetics and UV radiation. It presents the various European and international positions with respect to UV emitting devices (evolution of standards, regulations). Some recommendations are made regarding solar exposure, sun-tanning installations, and other domestic or industrial sources

  10. Modeling bidirectional radiance measurements collected by the advanced solid-state array spectroradiometer (ASAS) over Oregon transect conifer forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abuelgasim, A.A.; Strahler, A.H.

    1994-01-01

    A geometric-optical model of the bidirectional reflectance of a forest canopy, developed by Li and Strahler, fits observed directional radiance measurements with good accuracy. This model treats the forest cover as a scene of discrete, three-dimensional objects (trees) that are illuminated and viewed from different positions in the hemisphere. The shapes of the objects, their count densities and patterns of placement, are the driving variables, and they condition the mixture of sunlit and shaded objects and background that are observed from a particular viewing direction, given a direction of illumination. This mixture, in turn, controls the brightness apparent to an observer or a radiometric instrument. The Advanced Solid-State Array Spectroradiometer (ASAS) was used to validate this model. This aircraft sensor presently acquires images in 29 spectral bands in the range (465–871 nm) and is pointable fore-and-aft, allowing directional measurements of radiance as a target is approached and imaged at view angles ranging ± 45° from nadir. Through atmospheric correction, ASAS radiances were reduced to bidirectional reflectance factors (BRFs). These were compared to corresponding BRF values computed from the Li-Strahler model using, wherever possible, ground measured component BRFs for calibration. The comparisons showed a good match between the modeled and measured reflectance factors for four of the five Oregon Transect Sites. Thus, the geometric-optical approach provides a realistic model for the bidirectional reflectance distribution function of such natural vegetation canopies. Further modifications are suggested to improve the predicted BRFs and yield still better results. (author)

  11. Observations of ultraviolet spectra of H II regions and galaxies with IUE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondhalekar, P.M.

    1982-08-01

    The ultraviolet spectra, obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer, of a sample of H II regions and the nuclear regions of spiral and elliptical galaxies are described. The star formation rates in the nuclei of spiral galaxies are similar to the star formation rate in the solar neighbourhood. The data indicate that the current thinking on the synthesis of carbon and nitrogen in galaxies has to be revised and the K-corrections determined from the ultraviolet spectra of galaxies when compared with the photometry of distant galaxies suggests colour evolution of galaxies at z > 0.3. (author)

  12. SOLAR-ISS: A new reference spectrum based on SOLAR/SOLSPEC observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftah, M.; Damé, L.; Bolsée, D.; Hauchecorne, A.; Pereira, N.; Sluse, D.; Cessateur, G.; Irbah, A.; Bureau, J.; Weber, M.; Bramstedt, K.; Hilbig, T.; Thiéblemont, R.; Marchand, M.; Lefèvre, F.; Sarkissian, A.; Bekki, S.

    2018-03-01

    Context. Since April 5, 2008 and up to February 15, 2017, the SOLar SPECtrometer (SOLSPEC) instrument of the SOLAR payload on board the International Space Station (ISS) has performed accurate measurements of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) from the middle ultraviolet to the infrared (165 to 3088 nm). These measurements are of primary importance for a better understanding of solar physics and the impact of solar variability on climate. In particular, a new reference solar spectrum (SOLAR-ISS) is established in April 2008 during the solar minima of cycles 23-24 thanks to revised engineering corrections, improved calibrations, and advanced procedures to account for thermal and aging corrections of the SOLAR/SOLSPEC instrument. Aims: The main objective of this article is to present a new high-resolution solar spectrum with a mean absolute uncertainty of 1.26% at 1σ from 165 to 3000 nm. This solar spectrum is based on solar observations of the SOLAR/SOLSPEC space-based instrument. Methods: The SOLAR/SOLSPEC instrument consists of three separate double monochromators that use concave holographic gratings to cover the middle ultraviolet (UV), visible (VIS), and infrared (IR) domains. Our best ultraviolet, visible, and infrared spectra are merged into a single absolute solar spectrum covering the 165-3000 nm domain. The resulting solar spectrum has a spectral resolution varying between 0.6 and 9.5 nm in the 165-3000 nm wavelength range. We build a new solar reference spectrum (SOLAR-ISS) by constraining existing high-resolution spectra to SOLAR/SOLSPEC observed spectrum. For that purpose, we account for the difference of resolution between the two spectra using the SOLAR/SOLSPEC instrumental slit functions. Results: Using SOLAR/SOLSPEC data, a new solar spectrum covering the 165-3000 nm wavelength range is built and is representative of the 2008 solar minimum. It has a resolution better than 0.1 nm below 1000 nm and 1 nm in the 1000-3000 nm wavelength range. The new

  13. Al nanogrid electrode for ultraviolet detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, G; Deng, J; Zhou, L; Gan, Q; Hwang, J C M; Dierolf, V; Bartoli, F J; Mazuir, C; Schoenfeld, W V

    2011-09-15

    Optical properties of Al nanogrids of different pitches and gaps were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulation predicted that surface plasmons at the air/Al interface would enhance ultraviolet transmission through the subwavelength gaps of the nanogrid, making it an effective electrode on GaN-based photodetectors to compensate for the lack of transparent electrode and high p-type doping. The predicted transmission enhancement was verified by confocal scanning optical microscopy performed at 365 nm. The quality of the nanogrids fabricated by electron-beam lithography was verified by near-field scanning optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Based on the results, the pitch and gap of the nanogrids can be optimized for the best trade-off between electrical conductivity and optical transmission at different wavelengths. Based on different cutoff wavelengths, the nanogrids can also double as a filter to render photodetectors solar-blind.

  14. Maps of ultraviolet radiation in Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UV) has contributed relatively little energy to the solar spectrum; but is important, because it is biologically active. The software Surfer 8 has created maps designed of the territory of Costa Rica to assess the maximum levels of solar UV radiation on a horizontal plane. The data were used in creating the maps, were predicted at local noon in eighty-three locations scattered across the country, with a spectral atmospheric model which is physically established. The model has used as input data: the date and time, the location identified by latitude, longitude and height of land above sea level, the value of the vertical column ozone, surface albedo and atmospheric turbidity parameters. The estimate differs by 3% of the measurements made in situ, which agrees with the experimental data. The model has used the data estimation of UV radiation, clear sky conditions, which is the condition where you get the maximum energy possible in each locality. This is of fundamental importance when assessing the adverse effects on human health, leads the maximum intensity in this important solar spectrum band. A larger increase of 23% has presented in the UV radiation with altitude obtaining the hills and mountains the highest rates and places located at sea level and the lowest cost, the indices. The annual variation analysis has revealed an increase greater than 27% from the month of lowest UV radiation (December) and the month of greatest UV radiation (April). The issue is of particular interest because of the increasing number of people moving at different times of the year, altitudes over 2000 m altitude, in activities relating to tourism and employment. These individuals are significant increases in levels of UV solar radiation under conditions of clear skies. (author) [es

  15. Solar and terrestrial physics. [effects of solar activities on earth environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The effects of solar radiation on the near space and biomental earth, the upper atmosphere, and the magnetosphere are discussed. Data obtained from the OSO satellites pertaining to the solar cycle variation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation are analyzed. The effects of solar cycle variation of the characteristics of the solar wind are examined. The fluid mechanics of shock waves and the specific relationship to the characteristics of solar shock waves are investigated. The solar and corpuscular heating of the upper atmosphere is reported based on the findings of the AEROS and NATE experiments. Seasonal variations of the upper atmosphere composition are plotted based on OGO-6 mass spectrometer data.

  16. Ultraviolet radiation: the eye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesarini, J.P.; Sliney, D.H.

    1996-01-01

    Under most conditions, the eye is well adapted to protect itself against ultraviolet radiation encountered in the outdoor environment as a result of the exposure geometry of the sun. Only when snow is on the ground does one experience acute effects of UV sunlight exposure (i.e. snow blindness, or photokeratitis). With regard to artificial sources, there are many occasions where one views bright light sources such as tungsten-halogen lamps, arc lamps and welding arcs. Such viewing is normally only momentary because of the aversion response to bright light and due to discomfort glare. However, such an aversion does not take place for germicidal lamps and other UV lamps which do not contain a strong visible component in their spectrum. The adverse effects from viewing such sources has been studied for decades and during the last two decades guidelines for limiting exposure to protect the eye have been developed. The guidelines were fostered to a large extent by the growing use of lasers and the quickly recognized hazard posed by viewing laser sources. (author)

  17. Ultraviolet Communication for Medical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    DEI procured several UVC phosphors and tested them with vacuum UV (VUV) excitation. Available emission peaks include: 226 nm, 230 nm, 234 nm, 242...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Report contains color. 14. ABSTRACT Under this Phase II SBIR effort, Directed Energy Inc.’s (DEI) proprietary ultraviolet ( UV ...15. SUBJECT TERMS Non-line-of-sight (NLOS), networking, optical communication, plasma-shells, short range, ultraviolet ( UV ) light 16. SECURITY

  18. ULTRAVIOLET TECHNOLOGY FOR FOOD PRESERVATION

    OpenAIRE

    Guedes, AMM; Novello, D; Mendes, GMD; Cristianini, M

    2009-01-01

    ULTRAVIOLET TECHNOLOGY FOR FOOD PRESERVATION This literature review article had as objective to gather information about ultraviolet (UV) technology utilization on the food industry, its effects and potential application. Aspects as the origin, concept and applications of the technology on the equipment industry and running mechanisms were approached. The application of UV radiation on food decontamination is still little used due its low penetration, but it is known that it can be easily app...

  19. Mutations induced by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeifer, Gerd P.; You, Young-Hyun; Besaratinia, Ahmad

    2005-01-01

    The different ultraviolet (UV) wavelength components, UVA (320-400 nm), UVB (280-320 nm), and UVC (200-280 nm), have distinct mutagenic properties. A hallmark of UVC and UVB mutagenesis is the high frequency of transition mutations at dipyrimidine sequences containing cytosine. In human skin cancers, about 35% of all mutations in the p53 gene are transitions at dipyrimidines within the sequence 5'-TCG and 5'-CCG, and these are localized at several mutational hotspots. Since 5'-CG sequences are methylated along the p53 coding sequence in human cells, these mutations may be derived from sunlight-induced pyrimidine dimers forming at sequences that contain 5-methylcytosine. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) form preferentially at dipyrimidines containing 5-methylcytosine when cells are irradiated with UVB or sunlight. In order to define the contribution of 5-methylcytosine to sunlight-induced mutations, the lacI and cII transgenes in mouse fibroblasts were used as mutational targets. After 254 nm UVC irradiation, only 6-9% of the base substitutions were at dipyrimidines containing 5-methylcytosine. However, 24-32% of the solar light-induced mutations were at dipyrimidines that contain 5-methylcytosine and most of these mutations were transitions. Thus, CPDs forming preferentially at dipyrimidines with 5-methylcytosine are responsible for a considerable fraction of the mutations induced by sunlight in mammalian cells. Using mouse cell lines harboring photoproduct-specific photolyases and mutational reporter genes, we showed that CPDs (rather than 6-4 photoproducts or other lesions) are responsible for the great majority of UVB-induced mutations. An important component of UVB mutagenesis is the deamination of cytosine and 5-methylcytosine within CPDs. The mutational specificity of long-wave UVA (340-400 nm) is distinct from that of the shorter wavelength UV and is characterized mainly by G to T transversions presumably arising through mechanisms involving oxidized DNA

  20. Potential solar UVR exposure health risks in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wright, CY

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The detrimental effects of excess personal solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure include wrinkles, immunosuppression and skin cancer. Approximately 1 000 South Africans die each year from melanoma skin cancer and 30% of all histologically...

  1. Shuttle SBUV (SSBUV) Solar Spectral Irradiance V008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SSBUV) level-2 irradiance data are available for eight space shuttle missions flown between 1989 and 1996. SSBUV, a...

  2. Ultraviolet light imaging technology and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Takane; Suzuki, Kenji; Oba, Koichiro

    1991-06-01

    Demands on the high-quality imaging in ultraviolet (UV) light region have been increasing recently, especially in fields such as forensic investigations, laser experiments, spent fuel identification, and so on. Important requirements on the UV imaging devices in such applications are high sensitivity, excellent solar blindness, and small image distortion, since the imaging of very weak UV images are usually carried out under natural sunlight or room illuminations and the image data have to be processed to produce useful two-dimensional quantitative data. A new photocathode has been developed to meet these requirements. It is specially made of RbTe on a sapphire window and its quantum efficiency is as high as 20% with the solar blindness of 10,000. The tube is specially designed to meet UV light optics and to minimize image distortion. It has an invertor type image intensifier tube structure and intensifies the incident UV light up to approximately 10,000 times. The distortion of the output image is suppressed less than 1.8%, because of a specially designed electron optic lens system. The device has shown excellent results in the observation of such objects as fingerprints and footprints in forensic investigations, the Cherenkov light produced by the spent fuels stored in a cooling water pool in the nuclear power station, and UV laser beam path in excimer laser experiments. Furthermore, many other applications of the UV light imaging will be expected in various fields such as semiconductors, cosmetics, and electrical power.

  3. Monitoring the consequences of decreased ozone protection: The NSF ultraviolet radiation monitoring network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of decreased protection from ultraviolet radiation are as troubling as the continuing depletion of stratospheric ozone. Evidence exists to clearly link ozone depletion to changes in the antarctic marine environment. Results of two 1992 papers are summarized here. Enhanced exposure to mid-range UV radiation was found to be affecting marine ecosystems with a recorded 6-12 percent reduction in primary productivity directly related to the ozone layer depletion. In another experiment, a model was developed indicating that the ozone hole could reduce near-surface photosynthesis by as much as 12-15 percent. The NSF UV monitoring system in place for these and other experiments uses a spectroradiometer, making hourly, high-resolution measurements of the distribution of UV surface irradiance

  4. Harmful effects of ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Tanning for cosmetic purposes by sunbathing or by using artificial tanning devices is widespread. The hazards associated with exposure to ultraviolet radiation are of concern to the medical profession. Depending on the amount and form of the radiation, as well as on the skin type of the individual exposed, ultraviolet radiation causes erythema, sunburn, photodamage (photoaging), photocarcinogenesis, damage to the eyes, alteration of the immune system of the skin, and chemical hypersensitivity. Skin cancers most commonly produced by ultraviolet radiation are basal and squamous cell carcinomas. There also is much circumstantial evidence that the increase in the incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma during the past half century is related to increased sun exposure, but this has not been proved. Effective and cosmetically acceptable sunscreen preparations have been developed that can do much to prevent or reduce most harmful effects to ultraviolet radiation if they are applied properly and consistently. Other safety measures include (1) minimizing exposure to ultraviolet radiation, (2) being aware of reflective surfaces while in the sun, (3) wearing protective clothing, (4) avoiding use of artificial tanning devices, and (5) protecting infants and children

  5. Future Directions in Ultraviolet Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneborn, George (Editor); Moos, Warren; VanSteenberg, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The 'Future Directions in Ultraviolet Spectroscopy' conference was inspired by the accomplishments of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) Mission. The FUSE mission was launched in June 1999 and spent over eight years exploring the far-ultraviolet universe, gathering over 64 million seconds of high-resolution spectral data on nearly 3000 astronomical targets. The goal of this conference was not only to celebrate the accomplishments of FUSE, but to look toward the future and understand the major scientific drivers for the ultraviolet capabilities of the next generation fo space observatories. Invited speakers presented discussions based on measurements made by FUSE and other ultraviolet instruments, assessed their connection with measurements made with other techniques and, where appropriate, discussed the implications of low-z measurements for high-z phenomena. In addition to the oral presentations, many participants presented poster papers. The breadth of these presentation made it clear that much good science is still in progress with FUSE data and that these result will continue to have relevance in many scientific areas.

  6. Increased exposure of Southern Ocean phytoplankton to ultraviolet radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubin, Dan; Arrigo, Kevin R.; van Dijken, Gert L.

    2004-05-01

    Satellite remote sensing of both surface solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and chlorophyll over two decades shows that biologically significant ultraviolet radiation increases began to occur over the Southern Ocean three years before the ozone ``hole'' was discovered. Beginning in October 1983, the most frequent occurrences of enhanced UVR over phytoplankton-rich waters occurred in the Weddell Sea and Indian Ocean sectors of the Southern Ocean, impacting 60% of the surface biomass by the late 1990s. These results suggest two reasons why more serious impacts to the base of the marine food web may not have been detected by field experiments: (1) the onset of UVR increases several years before dedicated field work began may have impacted the most sensitive organisms long before such damage could be detected, and (2) most biological field work has so far not taken place in Antarctic waters most extensively subjected to enhanced UVR.

  7. Solar Indices - Solar Flares

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  8. Solar Indices - Solar Corona

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  9. Solar Indices - Solar Irradiance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  10. Ultraviolet-radiation-curable paints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosset, A M; Su, W F.A.; Vanderglas, E

    1981-09-30

    In product finishing lines, ultraviolet radiation curing of paints on prefabricated structures could be more energy efficient than curing by natural gas fired ovens, and could eliminate solvent emission. Diffuse ultraviolet light can cure paints on three dimensional metal parts. In the uv curing process, the spectral output of radiation sources must complement the absorption spectra of pigments and photoactive agents. Photosensitive compounds, such as thioxanthones, can photoinitiate unsaturated resins, such as acrylated polyurethanes, by a free radical mechanism. Newly developed cationic photoinitiators, such as sulfonium or iodonium salts (the so-called onium salts) of complex metal halide anions, can be used in polymerization of epoxy paints by ultraviolet light radiation. One-coat enamels, topcoats, and primers have been developed which can be photoinitiated to produce hard, adherent films. This process has been tested in a laboratory scale unit by spray coating these materials on three-dimensional objects and passing them through a tunnel containing uv lamps.

  11. Ultraviolet energy distributions and the temperatures of peculiar B and A stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelman, S.J.; NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD)

    1985-01-01

    Color temperatures have been estimated by comparing ultraviolet observations of HgMn and magnetic Ap stars with those of normal stars. Ultraviolet data from the OAO-2, ANS, TD-1, and IUE satellites generally give similar results. The values for the normal stars were derived from comparison of fluxes predicted by solar-composition fully line-blanketed model atmospheres with optical region spectrophotometry. The ultraviolet temperatures of the HgMn stars cover a narrower temperature range than do their optical region values. Magnetic Ap stars with similar optical region temperatures can show substantial differences in their ultraviolet color temperatures. This may result from magnetic field configuration and abundance differences. 27 references

  12. Ultraviolet spectrophotometry of three LINERs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, R. W.; Keel, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    Three galaxies known to be LINERs were observed spectroscopically in the ultraviolet in an attempt to detect the presumed nonthermal continuum source thought to be the source of photoionization in the nuclei. NGC 4501 was found to be too faint for study with the IUE spectrographs, while NGC 5005 had an extended ultraviolet light profile. Comparison with the optical light profile of NGC 5005 indicates that the ultraviolet source is distributed spatially in the same manner as the optical starlight, probably indicating that the ultraviolet excess is due to a component of hot stars in the nucleus. These stars contribute detectable absorption features longward of 2500 A; together with optical data, the IUE spectra suggest a burst of star formation about 1 billion yr ago, with a lower rate continuing to produce a few OB stars. In NGC 4579, a point source contributing most of the ultraviolet excess is found that is much different than the optical light distribution. Furthermore, the ultraviolet to X-ray spectral index in NGC 4579 is 1.4, compatible with the UV to X-ray indices found for samples of Seyfert galaxies. This provides compelling evidence for the detection of the photoionizing continuum in NGC 4579 and draws the research fields of normal galaxies and active galactic nuclei closer together. The emission-line spectrum of NGC 4579 is compared with calculations from a photoionization code, CLOUDY, and several shock models. The photoionization code is found to give superior results, adding to the increasing weight of evidence that the LINER phenomenon is essentially a scaled-down version of the Seyfert phenomenon.

  13. Ultraviolet radiation after exposure to a low-fluence IPL home-use device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen-Petersen, Daniel; Erlendsson, Andres M; Nash, J F

    2015-01-01

    The prevailing advice is to avoid sun exposure after intense pulsed light (IPL) hair removal. However, no systematic evaluation of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) after IPL hair removal exits. Therefore, we investigated the occurrence of side effects in subjects receiving solar-simulated UVR after...

  14. Development of an Operational System for the Retrieval of Aerosol and Land Surface Properties from the Terra Multi-Angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crean, Kathleen A.

