WorldWideScience

Sample records for solar flare observations

  1. Millimeter Observation of Solar Flares with Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, D. F.; Valio, A. B. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present the investigation of two solar flares on February 17 and May 13, 2013, studied in radio from 5 to 405 GHz (RSTN, POEMAS, SST), and in X-rays up to 300 keV (FERMI and RHESSI). The objective of this work is to study the evolution and energy distribution of the population of accelerated electrons and the magnetic field configuration. For this we constructed and fit the radio spectrum by a gyro synchrotron model. The optically thin spectral indices from radio observations were compared to that of the hard X-rays, showing that the radio spectral index is harder than the latter by 2. These flares also presented 10-15 % circular polarized emission at 45 and 90 GHz that suggests that the sources are located at different legs of an asymmetric loop.

  2. Solar flare loops observations and interpretations

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Guangli; Ji, Haisheng; Ning, Zongjun

    2018-01-01

    This book provides results of analysis of typical solar events, statistical analysis, the diagnostics of energetic electrons and magnetic field, as well as the global behavior of solar flaring loops such as their contraction and expansion. It pays particular attention to analyzing solar flare loops with microwave, hard X-ray, optical and EUV emissions, as well as the theories of their radiation, and electron acceleration/transport. The results concerning influence of the pitch-angle anisotropy of non-thermal electrons on their microwave and hard X-ray emissions, new spectral behaviors in X-ray and microwave bands, and results related to the contraction of flaring loops, are widely discussed in the literature of solar physics. The book is useful for graduate students and researchers in solar and space physics.

  3. Solar and stellar flare observations using WATCH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels; Rao, A. R.

    1988-01-01

    The Danish experiment WATCH (Wide Angle Telescope for Cosmic Hard X-rays) is to be flown on board the Soviet satellite GRANAT in middle of 1989. The performance characteristics of the WATCH instrument is described. It is estimated that WATCH can detect about 100 solar hard X-ray bursts per day....... WATCH can also detect about 40 energetic stellar soft X-ray flares, similar to the fast transient X-ray emissions detected by the Ariel V satellite....

  4. Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Because the Earth resides in the atmosphere of our nearest stellar neighbor, events occurring on the Sun's surface directly affect us by interfering with satellite operations and communications, astronaut safety, and, in extreme circumstances, power grid stability. Solar flares, the most energetic events in our solar system, are a substantial source of hazardous space weather affecting our increasingly technology-dependent society. While flares have been observed using ground-based telescopes for over 150 years, modern space-bourne observatories have provided nearly continuous multi-wavelength flare coverage that cannot be obtained from the ground. We can now probe the origins and evolution of flares by tracking particle acceleration, changes in ionized plasma, and the reorganization of magnetic fields. I will walk through our current understanding of why flares occur and how they affect the Earth and also show several examples of these fantastic explosions.

  5. Common SphinX and RHESSI observations of solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrozek, T.; Gburek, S.; Siarkowski, M.; Sylwester, B.; Sylwester, J.; Gryciuk, M.

    The Polish X-ray spectrofotometer SphinX has observed a great number of solar flares in the year 2009 - during the most quiet solar minimum almost over the last 100 years. Hundreds of flares have been recorded due to excellent sensitivity of SphinX's detectors. The Si-PIN diodes are about 100 times more sensitive to X-rays than GOES X-ray Monitors. SphinX detectors were absolutely calibrated on Earth with a use of the BESSY synchrotron. In space observations were made in the range 1.2-15~keV with 480~eV energy resolution. SphinX data overlap with the low-energy end of the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) data. RHESSI detectors are quite old (7 years in 2009), but still sensitive enough to provide us with observations of extremely weak solar flares such as those which occurred in 2009. We have selected a group of flares simultaneously observed by RHESSI and SphinX and performed a spectroscopic analysis of the data. Moreover, we compared the physical parameters of these flares plasma. Preliminary results of the comparison show very good agreement between both instruments.

