WorldWideScience

Sample records for solar photospheric plasma

  1. The Solar Photosphere: Evidence for Condensed Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The stellar equations of state treat the Sun much like an ideal gas, wherein the photosphere is viewed as a sparse gaseous plasma. The temperatures inferred in the solar interior give some credence to these models, especially since it is counterintuitive that an object with internal temperatures in excess of 1 MK could be existing in the liquid state. Nonetheless, extreme temperatures, by themselves, are insufficient evidence for the states of matter. The presence of magnetic fields and gravity also impact the expected phase. In the end, it is the physical expression of a state that is required in establishing the proper phase of an object. The photosphere does not lend itself easily to treatment as a gaseous plasma. The physical evidence can be more simply reconciled with a solar body and a photosphere in the condensed state. A discussion of each physical feature follows: (1 the thermal spectrum, (2 limb darkening, (3 solar collapse, (4 the solar density, (5 seismic activity, (6 mass displacement, (7 the chromosphere and critical opalescence, (8 shape, (9 surface activity, (10 photospheric/coronal flows, (11 photospheric imaging, (12 the solar dynamo, and (13 the presence of Sun spots. The explanation of these findings by the gaseous models often requires an improbable combination of events, such as found in the stellar opacity problem. In sharp contrast, each can be explained with simplicity by the condensed state. This work is an invitation to reconsider the phase of the Sun.

  2. STOCHASTIC COUPLING OF SOLAR PHOTOSPHERE AND CORONA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Ofman, Leon; Davila, Joseph M.; Coyner, Aaron J.

    2013-01-01

    The observed solar activity is believed to be driven by the dissipation of nonpotential magnetic energy injected into the corona by dynamic processes in the photosphere. The enormous range of scales involved in the interaction makes it difficult to track down the photospheric origin of each coronal dissipation event, especially in the presence of complex magnetic topologies. In this paper, we propose an ensemble-based approach for testing the photosphere-corona coupling in a quiet solar region as represented by intermittent activity in Solar and Heliospheric Observatory Michelson Doppler Imager and Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory Extreme Ultraviolet Imager image sets. For properly adjusted detection thresholds corresponding to the same degree of intermittency in the photosphere and corona, the dynamics of the two solar regions is described by the same occurrence probability distributions of energy release events but significantly different geometric properties. We derive a set of scaling relations reconciling the two groups of results and enabling statistical description of coronal dynamics based on photospheric observations. Our analysis suggests that multiscale intermittent dissipation in the corona at spatial scales >3 Mm is controlled by turbulent photospheric convection. Complex topology of the photospheric network makes this coupling essentially nonlocal and non-deterministic. Our results are in an agreement with the Parker's coupling scenario in which random photospheric shuffling generates marginally stable magnetic discontinuities at the coronal level, but they are also consistent with an impulsive wave heating involving multiscale Alfvénic wave packets and/or magnetohydrodynamic turbulent cascade. A back-reaction on the photosphere due to coronal magnetic reconfiguration can be a contributing factor.

  3. Observational signatures of the simulated solar photosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vitas, N.

    2011-01-01

    Most of the visible light coming from the Sun originates in the solar photosphere. Numerical simulations are a common tool to study the solar atmosphere starting from the basic laws of physics and few additional assumptions. This thesis presents results of three-dimensional radiative

  4. Solar and stellar photospheric abundances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Allende Prieto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  5. On the Structure of the Solar Photosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Secchi A.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Mary Posani (Department of French and Italian, The Ohio State University, Colum- bus, Ohio, 43221 and Eileen Reeves (Department of Comparative Literature, Prince- ton University, Princeton, New Jersey, 08544 provide a translation of Father Pietro Angelo Secchi’s classic work “ Sulla Struttura della Fotosfera Solare ” as it appeared in Bullettino Meteorologico dell’ Osservatorio del Collegio Romano , 30 November 1864, v.3(11, 1–3. Secchi’s paper was immediately translated into French by l’Abb ́ e Franc ̧ois Moigno appearing on December 22nd, 1864 ( Sur la structure de la photosph`ere du soleil. Les Mondes , 1864, v.6, 703–707. Moigno’s translation prompted significant interest in the nature of the Sun throughout Europe, with rapid claims of simultaneous discovery by Harv ́ e Faye (Faye H. Sur la constitution physique du soleil — premiere parti . Les Mondes, v.7, 293–306 and others. In this article, Secchi reiterated that the photosphere was composed of solid corpuscles floating on the transparent atmosphere of the Sun. Secchi concluded that the body of the Sun was gaseous based on his vi- sualization of solar granules or “ willow leaves ” described by Nasmyth (Nasmyth J. On the Structure of the Luminous Envelope of the Sun — In a letter to Joseph Sidebotham . Memoirs of the Literary and Philosophical Society of Manchester , 1862, 3rd Series, v.I, 407–411. Secchi also referred to Magnus’ work on solid particles in the gaseous flame (Magnus G. Notiz ̈uber die Bescha enheit der Sonne. Poggendorff’s Annalen der Physik und Chemie , 1864, v.121, 510–512; also in French Notice sur la constitution du soleil . Archives des science physique et naturelles (Gen`eve , 1864, v.20, 171–175. The works by Sechhi, Nasmyth, Magnus, and Faye would dominate astrophysical thought for the next 50 years.

  6. Do tidal waves exist in the solar photosphere?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klvaňa, Miroslav; Švanda, M.; Krivtsov, A.; Bumba, Václav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 1 (2004), s. 157-164 ISSN 0351-2657. [Central European Solar Physics Meeting /1./. Bairisch Kölldorf, 23.10.2003-25.10.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/01/0658; GA AV ČR IAA3003903; GA AV ČR KSK2043105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : solar photosphere * tidal waves * planets Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  7. CHROMOSPHERIC POLARIZATION IN THE PHOTOSPHERIC SOLAR OXYGEN INFRARED TRIPLET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Pino Alemán, Tanausú; Trujillo Bueno, Javier [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-07-20

    We present multilevel radiative transfer modeling of the scattering polarization observed in the solar O i infrared triplet around 777 nm. We demonstrate that the scattering polarization pattern observed on the solar disk forms in the chromosphere, far above the photospheric region where the bulk of the emergent intensity profiles originate. We investigate the sensitivity of the polarization pattern to the thermal structure of the solar atmosphere and to the presence of weak magnetic fields (10{sup −2}–100 G) through the Hanle effect, showing that the scattering polarization signals of the oxygen infrared triplet encode information on the magnetism of the solar chromosphere.

  8. Association of solar coronal loops to photospheric magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep Chitta, Lakshmi; Peter, Hardi; Solanki, Sami

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic connectivity and its evolution from the solar photosphere to the corona will play a crucial role in the energetics of the solar atmosphere. To explore this connectivity, we use high spatial resolution magnetic field observations of an active region from the balloon-borne SUNRISE telescope, in combination with the observations of coronal loops imaged in extreme ultraviolet by SDO/AIA. We show that photospheric magnetic field at the base of coronal loops is rapidly evolving through small-scale flux emergence and cancellation events with rates on the order of 10^15 Mx/s. When observed at high spatial resolution better than 0.5 arcsec, we find that basically all coronal loops considered so far are rooted in the photosphere above small-scale opposite polarity magnetic field patches. In the photosphere, the magnetic field threading coronal loops is interacting with opposite polarity parasitic magnetic concentrations leading to dynamic signatures in the upper atmosphere. Chromospheric small-scale jets aligned to coronal loops are observed at these locations. We will present preliminary results from 3D MHD simulations of coronal loops driven by realistic magneto-convection and discuss what role the magnetic interactions at coronal loop footpoints could play in the evolution of coronal loops and their heating.

  9. Temporal Variations of the Magnetic Flux in the Solar Photosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merzlyakov, V. L.; Starkova, L. I.

    2017-12-01

    The problem of the transport and transformation of magnetic fields from the generation zone to the photosphere is studied in this paper. For this purpose, the temporal variations of parameters of bipolar magnetic regions are analyzed based on the magnetic synoptic maps of the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) for the declining phase of cycle 22. A 150-day modulation of the magnetic flux value in bipolar regions and a variation in their rotation velocity with a duration of 80-100 days have been found. Such variations in the parameters are interpreted as a result of action of supergiant and giant convection cells. The magnetic flux from the generation zone emerges through the local channels formed by the supergiant convection cells. From the level of 0.95 R Sun, the flux is redistributed by giant cells, which form bipolar magnetic regions on the photosphere.

  10. PIXEL ANALYSIS OF PHOTOSPHERIC SPECTRAL DATA. I. PLASMA DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasca, Anthony P.; Chen, James [Plasma Physics Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Pevtsov, Alexei A., E-mail: anthony.rasca.ctr@nrl.navy.mil [National Solar Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States)

    2016-11-20

    Recent observations of the photosphere using high spatial and temporal resolution show small dynamic features at or below the current resolving limits. A new pixel dynamics method has been developed to analyze spectral profiles and quantify changes in line displacement, width, asymmetry, and peakedness of photospheric absorption lines. The algorithm evaluates variations of line profile properties in each pixel and determines the statistics of such fluctuations averaged over all pixels in a given region. The method has been used to derive statistical characteristics of pixel fluctuations in observed quiet-Sun regions, an active region with no eruption, and an active region with an ongoing eruption. Using Stokes I images from the Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM) of the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) telescope on 2012 March 13, variations in line width and peakedness of Fe i 6301.5 Å are shown to have a distinct spatial and temporal relationship with an M7.9 X-ray flare in NOAA 11429. This relationship is observed as stationary and contiguous patches of pixels adjacent to a sunspot exhibiting intense flattening in the line profile and line-center displacement as the X-ray flare approaches peak intensity, which is not present in area scans of the non-eruptive active region. The analysis of pixel dynamics allows one to extract quantitative information on differences in plasma dynamics on sub-pixel scales in these photospheric regions. The analysis can be extended to include the Stokes parameters and study signatures of vector components of magnetic fields and coupled plasma properties.

  11. On the time-dependent radiative transfer in photospheric plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, A.L.; Schweizer, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The paper is the second of a series investigating time-dependent radiative transfer processes of x-rays in photospheric plasmas. A quantitative discussion is presented of analytical results derived earlier along with a comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. The geometry considered is a homogeneous plasma ball with radius R. The source is concentrated on a concentric shell with radius r 0 < R. Point sources at the centre of the ball or semi-infinite geometries are discussed as limiting cases. Diffusion profiles are given for every scattering order and the total profile appears as the sum over these individual profiles. The comparison with Monte Carlo results is used to test the accuracy of the analytical approach and to adjust the time profiles of the first few scattering orders. The analytical theory yields good results over a wide range of situations. (author)

  12. Transport of Internetwork Magnetic Flux Elements in the Solar Photosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Piyush; Rast, Mark P.; Gošić, Milan; Bellot Rubio, Luis R.; Rempel, Matthias

    2018-02-01

    The motions of small-scale magnetic flux elements in the solar photosphere can provide some measure of the Lagrangian properties of the convective flow. Measurements of these motions have been critical in estimating the turbulent diffusion coefficient in flux-transport dynamo models and in determining the Alfvén wave excitation spectrum for coronal heating models. We examine the motions of internetwork flux elements in Hinode/Narrowband Filter Imager magnetograms and study the scaling of their mean squared displacement and the shape of their displacement probability distribution as a function of time. We find that the mean squared displacement scales super-diffusively with a slope of about 1.48. Super-diffusive scaling has been observed in other studies for temporal increments as small as 5 s, increments over which ballistic scaling would be expected. Using high-cadence MURaM simulations, we show that the observed super-diffusive scaling at short increments is a consequence of random changes in barycenter positions due to flux evolution. We also find that for long temporal increments, beyond granular lifetimes, the observed displacement distribution deviates from that expected for a diffusive process, evolving from Rayleigh to Gaussian. This change in distribution can be modeled analytically by accounting for supergranular advection along with granular motions. These results complicate the interpretation of magnetic element motions as strictly advective or diffusive on short and long timescales and suggest that measurements of magnetic element motions must be used with caution in turbulent diffusion or wave excitation models. We propose that passive tracer motions in measured photospheric flows may yield more robust transport statistics.

  13. The height dependence of temperature : velocity correlation in the solar photosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koza, J.; Kucera, A.; Rybák, J.; Wöhl, H.

    2007-01-01

    We derive correlation coe±cients between temperature and line-of-sight velocity as a function of optical depth throughout the solar photosphere for the non-magnetic photosphere and a small area of enhanced magnetic activity. The maximum anticorrelation of about ¡0:6 between temperature and

  14. Structure of the solar photosphere studied from the radiation hydrodynamics code ANTARES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, P; Lemmerer, B; Hanslmeier, A; Zaqarashvili, T; Veronig, A; Grimm-Strele, H; Muthsam, H J

    2017-01-01

    The ANTARES radiation hydrodynamics code is capable of simulating the solar granulation in detail unequaled by direct observation. We introduce a state-of-the-art numerical tool to the solar physics community and demonstrate its applicability to model the solar granulation. The code is based on the weighted essentially non-oscillatory finite volume method and by its implementation of local mesh refinement is also capable of simulating turbulent fluids. While the ANTARES code already provides promising insights into small-scale dynamical processes occurring in the quiet-Sun photosphere, it will soon be capable of modeling the latter in the scope of radiation magnetohydrodynamics. In this first preliminary study we focus on the vertical photospheric stratification by examining a 3-D model photosphere with an evolution time much larger than the dynamical timescales of the solar granulation and of particular large horizontal extent corresponding to [Formula: see text] on the solar surface to smooth out horizontal spatial inhomogeneities separately for up- and downflows. The highly resolved Cartesian grid thereby covers [Formula: see text] of the upper convection zone and the adjacent photosphere. Correlation analysis, both local and two-point, provides a suitable means to probe the photospheric structure and thereby to identify several layers of characteristic dynamics: The thermal convection zone is found to reach some ten kilometers above the solar surface, while convectively overshooting gas penetrates even higher into the low photosphere. An [Formula: see text] wide transition layer separates the convective from the oscillatory layers in the higher photosphere.

  15. THE ROTATION OF THE SOLAR PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J. C.; Gao, P. X., E-mail: jcxu@ynao.ac.cn [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2016-12-20

    The rotational characteristics of the solar photospheric magnetic field at four flux ranges are investigated together with the total flux of active regions (MF{sub ar}) and quiet regions (MF{sub qr}). The first four ranges (MF{sub 1–4}) are (1.5–2.9) × 10{sup 18}, (2.9–32.0) × 10{sup 18}, (3.20–4.27) × 10{sup 19}, and (4.27–38.01) × 10{sup 19}, respectively (the unit is Mx per element). Daily values of the flux data are extracted from magnetograms of the Michelson Doppler Imager on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory . Lomb–Scargle periodograms show that only MF{sub 2}, MF{sub 4}, MF{sub qr}, and MF{sub ar} exhibit rotational periods. The periods of the first three types of flux are very similar, i.e., 26.20, 26.23, and 26.24 days, respectively, while that of MF{sub ar} is longer, 26.66 days. This indicates that active regions rotate more slowly than quiet regions on average, and strong magnetic fields tend to repress the surface rotation. Sinusoidal function fittings and cross-correlation analyses reveal that MF{sub ar} leads MF{sub 2} and MF{sub 4} by 5 and 1 days, respectively. This is speculated to be related with the decaying of active regions. MF{sub 2} and MF{sub ar} are negatively correlated, while both MF{sub 4} and MF{sub qr} are positively correlated with MF{sub ar}. At the timescale of the solar activity cycle, MF{sub ar} leads (negatively) MF{sub 2} by around one year (350 days), and leads MF{sub 4} by about 3 rotation periods (82 days). The relation between MF{sub 2} and MF{sub ar} may be explained by the possibility that the former mainly comes from a higher latitude, or emerges from the subsurface shear layer. We conjecture that MF{sub 4} may partly come from the magnetic flux of active regions; this verifies previous results that were obtained with indirect solar magnetic indices.

  16. Influence of Photospheric Magnetic Conditions on the Catastrophic Behaviors of Flux Ropes in Solar Active Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Quanhao; Wang, Yuming; Hu, Youqiu; Liu, Rui; Liu, Jiajia, E-mail: zhangqh@mail.ustc.edu.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2017-02-01

    Since only the magnetic conditions at the photosphere can be routinely observed in current observations, it is of great significance to determine the influences of photospheric magnetic conditions on solar eruptive activities. Previous studies about catastrophe indicated that the magnetic system consisting of a flux rope in a partially open bipolar field is subject to catastrophe, but not if the bipolar field is completely closed under the same specified photospheric conditions. In order to investigate the influence of the photospheric magnetic conditions on the catastrophic behavior of this system, we expand upon the 2.5-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic model in Cartesian coordinates to simulate the evolution of the equilibrium states of the system under different photospheric flux distributions. Our simulation results reveal that a catastrophe occurs only when the photospheric flux is not concentrated too much toward the polarity inversion line and the source regions of the bipolar field are not too weak; otherwise no catastrophe occurs. As a result, under certain photospheric conditions, a catastrophe could take place in a completely closed configuration, whereas it ceases to exist in a partially open configuration. This indicates that whether the background field is completely closed or partially open is not the only necessary condition for the existence of catastrophe, and that the photospheric conditions also play a crucial role in the catastrophic behavior of the flux rope system.

  17. Probing the Quiet Solar Atmosphere from the Photosphere to the Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontogiannis, Ioannis; Gontikakis, Costis; Tsiropoula, Georgia; Tziotziou, Kostas

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the morphology and temporal variability of a quiet-Sun network region in different solar layers. The emission in several extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral lines through both raster and slot time-series, recorded by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode spacecraft is studied along with Hα observations and high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of the photospheric magnetic field. The photospheric magnetic field is extrapolated up to the corona, showing a multitude of large- and small-scale structures. We show for the first time that the smallest magnetic structures at both the network and internetwork contribute significantly to the emission in EUV lines, with temperatures ranging from 8× 104 K to 6× 105 K. Two components of transition region emission are present, one associated with small-scale loops that do not reach coronal temperatures, and another component that acts as an interface between coronal and chromospheric plasma. Both components are associated with persistent chromospheric structures. The temporal variability of the EUV intensity at the network region is also associated with chromospheric motions, pointing to a connection between transition region and chromospheric features. Intensity enhancements in the EUV transition region lines are preferentially produced by Hα upflows. Examination of two individual chromospheric jets shows that their evolution is associated with intensity variations in transition region and coronal temperatures.

  18. Seething horizontal magnetic fields in the quiet solar photosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harvey, J.W.; Branston, D.; Henney, C.J.; Keller, C.U.

    2007-01-01

    The photospheric magnetic field outside of active regions and the network has a ubiquitous and dynamic lineof- sight component that strengthens from disk center to limb as expected for a nearly horizontal orientation. This component shows a striking time variation with an average temporal rms near

  19. The Solar Photospheric Nitrogen Abundance : Determination with 3D and 1D Model Atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maiorca, E.; Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.; Busso, M.; Faraggiana, R.; Steffen, M.; Ludwig, H. -G.; Kamp, I.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new determination of the solar nitrogen abundance making use of 3D hydrodynamical modelling of the solar photosphere, which is more physically motivated than traditional static 1D models. We selected suitable atomic spectral lines, relying on equivalent width measurements already

  20. Transient events in the solar photosphere at high spatial and temporal resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis showcases some of the diverse and abundant transient events seen in observed and simulated magnetic and velocity ?elds in the solar photosphere. This thesis emphasizes the use and understanding of inversion codes to infer the magnetic and velocity ?elds from

  1. Solar Imagery - Photosphere - Sunspot Drawings - McMath-Hulbert Observatory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The McMath-Hulbert Observatory is a decommissioned solar observatory in Lake Angelus, Michigan, USA. It was established in 1929 as a private observatory by father...

  2. GENERATION OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN LOW SOLAR ATMOSPHERIC FLUX TUBES BY PHOTOSPHERIC MOTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumford, S. J.; Fedun, V.; Erdélyi, R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent ground- and space-based observations reveal the presence of small-scale motions between convection cells in the solar photosphere. In these regions, small-scale magnetic flux tubes are generated via the interaction of granulation motion and the background magnetic field. This paper studies the effects of these motions on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave excitation from broadband photospheric drivers. Numerical experiments of linear MHD wave propagation in a magnetic flux tube embedded in a realistic gravitationally stratified solar atmosphere between the photosphere and the low choromosphere (above β = 1) are performed. Horizontal and vertical velocity field drivers mimic granular buffeting and solar global oscillations. A uniform torsional driver as well as Archimedean and logarithmic spiral drivers mimic observed torsional motions in the solar photosphere. The results are analyzed using a novel method for extracting the parallel, perpendicular, and azimuthal components of the perturbations, which caters to both the linear and non-linear cases. Employing this method yields the identification of the wave modes excited in the numerical simulations and enables a comparison of excited modes via velocity perturbations and wave energy flux. The wave energy flux distribution is calculated to enable the quantification of the relative strengths of excited modes. The torsional drivers primarily excite Alfvén modes (≈60% of the total flux) with small contributions from the slow kink mode, and, for the logarithmic spiral driver, small amounts of slow sausage mode. The horizontal and vertical drivers primarily excite slow kink or fast sausage modes, respectively, with small variations dependent upon flux surface radius

  3. Generation of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves in Low Solar Atmospheric Flux Tubes by Photospheric Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumford, S. J.; Fedun, V.; Erdélyi, R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent ground- and space-based observations reveal the presence of small-scale motions between convection cells in the solar photosphere. In these regions, small-scale magnetic flux tubes are generated via the interaction of granulation motion and the background magnetic field. This paper studies the effects of these motions on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave excitation from broadband photospheric drivers. Numerical experiments of linear MHD wave propagation in a magnetic flux tube embedded in a realistic gravitationally stratified solar atmosphere between the photosphere and the low choromosphere (above β = 1) are performed. Horizontal and vertical velocity field drivers mimic granular buffeting and solar global oscillations. A uniform torsional driver as well as Archimedean and logarithmic spiral drivers mimic observed torsional motions in the solar photosphere. The results are analyzed using a novel method for extracting the parallel, perpendicular, and azimuthal components of the perturbations, which caters to both the linear and non-linear cases. Employing this method yields the identification of the wave modes excited in the numerical simulations and enables a comparison of excited modes via velocity perturbations and wave energy flux. The wave energy flux distribution is calculated to enable the quantification of the relative strengths of excited modes. The torsional drivers primarily excite Alfvén modes (≈60% of the total flux) with small contributions from the slow kink mode, and, for the logarithmic spiral driver, small amounts of slow sausage mode. The horizontal and vertical drivers primarily excite slow kink or fast sausage modes, respectively, with small variations dependent upon flux surface radius.

  4. GENERATION OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN LOW SOLAR ATMOSPHERIC FLUX TUBES BY PHOTOSPHERIC MOTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mumford, S. J.; Fedun, V.; Erdélyi, R., E-mail: s.mumford@sheffield.ac.uk [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), School of Mathematics and Statistics, The University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH UK (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-20

    Recent ground- and space-based observations reveal the presence of small-scale motions between convection cells in the solar photosphere. In these regions, small-scale magnetic flux tubes are generated via the interaction of granulation motion and the background magnetic field. This paper studies the effects of these motions on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave excitation from broadband photospheric drivers. Numerical experiments of linear MHD wave propagation in a magnetic flux tube embedded in a realistic gravitationally stratified solar atmosphere between the photosphere and the low choromosphere (above β = 1) are performed. Horizontal and vertical velocity field drivers mimic granular buffeting and solar global oscillations. A uniform torsional driver as well as Archimedean and logarithmic spiral drivers mimic observed torsional motions in the solar photosphere. The results are analyzed using a novel method for extracting the parallel, perpendicular, and azimuthal components of the perturbations, which caters to both the linear and non-linear cases. Employing this method yields the identification of the wave modes excited in the numerical simulations and enables a comparison of excited modes via velocity perturbations and wave energy flux. The wave energy flux distribution is calculated to enable the quantification of the relative strengths of excited modes. The torsional drivers primarily excite Alfvén modes (≈60% of the total flux) with small contributions from the slow kink mode, and, for the logarithmic spiral driver, small amounts of slow sausage mode. The horizontal and vertical drivers primarily excite slow kink or fast sausage modes, respectively, with small variations dependent upon flux surface radius.

  5. Investigating The Reliability Of Solar Photospheric Eruptivity Proxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guennou, C.; Pariat, E.; Vilmer, N.

    2016-12-01

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are among the most energetic events in the solar system, impacting the near-Earth environment and thus our technologies. The European H2020 research project FLARECAST (Flare Likelihood and Region Eruption Forecasting) aims to develop a fully automated solar flare forecasting system with unmatched accuracy compared to existing facilities. FLARECAST will automatically extract magnetic-field parameters of solar active regions from solar magnetogram and white-light images to produce accurate predictions using the state-of-the-art forecasting techniques based on data-mining and machine learning. Flare productivity is empirically known to be correlated with the size and complexity of active regions. Several parameters, based on magnetic-field data from active regions have been tested in recent years. None of these parameters, or combination of thereof, have yet demonstrated an unambiguous eruption criterion. However, the predictability of these parameters has so far only been tested on observational data and never on controlled-cases, e.g., originating from numerical datasets. In the framework of the FLARECAST explorative research component, we use MHD numerical simulations of the formation of stable and unstable magnetic flux ropes (Leake et al. 2013, 2014) to evaluate the predictive potential of different magnetic parameters. Time series of magnetograms are used from parametric simulations of stable and unstable flux emergence, to compute a list of about 111 different parameters. This list includes parameters previously used for forecasting, as well as parameters used for the first time for this purpose. Our results indicate that only parameters measuring the total non-potentiality of active regions, such as Lssm and Lsgm and WLsg and the total length of the inversion line present significant preflare signatures, probably making them successful flare predictors.

  6. A STUDY OF SOLAR PHOTOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE GRADIENT VARIATION USING LIMB DARKENING MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criscuoli, Serena [National Solar Observatory, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Foukal, Peter [192 Willow Road, Nahant, MA 01908 (United States)

    2017-01-20

    The variation in area of quiet magnetic network measured over the sunspot cycle should modulate the spatially averaged photospheric temperature gradient, since temperature declines with optical depth more gradually in magnetic flux tube atmospheres. Yet, limb darkening measurements show no dependence upon activity level, even at an rms precision of 0.04%. We study the sensitivity of limb darkening to changes in area filling factor using a 3D MHD model of the magnetized photosphere. The limb darkening change expected from the measured 11-year area variation lies below the level of measured limb darkening variations, for a reasonable range of magnetic flux in quiet network and internetwork regions. So the remarkably constant limb darkening observed over the solar activity cycle is not inconsistent with the measured 11-year change in area of quiet magnetic network. Our findings offer an independent constraint on photospheric temperature gradient changes reported from measurements of the solar spectral irradiance from the Spectral Irradiance Monitor, and recently, from wavelength-differential spectrophotometry using the Solar Optical Telescope aboard the HINODE spacecraft.

  7. ARE INTERNETWORK MAGNETIC FIELDS IN THE SOLAR PHOTOSPHERE HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lites, B. W.; Rempel, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Borrero, J. M. [Kiepenheuer-Institut fr Sonnenphysik, Schneckstrasse 6 D-79110, Freiburg (Germany); Danilovic, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fr Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3 D-37077, Gttingen (Germany)

    2017-01-20

    Using many observations obtained during 2007 with the Spectro-Polarimeter of the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope , we explore the angular distribution of magnetic fields in the quiet internetwork regions of the solar photosphere. Our work follows from the insight of Stenflo, who examined only linear polarization signals in photospheric lines, thereby avoiding complications of the analysis arising from the differing responses to linear and circular polarization. We identify and isolate regions of a strong polarization signal that occupy only a few percent of the observed quiet Sun area yet contribute most to the net linear polarization signal. The center-to-limb variation of the orientation of linear polarization in these strong signal regions indicates that the associated magnetic fields have a dominant vertical orientation. In contrast, the great majority of the solar disk is occupied by much weaker linear polarization signals. The orientation of the linear polarization in these regions demonstrates that the field orientation is dominantly horizontal throughout the photosphere. We also apply our analysis to Stokes profiles synthesized from the numerical MHD simulations of Rempel as viewed at various oblique angles. The analysis of the synthetic data closely follows that of the observations, lending confidence to using the simulations as a guide for understanding the physical origins of the center-to-limb variation of linear polarization in the quiet Sun area.

  8. The photospheric solar oxygen project. I. Abundance analysis of atomic lines and influence of atmospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffau, E.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Steffen, M.; Ayres, T. R.; Bonifacio, P.; Cayrel, R.; Freytag, B.; Plez, B.

    2008-09-01

    Context: The solar oxygen abundance has undergone a major downward revision in the past decade, the most noticeable one being the update including 3D hydrodynamical simulations to model the solar photosphere. Up to now, such an analysis has only been carried out by one group using one radiation-hydrodynamics code. Aims: We investigate the photospheric oxygen abundance considering lines from atomic transitions. We also consider the relationship between the solar model used and the resulting solar oxygen abundance, to understand whether the downward abundance revision is specifically related to 3D hydrodynamical effects. Methods: We performed a new determination of the solar photospheric oxygen abundance by analysing different high-resolution high signal-to-noise ratio atlases of the solar flux and disc-centre intensity, making use of the latest generation of CO5BOLD 3D solar model atmospheres. Results: We find 8.73 ≤ log (N_O/N_H) +12 ≤ 8.79. The lower and upper values represent extreme assumptions on the role of collisional excitation and ionisation by neutral hydrogen for the NLTE level populations of neutral oxygen. The error of our analysis is ± (0.04± 0.03) dex, the last being related to NLTE corrections, the first error to any other effect. The 3D “granulation effects” do not play a decisive role in lowering the oxygen abundance. Conclusions: Our recommended value is log (N_O/N_H) = 8.76 ± 0.07, considering our present ignorance of the role of collisions with hydrogen atoms on the NLTE level populations of oxygen. The reasons for lower O abundances in the past are identified as (1) the lower equivalent widths adopted and (2) the choice of neglecting collisions with hydrogen atoms in the statistical equilibrium calculations for oxygen. This paper is dedicated to the memory of Hartmut Holweger.

  9. A Comparative Study of Magnetic Fields in the Solar Photosphere and Chromosphere at Equatorial and Polar Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, G. J. D.; Patrikeeva, I.

    2009-07-01

    Besides their own intrinsic interest, correct interpretation of solar surface magnetic field observations is crucial to our ability to describe the global magnetic structure of the solar atmosphere. Photospheric magnetograms are often used as lower boundary conditions in models of the corona, but not data from the nearly force-free chromosphere. National Solar Observatory's (NSO) Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun VSM (Vector Spectromagnetograph) produces full-disk line-of-sight magnetic flux images deriving from both photospheric and chromospheric layers on a daily basis. In this paper, we investigate key properties of the magnetic field in these two layers using more than five years of VSM data. We find from near-equatorial measurements that the east-west inclination angle of most photospheric fields is less than about 12°, while chromospheric fields expand in all directions to a significant degree. Using a simple stereoscopic inversion, we find evidence that photospheric polar fields are also nearly radial but that during 2008 the chromospheric field in the south pole was expanding superradially. We obtain a spatially resolved polar photospheric flux distribution up to 80° latitude whose strength increases poleward approximately as cosine(colatitude) to the power 9-10. This distribution would give a polar field strength of 5-6 G. We briefly discuss implications for future synoptic map construction and modeling.

  10. Signatures of the impact of flare-ejected plasma on the photosphere of a sunspot light bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felipe, T.; Collados, M.; Khomenko, E.; Rajaguru, S. P.; Franz, M.; Kuckein, C.; Asensio Ramos, A.

    2017-12-01

    Aims: We investigate the properties of a sunspot light bridge, focusing on the changes produced by the impact of a plasma blob ejected from a C-class flare. Methods: We observed a sunspot in active region NOAA 12544 using spectropolarimetric raster maps of the four Fe I lines around 15 655 Å with the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph, narrow-band intensity images sampling the Fe I 6173 Å line with the GREGOR Fabry-Pérot Interferometer, and intensity broad-band images in G-band and Ca II H-band with the High-resolution Fast Imager. All these instruments are located at the GREGOR telescope at the Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. The data cover the time before, during, and after the flare event. The analysis is complemented with Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The physical parameters of the atmosphere at differents heights were inferred using spectral-line inversion techniques. Results: We identify photospheric and chromospheric brightenings, heating events, and changes in the Stokes profiles associated with the flare eruption and the subsequent arrival of the plasma blob to the light bridge, after traveling along an active region loop. Conclusions: The measurements suggest that these phenomena are the result of reconnection events driven by the interaction of the plasma blob with the magnetic field topology of the light bridge. Movies attached to Figs. 1 and 3 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  11. Onset of 2D magnetic reconnection in the solar photosphere, chromosphere, and corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, B.; Botha, G. J. J.; McLaughlin, J. A.; Hillier, A.

    2018-01-01

    Aims: We aim to investigate the onset of 2D time-dependent magnetic reconnection that is triggered using an external (non-local) velocity driver located away from, and perpendicular to, an equilibrium Harris current sheet. Previous studies have typically utilised an internal trigger to initiate reconnection, for example initial conditions centred on the current sheet. Here, an external driver allows for a more naturalistic trigger as well as the study of the earlier stages of the reconnection start-up process. Methods: Numerical simulations solving the compressible, resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations were performed to investigate the reconnection onset within different atmospheric layers of the Sun, namely the corona, chromosphere and photosphere. Results: A reconnecting state is reached for all atmospheric heights considered, with the dominant physics being highly dependent on atmospheric conditions. The coronal case achieves a sharp rise in electric field (indicative of reconnection) for a range of velocity drivers. For the chromosphere, we find a larger velocity amplitude is required to trigger reconnection (compared to the corona). For the photospheric environment, the electric field is highly dependent on the inflow speed; a sharp increase in electric field is obtained only as the velocity entering the reconnection region approaches the Alfvén speed. Additionally, the role of ambipolar diffusion is investigated for the chromospheric case and we find that the ambipolar diffusion alters the structure of the current density in the inflow region. Conclusions: The rate at which flux enters the reconnection region is controlled by the inflow velocity. This determines all aspects of the reconnection start-up process, that is, the early onset of reconnection is dominated by the advection term in Ohm's law in all atmospheric layers. A lower plasma-β enhances reconnection and creates a large change in the electric field. A high plasma-β hinders the

  12. PHOTOSPHERIC FLOW FIELD RELATED TO THE EVOLUTION OF THE SUN'S POLAR MAGNETIC PATCHES OBSERVED BY HINODE SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaithakkal, Anjali John; Suematsu, Y.; Kubo, M. [Department of Astronomical Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Iida, Y.; Tsuneta, S. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Shiota, D., E-mail: anjali.johnk@nao.ac.jp [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the role of photospheric plasma motions in the formation and evolution of polar magnetic patches using time-sequence observations with high spatial resolution. The observations were obtained with the spectropolarimeter on board the Hinode satellite. From the statistical analysis using 75 magnetic patches, we found that they are surrounded by strong converging, supergranulation associated flows during their apparent lifetime and that the converging flow around the patch boundary is better observed in the Doppler velocity profile in the deeper photosphere. Based on our analysis, we suggest that the like-polarity magnetic fragments in the polar region are advected and clustered by photospheric converging flows, thereby resulting in the formation of polar magnetic patches. Our observations show that, in addition to direct cancellation, magnetic patches decay by fragmentation followed by unipolar disappearance or unipolar disappearance without fragmentation. It is possible that the magnetic patches of existing polarity fragment or diffuse away into smaller elements and eventually cancel out with opposite polarity fragments that reach the polar region around the solar cycle maximum. This could be one of the possible mechanisms by which the existing polarity decays during the reversal of the polar magnetic field.

  13. Solar system plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    1995-01-01

    An overview is given of spacecraft observations of plasma waves in the solar system. In situ measurements of plasma phenomena have now been obtained at all of the planets except Mercury and Pluto, and in the interplanetary medium at heliocentric radial distances ranging from 0.29 to 58 AU. To illustrate the range of phenomena involved, we discuss plasma waves in three regions of physical interest: (1) planetary radiation belts, (2) planetary auroral acceleration regions and (3) the solar wind. In each region we describe examples of plasma waves that are of some importance, either due to the role they play in determining the physical properties of the plasma, or to the unique mechanism involved in their generation.

  14. A Comparative Study of Magnetic Fields in the Solar Photosphere and Chromosphere at Low and Polar Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrikeeva, Irina; Petrie, G.

    2009-05-01

    The SOLIS Vector-Spectromagnetograph produces full-disk line-of-sight (LOS) magnetic flux images deriving from both photospheric and chromospheric layers on a daily basis. We investigate key properties of the magnetic field in these two layers using more than five years of VSM data. We find from near-equatorial measurements that the East-West inclination angle of most photospheric fields is about 12°, while chromospheric fields expand in all directions to a significant degree. Using a simple stereoscopic inversion we find evidence that photospheric polar fields are also nearly radial, but that during 2008 the chromospheric field in the south pole was expanding super-radially. We obtain a spatially-resolved polar photospheric flux distribution up to 80° latitude whose strength increases poleward approximately as cosine(colatitude) to the power 9-10. This distribution would give a polar field strength of 5-6 G. These results have implications for future synoptic map construction and global modeling. This work is carried out through the National Solar Observatory Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) site program, which is co-funded by the Department of Defense in partnership with the National Science Foundation REU Program.

  15. Plasma physical aspects of the solar cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raadu, M.A.

    1982-08-01

    Mass motions below the photosphere drive the solar cycle which is association with variations in the magnetic field structure and accompanying phenomena. In addition to semi-empirical models, dynamo theories have been used to explain the solar cycle. The emergence of magnetic field generated by these mechanisms and its expansions into the corona involves many plasma physical processes. Magnetic buoyancy aids the expulsion of magnetic flux. The corona may respond dynamically or by continually adjusting to a quasi-static force-free or pressure-balanced equilibrium. The formation and disruption of current sheets is significant for the overall structure of the coronal magnetic field and the physics of quiescent prominences. The corona has a fine structure consisting of magnetic loops. The structure and stability of these are important as they are one of the underlying elements which make up the corona. (Author)

  16. New gamma-ray spectrum from a quark-gluon plasma photosphere around an evaporating primordial black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, W P

    1999-01-01

    It has been shown that once the surface temperature of a primordial black hole (PBH) surpasses LAMBDA sub Q sub C sub D = 200 MeV, the quarks and the gluons emitted through Hawking radiation interact with one another via quantum chromodynamics (QCD) Bremsstrahlung and pair production. They form a nearly thermal quark-gluon plasma (QGP) photosphere, which subsequently expands outward. As a consequence, the quark and the gluons in the photosphere scatter and dramatically lose energy as they propagate away from the PBH. The emergent GAMMA-ray spectrum intensity from pi sup 0 -> 2 GAMMA, which occurs when the quarks and the gluons fragment into hadrons at the outer QGP photosphere, peaks at about E subGAMMA ? 100 MeV, but the intensity is higher than that of the previous published QCD calculation. Here, we calculate the spectrum of the GAMMA-rays which emerge directly from inside of the QGP photosphere and which are due to the quark-antiquark annihilation and the QCD compton processes. We find for T sub p sub b s...

  17. Properties of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves in the Solar Photosphere Obtained with Hinode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, D.; Tsuneta, S.

    2009-09-01

    We report the observations of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves propagating along magnetic flux tubes in the solar photosphere. We identified 20 isolated strong peaks (8 peaks for pores and 12 peaks for intergranular magnetic structure) in the power spectra of the line-of-sight (LOS) magnetic flux, the LOS velocity, and the intensity for 14 different magnetic concentrations. The observation is performed with the spectro-polarimeter of the Solar Optical Telescope aboard the Hinode satellite. The oscillation periods are located in 3-6 minutes for the pores and in 4-9 minutes for the intergranular magnetic elements. These peaks correspond to the magnetic, the velocity, and the intensity fluctuation in time domain with root-mean-square amplitudes of 4-17 G (0.3%-1.2%), 0.03-0.12 km s-1, and 0.1%-1%, respectively. Phase differences between the LOS magnetic flux (phi B ), the LOS velocity (phi v ), the intensities of the line core (phi I,core), and the continuum intensity (phi I,cont) have striking concentrations at around -90° for phi B - phi v and phi v - phi I,core, around 180° for phi I,core - phi B , and around 10° for phi I,core - phi I,cont. Here, for example, phi B - phi v ~ -90° means that the velocity leads the magnetic field by a quarter of cycle. The observed phase relation between the magnetic and the photometric intensity fluctuations would not be consistent with that caused by the opacity effect, if the magnetic field strength decreases with height along the oblique LOS. We suggest that the observed fluctuations are due to longitudinal (sausage-mode) and/or transverse (kink-mode) MHD waves. The observed phase relation between the fluctuations in the magnetic flux and the velocity is consistent with the superposition of the ascending wave and the descending wave reflected at chromosphere/corona boundary (standing wave). Even with such reflected waves, the residual upward Poynting flux is estimated to be 2.7 × 106 erg cm-2 s-1 for a case of the kink

  18. Large-scale horizontal flows in the solar photosphere. I. Method and tests on synthetic data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švanda, Michal; Klvaňa, Miroslav; Sobotka, Michal

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 458 (2006), s. 301-306 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003404; GA ČR GD205/03/H144; GA ČR GA205/04/2129 Grant - others:ESA(CZ) ESA-PECS 8030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : Sun * photosphere * data analysis Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.971, year: 2006

  19. An Early Diagnostics of the Geoeffectiveness of Solar Eruptions from Photospheric Magnetic Flux Observations: The Transition from SOHO to SDO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, I. M.; Grechnev, V. V.; Abunin, A. A.

    2017-04-01

    In our previous articles (Chertok et al. in Solar Phys. 282, 175, 2013; Chertok et al. in Solar Phys. 290, 627, 2015), we presented a preliminary tool for the early diagnostics of the geoeffectiveness of solar eruptions based on the estimate of the total unsigned line-of-sight photospheric magnetic flux in accompanying extreme ultraviolet (EUV) arcades and dimmings. This tool was based on the analysis of eruptions observed during 1996 - 2005 with the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) and the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Empirical relationships were obtained to estimate the probable importance of upcoming space weather disturbances caused by an eruption, which just occurred, without data on the associated coronal mass ejections. In particular, it was possible to estimate the intensity of a non-recurrent geomagnetic storm (GMS) and Forbush decrease (FD), as well as their onset and peak times. After 2010 - 2011, data on solar eruptions are obtained with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We use relatively short intervals of overlapping EIT-AIA and MDI-HMI detailed observations, and additionally, a number of large eruptions over the next five years with the 12-hour cadence EIT images to adapt the SOHO diagnostic tool to SDO data. We show that the adopted brightness thresholds select practically the same areas of arcades and dimmings from the EIT 195 Å and AIA 193 Å image, with a cross-calibration factor of 3.6 - 5.8 (5.0 - 8.2) for the AIA exposure time of 2.0 s (2.9 s). We also find that for the same photospheric areas, the MDI line-of-sight magnetic flux systematically exceeds the HMI flux by a factor of 1.4. Based on these results, the empirical diagnostic relationships obtained from SOHO data are adjusted to SDO instruments. Examples of a post-diagnostics based on SDO data are presented. As before, the

  20. Comparison of different populations of granular features in the solar photosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, M.; Puglisi, G.; Guglielmino, S. L.; Romano, P.; Ermolli, I.; Zuccarello, F.

    2017-09-01

    Context. The granulation is the most visible manifestation of convective motions occurring in the uppermost layers of the solar convection zone. Strong magnetic fields hinder these motions, but the appearance of bright structures such as umbral dots (UDs) and light bridges (LBs) in sunspots also shows that in strong magnetic field regions, the convection is not completely suppressed. Aims: We aim to investigate the properties of the granules identified by a new segmentation algorithm in regions characterized by different magnetic field strength, in order to improve the current knowledge of the mechanism behind the appearance of the different bright structures in sunspots. Methods: We analyzed data acquired by the CRisp Imaging SpectroPolarimeter at the Swedish Solar Telescope on 6 August 2011 relevant to a large sunspot with a LB observed in NOAA AR 11263. We applied a new segmentation algorithm to the data acquired along the Fe I 630.15 nm line. Results: We found that the granules in the LB have a diameter between 0.̋22 and 0.̋99, that is, smaller than the granules in a nearby plage region (PL) and similar to those of the UDs. We observed values of the mean continuum intensity between 0.42 Ic and 0.98 Ic for the LB granules, which are similar to those of the UDs. PL granules have higher values, probably reflecting different conditions of the plasma convection. Mean Doppler velocity and mean magnetic field strength have been studied and even for these physical parameters we found similar values between LB granules and UDs. Conclusions: Different values for the physical properties analyzed have been found between the granules of the PL and LB granules of the three analyzed solar regions. In particular, we show that the granules in PL and sunspot regions have different physical properties. This clearly depends on the different physical conditions of the regions where these two kind of granular structures are embedded. We also confirm the recent findings on the

  1. Investigation of Relationship between High-energy X-Ray Sources and Photospheric and Helioseismic Impacts of X1.8 Solar Flare of 2012 October 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharykin, I. N.; Zimovets, I. V. [Space Research Institute (IKI) of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kosovichev, A. G.; Sadykov, V. M. [New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ (United States); Myshyakov, I. I., E-mail: ivan.sharykin@phystech.edu [Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Research (ISTP) of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Irkutsk (Russian Federation)

    2017-07-01

    The X-class solar flare of 2012 October 23 generated continuum photospheric emission and a strong helioseismic wave (“sunquake”) that points to an intensive energy release in the dense part of the solar atmosphere. We study properties of the energy release with high temporal and spatial resolutions, using photospheric data from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board Solar Dynamics Observatory , and hard X-ray observations made by RHESSI . For this analysis we use level-1 HMI data (filtergrams), obtained by scanning the Fe i line (6731 Å) with the time cadence of ∼3.6 s and spatial resolution of ∼0.″5 per pixel. It is found that the photospheric disturbances caused by the flare spatially coincide with the region of hard X-ray emission but are delayed by ≲4 s. This delay is consistent with predictions of the flare hydrodynamics RADYN models. However, the models fail to explain the magnitude of variations observed by the HMI. The data indicate that the photospheric impact and helioseismic wave might be caused by the electron energy flux, which is substantially higher than that in the current flare radiative hydrodynamic models.

  2. CONTINUUM INTENSITY AND [O i] SPECTRAL LINE PROFILES IN SOLAR 3D PHOTOSPHERIC MODELS: THE EFFECT OF MAGNETIC FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbian, D.; Moreno-Insertis, F., E-mail: damian@iac.es, E-mail: fmi@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-04-01

    The importance of magnetic fields in three-dimensional (3D) magnetoconvection models of the Sun’s photosphere is investigated in terms of their influence on the continuum intensity at different viewing inclination angles and on the intensity profile of two [O i] spectral lines. We use the RH numerical radiative transfer code to perform a posteriori spectral synthesis on the same time series of magnetoconvection models used in our publications on the effect of magnetic fields on abundance determination. We obtain a good match of the synthetic disk-center continuum intensity to the absolute continuum values from the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) observational spectrum; the match of the center-to-limb variation synthetic data to observations is also good, thanks, in part, to the 3D radiation transfer capabilities of the RH code. The different levels of magnetic flux in the numerical time series do not modify the quality of the match. Concerning the targeted [O i] spectral lines, we find, instead, that magnetic fields lead to nonnegligible changes in the synthetic spectrum, with larger average magnetic flux causing both of the lines to become noticeably weaker. The photospheric oxygen abundance that one would derive if instead using nonmagnetic numerical models would thus be lower by a few to several centidex. The inclusion of magnetic fields is confirmed to be important for improving the current modeling of the Sun, here in particular in terms of spectral line formation and of deriving consistent chemical abundances. These results may shed further light on the still controversial issue regarding the precise value of the solar oxygen abundance.

  3. Relationship between Hard X-Ray Footpoint Sources and Photospheric Electric Currents in Solar Flares: a Statistical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimovets, I. V.; Sharykin, I. N.; Wang, R.; Liu, Y. D.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2017-12-01

    It is believed that solar flares are a result of release of free magnetic energy contained in electric currents (ECs) flowing in active regions (ARs). However, there are still debates whether the primary energy release and acceleration of electrons take place in coronal current sheets or in chromospheric footpoints of current-carrying magnetic flux tubes (loops). We present results of an observational statistical study of spatial relationship between hard X-ray (HXR; EHXR≥50keV) footpoint sources detected by RHESSI and vertical photospheric ECs calculated using vector magnetograms obtained from the SDO/HMI data. We found that for a sample of 47 flares (from C3.0 to X3.1 class) observed on the solar disk by both instruments in 2010-2016, at least one HXR source was in a region of strong (within 20% of the maximum EC density in the corresponding ARs) vertical ECs having the form of a ribbon (79%) or an island (21%). The total vertical ECs in such HXR sources are in the range of 1010-1013 A. The EC density is in the range of 0.01-1.0 A/m2. We found no correlation between intensity of the HXR sources and the EC density. By comparing pre-flare and post-flare EC maps we did not find evidences of significant dissipation of vertical ECs in the regions corresponding to the HXR sources. In some cases, we found amplification of ECs during flares. We discuss effects of sensitivity and angular resolution of RHESSI and SDO/HMI. In general, the results indicate that there is a link between the flare HXR footpoint sources and enhanced vertical ECs in the photosphere. However, the results do not support a concept of electron acceleration by the electric field excited in footpoints of current-carrying loops due to some (e.g. Rayleigh-Taylor) instabilities (Zaitsev et al., 2016), since strong correlation between the HXR intensity and the EC density is expected in such concept.

  4. Magnetic reconnection in magnetotail and solar plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaogang.

    1991-01-01

    The formation of current sheets which dominates the heating of the solar corona and the onset of substorms due to collisionless tearing instability in the magnetotail are investigated in the context of magnetic field line reconnection in space plasmas. In Chapters 2 and 3 of this thesis, the collisionless tearing instability and current disruption of the magnetotail are considered. The linear collisionless tearing instability, with wavelengths of the order of 10 R E , and with a growth rate γ ∼ 10 -2 /sec, is identified as a possible mechanism for the growth phase of a substorm. The linear analysis is carried out in the presence of an equilibrium B y -field, neglected in other theories. The nonlinear theory of collisionless tearing mode is dominated by mode coupling effects. From the evolution equations for electro-magnetic field perturbations, the author derived a nonlinear growth rate by generalizing the boundary layer techniques of linear theory. He finds that the nonlinear growth is of the order of 1 sec, much faster than the linear growth. It is proposed that collisionless tearing modes provide a mechanism for current disruption observed by spacecrafts. The electrical field generated during the nonlinear evolution can cause particle acceleration in the earth-tail direction. His estimates indicate ion energies up to 0.7 MeV and electron energies up to 8.1 MeV, which is not inconsistent with the observations. In the Chapter 4 it is shown that current sheets can be formed in Parker's model of the solar corona in the presence of smooth photospheric flows, despite van Ballegooijen and Field's proof that in an ideal plasma current sheets doe not occur unless the boundary velocity field is discontinuous

  5. Acoustic and Slow Sausage Oscillations in the Stratified Solar Photosphere: Hinode Observations and Phase Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsap, Y. T.; Stepanov, A. V.; Kopylova, Y. G.

    2016-11-01

    Based on the linearized magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations within the framework of the thin flux tube approximation, the phase relationships between the disturbed quantities of evanescent acoustic and slow sausage MHD modes excited in the adiabatically stratified solar atmosphere are considered. It has been shown that the sign of the phase differences (equal to ±π/2) between the velocity and other disturbed quantities such as pressure, density, magnetic field, and temperature, depends on the wave frequency ω. The obtained phase relationships agree well with SOT/ Hinode observations obtained by Fujimura and Tsuneta ( Astrophys. J. 702, 1443, 2009) when ω≈ωc, where ωc is the cutoff frequency. The role of various modes excited in the solar atmosphere in the light of the chromospheric and coronal heating problems are discussed.

  6. Tracking Photospheric Energy Transport in Active Regions with SDO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attié, R.; Thompson, B. J.

    2017-12-01

    The solar photosphere presents flow fields at all observable scales. Where energy-bearing magnetic active regions break through the photosphere these flows are particularly strong, as sheared and twisted magnetic fields come into equilibrium with their surroundings while transporting magnetic energy into the corona. A part of this magnetic energy - the so-called `free energy' stored in the magnetic field in the form of "twisted" and shear of the field - is released in flares and eruptions. We can quantify the energy arrival and build-up in the corona by tracking flow fields and magnetic features at the photosphere as magnetic flux emerges and evolves before and after a flare or eruption.To do this reliably requires two things: a long series of photospheric observations at high sensitivity, spatial and temporal resolution, and an efficient, reliable and robust framework that tracks the photospheric plasma flows and magnetic evolution in both the quiet sun and active regions. SDO/HMI provides the observations, and we present here an innovative high resolution tracking framework that involves the `Balltracking' and `Magnetic Balltracking' algorithms. We show the first results of a systematic, quantitative and comprehensive measurements of the flows and transport of magnetic energy into the solar atmosphere and investigate whether this dynamic view can improve predictions of flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs).

  7. Solar Tornado Prominences: Plasma Motions Along Filament Barbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasenco, Olga; Velli, Marco; Martin, Sara F.; Rappazzo, Franco

    2013-03-01

    Recent high-resolution observations from the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) have reawakened interest in the old and fascinating phenomenon of solar tornado prominences. This class of prominences was first introduced by E. Pettit in 1932, who studied them over many years up to 1950. High resolution and high cadence multi-wavelength data obtained by SDO reveal that the tornado-like properties of these prominences are mainly an illusion due to projection effects. We show that counterstreaming plasma motions with projected velocities up to +/- 45 km/sec along the prominence spine and barbs create a tornado-like impression when viewed at the limb. We demonstrate that barbs are often rooted at the intersection between 4-5 supergranular cells. We discuss the observed oscillations along the vertical parts of barbs and whether they may be related to vortex flows coming from the convection downdrafts at the intersection of supergranules (and possibly smaller convective cells) in the photosphere and their entrained magnetic field. The unwinding of magnetic threads near the photosphere via reconnection might be a source of the waves which are observed as oscillations in prominence barbs.

  8. Nonlinear Force-free Field Extrapolation of a Coronal Magnetic Flux Rope Supporting a Large-scale Solar Filament from a Photospheric Vector Magnetogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chaowei; Wu, S. T.; Feng, Xueshang; Hu, Qiang

    2014-05-01

    Solar filaments are commonly thought to be supported in magnetic dips, in particular, in those of magnetic flux ropes (FRs). In this Letter, based on the observed photospheric vector magnetogram, we implement a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation of a coronal magnetic FR that supports a large-scale intermediate filament between an active region and a weak polarity region. This result is a first, in the sense that current NLFFF extrapolations including the presence of FRs are limited to relatively small-scale filaments that are close to sunspots and along main polarity inversion lines (PILs) with strong transverse field and magnetic shear, and the existence of an FR is usually predictable. In contrast, the present filament lies along the weak-field region (photospheric field strength barbs very well, which strongly supports the FR-dip model for filaments. The filament is stably sustained because the FR is weakly twisted and strongly confined by the overlying closed arcades.

  9. THE EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELD MORPHOLOGY ON THE DETERMINATION OF OXYGEN AND IRON ABUNDANCES IN THE SOLAR PHOTOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Christopher S. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Uitenbroek, Han; Criscuoli, Serena [National Solar Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Rempel, Matthias [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Rast, Mark P., E-mail: mark.rast@lasp.colorado.edu [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We have explored the impact of magnetic fields on the determination of the solar photospheric oxygen and iron abundances using three-dimensional radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of convection. Specifically, we examined differences in abundance deduced from three classes of atmospheres simulated with the MURaM code: a pure hydrodynamic (HD) simulation, an MHD simulation with a local dynamo magnetic field that has saturated with an unsigned vertical field strength of 80 G at τ = 1, and an MHD simulation with an initially imposed vertical mean field of 80 G. We use differential equivalent width analysis for diagnosing abundances derived from five oxygen and four iron lines of differing wavelength, oscillator strength, excitation potential, and Landé g-factor, and find that the morphology of the magnetic field is important to the outcome of abundance determinations. The largest deduced abundance differences are found in the vertical mean field simulations, where the O I and Fe I abundance corrections compared to the pure HD case are ∼+0.011 dex and +0.065 dex respectively. Small scale unresolved field resulting from the local dynamo has a smaller impact on abundance determinations, with corrections of –0.0001 dex and +0.0044 dex in the magnetized compared to the pure HD simulations. While the overall influence of magnetic field on abundance estimates is found to be small, we stress that such estimates are sensitive not only to the magnitude of magnetic field but also to its morphology.

  10. Large-scale horizontal flows in the solar photosphere. II. Long-term behaviour and magnetic activity response

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švanda, Michal; Klvaňa, Miroslav; Sobotka, Michal; Bumba, Václav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 477, č. 1 (2008), s. 285-292 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD205/03/H144; GA AV ČR IAA3003404 Grant - others:ESA(XE) ESA-PECS project no. 98030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : Sun * photosphere * magnetic fields Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.153, year: 2008

  11. NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD EXTRAPOLATION OF A CORONAL MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE SUPPORTING A LARGE-SCALE SOLAR FILAMENT FROM A PHOTOSPHERIC VECTOR MAGNETOGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Chaowei; Wu, S. T.; Hu, Qiang [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Feng, Xueshang, E-mail: cwjiang@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: wus@uah.edu, E-mail: qh0001@uah.edu, E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory for Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-05-10

    Solar filaments are commonly thought to be supported in magnetic dips, in particular, in those of magnetic flux ropes (FRs). In this Letter, based on the observed photospheric vector magnetogram, we implement a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation of a coronal magnetic FR that supports a large-scale intermediate filament between an active region and a weak polarity region. This result is a first, in the sense that current NLFFF extrapolations including the presence of FRs are limited to relatively small-scale filaments that are close to sunspots and along main polarity inversion lines (PILs) with strong transverse field and magnetic shear, and the existence of an FR is usually predictable. In contrast, the present filament lies along the weak-field region (photospheric field strength ≲ 100 G), where the PIL is very fragmented due to small parasitic polarities on both sides of the PIL and the transverse field has a low signal-to-noise ratio. Thus, extrapolating a large-scale FR in such a case represents a far more difficult challenge. We demonstrate that our CESE-MHD-NLFFF code is sufficient for the challenge. The numerically reproduced magnetic dips of the extrapolated FR match observations of the filament and its barbs very well, which strongly supports the FR-dip model for filaments. The filament is stably sustained because the FR is weakly twisted and strongly confined by the overlying closed arcades.

  12. Plasma physics in the solar system

    CERN Document Server

    Wibberenz, G

    1991-01-01

    The lecture series will start with some fundamental principles of cosmic physics. The main topics will deal with the sun, the interplanetary plasma, planetary magnetospheres, and energetic particles in the solar system. This includes the role of the sun in forming the heliosphere; manifestations of solar activity and the solar cycle, from large scale structures of the interplanetary medium to climatic changes; formation of the planetary magnetospheres by interactions between the solar wind and planetary magnetic fields; the diversities of charged particle acceleration, in particular the role of collisionless shocks in the solar system. Some specific space projects exploring the heliosphere will be presented.

  13. Nonlinear waves in solar plasmas - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballai, I

    2006-01-01

    Nonlinearity is a direct consequence of large scale dynamics in the solar plasmas. When nonlinear steepening of waves is balanced by dispersion, solitary waves are generated. In the vicinity of resonances, waves can steepen into nonlinear waves influencing the efficiency of energy deposition. Here we review recent theoretical breakthroughs that have lead to a greater understanding of many aspects of nonlinear waves arising in homogeneous and inhomogeneous solar plasmas

  14. Theory and Simulations of Solar System Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2011-01-01

    "Theory and simulations of solar system plasmas" aims to highlight results from microscopic to global scales, achieved by theoretical investigations and numerical simulations of the plasma dynamics in the solar system. The theoretical approach must allow evidencing the universality of the phenomena being considered, whatever the region is where their role is studied; at the Sun, in the solar corona, in the interplanetary space or in planetary magnetospheres. All possible theoretical issues concerning plasma dynamics are welcome, especially those using numerical models and simulations, since these tools are mandatory whenever analytical treatments fail, in particular when complex nonlinear phenomena are at work. Comparative studies for ongoing missions like Cassini, Cluster, Demeter, Stereo, Wind, SDO, Hinode, as well as those preparing future missions and proposals, like, e.g., MMS and Solar Orbiter, are especially encouraged.

  15. PHOTOSPHERIC ABUNDANCES OF POLAR JETS ON THE SUN OBSERVED BY HINODE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung-Sun [Hinode Team, ISAS/JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Brooks, David H. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Imada, Shinsuke, E-mail: lksun@solar.isas.jaxa.jp [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL), Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan)

    2015-08-20

    Many jets are detected at X-ray wavelengths in the Sun's polar regions, and the ejected plasma along the jets has been suggested to contribute mass to the fast solar wind. From in situ measurements in the magnetosphere, it has been found that the fast solar wind has photospheric abundances while the slow solar wind has coronal abundances. Therefore, we investigated the abundances of polar jets to determine whether they are the same as that of the fast solar wind. For this study, we selected 22 jets in the polar region observed by Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectroscopy (EIS) and X-ray Telescope (XRT) simultaneously on 2007 November 1–3. We calculated the First Ionization Potential (FIP) bias factor from the ratio of the intensity between high (S) and low (Si, Fe) FIP elements using the EIS spectra. The values of the FIP bias factors for the polar jets are around 0.7–1.9, and 75% of the values are in the range of 0.7–1.5, which indicates that they have photospheric abundances similar to the fast solar wind. The results are consistent with the reconnection jet model where photospheric plasma emerges and is rapidly ejected into the fast wind.

  16. Studies of Isolated and Non-isolated Photospheric Bright Points in an Active Region Observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanxiao; Xiang, Yongyuan; Erdélyi, Robertus; Liu, Zhong; Li, Dong; Ning, Zongjun; Bi, Yi; Wu, Ning; Lin, Jun

    2018-03-01

    Properties of photospheric bright points (BPs) near an active region have been studied in TiO λ 7058 Å images observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope of the Yunnan Observatories. We developed a novel recognition method that was used to identify and track 2010 BPs. The observed evolving BPs are classified into isolated (individual) and non-isolated (where multiple BPs are observed to display splitting and merging behaviors) sets. About 35.1% of BPs are non-isolated. For both isolated and non-isolated BPs, the brightness varies from 0.8 to 1.3 times the average background intensity and follows a Gaussian distribution. The lifetimes of BPs follow a log-normal distribution, with characteristic lifetimes of (267 ± 140) s and (421 ± 255) s, respectively. Their size also follows log-normal distribution, with an average size of about (2.15 ± 0.74) × 104 km2 and (3.00 ± 1.31) × 104 km2 for area, and (163 ± 27) km and (191 ± 40) km for diameter, respectively. Our results indicate that regions with strong background magnetic field have higher BP number density and higher BP area coverage than regions with weak background field. Apparently, the brightness/size of BPs does not depend on the background field. Lifetimes in regions with strong background magnetic field are shorter than those in regions with weak background field, on average.

  17. The Origin of Solar Filament Plasma Inferred from In Situ Observations of Elemental Abundances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, H. Q.; Chen, Y.; Li, B. [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, and Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai, Shandong 264209 (China); Li, L. P. [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhao, L. [Department of Climate and Space sciences and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48105 (United States); He, J. S.; Duan, D. [School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Cheng, X. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093 (China); Zhang, J., E-mail: hqsong@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2017-02-10

    Solar filaments/prominences are one of the most common features in the corona, which may lead to energetic coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and flares when they erupt. Filaments are about 100 times cooler and denser than the coronal material, and physical understanding of their material origin remains controversial. Two types of scenarios have been proposed: one argues that the filament plasma is brought into the corona from photosphere or chromosphere through a siphon or evaporation/injection process, while the other suggests that the material condenses from the surrounding coronal plasma due to thermal instability. The elemental abundance analysis is a reasonable clue to constrain the models, as the siphon or evaporation/injection model would predict that the filament material abundances are close to the photospheric or chromospheric ones, while the condensation model should have coronal abundances. In this Letter, we analyze the elemental abundances of a magnetic cloud that contains the ejected filament material. The corresponding filament eruption occurred on 1998 April 29, accompanying an M6.8 class soft X-ray flare located at the heliographic coordinates S18E20 (NOAA 08210) and a fast halo CME with the linear velocity of 1374 km s{sup −1} near the Sun. We find that the abundance ratios of elements with low and high first ionization potential such as Fe/O, Mg/O, and Si/O are 0.150, 0.050, and 0.070, respectively, approaching their corresponding photospheric values 0.065, 0.081, and 0.066, which does not support the coronal origin of the filament plasma.

  18. Correlation of Coronal Plasma Properties and Solar Magnetic Field in a Decaying Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Young, Peter R.; Muglach, Karin; Warren, Harry P.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    We present the analysis of a decaying active region observed by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode during 2009 December 7-11. We investigated the temporal evolution of its structure exhibited by plasma at temperatures from 300,000 to 2.8 million degrees, and derived the electron density, differential emission measure, effective electron temperature, and elemental abundance ratios of Si/S and Fe/S (as a measure of the First Ionization Potential (FIP) Effect). We compared these coronal properties to the temporal evolution of the photospheric magnetic field strength obtained from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory Michelson Doppler Imager magnetograms. We find that, while these coronal properties all decreased with time during this decay phase, the largest change was at plasma above 1.5 million degrees. The photospheric magnetic field strength also decreased with time but mainly for field strengths lower than about 70 Gauss. The effective electron temperature and the FIP bias seem to reach a basal state (at 1.5 x 10(exp 6) K and 1.5, respectively) into the quiet Sun when the mean photospheric magnetic field (excluding all areas <10 G) weakened to below 35 G, while the electron density continued to decrease with the weakening field. These physical properties are all positively correlated with each other and the correlation is the strongest in the high-temperature plasma. Such correlation properties should be considered in the quest for our understanding of how the corona is heated. The variations in the elemental abundance should especially be considered together with the electron temperature and density.

  19. Shock heating of the solar wind plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whang, Y. C.; Liu, Shaoliang; Burlaga, L. F.

    1990-01-01

    The role played by shocks in heating solar-wind plasma is investigated using data on 413 shocks which were identified from the plasma and magnetic-field data collected between 1973 and 1982 by Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft. It is found that the average shock strength increased with the heliocentric distance outside 1 AU, reaching a maximum near 5 AU, after which the shock strength decreased with the distance; the entropy of the solar wind protons also reached a maximum at 5 AU. An MHD simulation model in which shock heating is the only heating mechanism available was used to calculate the entropy changes for the November 1977 event. The calculated entropy agreed well with the value calculated from observational data, suggesting that shocks are chiefly responsible for heating solar wind plasma between 1 and 15 AU.