    2003-01-01

    An operational system to retrieve atmospheric aerosol and land surface properties using data from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument, currently flying onboard NASA's Terra spacecraft, has been deployed. The system is in full operation, with new data products generated daily and distributed to science users worldwide. This paper describes the evolution of the system, from initial requirements definition and prototyping through design, implementation, testing, operational deployment, checkout and maintenance activities. The current status of the system and future plans for enhancement are described. Major challenges encountered during implementation are detailed.

  15. Ultraviolet observations of AM Herculis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanzi, E.G.; Treves, A.; Milan Univ.; Sandford, M.C.W.; Willis, A.J.; Wilson, R.

    1980-01-01

    Seven ultraviolet spectra (1100-3200 Angstroem) of AM Her were obtained with the low resolution spectrometer of the IUE satellite. Strong emission features appear superimposed on a well defined continuum which is well fitted by a Fsub(lambda) D lambda -2 law. The observations are compared with the expectations from models of the source. (orig.) 891 WL/orig. 892 HIS

  16. Ultraviolet light and cutaneous lupus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, Marc; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light is one of the major factors known to trigger cutaneous disease activity in (systemic) lupus erythematosus patients. UV light, UVB in particular, is a potent inducer of apoptosis. Currently, disturbed clearance of apoptotic cells is one of the concepts explaining

  17. Near-ultraviolet radiation blocks SOS responses to DNA damage in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.A.; Eisenstark, A.

    1984-01-01

    Escherichia coli cells in which the recA promoter is fused to a lac structural gene, (Mu) Mud(Ap,lac)::rec, were irradiated with two far-ultraviolet light wavelengths (254 and 290 nm), selected monochromatic near-ultraviolet (NUV) wavelengths 313 nm, 334 nm, 365 nm, or broad band solar-UV (290-420 nm) from a solar simulator. Irradiation with the two far-ultraviolet wavelengths was followed by high yields of ..beta..-galactosidase, lambda prophage induction, and Weigle reactivation. These end points were not observed after irradiation with the selected NUV wavelengths or the broad spectrum solar-UV. Thus, neither broad spectrum solar-UV nor monochromatic NUV wavelengths resulted in the derepression of the recA promoter. Further, prior exposure of the cells either to the selected monochromatic NUV wavelengths or to solar-UV inhibited a) the induction of ..beta..-galactosidase by subsequent 254-nm radiation, b) subsequent 254-nm induction of lambda prophage, c) Weigle reactivation, and d) mutation frequency. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that NUV blocks subsequent recA protease action.

  18. Adaptation mechanisms of Escherichia Coli to the ultraviolet light I. Isolation of mutants resistant to ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcantara D, D.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this work is to study the adaptation mechanisms of Escherichia coli to the ultraviolet light of 254 nm (W), a component of the solar light that induces a variety of damages in the DNA of the cells exposed, which should be eliminated in order to avoid its lethal and mutagenic effects. Inside this first report, the results obtained about the resistance to UV radiation of 5 independent populations of Escherichia coli, which were subjected in parallel form to 80 successive exposures of UV light with inserted periods of growth are reported. (Author)

  19. Solar building

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Luxin

    2014-01-01

    In my thesis I describe the utilization of solar energy and solar energy with building integration. In introduction it is also mentioned how the solar building works, trying to make more people understand and accept the solar building. The thesis introduces different types of solar heat collectors. I compared the difference two operation modes of solar water heating system and created examples of solar water system selection. I also introduced other solar building applications. It is conv...

  20. Solar energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter discusses the role solar energy may have in the energy future of the US. The topics discussed in the chapter include the solar resource, solar architecture including passive solar design and solar collectors, solar-thermal concentrating systems including parabolic troughs and dishes and central receivers, photovoltaic cells including photovoltaic systems for home use, and environmental, health and safety issues

  1. Impact of ultraviolet radiation on humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesarini, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Solar radiation, including its ultraviolet (UV) components is a key factor in life on Earth. While small quantities of UV are beneficial for people (for example, through the production of vitamin D), the considerable amount to which people sometimes expose themselves may have extremely noxious effects including actinic erythema, sunburn, photo-induced diseases, photo-worsened diseases, actinic ageing and skin cancers. Since the last century, human exposure to UV has increased either by social-behaviour modifications, or by anthropogenic disruption to the environment through, among other things, industrial development. The World Health Organisation's (WHO) INTERSUN programme has several components: action for reconstruction of the ozone layer through, for example, preventing dumping of chlorofluorocarbons; creation and popularisation of a global UV index; prevention campaigns underlining the risks from UV exposure including dissemination of information to daily newspapers. These are all aimed at reducing the amount of UV radiation that people receive. In addition the WHO advises against exposure to UV artificial sources to reduce overall the quantity of UV received. (author)

  2. Impact of ultraviolet radiation on humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesarini, J.P. [Laboratoire de Recherche sur les Tumeurs de la Peau Humaine, INSERM, Paris (France)

    2001-07-01

    Solar radiation, including its ultraviolet (UV) components is a key factor in life on Earth. While small quantities of UV are beneficial for people (for example, through the production of vitamin D), the considerable amount to which people sometimes expose themselves may have extremely noxious effects including actinic erythema, sunburn, photo-induced diseases, photo-worsened diseases, actinic ageing and skin cancers. Since the last century, human exposure to UV has increased either by social-behaviour modifications, or by anthropogenic disruption to the environment through, among other things, industrial development. The World Health Organisation's (WHO) INTERSUN programme has several components: action for reconstruction of the ozone layer through, for example, preventing dumping of chlorofluorocarbons; creation and popularisation of a global UV index; prevention campaigns underlining the risks from UV exposure including dissemination of information to daily newspapers. These are all aimed at reducing the amount of UV radiation that people receive. In addition the WHO advises against exposure to UV artificial sources to reduce overall the quantity of UV received. (author)

  3. Coral skeletons defend against ultraviolet radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Reef

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many coral reef organisms are photosynthetic or have evolved in tight symbiosis with photosynthetic symbionts. As such, the tissues of reef organisms are often exposed to intense solar radiation in clear tropical waters and have adapted to trap and harness photosynthetically active radiation (PAR. High levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR associated with sunlight, however, represent a potential problem in terms of tissue damage. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By measuring UVR and PAR reflectance from intact and ground bare coral skeletons we show that the property of calcium carbonate skeletons to absorb downwelling UVR to a significant extent, while reflecting PAR back to the overlying tissue, has biological advantages. We placed cnidarians on top of bare skeletons and a UVR reflective substrate and showed that under ambient UVR levels, UVR transmitted through the tissues of cnidarians placed on top of bare skeletons were four times lower compared to their counterparts placed on a UVR reflective white substrate. In accordance with the lower levels of UVR measured in cnidarians on top of coral skeletons, a similar drop in UVR damage to their DNA was detected. The skeletons emitted absorbed UVR as yellow fluorescence, which allows for safe dissipation of the otherwise harmful radiation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study presents a novel defensive role for coral skeletons and reveals that the strong UVR absorbance by the skeleton can contribute to the ability of corals, and potentially other calcifiers, to thrive under UVR levels that are detrimental to most marine life.

  4. Deuterium abundance, from ultraviolet to visible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebrard, Guillaume

    2000-01-01

    In the frame of the standard Big Bang model, the primordial abundance of deuterium is the most sensitive to the baryonic density of the Universe. It was synthesized only during the primordial nucleosynthesis few minutes after the Big Bang and no other standard mechanism is able to produce any further significant amount. On the contrary, since deuterium is burned up within stars, its abundance D/H decreases along cosmic evolution. Thus, D/H measurements constrain Big Bang and galactic chemical evolution models. There are three samples of deuterium abundances: primordial, proto-solar and interstellar. Each of them is representative of a given epoch, respectively about 15 Gyrs past, 4.5 Gyrs past and present epoch. Although the evolution of the deuterium abundance seems to be qualitatively understood, the measurements show some dispersion. Present thesis works are linked to deuterium interstellar abundance measurements. Such measurements are classically obtained from spectroscopic observations of the hydrogen and deuterium Lyman series in absorption in the ultraviolet spectral range, using space observatories. Results presented here were obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope and FUSE, which has recently been launched. Simultaneously, a new way to observe deuterium has been proposed, in the visible spectral range from ground-based telescopes. This has led to the first detections and the identification of the deuterium Balmer series, in emission in HII regions, using CFHT and VLT telescopes. (author) [fr

  5. School students' knowledge and understanding of the Global Solar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The Global Solar Ultraviolet Index (UVI) is a health communication tool used to inform the public about the health risks of excess solar UV radiation and encourage appropriate sun-protection behaviour. Knowledge and understanding of the UVI has been evaluated among adult populations but not among ...

  6. Ultraviolet extensions of particle physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthier, Laure Gaëlle

    The discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012 at the Large Hadron Collider completed the Standard Model field content. Many questions though remain unanswered by the Standard Model triggering a search for new physics. New physics could manifest itself at the Large Hadron Collider by the discovery of new...... particles. However, the lack of new resonances might suggest that these new particles are still out of reach which leaves us with few options. Two possibilities are explored in this thesis. The first is to study precision measurements which might indicate new physics as small deviations from the Standard...... are expressed as power series with missing higher order terms. We also show how to connect ultraviolet models of new physics to the Standard Model effective field theory and calculate bounds on them using the Standard Model effective field theory fit results. Finally, we study a nonrelativistic ultraviolet...

  7. Chromospheric manifestations in solar hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foing, B.

    1983-02-01

    Monochromatic pictures of the sun have been obtained during the second flight of the Transition Region Camera, in the ultra-violet continuum. 160 nm intensity distribution has been studied statistically. The trace of solar structures are underlined, at the temperature minimum, by the statistical distribution of the brightness quanta parameters. The ladder series and their spatial organization have been studied. Physical origin of the brightness quanta, in solar atmosphere seem to be explained, for the chromospheric network, as magnetic element flux tubes effects on the energy and radiation balance at small scale, but also by trace of energy propagation and non radiative heating in the quiet chrom 9 uosphere [fr

  8. Effectiveness of eye drops protective against ultraviolet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daxer, A; Blumthaler, M; Schreder, J; Ettl, A

    1998-01-01

    To test the effectiveness of commercially available ultraviolet (UV)-protective eye drops (8-hydroxy-1-methylchinolinium methylsulphate) which are recommended for protection against both solar and artificial UV radiation. The spectral transmission in the wavelength range from 250 to 500 nm was investigated in 1-nm steps using a high-resolution double monochromator with holographic gratings of 2,400 lines/mm and a 1,000-watt halogen lamp as light source. The transmission spectrum was measured for different values of the layer thickness. The transmission of a liquid layer of about 10 microns, which corresponds to the thickness of the human tear film, shows a cut-off at 290 nm with a transmission of about 25-50% at shorter wavelengths. For wavelengths longer than 290 nm the transmission is higher than 90%. The threshold time ratio for keratitis formation with and without eye drops is above 0.93 considering solar radiation on the earth's surface and above 0.65 considering radiation from arc-welding, respectively. The transmission spectrum of the eye drops under realistic conditions does not show a protective effect against solar UV radiation. However, there exists reduction of UVC radiation in the spectral range typical of artificial UV sources such as arc-welding. We cannot recommend the application of these eye drops as an UV-protective aid against eye damage by solar UV radiation.

  9. Effect of the Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation Estimation Error on Net Primary Production Estimation - A Study with MODIS FPAR and TOMS Ultraviolet Reflective Products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Matsunaga, T.; Hoyano, A.

    2002-01-01

    Absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (APAR), which is defined as downward solar radiation in 400-700 nm absorbed by vegetation, is one of the significant variables for Net Primary Production (NPP) estimation from satellite data. Toward the reduction of the uncertainties in the global NPP estimation, it is necessary to clarify the APAR accuracy. In this paper, first we proposed the improved PAR estimation method based on Eck and Dye's method in which the ultraviolet (UV) reflectivity data derived from Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) at the top of atmosphere were used for clouds transmittance estimation. The proposed method considered the variable effects of land surface UV reflectivity on the satellite-observed UV data. Monthly mean PAR comparisons between satellite-derived and ground-based data at various meteorological stations in Japan indicated that the improved PAR estimation method reduced the bias errors in the summer season. Assuming the relative error of the fraction of PAR (FPAR) derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to be 10%, we estimated APAR relative errors to be 10-15%. Annual NPP is calculated using APAR derived from MODIS/ FPAR and the improved PAR estimation method. It is shown that random and bias errors of annual NPP in a 1 km resolution pixel are less than 4% and 6% respectively. The APAR bias errors due to the PAR bias errors also affect the estimated total NPP. We estimated the most probable total annual NPP in Japan by subtracting the bias PAR errors. It amounts about 248 MtC/yr. Using the improved PAR estimation method, and Eck and Dye's method, total annual NPP is 4% and 9% difference from most probable value respectively. The previous intercomparison study among using fifteen NPP models4) showed that global NPP estimations among NPP models are 44.4-66.3 GtC/yr (coefficient of variation = 14%). Hence we conclude that the NPP estimation uncertainty due to APAR estimation error is small

  10. Ultraviolet and visible radiation at Barrow, Alaska: Climatology and influencing factors on the basis of version 2 National Science Foundation network data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Germar; Booth, Charles R.; Ehramjian, James C.; Stone, Robert; Dutton, Ellsworth G.

    2007-05-01

    Spectral ultraviolet (UV) and visible irradiance has been measured near Barrow, Alaska (71°N, 157°W), between 1991 and 2005 with a SUV-100 spectroradiometer. The instrument is part of the U.S. National Science Foundation's UV Monitoring Network. Here we present results based on the recently produced "version 2" data release, which supersedes published "version 0" data. Cosine error and wavelength-shift corrections applied to the new version increased biologically effective UV dose rates by 0-10%. Corrected clear-sky measurements of different years are typically consistent to within ±3%. Measurements were complemented with radiative transfer model calculations to retrieve total ozone and surface albedo from measured spectra and for the separation of the different factors influencing UV and visible radiation. A climatology of UV and visible radiation was established, focusing on annual cycles, trends, and the effect of clouds. During several episodes in spring of abnormally low total ozone, the daily UV dose at 305 nm exceeded the climatological mean by up to a factor of 2.6. Typical noontime UV Indices during summer vary between 2 and 4; the highest UV Index measured was 5.0 and occurred when surface albedo was unusually high. Radiation levels in the UV-A and visible exhibit a strong spring-autumn asymmetry. Irradiance at 345 nm peaks on approximately 20 May, 1 month before the solstice. This asymmetry is caused by increased cloudiness in autumn and high albedo in spring, when the snow covered surface enhances downwelling UV irradiance by up to 57%. Clouds reduce UV radiation at 345 nm on average by 4% in March and by more than 40% in August. Aerosols reduce UV by typically 5%, but larger reductions were observed during Arctic haze events. Stratospheric aerosols from the Pinatubo eruption in 1991 enhanced spectral irradiance at 305 nm for large solar zenith angles. The year-to-year variations of spectral irradiance at 305 nm and of the UV Index are mostly caused

  11. Remotely Triggered Solar Blind Signaling Using Deep Ultraviolet (UV) LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    observer, providing a means of visual communication even if the direct path is blocked...propogate toward the observer, providing a means of visual communication even if the direct path is blocked. 47 B. NLOS DETECTION USING LOCK-IN

  12. Absolute, Extreme-Ultraviolet Solar Spectral Irradiance Monitor (AESSIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-01

    molecular constituents [Meier 1991]. This radiation is the principal source of energy for producing and maintaining the complex, time-dependent, thermal...158.4 nm emisions for interstellar wind studies. After -2005, there is unlikely to be sufficient power to provide the requisite heating of the scan

  13. Solar photovoltaic markets, economics, technology, and potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blais, J.M.J.; Molinski, T.S. [Manitoba Hydro, Winnipeg, MB (Canada)]|[Emerging Energy Systems, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2008-07-01

    Solar Photovoltaics (PV) are solid state semiconductor electronic devices that transform infrared, visible, or ultraviolet light energy from the sun directly into electrical energy. Selenium was used to create the first solar cell in 1883. In 1954, Bell Laboratories developed the modern day silicon solar cell, whereby impurities were added to silicon through a process called doping. Silicon doped with boron results in a positive electrical charge, while silicon doped with phosphorous results in a negative electrical charge. The atom collision from photons in sunlight provides the necessary energy to free a trapped electron in the doped silicon, which then may flow through a wire creating an electric current. Many different materials besides silicon are used to create solar cells, such as plastics, organic compounds, and theoretically even special paints, while other doping agents besides boron and phosphorous are also used, such as arsenic and gallium. This paper provided an introduction to solar PV and world solar PV growth and markets. A review of solar PV economics was also included. In 2008, the total installed costs of solar photovoltaic cells were in the range of 7 to 10 Canadian dollars. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of solar PV were presented. Solar technologies under research and development were also discussed and assessed. It was concluded that although solar PV was one of the most expensive forms of renewable generation, there is great potential for solar PV to gain broader based application as costs continue to drop. 11 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  14. Solar Features - Solar Flares

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A solar flare is a short-lived sudden increase in the intensity of radiation emitted in the neighborhood of sunspots. For many years it was best monitored in the...

  15. Ultraviolet divergences and supersymmetric theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagnotti, A.

    1984-09-01

    This article is closely related to the one by Ferrara in these same Proceedings. It deals with what is perhaps the most fascinating property of supersymmetric theories, their improved ultraviolet behavior. My aim here is to present a survey of the state of the art as of August, 1984, and a somewhat more detailed discussion of the breakdown of the superspace power-counting beyond N = 2 superfields. A method is also described for simplifying divergence calculations that uses the locality of subtracted Feynman integrals. 74 references

  16. Ultraviolet disinfection of potable water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, R. L. [Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1990-06-15

    Because of upcoming surface and groundwater regulations regarding the control of microbiological and chemical contaminants, there is a need to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of ultraviolet (UV) radiation for primary disinfection of potable water supplies. Data is presented on microbicidal wavelengths of UV and distribution of energy output for low and medium-pressure arc lamps. Both systems were found to perform equally well for inactivating microorganisms, but each had distinct advantages in different applications. Approximate dosages for 90% inactivation of selected microorganisms by UV is presented in a table. Cost analysis for disinfection is presented in two tables as well as the advantages and disadvantages of UV disinfection.

  17. Ultraviolet disinfection of potable water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Because of upcoming surface and groundwater regulations regarding the control of microbiological and chemical contaminants, there is a need to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of ultraviolet (UV) radiation for primary disinfection of potable water supplies. Data is presented on microbicidal wavelengths of UV and distribution of energy output for low and medium-pressure arc lamps. Both systems were found to perform equally well for inactivating microorganisms, but each had distinct advantages in different applications. Approximate dosages for 90% inactivation of selected microorganisms by UV is presented in a table. Cost analysis for disinfection is presented in two tables as well as the advantages and disadvantages of UV disinfection

  18. Ultraviolet divergences of Einstein gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goroff, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    The author discuss a two-loop calculation showing that the S matrix of Einstein's theory of gravity contains nonrenormalizable ultraviolet divergences in four dimension. The author discusses the calculation in both background field and normal field theory. The author describes a new method for dealing with ghost fields in gauge theories by combining them with suitable extensions of the gauge fields in higher dimensions. The author shows how using subtracted integrals in the calculation of higher loop graphs simplifies the calculation in the background field method by eliminating the need for mixed counterterms. Finally, the author makes some remarks about the implications of the result for supergravity theories

  19. Ultraviolet laser technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, David L

    1995-01-01

    Ultraviolet Laser Technology and Applications is a hands-on reference text that identifies the main areas of UV laser technology; describes how each is applied; offers clearly illustrated examples of UV opticalsystems applications; and includes technical data on optics, lasers, materials, and systems. This book is unique for its comprehensive, in-depth coverage. Each chapter deals with a different aspect of the subject, beginning with UV light itself; moving through the optics, sources, and systems; and concluding with detailed descriptions of applications in various fields.The text enables pr

  20. Effects of solar PAR and UV radiation on tropical biofouling communities

    KAUST Repository

    Dobretsov, SV; Gosselin, L; Qian, P

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effect of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) on the development of tropical micro- and macrofouling communities for 30 d. The experimental design involved 3 treatments: full spectrum

  1. Ambient solar UV radiation and seasonal trends in potential sunburn risk among schoolchildren in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wright, CY

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The detrimental effects of excess personal solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure include sunburn, immunosuppression and skin cancer. In South Africa, individuals with minimum natural protection from melanin, including fair-skinned individuals...