  6. High energy particle acceleration in solar flares Observational evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chupp, E. L.

    1983-01-01

    The recent gamma ray and neutron observations made by the SMM Gamma Ray Spectrometer are reviewed. The implication these observations hold for understanding particle acceleration in solar flares are discussed. The data require that both electrons and ions must be accelerated together to relativistic energies and interact with matter in a time scale of seconds.

  7. Flare Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benz Arnold O.

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays at 100 MeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, and SOHO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections (CMEs, electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting reconnection of magnetic field lines as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth’s lower ionosphere. While flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions.

  8. Flare Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold O. Benz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays beyond 1 GeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, SOHO, and more recently Hinode and SDO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections, electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting magnetic reconnection as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth’s ionosphere. Flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, but every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions.

  9. Flare Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Arnold O.

    2017-12-01

    Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays beyond 1 GeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, SOHO, and more recently Hinode and SDO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections, electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s) of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting magnetic reconnection as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth's ionosphere. Flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, but every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions.

  10. High-Energy Aspects of Solar Flares: Observations and Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory; Guo, Fan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-07-21

    The paper begins by describing the structure of the Sun, with emphasis on the corona. The Sun is a unique plasma laboratory, which can be probed by Sun-grazing comets, and is the driver of space weather. Energization and particle acceleration mechanisms in solar flares is presented; magnetic reconnection is key is understanding stochastic acceleration mechanisms. Then coupling between kinetic and fluid aspects is taken up; the next step is feedback of atmospheric response to the acceleration process – rapid quenching of acceleration. Future challenges include applications of stochastic acceleration to solar energetic particles (SEPs), Fermi γ-rays observations, fast-mode magnetosonic wave trains in a funnel-shaped wave guide associated with flare pulsations, and the new SMEX mission IRIS (Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph),

  11. Solar flare impulsive phase emission observed with SDO/EVE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Michael B.; Milligan, Ryan O.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Keenan, Francis P., E-mail: mkennedy29@qub.ac.uk [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-10

    Differential emission measures (DEMs) during the impulsive phase of solar flares were constructed using observations from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) and the Markov-Chain Monte Carlo method. Emission lines from ions formed over the temperature range log T{sub e} = 5.8-7.2 allow the evolution of the DEM to be studied over a wide temperature range at 10 s cadence. The technique was applied to several M- and X-class flares, where impulsive phase EUV emission is observable in the disk-integrated EVE spectra from emission lines formed up to 3-4 MK and we use spatially unresolved EVE observations to infer the thermal structure of the emitting region. For the nine events studied, the DEMs exhibited a two-component distribution during the impulsive phase, a low-temperature component with peak temperature of 1-2 MK, and a broad high-temperature component from 7 to 30 MK. A bimodal high-temperature component is also found for several events, with peaks at 8 and 25 MK during the impulsive phase. The origin of the emission was verified using Atmospheric Imaging Assembly images to be the flare ribbons and footpoints, indicating that the constructed DEMs represent the spatially average thermal structure of the chromospheric flare emission during the impulsive phase.

  12. On the Performance of Multi-Instrument Solar Flare Observations During Solar Cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Ryan O.; Ireland, Jack