  20. A Model for Straight and Helical Solar Jets: II. Parametric Study of the Plasma Beta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariat, E.; Dalmasse, K.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.; Karpen, J. T.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Jets are dynamic, impulsive, well-collimated plasma events that develop at many different scales and in different layers of the solar atmosphere. Aims. Jets are believed to be induced by magnetic reconnection, a process central to many astrophysical phenomena. Within the solar atmosphere, jet-like events develop in many different environments, e.g. in the vicinity of active regions as well as in coronal holes, and at various scales, from small photospheric spicules to large coronal jets. In all these events, signatures of helical structure and/or twisting/rotating motions are regularly observed. The present study aims to establish that a single model can generally reproduce the observed properties of these jet-like events. Methods. In this study, using our state-of-the-art numerical solver ARMS, we present a parametric study of a numerical tridimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of solar jet-like events. Within the MHD paradigm, we study the impact of varying the atmospheric plasma beta on the generation and properties of solar-like jets. Results. The parametric study validates our model of jets for plasma beta ranging from 10(sup 3) to 1, typical of the different layers and magnetic environments of the solar atmosphere. Our model of jets can robustly explain the generation of helical solar jet-like events at various beta less than or equal to 1. We show that the plasma beta modifies the morphology of the helical jet, explaining the different observed shapes of jets at different scales and in different layers of the solar atmosphere. Conclusions. Our results allow us to understand the energisation, triggering, and driving processes of jet-like events. Our model allows us to make predictions of the impulsiveness and energetics of jets as determined by the surrounding environment, as well as the morphological properties of the resulting jets.

  1. Comparison of physical properties of quiet and active regions through the analysis of magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar photosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criscuoli, S. [National Solar Observatory, Sacramento Peak, P.O. Box 62, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States)

    2013-11-20

    Recent observations have shown that the photometric and dynamic properties of granulation and small-scale magnetic features depend on the amount of magnetic flux of the region they are embedded in. We analyze results from numerical hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations characterized by different amounts of average magnetic flux and find qualitatively the same differences as those reported from observations. We show that these different physical properties result from the inhibition of convection induced by the presence of the magnetic field, which changes the temperature stratification of both quiet and magnetic regions. Our results are relevant for solar irradiance variations studies, as such differences are still not properly taken into account in irradiance reconstruction models.

  2. Solar Flare Magnetic Fields and Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, George

    2012-01-01

    This volume is devoted to the dynamics and diagnostics of solar magnetic fields and plasmas in the Sun’s atmosphere. Five broad areas of current research in Solar Physics are presented: (1) New techniques for incorporating radiation transfer effects into three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic models of the solar interior and atmosphere, (2) The connection between observed radiation processes occurring during flares and the underlying flare energy release and transport mechanisms, (3) The global balance of forces and momenta that occur during flares, (4) The data-analysis and theoretical tools needed to understand and assimilate vector magnetogram observations and (5) Connecting flare and CME phenomena to the topological properties of the magnetic field in the Solar Atmosphere. The role of the Sun’s magnetic field is a major emphasis of this book, which was inspired by a workshop honoring Richard C. (Dick) Canfield.  Dick has been making profound contributions to these areas of research over a long and pro...

  3. "SOLAR MAGNETIZED ""TORNADOES:"" RELATION TO FILAMENTS"

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Yang; Wang, Tongjiang; Veronig, Astrid; Temmer, Manuela; Gan, Weiqun

    2012-01-01

    Solar magnetized "tornadoes", a phenomenon discovered in the solar atmosphere, appear as tornado-like structures in the corona but root in the photosphere. Like other solar phenomena, solar tornadoes are a feature of magnetized plasma and therefore differ distinctly from terrestrial tornadoes. Here we report the first analysis of solar "tornadoes" {Two papers which focused on different aspect of solar tornadoes were published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters (Li et al. 2012) and Nature (W...

  4. Detection of nanoflare-heated plasma in the solar corona by the FOXSI-2 sounding rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Säm; Christe, Steven; Buitrago-Casas, Juan Camilo; Narukage, Noriyuki; Vievering, Juliana

    2017-11-01

    The processes that heat the solar and stellar coronae to several million kelvins, compared with the much cooler photosphere (5,800 K for the Sun), are still not well known1. One proposed mechanism is heating via a large number of small, unresolved, impulsive heating events called nanoflares2. Each event would heat and cool quickly, and the average effect would be a broad range of temperatures including a small amount of extremely hot plasma. However, detecting these faint, hot traces in the presence of brighter, cooler emission is observationally challenging. Here we present hard X-ray data from the second flight of the Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI-2), which detected emission above 7 keV from an active region of the Sun with no obvious individual X-ray flare emission. Through differential emission measure computations, we ascribe this emission to plasma heated above 10 MK, providing evidence for the existence of solar nanoflares. The quantitative evaluation of the hot plasma strongly constrains the coronal heating models.

  5. Temporal Changes of the Photospheric Velocity Fields

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klvaňa, Miroslav; Švanda, Michal; Bumba, Václav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 1 (2005), s. 89-98 ISSN 0351-2657. [Hvar astrophysical colloquium /7./: Solar activity cycle and global phenomena. Hvar, 20.09.2004-24.09.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/04/2129 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : Solar photosphere * velocity fields * tidal waves Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  6. Electric conductivity of plasma in solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertkov, A. D.

    1995-01-01

    One of the most important parameters in MHD description of the solar wind is the electric conductivity of plasma. There exist now two quite different approaches to the evaluation of this parameter. In the first one a value of conductivity taken from the most elaborated current theory of plasma should be used in calculations. The second one deals with the empirical, phenomenological value of conductivity. E.g.: configuration of interplanetary magnetic field, stretched by the expanding corona, depends on the magnitude of electrical conductivity of plasma in the solar wind. Knowing the main empirical features of the field configuration, one may estimate the apparent phenomenological value of resistance. The estimations show that the electrical conductivity should be approximately 10(exp 13) times smaller than that calculated by Spitzer. It must be noted that the empirical value should be treated with caution. Due to the method of its obtaining it may be used only for 'large-scale' description of slow processes like coronal expansion. It cannot be valid for 'quick' processes, changing the state of plasma, like collisions with obstacles, e.g., planets and vehicles. The second approach is well known in large-scale planetary hydrodynamics, stemming from the ideas of phenomenological thermodynamics. It could formulate real problems which should be solved by modern plasma physics, oriented to be adequate for complicated processes in space.

  7. INJECTION OF PLASMA INTO THE NASCENT SOLAR WIND VIA RECONNECTION DRIVEN BY SUPERGRANULAR ADVECTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Liping; He Jiansen; Tu Chuanyi; Chen Wenlei; Zhang Lei; Wang Linghua; Yan Limei; Peter, Hardi; Marsch, Eckart; Feng, Xueshang

    2013-01-01

    To understand the origin of the solar wind is one of the key research topics in modern solar and heliospheric physics. Previous solar wind models assumed that plasma flows outward along a steady magnetic flux tube that reaches continuously from the photosphere through the chromosphere into the corona. Inspired by more recent comprehensive observations, Tu et al. suggested a new scenario for the origin of the solar wind, in which it flows out in a magnetically open coronal funnel and mass is provided to the funnel by small-scale side loops. Thus mass is supplied by means of magnetic reconnection that is driven by supergranular convection. To validate this scenario and simulate the processes involved, a 2.5 dimensional (2.5D) numerical MHD model is established in the present paper. In our simulation a closed loop moves toward an open funnel, which has opposite polarity and is located at the edge of a supergranulation cell, and magnetic reconnection is triggered and continues while gradually opening up one half of the closed loop. Its other half connects with the root of the open funnel and forms a new closed loop which is submerged by a reconnection plasma stream flowing downward. Thus we find that the outflowing plasma in the newly reconnected funnel originates not only from the upward reconnection flow but also from the high-pressure leg of the originally closed loop. This implies an efficient supply of mass from the dense loop to the dilute funnel. The mass flux of the outflow released from the funnel considered in our study is calculated to be appropriate for providing the mass flux at the coronal base of the solar wind, though additional heating and acceleration mechanisms are necessary to keep the velocity at the higher location. Our numerical model demonstrates that in the funnel the mass for the solar wind may be supplied from adjacent closed loops via magnetic reconnection as well as directly from the footpoints of open funnels.

  8. SPDE: Solar Plasma Diagnostic Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Marilyn E.

    1995-01-01

    The physics of the Solar corona is studied through the use of high resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy and high resolution ultraviolet imagery. The investigation includes the development and application of a flight instrument, first flown in May, 1992 on NASA sounding rocket 36.048. A second flight, NASA founding rocket 36.123, took place on 25 April 1994. Both flights were successful in recording new observations relevant to the investigation. The effort in this contract covers completion of the modifications to the existing rocket payload, its reflight, and the preliminary day reduction and analysis. Experience gained from flight 36.048 led us to plan several payload design modifications. These were made to improve the sensitivity balance between the UV and EUV spectrographs, to improve the scattered light rejection in the spectrographs, to protect the visible light rejection filter for the Normal Incidence X-ray Imager instrument (NIXI), and to prepare one new multilayer mirror coating to the NIXI. We also investigated the addition of a brassboard CCD camera to the payload to test it as a possible replacement for the Eastman type 101-07 film used by the SPDE instruments. This camera was included in the experimeter's data package for the Project Initiation Conference for the flight of NASA Mission 36.123, held in January, 1994, but for programmatic reasons was deleted from the final payload configuration. The payload was shipped to the White Sands Missile Range on schedule in early April. The launch and successful recovery took place on 25 April, in coordination with the Yohkoh satellite and a supporting ground-based observing campaign.

  9. Plasma sources of solar system magnetospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Blanc, Michel; Chappell, Charles; Krupp, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    This volume reviews what we know of the corresponding plasma source for each intrinsically magnetized planet. Plasma sources fall essentially in three categories: the solar wind, the ionosphere (both prevalent on Earth), and the satellite-related sources. Throughout the text, the case of each planet is described, including the characteristics, chemical composition and intensity of each source. The authors also describe how the plasma generated at the source regions is transported to populate the magnetosphere, and how it is later lost. To summarize, the dominant sources are found to be the solar wind and sputtered surface ions at Mercury, the solar wind and ionosphere at Earth (the relative importance of the two being discussed in a specific introductory chapter), Io at Jupiter and – a big surprise of the Cassini findings – Enceladus at Saturn. The situation for Uranus and Neptune, which were investigated by only one fly-by each, is still open and requires further studies and exploration. In the final cha...

  10. Solar terrestrial coupling through space plasma processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birn, J.

    2000-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project investigates plasma processes that govern the interaction between the solar wind, charged particles ejected from the sun, and the earth's magnetosphere, the region above the ionosphere governed by the terrestrial magnetic field. Primary regions of interest are the regions where different plasma populations interact with each other. These are regions of particularly dynamic plasma behavior, associated with magnetic flux and energy transfer and dynamic energy release. The investigations concerned charged particle transport and energization, and microscopic and macroscopic instabilities in the magnetosphere and adjacent regions. The approaches combined space data analysis with theory and computer simulations

  11. Optimization of Photospheric Electric Field Estimates for Accurate Retrieval of Total Magnetic Energy Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumme, E.; Pomoell, J.; Kilpua, E. K. J.

    2017-12-01

    Estimates of the photospheric magnetic, electric, and plasma velocity fields are essential for studying the dynamics of the solar atmosphere, for example through the derivative quantities of Poynting and relative helicity flux and using the fields to obtain the lower boundary condition for data-driven coronal simulations. In this paper we study the performance of a data processing and electric field inversion approach that requires only high-resolution and high-cadence line-of-sight or vector magnetograms, which we obtain from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The approach does not require any photospheric velocity estimates, and the lacking velocity information is compensated for using ad hoc assumptions. We show that the free parameters of these assumptions can be optimized to reproduce the time evolution of the total magnetic energy injection through the photosphere in NOAA AR 11158, when compared to recent state-of-the-art estimates for this active region. However, we find that the relative magnetic helicity injection is reproduced poorly, reaching at best a modest underestimation. We also discuss the effect of some of the data processing details on the results, including the masking of the noise-dominated pixels and the tracking method of the active region, neither of which has received much attention in the literature so far. In most cases the effect of these details is small, but when the optimization of the free parameters of the ad hoc assumptions is considered, a consistent use of the noise mask is required. The results found in this paper imply that the data processing and electric field inversion approach that uses only the photospheric magnetic field information offers a flexible and straightforward way to obtain photospheric magnetic and electric field estimates suitable for practical applications such as coronal modeling studies.

  12. Solar wind plasma interaction with solar probe plus spacecraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Guillemant

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available 3-D PIC (Particle In Cell simulations of spacecraft-plasma interactions in the solar wind context of the Solar Probe Plus mission are presented. The SPIS software is used to simulate a simplified probe in the near-Sun environment (at a distance of 0.044 AU or 9.5 RS from the Sun surface. We begin this study with a cross comparison of SPIS with another PIC code, aiming at providing the static potential structure surrounding a spacecraft in a high photoelectron environment. This paper presents then a sensitivity study using generic SPIS capabilities, investigating the role of some physical phenomena and numerical models. It confirms that in the near- sun environment, the Solar Probe Plus spacecraft would rather be negatively charged, despite the high yield of photoemission. This negative potential is explained through the dense sheath of photoelectrons and secondary electrons both emitted with low energies (2–3 eV. Due to this low energy of emission, these particles are not ejected at an infinite distance of the spacecraft and would rather surround it. As involved densities of photoelectrons can reach 106 cm−3 (compared to ambient ions and electrons densities of about 7 × 103 cm−3, those populations affect the surrounding plasma potential generating potential barriers for low energy electrons, leading to high recollection. This charging could interfere with the low energy (up to a few tens of eV plasma sensors and particle detectors, by biasing the particle distribution functions measured by the instruments. Moreover, if the spacecraft charges to large negative potentials, the problem will be more severe as low energy electrons will not be seen at all. The importance of the modelling requirements in terms of precise prediction of spacecraft potential is also discussed.

  13. Plasma fluctuations in the solar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neugebauer, M.; Wu, C.S.; Huba, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    Ogo 5 plasma and magnetic field data are used to compute power spectra of solar wind fluctuations over the frequency interval 10 -3 10 -1 Hz. We confirm the validity of the assumption made in earlier papers that the power spectra calculated from total flux measurements are approximately equal to the power spectra of density fluctuations times the square of the average solar wind speed. The relative density power spectrum P/sub n//n 2 0 is usually of the same order of magnitude as the power spectrum of speed fluctuations relative to the Alfven speed, P/sub v//v 2 /sub A/. All cases studied show evidence of the presence of Alfven waves in this frequency range. In some data sets the density and field fluctuations are consistent with magnetosonic waves. In other sets the ratio of the power in field magnitude fluctuations to that in density fluctuations is inconsistent with magnetosonic waves; for these cases we postulate static inhomogeneities with a balance between electron thermal and magnetic pressures. Finally, we suggest that the power enhancements near 1 Hz reported in earlier papers may be caused by a resonant proton cyclotron instability driven by the proton thermal anisotropy in the solar wind

  14. Poynting flux dominated jets challenged by their photospheric emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bégué, Damien [The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Physics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, AlbaNova, University Center, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-12-17

    One of the key open question for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) jets, is the magnetization of the outflow. Here we consider the photospheric emission of Poynting flux dominated outflows, when the dynamics is mediated by magnetic reconnection. We show that thermal three-particle processes, responsible for the thermalization of the plasma, become inefficient far below the photosphere. Conservation of the total photon number above this radius, combined with Compton scattering below the photosphere enforces kinetic equilibrium between electrons and photons. This, in turn, leads to an increase in the observed photon temperature, which reaches ≳ 8 MeV (observed energy) when decoupling the plasma at the photosphere. This result is weakly dependent on the free model parameters. The predicted peak energy is more than an order of magnitude higher than the observed peak energy of most GRBs, which puts strong constraints on the magnetization of these outflows.

  15. North-South asymmetry of interplanetary plasma and solar parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Borie, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    Data of interplanetary plasma (field magnitude, solar wind speed, ion plasma density and temperature) and solar parameters (sunspot number, solar radio flux, and geomagnetic index) over the period 1965-1991, have been used to examine the asymmetry between the solar field north and south of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). The dependence of N-S asymmetry of field magnitude (B) upon the interplanetary solar polarities is statistically insignificant. There is no clear indication for the presence of N-S asymmetry in the grand-average field magnitude over the solar cycles. During the period 1981-89 (qA<0; negative solar polarity state), the solar plasma was more dense and cooler south of the HCS than north of it. The solar flux component of toward field vector is larger in magnitude than those of away field vector during the qA<0 epoch, and no asymmetry observed in the qA<0 epoch. Furthermore, the sign of the N-S asymmetry in the solar activity depends positively upon the solar polarity state. In addition, it was studied the N-S asymmetry of solar parameters near the HCS, throughout the periods of northern and southern hemispheres were more active than the other. Some asymmetries (with respect to the HCS) in plasma parameters existed during the periods of southern hemisphere predominance

  16. NEON INSIGHTS FROM OLD SOLAR X-RAYS: A PLASMA TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE CORONAL NEON CONTENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, Jeremy J.

    2011-01-01

    An analysis using modern atomic data of fluxes culled from the literature for O VIII and Ne IX lines observed in solar active regions by the P78 and Solar Maximum Mission satellites confirms that the coronal Ne/O abundance ratio varies by a factor of two or more, and finds an increase in Ne/O with increasing active region plasma temperature. The latter is reminiscent of evidence for increasing Ne/O with stellar activity in low-activity coronae that reaches a 'neon saturation' in moderately active stars at approximately twice the historically accepted solar value of about 0.15 by number. We argue that neon saturation represents the underlying stellar photospheric compositions, and that low-activity coronae, including that of the Sun, are generally depleted in neon. The implication would be that the solar Ne/O abundance ratio should be revised upward by a factor of about two to n(Ne)/n(O) ∼ 0.3. Diverse observations of neon in the local cosmos provide some support for such a revision. Neon would still be of some relevance for reconciling helioseismology with solar models computed using recently advocated chemical mixtures with lower metal content.

  17. The rotation of photospheric magnetic fields: A random walk transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. -M.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    In an earlier study of solar differential rotation, we showed that the transport of magnetic flux across latitudes acts to establish quasi-stationary patterns, therby accounting for the observed rigid rotation of the large-scale photospheric field. In that paper, the effect of supergranular convection was represented by a continuum diffusion, limiting the applicability of the calculations to large spatial scales. Here we extend the model to scales comparable to that of the supergranulation itself by replacing the diffusive transport with a discrete random walk process. Rotation curves are derived by cross-correlating the simulated photospheric field maps for a variety of time lags and spatial resolutions. When the lag between maps is relatively short less than or approximately = 15 days), the midlatitude correlation functions show two distinct components: a broad feature associated with the large-scale unipolar patterns and a narrow feature originating from small magnetic structures encompossing from one to several supergranular cells. By fitting the broad component we obtain the rigid rotation profile of the patterns, whereas by fitting the narrow component, we recover the differential rate of the photospheric plasma itself. For time lags of 1 month or greater, only the broad feature associated with the long-lived patterns remains clearly identifiable in the simulations.

  18. The height dependence of quiet-sun photospheric temperature fluctuations in observations and simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koza, J.; Kucera, A.; Rybák, J.; Wöhl, H.

    2006-01-01

    We derive rms temperature fluctuations as a function of height throughout the solar photosphere for the non-magnetic photosphere and a small area of enhanced magnetic activity, through semi-empirical inversion based on response functions of a 15-minute time sequence of 118″-long slit spectrograms

  19. Do evaporating black holes form photospheres?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacGibbon, Jane H.; Carr, B. J.; Page, Don N.

    2008-01-01

    Several authors, most notably Heckler, have claimed that the observable Hawking emission from a microscopic black hole is significantly modified by the formation of a photosphere around the black hole due to QED or QCD interactions between the emitted particles. In this paper we analyze these claims and identify a number of physical and geometrical effects which invalidate these scenarios. We point out two key problems. First, the interacting particles must be causally connected to interact, and this condition is satisfied by only a small fraction of the emitted particles close to the black hole. Second, a scattered particle requires a distance ∼E/m e 2 for completing each bremsstrahlung interaction, with the consequence that it is improbable for there to be more than one complete bremsstrahlung interaction per particle near the black hole. These two effects have not been included in previous analyses. We conclude that the emitted particles do not interact sufficiently to form a QED photosphere. Similar arguments apply in the QCD case and prevent a QCD photosphere (chromosphere) from developing when the black hole temperature is much greater than Λ QCD , the threshold for QCD particle emission. Additional QCD phenomenological arguments rule out the development of a chromosphere around black hole temperatures of order Λ QCD . In all cases, the observational signatures of a cosmic or Galactic halo background of primordial black holes or an individual black hole remain essentially those of the standard Hawking model, with little change to the detection probability. We also consider the possibility, as proposed by Belyanin et al. and D. Cline et al., that plasma interactions between the emitted particles form a photosphere, and we conclude that this scenario too is not supported.

  20. HOT PLASMA FROM SOLAR ACTIVE-REGION CORES: CONSTRAINTS FROM THE HINODE X-RAY TELESCOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmelz, J. T. [USRA, 7178 Columbia Gateway Drive, Columbia, MD 21046 (United States); Christian, G. M.; Matheny, P. O., E-mail: jschmelz@usra.edu [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    Mechanisms invoked to heat the solar corona to millions of degrees kelvin involve either magnetic waves or magnetic reconnections. Turbulence in the convection zone produces MHD waves, which travel upward and dissipate. Photospheric motions continuously build up magnetic energy, which is released through magnetic reconnection. In this paper, we concentrate on hot non-flaring plasma with temperatures of 5 MK <  T  < 10 MK because it is one of the few observables for which wave and reconnection models make different predictions. Wave models predict no (or little) hot plasma, whereas reconnection models predict it, although in amounts that are challenging to detect with current instrumentation. We used data from the X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). We requested a special XRT observing sequence, which cycled through the thickest XRT filter several times per hour so we could average these images and improve the signal-to-noise. We did differential emission measure (DEM) analysis using the time-averaged thick-filter data as well as all available channels from both the XRT and AIA for regions observed on 2014 December 11. Whereas our earlier work was only able to determine that plasma with a temperature greater than 5 MK was present , we are now able to find a well-constrained DEM distribution. We have therefore added a strong observational constraint that must be explained by any viable coronal heating model. Comparing state-of-the-art wave and reconnection model predictions, we can conclude that reconnection is heating the hot plasma in these active regions.

  1. The dynamics of solar plasma events and their interplanetary consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Subhash Chandra; Sharma, Giriraj

    2015-07-01

    In the present study we have analyzed the interplanetary plasma / field parameter, which have initiated the complex nature intense and highly geo-effective events in the magnetosphere. It is believed that Solar wind velocity V. interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B and Bz are the crucial drivers of these activities. However, sometimes strong geomagnetic disturbance is associated with the interaction between slow and fast solar wind streams originating from coronal holes leads to create co-rotating plasma interaction region (CIR). Thus the dynamics of the magnetospheric plasma configuration is the reflection of measured solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. While the magnetospheric plasma anomalies are generally represented by geomagnetic storms and sudden ionosphere disturbance (SIDs). The study considers 220 geomagnetic storms associated with disturbance storm time (Dst) decrease of more than -50 nT to -300 nT, observed during solar cycle 23 and the ascending phase of solar cycle 24. These have been analyzed and studied statistically. The spacecraft data acquired by space satellites and those provided by World Data Center (WDC) - A and geomagnetic stations data from WDC- C, Kyoto are utilized in the study. It is observed that the yearly occurrences of geomagnetic storm are strongly correlated with sunspot cycle, however we have not found any significant correlation between the maximum and minimum phase of solar cycle. It is also inferred from the results that solar cycle-23 was remarkable for occurrence of intense geomagnetic storms during its descending phase.

  2. Dynamics of the Solar Plasma Events and Their Interplanetary Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Subhash Chandra

    2016-07-01

    In the present study we have analyzed the interplanetary plasma / field parameter, which have initiated the complex nature intense and highly geo-effective events in the magnetosphere. It is believed that Solar wind velocity V. interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B and Bz are the crucial drivers of these activities. However, sometimes strong geomagnetic disturbance is associated with the interaction between slow and fast solar wind originating from coronal holes leads to create co-rotating plasma interaction region (CIR). Thus the dynamics of the magnetospheric plasma configuration is the reflection of measured solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. While the magnetospheric plasma anomalies are generally represented by geomagnetic storms and sudden ionosphere disturbance (SIDs). The study considers geomagnetic storms associated with disturbance storm time (Dst) decreases of more than -50 nT to -300 nT, observed during solar cycle 23 and the ascending phase of solar cycle 24. These have been analyzed and studied statistically. The spacecraft data those provided by SOHO, ACE and geomagnetic stations like WDC-Kyoto are utilized in the study. It is observed that the yearly occurrences of geomagnetic storm are strongly correlated with 11-year sunspot cycle, but no significant correlation between the maximum and minimum phase of solar cycle have been found. It is also found that solar cycle-23 is remarkable for occurrence of intense geomagnetic storms during its declining phase. The detailed results are discussed in this paper.

  3. Detection of photospheric calcium in a DBA white dwarf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenyon, S.J.; Shipman, H.L.; Sion, E.M.; Aannestad, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    The detection of photospheric calcium absorption lines in the white dwarf star G200-39 (DBAZ4) is reported. The abundance of calcium relative to that of hydrogen is approximately solar, a result which lends support to the hypothesis that accretion of interstellar matter is responsible for hybrid composition white dwarfs. 21 references

  4. The plasma properties of the solar upper atmosphere determined from high resolution observations and the nature of the physical processes sustaining it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, U.

    1994-01-01

    Half a century ago, it was established that the temperature of the ''quiescent'' solar corona is ∼10 6 K (∼100 eV). Wave theories have been used to explain the means by which the Sun keeps the corona about 200 times hotter than the 5000 K (∼0.5 eV) photosphere. In recent years, it has been suggested that a mechanism other than wave dissipation heats the ''quiescent'' corona and other transient phenomena that occur in the upper solar atmosphere. It is postulated by some that the solar upper atmosphere is heated by small bursts of energy resulting from magnetic reconnection. In this paper, the plasma properties of the upper solar atmosphere, a domain that, when flares are included, encompasses about three orders of magnitude in temperature (3x10 4 --3x10 7 K) and four orders of magnitude in electron density (3x10 8 ---3x10 12 cm -3 ), are described. It is shown that conventional scenarios based on magnetic reconnections may not adequately explain the observed plasma properties of the solar upper atmosphere. However, a model, consisting of electric currents flowing along magnetic field lines may have a better chance simulating the observed properties. For quiescent solar upper atmosphere phenomena, constant currents are needed to simulate the observations, while for flares, currents supplied by an exponentially decaying storage media are required

  5. Diagnosing transient plasma status: from solar atmosphere to tokamak divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giunta, A.S.; Henderson, S.; O'Mullane, M.; Summers, H.P.; Harrison, J.; Doyle, J.G.

    2016-01-01

    This work strongly exploits the interdisciplinary links between astrophysical (such as the solar upper atmosphere) and laboratory plasmas (such as tokamak devices) by sharing the development of a common modelling for time-dependent ionisation. This is applied to the interpretation of solar flare data observed by the UVSP (Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter), on-board the Solar Maximum Mission and the IRIS (Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph), and also to data from B2-SOLPS (Scrape Off Layer Plasma Simulations) for MAST (Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak) Super-X divertor upgrade. The derived atomic data, calculated in the framework of the ADAS (Atomic Data and Analysis Structure) project, allow equivalent prediction in non-stationary transport regimes and transients of both the solar atmosphere and tokamak divertors, except that the tokamak evolution is about one thousand times faster.

  6. On the height of the faculae above the photosphere from the eclipse of July 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimov, L.A.; Belkina, I.L.; Dyatel, N.P.

    1984-01-01

    The relative moments of contacts of lunar and solar limbs for the undisturbed photosphere regions and faculae are determined from July 31, 1981 solar eclipse slitless spectrograms. The comparison of the observed moments of local contacts with the theoretical ones, based on the lunar limh relief data, has shown that the visible limb of the farulae is approximately 120 km higher than the undisturbed photosphere limb. This result is in agreement with the previous eclipse data of July 10, 1972

  7. Height of the faculae above the photosphere from the eclipse of July 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akimov, L.A.; Belkina, I.L.; Dyatel, N.P. (Khar' kovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (Ukrainian SSR). Astronomicheskaya Observatoriya)

    The relative moments of contacts of lunar and solar limbs for the undisturbed photosphere regions and faculae are determined from July 31, 1981 solar eclipse slitless spectrograms. The comparison of the observed moments of local contacts with the theoretical ones, based on the lunar limb relief data, has shown that the visible limb of the farulae is approximately 120 km higher than the undisturbed photosphere limb. This result is in agreement with the previous eclipse data of July 10, 1972.

  8. An atlas of photospheric magnetic field observations and computed coronal magnetic fields: 1976-1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeksema, J. T.; Scherrer, P. H.

    1986-01-01

    Daily magnetogram observations of the large-scale photospheric magnetic field have been made at the John M. Wilcox Solar Observatory at Stanford since May of 1976. These measurements provide a homogeneous record of the changing solar field through most of solar cycle 21. Using the photospheric data, the configuration of the coronal and heliospheric fields can be calculated using a Potential Field-Source Surface model. This provides a three-dimensional picture of the heliospheric field evolution during the solar cycle. This paper announces the publication of UAG Report No. 94, an Atlas containing the complete set of synoptic charts of the measured photospheric magnetic field, the computed field at the source surface, and the coefficients of the multipole expansion of the coronal field. The general underlying structures of the solar and heliospheric fields, which determine the environment for solar-terrestrial relations and provide the context within which solar activity related events occur, can be approximated from these data.

  9. Solar energy converter using surface plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, L. M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Sunlight is dispersed over a diffraction grating formed on the surface of a conducting film on a substrate. The angular dispersion controls the effective grating period so that a matching spectrum of surface plasmons is excited for parallel processing on the conducting film. The resulting surface plasmons carry energy to an array of inelastic tunnel diodes. This solar energy converter does not require different materials for each frequency band, and sunlight is directly converted to electricity in an efficient manner by extracting more energy from the more energetic photons.

  10. Propagation of Torsional Alfvén Waves from the Photosphere to the Corona: Reflection, Transmission, and Heating in Expanding Flux Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, Roberto; Terradas, Jaume; Oliver, Ramón; Ballester, José Luis, E-mail: roberto.soler@uib.es [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2017-05-01

    It has been proposed that Alfvén waves play an important role in the energy propagation through the solar atmospheric plasma and its heating. Here we theoretically investigate the propagation of torsional Alfvén waves in magnetic flux tubes expanding from the photosphere up to the low corona and explore the reflection, transmission, and dissipation of wave energy. We use a realistic variation of the plasma properties and the magnetic field strength with height. Dissipation by ion–neutral collisions in the chromosphere is included using a multifluid partially ionized plasma model. Considering the stationary state, we assume that the waves are driven below the photosphere and propagate to the corona, while they are partially reflected and damped in the chromosphere and transition region. The results reveal the existence of three different propagation regimes depending on the wave frequency: low frequencies are reflected back to the photosphere, intermediate frequencies are transmitted to the corona, and high frequencies are completely damped in the chromosphere. The frequency of maximum transmissivity depends on the magnetic field expansion rate and the atmospheric model, but is typically in the range of 0.04–0.3 Hz. Magnetic field expansion favors the transmission of waves to the corona and lowers the reflectivity of the chromosphere and transition region compared to the case with a straight field. As a consequence, the chromospheric heating due to ion–neutral dissipation systematically decreases when the expansion rate of the magnetic flux tube increases.

  11. Density gradients in the solar plasma observed by interplanetary scintillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gapper, G.R.; Hewish, A.

    1981-01-01

    A new technique is described which overcomes the limitation set by Fresnel filtering in previous IPS studies of the small-scale density irregularities in the solar plasma. Phase gradients introduced by irregularities larger than the Fresnel limit cause transverse displacements of the small-scale scintillation pattern. In the presence of the solar wind, such refraction effects may be revealed by simultaneous measurements of intensity scintillation at two radio frequencies. Observations show that the structure corresponding to temporal frequencies approximately 0.02 Hz is in agreement with an extrapolation of the Kolmogorov spectrum derived from spacecraft data at lower frequencies. (author)

  12. Brightness of the photosphere and faculae at the limb based on eclipse observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akimov, L.A.; Belkina, I.L.; Dyatel, N.P.

    1982-05-01

    The absolute distributions of integral and surface brightness of the photospheric continuum (lambdaroughly-equal5870 A) and in faculae at the very limb are obtained from slitless spectrograms of the total solar eclipse of July 10, 1972. Several possible reasons for the brightness increase toward the limb in the distribution of photospheric surface brightness are discussed. The faculae showed high contrasts, up to 1.76 at a height of 200 km from the limb. A comparison of the times of local contacts observed and calculated with allowance for lunar relief showed that the active regions are at about 300 km above the photosphere. A schematic model of a facula is proposed.

  13. Photospheric Origin of Three-minute Oscillations in a Sunspot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Jongchul; Lee, Jeongwoo; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Song, Donguk [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyungsuk; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34055 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-10

    The origin of the three-minute oscillations of intensity and velocity observed in the chromosphere of sunspot umbrae is still unclear. We investigated the spatio-spectral properties of the 3 minute oscillations of velocity in the photosphere of a sunspot umbra as well as those in the low chromosphere using the spectral data of the Ni i λ 5436, Fe i λ 5435, and Na i D{sub 2} λ 5890 lines taken by the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. As a result, we found a local enhancement of the 3 minute oscillation power in the vicinities of a light bridge (LB) and numerous umbral dots (UDs) in the photosphere. These 3 minute oscillations occurred independently of the 5 minute oscillations. Through wavelet analysis, we determined the amplitudes and phases of the 3 minute oscillations at the formation heights of the spectral lines, and they were found to be consistent with the upwardly propagating slow magnetoacoustic waves in the photosphere with energy flux large enough to explain the chromospheric oscillations. Our results suggest that the 3 minute chromospheric oscillations in this sunspot may have been generated by magnetoconvection occurring in the LB and UDs.

  14. Ulysses solar wind plasma observations at high southerly latitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J L; Bame, S J; Feldman, W C; Gosling, J T; Hammond, C M; McComas, D J; Goldstein, B E; Neugebauer, M; Scime, E E; Suess, S T

    1995-05-19

    Solar wind plasma observations made by the Ulysses spacecraft through -80.2 degrees solar latitude and continuing equatorward to -40.1 degrees are summarized. Recurrent high-speed streams and corotating interaction regions dominated at middle latitudes. The speed of the solar wind was typically 700 to 800 kilometers per second poleward of -35 degrees . Corotating reverse shocks persisted farther south than did forward shocks because of the tilt of the heliomagnetic streamer belt. Sporadic coronal mass ejections were seen as far south as -60.5 degrees . Proton temperature was higher and the electron strahl was broader at higher latitudes. The high-latitude wind contained compressional, pressure-balanced, and Alfvénic structures.

  15. Dependence of Lunar Surface Charging on Solar Wind Plasma Conditions and Solar Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, T. J.; Farrell, W. M.; Halekas, J. S.; Burchill, J. K.; Collier, M. R.; Zimmerman, M. I.; Vondrak, R. R.; Delory, G. T.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2014-01-01

    The surface of the Moon is electrically charged by exposure to solar radiation on its dayside, as well as by the continuous flux of charged particles from the various plasma environments that surround it. An electric potential develops between the lunar surface and ambient plasma, which manifests itself in a near-surface plasma sheath with a scale height of order the Debye length. This study investigates surface charging on the lunar dayside and near-terminator regions in the solar wind, for which the dominant current sources are usually from the pohotoemission of electrons, J(sub p), and the collection of plasma electrons J(sub e) and ions J(sub i). These currents are dependent on the following six parameters: plasma concentration n(sub 0), electron temperature T(sub e), ion temperature T(sub i), bulk flow velocity V, photoemission current at normal incidence J(sub P0), and photo electron temperature T(sub p). Using a numerical model, derived from a set of eleven basic assumptions, the influence of these six parameters on surface charging - characterized by the equilibrium surface potential, Debye length, and surface electric field - is investigated as a function of solar zenith angle. Overall, T(sub e) is the most important parameter, especially near the terminator, while J(sub P0) and T(sub p) dominate over most of the dayside.

  16. Depletion of solar wind plasma near a planetary boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwan, B.J.; Wolf, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented that describes the squeezing of solar wind plasma out along interplanetary magnetic field lines in the region between the bow shock and the effective planetary boundary (in the case of the earth, the magnetopause). In the absence of local magnetic merging the squeezing process should create a 'depletion layer,' a region of very low plasma density just outside the magnetopause. Numerical solutions are obtained for the dimensionless magnetohydrodynamic equations describing this depletion process for the case where the solar wind magnetic field is perpendicular to the solar wind flow direction. For the case of the earth with a magnetopause standoff distance of 10 R/subE/, the theory predicts that the density should be reduced by a factor > or =2 in a layer about 700--1300 km thick if M/subA/, the Alfven Mach number in the solar wind, is equal to 8. The layer thickness should vary as M/subA/ -2 and should be approximately uniform for a large area of the magnetopause around the subsolar point. Computed layer thicknesses are somewhat smaller than those derived from Lees' axisymmetric model. Depletion layers should develop fully only where magnetic merging is locally unimportant. Scaling of the model calculations to Venus and Mars suggest layer thicknesses about 1/10 and 1/15 those of the earth, respectively, neglecting diffusion and ionospheric effects

  17. Photospheric Velocity Structures during the Emergence of Small Active Regions on the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khlystova, Anna [Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics SB RAS, Lermontov St., 126a, 664033 Irkutsk (Russian Federation); Toriumi, Shin, E-mail: hlystova@iszf.irk.ru, E-mail: shin.toriumi@nao.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2017-04-10

    We study the plasma flows in the solar photosphere during the emergence of two small active regions, NOAA 9021 and 10768. Using Solar and Heliospheric Observatory /Michelson Doppler Imager data, we find that the strong plasma upflows appear at the initial stage of active region formation, with maximum upflow velocities of −1650 and −1320 m s{sup −1}. The structures with enhanced upflows have size ∼8 Mm in diameter, and they exist for 1–2 hr. The parameters of the enhanced upflows are consistent with those of the large active region NOAA 10488, which may suggest the possibility that the elementary emerging magnetic loops that appear at the earliest phase of active region formation have similar properties, irrespective of scales of active regions. Comparison between the observations and a numerical simulation of magnetic flux emergence shows a striking consistency. We find that the driving force of the plasma upflow is at first the gas pressure gradient and later the magnetic pressure gradient.

  18. Solar Prominence Modelling and Plasma Diagnostics at ALMA Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, Andrew; Labrosse, Nicolas

    2017-09-01

    Our aim is to test potential solar prominence plasma diagnostics as obtained with the new solar capability of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We investigate the thermal and plasma diagnostic potential of ALMA for solar prominences through the computation of brightness temperatures at ALMA wavelengths. The brightness temperature, for a chosen line of sight, is calculated using the densities of electrons, hydrogen, and helium obtained from a radiative transfer code under non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) conditions, as well as the input internal parameters of the prominence model in consideration. Two distinct sets of prominence models were used: isothermal-isobaric fine-structure threads, and large-scale structures with radially increasing temperature distributions representing the prominence-to-corona transition region. We compute brightness temperatures over the range of wavelengths in which ALMA is capable of observing (0.32 - 9.6 mm), however, we particularly focus on the bands available to solar observers in ALMA cycles 4 and 5, namely 2.6 - 3.6 mm (Band 3) and 1.1 - 1.4 mm (Band 6). We show how the computed brightness temperatures and optical thicknesses in our models vary with the plasma parameters (temperature and pressure) and the wavelength of observation. We then study how ALMA observables such as the ratio of brightness temperatures at two frequencies can be used to estimate the optical thickness and the emission measure for isothermal and non-isothermal prominences. From this study we conclude that for both sets of models, ALMA presents a strong thermal diagnostic capability, provided that the interpretation of observations is supported by the use of non-LTE simulation results.

  19. PHOTOSPHERIC EMISSION FROM STRATIFIED JETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ono, Masaomi; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Mao, Jirong [Astrophysical Big Bang Laboratory, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Yamada, Shoichi [Department of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Pe' er, Asaf [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Mizuta, Akira [KEK Theory Center, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Harikae, Seiji, E-mail: hito@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Quants Research Department, Financial Engineering Division, Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley Securities Co., Ltd., Mejirodai Bldg., 3-29-20 Mejirodai, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8688 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    We explore photospheric emissions from stratified two-component jets, wherein a highly relativistic spine outflow is surrounded by a wider and less relativistic sheath outflow. Thermal photons are injected in regions of high optical depth and propagated until the photons escape at the photosphere. Because of the presence of shear in velocity (Lorentz factor) at the boundary of the spine and sheath region, a fraction of the injected photons are accelerated using a Fermi-like acceleration mechanism such that a high-energy power-law tail is formed in the resultant spectrum. We show, in particular, that if a velocity shear with a considerable variance in the bulk Lorentz factor is present, the high-energy part of observed gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) photon spectrum can be explained by this photon acceleration mechanism. We also show that the accelerated photons might also account for the origin of the extra-hard power-law component above the bump of the thermal-like peak seen in some peculiar bursts (e.g., GRB 090510, 090902B, 090926A). We demonstrate that time-integrated spectra can also reproduce the low-energy spectrum of GRBs consistently using a multi-temperature effect when time evolution of the outflow is considered. Last, we show that the empirical E{sub p}-L{sub p} relation can be explained by differences in the outflow properties of individual sources.

  20. Plasma Heating in Solar Microflares: Statistics and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirichenko, A. S.; Bogachev, S. A. [Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we present the results of an analysis of 481 weak solar flares, from A0.01 class flares to the B GOES class, that were observed during the period of extremely low solar activity from 2009 April to July. For all flares we measured the temperature of the plasma in the isothermal and two-temperature approximations and tried to fit its relationship with the X-ray class using exponential and power-law functions. We found that the whole temperature distribution in the range from A0.01 to X-class cannot be fit by one exponential function. The fitting for weak flares below A1.0 is significantly steeper than that for medium and large flares. The power-law approximation seems to be more reliable: the corresponding functions were found to be in good agreement with experimental data both for microflares and for normal flares. Our study predicts that evidence of plasma heating can be found in flares starting from the A0.0002 X-ray class. Weaker events presumably cannot heat the surrounding plasma. We also estimated emission measures for all flares studied and the thermal energy for 113 events.

  1. Large-scale Flow and Transport of Magnetic Flux in the Solar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Abstract. Horizontal large-scale velocity field describes horizontal displacement of the photospheric magnetic flux in zonal and meridian directions. The flow systems of solar plasma, constructed according to the velocity field, create the large-scale cellular-like patterns with up-flow in the center and the down-flow on the ...

  2. Co-existence of two plasma phases in solar and AGN coronas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubičela A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we have juxtaposed two distant cosmic locations of the Sun and AGN where neutral hydrogen appears in a close connection with hot coronas. Besides the solar photosphere, chromosphere and prominences where the presence of neutral hydrogen is well established, its emission quite high in hot solar corona is still puzzling. Some of earlier observations where Hα emission in solar corona was detected in eclipse and in daily coronagraphic observations are reviewed. A proper theoretical explanation of this cold chromospheric-type emission in the hot corona does not exist yet. On the other side, a similar emission of hydrogen lines is present in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs. Much research work is currently being done in this field. We outline some of the concepts of the AGN structure prevailing in the astrophysics today.

  3. Brightness of the photosphere and faculae at the limb according to eclipse observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akimov, L.A.; Belkina, I.L.; Dyatel, N.P. (Khar' kovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (Ukrainian SSR). Astronomicheskaya Observatoriya)

    The absolute integrated and surface brightness distributions of the photospheric continuum (lambda approximately 5870 A) and faculae at the extreme limb are obtained from July 10, 1972 solar eclipse slitless spectrograms. Some possible reasons of the limb brightening in the surface brightness distributions of the photosphere are discussed. It is detected that facular contrasts have the high values, up to 1.76 for the height about 200 km. This fact shows that radiation and matter density changes depending on height in the upper atmosphere in a facula more quickly than outside the facula. The comparison of the observed moments of local contacts with the theoretical ones, based on the lunar limb relief data, has shown that the active regions are approximately 300 km higher than the photosphere. The schematic model of the photospheric faculae is given.

  4. Brightness of the photosphere and faculae at the limb according to eclipse observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimov, L.A.; Belkina, I.L.; Dyatel, N.P.

    1982-01-01

    The absolute integrated and surface brightness distributions of the photospheric continuum (lambda approximately 5870 A) and faculae at the extreme limb are obtained from July 10, 1972 solar eclipse slitless spectrograms. Some possible reasons of the limb brightening in the surface brightness distributions of the photosphere are discussed. It is detected that facular contrasts have the high values, up to 1.76 for the height about 200 km. This fact shows that radiation and matter density changes depending on height in the upper atmosphere in a facula more quickly than outside the facula. The comparison of the observed moments of local contacts with the theoretical ones, based on the lunar limb relief data, has shown that the active regions are approximately 300 km higher than the photosphere. The schematic model of the photospheric faculae is given

  5. Fluid description of multi-component solar partially ionized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khomenko, E., E-mail: khomenko@iac.es; Collados, M.; Vitas, N. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Díaz, A. [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    We derive self-consistent formalism for the description of multi-component partially ionized solar plasma, by means of the coupled equations for the charged and neutral components for an arbitrary number of chemical species, and the radiation field. All approximations and assumptions are carefully considered. Generalized Ohm's law is derived for the single-fluid and two-fluid formalism. Our approach is analytical with some order-of-magnitude support calculations. After general equations are developed, we particularize to some frequently considered cases as for the interaction of matter and radiation.

  6. Surface waves in the partially ionized solar plasma slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, B. P.

    2013-12-01

    The properties of surface waves in the partially ionized, incompressible magnetized plasma slab are investigated in the present work. The waves are affected by the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects which cause the finite drift of the magnetic field in the medium. When the finite drift of the magnetic field is ignored, the characteristics of the wave propagation in the partially ionized plasma fluid are similar to the ideal MHD, except now the propagation properties depend on the fractional ionization of the medium. In the presence of the Hall diffusion, the propagation of the sausage and kink surface waves depends on the level of fractional ionization of the medium. For example, short wavelength surface modes cannot propagate in the medium if the scale over which Hall operates is comparable to the size of the plasma slab. With the increasing ionization, the surface modes of shorter wavelength are permitted in the system. When both the Hall and Pedersen diffusion are present in the medium, the waves undergo damping. In the case of Pedersen dominating Hall, the damping of the long wavelength fluctuations is dependent on the ratio of the plasma densities inside and outside the slab and on the square of the Pedersen diffusivity. For typical solar parameters, waves may damp over few minutes.

  7. Anomalous energy transport in hot plasmas: solar corona and Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaufume, P.

    1992-04-01

    Anomalous energy transport is studied in two hot plasmas and appears to be associated with a heating of the solar corona and with a plasma deconfining process in tokamaks. The magnetic structure is shown to play a fundamental role in this phenomenon through small scale instabilities which are modelized by means of a nonlinear dynamical system: the Beasts' Model. Four behavior classes are found for this system, which are automatically classified in the parameter space thanks to a neural network. We use a compilation of experimental results relative to the solar corona to discuss current-based heating processes. We find that a simple Joule effect cannot provide the required heating rates, and therefore propose a dimensional model involving a resistive reconnective instability which leads to an efficient and discontinuous heating mechanism. Results are in good agreement with the observations. We give an analytical expression for a diffusion coefficient in tokamaks when magnetic turbulence is perturbing the topology, which we validate thanks to the standard mapping. A realistic version of the Beasts' Model allows to test a candidate to anomalous transport: the thermal filamentation instability

  8. LANGMUIR WAVE DECAY IN INHOMOGENEOUS SOLAR WIND PLASMAS: SIMULATION RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krafft, C. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Volokitin, A. S. [IZMIRAN, Troitsk, 142190, Moscow (Russian Federation); Krasnoselskikh, V. V., E-mail: catherine.krafft@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l’Environnement et de l’Espace, 3A Av. de la Recherche Scientifique, F-45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France)

    2015-08-20

    Langmuir turbulence excited by electron flows in solar wind plasmas is studied on the basis of numerical simulations. In particular, nonlinear wave decay processes involving ion-sound (IS) waves are considered in order to understand their dependence on external long-wavelength plasma density fluctuations. In the presence of inhomogeneities, it is shown that the decay processes are localized in space and, due to the differences between the group velocities of Langmuir and IS waves, their duration is limited so that a full nonlinear saturation cannot be achieved. The reflection and the scattering of Langmuir wave packets on the ambient and randomly varying density fluctuations lead to crucial effects impacting the development of the IS wave spectrum. Notably, beatings between forward propagating Langmuir waves and reflected ones result in the parametric generation of waves of noticeable amplitudes and in the amplification of IS waves. These processes, repeated at different space locations, form a series of cascades of wave energy transfer, similar to those studied in the frame of weak turbulence theory. The dynamics of such a cascading mechanism and its influence on the acceleration of the most energetic part of the electron beam are studied. Finally, the role of the decay processes in the shaping of the profiles of the Langmuir wave packets is discussed, and the waveforms calculated are compared with those observed recently on board the spacecraft Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory and WIND.

  9. THE SUN’S PHOTOSPHERIC CONVECTION SPECTRUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathaway, David H.; Teil, Thibaud; Kitiashvili, Irina [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Norton, Aimee A., E-mail: david.hathaway@nasa.gov, E-mail: thibaud.teil@gmail.com, E-mail: irina.n.kitiashvili@nasa.gov, E-mail: aanorton@stanford.edu [W.W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94305 (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Spectra of the cellular photospheric flows are determined from full-disk Doppler velocity observations acquired by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft. Three different analysis methods are used to separately determine spectral coefficients representing the poloidal flows, the toroidal flows, and the radial flows. The amplitudes of these spectral coefficients are constrained by simulated data analyzed with the same procedures as the HMI data. We find that the total velocity spectrum rises smoothly to a peak at a wavenumber of about 120 (wavelength of about 35 Mm), which is typical of supergranules. The spectrum levels off out to wavenumbers of about 400, and then rises again to a peak at a wavenumber of about 3500 (wavelength of about 1200 km), which is typical of granules. The velocity spectrum is dominated by the poloidal flow component (horizontal flows with divergence but no curl) at wavenumbers above 30. The toroidal flow component (horizontal flows with curl but no divergence) dominates at wavenumbers less than 30. The radial flow velocity is only about 3% of the total flow velocity at the lowest wavenumbers, but increases in strength to become about 50% at wavenumbers near 4000. The spectrum compares well with the spectrum of giant cell flows at the lowest wavenumbers and with the spectrum of granulation from a 3D radiative-hydrodynamic simulation at the highest wavenumbers.

  10. Impact of Solar wind plasma parameters on geomagnetic condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Balveer Singh; Gupta, Dinesh Chandra

    Today’s challenge for space weather research is to quantitatively predict the dynamics of the magnetosphere from measured solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field conditions. A correlative studies between the Geomagnetic Storms (GMSs) and the various interplanetary field/plasma parameters have been performed to search the causes of geomagnetic activity and developing models for prediction of the occurrence of GMSs which are important for space weather predictions. In the present paper we found possible co-relation of geomagnetic storms with solar wind and IMF parameters in three different situations and also drive the linear relation equation for all parameters in three situations. On basis of present statistical study we developed an empirical model. With the help of this model we can predict all categories of geomagnetic storms. This model based on following fact. The total interplanetary magnetic field Btotal can use as alarm of geomagnetic storms, when sudden changes in total magnetic field B total, it is a first alarm on condition for storms arrival. It is observed in the present study that southward Bz-component of IMF is an important factor for geomagnetic storms. And it is the result of the paper that the magnitude of Bz is maximum neither during initial phase (at the instant of IP shock) nor during main phase (at the instant of Dst minimum). So it is seen in this study that there is a time delay between maximum value of southward Bz and Dst minimum and this time delay can be used in the prediction of the intensity of magnetic storm two -three hours before of main phase of geomagnetic storm. A linear relation have been derived between maximum value of southward component of Bz and Dst for prediction is Dst = (-0.06) + (7.65)Bz + t. Some auxiliary condition should be fulfils with this, speed of solar wind should be on average 350 km/s to 750 km/s, plasma beta should be low and most important plasma temperature should be low for intense storms if plasma

  11. Effect of solar wind plasma parameters on space weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Balveer S.; Gupta, Dinesh C.; Kaushik, Subhash C.

    2015-01-01

    Today's challenge for space weather research is to quantitatively predict the dynamics of the magnetosphere from measured solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. Correlative studies between geomagnetic storms (GMSs) and the various interplanetary (IP) field/plasma parameters have been performed to search for the causes of geomagnetic activity and develop models for predicting the occurrence of GMSs, which are important for space weather predictions. We find a possible relation between GMSs and solar wind and IMF parameters in three different situations and also derived the linear relation for all parameters in three situations. On the basis of the present statistical study, we develop an empirical model. With the help of this model, we can predict all categories of GMSs. This model is based on the following fact: the total IMF Btotal can be used to trigger an alarm for GMSs, when sudden changes in total magnetic field Btotal occur. This is the first alarm condition for a storm's arrival. It is observed in the present study that the southward Bz component of the IMF is an important factor for describing GMSs. A result of the paper is that the magnitude of Bz is maximum neither during the initial phase (at the instant of the IP shock) nor during the main phase (at the instant of Disturbance storm time (Dst) minimum). It is seen in this study that there is a time delay between the maximum value of southward Bz and the Dst minimum, and this time delay can be used in the prediction of the intensity of a magnetic storm two-three hours before the main phase of a GMS. A linear relation has been derived between the maximum value of the southward component of Bz and the Dst, which is Dst = (-0.06) + (7.65) Bz +t. Some auxiliary conditions should be fulfilled with this, for example the speed of the solar wind should, on average, be 350 km s-1 to 750 km s-1, plasma β should be low and, most importantly, plasma temperature should be low for intense

  12. Solar radio emission very near the plasma frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wentzel, D.G.

    1983-01-01

    Plasma-frequency radio emission from the solar corona has been observed with very short duration and very narrow bandwidth. These observations imply an upper corona with a structured field-aligned density distribution. I evaluate the propagation characteristics of fundamental plasma radio emission when the bandwidth is small compared with the electron gyrofrequency (Ω), which is small compared with the plasma frequency (ω/sub p/). The ''normal'' group velocity, c(Ω/ω/sub p/) 1 /sup // 2 , applies only to radiation emitted nearly parallel to the magnetic field. Most of the radiation at first travels with a much lower group velocity and is delayed relative to the radiation emitted parallel to the magnetic field. Radiation emitted at one instant of time over a finite range of angles leaves the corona with a time profile of finite duration. Very short observed signals of about 20 ms duration may be explained in two ways. (1) We observe only rays from a small part of the cone of emission. Then the observed bandwidth may be small compared with the inherent bandwidth of emission. (2) The density scale height is substantially less than 10 5 km, and the direction of the density gradient is well outside the cone of emission. The shortest signals from the upper corona may indicate density variations across magnetic flux tubes with scale heights as small as 10 4 km

  13. The lower solar atmosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    This "rapporteur" report discusses the solar photosphere and low chromosphere in the context of chemical composition studies. The highly dynamical nature of the photosphere does not seem to jeopardize precise determination of solar abundances in classical fashion. It is still an open question how

  14. A solar tornado observed by EIS. Plasma diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levens, P. J.; Labrosse, N.; Fletcher, L.; Schmieder, B.

    2015-10-01

    Context. The term "solar tornadoes" has been used to describe apparently rotating magnetic structures above the solar limb, as seen in high resolution images and movies from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). These often form part of the larger magnetic structure of a prominence, however the links between them remain unclear. Here we present plasma diagnostics on a tornado-like structure and its surroundings, seen above the limb by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) aboard the Hinode satellite. Aims: We aim to extend our view of the velocity patterns seen in tornado-like structures with EIS to a wider range of temperatures and to use density diagnostics, non-thermal line widths, and differential emission measures to provide insight into the physical characteristics of the plasma. Methods: Using Gaussian fitting to fit and de-blend the spectral lines seen by EIS, we calculated line-of-sight velocities and non-thermal line widths. Along with information from the CHIANTI database, we used line intensity ratios to calculate electron densities at each pixel. Using a regularised inversion code we also calculated the differential emission measure (DEM) at different locations in the prominence. Results: The split Doppler-shift pattern is found to be visible down to a temperature of around log T = 6.0. At temperatures lower than this, the pattern is unclear in this data set. We obtain an electron density of log ne = 8.5 when looking towards the centre of the tornado structure at a plasma temperature of log T = 6.2, as compared to the surroundings of the tornado structure where we find log ne to be nearer 9. Non-thermal line widths show broader profiles at the tornado location when compared to the surrounding corona. We discuss the differential emission measure in both the tornado and the prominence body, which suggests that there is more contribution in the tornado at temperatures below log T = 6.0 than in the

  15. Ultra-High-Resolution Observations of MHD Waves in Photospheric Magnetic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jess, D. B.; Verth, G.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter reviews the recent observations of waves and oscillations manifesting in fine-scale magnetic structures in the solar photosphere, which are often interpreted as the "building blocks' of the magnetic Sun. The authors found, through phase relationships between the various waveforms, that small-scale magnetic bright points (MBPs) in the photosphere demonstrated signatures of specific magnetoacoustic waves, in particular the sausage and kink modes. Modern magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the lower solar atmosphere clearly show how torsional motions can easily be induced in magnetic elements in the photosphere through the processes of vortical motions and/or buffeting by neighboring granules. The authors detected significant power associated with high-frequency horizontal motions, and suggested that these cases may be especially important in the creation of a turbulent environment that efficiently promotes Alfvén wave dissipation.

  16. A study of north-south asymmetry of interplanetary magnetic field plasma and some solar indices throughout four solar cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Borie, M. A.; Abdel-halim, A. A.; El-Monier, S. Y.; Bishara, A. A.

    2017-06-01

    We provide a long epoch study of a set of solar and plasma parameters (sunspot number Rz, total solar irradiance TSI, solar radio flux SF, solar wind speed V, ion density n, dynamic pressure nV 2, and ion temperature T) covering a temporal range of several decades corresponding to almost four solar cycles. Such data have been organized accordingly with the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) polarity, i.e. away (A) if the azimuthal component of the IMF points away from the Sun and T if it points towards, to examine the N-S asymmetries between the northern and southern hemispheres. Our results displayed the sign of the N-S asymmetry in solar activity depends on the solar magnetic polarity state (qA>0 or qA<0). The solar flux component of toward field vector was larger in magnitude than those of away field vector during the negative polarity epochs (1986-88 and 2001-08). In addition, the solar wind speeds (SWS) are faster by about 22.11±4.5 km/s for away polarity days than for toward polarity days during the qA<0 epoch (2001-08), where the IMF points away from the Sun. Moreover, during solar cycles 21st and 24th the solar plasma is more dense, hotter, and faster south of the HCS.

  17. RATES OF PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FLUX CANCELLATION MEASURED WITH HINODE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Soyoung; Chae, Jongchul; Litvinenko, Yuri E.

    2009-01-01

    Photospheric magnetic flux cancellation on the Sun is generally believed to be caused by magnetic reconnection occurring in the low solar atmosphere. Individual canceling magnetic features are observationally characterized by the rate of flux cancellation. The specific cancellation rate, defined as the rate of flux cancellation divided by the interface length, gives an accurate estimate of the electric field in the reconnecting current sheet. We have determined the specific cancellation rate using the magnetograms taken by the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard the Hinode satellite. The specific rates determined with SOT turned out to be systematically higher than those based on the data taken by the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. The median value of the specific cancellation rate was found to be 8 x 10 6 G cm s -1 -a value four times that obtained from the MDI data. This big difference is mainly due to a higher angular resolution and better sensitivity of the SOT, resulting in magnetic fluxes up to five times larger than those obtained from the MDI. The higher rates of flux cancellation correspond to either faster inflows or stronger magnetic fields of the reconnection inflow region, which may have important consequences for the physics of photospheric magnetic reconnection.

  18. Flare Prediction Using Photospheric and Coronal Image Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Eric; Bobra, Monica; Shankar, Vaishaal; Todd Hoeksema, J.; Recht, Benjamin

    2018-03-01

    The precise physical process that triggers solar flares is not currently understood. Here we attempt to capture the signature of this mechanism in solar-image data of various wavelengths and use these signatures to predict flaring activity. We do this by developing an algorithm that i) automatically generates features in 5.5 TB of image data taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory of the solar photosphere, chromosphere, transition region, and corona during the time period between May 2010 and May 2014, ii) combines these features with other features based on flaring history and a physical understanding of putative flaring processes, and iii) classifies these features to predict whether a solar active region will flare within a time period of T hours, where T = 2 and 24. Such an approach may be useful since, at the present time, there are no physical models of flares available for real-time prediction. We find that when optimizing for the True Skill Score (TSS), photospheric vector-magnetic-field data combined with flaring history yields the best performance, and when optimizing for the area under the precision-recall curve, all of the data are helpful. Our model performance yields a TSS of 0.84 ±0.03 and 0.81 ±0.03 in the T = 2- and 24-hour cases, respectively, and a value of 0.13 ±0.07 and 0.43 ±0.08 for the area under the precision-recall curve in the T=2- and 24-hour cases, respectively. These relatively high scores are competitive with previous attempts at solar prediction, but our different methodology and extreme care in task design and experimental setup provide an independent confirmation of these results. Given the similar values of algorithm performance across various types of models reported in the literature, we conclude that we can expect a certain baseline predictive capacity using these data. We believe that this is the first attempt to predict solar flares using photospheric vector-magnetic field data as well as multiple wavelengths of image

  19. Flare Prediction Using Photospheric and Coronal Image Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, E.; Shankar, V.; Bobra, M.; Recht, B.

    2016-12-01

    We attempt to forecast M-and X-class solar flares using a machine-learning algorithm and five years of image data from both the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instruments aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. HMI is the first instrument to continuously map the full-disk photospheric vector magnetic field from space (Schou et al., 2012). The AIA instrument maps the transition region and corona using various ultraviolet wavelengths (Lemen et al., 2012). HMI and AIA data are taken nearly simultaneously, providing an opportunity to study the entire solar atmosphere at a rapid cadence. Most flare forecasting efforts described in the literature use some parameterization of solar data - typically of the photospheric magnetic field within active regions. These numbers are considered to capture the information in any given image relevant to predicting solar flares. In our approach, we use HMI and AIA images of solar active regions and a deep convolutional kernel network to predict solar flares. This is effectively a series of shallow-but-wide random convolutional neural networks stacked and then trained with a large-scale block-weighted least squares solver. This algorithm automatically determines which patterns in the image data are most correlated with flaring activity and then uses these patterns to predict solar flares. Using the recently-developed KeystoneML machine learning framework, we construct a pipeline to process millions of images in a few hours on commodity cloud computing infrastructure. This is the first time vector magnetic field images have been combined with coronal imagery to forecast solar flares. This is also the first time such a large dataset of solar images, some 8.5 terabytes of images that together capture over 3000 active regions, has been used to forecast solar flares. We evaluate our method using various flare prediction windows defined in the literature (e.g. Ahmed et al., 2013) and a novel per

  20. Photospheric modeling through spectral line inversion. temperature and radial velocity stratifications and fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koza, J.; Kucera, A.; Rybák, J.; Wöhl, H.

    2006-01-01

    We aim to determine average radial stratifications of various physical parameters throughout the solar photosphere at high angular resolution for non-magnetic and magnetic areas and to compare these with standard semiempirical 1D modeling and with 3D hydrodynamics (HD) and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD)

  1. A study of the asymmetrical distribution of solar activity features on solar and plasma parameters (1967-2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Borie, M. A.; El-Taher, A. M.; Aly, N. E.; Bishara, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    The impact of asymmetrical distribution of hemispheric sunspot areas (SSAs) on the interplanetary magnetic field, plasma, and solar parameters from 1967 to 2016 has been studied. The N-S asymmetry of solar-plasma activities based on SSAs has a northern dominance during solar cycles 20 and 24. However, it has a tendency to shift to the southern hemisphere in cycles 21, 22, and 23. The solar cycle 23 showed that the sorted southern SSAs days predominated over the northern days by ˜17%. Through the solar cycles 21-24, the SSAs of the southern hemisphere were more active. In contrast, the northern SSAs predominate over the southern one by 9% throughout solar cycle 20. On the other hand, the average differences of field magnitude for the sorted northern and southern groups during solar cycles 20-24 are statistically insignificant. Clearly, twenty years showed that the solar plasma ion density from the sorted northern group was denser than that of southern group and a highest northern dominant peak occurred in 1971. In contrast, seventeen out of fifty years showed the reverse. In addition, there are fifteen clear asymmetries of solar wind speed (SWS), with SWS (N) > SWS (S), and during the years 1972, 2002, and 2008, the SWS from the sorted northern group was faster than that of southern activity group by 6.16 ± 0.65 km/s, 5.70 ± 0.86 km/s, and 5.76 ± 1.35 km/s, respectively. For the solar cycles 20-24, the grand-averages of P from the sorted solar northern and southern have nearly the same parameter values. The solar plasma was hotter for the sorted northern activity group than the southern ones for 17 years out of 50. Most significant northern prevalent asymmetries were found in 1972 (5.76 ± 0.66 × 103 K) and 1996 (4.7 ± 0.8 × 103 K), while two significant equivalent dominant southern asymmetries (˜3.8 ± 0.3 × 103 K) occurred in 1978 and 1993. The grand averages of sunspot numbers have symmetric activity for the two sorted northern and southern hemispheres

  2. Hybrid Model of Inhomogeneous Solar Wind Plasma Heating by Alfven Wave Spectrum: Parametric Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.

    2010-01-01

    Observations of the solar wind plasma at 0.3 AU and beyond show that a turbulent spectrum of magnetic fluctuations is present. Remote sensing observations of the corona indicate that heavy ions are hotter than protons and their temperature is anisotropic (T(sub perpindicular / T(sub parallel) >> 1). We study the heating and the acceleration of multi-ion plasma in the solar wind by a turbulent spectrum of Alfvenic fluctuations using a 2-D hybrid numerical model. In the hybrid model the protons and heavy ions are treated kinetically as particles, while the electrons are included as neutralizing background fluid. This is the first two-dimensional hybrid parametric study of the solar wind plasma that includes an input turbulent wave spectrum guided by observation with inhomogeneous background density. We also investigate the effects of He++ ion beams in the inhomogeneous background plasma density on the heating of the solar wind plasma. The 2-D hybrid model treats parallel and oblique waves, together with cross-field inhomogeneity, self-consistently. We investigate the parametric dependence of the perpendicular heating, and the temperature anisotropy in the H+-He++ solar wind plasma. It was found that the scaling of the magnetic fluctuations power spectrum steepens in the higher-density regions, and the heating is channeled to these regions from the surrounding lower-density plasma due to wave refraction. The model parameters are applicable to the expected solar wind conditions at about 10 solar radii.