  2. Dose modeling in ultraviolet phototherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, David Robert; Robbins, Chris; O'Hare, Neil John

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Ultraviolet phototherapy is widely used in the treatment of numerous skin conditions. This treatment is well established and largely beneficial to patients on both physical and psychological levels; however, overexposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) can have detrimental effects, such as erythemal responses and ocular damage in addition to the potentially carcinogenic nature of UVR. For these reasons, it is essential to control and quantify the radiation dose incident upon the patient to ensure that it is both biologically effective and has the minimal possible impact on the surrounding unaffected tissue. Methods: To date, there has been little work on dose modeling, and the output of artificial UVR sources is an area where research has been recommended. This work characterizes these sources by formalizing an approach from first principles and experimentally examining this model. Results: An implementation of a line source model is found to give impressive accuracy and quantifies the output radiation well. Conclusions: This method could potentially serve as a basis for a full computational dose model for quantifying patient dose.

  3. Ultraviolet spectral reflectance of carbonaceous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applin, Daniel M.; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Cloutis, Edward A.; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Pitman, Karly M.; Roush, Ted L.; Hendrix, Amanda R.; Lucey, Paul G.

    2018-06-01

    A number of planetary spacecraft missions have carried instruments with sensors covering the ultraviolet (UV) wavelength range. However, there exists a general lack of relevant UV reflectance laboratory data to compare against these planetary surface remote sensing observations in order to make confident material identifications. To address this need, we have systematically analyzed reflectance spectra of carbonaceous materials in the 200-500 nm spectral range, and found spectral-compositional-structural relationships that suggest this wavelength region could distinguish between otherwise difficult-to-identify carbon phases. In particular (and by analogy with the infrared spectral region), large changes over short wavelength intervals in the refractive indices associated with the trigonal sp2π-π* transition of carbon can lead to Fresnel peaks and Christiansen-like features in reflectance. Previous studies extending to shorter wavelengths also show that anomalous dispersion caused by the σ-σ* transition associated with both the trigonal sp2 and tetrahedral sp3 sites causes these features below λ = 200 nm. The peak wavelength positions and shapes of π-π* and σ-σ* features contain information on sp3/sp2, structure, crystallinity, and powder grain size. A brief comparison with existing observational data indicates that the carbon fraction of the surface of Mercury is likely amorphous and submicroscopic, as is that on the surface of the martian satellites Phobos and Deimos, and possibly comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, while further coordinated observations and laboratory experiments should refine these feature assignments and compositional hypotheses. The new laboratory diffuse reflectance data reported here provide an important new resource for interpreting UV reflectance measurements from planetary surfaces throughout the solar system, and confirm that the UV can be rich in important spectral information.

  4. Reduced IL-1Ra/IL-1 ratio in ultraviolet B-exposed skin of patients with polymorphic light eruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, A. S.; Pavel, S.; Tensen, C. P.; Teunissen, M. B. M.; Out-Luiting, J. J.; Willemze, R.; de Gruijl, F. R.

    2009-01-01

    Polymorphic light eruption (PLE) is a putative delayed-type allergic reaction to (solar) ultraviolet (UV) exposure. Inadequate immune suppression after UVB-induced sunburn appears to be associated with reduced trafficking of Langerhans cells (LCs) out of and neutrophils into the epidermis of

  5. Ultraviolet radiation monitoring in makkah city, Saudi Arabia, using thermoluminescence material CaF2:Tm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ghorabie, F.H.; Natto, S.S.; AL-Lehyani, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to explore the possibility of using Ca F2:Tm thermoluminescence material for measuring and monitoring of solar UV R in Makkah City, Saudi Arabia. Several laboratory experiments, prior to the field measurements, were performed included study of the effects of ultraviolet wavelengths on the response of the phosphor, study of the effect of increasing ultraviolet radiation dose on the intensity of thermoluminescence and study the effect of time factor on the thermoluminescence fading of Ca F 2 :Tm. The phosphor was then exposed directly for one hour to sunlight radiation on a daily basis for 90 days in an open field inside Umm Al-Qura university campus. The field measurements were performed during the months of June, July and August 2003 at 1:00 p.m. The laboratory and field results of this study showed that Ca F 2 :Tm can be used as a suitable dosimeter for solar UV R

  6. The measurement of ultraviolet radiation and sunburn time over southern Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, W. F. J.

    1994-01-01

    Studies of the depletion of ozone which have been conducted from the TOMS instrument on the NIMBUS 7 satellite indicate that total ozone has declined by 5 percent over the last 12 years at most mid-latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere typical of southern Ontario. The measurement of the actual resultant increases in UVB is now important. A monitoring program of UVB (biologically active solar ultraviolet radiation) has been conducted for the last 24 months at a site near Bolton, Ontario. The sunburn time varies from less than 17 minutes in late July, to over 4 hours in December on clear days. The levels depend on solar insolation and total ozone column. The ultraviolet levels are strongly affected by cloud and sky conditions. The implications of present and future depletion on the sunburn time are discussed.

  7. Solar variations and their influence on trends in upper stratospheric ozone and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuebbles, D.J.; Kinnison, D.E.; Lean, J.L.

    1990-10-01

    Over the past decade, knowledge of the magnitude and temporal structure of the variations in the sun's ultraviolet irradiance has increased steadily. A number of theoretical modeling studies have shown that changes in the solar ultraviolet flux during the 11-year solar cycle can have a significant effect on stratospheric ozone concentrations. With the exception of Brasseur et al., who examined a very broad range of solar flux variations, all of these studies assumed much larger changes in the ultraviolet flux than measurements now indicate. These studies either calculated the steady-state effect at solar maximum and solar minimum or assumed sinusoidal variations in the solar flux changes with time. It is now possible to narrow the uncertainty range of the expected effects on upper stratospheric ozone and temperature resulting from the 11-year solar cycle. A more accurate representation of the solar flux changes with time is used in this analysis, as compared to previous published studies. This study also evaluates the relative roles of solar flux variations and increasing concentrations of long-lived trace gases in determining the observed trends in upper stratospheric ozone and temperature. The LLNL two-dimensional chemical-radiative-transport model of the global atmosphere is used to evaluate the combined effects on the stratosphere from changes in solar ultraviolet irradiances and trace gas concentrations over the last several decades. Derived trends in upper stratospheric ozone concentrations and temperature are then compared with available analyses of ground-based and satellite measurements over this time period

  8. Ultraviolet safety assessments of insect light traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, David H; Gilbert, David W; Lyon, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Near-ultraviolet (UV-A: 315-400 nm), "black-light," electric lamps were invented in 1935 and ultraviolet insect light traps (ILTs) were introduced for use in agriculture around that time. Today ILTs are used indoors in several industries and in food-service as well as in outdoor settings. With recent interest in photobiological lamp safety, safety standards are being developed to test for potentially hazardous ultraviolet emissions. A variety of UV "Black-light" ILTs were measured at a range of distances to assess potential exposures. Realistic time-weighted human exposures are shown to be well below current guidelines for human exposure to ultraviolet radiation. These UV-A exposures would be far less than the typical UV-A exposure in the outdoor environment. Proposals are made for realistic ultraviolet safety standards for ILT products.

  9. Comparative Evaluation of Ultraviolet and Visible Light Transmittance through Prescriptive Ophthalmic Minus Lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Nazari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wearing spectacles is the most common approach in correcting the refractive errors worldwide. Due to harmful effects of overexposure to solar ultraviolet radiations, the usage of multi-layer coatings in ophthalmic lenses has recently been increased. These lenses can reduce the reflections and hence increase the transmission of visible light; they can also decrease the transmission of ultraviolet rays. This study aims to compare the transmission of ultraviolet (A and B and visible rays through coated and uncoated prescriptive ophthalmic plastic lenses.Materials and Methods: In this study, 39 minus non-photochromic multi-coated white plastic single-vision lenses; 9 similar lenses but without any coatings were assessed by spectral transmittancemeter for evaluation of the transmission of visible and ultraviolet rays.Results: The transmission of visible light was 97.9%±1.07% for coated lenses and 93.5%±0.54% for lenses without coating. Ultraviolet-A transmission was 12.15%±8.02% for coated lenses compared to 66.27%±23.92% in lenses without coating. The transmission of ultraviolet-B rays was 1.21%±0.4% and 23.0%±15.97% for lenses with and without coatings, respectively.Conclusion: The transmission of visible light was significantly higher in multi-coated lenses compared to uncoated samples; whereas the transmissions of ultraviolet rays in multi-coated lenses were significantly lower than uncoated ones. Therefore, it is recommended that, except for particular cases, prescribed lenses be equipped with this multi-layer coating.

  10. Extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy of highly charged argon ions at the Berlin EBIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biedermann, C; Radtke, R; Fussmann, G; Allen, F I

    2007-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet radiation from highly charged argon was investigated at the Berlin Electron Beam Ion Trap with a 2 m grazing incidence spectrometer. Lines in the wavelength range 150 to 660 A originating from C-like Ar 12+ to Li-like Ar 15+ ions have been identified and are compared with database information from solar line lists and predictions. Line ratios for the observed resonance, intercombination and forbidden lines offer important diagnostic capabilities for low density, hot plasmas

  11. The Ultraviolet Albedo of Ganymede

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Melissa; Hendrix, A.

    2013-10-01

    A large set of ultraviolet images of Ganymede have been acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope over the last 15 years. These images have been used almost exclusively to study Ganymede’s stunning auroral emissions (Feldman et al. 2000; Eviatar et al. 2001; McGrath et al. 2004; Saur et al. 2011; McGrath et al. 2013), and even the most basic information about Ganymede’s UV albedo has yet to be gleaned from these data. We will present a first-cut analysis of both disk-averaged and spatially-resolved UV albedos of Ganymede, with focus on the spatially-resolved Lyman-alpha albedo, which has never been considered previously for this satellite. Ganymede's visibly bright regions are known to be rich in water ice, while the visibly dark regions seem to be more carbonaceous (Carlson et al., 1996). At Lyman-alpha, these two species should also have very different albedo values. References Carlson, R. and 39 co-authors, Near-infrared spectroscopy and spectral mapping of Jupiter and the Galilean satellites: Results from Galileo’s initial orbit, Science, 274, 385-388, 1996. Eviatar, A., D. F. Strobel, B. C. Wolven, P. D. Feldman, M. A. McGrath, and D. J. Williams, Excitation of the Ganymede ultraviolet aurora, Astrophys. J, 555, 1013-1019, 2001. Feldman, P. D., M. A. McGrath, D. F. Strobel, H. W. Moos, K. D. Retherford, and B. C. Wolven, HST/STIS imaging of ultraviolet aurora on Ganymede, Astrophys. J, 535, 1085-1090, 2000. McGrath M. A., Lellouch E., Strobel D. F., Feldman P. D., Johnson R. E., Satellite Atmospheres, Chapter 19 in Jupiter: The Planet, Satellites and Magnetosphere, ed. F. Bagenal, T. Dowling, W. McKinnon, Cambridge University Press, 2004. McGrath M. A., Jia, Xianzhe; Retherford, Kurt; Feldman, Paul D.; Strobel, Darrell F.; Saur, Joachim, Aurora on Ganymede, J. Geophys. Res., doi: 10.1002/jgra.50122, 2013. Saur, J., S. Duling, S., L. Roth, P. D. Feldman, D. F. Strobel, K. D. Retherford, M. A. McGrath, A. Wennmacher, American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting

  12. Hand protection from ultraviolet exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khazova, M.; O'Hagan, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: A number of industrial applications and public services involve exposure to ultraviolet radiation (U.V.R.) from a variety of lamps and lasers, for example, in forensic examination, biological trans-illuminators, dentistry, laser material processing, microelectronics, etc. The proposed European Union Directive on Optical Radiation would place specific requirements on employers to provide adequate safety measures to reduce exposure to U.V.R., including gloves for hand protection. The selection of gloves should be based on a risk assessment and on the performance characteristics of the gloves for the task. However, current International and national standards do not describe evaluation procedures of disposable gloves for hand protection against non-ionising radiation. A methodology for assessment of the UV protection level for disposable gloves and a simple measurement protocol are proposed, based on a common approach with UV protection by clothing and sunscreens. Glove Ultraviolet Protection Factor is defined as a time-scale increase in exposure permitted for the hand protected by a glove with respect to an unprotected hand. However, the wide variety of U.V.R. sources and the real-life conditions of glove use (stretching and wetting the surface by liquids) bring substantial challenges to the assessment method. Our study of ∼ 50 samples of widely used disposable gloves made of different materials (nitrile, vinyl, latex and chloroprene) showed that for all tested gloves a change in U.V.R. attenuation with stretching is characteristic for the type of glove material and can be included as a scaling factor in the definition of U.V.R. protection. Glove material has a bigger effect on U.V.R. protection level than variations in the glove thickness or its colour. The following approaches are suggested to overcome the problem of variable U.V.R. sources: - Worst case scenario minimal protection level, most restrictive case - Application

  13. Hand protection from ultraviolet exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khazova, M.; O' Hagan, J.B. [Health Protection Agency, Radiation Protection Division, Chilton, Did cot (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: A number of industrial applications and public services involve exposure to ultraviolet radiation (U.V.R.) from a variety of lamps and lasers, for example, in forensic examination, biological trans-illuminators, dentistry, laser material processing, microelectronics, etc. The proposed European Union Directive on Optical Radiation would place specific requirements on employers to provide adequate safety measures to reduce exposure to U.V.R., including gloves for hand protection. The selection of gloves should be based on a risk assessment and on the performance characteristics of the gloves for the task. However, current International and national standards do not describe evaluation procedures of disposable gloves for hand protection against non-ionising radiation. A methodology for assessment of the UV protection level for disposable gloves and a simple measurement protocol are proposed, based on a common approach with UV protection by clothing and sunscreens. Glove Ultraviolet Protection Factor is defined as a time-scale increase in exposure permitted for the hand protected by a glove with respect to an unprotected hand. However, the wide variety of U.V.R. sources and the real-life conditions of glove use (stretching and wetting the surface by liquids) bring substantial challenges to the assessment method. Our study of {approx} 50 samples of widely used disposable gloves made of different materials (nitrile, vinyl, latex and chloroprene) showed that for all tested gloves a change in U.V.R. attenuation with stretching is characteristic for the type of glove material and can be included as a scaling factor in the definition of U.V.R. protection. Glove material has a bigger effect on U.V.R. protection level than variations in the glove thickness or its colour. The following approaches are suggested to overcome the problem of variable U.V.R. sources: - Worst case scenario minimal protection level, most restrictive case - Application

  14. Measurement of solar spectra relating to photosynthesis and solar cells: an inquiry lab for secondary science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggirello, Rachel M; Balcerzak, Phyllis; May, Victoria L; Blankenship, Robert E

    2012-07-01

    The process of photosynthesis is central to science curriculum at all levels. This article describes an inquiry-based laboratory investigation developed to explore the impact of light quality on photosynthesis and to connect this process to current research on harvesting solar energy, including bioenergy, artificial photosynthesis, and solar cells. This laboratory was used with high-school science teachers who then took this experience back to their classrooms. During this exercise, teachers used an economical spectroradiometer to measure the solar spectrum and relate this to photosynthetic light absorption by determining the quality of light beneath trees. Following this investigation, teachers learned about the plant-inspired dye-sensitized solar cells and constructed one. To connect their light quality investigation to the efficiency of photosynthesis and solar cells, teachers then collected data at locations with varying quality and intensity of light. In sum, this investigation provides a crucial connection between photosynthesis and cutting edge research on solar energy technologies. Our learning experience provides a new instructional model for understanding a little investigated aspect of photosynthesis and connects to authentic scientific research. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Establishing a ultraviolet radiation observational network and enhancing the study on ultraviolet radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jianhui; Wang, Gengchen

    2003-09-01

    On the basis of analyzing observational data on solar radiation, meteorological parameters, and total ozone amount for the period of January 1990 to December 1991 in the Beijing area, an empirical calculation method for ultraviolet radiation (UV) in clear sky is obtained. The results show that the calculated values agree well with the observed, with maximum relative bias of 6.2% and mean relative bias for 24 months of 1.9%. Good results are also obtained when this method is applied in Guangzhou and Mohe districts. The long-term variation of UV radiation in clear sky over the Beijing area from 1979 to 1998 is calculated, and the UV variation trends and causes are discussed: direct and indirect UV energy absorption by increasing pollutants in the troposphere may have caused the UV decrease in clear sky in the last 20 years. With the enhancement of people’s quality of life and awareness of health, it will be valuable and practical to provid UV forecasts for typical cities and rural areas. So, we should develop and enhance UV study in systematic monitoring, forecasting, and developing a good and feasible method for UV radiation reporting in China, especially for big cities.

  16. Low cost solar air heater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, R.S.; Singh, Sukhmeet; Singh, Parm Pal

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Single glazed low cost solar air heater is more efficient during summer while double glazed is better in winter. ► For the same initial investment, low cost solar air heaters collect more energy than packed bed solar air heater. ► During off season low cost solar air heater can be stored inside as it is light in weight. - Abstract: Two low cost solar air heaters viz. single glazed and double glazed were designed, fabricated and tested. Thermocole, ultraviolet stabilised plastic sheet, etc. were used for fabrication to reduce the fabrication cost. These were tested simultaneously at no load and with load both in summer and winter seasons along with packed bed solar air heater using iron chips for absorption of radiation. The initial costs of single glazed and double glazed are 22.8% and 26.8% of the initial cost of packed bed solar air heater of the same aperture area. It was found that on a given day at no load, the maximum stagnation temperatures of single glazed and double glazed solar air heater were 43.5 °C and 62.5 °C respectively. The efficiencies of single glazed, double glazed and packed bed solar air heaters corresponding to flow rate of 0.02 m 3 /s-m 2 were 30.29%, 45.05% and 71.68% respectively in winter season. The collector efficiency factor, heat removal factor based on air outlet temperature and air inlet temperature for three solar air heaters were also determined.

  17. A Compact Extreme Ultraviolet Imager

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Just how far can one shrink a solar/heliospheric image??? — Can you shrink it small enough to fit on a cube-sat? What can we image — successfully — from a cube-sat?...

  18. Final Report: Spectral Analysis of L-shell Data in the Extreme Ultraviolet from Tokamak Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepson, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jernigan, J. Garrett [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Beiersdorfer, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-02-05

    We performed detailed analyses of extreme ultraviolet spectra taken by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on the National Spherical Torus Experiment at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and on the Alcator CKmod tokamak at the M.I.T. Plasma Science and Fusion Center. We focused on the emission of iron, carbon, and other elements in several spectral band pass regions covered by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We documented emission lines of carbon not found in currently used solar databases and demonstrated that this emission was due to charge exchange.

  19. Solar Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, William W.

    Presented is the utilization of solar radiation as an energy resource principally for the production of electricity. Included are discussions of solar thermal conversion, photovoltic conversion, wind energy, and energy from ocean temperature differences. Future solar energy plans, the role of solar energy in plant and fossil fuel production, and…

  20. Possibility of using sources of vacuum ultraviolet irradiation to solve problems of space material science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhoutseva, E. T.; Yaremenko, E. I.

    1974-01-01

    An urgent problem in space materials science is simulating the interaction of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) of solar emission with solids in space conditions, that is, producing a light source with a distribution that approximates the distribution of solar energy. Information is presented on the distribution of the energy flux of VUV of solar radiation. Requirements that must be satisfied by the VUV source used for space materials science are formulated, and a critical evaluation is given of the possibilities of using existing sources for space materials science. From this evaluation it was established that none of the sources of VUV satisfies the specific requirements imposed on the simulator of solar radiation. A solution to the problem was found to be in the development of a new type of source based on exciting a supersonic gas jet flowing into vacuum with a sense electron beam. A description of this gas-jet source, along with its spectral and operation characteristics, is presented.

  1. Short and long term variation in ultraviolet radiation and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menni, Cristina; Lowell, Walter E; Bentzen, Joan

    2012-01-01

    We examined the role of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) in persons diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) in four different populations, Italians, Danish, White and African Americans. We tested whether variation in UVR as determined by seasons (short term variation) and solar cycles (long term...... to study the pattern of month of birth distribution in patients with MS comparing with general population data. T-tests were employed to study solar cycles association with lifespan. A surplus of births was observed in June for White Americans. A decrease of births in October and November, though...... not significant after multiple testing correction, was observed in the three populations. In White American with MS overall, males and females, we found that solar cycle is associated with lifespan. We found that season and solar cycles have some role in MS susceptibility and life duration. However...