    2018-02-01

    The current fleet of space-based solar observatories offers us a wealth of opportunities to study solar flares over a range of wavelengths. Significant advances in our understanding of flare physics often come from coordinated observations between multiple instruments. Consequently, considerable efforts have been, and continue to be, made to coordinate observations among instruments ( e.g. through the Max Millennium Program of Solar Flare Research). However, there has been no study to date that quantifies how many flares have been observed by combinations of various instruments. Here we describe a technique that retrospectively searches archival databases for flares jointly observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/ EUV Variability Experiment (EVE - Multiple EUV Grating Spectrograph (MEGS)-A and -B, Hinode/( EUV Imaging Spectrometer, Solar Optical Telescope, and X-Ray Telescope), and Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). Out of the 6953 flares of GOES magnitude C1 or greater that we consider over the 6.5 years after the launch of SDO, 40 have been observed by 6 or more instruments simultaneously. Using each instrument's individual rate of success in observing flares, we show that the numbers of flares co-observed by 3 or more instruments are higher than the number expected under the assumption that the instruments operated independently of one another. In particular, the number of flares observed by larger numbers of instruments is much higher than expected. Our study illustrates that these missions often acted in cooperation, or at least had aligned goals. We also provide details on an interactive widget ( Solar Flare Finder), now available in SSWIDL, which allows a user to search for flaring events that have been observed by a chosen set of instruments. This provides access to a broader range of events in order to answer specific science questions. The difficulty in scheduling coordinated

  13. Solar Flares Observed with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2004-01-01

    Solar flares are impressive examples of explosive energy release in unconfined, magnetized plasma. It is generally believed that the flare energy is derived from the coronal magnetic field. However, we have not been able to establish the specific energy release mechanism(s) or the relative partitioning of the released energy between heating, particle acceleration (electrons and ions), and mass motions. NASA's RHESSI Mission was designed to study the acceleration and evolution of electrons and ions in flares by observing the X-ray and gamma-ray emissions these energetic particles produce. This is accomplished through the combination of high-resolution spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging, including the first images of flares in gamma rays. RHESSI has observed over 12,000 solar flares since its launch on February 5, 2002. I will demonstrate how we use the RHESSI spectra to deduce physical properties of accelerated electrons and hot plasma in flares. Using images to estimate volumes, w e typically find that the total energy in accelerated electrons is comparable to that in the thermal plasma. I will also present flare observations that provide strong support for the presence of magnetic reconnection in a large-scale, vertical current sheet in the solar corona. RHESSI observations such as these are allowing us to probe more deeply into the physics of solar flares.

  14. Hard X-Ray Emission from Partially Occulted Solar Flares: RHESSI Observations in Two Solar Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberger, Frederic; Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Oka, Mitsuo; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Liu, Wei; Petrosian, Vahé; Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Säm

    2017-02-01

    Flares close to the solar limb, where the footpoints are occulted, can reveal the spectrum and structure of the coronal looptop source in X-rays. We aim at studying the properties of the corresponding energetic electrons near their acceleration site, without footpoint contamination. To this end, a statistical study of partially occulted flares observed with Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager is presented here, covering a large part of solar cycles 23 and 24. We perform detailed spectra, imaging, and light curve analyses for 116 flares and include contextual observations from SDO and STEREO when available, providing further insights into flare emission that were previously not accessible. We find that most spectra are fitted well with a thermal component plus a broken power-law, non-thermal component. A thin-target kappa distribution model gives satisfactory fits after the addition of a thermal component. X-ray imaging reveals small spatial separation between the thermal and non-thermal components, except for a few flares with a richer coronal source structure. A comprehensive light curve analysis shows a very good correlation between the derivative of the soft X-ray flux (from GOES) and the hard X-rays for a substantial number of flares, indicative of the Neupert effect. The results confirm that non-thermal particles are accelerated in the corona and estimated timescales support the validity of a thin-target scenario with similar magnitudes of thermal and non-thermal energy fluxes.

  15. Observations of an Eruptive Solar Flare in the Extended EUV Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaton, Daniel B.; Darnel, Jonathan M.

    2018-01-01

    We present observations of a powerful solar eruption, accompanied by an X8.2 solar flare, from NOAA Active Region 12673 on 2017 September 10 by the Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI) on the GOES-16 spacecraft. SUVI is noteworthy for its relatively large field of view, which allows it to image solar phenomena to heights approaching 2 solar radii. These observations include the detection of an apparent current sheet associated with magnetic reconnection in the wake of the eruption, and evidence of an extreme-ultraviolet wave at some of the largest heights ever reported. We discuss the acceleration of the nascent coronal mass ejection to approximately 2000 km s‑1 at about 1.5 solar radii. We compare these observations with models of eruptions and eruption-related phenomena. We also describe the SUVI data and discuss how the scientific community can access SUVI observations of the event.