  3. FINE-SCALE PHOTOSPHERIC CONNECTIONS OF ELLERMAN BOMBS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Heesu; Chae, Jongchul; Song, Donguk; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Kwak, Hannah [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Yeon-Han [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 34055 (Korea, Republic of); Yurchyshyn, Vasyl B, E-mail: yang83@snu.ac.kr [Big Bear Solar Observatory, Big Bear City, CA 92314-9672 (United States)

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the photospheric and magnetic field structures associated with Ellerman bombs (EBs) using the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory. The nine observed EBs were accompanied by elongated granule-like features (EGFs) that showed transverse motions prior to the EBs with an average speed of about 3.8 km s{sup −1}. Each EGF consisted of a sub-arcsecond bright core encircled by a dark lane around its moving front. The bright core appeared in the TiO broadband filter images and in the far wings of the H α and Ca ii 8542 Å lines. In four EBs, the bi-directional expanding motion of the EGFs was identified in the TiO images. In those cases, the EGFs were found to be accompanied by an emerging flux (EF). In four other EBs, the EGF developed at the edge of a penumbra and traveled in the sunspot’s radial direction. The EGFs in these cases were identified as a moving magnetic feature (MMF). Our results show a clear connection among the magnetic elements, photospheric features, and EBs. This result suggests that the EBs result from magnetic reconnection forced by EFs or MMFs that are frequently manifested by EGFs.

  4. Understanding Solar Coronal Heating through Atomic and Plasma Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Daniel Wolf; Arthanayaka, Thusitha; Bose, Sayak; Hahn, Michael; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory V.; Gekelman, Walter; Vincena, Steve

    2017-08-01

    Recent solar observations suggest that the Sun's corona is heated by Alfven waves that dissipate at unexpectedly low heights in the corona. These observations raise a number of questions. Among them are the problems of accurately quantifying the energy flux of the waves and that of describing the physical mechanism that leads to the wave damping. We are performing laboratory experiments to address both of these issues.The energy flux depends on the electron density, which can be measured spectroscopically. However, spectroscopic density diagnostics have large uncertainties, because they depend sensitively on atomic collisional excitation, de-excitation, and radiative transition rates for multiple atomic levels. Essentially all of these data come from theory and have not been experimentally validated. We are conducting laboratory experiments using the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that will provide accurate empirical calibrations for spectroscopic density diagnostics and which will also help to guide theoretical calculations.The observed rapid wave dissipation is likely due to inhomogeneities in the plasma that drive flows and currents at small length scales where energy can be more efficiently dissipated. This may take place through gradients in the Alfvén speed along the magnetic field, which causes wave reflection and generates turbulence. Alternatively, gradients in the Alfvén speed across the field can lead to dissipation through phase-mixing. Using the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at the University of California Los Angeles, we are studying both of these dissipation mechanisms in the laboratory in order to understand their potential roles in coronal heating.

  5. THE EVOLUTION OF OPEN MAGNETIC FLUX DRIVEN BY PHOTOSPHERIC DYNAMICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linker, Jon A.; Lionello, Roberto; Mikic, Zoran; Titov, Viacheslav S.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2011-01-01

    The coronal magnetic field is of paramount importance in solar and heliospheric physics. Two profoundly different views of the coronal magnetic field have emerged. In quasi-steady models, the predominant source of open magnetic field is in coronal holes. In contrast, in the interchange model, the open magnetic flux is conserved, and the coronal magnetic field can only respond to the photospheric evolution via interchange reconnection. In this view, the open magnetic flux diffuses through the closed, streamer belt fields, and substantial open flux is present in the streamer belt during solar minimum. However, Antiochos and coworkers, in the form of a conjecture, argued that truly isolated open flux cannot exist in a configuration with one heliospheric current sheet-it will connect via narrow corridors to the polar coronal hole of the same polarity. This contradicts the requirements of the interchange model. We have performed an MHD simulation of the solar corona up to 20 R sun to test both the interchange model and the Antiochos conjecture. We use a synoptic map for Carrington rotation 1913 as the boundary condition for the model, with two small bipoles introduced into the region where a positive polarity extended coronal hole forms. We introduce flows at the photospheric boundary surface to see if open flux associated with the bipoles can be moved into the closed-field region. Interchange reconnection does occur in response to these motions. However, we find that the open magnetic flux cannot be simply injected into closed-field regions-the flux eventually closes down and disconnected flux is created. Flux either opens or closes, as required, to maintain topologically distinct open- and closed-field regions, with no indiscriminate mixing of the two. The early evolution conforms to the Antiochos conjecture in that a narrow corridor of open flux connects the portion of the coronal hole that is nearly detached by one of the bipoles. In the later evolution, a detached

  6. The FIELDS Instrument Suite for Solar Probe Plus Measuring the Coronal Plasma and Magnetic Field, Plasma Waves and Turbulence, and Radio Signatures of Solar Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, S. D.; Goetz, K.; Harvey, P. R.; Turin, P.; Bonnell, J. W.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Ergun, R. E.; MacDowall, R. J.; Pulupa, M.; Choi, M. K.; hide

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission will make the first in situ measurements of the solar corona and the birthplace of the solar wind. The FIELDS instrument suite on SPP will make direct measurements of electric and magnetic fields, the properties of in situ plasma waves, electron density and temperature profiles, and interplanetary radio emissions, amongst other things. Here, we describe the scientific objectives targeted by the SPP/FIELDS instrument, the instrument design itself, and the instrument concept of operations and planned data products.

  7. Influence of the solar EUV flux on the Martian plasma environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Modolo

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of the solar wind with the Martian atmosphere and ionosphere is investigated by using three-dimensional, global and multi-species hybrid simulations. In the present work we focus on the influence of the solar EUV flux on the Martian plasma environment by comparing simulations done for conditions representative of the extrema of the solar cycle. The dynamics of four ionic species (H+, He++, O+, O2+, originating either from the solar wind or from the planetary plasma, is treated fully kinetically in the simulation model in order to characterize the distribution of each component of the plasma, both at solar maximum and at solar minimum. The solar EUV flux controls the ionization frequencies of the exospheric species, atomic hydrogen and oxygen, as well as the density, the temperature, and thus the extension of the exosphere. Ionization by photons and by electron impacts, and the main charge exchange reactions are self-consistently included in the simulation model. Simulation results are in reasonable agreement with the observations made by Phobos-2 and Mars Global Surveyor (MGS spacecraft: 1 the interaction creates a cavity, void of solar wind ions (H+, He++, which depends weakly upon the phase of the solar cycle, 2 the motional electric field of the solar wind flow creates strong asymmetries in the Martian environment, 3 the spatial distribution of the different components of the planetary plasma depends strongly upon the phase of the solar cycle. The fluxes of the escaping planetary ions are computed from the simulated data and results for solar maximum are compared with estimates based on the measurements made by experiments ASPERA and TAUS on board Phobos-2.

  8. THE BUILDUP OF A SCALE-FREE PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC NETWORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thibault, K.; Charbonneau, P.; Crouch, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    We use a global Monte Carlo simulation of the formation of the solar photospheric magnetic network to investigate the origin of the scale invariance characterizing magnetic flux concentrations visible on high-resolution magnetograms. The simulations include spatially and temporally homogeneous injection of small-scale magnetic elements over the whole photosphere, as well as localized episodic injection associated with the emergence and decay of active regions. Network elements form in response to cumulative pairwise aggregation or cancellation of magnetic elements, undergoing a random walk on the sphere and advected on large spatial scales by differential rotation and a poleward meridional flow. The resulting size distribution of simulated network elements is in very good agreement with observational inferences. We find that the fractal index and size distribution of network elements are determined primarily by these post-emergence surface mechanisms, and carry little or no memory of the scales at which magnetic flux is injected in the simulation. Implications for models of dynamo action in the Sun are briefly discussed.

  9. THE BUILDUP OF A SCALE-FREE PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC NETWORK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibault, K.; Charbonneau, P. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, 2900 Edouard-Montpetit, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Crouch, A. D., E-mail: kim@astro.umontreal.ca-a, E-mail: paulchar@astro.umontreal.ca-b, E-mail: ash@cora.nwra.com-c [CORA/NWRA, 3380 Mitchell Lane, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    We use a global Monte Carlo simulation of the formation of the solar photospheric magnetic network to investigate the origin of the scale invariance characterizing magnetic flux concentrations visible on high-resolution magnetograms. The simulations include spatially and temporally homogeneous injection of small-scale magnetic elements over the whole photosphere, as well as localized episodic injection associated with the emergence and decay of active regions. Network elements form in response to cumulative pairwise aggregation or cancellation of magnetic elements, undergoing a random walk on the sphere and advected on large spatial scales by differential rotation and a poleward meridional flow. The resulting size distribution of simulated network elements is in very good agreement with observational inferences. We find that the fractal index and size distribution of network elements are determined primarily by these post-emergence surface mechanisms, and carry little or no memory of the scales at which magnetic flux is injected in the simulation. Implications for models of dynamo action in the Sun are briefly discussed.

  10. Photospheric, Chromospheric and Helioseismic Signatures of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2003-10-26

    Oct 26, 2003 ... since the beginning of routine TSI measurements in 1978 (Woods et al. 2004). We have selected this flare for detailed analysis of its photospheric, chromospheric and helioseismic signatures due to the favourable location of the active region near the. CMP which minimizes the projection effects. 2.

  11. Flight Plasma Diagnostics for High-Power, Solar-Electric Deep-Space Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lee; De Soria-Santacruz Pich, Maria; Conroy, David; Lobbia, Robert; Huang, Wensheng; Choi, Maria; Sekerak, Michael J.

    2018-01-01

    NASA's Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission (ARRM) project plans included a set of plasma and space environment instruments, the Plasma Diagnostic Package (PDP), to fulfill ARRM requirements for technology extensibility to future missions. The PDP objectives were divided into the classes of 1) Plasma thruster dynamics, 2) Solar array-specific environmental effects, 3) Plasma environmental spacecraft effects, and 4) Energetic particle spacecraft environment. A reference design approach and interface requirements for ARRM's PDP was generated by the PDP team at JPL and GRC. The reference design consisted of redundant single-string avionics located on the ARRM spacecraft bus as well as solar array, driving and processing signals from multiple copies of several types of plasma, effects, and environments sensors distributed over the spacecraft and array. The reference design sensor types were derived in part from sensors previously developed for USAF Research Laboratory (AFRL) plasma effects campaigns such as those aboard TacSat-2 in 2007 and AEHF-2 in 2012.

  12. Increases in plasma sheet temperature with solar wind driving during substorm growth phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, C; Watt, C E J; Rae, I J; Fazakerley, A N; Kalmoni, N M E; Freeman, M P; Boakes, P D; Nakamura, R; Dandouras, I; Kistler, L M; Jackman, C M; Coxon, J C; Carr, C M

    2014-01-01

    During substorm growth phases, magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause extracts ∼1015 J from the solar wind which is then stored in the magnetotail lobes. Plasma sheet pressure increases to balance magnetic flux density increases in the lobes. Here we examine plasma sheet pressure, density, and temperature during substorm growth phases using 9 years of Cluster data (>316,000 data points). We show that plasma sheet pressure and temperature are higher during growth phases with higher solar wind driving, whereas the density is approximately constant. We also show a weak correlation between plasma sheet temperature before onset and the minimum SuperMAG AL (SML) auroral index in the subsequent substorm. We discuss how energization of the plasma sheet before onset may result from thermodynamically adiabatic processes; how hotter plasma sheets may result in magnetotail instabilities, and how this relates to the onset and size of the subsequent substorm expansion phase. PMID:26074645

  13. The instruments of the plasma experiment aboard the HELIOS solar probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbauer, H.; Schwenn, R.; Miggenrieder, H.; Meyer, B.; Gruenwaldt, H.; Muehlhaeuser, K.H.; Pellkofer, H.; Wolfe, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The 'Plasma Experiment' aboard of the solar probe HELIOS consists of four independent instruments which are designed to investigate the interplanetary plasma, the so-called solar wind. Primarily the velocity distribution functions of the different kinds of particles are measured. All important hydrodynamic parameters of the solar wind plasma can then be derived. Three instruments analyze the positive component of the solar wind (protons and heavier ions with energy-per-charge values from 0.155 to 15.32 kV). Two of them permit an angular resolution in both directions of incidence. One instrument measures electrons in the energy range from 0.5 to 1660 eV with a one-dimensional angular resolution. Since the launch all the instruments, which are partially novel developments,have performed very well. (orig.) [de

  14. Inductively coupled hydrogen plasma processing of AZO thin films for heterojunction solar cell applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, H.P.; Xu, S.; Zhao, Z.; Xiang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A high-density plasma reactor of inductively coupled plasma source is used in this work. • The conductivity and transmittance can be enhanced simultaneously in the hydrogen process. • The formation of additional donors and passivation due to the hydrogen plasma processing. • The photovoltaic improvement due to the improved AZO layer and hetero-interface quality in the solar cells. - Abstract: Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films deposited by means of RF magnetron sputtering were processed in a low frequency inductively coupled plasma of H 2 , aiming at heterojunction (HJ) solar cell applications. A variety of characterization results show that the hydrogen plasma processing exerts a significant influence on the microstructures, electrical and optical properties of the AZO films. The incorporation of hydrogen under the optimum treatment simultaneously promoted the transmittance and conductivity due to the hydrogen associated passivation effect on the native defects and the formation of shallow donors in the films, respectively. A p-type c-Si based HJ solar cell with a front AZO contact was also treated in as-generated non-equilibrium hydrogen plasma and the photovoltaic performance of the solar cell was prominently improved. The underlying mechanism was discussed in terms of the beneficial impacts of high-density hydrogen plasma on the properties of AZO itself and the hetero-interfaces involved in the HJ structure (interface defect and energy band configuration)

  15. Morphology and Dynamics of Solar Prominences from 3D MHD Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terradas, J.; Soler, R.; Luna, M.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a numerical study of the time evolution of solar prominences embedded in sheared magnetic arcades. The prominence is represented by a density enhancement in a background-stratified atmosphere and is connected to the photosphere through the magnetic field. By solving the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations in three dimensions, we study the dynamics for a range of parameters representative of real prominences. Depending on the parameters considered, we find prominences that are suspended above the photosphere, i.e., detached prominences, but also configurations resembling curtain or hedgerow prominences whose material continuously connects to the photosphere. The plasma-β is an important parameter that determines the shape of the structure. In many cases magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and oscillatory phenomena develop. Fingers and plumes are generated, affecting the whole prominence body and producing vertical structures in an essentially horizontal magnetic field. However, magnetic shear is able to reduce or even to suppress this instability.

  16. MORPHOLOGY AND DYNAMICS OF SOLAR PROMINENCES FROM 3D MHD SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terradas, J.; Soler, R.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L. [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Luna, M., E-mail: jaume.terradas@uib.es [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-01-20

    In this paper we present a numerical study of the time evolution of solar prominences embedded in sheared magnetic arcades. The prominence is represented by a density enhancement in a background-stratified atmosphere and is connected to the photosphere through the magnetic field. By solving the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations in three dimensions, we study the dynamics for a range of parameters representative of real prominences. Depending on the parameters considered, we find prominences that are suspended above the photosphere, i.e., detached prominences, but also configurations resembling curtain or hedgerow prominences whose material continuously connects to the photosphere. The plasma-β is an important parameter that determines the shape of the structure. In many cases magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and oscillatory phenomena develop. Fingers and plumes are generated, affecting the whole prominence body and producing vertical structures in an essentially horizontal magnetic field. However, magnetic shear is able to reduce or even to suppress this instability.

  17. MORPHOLOGY AND DYNAMICS OF SOLAR PROMINENCES FROM 3D MHD SIMULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terradas, J.; Soler, R.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Luna, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a numerical study of the time evolution of solar prominences embedded in sheared magnetic arcades. The prominence is represented by a density enhancement in a background-stratified atmosphere and is connected to the photosphere through the magnetic field. By solving the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations in three dimensions, we study the dynamics for a range of parameters representative of real prominences. Depending on the parameters considered, we find prominences that are suspended above the photosphere, i.e., detached prominences, but also configurations resembling curtain or hedgerow prominences whose material continuously connects to the photosphere. The plasma-β is an important parameter that determines the shape of the structure. In many cases magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and oscillatory phenomena develop. Fingers and plumes are generated, affecting the whole prominence body and producing vertical structures in an essentially horizontal magnetic field. However, magnetic shear is able to reduce or even to suppress this instability

  18. Magnetic moment of solar plasma and the Kelvin force: -The driving force of plasma up-flow -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Kiyoto

    2017-04-01

    Thermal plasma in the solar atmosphere is magnetized (diamagnetic). The magnetic moment does not disappear by collisions because complete gyration is not a necessary condition to have magnetic moment. Magnetized fluid is subjected to Kelvin force in non-uniform magnetic field. Generally, magnetic field strength decreases upwards in the solar atmosphere, hence the Kelvin force is directed upwards along the field. This force is not included in the fluid treatment of MHD. By adding the Kelvin force to the MHD equation of motion, we can expect temperature dependent plasma flows along the field which are reported by many observations. The temperature dependence of the flow speed is explained by temperature dependence of magnetic moment. From the observed parameters, we can infer physical parameters in the solar atmosphere such as scale length of the magnetic field strength and the friction force acting on the flowing plasma. In case of closed magnetic field lines, loop-top concentration of hot plasma is expected which is frequently observed.

  19. O2 plasma sintering study of TiO2 photoelectrodes in dye solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, R. S.; Gonçalves, A. D.; Stegemann, C.; da Silva Sobrinho, A. S.; Miyakawa, W.; Massi, M.

    2017-08-01

    The development of more efficient photoelectrochemical solar cells has been, over the years, the subject of many scientific researches. In this paper a methodology was established to carry out the sintering process of nanoporous TiO2 layer by using plasma, which was compared with sintered layers made by the conventional sintering process in a furnace. The TiO2 commercial paste was spread by doctor-blading technique and subjected to different sintering processes. Porous layer samples were subjected to structural and morphological analyses. Then photoelectrodes dye-loading was measured by optical spectrophotometry. The quality of the layers under plasma sintering process in terms of weight loss and removal of organic compounds was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry and FT-IR. The results showed that the plasma sintering process favors the adsorption of dye on the layer surface due to the creation of active states caused by O2 reactive plasma. Furthermore the O2 plasma process provides enough energy for removing organic compounds arising from the TiO2 paste and for providing nanoparticle sintering. Solar cells assembled with the plasma-sintered layers had a power conversion efficiency 20.1% higher than the obtained in solar cells sintered in a conventional furnace, proving the efficiency of the plasma sintering process.

  20. MIT solar wind plasma data from Explorer 33 and Explorer 35: July 1966 to September 1970

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, H.; Binsack, J.; Wang, C.; Clapp, E.

    1971-01-01

    The plasma experiments on Explorer 33 and Explorer 35 have yielded large amounts of solar wind data. This report gives a brief review of the method used to obtain the data, provides a description of the plasma parameters, and describes in detail the format of the plots and tapes which are available from the Data Center. Hourly average plots of the data are included at the end of the report. From these plots, the availability and interest of the solar wind data for any period of time may be determined.

  1. Plasma monitoring and PECVD process control in thin film silicon-based solar cell manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Onno

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A key process in thin film silicon-based solar cell manufacturing is plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD of the active layers. The deposition process can be monitored in situ by plasma diagnostics. Three types of complementary diagnostics, namely optical emission spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and non-linear extended electron dynamics are applied to an industrial-type PECVD reactor. We investigated the influence of substrate and chamber wall temperature and chamber history on the PECVD process. The impact of chamber wall conditioning on the solar cell performance is demonstrated.

  2. Role of Laboratory Plasma Experiments in exploring the Physics of Solar Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, S.

    2017-12-01

    Solar eruptive events are triggered over a broad range of spatio-temporal scales by a variety of fundamental processes (e.g., force-imbalance, magnetic-reconnection, electrical-current driven instabilities) associated with arched magnetoplasma structures in the solar atmosphere. Contemporary research on solar eruptive events is at the forefront of solar and heliospheric physics due to its relevance to space weather. Details on the formation of magnetized plasma structures on the Sun, storage of magnetic energy in such structures over a long period (several Alfven transit times), and their impulsive eruptions have been recorded in numerous observations and simulated in computer models. Inherent limitations of space observations and uncontrolled nature of solar eruptions pose significant challenges in testing theoretical models and developing the predictive capability for space-weather. The pace of scientific progress in this area can be significantly boosted by tapping the potential of appropriately scaled laboratory plasma experiments to compliment solar observations, theoretical models, and computer simulations. To give an example, recent results from a laboratory plasma experiment on arched magnetic flux ropes will be presented and future challenges will be discussed. (Work supported by National Science Foundation, USA under award number 1619551)

  3. The Polarization Signature of Photospheric Magnetic Fields in 3D MHD Simulations and Observations at Disk Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, C. [National Solar Observatory, 3665 Discovery Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Fabbian, D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensytemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Rezaei, R. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, C/Vía Láctea S/N, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Puschmann, K. G., E-mail: cbeck@nso.edu [Alzenau (Germany)

    2017-06-10

    Before using three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations of the solar photosphere in the determination of elemental abundances, one has to ensure that the correct amount of magnetic flux is present in the simulations. The presence of magnetic flux modifies the thermal structure of the solar photosphere, which affects abundance determinations and the solar spectral irradiance. The amount of magnetic flux in the solar photosphere also constrains any possible heating in the outer solar atmosphere through magnetic reconnection. We compare the polarization signals in disk-center observations of the solar photosphere in quiet-Sun regions with those in Stokes spectra computed on the basis of 3D MHD simulations having average magnetic flux densities of about 20, 56, 112, and 224 G. This approach allows us to find the simulation run that best matches the observations. The observations were taken with the Hinode SpectroPolarimeter (SP), the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP), the Polarimetric Littrow Spectrograph (POLIS), and the GREGOR Fabry–Pèrot Interferometer (GFPI), respectively. We determine characteristic quantities of full Stokes profiles in a few photospheric spectral lines in the visible (630 nm) and near-infrared (1083 and 1565 nm). We find that the appearance of abnormal granulation in intensity maps of degraded simulations can be traced back to an initially regular granulation pattern with numerous bright points in the intergranular lanes before the spatial degradation. The linear polarization signals in the simulations are almost exclusively related to canopies of strong magnetic flux concentrations and not to transient events of magnetic flux emergence. We find that the average vertical magnetic flux density in the simulation should be less than 50 G to reproduce the observed polarization signals in the quiet-Sun internetwork. A value of about 35 G gives the best match across the SP, TIP, POLIS, and GFPI observations.

  4. Daytime Solar Heating of Photovoltaic Arrays in Low Density Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galofaro, J.; Vayner, B.; Ferguson, D.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the current work is to determine the out-gassing rate of H2O molecules for a solar array placed under daytime solar heating (full sunlight) conditions typically encountered in a Low Earth Orbital (LEO) environment. Arc rates are established for individual arrays held at 14 C and are used as a baseline for future comparisons. Radiated thermal solar flux incident to the array is simulated by mounting a stainless steel panel equipped with resistive heating elements several centimeters behind the array. A thermal plot of the heater plate temperature and the array temperature as a function of heating time is then obtained. A mass spectrometer is used to record the levels of partial pressure of water vapor in the test chamber after each of the 5 heating/cooling cycles. Each of the heating cycles was set to time duration of 40 minutes to simulate the daytime solar heat flux to the array over a single orbit. Finally the array is cooled back to ambient temperature after 5 complete cycles and the arc rates of the solar arrays is retested. A comparison of the various data is presented with rather some unexpected results.

  5. Plasma phenomena around comets: interaction with the solar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagdeev, R.Z.; Shapiro, V.D.; Shevchenko, V.I.; Szegoe, K.

    1987-08-01

    The most important plasma physical experimental data measured during the cometary missions are summarized. These data do not include tail phenomena. Theoretical considerations are also presented concerning the upstream and bow shock regions. (author) 47 refs.; 15 figs

  6. Modeling of Solar Flare Plasma and Its Radiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Varady, M.; Kašparová, Jana; Moravec, Z.; Heinzel, Petr; Karlický, Marian

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 9 (2010), s. 2249-2253 ISSN 0093-3813 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : Hydrodynamics * particle beam transport * solar radiation Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.070, year: 2010

  7. The solar wind plasma density control of night-time auroral particle precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Vorobjev

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available DMSP F6 and F7 spacecraft observations of the average electron and ion energy, and energy fluxes in different night-time precipitation regions for the whole of 1986 were used to examine the precipitation features associated with solar wind density changes. It was found that during magnetic quietness |AL|<100nT, the enhancement of average ion fluxes was observed at least two times, along with the solar wind plasma density increase from 2 to 24cm–3. More pronounced was the ion flux enhancement that occurred in the b2i–b4s and b4s–b5 regions, which are approximately corresponding to the statistical auroral oval and map to the magnetospheric plasma sheet tailward of the isotropy boundary. The average ion energy decrease of about 2–4kev was registered simultaneously with this ion flux enhancement. The results verify the occurrence of effective penetration of the solar wind plasma into the magnetospheric tail plasma sheet. Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere, particle precipitation – Magnetospheric physics (solar windmagnetosphere interaction

  8. The theory of magnetohydrodynamic wave generation by localized sources. III - Efficiency of plasma heating by dissipation of far-field waves. [in solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, William

    1992-01-01

    The fraction of radiation emitted by Alfven waves is calculated by using two separate methods to determine whether the Alfven flux generated in the photosphere is sufficient to heat the corona. One method employs a set of scaling laws for the fluxes as functions of plasma and source parameters; the second method consist of a procedure for calculating the flux in each waveband from the interaction of vector-harmonic components of an arbitrary applied forcing. Both methods indicate that the Alfven flux accounts roughly for half of the total emission. The need to reexamine estimates of the amount of Alfven flux reaching the corona based on observations of plasma disturbances in the photosphere is emphasized.

  9. Crystalline silicon thin film growth by ECR plasma CVD for solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licai Wang

    1999-07-01

    This thesis describes the background, motivation and work carried out towards this PhD programme entitled 'Crystalline Silicon Thin Film Growth by ECR Plasma CVD for Solar Cells'. The fundamental principles of silicon solar cells are introduced with a review of silicon thin film and bulk solar cells. The development and prospects for thin film silicon solar cells are described. Some results of a modelling study on thin film single crystalline solar cells are given which has been carried out using a commercially available solar cell simulation package (PC-1D). This is followed by a description of thin film deposition techniques. These include Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) and Plasma-Assisted CVD (PACVD). The basic theory and technology of the emerging technique of Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) PACVD, which was used in this research, are introduced and the potential advantages summarised. Some of the basic methods of material and cell characterisation are briefly described, together with the work carried out in this research. The growth by ECR PACVD at temperatures 2 illumination. The best efficiency in the ECR grown structures was 13.76% using an epitaxial emitter. Cell performance was analysed in detail and the factors controlling performance identified by fitting self-consistently the fight and dark current-voltage and spectral response data using PC-1D. Finally, the conclusions for this research and suggestions for further work are outlined. (author)

  10. Investigations into the relationship between spheromak, solar, and astrophysical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellan, P.M.; Hsu, S.C.; Hansen, J.F.; Tokman, M.; Pracko, S.E.; Romero-Talamas, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Spheromaks offer the potential for a simple, low cost fusion reactor and involve physics similar to certain solar and astrophysical phenomena. A program to improve understanding of spheromaks by exploiting this relationship is underway using (i) a planar spheromak gun and (ii) a solar prominence simulator. These devices differ in symmetry but both involve spheromak technology whereby high-voltage is applied across electrodes linking a bias magnetic flux created by external coils. The planar spheromak gun consists of a co-planar disk and annulus linked by a poloidal bias field. Application of high voltage across the gap between disk and annulus drives a current along the bias field. If the current to flux ratio exceeds the inverse of the characteristic linear dimension, a spheromak is ejected. A distinct kink forms just below the ejection threshold. The solar simulation gun consists of two adjacent electromagnets which generate a 'horse-shoe' arched bias field. A current is driven along this arched field by a capacitor bank. The current channel first undergoes pinching, then writhes, and finally bulges outwards due to the hoop force. (author)

  11. The applications of Complexity Theory and Tsallis Non-extensive Statistics at Solar Plasma Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlos, George

    2015-04-01

    As the solar plasma lives far from equilibrium it is an excellent laboratory for testing complexity theory and non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. In this study, we present the highlights of complexity theory and Tsallis non extensive statistical mechanics as concerns their applications at solar plasma dynamics, especially at sunspot, solar flare and solar wind phenomena. Generally, when a physical system is driven far from equilibrium states some novel characteristics can be observed related to the nonlinear character of dynamics. Generally, the nonlinearity in space plasma dynamics can generate intermittent turbulence with the typical characteristics of the anomalous diffusion process and strange topologies of stochastic space plasma fields (velocity and magnetic fields) caused by the strange dynamics and strange kinetics (Zaslavsky, 2002). In addition, according to Zelenyi and Milovanov (2004) the complex character of the space plasma system includes the existence of non-equilibrium (quasi)-stationary states (NESS) having the topology of a percolating fractal set. The stabilization of a system near the NESS is perceived as a transition into a turbulent state determined by self-organization processes. The long-range correlation effects manifest themselves as a strange non-Gaussian behavior of kinetic processes near the NESS plasma state. The complex character of space plasma can also be described by the non-extensive statistical thermodynamics pioneered by Tsallis, which offers a consistent and effective theoretical framework, based on a generalization of Boltzmann - Gibbs (BG) entropy, to describe far from equilibrium nonlinear complex dynamics (Tsallis, 2009). In a series of recent papers, the hypothesis of Tsallis non-extensive statistics in magnetosphere, sunspot dynamics, solar flares, solar wind and space plasma in general, was tested and verified (Karakatsanis et al., 2013; Pavlos et al., 2014; 2015). Our study includes the analysis of solar plasma time

  12. Height-dependent Velocity Structure of Photospheric Convection in Granules and Intergranular Lanes with Hinode /SOT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oba, T. [Department of Space and Astronautical Science/SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Iida, Y. [Department of Science and Technology/Kwansei Gakuin University, Gakuen 2-1, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan); Shimizu, T., E-mail: oba.takayoshi@ac.jaxa.jp [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

    2017-02-10

    The solar photosphere is the visible surface of the Sun, where many bright granules, surrounded by narrow dark intergranular lanes, are observed everywhere. The granular pattern is a manifestation of convective motion at the photospheric level, but its velocity structure in the height direction is poorly understood observationally. Applying bisector analysis to a photospheric spectral line recorded by the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope, we derived the velocity structure of the convective motion in granular regions and intergranular lanes separately. The amplitude of motion of the convective material decreases from 0.65 to 0.40 km s{sup −1} as the material rises in granules, whereas the amplitude of motion increases from 0.30 to 0.50 km s{sup −1} as it descends in intergranular lanes. These values are significantly larger than those obtained in previous studies using bisector analysis. The acceleration of descending materials with depth is not predicted from the convectively stable condition in a stratified atmosphere. Such convective instability can be developed more efficiently by radiative cooling and/or a gas pressure gradient, which can control the dynamical behavior of convective material in intergranular lanes. Our analysis demonstrated that bisector analysis is a useful method for investigating the long-term dynamic behavior of convective material when a large number of pixels is available. In addition, one example is the temporal evolution of granular fragmentation, in which downflowing material develops gradually from a higher layer downward.

  13. The Performance of Silicon Solar Cells Exposed to a Simulated Low Earth Orbit Plasma Environment: Laboratory Ground Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Hameed, Afaf M.; Sabry, M.; Ghitas, Ahmed; El-Tokhy, Fatma S.; Schlosser, Viktor

    2015-12-01

    We have studied the effects of a low earth orbit (LEO) plasma environment on the performance of solar cells. Laboratory ground tests were used to simulate the properties of a low-energy LEO plasma. A Penning plasma source was used to generate plasma from an argon (Ar) gas flow at low pressure (˜10-5 torr) through a vacuum chamber. Diagnostic tools were used to investigate the plasma conditions and their effects on six silicon (Si) solar cells located in the chamber. Alternating current conditions for both biased and unbiased monocrystalline Si solar cells produced from n/ p terrestrial cells with deep junctions were investigated after exposure to plasma fluence for different times up to 14 h. The results obtained confirmed variation of the performance of the cells samples as a consequence of exposure to the plasma.

  14. Plasma depletion layer: its dependence on solar wind conditions and the Earth dipole tilt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Wang

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The plasma depletion layer (PDL is a layer on the sunward side of the magnetopause with lower plasma density and higher magnetic field compared to their corresponding upstream magnetosheath values. It is believed that the PDL is controlled jointly by conditions in the solar wind plasma and the (IMF. In this study, we extend our former model PDL studies by systematically investigating the dependence of the PDL and the slow mode front on solar wind conditions using global MHD simulations. We first point out the difficulties for the depletion factor method and the plasma β method for defining the outer boundary of the plasma depletion layer. We propose to use the N/B ratio to define the PDL outer boundary, which can give the best description of flux tube depletion. We find a strong dependence of the magnetosheath environment on the solar wind magnetosonic Mach number. A difference between the stagnation point and the magnetopause derived from the open-closed magnetic field boundary is found. We also find a strong and complex dependence of the PDL and the slow mode front on the IMF Bz. A density structure right inside the subsolar magnetopause for higher IMF Bz;might be responsible for some of this dependence. Both the IMF tilt and clock angles are found to have little influence on the magnetosheath and the PDL structures. However, the IMF geometry has a much stronger influence on the slow mode fronts in the magnetosheath. Finally, the Earth dipole tilt is found to play a minor role for the magnetosheath geometry and the PDL along the Sun-Earth line. A complex slow mode front geometry is found for cases with different Earth dipole tilts. Comparisons between our results with those from some former studies are conducted, and consistencies and inconsistencies are found. Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetosheath, solar wind-magnetosphere interactions – Space plasma physics (numerical simulation studies

  15. The energy flux of MHD wave modes excited by realistic photospheric drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedun, Viktor; Von Fay-Siebenburgen, Erdélyi Robert; Mumford, Stuart

    The mechanism(s) responsible for solar coronal heating are still an unresolved and challenging task. In the framework of 3D numerical modelling of MHD wave excitation and propagation in the strongly stratified solar atmosphere we analyse the mode coupling and estimate the wave energy partition which can be supplied to the upper layers of the solar atmosphere by locally decomposed slow, fast and Alfven modes. These waves are excited by a number of realistic photospheric drivers which are mimicking the random granular buffeting, the coherent global solar oscillations and swirly motion observed in e.g. magnetic bright points. Based on a self-similar approach, a realistic magnetic flux tubes configuration is constructed and implemented in the VALIIIC model of the solar atmosphere. A novel method for decomposing the velocity perturbations into parallel, perpendicular and azimuthal components in 3D geometry is developed using field lines to trace a volume of constant energy flux. This method is used to identify the excited wave modes propagating upwards from the photosphere and to compute the percentage energy contribution of each mode. We have found, that for all cases where torsional motion is present, the main contribution to the flux (60%) is by Alfven wave. In the case of the vertical driver it is found to mainly excite the fast- and slow-sausage modes and a horizontal driver primarily excites the slow kink mode.

  16. Automated Segmentation of High-Resolution Photospheric Images of Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meng; Tian, Yu; Rao, Changhui

    2018-02-01

    Due to the development of ground-based, large-aperture solar telescopes with adaptive optics (AO) resulting in increasing resolving ability, more accurate sunspot identifications and characterizations are required. In this article, we have developed a set of automated segmentation methods for high-resolution solar photospheric images. Firstly, a local-intensity-clustering level-set method is applied to roughly separate solar granulation and sunspots. Then reinitialization-free level-set evolution is adopted to adjust the boundaries of the photospheric patch; an adaptive intensity threshold is used to discriminate between umbra and penumbra; light bridges are selected according to their regional properties from candidates produced by morphological operations. The proposed method is applied to the solar high-resolution TiO 705.7-nm images taken by the 151-element AO system and Ground-Layer Adaptive Optics prototype system at the 1-m New Vacuum Solar Telescope of the Yunnan Observatory. Experimental results show that the method achieves satisfactory robustness and efficiency with low computational cost on high-resolution images. The method could also be applied to full-disk images, and the calculated sunspot areas correlate well with the data given by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  17. Modeling Vertical Plasma Flows in Solar Filament Barbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinenko, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Speeds of observed flows in quiescent solar filaments are typically much less than the local Alfvén speed. This is why the flows in filament barbs can be modeled by perturbing a local magnetostatic solution describing the balance between the Lorentz force, gravity, and gas pressure in a barb. Similarly, large-scale filament flows can be treated as adiabatically slow deformations of a force-free magnetic equilibrium that describes the global structure of a filament. This approach reconciles current theoretical models with the puzzling observational result that some of the flows appear to be neither aligned with the magnetic field nor controlled by gravity.

  18. Heating and Acceleration of Solar Wind Ions by Turbulent Wave Spectrum in Inhomogeneous Expanding Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, Leon; Ozak, Nataly; Vinas, Adolfo F.

    2016-01-01

    Near the Sun (acceleration, heating, and propagation of the solar wind are likely affected by the background inhomogeneities of the magnetized plasma. The heating and the acceleration of the solar wind ions by turbulent wave spectrum in inhomogeneous plasma is studied using a 2.5D hybrid model. The hybrid model describes the kinetics of the ions, while the electrons are modeled as massless neutralizing fluid in an expanding box approach. Turbulent magnetic fluctuations dominated by power-law frequency spectra, which are evident from in-situ as well as remote sensing measurements, are used in our models. The effects of background density inhomogeneity across the magnetic field on the resonant ion heating are studied. The effect of super- Alfvenic ion drift on the ion heating is investigated. It is found that the turbulent wave spectrum of initially parallel propagating waves cascades to oblique modes, and leads to enhanced resonant ion heating due to the inhomogeneity. The acceleration of the solar wind ions is achieved by the parametric instability of large amplitude waves in the spectrum, and is also affected by the inhomogeneity. The results of the study provide the ion temperature anisotropy and drift velocity temporal evolution due to relaxation of the instability. The non-Maxwellian velocity distribution functions (VDFs) of the ions are modeled in the inhomogeneous solar wind plasma in the acceleration region close to the Sun.

  19. Turbulent Gravito-Electrostatic Sheath (GES) Structure with Kappa-Distributed Electrons for Solar Plasma Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutam, H. P.; Karmakar, P. K.

    2017-12-01

    We report on new characteristic features of the plasma-based gravito-electrostatic sheath (GES) model for solar plasma equilibrium characterization through nonthermal (κ-distributed) electrons composed of both a thermal halo (low-speed) and a suprathermal (high-speed) energy tail. The constituent ions are treated collectively as inertial species. The presence of intrinsic fluid turbulence is included with the help of a proper logatropic equation of state in the ionic momentum conservation law. The analysis is based on the basic physics of space-charge polarization effects, collectively evolving as a plasma sheath, but previously known only for laboratory plasma-scales. We show that the radial location of the solar surface boundary (SSB, inner boundary, diffused), formed by the counteracting GES force balancing, becomes slightly enhanced (by 0.5 on the Jeans scale). The net electric current densities, in both the solar interior and exterior, confirm the universal law of total charge conservation in the presence of geometrical curvature effects. The relevant properties of the new κ-modified equilibrium GES structure are numerically illustrated and discussed. The results are finally compared in the light of existing reports based on the Maxwell-Boltzmann electron distribution. The new outcomes can be extensively expanded to analyze the realistic thermostatistical dynamics of the Sun and its ambient atmosphere, as predicted earlier from various space-based observations.

  20. Identifying and Characterizing Kinetic Instabilities using Solar Wind Observations of Non-Maxwellian Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, K. G.

    2016-12-01

    Weakly collisional plasmas, of the type typically observed in the solar wind, are commonly in a state other than local thermodynamic equilibrium. This deviation from a Maxwellian velocity distribution can be characterized by pressure anisotropies, disjoint beams streaming at differing speeds, leptokurtic distributions at large energies, and other non-thermal features. As these features may be artifacts of dynamic processes, including the the acceleration and expansion of the solar wind, and as the free energy contained in these features can drive kinetic micro-instabilities, accurate measurement and modeling of these features is essential for characterizing the solar wind. After a review of these features, a technique is presented for the efficient calculation of kinetic instabilities associated with a general, non-Maxwellian plasma. As a proof of principle, this technique is applied to bi-Maxwellian systems for which kinetic instability thresholds are known, focusing on parameter scans including beams and drifting heavy minor ions. The application of this technique to fits of velocity distribution functions from current, forthcoming, and proposed missions including WIND, DSCOVR, Solar Probe Plus, and THOR, as well as the underlying measured distribution functions, is discussed. Particular attention is paid to the effects of instrument pointing and integration time, as well as potential deviation between instabilities associated with the Maxwellian fits and those associated with the observed, potentially non-Maxwellian, velocity distribution. Such application may further illuminate the role instabilities play in the evolution of the solar wind.

  1. Plasma deposition of microcrystalline silicon solar cells. Looking beyond the glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donker, M.N. van den

    2006-07-01

    Microcrystalline silicon emerged in the past decade as highly interesting material for application in efficient and stable thin film silicon solar cells. It consists of nanometer-sized crystallites embedded in a micrometer-sized columnar structure, which gradually evolves during the SiH{sub 4} based deposition process starting from an amorphous incubation layer. Understanding of and control over this transient and multi-scale growth process is essential in the route towards low-cost microcrystalline silicon solar cells. This thesis presents an experimental study on the technologically relevant high rate (5-10 Aa s{sup -1}) parallel plate plasma deposition process of state-of-the-art microcrystalline silicon solar cells. The objective of the work was to explore and understand the physical limits of the plasma deposition process as well as to develop diagnostics suitable for process control in eventual solar cell production. Among the developed non-invasive process diagnostics were a pyrometer, an optical spectrometer, a mass spectrometer and a voltage probe. Complete thin film silicon solar cells and modules were deposited and characterized. (orig.)

  2. Stochastic gyroresonant electron acceleration on a low-beta plasma. II - Implications of thermal effects in a solar flare plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James A.; Steinacker, Juergen

    1992-01-01

    We consider the thermal damping of R and L waves under typical solar flare conditions. We find that the thermal particles cause rapid dissipation of the cyclotron waves, but do not affect whistlers and Alfven waves. The dissipation of electron cyclotron waves in particular leads to a threshold energy for acceleration which is about 10 times the thermal energy. Therefore, in the absence of an instability that excites these HF waves, a second mechanism is required in order to inject a sufficient number of electrons above the threshold energy and account for solar flare gamma-ray bremsstrahlung emission. We also find that the comoving gyroresonance, which occurs when the electron is in gyroresonance with an R wave whose group velocity equals the parallel electron velocity, can be realized by relativistic electrons if the plasma temperature is less than or approximately equal to 5,000,000 K.

  3. Solar wind data from the MIT plasma experiments on Pioneer 6 and Pioneer 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, A. J.; Heinemann, M. A.; Mckinnis, R. W.; Bridge, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    Hourly averages are presented of solar wind proton parameters obtained from experiments on the Pioneer 6 and Pioneer 7 spacecraft during the period December 16, 1965 to August 1971. The number of data points available on a given day depends upon the spacecraft-earth distance, the telemetry bit rate, and the ground tracking time allotted to each spacecraft. Thus, the data obtained earlier in the life of each spacecraft are more complete. The solar wind parameters are given in the form of plots and listings. Trajectory information is also given along with a detailed description of the analysis procedures used to extract plasma parameters from the measured data.

  4. Boron profiles in doped amorphous-silicon solar cells formed by plasma ion deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoddart, C.T.H.; Hunt, C.P.; Coleman, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    Amorphous silicon p-n junction solar cells of large area (100 cm 2 ) and having a quantum efficiency approaching 100% in the blue region have been prepared by plasma ion-plating, the p layer being formed from diborane and silane gases in a cathode glow-discharge. Surface secondary ion mass spectrometry combined with ion beam etching was found to be a very sensitive method with high in-depth resolution for obtaining the initial boron-silicon profile of the solar cell p-n junction. (author)

  5. Induced emission of Alfvén waves in inhomogeneous streaming plasma: implications for solar corona heating and solar wind acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinsky, V L; Shevchenko, V I

    2013-07-05

    The results of a self-consistent kinetic model of heating the solar corona and accelerating the fast solar wind are presented for plasma flowing in a nonuniform magnetic field configuration of near-Sun conditions. The model is based on a scale separation between the large transit or inhomogeneity scales and the small dissipation scales. The macroscale instability of the marginally stable particle distribution function compliments the resonant frequency sweeping dissipation of transient Alfvén waves by their induced emission in inhomogeneous streaming plasma that provides enough energy for keeping the plasma temperature decaying not faster than r(-1) in close agreement with in situ heliospheric observations.

  6. A triggering of solar flare by magnetosonic waves in a neutral sheet plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Jun-ichi; Washimi, Haruichi.

    1981-09-01

    A theoretical model of the triggering of a solar flare by magnetosonic waves in a neutral sheet plasma is discussed. It is shown that the ponderomotive force due to the magnetosonic waves strongly excites the plasma convection flow in the magnetic neutral sheet which in turn enhances the tearing instability. The system of basic equations for the tearing mode including the time-averaged nonlinear effects due to the magnetosonic waves is derived and the boundary value problem is solved. The results show that the growth time of the instability is shortened to about 100 sec for reasonable magnetosonic wave intensity. (author)

  7. Numerical simulation of nonlinear beam-plasma interaction for the application to solar radio burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takakura, T.

    1981-01-01

    By the use of semi-analytical method the numerical simulations for the nonlinear scattering of axially symmetric plasma waves into plasma waves and radio waves have been made. The initial electron beam has a finite length and one-dimensional velocity distribution of power law. Induced back-scattering of plasma waves by thermal ions is strong even for a solar electron stream of rather low flux, say 2x10 11 cm -2 above 5 keV at fsub(p) of 40 MHz, which is enough to emit the observed type III bursts as the second harmonic. The ratio between the energy densities of plasma waves and thermal electrons (nkT) is of the order of 10 -6 , which may be a few orders lower than the threshold value for a caviton collapse of the plasma waves to occur. The second harmonic radio emission as attributed to the coalescence of two plasma waves, i.e. one excited by electron beam and one back-scattered by ions, is several orders higher than the fundamental radio emission caused by the scattering of plasma waves by thermal ions. (Auth.)

  8. Transition Region Emission and the Energy Input to Thermal Plasma in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.; Haga, Leah; Raymond, John C.; Panasyuk, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the energetics of solar flares depends on obtaining reliable determinations of the energy input to flare plasma. X-ray observations of the thermal bremsstrahlung from hot flare plasma provide temperatures and emission measures which, along with estimates of the plasma volume, allow the energy content of this hot plasma to be computed. However, if thermal energy losses are significant or if significant energy goes directly into cooler plasma, this is only a lower limit on the total energy injected into thermal plasma during the flare. We use SOHO UVCS observations of O VI flare emission scattered by coronal O VI ions to deduce the flare emission at transition region temperatures between 100,000 K and 1 MK for the 2002 July 23 and other flares. We find that the radiated energy at these temperatures significantly increases the deduced energy input to the thermal plasma, but by an amount that is less than the uncertainty in the computed energies. Comparisons of computed thermal and nonthermal electron energies deduced from RHESSI, GOES, and UVCS are shown.

  9. Plasma waves observed by the IRM and UKS spacecraft during the AMPTE solar wind lithium releases: Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeusler, B.; Woolliscroft, L.J.; Anderson, R.R.; Gurnett, D.A.; Holzworth, R.H.; Koons, H.C.; Bauer, O.H.; Haerendel, G.; Treumann, R.A.; Christiansen, P.J.

    1986-02-01

    The two September 1984 solar wind lithium releases produced a rich variety of plasma waves which have been measured in situ by the plasma wave instrumentation on board the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) IRM and UKS spacecraft. Reflection of the natural galactic and terrestrial electromagnetic radiation from the dense Li plasma caused a cutoff in the high-frequency electric field intensities from which the temporal and spatial variation of the plasma density can be determined. Inside the diamagnetic cavity the electron plasma frequency and also temporarily the Li plasma frequency have been excited.

  10. Correlation of Magnetic Fields with Solar Wind Plasma Parameters at 1AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, F.

    2017-12-01

    The physical parameters of the solar wind observed in-situ near 1AU have been studied for several decades, and relationships between them, such as the positive correlation between the solar wind plasma temperature T and velocity V, and the negative correlation between density N and velocity V, are well known. However, the magnetic field intensity does not appear to be well correlated with any individual plasma parameter. In this paper, we discuss previously under-reported correlations between B and the combined plasma parameters √NV2 as well as between B and √NT. These two correlations are strong during the periods of corotating interaction regions and high speed streams, moderate during intervals of slow solar wind, and rather poor during the passage of interplanetary coronal mass ejections. The results indicate that the magnetic pressure in the solar wind is well correlated both with the plasma dynamic pressure and the thermal pressure. Then, we employ a 3D MHD model to simulate the formation of the relationships between the magnetic strength B and √NV2 as well as √NT observed at 1AU. The inner boundary condition is derived by empirical models, with the magnetic field and density are optional. Five kinds of boundary conditions at the inner boundary of heliosphere are tested. In the cases that the magnetic field is related to speed at the inner boundary, the correlation coefficients between B and √NV2 as well as between B and √NT are even higher than that in the observational results. At 1AU the simulated radial magnetic field shows little latitude dependence, which matches the observation of Ulysses. Most of the modeled characters in these cases are closer to observation than others. This inner boundary condition may more accurately characterize Sun's magnetic influence on the heliosphere. The new input may be able to improve the simulation of CME propagation in the inner heliosphere and the space weather forecasting.

  11. Laboratory Simulations of CME-Solar Wind Interactions Using a Coaxial Gun and Background Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, B. H.; Zhang, Y.; Fisher, D.; Gilmore, M.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding and predicting solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is of critical importance for mitigating their disruptive behavior on ground- and space-based technologies. While predictive models of CME propagation and evolution have relied primarily on sparse in-situ data along with ground and satellite images for validation purposes, emerging laboratory efforts have shown that CME-like events can be created with parameters applicable to the solar regime that may likewise aid in predictive modeling. A modified version of the coaxial plasma gun from the Plasma Bubble Expansion Experiment (PBEX) [A. G. Lynn, Y. Zhang, S. C. Hsu, H. Li, W. Liu, M. Gilmore, and C. Watts, Bull. Amer. Phys. Soc. 52, 53 (2007)] will be used in conjunction with the Helicon-Cathode (HelCat) basic plasma science device in order to observe the magnetic characteristics of CMEs as they propagate through the solar wind. The evolution of these interactions will be analyzed using a multi-tip Langmuir probe array, a 33-position B-dot probe array, and a high speed camera. The results of this investigation will be used alongside the University of Michigan's BATS-R-US 3-D MHD numerical code, which will be used to perform simulations of the coaxial plasma gun experiment. The results of these two approaches will be compared in order to validate the capabilities of the BATS-R-US code as well as to further our understanding of magnetic reconnection and other processes that take place as CMEs propagate through the solar wind. The details of the experimental setup as well as the analytical approach are discussed.

  12. Automated identification and tracking of polar-cap plasma patches at solar minimum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Burston

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A method of automatically identifying and tracking polar-cap plasma patches, utilising data inversion and feature-tracking methods, is presented. A well-established and widely used 4-D ionospheric imaging algorithm, the Multi-Instrument Data Assimilation System (MIDAS, inverts slant total electron content (TEC data from ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS receivers to produce images of the free electron distribution in the polar-cap ionosphere. These are integrated to form vertical TEC maps. A flexible feature-tracking algorithm, TRACK, previously used extensively in meteorological storm-tracking studies is used to identify and track maxima in the resulting 2-D data fields. Various criteria are used to discriminate between genuine patches and "false-positive" maxima such as the continuously moving day-side maximum, which results from the Earth's rotation rather than plasma motion. Results for a 12-month period at solar minimum, when extensive validation data are available, are presented. The method identifies 71 separate structures consistent with patch motion during this time. The limitations of solar minimum and the consequent small number of patches make climatological inferences difficult, but the feasibility of the method for patches larger than approximately 500 km in scale is demonstrated and a larger study incorporating other parts of the solar cycle is warranted. Possible further optimisation of discrimination criteria, particularly regarding the definition of a patch in terms of its plasma concentration enhancement over the surrounding background, may improve results.

  13. Dust in the planetary system: Dust interactions in space plasmas of the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ingrid; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Czechowski, Andrzej

    2014-03-01

    Cosmic dust particles are small solid objects observed in the solar planetary system and in many astronomical objects like the surrounding of stars, the interstellar and even the intergalactic medium. In the solar system the dust is best observed and most often found within the region of the orbits of terrestrial planets where the dust interactions and dynamics are observed directly from spacecraft. Dust is observed in space near Earth and also enters the atmosphere of the Earth where it takes part in physical and chemical processes. Hence space offers a laboratory to study dust-plasma interactions and dust dynamics. A recent example is the observation of nanodust of sizes smaller than 10 nm. We outline the theoretical considerations on which our knowledge of dust electric charges in space plasmas are founded. We discuss the dynamics of the dust particles and show how the small charged particles are accelerated by the solar wind that carries a magnetic field. Finally, as examples for the space observation of cosmic dust interactions, we describe the first detection of fast nanodust in the solar wind near Earth orbit and the first bi-static observations of PMSE, the radar echoes that are observed in the Earth ionosphere in the presence of charged dust.

  14. MODELING THE SUN’S SMALL-SCALE GLOBAL PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, K. A.; Mackay, D. H.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new model for the Sun’s global photospheric magnetic field during a deep minimum of activity, in which no active regions emerge. The emergence and subsequent evolution of small-scale magnetic features across the full solar surface is simulated, subject to the influence of a global supergranular flow pattern. Visually, the resulting simulated magnetograms reproduce the typical structure and scale observed in quiet Sun magnetograms. Quantitatively, the simulation quickly reaches a steady state, resulting in a mean field and flux distribution that are in good agreement with those determined from observations. A potential coronal magnetic field is extrapolated from the simulated full Sun magnetograms to consider the implications of such a quiet photospheric magnetic field on the corona and inner heliosphere. The bulk of the coronal magnetic field closes very low down, in short connections between small-scale features in the simulated magnetic network. Just 0.1% of the photospheric magnetic flux is found to be open at 2.5 R ⊙ , around 10–100 times less than that determined for typical Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager synoptic map observations. If such conditions were to exist on the Sun, this would lead to a significantly weaker interplanetary magnetic field than is currently observed, and hence a much higher cosmic ray flux at Earth.

  15. Coronal Elemental Abundances in Solar Emerging Flux Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Deborah; Brooks, David H.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; James, Alexander W.; Démoulin, Pascal; Long, David M.; Warren, Harry P.; Williams, David R.

    2018-03-01

    The chemical composition of solar and stellar atmospheres differs from the composition of their photospheres. Abundances of elements with low first ionization potential (FIP) are enhanced in the corona relative to high-FIP elements with respect to the photosphere. This is known as the FIP effect and it is important for understanding the flow of mass and energy through solar and stellar atmospheres. We used spectroscopic observations from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on board the Hinode observatory to investigate the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of coronal plasma composition within solar emerging flux regions inside a coronal hole. Plasma evolved to values exceeding those of the quiet-Sun corona during the emergence/early-decay phase at a similar rate for two orders of magnitude in magnetic flux, a rate comparable to that observed in large active regions (ARs) containing an order of magnitude more flux. During the late-decay phase, the rate of change was significantly faster than what is observed in large, decaying ARs. Our results suggest that the rate of increase during the emergence/early-decay phase is linked to the fractionation mechanism that leads to the FIP effect, whereas the rate of decrease during the later decay phase depends on the rate of reconnection with the surrounding magnetic field and its plasma composition.

  16. Morphology of equatorial plasma bubbles during low and high solar activity years over Indian sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, slant total electron content (STEC) data computed from ground based GPS measurements over Hyderabad (Geog. Lat. 17.41° N, geog. long. 78.55° E, mag. lat. 08.81° N) and two close stations at Bangalore (Geog. Lat. 13.02°/13.03° N, geog. long. 77.57°/77.51° E, mag. lat. 04.53°/04.55° N) in Indian region during 2007-2012, have been used to study the occurrences and characteristics of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs). The analysis found maximum EPB occurrences during the equinoctial months and minimum during the December solstice throughout 2007-2012 except during the solar minimum years in 2007-2009. During 2007-2009, the maximum EPB occurrences were observed in June solstice which could not be predicted by the model proposed by Tsunoda (J. Geophys. Res., 90:447-456, 1985). The equinox maximum in EPB occurrences for high solar activity years could be caused by the vertical F-layer drift due to pre-reversal electric field (PRE), and expected to be maximum when day-night terminator aligns with the magnetic meridian i.e. during the equinox months whereas maximum occurrences during the solstice months of solar minimum could be caused by the seed perturbation in plasma density induced by gravity waves from tropospheric origins. Generally EPB occurrences are found to be more prominent during nighttime hours (2000-2400 hours) than the daytime hours. Peak in EPB occurrences is in early night for high solar activity years whereas same is late night for low solar activity. The day and nighttime EPB occurrences have been analyzed and found to vary in accordance with solar activity with an annual correlation coefficient (R) of ˜0.99 with F_{10.7} cm solar Flux. Additionally, solar activity influence on EPB occurrences is seasonal dependent with a maximum influence during the equinox season (R=0.88) and a minimum during winter season (R =0.73). The solar activity influences on EPB occurrences are found in agreement with the previous works reported in

  17. The heating and acceleration actions of the solar plasma wave by QFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    measuring value of one-way velocity of light (H05-0006-08) to replace the infinity value of light speed measured by Galileo in 1607, thereby the mass m in NM will become variable m. Or else, the energy of electron in accelerator should not larger than 0.51Mev which conflict with the experimental fact. According to the variable mass and the definition of force we again get Eq.(1) from NM without hypothesis, i.e., NM is generalized in which Galileo coordinates transformation and the action at a distance will be of no effect. Eq.(1) has more reliable experimental base and generalized NM may be applied to the high-speed and the microscopic conditions. Because of the result of a test of GR with use of a hydrogen-maser frequency standard in a spacecraft launched nearly vertically upward to 10000 km (R. F. C. Vessot et.al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 45, 2081 (1980)), the isotropy of one-way velocity of light had been validated at the 1*10 (-10) level (D2.4-0030-12, H0.1-0009-12, H0.2-0008-12). Again from the Lorentz transformation (H01-0006-08) and the uncertainty principle (H05-0036-10) deduced from the metrical results of Doppler effects, SR and QM, thereby QFT and GR, all become the inferential theorems from generalized NM. Eq.(1) is as a bridge to join the modern physics and classical physics. In my paper ‘Basal electric and magnetic fields of celestial bodies come from positive-negative charge separation caused by gravitation of quasi-Casimir pressure in weak interaction’ (D31-0054-10): According to QFT the gravitation is the statistic average pressure collided by net virtual neutrinos nuν _{0} flux, the net nuν _{0} flux can press a part freedom electrons in plasma of ionosphere into the surface of celestial bodies, the static electric force of redundant positive ions prevents electrons further falling and till reach the equilibrium of stable spatial charge distribution, which is just the cause of the geomagnetic field and the geo-electric field. In the solar surface plasma add

  18. The sun and solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenna-Lawlor, S.

    1982-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: the sun's core (thermonuclear reactions, energy transfer from core through radiation zone, convection zone, photosphere, chromosphere and corona); the photosphere (convection, granulation, sunspots, magnetic fields, solar cycle, rotation of the sun); solar variability and paleoclimatic records (correlation of low solar activity with increased 14 C production in atmosphere); the chromosphere and corona (turbulence, temperature, coronal streamers, energy transfer); solar flares (cosmic rays, aurorae, spectra, velocity of flares, prominences, mechanisms of flares); the solar wind. (U.K.)

  19. Plasma depletion layer: its dependence on solar wind conditions and the Earth dipole tilt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Wang

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The plasma depletion layer (PDL is a layer on the sunward side of the magnetopause with lower plasma density and higher magnetic field compared to their corresponding upstream magnetosheath values. It is believed that the PDL is controlled jointly by conditions in the solar wind plasma and the (IMF. In this study, we extend our former model PDL studies by systematically investigating the dependence of the PDL and the slow mode front on solar wind conditions using global MHD simulations. We first point out the difficulties for the depletion factor method and the plasma β method for defining the outer boundary of the plasma depletion layer. We propose to use the N/B ratio to define the PDL outer boundary, which can give the best description of flux tube depletion. We find a strong dependence of the magnetosheath environment on the solar wind magnetosonic Mach number. A difference between the stagnation point and the magnetopause derived from the open-closed magnetic field boundary is found. We also find a strong and complex dependence of the PDL and the slow mode front on the IMF Bz. A density structure right inside the subsolar magnetopause for higher IMF Bz;might be responsible for some of this dependence. Both the IMF tilt and clock angles are found to have little influence on the magnetosheath and the PDL structures. However, the IMF geometry has a much stronger influence on the slow mode fronts in the magnetosheath. Finally, the Earth dipole tilt is found to play a minor role for the magnetosheath geometry and the PDL along the Sun-Earth line. A complex slow mode front geometry is found for cases with different Earth dipole tilts. Comparisons between our results with those from some former studies are conducted, and consistencies and inconsistencies are found.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetosheath, solar wind-magnetosphere interactions – Space plasma physics (numerical

  20. Evershed effect observed in various solar photospheric lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimoto, K.

    Observational data of the Evershed effect are used to examine the validity of the models to account for the origin of the filamentary structure of the penumbra. The rolling convection model of Danielson (1961) and the elevated dark filament model of Moore (1981) and Cram et al. (1981) are considered. The dependence of the Evershed velocity on the equivalent width at the outer edge of the penumbra is compared with that in the inner penumbra. Also, the dependence of the Evershed velocity on the lower level excitation potential of spectral lines is studied. The results show that the elevated dark filament model produces a better agreement with the observational data than to rolling convection model.

  1. Photospheric, Chromospheric and Helioseismic Signatures of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2003-10-26

    Oct 26, 2003 ... Udaipur Solar Observatory, Physical Research Laboratory, Udaipur 313 001, India. e-mail: ambastha@prl.res.in. Abstract. ... the 3-D power spectra and search for helioseismic response of this large flare on the amplitude, frequency ... The total solar irradiance (TSI) due to this flare recorded an increase by ...

  2. Investigation of solar wind dependence of the plasma sheet based on long-term Geotail/LEP data evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, R.; Seki, K.; Saito, Y.; Shinohara, I.; Miyashita, Y.; Imada, S.; Machida, S.

    2014-12-01

    It is observationally known that the plasma density and temperature in plasma sheet are significantly changed by solar wind conditions [e.g., Terasawa et al., 1997]. Thus it is considered that the plasma sheet plasma is originated from the solar wind, and several entry mechanisms have been suggested. When the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is southward, the solar wind plasma enters the plasma sheet mainly through magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause. In contrast, for the northward IMF, the double-lobe reconnection [Song et al., 1999], abnormal diffusion [Johnson and Cheng., 1997], and plasma mixing through the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability caused by viscous interaction [Hasegawa et al., 2004] have been proposed. Relative contribution of each process is, however, far from understood. In the present study, we use magnetotail observations by the Geotail spacecraft at radial distances of 10-32 Re during 12-year period from 1995 to 2006 to investigate properties of the plasma sheet. We conducted a statistical analysis with calibrated LEP-EA [Mukai et al., 1994] ion and electron data. We selected central plasma sheet observations and derived electron and ion temperature and density using the same method and criteria as Terasawa et al. [1997]. In addition, OMNI solar-wind data are used. The results show that the plasma sheet density (both ion and electron temperatures) has a good correlation with the solar wind density (kinetic energy) over the whole solar cycle. We find clear dawn-dusk asymmetry in the temperature ratio Ti/Te, i.e., the average Ti/Te is higher on the duskside than the dawn. The density also shows the dawn-dusk asymmetry and higher on the duskside than on the dawnside. A previous study by Wang et al. [2012] showed that Ti/Te is high (typically 5-10) in the magnetosheath. The statistical results, therefore, suggest that the shocked solar wind plasma can easily enter the duskside plasma sheet rather than the dawnside. We will discuss the

  3. Penumbral Waves Driving Solar Fan-shaped Chromospheric Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, A.; Henriques, V. M. J.; Mathioudakis, M.; Samanta, T.

    2018-03-01

    We use Hα imaging spectroscopy taken via the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope to investigate the occurrence of fan-shaped jets at the solar limb. We show evidence for near-simultaneous photospheric reconnection at a sunspot edge leading to the jets appearance, with upward velocities of 30 km s‑1, and extensions up to 8 Mm. The brightening at the base of the jets appears recurrent, with a periodicity matching that of the nearby sunspot penumbra, implying running penumbral waves could be the driver of the jets. The jets’ constant extension velocity implies that a driver counteracting solar gravity exists, possibly as a result of the recurrent reconnection erupting material into the chromosphere. These jets also show signatures in higher temperature lines captured from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, indicating a very hot jet front, leaving behind optically thick cool plasma in its wake.

  4. Simulated solar wind plasma interaction with the Martian exosphere: influence of the solar EUV flux on the bow shock and the magnetic pile-up boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Modolo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The solar wind plasma interaction with the Martian exosphere is investigated by means of 3-D multi-species hybrid simulations. The influence of the solar EUV flux on the bow shock and the magnetic pile-up boundary is examined by comparing two simulations describing the two extreme states of the solar cycle. The hybrid formalism allows a kinetic description of each ions species and a fluid description of electrons. The ionization processes (photoionization, electron impact and charge exchange are included self-consistently in the model where the production rate is computed locally, separately for each ionization act and for each neutral species. The results of simulations are in a reasonable agreement with the observations made by Phobos 2 and Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. The position of the bow shock and the magnetic pile-up boundary is weakly dependent of the solar EUV flux. The motional electric field creates strong asymmetries for the two plasma boundaries.