  2. Multivariate Analysis of MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Aerosol Retrievals and the Statistical Hurricane Intensity Prediction Scheme (SHIPS Parameters for Atlantic Hurricanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed M. Kamal

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS aerosol retrievals over the North Atlantic spanning seven hurricane seasons are combined with the Statistical Hurricane Intensity Prediction Scheme (SHIPS parameters. The difference between the current and future intensity changes were selected as response variables. For 24 major hurricanes (category 3, 4 and 5 between 2003 and 2009, eight lead time response variables were determined to be between 6 and 48 h. By combining MODIS and SHIPS data, 56 variables were compiled and selected as predictors for this study. Variable reduction from 56 to 31 was performed in two steps; the first step was via correlation coefficients (cc followed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA extraction techniques. The PCA reduced 31 variables to 20. Five categories were established based on the PCA group variables exhibiting similar physical phenomena. Average aerosol retrievals from MODIS Level 2 data in the vicinity of UTC 1,200 and 1,800 h were mapped to the SHIPS parameters to perform Multiple Linear Regression (MLR between each response variable against six sets of predictors of 31, 30, 28, 27, 23 and 20 variables. The deviation among the predictors Root Mean Square Error (RMSE varied between 0.01 through 0.05 and, therefore, implied that reducing the number of variables did not change the core physical information. Even when the parameters are reduced from 56 to 20, the correlation values exhibit a stronger relationship between the response and predictors. Therefore, the same phenomena can be explained by the reduction of variables.

  3. New 4.4 km-resolution aerosol product from NASA's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer: A user's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastan, A.; Garay, M. J.; Witek, M. L.; Seidel, F.; Bull, M. A.; Kahn, R. A.; Diner, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    The NASA Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite has provided an 18-year-and-growing aerosol data record. MISR's V22 aerosol product has been used extensively in studies of regional and global climate and the health effects of particulate air pollution. The MISR team recently released a new version of this product (V23), which increases the spatial resolution from 17.6 km to 4.4 km, improves performance versus AERONET, and provides better spatial coverage, more accurate cloud screening, and improved radiometric conditioning relative to V22. The product formatting was also completely revamped to improve clarity and usability. Established and prospective users of the MISR aerosol product are invited to learn about the features and performance of the new product and to participate in one-on-one demonstrations of how to obtain, visualize, and analyze the new product. Because the aerosol product is used in generating atmospherically-corrected surface bidirectional reflectance factors, improvements in MISR's 1.1 km resolution land surface product are a by-product of the updated aerosol retrievals. Illustrative comparisons of the V22 and V23 aerosol and surface products will be shown.

  4. Solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, D.

    1981-01-01

    The book opens with a review of the patterns of energy use and resources in the United States, and an exploration of the potential of solar energy to supply some of this energy in the future. This is followed by background material on solar geometry, solar intensities, flat plate collectors, and economics. Detailed attention is then given to a variety of solar units and systems, including domestic hot water systems, space heating systems, solar-assisted heat pumps, intermediate temperature collectors, space heating/cooling systems, concentrating collectors for high temperatures, storage systems, and solar total energy systems. Finally, rights to solar access are discussed.

  5. Solar Combisystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thür, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    This note first introduces what is a solar combisystem, the structure how a solar combisystem is build up and what are criteria’s to evaluate a solar combisystem concept. Further on the main components of a solar combisystem, the main characteristics and possible advantages and disadvantages...... compared to each other are described. It is not the goal of this note to explain the technical details how to design all components of a solar combisystem. This is done during other lectures of the solar course and in other basic courses as well. This note tries to explain how a solar combisystem...

  6. Galactic Astronomy in the Ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastorguev, A. S.; Sachkov, M. E.; Zabolotskikh, M. V.

    2017-12-01

    We propose a number of prospective observational programs for the ultraviolet space observatory WSO-UV, which seem to be of great importance to modern galactic astronomy. The programs include the search for binary Cepheids; the search and detailed photometric study and the analysis of radial distribution of UV-bright stars in globular clusters ("blue stragglers", blue horizontal-branch stars, RR Lyrae variables, white dwarfs, and stars with UV excesses); the investigation of stellar content and kinematics of young open clusters and associations; the study of spectral energy distribution in hot stars, including calculation of the extinction curves in the UV, optical and NIR; and accurate definition of the relations between the UV-colors and effective temperature. The high angular resolution of the observatory allows accurate astrometric measurements of stellar proper motions and their kinematic analysis.

  7. Additive effects of ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, A.P.

    1980-01-01

    A xenon-mercury high pressure lamp and a double monochromator were used to produce ultraviolet (uv) radiation at 295 nm. Pigmented rabbit eyes were irradiated and evaluated by slitlamp biomicroscopy. Corneal threshold (Hc) was 0.05 J.cm-2 and lens threshold (hL) was 0.75 J.cm-2. Other eyes were irradiated with 2 Hc and evaluated from 4 to 24 h at 4 h intervals. Corneal damage was only greater than that expected from a single Hc exposure if the separation between the two Hc exposures did not exceed 8 h. The most repeatable and reliable corneal response to these levels of uv was the development of corneal epithelial granules

  8. Ultraviolet Spectrophotometry of VV Cephei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Woon Kang

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available The IUE archival spectra of VV Cephei were collected to investigate the eclipse nature in the ultraviolet. The temperature of the B star has been determined, as approximately 30000K, based on the flux distributions during egress. Light curves of VV Cephei were reduced from the spectrophotometry of the IUE archival spectra. Three light curves at the center wavelengths of 3250 Å, 2550 Å and 2850 Å have been analyzed by the modified Wilson and Devinney light curve program. The radii of the B star and M star were deduced to 0.05 and 0.22 of unit separation, respectively. The UV light curves show an evidence that the light was attenuated by the highly opaque atomsphere of the M star.

  9. Ultraviolet, Visible, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Michael H.

    Spectroscopy in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) range is one of the most commonly encountered laboratory techniques in food analysis. Diverse examples, such as the quantification of macrocomponents (total carbohydrate by the phenol-sulfuric acid method), quantification of microcomponents, (thiamin by the thiochrome fluorometric procedure), estimates of rancidity (lipid oxidation status by the thiobarbituric acid test), and surveillance testing (enzyme-linked immunoassays), are presented in this text. In each of these cases, the analytical signal for which the assay is based is either the emission or absorption of radiation in the UV-Vis range. This signal may be inherent in the analyte, such as the absorbance of radiation in the visible range by pigments, or a result of a chemical reaction involving the analyte, such as the colorimetric copper-based Lowry method for the analysis of soluble protein.

  10. An Ultraviolet Optical Wireless Sensor Network in Multi-scattering Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedar, Debbie; Arnon, Shlomi

    2006-10-01

    Networks of wirelessly communicating sensors are a promising technology for future data-gathering systems in both civilian and military applications including medical and environmental monitoring and surveillance, home security and industry. Optical wireless communication is a potential solution for the links, particularly thanks to the small and lightweight hardware and low power consumption. A noteworthy feature of optical wireless communication at ultraviolet wavelengths is that scattering of radiation by atmospheric particles is significant, so that the backscattering of light by these particles can function as a vehicle of communication as if numerous tiny reflecting mirrors were placed in the atmosphere. Also, almost no solar radiation penetrates the atmosphere in this spectral band, which is hence called the solar blind ultraviolet spectrum, so that very large field-of-view receivers can be used. In this paper we present a model of a non-line-of-sight (NLOS) optical wireless sensor network operating in the solar blind ultraviolet spectrum. The system feasibility is evaluated and found to facilitate miniature operational sensor networks. The problem of multi-access interference is addressed and the possibility of overcoming it using WDM diversity methods is investigated.

  11. Solar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The solar collectors shown are elements of domestic solar hot water systems produced by Solar One Ltd., Virginia Beach, Virginia. Design of these systems benefited from technical expertise provided Solar One by NASA's Langley Research Center. The company obtained a NASA technical support package describing the d e sign and operation of solar heating equipment in NASA's Tech House, a demonstration project in which aerospace and commercial building technology are combined in an energy- efficient home. Solar One received further assistance through personal contact with Langley solar experts. The company reports that the technical information provided by NASA influenced Solar One's panel design, its selection of a long-life panel coating which increases solar collection efficiency, and the method adopted for protecting solar collectors from freezing conditions.

  12. Solar radiophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean, D.J.; Labrum, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book treats all aspects of solar radioastronomy at metre wavelengths, particularly work carried out on the Australian radioheliograph at Culgoora, with which most of the authors have been associated in one way or another. After an introductory section on historical aspects, the solar atmosphere, solar flares, and coronal radio emission, the book deals with instrumentation, theory, and details of observations and interpretations of the various aspects of metrewave solar radioastronomy, including burst types, solar storms, and the quiet sun. (U.K.)

  13. Kinetic Physics of the Solar Corona and Solar Wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsch Eckart

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic plasma physics of the solar corona and solar wind are reviewed with emphasis on the theoretical understanding of the in situ measurements of solar wind particles and waves, as well as on the remote-sensing observations of the solar corona made by means of ultraviolet spectroscopy and imaging. In order to explain coronal and interplanetary heating, the microphysics of the dissipation of various forms of mechanical, electric and magnetic energy at small scales (e.g., contained in plasma waves, turbulences or non-uniform flows must be addressed. We therefore scrutinise the basic assumptions underlying the classical transport theory and the related collisional heating rates, and also describe alternatives associated with wave-particle interactions. We elucidate the kinetic aspects of heating the solar corona and interplanetary plasma through Landau- and cyclotron-resonant damping of plasma waves, and analyse in detail wave absorption and micro instabilities. Important aspects (virtues and limitations of fluid models, either single- and multi-species or magnetohydrodynamic and multi-moment models, for coronal heating and solar wind acceleration are critically discussed. Also, kinetic model results which were recently obtained by numerically solving the Vlasov–Boltzmann equation in a coronal funnel and hole are presented. Promising areas and perspectives for future research are outlined finally.

  14. Characterization of a smartphone camera's response to ultraviolet A radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoe, Damien; Parisi, Alfio; Carter, Brad

    2013-01-01

    As part of a wider study into the use of smartphones as solar ultraviolet radiation monitors, this article characterizes the ultraviolet A (UVA; 320-400 nm) response of a consumer complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-based smartphone image sensor in a controlled laboratory environment. The CMOS image sensor in the camera possesses inherent sensitivity to UVA, and despite the attenuation due to the lens and neutral density and wavelength-specific bandpass filters, the measured relative UVA irradiances relative to the incident irradiances range from 0.0065% at 380 nm to 0.0051% at 340 nm. In addition, the sensor demonstrates a predictable response to low-intensity discrete UVA stimuli that can be modelled using the ratio of recorded digital values to the incident UVA irradiance for a given automatic exposure time, and resulting in measurement errors that are typically less than 5%. Our results support the idea that smartphones can be used for scientific monitoring of UVA radiation. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

  15. Pollen and spores as a passive monitor of ultraviolet radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley Toby Fraser

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sporopollenin is the primary component of the outer walls of pollen and spores. The chemical composition of sporopollenin is responsive to levels of ultraviolet (UV radiation exposure, via a concomitant change in the concentration of phenolic compounds. This relationship offers the possibility of using fossil pollen and spore chemistry as a novel proxy for past UV flux. Phenolic compounds in sporopollenin can be quantified using Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy. The high potential for preservation of pollen and spores in the geologic record, and the conservative nature of sporopollenin chemistry across the land plant phylogeny, means that this new proxy has the potential to reconstruct UV flux over much longer timescales than has previously been possible. This new tool has important implications for understanding the relationship between UV flux, solar insolation and climate in the past, as well as providing a possible means of assessing paleoaltitude, and ozone thickness.

  16. Climate hypersensitivity to solar forcing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Soon

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available We compare the equilibrium climate responses of a quasi-dynamical energy balance model to radiative forcing by equivalent changes in CO2, solar total irradiance (Stot and solar UV (SUV. The response is largest in the SUV case, in which the imposed UV radiative forcing is preferentially absorbed in the layer above 250 mb, in contrast to the weak response from global-columnar radiative loading by increases in CO2 or Stot. The hypersensitive response of the climate system to solar UV forcing is caused by strongly coupled feedback involving vertical static stability, tropical thick cirrus ice clouds and stratospheric ozone. This mechanism offers a plausible explanation of the apparent hypersensitivity of climate to solar forcing, as suggested by analyses of recent climatic records. The model hypersensitivity strongly depends on climate parameters, especially cloud radiative properties, but is effective for arguably realistic values of these parameters. The proposed solar forcing mechanism should be further confirmed using other models (e.g., general circulation models that may better capture radiative and dynamical couplings of the troposphere and stratosphere.Key words: Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (climatology · general or miscellaneous · Solar physics · astrophysics · and astronomy (ultraviolet emissions

  17. Stratospheric ozone, ultraviolet radiation and climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucher, O.

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that an overexposure to ultraviolet radiation is associated with a number of health risks such as an increased risk of cataracts and skin cancers. At a time when climate change is often blamed for all our environmental problems, what is the latest news about the stratospheric ozone layer and other factors controlling ultraviolet radiation at the surface of the Earth? Will the expected changes in the chemical composition of the atmosphere and changes in our climate increase or decrease the risk for skin cancer? This article investigates the role of the various factors influencing ultraviolet radiation and presents the latest knowledge on the subject. (author)

  18. Ultraviolet safety assessments of insect light traps

    OpenAIRE

    Sliney, David H.; Gilbert, David W.; Lyon, Terry

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Near-ultraviolet (UV-A: 315?400?nm), ?black-light,? electric lamps were invented in 1935 and ultraviolet insect light traps (ILTs) were introduced for use in agriculture around that time. Today ILTs are used indoors in several industries and in food-service as well as in outdoor settings. With recent interest in photobiological lamp safety, safety standards are being developed to test for potentially hazardous ultraviolet emissions. A variety of UV ?Black-light? ILTs were measured at...

  19. Some aspects of vacuum ultraviolet radiation physics

    CERN Document Server

    Damany, Nicole; Vodar, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Some Aspects of Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation Physics presents some data on the state of research in vacuum ultraviolet radiation in association with areas of physics. Organized into four parts, this book begins by elucidating the optical properties of solids in the vacuum ultraviolet region (v.u.v.), particularly the specific methods of determination of optical constants in v.u.v., the properties of metals, and those of ionic insulators. Part II deals with molecular spectroscopy, with emphasis on the spectra of diatomic and simple polyatomic molecules, paraffins, and condensed phases. Part III

  20. Stimulation of hair cells with ultraviolet light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimzadeh, Julien B.; Fabella, Brian A.; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2018-05-01

    Hair bundles are specialized organelles that transduce mechanical inputs into electrical outputs. To activate hair cells, physiologists have resorted to mechanical methods of hair-bundle stimulation. Here we describe a new method of hair-bundle stimulation, irradiation with ultraviolet light. A hair bundle illuminated by ultraviolet light rapidly moves towards its tall edge, a motion typically associated with excitatory stimulation. The motion disappears upon tip-link rupture and is associated with the opening of mechanotransduction channels. Hair bundles can be induced to move sinusoidally with oscillatory modulation of the stimulation power. We discuss the implications of ultraviolet stimulation as a novel hair-bundle stimulus.

  1. Signature of open magnetic field lines in the extended solar corona and of solar wind acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, E.; Giordano, S.; Benna, C.; Kohl, J. L.; Noci, G.; Michels, J.; Fineschi, S.

    1997-01-01

    The observations carried out with the ultraviolet coronagraph spectrometer onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) are discussed. The purpose of the observations was to determine the line of sight and radial velocity fields in coronal regions with different magnetic topology. The results showed that the regions where the high speed solar wind flows along open field lines are characterized by O VI 1032 and HI Lyman alpha 1216 lines. The global coronal maps of the line of sight velocity were reconstructed. The corona height, where the solar wind reaches 100 km/s, was determined.

  2. Need for a well-balanced sunscreen to protect human skin from both Ultraviolet A and Ultraviolet B damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Moyal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin exposure to sunlight can cause many adverse effects. It is now recognized that both Ultraviolet A (UVA and UVB wavelengths are responsible for the detrimental effects of solar radiation on skin. With our increasing knowledge on the harmful effects of UVA, the need for effective, well-balanced photoprotection has become more crucial. Numerous clinical studies showed that well-balanced sunscreen, with a SPF/UVAPF ratio ≤ 3, provide the most effective protection against pigmentation (especially on dark skin, DNA damage, UV-induced skin immunosuppression and photodermatoses. The calculation of UVA protection required in Asia revealed its particular importance in India, and gives clear evidence that the SPF value alone is not sufficient to evaluate the efficacy of a sunscreen.

  3. Spectroscopic observation of the middle ultraviolet earth albedo by S-520-4 rocket and mesospheric ozone density profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Katsuhisa; Ogawa, Toshihiro.

    1982-01-01

    The ozone Hartey absorption band in the middle ultraviolet range is commonly adopted for the ozone measurement by rocket and satellite observations. In Japan, since 1965 the ozone absorption in the solar ultraviolet radiation has been observed by rocket-borne uv photometers. On the other hand the spectroscopic measurements of the scattered solar ultraviolet radiation from the terrestrial atmosphere will be performed by the EXOS-C satellite which will be launched in 1984. We tested the spectrometer for this satellite experiment by S-520-4 rocket launched on 5 September 1981. This instrument observed the scattered radiation of 2500 A -- 3300 A and the visible earth albedo of 4030 A. The spectrometer is consisted of a concave grating and has about 10 A wavelength resolution. A photomultiplier having a Cs-Te photocathode is used as a uv detector. The visible albedo is measured by a photometer consisting of an interference filter and a phototube. We estimated the atmospheric ozone profile, comparing the uv spectrum obtained by this experiment with the model calculations. The estimated ozone density profile higher than 30 km altitude has good agreement with the profile obtained by the previous uv photometer experiments at Uchinoura. There are differences between the observed spectrum and the calculated one in = 3100 A. We can explain them by the effect of Mie scattering and the uv stray light. In the present experiment we could successfully test the functions of the instrument in the space. rocket, spectrometer, solar ultraviolet radiation, earth albedo, ozone (author)

  4. Comparative analysis of the indices of solar collectors designs of abroad and domestic production. New technical solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popel', O.S.; Frid, S.E.; Shcheglov, V.N.; Sulejmanov, M.Zh.; Kolomiets, Yu.G.; Prokopchenko, I.N.

    2006-01-01

    Paper presents comparative analysis of heat-engineering and design parameters of the domestic and foreign solar collectors and describes well-grounded proposals on application of new structural materials (heat-resistant and ultraviolet radiation-resistant plastics) [ru

  5. Photodetector of ultra-violet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorogan, V.; Vieru, T.; Coseac, V.; Chirita, F.

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to photodetectors on the semiconductors base, in particular, to photodetectors of ultra-violet radiation and can be used in the optoelectronics systems for determining the intensity and dose of ultraviolet radiation emitted by the Sun and other sources. In the structure of the photodetector of ultraviolet radiation with a superficial potential barrier formed of semiconductors A 3 B 5 with the prohibited power width Eg 1 , solid solutions thereof with the prohibited power width Eg 2 and SnO 2 or ITO, in the semiconductors A 3 B 5 at a surface distance less than the absorption length of the visible radiation it is formed an isotype heterojunction between the semiconductors A 3 B 5 and solid solutions thereof with the prohibited power width Eg 2 > Eg 1 . The technical result consists in manufacturing of a photodetector sensitive solely to the ultraviolet radiation

  6. Outdoor ultraviolet exposure of children and adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffey, B.L.; Gibson, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    The weekday and weekend outdoor ultraviolet exposure of young people from primary and secondary schools in three geographically distinct regions of England was determined over a 3-month period in summer. Ultraviolet exposure was measured using personal film badges worn by each young person and time spent outdoors, in hourly intervals, assessed using exposure records. In each area a class of 9-10 year-old children from a primary school and a class of 14-15-year-old adolescents from a secondary school took part, giving a total of 180 subjects. We found that primary school children received higher outdoor ultraviolet exposure than young people in secondary schools, and geographical differences in exposure could not be accounted for solely by differences in ambient ultraviolet. There was little difference between the exposure of males and females. Children and adolescents did not behave as homogeneous groups with regard to exposure. (Author)

  7. Ultraviolet light - nature's own disinfection process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munkeberg, T [Thorolf Gregersen a/s, Oslo (Norway)

    1978-05-18

    Ultraviolet radiation from the sun is the means by which natural pollution products, as well as much of the smaller amount of pollution products produced by man, are converted and returned to the cycle of nature. Artificial ultraviolet radiation offers an optimum method for the disinfection of drinking water and can be used in the long term without undesireable effects on man or the enviromment. There is no evidence that ultraviolet irradiation leads to radiation resistant mutations of bacteria. The geometrical arrangement of ultraviolet disinfection units is described and the capacities of typical units is mentioned as being 600-800 m/sup 3/ /hr, though there is no reason why this should not be increased.