  16. Solar Flares: Magnetohydrodynamic Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunari Shibata

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the current understanding of solar flares, mainly focused on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD processes responsible for producing a flare. Observations show that flares are one of the most explosive phenomena in the atmosphere of the Sun, releasing a huge amount of energy up to about 10^32 erg on the timescale of hours. Flares involve the heating of plasma, mass ejection, and particle acceleration that generates high-energy particles. The key physical processes for producing a flare are: the emergence of magnetic field from the solar interior to the solar atmosphere (flux emergence, local enhancement of electric current in the corona (formation of a current sheet, and rapid dissipation of electric current (magnetic reconnection that causes shock heating, mass ejection, and particle acceleration. The evolution toward the onset of a flare is rather quasi-static when free energy is accumulated in the form of coronal electric current (field-aligned current, more precisely, while the dissipation of coronal current proceeds rapidly, producing various dynamic events that affect lower atmospheres such as the chromosphere and photosphere. Flares manifest such rapid dissipation of coronal current, and their theoretical modeling has been developed in accordance with observations, in which numerical simulations proved to be a strong tool reproducing the time-dependent, nonlinear evolution of a flare. We review the models proposed to explain the physical mechanism of flares, giving an comprehensive explanation of the key processes mentioned above. We start with basic properties of flares, then go into the details of energy build-up, release and transport in flares where magnetic reconnection works as the central engine to produce a flare.

  17. Solar Features - Solar Flares

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A solar flare is a short-lived sudden increase in the intensity of radiation emitted in the neighborhood of sunspots. For many years it was best monitored in the...

  18. Observation and Interpretation of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms from the December 5, 2006 Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Shih, A. Y.; Stone, E. C.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Labrador, A. W.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss observations of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs) from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection event reported by Mewaldt et al. (2009). The observations were made during the 5 December 2006 X9 solar flare, located at E79, by the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on STEREO A and B. Prior to the arrival of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth, both LETs observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV particles arriving from the Sun. The derived solar emission profile, arrival directions, and energy spectrum all show that the atoms produced by either flare or shock-accelerated protons. RHESSI measurements of the 2.2-MeV gamma-ray line provide an estimate of the number of interacting flare-accelerated protons in this event, which leads to an improved estimate of ENA production by flare-accelerated protons. CME-driven shock acceleration is also considered. Taking into account ENA losses, we conclude that the observed ENAs must have been produced in the high corona at heliocentric distances .2 solar radii.

  19. NuSTAR Hard X-Ray Observation of a Sub-A Class Solar Flare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glesener, Lindsay [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States); Krucker, Säm; Hudson, Hugh [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley (United States); Hannah, Iain G. [SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Grefenstette, Brian W. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena (United States); White, Stephen M. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Albuquerque (United States); Smith, David M.; Marsh, Andrew J. [Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz (United States)

    2017-08-20

    We report a Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array ( NuSTAR ) observation of a solar microflare, SOL2015-09-01T04. Although it was too faint to be observed by the GOES X-ray Sensor, we estimate the event to be an A0.1 class flare in brightness. This microflare, with only ∼5 counts s{sup −1} detector{sup −1} observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager ( RHESSI ), is fainter than any hard X-ray (HXR) flare in the existing literature. The microflare occurred during a solar pointing by the highly sensitive NuSTAR astrophysical observatory, which used its direct focusing optics to produce detailed HXR microflare spectra and images. The microflare exhibits HXR properties commonly observed in larger flares, including a fast rise and more gradual decay, earlier peak time with higher energy, spatial dimensions similar to the RHESSI microflares, and a high-energy excess beyond an isothermal spectral component during the impulsive phase. The microflare is small in emission measure, temperature, and energy, though not in physical size; observations are consistent with an origin via the interaction of at least two magnetic loops. We estimate the increase in thermal energy at the time of the microflare to be 2.4 × 10{sup 27} erg. The observation suggests that flares do indeed scale down to extremely small energies and retain what we customarily think of as “flare-like” properties.