  5. Modeling the hot-dense plasma of the solar interior in and out of thermal equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiao-Hsuan

    The developments in helioseismology ensure a wealth of studies in solar physics. In particular, with the high precision of the observations of helioseismology, a high-quality solar model is mandated, since even the tiny deviations between a model and the real Sun can be detected. One crucial ingredient of any solar model is the thermodynamics of hot-dense plasmas, in particular the equation of state. This has motivated efforts to develop sophisticated theoretical equations of state (EOS). It is important to realize that for the conditions of solar-interior plasmas, there are no terrestrial laboratory experiments; the only observational constraints come from helioseismology. Among the most successful EOS is so called OPAL EOS, which is part of the Opacity Project at Livermore. It is based on an activity expansion of the quantum plasma, and realized in the so-called "physical picture". One of its main competitor is the so called MHD EOS, which is part of the international Opacity Project (OP), a non-classified multi-country consortium. The approach of MHD is via the so-called "chemical picture". Since OPAL is the most accurate equation of state so far, there has been a call for a public-domain version of it. However, the OPAL code remains proprietary, and its "emulation" makes sense. An additional reason for such a project is that the results form OPAL can only be accessed via tables generated by the OPAL team. Their users do not have the flexibility to change the chemical composition from their end. The earlier MHD-based OPAL emulator worked well with its modifications of the MHD equation of state, which is the Planck-Larkin partition function and its corresponding scattering terms. With this modification, MHD can serve as a OPAL emulator with all the flexibility and accessibility. However, to build a really user-friendly OPAL emulator one should consider CEFF-based OPAL emulator. CEFF itself is already widely used practical EOS which can be easily implemented

  6. Enhancing Moisture and Water Resistance in Perovskite Solar Cells by Encapsulation with Ultrathin Plasma Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idígoras, Jesús; Aparicio, Francisco J; Contreras-Bernal, Lidia; Ramos-Terrón, Susana; Alcaire, María; Sánchez-Valencia, Juan Ramón; Borras, Ana; Barranco, Ángel; Anta, Juan A

    2018-03-30

    A compromise between high power conversion efficiency and long-term stability of hybrid organic-inorganic metal halide perovskite solar cells is necessary for their outdoor photovoltaic application and commercialization. Herein, a method to improve the stability of perovskite solar cells under water and moisture exposure consisting of the encapsulation of the cell with an ultrathin plasma polymer is reported. The deposition of the polymer is carried out at room temperature by the remote plasma vacuum deposition of adamantane powder. This encapsulation method does not affect the photovoltaic performance of the tested devices and is virtually compatible with any device configuration independent of the chemical composition. After 30 days under ambient conditions with a relative humidity (RH) in the range of 35-60%, the absorbance of encapsulated perovskite films remains practically unaltered. The deterioration in the photovoltaic performance of the corresponding encapsulated devices also becomes significantly delayed with respect to devices without encapsulation when vented continuously with very humid air (RH > 85%). More impressively, when encapsulated solar devices were immersed in liquid water, the photovoltaic performance was not affected at least within the first 60 s. In fact, it has been possible to measure the power conversion efficiency of encapsulated devices under operation in water. The proposed method opens up a new promising strategy to develop stable photovoltaic and photocatalytic perovskite devices.

  7. Plasma immersion ion implantation of boron for ribbon silicon solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derbouz K.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report for the first time on the solar cell fabrication on n-type silicon RST (for Ribbon on Sacrificial Template using plasma immersion ion implantation. The experiments were also carried out on FZ silicon as a reference. Boron was implanted at energies from 10 to 15 kV and doses from 1015 to 1016 cm-2, then activated by a thermal annealing in a conventional furnace at 900 and 950 °C for 30 min. The n+ region acting as a back surface field was achieved by phosphorus spin-coating. The frontside boron emitter was passivated either by applying a 10 nm deposited SiOX plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD or with a 10 nm grown thermal oxide. The anti-reflection coating layer formed a 60 nm thick SiNX layer. We show that energies less than 15 kV and doses around 5 × 1015 cm-2 are appropriate to achieve open circuit voltage higher than 590 mV and efficiency around 16.7% on FZ-Si. The photovoltaic performances on ribbon silicon are so far limited by the bulk quality of the material and by the quality of the junction through the presence of silicon carbide precipitates at the surface. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that plasma immersion ion implantation is very promising for solar cell fabrication on ultrathin silicon wafers such as ribbons.

  8. Spectral analysis of turbulence propagation mechanisms in solar wind and tokamaks plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Yue

    2014-01-01

    This thesis takes part in the study of spectral transfers in the turbulence of magnetized plasmas. We will be interested in turbulence in solar wind and tokamaks. Spacecraft measures, first principle simulations and simple dynamical systems will be used to understand the mechanisms behind spectral anisotropy and spectral transfers in these plasmas. The first part of this manuscript will introduce the common context of solar wind and tokamaks, what is specific to each of them and present some notions needed to understand the work presented here. The second part deals with turbulence in the solar wind. We will present first an observational study on the spectral variability of solar wind turbulence. Starting from the study of Grappin et al. (1990, 1991) on Helios mission data, we bring a new analysis taking into account a correct evaluation of large scale spectral break, provided by the higher frequency data of the Wind mission. This considerably modifies the result on the spectral index distribution of the magnetic and kinetic energy. A second observational study is presented on solar wind turbulence anisotropy using autocorrelation functions. Following the work of Matthaeus et al. (1990); Dasso et al. (2005), we bring a new insight on this statistical, in particular the question of normalisation choices used to build the autocorrelation function, and its consequence on the measured anisotropy. This allows us to bring a new element in the debate on the measured anisotropy depending on the choice of the referential either based on local or global mean magnetic field. Finally, we study for the first time in 3D the effects of the transverse expansion of solar wind on its turbulence. This work is based on a theoretical and numerical scheme developed by Grappin et al. (1993); Grappin and Velli (1996), but never used in 3D. Our main results deal with the evolution of spectral and polarization anisotropy due to the competition between non-linear and linear (Alfven coupling

  9. Diagnostics of the solar corona from comparison between Faraday rotation measurements and magnetohydrodynamic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Chat, G.; Cohen, O. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Kasper, J. C. [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Spangler, S. R., E-mail: gaetan.lechat@obspm.fr [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2014-07-10

    Polarized natural radio sources passing behind the Sun experience Faraday rotation as a consequence of the electron density and magnetic field strength in coronal plasma. Since Faraday rotation is proportional to the product of the density and the component of the magnetic field along the line of sight of the observer, a model is required to interpret the observations and infer coronal structures. Faraday rotation observations have been compared with relatively ad hoc models of the corona. Here for the first time we compare these observations with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the solar corona driven by measurements of the photospheric magnetic field. We use observations made with the NRAO Very Large Array of 34 polarized radio sources occulted by the solar corona between 5 and 14 solar radii. The measurements were made during 1997 May, and 2005 March and April. We compare the observed Faraday rotation values with values extracted from MHD steady-state simulations of the solar corona. We find that (1) using a synoptic map of the solar magnetic field just one Carrington rotation off produces poorer agreements, meaning that the outer corona changes in the course of one month, even in solar minimum; (2) global MHD models of the solar corona driven by photospheric magnetic field measurements are generally able to reproduce Faraday rotation observations; and (3) some sources show significant disagreement between the model and the observations, which appears to be a function of the proximity of the line of sight to the large-scale heliospheric current sheet.

  10. Diagnostics of the solar corona from comparison between Faraday rotation measurements and magnetohydrodynamic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Chat, G.; Cohen, O.; Kasper, J. C.; Spangler, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Polarized natural radio sources passing behind the Sun experience Faraday rotation as a consequence of the electron density and magnetic field strength in coronal plasma. Since Faraday rotation is proportional to the product of the density and the component of the magnetic field along the line of sight of the observer, a model is required to interpret the observations and infer coronal structures. Faraday rotation observations have been compared with relatively ad hoc models of the corona. Here for the first time we compare these observations with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the solar corona driven by measurements of the photospheric magnetic field. We use observations made with the NRAO Very Large Array of 34 polarized radio sources occulted by the solar corona between 5 and 14 solar radii. The measurements were made during 1997 May, and 2005 March and April. We compare the observed Faraday rotation values with values extracted from MHD steady-state simulations of the solar corona. We find that (1) using a synoptic map of the solar magnetic field just one Carrington rotation off produces poorer agreements, meaning that the outer corona changes in the course of one month, even in solar minimum; (2) global MHD models of the solar corona driven by photospheric magnetic field measurements are generally able to reproduce Faraday rotation observations; and (3) some sources show significant disagreement between the model and the observations, which appears to be a function of the proximity of the line of sight to the large-scale heliospheric current sheet.

  11. Ion-Scale Spectral Break in the Normal Plasma Beta Range in the Solar Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Tu, C.-Y.; He, J.-S.; Wang, L.-H.

    2018-01-01

    The spectral break (fb) of magnetic fluctuations at the ion scale in the solar wind is considered to give important clue on the turbulence dissipation mechanism. Among several possible mechanisms, the most notable two are related respectively to proton thermal gyroradius ρi and proton inertial length di. The corresponding frequencies of them are fρi=VSW/(2πρi) and fdi=VSW/(2πdi), respectively, where VSW is the solar wind speed. However, no definite conclusion has been given for which one is more reasonable because the two parameters have similar value when plasma beta β ˜ 1. Here we do a statistical study to see if the two ratios fb/fρi and fb/fdi have different dependence on β in the solar wind turbulence with 0.1 fdi is statistically not dependent on β, and the average value of it is 0.48 ± 0.06. However, fb/fρi increases with increasing β clearly and is significantly smaller than fb/fdi when β fdi, and the influence of β could be negligible in the studied β range. It indicates a preference of the dissipation mechanism associated with di in the solar wind with 0.1 < β < 0.8. Further theoretical studies are needed to give detailed explanation.

  12. Real-time 3-D hybrid simulation of Titan's plasma interaction during a solar wind excursion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Simon

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The plasma environment of Saturn's largest satellite Titan is known to be highly variable. Since Titan's orbit is located within the outer magnetosphere of Saturn, the moon can leave the region dominated by the magnetic field of its parent body in times of high solar wind dynamic pressure and interact with the thermalized magnetosheath plasma or even with the unshocked solar wind. By applying a three-dimensional hybrid simulation code (kinetic description of ions, fluid electrons, we study in real-time the transition that Titan's plasma environment undergoes when the moon leaves Saturn's magnetosphere and enters the supermagnetosonic solar wind. In the simulation, the transition between both plasma regimes is mimicked by a reversal of the magnetic field direction as well as a change in the composition and temperature of the impinging plasma flow. When the satellite enters the solar wind, the magnetic draping pattern in its vicinity is reconfigured due to reconnection, with the characteristic time scale of this process being determined by the convection of the field lines in the undisturbed plasma flow at the flanks of the interaction region. The build-up of a bow shock ahead of Titan takes place on a typical time scale of a few minutes as well. We also analyze the erosion of the newly formed shock front upstream of Titan that commences when the moon re-enters the submagnetosonic plasma regime of Saturn's magnetosphere. Although the model presented here is far from governing the full complexity of Titan's plasma interaction during a solar wind excursion, the simulation provides important insights into general plasma-physical processes associated with such a disruptive change of the upstream flow conditions.

  13. An extensive VLT/X-shooter library of photospheric templates of pre-main sequence stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, C. F.; Frasca, A.; Alcalá, J. M.; Natta, A.; Stelzer, B.; Testi, L.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Studies of the formation and evolution of young stars and their disks rely on knowledge of the stellar parameters of the young stars. The derivation of these parameters is commonly based on comparison with photospheric template spectra. Furthermore, chromospheric emission in young active stars impacts the measurement of mass accretion rates, a key quantity for studying disk evolution. Aims: Here we derive stellar properties of low-mass (M⋆≲ 2 M⊙) pre-main sequence stars without disks, which represent ideal photospheric templates for studies of young stars. We also use these spectra to constrain the impact of chromospheric emission on the measurements of mass accretion rates. The spectra are reduced, flux-calibrated, and corrected for telluric absorption, and are made available to the community. Methods: We derive the spectral type for our targets by analyzing the photospheric molecular features present in their VLT/X-shooter spectra by means of spectral indices and comparison of the relative strength of photospheric absorption features. We also measure effective temperature, gravity, projected rotational velocity, and radial velocity from our spectra by fitting them with synthetic spectra with the ROTFIT tool. The targets have negligible extinction (AVpresented in our previous publication. We perform synthetic photometry on the spectra to derive the typical colors of young stars in different filters. We measure the luminosity of the emission lines present in the spectra and estimate the noise due to chromospheric emission in the measurements of accretion luminosity in accreting stars. Results: We provide a calibration of the photospheric colors of young pre-main sequence stars as a function of their spectral type in a set of standard broad-band optical and near-infrared filters. The logarithm of the noise on the accretion luminosity normalized to the stellar luminosity is roughly constant and equal to -2.3 for targets with masses larger than 1 solar

  14. Proton gyroresonance with parallel waves in a low-beta solar flare plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinacker, Juergen; Miller, James A.

    1992-01-01

    We consider the gyroresonant interaction of protons with parallel electromagnetic plasma waves. These waves have either right- or left-hand circular polarization and include as a subset Alfven and whistler waves. We identify three comoving gyroresonances, which can lead to divergences in the Fokker-Planck coefficients. Taking into account thermal damping, we calculate the Fokker-Planck coefficient along with momentum diffusion coefficient D(p) and the mean-free path. Resulting acceleration time scales are compared with solar flare observations.

  15. Beam-driven return current instability and anomalous plasma heating in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, D.; McQuillan, P.; Brown, J. C.

    1988-09-01

    The authors consider the problem of ion-acoustic wave generation, and resultant anomalous Joule heating, by a return current driven unstable by a small-area thick-target electron beam in solar flares. They demonstrate the existence of two quite distinct types of ion-acoustic unstable heating regimes: marginally stable heating and a "catastrophic" heating regime. For the marginally stable case electron and ion heating equations are solved numerically. Rapid anomalous Ohmic heating occurs then in a substantial plasma volume. This large hot plasma emits thermal bremsstrahlung hard X-rays (⪆20 keV) comparable to, or exceeding, the nonthermal bremsstrahlung. This means that with small beam areas, this indirect mechanism can result in a higher hard X-ray bremsstrahlung efficiency than in a conventional collisional thick target. The catastrophic heating regime is discussed qualitatively.

  16. Influence of O2 plasma treatment on NiO x layer in perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishihara, Yoshihiko; Chikamatsu, Masayuki; Kazaoui, Said; Miyadera, Tetsuhiko; Yoshida, Yuji

    2018-04-01

    We fabricated perovskite solar cells (PSCs) with an inverted p-i-n planar structure using a NiO x film as a hole-transporting layer. Since the surface of the NiO x film fabricated by sputtering is hydrophobic, O2 plasma treatment under various conditions was performed to improve its wettability. Water contact angles after the treatment under both normal and weak conditions on the NiO x film reached approximately 15°. After the treatment, the valence band level of the NiO x film was deeper by about 0.15 eV. The maximum efficiency of the NiO x -based device under the optimized O2 plasma condition reached 12.3%.

  17. Disturbance zonal and vertical plasma drifts in the Peruvian sector during solar minimum phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A. M.; Abdu, M. A.; Souza, J. R.; Sobral, J. H. A.; Batista, I. S.

    2016-03-01

    In the present work, we investigate the behavior of the equatorial F region zonal plasma drifts over the Peruvian region under magnetically disturbed conditions during two solar minimum epochs, one of them being the recent prolonged solar activity minimum. The study utilizes the vertical and zonal components of the plasma drifts measured by the Jicamarca (11.95°S; 76.87°W) incoherent scatter radar during two events that occurred on 10 April 1997 and 24 June 2008 and model calculation of the zonal drift in a realistic ionosphere simulated by the Sheffield University Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model-INPE. Two main points are focused: (1) the connection between electric fields and plasma drifts under prompt penetration electric field during a disturbed periods and (2) anomalous behavior of daytime zonal drift in the absence of any magnetic storm. A perfect anticorrelation between vertical and zonal drifts was observed during the night and in the initial and growth phases of the magnetic storm. For the first time, based on a realistic low-latitude ionosphere, we will show, on a detailed quantitative basis, that this anticorrelation is driven mainly by a vertical Hall electric field induced by the primary zonal electric field in the presence of an enhanced nighttime E region ionization. It is shown that an increase in the field line-integrated Hall-to-Pedersen conductivity ratio (∑H/∑P), which can arise from precipitation of energetic particles in the region of the South American Magnetic Anomaly, is capable of explaining the observed anticorrelation between the vertical and zonal plasma drifts. Evidence for the particle ionization is provided from the occurrence of anomalous sporadic E layers over the low-latitude station, Cachoeira Paulista (22.67°S; 44.9°W)—Brazil. It will also be shown that the zonal plasma drift reversal to eastward in the afternoon two hours earlier than its reference quiet time pattern is possibly caused by weakening of the zonal wind

  18. Thermal Structure of Supra-Arcade Plasma in Two Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Katharine K.; Savage, Sabrina; McKenzie, David E.; Weber, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we use Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA data to determine the thermal structure of supra-arcade plasma in two solar flares. The first flare is a Ml.2 flare that occurred on November 5, 2010 on the east limb. This flare was one of a series of flares from AR 11121, published in Reeves & Golub (2011). The second flare is an XI.7 flare that occurred on January 27, 2012 on the west limb. This flare exhibits visible supra-arcade downflows (SADs), where the November 2010 flare does not. For these two flares we combine XRT and AlA data to calculate DEMs of each pixel in the supra-arcade plasma, giving insight into the temperature and density structures in the fan of plasma above the post-flare arcade. We find in each case that the supra-arcade plasma is around 10 MK, and there is a marked decrease in the emission measure in the SADs. We also compare the DEMs calculated with the combined AIA/XRT dataset to those calculated using AIA alone.

  19. Structure and dynamics of the solar chromosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijger, Johannes Mattheus

    2002-01-01

    The thesis "Structure and dynamics of the solar chromosphere" of J.M. Krijger is a study on the behavior of the solar chromosphere, the thin layer just above the solar surface (photosphere) visible in purple red light during a total solar eclipse. The most important result of this thesis is that the

  20. The Parametric Decay Instability of Alfvén Waves in Turbulent Plasmas and the Applications in the Solar Wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Mijie; Xiao, Chijie; Wang, Xiaogang [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Fusion Simulation Center, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Hui, E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2017-06-10

    We perform three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to study the parametric decay instability (PDI) of Alfvén waves in turbulent plasmas and explore its possible applications in the solar wind. We find that, over a broad range of parameters in background turbulence amplitudes, the PDI of an Alfvén wave with various amplitudes can still occur, though its growth rate in turbulent plasmas tends to be lower than both the theoretical linear theory prediction and that in the non-turbulent situations. Spatial–temporal FFT analyses of density fluctuations produced by the PDI match well with the dispersion relation of the slow MHD waves. This result may provide an explanation of the generation mechanism of slow waves in the solar wind observed at 1 au. It further highlights the need to explore the effects of density variations in modifying the turbulence properties as well as in heating the solar wind plasmas.

  1. Solar Wind Plasma Interaction with Asteroid 16 Psyche: Implication for Formation Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, Shahab; Poppe, Andrew R.

    2018-01-01

    The asteroid 16 Psyche is a primitive metal-rich asteroid that has not yet been visited by spacecraft. Based on remote observations, Psyche is most likely composed of iron and nickel metal; however, the history of its formation and solidification is still unknown. If Psyche is a remnant core of a differentiated planetesimal exposed by collisions, it opens a unique window toward understanding the cores of the terrestrial bodies, including the Earth and Mercury. If not, it is perhaps a reaccreted rubble pile that has never melted. In the former case, Psyche may have a remanent, dipolar magnetic field; in the latter case, Psyche may have no intrinsic field, but nevertheless would be a conductive object in the solar wind. We use Advanced Modeling Infrastructure in Space Simulation (AMITIS), a three-dimensional GPU-based hybrid model of plasma that self-consistently couples the interior electromagnetic response of Psyche (i.e., magnetic diffusion) to its ambient plasma environment in order to quantify the different interactions under these two cases. The model results provide estimates for the electromagnetic environment of Psyche, showing that the magnetized case and the conductive case present very different signatures in the solar wind. These results have implications for an accurate interpretation of magnetic field observations by NASA's Discovery mission (Psyche mission) to the asteroid 16 Psyche.

  2. Mini-magnetospheric plasma propulsion (M2P2): High speed propulsion sailing the solar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winglee, Robert; Slough, John; Ziemba, Tim; Goodson, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    Mini-Magnetospheric Plasma Propulsion (M2P2) seeks the creation of a magnetic wall or bubble (i.e. a magnetosphere) that will intercept the supersonic solar wind which is moving at 300-800 km/s. In so doing, a force of about 1 N will be exerted on the spacecraft by the spacecraft while only requiring a few mN of force to sustain the mini-magnetosphere. Equivalently, the incident solar wind power is about 1 MW while about 1 kW electrical power is required to sustain the system, with about 0.25-0.5 kg being expended per day. This nominal configuration utilizing only solar electric cells for power, the M2P2 will produce a magnetic barrier approximately 15-20 km in radius, which would accelerate a 70-140 kg payload to speeds of about 50-80 km/s. At this speed, missions to the heliopause and beyond can be achieved in under 10 yrs. Design characteristics for a prototype are also described

  3. Expanding Thermal Plasma Chemical Vapour Deposition of ZnO:Al Layers for CIGS Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al grown by expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition (ETP-CVD has demonstrated excellent electrical and optical properties, which make it an attractive candidate as a transparent conductive oxide for photovoltaic applications. However, when depositing ZnO:Al on CIGS solar cell stacks, one should be aware that high substrate temperature processing (i.e., >200°C can damage the crucial underlying layers/interfaces (such as CIGS/CdS and CdS/i-ZnO. In this paper, the potential of adopting ETP-CVD ZnO:Al in CIGS solar cells is assessed: the effect of substrate temperature during film deposition on both the electrical properties of the ZnO:Al and the eventual performance of the CIGS solar cells was investigated. For ZnO:Al films grown using the high thermal budget (HTB condition, lower resistivities, ρ, were achievable (~5 × 10−4 Ω·cm than those grown using the low thermal budget (LTB conditions (~2 × 10−3 Ω·cm, whereas higher CIGS conversion efficiencies were obtained for the LTB condition (up to 10.9% than for the HTB condition (up to 9.0%. Whereas such temperature-dependence of CIGS device parameters has previously been linked with chemical migration between individual layers, we demonstrate that in this case it is primarily attributed to the prevalence of shunt currents.

  4. On the presence of electric currents in the solar atmosphere. I - A theoretical framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagyard, M.; Low, B. C.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1981-01-01

    The general magnetic field above the solar photosphere is divided by an elementary analysis based on Ampere's law into two parts: a potential field due to electric currents below the photosphere and a field produced by electric currents above the photosphere combined with the induced mirror currents. The latter, by symmetry, has a set of field lines lying in the plane taken to be the photosphere which may be constructed from given vector magnetograph measurements. These field lines also represent all the information on the electric currents above the photosphere that a magnetograph can provide. Theoretical illustrations are given, and implications for data analysis are discussed.

  5. New View on Quiet-Sun Photospheric Dynamics Offered by NST Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramenko, Valentyna; Yurchyshyn, V.; Goode, P. R.

    2011-05-01

    Recent observations of the quiet sun photosphere obtained with the 1.6 meter New Solar telescope (NST) of Big Bear Solar observatory (BBSO) delivered new information about photospheric fine structures and their dynamics, as well as posing new questions. The 2-hour uninterrupted data set of solar granulation obtained under excellent seeing conditions on August 3, 2010 (with cadence of 10 sec) was the basis for the study. Statistical analysis of automatically detected and tracked magnetic bright points (MBPs) showed that the MBPs population monotonically increases as their size decreases, down to 60-70 km. Our analysis shows that if the smallest magnetic flux tubes exist, their size is still smaller that 60-70 km, which impose strong restrictions on the modeling of these structures. We also found that the distributions of the MBP's size and lifetime do not follow a traditional Gaussian distribution, typical for random processes. Instead, it follows a log-normal distribution, typical for avalanches, catastrophes, stock market data, etc. Our data set also demonstrated that a majority (98.6 %) of MBPs are short live (<2 min). This remarkable fact was not obvious from previous studies because an extremely high time cadence was required. The fact indicates that the majority of MBPs appear for a very short time (tens of seconds), similar to other transient features, for example, chromospheric jets. The most important point here is that these small and short living MBPs significantly increase dynamics (flux emergence, collapse into MBPs, and magnetic flux recycling) of the solar surface magnetic fields.

  6. The "FIP Effect" and the Origins of Solar Energetic Particles and of the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reames, Donald V.

    2018-03-01

    We find that the element abundances in solar energetic particles (SEPs) and in the slow solar wind (SSW), relative to those in the photosphere, show different patterns as a function of the first ionization potential (FIP) of the elements. Generally, the SEP and SSW abundances reflect abundance samples of the solar corona, where low-FIP elements, ionized in the chromosphere, are more efficiently conveyed upward to the corona than high-FIP elements that are initially neutral atoms. Abundances of the elements, especially C, P, and S, show a crossover from low to high FIP at {≈} 10 eV in the SEPs but {≈} 14 eV for the solar wind. Naively, this seems to suggest cooler plasma from sunspots beneath active regions. More likely, if the ponderomotive force of Alfvén waves preferentially conveys low-FIP ions into the corona, the source plasma that eventually will be shock-accelerated as SEPs originates in magnetic structures where Alfvén waves resonate with the loop length on closed magnetic field lines. This concentrates FIP fractionation near the top of the chromosphere. Meanwhile, the source of the SSW may lie near the base of diverging open-field lines surrounding, but outside of, active regions, where such resonance does not exist, allowing fractionation throughout the chromosphere. We also find that energetic particles accelerated from the solar wind itself by shock waves at corotating interaction regions, generally beyond 1 AU, confirm the FIP pattern of the solar wind.

  7. The heating of the thermal plasma with energetic electrons in small solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H. A.; Lin, R. P.

    1986-01-01

    The energetic electrons deduced from hard X-rays in the thick target model may be responsible for heating of soft X-ray plasma in solar flares. It is shown from OSO-7 studies that if a cutoff of 10 keV is assumed, the total electron is comparable to the thermal plasma energy. However, (1) the soft X-ray emission often appears to begin before the hard X-ray burst, (2) in about one-third of flares there is no detectable hard X-ray emission, and (3) for most events the energy content (assuming constant density) of soft X-ray plasma continues to rise after the end of the hard X-ray burst. To understand these problems we have analyzed the temporal relationship between soft X-rays and hard X-rays for 20 small events observed by ISEE-3 during 1980. One example is shown. The start of soft X-ray and hard X-ray bursts is defined as the time when the counting rates of the 4.8 to 5. keV and 25.8 to 43.2 keV channels, respectively, exceed the background by one standard deviation.

  8. Densities and mass motions in transition-zone plasmas in solar flares observed from Skylab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, C.-C.

    1980-01-01

    The electron densities and bulk motions in the transition-zone plasma of a solar flare are investigated by an analysis of EUV emission line spectra taken on Skylab. Spectra of three flares were obtained with the NRL normal incidence grating slit spectrograph in the ranges 1100-1940 and 1940-3940 A. The line ratios of transition-zone Si III lines and the intensity of the forbidden O IV 1401-A lines during flare maximum indicate electron densities on the order of 10 to the 12th/cu cm, decreasing by a factor of 2 to 3 in the flare decay phase. Line broadening of the transition-zone ions such as Si III, O IV, C IV and N V is noted, and the observed asymmetrical N V line profiles are approximated by a bi-Gaussian model of a stationary and a moving plasma component with a bulk velocity of 12 to 70 km/sec. Turbulent velocities of from 45 to 85 km/sec and from 20 to 40 km/sec are also indicated for the moving and stationary components of the transition-zone plasma, respectively.

  9. Equatorial plasma bubbles and L-band scintillations in Africa during solar minimum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Paznukhov

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We report on the longitudinal, local time and seasonal occurrence of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs and L band (GPS scintillations over equatorial Africa. The measurements were made in 2010, as a first step toward establishing the climatology of ionospheric irregularities over Africa. The scintillation intensity is obtained by measuring the standard deviation of normalized GPS signal power. The EPBs are detected using an automated technique, where spectral analysis is used to extract and identify EPB events from the GPS TEC measurements. Overall, the observed seasonal climatology of the EPBs as well as GPS scintillations in equatorial Africa is adequately explained by geometric arguments, i.e., by the alignment of the solar terminator and local geomagnetic field, or STBA hypothesis (Tsunoda, 1985, 2010a. While plasma bubbles and scintillations are primarily observed during equinoctial periods, there are longitudinal differences in their seasonal occurrence statistics. The Atlantic sector has the most intense, longest lasting, and highest scintillation occurrence rate in-season. There is also a pronounced increase in the EPB occurrence rate during the June solstice moving west to east. In Africa, the seasonal occurrence shifts towards boreal summer solstice, with fewer occurrences and shorter durations in equinox seasons. Our results also suggest that the occurrence of plasma bubbles and GPS scintillations over Africa are well correlated, with scintillation intensity depending on depletion depth. A question remains about the possible physical mechanisms responsible for the difference in the occurrence phenomenology of EPBs and GPS scintillations between different regions in equatorial Africa.

  10. A High Temperature Liquid Plasma Model of the Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a liquid model of the Sun is presented wherein the entire solar mass is viewed as a high density/high energy plasma. This model challenges our current understanding of the densities associated with the internal layers of the Sun, advocating a relatively constant density, almost independent of radial position. The incompressible nature of liquids is advanced to prevent solar collapse from gravitational forces. The liquid plasma model of the Sun is a non-equilibrium approach, where nuclear reactions occur throughout the solar mass. The primary means of addressing internal heat transfer are convection and conduction. As a result of the convective processes on the solar surface, the liquid model brings into question the established temperature of the solar photosphere by highlighting a violation of Kirchhoff’s law of thermal emission. Along these lines, the model also emphasizes that radiative emission is a surface phenomenon. Evidence that the Sun is a high density/high energy plasma is based on our knowledge of Planckian thermal emission and condensed matter, including the existence of pressure ionization and liquid metallic hydrogen at high temperatures and pressures. Prior to introducing the liquid plasma model, the historic and scientific justifications for the gaseous model of the Sun are reviewed and the gaseous equations of state are also discussed.

  11. Solitary wave propagation in solar flux tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdelyi, Robert; Fedun, Viktor

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate the excitation, time-dependent dynamic evolution, and interaction of nonlinear propagating (i.e., solitary) waves on vertical cylindrical magnetic flux tubes in compressible solar atmospheric plasma. The axisymmetric flux tube has a field strength of 1000 G at its footpoint, which is typical for photospheric regions. Nonlinear waves that develop into solitary waves are excited by a footpoint driver. The propagation of the nonlinear signal is investigated by solving numerically a set of fully nonlinear 2.0D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in cylindrical coordinates. For the initial conditions, axisymmetric solutions of the linear dispersion relation for wave modes in a magnetic flux tube are applied. In the present case, we focus on the sausage mode only. The dispersion relation is solved numerically for a range of plasma parameters. The equilibrium state is perturbed by a Gaussian at the flux tube footpoint. Two solitary solutions are found by solving the full nonlinear MHD equations. First, the nonlinear wave propagation with external sound speed is investigated. Next, the solitary wave propagating close to the tube speed, also found in the numerical solution, is studied. In contrast to previous analytical and numerical works, here no approximations were made to find the solitary solutions. A natural application of the present study may be spicule formation in the low chromosphere. Future possible improvements in modeling and the relevance of the photospheric chromospheric transition region coupling by spicules is suggested

  12. Perovskite solar cells based on nanocolumnar plasma-deposited ZnO thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, F Javier; López-Santos, Maria C; Guillén, Elena; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Grätzel, Michael; Gonzalez-Elipe, Agustin R; Ahmad, Shahzada

    2014-04-14

    ZnO thin films having a nanocolumnar microstructure are grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at 423 K on pre-treated fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates. The films consist of c-axis-oriented wurtzite ZnO nanocolumns with well-defined microstructure and crystallinity. By sensitizing CH3NH3PbI3 on these photoanodes a power conversion of 4.8% is obtained for solid-state solar cells. Poly(triarylamine) is found to be less effective when used as the hole-transport material, compared to 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenylamine)-9,9'-spirobifluorene (spiro-OMeTAD), while the higher annealing temperature of the perovskite leads to a better infiltration in the nanocolumnar structure and an enhancement of the cell efficiency. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Generation of type III solar radio bursts: the role of induced scattering of plasma waves by ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, B.N.; Lerner, A.M.; Rapoport, V.O.

    1984-01-01

    The plasma waves in type III solar radio-burst sources might have a spectrum which can explain why, in the quasilinear burst generation model, nonlinear scattering of the waves by ions is so weak. The agent exciting a burst would travel through the corona at velocities limited to a definite range

  14. Incorporation of a Generalized Data Assimilation Module within a Global Photospheric Flux Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Table of Contents 1. INTRODUCTION...Traditional Photospheric Magnetic Flux Synoptic Maps .........................................................1 2.2 Photospheric Flux Transport Models...4 3. WH model evolved synoptic map (latitude vs. longitude

  15. Twist of Magnetic Fields in Solar Active Regions Hongqi Zhang ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    twisted field (current helicity) in the photosphere (Seehafer 1990; Pevtsov et al. 1995;. Bao & Zhang 1998). Bao & Zhang (1998) and Zhang & Bao (1999) computed the photospheric current helicity parameter h|| for 422 active regions, including most of the large ones observed in the period of 1988 1997 at Huairou Solar ...

  16. Double plasma resonance instability as a source of solar zebra emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benáček, J.; Karlický, M.

    2018-03-01

    Context. The double plasma resonance (DPR) instability plays a basic role in the generation of solar radio zebras. In the plasma, consisting of the loss-cone type distribution of hot electrons and much denser and colder background plasma, this instability generates the upper-hybrid waves, which are then transformed into the electromagnetic waves and observed as radio zebras. Aims: In the present paper we numerically study the double plasma resonance instability from the point of view of the zebra interpretation. Methods: We use a 3-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell (3D PIC) relativistic model. We use this model in two versions: (a) a spatially extended "multi-mode" model and (b) a spatially limited "specific-mode" model. While the multi-mode model is used for detailed computations and verifications of the results obtained by the "specific-mode" model, the specific-mode model is used for computations in a broad range of model parameters, which considerably save computational time. For an analysis of the computational results, we developed software tools in Python. Results: First using the multi-mode model, we study details of the double plasma resonance instability. We show how the distribution function of hot electrons changes during this instability. Then we show that there is a very good agreement between results obtained by the multi-mode and specific-mode models, which is caused by a dominance of the wave with the maximal growth rate. Therefore, for computations in a broad range of model parameters, we use the specific-mode model. We compute the maximal growth rates of the double plasma resonance instability with a dependence on the ratio between the upper-hybrid ωUH and electron-cyclotron ωce frequency. We vary temperatures of both the hot and background plasma components and study their effects on the resulting growth rates. The results are compared with the analytical ones. We find a very good agreement between numerical and analytical growth

  17. Opportunities for Utilizing the International Space Station for Studies of F2- Region Plasma Science and High Voltage Solar Array Interactions with the Plasma Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Coffey, Victoria; Wright, Kenneth; Craven, Paul; Koontz, Steven

    2010-01-01

    The near circular, 51.6deg inclination orbit of the International Space Station (ISS) is maintained within an altitude range of approximately 300 km to 400 km providing an ideal platform for conducting in-situ studies of space weather effects on the mid and low-latitude F-2 region ionosphere. The Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) is a suite of instruments installed on the ISS in August 2006 which includes a Floating Potential Probe (FPP), a Plasma Impedance Probe (PIP), a Wide-sweep Langmuir Probe (WLP), and a Narrow-sweep Langmuir Probe (NLP). The primary purpose for deploying the FPMU is to characterize ambient plasma temperatures and densities in which the ISS operates and to obtain measurements of the ISS potential relative to the space plasma environment for use in characterizing and mitigating spacecraft charging hazards to the vehicle and crew. In addition to the engineering goals, data from the FPMU instrument package is available for collaborative multi-satellite and ground based instrument studies of the F-region ionosphere during both quiet and disturbed periods. Finally, the FPMU measurements supported by ISS engineering telemetry data provides a unique opportunity to investigate interactions of the ISS high voltage (160 volt) solar array system with the plasma environment. This presentation will provide examples of FPMU measurements along the ISS orbit including night-time equatorial plasma density depletions sampled near the peak electron density in the F2-region ionosphere, charging phenomenon due to interaction of the ISS solar arrays with the plasma environment, and modification of ISS charging due to visiting vehicles demonstrating the capabilities of the FPMU probes for monitoring mid and low latitude plasma processes as well as vehicle interactions with the plasma environment.

  18. Argon plasma treatment of silicon nitride (SiN) for improved antireflection coating on c-Si solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Hemanta; Mitra, Suchismita; Saha, Hiranmay; Datta, Swapan Kumar; Banerjee, Chandan, E-mail: chandanbanerjee74@gmail.com

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Antireflection properties of argon plasma treated silicon nitride layer and its effect on crystalline silicon solar cell. • The reduction in reflection due to the formation of a silicon oxynitride/silicon nitride double layer. • EQE reveals a relative increase of 2.72% in J{sub sc} and 4.46% in conversion efficiency. - Abstract: Antireflection properties of argon plasma treated silicon nitride layer and its effect on crystalline silicon solar cell is presented here. Hydrogenated silicon nitride (a-SiN:H) layer has been deposited on a silicon substrate by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD) using a mixture of silane (SiH{sub 4}), ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gases followed by a argon plasma treatment. Optical analysis reveals a significant reduction in reflectance after argon plasma treatment of silicon nitride layer. While FESEM shows nanostructures on the surface of the silicon nitride film, FTIR reveals a change in Si−N, Si−O and N−H bonds. On the other hand, ellipsometry shows the variation of refractive index and formation of double layer. Finally, a c-Si solar cell has been fabricated with the said anti-reflection coating. External quantum efficiency reveals a relative increase of 2.72% in the short circuit current density and 4.46% in conversion efficiency over a baseline efficiency of 16.58%.

  19. Plasma turbulence resulting from the interaction between the solar wind and the earth's magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, A.

    1989-01-01

    The interaction between the supersonic and super-Alfvenic solar wind plasma and the Earth's magnetic field leads to the formation of critical layers, such as the bow shock, the magnetopause, the polar cusp, and the inner and outer edge of the plasmasheet. The mean free path between binary colisions being much larger than the transverse scale of these layers, plasma turbulence must ensure the thermalization, the magnetic diffusion, the dissipation within these critical layers. We suggest the existence of small scale, presumably 2D structures, developing within these thin layers. The unambiguous characterization of these small-scale structures is, however, beyond the capabilities of existing spacecraft, which cannot spatially resolve them, nor disentangle spatial/temporal variations. We present a new mission concept: a cluster of four relatively simple spacecraft, which will make it possible (i) to disentangle spatial from temporal variations, (ii) to evaluate, by finite differences between spacecraft measurements, the gradients, divergences, curls of MHD parameters, and )iii) to characterize small-scale structures, via inter-spacecraft correlations. (author). 10 refs.; 10 figs

  20. Simple fabrication of back contact heterojunction solar cells by plasma ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Koichi; Yamaguchi, Noboru; Hironiwa, Daisuke; Suzuki, Hideo; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Matsumura, Hideki

    2017-08-01

    A back-contact amorphous-silicon (a-Si)/crystalline silicon (c-Si) heterojunction is one of the most promising structures for high-efficiency solar cells. However, the patterning of back-contact electrodes causes the increase in fabrication cost. Thus, to simplify the fabrication of back-contact cells, we attempted to form p-a-Si/i-a-Si/c-Si and n-a-Si/i-a-Si/c-Si regions by the conversion of a patterned area of p-a-Si/i-a-Si/c-Si to n-a-Si/i-a-Si/c-Si by plasma ion implantation. It is revealed that the conversion of the conduction type can be realized by the plasma ion implantation of phosphorus (P) atoms into p-a-Si/i-a-Si/c-Si regions, and also that the quality of passivation can be kept sufficiently high, the same as that before ion implantation, when the samples are annealed at around 250 °C and also when the energy and dose of ion implantation are appropriately chosen for fitting to a-Si layer thickness and bulk c-Si carrier density.

  1. Nonlinear wave time dependent dynamic evolution in solar flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedun, V.; Erdelyi, R.

    2005-12-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate the excitation, time dependent dynamic evolution and interaction of weakly nonlinear propagating (i.e. solitary) waves on vertical cylindrical magnetic flux tubes in a compressible solar atmospheric plasma. The axisymmetric flux tube has a field strength of 1000 G at its footpoint what is typical for photospheric regions. Solitons are excited by a footpoint driver. The propagation of the nonlinear signal is investigated by solving numerically a set of fully nonlinear 2D MHD equations in cylindrical coordinates. For the initial conditions the solutions of the linear dispersion relation for wave modes (in the present case we focus on the sausage mode) in a magnetic flux tube is applied. This dispersion relation is solved numerically for a range of plasma parameters. We compare our results with the works of Roberts [1], Wilson [2] (dispersion relation), Molotovshchikov [3] (nonlinear slow sausage waves) and Weisshaar [4] (numerical solutions of the Leibovich-Prichard-Roberts equation). (1) We found solitary solutions and investigate solitary propagating with external sound speed by solving the full MHD equations. (2) We also found a solitary wave propagating with the tube speed. A natural application of our studies may be spicule formation in the chromosphere, as suggested by Roberts [5], where it was demonstrated theoretically, that a solar photospheric magnetic flux tube can support the propagation of solitons governed by the Benjamin-Ono (slow mode) equations. Future possible improvements in modeling and the relevance of the photospheric chromospheric transition region coupling by spicules is suggested. [1] B. Roberts and A. Webb, Sol. Phys., 1978, v. 56, p. 5 [2] P.R. Wilson, Astron. Astrophys., 1980, v. 87, p. 121 [3] A.L. Molotovshchikov and M.S. Ruderman, Sol. Phys., 1987, v. 109, p. 247 [4] E. Weisshaar, Phys. Fluids A, 1989, v. 1(8), p. 1406 [5] B. Roberts and A. Mangeney, Royal Astronomical Society, Monthly

  2. Plasma surrounding the global heliosphere at large distances controlled by the solar cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dialynas, Konstantinos; Krimigis, Stamatios; Mitchell, Donald; Decker, Robert; Roelof, Edmond

    2016-04-01

    The past decade can be characterized by a series of key, groundbreaking remote energetic neutral atom (ENA) images (INCA, IBEX) and in-situ ion (Voyager 1 & 2) observations concerning the characteristics and interactions of the heliosphere with the Local Interstellar Medium (LISM). Voyagers 1 and 2 (V1, V2) discovered the reservoir of ions and electrons that constitute the heliosheath (HS) after crossing the termination shock (TS) 35deg north and 32deg south of the ecliptic plane at 94 and 84 astronomical units (1 AU= 1.5 x108 km), respectively. The in situ measurements by each Voyager were placed in a global context by remote sensing images using ENA obtained with the Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA) onboard Cassini orbiting Saturn. The ENA images contain a 5.2-55 keV hydrogen (H) ENA region (Belt) that loops through the celestial sphere and contributes to balancing the pressure of the interstellar magnetic field (ISMF). The success of any future mission with dedicated ENA detectors (e.g. the IMAP mission), highly depends on the antecedent understanding of the details of the plasma processes in the Heliosphere as revealed by remote sensing of the plasma environment characteristics. Therefore, we address here one of the remaining and most important questions: "Where do the 5-55 keV ENAs that INCA measures come from?". We analyzed INCA all-sky maps from 2003 to 2015 and compare the solar cycle (SC) variation of the ENAs in both the nose (upstream) and anti-nose (downstream) directions with the intensities of > 30 keV ions (source of ENA through charge exchange-CE with H) measured in-situ by V1 and V2, in overlapping energy bands ~30-55 keV. ENA intensities decrease during the declining phase of SC23 by ~x3 from 2003 to 2011 but recover through 2014 (SC24); similarly, V1 and V2 ion intensities also decrease and then recover through 2014. The similarity of time profiles of remotely sensed ENA and locally measured ions are consistent with (a) ENA originating in the HS

  3. Drift zonal plasma ionospheric in the Brazilian sector during a period of extreme low solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abalde Guede, Jose Ricardo; Tardelli-Coelho, Flavia Elaine

    2016-07-01

    The zonal drift velocities of the ionospheric plasma irregularities of large scale were analyzed; these irregularities were observed using optical emission techniques OI 630.0 nm obtained by photometers imagers installed in two locations on the campus of Urbanova UNIVAP in São José dos Campos - SP designated SJC and Campus ULBRA in Palmas - TO cited as PAL. Data were collected from five years, from 2006 to 2010, low solar activity period. Of the total of 337 nights in SJC and 329 nights in PAL analyzed were selected a total of 18 nights of significant plasma bubble occurrences, 9 nights in SJC and 9 nights in PAL, and studied under two conditions: considering fixed altitude of 280 km OI emission layer of 630.0 nm and calculating the height of this variable layer over each night analyzed. To find these varying altitudes along each night we were assisted with the analysis of CADI digital ionosonde data operating in conjunction with the imaging photometer in its observatory. The radio data available in digisonde allowed to do the analysis on 12 variables altitudes of 18 nights studied for fixed altitude; this occurred because of scattering present in ionograms for those nights and times, due to the presence of plasma bubbles in the study through the of the observatory zenith. Quantitative analysis determined the drift velocity zone for each of the analyzed bubbles 18 nights during the given fixed height and 12 nights evaluating varying altitudes along each night. The means were obtained nights analyzed in each observatory for both methods; SJC in the average velocities is derived from the plasma zone 9 nights bubbles analyzed in the method is fixed altitude 84 ± 18 m / s in the case of PAL the average velocities found is 87 ± 12 m / s. In the other case with variable altitude emission to SJC 8 nights analyzed, we reached a mean value of 87 ± 12 m / s, and for PAL, 4 of 9 nights initially selected, the average speed of the zonal drift plasma bubbles were found 85

  4. The history of re-connection and the concept of the solar wind plasma with relatively small electrical conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertkov, A. D.

    1995-01-01

    Petschek's 're-connection' model, aspiring to be universal, treated as a boundary problem meets unresolvable difficulties connected with impossibility to specify correctly boundary and initial conditions. This problem was incorrectly formulated. Hence, ineradicable logarithmic singularities occurred on the boundary surfaces. Attempts to eliminate them by incorporating the finite electrical conductivity are incorrect. This should lead to the change in the equation type, boundary condition type and in consequence to the change in solutions. Besides, the slow mode shocks cannot be driven by small internal source. As an alternative a new plasma concept is suggested. The state of fully ionized plasma in space depends completely on the entropy of the plasma heating source and on the process in which plasma is involved. The presumptive source of the solar wind creation - the induction electric field of the solar origin - has very low entropy. The state of plasma should be very far from the thermodynamic equilibrium. Debye's screening is not complete. The excitation of the powerful resonant self-consistent electric fields in plasma provides low electric conductivity. The MHD problems should be treated in frameworks of dissipative theories.

  5. Probing the Solar Interior

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and is invisible to powerful telescopes in visible, X-ray or radio wavelengths. Photospheric features such as ..... gaps. 3000. 3100. 3200. GENERAL I ARTICLE which the light from entire solar disk is mixed together. In such observations, the Doppler shifts corresponding to the high degree modes, which have small structures ...

  6. Solar atmosphere wave dynamics generated by solar global oscillating eigenmodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, M. K.; Fedun, V.; Erdélyi, R.; Zheng, R.

    2018-01-01

    The solar atmosphere exhibits a diverse range of wave phenomena, where one of the earliest discovered was the five-minute global acoustic oscillation, also referred to as the p-mode. The analysis of wave propagation in the solar atmosphere may be used as a diagnostic tool to estimate accurately the physical characteristics of the Sun's atmospheric layers. In this paper, we investigate the dynamics and upward propagation of waves which are generated by the solar global eigenmodes. We report on a series of hydrodynamic simulations of a realistically stratified model of the solar atmosphere representing its lower region from the photosphere to low corona. With the objective of modelling atmospheric perturbations, propagating from the photosphere into the chromosphere, transition region and low corona, generated by the photospheric global oscillations the simulations use photospheric drivers mimicking the solar p-modes. The drivers are spatially structured harmonics across the computational box parallel to the solar surface. The drivers perturb the atmosphere at 0.5 Mm above the bottom boundary of the model and are placed coincident with the location of the temperature minimum. A combination of the VALIIIC and McWhirter solar atmospheres are used as the background equilibrium model. We report how synthetic photospheric oscillations may manifest in a magnetic field free model of the quiet Sun. To carry out the simulations, we employed the magnetohydrodynamics code, SMAUG (Sheffield MHD Accelerated Using GPUs). Our results show that the amount of energy propagating into the solar atmosphere is consistent with a model of solar global oscillations described by Taroyan and Erdélyi (2008) using the Klein-Gordon equation. The computed results indicate a power law which is compared to observations reported by Ireland et al. (2015) using data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly.

  7. Atomic layer deposition precursor step repetition and surface plasma pretreatment influence on semiconductor–insulator–semiconductor heterojunction solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talkenberg, Florian, E-mail: florian.talkenberg@ipht-jena.de; Illhardt, Stefan; Schmidl, Gabriele; Schleusener, Alexander; Sivakov, Vladimir [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Radnóczi, György Zoltán; Pécz, Béla [Centre for Energy Research, Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Konkoly-Thege Miklós u. 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Dikhanbayev, Kadyrjan; Mussabek, Gauhar [Department of Physics and Engineering, al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 al-Farabi Ave., 050040 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Gudovskikh, Alexander [Nanotechnology Research and Education Centre, St. Petersburg Academic University, Russian Academy of Sciences, Hlopina Str. 8/3, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    Semiconductor–insulator–semiconductor heterojunction solar cells were prepared using atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. The silicon surface was treated with oxygen and hydrogen plasma in different orders before dielectric layer deposition. A plasma-enhanced ALD process was applied to deposit dielectric Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the plasma pretreated n-type Si(100) substrate. Aluminum doped zinc oxide (Al:ZnO or AZO) was deposited by thermal ALD and serves as transparent conductive oxide. Based on transmission electron microscopy studies the presence of thin silicon oxide (SiO{sub x}) layer was detected at the Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface. The SiO{sub x} formation depends on the initial growth behavior of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and has significant influence on solar cell parameters. The authors demonstrate that a hydrogen plasma pretreatment and a precursor dose step repetition of a single precursor improve the initial growth behavior of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and avoid the SiO{sub x} generation. Furthermore, it improves the solar cell performance, which indicates a change of the Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface states.

  8. Evolution of Photospheric Flow and Magnetic Fields Associated with the 2015 June 22 M6.5 Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiasheng; Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Wang, Haimin

    2018-02-01

    The evolution of photospheric flow and magnetic fields before and after flares can provide important information regarding the flare triggering and back-reaction processes. However, such studies on the flow field are rare due to the paucity of high-resolution observations covering the entire flaring period. Here we study the structural evolution of penumbra and shear flows associated with the 2015 June 22 M6.5 flare in NOAA AR 12371, using high-resolution imaging observation in the TiO band taken by the 1.6 m Goode Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory, with the aid of the differential affine velocity estimator method for flow tracking. The accompanied photospheric vector magnetic field changes are also analyzed using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. As a result, we found, for a penumbral segment in the negative field adjacent to the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL), an enhancement of penumbral flows (up to an unusually high value of ∼2 km s‑1) and extension of penumbral fibrils after the first peak of the flare hard X-ray emission. We also found an area at the PIL, which is co-spatial with a precursor brightening kernel, that exhibits a gradual increase of shear flow velocity (up to ∼0.9 km s‑1) after the flare. The enhancing penumbral and shear flow regions are also accompanied by an increase of horizontal field and decrease of magnetic inclination angle (measured from the solar surface). These results are discussed in the context of the theory of back-reaction of coronal restructuring on the photosphere as a result of flare energy release.

  9. Strong Transverse Photosphere Magnetic Fields and Twist in Light Bridge Dividing Delta Sunspot of Active Region 12673

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haimin; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Liu, Chang; Ahn, Kwangsu; Toriumi, Shin; Cao, Wenda

    2018-01-01

    Solar Active Region (AR) 12673 is the most flare productive AR in the solar cycle 24. It produced four X-class flares including the X9.3 flare on 06 September 2017 and the X8.2 limb event on 10 September. Sun and Norton (2017) reported that this region had an unusual high rate of flux emergence, while Huang et al. (2018) reported that the X9.3 flare had extremely strong white-light flare emissions. Yang at al. (2017) described the detailed morphological evolution of this AR. In this report, we focus on usual behaviors of the light bridge (LB) dividing the delta configuration of this AR, namely the strong magnetic fields (above 5500 G) in the LB and apparent photospheric twist as shown in observations with a 0.1 arcsec spatial resolution obtained by the 1.6m telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory.

  10. Spectral variability of photospheric radiation due to faculae. I. The Sun and Sun-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Charlotte M.; Beeck, Benjamin; Unruh, Yvonne C.; Solanki, Sami K.; Krivova, Natalie A.; Yeo, Kok Leng

    2017-09-01

    Context. Stellar spectral variability on timescales of a day and longer, arising from magnetic surface features such as dark spots and bright faculae, is an important noise source when characterising extra-solar planets. Current 1D models of faculae do not capture the geometric properties and fail to reproduce observed solar facular contrasts. Magnetoconvection simulations provide facular contrasts accounting for geometry. Aims: We calculate facular contrast spectra from magnetoconvection models of the solar photosphere with a view to improve (a) future parameter determinations for planets with early G type host stars and (b) reconstructions of solar spectral variability. Methods: Regions of a solar twin (G2, log g = 4.44) atmosphere with a range of initial average vertical magnetic fields (100 to 500 G) were simulated using a 3D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics code, MURaM, and synthetic intensity spectra were calculated from the ultraviolet (149.5 nm) to the far infrared (160 000 nm) with the ATLAS9 radiative transfer code. Nine viewing angles were investigated to account for facular positions across most of the stellar disc. Results: Contrasts of the radiation from simulation boxes with different levels of magnetic flux relative to an atmosphere with no magnetic field are a complicated function of position, wavelength and magnetic field strength that is not reproduced by 1D facular models. Generally, contrasts increase towards the limb, but at UV wavelengths a saturation and decrease are observed close to the limb. Contrasts also increase strongly from the visible to the UV; there is a rich spectral dependence, with marked peaks in molecular bands and strong spectral lines. At disc centre, a complex relationship with magnetic field was found and areas of strong magnetic field can appear either dark or bright, depending on wavelength. Spectra calculated for a wide variety of magnetic fluxes will also serve to improve total and spectral solar irradiance

  11. Mercury's Solar Wind Interaction as Characterized by Magnetospheric Plasma Mantle Observations With MESSENGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, Jamie M.; Slavin, James A.; Raines, Jim M.; DiBraccio, Gina A.

    2017-12-01

    We analyze 94 traversals of Mercury's southern magnetospheric plasma mantle using data from the MESSENGER spacecraft. The mean and median proton number densities in the mantle are 1.5 and 1.3 cm-3, respectively. For sodium number density these values are 0.004 and 0.002 cm-3. Moderately higher densities are observed on the magnetospheric dusk side. The mantle supplies up to 1.5 × 108 cm-2 s-1 and 0.8 × 108 cm-2 s-1 of proton and sodium flux to the plasma sheet, respectively. We estimate the cross-electric magnetospheric potential from each observation and find a mean of 19 kV (standard deviation of 16 kV) and a median of 13 kV. This is an important result as it is lower than previous estimations and shows that Mercury's magnetosphere is at times not as highly driven by the solar wind as previously thought. Our values are comparable to the estimations for the ice giant planets, Uranus and Neptune, but lower than Earth. The estimated potentials do have a very large range of values (1-74 kV), showing that Mercury's magnetosphere is highly dynamic. A correlation of the potential is found to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) magnitude, supporting evidence that dayside magnetic reconnection can occur at all shear angles at Mercury. But we also see that Mercury has an Earth-like magnetospheric response, favoring -BZ IMF orientation. We find evidence that -BX orientations in the IMF favor the southern cusp and southern mantle. This is in agreement with telescopic observations of exospheric emission, but in disagreement with modeling.

  12. Simultaneous Observation of High Temperature Plasma of Solar Corona By TESIS CORONAS-PHOTON and XRT Hinode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, A.; Kuzin, S.; Bogachev, S.; Shestov, S.

    2012-05-01

    The Mg XII spectroheliograph is a part of instrumentation complex TESIS (satellite CORONAS-PHOTON). This instrument builds monochromatic images of hot plasma of the solar corona (λ = 8.42 Å, T>5 MK). The Mg XII spectroheliograph observed hot plasma in the non-flaring active-region NOAA 11019 during nine days. We reconstructed DEM of this active region with the help of genetic algorithm (we used data of the Mg XII spectroheliograph, XRT and EIT). Emission measure of the hot component amounts 1 % of the emission measure of the cool component.

  13. Progress on Reconstructing the Solar Coronal Magnetic Field above Active region at different scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canou, A.; Amari, T.

    2013-03-01

    he low solar corona is dominated by the magnetic field which is created in the Sun's interior by a dynamo process and which then emerges into the atmosphere. This magnetic field plays an important role in most structures and phenomena observed at various wavelengths such as prominences, small and large scale eruptive events, and continuous heating of the plasma. It is therefore important to understand its three-dimensional properties in order to elaborate efficient theoretical models. Unfortunately, the magnetic field is difficult to measure locally in the hot and tenuous corona. But this can be done at the level of the cooler and denser photosphere, and several instruments with high resolution vector magnetographs are currently available (e.g. THEMIS/MTR, SOLIS/VSM, HINODE/SOT/SP or SDO/HMI) or will be available on future programmed missions (e.g. Solar Orbiter, ATST and EST). This has lead solar physicists to develop an approach which consists in reconstructing the coronal magnetic field from boundary data given on the photosphere. We will present our recent progress and results to solve this problem at the active region scale or the larger one such as the full disk or synoptic one, for which the large amount of data as well as their sparsity on the solar disk, require to develop particular strategies. We will also show how this can be helpful to characterize the many aspects of active regions during their static or pre-eruptive evolution phases.

  14. F-layer irregularities and plasma drifts associated with spread-F echoes during distinct solar activity periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candido, Claudia; Batista, Inez

    2013-04-01

    Equatorial F-layer irregularities are extensively reported to occur after post-sunset times presenting occurrence peaks in equinoxes and December Solstice in Brazilian sector. One of their most singular features is its seasonal dependence, associated with the alignment between the terminator and magnetic field meridian. On the other hand, during low and early ascending solar activity plasma irregularities are frequently observed to occur around midnight/ post-midnight hours, especially in June solstice. They present distinct features, such as westward propagation and distinct morphology, as observed by digisondes and other instruments. In this work we present studies of the plasma drifts obtained from a special mode operation of the digisonde DPS-4, associated with F-layer irregularities observed during distinct levels of solar activity. We discuss the ionospheric climatology associated with the irregularities using data from digisondes installed at equatorial and low latitude region: Sao Luis, Fortaleza and Cachoeira Paulista.

  15. Solar Hα and white light telescope at Hvar Observatory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čalogovic, J.; Dumbovic, M.; Novak, S.; Vršnak, B.; Brajša, R.; Pötzi, W.; Hirtenfellner-Polanec, W.; Veronig, A.; Hanslmeier, A.; Klvaňa, Miroslav; Ambrož, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 2012 (2012), s. 83-88 ISSN 1845-8319 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : solar observations * telescope * photosphere Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  16. On the Temperature of the Photosphere: Energy Partition in the Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this note, energy partition within the Sun is briefly addressed. It is argued that the laws of thermal emission cannot be directly applied to the Sun, as the continuous solar spectrum ( T app 6 ; 000K reveals but a small fraction of the true solar energy profile. Without considering the energy linked to fusion itself, it is hypothesized that most of the photospheric energy remains trapped in the Sun’s translational degrees of freedom and associated convection currents. The Sun is known to support both convective granules and differential rotation on its surface. The emission of X-rays in association with eruptive flares and the elevated temperatures of the corona might provide some measure of these energies. At the same time, it is expected that a fraction of the solar energy remains tied to the filling of conduction bands by electrons especially within sunspots. This constitutes a degree of freedom whose importance cannot be easily assessed. The discussion highlights how little is truly understood about energy partition in the Sun.

  17. Dynamics of coronal rain and descending plasma blobs in solar prominences. I. Fully ionized case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, R.; Soler, R.; Terradas, J. [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Khodachenko, M. L., E-mail: ramon.oliver@uib.es [Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Schmiedlstrasse 6, A-8042 Graz (Austria)

    2014-03-20

    Observations of active regions and limb prominences often show cold, dense blobs descending with an acceleration smaller than that of free fall. The dynamics of these condensations falling in the solar corona is investigated in this paper using a simple fully ionized plasma model. We find that the presence of a heavy condensation gives rise to a dynamical rearrangement of the coronal pressure that results in the formation of a large pressure gradient that opposes gravity. Eventually this pressure gradient becomes so large that the blob acceleration vanishes or even points upward. Then, the blob descent is characterized by an initial acceleration phase followed by an essentially constant velocity phase. These two stages can be identified in published time-distance diagrams of coronal rain events. Both the duration of the first stage and the velocity attained by the blob increase for larger values of the ratio of blob to coronal density, for larger blob mass, and for smaller coronal temperature. Dense blobs are characterized by a detectable density growth (up to 60% in our calculations) and by a steepening of the density in their lower part, that could lead to the formation of a shock. They also emit sound waves that could be detected as small intensity changes with periods of the order of 100 s and lasting between a few and about 10 periods. Finally, the curvature of falling paths with large radii is only relevant when a very dense blob falls along inclined magnetic field lines.

  18. Simulation study of solar plasma eruptions caused by interactions between emerging flux and coronal arcade fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Takafumi; Yokoyama, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the triggering mechanisms of plasma eruptions in the solar atmosphere due to interactions between emerging flux and coronal arcade fields by using two-dimensional MHD simulations. We perform parameter surveys with respect to arcade field height, magnetic field strength, and emerging flux location. Our results show that two possible mechanisms exist, and which mechanism is dominant depends mostly on emerging flux location. One mechanism appears when the location of emerging flux is close to the polarity inversion line (PIL) of an arcade field. This mechanism requires reconnection between the emerging flux and the arcade field, as pointed out by previous studies. The other mechanism appears when the location of emerging flux is around the edge of an arcade field. This mechanism does not require reconnection between the emerging flux and the arcade field but does demand reconnection in the arcade field above the PIL. Furthermore, we found that the eruptive condition for this mechanism can be represented by a simple formula.

  19. Environmentally Friendly Plasma-Treated PEDOT:PSS as Electrodes for ITO-Free Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaagensmith, Bjorn; Reza, Khan Mamun; Hasan, Md Nazmul; Elbohy, Hytham; Adhikari, Nirmal; Dubey, Ashish; Kantack, Nick; Gaml, Eman; Qiao, Qiquan

    2017-10-18

    Solution processed poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) transparent electrodes (TEs) offer great potential as a low cost alternative to expensive indium tin oxide (ITO). However, strong acids are typically used for enhancing the conductivity of PEDOT:PSS TEs, which produce processing complexity and environmental issues. This work presents an environmentally friendly acid free approach to enhance the conductivity of PEDOT:PSS using a light oxygen plasma treatment, in addition to solvent blend additives and post treatments. The plasma treatment was found to significantly reduce the sheet resistance of PEDOT:PSS TEs from 85 to as low as 15 Ω sq -1 , which translates to the highest reported conductivity of 5012 S/cm for PEDOT:PSS TEs. The plasma treated PEDOT:PSS TE resulted in an ITO-free perovskite solar cell efficiency of 10.5%, which is the highest reported efficiency for ITO-free perovskite solar cells with a PEDOT:PSS electrode that excludes the use of acid treatments. This research presents the first demonstration of this technology. Moreover, the PEDOT:PSS TEs enabled better charge extraction from the perovskite solar cells and reduced hysteresis in the current density-voltage (J-V) curves.

  20. MESSENGER Spacecraft Phase Scintillation due to Plasma ductting effect on RF beam propagation at Superior Solar Conjunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosavi, N.; Sequeira, H.; Copeland, D.; Menyuk, C.

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the evolution of a radio frequency (RF) X-band signal as it propagates through the solar corona turbulence in superior solar conjunction at low Sun-Earth-Probe (SEP) angles.Data that was obtained during several MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENivornment, GEochmeisty, and Ranging) conjunctions reveal a short-term and long-term effect. Amplitude scintillation is evident on a short time scale. Phase scintillations are stronger, but occur over a longer time scale. We examine different possible phenomena in the solar plasma that could be the source of the different time scales of the amplitude and phase scintillations. We propose a theoretical model in which the amplitude scintillations are due to local fluctuations of the index of refraction that scatter the RF signal. These rapidly varying fluctuations randomly attenuate the signal without affecting its phase. By contrast, we propose a model in which phase fluctuations are due to long ducts in the solar plasma, streaming from the sun, that trap some parts of the RF signal. These ducts act as waveguides, changing the phase velocity of the RF beam as it travels a zigzag path inside a duct. When the radiated wave exits from a duct, its phase is changed with respect to the signal that did not pass through the duct, which can lead to destructive interference and carrier suppression. The trapping of the wave is random in nature and can be either a fast or slow process. The predictions of this model are consistent with observations.

  1. Detailed analysis of dynamic evolution of three Active Regions at the photospheric level before flare and CME occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yudong; Korsós, M. B.; Erdélyi, R.

    2018-01-01

    We present a combined analysis of the applications of the weighted horizontal magnetic gradient (denoted as WGM in Korsós et al. (2015)) method and the magnetic helicity tool (Berger and Field, 1984) employed for three active regions (ARs), namely NOAA AR 11261, AR 11283 and AR 11429. We analysed the time series of photospheric data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory taken between August 2011 and March 2012. During this period the three ARs produced a series of flares (eight M- and six X-class) and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). AR 11261 had four M-class flares and one of them was accompanied by a fast CME. AR 11283 had similar activities with two M- and two X-class flares, but only with a slow CME. Finally, AR 11429 was the most powerful of the three ARs as it hosted five compact and large solar flare and CME eruptions. For applying the WGM method we employed the Debrecen sunspot data catalogue, and, for estimating the magnetic helicity at photospheric level we used the Space-weather HMI Active Region Patches (SHARP's) vector magnetograms from SDO/HMI (Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager). We followed the evolution of the components of the WGM and the magnetic helicity before the flare and CME occurrences. We found a unique and mutually shared behaviour, called the U-shaped pattern, of the weighted distance component of WGM and of the shearing component of the helicity flux before the flare and CME eruptions. This common pattern is associated with the decreasing-receding phases yet reported only known to be a necessary feature prior to solar flare eruption(s) but found now at the same time in the evolution of the shearing helicity flux. This result leads to the conclusions that (i) the shearing motion of photospheric magnetic field may be a key driver for solar eruption in addition to the flux emerging process, and that (ii) the found decreasing-approaching pattern in the evolution of shearing helicity flux may be another precursor

  2. Solar Force-free Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wiegelmann

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The structure and dynamics of the solar corona is dominated by the magnetic field. In most areas in the corona magnetic forces are so dominant that all non-magnetic forces like plasma pressure gradient and gravity can be neglected in the lowest order. This model assumption is called the force-free field assumption, as the Lorentz force vanishes. This can be obtained by either vanishing electric currents (leading to potential fields or the currents are co-aligned with the magnetic field lines. First we discuss a mathematically simpler approach that the magnetic field and currents are proportional with one global constant, the so-called linear force-free field approximation. In the generic case, however, the relation between magnetic fields and electric currents is nonlinear and analytic solutions have been only found for special cases, like 1D or 2D configurations. For constructing realistic nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field models in 3D, sophisticated numerical computations are required and boundary conditions must be obtained from measurements of the magnetic field vector in the solar photosphere. This approach is currently of large interests, as accurate measurements of the photospheric field become available from ground-based (for example SOLIS and space-born (for example Hinode and SDO instruments. If we can obtain accurate force-free coronal magnetic field models we can calculate the free magnetic energy in the corona, a quantity which is important for the prediction of flares and coronal mass ejections. Knowledge of the 3D structure of magnetic field lines also help us to interpret other coronal observations, e.g., EUV images of the radiating coronal plasma.