  8. Ultraviolet light - nature's own disinfection process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munkeberg, T.

    1978-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation from the sun is the means by which natural pollution products, as well as much of the smaller amount of pollution products produced by man, are converted and returned to the cycle of nature. Artificial ultraviolet radiation offers an optimum method for the disinfection of drinking water and can be used in the long term without undesireable effects on man or the enviromment. There is no evidence that ultraviolet irradiation leads to radiation resistant mutations of bacteria. The geometrical arrangement of ultraviolet disinfection units is described and the capacities of typical units is mentioned as being 600-800 m 3 /hr, though there is no reason why this should not be increased. (JIW)

  9. Inactivation of mitochondrial ATPase by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez, E.; Cuellar, A.

    1984-01-01

    The present work describes experiments that show that far-ultraviolet irradiation induce the inhibition of ATPase activity in both membrane-bound and soluble F1. It was also found that ultraviolet light promotes the release of tightly bound adenine nucleotides from F1-ATPase. Experiments carried out with submitochondrial particles indicate that succinate partially protects against these effects of ultraviolet light. Titration of sulfhydryl groups in both irradiated submitochondrial particles and soluble F1-ATPase indicates that a conformational change induced by photochemical modifications of amino acid residues appears involved in the inactivation of the enzyme. Finally, experiments are described which show that the tyrosine residue located in the active site of F1-ATPase is modified by ultraviolet irradiation

  10. Stability and Transient Effects in Ultraviolet Filaments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Niday, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    .... Much of the work in this field has been done with infrared pulses; however, it has been proposed that ultraviolet pulses have the advantage that longer pulse lengths can be used, thereby delivering more energy...

  11. PMMA Wettability Caused by Ultraviolet Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Dehtjars, J; Lancere, L; Poļaka, N; Soudnikovich, A; Tjuļkins, F; Valters, V

    2010-01-01

    The article is targeted to explore ultraviolet radiation (UV) influence on PMMAf or eye prostheses. UV beingt he Sun lightc omponenta nd could effect PMMA surface that in turn contributesi nteractionw ith tear. PMMA wettabilityw as poweredb y UV.

  12. Ultraviolet treatment on high performance filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Huang

    2005-01-01

    Quartz, Kevlar, carbon, and glass filaments were irradiated by ultraviolet ray with various periods. Tensile strength of the treated fibres was tested and analyzed, and the outward appearance of the treated filaments was shown

  13. Human exposure to ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhardt, J.H.; Matthes, R.

    1987-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is that part of the electromagnetic spectrum located between the softest ionizing radiation and visible radiation. The lower limit of 100 nm is equivalent to photon energies of 12.4 eV, which corresponds approximately to the limit for the production of ionization in biologically important materials. A historical subdividing of the UV-region takes some of the biological effects into account. In this arrangement the range 400-315 nm, the so-called black light region, is called UV-A. In this wavelength region, fluorescence can be induced in many substances. UV-B covers the range 315-280 nm (the skin erythemal region). Most of the biologically active and potentially harmful UV from the sun reaching the surface of the earth is part of this spectral region. UV-C includes the radiation of wavelengths less than 280 nm (the germicidal region). It should be noted that this classification is somewhat arbitrary, and today it is more usual to evaluate the biological effectiveness of the whole UV-range from 200 to 400 nm

  14. Unintentional exposure to ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sliney, D.H.

    1987-01-01

    To evaluate the risks from unintentional exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR), and to consider hazard control regulation, one must face first the problem of their state of scientific knowledge and the public's perception of UVR. Few people in the general public would question the health benefits of sunlight. Many flock to the beaches each summer to develop a healthy tan. Since the 1920's scientists have recognized that most of the benefits--and risks--of sunlight exposure result from the UVR present in sunlight. Dermatologists warn sunbathers to avoid exposure or protect themselves against the intense midday UVR or risk skin cancer. A growing number of scientists warn of hazards to the eye if UVR--perhaps even shorter visible wavelengths--are not filtered by lenses. In addition to any intentional exposure for health or cosmetic purposes, many people are also exposed to UVR without being aware of it or without their intent to be exposed. Outdoor workers are exposed to sunlight, many industrial workers (e.g., welders) are exposed to UVR from arc sources, some UVR penetrates clothing, and people indoors are exposed to UVR from artificial lighting

  15. Dermal damage from ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kligman, L.H.

    1988-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is increasingly recognized as the cause of a vast number of changes in the skin of humans and animals. These include alterations at the molecular, cellular, tissue and systematic levels. In the recent past, much has been learned about the immediate effects in skin of acute UV exposure (i.e. sunburn) with its epidermal cell death, inflammation and vasolidation. With chronic exposure, many of the clinical and histologic effects can be seen only after decades. Visually, these are hyper- and hypopigmented macules, dry scaly, wrinkled skin with a variety of benign, pre-malignant and malignant neoplasms. All epidermal in origin, they lead, inexorably in humans, to the appearance the authors described as photo-aged. Underlying many of these visible manifestations are drastic changes in the dermis. These relate chiefly to destruction of mature collagen, with a compensatory overproduction of reticulin fibers, hyperplasia of elastic fibers eventuating in elastosis, increased levels of the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) comprising the ground substance and changes in the microvasculature. First described in actinically damaged humans, systematic investigation required an animal model

  16. Masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardinale, G; Goldsmith, J; Kearney, P A; Larson, C; Moore, C E; Prisbrey, S; Tong, W; Vernon, S P; Weber, F; Yan, P-Y.

    1998-01-01

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), the technology specific requirements on the mask are a direct consequence of the utilization of radiation in the spectral region between 10 and 15 nm. At these wavelengths, all condensed materials are highly absorbing and efficient radiation transport mandates the use of all-reflective optical systems. Reflectivity is achieved with resonant, wavelength-matched multilayer (ML) coatings on all of the optical surfaces - including the mask. The EUV mask has a unique architecture - it consists of a substrate with a highly reflective ML coating (the mask blank) that is subsequently over-coated with a patterned absorber layer (the mask). Particulate contamination on the EUVL mask surface, errors in absorber definition and defects in the ML coating all have the potential to print in the lithographic process. While highly developed technologies exist for repair of the absorber layer, no viable strategy for the repair of ML coating defects has been identified. In this paper the state-of-the-art in ML deposition technology, optical inspection of EUVL mask blank defects and candidate absorber patterning approaches are reviewed

  17. Ultraviolet complete dark energy model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narain, Gaurav; Li, Tianjun

    2018-04-01

    We consider a local phenomenological model to explain a nonlocal gravity scenario which has been proposed to address dark energy issues. This nonlocal gravity action has been seen to fit the data as well as Λ -CDM and therefore demands a more fundamental local treatment. The induced gravity model coupled with higher-derivative gravity is exploited for this proposal, as this perturbatively renormalizable model has a well-defined ultraviolet (UV) description where ghosts are evaded. We consider a generalized version of this model where we consider two coupled scalar fields and their nonminimal coupling with gravity. In this simple model, one of the scalar field acquires a vacuum expectation value (VEV), thereby inducing a mass for one of the scalar fields and generating Newton's constant. The induced mass however is seen to be always above the running energy scale thereby leading to its decoupling. The residual theory after decoupling becomes a platform for driving the accelerated expansion under certain conditions. Integrating out the residual scalar generates a nonlocal gravity action. The leading term of which is the nonlocal gravity action used to fit the data of dark energy.

  18. Influence of near ultraviolet light on microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraikin, G.Y.A.; Rubin, L.B.

    1980-01-01

    Our results and the recent literature data on the biological action of near ultraviolet light (300-380 nm) are examined in the review. Factual material is presented on the principles governing the manifestation of the following effects of near ultraviolet light in microorganisms: inactivation, delayed growth, photoreactivation, photoprotection, photoinduced sporulation (in fungi), and carotene synthesis. The mature and possible mechanisms of the effects examined are discussed

  19. Ultraviolet colors of subdwarf O stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesselius, P.R.

    1978-01-01

    The group of subdwarf O stars consisting of field stars and some central stars of old planetary nebulae does occupy an interesting place in the HR diagram. Greenstein and Sargent (1974) have tried to establish this place, and conclude that especially the hottest ones need ultraviolet data to improve the values of effective temperature and absolute luminosity. The author therefore observed some twenty sdO stars in the far ultraviolet using the spectrophotometer in the Netherlands' satellite ANS. (Auth.)

  20. Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Bright Source List

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, Roger F.; Marshall, Herman L.; Antia, Behram; Christian, Carol A.; Dobson, Carl A.; Finley, David S.; Fruscione, Antonella; Girouard, Forrest R.; Hawkins, Isabel; Jelinsky, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    Initial results from the analysis of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) all-sky survey (58-740 A) and deep survey (67-364 A) are presented through the EUVE Bright Source List (BSL). The BSL contains 356 confirmed extreme ultraviolet (EUV) point sources with supporting information, including positions, observed EUV count rates, and the identification of possible optical counterparts. One-hundred twenty-six sources have been detected longward of 200 A.

  1. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of transient species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeuw, D.M. de.

    1979-01-01

    Transient species are studied in the isolation of the gas phase using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). A description of the equipment used and a discussion of some theoretical topics, which play a role in the interpretation of PE spectra, are given. Koopmans' theorem, Hartree-Fock-Slater (HFS) calculations and the sum rule are discussed. A versatile ultraviolet PE spectrometer, designed specifically for this purpose, has been built and the construction and performance of this instrument are described. (Auth.)

  2. Ultraviolet Behavior of N = 8 Supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Lance J.

    2010-01-01

    In these lectures the author describes the remarkable ultraviolet behavior of N = 8 supergravity, which through four loops is no worse than that of N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory (a finite theory). I also explain the computational tools that allow multi-loop amplitudes to be evaluated in this theory - the KLT relations and the unitarity method - and sketch how ultraviolet divergences are extracted from the amplitudes.

  3. Ocular ultraviolet radiation exposure of welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenkate, Thomas D

    2017-05-01

    reference made to the average solar UVR exposure of a Danish outdoor worker being 22 400 J/m 2 per year (min-max 5400 - 66 900 J/m 2 per year) (10). For comparison, taking the mean 8-hour UVR dose within the welding helmets as 15 mJ/cm2 (3), this would equate to an annual ocular/facial UVR dose for welders of 37 500 J/m 2 (at 5 days/week, 50 weeks/year). Even though this value is weighted for the ACGIH action spectrum, and the value for the Danish outdoor workers is weighted for the erythema spectrum, it provides a reasonable comparison and indicates that welders are likely to receive comparable facial/ocular UVR doses to outdoor workers. Slagor et al also state that "it is inferred that welders are not exposed to large amounts of UVR during their work life, in spite of the photokeratoconjunctivitis incidents" (1, p451). I would propose that the UVR dosimetry studies described above (2, 3), taken together with studies on UVR emissions of welding arcs which show that the MPE for many welding arcs can be exceeded in a matter of seconds (11-13), indicate that welders do work in an extreme UVR environment. These studies also suggest that welders are regularly exposed to levels of UVR that exceed the occupational exposure limits at body sites which are thought to be protected (eg, face and eyes) (2, 3). When these exposures are further considered in light of the range of eye conditions reported to occur in welders (14-17), the importance of implementing a comprehensive eye safety strategy for welders and all workers in a welding environment is imperative. References 1. Slagor RM, La Cour M, Bonde JP. The risk of cataract in relation to metal arc welding. Scan J Work Environ Health. 2016;42(5):447-53. https://doi.org/10.5271/sjweh.3572.  2. Shehade SA, Roberts PJ, Diffey BF, Foulds IS. Photodermatitis due to spot welding. Br J Dermatol. 1987;117:117-9. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2133.1987.tb04100.x.  3. Tenkate TD, Collins MJ. Personal ultraviolet radiation exposure of

  4. Photochemoprevention of ultraviolet B signaling and photocarcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afaq, Farrukh [Department of Dermatology, University of Wisconsin, Medical Sciences Center, Room B25, 1300 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Adhami, Vaqar M. [Department of Dermatology, University of Wisconsin, Medical Sciences Center, Room B25, 1300 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Mukhtar, Hasan [Department of Dermatology, University of Wisconsin, Medical Sciences Center, Room B25, 1300 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)]. E-mail: hmukhtar@wisc.edu

    2005-04-01

    Exposure to solar radiation, particularly its ultraviolet (UV) B component, has a variety of harmful effects on human health. Some of these effects include sunburn cell formation, basal and squamous cell cancers, melanoma, cataracts, photoaging of the skin, and immune suppression. Amongst these various adverse effects of UV radiation, skin cancer is of the greatest concern. Over the years, changes in lifestyle has led to a significant increase in the amount of UV radiation that people receive, and this consequently has led to a surge in the incidence of skin cancer. The development of skin cancer is a complex multistage phenomenon involving three distinct stages exemplified by initiation, promotion and progression stages. Each of these stages is mediated via alterations in various cellular, biochemical, and molecular changes. Initiation, the first step in the carcinogenesis process is essentially an irreversible step in which genetic alterations occur in genes that ultimately leads to DNA modification and fixation of mutation. Tumor promotion is the essential process in cancer development involving clonal expansion of initiated cells giving rise to pre-malignant and then to malignant lesions, essentially by alterations in signal transduction pathways. Tumor progression involves the conversion of pre-malignant and malignant lesions into an invasive and potentially metastatic malignant tumor. All these processes for skin cancer development involve stimulation of DNA synthesis, DNA damage and proliferation, inflammation, immunosuppression, epidermal hyperplasia, cell cycle dysregulation, depletion of antioxidant defenses, impairment of signal transduction pathways, induction of cyclooxygenase, increase in prostaglandin synthesis, and induction of ornithine decarboxylase. Photochemoprevention has been appreciated as a viable approach to reduce the occurrence of skin cancer and in recent years, the use of agents, especially botanical antioxidants, present in the common

  5. Photochemoprevention of ultraviolet B signaling and photocarcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afaq, Farrukh; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to solar radiation, particularly its ultraviolet (UV) B component, has a variety of harmful effects on human health. Some of these effects include sunburn cell formation, basal and squamous cell cancers, melanoma, cataracts, photoaging of the skin, and immune suppression. Amongst these various adverse effects of UV radiation, skin cancer is of the greatest concern. Over the years, changes in lifestyle has led to a significant increase in the amount of UV radiation that people receive, and this consequently has led to a surge in the incidence of skin cancer. The development of skin cancer is a complex multistage phenomenon involving three distinct stages exemplified by initiation, promotion and progression stages. Each of these stages is mediated via alterations in various cellular, biochemical, and molecular changes. Initiation, the first step in the carcinogenesis process is essentially an irreversible step in which genetic alterations occur in genes that ultimately leads to DNA modification and fixation of mutation. Tumor promotion is the essential process in cancer development involving clonal expansion of initiated cells giving rise to pre-malignant and then to malignant lesions, essentially by alterations in signal transduction pathways. Tumor progression involves the conversion of pre-malignant and malignant lesions into an invasive and potentially metastatic malignant tumor. All these processes for skin cancer development involve stimulation of DNA synthesis, DNA damage and proliferation, inflammation, immunosuppression, epidermal hyperplasia, cell cycle dysregulation, depletion of antioxidant defenses, impairment of signal transduction pathways, induction of cyclooxygenase, increase in prostaglandin synthesis, and induction of ornithine decarboxylase. Photochemoprevention has been appreciated as a viable approach to reduce the occurrence of skin cancer and in recent years, the use of agents, especially botanical antioxidants, present in the common

  6. Instrument Design of the Large Aperture Solar UV Visible and IR Observing Telescope (SUVIT) for the SOLAR-C Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suematsu, Y.; Katsukawa, Y.; Shimizu, T.; Ichimoto, K.; Takeyama, N.

    2012-12-01

    We present an instrumental design of one major solar observation payload planned for the SOLAR-C mission: the Solar Ultra-violet Visible and near IR observing Telescope (SUVIT). The SUVIT is designed to provide high-angular-resolution investigation of the lower solar atmosphere, from the photosphere to the uppermost chromosphere, with enhanced spectroscopic and spectro-polarimetric capability in wide wavelength regions from 280 nm (Mg II h&k lines) to 1100 nm (He I 1083 nm line) with 1.5 m class aperture and filtergraphic and spectrographic instruments.

  7. Solar energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruisheer, N.

    1992-01-01

    In five brief articles product information is given on solar energy applications with special attention to the Netherlands. After an introduction on solar energy availability in the Netherlands the developments in solar boiler techniques are dealt with. Solar water heaters have advantages for the environment, and government subsidies stimulate different uses of such water heaters. Also the developments of solar cells show good prospects, not only for developing countries, but also for the industrialized countries. In brief the developments in solar energy storage and the connection of solar equipment to the grid are discussed. Finally attention is paid to the applications of passive solar energy in the housing construction, the use of transparent thermal insulation and the developments of translucent materials. 18 figs., 18 ills

  8. Solar Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of solar photographic and illustrated datasets contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide....

  9. Solar Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of solar feature datasets contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide.

  10. Solar Indices

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  11. Research and development for evaluation system of solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-08-01

    In order to evaluate the performance and capability of solar cell properly and impartially, the evaluation systems for the performance and reliability have been assured. The results are as follows. 1. Development for performance evaluation method; (1) The international comparisons of standard solar cell calibration methods and our method has been assured to be mostly near to the average value. (2) Experimental solar cell has been made and the indoors and outdoors evaluation of solar cell module have become to be possible with same accuracy. (3) As the spectro-radiometer of high performance have been developed, the measurements of the output of the solar cell module have become possible, monitering spectrum of wide range of natural solar beam. (4) With use of several kinds of standard solar cell, measurement errors have been assured. (5) As for nominal operating cell temperature of module, experimental researches have been done indoors and outdoors and the diffeneces have been assured. 2. Development of reliability evaluation method; (1) In outdoor exposure test, the basic data of the accelerating degradation test have been accumulated and it has been assured that the degradation of crystal type is few. (2) By the acceleration degradation test with use of weathermeter, and temperature and humidity cycling test device, the proceses of degradation have been assured. (3) In the processes of enviromental tests and mechanical strength tests, remarkable degradation has not been recognized.(1 tab)

  12. Design principles and field performance of a solar spectral irradiance meter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsiankou, V.; Hinzer, K.; Haysom, J.; Schriemer, H.; Emery, K.; Beal, R.

    2016-08-01

    A solar spectral irradiance meter (SSIM), designed for measuring the direct normal irradiance (DNI) in six wavelength bands, has been combined with models to determine key atmospheric transmittances and the resulting spectral irradiance distribution of DNI under all sky conditions. The design principles of the SSIM, implementation of a parameterized transmittance model, and field performance comparisons of modeled solar spectra with reference radiometer measurements are presented. Two SSIMs were tested and calibrated at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) against four spectroradiometers and an absolute cavity radiometer. The SSIMs' DNI was on average within 1% of the DNI values reported by one of NREL's primary absolute cavity radiometers. An additional SSIM was installed at the SUNLAB Outdoor Test Facility in September 2014, with ongoing collection of environmental and spectral data. The SSIM's performance in Ottawa was compared against a commercial pyrheliometer and a spectroradiometer over an eight month study. The difference in integrated daily spectral irradiance between the SSIM and the ASD spectroradiometer was found to be less than 1%. The cumulative energy density collected by the SSIM over this duration agreed with that measured by an Eppley model NIP pyrheliometer to within 0.5%. No degradation was observed.