  20. Solar flares observed simultaneously with SphinX, GOES and RHESSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrozek, Tomasz; Gburek, Szymon; Siarkowski, Marek; Sylwester, Barbara; Sylwester, Janusz; Kępa, Anna; Gryciuk, Magdalena

    2013-07-01

    In February 2009, during recent deepest solar minimum, Polish Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) begun observations of the Sun in the energy range of 1.2-15 keV. SphinX was almost 100 times more sensitive than GOES X-ray Sensors. The silicon PIN diode detectors used in the experiment were carefully calibrated on the ground using Synchrotron Radiation Source BESSY II. The SphinX energy range overlaps with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) energy range. The instrument provided us with observations of hundreds of very small flares and X-ray brightenings. We have chosen a group of solar flares observed simultaneously with GOES, SphinX and RHESSI and performed spectroscopic analysis of observations wherever possible. The analysis of thermal part of the spectra showed that SphinX is a very sensitive complementary observatory for RHESSI and GOES.

  1. Analysis and modelling of recurrent solar flares observed with Hinode/EIS on March 9, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, V.; Del Zanna, G.; Valori, G.; Pariat, E.; Mason, H. E.; Dudík, J.; Janvier, M.

    2017-05-01

    Three homologous C-class flares and one last M-class flare were observed by both the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) in the AR 11429 on March 9, 2012. All the recurrent flares occurred within a short interval of time (less than 4 h), showed very similar plasma morphology and were all confined, until the last one when a large-scale eruption occurred. The C-class flares are characterized by the appearance, at approximatively the same locations, of two bright and compact footpoint sources of ≈3-10 MK evaporating plasma, and a semi-circular ribbon. During all the flares, the continuous brightening of a spine-like hot plasma (≈10 MK) structure is also observed. Spectroscopic observations with Hinode/EIS are used to measure and compare the blueshift velocities in the Fe xxiii emission line and the electron number density at the flare footpoints for each flare. Similar velocities, of the order of 150-200 km s-1, are observed during the C2.0 and C4.7 confined flares, in agreement with the values reported by other authors in the study of the last M1.8 class flare. On the other hand, lower electron number densities and temperatures tend to be observed in flares with lower peak soft X-ray flux. In order to investigate the homologous nature of the flares, we performed a non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation of the 3D magnetic field configuration in the corona. The NLFFF extrapolation and the Quasi-Separatrix Layers (QSLs) provide the magnetic field context which explains the location of the kernels, spine-like hot plasma and semi-circular brightenings observed in the (non-eruptive) flares. Given the absence of a coronal null point, we argue that the homologous flares were all generated by the continuous recurrence of bald patch reconnection. The movie associated to Fig. 2 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  2. DARK POST-FLARE LOOPS OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Qiao; Wang, Jing-Song; Zhang, Xiaoxin [Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Center for Space Weather, China Meteorological Administration, Beijing 100081 (China); Feng, Xueshang, E-mail: qsong@nao.cas.cn [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-04-20

    Solar post-flare loops (PFLs) are arcade-like loop systems that appear during the gradual phases of eruptive flares. The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) allow us to investigate the fine structures in PFLs. In this work, we focus on studying the dark post-flare loops (DPFLs) during X-class flares, which are more evident in SDO/AIA data than in previous EUV data. We identify and analyze the DPFLs observed by SDO and find that: (1) the DPFLs of an X5.4 flare have an average lifetime of 10.0  ±  5.5 minutes, an average width of 1022  ±  339 km, and an average maximum length of 33  ±  10 Mm, (2) blob-like falling features with a size close to the resolution of SDO/AIA are identified in the DPFLs and have an average velocity of 76  ±  19 km s{sup −1}, and (3) the average widths of the DPFLs slightly increase with the characteristic temperatures in the AIA 304, 171, 193, and 211 Å channels. Our investigation shows that DPFLs are found in all of the 20 cases within this study, which suggests that they are a common phenomenon in X-class flares and are probably produced by the same mechanism that creates coronal rain.