  3. Coronal heating in coupled photosphere-chromosphere-coronal systems: turbulence and leakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdini, A.; Grappin, R.; Velli, M.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Coronal loops act as resonant cavities for low-frequency fluctuations that are transmitted from the deeper layers of the solar atmosphere. These fluctuations are amplified in the corona and lead to the development of turbulence that in turn is able to dissipate the accumulated energy, thus heating the corona. However, trapping is not perfect, because some energy leaks down to the chromosphere on a long timescale, limiting the turbulent heating. Aims: We consider the combined effects of turbulence and energy leakage from the corona to the photosphere in determining the turbulent energy level and associated heating rate in models of coronal loops, which include the chromosphere and transition region. Methods: We use a piece-wise constant model for the Alfvén speed in loops and a reduced MHD-shell model to describe the interplay between turbulent dynamics in the direction perpendicular to the mean field and propagation along the field. Turbulence is sustained by incoming fluctuations that are equivalent, in the line-tied case, to forcing by the photospheric shear flows. While varying the turbulence strength, we systematically compare the average coronal energy level and dissipation in three models with increasing complexity: the classical closed model, the open corona, and the open corona including chromosphere (or three-layer model), with the last two models allowing energy leakage. Results: We find that (i) leakage always plays a role. Even for strong turbulence, the dissipation time never becomes much lower than the leakage time, at least in the three-layer model; therefore, both the energy and the dissipation levels are systematically lower than in the line-tied model; (ii) in all models, the energy level is close to the resonant prediction, i.e., assuming an effective turbulent correlation time longer than the Alfvén coronal crossing time; (iii) the heating rate is close to the value given by the ratio of photospheric energy divided by the Alfv

  4. Photospheric Current Spikes And Their Possible Association With Flares - Results from an HMI Data Driven Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, M. L.; Kwan, C.; Ayhan, B.; Eric, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    A data driven, near photospheric magnetohydrodynamic model predicts spikes in the horizontal current density, and associated resistive heating rate. The spikes appear as increases by orders of magnitude above background values in neutral line regions (NLRs) of active regions (ARs). The largest spikes typically occur a few hours to a few days prior to M or X flares. The spikes correspond to large vertical derivatives of the horizontal magnetic field. The model takes as input the photospheric magnetic field observed by the Helioseismic & Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite. This 2.5 D field is used to determine an analytic expression for a 3 D magnetic field, from which the current density, vector potential, and electric field are computed in every AR pixel for 14 ARs. The field is not assumed to be force-free. The spurious 6, 12, and 24 hour Doppler periods due to SDO orbital motion are filtered out of the time series of the HMI magnetic field for each pixel. The subset of spikes analyzed at the pixel level are found to occur on HMI and granulation scales of 1 arcsec and 12 minutes. Spikes are found in ARs with and without M or X flares, and outside as well as inside NLRs, but the largest spikes are localized in the NLRs of ARs with M or X flares. The energy to drive the heating associated with the largest current spikes comes from bulk flow kinetic energy, not the electromagnetic field, and the current density is highly non-force free. The results suggest that, in combination with the model, HMI is revealing strong, convection driven, non-force free heating events on granulation scales, and it is plausible these events are correlated with subsequent M or X flares. More and longer time series need to be analyzed to determine if such a correlation exists.

  5. Apparent Solar Tornado-Like Prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasenco, Olga; Martin, Sara F.; Velli, Marco

    2014-02-01

    Recent high-resolution observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) have reawakened interest in the old and fascinating phenomenon of solar tornado-like prominences. This class of prominences was first introduced by Pettit ( Astrophys. J. 76, 9, 1932), who studied them over many years. Observations of tornado prominences similar to the ones seen by SDO had already been documented by Secchi ( Le Soleil, 1877). High-resolution and high-cadence multiwavelength data obtained by SDO reveal that the tornado-like appearance of these prominences is mainly an illusion due to projection effects. We discuss two different cases where prominences on the limb might appear to have a tornado-like behavior. One case of apparent vortical motions in prominence spines and barbs arises from the (mostly) 2D counterstreaming plasma motion along the prominence spine and barbs together with oscillations along individual threads. The other case of apparent rotational motion is observed in a prominence cavity and results from the 3D plasma motion along the writhed magnetic fields inside and along the prominence cavity as seen projected on the limb. Thus, the "tornado" impression results either from counterstreaming and oscillations or from the projection on the plane of the sky of plasma motion along magnetic-field lines, rather than from a true vortical motion around an (apparent) vertical or horizontal axis. We discuss the link between tornado-like prominences, filament barbs, and photospheric vortices at their base.

  6. Plasma Jets and Eruptions in Solar Coronal Holes: A Three-dimensional Flux Emergence Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Insertis, F.; Galsgaard, K.

    2013-07-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) numerical experiment of the launching of a hot and fast coronal jet followed by several violent eruptions is analyzed in detail. These events are initiated through the emergence of a magnetic flux rope from the solar interior into a coronal hole. We explore the evolution of the emerging magnetically dominated plasma dome surmounted by a current sheet and the ensuing pattern of reconnection. A hot and fast coronal jet with inverted-Y shape is produced that shows properties comparable to those frequently observed with EUV and X-ray detectors. We analyze its 3D shape, its inhomogeneous internal structure, and its rise and decay phases, lasting for some 15-20 minutes each. Particular attention is devoted to the field line connectivities and the reconnection pattern. We also study the cool and high-density volume that appears to encircle the emerged dome. The decay of the jet is followed by a violent phase with a total of five eruptions. The first of them seems to follow the general pattern of tether-cutting reconnection in a sheared arcade, although modified by the field topology created by the preceding reconnection evolution. The two following eruptions take place near and above the strong-field concentrations at the surface. They show a twisted, Ω-loop-like rope expanding in height, with twist being turned into writhe, thus hinting at a kink instability (perhaps combined with a torus instability) as the cause of the eruption. The succession of a main jet ejection and a number of violent eruptions that resemble mini-CMEs and their physical properties suggest that this experiment may provide a model for the blowout jets recently proposed in the literature.

  7. Solar Neutrons and Related Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Dorman, Lev

    2010-01-01

    This book presents the first comprehensive compilation and review of the extensive body of experimental and theoretical material on solar neutrons and related phenomena published in the scientific literature over the last sixty years. Phenomena related to solar neutrons are more specifically: the decay products of solar neutrons solar gamma rays generated in processes like nuclear reactions between solar energetic charged particles and matter of the solar atmosphere, as well as by the capture of solar neutrons by hydrogen atoms in the solar atmosphere the propagation of solar neutrons, solar gamma rays and other secondary particles through the solar photosphere, chromosphere and corona, as well as through interplanetary space and through the Earth's atmosphere. Models and simulations of particle acceleration, interactions, and propagation processes show that observations of solar neutrons and gamma rays in space and in the Earth's atmosphere yield essential and unique information on the source function of ene...

  8. Effect of organic solar cells using various power O2 plasma treatments on the indium tin oxide substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Jhong-Ciao; Wang, Yeong-Her; Chen, Kan-Lin; Huang, Chien-Jung

    2016-03-01

    The effect of organic solar cells (OSCs) by using different power O2 plasma treatments on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate was studied. The power of O2 plasma treatment on ITO substrate was varied from 20W to 80W, and the power conversion efficiency of device was improved from 1.18% to 1.93% at 20W O2 plasma treatment. The function of O2 plasma treatment on ITO substrate was to remove the surface impurity and to improve the work function of ITO, which can reduce the energy offset between the ITO and SubPc layer and depress the leakage current of device, leading to the shunt resistance increased from 897 to 1100Ωcm(2). The surface roughness of ITO decreased from 3.81 to 3.33nm and the work function of ITO increased from 4.75 to 5.2eV after 20W O2 plasma treatment on ITO substrate. As a result, the open circuit voltage and the fill factor were improved from 0.46 to 0.70V and from 0.56 to 0.61, respectively. However, the series resistance of device was dramatically increased as the power of O2 plasma treatment exceeds 40W, leading to the efficiency reduction. The result is attributed to the variation of oxygen vacancies in ITO film after the 60, 80W O2 plasma treatment. As a consequence, the power of O2 plasma treatment on ITO substrate for the OSCs application should be controlled below 40W to avoid affecting the electricity of ITO film. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Periodic photospheric and chromospheric modulation in Alpha Orionis (Betelgeuse)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, A. K.; Baliunas, S. L.; Hartmann, L.; Nassiopoulos, G. E.; Guinan, E. F.; Sonneborn, G.

    1987-01-01

    The bright cool supergiant Alpha Orionis has been monitored spectroscopically and photometrically over the past three years (1984-1986) in the optical and the ultraviolet wavelength regions. A 420-day periodic modulation of the flux is observed in the optical and ultaviolet continua, and in the Mg II line emission cores. Periodic photospheric pulsations are the most likely explanation of these observations. This identification is based on the large amplitude of the variation, the correlation of the continuum and chromospheric fluxes, and the length of the observed period. Pulsation may heat and extend the atmosphere of Alpha Ori and initiate the mass flow from the star.

  10. Interaction of the plasma tail of comet Bradfield 1979L on 1980 February 6 with a possibly flare-generated solar-wind disturbance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedner, M.B. Jr.; Brandt, J.C.; Zwickl, R.D.; Bame, S.J.

    1982-01-01

    Solar-wind plasma data from the ISEE-3 and Helios 2 spacecraft have been examined in order to explain a uniquely rapid 10 0 turning of the plasma tail of comet Bradfield 1979L on 1980 February 6. An earlier study conducted before the availability of in situ solar-wind data (Brandt et al., 1980) suggested that the tail position angle change occurred in response to a solar-wind velocity shear across which the polar component changed by approx. 50 km s - 1 . The present contribution confirms this result and further suggests that the comet-tail activity was caused by non-corotating, disturbed plasma flows probably associated with an Importance 1B solar flare

  11. FIRST SIMULTANEOUS DETECTION OF MOVING MAGNETIC FEATURES IN PHOTOSPHERIC INTENSITY AND MAGNETIC FIELD DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Goode, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The formation and the temporal evolution of a bipolar moving magnetic feature (MMF) was studied with high-spatial and temporal resolution. The photometric properties were observed with the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory using a broadband TiO filter (705.7 nm), while the magnetic field was analyzed using the spectropolarimetric data obtained by Hinode. For the first time, we observed a bipolar MMF simultaneously in intensity images and magnetic field data, and studied the details of its structure. The vector magnetic field and the Doppler velocity of the MMF were also studied. A bipolar MMF with its positive polarity closer to the negative penumbra formed, accompanied by a bright, filamentary structure in the TiO data connecting the MMF and a dark penumbral filament. A fast downflow (≤2 km s –1 ) was detected at the positive polarity. The vector magnetic field obtained from the full Stokes inversion revealed that a bipolar MMF has a U-shaped magnetic field configuration. Our observations provide a clear intensity counterpart of the observed MMF in the photosphere, and strong evidence of the connection between the MMF and the penumbral filament as a serpentine field.

  12. The Influence of the Solar Coronal Radiation on Coronal Plasma Structures, I: Determination of the Incident Coronal Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gerrard M.; Labrosse, Nicolas

    2018-02-01

    Coronal structures receive radiation not only from the solar disc, but also from the corona. This height-dependent incident radiation plays a crucial role in the excitation and the ionisation of the illuminated plasma. The aim of this article is to present a method for computing the detailed incident radiation coming from the solar corona, which is perceived at a point located at an arbitrary height. The coronal radiation is calculated by integrating the radiation received at a point in the corona over all of the corona visible from this point. The emission from the corona at all wavelengths of interest is computed using atomic data provided by CHIANTI. We obtain the spectrum illuminating points located at varying heights in the corona at wavelengths between 100 and 912 Å when photons can ionise H or He atoms and ions in their ground states. As expected, individual spectral lines will contribute most at the height within the corona where the local temperature is closest to their formation temperature. As there are many spectral lines produced by many ions, the coronal intensity cannot be assumed to vary in the same way at all wavelengths and so must be calculated for each separate height that is to be considered. This code can be used to compute the spectrum from the corona illuminating a point at any given height above the solar surface. This brings a necessary improvement to models where an accurate determination of the excitation and ionisation states of coronal plasma structures is crucial.

  13. Inductively and capacitively coupled plasmas at interface: A comparative study towards highly efficient amorphous-crystalline Si solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yingnan; Ong, Thiam Min Brian; Levchenko, I.; Xu, Shuyan

    2018-01-01

    A comparative study on the application of two quite different plasma-based techniques to the preparation of amorphous/crystalline silicon (a-Si:H/c-Si) interfaces for solar cells is presented. The interfaces were fabricated and processed by hydrogen plasma treatment using the conventional plasma-enhanced chemical vacuum deposition (PECVD) and inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition (ICP-CVD) methods The influence of processing temperature, radio-frequency power, treatment duration and other parameters on interface properties and degree of surface passivation were studied. It was found that passivation could be improved by post-deposition treatment using both ICP-CVD and PECVD, but PECVD treatment is more efficient for the improvement on passivation quality, whereas the minority carrier lifetime increased from 1.65 × 10-4 to 2.25 × 10-4 and 3.35 × 10-4 s after the hydrogen plasma treatment by ICP-CVD and PECVD, respectively. In addition to the improvement of carrier lifetimes at low temperatures, low RF powers and short processing times, both techniques are efficient in band gap adjustment at sophisticated interfaces.

  14. Solar Plasma Radio Emission in the Presence of Imbalanced Turbulence of Kinetic-Scale Alfvén Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubchyk, O.; Kontar, E. P.; Voitenko, Y. M.; Bian, N. H.; Melrose, D. B.

    2017-09-01

    We study the influence of kinetic-scale Alfvénic turbulence on the generation of plasma radio emission in the solar coronal regions where the ratio β of plasma to magnetic pressure is lower than the electron-to-ion mass ratio me/mi. The present study is motivated by the phenomenon of solar type I radio storms that are associated with the strong magnetic field of active regions. The measured brightness temperature of the type I storms can be up to 10^{10} K for continuum emission, and can exceed 10^{11} K for type I bursts. At present, there is no generally accepted theory explaining such high brightness temperatures and some other properties of the type I storms. We propose a model with an imbalanced turbulence of kinetic-scale Alfvén waves that produce an asymmetric quasi-linear plateau on the upper half of the electron velocity distribution. The Landau damping of resonant Langmuir waves is suppressed and their amplitudes grow spontaneously above the thermal level. The estimated saturation level of Langmuir waves is high enough to generate observed type I radio emission at the fundamental plasma frequency. Harmonic emission does not appear in our model because the backward-propagating Langmuir waves undergo strong Landau damping. Our model predicts 100% polarization in the sense of the ordinary (o-) mode of type I emission.

  15. The SiNx films process research by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition in crystalline silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bitao; Zhang, Yingke; Ouyang, Qiuping; Chen, Fei; Zhan, Xinghua; Gao, Wei

    2017-07-01

    SiNx thin film has been widely used in crystalline silicon solar cell production because of the good anti-reflection and passivation effect. We can effectively optimize the cells performance by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method to change deposition conditions such as temperature, gas flow ratio, etc. In this paper, we deposit a new layer of SiNx thin film on the basis of double-layers process. By changing the process parameters, the compactness of thin films is improved effectively. The NH3 passivation technology is augmented in a creative way, which improves the minority carrier lifetime. In sight of this, a significant increase is generated in the photoelectric performance of crystalline silicon solar cell.

  16. Planetary data distribution by the French Plasma Physics Data Centre (CDPP): the example of Rosetta Plasma Consortium in the perspective of Solar Orbiter, Bepi-Colombo and JUICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Génot, V.; Dufourg, N.; Bouchemit, M.; Budnik, E.; André, N.; Cecconi, B.; Gangloff, M.; Durand, J.; Pitout, F.; Jacquey, C.; Rouillard, A.; Jourdane, N.; Heulet, D.; Lavraud, B.; Modolo, R.; Garnier, P.; Louarn, P.; Henri, P.; Galand, M.; Beth, A.

    2017-09-01

    The French Plasma Physics Data Centre (CDPP, http://www.cdpp.eu/ ) has been addressing for almost the past 20 years all issues pertaining to natural plasma data distribution and valorization. Initially established by CNES and CNRS on the ground of a solid data archive, CDPP activities diversified with the advent of broader networks and interoperability standards, and through fruitful collaborations (e.g. with NASA/PDS). Providing access to remote data, designing and building science driven analysis tools then became at the forefront of CDPP developments. In the frame of data distribution, the CDPP has provided to the Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC), a suite of five different plasma sensors, with the possibility to visualize plasma data acquired by the Rosetta mission through its data analysis tool AMDA. AMDA was used during the operational phase of the Rosetta mission, facilitating data access between different Rosetta PI sensor teams, thus allowing 1/ a more efficient instruments operation planning and 2/ a better understanding of single instrument observations in the context of other sensor measurements and of more global observations. The data are now getting open to the public via the AMDA tool as they are released to the ESA/PSA. These in-situ data are complemented by model data, for instance, a solar wind propagation model (see http://heliopropa.irap.omp.eu ) or illumination maps of 67P (available through http://vespa.obspm.fr ). The CDPP also proposes 3D visualization tool for planetary / heliospheric environments which helps putting data in context (http://3dview.cdpp.eu ); for instance all comets and asteroids in a given volume and for a given time interval can be searched and displayed. From this fruitful experience the CDPP intends to play a similar role for the forthcoming data of the Solar Orbiter, Bepi-Colombo and JUICE missions as it is officially part of several instrument consortia. Beside highlighting the current database and products, the

  17. The solar wind structure that caused a large-scale disturbance of the plasma tail of comet Austin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozuka, Yukio; Konno, Ichishiro; Saito, Takao; Numazawa, Shigemi

    1992-01-01

    The plasma tail of Comet Austin (1989c1) showed remarkable disturbances because of the solar maximum periods and its orbit. Figure 1 shows photographs of Comet Austin taken in Shibata, Japan, on 29 Apr. 1990 UT, during about 20 minutes with the exposure times of 90 to 120 s. There are two main features in the disturbance; one is many bowed structures, which seem to move tailwards; and the other is a large-scale wavy structure. The bowed structures can be interpreted as arcade structures brushing the surface of both sides of the cometary plasma surrounding the nucleus. We identified thirteen structures of the arcades from each of the five photographs and calculated the relation between the distance of each structure from the cometary nucleus, chi, and the velocity, upsilon. The result is shown. This indicates that the velocity of the structures increases with distance. This is consistent with the result obtained from the observation at the Kiso Observatory.

  18. Simulating solar MHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schüssler

    Full Text Available Two aspects of solar MHD are discussed in relation to the work of the MHD simulation group at KIS. Photospheric magneto-convection, the nonlinear interaction of magnetic field and convection in a strongly stratified, radiating fluid, is a key process of general astrophysical relevance. Comprehensive numerical simulations including radiative transfer have significantly improved our understanding of the processes and have become an important tool for the interpretation of observational data. Examples of field intensification in the solar photosphere ('convective collapse' are shown. The second line of research is concerned with the dynamics of flux tubes in the convection zone, which has far-reaching implications for our understanding of the solar dynamo. Simulations indicate that the field strength in the region where the flux is stored before erupting to form sunspot groups is of the order of 105 G, an order of magnitude larger than previous estimates based on equipartition with the kinetic energy of convective flows.

    Key words. Solar physics · astrophysics and astronomy (photosphere and chromosphere; stellar interiors and dynamo theory; numerical simulation studies.

  19. Zonal drifts of plasma bubbles in South American sector during the extreme low solar activity 2008 - 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abalde, J. R.; Coelho, F. E.; Fagundes, P. R.; de Jesus, R.; Pillat, V. G.; de Abreu, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Transequatorial F region plasma bubbles are large-scale ionospheric depleted regions that develop in the bottomside of equatorial F region due to plasma instability processes. All-sky imaging observations of the OI 630.0 nm nightglow emissions were carried out at Sao Jose dos Campos - SJC (23.21°S, 45.86°W; dip latitude 17.6°S) and Palmas - PAL (10.28°S, 48.33°W; dip latitude 6.7°S), Brazil, during the years 2008 and 2010, a period of minimum extreme solar activity. In this work we present and discuss the height-resolved nocturnal F region zonal drift velocities obtained from plasma bubbles observed in imaging observations of OI 630.0 nm emissions result from excitation mechanisms by dissociative recombination of O2. We have investigated the nighttime zonal plasma drift variations using fixed emission peak altitudes, used by earlier investigators, as well as emission peak altitudes based on simultaneous ionospheric sounding observations for both observatories. The average maximum and minimum zonal plasma drift velocities inferred for OI 630.0 nm emission, using emission peak altitudes based on simultaneous ionospheric observations, (SJC: 116 ± 7 and 57 ± 15 m/s; PAL: 119 ± 6 and 58 ± 10 m/s) are lower and with less scatter than that using fixed emission peak altitudes (SJC: 119 ± 6 and 58 ± 10 m/s; PAL: 111 ± 5 and 85 ± 10 m/s). Also, the nocturnal variations of the zonal plasma drift velocities obtained with peak altitudes based on simultaneous ionospheric observations show better agreement than for the case with fixed emission peak altitudes (h = 280 km).

  20. The Role of Scale and Model Bias in ADAPT's Photospheric Eatimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godinez Vazquez, Humberto C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hickmann, Kyle Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Arge, Charles Nicholas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Henney, Carl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-20

    The Air Force Assimilative Photospheric flux Transport model (ADAPT), is a magnetic flux propagation based on Worden-Harvey (WH) model. ADAPT would be used to provide a global photospheric map of the Earth. A data assimilation method based on the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF), a method of Monte Carlo approximation tied with Kalman filtering, is used in calculating the ADAPT models.

  1. Particle Acceleration and Plasma Heating in the Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, V. V.; Stepanov, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new mechanism of electron acceleration and plasma heating in the solar chromosphere, based on the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The instability develops at the chromospheric footpoints of a flare loop and deforms the local magnetic field. As a result, the electric current in the loop varies, and a resulting inductive electric field appears. A pulse of the induced electric field, together with the pulse of the electric current, propagates along the loop with the Alfvén velocity and begins to accelerate electrons up to an energy of about 1 MeV. Accelerated particles are thermalized in the dense layers of the chromosphere with the plasma density n ≈10^{14} - 10^{15} cm^{-3}, heating them to a temperature of about several million degrees. Joule dissipation of the electric current pulse heats the chromosphere at heights that correspond to densities n ≤10^{11} - 10^{13} cm^{-3}. Observations with the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory indicate that chromospheric footpoints of coronal loops might be heated to coronal temperatures and that hot plasma might be injected upwards, which brightens ultra-fine loops from the photosphere to the base of the corona. Thereby, recent observations of the Sun and the model we propose stimulate a déjà vu - they are reminiscent of the concept of the chromospheric flare.

  2. A new approach for deriving the solar irradiance from non-flaring solar upper atmosphere plasmas at 2 x 10^4<-T<-2 x 10^7 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgan, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abdallaf, Jr., Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fontes, Christopher J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sherrill, Manolo E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Feldmn, U [NON LANL; Landi, E [NON LANL; Brown, C M [NON LANL; Seely, J F [NON LANL; Doschek, G A [NON LANL; Dammasch, I E [NON LANL

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new approach for deriving the solar irradiance in the X-ray to VUV range due to the emission by solar upper atmosphere plasmas at 2 x 10{sup 4} {le} T {le} 2 x 10{sup 7} K. Our approach is based on new understanding of the properties of the solar upper atmosphere; specifically, the discovery that the majority of emission from the non-flaring solar upper transition region and corona in the temperature range 3 x 10{sup 5} {le} T {le} 3 x 10{sup 6} K arises from isothermal plasmas that have four distinct temperatures: 0.35, 0.9, 1.4 and 3 x 10{sup 6} K. In the lower transition region (2 x 10{sup 4} {le} T {le} 2 x 10{sup 5} K) of coronal holes, quiet regions or active regions, although multithermal and variable in brightness, the shape of emission measure vs. temperature curves is almost constant. Flaring plasmas are for most part isothermal, although their emission measure and temperature continuously change. In this paper we review these recent results and propose a set of simple spectrometers for recording the solar spectrum in several narrow bands. The solar emission measure, average plasma temperature, and composition can be derived using the measured line fluxes. By combining the emission measure and other plasma properties with the output of a suite of atomic physics codes, which are also described here, the solar irradiance in the temperature range 2 x 10{sup 4} {le} T {le} 2 x 10{sup 7} K can be calculated.

  3. Modeling a Shallow Solar Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    2009-03-01

    Photospheric ephemeral regions (EPRs) cover the Sun like a magnetic carpet. From this, we update the Babcock - Leighton solar dynamo. Rather than sunspot fields appearing in the photosphere de novo from eruptions originating in the deep interior, we consider that sunspots form directly in the photosphere by a rapid accumulation of like-sign field from EPRs. This would only occur during special circumstances: locations and times when the temperature structure is highly superadiabatic and contains a large subsurface horizontal magnetic field (only present in the Sun’s lower latitudes). When these conditions are met, superadiabatic percolation occurs, wherein an inflow and downflow of gas scours the surface of EPRs to form active regions. When these conditions are not met, magnetic elements undergo normal percolation, wherein magnetic elements move about the photosphere in Brownian-type motions. Cellular automata (CA) models are developed that allow these processes to be calculated and thereby both small-scale and large-scale models of magnetic motions can be obtained. The small-scale model is compared with active region development and Hinode observations. The large-scale CA model offers a solar dynamo, which suggests that fields from decaying bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs) drift on the photosphere driven by subsurface magnetic forces. These models are related to observations and are shown to support Waldmeier’s findings of an inverse relationship between solar cycle length and cycle size. Evidence for significant amounts of deep magnetic activity could disprove the model presented here, but recent helioseismic observations of “butterfly patterns” at depth are likely just a reflection of surface activity. Their existence seems to support the contention made here that the field and flow separate, allowing cool, relatively field-free downdrafts to descend with little field into the nether worlds of the solar interior. There they heat by compression to form a

  4. DISCONNECTING OPEN SOLAR MAGNETIC FLUX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeForest, C. E.; Howard, T. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    Disconnection of open magnetic flux by reconnection is required to balance the injection of open flux by coronal mass ejections and other eruptive events. Making use of recent advances in heliospheric background subtraction, we have imaged many abrupt disconnection events. These events produce dense plasma clouds whose distinctive shape can now be traced from the corona across the inner solar system via heliospheric imaging. The morphology of each initial event is characteristic of magnetic reconnection across a current sheet, and the newly disconnected flux takes the form of a 'U-'shaped loop that moves outward, accreting coronal and solar wind material. We analyzed one such event on 2008 December 18 as it formed and accelerated at 20 m s –2 to 320 km s –1 , thereafter expanding self-similarly until it exited our field of view 1.2 AU from the Sun. From acceleration and photometric mass estimates we derive the coronal magnetic field strength to be 8 μT, 6 R ☉ above the photosphere, and the entrained flux to be 1.6 × 10 11 Wb (1.6 × 10 19 Mx). We model the feature's propagation by balancing inferred magnetic tension force against accretion drag. This model is consistent with the feature's behavior and accepted solar wind parameters. By counting events over a 36 day window, we estimate a global event rate of 1 day –1 and a global solar minimum unsigned flux disconnection rate of 6 × 10 13 Wb yr –1 (6 × 10 21 Mx yr –1 ) by this mechanism. That rate corresponds to ∼ – 0.2 nT yr –1 change in the radial heliospheric field at 1 AU, indicating that the mechanism is important to the heliospheric flux balance.

  5. Reduction of the phosphorus contamination for plasma deposition of p—i—n microcrystalline silicon solar cells in a single chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guang-Hong, Wang; Xiao-Dan, Zhang; Sheng-Zhi, Xu; Xin-Xia, Zheng; Chang-Chun, Wei; Jian, Sun; Shao-Zhen, Xiong; Xin-Hua, Geng; Ying, Zhao

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates several pretreatment techniques used to reduce the phosphorus contamination between solar cells. They include hydrogen plasma pretreatment, deposition of a p-type doped layer, i-a-Si:H or μc-Si:H covering layer between solar cells. Their effectiveness for the pretreatment is evaluated by means of phosphorus concentration in films, the dark conductivity of p-layer properties and cell performance. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  6. A Statistical Comparison between Photospheric Vector Magnetograms Obtained by SDO/HMI and Hinode/SP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainz Dalda, Alberto

    2017-12-01

    Since 2010 May 1, we have been able to study (almost) continuously the vector magnetic field in the Sun, thanks to two space-based observatories: the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Hinode. Both are equipped with instruments able to measure the Stokes parameters of Zeeman-induced polarization of photospheric line radiation. But the observation modes; the spectral lines; the spatial, spectral, and temporal sampling; and even the inversion codes used to recover magnetic and thermodynamic information from the Stokes profiles are different. We compare the vector magnetic fields derived from observations with the HMI instrument on board SDO with those observed by the SP instrument on Hinode. We have obtained relationships between components of magnetic vectors in the umbra, penumbra, and plage observed in 14 maps of NOAA Active Region 11084. Importantly, we have transformed SP data into observables comparable to those of HMI, to explore possible influences of the different modes of operation of the two instruments and the inversion schemes used to infer the magnetic fields. The assumed filling factor (fraction of each pixel containing a Zeeman signature) produces the most significant differences in derived magnetic properties, especially in the plage. The spectral and angular samplings have the next-largest effects. We suggest to treat the disambiguation in the same way in the data provided by HMI and SP. That would make the relationship between the vector magnetic field recovered from these data stronger, which would favor the simultaneous or complementary use of both instruments.

  7. Plasma blobs observed by ground-based optical and radio techniques in the F-region under different solar activity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Alexandre

    Observations of the OI 630 nm nightglow emission using a wide-angle imaging system have been carried out at Cachoeira Paulista (22.7°S, 45.0°W; 15.8°S dip latitude), Brazil during the period 1987 to 1999. The OI 630 nm images obtained during this period show optical signature of the plasma blobs with a strong seasonal variation. Also, it was observed that, during high solar activity, the plasma blobs occurrences were higher than during low solar activity. Important features from this set of observations are presented and discussed in this paper.

  8. Alfvenic Turbulence from the Sun to 65 Solar Radii: Numerical predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, J. C.; Chandran, B. D. G.

    2015-12-01

    The upcoming NASA Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission will fly to within 9 solar radii from the solar surface, about 7 times closer to the Sun than any previous spacecraft has ever reached. This historic mission will gather unprecedented remote-sensing data and the first in-situ measurements of the plasma in the solar atmosphere, which will revolutionize our knowledge and understanding of turbulence and other processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind. This close to the Sun the background solar-wind properties are highly inhomogeneous. As a result, outward-propagating Alfven waves (AWs) arising from the random motions of the photospheric magnetic-field footpoints undergo strong non-WKB reflections and trigger a vigorous turbulent cascade. In this talk I will discuss recent progress in the understanding of reflection-driven Alfven turbulence in this scenario by means of high-resolution numerical simulations, with the goal of predicting the detailed nature of the velocity and magnetic field fluctuations that the SPP mission will measure. In particular, I will place special emphasis on relating the simulations to relevant physical mechanisms that might govern the radial evolution of the turbulence spectra of outward/inward-propagating fluctuations and discuss the conditions that lead to universal power-laws.

  9. Effect of Plasma, RF, and RIE Treatments on Properties of Double-Sided High Voltage Solar Cells with Vertically Aligned p-n Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola O. Semenenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Si-based solar cells with vertically aligned p-n junctions operating at high voltage were designed and fabricated. The plasma treatments and antireflection coating deposition on the working surfaces of both single- and multijunction cells were made using the special holders. It was shown that additional treatment of solar cells in argon plasma prior to hydrogen plasma treatment and deposition of diamond-like carbon antireflection films led to the improvement of the cell efficiency by up to 60%. Radio frequency waves support plasma generation and improve photoelectric conversion mainly due to reduction of internal stresses at the interfaces. Application of reactive ion etching technique removes the broken layer, reduces elastic strain in the wafer, decreases recombination of charge carriers in the bulk, and provides cell efficiency increase by up to ten times.

  10. Effect of fluorine plasma treatment with chemically reduced graphene oxide thin films as hole transport layer in organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Youn-Yeol; Kang, Byung Hyun; Lee, Yang Doo; Lee, Sang Bin; Ju, Byeong-Kwon, E-mail: bkju@korea.ac.kr

    2013-12-15

    The inorganic materials such as V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, MoO{sub 3} and WO{sub 3} were investigated to replace PEDOT:PSS as hole transport layer (HTL) in organic electronic devices such as organic solar cells (OSCs) and organic lighting emission diodes. However, these methods require vacuum techniques that are long time process and complex. Here, we report about plasma treatment with SF{sub 6} and CF{sub 4} using reactive ion etching on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) thin films that are obtained using an eco-friendly method with vitamin C. The plasma treated rGO thin films have dipoles since they consist of covalent bonds with fluorine on the surface of rGO. This means it is possible to increase the electrostatic potential energy than bare rGO. Increased potential energy on the surface of rGO films is worth applying organic electronic devices as HTL such as OSCs. Consequently, the power conversion efficiency of OSCs increased more than the rGO films without plasma treatment.

  11. Optoelectronic properties of Black-Silicon generated through inductively coupled plasma (ICP) processing for crystalline silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Jens; Gaudig, Maria; Bernhard, Norbert; Lausch, Dominik

    2016-06-01

    The optoelectronic properties of maskless inductively coupled plasma (ICP) generated black silicon through SF6 and O2 are analyzed by using reflection measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and quasi steady state photoconductivity (QSSPC). The results are discussed and compared to capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) and industrial standard wet chemical textures. The ICP process forms parabolic like surface structures in a scale of 500 nm. This surface structure reduces the average hemispherical reflection between 300 and 1120 nm up to 8%. Additionally, the ICP texture shows a weak increase of the hemispherical reflection under tilted angles of incidence up to 60°. Furthermore, we report that the ICP process is independent of the crystal orientation and the surface roughness. This allows the texturing of monocrystalline, multicrystalline and kerf-less wafers using the same parameter set. The ICP generation of black silicon does not apply a self-bias on the silicon sample. Therefore, the silicon sample is exposed to a reduced ion bombardment, which reduces the plasma induced surface damage. This leads to an enhancement of the effective charge carrier lifetime up to 2.5 ms at 1015 cm-3 minority carrier density (MCD) after an atomic layer deposition (ALD) with Al2O3. Since excellent etch results were obtained already after 4 min process time, we conclude that the ICP generation of black silicon is a promising technique to substitute the industrial state of the art wet chemical textures in the solar cell mass production.

  12. MULTISCALE DYNAMICS OF SOLAR MAGNETIC STRUCTURES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Multiscale topological complexity of the solar magnetic field is among the primary factors controlling energy release in the corona, including associated processes in the photospheric and chromospheric boundaries. We present a new approach for analyzing multiscale behavior of the photospheric magnetic flux underlying these dynamics as depicted by a sequence of high-resolution solar magnetograms. The approach involves two basic processing steps: (1) identification of timing and location of magnetic flux origin and demise events (as defined by DeForest et al.) by tracking spatiotemporal evolution of unipolar and bipolar photospheric regions, and (2) analysis of collective behavior of the detected magnetic events using a generalized version of the Grassberger-Procaccia correlation integral algorithm. The scale-free nature of the developed algorithms makes it possible to characterize the dynamics of the photospheric network across a wide range of distances and relaxation times. Three types of photospheric conditions are considered to test the method: a quiet photosphere, a solar active region (NOAA 10365) in a quiescent non-flaring state, and the same active region during a period of M-class flares. The results obtained show (1) the presence of a topologically complex asymmetrically fragmented magnetic network in the quiet photosphere driven by meso- and supergranulation, (2) the formation of non-potential magnetic structures with complex polarity separation lines inside the active region, and (3) statistical signatures of canceling bipolar magnetic structures coinciding with flaring activity in the active region. Each of these effects can represent an unstable magnetic configuration acting as an energy source for coronal dissipation and heating.

  13. Spectrally-resolved Soft X-ray Observations and the Temperature Structure of the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspi, Amir; Warren, Harry; McTiernan, James; Woods, Thomas N.

    2015-04-01

    Solar X-ray observations provide important diagnostics of plasma heating and particle acceleration, during solar flares and quiescent periods. How the corona is heated to its ~1-3 MK nominal temperature remains one of the fundamental unanswered questions of solar physics; heating of plasma to tens of MK during solar flares -- particularly to the hottest observed temperatures of up to ~50 MK -- is also still poorly understood. Soft X-ray emission (~0.1-10 keV; or ~0.1-10 nm) is particularly sensitive to hot coronal plasma and serves as a probe of the thermal processes driving coronal plasma heating. Spectrally- and temporally-resolved measurements are crucial for understanding these energetic processes, but there have historically been very few such observations. We present new solar soft X-ray spectra from the Amptek X123-SDD, measuring quiescent solar X-ray emission from ~0.5 to ~30 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution from two SDO/EVE calibration sounding rocket underflights in 2012 and 2013. Combined with observations from RHESSI, GOES/XRS, SDO/EVE, and SDO/AIA, the temperature distribution derived from these data suggest significant hot (5-10 MK) emission from active regions, and the 2013 spectra suggest a low-FIP enhancement of only ~1.6 relative to the photosphere, 40% of the usually-observed value from quiescent coronal plasma. We explore the implications of these findings on coronal heating. We discuss future missions for spectrally-resolved soft X-ray observations using the X123-SDD, including the upcoming MinXSS 3U CubeSat using the X123-SDD and scheduled for deployment in mid-2015, and the CubIXSS 6U CubeSat mission concept.

  14. On Solar Granulations, Limb Darkening, and Sunspots: Brief Insights in Remembrance of Father Angelo Secchi

    OpenAIRE

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2011-01-01

    Father Angelo Secchi used the existence of solar granulation as a central line of rea- soning when he advanced that the Sun was a gaseous body with a photosphere contain- ing incandescent particulate matter (Secchi A. Sulla Struttura della Fotosfera Solare. Bullettino Meteorologico dell’Osservatorio del Collegio Romano , 30 November 1864, v.3(11), 1–3). Secchi saw the granules as condensed matter emitting the photospheric spectrum, while the darkened intergranular lanes conv...

  15. ICE SOLAR WIND PLASMA ELECTRON ANALYSER DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — These data were obtained from the LANL plasma experiment on ICE (Principal Investigator: S.J. Bame assistance from K. Sofaly and S. Kedge). The instrument measures...

  16. Plasma texturing on large-area industrial grade CZ silicon solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Nordseth, Ørnulf; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2013-01-01

    We report on an experimental study of nanostructuring of silicon solar cells using reactive ion etching (RIE). A simple mask-less, scalable RIE nanostructuring of the solar cell surface is shown to reduce the AM1.5-weighted average reflectance to a level below 1 % in a fully optimized RIE texturing......, and thus holds a significant potential for improvement of the cell performance compared to current industrial standards. The reflectance is shown to remain below that of conventional textured cells also at high angle of incidence. The process is shown to be equally applicable to mono-, multi- and quasi......-mono-crystalline Si. The process was successfully integrated in fabrication of solar cells using only industry standard processes on a Czochralski (CZ) silicon starting material. The resulting cell performance was compared to cells with conventional texturing. For cells, where the nanostructuring was not fully...

  17. Plasma texturing on large-area industrial grade CZ silicon solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Nordseth, Ørnulf; Boisen, Anja

    2013-01-01

    We report on an experimental study of nanostructuring of silicon solar cells using reactive ion etching (RIE). A simple mask-less, scalable RIE nanostructuring of the solar cell surface is shown to reduce the AM1.5-weighted average reflectance to a level below 1 % in a fully optimized RIE texturing......-mono-crystalline Si. The process was successfully integrated in fabrication of solar cells using only industry standard processes on a Czochralski (CZ) silicon starting material. The resulting cell performance was compared to cells with conventional texturing. For cells, where the nanostructuring was not fully......, and thus holds a significant potential for improvement of the cell performance compared to current industrial standards. The reflectance is shown to remain below that of conventional textured cells also at high angle of incidence. The process is shown to be equally applicable to mono-, multi- and quasi...

  18. Solar Synoptic Products from SOLIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henney, Carl J.; SOLIS Team

    2007-05-01

    The Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) project records the solar photospheric and chromospheric daily. SOLIS is currently comprised of two instruments: the Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM) and the Integrated Sunlight Spectrometer (ISS). A third instrument, Full Disk Patrol (FDP), is expected to be installed within a year. Area-scans and full-disk photospheric and chromospheric longitudinal magnetograms are recorded daily as part of the VSM nominal observing program. Since August 2003, the VSM has recorded full-disk photospheric vector magnetograms at least weekly and, since November 2006, area-scans of active regions daily. Quick-look vector images are now publicly available daily. In the near future, a typical observing day will include three full-disk photospheric vector magnetograms. Carrington rotation and daily synoptic maps are also available from the photospheric magnetograms and coronal hole estimate images. In addition, calibrated ISS spectra and parameter time series data are available publicly. Synoptic products and recent science results will be highlighted in this presentation. The SOLIS synoptic products are available on the NSO-SOLIS web site at: http://solis.nso.edu/. SOLIS VSM data used here are produced cooperatively by NSF/NSO and NASA/GSFC. The National olar Observatory is operated by AURA, Inc. under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  19. Comments on the dissipation of hydromagnetic surface waves. [applicable to solar coronal plasma heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    A recent paper by Wentzel, which claims to calculate a plasma heating rate due to dissipation of surface waves in an ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluid, is found to be in error in interpretation. A well-established general theorem pertaining to the conservative ideal MHD fluid requires that the normal mode calculated by Wentzel be oscillatory in time. Within ideal MHD, dissipation and plasma heating are therefore impossible.

  20. Adiabatic heating in impulsive solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maetzler, C.; Bai, T.; Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of adiabatic heating in two impulsive solar flares on the basis of dynamic X-ray spectra in the 28-254 keV range, H-alpha, microwave, and meter-wave radio observations. It is found that the X-ray spectra of the events are like those of thermal bremsstrahlung from single-temperature plasmas in the 10-60 keV range if photospheric albedo is taken into account. The temperature-emission correlation indicates adiabatic compression followed by adiabatic expansion and that the electron distribution remains isotropic. H-alpha data suggest compressive energy transfer. The projected areas and volumes of the flares are estimated assuming that X-ray and microwave emissions are produced in a single thermal plasma. Electron densities of about 10 to the 9th/cu cm are found for homogeneous, spherically symmetric sources. It is noted that the strong self-absorption of hot-plasma gyrosynchrotron radiation reveals low magnetic field strengths.

  1. Plasma Turbulence and Kinetic Instabilities at Ion Scales in the Expanding Solar Wind

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hellinger, Petr; Matteini, L.; Landi, S.; Franci, L.; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 812, č. 2 (2015), L32/1-L32/6 ISSN 2041-8205 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-10057S Grant - others:European Commission(XE) 284515 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : instabilities * solar wind * turbulence Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.487, year: 2015

  2. Plasma turbulence and kinetic instabilities at ion scales in the expanding solar wind

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hellinger, Petr; Matteini, L.; Landi, S.; Verdini, A.; Franci, L.; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 811, č. 2 (2015), L32/1-L32/6 ISSN 2041-8205 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : instabilities * solar wind * turbulence * waves Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.487, year: 2015 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/2041-8205/811/2/L32/pdf

  3. Probing photospheric magnetic fields with new spectral line pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitha, H. N.; Solanki, S. K.

    2017-12-01

    Context. The magnetic line ratio (MLR) method has been extensively used in the measurement of photospheric magnetic field strength. It was devised for the neutral iron line pair at 5247.1 Å and 5250.2 Å (5250 Å pair). Other line pairs as well-suited as this pair have not been reported in the literature. Aims: The aim of the present work is to identify new line pairs useful for the MLR technique and to test their reliability. Methods: We used a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic 3D MHD simulation representing the quiet Sun atmosphere to synthesize the Stokes profiles. Then, we applied the MLR technique to the Stokes V profiles to recover the fields in the MHD cube both at original resolution and after degrading with a point spread function. In both these cases, we aim to empirically represent the field strengths returned by the MLR method in terms of the field strengths in the MHD cube. Results: We have identified two new line pairs that are very well adapted to be used for MLR measurements. The first pair is in the visible, Fe I 6820-6842 Å, whose intensity profiles have previously been used to measure stellar magnetic fields, and the other pair is in the infrared (IR), Fe I 15 534-15 542 Å. The lines in these pairs reproduce the magnetic fields in the MHD cube rather well and, in fact, somewhat better than the original 5250 Å pair. Conclusions: The newly identified line pairs complement the old pairs. The lines in the new IR pair, because of their higher Zeeman sensitivity, are ideal for the measurement of weak fields. The new visible pair works best above 300 G. The new IR pair, due to its large Stokes V signal samples more fields in the MHD cube than the old IR pair at 1.56 μm, even in the presence of noise, and hence likely also on the real Sun. Owing to their low formation heights (100-200 km above τ5000 = 1), both the new line pairs are well suited for probing magnetic fields in the lower photosphere.

  4. Development of solar wind shock models with tensor plasma pressure for data analysis. Final technical report, 1 Aug 1970--31 Dec 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham-shrauner, B.

    1975-01-01

    The development of solar wind shock models with tensor plasma pressure and the comparison of some of the shock models with the satellite data from Pioneer 6 through Pioneer 9 are reported. Theoretically, difficulties were found in non-turbulent fluid shock models for tensor pressure plasmas. For microscopic shock theories nonlinear growth caused by plasma instabilities was frequently not clearly demonstrated to lead to the formation of a shock. As a result no clear choice for a shock model for the bow shock or interplanetary tensor pressure shocks emerged

  5. Fast plasma heating by anomalous and inertial resistivity effects in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijveman, A.; Hoyng, P.; Ionson, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    A simple model is presented to describe fast plasma heating by anomalous and inertial resistivity effects. It is noted that a small fraction of the plasma contains strong currents that run parallel to the magnetic field and are driven by an exponentiating electric field. The anomalous character of the current dissipation derives from the excitation of electrostatic ion-cyclotron and/or ion-acoustic waves. The possible role of resistivity deriving from geometrical effects ('inertial resistivity') is also considered. Using a marginal stability analysis, equations for the average electron and ion temperatures are derived and numerically solved. No loss mechanisms are taken into account. The evolution of the plasma is described as a path in the drift velocity diagram, where the drift velocity is plotted as a function of the electron to ion temperature ratio.

  6. Plasma modification of poly(2-heptadecyl-4-vinylthieno[3,4-d]thiazole) low bandgap polymer and its application in solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attri, Pankaj; Bharti, Vishal; Kim, Young Sun; Gaur, Jitender; Chand, Suresh; Kwon, Gi-Chung; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Weontae; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, In Tae

    2014-12-28

    For the first time, we here propose a green methodology to modify a low bandgap polymer for highly efficient solar cells using atmospheric pressure plasma jet or soft plasma operating on different feeding gases (air, Ar and N2). The physical properties of the modified polymer were investigated using conductivity measurements, UV-visible spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, cyclic voltammograms, atomic force microscopy, cathodoluminescence and confocal Raman spectroscopy. Further, we examined the variation of the work function of the polymer before and after plasma treatment using a γ-focused ion beam. Additionally, photovoltaic cells based on the plasma-modified polymer having ITO/PEDOT:PSS/PHVTT (with or without plasma modification):PC71BM/LiF/Al configuration were fabricated and then characterized. We found that the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the plasma-modified polymer increased dramatically as compared to the control polymer (without plasma treatment). PCE of the control polymer was found to be 4.11%, while after air, Ar and N2 gas plasma treatment the polymer showed PCEs of 4.85%, 4.87% and 5.14% respectively. Thus, plasma treatment not only alters the surface properties, but also modifies the bulk properties (changes in HOMO and LUMO bandgap level). Hence, this work provides new dimensions to explore more about plasma and polymer chemistry.

  7. Compensation of decreased ion energy by increased hydrogen dilution in plasma deposition of thin film silicon solar cells at low substrate temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerk, A.D.; de Jong, M.M.; Rath, J.K.; Brinza, M.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Goedheer, W.J.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.; Gorbachev, Y.E.; Orlov, K.E.; Khilkevitch, E.M.; Smirnov, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    In order to deposit thin film silicon solar cells on plastics and papers, the deposition process needs to be adapted for low deposition temperatures. In a very high frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF PECVD) process, both the gas phase and the surface processes are affected by

  8. Plasma Beta Dependence of the Ion-scale Spectral Break of Solar Wind Turbulence: High-resolution 2D Hybrid Simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Franci, L.; Landi, S.; Matteini, L.; Verdini, A.; Hellinger, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 833, č. 1 (2016), 91/1-91/7 ISSN 0004-637X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-10057S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : plasmas * solar wind * turbulence Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.533, year: 2016

  9. Photospheric Emission from Collapsar Jets in 3D Relativistic Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hirotaka; Matsumoto, Jin; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Warren, Donald C.; Barkov, Maxim V.

    2015-12-01

    We explore the photospheric emission from a relativistic jet breaking out from a massive stellar envelope based on relativistic hydrodynamical simulations and post-process radiation transfer calculations in three dimensions. To investigate the impact of three-dimensional (3D) dynamics on the emission, two models of injection conditions are considered for the jet at the center of the progenitor star: one with periodic precession and another without precession. We show that structures developed within the jet due to the interaction with the stellar envelope, as well as due to the precession, have a significant imprint on the resulting emission. Particularly, we find that the signature of precession activity by the central engine is not smeared out and can be directly observed in the light curve as a periodic signal. We also show that non-thermal features, which can account for observations of gamma-ray bursts, are produced in the resulting spectra even though only thermal photons are injected initially and the effect of non-thermal particles is not considered.

  10. Seasonal and solar cycle association of zonal drifts of ionospheric plasma irregularities in the Indian equatorial region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Pathan

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Long series of simultaneous VHF scintillation observations at two stations situated in near magnetic east-west direction in the vicinity of the dip equator in the Indian region have been employed to investigate the night-time ionospheric plasma zonal drifts. The drifts are found to be predominantly easterly. On comparing the magnitudes of the drifts with those results derived earlier by HF fading technique, monitoring signals from two satellites at a station and spaced receiver experiment, their associations with the season and the degree of solar activity are discussed. On a broader scale, the annual mean sunspot number is shown to have a direct control on the derived drift, the positive relationship even on day to day basis with the solar flux is established. However, the relationship, as understood by the slope of the best fit line, in the Indian region (0.27 is found to be weaker when compared with the similar slope (0.45 in the American sector. There appears to be no geomagnetic activity control on the estimated drifts.

  11. Time delays in the correlation between solar activity and the F2 region plasma frequency

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Třísková, Ludmila; Truhlík, Vladimír; Podolská, Kateřina

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 73, 5-6 (2011), s. 623-626 ISSN 1364-6826 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/10/2086 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : F2 region ionosphere * Solar activity * Time series Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.596, year : 2011 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682610004128

  12. ARE TORNADO-LIKE MAGNETIC STRUCTURES ABLE TO SUPPORT SOLAR PROMINENCE PLASMA?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Priest, E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent high-resolution and high-cadence observations have surprisingly suggested that prominence barbs exhibit apparent rotating motions suggestive of a tornado-like structure. Additional evidence has been provided by Doppler measurements. The observations reveal opposite velocities for both hot and cool plasma on the two sides of a prominence barb. This motion is persistent for several hours and has been interpreted in terms of rotational motion of prominence feet. Several authors suggest that such barb motions are rotating helical structures around a vertical axis similar to tornadoes on Earth. One of the difficulties of such a proposal is how to support cool prominence plasma in almost-vertical structures against gravity. In this work we model analytically a tornado-like structure and try to determine possible mechanisms to support the prominence plasma. We have found that the Lorentz force can indeed support the barb plasma provided the magnetic structure is sufficiently twisted and/or significant poloidal flows are present

  13. ARE TORNADO-LIKE MAGNETIC STRUCTURES ABLE TO SUPPORT SOLAR PROMINENCE PLASMA?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Priest, E. [Mathematics Institute, University of St Andrews, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-20

    Recent high-resolution and high-cadence observations have surprisingly suggested that prominence barbs exhibit apparent rotating motions suggestive of a tornado-like structure. Additional evidence has been provided by Doppler measurements. The observations reveal opposite velocities for both hot and cool plasma on the two sides of a prominence barb. This motion is persistent for several hours and has been interpreted in terms of rotational motion of prominence feet. Several authors suggest that such barb motions are rotating helical structures around a vertical axis similar to tornadoes on Earth. One of the difficulties of such a proposal is how to support cool prominence plasma in almost-vertical structures against gravity. In this work we model analytically a tornado-like structure and try to determine possible mechanisms to support the prominence plasma. We have found that the Lorentz force can indeed support the barb plasma provided the magnetic structure is sufficiently twisted and/or significant poloidal flows are present.

  14. Are Tornado-Like Magnetic Structures Able to Support Solar Prominence Plasma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunjo, S. T.; Luna Bennasar, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Priest, E. R.

    2015-12-01

    Recent high-resolution and high-cadence observations have surprisingly suggested that prominence barbs exhibit apparent rotating motions suggestive of a tornado-like structure. Additional evidence has been provided by Doppler measurements. The observations reveal opposite velocities for both hot and cool plasma on the two sides of a prominence barb. This motion is persistent for several hours and has been interpreted in terms of rotational motion of prominence feet. Several authors suggest that such barb motions are rotating helical structures around a vertical axis similar to tornadoes on Earth. One of the difficulties of such a proposal is how to support cool prominence plasma in almost-vertical structures against gravity. In this work we model analytically a tornado-like structure and try to determine possible mechanisms to support the prominence plasma. We have found that the Lorentz force can indeed support the barb plasma provided the magnetic structure is sufficiently twisted and/or significant poloidal flows are present.

  15. Expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition of ZnO:Al layers for CIGS solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, K.; Williams, B.L.; Mittal, A.; Knoops, H.C.M.; Kniknie, B.J.; Bakker, N.J.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Creatore, M.

    2014-01-01

    Aluminium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) grown by expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition (ETP-CVD) has demonstrated excellent electrical and optical properties, which make it an attractive candidate as a transparent conductive oxide for photovoltaic applications. However, when depositing

  16. The Light Source Problem: The Effect of Heterogeneous Stellar Photospheres on Searches for Transiting Exoplanet Biosignatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackham, B. V.; Apai, D.; Giampapa, M. S.

    2017-11-01

    TESS will soon enable the study of terrestrial exoplanet atmospheres. However, spots and faculae in stellar photospheres can complicate these measurements by mimicking or masking atmospheric features. We detail our work to constrain this effect.

  17. Surface tailoring of newly developed amorphous Znsbnd Sisbnd O thin films as electron injection/transport layer by plasma treatment: Application to inverted OLEDs and hybrid solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongsheng; Kim, Junghwan; Yamamoto, Koji; Xing, Xing; Hosono, Hideo

    2018-03-01

    We report a unique amorphous oxide semiconductor Znsbnd Sisbnd O (a-ZSO) which has a small work function of 3.4 eV for as-deposited films. The surface modification of a-ZSO thin films by plasma treatments is examined to apply it to the electron injection/transport layer of organic devices. It turns out that the energy alignment and exciton dissociation efficiency at a-ZSO/organic semiconductor interface significantly changes by choosing different gas (oxygen or argon) for plasma treatments (after a-ZSO was exposed to atmospheric environment for 5 days). In situ ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) measurement reveals that the work function of a-ZSO is increased to 4.0 eV after an O2-plasma treatment, while the work function of 3.5 eV is recovered after an Ar-plasma treatment which indicates this treatment is effective for surface cleaning. To study the effects of surface treatments to device performance, OLEDs and hybrid polymer solar cells with O2-plasma or Ar-plasma treated a-ZSO are compared. Effects of these surface treatments on performance of inverted OLEDs and hybrid polymer solar cells are examined. Ar-plasma treated a-ZSO works well as the electron injection layer in inverted OLEDs (Alq3/a-ZSO) because the injection barrier is small (∼ 0.1 eV). On the other hands, O2-plasma treated a-ZSO is more suitable for application to hybrid solar cells which is benefiting from higher exciton dissociation efficiency at polymer (P3HT)/ZSO interface.

  18. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in photospheric flows - Effects of coronal heating and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpen, Judith T.; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Dahlburg, Russell B.; Spicer, Daniel S.

    1993-01-01

    A series of hydrodynamic numerical simulations has been used to investigate the nonlinear evolution of driven, subsonic velocity shears under a range of typical photospheric conditions. These calculations show that typical photospheric flows are susceptible to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI), with rapid nonlinear growth times that are approximately half of a typical granule lifetime. The KHI produces vortical structures in intergranule lanes comparable to a typical fluxule radius; this is precisely the correct scale for maximum power transfer to the corona.

  19. The Small-scale Structure of Photospheric Convection Retrieved by a Deconvolution Technique Applied to Hinode /SP Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oba, T. [SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252–5210 (Japan); Riethmüller, T. L.; Solanki, S. K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung (MPS), Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Iida, Y. [Department of Science and Technology/Kwansei Gakuin University, Gakuen 2-1, Sanda, Hyogo, 669–1337 Japan (Japan); Quintero Noda, C.; Shimizu, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252–5210 (Japan)

    2017-11-01

    Solar granules are bright patterns surrounded by dark channels, called intergranular lanes, in the solar photosphere and are a manifestation of overshooting convection. Observational studies generally find stronger upflows in granules and weaker downflows in intergranular lanes. This trend is, however, inconsistent with the results of numerical simulations in which downflows are stronger than upflows through the joint action of gravitational acceleration/deceleration and pressure gradients. One cause of this discrepancy is the image degradation caused by optical distortion and light diffraction and scattering that takes place in an imaging instrument. We apply a deconvolution technique to Hinode /SP data in an attempt to recover the original solar scene. Our results show a significant enhancement in both the convective upflows and downflows but particularly for the latter. After deconvolution, the up- and downflows reach maximum amplitudes of −3.0 km s{sup −1} and +3.0 km s{sup −1} at an average geometrical height of roughly 50 km, respectively. We found that the velocity distributions after deconvolution match those derived from numerical simulations. After deconvolution, the net LOS velocity averaged over the whole field of view lies close to zero as expected in a rough sense from mass balance.

  20. The influence of planetary attractions on the solar tachocline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callebaut, D.K.; de Jager, C.; Duhau, S.

    2012-01-01

    We present a physical analysis of the occasionally forwarded hypothesis that solar variability, as shown in the various photospheric and outer solar layer activities, might be due to the Newtonian attraction by the planets. We calculate the planetary forces exerted on the tachocline and thereby not

  1. Grid-Free 2D Plasma Simulations of the Complex Interaction Between the Solar Wind and Small, Near-Earth Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.; Poppe, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from a new grid-free 2D plasma simulation code applied to a small, unmagnetized body immersed in the streaming solar wind plasma. The body was purposely modeled as an irregular shape in order to examine photoemission and solar wind plasma flow in high detail on the dayside, night-side, terminator and surface-depressed 'pocket' regions. Our objective is to examine the overall morphology of the various plasma interaction regions that form around a small body like a small near-Earth asteroid (NEA). We find that the object obstructs the solar wind flow and creates a trailing wake region downstream, which involves the interplay between surface charging and ambipolar plasma expansion. Photoemission is modeled as a steady outflow of electrons from illuminated portions of the surface, and under direct illumination the surface forms a non-monotonic or ''double-sheath'' electric potential upstream of the body, which is important for understanding trajectories and equilibria of lofted dust grains in the presence of a complex asteroid geometry. The largest electric fields are found at the terminators, where ambipolar plasma expansion in the body-sized night-side wake merges seamlessly with the thin photoelectric sheath on the dayside. The pocket regions are found to be especially complex, with nearby sunlit regions of positive potential electrically connected to unlit negative potentials and forming adjacent natural electric dipoles. For objects near the surface, we find electrical dissipation times (through collection of local environmental solar wind currents) that vary over at least 5 orders of magnitude: from 39 Micro(s) inside the near-surface photoelectron cloud under direct sunlight to less than 1 s inside the particle-depleted night-side wake and shadowed pocket regions

  2. Multi-fluid MHD Study of the Solar Wind Induced Plasma Escape from the Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y.; Russell, C. T.; Nagy, A. F.; Toth, G.; Dong, C.; Bougher, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the multi-fluid MHD model (Najib et al., 2011) is further improved to include an electron pressure equation to self-consistently calculate the electron temperature. The electron pressure equation included in the improved model can accurately calculate the electron temperature and the electron pressure force. The electron temperature is also needed to calculate rates of some electron temperature dependent chemical reactions such as dissociative recombination and electron impact ionization. So the improvement of the model leads to a more accurate evaluation of the ion density in the ionosphere and a more accurate description of the interaction process. Model results of a typical case with electron pressure equation included are compared in detail to an identical case without the electron pressure equation to identify the effect of the improved physics. The two cases will be examined to identify changes in the global interaction patterns. Electron temperature will also be compared for the two cases to identify regions where temperatures differs the most. The ion density profiles at different locations will be compared to identify the changes of plasma density due to changes of recombination rates and impact ionization rates caused by different electron temperatures. The calculated electron temperature profile will also be compared to the only available pre-MAVEN electron observations from the Viking Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA) (Hansen et al., 1977). Based on model results, two-dimensional maps of the ion densities and fluxes are to be generated in the tail region at various distances to locate the intense region for plasma bulk escape. We will also plan to fly through the 3D MHD model results using planned MAVEN orbits to predict when and where the spacecraft will pass different plasma boundaries (such as the bow shock, MPB, and ionopause), and the typical range of the plasma parameters in different regions.

  3. Mass spectrometric study of various coated targets utilizing the PUPR Mirror/Cusp plasma machine for the NASA Solar Probe space mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lleonart-Davila, G; Gaudier, J; Rivera, R; Gonzalez-Lizardo, A; Leal-Quiros, E [Plasma Engineering Laboratory, Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 00918 (Puerto Rico)], E-mail: glleonart@gmail.com

    2008-10-15

    The NASA Solar Probe space mission will be a historic operation, flying for the first time into one of the last unexplored regions of the solar system, the Sun's atmosphere or corona; hopefully revolutionizing our knowledge of the physics of the origin and evolution of the solar wind phenomenon. The spacecraft's most prominent feature is the thermal protection system (TPS), composed of a large carbon-carbon conical shield, designed to withstand the Sun's violent temperatures. Thermal testing will be conducted on various coatings on the carbon-carbon targets in order to study mass loss components using mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry is an analytical technique used to measure the mass-to-charge ratio of ions. It is more generally used to find the composition of a physical sample by generating a mass spectrum representing the masses of sample components. By using a quadrupole mass spectrometer, the effects of plasma on various coated targets were analyzed and the effects of various gases on the plasma were studied on the PUPR Mirror/Cusp (M/C) plasma machine. A series of five tests was performed for this experiment; the first four tests consist of creating plasma with four different gases, and studying the effects of each gas on the plasma using mass spectrometry, in order to decide which plasma resembles the Sun's atmosphere or corona. The fifth test consists of introducing various coated targets, which represent the spacecraft's shield, inside the PUPR M/C plasma machine, to study how the different coatings react with the plasma that best bears a resemblance to the Sun's atmosphere, for approximately 12 h of exposure. After studying the results for the first four tests, it is evident that each gas has a distinctive effect on the plasma. For the fifth test following the study of the mass spectrometry results, it is clear that the quadrupole mass spectrometer was able to detect mass loss components for the introduced targets, and

  4. Improvements in the equation of state for the partially ionized plasmas of the solar interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Aihua

    2005-11-01

    The three major material properties relevant for solar and stellar modeling are the equation of state (EOS), opacity and the nuclear reaction rate. Due to the nature of the equations of stellar structure and evolution, in most parts of a stars interior, the three material properties are entangled, and it is difficult to use astrophysics to constrain a single one. Luckily, thanks to the adiabatic stratification of the convection zone, there the structure only depends on the EOS, which is therefore largely disentangled from the other quantities. Our research, which aims at constraining the EOS using information from the Sun, is therefore most successful when data from the convection zone are used. Among the many solar equations of state that are being currently used there are two popular ones: Mihalas-Däppen-Hummer (MHD) EOS and OPAL EOS. Helioseismic inversion procedures, which have become standard to evaluate the accuracy of different solar models with respect to the real Sun, have revealed that except for the top 2%, the OPAL EOS matches the solar observations better than the MHD EOS. For this reason we have set our research goal to find a modification of the MHD EOS that can, in a first step, simulate the OPAL EOS, and ultimately, the real Sun. This goal has been attained. By construction, the OPAL EOS contains higher order correlation terms which are missing in the MHD EOS. Through an inversion procedure from the activity series expansion (ACTEX), upon which the OPAL EOS is based to the free energy expression of the MHD EOS, we have found out that the free particle assumption, used in the original version of the MHD EOS has indeed to be abandoned. We show that the two-body scattering terms of the Coulomb interaction, as well as electron degeneracy play a significant role in the difference between the original version of the MHD and OPAL EOS. During our interdisciplinary investigation, aiming at seeking an improved MHD EOS under the guidance of the OPAL EOS, we

  5. Chromospheric Plasma Ejections in a Light Bridge of a Sunspot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Donguk; Chae, Jongchul; Yang, Heesu; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Kwak, Hannah [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Yurchyshyn, Vasyl [Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314-9672 (United States); Lim, Eun-Kyung; Cho, Kyung-Suk, E-mail: dusong@astro.snu.ac.kr [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute 776, Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34055 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-01

    It is well-known that light bridges (LBs) inside a sunspot produce small-scale plasma ejections and transient brightenings in the chromosphere, but the nature and origin of such phenomena are still unclear. Utilizing the high-spatial and high-temporal resolution spectral data taken with the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph and the TiO 7057 Å broadband filter images installed at the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope of Big Bear Solar Observatory, we report arcsecond-scale chromospheric plasma ejections (1.″7) inside a LB. Interestingly, the ejections are found to be a manifestation of upwardly propagating shock waves as evidenced by the sawtooth patterns seen in the temporal-spectral plots of the Ca ii 8542 Å and H α intensities. We also found a fine-scale photospheric pattern (1″) diverging with a speed of about 2 km s{sup −1} two minutes before the plasma ejections, which seems to be a manifestation of magnetic flux emergence. As a response to the plasma ejections, the corona displayed small-scale transient brightenings. Based on our findings, we suggest that the shock waves can be excited by the local disturbance caused by magnetic reconnection between the emerging flux inside the LB and the adjacent umbral magnetic field. The disturbance generates slow-mode waves, which soon develop into shock waves, and manifest themselves as the arcsecond-scale plasma ejections. It also appears that the dissipation of mechanical energy in the shock waves can heat the local corona.