  13. Evaluation of the desert dust effects on global, direct and diffuse spectral ultraviolet irradiance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Román

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of a strong desert dust episode over the Iberian Peninsula, and its effect on the spectral ultraviolet (UV irradiance in Granada, Spain. Remote sensing measurements, forecast models, and synoptic analysis are used to identify a Saharan desert dust outbreak that affected the Iberian Peninsula starting 20 July 2009. Additionally, a Bentham DMc150 spectroradiometer is employed to obtain global, direct and diffuse spectral UV irradiances every 15 minutes in Granada. The desert dust caused a large attenuation of the direct UV irradiance (up to 55%, while the diffuse UV irradiance increased up to 40% at 400 nm. The UVSPEC/LibRadtran radiative transfer model is used to study the spectral dependence of the experimental UV irradiance ratios (ratios of spectral irradiance for the day with the highest aerosol load to that measured in days with low–moderate load. The spectral increase or decrease of the UV direct irradiance ratios depends on a new parameter: a threshold wavelength. The spectral dependence of the UV diffuse irradiance ratio can be explained because under the influence of the intense dust outbreak, the Mie scattering by aerosols at shorter wavelengths is stronger than the Rayleigh scattering by gases. Finally, the sensitivity analysis of the aerosol absorption properties shows a substantial attenuation of UV spectral irradiance with a weak spectral dependence.

  14. Solar Special

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Roekel, A.; Osborne, J.; Schroeter, S.; De Jong, R.; De Saint Jacob, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Solar power is growing much faster than most policymakers and analysts realise. As costs come down and feed-in tariffs go up across Europe, a number of countries have started in pursuit of market leader Germany. But in Germany criticism is growing of the multi-billion-euro support schemes that keep the solar industry booming. In this section of the magazine several articles are dedicated to developments in solar energy in Europe. The first article is an overview story on the strong growing global market for solar cells, mainly thanks to subsidy schemes. The second article is on the position of foreign companies in the solar market in Italy. Article number three is dedicated to the conditions for solar technology companies to establish themselves in the German state of Saxony. Also the fifth article deals with the development of solar cells in Saxony: scientists, plant manufacturers and module producers in Saxony are working on new technologies that can be used to produce solar electricity cost-effectively. The goal is to bring the price down to match that of conventionally generated electricity within the next few years. The sixth article deals with the the solar power market in Belgium, which may be overheated or 'oversubsidized'. Article seven is on France, which used to be a pioneer in solar technology, but now produces only a fraction of the solar output of market leader Germany. However, new attractive feed-in-tariffs are changing the solar landscape drastically

  15. Solar Indices - Solar Radio Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  16. Ultraviolet resources over Northern Eurasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubarova, Natalia; Zhdanova, Yekaterina

    2013-10-05

    We propose a new climatology of UV resources over Northern Eurasia, which includes the assessments of both detrimental (erythema) and positive (vitamin D synthesis) effects of ultraviolet radiation on human health. The UV resources are defined by using several classes and subclasses - UV deficiency, UV optimum, and UV excess - for 6 different skin types. To better quantifying the vitamin D irradiance threshold we accounted for an open body fraction S as a function of effective air temperature. The spatial and temporal distribution of UV resources was estimated by radiative transfer (RT) modeling (8 stream DISORT RT code) with 1×1° grid and monthly resolution. For this purpose special datasets of main input geophysical parameters (total ozone content, aerosol characteristics, surface UV albedo, UV cloud modification factor) have been created over the territory of Northern Eurasia. The new approaches were used to retrieve aerosol parameters and cloud modification factor in the UV spectral region. As a result, the UV resources were obtained for clear-sky and mean cloudy conditions for different skin types. We show that the distribution of UV deficiency, UV optimum and UV excess is regulated by various geophysical parameters (mainly, total ozone, cloudiness and open body fraction) and can significantly deviate from latitudinal dependence. We also show that the UV optimum conditions can be simultaneously observed for people with different skin types (for example, for 4-5 skin types at the same time in spring over Western Europe). These UV optimum conditions for different skin types occupy a much larger territory over Europe than that over Asia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Commentary Relative to the Emission Spectrum of the Solar Atmosphere: Further Evidence for a Distinct Solar Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The chromosphere and corona of the Sun represent tenuous regions which are characterized by numerous optically thin emission lines in the ultraviolet and X-ray bands. When observed from the center of the solar disk outward, these emission lines experience modest brightening as the limb is approached. The intensity of many ultraviolet and X-ray emission lines nearly doubles when observation is extended just beyond the edge of the disk. These findings indicate that the solar body is opaque in this frequency range and that an approximately two fold greater region of the solar atmosphere is being sampled outside the limb. These observations provide strong support for the presence of a distinct solar surface. Therefore, the behavior of the emission lines in this frequency range constitutes the twenty fifth line of evidence that the Sun is comprised of condensed matter

  18. Melanin photosensitizes ultraviolet light (UVC) DNA damage in pigmented cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huselton, C.A.; Hill, H.Z.

    1990-01-01

    Melanins, pigments of photoprotection and camouflage, are very photoreactive and can both absorb and emit active oxygen species. Nevertheless, black skinned individuals rarely develop skin cancer and melanin is assumed to act as a solar screen. Since DNA is the target for solar carcinogenesis, the effect of melanin on Ultraviolet (UV)-induced thymine lesions was examined in mouse melanoma and carcinoma cells that varied in melanin content. Cells prelabeled with 14C-dThd were irradiated with UVC; DNA was isolated, purified, degraded to bases by acid hydrolysis and analyzed by HPLC. Thymine dimers were detected in all of the extracts of irradiated cells. Melanotic and hypomelanotic but not mammary carcinoma cell DNA from irradiated cells contained hydrophilic thymine derivatives. The quantity of these damaged bases was a function of both the UVC dose and the cellular melanin content. One such derivative was identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy as thymine glycol. The other appears to be derived from thymine glycol by further oxidation during acid hydrolysis of the DNA. The finding of oxidative DNA damage in melanin-containing cells suggests that melanin may be implicated in the etiology of caucasian skin cancer, particularly melanoma. Furthermore, the projected decrease in stratospheric ozone could impact in an unanticipated deleterious manner on dark-skinned individuals

  19. A model investigation of annual surface ultraviolet radiation in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabziparvar, A.-A.

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, there has been some concern regarding solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation received at the earth,s surface because of its biological hazards affecting living organisms. Although the geographical distribution of ground-based UV network is relatively good in some continents,but over Asia, the number of UV instruments are not sufficient for meteorological and biological purposes. Iran, as an Asian country, is also suffering from the lack of UV monitoring network with the exception of one ground-based UV spectrophotometer site (Brower III) at Esfahan. Using a complex radiative transfer model and various meteorological data (for 8 years) such as total column ozone, cloudiness, surface albedo, surface air pressure, relative humidity, visibility and daily total solar radiation (TSR), the geographical distribution of annual integrated biological surface UV irradiances such as UVB, erythema and cataracts are calculated. The comparison is made for cloud-free and all-sky conditions for eight selected cities distributed from the southern tip of the country (25 N-60 E) to the northern border (39 N-48 E). It is shown that the difference between the annual UV at south and north in all-sky condition is larger than the differences in cloud-free condition. The ratio of some biological UV irradiances at southern cities to the same component at northern cities shows a factor of two and more which is quite significant. The possible reasons which might cause such differences are discussed

  20. A pilot solar water disinfecting system: performance analysis and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, T.S.; El-Ghetany, H.H. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Aeronautics and Space Engineering

    2002-07-01

    In most countries, contaminated water is the major cause of most water-borne diseases. Disinfection of water may be accomplished by a number of different physical-chemical treatments including direct application of thermal energy, chemical and filtration techniques. Solar energy also can be used effectively in this field because inactivation of microorganisms is done either by heating water to a disinfecting temperature or by exposing it to ultraviolet solar radiation. A pilot solar system for disinfecting contaminated water is designed, constructed and tested. Investigations are carried out to evaluate the performance of a wooden hot box solar facility as a solar disinfectant. Experimental data show that solar energy is viable for the disinfection process. A solar radiation model is presented and compared with the experimental data. A mathematical model of the solar disinfectant is also presented. The governing equations are solved numerically via the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The effects of environmental conditions (ambient temperature, wind speed, solar radiation, etc.) on the performance of the solar disinfectant are examined. Results showed that the system is affected by ambient temperature, wind speed, ultraviolet solar radiation intensity, the turbidity of the water, the quantity of water exposed, the contact area between the transparent water container in the solar disinfectant and the absorber plate as well as the geometrical parameters of the system. It is pointed out that for partially cloudy conditions with a low ambient temperature and high wind speeds, the thermal efficiency of the solar disinfectant is at a minimum. The use of solar energy for the disinfection process will increase the productivity of the system while completely eliminating the coliform group bacteria at the same time. (author)

  1. Improved Statistical Model Of 10.7-cm Solar Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedder, John D.; Tabor, Jill L.

    1993-01-01

    Improved mathematical model simulates short-term fluctuations of flux of 10.7-cm-wavelength solar radiation during 91-day averaging period. Called "F10.7 flux", important as measure of solar activity and because it is highly correlated with ultraviolet radiation causing fluctuations in heating and density of upper atmosphere. F10.7 flux easily measureable at surface of Earth.

  2. Spectrophotometer-Integrating-Sphere System for Computing Solar Absorptance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, William G., Jr.; Slemp, Wayne S.; Perry, John E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A commercially available ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared spectrophotometer was modified to utilize an 8-inch-diameter modified Edwards-type integrated sphere. Software was written so that the reflectance spectra could be used to obtain solar absorptance values of 1-inch-diameter specimens. A descriptions of the system, spectral reflectance, and software for calculation of solar absorptance from reflectance data are presented.

  3. Ocean acidification alters the photosynthetic responses of a coccolithophorid to fluctuating ultraviolet and visible radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng; Gao, Kunshan; Villafañe, Virginia E; Campbell, Douglas A; Helbling, E Walter

    2013-08-01

    Mixing of seawater subjects phytoplankton to fluctuations in photosynthetically active radiation (400-700 nm) and ultraviolet radiation (UVR; 280-400 nm). These irradiance fluctuations are now superimposed upon ocean acidification and thinning of the upper mixing layer through stratification, which alters mixing regimes. Therefore, we examined the photosynthetic carbon fixation and photochemical performance of a coccolithophore, Gephyrocapsa oceanica, grown under high, future (1,000 μatm) and low, current (390 μatm) CO₂ levels, under regimes of fluctuating irradiances with or without UVR. Under both CO₂ levels, fluctuating irradiances, as compared with constant irradiance, led to lower nonphotochemical quenching and less UVR-induced inhibition of carbon fixation and photosystem II electron transport. The cells grown under high CO₂ showed a lower photosynthetic carbon fixation rate but lower nonphotochemical quenching and less ultraviolet B (280-315 nm)-induced inhibition. Ultraviolet A (315-400 nm) led to less enhancement of the photosynthetic carbon fixation in the high-CO₂-grown cells under fluctuating irradiance. Our data suggest that ocean acidification and fast mixing or fluctuation of solar radiation will act synergistically to lower carbon fixation by G. oceanica, although ocean acidification may decrease ultraviolet B-related photochemical inhibition.

  4. Coupled solar still, solar heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davison, R R; Harris, W B; Moor, D H; Delyannis, A; Delyannis, E [eds.

    1976-01-01

    Computer simulation of combinations of solar stills and solar heaters indicates the probable economic advantage of such an arrangement in many locations if the size of the heater is optimized relative to that of the still. Experience with various low cost solar heaters is discussed.

  5. Solar Sailing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les

    2009-01-01

    Solar sailing is a topic of growing technical and popular interest. Solar sail propulsion will make space exploration more affordable and offer access to destinations within (and beyond) the solar system that are currently beyond our technical reach. The lecture will describe solar sails, how they work, and what they will be used for in the exploration of space. It will include a discussion of current plans for solar sails and how advanced technology, such as nanotechnology, might enhance their performance. Much has been accomplished recently to make solar sail technology very close to becoming an engineering reality and it will soon be used by the world s space agencies in the exploration of the solar system and beyond. The first part of the lecture will summarize state-of-the-art space propulsion systems and technologies. Though these other technologies are the key to any deep space exploration by humans, robots, or both, solar-sail propulsion will make space exploration more affordable and offer access to distant and difficult destinations. The second part of the lecture will describe the fundamentals of space solar sail propulsion and will describe the near-, mid- and far-term missions that might use solar sails as a propulsion system. The third part of the lecture will describe solar sail technology and the construction of current and future sailcraft, including the work of both government and private space organizations.

  6. Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Asteroid(4) Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Bodewits, Dennis; Feaga, Lori M.; Landsman, Wayne; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Mutchler, Max J.; Russell, Christopher T.; McFadden, Lucy A.; Raymond, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    We report a comprehensive review of the UV-visible spectrum and rotational lightcurve of Vesta combining new observations by Hubble Space Telescope and Swift with archival International Ultraviolet Explorer observations. The geometric albedos of Vesta from 220 nm to 953 nm arc derived by carefully comparing these observations from various instruments at different times and observing geometries. Vesta has a rotationally averaged geometric albedo of 0.09 at 250 nm, 0.14 at 300 nm, 0.26 at 373 nm, 0.38 at 673 nm, and 0.30 at 950 nm. The linear spectral slope in the ultraviolet displays a sharp minimum ncar sub-Earth longitude of 20deg, and maximum in the eastern hemisphere. This is completely consistent with the distribution of the spectral slope in the visible wavelength. The uncertainty of the measurement in the ultraviolet is approx.20%, and in the visible wavelengths better than 10%. The amplitude of Vesta's rotational lightcurves is approx.10% throughout the range of wavelengths we observed, but is smaller at 950 nm (approx.6%) ncar the 1-micron mafic band center. Contrary to earlier reports, we found no evidence for any difference between the phasing of the ultraviolet and visible/ncar-infrared lightcurves with respect to sub-Earth longitude. Vesta's average spectrum between 220 and 950 nm can well be described by measured reflectance spectra of fine particle howardite-like materials of basaltic achondrite meteorites. Combining this with the in-phase behavior of the ultraviolet, visible. and ncar-infrared lightcurves, and the spectral slopes with respect to the rotational phase, we conclude that there is no global ultraviolet/visible reversal on Vesta. Consequently, this implies lack of global space weathering on Vesta. Keyword,: Asteroid Vesta; Spectrophotometry; Spectroscopy; Ultraviolet observations; Hubble Space Telescope observations

  7. Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemen, J. R.; Freeland, S. L.

    1997-01-01

    Efforts concentrated on development and implementation of the SolarSoft (SSW) data analysis system. From an EIT analysis perspective, this system was designed to facilitate efficient reuse and conversion of software developed for Yohkoh/SXT and to take advantage of a large existing body of software developed by the SDAC, Yohkoh, and SOHO instrument teams. Another strong motivation for this system was to provide an EIT analysis environment which permits coordinated analysis of EIT data in conjunction with data from important supporting instruments, including Yohkoh/SXT and the other SOHO coronal instruments; CDS, SUMER, and LASCO. In addition, the SSW system will support coordinated EIT/TRACE analysis (by design) when TRACE data is available; TRACE launch is currently planned for March 1998. Working with Jeff Newmark, the Chianti software package (K.P. Dere et al) and UV /EUV data base was fully integrated into the SSW system to facilitate EIT temperature and emission analysis.

  8. Solar photocatalytic cleaning of polluted water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockelmann, D.

    1994-01-01

    Alternatively to biological, physical and chemical methods of waste water cleaning, photocatalysis can be employed. In this residue-free method, titanium dioxide particles are brought into contact with polluted water as photocatalysts. Under UV irradiation at wave-lengths below 400 nm, change carriers are generated in the semiconductor particles that act so intensely oxidizing as to completely degrade almost all organic pollutants in waste water. In this process, the ultra-violet part of the solar spectrum can be harnessed to generate oxidation equivalents. Thus, solar photocatalytic waste water cleaning is excellently suited for developing countries. (BWI) [de

  9. Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    This is a close-up of the NASA-sponsored Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) Satellite. The SORCE mission, launched aboard a Pegasus rocket January 25, 2003, will provide state of the art measurements of incoming x-ray, ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared, and total solar radiation. Critical to studies of the Sun and its effect on our Earth system and mankind, SORCE will provide measurements that specifically address long-term climate change, natural variability and enhanced climate prediction, and atmospheric ozone and UV-B radiation. Orbiting around the Earth accumulating solar data, SORCE measures the Sun's output with the use of state-of-the-art radiometers, spectrometers, photodiodes, detectors, and bolo meters engineered into instruments mounted on a satellite observatory. SORCE is carrying 4 instruments: The Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM); the Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE); the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM); and the XUV Photometer System (XPS).

  10. Comparison of solar irradiances measured by SBUV, SME, and rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesinger, B.M.; Heath, D.F.

    1988-01-01

    Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) measurements of the solar irradiance between 170 and 320 nm have been compared with rocket and Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) ultraviolet spectrometer measurements. The SBUV and SME data were those available from the National Space Sciences Data Center (NSSDC). The published rocket measurement are sensitive enough to detect substantial systematic changes with time in other instruments and to check absolute calibration but not sufficiently sensitive to validate claims of changes in the solar ultraviolet irradiance longer than 170 nm. The SBUV irradiances show as systematic decrease with time not seen in the rocket measurements; a correction for this decrease, based on changes between the instrument properties measured in 1980--1981 and those in 1984, is introduced. Ratios of spectra in early 1982 to those in mid-1984, calculated using the SME and SBUV solar irradiances, have been compared with each other asnd with those predicted from Mg 280-nm variations. The scatter and overall structure in the SME spectra from the NSSDC is 3--5%, of the order of or larger than most of the changes predicted by the Mg index. The corrected SBUV ratio and the Mg index prediction for it agree to within 1% such agreement supports a common origin for variations between solar maximum and minimum and those for individual rotations: the degree to which active regions cover the visible hemisphere of the Sun. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  11. Ultraviolet radiation therapy and UVR dose models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, David Robert, E-mail: davidrobert.grimes@oncology.ox.ac.uk [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland and Cancer Research UK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratory, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been an effective treatment for a number of chronic skin disorders, and its ability to alleviate these conditions has been well documented. Although nonionizing, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is still damaging to deoxyribonucleic acid integrity, and has a number of unpleasant side effects ranging from erythema (sunburn) to carcinogenesis. As the conditions treated with this therapy tend to be chronic, exposures are repeated and can be high, increasing the lifetime probability of an adverse event or mutagenic effect. Despite the potential detrimental effects, quantitative ultraviolet dosimetry for phototherapy is an underdeveloped area and better dosimetry would allow clinicians to maximize biological effect whilst minimizing the repercussions of overexposure. This review gives a history and insight into the current state of UVR phototherapy, including an overview of biological effects of UVR, a discussion of UVR production, illness treated by this modality, cabin design and the clinical implementation of phototherapy, as well as clinical dose estimation techniques. Several dose models for ultraviolet phototherapy are also examined, and the need for an accurate computational dose estimation method in ultraviolet phototherapy is discussed.

  12. Ultraviolet radiation therapy and UVR dose models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, David Robert

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been an effective treatment for a number of chronic skin disorders, and its ability to alleviate these conditions has been well documented. Although nonionizing, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is still damaging to deoxyribonucleic acid integrity, and has a number of unpleasant side effects ranging from erythema (sunburn) to carcinogenesis. As the conditions treated with this therapy tend to be chronic, exposures are repeated and can be high, increasing the lifetime probability of an adverse event or mutagenic effect. Despite the potential detrimental effects, quantitative ultraviolet dosimetry for phototherapy is an underdeveloped area and better dosimetry would allow clinicians to maximize biological effect whilst minimizing the repercussions of overexposure. This review gives a history and insight into the current state of UVR phototherapy, including an overview of biological effects of UVR, a discussion of UVR production, illness treated by this modality, cabin design and the clinical implementation of phototherapy, as well as clinical dose estimation techniques. Several dose models for ultraviolet phototherapy are also examined, and the need for an accurate computational dose estimation method in ultraviolet phototherapy is discussed

  13. Glacial Influences on Solar Radiation in a Subarctic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding macroscale processes controlling solar radia­tion in marine systems will be important in interpreting the potential effects of global change from increasing ultraviolet radiation (UV) and glacial retreat. This study provides the first quantitative assessment of UV i...

  14. Charge exchange emission from solar wind helium ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, D; Hoekstra, R; Seredyuk, B; McCullough, RW; Jones, GH; Tielens, AGGM

    2006-01-01

    Charge exchange X-ray and far-ultraviolet (FUV) aurorae can provide detailed insight into the interaction between solar system plasmas. Using the two complementary experimental techniques of photon emission spectroscopy and translation energy spectroscopy, we have studied state-selective charge

  15. CLASSICS Handbook of Solar Radiation Data for India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    Handbook of Solar Radiation Data for India. By Anna Mani. CHAPTER 1. Introduction. 1.1. The sun and its radiation. The electromagnetic radiation emitted by the sun covers a very large range of wave- lengths, from radiowaves through the infrared, visible and ultraviolet to X-rays and gamma rays. However, 99 per cent of ...