  3. Evidence for explosive chromospheric evaporation in a solar flare observed with SMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarro, D. M.; Saba, J. L. R.; Strong, K. T.; Canfield, R. C.; Metcalf, T.

    1986-01-01

    SMM soft X-ray data and Sacramento Peak Observatory H-alpha observations are combined in a study of the impulsive phase of a solar flare. A blue asymmetry, indicative of upflow motions, was observed in the coronal Ca XIX line during the soft X-ray rise phase. H-alpha redshifts, indicative of downward motions, were observed simultaneously in bright flare kernels during the period of hard X-ray emission. It is shown that, to within observational errors, the impulsive phase momentum transported by the upflowing soft X-ray plasma is equivalent to that of the downward moving chromospheric material.

  4. PROPERTIES OF CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION AND PLASMA DYNAMICS OF A SOLAR FLARE FROM IRIS OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Dominguez, Santiago Vargas; Kosovichev, Alexander G. [Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States); Sharykin, Ivan N.; Struminsky, Alexei B.; Zimovets, Ivan [Space Research Institute (IKI) of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of hot chromospheric plasma of solar flares is a key to understanding the mechanisms of flare energy release and particle acceleration. A moderate M1.0 class flare of 2014 June 12, (SOL2014-06-12T21:12) was simultaneously observed by NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and other spacecraft, and also by the New Solar Telescope at the BBSO. This paper presents the first part of our investigation focused on analysis of the IRIS data. Our analysis of the IRIS data in different spectral lines reveals a strong redshifted jet-like flow with a speed of ∼100 km s{sup −1} of the chromospheric material before the flare. Strong nonthermal emission of the C ii k 1334.5 Å line, formed in the chromosphere–corona transition region, is observed at the beginning of the impulsive phase in several small (with a size of ∼1″) points. It is also found that the C ii k line is redshifted across the flaring region before, during, and after the impulsive phase. A peak of integrated emission of the hot (1.1 · 10{sup 7} K) plasma in the Fe xxi 1354.1 Å line is detected approximately five minutes after the integrated emission peak of the lower temperature C ii k. A strong blueshift of the Fe xxi line across the flaring region corresponds to evaporation flows of the hot chromospheric plasma with a speed of 50 km s{sup −1}. Additional analysis of the RHESSI data supports the idea that the upper chromospheric dynamics observed by IRIS has features of “gentle” evaporation driven by heating of the solar chromosphere by accelerated electrons and by a heat flux from the flare energy release site.

  5. OBSERVATION OF HEATING BY FLARE-ACCELERATED ELECTRONS IN A SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glesener, Lindsay; Bain, Hazel M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Krucker, Säm [Also at Institute of 4-D Technologies, School of Engineering, University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, 5210 Windisch, Switzerland. (Switzerland); Lin, Robert P., E-mail: glesener@ssl.berkeley.edu [Also at Physics Department, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. (United States)

    2013-12-20

    We report a Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observation of flare-accelerated electrons in the core of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and examine their role in heating the CME. Previous CME observations have revealed remarkably high thermal energies that can far surpass the CME's kinetic energy. A joint observation by RHESSI and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of a partly occulted flare on 2010 November 3 allows us to test the hypothesis that this excess energy is collisionally deposited by flare-accelerated electrons. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images show an ejection forming the CME core and sheath, with isothermal multifilter analysis revealing temperatures of ∼11 MK in the core. RHESSI images reveal a large (∼100 × 50 arcsec{sup 2}) hard X-ray (HXR) source matching the location, shape, and evolution of the EUV plasma, indicating that the emerging CME is filled with flare-accelerated electrons. The time derivative of the EUV emission matches the HXR light curve (similar to the Neupert effect observed in soft and HXR time profiles), directly linking the CME temperature increase with the nonthermal electron energy loss, while HXR spectroscopy demonstrates that the nonthermal electrons contain enough energy to heat the CME. This is the most direct observation to date of flare-accelerated electrons heating a CME, emphasizing the close relationship of the two in solar eruptive events.