  6. APPARENT CROSS-FIELD SUPERSLOW PROPAGATION OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN SOLAR PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, T.; Yokoyama, T. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan); Goossens, M.; Doorsselaere, T. Van [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, Bus 2400, B-3001 Herverlee (Belgium); Soler, R.; Terradas, J. [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Wright, A. N., E-mail: kaneko@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-20

    In this paper we show that the phase-mixing of continuum Alfvén waves and/or continuum slow waves in the magnetic structures of the solar atmosphere as, e.g., coronal arcades, can create the illusion of wave propagation across the magnetic field. This phenomenon could be erroneously interpreted as fast magnetosonic waves. The cross-field propagation due to the phase-mixing of continuum waves is apparent because there is no real propagation of energy across the magnetic surfaces. We investigate the continuous Alfvén and slow spectra in two-dimensional (2D) Cartesian equilibrium models with a purely poloidal magnetic field. We show that apparent superslow propagation across the magnetic surfaces in solar coronal structures is a consequence of the existence of continuum Alfvén waves and continuum slow waves that naturally live on those structures and phase-mix as time evolves. The apparent cross-field phase velocity is related to the spatial variation of the local Alfvén/slow frequency across the magnetic surfaces and is slower than the Alfvén/sound velocities for typical coronal conditions. Understanding the nature of the apparent cross-field propagation is important for the correct analysis of numerical simulations and the correct interpretation of observations.

  7. A New Characteristic Boundary Condition Formulation for a Data-Driven Magnetohydrodynamic Model of Global Solar Corona Using SDO Vector Magnetogram Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalim, Mehmet S.; Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Liu, Yang; Hu, Qiang; Wu, Shi T.

    2016-10-01

    The solar wind which is the plasma emerging from the Sun is the main driving mechanism of the solar storms which can lead to geomagnetic storms that are the primary causes of the space weather disturbances that affect the magnetic environment of the Earth and can have hazardous effects on the space-borne and ground-based technological systems as well as human health. Therefore, accurate modeling of the solar wind is very important in order to be able to understand the underlying mechanisms of solar storms. In this study, we present a data-driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of the global solar corona which utilizes a new characteristic boundary condition formulation implemented within the Multi-Scale Fluid-Kinetic Simulation Suite (MS-FLUKSS). Our global solar corona model can be driven by both time-dependent and Carrington-rotation averaged vector magnetogram synoptic map data obtained by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (SDO/HMI) and the horizontal velocity data on the photosphere obtained by applying the Differential Affine Velocity Estimator for Vector Magnetograms (DAVE4VM) method on the HMI-observed vector magnetic fields. We will present our global solar corona model, in particular focus on the formulations for our characteristic boundary conditions and demonstrate results of our model.

  8. Variability of the ionospheric plasma density, NmF2, and of Total Electron Content, TEC, over equatorial and low latitude region in Brazil during solar minimum activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candido, Claudia; Batista, Inez S.; Negreti, Patricia M. S.; Klausner, Virginia

    The recent solar minimum period was unusually deep and prolonged, which opened a window to observe the ionospheric behavior under unprecedented low solar activity conditions. This work is part of a multi-instrumental effort to investigate the equatorial and low latitude ionosphere over Brazilian sector during low solar activity. We present a study of the ionospheric plasma densities variations through ionosondes measurements and dual frequency GPS receivers (L1= 1275.4 MHz, L2 = 1227.6 MHz) for two equatorial stations, Sao Luis (3° S, 45º W) e Fortaleza (4° S, 39.5° W), and for a station close to the south crest of the equatorial ionization anomaly region, Cachoeira Paulista (23º S, 45º W). From ionosondes we extract the plasma critical frequency foF2 which is related to F2 region peak electron density, NmF2, by the relationship: NmF2 = 1.24 x 104 (foF2)2, and the F2 layer peak height, hmF2. From GPS receivers we used the quantity VTEC (Vertical total electron content). We analyzed the seasonal and local time variations of NmF2 and VTEC, as well as the differences between two solar minima, 2008-2009 and 1996. We observe that the ionospheric plasma densities were lower in 2008-2009 than in 1996 for both regions. In addition, we observe that the lowest plasma densities persisted longer during 2008/2009 than in 1996, especially for nighttime periods. Finally, we applied the wavelet technique to investigate the impact of some distinct time scales drivers on the ionosphere, such as the wave activity from below that seems have been better observed and appreciated during this unusual solar quiescence.

  9. Surface modification of porous nanocrystalline TiO2 films for dye-sensitized solar cell application by various gas plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Youngsoo; Yoon, Chang-Ho; Kim, Kang-Jin; Lee, Yeonhee

    2007-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) film for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) has surface defects such as oxygen vacancies created during the annealing process. The authors used a plasma treatment technique to reduce defects on TiO 2 surfaces. They investigated the influence of different gas plasma treatments of TiO 2 film on the photoelectric performance of DSSC. Short-circuit photocurrent density (J sc ), open-circuit photovoltage (V oc ), and the amount of adsorbed dye for DSSCs were measured. As a result, the solar-to-electricity conversion efficiencies of the O 2 - and N 2 -treated cells increased by 15%-20% compared to untreated cells. On the other hand, solar energy conversion efficiency of CF 4 -plasma treated cells decreased drastically. The increased amount of adsorbed dye on the TiO 2 film was measured by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. TiO 2 surfaces modified by plasma treatment were characterized using analytical instruments such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure

  10. Interchange Reconnection Associated with a Confined Filament Eruption: Implications for the Source of Transient Cold-dense Plasma in Solar Winds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Chen, Yao; Wang, Bing; Li, Gang; Xiang, Yongyuan

    2017-01-01

    The cold-dense plasma is occasionally detected in the solar wind with in situ data, but the source of the cold-dense plasma remains illusive. Interchange reconnections (IRs) between closed fields and nearby open fields are known to contribute to the formation of solar winds. We present a confined filament eruption associated with a puff-like coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2014 December 24. The filament underwent successive activations and finally erupted, due to continuous magnetic flux cancelations and emergences. The confined erupting filament showed a clear untwist motion, and most of the filament material fell back. During the eruption, some tiny blobs escaped from the confined filament body, along newly formed open field lines rooted around the south end of the filament, and some bright plasma flowed from the north end of the filament to remote sites at nearby open fields. The newly formed open field lines shifted southward with multiple branches. The puff-like CME also showed multiple bright fronts and a clear southward shift. All the results indicate an intermittent IR existed between closed fields of the confined erupting filament and nearby open fields, which released a portion of filament material (blobs) to form the puff-like CME. We suggest that the IR provides a possible source of cold-dense plasma in the solar wind.

  11. Interchange Reconnection Associated with a Confined Filament Eruption: Implications for the Source of Transient Cold-dense Plasma in Solar Winds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Chen, Yao; Wang, Bing [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, and Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai 264209 (China); Li, Gang [Department of Physics and CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Xiang, Yongyuan, E-mail: ruishengzheng@sdu.edu.cn [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650216 (China)

    2017-05-01

    The cold-dense plasma is occasionally detected in the solar wind with in situ data, but the source of the cold-dense plasma remains illusive. Interchange reconnections (IRs) between closed fields and nearby open fields are known to contribute to the formation of solar winds. We present a confined filament eruption associated with a puff-like coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2014 December 24. The filament underwent successive activations and finally erupted, due to continuous magnetic flux cancelations and emergences. The confined erupting filament showed a clear untwist motion, and most of the filament material fell back. During the eruption, some tiny blobs escaped from the confined filament body, along newly formed open field lines rooted around the south end of the filament, and some bright plasma flowed from the north end of the filament to remote sites at nearby open fields. The newly formed open field lines shifted southward with multiple branches. The puff-like CME also showed multiple bright fronts and a clear southward shift. All the results indicate an intermittent IR existed between closed fields of the confined erupting filament and nearby open fields, which released a portion of filament material (blobs) to form the puff-like CME. We suggest that the IR provides a possible source of cold-dense plasma in the solar wind.

  12. Transient auroral events near midday: Relationship with solar wind/magnetosheath plasma and magnetic field conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, B.; Sandholt, P.E.; Lybekk, B.; Egeland, A.

    1990-09-01

    Ground-based observations of auroral/geomagnetic transient events near magnetic midday and magnetosheath magnetic field and plasma observations from spacecraft IMP-8 are presented. One category of events is characterized by a sequence of discrete auroral arc fragments moving westward along the poleward boundary of the persistent cusp arc, accompanied by an isolated magnetic pulse at latitudes close to the auroral event. This phenomenon occurs mainly during intervals of southward directed magnetosheath/interplanetary magnetic field. The auroral display in the second category of events is separated in two components, possibly associated with the cusp and the cleft/low latitude boundary layer. Intensification of the cleft aurora and magnetic perturbations over a wide latitudinal range were observed after a sharp northward magnetosheath magnetic field transition and a large variation in plasma density. It is suggested that these different events are ionospheric footprints of different time-dependent coupling processes near/in the magnetopause boundary layer. However, the specific mechanism involved (e.g. flux transfer events or pressure pulses/boundary waves) may not be uniquely inferred from these observations. 37 refs., 13 figs

  13. PLASMA TURBULENCE AND KINETIC INSTABILITIES AT ION SCALES IN THE EXPANDING SOLAR WIND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellinger, Petr; Trávnícek, Pavel M. [Astronomical Institute, CAS, Bocni II/1401, CZ-14100 Prague (Czech Republic); Matteini, Lorenzo [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Landi, Simone; Verdini, Andrea; Franci, Luca, E-mail: petr.hellinger@asu.cas.cz [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Firenze Largo E. Fermi 2, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between a decaying strong turbulence and kinetic instabilities in a slowly expanding plasma is investigated using two-dimensional (2D) hybrid expanding box simulations. We impose an initial ambient magnetic field perpendicular to the simulation box, and we start with a spectrum of large-scale, linearly polarized, random-phase Alfvénic fluctuations that have energy equipartition between kinetic and magnetic fluctuations and vanishing correlation between the two fields. A turbulent cascade rapidly develops; magnetic field fluctuations exhibit a power-law spectrum at large scales and a steeper spectrum at ion scales. The turbulent cascade leads to an overall anisotropic proton heating, protons are heated in the perpendicular direction, and, initially, also in the parallel direction. The imposed expansion leads to generation of a large parallel proton temperature anisotropy which is at later stages partly reduced by turbulence. The turbulent heating is not sufficient to overcome the expansion-driven perpendicular cooling and the system eventually drives the oblique firehose instability in a form of localized nonlinear wave packets which efficiently reduce the parallel temperature anisotropy. This work demonstrates that kinetic instabilities may coexist with strong plasma turbulence even in a constrained 2D regime.

  14. Tuning of undoped ZnO thin film via plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition and its application for an inverted polymer solar cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-jin Jin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We studied the tuning of structural and optical properties of ZnO thin film and its correlation to the efficiency of inverted solar cell using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD. The sequential injection of DEZn and O2 plasma was employed for the plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition of ZnO thin film. As the growth temperature of ZnO film was increased from 100 °C to 300 °C, the crystallinity of ZnO film was improved from amorphous to highly ordered (002 direction ploy-crystal due to self crystallization. Increasing oxygen plasma time in PEALD process also introduces growing of hexagonal wurtzite phase of ZnO nanocrystal. Excess of oxygen plasma time induces enhanced deep level emission band (500 ∼ 700 nm in photoluminescence due to Zn vacancies and other defects. The evolution of structural and optical properties of PEALD ZnO films also involves in change of electrical conductivity by 3 orders of magnitude. The highly tunable PEALD ZnO thin films were employed as the electron conductive layers in inverted polymer solar cells. Our study indicates that both structural and optical properties rather than electrical conductivities of ZnO films play more important role for the effective charge collection in photovoltaic device operation. The ability to tune the materials properties of undoped ZnO films via PEALD should extend their functionality over the wide range of advanced electronic applications.

  15. Analysis of Hard X-Ray, Microwave and Millimeter Emission in Solar Flare Plasma on 5 July 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Smirnova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bauman Moscow State Technical University’s (BMSTU’s radiotelescope RT-7.5 is in continuous operation to observe the active regions on the Sun at frequencies of 93 and 140 GHz (3.2 and 2.2 mm, respectively. A special attention is focused on the observations of solar flares. The given frequency range is understudied, but it allows us to have the unique information about the physical parameters of the chromospheric plasma of flare loops (Shustikov et al. 2015. The paper is aimed at a detailed study and interpretation of the characteristic features of the spectrum of solar flare radio emission observed using the BMSTU radio telescope RT-7.5 at frequencies of 93 and 140 GHz in case there is a radio flux density growth with frequency. A positive slope of the sub-THz spectrum of radio emission was earlier observed only from time to time at frequencies of 200 and 400 GHz (Kaufmann et al., 2009. Currently, the interpretation of this effect is still under discussion due to a lack of sufficient observational material with the desired frequency resolution in the sub-THz range (Krucker et al., 2013. The paper, using the July 5, 2012 flare event of X-class GOES M6.1 as an example, through numerical simulation of the radio flux density spectrum shows that the observed positive spectral slope of this flare between the frequencies of 93 and 140 GHz can be explained by available single population of low- and high-energy electrons, the generation of which occurs in the solar chromosphere-transition region of the Sun. It could be suggested that the effective Science & Education of the Bauman MSTU 95 electron acceleration occurs in the chromosphere, rather than, as previously thought, only at the coronal level. The section 1 briefly describes the observational data and methods of their obtaining and processing. The section 2 presents the main result of numerical modelling of the radio spectrum. The section 3 offers discussion of results and conclusions. The work

  16. ON THE SUPPORT OF NEUTRALS AGAINST GRAVITY IN SOLAR PROMINENCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terradas, J.; Soler, R.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L., E-mail: jaume.terradas@uib.es [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2015-04-01

    Cool and dense prominences found in the solar atmosphere are known to be partially ionized because of their relatively low temperature. In this Letter, we address the long-standing problem of how the neutral component of the plasma in prominences is supported against gravity. Using the multiple-fluid approach, we solve the time-dependent equations in two dimensions considering the frictional coupling between the neutral and ionized components of the magnetized plasma representative of a solar prominence embedded in a hot coronal environment. We demonstrate that given an initial density enhancement in the two fluids, representing the body of the prominence, the system is able to relax in the vicinity of magnetic dips to a stationary state in which both neutrals and ionized species are dynamically suspended above the photosphere. Two different coupling processes are considered in this study: collisions between ions and neutrals and charge exchange interactions. We find that for realistic conditions, ions are essentially static, while neutrals have a very small downflow velocity. The coupling between ions and neutrals is so strong at the prominence body that the behavior is similar to that of a single fluid with an effective density equal to the sum of the ion and neutral species. We also find that the charge exchange mechanism is about three times more efficient at sustaining neutrals than elastic scattering of ions with neutrals.

  17. Corruption of radio metric Doppler due to solar plasma dynamics: S/X dual-frequency Doppler calibration for these effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, F. B.; Reinbold, S. R.; Yip, K. W.; Koch, R. E.; Lubeley, A.

    1975-01-01

    Doppler data from Mariner 6, 7, 9, and 10 and Pioneer 10 and 11 were discussed and the rms noise level for various sun-earth-probe angles were shown. The noise levels of both S- and X-band Doppler data for sun-earth-probe angles smaller than 20 deg were observed to be orders of magnitude greater than nominal. Such solar plasma-related Doppler degradation reduced the Mariner 10-Mercury 11 encounter navigation accuracy by nearly a factor of 10. Furthermore, this degradation was shown to be indirectly related to plasma dynamics and not a direct measure of the dynamics.

  18. Determination of the Alfvén Speed and Plasma-beta Using the Seismology of Sunspot Umbra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, I.-H.; Moon, Y.-J.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Park, J.; Choi, S. [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, K.-S.; Bong, S.-C.; Baek, J.-H.; Kim, Y.-H.; Lee, J., E-mail: ihjo@khu.ac.kr [Space Science Division, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-01

    For 478 centrally located sunspots observed in the optical continuum with Solar Dynamics Observatory /Helioseismic Magnetic Imager, we perform seismological diagnostics of the physical parameters of umbral photospheres. The new technique is based on the theory of slow magnetoacoustic waves in a non-isothermally stratified photosphere with a uniform vertical magnetic field. We construct a map of the weighted frequency of three-minute oscillations inside the umbra and use it for the estimation of the Alfvén speed, plasma-beta, and mass density within the umbra. We find the umbral mean Alfvén speed ranges between 10.5 and 7.5 km s{sup −1} and is negatively correlated with magnetic field strength. The umbral mean plasma-beta is found to range approximately between 0.65 and 1.15 and does not vary significantly from pores to mature sunspots. The mean density ranges between (1–6) × 10{sup −4} kg m{sup −3} and shows a strong positive correlation with magnetic field strength.

  19. HEATING MECHANISMS IN THE LOW SOLAR ATMOSPHERE THROUGH MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN CURRENT SHEETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Lei; Lin, Jun [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Roussev, Ilia I. [Division of Geosciences, National Science Foundation Arlington, Virginia (United States); Schmieder, Brigitte, E-mail: leini@ynao.ac.cn [Observatoire de Paris, LESIA, Meudon (France)

    2016-12-01

    We simulate several magnetic reconnection processes in the low solar chromosphere/photosphere; the radiation cooling, heat conduction and ambipolar diffusion are all included. Our numerical results indicate that both the high temperature (≳8 × 10{sup 4} K) and low temperature (∼10{sup 4} K) magnetic reconnection events can happen in the low solar atmosphere (100–600 km above the solar surface). The plasma β controlled by plasma density and magnetic fields is one important factor to decide how much the plasma can be heated up. The low temperature event is formed in a high β magnetic reconnection process, Joule heating is the main mechanism to heat plasma and the maximum temperature increase is only several thousand Kelvin. The high temperature explosions can be generated in a low β magnetic reconnection process, slow and fast-mode shocks attached at the edges of the well developed plasmoids are the main physical mechanisms to heat the plasma from several thousand Kelvin to over 8 × 10{sup 4} K. Gravity in the low chromosphere can strongly hinder the plasmoid instability and the formation of slow-mode shocks in a vertical current sheet. Only small secondary islands are formed; these islands, however, are not as well developed as those in the horizontal current sheets. This work can be applied to understand the heating mechanism in the low solar atmosphere and could possibly be extended to explain the formation of common low temperature Ellerman bombs (∼10{sup 4} K) and the high temperature Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) bombs (≳8 × 10{sup 4}) in the future.

  20. Use of Al XII and Mg XI lines as solar plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromage, B.J.I.; Phillips, K.J.H.; Keenan, F.P.; McCann, S.M.

    1989-09-01

    We present three sets of observations of n=1 to n=2 lines due to helium-like aluminium (Al XII), made during two solar flares (25 August, 1980 and 19 October, 1986), using the X-ray Polychromator on satellite. The observed temperature-sensitive line ratio G is shown to be consistent with previously observed close-coupling calculations, although the ratio R, which is both temperature and density-sensitive for lower-Z elements, is not sufficiently well determined from these data to say more than that the observed values of R are not inconsistent with the theoretical calculations. This region of the spectrum also includes the helium-like magnesium (Mg XI) 1 1 S-3 1 P line, and it is shown that the ratio of this line to the Al XII resonance (1 1 S-2 1 P) line is a more sensitive indicator of electron temperature than are the Al XII G and R ratios. We demonstrate that the three ratios may be used together in order to derive values of emission measure, electron temperature and electron density during these flares. (author)

  1. Photovoltaic properties of Si-based quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells prepared using laser plasma in liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hiroki; Chewchinda, Pattarin; Inoue, Yasunori; Funakubo, Hiroshi; Hara, Michikazu; Fujino, Masaie; Odawara, Osamu; Wada, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of Si-based quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) were examined. Si nanoparticles were prepared using laser-induced plasma. Si wafer in ethanol was irradiated with a Nd:YAG second harmonic generation (SHG) laser beam. The prepared nanoparticles were identified by X-ray diffraction analysis and Raman spectroscopy. Particle size was measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Highly crystalline Si nanoparticles were observed by TEM. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the Si nanoparticles were also measured. Two types of QDSSCs were produced. One included ethanol during the production of TiO2/Si nanoparticle layer on a transparent conductive oxide electrode because ethanol solution with dispersed Si nanoparticles was prepared by this method; the other type did not include ethanol. The photovoltaic properties of the former were significantly degraded; the latter maintained its good photovoltaic properties. The properties of the latter gradually improved during the measurements. In particular, current density was increased, which increased conversion efficiency. These phenomena are related to changes in Si nanoparticle surface conditions.

  2. Heterojunction p-Cu2O/ZnO-n solar cell fabricated by spark plasma sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Tenailleau

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cuprous oxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles were prepared at room temperature by inorganic polycondensation. X-ray diffraction (XRD analyses show that the oxide phases formed are pure and well crystallized. The spark plasma sintering (SPS technique was successfully used to prepare dense nanoceramics with superimposed layers of Cu2O and ZnO nanopowders. Sintering conditions were optimized to densify the ceramics without phase transformation or diffusion. These ceramics were also characterized by XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, as well as X-ray computed tomography (XCT. SEM and XCT showed that nanograins are preserved after SPS throughout both oxide materials, while a smaller layer (~20 µm of pure oxide phase with larger grains is formed in between Cu2O and ZnO during the sintering process. The SPS technique results in high material density, with the absence of porosity and cracks, homogenous distribution, and a good phase separation. This is the first time that such as-prepared dense oxide-based heterojunction exhibits a photovoltaic effect under illumination opening a new route for preparing solar cells.

  3. Investigation of positive roles of hydrogen plasma treatment for interface passivation based on silicon heterojunction solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Liping; Liu, Wenzhu; Liu, Jinning; Shi, Jianhua; Meng, Fanying; Liu, Zhengxin; Guo, Wanwu; Bao, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The positive roles of H 2 -plasma treatment (HPT) have been investigated by using different treatment procedures in view of the distinctly improved passivation performance of amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunctions (SHJs). It has been found that a hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin film and crystalline silicon (a-Si:H/c-Si) interface with a high stretching mode (HSM) is detrimental to passivation. A moderate pre-HPT introduces atomic H, which plays an effective tuning role in decreasing the interfacial HSM; unfortunately, an epitaxial layer is formed. Further improvement in passivation can be achieved in terms of increasing the HSM of a-Si:H film treated by appropriate post-HPT based on the a-Si:H thickness. The minority carrier lifetime of crystalline wafers can be improved by treated films containing a certain quantity of crystallites. The microstructure factor R and the maximum intensity of the dielectric function ε 2max have been found to be critical microstructure parameters that describe high-quality a-Si:H passivation layers, which are associated with the amorphous-to-microcrystalline transition phase induced by multi-step HPT. Finally, the open circuit voltage and conversion efficiency of the SHJ solar cell can be improved by implementing an effective HPT process. (paper)

  4. Plasma dynamics in solar macrospicules from high-cadence extreme-UV observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loboda, I. P.; Bogachev, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    Macrospicules are relatively large spicule-like formations found mainly over the polar coronal holes when observing in the transition region spectral lines. In this study, we took advantage of the two short series of observations in the He II 304 Å line obtained by the TESIS solar observatory with a cadence of up to 3.5 s to study the dynamics of macrospicules in unprecedented detail. We used a one-dimensional hydrodynamic method based on the assumption of their axial symmetry and on a simple radiative transfer model to reconstruct the evolution of the internal velocity field of 18 macrospicules from this dataset. Besides the internal dynamics, we studied the motion of the apparent end points of the same 18 macrospicules and found 15 of them to follow parabolic trajectories with high precision which correspond closely to the obtained velocity fields. We found that in a clear, unperturbed case these macrospicules move with a constant deceleration inconsistent with a purely ballistic motion and have roughly the same velocity along their entire axis, with the obtained decelerations typically ranging from 160 to 230 m s-2, and initial velocities from 80 to 130 km s-1. We also found a propagating acoustic wave for one of the macrospicules and a clear linear correlation between the initial velocities of the macrospicules and their decelerations, which indicates that they may be driven by magneto-acoustic shocks. Finally, we inverted our previous method by taking velocities from the parabolic fits to give rough estimates of the percentage of mass lost by 12 of the macrospicules. We found that typically from 10 to 30% of their observed mass fades out of the line (presumably being heated to higher coronal temperatures) with three exceptions of 50% and one of 80%.

  5. DYNAMICS OF CORONAL RAIN AND DESCENDING PLASMA BLOBS IN SOLAR PROMINENCES. II. PARTIALLY IONIZED CASE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, R.; Soler, R.; Terradas, J. [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Zaqarashvili, T. V., E-mail: ramon.oliver@uib.es [Institute of Physics, IGAM, University of Graz, Universitätsplatz 5, 8010, Graz (Austria)

    2016-02-20

    Coronal rain clumps and prominence knots are dense condensations with chromospheric to transition region temperatures that fall down in the much hotter corona. Their typical speeds are in the range 30–150 km s{sup −1} and of the order of 10–30 km s{sup −1}, respectively, i.e., they are considerably smaller than free-fall velocities. These cold blobs contain a mixture of ionized and neutral material that must be dynamically coupled in order to fall together, as observed. We investigate this coupling by means of hydrodynamic simulations in which the coupling arises from the friction between ions and neutrals. The numerical simulations presented here are an extension of those of Oliver et al. to the partially ionized case. We find that, although the relative drift speed between the two species is smaller than 1 m s{sup −1} at the blob center, it is sufficient to produce the forces required to strongly couple charged particles and neutrals. The ionization degree has no discernible effect on the main results of our previous work for a fully ionized plasma: the condensation has an initial acceleration phase followed by a period with roughly constant velocity, and, in addition, the maximum descending speed is clearly correlated with the ratio of initial blob to environment density.

  6. An Airborne Infrared Telescope and Spectrograph for Solar Eclipse Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, Edward E.; Cheimets, Peter; Golub, Leon

    2014-06-01

    The solar infrared spectrum offers great possibilities for direct spatially resolved measurements of the solar coronal magnetic fields, via imaging of the plasma that is constrained to follow the magnetic field direction and via spectro-polarimetry that permits measurement of the field strength in the corona. Energy stored in coronal magnetic fields is released in flares and coronal mass ejections (CME) and provides the ultimate source of energy for space weather. The large scale structure of the coronal field, and the opening up of the field in a transition zone between the closed and open corona determines the speed and structure of the solar wind, providing the background environment through which CMEs propagate. At present our only direct measurements of the solar magnetic fields are in the photosphere and chromosphere. The ability to determine where and why the corona transitions from closed to open, combined with measurements of the field strength via infrared coronal spectro-polarimetry will give us a powerful new tool in our quest to develop the next generation of forecasting models.We describe a first step in achieving this goal: a proposal for a new IR telescope, image stabilization system, and spectrometer, for the NCAR HIPER GV aircraft. The telescope/spectrograph will operate in the 2-6micron wavelength region, during solar eclipses, starting with the trans-north American eclipse in August 2017. The HIAPER aircraft flying at ~35,000 ft will provide an excellent platform for IR observations. Our imaging and spectroscopy experiment will show the distribution and intensity of IR forbidden lines in the solar corona.

  7. An alternative origin for extraterrestrial biomolecules from the hot and ionized photosphere of the protosolar nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekaert, D. V.; Derenne, S.; Tissandier, L.; Marrocchi, Y.; Anquetil, C.; Marty, B.

    2017-12-01

    Organic matter (OM) synthesized from plasma experiments (so-called Nebulotron) can provide an insight into the processes of organosynthesis within the ionized gas phase of the protosolar nebula (PSN). Organic materials recovered from Nebulotron experiments have a record of success in reproducing key features of chondritic insoluble organic matter (IOM), including the aromatic/aliphatic and soluble/insoluble ratios [1], the occurrence of D/H hot and cold spots [2], spectral features as well as elementary and isotopic patterns observed in trapped noble gases [3]. However, up until now little attention has been paid to the soluble fraction of the recovered OM (SOM). In this study, a high-vacuum plasma setting was designed to produce organic condensates from a CO-N2-H2 gas mixture reminiscent of the PSN. The chemical diversity of the synthetized SOM has been investigated by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry. Our results show that a large range of biomolecules detected in meteorites and comets could have been directly synthetized from the gas phase of the PSN under high ionization rates and temperatures > 800 K. Among other molecules, urea, formamide, glycerol, hydantoin, carboxylic acids, as well as amino acid and nucleobase derivatives are reported. While photochemical processing of interstellar icy grains or asteroidal aqueous alteration are often advocated for the origin of biomolecules in extraterrestrial samples, our results suggest that biomolecule production was also effective in the hot and ionized photosphere of the PSN. Interestingly, solid-state 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectra of the Nebulotron IOM, indicates that they are very low in aromatics relative to extraterrestrial samples. Given that aromatic units in meteoritic IOM likely result from the cyclization/aromatization of aliphatic chains in the gas [1], Nebulotron-like aliphatic materials could represent the initial precursors of meteoritic OM [4]. These materials would be widespread in the

  8. Solar Field Mapping and Dynamo Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth H. Schatten

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the importance of the Sun’s large-scale magnetic field to the Sun-Planetary environment. This paper narrows its focus down to the motion and evolution of the photospheric large-scale magnetic field which affects many environments throughout this region. For this purpose we utilize a newly developed Netlogo cellular automata model. The domain of this algorithmic model is the Sun’s photosphere. Within this computational space are placed two types of entities or agents; one may refer to them as bluebirds and cardinals; the former carries outward magnetic flux and the latter carries out inward magnetic flux. One may simply call them blue and red agents. The agents provide a granularity with discrete changes not present in smooth MHD models; they undergo three processes: birth, motion, and death within the photospheric domain. We discuss these processes, as well as how we are able to develop a model that restricts its domain to the photosphere and allows the deeper layers to be considered only through boundary conditions. We show the model’s ability to mimic a number of photospheric magnetic phenomena: the solar cycle (11-year oscillations, the Waldmeier effect, unipolar magnetic regions (e.g. sectors and coronal holes, Maunder minima, and the march/rush to the poles involving the geometry of magnetic field reversals. We also discuss why the Sun sometimes appears as a magnetic monopole, which of course requires no alteration of Maxwell’s equations.

  9. Motions of photospheric features in a sunspot moat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sobotka, Michal; Bonet, J. A.; Marquez, I.; Muller, R.; Roudier, T.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 1 (2004), s. 27-36 ISSN 0351-2657. [Central European Solar Physics Meeting /1./. Bairisch Kölldorf, 23.10. 2003 -25.10. 2003 ] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003404; GA AV ČR KSK2043105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : granules * G-band bright points * motions Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  10. HMI Data Driven Magnetohydrodynamic Model Predicted Active Region Photospheric Heating Rates: Their Scale Invariant, Flare Like Power Law Distributions, and Their Possible Association With Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Michael L.; Kwan, Chiman; Ayhan, Bulent; Shang, Eric L.

    2017-01-01

    A data driven, near photospheric, 3 D, non-force free magnetohydrodynamic model predicts time series of the complete current density, and the resistive heating rate Q at the photosphere in neutral line regions (NLRs) of 14 active regions (ARs). The model is driven by time series of the magnetic field B observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite. Spurious Doppler periods due to SDO orbital motion are filtered out of the time series for B in every AR pixel. Errors in B due to these periods can be significant. The number of occurrences N(q) of values of Q > or = q for each AR time series is found to be a scale invariant power law distribution, N(Q) / Q-s, above an AR dependent threshold value of Q, where 0.3952 or = E obeys the same type of distribution, N(E) / E-S, above an AR dependent threshold value of E, with 0.38 < or approx. S < or approx. 0.60, also with little variation among ARs. Within error margins the ranges of s and S are nearly identical. This strong similarity between N(Q) and N(E) suggests a fundamental connection between the process that drives coronal flares and the process that drives photospheric NLR heating rates in ARs. In addition, results suggest it is plausible that spikes in Q, several orders of magnitude above background values, are correlated with times of the subsequent occurrence of M or X flares.

  11. Analysis of Solar Coronal Holes with Synoptic Magnetogram Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canner, A.; Kim, T. K.; Pogorelov, N.; Yalim, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    Coronal holes are regions in which the magnetic field of the Sun is open with high magnetic flux and low plasma density. Because of the low plasma beta in these regions, the open field lines transport plasma from the Sun throughout the heliosphere. Coronal hole area is closely related to the expansion factor of the magnetic flux tube, as demonstrated by Tokumaru et al. (2017). Following the approach of Tokumaru et al. (2017), we employ a potential field source surface model to identify the open field regions on the photosphere and estimate the area and expansion factor for each coronal hole. While Tokumaru et al. (2017) analyzed synoptic maps from Kitt Peak National Observatory for the period 1995-2011, we use different magnetograph observations with higher spatial resolution (e.g., SOHO-MDI) for the same time period. We compare the coronal hole area - expansion factor relationship with the original results of Tokumaru et al (2017). This work was supported by the NSF-funded Research Experience for Undergraduates program "Solar and Heliospheric Physics at UAH and MSFC" run by the University of Alabama in Huntsville in partnership with the Marshall Space Flight Center through grant AGS-1460767.

  12. Modulation of Jupiter's plasma flow, polar currents, and auroral precipitation by solar wind-induced compressions and expansions of the magnetosphere: a simple theoretical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We construct a simple model of the plasma flow, magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling currents, and auroral precipitation in Jupiter's magnetosphere, and examine how they respond to compressions and expansions of the system induced by changes in solar wind dynamic pressure. The main simplifying assumption is axi-symmetry, the system being modelled principally to reflect dayside conditions. The model thus describes three magnetospheric regions, namely the middle and outer magnetosphere on closed magnetic field lines bounded by the magnetopause, together with a region of open field lines mapping to the tail. The calculations assume that the system is initially in a state of steady diffusive outflow of iogenic plasma with a particular equatorial magnetopause radius, and that the magnetopause then moves rapidly in or out due to a change in the solar wind dynamic pressure. If the change is sufficiently rapid (~2–3 h or less the plasma angular momentum is conserved during the excursion, allowing the modified plasma angular velocity to be calculated from the radial displacement of the field lines, together with the modified magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling currents and auroral precipitation. The properties of these transient states are compared with those of the steady states to which they revert over intervals of ~1–2 days. Results are shown for rapid compressions of the system from an initially expanded state typical of a solar wind rarefaction region, illustrating the reduction in total precipitating electron power that occurs for modest compressions, followed by partial recovery in the emergent steady state. For major compressions, however, typical of the onset of a solar wind compression region, a brightened transient state occurs in which super-rotation is induced on closed field lines, resulting in a reversal in sense of the usual magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling current system. Current system reversal results in accelerated auroral electron

  13. On the nature of IMF polarity dependent asymmetries in solar wind plasma properties during the minimum of sunspot cycles 23 and 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, B. Felix; Philip, Bijoy John; Girish, T. E.

    2016-03-01

    The monthly solar wind speed and density observed near 1 AU in IMF sectors of opposite magnetic polarity are studied during the minimum of sunspot cycles 23 and 24. During sunspot minima, the IMF is pointing away from the sun (Away sector) in the north of the Heliospheric Current Sheet (HCS) and pointing towards the sun (Toward sector) in the south of HCS during odd sunspot cycles and the same process is reversed during the even cycles. During this period, the solar wind plasma parameters (number density and speed) show a systematic month to month variation with solar wind number density decreases and velocity increases from equator to poles (heliomagnetic latitudinal organization) only in 'Away' IMF sectors compared to 'Toward' IMF sectors. This feature is particularly more evident for low speed solar wind and happens in a helio-hemisphere with a larger polar coronal hole. The association of the above phenomena with north-south asymmetry in coronal and solar wind flow characteristics will be discussed.

  14. An Observationally Constrained Model of a Flux Rope that Formed in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Alexander W.; Valori, Gherardo; Green, Lucie M.; Liu, Yang; Cheung, Mark C. M.; Guo, Yang; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia

    2018-03-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large-scale eruptions of plasma from the coronae of stars. Understanding the plasma processes involved in CME initiation has applications for space weather forecasting and laboratory plasma experiments. James et al. used extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations to conclude that a magnetic flux rope formed in the solar corona above NOAA Active Region 11504 before it erupted on 2012 June 14 (SOL2012-06-14). In this work, we use data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to model the coronal magnetic field of the active region one hour prior to eruption using a nonlinear force-free field extrapolation, and find a flux rope reaching a maximum height of 150 Mm above the photosphere. Estimations of the average twist of the strongly asymmetric extrapolated flux rope are between 1.35 and 1.88 turns, depending on the choice of axis, although the erupting structure was not observed to kink. The decay index near the apex of the axis of the extrapolated flux rope is comparable to typical critical values required for the onset of the torus instability, so we suggest that the torus instability drove the eruption.

  15. Infrared photometry of solar photospheric structures. II. Center-to-limb variation of active regions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sanches Cuberes, M.; Vazquez, M.; Bonet, J. A.; Sobotka, Michal

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 570, č. 2 (2002), s. 886-899 ISSN 0004-637X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003903; GA AV ČR KSK2043105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : sun faculae * plages * granulation Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 6.187, year: 2002

  16. Evolution and motions of small-scale photospheric structures near a large solar pore

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dorotovič, I.; Sobotka, Michal; Brandt, P. N.; Simon, G. W.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 387, č. 2 (2002), s. 665-671 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003903; GA ČR GA205/01/0658; GA AV ČR KSK2043105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : sun activity * granulation * sunspots Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.781, year: 2002

  17. Large-scale horizontal flows in the solar photosphere. III. Effects on filament destabilization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roudier, T.; Švanda, Michal; Meunier, N.; Keil, S.; Rieutord, M.; Malherbe, J. M.; Rondi, S.; Molodij, G.; Bommier, V.; Schmieder, B.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 480, č. 1 (2008), s. 255-263 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/04/2129 Grant - others:RTN(XE) HRPN-CT-2002-00313; ESA(XE) ESA-PECS project no. 8030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : Sun atmosphere * Sun filaments * magnetic fields Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.153, year: 2008

  18. Three-Dimensional View of Transient Horizontal Magnetic Fields in the Photosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ishikawa, R.; Tsuneta, S.; Jurčák, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 713, č. 2 (2010), s. 1310-1321 ISSN 0004-637X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300030808 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : magnetic fields * Sun * photosphere * granulation * surface magnetism Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 7.436, year: 2010

  19. Creating 3-dimensional Models of the Photosphere using the SIR Code

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Thonhofer, S.; Utz, D.; Jurčák, Jan; Pauritsch, J.; Hanslmeier, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 2 (2013), s. 471-476 ISSN 1845-8319. [Hvar Astrophysical Colloquium /12./. Hvar, 03.09.2012-07.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300030808 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : photosphere, * magnetic bright point * Hinode/SOT Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  20. A Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer Study of Photospheric Emission in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsotan, Tyler; Lazzati, Davide

    2018-01-01

    We present the analysis of photospheric emission for a set of hydrodynamic simulations of long duration gamma-ray burst jets from massive compact stars. The results are obtained by using the Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer code (MCRaT) to simulate thermal photons scattering through the collimated outflows. MCRaT allows us to study explicitly the time evolution of the photosphere within the photospheric region, as well as the gradual decoupling of the photon and matter counterparts of the jet. The results of the radiation transfer simulations are also used to construct light curves and time-resolved spectra at various viewing angles, which are then used to make comparisons with observed data and outline the agreement and strain points between the photospheric model and long duration gamma-ray burst observations. We find that our fitted time-resolved spectral Band β parameters are in agreement with observations, even though we do not consider the effects of nonthermal particles. Finally, the results are found to be consistent with the Yonetoku correlation, but bear some strain with the Amati correlation.

  1. TRACING p -MODE WAVES FROM THE PHOTOSPHERE TO THE CORONA IN ACTIVE REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Junwei; Chen, Ruizhu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Felipe, Tobías; Khomenko, Elena [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38025 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2016-10-10

    Atmosphere above sunspots is abundant with different types of waves. Among these waves are running penumbral waves in the chromosphere, quasi-periodic oscillations in the lower coronal loops, and recently reported running waves in sunspots’ photosphere, all of which were interpreted as magnetoacoustic waves by some authors. Are these waves in different atmospheric layers related to each other, what is the nature of these waves, and where are the ultimate sources of these waves? Applying a time–distance helioseismic analysis over a suite of multi-wavelength observations above a sunspot, we demonstrate that the helioseismic p -mode waves are able to channel up from the photosphere through the chromosphere and transition region into the corona, and that the magnetoacoustic waves observed in different atmospheric layers are a same wave originating from the photosphere but exhibiting differently under different physical conditions. We also show waves of different frequencies travel along different paths, which can be used to derive the physical properties of the atmosphere above sunspots. Our numerical simulation of traveling of waves from a subphotospheric source qualitatively resembles the observed properties of the waves and offers an interpretation of the shapes of the wavefronts above the photosphere.

  2. Probing deep photospheric layers of the quiet Sun with high magnetic sensitivity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lagg, A.; Solanki, S.K.; Dörr, H.P.; Martinez Gonzalez, M. J.; Riethmüller, T.; Collados Vera, M.; Schlichenmaier, R.; Orozco Suárez, D.; Franz, M.; Feller, A.; Kuckein, C.; Schmidt, W.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Pastor Yabar, A.; von der Lühe, O.; Denker, C.; Balthasar, H.; Volkmer, R.; Staude, J.; Hofmann, A.; Strassmeier, K.G.; Kneer, F.; Waldmann, T.A.; Borrero, J.M.; Sobotka, Michal; Verma, M.; Louis, R.E.; Rezaei, R.; Soltau, D.; Berkefeld, T.; Sigwarth, M.; Schmidt, D.; Kiess, C.; Nicklas, H.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 596, December (2016), A6/1-A6/13 ISSN 0004-6361 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 312495 - SOLARNET Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Sun * photosphere * granulation Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.378, year: 2014

  3. Fibre structure of decametric type II radio bursts as a manifestation of emission propagation effects in a disturbed near-solar plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Afanasiev

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the fine structure of solar decametric type II radio bursts in the form of drifting narrowband fibres on the dynamic spectrum. Observations show that this structure appears in those events where there is a coronal mass ejection (CME traveling in the near-solar space ahead of the shock wave responsible for the radio burst. The diversity in observed morphology of fibres and values of their parameters implies that the fibres may be caused by different formation mechanisms. The burst emission propagates through extremely inhomogeneous plasma of the CME, so one possible mechanism can be related to radio propagation effects. I suggest that the fibres in some events represent traces of radio emission caustics, which are formed due to regular refraction of radio waves on the large-scale inhomogeneous structure of the CME front. To support this hypothesis, I have modeled the propagation of radio waves through inhomogeneous plasma of the CME, taking into consideration the presence of electron density fluctuations in it. The calculations, which are based on the Monte Carlo technique, indicate that, in particular, the emission of the fibres should be harmonic. Moreover, the mechanism under consideration suggests that in solar observations from two different points in space, the observed sets of fibres can be shifted in frequency with respect to one another or can have a different structure. This potentially can be used for identifying fibres caused by the propagation effects.

  4. Performance Improvement of Microcrystalline p-SiC/i-Si/n-Si Thin Film Solar Cells by Using Laser-Assisted Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Ying Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The microcrystalline p-SiC/i-Si/n-Si thin film solar cells treated with hydrogen plasma were fabricated at low temperature using a CO2 laser-assisted plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (LAPECVD system. According to the micro-Raman results, the i-Si films shifted from 482 cm−1 to 512 cm−1 as the assisting laser power increased from 0 W to 80 W, which indicated a gradual transformation from amorphous to crystalline Si. From X-ray diffraction (XRD results, the microcrystalline i-Si films with (111, (220, and (311 diffraction were obtained. Compared with the Si-based thin film solar cells deposited without laser assistance, the short-circuit current density and the power conversion efficiency of the solar cells with assisting laser power of 80 W were improved from 14.38 mA/cm2 to 18.16 mA/cm2 and from 6.89% to 8.58%, respectively.

  5. The environment of the fast rotating star Achernar. III. Photospheric parameters revealed by the VLTI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domiciano de Souza, A.; Kervella, P.; Moser Faes, D.; Dalla Vedova, G.; Mérand, A.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Espinosa Lara, F.; Rieutord, M.; Bendjoya, P.; Carciofi, A. C.; Hadjara, M.; Millour, F.; Vakili, F.

    2014-09-01

    Context. Rotation significantly impacts on the structure and life of stars. In phases of high rotation velocity (close to critical), the photospheric structure can be highly modified, and present in particular geometrical deformation (rotation flattening) and latitudinal-dependent flux (gravity darkening). The fastest known rotators among the nondegenerate stars close to the main sequence, Be stars, are key targets for studying the effects of fast rotation on stellar photospheres. Aims: We seek to determine the purely photospheric parameters of Achernar based on observations recorded during an emission-free phase (normal B phase). Methods: Several recent works proved that optical/IR long-baseline interferometry is the only technique able to sufficiently spatially resolve and measure photospheric parameters of fast rotating stars. We thus analyzed ESO-VLTI (PIONIER and AMBER) interferometric observations of Achernar to measure its photospheric parameters by fitting our physical model CHARRON using a Markov chain Monte Carlo method. This analysis was also complemented by spectroscopic, polarimetric, and photometric observations to investigate the status of the circumstellar environment of Achernar during the VLTI observations and to cross-check our model-fitting results. Results: Based on VLTI observations that partially resolve Achernar, we simultaneously measured five photospheric parameters of a Be star for the first time: equatorial radius (equatorial angular diameter), equatorial rotation velocity, polar inclination, position angle of the rotation axis projected on the sky, and the gravity darkening β coefficient (effective temperature distribution). The close circumstellar environment of Achernar was also investigated based on contemporaneous polarimetry, spectroscopy, and interferometry, including image reconstruction. This analysis did not reveal any important circumstellar contribution, so that Achernar was essentially in a normal B phase at least from mid

  6. Turbulence and wave particle interactions in solar-terrestrial plasmas. Annual Status Report, 1 July 1983-30 June 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulk, G.A.; Goldman, M.V.; Toomre, J.

    1985-01-01

    Activities in the following study areas are reported: (1) particle and wave processes in solar flares; (2) solar convection zone turbulence; and (3) solar radiation emission. To investigate the amplification of cyclotron maser radiation in solar flares, a radio frequency. (RF) heating model was developed for the corona surrounding the energy release site. Then nonlinear simulations of compressible convection display prominent penetration by plumes into regions of stable stratification at the base of the solar convection zone, leading to the excitation of internal gravity waves there. Lastly, linear saturation of electron-beam-driven Langmuir waves by ambient density fluctuations, nonlinear saturation by strong turbulence processes, and radiation emission mechanisms are examined. An additional section discusses solar magnetic fields and hydromagnetic waves in inhomogeneous media, and the effect of magnetic fields on stellar oscillation

  7. Heating in the Solar Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiuderi, C.

    1985-01-01

    In the case of the solar chromosphere and corona (the solar mantle) the primary energy source is the mechanical energy from photospheric motions. Plenty of energy is available; the problem is to transfer the needed amount of energy to the proper place to account for the observations. The global problem is reviewed from the point of view of the generation and transmission of energy, the intermediate storage of energy, and the release of energy in such a way that the observed features are generated.

  8. The close circumstellar environment of Betelgeuse. IV. VLTI/PIONIER interferometric monitoring of the photosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montargès, M.; Kervella, P.; Perrin, G.; Chiavassa, A.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Aurière, M.; López Ariste, A.; Mathias, P.; Ridgway, S. T.; Lacour, S.; Haubois, X.; Berger, J.-P.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The mass-loss mechanism of cool massive evolved stars is poorly understood. The proximity of Betelgeuse makes it an appealing target to study its atmosphere, map the shape of its envelope, and follow the structure of its wind from the photosphere out to the interstellar medium. Aims: A link is suspected between the powerful convective motions in Betelgeuse and its mass loss. We aim to constrain the spatial structure and temporal evolution of the convective pattern on the photosphere and to search for evidence of this link. Methods: We report new interferometric observations in the infrared H-band using the VLTI/PIONIER instrument. We monitored the photosphere of Betelgeuse between 2012 January and 2014 November to look for evolutions that may trigger the outflow. Results: Our interferometric observations at low spatial frequencies are compatible with the presence of a hot spot on the photosphere that has a characteristic width of one stellar radius. It appears to be superposed on the smaller scale convective pattern. In the higher spatial frequency domain, we observe a significant difference between the observations and the predictions of 3D hydrodynamical simulations. Conclusions: We bring new evidence for the presence of a convective pattern in the photosphere of red supergiants. The inferred hot spot is probably the top of a giant convection cell although an asymmetric extension of the star cannot be excluded by these interferometric observations alone. The properties of the observed surface features show a stronger contrast and inhomogeneity as predicted by 3D radiative hydrodynamical simulations. We propose that the large observed feature is modifying the signature of the convective pattern at the surface of the star in a way that simulations cannot reproduce. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at Paranal Observatory, under ESO programs 288.D-5035(A), 090.D-0548(A), 092.D-0366(A), 092.D-0366(B) and 094.D-0869 (A).

  9. Instrument design of 1.5-m aperture solar optical telescope for the Solar-C Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suematsu, Yoshinori; Katsukawa, Yukio; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi

    2017-11-01

    A 1.5 m aperture optical telescope is planned for the next Japanese solar mission SOLAR-C as one of major three observing instruments. The optical telescope is designed to provide high-angular-resolution investigation of lower atmosphere from the photosphere to the uppermost chromosphere with enhanced spectroscopic and spectropolarimetric capability covering a wide wavelength region from 280 nm to 1100 nm. The opto-mechanical and -thermal performance of the telescope is crucial to attain high-quality solar observations and we present a study of optical and structural design of the large aperture space solar telescope, together with conceptual design of its accompanying focal plane instruments: wide-band and narrow-band filtergraphs and a spectro-polarimeter for high spatial and temporal observations in the solar photospheric and chromospheric lines useful for sounding physical condition of dynamical phenomena.

  10. On the possibility for laboratory simulation of generation of Alfven disturbances in magnetic tubes in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopov, Pavel; Zaharov, Yuriy; Tishchenko, Vladimir; Boyarintsev, Eduard; Melehov, Aleksandr; Ponomarenko, Arnold; Posuh, Vitaliy; Shayhislamov, Ildar

    2016-03-01

    The paper deals with generation of Alfven plasma disturbances in magnetic flux tubes through exploding laser plasma in magnetized background plasma. Processes with similar effect of excitation of torsion-type waves seem to provide energy transfer from the solar photosphere to corona. The studies were carried out at experimental stand KI-1 represented a high-vacuum chamber of 1.2 m diameter, 5 m long, external magnetic field up to 500 Gs along the chamber axis, and up to 2×10^-6 Torr pressure in operating mode. Laser plasma was produced when focusing the CO2 laser pulse on a flat polyethylene target, and then the laser plasma propagated in θ-pinch background hydrogen (or helium) plasma. As a result, the magnetic flux tube of 15-20 cm radius was experimentally simulated along the chamber axis and the external magnetic field direction. Also, the plasma density distribution in the tube was measured. Alfven wave propagation along the magnetic field was registered from disturbance of the magnetic field transverse component B_ψ and field-aligned current J_z. The disturbances propagate at near-Alfven velocity of 70-90 km/s and they are of left-hand circular polarization of the transverse component of magnetic field. Presumably, Alfven wave is generated by the magnetic laminar mechanism of collisionless interaction between laser plasma cloud and background. The right-hand polarized high-frequency whistler predictor was registered which have been propagating before Alfven wave at 300 km/s velocity. The polarization direction changed with Alfven wave coming. Features of a slow magnetosonic wave as a sudden change in background plasma concentration along with simultaneous displacement of the external magnetic field were found. The disturbance propagates at ~20-30 km/s velocity, which is close to that of ion sound at low plasma beta value. From preliminary estimates, the disturbance transfers about 10 % of the original energy of laser plasma.

  11. Theoretical scaling law of coronal magnetic field and electron power-law index in solar microwave burst sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.; Song, Q. W.; Tan, B. L.

    2018-04-01

    It is first proposed a theoretical scaling law respectively for the coronal magnetic field strength B and electron power-law index δ versus frequency and coronal height in solar microwave burst sources. Based on the non-thermal gyro-synchrotron radiation model (Ramaty in Astrophys. J. 158:753, 1969), B and δ are uniquely solved by the observable optically-thin spectral index and turnover (peak) frequency, the other parameters (plasma density, temperature, view angle, low and high energy cutoffs, etc.) are relatively insensitive to the calculations, thus taken as some typical values. Both of B and δ increase with increasing of radio frequency but with decreasing of coronal height above photosphere, and well satisfy a square or cubic logarithmic fitting.

  12. Correlation between the physical parameters of the i-nc-Si absorber layer grown by 27.12 MHz plasma with the nc-Si solar cell parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debajyoti; Mondal, Praloy

    2017-09-01

    Growth of highly conducting nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) thin films of optimum crystalline volume fraction, involving dominant crystallographic preferred orientation with simultaneous low fraction of microstructures at a low substrate temperature and high growth rate, is a challenging task for its promising utilization in nc-Si solar cells. Utilizing enhanced electron density and superior ion flux densities of the high frequency (∼27.12 MHz) SiH4 plasma, improved nc-Si films have been produced by simple optimization of H2-dilution, controlling the ion damage and enhancing supply of atomic-hydrogen onto the growing surface. Single junction nc-Si p-i-n solar cells have been prepared with i-nc-Si absorber layer and optimized. The physical parameters of the absorber layer have been systematically correlated to variations of the solar cell parameters. The preferred alignment of crystallites, its contribution to the low recombination losses for conduction of charge carriers along the vertical direction, its spectroscopic correlation with the dominant growth of ultra-nanocrystalline silicon (unc-Si) component and corresponding longer wavelength absorption, especially in the neighborhood of i/n-interface region recognize scientific and technological key issues that pave the ground for imminent advancement of multi-junction silicon solar cells.

  13. The pier and building of the European Solar Telescope (EST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettonvil, F. C. M.; Codina, R.; Gómez Merchán, A.; Hammerschlag, R. H.; Hartman, J. J. M.; Hernández Suárez, E.; Jägers, A. P. L.; Murga Llano, G.; Pelser, J. W.; Sliepen, G.

    2010-07-01

    EST (European Solar Telescope) is a 4-m class solar telescope, which is currently in the conceptual design phase. EST will be located in the Canary Islands and will aim at high spectral, spatial and temporal resolution observations in the photosphere and chromosphere, using a suite of instruments that can produce efficiently two-dimensional spectropolarimetric information of the thermal, dynamic and magnetic properties of the plasma over many scale heights. The pier is defined as the construction that supports the telescope and the enclosure. It needs a certain height to minimize daytime ground turbulence. At the bottom of the pier a large instrument lab is located, 16 m in diameter and 10 m high. To the pier is attached a service building that accommodates all auxiliary services, possibly together with a separate building. Solid concrete- and open framework piers are compared, in terms of stability, thermal properties and flow characteristics and building structures in terms of construction issues. FE and CFD analysis are used to give qualitative insight in the differences between the alternatives. The preferred alternative is a cone shaped pier surrounded by an open framework.

  14. BRITE-Constellation high-precision time-dependent photometry of the early O-type supergiant ζ Puppis unveils the photospheric drivers of its small- and large-scale wind structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramiaramanantsoa, Tahina; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Harmon, Robert; Ignace, Richard; St-Louis, Nicole; Vanbeveren, Dany; Shenar, Tomer; Pablo, Herbert; Richardson, Noel D.; Howarth, Ian D.; Stevens, Ian R.; Piaulet, Caroline; St-Jean, Lucas; Eversberg, Thomas; Pigulski, Andrzej; Popowicz, Adam; Kuschnig, Rainer; Zocłońska, Elżbieta; Buysschaert, Bram; Handler, Gerald; Weiss, Werner W.; Wade, Gregg A.; Rucinski, Slavek M.; Zwintz, Konstanze; Luckas, Paul; Heathcote, Bernard; Cacella, Paulo; Powles, Jonathan; Locke, Malcolm; Bohlsen, Terry; Chené, André-Nicolas; Miszalski, Brent; Waldron, Wayne L.; Kotze, Marissa M.; Kotze, Enrico J.; Böhm, Torsten

    2018-02-01

    From 5.5 months of dual-band optical photometric monitoring at the 1 mmag level, BRITE-Constellation has revealed two simultaneous types of variability in the O4I(n)fp star ζ Puppis: one single periodic non-sinusoidal component superimposed on a stochastic component. The monoperiodic component is the 1.78-d signal previously detected by Coriolis/Solar Mass Ejection Imager, but this time along with a prominent first harmonic. The shape of this signal changes over time, a behaviour that is incompatible with stellar oscillations but consistent with rotational modulation arising from evolving bright surface inhomogeneities. By means of a constrained non-linear light-curve inversion algorithm, we mapped the locations of the bright surface spots and traced their evolution. Our simultaneous ground-based multisite spectroscopic monitoring of the star unveiled cyclical modulation of its He II λ4686 wind emission line with the 1.78-d rotation period, showing signatures of corotating interaction regions that turn out to be driven by the bright photospheric spots observed by BRITE. Traces of wind clumps are also observed in the He II λ4686 line and are correlated with the amplitudes of the stochastic component of the light variations probed by BRITE at the photosphere, suggesting that the BRITE observations additionally unveiled the photospheric drivers of wind clumps in ζ Pup and that the clumping phenomenon starts at the very base of the wind. The origins of both the bright surface inhomogeneities and the stochastic light variations remain unknown, but a subsurface convective zone might play an important role in the generation of these two types of photospheric variability.

  15. Highly tunable electronic properties in plasma-synthesized B-doped microcrystalline-to-amorphous silicon nanostructure for solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, J. W. M.; Ong, J. G. D.; Guo, Y.; Bazaka, K.; Levchenko, I.; Xu, S.

    2017-10-01

    Highly controllable electronic properties (carrier mobility and conductivity) were obtained in the sophisticatedly devised, structure-controlled, boron-doped microcrystalline silicon structure. Variation of plasma parameters enabled fabrication of films with the structure ranging from a highly crystalline (89.8%) to semi-amorphous (45.4%) phase. Application of the innovative process based on custom-designed, optimized, remote inductively coupled plasma implied all advantages of the plasma-driven technique and simultaneously avoided plasma-intrinsic disadvantages associated with ion bombardment and overheating. The high degree of SiH4, H2 and B2H6 precursor dissociation ensured very high boron incorporation into the structure, thus causing intense carrier scattering. Moreover, the microcrystalline-to-amorphous phase transition triggered by the heavy incorporation of the boron dopant with increasing B2H6 flow was revealed, thus demonstrating a very high level of the structural control intrinsic to the process. Control over the electronic properties through variation of impurity incorporation enabled tailoring the carrier concentrations over two orders of magnitude (1018-1020 cm-3). These results could contribute to boosting the properties of solar cells by paving the way to a cheap and efficient industry-oriented technique, guaranteeing a new application niche for this new generation of nanomaterials.

  16. Simple O2 Plasma-Processed V2O5 as an Anode Buffer Layer for High-Performance Polymer Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bao, Xichang; Zhu, Qianqian; Wang, Ting

    2015-01-01

    A simple O2 plasma processing method for preparation of a vanadium oxide (V2O5) anode buffer layer on indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass for polymer solar cells (PSCs) is reported. The V2O5 layer with high transmittance and good electrical and interfacial properties was prepared by spin coating...... a vanadium(V) triisopropoxide oxide alcohol solution on ITO and then O2 plasma treatment for 10 min [V2O5 (O2 plasma)]. PSCs based on P3HT:PC61BM and PBDTTT-C:PC71BM using V2O5 (O2 plasma) as an anode buffer layer show high power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of 4.47 and 7.54%, respectively, under...... the illumination of AM 1.5G (100 mW/cm2). Compared to that of the control device with PBDTTT-C:PC71BM as the active layer and PEDOT:PSS (PCE of 6.52%) and thermally annealed V2O5 (PCE of 6.27%) as the anode buffer layer, the PCE was improved by 15.6 and 20.2%, respectively, after the introduction of a V2O5 (O2...

  17. Numerical MHD Simulation of the Coupled Evolution of Plasma and Magnetic Field in the Solar Chromosphere. I. Gradual and Impulsive Energisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseeva, L. M.; Kshevetskii, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    The dynamical coupling between solar chromospheric plasma and the magnetic field is investigated by numerically solving a fully self-consistent, two-dimensional initial-value problem for the nonlinear collisional MHD equations including electric resistivity, thermal conduction, and, in some cases, gas-dynamic viscosity. The processes in the contact zone between two horizontal magnetic fields of opposite polarities are considered. The plasma is assumed to be initially motionless and to have a temperature of 50,000 K uniform throughout the plasma volume; the characteristic magnetic field corresponds to a plasma β≳ 1. In a physical time interval of 17 seconds typically covered by a computational run, the plasma temperature gradually increases by a factor of two to three. Against this background, an impulsive (in 0.1 seconds or less) increase in the current-aligned plasma velocity occurs at the site of the current-layer thinning (sausage-type deformation, or m=0 pinch instability). This velocity burst can be interpreted physically as an event of suprathermal-proton generation. Further development of the sausage instability results in an increase in the kinetic temperature of the protons to high values, even to those observed in flares. The form of our system of MHD equations indicates that this kind of increase is a property of the exact solution of the system for an appropriate choice of parameters. Magnetic reconnection does not manifest itself in this solution: it would generate flows forbidden by the chosen geometry. Therefore, the pinch-sausage effect can act as an energiser of the upper chromosphere and be an alternative to the magnetic-reconnection process as the producer of flares.

  18. RECONNECTION-DRIVEN DOUBLE LAYERS IN THE STRATIFIED PLASMA OF THE SOLAR TRANSITION REGION: SUPPLY OF HOT PLASMA INTO THE CORONA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Nagendra [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A novel mechanism for the supply of hot plasma into the corona from the chromosphere is suggested here; the mechanism involves collisionless magnetic reconnection (CMR) in the transition region (TR) followed by double layer (DL) formation in the enhanced expansion of the chromospheric cold plasma mixed with CMR-heated hot electrons. It is well known that (i) the CMR produces energetic electrons and (ii) DLs naturally form in expanding dense plasmas containing a minor population of hot electrons. We apply these plasma physics facts to the dynamics of stratified plasma in the TR. In the TR where densities fall below ∼10{sup 16} m{sup −3}, all collisional mean-free paths, electron–ion, ion–neutral, and electron–neutral, become long enough to render plasma collisionless at kinetic scale lengths, making CMR and DL formation possible. The DLs accelerate the chromospheric cold ions to energies comparable to the energy of the hot electrons. When the upflowing energized ions neutralized by the escaping hot electrons thermalize, the resulting hot tenuous plasma supplies an energy flux ∼3 × 10{sup 5} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} = 3 × 10{sup 2} J m{sup −2} s{sup −1} into the corona. The CMR–DL mechanism introduces sudden transitions in the TR as microstructures in both density and energy. The global transition in the TR could be a fractal structure containing such microscopic features. If not impossible, it is difficult to measure such microstructures, but it seems that the coronal heating begins in the nearly collisionless TR by CMR and DL formation.

  19. Segmentation of photospheric magnetic elements corresponding to coronal features to understand the EUV and UV irradiance variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zender, J. J.; Kariyappa, R.; Giono, G.; Bergmann, M.; Delouille, V.; Damé, L.; Hochedez, J.-F.; Kumara, S. T.

    2017-09-01

    Context. The magnetic field plays a dominant role in the solar irradiance variability. Determining the contribution of various magnetic features to this variability is important in the context of heliospheric studies and Sun-Earth connection. Aims: We studied the solar irradiance variability and its association with the underlying magnetic field for a period of five years (January 2011-January 2016). We used observations from the Large Yield Radiometer (LYRA), the Sun Watcher with Active Pixel System detector and Image Processing (SWAP) on board PROBA2, the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Methods: The Spatial Possibilistic Clustering Algorithm (SPoCA) is applied to the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations obtained from the AIA to segregate coronal features by creating segmentation maps of active regions (ARs), coronal holes (CHs) and the quiet sun (QS). Further, these maps are applied to the full-disk SWAP intensity images and the full-disk (FD) HMI line-of-sight (LOS) magnetograms to isolate the SWAP coronal features and photospheric magnetic counterparts, respectively. We then computed full-disk and feature-wise averages of EUV intensity and line of sight (LOS) magnetic flux density over ARs/CHs/QS/FD. The variability in these quantities is compared with that of LYRA irradiance values. Results: Variations in the quantities resulting from the segmentation, namely the integrated intensity and the total magnetic flux density of ARs/CHs/QS/FD regions, are compared with the LYRA irradiance variations. We find that the EUV intensity over ARs/CHs/QS/FD is well correlated with the underlying magnetic field. In addition, variations in the full-disk integrated intensity and magnetic flux density values are correlated with the LYRA irradiance variations. Conclusions: Using the segmented coronal features observed in the EUV wavelengths as proxies to isolate the underlying

  20. Mapping 3D plasma structure in the solar wind with the L1 constellation: joint observations from Wind, ACE, DSCOVR, and SoHO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, M. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Case, A. W.; Korreck, K. E.; Szabo, A.; Biesecker, D. A.; Prchlik, J.

    2017-12-01

    At this moment in time, four observatories with similar instrumentation- Wind, ACE, DSCOVR, and SoHO- are stationed directly upstream of the Earth and making continuous observations. They are separated by drift-time baselines of seconds to minutes, timescales on which MHD instabilities in the solar wind are known to grow and evolve, and spatial baselines of tens to 200 earth radii, length scales relevant to the Earth's magnetosphere. By comparing measurements of matched solar wind structures from the four vantage points, the form of structures and associated dynamics on these scales is illuminated. Our targets include shocks and MHD discontinuities, stream fronts, locii of reconnection and exhaust flow boundary layers, plasmoids, and solitary structures born of nonlinear instability. We use the tetrahedral quality factors and other conventions adopted for Cluster to identify periods where the WADS constellation is suitably non-degenerate and arranged in such a way as to enable specific types of spatial, temporal, or spatiotemporal inferences. We present here an overview of the geometries accessible to the L1 constellation and timing-based and plasma-based observations of solar wind structures from 2016-17. We discuss the unique potential of the constellation approach for space physics and space weather forecasting at 1 AU.

  1. Plasmasol, photovoltaic effect in a solar photo plasma. Final report of the project. Concerted action energy - 2003; Plasmasol, effet photovoltaique dans un photoplasma solaire. Rapport final du Projet. Action Concertee Energie - 2003 CNRS-MRNT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this project was to study the feasibility of the solar energy photovoltaic conversion from the photo-ionization of a gaseous medium constituted of metallic vapors. After a bibliography and a recall of based physical data the report presents the absorption of the solar radiation by the cesium vapor, a simplified model of the photovoltaic effect in a photo-plasma, the experimental device and the results. (A.L.B.)