  16. Ambient solar UV radiation and seasonal trends in potential sunburn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The detrimental effects of excess personal solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure include sunburn, immunosuppression and skin cancer. In South Africa, individuals with minimum natural protection from melanin, including fair-skinned individuals and African albinos, and people spending extended ...

  17. Mutagenesis of Trichoderma Viride by Ultraviolet and Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Risheng; Li Manman; Deng Shengsong; Hu Huajia; Wang Huai; Li Fenghe

    2012-01-01

    Considering the importance of a microbial strain capable of increased cellulase production, a mutant strain UP4 of Trichoderma viride was developed by ultraviolet (UV) and plasma mutation. The mutant produced a 21.0 IU/mL FPase which was 98.1% higher than that of the parent strain Trichoderma viride ZY-1. In addition, the effect of ultraviolet and plasma mutagenesis was not merely simple superimposition of single ultraviolet mutation and single plasma mutation. Meanwhile, there appeared a capsule around some of the spores after the ultraviolet and plasma treatment, namely, the spore surface of the strain became fuzzy after ultraviolet or ultraviolet and plasma mutagenesis.

  18. Mutagenesis of Trichoderma Viride by Ultraviolet and Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Risheng; Li, Manman; Deng, Shengsong; Hu, Huajia; Wang, Huai; Li, Fenghe

    2012-04-01

    Considering the importance of a microbial strain capable of increased cellulase production, a mutant strain UP4 of Trichoderma viride was developed by ultraviolet (UV) and plasma mutation. The mutant produced a 21.0 IU/mL FPase which was 98.1% higher than that of the parent strain Trichoderma viride ZY-1. In addition, the effect of ultraviolet and plasma mutagenesis was not merely simple superimposition of single ultraviolet mutation and single plasma mutation. Meanwhile, there appeared a capsule around some of the spores after the ultraviolet and plasma treatment, namely, the spore surface of the strain became fuzzy after ultraviolet or ultraviolet and plasma mutagenesis.

  19. Renewable energy worldwide outlooks: solar energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darnell, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    Solar energy yield is weak because it is very diffuse. The solar energy depends on the weather. The collectors need the beam radiation. Wavelength is important for some applications that include not only the visible spectrum but also infrared and ultraviolet radiation. The areas of the greatest future population growth are high on solar energy resources. We have different types of conversion systems where energy can be converted from solar to electric or thermal energy. Photovoltaic cells are made of silicone or gallium arsenide, this latter for the space use. For the solar energy applications there is a storage problem: electric batteries or superconducting magnets. Today, the highest use of solar energy is in the low temperature thermal category with over 90% of the world contribution from this energy. The penetration of solar energy will be higher in rural areas than in urban regions. But there are technical, institutional, economic constraints. In spite of that the use of solar energy would be increasing and will go on to increase thereafter. The decreasing costs over time are a real phenomenon and there is a broad public support for increased use of that energy. 15 figs

  20. IUE's treasure-chest of the ultraviolet Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-11-01

    to 3200 angstrom units, which is blotted out by the Earths atmosphere. Operating far above the atmosphere, IUE generated spectra showing intensities at different wavelengths, coming from the selected objects in the sky. To an astrophysicist, such spectra are much more informative than images, about the mechanisms that produce and dissipate the objects energy. Temperatures, motions, magnetism and chemical composition are all discernable in the ultraviolet spectra. As a result, astronomers have a far better picture of the hot atmospheres of stars than they did before IUE's launch. Even the Sun, a quiet star of moderate size, possesses a very hot atmosphere emitting ultraviolet light, which is now being monitored non-stop by the ESA-NASA solar spacecraft SOHO. Some other stars, ranging from small white dwarfs to large, massive stars, give off ultraviolet emissions from their very hot surfaces. Hot and fierce winds of gas emitted from stars have a profound effect on the lives and environments of the stars, and on any companions caught up in the winds. IUE unmasked the ultraviolet behaviour of a large menagerie of different star types, and astronomers at the Sevilla meeting will discuss profound revisions in astrophysical ideas resulting from the observations. Other participants will review IUE's contribution to new knowledge about galaxies. These vast assemblies of stars also reveal violent behaviour in ultraviolet light. In a special campaign, a multinational team used IUE to observe the stormy galaxy NGC 5548 some 60 times in eight months. As a result, they discovered effects of central outbursts spreading from hot regions at the very core of the galaxy to adjacent cooler regions, in a timescale of weeks. In galaxy NGC 7469, observed simultaneously by IUE and by the X-ray satellite Rossi XTE, the timescale shrank to days. Quasars are erupting galaxies observable at great distances, and their examination by ultraviolet light, by IUE and more recently by the Hubble Space

  1. The ultraviolet variations of iota Cas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, M. R.; Mallama, A. D.; Soskey, D. G.; Holm, A. V.

    1976-01-01

    The Ap variable star iota Cas was observed with the photometers on OAO-2 covering the spectral range 1430-4250 A. The ultraviolet light curves show a double wave with primary minimum and maximum at phase ? 0.00 and 0.35, respectively. Secondary minimum light is at phase ? 0.65 with secondary maximum at phase ? 0.85. The light curves longward of 3150 A vary in opposition to those shortward of this 'null region'. Ground-based coude spectra show that the Fe II and Cr II line strengths have a double-wave variation such that maximum strength occurs at minimum ultraviolet light. We suggest that the strong ultraviolet opacities due to photoionization and line blanketing by these metals may cause the observed photometric variations. We have also constructed an oblique-rotator model which shows iron and chromium lying in a great circle band rather than in circular spots.

  2. JUDE: An Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, J.; Rahna, P. T.; Sutaria, F.; Safonova, M.; Gudennavar, S. B.; Bubbly, S. G.

    2017-07-01

    The Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UVIT) was launched as part of the multi-wavelength Indian AstroSat mission on 28 September, 2015 into a low Earth orbit. A 6-month performance verification (PV) phase ended in March 2016, and the instrument is now in the general observing phase. UVIT operates in three channels: visible, near-ultraviolet (NUV) and far-ultraviolet (FUV), each with a choice of broad and narrow band filters, and has NUV and FUV gratings for low-resolution spectroscopy. We have written a software package (JUDE) to convert the Level 1 data from UVIT into scientifically useful photon lists and images. The routines are written in the GNU Data Language (GDL) and are compatible with the IDL software package. We use these programs in our own scientific work, and will continue to update the programs as we gain better understanding of the UVIT instrument and its performance. We have released JUDE under an Apache License.

  3. The ultraviolet telescope on the Astron satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyarchuk, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    On 23 March 1983 in the USSR, the Astron astrophysical satellite, with the largest ultraviolet telescope (the UVT) in the world (main mirror diameter 80 cm) and a set of X-ray instruments on board was placed in a high-apogee orbit. The design of the ultraviolet telescope and the results of some of the observations carried out with it are described here. The X-ray instruments are discussed in a separate article. The ultraviolet telescope on the Astron astrophysical satellite is a result of the joint efforts of scientists and engineers at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory (Academy of Sciences of the USSR), the Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory (Academy of Sciences of the Armenian USSR), and several industrial enterprises in our country. The Laboratoire d'Astronomie Spatiale (CNRS, Marseille, France) played a large role in building the spectrometer for the UVT

  4. Modelling and Display of the Ultraviolet Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, J.; Henry, R.; Murthy, J.; Allen, M.; McGlynn, T. A.; Scollick, K.

    1994-12-01

    A computer program is currently under development to model in 3D - one dimension of which is wavelength - all the known and major speculated sources of ultraviolet (900 A - 3100 A ) radiation over the celestial sphere. The software is being written in Fortran 77 and IDL and currently operates under IRIX (the operating system of the Silicon Graphics Iris Machine); all output models are in FITS format. Models along with display software will become available to the astronomical community. The Ultraviolet Sky Model currently includes the Zodiacal Light, Point Sources of Emission, and the Diffuse Galactic Light. The Ultraviolet Sky Model is currently displayed using SkyView: a package under development at NASA/ GSFC, which allows users to retrieve and display publically available all-sky astronomical survey data (covering many wavebands) over the Internet. We present a demonstration of the SkyView display of the Ultraviolet Model. The modelling is a five year development project: the work illustrated here represents product output at the end of year one. Future work includes enhancements to the current models and incorporation of the following models: Galactic Molecular Hydrogen Fluorescence; Galactic Highly Ionized Atomic Line Emission; Integrated Extragalactic Light; and speculated sources in the intergalactic medium such as Ionized Plasma and radiation from Non-Baryonic Particle Decay. We also present a poster which summarizes the components of the Ultraviolet Sky Model and outlines a further package that will be used to display the Ultraviolet Model. This work is supported by United States Air Force Contract F19628-93-K-0004. Dr J. Daniels is supported with a post-doctoral Fellowship from the Leverhulme Foundation, London, United Kingdom. We are also grateful for the encouragement of Dr Stephen Price (Phillips Laboratory, Hanscomb Air Force Base, MA)

  5. Solar Photovoltaic

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chen; Lu, Yuefeng

    2016-01-01

    In the 21st century, human demand for new energy sources is urgent, because the traditional fossil energy is unable to meet human needs, and the fossil resource will make pollution, in this situation, solar energy gradually into the vision of scientists. As science advances, humans can already extensive use of solar energy to generate electricity. Solar energy is an inexhaustible and clean energy. In the global energy crisis, environmental pollution is the growing problem of today. The us...

  6. Solar magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priest, E.R.

    1982-01-01

    The book serves several purposes. First set of chapters gives a concise general introduction to solar physics. In a second set the basic methods of magnetohydrodynamics are developed. A third set of chapters is an account of current theories for observed phenomena. The book is suitable for a course in solar physics and it also provides a comprehensive review of present magnetohydrodynamical models in solar physics. (SC)

  7. Molecular geometry in the ultraviolet absorption spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, S.F. de; Monteiro, L.S.; Adamis, L.M.B.; Baltar, M.C.P.; Silva, R.M. da

    1977-01-01

    The ultraviolet absorption spectra may be sensibly affected by steric effects. These effects can cause a lot of difficulties and unexpected changes in spectrum. The most general source of such difficulties is steric inhibition of resonance. In addition to this, ultraviolet epectra may be markedly changed by steric factors which change the positions of dipoles in the molecule with respect to each other and by the interaction of nonconjugated chromophores suitably located in space. We have studied in detail each of these effects presenting a lot of usual and importants examples in Organic Chemistry. Others relevants subjects were not considerated in this present work [pt

  8. Disinfection of drinking water by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    It is no longer mandatory that a given residue of chlorine is present in drinking water and this has led to interest in the use of ultraviolet radiation for disinfection of water in large public waterworks. After a brief discussion of the effect of ultraviolet radiation related to wavelength, the most usual type of irradiation equipment is briefly described. Practioal considerations regarding the installation, such as attenuation of the radiation due to water quality and deposits are presented. The requirements as to dose and residence time are also discussed and finally it is pointed out that hydraulic imperfections can reduce the effectiveness drastically. (JIW)Ψ

  9. Nanoscale freestanding gratings for ultraviolet blocking filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Beek, J.T.; Fleming, R.C.; Hindle, P.S.; Prentiss, J.D.; Schattenburg, M.L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Ritzau, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) blocking filters are needed for atomic flux imaging in environments where high levels of ultraviolet radiation are present. Freestanding gratings are a promising candidate for UV filtering. They have a high aspect ratio ({approximately}13), narrow ({approximately}40 nm) slots, and effectively block UV radiation. The grating fabrication process makes use of several etching, electroplating, and lithographic steps and includes an optional step to plug pinholes induced by particles during processing. Gratings were successfully manufactured and tested. Measured UV transmissions of {approximately}10{sup {minus}5} and particle transmissions of {approximately}10{percent} are in agreement with theoretical predictions. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Vacuum Society.}

  10. Quartz glass behavior at ultraviolet spectrum region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, A.F.B.; Barbosa, L.C.; Evora, C.A.P.D.

    1990-01-01

    Melted quartz ingots were produced from raw materials of different sources. Behavior studies of these three different quartz glass were made at the eletromagnetic spectrum ultraviolet region. The atomic absorption spectroscopy was used as an analysis technique of the alkaline, transition and aluminum metal traces. It was found that the alkaline, transition and aluminum metals impurities present a great influence on the melted quartz spectral behavior at the ultraviolet region. It was stated that measurments at this spectrum region constitute an important characterization technique to natural quartz as well as melted quartz. (author) [pt

  11. Assessing Ultraviolet Hazards Using Portable Measuring Instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridyard, A.

    2000-01-01

    The 'Erythemal Action Spectrum' shows an increase of 10 3 in human skin sensitivity to UV radiation over only 30 nm of change of wavelength, from 328 nm to 298 nm. This represents a severe challenge to the manufacturing and calibration of a portable instrument which can measure the vanishingly small amounts of short wavelength UV from solarium tanning lamps, and to apply accurately an action spectra to be able to quantify the hazard presented by such lamps to skin. The classification of UV lamp types from their 'effective irradiance' requires very sharp discrimination between UV power contained in the short wavelength and the long wavelength parts of the UV spectra, so radiometers give misleading results. The only instrument suitable for making these measurements is the spectroradiometer. The development of such an instrument in a hand held portable form is described, with the difficulties associated with its calibration and such factors as stray light rejection. (author)

  12. Solar constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provost, J.

    1984-01-01

    Accurate tests of the theory of stellar structure and evolution are available from the Sun's observations. The solar constraints are reviewed, with a special attention to the recent progress in observing global solar oscillations. Each constraint is sensitive to a given region of the Sun. The present solar models (standard, low Z, mixed) are discussed with respect to neutrino flux, low and high degree five-minute oscillations and low degree internal gravity modes. It appears that actually there do not exist solar models able to fully account for all the observed quantities. (Auth.)

  13. Solar Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Oriel Corporation's simulators have a high pressure xenon lamp whose reflected light is processed by an optical system to produce a uniform solar beam. Because of many different types of applications, the simulators must be adjustable to replicate many different areas of the solar radiation spectrum. Simulators are laboratory tools for such purposes as testing and calibrating solar cells, or other solar energy systems, testing dyes, paints and pigments, pharmaceuticals and cosmetic preparations, plant and animal studies, food and agriculture studies and oceanographic research.

  14. Plasmonic enhancement of ultraviolet fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xiaojin

    Plasmonics relates to the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and conduction electrons at metallic interfaces or in metallic nanostructures. Surface plasmons are collective electron oscillations at a metal surface, which can be manipulated by shape, texture and material composition. Plasmonic applications cover a broad spectrum from visible to near infrared, including biosensing, nanolithography, spectroscopy, optoelectronics, photovoltaics and so on. However, there remains a gap in this activity in the ultraviolet (UV, research. Motivating factors in the study of UV Plasmonics are the direct access to biomolecular resonances and native fluorescence, resonant Raman scattering interactions, and the potential for exerting control over photochemical reactions. This dissertation aims to fill in the gap of Plasmonics in the UV with efforts of design, fabrication and characterization of aluminium (Al) and magnesium (Mg) nanostructures for the application of label-free bimolecular detection via native UV fluorescence. The first contribution of this dissertation addresses the design of Al nanostructures in the context of UV fluorescence enhancement. A design method that combines analytical analysis with numerical simulation has been developed. Performance of three canonical plasmonic structures---the dipole antenna, bullseye nanoaperture and nanoaperture array---has been compared. The optimal geometrical parameters have been determined. A novel design of a compound bullseye structure has been proposed and numerically analyzed for the purpose of compensating for the large Stokes shift typical of UV fluorescence. Second, UV lifetime modification of diffusing molecules by Al nanoapertures has been experimentally demonstrated for the first time. Lifetime reductions of ~3.5x have been observed for the high quantum yield (QY) laser dye p-terphenyl in a 60 nm diameter aperture with 50 nm undercut. Furthermore, quantum-yield-dependence of lifetime reduction has been

  15. ESA innovation rescues Ultraviolet Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Astrophysicist Freeman J. Dyson from the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton characterizes IUE as "A little half-meter mirror sitting in the sky, unnoticed by the public, pouring out results". By use of the IUE satellite, astronomers obtain access to the ultraviolet radiation of celestial bodies in unique ways not available by any other means, neither from the ground nor by any other spacecraft currently in orbit. IUE serves a wide community of astronomers all over Europe, the United States and many other parts of the world. It allows the acquisition of critical data for fundamental studies of comets and their evaporation when they approach the Sun, of the mechanisms driving the stellar winds which make many stars lose a significant fraction of their mass (before they die slowly as White Dwarfs or in sudden Supernova explosions), as well as in the search to understand the ways in which black holes possibly power the violent nuclei of Active galaxies. One year ago the project was threatened with termination and serious concern was expressed by astronomers about the potential loss of IUE's capabilities, as a result of NASA not continuing to operate the spacecraft. Under the leadership of ESA, the three Agencies involved in the operations of IUE (ESA, NASA and the United Kingdom's Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council, PPARC), reviewed the operations agreements of the Project. A minor investment allowing the implementation of modern management and engineering techniques as well as a complete revision of the communication infrastructure of the project and continuous improvements in efficiency in the ESA management, also taking advantage of today's technologies, both in computing and communications, have made it possible to continue IUE operations within the financial means available, with ESA taking up most of NASA's share in the operations. According to Dr. Willem Wamsteker, ESA's Dutch IUE Project Scientist, "it was a extremely interesting

  16. Establishment of a dosimetry method for the exposure evaluation to the ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronchi, Claudia Carla

    2009-01-01

    A dosimetric method for the exposure evaluation to ultraviolet radiation was established with Al 2 O 3 :C InLight detectors and an OSL microStar reader and software, of Landauer, associated to the techniques of Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) and Photo transferred Optically Stimulated Luminescence (PTOSL). The main phases of this work were: characterization of the Al 2 O 3 :C InLight detectors, without pre-conditioning, exposed to ultraviolet radiation (RUV) of solar and artificial sources, using the OSL technique; characterization of the Al 2 O 3 :C InLight detectors, pre-conditioned, exposed to RUV solar and artificial sources, using the PTOSL technique; practical applications of the Al 2 O 3 :C InLight detectors to the solar and artificial RUV, originating from TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) and electric welding. The Al 2 O 3 :C InLight detectors presented satisfactory OSL and PTOSL responses in relation to the parameters: wavelength, UV illumination time, irradiance, radiance exposure and angular dependence to the RUV. Those detectors presented maximum OSL and PTOSL stimulation for the wavelength of 330 nm, showing that they are may be useful for UVA radiation detection and dosimetry. (author)

  17. Far-ultraviolet spectral changes of titanium dioxide with gold nanoparticles by ultraviolet and visible light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Ichiro; Kurawaki, Yuji

    2018-05-01

    Attenuated total reflectance spectra including the far-ultraviolet (FUV, ≤ 200 nm) region of titanium dioxide (TiO2) with and without gold (Au) nanoparticles were measured. A newly developed external light-irradiation system enabled to observe spectral changes of TiO2 with Au nanoparticles upon light irradiations. Absorption in the FUV region decreased and increased by the irradiation with ultraviolet and visible light, respectively. These spectral changes may reflect photo-induced electron transfer from TiO2 to Au nanoparticles under ultraviolet light and from Au nanoparticles to TiO2 under visible light, respectively.

  18. Destruction of Sun-Grazing Comet C-2011 N3 (SOHO) Within the Low Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrijver, C. J.; Brown, J. C.; Battams, K.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Liu, W.; Hudson, H.; Pesnell, W. D.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of comets in Sun-grazing orbits that survive solar insolation long enough to penetrate into the Suns inner corona provide information on the solar atmosphere and magnetic field as well as on the makeup of the comet. On 6 July 2011, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observed the demise of comet C2011 N3 (SOHO) within the low solar corona in five wavelength bands in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). The comet penetrated to within 0.146 solarradius (100,000 kilometers) of the solar surface before its EUV signal disappeared.

  19. Ga2O3-In2O3 thin films on sapphire substrates: Synthesis and ultraviolet photoconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muslimov, A. E.; Butashin, A. V.; Kolymagin, A. B.; Nabatov, B. V.; Kanevsky, V. M.

    2017-11-01

    The structure and electrical and optical properties of β-Ga2O3-In2O3 thin films on sapphire substrates with different orientations have been investigated. The samples have been prepared by annealing of gallium-indium metallic films on sapphire substrates in air at different gallium-to-indium ratios in the initial mixture. The photoconductivity of these structures in the solar-blind ultraviolet spectral region has been examined.