  2. Microwave exposure as a fast and cost-effective alternative of oxygen plasma treatment of indium-tin oxide electrode for application in organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soultati, Anastasia; Kostis, Ioannis; Papadimitropoulos, Giorgos; Zeniou, Angelos; Gogolides, Evangelos; Alexandropoulos, Dimitris; Vainos, Nikos; Davazoglou, Dimitris; Speliotis, Thanassis; Stathopoulos, Nikolaos A.; Argitis, Panagiotis; Vasilopoulou, Maria

    2017-12-01

    Pre-treatment methods are commonly employed to clean as well as to modify electrode surfaces. Many previous reports suggest that modifying the surface properties of indium tin oxide (ITO) by oxygen plasma treatment is a crucial step for the fabrication of high performance organic solar cells. In this work, we propose a fast and cost-effective microwave exposure step for the modification of the surface properties of ITO anode electrodes used in organic solar cells. It is demonstrated that a short microwave exposure improves the hydrophilicity and reduces the roughness of the ITO surface, as revealed by contact angle and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements, respectively, leading to a better quality of the PEDOT:PSS film coated on top of it. Similar results were obtained with the commonly used oxygen plasma treatment of ITO suggesting that microwave exposure is an effective process for modifying the surface properties of ITO with the benefits of low-cost, easy and fast processing. In addition, the influence of the microwave exposure of ITO anode electrode on the performance of an organic solar cell based on the poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl C70 butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PC70BM) blend is investigated. The 71% efficiency enhancement obtained in the microwave annealed-ITO based device as compared to the device with the as-received ITO was mainly attributed to the improvement in the short circuit current (J sc) and decreased leakage current caused by the reduced series and the increased shunt resistances and also by the higher charge generation efficiency, and the reduced recombination losses.

  3. Low energy spectral index and Ep evolution of quasi-thermal photosphere emission of gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Wei; Zhang, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations by the Fermi satellite suggest that a photosphere emission component is contributing to the observed spectrum of many gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). One important question is whether the photosphere component can interpret the typical 'Band' function of GRBs with a typical low energy photon spectral index α ∼ –1. We perform a detailed study of the photosphere emission spectrum by progressively introducing several physical ingredients previously not fully incorporated, including the probability distribution of the location of a dynamically evolving photosphere, superposition of emission from an equal arrival time 'volume' in a continuous wind, the evolution of optical depth of a wind with finite but evolving outer boundary, as well as the effect of different top-hat wind luminosity (L w ) profiles. By assuming a comoving blackbody spectrum emerging from the photosphere, we find that for an outflow with a constant or increasing L w , the low-energy spectrum below the peak energy (E p ), can be modified to F ν ∼ ν 1.5 (α ∼ +0.5). A softer (–1 < α < +0.5) or flat (α = –1) spectrum can be obtained during the L w decreasing phase or high-latitude-emission-dominated phase. We also study the evolution of E p as a function of wind and photosphere luminosity in this photosphere model. An E p – L tracking pattern can be reproduced if a certain positive dependence between the dimensionless entropy η and L w is introduced. However, the hard-to-soft evolution pattern cannot be reproduced unless a contrived condition is invoked. In order to interpret the Band spectrum, a more complicated photosphere model or a different energy dissipation and radiation mechanism is needed.

  4. Compact solar UV burst triggered in a magnetic field with a fan-spine topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitta, L. P.; Peter, H.; Young, P. R.; Huang, Y.-M.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Solar ultraviolet (UV) bursts are small-scale features that exhibit intermittent brightenings that are thought to be due to magnetic reconnection. They are observed abundantly in the chromosphere and transition region, in particular in active regions. Aims: We investigate in detail a UV burst related to a magnetic feature that is advected by the moat flow from a sunspot towards a pore. The moving feature is parasitic in that its magnetic polarity is opposite to that of the spot and the pore. This comparably simple photospheric magnetic field distribution allows for an unambiguous interpretation of the magnetic geometry leading to the onset of the observed UV burst. Methods: We used UV spectroscopic and slit-jaw observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) to identify and study chromospheric and transition region spectral signatures of said UV burst. To investigate the magnetic topology surrounding the UV burst, we used a two-hour-long time sequence of simultaneous line-of-sight magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and performed data-driven 3D magnetic field extrapolations by means of a magnetofrictional relaxation technique. We can connect UV burst signatures to the overlying extreme UV (EUV) coronal loops observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). Results: The UV burst shows a variety of extremely broad line profiles indicating plasma flows in excess of ±200 km s-1 at times. The whole structure is divided into two spatially distinct zones of predominantly up- and downflows. The magnetic field extrapolations show a persistent fan-spine magnetic topology at the UV burst. The associated 3D magnetic null point exists at a height of about 500 km above the photosphere and evolves co-spatially with the observed UV burst. The EUV emission at the footpoints of coronal loops is correlated with the evolution of the underlying UV burst. Conclusions: The magnetic field around the null point is sheared by

  5. An alternative to the plasma emission model: Particle-in-cell, self-consistent electromagnetic wave emission simulations of solar type III radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsiklauri, David

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution (sub-Debye length grid size and 10 000 particle species per cell), 1.5D particle-in-cell, relativistic, fully electromagnetic simulations are used to model electromagnetic wave emission generation in the context of solar type III radio bursts. The model studies generation of electromagnetic waves by a super-thermal, hot beam of electrons injected into a plasma thread that contains uniform longitudinal magnetic field and a parabolic density gradient. In effect, a single magnetic line connecting Sun to Earth is considered, for which five cases are studied. (i) We find that the physical system without a beam is stable and only low amplitude level electromagnetic drift waves (noise) are excited. (ii) The beam injection direction is controlled by setting either longitudinal or oblique electron initial drift speed, i.e., by setting the beam pitch angle (the angle between the beam velocity vector and the direction of background magnetic field). In the case of zero pitch angle, i.e., when v-vector b ·E-vector perpendicular =0, the beam excites only electrostatic, standing waves, oscillating at local plasma frequency, in the beam injection spatial location, and only low level electromagnetic drift wave noise is also generated. (iii) In the case of oblique beam pitch angles, i.e., when v-vector b ·E-vector perpendicular =0, again electrostatic waves with same properties are excited. However, now the beam also generates the electromagnetic waves with the properties commensurate to type III radio bursts. The latter is evidenced by the wavelet analysis of transverse electric field component, which shows that as the beam moves to the regions of lower density and hence lower plasma frequency, frequency of the electromagnetic waves drops accordingly. (iv) When the density gradient is removed, an electron beam with an oblique pitch angle still generates the electromagnetic radiation. However, in the latter case no frequency decrease is seen. (v) Since in most of

  6. MODELING THE ROSSITER–MCLAUGHLIN EFFECT: IMPACT OF THE CONVECTIVE CENTER-TO-LIMB VARIATIONS IN THE STELLAR PHOTOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cegla, H. M.; Watson, C. A. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Oshagh, M.; Figueira, P.; Santos, N. C. [Instituto de Astrofisica e Ciências do Espaço, Universidade do Porto, CAUP, Rua das Estrelas, PT4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Shelyag, S., E-mail: h.cegla@qub.ac.uk [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia)

    2016-03-01

    Observations of the Rossiter–McLaughlin (RM) effect provide information on star–planet alignments, which can inform planetary migration and evolution theories. Here, we go beyond the classical RM modeling and explore the impact of a convective blueshift that varies across the stellar disk and non-Gaussian stellar photospheric profiles. We simulated an aligned hot Jupiter with a four-day orbit about a Sun-like star and injected center-to-limb velocity (and profile shape) variations based on radiative 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of solar surface convection. The residuals between our modeling and classical RM modeling were dependent on the intrinsic profile width and v sin i; the amplitude of the residuals increased with increasing v sin i and with decreasing intrinsic profile width. For slowly rotating stars the center-to-limb convective variation dominated the residuals (with amplitudes of 10 s of cm s{sup −1} to ∼1 m s{sup −1}); however, for faster rotating stars the dominant residual signature was due a non-Gaussian intrinsic profile (with amplitudes from 0.5 to 9 m s{sup −1}). When the impact factor was 0, neglecting to account for the convective center-to-limb variation led to an uncertainty in the obliquity of ∼10°–20°, even though the true v sin i was known. Additionally, neglecting to properly model an asymmetric intrinsic profile had a greater impact for more rapidly rotating stars (e.g., v sin i = 6 km s{sup −1}) and caused systematic errors on the order of ∼20° in the measured obliquities. Hence, neglecting the impact of stellar surface convection may bias star–planet alignment measurements and consequently theories on planetary migration and evolution.

  7. High efficiency high rate microcrystalline silicon thin-film solar cells deposited at plasma excitation frequencies larger than 100 MHz

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strobel, C.; Leszczynska, B.; Merkel, U.; Kuske, J.; Fischer, D.D.; Albert, M.; Holovský, Jakub; Michard, S.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 143, Dec (2015), 347-353 ISSN 0927-0248 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7E12029 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 283501 - Fast Track Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : VHF * PECVD * microcrystalline silicon * solar cell * high rate * high efficiency Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.732, year: 2015

  8. Plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition of TiO2 compact layers for flexible mesostructured perovskite solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zardetto, V.; Di Giacomo, F.; Lucarelli, G.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Brown, T.M.; Creatore, M.

    2017-01-01

    In mesostructured perovskite solar cell devices, charge recombination processes at the interface between the transparent conductive oxide, perovskite and hole transport layer are suppressed by depositing an efficient compact TiO2 blocking layer. In this contribution we investigate the role of the

  9. The global structure of the solar wind in June 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmanov, A. V.

    1993-12-01

    A numerical simulation of the global solar wind structure for Carrington rotation 1843 (31 May 28 June, 1991) is performed based on a fully three-dimensional, steady-state MHD model of the solar wind (Usmanov, 1993b). A self-consistent solution for 3-D MHD equations is constructed for the spherical shell extending from the solar photosphere up to 10 AU. Solar magnetic field observations are used to prescribe boundary conditions. The computed distribution of the magnetic field is compared with coronal hole observations and with the IMF measurements made by IMP-8 spacecraft at the Earth's orbit.

  10. Solar Surface Magneto-Convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert F. Stein

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We review the properties of solar magneto-convection in the top half of the convection zones scale heights (from 20 Mm below the visible surface to the surface, and then through the photosphere to the temperature minimum. Convection is a highly non-linear and non-local process, so it is best studied by numerical simulations. We focus on simulations that include sufficient detailed physics so that their results can be quantitatively compared with observations. The solar surface is covered with magnetic features with spatial sizes ranging from unobservably small to hundreds of megameters. Three orders of magnitude more magnetic flux emerges in the quiet Sun than emerges in active regions. In this review we focus mainly on the properties of the quiet Sun magnetic field. The Sun’s magnetic field is produced by dynamo action throughout the convection zone, primarily by stretching and twisting in the turbulent downflows. Diverging convective upflows and magnetic buoyancy carry magnetic flux toward the surface and sweep the field into the surrounding downflow lanes where the field is dragged downward. The result is a hierarchy of undulating magnetic Ω- and U-loops of different sizes. New magnetic flux first appears at the surface in a mixed polarity random pattern and then collects into isolated unipolar regions due to underlying larger scale magnetic structures. Rising magnetic structures are not coherent, but develop a filamentary structure. Emerging magnetic flux alters the convection properties, producing larger, darker granules. Strong field concentrations inhibit transverse plasma motions and, as a result, reduce convective heat transport toward the surface which cools. Being cooler, these magnetic field concentrations have a shorter scale height and become evacuated. The field becomes further compressed and can reach strengths in balance with the surrounding gas pressure. Because of their small internal density, photons escape from deeper in

  11. New Solar Irradiance Measurements from the Miniature X-Ray Solar Spectrometer Cubesat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Jones, Andrew; Kohnert, Richard; Mason, James Paul; Moore, Christopher S.; Palo, Scott; Rouleau, Colden [University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Caspi, Amir [Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO (United States); Chamberlin, Phillip C. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Solomon, Stanley C. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Machol, Janet; Viereck, Rodney [NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The goal of the Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer ( MinXSS ) CubeSat is to explore the energy distribution of soft X-ray (SXR) emissions from the quiescent Sun, active regions, and during solar flares and to model the impact on Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere. The energy emitted in the SXR range (0.1–10 keV) can vary by more than a factor of 100, yet we have limited spectral measurements in the SXRs to accurately quantify the spectral dependence of this variability. The MinXSS primary science instrument is an Amptek, Inc. X123 X-ray spectrometer that has an energy range of 0.5–30 keV with a nominal 0.15 keV energy resolution. Two flight models have been built. The first, MinXSS -1, has been making science observations since 2016 June 9 and has observed numerous flares, including more than 40 C-class and 7 M-class flares. These SXR spectral measurements have advantages over broadband SXR observations, such as providing the capability to derive multiple-temperature components and elemental abundances of coronal plasma, improved irradiance accuracy, and higher resolution spectral irradiance as input to planetary ionosphere simulations. MinXSS spectra obtained during the M5.0 flare on 2016 July 23 highlight these advantages and indicate how the elemental abundance appears to change from primarily coronal to more photospheric during the flare. MinXSS -1 observations are compared to the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite ( GOES ) X-ray Sensor (XRS) measurements of SXR irradiance and estimated corona temperature. Additionally, a suggested improvement to the calibration of the GOES XRS data is presented.

  12. New Solar Irradiance Measurements from the Miniature X-Ray Solar Spectrometer CubeSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Caspi, Amir; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Jones, Andrew; Kohnert, Richard; Mason, James Paul; Moore, Christopher S.; Palo, Scott; Rouleau, Colden; Solomon, Stanley C.; Machol, Janet; Viereck, Rodney

    2017-02-01

    The goal of the Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat is to explore the energy distribution of soft X-ray (SXR) emissions from the quiescent Sun, active regions, and during solar flares and to model the impact on Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere. The energy emitted in the SXR range (0.1-10 keV) can vary by more than a factor of 100, yet we have limited spectral measurements in the SXRs to accurately quantify the spectral dependence of this variability. The MinXSS primary science instrument is an Amptek, Inc. X123 X-ray spectrometer that has an energy range of 0.5-30 keV with a nominal 0.15 keV energy resolution. Two flight models have been built. The first, MinXSS-1, has been making science observations since 2016 June 9 and has observed numerous flares, including more than 40 C-class and 7 M-class flares. These SXR spectral measurements have advantages over broadband SXR observations, such as providing the capability to derive multiple-temperature components and elemental abundances of coronal plasma, improved irradiance accuracy, and higher resolution spectral irradiance as input to planetary ionosphere simulations. MinXSS spectra obtained during the M5.0 flare on 2016 July 23 highlight these advantages and indicate how the elemental abundance appears to change from primarily coronal to more photospheric during the flare. MinXSS-1 observations are compared to the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) X-ray Sensor (XRS) measurements of SXR irradiance and estimated corona temperature. Additionally, a suggested improvement to the calibration of the GOES XRS data is presented.

  13. Solar Twins and the Barium Puzzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Arumalla B. S.; Lambert, David L., E-mail: bala@astro.as.utexas.edu [W.J. McDonald Observatory and Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States)

    2017-08-20

    Several abundance analyses of Galactic open clusters (OCs) have shown a tendency for Ba but not for other heavy elements (La−Sm) to increase sharply with decreasing age such that Ba was claimed to reach [Ba/Fe] ≃ +0.6 in the youngest clusters (ages < 100 Myr) rising from [Ba/Fe] = 0.00 dex in solar-age clusters. Within the formulation of the s -process, the difficulty to replicate higher Ba abundance and normal La−Sm abundances in young clusters is known as the barium puzzle. Here, we investigate the barium puzzle using extremely high-resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra of 24 solar twins and measured the heavy elements Ba, La, Ce, Nd, and Sm with a precision of 0.03 dex. We demonstrate that the enhanced Ba ii relative to La−Sm seen among solar twins, stellar associations, and OCs at young ages (<100 Myr) is unrelated to aspects of stellar nucleosynthesis but has resulted from overestimation of Ba by standard methods of LTE abundance analysis in which the microturbulence derived from the Fe lines formed deep in the photosphere is insufficient to represent the true line broadening imposed on Ba ii lines by the upper photospheric layers from where the Ba ii lines emerge. Because the young stars have relatively active photospheres, Ba overabundances most likely result from the adoption of a too low value of microturbulence in the spectrum synthesis of the strong Ba ii lines but the change of microturbulence in the upper photosphere has only a minor affect on La−Sm abundances measured from the weak lines.

  14. Solar prominences

    CERN Document Server

    Engvold, Oddbjørn

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents the latest research results on solar prominences, including new developments on e.g. chirality, fine structure, magnetism, diagnostic tools and relevant solar plasma physics. In 1875 solar prominences, as seen out of the solar limb, were described by P.A. Secchi in his book Le Soleil as "gigantic pink or peach-flower coloured flames". The development of spectroscopy, coronagraphy and polarimetry brought tremendous observational advances in the twentieth century. The authors present and discuss exciting new challenges (resulting from observations made by space and ground-based telescopes in the 1990s and the first decade of the 21st century) concerning the diagnostics of prominences, their formation, their life time and their eruption along with their impact in the heliosphere (including the Earth). The book starts with a general introduction of the prominence “object” with some historical background on observations and instrumentation. In the next chapter, the various forms of promine...

  15. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere VII. Further Insights into the Chromosphere and Corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the liquid metallic hydrogen model of the Sun, the chromosphere is responsible for the capture of atomic hydrogen in the solar atmosphere and its eventual re-entry onto the photospheric surface (P.M. Robitaille. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere IV. On the Nature of the Chromosphere. Prog. Phys., 2013, v. 3, L15–L21. As for the corona, it represents a diffuse region containing both gaseous plasma and condensed matter with elevated electron affinity (P.M. Robitaille. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere V. On the Nature of the Corona. Prog. Phys., 2013, v. 3, L22–L25. Metallic hydrogen in the corona is thought to enable the continual harvest of electrons from the outer reaches of the Sun, thereby preserving the neutrality of the solar body. The rigid rotation of the corona is offered as the thirty-third line of evidence that the Sun is comprised of condensed matter. Within the context of the gaseous models of the Sun, a 100 km thick transition zone has been hypothesized to exist wherein temperatures increase dramatically from 104–106 K. Such extreme transitional temperatures are not reasonable given the trivial physical scale of the proposed transition zone, a region adopted to account for the ultra-violet emission lines of ions such as C IV, O IV, and Si IV. In this work, it will be argued that the transition zone does not exist. Rather, the intermediate ionization states observed in the solar atmosphere should be viewed as the result of the simultaneous transfer of protons and electrons onto condensed hydrogen structures, CHS. Line emissions from ions such as C IV, O IV, and Si IV are likely to be the result of condensation reactions, manifesting the involvement of species such as CH4, SiH4, H3O+ in the synthesis of CHS in the chromosphere. In addition, given the presence of a true solar surface at the level of the photosphere in the liquid metallic hydrogen model

  16. Differential emission measure analysis of hot-flare plasma from solar-maximum mission X-ray data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijver, J.; Jakimiec, J.; Sylwester, J.; Lemen, J.R.; Mewe, R.; Bentley, R.D.; Fludra, A.; Sylwester, B.

    1984-01-01

    We have investigated differential emission measure (DEM) distribution of hot flare plasma (T>10 MK) using SMM X-ray data from Bent Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) and Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS). We have found that the analysis provide a very sensitive test of consistency of observational data

  17. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet processed Pt/ZnO composites and its application as counter-electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chia-Chun; Wan, Ting-Hao; Hsu, Cheng-Che; Cheng, I.-Chun; Chen, Jian-Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Nitrogen dc-pulse atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is used to fabricate Pt/ZnO composites as the counter electrodes (CEs) of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Due to the synergetic effect of the reactive plasma species and heat in nitrogen APPJ, the spin-coated precursors including chloroplatinic acid and zinc acetate can be reduced on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass substrates in a few seconds. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) analyses indicate that the precursors are reduced to Pt/ZnO under APPJ calcination. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Tafel measurement show the promising catalytic activities of Pt/ZnO CEs with low charge transfer resistance and high exchange current density. The efficiency of a DSSC with a 30-s APPJ-calcined Pt/ZnO CE is similar to that with a conventional furnace-annealed Pt CE for 15 min. The results indicate that nitrogen dc-pulse APPJ treatment is an efficient tool for rapidly fabricating Pt/ZnO composite CEs of DSSCs.

  18. P-type sp3-bonded BN/n-type Si heterodiode solar cell fabricated by laser-plasma synchronous CVD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Shojiro; Nagata, Takahiro; Chikyo, Toyohiro; Sato, Yuhei; Watanabe, Takayuki; Hirano, Daisuke; Takizawa, Takeo; Nakamura, Katsumitsu; Hashimoto, Takuya; Nakamura, Takuya; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu; Yamamoto, Atsushi

    2009-01-01

    A heterojunction of p-type sp 3 -bonded boron nitride (BN) and n-type Si fabricated by laser-plasma synchronous chemical vapour deposition (CVD) showed excellent rectifying properties and proved to work as a solar cell with photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 1.76%. The BN film was deposited on an n-type Si (1 0 0) substrate by plasma CVD from B 2 H 6 + NH 3 + Ar while doping of Si into the BN film was induced by the simultaneous irradiation of an intense excimer laser with a pulse power of 490 mJ cm -2 , at a wavelength of 193 nm and at a repetition rate of 20 Hz. The source of dopant Si was supposed to be the Si substrate ablated at the initial stage of the film growth. The laser enhanced the doping (and/or diffusion) of Si into BN as well as the growth of sp 3 -bonded BN simultaneously in this method. P-type conduction of BN films was determined by the hot (thermoelectric) probe method. The BN/Si heterodiode with an essentially transparent p-type BN as a front layer is supposed to efficiently absorb light reaching the active region so as to potentially result in high efficiency.

  19. The Origin, Early Evolution and Predictability of Solar Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Lucie M.; Török, Tibor; Vršnak, Bojan; Manchester, Ward; Veronig, Astrid

    2018-02-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were discovered in the early 1970s when space-borne coronagraphs revealed that eruptions of plasma are ejected from the Sun. Today, it is known that the Sun produces eruptive flares, filament eruptions, coronal mass ejections and failed eruptions; all thought to be due to a release of energy stored in the coronal magnetic field during its drastic reconfiguration. This review discusses the observations and physical mechanisms behind this eruptive activity, with a view to making an assessment of the current capability of forecasting these events for space weather risk and impact mitigation. Whilst a wealth of observations exist, and detailed models have been developed, there still exists a need to draw these approaches together. In particular more realistic models are encouraged in order to asses the full range of complexity of the solar atmosphere and the criteria for which an eruption is formed. From the observational side, a more detailed understanding of the role of photospheric flows and reconnection is needed in order to identify the evolutionary path that ultimately means a magnetic structure will erupt.

  20. Radiative and magnetic properties of solar active regions. II. Spatially resolved analysis of O V 62.97 nm transition region emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fludra, A.; Warren, H.

    2010-11-01

    Context. Global relationships between the photospheric magnetic flux and the extreme ultraviolet emission integrated over active region area have been studied in a previous paper by Fludra & Ireland (2008, A&A, 483, 609). Spatially integrated EUV line intensities are tightly correlated with the total unsigned magnetic flux, and yet these global power laws have been shown to be insufficient for accurately determining the coronal heating mechanism owing to the mathematical ill-conditioning of the inverse problem. Aims: Our aim is to establish a relationship between the EUV line intensities and the photospheric magnetic flux density on small spatial scales in active regions and investigate whether it provides a way of identifying the process that heats the coronal loops. Methods: We compare spatially resolved EUV transition region emission and the photospheric magnetic flux density. This analysis is based on the O V 62.97 nm line recorded by the SOHO Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) and SOHO MDI magnetograms for six solar active regions. The magnetic flux density ϕ is converted to a simulated O V intensity using a model relationship I(ϕ, L) = Cϕδ Lλ, where the loop length L is obtained from potential magnetic field extrapolations. This simulated spatial distribution of O V intensities is convolved with the CDS instrument's point spread function and compared pixel by pixel with the observed O V line intensity. Parameters δ and λ are derived to give the best fit for the observed and simulated intensities. Results: Spatially-resolved analysis of the transition region emission reveals the complex nature of the heating processes in active regions. In some active regions, particularly large, local intensity enhancements up to a factor of five are present. When areas with O V intensities above 3000 erg cm-2 s-1 sr-1 are ignored, a power law has been fitted to the relationship between the local O V line intensity and the photospheric magnetic flux density in each

  1. Gyrokinetic theory of magnetic structures in high-beta plasmas of the Earths magnetopause and of the slow solar wind

    OpenAIRE

    Jovanovic, Dusan; Alexandrova, Olga; Maksimovic, Milan; Belic, Milivoj

    2017-01-01

    Nonlinear effects of the trapping of resonant particles by the combined action of the electric field and the magnetic mirror force is studied using a gyrokinetic description that includes the finite Larmor radius effects. A general nonlinear solution is found that is supported by the nonlinearity arising from the resonant particles, trapped by the combined action of the parallel electric field and the magnetic mirror force. Applying these results to the space plasma conditions, we demonstrate...

  2. Plasma patterning of Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):Poly(styrenesulfonate) anodes for efficient polymer solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colsmann, Alexander; Stenzel, Florian; Balthasar, Gerhard; Do, Hung; Lemmer, Uli

    2009-01-01

    In this work we present indium tin oxide free polymer photovoltaic devices featuring a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) anode that has been patterned by oxygen plasma etching. By optimizing the PEDOT:PSS formulation and thickness, we achieved conductivities up to 400 S/cm. The best overall power conversion efficiency was found to be 2.2% under equivalent illumination to one sun with a PEDOT:PSS film conductivity of 300 S/cm

  3. Towards a coherent view of mass loss in Betelgeuse from the photosphere to the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montarges, Miguel; Kervella, Pierre; Perrin, Guy

    2013-06-01

    Massive evolved stars contribute to the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium (ISM), the Galaxy and ultimately the Universe through their mass loss. From the photosphere to the ISM, large convective motions, low surface gravity and high brightness combine to trigger an intense stellar wind. The released material evolves chemically as the distance from the star increases, and eventually forms dust particles. The involved physical and chemical processes are central to apprehend the cosmic impact of massive evolved stars, but they are poorly understood: the surface convection remains essentially uncharacterized, as the composition of the wind, and the role of the magnetic field is unknown. Betelgeuse is the closest red supergiant and therefore it stands out as the best candidate to obtain detailed observations of the close circumstellar environment of a massive evolved star. We are currently running a high angular resolution observations program to obtain a multi-wavelength and multi-epoch characterisation of this star. Using the IOTA interferometer, Haubois et al. reconstructed an image of the photosphere of the star. Within 1 to 100 stellar radii, the VLT and VLTI allowed us to probe the compact molecular envelope of Betelgeuse (the MOLsphere) in the near-infrared, and the extended dusty envelope in the thermal infrared domain. They were recently completed with HST/STIS observations of the chromosphere in the UV, whose location is surprisingly coincident with the MOLsphere. We will present a brief review of our recent results and of our ongoing work on Betelgeuse.

  4. The solar cycle variation of coronal temperature and density during cycle 21-22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhathakurta, M.; Fisher, R. R.; Altrock, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we characterize the temperature and the density structure of the corona utilizing co-spatial spectrophotometric observations during the descending phase of cycle 21 through the ascending phase of cycle 22. The data include ground-based intensity observations of the green (5303A Fe XIV) and red (6374A Fe X) coronal forbidden lines from Sacramento Peak and synoptic maps of white-light K-coronal polarized brightness, pB from the High Altitude Observatory, and photospheric magnetographs from the National Solar Observatory, Sacramento Peak. A determination of plasma temperature T can be derived unambiguously from the intensity ratio Fe X/Fe XIV, since both emission lines come from ionized states of Fe, and the ratios are only weakly dependent on density. The latitudinal variation of the temperature and the density within the descending and the ascending phases of solar cycle 21 and 22 are presented. There is a large-scale organization of the inferred coronal temperature distribution; these structures tend to persist through most of the magnetic activity cycle. This distribution differs in spatial and temporal characterization from the traditional picture of sunspot and active region evolution over the range of sunspot cycle.

  5. Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes Boris Filippov1,∗, Olesya Martsenyuk1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-01-09

    Jan 9, 2015 ... Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes. 161. 3. Observational manifestations of flux ropes in the corona. How can one find observational manifestations of flux ropes in the corona? The coronal magnetic field is still largely elusive for reliable measurements. Photospheric magnetic field extrapolations are, therefore, ...

  6. The Solar Orbiter Mission and its Polarimetric and Helioseismic Imager (SO/PHI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandorfer, Achim; Solanki, Sami K; Woch, Joachim [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Strasse 2, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Pillet, Valentin MartInez [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/ VIa Lactea, s/n, E38205 - La Laguna (Tenerife) (Spain); Herrero, Alberto Alvarez [Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial, E-28850, Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Appourchaux, Thierry, E-mail: gandorfer@mps.mpg.de [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS-Universite Paris XI UMR8617, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2011-01-01

    We briefly outline the scientific and instrumental aspects of ESA's Solar Orbiter mission. Special emphasis is given to the Polarimetric and Helioseismic Imager, the instrument with the highest relevance for helioseismology applications, which will observe gas motions and the vector magnetic field in the photosphere at high spatial and temporal resolution.

  7. Spectropolarimetric observations of an arch filament system with the GREGOR solar telescope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balthasar, H.; Gömöry, P.; Gonzalez Manrique, S. J.; Kuckein, C.; Kavka, J.; Kučera, A.; Schwartz, P.; Vašková, R.; Berkefeld, T.; Collados Vera, M.; Denker, C.; Feller, A.; Hofmann, A.; Lagg, A.; Nicklas, H.; Orozco Suárez, D.; Pastor Yabar, A.; Schlichenmaier, R.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, W.; Sigwarth, M.; Sobotka, Michal; Solanki, S.K.; Soltau, D.; Staude, J.; Strassmeier, K.G.; Volkmer, R.; von der Lühe, O.; Waldmann, T.A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 337, č. 10 (2016), s. 1050-1056 ISSN 0004-6337. [Dynamic Sun - Exploring the Many Facets of Solar Eruptive Events. Potsdam, 26.10.2015-29.10.2015] Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Sun * filaments * photosphere Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 0.916, year: 2016

  8. Nearly constant ratio between the proton inertial scale and the spectrum break length scale in the plasma beta range from 0.2 to 1.4 in the solar wind turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Tu, C. Y.; He, J.; Wang, L.

    2017-12-01

    The spectrum break at the ion scale of the solar wind magnetic fluctuations are considered to give important clue on the turbulence dissipation mechanism. Among several possible mechanisms, the most notable ones are the two mechanisms that related respectively with proton thermal gyro-radius and proton inertial length. However, no definite conclusion has been given for which one is more reasonable because the two parameters have similar values in the normal plasma beta range. Here we do a statistical study for the first time to see if the two mechanism predictions have different dependence on the solar wind velocity and on the plasma beta in the normal plasma beta range in the solar wind at 1 AU. From magnetic measurements by Wind, Ulysses and Messenger, we select 60 data sets with duration longer than 8 hours. We found that the ratio between the proton inertial scale and the spectrum break scale do not change considerably with both varying the solar wind speed from 300km/s to 800km/s and varying the plasma beta from 0.2 to 1.4. The average value of the ratio times 2pi is 0.46 ± 0.08. However, the ratio between the proton gyro-radius and the break scale changes clearly. This new result shows that the proton inertial scale could be a single factor that determines the break length scale and hence gives a strong evidence to support the dissipation mechanism related to it in the normal plasma beta range. The value of the constant ratio may relate with the dissipation mechanism, but it needs further theoretical study to give detailed explanation.

  9. Heating of an Erupting Prominence Associated with a Solar Coronal Mass Ejection on 2012 January 27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin-Yi; Moon, Yong-Jae; Kim, Kap-Sung [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do, 17104 (Korea, Republic of); Raymond, John C.; Reeves, Katharine K. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-07-20

    We investigate the heating of an erupting prominence and loops associated with a coronal mass ejection and X-class flare. The prominence is seen as absorption in EUV at the beginning of its eruption. Later, the prominence changes to emission, which indicates heating of the erupting plasma. We find the densities of the erupting prominence using the absorption properties of hydrogen and helium in different passbands. We estimate the temperatures and densities of the erupting prominence and loops seen as emission features using the differential emission measure method, which uses both EUV and X-ray observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the X-ray Telescope on board Hinode . We consider synthetic spectra using both photospheric and coronal abundances in these calculations. We verify the methods for the estimation of temperatures and densities for the erupting plasmas. Then, we estimate the thermal, kinetic, radiative loss, thermal conduction, and heating energies of the erupting prominence and loops. We find that the heating of the erupting prominence and loop occurs strongly at early times in the eruption. This event shows a writhing motion of the erupting prominence, which may indicate a hot flux rope heated by thermal energy release during magnetic reconnection.

  10. Strategy for the Explorer program for solar and space physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Contents include: executive summary; the Explorer program - background and current status; strategy - level of activity; solar-terrestrial research (solar physics, space plasma physics, and upper atmospheric physics)

  11. Labotratory Simulation Experiments of Cometary Plasma

    OpenAIRE

    MINAMI, S.; Baum, P. J.; Kamin, G.; White, R. S.; 南, 繁行

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory simulation experiment to study the interaction between a cometary plasma and the solar wind has been performed using the UCR-T 1 space simulation facility at the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, the University of California, Riverside. Light emitting plasma composed of Sr, Ba and/or C simulating cometary coma plasma is produced by a plasma emitter which interacts with intense plasma flow produced by a co-axial plasma gun simulating the solar wind. The purpose of this ...

  12. From the Telescope to the Laboratory and Back Again: The Center for Astrophysical Plasma Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston Montgomery, Michael; Winget, Don; Schaeuble, Marc; Hawkins, Keith; Wheeler, Craig

    2018-01-01

    The Center for Astrophysical Plasma Properties (CAPP) is a new center focusing on the spectroscopic properties of stars and accretion disks using “at-parameter” experiments. Currently, these experiments use the X-ray output of the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories—the largest X-ray source in the world—to heat plasmas to the same conditions (temperature, density, and radiation environment) as those observed in astronomical objects. Current experiments include measuring (1) density-dependent opacities of iron-peak elements at solar interior conditions, (2) spectral lines of low-Z elements at white dwarf photospheric conditions, (3) atomic population kinetics of neon in a radiation-dominated environment, and (4) resonant Auger destruction (RAD) of silicon at accretion disk conditions around supermassive black holes. We will be moving to new astrophysical environments and additional experimental facilities, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the OMEGA facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). We seek students and collaborators to work on these experiments as well as the calculations that complement them. CAPP has funding for 5 years and can support up to six graduate students and three post-docs.

  13. Peculiar CNO photospheric abundances in the central star of NGC 2392

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Roberto H.; Urbaneja, Miguel A.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Prinja, Raman K.

    2012-08-01

    Using new, high signal-to-noise CFHT ESPaDOnS visual spectrograms, and archive IUE and FUSE UV spectrograms, together with state-of-the-art non-LTE hydrodynamical model atmospheres, we have obtained accurate He, C, N, O photospheric abundance determinations in the central stars of NGC 2392, IC 4593, and NGC 6826. We compare with the corresponding nebular abundances, taken from the literature. The central star of NGC 2392 shows high He, N, and very low C, O abundances. We propose that these peculiar abundances must have originated in a common-envelope phase of interaction with a close binary companion. If we assume that the companion is more evolved than the visible central star, this offers a way of solving the old mystery of the discrepant He II Zanstra temperature of NGC 2392.

  14. Processes observable in the photosphere during the formation of an active region. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bumba, V.; Suda, J.

    1984-01-01

    All processes are studied visible during the development of the magnetic field, sunspots and chromospheric structures in the usual active region of August 1974. The connection of the active region with the dynamics of the background field is discussed. The formation of a ''centre of magnetic activity'' is demonstrated on magnetic charts as well as in photospheric and chromospheric details. The regularities in the active region's magnetic field topology and dynamics, and their relations to the sunspot group development and formation of individual sunspots are shown. The process is described of formation of a penumbra as a slow, continuous reorganization of granular field areas around the main spot nucleus in strong dependence on the field topology. It may proceed successively around the umbra surrounded by the opposite polarity in the course of several hours, stopping or possibly reversing before it continues its growth. Again it is very difficult to explain the observed field behaviour on a model of emerging flux tubes. (author)

  15. Low-frequency photospheric and wind variability in the early-B supergiant HD 2905

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón-Díaz, S.; Aerts, C.; Urbaneja, M. A.; Camacho, I.; Antoci, V.; Fredslund Andersen, M.; Grundahl, F.; Pallé, P. L.

    2018-04-01

    Context. Despite important advances in space asteroseismology during the last decade, the early phases of evolution of stars with masses above 15 M⊙ (including the O stars and their evolved descendants, the B supergiants) have been only vaguely explored up to now. This is due to the lack of adequate observations for a proper characterization of the complex spectroscopic and photometric variability occurring in these stars. Aim. Our goal is to detect, analyze, and interpret variability in the early-B-type supergiant HD 2905 (κ Cas, B1 Ia) using long-term, ground-based, high-resolution spectroscopy. Methods: We gather a total of 1141 high-resolution spectra covering some 2900 days with three different high-performance spectrographs attached to 1-2.6m telescopes at the Canary Islands observatories. We complement these observations with the hipparcos light curve, which includes 160 data points obtained during a time span of 1200 days. We investigate spectroscopic variability of up to 12 diagnostic lines by using the zero and first moments of the line profiles. We perform a frequency analysis of both the spectroscopic and photometric dataset using Scargle periodograms. We obtain single snapshot and time-dependent information about the stellar parameters and abundances by means of the FASTWIND stellar atmosphere code. Results: HD 2905 is a spectroscopic variable with peak-to-peak amplitudes in the zero and first moments of the photospheric lines of up to 15% and 30 km s-1, respectively. The amplitude of the line-profile variability is correlated with the line formation depth in the photosphere and wind. All investigated lines present complex temporal behavior indicative of multi-periodic variability with timescales of a few days to several weeks. No short-period (hourly) variations are detected. The Scargle periodograms of the hipparcos light curve and the first moment of purely photospheric lines reveal a low-frequency amplitude excess and a clear dominant frequency

  16. Multi-wavelength analysis from tomography study on solar chromosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumpuni, Emanuel Sungging; Herdiwijaya, Dhani; Djamal, Mitra

    2015-01-01

    The Sun as the most important star for scientific laboratory in astrophysics as well as encompassing all living aspect on Earth, still holds scientific mystery. As the established model that the Sun’s energy fueled by the nuclear reaction, along with transport process to the typical Solar surface on around 6000-K temperature, many aspects still left as an open questions, such as how the chromosphere responded to the photospheric dynamics. In this preliminary work, we try to analyze the Solar chromosphere respond to the Photospheric dynamics using tomography study implementing multi-wavelength analysis observation obtained from Dutch Open Telescope. Using the Hydrogen-alpha Doppler signal as the primary diagnostic tool, we try to investigate the inter-relation between the magnetic and gas pressure dynamics that occur in the chromosphere

  17. The induced electric field distribution in the solar atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Rong; Yang Zhi-Liang; Deng Yuan-Yong

    2013-01-01

    A method of calculating the induced electric field is presented. The induced electric field in the solar atmosphere is derived by the time variation of the magnetic field when the accumulation of charged particles is neglected. In order to derive the spatial distribution of the magnetic field, several extrapolation methods are introduced. With observational data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory taken on 2010 May 20, we extrapolate the magnetic field from the photosphere to the upper atmosphere. By calculating the time variation of the magnetic field, we can get the induced electric field. The derived induced electric field can reach a value of 10 2 V cm −1 and the average electric field has a maximum point at the layer 360 km above the photosphere. The Monte Carlo method is used to compute the triple integration of the induced electric field.

  18. Solar Surface Convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordlund Åke

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We review the properties of solar convection that are directly observable at the solar surface, and discuss the relevant underlying physics, concentrating mostly on a range of depths from the temperature minimum down to about 20 Mm below the visible solar surface.The properties of convection at the main energy carrying (granular scales are tightly constrained by observations, in particular by the detailed shapes of photospheric spectral lines and the topology (time- and length-scales, flow velocities, etc. of the up- and downflows. Current supercomputer models match these constraints very closely, which lends credence to the models, and allows robust conclusions to be drawn from analysis of the model properties.At larger scales the properties of the convective velocity field at the solar surface are strongly influenced by constraints from mass conservation, with amplitudes of larger scale horizontal motions decreasing roughly in inverse proportion to the scale of the motion. To a large extent, the apparent presence of distinct (meso- and supergranulation scales is a result of the folding of this spectrum with the effective “filters” corresponding to various observational techniques. Convective motions on successively larger scales advect patterns created by convection on smaller scales; this includes patterns of magnetic field, which thus have an approximately self-similar structure at scales larger than granulation.Radiative-hydrodynamical simulations of solar surface convection can be used as 2D/3D time-dependent models of the solar atmosphere to predict the emergent spectrum. In general, the resulting detailed spectral line profiles agree spectacularly well with observations without invoking any micro- and macroturbulence parameters due to the presence of convective velocities and atmosphere inhomogeneities. One of the most noteworthy results has been a significant reduction in recent years in the derived solar C, N, and O abundances with

  19. An optical spectroscopic study of T Tauri stars. I. Photospheric properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herczeg, Gregory J. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Haidian Qu, Beijing 100871 (China); Hillenbrand, Lynne A. [Caltech, MC105-24, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-05-10

    Estimates of the mass and age of young stars from their location in the H-R diagram are limited by not only the typical observational uncertainties that apply to field stars, but also by large systematic uncertainties related to circumstellar phenomena. In this paper, we analyze flux-calibrated optical spectra to measure accurate spectral types and extinctions of 281 nearby T Tauri stars (TTSs). The primary advances in this paper are (1) the incorporation of a simplistic accretion continuum in optical spectral type and extinction measurements calculated over the full optical wavelength range and (2) the uniform analysis of a large sample of stars, many of which are well known and can serve as benchmarks. Comparisons between the non-accreting TTS photospheric templates and stellar photosphere models are used to derive conversions from spectral type to temperature. Differences between spectral types can be subtle and difficult to discern, especially when accounting for accretion and extinction. The spectral types measured here are mostly consistent with spectral types measured over the past decade. However, our new spectral types are one to two subclasses later than literature spectral types for the original members of the TW Hya Association (TWA) and are discrepant with literature values for some well-known members of the Taurus Molecular Cloud. Our extinction measurements are consistent with other optical extinction measurements but are typically 1 mag lower than near-IR measurements, likely the result of methodological differences and the presence of near-IR excesses in most CTTSs. As an illustration of the impact of accretion, spectral type, and extinction uncertainties on the H-R diagrams of young clusters, we find that the resulting luminosity spread of stars in the TWA is 15%-30%. The luminosity spread in the TWA and previously measured for binary stars in Taurus suggests that for a majority of stars, protostellar accretion rates are not large enough to

  20. CHARACTERIZING THE STELLAR PHOTOSPHERES AND NEAR-INFRARED EXCESSES IN ACCRETING T TAURI SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClure, M. K.; Calvet, N.; Hartmann, L.; Ingleby, L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, 830 Dennison Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Espaillat, C. [Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hernandez, J. [Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomia (CIDA), Merida 5101-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Luhman, K. L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and the Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); D' Alessio, P. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 58089 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Sargent, B., E-mail: melisma@umich.edu, E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu, E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu, E-mail: lingleby@umich.edu, E-mail: cespaillat@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: hernandj@cida.ve, E-mail: kluhman@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: p.dalessio@astrosmo.unam.mx, E-mail: baspci@rit.edu [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2013-05-20

    Using NASA Infrared Telescope Facility SpeX data from 0.8 to 4.5 {mu}m, we determine self-consistently the stellar properties and excess emission above the photosphere for a sample of classical T Tauri stars (CTTS) in the Taurus molecular cloud with varying degrees of accretion. This process uses a combination of techniques from the recent literature as well as observations of weak-line T Tauri stars to account for the differences in surface gravity and chromospheric activity between the T Tauri stars and dwarfs, which are typically used as photospheric templates for CTTS. Our improved veiling and extinction estimates for our targets allow us to extract flux-calibrated spectra of the excess in the near-infrared. We find that we are able to produce an acceptable parametric fit to the near-infrared excesses using a combination of up to three blackbodies. In half of our sample, two blackbodies at temperatures of 8000 K and 1600 K suffice. These temperatures and the corresponding solid angles are consistent with emission from the accretion shock on the stellar surface and the inner dust sublimation rim of the disk, respectively. In contrast, the other half requires three blackbodies at 8000, 1800, and 800 K, to describe the excess. We interpret the combined two cooler blackbodies as the dust sublimation wall with either a contribution from the disk surface beyond the wall or curvature of the wall itself, neither of which should have single-temperature blackbody emission. In these fits, we find no evidence of a contribution from optically thick gas inside the inner dust rim.

  1. Photospheric Spots and Flare on the Active Dwarf Star FR Cnc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhevnikova, A. V.; Kozhevnikov, V. P.; Alekseev, I. Yu.

    2018-03-01

    We perform analysis of new BVRI photometry of young active dwarf star FR Cnc (K7V), obtained at Kourovka astronomical observatory of Ural Federal University with the help of multichannel electrophotometer in February 2010. The lightcurve displays sinusoidal rotation modulation with the amplitude of 0m.15 in V band. Reddening of the brightness at the photometric minimum confirms that this modulation is caused by cold photospheric spots. An analysis of the spottedness distribution in terms of a zonal model based on our own and published data shows that the spots are localized at lower and middle latitudes from 47° to 56°, occupy 10-21% of the star's area, and are colder than the photosphere by 1650 K. A flare was detected on February 3, 2010, at a time corresponding to HJD=2455231. 3136. A maximum amplitude of 0m.11 was observed in the B band, the amplitudes in the V, R, and I bands were 0m.04, 0m.03, and 0m.02, respectively, and the duration of the flare was 32.5 min. It was noted that the flare occurred near the maximum spottedness of the star. The calculated total energy of the flare was 2.4·1033 and 1.3·1033 erg in the B and V bands, respectively. The flare was found to have an afterglow, with an overall increase in the star's brightness by 0m.02 in the B band after the flare compared to the pre-flare level.

  2. Time-dependence Effects in Photospheric-Phase Type II Supernova Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John

    2007-08-01

    We have incorporated time-dependent terms into the statistical and radiative equilibrium calculations of the non-LTE line-blanketed radiative transfer code CMFGEN. To illustrate the significant improvements in spectral fitting achieved for photospheric phase Type II SN, and to document the effects associated with time dependence, we model the outer 6.1 Msolar of ejecta of a BSG/RSG progenitor star. Hopping by 3-day increments, we compute the UV to near-IR spectral evolution for both continuum and lines, from the fully ionized conditions at one week to the partially recombined conditions at 6 weeks after the explosion. We confirm the importance of allowing for time-dependence in the modeling of Type-II SN, as recently discussed by Utrobin & Chugai for SN1987A. However unlike Utrobin & Chugai, who treated the radiation field in a core-halo approximation and assumed the Sobolev approximation for line formation, we allow for the full interaction between the radiation field and level populations, and study the effects on the full spectrum. At the hydrogen-recombination epoch, HI lines and NaD are considerably stronger and broader than in equivalent steady-state models, while CaII is weakened. Former successes of steady-state CMFGEN models are unaffected, while former discrepancies are cured. Time dependence affects all lines, while the continuum, from the UV to the optical, changes only moderately. We identify two key effects: First, time dependence together with the energy gain through changes in ionization and excitation lead to an over-ionization in the vicinity of the photosphere, dramatically affecting line optical depths and profiles. Second, the ionization is frozen-in at large radii/velocities. This stems solely from the time-scale contrast between recombination and expansion and will occur, modulo non-thermal excitation effects, in all SN types. The importance of this effect on spectral analyses, across SN types and epochs, remains to be determined.

  3. A Novel Approach to Fast SOLIS Stokes Inversion for Photospheric Vector Magnetography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker, Brian; Mighell, K.

    2009-05-01

    The SOLIS (Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun) Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM) is a full-disc spectropolarimeter, located at Kitt Peak National Observatory, which records Zeeman-induced polarization in the magnetically-sensitive FeI spectral lines at 630.15 nm and 630.25 nm. A SOLIS VSM full-disc dataset consists of 2048 scanlines, with each scanline containing the Stokes I, Q, U, and V spectral line profiles in 128 unique wavelength bins for all 2048 pixels in the scanline. These Stokes polarization profiles are inverted to obtain the magnetic and thermodynamic structure of the observations, based on a model Milne-Eddington plane-parallel atmosphere. Until recently, this has been a compute-intensive, relatively slow process. This poster presents a novel method of producing such model-based characterizations of the photospheric magnetic field by utilizing an inversion engine based on a genetic algorithm. The algorithm executes in a heterogeneous compute environment composed of both a CPU and a graphics processing unit (GPU). Using the cutting-edge NVIDIA CUDA platform, we are able to offload the compute-intensive portions of the inversion code to the GPU, which results in significant speedup. This speedup provides the impetus which has driven the development of this strategy. Currently, SOLIS vector magnetic field products are generated with a modified version of the HAO ASP inversion code developed by Skumanich & Lites (1987), and these data products are made available to the scientific community 24 hours after the actual observation(s). With this work, we aim to drastically reduce this waiting period to allow near real-time characterizations of the photospheric vector magnetic field. Here, we here detail the inversion method we have pioneered, present preliminary results on the derived full-disc magnetic field as well as timing/speedup considerations, and finally offer some outlooks on the future direction of this work.

  4. DC-pulse atmospheric-pressure plasma jet and dielectric barrier discharge surface treatments on fluorine-doped tin oxide for perovskite solar cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jui-Hsuan; Cheng, I.-Chun; Hsu, Cheng-Che; Chen, Jian-Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Nitrogen DC-pulse atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) and nitrogen dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) were applied to pre-treat fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass substrates for perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Nitrogen DC-pulse APPJ treatment (substrate temperature: ~400 °C) for 10 s can effectively increase the wettability, whereas nitrogen DBD treatment (maximum substrate temperature: ~140 °C) achieved limited improvement in wettability even with increased treatment time of 60 s. XPS results indicate that 10 s APPJ, 60 s DBD, and 15 min UV-ozone treatment of FTO glass substrates can decontaminate the surface. A PSC fabricated on APPJ-treated FTO showed the highest power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 14.90%; by contrast, a PSC with nitrogen DBD-treated FTO shows slightly lower PCE of 12.57% which was comparable to that of a PSC on FTO treated by a 15 min UV-ozone process. Both nitrogen DC-pulse APPJ and nitrogen DBD can decontaminate FTO substrates and can be applied for the substrate cleaning step of PSC.

  5. Multichannel Blind Deconvolution As A Tool For Solar Image Restoration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimberová, Stanislava; Flusser, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 228, 1-2 (2005), s. 165-175 ISSN 0038-0938 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/04/0155; GA AV ČR IBS1003006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : image restoration * multichanel blind deconvolution * solar photosphere Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.892, year: 2005

  6. Solar--geophysical data number 410, October 1978. Part II. (Comprehensive reports). Data for April 1978--March 1978 and miscellanea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, H.E.

    1978-10-01

    This comprehensive report for April 1978, March 1978 and Miscellaneous data provides data on active regions, synoptic solar maps, solar flares, solar radio waves, energetic solar particles and plasma, synoptic chart, abbreviated calendar record, regional flare index, solar x-ray radiation, cosmic rays, energetic solar particles and plasma for March 1978 and solar flares for February 1978

  7. Physics of Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, Leslie Colin

    2003-01-01

    A short, self-sufficient introduction to the physics of plasma for beginners as well as researchers in a number of fields. The author looks at the dynamics and stability of magnetoplasma and discusses wave and transport in this medium. He also looks at such applications as fusion research using magnetic confinement of Deuterium plasma, solar physics with its plasma loops reaching high into the corona, sunspots and solar wind, engineering applications to metallurgy, MHD direct generation of electricity, and railguns, finally touching on the relatively new and difficult subject of dusty plasmas.

  8. Optical and passivating properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition for application on silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wight, Daniel Nilsen

    2008-07-01

    Within this thesis, several important subjects related to the use of amorphous silicon nitride made by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition as an anti-reflective coating on silicon solar cells are presented. The first part of the thesis covers optical simulations to optimise single and double layer anti-reflective coatings with respect to optical performance when situated on a silicon solar cell. The second part investigates the relationship between important physical properties of silicon nitride films when deposited under different conditions. The optical simulations were either based on minimising the reflectance off a silicon nitride/silicon wafer stack or maximising the transmittance through the silicon nitride into the silicon wafer. The former method allowed consideration of the reflectance off the back surface of the wafer, which occurs typically at wavelengths above 1000 nm due to the transparency of silicon at these wavelengths. However, this method does not take into consideration the absorption occurring in the silicon nitride, which is negligible at low refractive indexes but quite significant when the refractive index increases above 2.1. For high-index silicon nitride films, the latter method is more accurate as it considers both reflectance and absorbance in the film to calculate the transmittance into the Si wafer. Both methods reach similar values for film thickness and refractive index for optimised single layer anti-reflective coatings, due to the negligible absorption occurring in these films. For double layer coatings, though, the reflectance based simulations overestimated the optimum refractive index for the bottom layer, which would have lead to excessive absorption if applied to real anti-reflective coatings. The experimental study on physical properties for silicon nitride films deposited under varying conditions concentrated on the estimation of properties important for its applications, such as optical properties, passivation

  9. Coronal Holes and Magnetic Flux Ropes Interweaving Solar Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowder, Chris; Yeates, Anthony; Leamon, Robert; Qiu, Jiong

    2016-10-01

    Coronal holes, dark patches observed in solar observations in extreme ultraviolet and x-ray wavelengths, provide an excellent proxy for regions of open magnetic field rooted near the photosphere. Through a multi-instrument approach, including SDO data, we are able to stitch together high resolution maps of coronal hole boundaries spanning the past two solar activity cycles. These observational results are used in conjunction with models of open magnetic field to probe physical solar parameters. Magnetic flux ropes are commonly defined as bundles of solar magnetic field lines, twisting around a common axis. Photospheric surface flows and magnetic reconnection work in conjunction to form these ropes, storing magnetic stresses until eruption. With an automated methodology to identify flux ropes within observationally driven magnetofrictional simulations, we can study their properties in detail. Of particular interest is a solar-cycle length statistical description of eruption rates, spatial distribution, magnetic orientation, flux, and helicity. Coronal hole observations can provide useful data about the distribution of the fast solar wind, with magnetic flux ropes yielding clues as to ejected magnetic field and the resulting space weather geo-effectiveness. With both of these cycle-spanning datasets, we can begin to form a more detailed picture of the evolution and consequences of both sets of solar magnetic features.

  10. MULTI-SHELL MAGNETIC TWISTERS AS A NEW MECHANISM FOR CORONAL HEATING AND SOLAR WIND ACCELERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murawski, K. [Group of Astrophysics, Institute of Physics, UMCS, ul. Radziszewskiego 10, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Srivastava, A. K.; Dwivedi, B. N. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi-221005 (India); Musielak, Z. E. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States)

    2015-07-20

    We perform numerical simulations of impulsively generated Alfvén waves in an isolated photospheric flux tube and explore the propagation of these waves along such magnetic structure that extends from the photosphere, where these waves are triggered, to the solar corona, and we analyze resulting magnetic shells. Our model of the solar atmosphere is constructed by adopting the temperature distribution based on the semi-empirical model and specifying the curved magnetic field lines that constitute the magnetic flux tube that is rooted in the solar photosphere. The evolution of the solar atmosphere is described by 3D, ideal MHD equations that are numerically solved by the FLASH code. Our numerical simulations reveal, based on the physical properties of the multi-shell magnetic twisters and the amount of energy and momentum associated with them, that these multi-shell magnetic twisters may be responsible for the observed heating of the lower solar corona and for the formation of solar wind. Moreover, it is likely that the existence of these twisters can be verified by high-resolution observations.

  11. Solar wind stagnation near comets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeev, A.A.; Cravens, T.E.; Gombosi, T.I.

    1983-03-01

    The nature of the solar wind flow near comets is examined analytically. In particular, the typical values for the stagnation pressure and magnetic barrier strength are estimated, taking into account the magnetic field line tension and the charge exchange cooling of the mass loaded solar wind. Knowledge of the strength of the magnetic barrier is required in order to determine the location of the contact discontinuity which separates the contaminated solar wind plasma and the outflowing plasma of the cometary ionosphere. (author)

  12. Solar chameleons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brax, Philippe; Zioutas, Konstantin

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the creation of chameleons deep inside the Sun (R∼0.7R sun ) and their subsequent conversion to photons near the magnetized surface of the Sun. We find that the spectrum of the regenerated photons lies in the soft x-ray region, hence addressing the solar corona problem. Moreover, these back-converted photons originating from chameleons have an intrinsic difference with regenerated photons from axions: their relative polarizations are mutually orthogonal before Compton interacting with the surrounding plasma. Depending on the photon-chameleon coupling and working in the strong coupling regime of the chameleons to matter, we find that the induced photon flux, when regenerated resonantly with the surrounding plasma, coincides with the solar flux within the soft x-ray energy range. Moreover, using the soft x-ray solar flux as a prior, we find that with a strong enough photon-chameleon coupling, the chameleons emitted by the Sun could lead to a regenerated photon flux in the CAST magnetic pipes, which could be within the reach of CAST with upgraded detector performance. Then, axion helioscopes have thus the potential to detect and identify particle candidates for the ubiquitous dark energy in the Universe.

  13. Solar Chameleons

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    We analyse the creation of chameleons deep inside the sun and their subsequent conversion to photons near the magnetised surface of the sun. We find that the spectrum of the regenerated photons lies in the soft X-ray region, hence addressing the solar corona problem. Moreover, these back-converted photons originating from chameleons have an intrinsic difference with regenerated photons from axions: their relative polarisations are mutually orthogonal before Compton interacting with the surrounding plasma. Depending on the photon-chameleon coupling and working in the strong coupling regime of the chameleons to matter, we find that the induced photon flux, when regenerated resonantly with the surrounding plasma, coincides with the solar flux within the soft X-ray energy range. Moreover, using the soft X-ray solar flux as a prior, we find that with a strong enough photon-chameleon coupling the chameleons emitted by the sun could lead to a regenerated photon flux in the CAST pipes, which could be within the reach...

  14. The Abundances of Carbon and Nitrogen in the Photospheres of Active B Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Geraldine J.

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary models for the structure and evolution of rapidly-rotating OB stars predict a photospheric enrichment of nitrogen due to the mixing of the CNO-processed material from the star's core with the original surface material. The predicted N-enhancement increases as the star approaches its critical rotational velocity. Alternatively the Algol primaries should have N-enriched photospheres if the material currently being transferred is from the mass loser's original core. To test these predictions, the C and N abundances in selected early Be stars and B-type mass gainers in Algol systems have been determined from spectroscopic data obtained with the IUE and FUSE spacecraft. The abundance analyses, carried through with the Hubeny/Lanz NLTE codes TLUSTY/SYNSPEC, were confronted with some challenges that are not encountered in abundance studies of sharp-lined, non-emission B stars including the treatment of shallow, blended rotationally-broadened lines, the appropriate value for the microturbulence parameter, correction for disk emission and possible shell absorption, and latitudinal variation of Teff and log g. The FUV offers an advantage over the optical region as there is far less influence from disk emission and the N lines are intrinsically stronger. Particularly useful are the features of C II 1324 Å, C III 1176 Å, 1247 Å, N I 1243 Å, and N III 1183,84 Å. Be stars with v sin i < 150 km s-1 were chosen to minimize the effect of latitudinal parameter variation. Given the errors it appears that the N abundance in the Be stars is normal. Expected mixing is apparently suppressed, and this study lends no support for Be star models based upon critical rotation. However, expected N-enhancement and a low C abundance are inferred for the B-type primaries in some interacting binaries. GJP is grateful for support from NASA Grants NNX07AH56G (ADP) and NNX07AF89G (FUSE), and the USC WiSE program.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic process in solar activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxiu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetohydrodynamics is one of the major disciplines in solar physics. Vigorous magnetohydrodynamic process is taking place in the solar convection zone and atmosphere. It controls the generating and structuring of the solar magnetic fields, causes the accumulation of magnetic non-potential energy in the solar atmosphere and triggers the explosive magnetic energy release, manifested as violent solar flares and coronal mass ejections. Nowadays detailed observations in solar astrophysics from space and on the ground urge a great need for the studies of magnetohydrodynamics and plasma physics to achieve better understanding of the mechanism or mechanisms of solar activity. On the other hand, the spectacular solar activity always serves as a great laboratory of magnetohydrodynamics. In this article, we reviewed a few key unresolved problems in solar activity studies and discussed the relevant issues in solar magnetohydrodynamics.

  16. Parametric study on kink instabilities of twisted magnetic flux ropes in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Z. X.; Keppens, R.; Roussev, I. I.; Lin, J.

    2018-01-01

    Aims: Twisted magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) in the solar atmosphere have been researched extensively because of their close connection to many solar eruptive phenomena, such as flares, filaments, and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In this work, we performed a set of 3D isothermal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulations, which use analytical twisted MFR models and study dynamical processes parametrically inside and around current-carrying twisted loops. We aim to generalize earlier findings by applying finite plasma β conditions. Methods: Inside the MFR, approximate internal equilibrium is obtained by pressure from gas and toroidal magnetic fields to maintain balance with the poloidal magnetic field. We selected parameter values to isolate best either internal or external kink instability before studying complex evolutions with mixed characteristics. We studied kink instabilities and magnetic reconnection in MFRs with low and high twists. Results: The curvature of MFRs is responsible for a tire tube force due to its internal plasma pressure, which tends to expand the MFR. The curvature effect of toroidal field inside the MFR leads to a downward movement toward the photosphere. We obtain an approximate internal equilibrium using the opposing characteristics of these two forces. A typical external kink instability totally dominates the evolution of MFR with infinite twist turns. Because of line-tied conditions and the curvature, the central MFR region loses its external equilibrium and erupts outward. We emphasize the possible role of two different kink instabilities during the MFR evolution: internal and external kink. The external kink is due to the violation of the Kruskal-Shafranov condition, while the internal kink requires a safety factor q = 1 surface inside the MFR. We show that in mixed scenarios, where both instabilities compete, complex evolutions occur owing to reconnections around and within the MFR. The S-shaped structures in current distributions

  17. MAGNETIC FLUX CANCELATION AS THE TRIGGER OF SOLAR QUIET-REGION CORONAL JETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L. [Heliophysics and Planetary Science Office, ZP13, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Chakrapani, Prithi, E-mail: navdeep.k.panesar@nasa.gov [Hunter College High School, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-11-20

    We report observations of 10 random on-disk solar quiet-region coronal jets found in high-resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory ( SDO )/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and having good coverage in magnetograms from the SDO /Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). Recent studies show that coronal jets are driven by the eruption of a small-scale filament (called a minifilament ). However, the trigger of these eruptions is still unknown. In the present study, we address the question: what leads to the jet-driving minifilament eruptions? The EUV observations show that there is a cool-transition-region-plasma minifilament present prior to each jet event and the minifilament eruption drives the jet. By examining pre-jet evolutionary changes in the line of sight photospheric magnetic field, we observe that each pre-jet minifilament resides over the neutral line between majority-polarity and minority-polarity patches of magnetic flux. In each of the 10 cases, the opposite-polarity patches approach and merge with each other (flux reduction between 21% and 57%). After several hours, continuous flux cancelation at the neutral line apparently destabilizes the field holding the cool-plasma minifilament to erupt and undergo internal reconnection, and external reconnection with the surrounding coronal field. The external reconnection opens the minifilament field allowing the minifilament material to escape outward, forming part of the jet spire. Thus, we found that each of the 10 jets resulted from eruption of a minifilament following flux cancelation at the neutral line under the minifilament. These observations establish that magnetic flux cancelation is usually the trigger of quiet-region coronal jet eruptions.

  18. Magnetic tornadoes as energy channels into the solar corona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedemeyer-Böhm, Sven; Scullion, Eamon; Steiner, Oskar; van der Voort, Luc Rouppe; de la Cruz Rodriguez, Jaime; Fedun, Viktor; Erdélyi, Robert

    2012-06-27

    Heating the outer layers of the magnetically quiet solar atmosphere to more than one million kelvin and accelerating the solar wind requires an energy flux of approximately 100 to 300 watts per square metre, but how this energy is transferred and dissipated there is a puzzle and several alternative solutions have been proposed. Braiding and twisting of magnetic field structures, which is caused by the convective flows at the solar surface, was suggested as an efficient mechanism for atmospheric heating. Convectively driven vortex flows that harbour magnetic fields are observed to be abundant in the photosphere (the visible surface of the Sun). Recently, corresponding swirling motions have been discovered in the chromosphere, the atmospheric layer sandwiched between the photosphere and the corona. Here we report the imprints of these chromospheric swirls in the transition region and low corona, and identify them as observational signatures of rapidly rotating magnetic structures. These ubiquitous structures, which resemble super-tornadoes under solar conditions, reach from the convection zone into the upper solar atmosphere and provide an alternative mechanism for channelling energy from the lower into the upper solar atmosphere.

  19. Optical and thermal design of 1.5-m aperture solar UV visible and IR observing telescope for Solar-C mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suematsu, Y.; Katsukawa, Y.; Shimizu, T.; Ichimoto, K.; Horiuchi, T.; Matsumoto, Y.; Takeyama, N.

    2017-11-01

    The next Japanese solar mission, SOLAR-C, which has been envisaged after successful science operation of Hinode (SOLAR-B) mission, is perusing two plans: plan-A and plan-B, and under extensive study from science objectives as well as engineering point of view. The plan-A aims at performing out-of-ecliptic observations for investigating, with helioseismic approach, internal structure and dynamo mechanisms of the Sun. It also explores polar regions where fast solar wind is believed to originate. A baseline orbit for plan-A is a circular orbit of 1 AU distance from the Sun with its inclination at around or greater than 40 degrees. The plan-B aims to study small-scale plasma processes and structures in the solar atmosphere which attract researchers' growing interest, followed by many Hinode discoveries [1], for understanding fully dynamism and magnetic nature of the atmosphere. With plan-B, high-angular-resolution investigation of the entire solar atmosphere (from the photosphere to the corona, including their interface layers, i.e., chromosphere and transition region) is to be performed with enhanced spectroscopic and spectro-polarimetric capability as compared with Hinode, together with enhanced sensitivity towards ultra-violet wavelengths. The orbit of plan-B is either a solar synchronous polar orbit of altitude around 600 km or a geosynchronous orbit to ensure continuous solar observations. After the decision of any one of the two plans, the SOLAR-C will be proposed for launch in mid-2010s. In this paper, we will present a basic design of one of major planned instrumental payload for the plan-B: the Solar Ultra-violet Visible and near IR observing Telescope (hereafter referred to as SUVIT). The basic concept in designing the SUVIT is to utilize as much as possible a heritage of successful telescope of the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard Hinode [2]. Major differences of SUVIT from SOT are the three times larger aperture of 1.5 m, which enables to collect one

  20. Large-scale horizontal flows in the solar photosphere IV. On the vertical structure of large-scale horizontal flows

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švanda, Michal; Klvaňa, Miroslav; Sobotka, Michal; Kosovichev, A.G.; Duvall, T.L.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 4 (2009), s. 429-434 ISSN 1384-1076 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300030808 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : Sun * photospere * interior Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.675, year: 2009

  1. Fisica solare

    CERN Document Server

    Degl’Innocenti, Egidio Landi

    2008-01-01

    Il volume è un'introduzione alla Fisica Solare che si propone lo scopo di illustrare alla persona che intende avvicinarsi a questa disciplina (studenti, dottori di ricerca, ricercatori) i meccanismi fisici che stanno alla base della complessa fenomenologia osservata sulla stella a noi più vicina. Il volume non ha la pretesa di essere esauriente (basta pensare che la fisica solare spazia su un gran numero di discipline, quali la Fisica Nucleare, la Termodinamica, L'Elettrodinamica, la Fisica Atomica e Molecolare, la Spettoscopia in tutte le bande dello spettro elettromagnetico, la Magnetoidrodinamica, la Fisica del Plasma, lo sviluppo di nuova strumentazione, l'Ottica, ecc.). Piuttosto, sono stati scelti un numero di argomenti di rilevanza fondamentale nello studio presente del Sole (soprattutto nei riguardi delle osservazioni da terra con grandi telescopi) e su tali argomenti si è cercato di dare una panoramica generale, inclusiva dell'evoluzione storica, senza scendere in soverchi dettagli. Siccome la Fis...