  20. Vacuum ultraviolet photochemistry of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skurat, Vladimir

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of vacuum UV radiation (wavelength range from 1 to 200 nm) with polymers is interesting for fundamental and applied sciences. This interest is stimulated by various reasons: - Wide applications of polymeric materials in semiconductor technology, where they are used as photoresist materials in combination with VUV light sources (lasers, excimer lamps, synchrotron radiation and others). - Polymers are widely used as spacecraft materials in the last 20 years. On near-Earth orbits, the polymeric materials of spacecraft surfaces are destroyed by solar radiation. - VUV radiation is one of the components of gas discharge plasmas, which are used for treatment of polymer, with the aim of modifying their surface properties. The main features of interaction of VUV radiation with polymers are discussed. The spectra of intrinsic absorption of saturated polymers (polyethylene, polypropylene, polytetrafluoroethylene and others) are situated mainly in the VUV region. The photochemistry of polymers in the VUV region is very different from their photochemistry at wavelengths longer than 200 nm, where the absorption spectra belong to impurities and polymer defects. The polymer photochemistry in the VUV region is wavelength-dependent. At wavelengths longer than about 140 nm, the main role is played by transformations of primary-formed singlet excited molecules. At shorter wavelengths the role of photoionization increases progressively and the main features of VUV photolysis become similar to the picture of radiolysis, with significant contributions of charge pairs and triplet excited molecules. Very important features of VUV light absorption in polymers are high absorption coefficients. Because of this, the surface layers absorb large doses of energy. This leads to very profound transformation of material on the polymer surface. In particular for polymers which are considered destroyed by radiation (for example, perfluoropolymers), this leads to VUV-induced erosion

  1. Solar UV Variations During the Decline of Cycle 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLand, Matthew, T.; Cebula, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of temporal and spectral variations in solar ultraviolet irradiance over a solar cycle is essential for understanding the forcing of Earth's atmosphere and climate. Satellite measurements of solar UV variability for solar cycles 21, 22, and 23 show consistent solar cycle irradiance changes at key wavelengths (e.g. 205 nm, 250 nm) within instrumental uncertainties. All historical data sets also show the same relative spectral dependence for both short-term (rotational) and long-term (solar cycle) variations. Empirical solar irradiance models also produce long-term solar UV variations that agree well with observational data. Recent UV irradiance data from the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) and Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) instruments covering the declining phase of Cycle 23 present a different picture oflong-term solar variations from previous results. Time series of SIM and SOLSTICE spectral irradiance data between 2003 and 2007 show solar variations that greatly exceed both previous measurements and predicted irradiance changes over this period, and the spectral dependence of the SIM and SOLSTICE variations during these years do not show features expected from solar physics theory. The use of SORCE irradiance variations in atmospheric models yields substantially different middle atmosphere ozone responses in both magnitude and vertical structure. However, short-term solar variability derived from SIM and SOLSTICE UV irradiance data is consistent with concurrent solar UV measurements from other instruments, as well as previous results, suggesting no change in solar physics. Our analysis of short-term solar variability is much less sensitive to residual instrument response changes than the observations of long-term variations. The SORCE long-term UV results can be explained by under-correction of instrument response changes during the first few years of measurements

  2. Different atmospheric parameters influence on spectral UV radiation (measurements and modelling)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubarova, N Y [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Meteorological Observatory; Krotkov, N A [Maryland Univ., MD (United States). JCESS/Meteorology Dept.; Geogdzhaev, I V; Bushnev, S V; Kondranin, T V [SUMGF/MIPT, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Khattatov, V U [Central Aerological Observatory, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31

    The ultraviolet (UV) radiation plays a vital role in the biophysical processes despite its small portion in the total solar flux. UV radiation is subject to large variations at the Earth surface depending greatly on solar elevation, ozone and cloud amount, aerosols and surface albedo. The analysis of atmospheric parameters influence is based on the spectral archive data of three spectral instruments: NSF spectroradiometer (Barrow network) (NSF Polar Programs UV Spectroradiometer Network 1991-1992,1992), spectrophotometer (SUVS-M) of Central Aerological Observatory CAO, spectroradiometer of Meteorological Observatory of the Moscow State University (MO MSU) and model simulations based on delta-Eddington approximation

  3. Different atmospheric parameters influence on spectral UV radiation (measurements and modelling)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubarova, N.Y. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Meteorological Observatory; Krotkov, N.A. [Maryland Univ., MD (United States). JCESS/Meteorology Dept.; Geogdzhaev, I.V.; Bushnev, S.V.; Kondranin, T.V. [SUMGF/MIPT, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Khattatov, V.U. [Central Aerological Observatory, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The ultraviolet (UV) radiation plays a vital role in the biophysical processes despite its small portion in the total solar flux. UV radiation is subject to large variations at the Earth surface depending greatly on solar elevation, ozone and cloud amount, aerosols and surface albedo. The analysis of atmospheric parameters influence is based on the spectral archive data of three spectral instruments: NSF spectroradiometer (Barrow network) (NSF Polar Programs UV Spectroradiometer Network 1991-1992,1992), spectrophotometer (SUVS-M) of Central Aerological Observatory CAO, spectroradiometer of Meteorological Observatory of the Moscow State University (MO MSU) and model simulations based on delta-Eddington approximation

  4. How do environmental and behavioral factors impact ultraviolet radiation effects on health: the RISC-UV Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, M. P.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Haeffelin, M.; Saiag, P.; Mahe, E.; Brogniez, C.; Dupont, J. C.; Pazmiño, A.; Auriol, F.; Bonnel, B.

    2009-04-01

    UV radiation data obtained at various spatial scales (satellite, ground-based and spot measurements) by a variety of measuring systems. Moreover a set of atmospheric parameters (total ozone column, the vertical profile and optical thickness of aerosols, cloud cover and solar albedo) related to UV radiation is also collected. Material: The instrumental set consisted of several instruments for: 1) UV radiation measurements (a spectroradiometer, UV-A, UV-B, Erythemal UV and broadband solar pyranometers); 2) cloud, ozone and aerosol observations (photometer, Lidar and radiometers); and 3) personal monitors for UV index measurements, as handhelds, watches and mini-station. Results: Measurements performed in cloudy and sunny days around noon local time (± 1h) showed mean values of 3.3 ± 1.0 UVI, and the maximum UVI was 5.5 at noon on a clear sky day (September 14). The influence of cirrus clouds and aerosols radiation attenuation is currently studied on several case studies. From the mean UVI values, we estimated the time of necessary exposure for the induction of erythema of the skin and for the synthesis 1000 UI of vitamin D per day (1000 UI). (McKenzie et al., 2008). Preliminary results show that around solar noon (between 9 and 12 UTC that is 11 and 14 local time), on the one hand, about 45 min of exposure is required to cause skin redness and consequently lead to harmful effects on the human health. On the other hand, this exposure can be insufficient to lead to beneficial effects if we consider only the generally exposed parts of the body, as the hands and the face. It is only in the extreme conditions - exposure of the whole body - that the synthesis of the vitamin D can be done in 10 to 20 minutes. Otherwise an exposure during several hours is necessary. These results are particularly interesting with respect to possible problems of lack of vitamin D in the French population, mainly rickets (children) and osteosporosis (old persons), as well as other diseases

  5. The Ultraviolet Radiation Environment around M Dwarf Exoplanet Host Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Kevin; Froning, Cynthia S.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Roberge, Aki; Stocke, John T.; Tian, Feng; Bushinsky, Rachel; Desert, Jean-Michel; Mauas, Pablo; Mauas, Pablo; hide

    2013-01-01

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. Ultraviolet photons influence the atmospheric temperature profiles and production of potential biomarkers on Earth-like planets around these stars. At present, little observational or theoretical basis exists for understanding the ultraviolet spectra of M dwarfs, despite their critical importance to predicting and interpreting the spectra of potentially habitable planets as they are obtained in the coming decades. Using observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, we present a study of the UV radiation fields around nearby M dwarf planet hosts that covers both far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) wavelengths. The combined FUV+NUV spectra are publicly available in machine-readable format. We find that all six exoplanet host stars in our sample (GJ 581, GJ 876, GJ 436, GJ 832, GJ 667C, and GJ 1214) exhibit some level of chromospheric and transition region UV emission. No "UV-quiet" M dwarfs are observed. The bright stellar Lyman-alpha emission lines are reconstructed, and we find that the Lyman-alpha line fluxes comprise approximately 37%-75% of the total 1150-3100 A flux from most M dwarfs; approximately greater than 10(exp3) times the solar value. We develop an empirical scaling relation between Lyman-alpha and Mg II emission, to be used when interstellar H I attenuation precludes the direct observation of Lyman-alpha. The intrinsic unreddened flux ratio is F(Lyman-alpha)/F(Mg II) = 10(exp3). The F(FUV)/F(NUV) flux ratio, a driver for abiotic production of the suggested biomarkers O2 and O3, is shown to be approximately 0.5-3 for all M dwarfs in our sample, greather than 10(exp3) times the solar ratio. For the four stars with moderate signal-to-noise Cosmic Origins Spectrograph time-resolved spectra, we find UV emission line variability with amplitudes of 50%.500% on 10(exp2)-10(exp3) s timescales. This effect should be taken

  6. THE ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION ENVIRONMENT AROUND M DWARF EXOPLANET HOST STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    France, Kevin; Froning, Cynthia S.; Stocke, John T.; Bushinsky, Rachel [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Linsky, Jeffrey L. [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Roberge, Aki [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Tian, Feng [Center for Earth System Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Desert, Jean-Michel [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mauas, Pablo; Vieytes, Mariela [Instituto de Astronomsica del Espacio (CONICET-UBA), C.C. 67 Sucursal 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Walkowicz, Lucianne M., E-mail: kevin.france@colorado.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. Ultraviolet photons influence the atmospheric temperature profiles and production of potential biomarkers on Earth-like planets around these stars. At present, little observational or theoretical basis exists for understanding the ultraviolet spectra of M dwarfs, despite their critical importance to predicting and interpreting the spectra of potentially habitable planets as they are obtained in the coming decades. Using observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, we present a study of the UV radiation fields around nearby M dwarf planet hosts that covers both far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) wavelengths. The combined FUV+NUV spectra are publicly available in machine-readable format. We find that all six exoplanet host stars in our sample (GJ 581, GJ 876, GJ 436, GJ 832, GJ 667C, and GJ 1214) exhibit some level of chromospheric and transition region UV emission. No 'UV-quiet' M dwarfs are observed. The bright stellar Ly{alpha} emission lines are reconstructed, and we find that the Ly{alpha} line fluxes comprise {approx}37%-75% of the total 1150-3100 A flux from most M dwarfs; {approx}>10{sup 3} times the solar value. We develop an empirical scaling relation between Ly{alpha} and Mg II emission, to be used when interstellar H I attenuation precludes the direct observation of Ly{alpha}. The intrinsic unreddened flux ratio is F(Ly{alpha})/F(Mg II) = 10 {+-} 3. The F(FUV)/F(NUV) flux ratio, a driver for abiotic production of the suggested biomarkers O{sub 2} and O{sub 3}, is shown to be {approx}0.5-3 for all M dwarfs in our sample, >10{sup 3} times the solar ratio. For the four stars with moderate signal-to-noise Cosmic Origins Spectrograph time-resolved spectra, we find UV emission line variability with amplitudes of 50%-500% on 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} s timescales. This effect should be taken into account in future UV

  7. High Data Rate Optical Wireless Communications Based on Ultraviolet Band

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Xiaobin

    2017-10-01

    Optical wireless communication systems based on ultraviolet (UV)-band has a lot inherent advantages, such as low background solar radiation, low device dark noise. Besides, it also has small restrictive requirements for PAT (pointing, acquisition, and tracking) because of its high atmospheric scattering with molecules and aerosols. And these advantages are driving people to explore and utilize UV band for constructing and implementing a high-data-rate, less PAT communication links, such as diffuse-line-of-sight links (diffuse-LOS) and non-line-of-sight (NLOS). The responsivity of the photodetector at UV range is far lower than that of visible range, high power UV transmitters which can be easily modulated are under investigation. These factors make it is hard to realize a high-data-rate diffuse-LOS or NLOS UV communication links. To achieve a UV link mentioned above with current devices and modulation schemes, this thesis presents some efficient modulation schemes and available devices for the time being. Besides, a demonstration of ultraviolet-B (UVB) communication link is implemented utilizing quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM). The demonstration is based on a 294-nm UVB-light-emitting-diode (UVB-LED) with a full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 9 nm, and according to the measured L-I-V curve, we set the bias voltage as 7V for maximum the ac amplitude and thus get a high signal-noise-ratio (SNR) channel, and the light output power is 190 μW with such bias voltage. Besides, there is a unique silica gel lens on top of the LED to concentrate the beam. A -3-dB bandwidth of 29 MHz was measured and a high-speed near-solar-blind communication link with a data rate of 71 Mbit/s was achieved using 8-QAM-OFDM at perfect alignment, and 23.6 Mbit/s using 2-QAM-OFDM when the angle subtended by the pointing direction of the UVB-LED and photodetector (PD) is 12 degrees, thus establishing a diffuse-line-of-sight (LOS) link

  8. Solar cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over two billion people face fuel wood shortages, causing tremendous personal and environmental stress. Over 4 million people die prematurely from indoor air pollution. Solar cooking can reduce fuel wood consumption and indoor air pollution. Solar cooking has been practiced and published since th...

  9. Solar Sprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Richard; Anderson, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    In the "Solar Sprint" activity, students design, test, and race a solar-powered car built with Legos. The use of ratios is incorporated to simulate the actual work of scientists and engineers. This method encourages fourth-grade students to think about multiple variables and stimulates their curiosity when an activity doesn't come out as…

  10. Habitat impact on ultraviolet reflectance in moths

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zapletalová, Lenka; Zapletal, Michal; Konvička, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 5 (2016), s. 1300-1305 ISSN 0046-225X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-33733S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Lepidoptera * ultraviolet reflectance * mimicry Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.601, year: 2016

  11. Characterization of ethanol concentrations at ultraviolet wavelength ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the measurement of optical absorption spectrum for different concentrations of ethanol at ultraviolet wavelength. Ethanol absorption spectrum was measured using portable spectroscopy setup from Avantes. It consists of Balanced Deuterium Halogen light source and spectrometer. The light source can ...

  12. Ultraviolet spectra of Mg in liquid helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriwaki, Y.; Morita, N.

    1999-01-01

    Emission and absorption spectra of Mg atoms implanted in liquid helium have been observed in the ultraviolet region. We have presented a model of exciplex formation of Mg-He 10 and found that this model is more suitable for understanding the dynamics in the 3s3p 1 P→3s 21 S transition than the bubble model. (orig.)

  13. Combined ultraviolet studies of astronomical sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliunas, S. L.; Dupree, A. K.; Elvis, M.; Huchra, J. P.; Kenyon, S.; Raymond, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Topics addressed include: Cygnus Loop; P Cygni profiles in dwarf novae; YY Gem; nova shells; HZ Herculis; activity cycles in cluster giants; Alpha Ori; metal deficient giant stars; ultraviolet spectra of symbiotic stars detected by the Very Large Array; time variability in symbiotic stars; blue galaxies; and quasistellar objects with X-ray spectra.

  14. The impact of ultraviolet radiation on timber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, B.

    1993-01-01

    Photochemical degradation of timber, the outcome of exposure of timber to ultraviolet radiation, is a light induced chemical and physical decay. Timber is a collection of dead wood cells. Impacts of radiation on the growing tree are therefore outside the scope of this paper, which is primarily concerned with timber as a material. (author). 5 refs. 2 figs

  15. UV radiation hardness of silicon inversion layer solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hezel, R.

    1990-01-01

    For full utilization of the high spectral response of inversion layer solar cells in the very-short-wavelength range of the solar spectrum sufficient ultraviolet-radiation hardness is required. In addition to the charge-induced passivation achieved by cesium incorporation into the silicon nitride AR coating, in this paper the following means for further drastic reduction of UV light-induced effects in inversion layer solar cells without encapsulation are introduced and interpretations are given: increasing the nitride deposition temperature, silicon surface oxidation at low temperatures, and texture etching and using higher substrate resistivities. High UV radiation tolerance and improvement of the cell efficiency could be obtained simultaneously

  16. 21 CFR 878.4635 - Ultraviolet lamp for tanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for tanning. 878.4635 Section 878... tanning. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet lamp for tanning is a device that is a lamp (including a fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation to tan the skin. See § 1040.20 of this chapter. (b...

  17. 21 CFR 880.6710 - Medical ultraviolet water purifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical ultraviolet water purifier. 880.6710... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6710 Medical ultraviolet water purifier. (a) Identification. A medical ultraviolet water purifier is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to destroy bacteria in water by...

  18. Solar photocatalytic cleaning of polluted water. Solare Reinigung verschmutzter Waesser mittels Photokatalyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockelmann, D

    1994-01-01

    Alternatively to biological, physical and chemical methods of waste water cleaning, photocatalysis can be employed. In this residue-free method, titanium dioxide particles are brought into contact with polluted water as photocatalysts. Under UV irradiation at wave-lengths below 400 nm, change carriers are generated in the semiconductor particles that act so intensely oxidizing as to completely degrade almost all organic pollutants in waste water. In this process, the ultra-violet part of the solar spectrum can be harnessed to generate oxidation equivalents. Thus, solar photocatalytic waste water cleaning is excellently suited for developing countries. (BWI)

  19. Solar thermal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.

    2006-01-01

    While wind power is widely acknowledged as the most developed of the 'new' renewables, the number two technology, in terms of installed capacity functioning worldwide, is solar heating, or solar thermal. The author has investigated recent industry reports on how these markets are developing. The authors of an International Energy Agency (IEA) survey studied 41 countries in depth at the end of 2004, revealing that 141 million m 3 - corresponding to an installed capacity of 98.4 GWth - were installed in the sample countries (these nations represent 3.74 billion people, about 57% of the world's population). The installed capacity within the areas studied represents approximately 85%-90% of the solar thermal market worldwide. The use of solar heating varies greatly between countries - even close neighbours - and between economic regions. Its uptake often has more to do with policy than solar resource. There is also different uptake of technology. In China, Europe and Japan, plants with flat-plate and evacuated tube collectors are used, mainly to heat water and for space heating. Unglazed plastic collectors, used mainly for swimming pool heating, meanwhile, dominate the North American markets. Though the majority of solar heating installations today are installed on domestic rooftops, the larger-scale installations should not be overlooked. One important part of the market is the hotel sector - in particular hotels in locations that serve the seasonal summer holiday market, where solar is extremely effective. Likewise hospitals and residential homes, multi-family apartment blocks and sports centres are all good examples of places where solar thermal can deliver results. There are also a growing number of industrial applications, where solar thermal can meet the hot water needs (and possibly more) of a range of industries, such as food processing and agriculture. The ability of solar to provide a heat source for cooling is expected to become increasingly important as

  20. Solar thermal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.

    2006-07-15

    While wind power is widely acknowledged as the most developed of the 'new' renewables, the number two technology, in terms of installed capacity functioning worldwide, is solar heating, or solar thermal. The author has investigated recent industry reports on how these markets are developing. The authors of an International Energy Agency (IEA) survey studied 41 countries in depth at the end of 2004, revealing that 141 million m{sup 3} - corresponding to an installed capacity of 98.4 GWth - were installed in the sample countries (these nations represent 3.74 billion people, about 57% of the world's population). The installed capacity within the areas studied represents approximately 85%-90% of the solar thermal market worldwide. The use of solar heating varies greatly between countries - even close neighbours - and between economic regions. Its uptake often has more to do with policy than solar resource. There is also different uptake of technology. In China, Europe and Japan, plants with flat-plate and evacuated tube collectors are used, mainly to heat water and for space heating. Unglazed plastic collectors, used mainly for swimming pool heating, meanwhile, dominate the North American markets. Though the majority of solar heating installations today are installed on domestic rooftops, the larger-scale installations should not be overlooked. One important part of the market is the hotel sector - in particular hotels in locations that serve the seasonal summer holiday market, where solar is extremely effective. Likewise hospitals and residential homes, multi-family apartment blocks and sports centres are all good examples of places where solar thermal can deliver results. There are also a growing number of industrial applications, where solar thermal can meet the hot water needs (and possibly more) of a range of industries, such as food processing and agriculture. The ability of solar to provide a heat source for cooling is expected to become