  2. Statistics of convective collapse events in the photosphere and chromosphere observed with the HINODE SOT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, C.E.; de Wijn, A.G.; Centeno, R.; Lites, B.W.; Keller, C.U.

    2010-01-01

    Convective collapse, a theoretically predicted process that intensifies existing weak magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere, was first directly observed in a single event by Nagata et al. (2008) using the high resolution Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) of the Hinode satellite. Using the same space

  3. Statistics of convective collapse events in the photosphere and chromosphere observed with the Hinode SOT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, C.E.; de Wijn, A.G.; Centeno, R.; Lites, B.W.; Keller, C.U.

    2009-01-01

    Convective collapse, a theoretically predicted process that intensifies existing weak magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere, was first directly observed in a single event by Nagata et al. (2008, ApJ, 677, L145) using the high resolution Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) of the Hinode satellite. Using

  4. Solar small-scale magnetoconvection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, R. F.; Nordlund, Å.

    2006-01-01

    Turbulent Compressible Convection; Dynamo Action Driven; Magnetic-Fields; Numerical Simulations; Photospherical; Convection; Flux Separation; Granulation; Equations; Stars; Overshoot......Turbulent Compressible Convection; Dynamo Action Driven; Magnetic-Fields; Numerical Simulations; Photospherical; Convection; Flux Separation; Granulation; Equations; Stars; Overshoot...

  5. Resonant Absorption of Surface Sausage and Surface Kink Modes under Photospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dae Jung; Van Doorsselaere, Tom; Goossens, Marcel

    2017-11-01

    We study the effect of resonant absorption of surface sausage and surface kink modes under photospheric conditions where the slow surface sausage modes undergo resonant damping in the slow continuum and the surface kink modes in the slow and Alfvén continua at the transitional layers. We use recently derived analytical formulas to obtain the damping rate (time). By considering linear density and linear pressure profiles for the transitional layers, we show that resonant absorption in the slow continuum could be an efficient mechanism for the wave damping of the slow surface sausage and slow surface kink modes while the damping rate of the slow surface kink mode in the Alfvén continuum is weak. It is also found that the resonant damping of the fast surface kink mode is much stronger than that of the slow surface kink mode, showing a similar efficiency as under coronal conditions. It is worth noting that the slow body sausage and kink modes can also resonantly damp in the slow continuum for those linear profiles.

  6. Photospheric Emission in the Joint GBM and Konus Prompt Spectra of GRB 120323A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiriec, S.; Gehrels, N.; McEnery, J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Hartmann, D. H.

    2017-01-01

    GRB 120323A is a very intense short gamma-ray burst (GRB) detected simultaneously during its prompt gamma-ray emission phase with the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope and the Konus experiment on board the Wind satellite. GBM and Konus operate in the kiloelectronvolt - megaelectronvolt regime; however, the GBM range is broader toward both the low and the high parts of the gamma-ray spectrum. Analyses of such bright events provide a unique opportunity to check the consistency of the data analysis as well as cross-calibrate the two instruments. We performed time-integrated and coarse time-resolved spectral analysis of GRB 120323A prompt emission. We conclude that the analyses of GBM and Konus data are only consistent when using a double-hump spectral shape for both data sets; in contrast, the single hump of the empirical Band function, traditionally used to fit GRB prompt emission spectra, leads to significant discrepancies between GBM and Konus analysis results. Our two-hump model is a combination of a thermal-like and a non-thermal component. We interpret the first component as a natural manifestation of the jet photospheric emission.

  7. DISTANCE DETERMINATION TO 12 TYPE II SUPERNOVAE USING THE EXPANDING PHOTOSPHERE METHOD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M. I.; Hamuy, Mario; Lira, P.; Maza, J.; Clocchiatti, A.; Phillips, M.; Morrell, N.; Roth, M.; Suntzeff, N. B.; Matheson, T.; Filippenko, A. V.; Foley, R. J.; Leonard, D. C.

    2009-01-01

    We use early-time photometry and spectroscopy of 12 Type II plateau supernovae (SNe IIP) to derive their distances using the expanding photosphere method (EPM). We perform this study using two sets of Type II supernova (SN II) atmosphere models, three filter subsets ({BV}, {BVI}, and {VI}), and two methods for the host-galaxy extinction, which leads to 12 Hubble diagrams. We find that systematic differences in the atmosphere models lead to ∼50% differences in the EPM distances and to a value of H 0 between 52 and 101 km s -1 Mpc -1 . Using the {VI} filter subset we obtain the lowest dispersion in the Hubble diagram, σ μ = 0.32 mag. We also apply the EPM analysis to the well observed SN IIP 1999em. With the {VI} filter subset we derive a distance ranging from 9.3 ± 0.5 Mpc to 13.9 ± 1.4 Mpc depending on the atmosphere model employed.

  8. Theory and Transport of Nearly Incompressible Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence. IV. Solar Coronal Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zank, G. P.; Adhikari, L.; Hunana, P.; Tiwari, S. K.; Moore, R.; Shiota, D.; Bruno, R.; Telloni, D.

    2018-02-01

    A new model describing the transport and evolution of turbulence in the quiet solar corona is presented. In the low plasma beta environment, transverse photospheric convective fluid motions drive predominantly quasi-2D (nonpropagating) turbulence in the mixed-polarity “magnetic carpet,” together with a minority slab (Alfvénic) component. We use a simplified sub-Alfvénic flow velocity profile to solve transport equations describing the evolution and dissipation of turbulence from 1\\hspace{0.5em}{{t}}{{o}} 15 {R}ȯ (including the Alfvén surface). Typical coronal base parameters are used, although one model uses correlation lengths derived observationally by Abramenko et al., and the other assumes values 10 times larger. The model predicts that (1) the majority quasi-2D turbulence evolves from a balanced state at the coronal base to an imbalanced state, with outward fluctuations dominating, at and beyond the Alfvén surface, i.e., inward turbulent fluctuations are dissipated preferentially; (2) the initially imbalanced slab component remains imbalanced throughout the solar corona, being dominated by outwardly propagating Alfvén waves, and wave reflection is weak; (3) quasi-2D turbulence becomes increasingly magnetized, and beyond ∼ 6 {R}ȯ , the kinetic energy is mainly in slab fluctuations; (4) there is no accumulation of inward energy at the Alfvén surface; (5) inertial range quasi-2D rather than slab fluctuations are preferentially dissipated within ∼ 3 {R}ȯ ; and (6) turbulent dissipation of quasi-2D fluctuations is sufficient to heat the corona to temperatures ∼ 2× {10}6 K within 2 {R}ȯ , consistent with observations that suggest that the fast solar wind is accelerated most efficiently between ∼ 2\\hspace{0.5em}{{a}}{{n}}{{d}} 4 {R}ȯ .

  9. A Thermodynamic History of the Solar Constitution — I: The Journey to a Gaseous Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available History has the power to expose the origin and evolution of scientific ideas. How did humanity come to visualize the Sun as a gaseous plasma? Why is its interior thought to contain blackbody radiation? Who were the first people to postulate that the density of the solar body varied greatly with depth? When did mankind first conceive that the solar surface was merely an illusion? What were the foundations of such thoughts? In this regard, a detailed review of the Sun’s thermodynamic history provides both a necessary exposition of the circumstance which accompanied the acceptance of the gaseous mod- els and a sound basis for discussing modern solar theories. It also becomes an invitation to reconsider the phase of the photosphere. As such, in this work, the contributions of Pierre Simon Laplace, Alexander Wilson, William Herschel, Hermann von Helmholtz, Herbert Spencer, Richard Christopher Carrington, John Frederick William Herschel, Father Pietro Angelo Secchi, Herv ́ e August Etienne Albans Faye, Edward Frankland, Joseph Norman Lockyer, Warren de la Rue, Balfour Stewart, Benjamin Loewy, and Gustav Robert Kirchhoff, relative to the evolution of modern stellar models, will be discussed. Six great pillars created a gaseous Sun: 1 Laplace’s Nebular Hypothesis, 2 Helmholtz’ contraction theory of energy production, 3 Andrew’s elucidation of crit- ical temperatures, 4 Kirchhoff’s formulation of his law of thermal emission, 5 Pl ̈ ucker and Hittorf’s discovery of pressure broadening in gases, and 6 the evolution of the stel- lar equations of state. As these are reviewed, this work will venture to highlight not only the genesis of these revolutionary ideas, but also the forces which drove great men to advance a gaseous Sun.

  10. Fundamental (f) oscillations in a magnetically coupled solar interior-atmosphere system - An analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintér, Balázs; Erdélyi, R.

    2018-01-01

    Solar fundamental (f) acoustic mode oscillations are investigated analytically in a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. The model consists of three layers in planar geometry, representing the solar interior, the magnetic atmosphere, and a transitional layer sandwiched between them. Since we focus on the fundamental mode here, we assume the plasma is incompressible. A horizontal, canopy-like, magnetic field is introduced to the atmosphere, in which degenerated slow MHD waves can exist. The global (f-mode) oscillations can couple to local atmospheric Alfvén waves, resulting, e.g., in a frequency shift of the oscillations. The dispersion relation of the global oscillation mode is derived, and is solved analytically for the thin-transitional layer approximation and for the weak-field approximation. Analytical formulae are also provided for the frequency shifts due to the presence of a thin transitional layer and a weak atmospheric magnetic field. The analytical results generally indicate that, compared to the fundamental value (ω =√{ gk }), the mode frequency is reduced by the presence of an atmosphere by a few per cent. A thin transitional layer reduces the eigen-frequencies further by about an additional hundred microhertz. Finally, a weak atmospheric magnetic field can slightly, by a few percent, increase the frequency of the eigen-mode. Stronger magnetic fields, however, can increase the f-mode frequency by even up to ten per cent, which cannot be seen in observed data. The presence of a magnetic atmosphere in the three-layer model also introduces non-permitted propagation windows in the frequency spectrum; here, f-mode oscillations cannot exist with certain values of the harmonic degree. The eigen-frequencies can be sensitive to the background physical parameters, such as an atmospheric density scale-height or the rate of the plasma density drop at the photosphere. Such information, if ever observed with high-resolution instrumentation and inverted, could help to

  11. Motions of Supergranular Structures on the Solar Surface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švanda, Michal; Klvaňa, Miroslav; Sobotka, Michal

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 1 (2005), s. 39-48 ISSN 0351-2657. [Hvar astrophysical colloquium /7./: Solar activity cycle and global phenomena. Hvar, 20.09.2004-24.09.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/04/2129; GA ČR GD205/03/H144; GA AV ČR KSK2043105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : solar photosphere * velocity fields * tidal waves Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  12. Models of the formation of the solar nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassen, P.; Summers, A.

    1983-01-01

    Protostellar cloud collapse and solar nebula formation models indicate that the size of the nebula produced will be larger in terms of both gas centrifugal balance R(CF) and collapse time diffusion length R(V). From this, it can be deduced that low mass nebulas are produced if (R(V)/R(CF))-squared is much greater than unity, while nebulas result for values lower than approximately unity. The total angular momentum value distinguishes most current models of the solar nebula. Analytic expressions for the surface density, nebular mass flux and photospheric temperature distributions during the formation stage are presented for simple modes illustrating and general properties of growing protostellar disks.

  13. Convective blueshifts in the solar atmosphere. I. Absolute measurements with LARS of the spectral lines at 6302 Å

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhner-Böttcher, J.; Schmidt, W.; Stief, F.; Steinmetz, T.; Holzwarth, R.

    2018-03-01

    Context. The solar convection manifests as granulation and intergranulation at the solar surface. In the photosphere, convective motions induce differential Doppler shifts to spectral lines. The observed convective blueshift varies across the solar disk. Aim. We focus on the impact of solar convection on the atmosphere and aim to resolve its velocity stratification in the photosphere. Methods: We performed high-resolution spectroscopic observations of the solar spectrum in the 6302 Å range with the Laser Absolute Reference Spectrograph at the Vacuum Tower Telescope. A laser frequency comb enabled the calibration of the spectra to an absolute wavelength scale with an accuracy of 1 m s-1. We systematically scanned the quiet Sun from the disk center to the limb at ten selected heliocentric positions. The analysis included 99 time sequences of up to 20 min in length. By means of ephemeris and reference corrections, we translated wavelength shifts into absolute line-of-sight velocities. A bisector analysis on the line profiles yielded the shapes and convective shifts of seven photospheric lines. Results: At the disk center, the bisector profiles of the iron lines feature a pronounced C-shape with maximum convective blueshifts of up to -450 m s-1 in the spectral line wings. Toward the solar limb, the bisectors change into a "\\"-shape with a saturation in the line core at a redshift of +100 m s-1. The center-to-limb variation of the line core velocities shows a slight increase in blueshift when departing the disk center for larger heliocentric angles. This increase in blueshift is more pronounced for the magnetically less active meridian than for the equator. Toward the solar limb, the blueshift decreases and can turn into a redshift. In general, weaker lines exhibit stronger blueshifts. Conclusions: Best spectroscopic measurements enabled the accurate determination of absolute convective shifts in the solar photosphere. We convolved the results to lower spectral

  14. PROPERTIES OF UMBRAL DOTS AS MEASURED FROM THE NEW SOLAR TELESCOPE DATA AND MHD SIMULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilcik, A.; Yurchyshyn, V. B.; Abramenko, V.; Goode, P. R.; Cao, W.; Rempel, M.; Kitai, R.; Watanabe, H.

    2012-01-01

    We studied bright umbral dots (UDs) detected in a moderate size sunspot and compared their statistical properties to recent MHD models. The study is based on high-resolution data recorded by the New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory and three-dimensional (3D) MHD simulations of sunspots. Observed UDs, living longer than 150 s, were detected and tracked in a 46 minute long data set, using an automatic detection code. A total of 1553 (620) UDs were detected in the photospheric (low chromospheric) data. Our main findings are (1) none of the analyzed UDs is precisely circular, (2) the diameter-intensity relationship only holds in bright umbral areas, and (3) UD velocities are inversely related to their lifetime. While nearly all photospheric UDs can be identified in the low chromospheric images, some small closely spaced UDs appear in the low chromosphere as a single cluster. Slow-moving and long-living UDs seem to exist in both the low chromosphere and photosphere, while fast-moving and short-living UDs are mainly detected in the photospheric images. Comparison to the 3D MHD simulations showed that both types of UDs display, on average, very similar statistical characteristics. However, (1) the average number of observed UDs per unit area is smaller than that of the model UDs, and (2) on average, the diameter of model UDs is slightly larger than that of observed ones.

  15. Magnetic swirls and associated fast magnetoacoustic kink waves in a solar chromospheric flux tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawski, K.; Kayshap, P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Pascoe, D. J.; Jelínek, P.; Kuźma, B.; Fedun, V.

    2018-02-01

    We perform numerical simulations of impulsively generated magnetic swirls in an isolated flux tube that is rooted in the solar photosphere. These swirls are triggered by an initial pulse in a horizontal component of the velocity. The initial pulse is launched either (a) centrally, within the localized magnetic flux tube or (b) off-central, in the ambient medium. The evolution and dynamics of the flux tube are described by three-dimensional, ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations. These equations are numerically solved to reveal that in case (a) dipole-like swirls associated with the fast magnetoacoustic kink and m = 1 Alfvén waves are generated. In case (b), the fast magnetoacoustic kink and m = 0 Alfvén modes are excited. In both these cases, the excited fast magnetoacoustic kink and Alfvén waves consist of a similar flow pattern and magnetic shells are also generated with clockwise and counter-clockwise rotating plasma within them, which can be the proxy of dipole-shaped chromospheric swirls. The complex dynamics of vortices and wave perturbations reveals the channelling of sufficient amount of energy to fulfil energy losses in the chromosphere (˜104 W m-1) and in the corona (˜102 W m-1). Some of these numerical findings are reminiscent of signatures in recent observational data.

  16. Solar activity monitoring and forecasting capabilities at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. Gallagher

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The availability of full-disk, high-resolution Ha images from Big Bear Solar Observatory (USA, Kanzelhöhe Solar Observatory (Austria, and Yunnan Astronomical Observatory (China allows for the continual monitoring of solar activity with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. Typically, this Global Ha Network (GHN provides almost uninterrupted Ha images with a cadence of 1 min and an image scale of 1'' per pixel.  Every hour, GHN images are transferred to the web-based BBSO Active Region Monitor (ARM; www.bbso.njit.edu/arm, which includes the most recent EUV, continuum, and magnetogram data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, together with magnetograms from the Global Oscillation Network Group. ARM also includes a variety of active region properties from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Space Environment Center, such as up-to-date active region positions, GOES 5-min X-ray data, and flare identification. Stokes I, V, Q, and U images are available from the recently operational BBSO Digital Vector Magnetograph and the Vector Magnetograph at the Huairou Solar Observing Station of Beijing Observatory. Vector magnetograms provide complete information on the photospheric magnetic field, and allow for magnetic flux gradients, electric currents, and shear forces to be calculated: these measurements are extremely sensitive to conditions resulting in flaring activity. Furthermore, we have developed a Flare Prediction System which estimates the probability for each region to produce C-, M-, or X-class flares based on nearly eight years of NOAA data from cycle 22. This, in addition to BBSO’s daily solar activity reports, has proven a useful resource for activity forecasting.Key words. Solar physics, astronomy and astrophysics (flares and mass ejections; instruments and techniques; photosphere and chromosphere

  17. Solar activity monitoring and forecasting capabilities at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. Gallagher

    Full Text Available The availability of full-disk, high-resolution Ha images from Big Bear Solar Observatory (USA, Kanzelhöhe Solar Observatory (Austria, and Yunnan Astronomical Observatory (China allows for the continual monitoring of solar activity with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. Typically, this Global Ha Network (GHN provides almost uninterrupted Ha images with a cadence of 1 min and an image scale of 1'' per pixel. 

    Every hour, GHN images are transferred to the web-based BBSO Active Region Monitor (ARM; www.bbso.njit.edu/arm, which includes the most recent EUV, continuum, and magnetogram data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, together with magnetograms from the Global Oscillation Network Group. ARM also includes a variety of active region properties from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Space Environment Center, such as up-to-date active region positions, GOES 5-min X-ray data, and flare identification. Stokes I, V, Q, and U images are available from the recently operational BBSO Digital Vector Magnetograph and the Vector Magnetograph at the Huairou Solar Observing Station of Beijing Observatory. Vector magnetograms provide complete information on the photospheric magnetic field, and allow for magnetic flux gradients, electric currents, and shear forces to be calculated: these measurements are extremely sensitive to conditions resulting in flaring activity. Furthermore, we have developed a Flare Prediction System which estimates the probability for each region to produce C-, M-, or X-class flares based on nearly eight years of NOAA data from cycle 22. This, in addition to BBSO’s daily solar activity reports, has proven a useful resource for activity forecasting.

    Key words. Solar physics, astronomy and astrophysics (flares and mass ejections; instruments and techniques

  18. Solar Indices - Solar Irradiance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  19. Solar Indices - Solar Ultraviolet

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  20. Solar Indices - Solar Corona

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  1. Solar Indices - Solar Flares

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  2. Non-Potential Magnetic Fields and Magnetic Reconnection In Low Collisional Plasmas-Discovery of Solar EUV Mini-Sigmoids and Development of Novel In-Space Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesny, David

    Magnetic reconnection is the source of many of the most powerful explosions of astrophysical plasmas in the universe. Blazars, magnetars, stellar atmospheres, and planetary magnetic fields have all been shown to be primary sites of strong reconnection events. For studying the fundamental physics behind this process, the solar atmosphere is our most accessible laboratory setting. Magnetic reconnection resulting from non-potential fields leads to plasma heating and particle acceleration, often in the form of explosive activity, contributing to coronal heating and the solar wind. Large-scale non-potential (sigmoid) fields in the solar atmosphere are poorly understood due to their crowded neighborhoods. For the first time, small-scale, non-potential loop structures have been observed in quiet Sun EUV observations. Fourteen unique mini-sigmoid events and three diffuse non-potential loops have been discovered, suggesting a multi-scaled self-similarity in the sigmoid formation process. These events are on the order of 10 arcseconds in length and do not appear in X-ray emissions, where large-scale sigmoids are well documented. We have discovered the first evidence of sigmoidal structuring in EUV bright point phenomena, which are prolific events in the solar atmosphere. Observations of these mini-sigmoids suggest that they are being formed via tether-cutting reconnection, a process observed to occur at active region scales. Thus, tether-cutting is suggested to be ubiquitous throughout the solar atmosphere. These dynamics are shown to be a function of the free magnetic energy in the quiet Sun network. Recently, the reconnection process has been reproduced in Earth-based laboratory tokamaks. Easily achievable magnetic field configurations can induce reconnection and result in ion acceleration. Here, magnetic reconnection is utilized as the plasma acceleration mechanism for a theoretical propulsion system. The theory of torsional spine reconnection is shown to result in ion

  3. Formation and Initiation of Erupting Flux Rope and Embedded Filament Driven by Photospheric Converging Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Xiaozhou; Gan, Weiqun [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 210008 Nanjing (China); Xia, Chun; Keppens, Rony, E-mail: zhaoxz@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: wqgan@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: chun.xia@kuleuven.be, E-mail: rony.keppens@kuleuven.be [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we study how a flux rope (FR) is formed and evolves into the corresponding structure of a coronal mass ejection (CME) numerically driven by photospheric converging motion. A two-and-a-half-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulation is conducted in a chromosphere-transition-corona setup. The initial arcade-like linear force-free magnetic field is driven by an imposed slow motion converging toward the magnetic inversion line at the bottom boundary. The convergence brings opposite-polarity magnetic flux to the polarity inversion, giving rise to the formation of an FR by magnetic reconnection and eventually to the eruption of a CME. During the FR formation, an embedded prominence gets formed by the levitation of chromospheric material. We confirm that the converging flow is a potential mechanism for the formation of FRs and a possible triggering mechanism for CMEs. We investigate the thermal, dynamical, and magnetic properties of the FR and its embedded prominence by tracking their thermal evolution, analyzing their force balance, and measuring their kinematic quantities. The phase transition from the initiation phase to the acceleration phase of the kinematic evolution of the FR was observed in our simulation. The FR undergoes a series of quasi-static equilibrium states in the initiation phase; while in the acceleration phase the FR is driven by Lorentz force and the impulsive acceleration occurs. The underlying physical reason for the phase transition is the change of the reconnection mechanism from the Sweet–Parker to the unsteady bursty regime of reconnection in the evolving current sheet underneath the FR.

  4. What is the Relationship Between the Properties of Photospheric Flows and Flares?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Brian; Li, Y.; Schuck, P. W.; Fisher, G. H.

    2009-05-01

    We estimated photospheric velocities by separately applying the Fourier Local Correlation Tracking (FLCT) and Differential Affine Velocity Estimator (DAVE) methods to 2708 co-registered pairs of SOHO/MDI magnetograms, with nominal 96-minute cadence, from 46 active regions (ARs) from 1996-1998 over the time interval κ45 when each AR was within 45° of disk center. For each magnetogram pair, we computed the average estimated radial magnetic field, BR and each tracking method produced an independently estimated flow field, u. We then quantitatively characterized these magnetic and flow fields by computing several extrinsic and intrinsic properties of each; extrinsic properties scale with AR size, while intrinsic properties do not depend directly on AR size. Intrinsic flow properties included moments of speeds, horizontal divergences, and radial curls; extrinsic flow properties included included sums of these properties, and a crude proxy for the ideal Poynting flux, ∑ |u| BR2. Several quantities derived from BR were also computed, including: total unsigned flux, Φ a measure of the amount of unsigned flux near strong-field polarity inversion lines (SPILs), R and ∑ BR2. Next, using correlation and discriminant analysis, we investigated the associations between derived properties and average flare flux determined from the GOES flare catalog, when averaged over both κ45 and shorter time windows, of 6 and 24 hours. Our AR sample included both flaring and flare-quiet ARs; the latter did not flare above GOES C1.0 level during κ45. Among magnetic properties, we found R to be most strongly associated with flare flux. Among extrinsic flow properties, the proxy Poynting flux, ∑ |u| BR2, was most strongly associated with flux, at a level comparable to that of R. All intrinsic flow properties studied were more poorly associated with flare flux than these magnetic properties.

  5. HARD X-RAY EMISSION DURING FLARES AND PHOTOSPHERIC FIELD CHANGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtseva, O.; Petrie, G. J. D.; Pevtsov, A. A.; Martínez-Oliveros, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    We study the correlation between abrupt permanent changes of magnetic field during X-class flares observed by the Global Oscillation Network Group and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instruments, and the hard X-ray (HXR) emission observed by RHESSI, to relate the photospheric field changes to the coronal restructuring and investigate the origin of the field changes. We find that spatially the early RHESSI emission corresponds well to locations of the strong field changes. The field changes occur predominantly in the regions of strong magnetic field near the polarity inversion line (PIL). The later RHESSI emission does not correspond to significant field changes as the flare footpoints are moving away from the PIL. Most of the field changes start before or around the start time of the detectable HXR signal, and they end at about the same time or later than the detectable HXR flare emission. Some of the field changes propagate with speed close to that of the HXR footpoint at a later phase of the flare. The propagation of the field changes often takes place after the strongest peak in the HXR signal when the footpoints start moving away from the PIL, i.e., the field changes follow the same trajectory as the HXR footpoint, but at an earlier time. Thus, the field changes and HXR emission are spatio-temporally related but not co-spatial nor simultaneous. We also find that in the strongest X-class flares the amplitudes of the field changes peak a few minutes earlier than the peak of the HXR signal. We briefly discuss this observed time delay in terms of the formation of current sheets during eruptions

  6. Magnetic fields in proton solar flare of X17.2/4B class according to data of simultaneous measurements in a few spectral lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozitsky, V.; Lozitska, N.

    2017-06-01

    Spectral-polarized magnetic field measurements in solar flare of 28 October 2003 of X17.2/4B class are compared in six FeI lines and in Hα line. Observations were carried out on Echelle spectrograph of horizontal solar telescope of Astronomical Observatory of Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv. Presented data relate to peak phase of flare and a place of photosphere outside sunspots where effective (average) magnetic field in FeI 6302.5 line was about 100 G and had S polarity. Measured splitting of emissive peaks in cores of strong FeI lines of 15th multiplet correspond to stronger fields, in range 550-700 G and S polarity too. Noticeablre splitting of emissive peaks (11-20 mÅ) were found also in Fe I 5434.527 line with effective Lande factor geff = -0.014. Value of this splitting and its sign indicate the existence of extremely strong fields of 25-50 kG of opposite (N) polarity which had negative Doppler velocities (lifting of plasma) on level of 1.7-2.2 km/sec. Magnetic field according to Hα line was 300 G and N polarity. Presented results indicate the essential inhomogeneity of magnetic field in flare volume which include the opposite polarities along the line of sight and wide range of effective magnetic fields.

  7. Abundance analysis of neodymium in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkawy, Ali G. A.; Shaltout, Abdelrazek M. K.; Beheary, M. M.; Bakry, A.

    2017-10-01

    Based on non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) calculations, the solar neodymium (Nd) content was found based on a model atom of singly ionized neodymium (Nd II) containing 153 energy levels and 42 line transitions plus the ground state of Nd III. Here, we re-derive the solar Nd abundance using the model of the solar photosphere of Holweger & Müller.We succeed in selecting a good sample line list, relying on 20 Nd II solar lines together with the most accurate transition probabilities measured experimentally and available observational data. With damping parameters obtained from the literature, we find a mean NLTE solar photospheric Nd abundance of log ɛNd(1D) = 1.43 ± 0.16, which is in excellent agreement with the meteoritic value (log ɛNd = 1.45 ± 0.02). For a set of selected Nd II lines, the NLTE abundance correction is found to be +0.01 dex compared with the standard LTE effect. The influence of collisional interactions with electrons and neutral hydrogen atoms is investigated in detail.

  8. Improved Cr II log(gf)s and Cr Abundances in the Photospheres of the Sun and Metal-Poor Star HD 84937

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James E.; Sneden, Chris; Nave, Gillian; Den Hartog, Elizabeth; Emrahoglu, Nuri; Cowan, John J.

    2017-01-01

    New laser induced fluorescence (LIF) data for eight levels of singly ionized chromium (Cr) and emission branching fraction (BF) measurements for 183 lines of the second spectrum of chromium (Cr II) are reported. A goal of this study is to reconcile Solar and stellar Cr abundance values based on Cr I and Cr II lines. Analyses of eighteen spectra from three Fourier Transform Spectrometers supplemented with ultraviolet spectra from a high resolution echelle spectrometer yield the BF measurements. Radiative lifetimes from LIF measurements are used to convert the BFs to absolute transition probabilities. These new laboratory data are applied to determine the Cr abundance log eps in the Sun and metal-poor star HD 84937. The mean result in the Sun is = 5.624 ± 0.009 compared to = 5.644 ± 0.006 on a scale with the H abundance log eps(H) = 12. Similarily the photosphere of HD 84937 is found to be in Saha balance with = 3.417 ± 0.006 and 0 eV) > = 3.374 ± 0.011 for this dwarf star. The resonance (E.P. = 0 eV) lines of Cr I reveal overionization of the ground level of neutral Cr. We find a correlation of Cr with the iron-peak element Ti, suggesting an associated or related nucleosynthetic production. Four iron-peak elements (Cr along with Ti, V and Sc) appear to have a similar (or correlated) production history - other iron-peak elements appear not to be associated with Cr.This work is supported in part by NASA grant NNX16AE96G (J.E.L.), by NSF grant AST-1516182 (J.E.L. & E.D.H.), by NASA interagency agreement NNH10AN381 (G.N.), and NSF grant AST-1211585 (C.S.). Postdoctoral research support for N. E. is from the Technological and Scientific Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK).

  9. Solar Magnetic Phenomena Proceedings of the 3rd Summerschool and Workshop held at the Solar Observatory Kanzelhöhe, Kärnten, Austria, August 25 — September 5, 2003

    CERN Document Server

    Hanslmeier, Arnold; Messerotti, Mauro

    2005-01-01

    The book contains lecture papers and contributed papers on different aspects of magnetic phenomena in the solar atmosphere. The main topics addressed are the physics of solar flares, prominences, coronal mass ejections, magnetic helicity, high-energy radiation from the Sun, observations of the photosphere and chromosphere as well as highlights from the SOHO mission. The lecture papers provide a very valuable introduction and overview on recent developments in these fields of solar physics. The comprehensive lists of references at the end of each review enable the interested reader to go into more detail. The book is particularly useful for graduate students and young researchers working in solar physics.

  10. Reconstruction of solar UV irradiance since 1974

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S. K.; Wenzler, T.; Podlipnik, B.

    2009-09-01

    Variations of the solar UV irradiance are an important driver of chemical and physical processes in the Earth's upper atmosphere and may also influence global climate. Here we reconstruct solar UV irradiance in the range 115-400 nm over the period 1974-2007 by making use of the recently developed empirical extension of the Spectral And Total Irradiance Reconstruction (SATIRE) models employing Solar Ultraviolet Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SUSIM) data. The evolution of the solar photospheric magnetic flux, which is a central input to the model, is described by the magnetograms and continuum images recorded at the Kitt Peak National Solar Observatory between 1974 and 2003 and by the Michelson Doppler Imager instrument on SOHO since 1996. The reconstruction extends the available observational record by 1.5 solar cycles. The reconstructed Ly-α irradiance agrees well with the composite time series by Woods et al. (2000). The amplitude of the irradiance variations grows with decreasing wavelength and in the wavelength regions of special interest for studies of the Earth's climate (Ly-α and oxygen absorption continuum and bands between 130 and 350 nm) is 1-2 orders of magnitude stronger than in the visible or if integrated over all wavelengths (total solar irradiance).

  11. Spatiotemporal organization of energy release events in the quiet solar corona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uritsky, Vadim M. [Catholic University of America at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Davila, Joseph M., E-mail: vadim.uritsky@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Using data from the STEREO and SOHO spacecraft, we show that temporal organization of energy release events in the quiet solar corona is close to random, in contrast to the clustered behavior of flaring times in solar active regions. The locations of the quiet-Sun events follow the meso- and supergranulation pattern of the underling photosphere. Together with earlier reports of the scale-free event size statistics, our findings suggest that quiet solar regions responsible for bulk coronal heating operate in a driven self-organized critical state, possibly involving long-range Alfvénic interactions.

  12. Magnetospheric plasma waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shawhan, S.D.

    1977-01-01

    A brief history of plasma wave observations in the Earth's magnetosphere is recounted and a classification of the identified plasma wave phenomena is presented. The existence of plasma waves is discussed in terms of the characteristic frequencies of the plasma, the energetic particle populations and the proposed generation mechanisms. Examples are given for which plasmas waves have provided information about the plasma parameters and particle characteristics once a reasonable theory has been developed. Observational evidence and arguments by analogy to the observed Earth plasma wave processes are used to identify plasma waves that may be significant in other planetary magnetospheres. The similarities between the observed characteristics of the terrestrial kilometric radiation and radio bursts from Jupiter, Saturn and possibly Uranus are stressed. Important scientific problems concerning plasma wave processes in the solar system and beyond are identified and discussed. Models for solar flares, flare star radio outbursts and pulsars include elements which are also common to the models for magnetospheric radio bursts. Finally, a listing of the research and development in terms of instruments, missions, laboratory experiments, theory and computer simulations needed to make meaningful progress on the outstanding scientific problems of plasma wave research is given. (Auth.)

  13. On the possibility for laboratory simulation of generation of Alfvén disturbances in magnetic tubes in the solar atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokopov P.A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with generation of Alfvén plasma disturbances in magnetic flux tubes through exploding laser plasma in magnetized background plasma. Processes with similar effect of excitation of torsion-type waves seem to provide energy transfer from the solar photosphere to the corona. The studies were carried out at experimental stand KI-1 representing a high-vacuum chamber 1.2 m in diameter, 5 m in length, external magnetic field up to 500 G along the chamber axis, and up to 2·10–6 Torr pressure in operating mode. Laser plasma was produced when focusing the CO2 laser pulse on a flat polyethylene target, and then the laser plasma propagated in θ-pinch background hydrogen (or helium plasma. As a result, the magnetic flux tube 15–20 cm in radius was experimentally simulated along the chamber axis and the external magnetic field direction. Also, the plasma density distribution in the tube was measured. Alfvén wave propagation along the magnetic field was registered from disturbance of the magnetic field transverse component Bφ and field-aligned current Jz. The disturbances propagate at a near-Alfvén velocity 70–90 km/s and they are of left-hand circular polarization of the transverse component of magnetic field. Presumably, the Alfvén wave is generated by the magnetic laminar mechanism of collisionless interaction between laser plasma cloud and background. A right-hand polarized high-frequency whistler predictor was registered which propagated before the Alfvén wave at a velocity of 300 km/s. The polarization direction changed with the Alfvén wave coming. Features of a slow magnetosonic wave as a sudden change in background plasma concentration along with simultaneous displacement of the external magnetic field were found. The disturbance propagates at ~20–30 km/s velocity, which is close to that of ion sound at low plasma beta value. From preliminary estimates, the disturbance transfers about 10 % of the original energy of

  14. Fibre structure of decametric type II radio bursts as a manifestation of emission propagation effects in a disturbed near-solar plasma

    OpenAIRE

    A. N. Afanasiev

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the fine structure of solar decametric type II radio bursts in the form of drifting narrowband fibres on the dynamic spectrum. Observations show that this structure appears in those events where there is a coronal mass ejection (CME) traveling in the near-solar space ahead of the shock wave responsible for the radio burst. The diversity in observed morphology of fibres and values of their parameters implies that the fibres may be caused by different formation mechanisms. ...

  15. The Period Ratio for Standing Kink and Sausage Modes in Solar Structures with Siphon Flow. I. Magnetized Slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Chen, Yanjun

    2013-04-01

    In the applications of solar magneto-seismology, the ratio of the period of the fundamental mode to twice the period of its first overtone, P 1/2P 2, plays an important role. We examine how field-aligned flows affect the dispersion properties, and hence the period ratios, of standing modes supported by magnetic slabs in the solar atmosphere. We numerically solve the dispersion relations and devise a graphic means to construct standing modes. For coronal slabs, we find that the flow effects are significant for the fast kink and sausage modes alike. For the kink ones, they may reduce P 1/2P 2 by up to 23% compared with the static case, and the minimum allowed P 1/2P 2 can fall below the lower limit analytically derived for static slabs. For the sausage modes, while introducing the flow reduces P 1/2P 2 by typically case, it significantly increases the threshold aspect ratio only above which standing sausage modes can be supported, meaning that their detectability is restricted to even wider slabs. In the case of photospheric slabs, the flow effect is not as strong. However, standing modes are distinct from the coronal case in that standing kink modes show a P 1/2P 2 that deviates from unity even for a zero-width slab, while standing sausage modes no longer suffer from a threshold aspect ratio. We conclude that transverse structuring in plasma density and flow speed should be considered in seismological applications of multiple periodicities to solar atmospheric structures.

  16. Solar building

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Luxin

    2014-01-01

    In my thesis I describe the utilization of solar energy and solar energy with building integration. In introduction it is also mentioned how the solar building works, trying to make more people understand and accept the solar building. The thesis introduces different types of solar heat collectors. I compared the difference two operation modes of solar water heating system and created examples of solar water system selection. I also introduced other solar building applications. It is conv...

  17. Plasma state. The universe's fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, Th.

    2004-01-01

    The plasma is the fourth state of matter, obtained at a very high temperature by the separation of the electrons from their nuclei. Plasma represents 99% of the visible mass of our present day universe and was the unique state of matter at its very beginning. Plasmas are present in the core of stars and in the interstellar environment. More closer to us, they are responsible of spectacular phenomena, like aurora borealis, lightning, comet queues etc.. This book makes a review of the different types of plasmas (electromagnetic, Earth's plasmas, spatial plasmas, solar plasmas, astrophysical plasmas). One chapter presents the thermonuclear fusion as future energy source. Another one treats of the chaos and turbulence inside plasmas. Some applications of plasmas are reviewed: MHD and ionic propulsion systems, MHD energy conversion and MHD generators, thermo-ionic converters, solid-state plasmas, particle accelerators, coherent radiation sources, 'Zeta' machines, X-ray lasers, isotopic separation, non-neutral plasmas and charged beams, free-electrons lasers, electrons and positrons plasmas, industrial applications (etching and cleaning, manufacturing of solar cells, flat screens, industrial reactors, waste treatment, cold plasma-assisted sterilization, effluents decontamination etc.). A last chapter makes an overview of the modern research in plasma physics. (J.S.)

  18. Solar energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter discusses the role solar energy may have in the energy future of the US. The topics discussed in the chapter include the solar resource, solar architecture including passive solar design and solar collectors, solar-thermal concentrating systems including parabolic troughs and dishes and central receivers, photovoltaic cells including photovoltaic systems for home use, and environmental, health and safety issues

  19. A study of solar magnetic fields below the surface, at the surface, and in the solar atmosphere - understanding the cause of major solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintzoglou, Georgios

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fields govern all aspects of solar activity from the 11-year solar cycle to the most energetic events in the solar system, such as solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). As seen on the surface of the sun, this activity emanates from localized concentrations of magnetic fields emerging sporadically from the solar interior. These locations are called solar Active Regions (ARs). However, the fundamental processes regarding the origin, emergence and evolution of solar magnetic fields as well as the generation of solar activity are largely unknown or remain controversial. In this dissertation, multiple important issues regarding solar magnetism and activities are addressed, based on advanced observations obtained by AIA and HMI instruments aboard the SDO spacecraft. First, this work investigates the formation of coronal magnetic flux ropes (MFRs), structures associated with major solar activity such as CMEs. In the past, several theories have been proposed to explain the cause of this major activity, which can be categorized in two contrasting groups (a) the MFR is formed in the eruption, and (b) the MFR pre-exists the eruption. This remains a topic of heated debate in modern solar physics. This dissertation provides a complete treatment of the role of MFRs from their genesis all the way to their eruption and even destruction. The study has uncovered the pre-existence of two weakly twisted MFRs, which formed during confined flaring 12 hours before their associated CMEs. Thus, it provides unambiguous evidence for MFRs truly existing before the CME eruptions, resolving the pre-existing MFR controversy. Second, this dissertation addresses the 3-D magnetic structure of complex emerging ARs. In ARs the photospheric fields might show all aspects of complexity, from simple bipolar regions to extremely complex multi-polar surface magnetic distributions. In this thesis, we introduce a novel technique to infer the subphotospheric configuration of emerging

  20. SPECTRO-POLARIMETRIC SIMULATIONS OF THE SOLAR LIMB: ABSORPTION-EMISSION Fe I 6301.5 Å AND 6302.5 Å LINE PROFILES AND TORSIONAL FLOWS IN THE INTERGRANULAR MAGNETIC FLUX CONCENTRATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelyag, S. [School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2015-03-01

    Using radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the magnetized solar photosphere and detailed spectro-polarimetric diagnostics with the Fe I 6301.5 Å and 6302.5 Å photospheric lines in the local thermodynamic equilibrium approximation, we model active solar granulation as if it was observed at the solar limb. We analyze general properties of the radiation across the solar limb, such as the continuum and the line core limb darkening and the granulation contrast. We demonstrate the presence of profiles with both emission and absorption features at the simulated solar limb, and pure emission profiles above the limb. These profiles are associated with the regions of strong linear polarization of the emergent radiation, indicating the influence of the intergranular magnetic fields on the line formation. We analyze physical origins of the emission wings in the Stokes profiles at the limb, and demonstrate that these features are produced by localized heating and torsional motions in the intergranular magnetic flux concentrations.

  1. New solar telescope in Big Bear: evidence for super-diffusivity and small-scale solar dynamos?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goode, Philip R; Abramenko, Valentyna; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    2012-01-01

    The 1.6 m clear aperture New Solar Telescope (NST) in Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) is now providing the highest resolution solar data ever. These data have revealed surprises about the Sun on small-scales including the observation that bright points (BPs), which can be used as proxies for the intense, compact magnetic elements that are apparent in photospheric intergranular lanes. The BPs are ever more numerous on ever smaller spatial scales as though there were no limit to how small the BPs can be. Here we discuss high resolution NST data on BPs that provide support for the ideas that a turbulent regime of super-diffusivity dominates in the quiet Sun, and there are local dynamos operating near the solar surface. (comment)

  2. COMPARING CORONAL AND HELIOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELDS OVER SEVERAL SOLAR CYCLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskela, J. S.; Virtanen, I. I.; Mursula, K., E-mail: jennimari.koskela@oulu.fi [University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FI-90014 Oulu (Finland)

    2017-01-20

    Here we use the PFSS model and photospheric data from Wilcox Solar Observatory, SOHO /MDI, SDO/HMI, and SOLIS to compare the coronal field with heliospheric magnetic field measured at 1 au, compiled in the NASA/NSSDC OMNI 2 data set. We calculate their mutual polarity match and the power of the radial decay, p , of the radial field using different source surface distances and different number of harmonic multipoles. We find the average polarity match of 82% for the declining phase, 78%–79% for maxima, 76%–78% for the ascending phase, and 74%–76% for minima. On an average, the source surface of 3.25 R{sub S} gives the best polarity match. We also find strong evidence for solar cycle variation of the optimal source surface distance, with highest values (3.3 R{sub S}) during solar minima and lowest values (2.6 R{sub S}–2.7 R{sub S}) during the other three solar cycle phases. Raising the number of harmonic terms beyond 2 rarely improves the polarity match, showing that the structure of the HMF at 1 au is most of the time rather simple. All four data sets yield fairly similar polarity matches. Thus, polarity comparison is not affected by photospheric field scaling, unlike comparisons of the field intensity.

  3. Physics of partially ionized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Krishan, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Plasma is one of the four fundamental states of matter; the other three being solid, liquid and gas. Several components, such as molecular clouds, diffuse interstellar gas, the solar atmosphere, the Earth's ionosphere and laboratory plasmas, including fusion plasmas, constitute the partially ionized plasmas. This book discusses different aspects of partially ionized plasmas including multi-fluid description, equilibrium and types of waves. The discussion goes on to cover the reionization phase of the universe, along with a brief description of high discharge plasmas, tokomak plasmas and laser plasmas. Various elastic and inelastic collisions amongst the three particle species are also presented. In addition, the author demonstrates the novelty of partially ionized plasmas using many examples; for instance, in partially ionized plasma the magnetic induction is subjected to the ambipolar diffusion and the Hall effect, as well as the usual resistive dissipation. Also included is an observation of kinematic dynam...

  4. Variations in Solar Parameters and Cosmic Rays with Solar Magnetic Polarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, S. [Department of Earth Science Education, Chonnam National University, Gwangju, 61186 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Y., E-mail: suyeonoh@jnu.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy, Space Science and Geology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 34134 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-01

    The sunspot number varies with the 11-year Schwabe cycle, and the solar magnetic polarity reverses every 11 years approximately at the solar maximum. Because of polarity reversal, the difference between odd and even solar cycles is seen in solar activity. In this study, we create the mean solar cycle expressed by phase using the monthly sunspot number for all solar cycles 1–23. We also generate the mean solar cycle for sunspot area, solar radio flux, and cosmic ray flux within the allowance of observational range. The mean solar cycle has one large peak at solar maximum for odd solar cycles and two small peaks for most even solar cycles. The odd and even solar cycles have the statistical difference in value and shape at a confidence level of at least 98%. For solar cycles 19–23, the second peak in the even solar cycle is larger than the first peak. This result is consistent with the frequent solar events during the declining phase after the solar maximum. The difference between odd and even solar cycles can be explained by a combined model of polarity reversal and solar rotation. In the positive/negative polarity, the polar magnetic field introduces angular momentum in the same/opposite direction as/to the solar rotation. Thus the addition/subtraction of angular momentum can increase/decrease the motion of plasma to support the formation of sunspots. Since the polarity reverses at the solar maximum, the opposite phenomenon occurs in the declining phase.

  5. The type IIP supernova 2012aw in M95: Hydrodynamical modeling of the photospheric phase from accurate spectrophotometric monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dall'Ora, M.; Botticella, M. T.; Della Valle, M.; Pumo, M. L.; Zampieri, L.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.; Benetti, S.; Pignata, G.; Bufano, F.; Bayless, A. J.; Pritchard, T. A.; Taubenberger, S.; Benitez, S.; Kotak, R.; Inserra, C.; Fraser, M.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Haislip, J. B.; Harutyunyan, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present an extensive optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic campaign of the Type IIP supernova SN 2012aw. The data set densely covers the evolution of SN 2012aw shortly after the explosion through the end of the photospheric phase, with two additional photometric observations collected during the nebular phase, to fit the radioactive tail and estimate the 56 Ni mass. Also included in our analysis is the previously published Swift UV data, therefore providing a complete view of the ultraviolet-optical-infrared evolution of the photospheric phase. On the basis of our data set, we estimate all the relevant physical parameters of SN 2012aw with our radiation-hydrodynamics code: envelope mass M env ∼ 20 M ☉ , progenitor radius R ∼ 3 × 10 13 cm (∼430 R ☉ ), explosion energy E ∼ 1.5 foe, and initial 56 Ni mass ∼0.06 M ☉ . These mass and radius values are reasonably well supported by independent evolutionary models of the progenitor, and may suggest a progenitor mass higher than the observational limit of 16.5 ± 1.5 M ☉ of the Type IIP events.

  6. The type IIP supernova 2012aw in M95: Hydrodynamical modeling of the photospheric phase from accurate spectrophotometric monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall' Ora, M.; Botticella, M. T.; Della Valle, M. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Napoli (Italy); Pumo, M. L.; Zampieri, L.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.; Benetti, S. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Pignata, G.; Bufano, F. [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Bayless, A. J. [Southwest Research Institute, Department of Space Science, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States); Pritchard, T. A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Penn State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Taubenberger, S.; Benitez, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Kotak, R.; Inserra, C.; Fraser, M. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Elias-Rosa, N. [Institut de Ciències de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC) Campus UAB, Torre C5, Za plata, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Haislip, J. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 120 E. Cameron Ave., Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Harutyunyan, A. [Fundación Galileo Galilei - Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, Rambla José Ana Fernández Pérez 7, E-38712 Breña Baja, TF - Spain (Spain); and others

    2014-06-01

    We present an extensive optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic campaign of the Type IIP supernova SN 2012aw. The data set densely covers the evolution of SN 2012aw shortly after the explosion through the end of the photospheric phase, with two additional photometric observations collected during the nebular phase, to fit the radioactive tail and estimate the {sup 56}Ni mass. Also included in our analysis is the previously published Swift UV data, therefore providing a complete view of the ultraviolet-optical-infrared evolution of the photospheric phase. On the basis of our data set, we estimate all the relevant physical parameters of SN 2012aw with our radiation-hydrodynamics code: envelope mass M {sub env} ∼ 20 M {sub ☉}, progenitor radius R ∼ 3 × 10{sup 13} cm (∼430 R {sub ☉}), explosion energy E ∼ 1.5 foe, and initial {sup 56}Ni mass ∼0.06 M {sub ☉}. These mass and radius values are reasonably well supported by independent evolutionary models of the progenitor, and may suggest a progenitor mass higher than the observational limit of 16.5 ± 1.5 M {sub ☉} of the Type IIP events.

  7. Prompt Neutrino Emission of Gamma-ray Bursts in the Dissipative Photospheric Scenario Revisited: Possible Contributions from Cocoons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Di; Dai, Zi-Gao [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Mészáros, Peter, E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.cn [Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics, Department of Physics, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2017-07-01

    High-energy neutrinos are expected to originate from different stages in a gamma-ray burst (GRB) event. In this work, we revisit the dissipative photospheric scenario, in which the GRB prompt emission is produced around the photospheric radius. Meanwhile, possible dissipation mechanisms (e.g., internal shocks or magnetic reconnection) could accelerate cosmic-rays (CRs) to ultra-high energies and then produce neutrinos via hadronuclear and photohadronic processes, which are referred to as prompt neutrinos . In this paper, we obtain the prompt neutrino spectrum of a single GRB within a self-consistent analytical framework, in which the jet-cocoon structure and possible collimation effects are included. We investigate a possible neutrino signal from the cocoon, which has been ignored in the previous studies. We show that if a GRB event happens at a distance of the order of Mpc, there is a great chance to observe the neutrino emission from the cocoon by IceCube, which is even more promising than jet neutrinos, as the opening angle of the cocoon is much larger. We also determine the diffuse neutrino flux of GRB cocoons and find that it could be comparable with that of the jets. Our results are consistent with the latest result reported by the IceCube collaboration that no significant correlation between neutrino events and observed GRBs is seen in the new data.

  8. Samba Solar; Samba Solar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurston, Charles W.

    2012-07-01

    Brazil, the biggest country of the South American subcontinent, has discovered the power of solar energy. Brazil recently introduced net metering of solar power plants and started to open the power supply grid to PV systems. The market has great potential as Brazil is the world's sixth biggest national economy.

  9. Magnetic Nulls and Super-radial Expansion in the Solar Corona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, Sarah E.; Dalmasse, Kevin; Tomczyk, Steven; Toma, Giuliana de; Burkepile, Joan; Galloy, Michael [National Center for Atmospheric Research, 3080 Center Green Drive, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Rachmeler, Laurel A. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35811 (United States); Rosa, Marc L. De, E-mail: sgibson@ucar.edu [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street B/252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2017-05-10

    Magnetic fields in the Sun’s outer atmosphere—the corona—control both solar-wind acceleration and the dynamics of solar eruptions. We present the first clear observational evidence of coronal magnetic nulls in off-limb linearly polarized observations of pseudostreamers, taken by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) telescope. These nulls represent regions where magnetic reconnection is likely to act as a catalyst for solar activity. CoMP linear-polarization observations also provide an independent, coronal proxy for magnetic expansion into the solar wind, a quantity often used to parameterize and predict the solar wind speed at Earth. We introduce a new method for explicitly calculating expansion factors from CoMP coronal linear-polarization observations, which does not require photospheric extrapolations. We conclude that linearly polarized light is a powerful new diagnostic of critical coronal magnetic topologies and the expanding magnetic flux tubes that channel the solar wind.

  10. Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    weather were associated with huge ejections of plasma from the solar corona, which took the form of magnetic clouds when moved from the Sun. It is the collisions of the magnetic clouds with the Earth's magnetosphere that lead to ...

  11. On the Properties of Slow MHD Sausage Waves within Small-scale Photospheric Magnetic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freij, N.; Dorotovič, I.; Morton, R. J.; Ruderman, M. S.; Karlovský, V.; Erdélyi, R.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of magnetoacoustic waves in magnetic structures in the solar atmosphere is well-documented. Applying the technique of solar magneto-seismology (SMS) allows us to infer the background properties of these structures. Here, we aim to identify properties of the observed magnetoacoustic waves and study the background properties of magnetic structures within the lower solar atmosphere. Using the Dutch Open Telescope and Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instruments, we captured two series of high-resolution intensity images with short cadences of two isolated magnetic pores. Combining wavelet analysis and empirical mode decomposition (EMD), we determined characteristic periods within the cross-sectional (I.e., area) and intensity time series. Then, by applying the theory of linear magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), we identified the mode of these oscillations within the MHD framework. Several oscillations have been detected within these two magnetic pores. Their periods range from 3 to 20 minutes. Combining wavelet analysis and EMD enables us to confidently find the phase difference between the area and intensity oscillations. From these observed features, we concluded that the detected oscillations can be classified as slow sausage MHD waves. Furthermore, we determined several key properties of these oscillations such as the radial velocity perturbation, the magnetic field perturbation, and the vertical wavenumber using SMS. The estimated range of the related wavenumbers reveals that these oscillations are trapped within these magnetic structures. Our results suggest that the detected oscillations are standing harmonics, and this allows us to estimate the expansion factor of the waveguides by employing SMS. The calculated expansion factor ranges from 4 to 12.

  12. What is a plasma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intrator, Thomas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-30

    This introduction will define the plasma fourth state of matter, where we find plasmas on earth and beyond, and why they are useful. There are applications to many consumer items, fusion energy, scientific devices, satellite communications, semiconductor processing, spacecraft propulsion, and more. Since 99% of our observable universe is ionized gas, plasma physics determines many important features of astrophysics, space physics, and magnetosphere physics in our solar system. We describe some plasma characteristics, examples in nature, some useful applications, how to create plasmas. A brief introduction to the theoretical framework includes the connection between kinetic and fluid descriptions, quasi neutrality, Debye shielding, ambipolar electric fields, some plasma waves. Hands-on demonstrations follow. More complete explanations will follow next week.

  13. High power, very broadband microwave radiation from the interaction of a relativistic electron beam with plasmas in the low magnetic field regime, with application to the Type III solar burst phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, K.G.

    1983-01-01

    Prodigious quantities of microwave energy are observed uniformly across a very wide frequency band when a relativistic electron beam penetrates a plasma. Typically 20 MW total in the calibrated range is measured and estimate as high as 350 MW total in the full observational range for Δf approx. = 100 GHz. An intense, annular, pulsed REB (1 approx. = 128 kA; r approx. = 3 cm; Δr approx. = 1 cm; 50 ns FWHM; γ approx. = 3) through an unmagnetized or weakly magnetized plasma column (n/sub plasma/ approx. = 10 13 cm -3 ). A 0.01 less than or equal to (n/sub beam)/(n/plasma) less than or equal to 2 is used, the higher values of this range being an unconsidered region for most previous theoretical and experimental efforts. For these high (n/sub b)/(n/sub p) values, the observed emission with >> Vertical Barsub p/ and weak harmonic structure is wholly unanticipated from Langmuir scattering or soliton collapse models. A model of Compton-like boosting by the beam electrons of ambient plasma waves, with the collateral emission of high frequency photons, qualitatively explains this observed spectra. Power emerges largely in an angle approx. =I/γ, as required by Compton mechanisms. As n/sub b//n/sub p/ falls, Vertical Barsub p/ - 2Vertical Barsub p/ structure and harmonic power ratios consistent with soliton collapse theories are observed. With further reduction of (n/sub b/)/(n sub p/) only the Vertical Barsub p/ line persists. Thus a transition has been observed in spectral behavior from the weak to strong turbulence theories advocated for Type III solar burst radiation, and further into a regime characterized as super-strong REB-plasma interactions. The presence of radiation is observed for < approx. = Vertical Barsub p/ after the beam is off, and this ''afterglow'' radiation is interpreted as due to the scattering of short wavelength Langmuir waves which are the parametric decay products of beam-excited, long-wavelength Langmuir waves

  14. Plasma Heating and Alfvénic Turbulence Enhancement During Two Steps of Energy Conversion in Magnetic Reconnection Exhaust Region of Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiansen, He; Xingyu, Zhu; Yajie, Chen; Chadi, Salem; Michael, Stevens; Hui, Li; Wenzhi, Ruan; Lei, Zhang; Chuanyi, Tu

    2018-04-01

    The magnetic reconnection exhaust is a pivotal region with enormous magnetic energy being continuously released and converted. The physical processes of energy conversion involved are so complicated that an all-round understanding based on in situ measurements is still lacking. We present the evidence of plasma heating by illustrating the broadening of proton and electron velocity distributions, which are extended mainly along the magnetic field, in an exhaust of interchange reconnection between two interplanetary magnetic flux tubes of the same polarity on the Sun. The exhaust is asymmetric across an interface, with both sides being bounded by a pair of compound discontinuities consisting of rotational discontinuity and slow shock. The energized plasmas are found to be firehose unstable, and responsible for the emanation of Alfvén waves during the second step of energy conversion. It is realized that the energy conversion in the exhaust can be a two-step process involving both plasma energization and wave emission.

  15. The role of the zonal E×B plasma drift in the low-latitude ionosphere at high solar activity near equinox from a new three-dimensional theoretical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pavlov

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available A new three-dimensional, time-dependent theoretical model of the Earth's low and middle latitude ionosphere and plasmasphere has been developed, to take into account the effects of the zonal E×B plasma drift on the electron and ion number densities and temperatures, where E and B are the electric and geomagnetic fields, respectively. The model calculates the number densities of O+(4S, H+, NO+, O2+, N2+, O+(2D, O+(2P, O+(4P, and O+(2P* ions, the electron density, the electron and ion temperatures using a combination of the Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches and an eccentric tilted dipole approximation for the geomagnetic field. The F2-layer peak density, NmF2, and peak altitude, hmF2, which were observed by 16 ionospheric sounders during the 12–13 April 1958 geomagnetically quiet time high solar activity period are compared with those from the model simulation. The reasonable agreement between the measured and modeled NmF2 and hmF2 requires the modified equatorial meridional E×B plasma drift given by the Scherliess and Fejer (1999 model and the modified NRLMSISE-00 atomic oxygen density. In agreement with the generally accepted assumption, the changes in NmF2 due to the zonal E×B plasma drift are found to be inessential by day, and the influence of the zonal E×B plasma drift on NmF2 and hmF2 is found to be negligible above about 25° and below about –26° geomagnetic latitude, by day and by night. Contrary to common belief, it is shown, for the first time, that the model, which does not take into account the zonal E×B plasma drift, underestimates night-time NmF2 up to the maximum factor of 2.3 at low geomagnetic latitudes, and this plasma transport in geomagnetic longitude is found to be important in the calculations of NmF2 and hmF2 by night from about –20° to about 20° geomagnetic latitude. The longitude dependence of the night-time low-latitude influence of the zonal E×B plasma drift on NmF2, which is found for the first time, is

  16. News and Views: Kleopatra a pile of rubble, shedding moons; Did plasma flow falter to stretch solar minimum? Amateurs hit 20 million variable-star observations; Climate maths; Planetary priorities; New roles in BGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Metallic asteroid 216 Kleopatra is shaped like a dog's bone and has two tiny moons - which came from the asteroid itself - according to a team of astronomers from France and the US, who also measured its surprisingly low density and concluded that it is a collection of rubble. The recent solar minimum was longer and lower than expected, with a low polar field and an unusually large number of days with no sunspots visible. Models of the magnetic field and plasma flow within the Sun suggest that fast, then slow meridional flow could account for this pattern. Variable stars are a significant scientific target for amateur astronomers. The American Association of Variable Star Observers runs the world's largest database of variable star observations, from volunteers, and reached 20 million observations in February.

  17. More than a solar cycle of synoptic solar and coronal data - a video presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeksema, J.T.; Scherrer, P.H.; Herant, M.; Title, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Color video movies of synoptic observations of the sun and corona can now be created. Individual analog frames on laser disks can be referenced digitally and played back at any speed. We have brought together photospheric magnetic field data from the Wilcox Solar Observatory at Stanford and the National Solar Observatory, model computations of the coronal magnetic field, and coronal data from the Sacramento Peak coronagraph and the Mauna Loa K-coronameter and made a series of movies presenting the data sets individually and in comparison with one another. This paper presents a description of each of the data sets and movies developed thus far and briefly outlines some of the more interesting and obvious features observed when viewing the movies

  18. More than a solar cycle of synoptic solar and coronal data - A video presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeksema, J. T.; Scherrer, P. H.; Herant, M.; Title, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Color video movies of synoptic observations of the sun and corona can now be created. Individual analog frames on laser disks can be referenced digitally and played back at any speed. We have brought together photospheric magnetic field data from the Wilcox Solar Observatory at Stanford and the National Solar Observatory, model computations of the coronal magnetic field, and coronal data from the Sacramento Peak coronagraph and the Mauna Loa K-coronameter and made a series of movies presenting the data sets individually and in comparison with one another. This paper presents a description of each of the data sets and movies developed thus far and briefly outlines some of the more interesting and obvious features observed when viewing the movies.

  19. On the origin of the changes in the opto-electrical properties of boron-doped zinc oxide films after plasma surface treatment for thin-film silicon solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Anh Huy Tuan; Kim, Youngkuk; Lee, Youn-Jung; Hussain, Shahzada Qamar; Nguyen, Cam Phu Thi; Lee, Jaehyung; Yi, Junsin

    2018-03-01

    The modification of the steep and sharp valleys on the surface of the boron-doped zinc oxide (BZO) front electrodes by plasma surface treatment is a critical process for avoiding a significant reduction in the electrical performance of thin-film silicon solar cells. In this work, we report the origin of the changes in the electrical and optical properties of the BZO films that occur after this process. On the basis of an analysis of the chemical states, we found an improvement of the carrier concentration along with the treatment time that was mainly due to an increase of the oxygen vacancy. This indicated a deficiency of the oxygen in the BZO films under argon-ion bombardment. The red-shift of the A1 longitudinal optical mode frequency in the Raman spectra that was attributed to the existence of vacancy point defects within the films also strengthened this argument. The significant reduction of the haze ratio as well as the appearance of interference peaks on the transmittance spectra as the treatment time was increased were mainly due to the smoothing of the film surface, which indicated a degradation of the light-scattering capability of the BZO films. We also observed a gain of the visible-region transmittance that was attributed to the decrease of the thickness of the BZO films after the plasma surface treatment, instead of the crystallinity improvement. On the basis of our findings, we have proposed a further design rule of the BZO front electrodes for thin-film silicon solar cell applications.

  20. Solar Features - Solar Flares

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A solar flare is a short-lived sudden increase in the intensity of radiation emitted in the neighborhood of sunspots. For many years it was best monitored in the...

  1. Giant quiescent solar filament observed with high-resolution spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuckein, C.; Verma, M.; Denker, C.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: An extremely large filament was studied in various layers of the solar atmosphere. The inferred physical parameters and the morphological aspects are compared with smaller quiescent filaments. Methods: A giant quiet-Sun filament was observed with the high-resolution Echelle spectrograph at the Vacuum Tower Telescope at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain, on 2011 November 15. A mosaic of spectra (ten maps of 100″ × 182″) was recorded simultaneously in the chromospheric absorption lines Hα and Na I D2. Physical parameters of the filament plasma were derived using cloud model (CM) inversions and line core fits. The spectra were complemented with full-disk filtergrams (He I λ10830 Å, Hα, and Ca II K) of the Chromospheric Telescope (ChroTel) and full-disk magnetograms of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). Results: The filament had extremely large linear dimensions (~817 arcsec), which corresponds to about 658 Mm along a great circle on the solar surface. A total amount of 175119 Hα contrast profiles were inverted using the CM approach. The inferred mean line-of-sight (LOS) velocity, Doppler width, and source function were similar to previous works of smaller quiescent filaments. However, the derived optical thickness was higher. LOS velocity trends inferred from the Hα line core fits were in accord but weaker than those obtained with CM inversions. Signatures of counter-streaming flows were detected in the filament. The largest brightening conglomerates in the line core of Na I D2 coincided well with small-scale magnetic fields as seen by HMI. Mixed magnetic polarities were detected close to the ends of barbs. The computation of photospheric horizontal flows based on HMI magnetograms revealed flow kernels with a size of 5-8 Mm and velocities of 0.30-0.45 km s-1 at the ends of the filament. Conclusions: The physical properties of extremely large filaments are similar to their smaller counterparts, except for the optical thickness, which in

  2. Solar Cookers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Richard C.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the use of solar cookers in the science classroom. Includes instructions for construction of a solar cooker, an explanation of how solar cookers work, and a number of suggested activities. (DS)

  3. On the Incidence of Wise Infrared Excess Among Solar Analog, Twin, and Sibling Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Costa, A. D.; Martins, B. L. Canto; Lima Jr, J. E.; Silva, D. Freire da; Medeiros, J. R. De [Departamento de Física Teórica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Campus Universitário, Natal, RN, 59072-970 (Brazil); Leão, I. C. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Freitas, D. B. de, E-mail: dgerson@fisica.ufrn.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Caixa Postal 6030, Campus do Pici, 60455-900, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil)

    2017-03-01

    This study presents a search for infrared (IR) excess in the 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 μ m bands in a sample of 216 targets, composed of solar sibling, twin, and analog stars observed by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer ( WISE ) mission. In general, an IR excess suggests the existence of warm dust around a star. We detected 12 μ m and/or 22 μ m excesses at the 3 σ level of confidence in five solar analog stars, corresponding to a frequency of 4.1% of the entire sample of solar analogs analyzed, and in one out of 29 solar sibling candidates, confirming previous studies. The estimation of the dust properties shows that the sources with IR excesses possess circumstellar material with temperatures that, within the uncertainties, are similar to that of the material found in the asteroid belt in our solar system. No photospheric flux excess was identified at the W1 (3.4 μ m) and W2 (4.6 μ m) WISE bands, indicating that, in the majority of stars of the present sample, no detectable dust is generated. Interestingly, among