  6. Characteristics that Produce White-light Enhancements in Solar Flares Observed by Hinode/SOT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kyoko; Kitagawa, Jun; Masuda, Satoshi

    2017-12-01

    To understand the conditions that produce white-light (WL) enhancements in solar flares, a statistical analysis of visible continuum data as observed by Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) was performed. In this study, approximately 100 flare events from M- and X-class flares were selected. The time period during which the data were recorded spans from 2011 January to 2016 February. Of these events, approximately half are classified as white-light flares (WLFs), whereas the remaining events do not show any enhancements of the visible continuum (non-WLF; NWL). To determine the existence of WL emission, running difference images of not only the Hinode/SOT WL (G-band, blue, green, and red filter) data, but also the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager continuum data are used. A comparison between these two groups of WL data in terms of duration, temperature, emission measure of GOES soft X-rays, distance between EUV flare ribbons, strength of hard X-rays, and photospheric magnetic field strength was undertaken. In this statistical study, WLF events are characterized by a shorter timescale and shorter ribbon distance compared with NWL events. From the scatter plots of the duration of soft X-rays and the energy of non-thermal electrons, a clear distinction between WLF and NWL events can be made. It is found that the precipitation of large amounts of accelerated electrons within a short time period plays a key role in generating WL enhancements. Finally, it was demonstrated that the coronal magnetic field strength in the flare region is one of the most important factors that allow the individual identification of WLF events from NWL events.

  7. A Compressed Sensing-based Image Reconstruction Algorithm for Solar Flare X-Ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Simon; Bolzern, Roman; Battaglia, Marina

    2017-11-01

    One way of imaging X-ray emission from solar flares is to measure Fourier components of the spatial X-ray source distribution. We present a new compressed sensing-based algorithm named VIS_CS, which reconstructs the spatial distribution from such Fourier components. We demonstrate the application of the algorithm on synthetic and observed solar flare X-ray data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager satellite and compare its performance with existing algorithms. VIS_CS produces competitive results with accurate photometry and morphology, without requiring any algorithm- and X-ray-source-specific parameter tuning. Its robustness and performance make this algorithm ideally suited for the generation of quicklook images or large image cubes without user intervention, such as for imaging spectroscopy analysis.

  8. Observations of Reconnection Flows in a Flare on the Solar Disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Juntao; Simões, P. J. A.; Jeffrey, N. L. S.; Fletcher, L.; Wright, P. J.; Hannah, I. G., E-mail: j.wang.4@research.gla.ac.uk [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-20

    Magnetic reconnection is a well-accepted part of the theory of solar eruptive events, though the evidence is still circumstantial. Intrinsic to the reconnection picture of a solar eruptive event, particularly in the standard model for two-ribbon flares (CSHKP model), are an advective flow of magnetized plasma into the reconnection region, expansion of field above the reconnection region as a flux rope erupts, retraction of heated post-reconnection loops, and downflows of cooling plasma along those loops. We report on a unique set of Solar Dynamics Observatory /Atmospheric Imaging Assembly imaging and Hinode /EUV Imaging Spectrometer spectroscopic observations of the disk flare SOL2016-03-23T03:54 in which all four flows are present simultaneously. This includes spectroscopic evidence for a plasma upflow in association with large-scale expanding closed inflow field. The reconnection inflows are symmetric, and consistent with fast reconnection, and the post-reconnection loops show a clear cooling and deceleration as they retract. Observations of coronal reconnection flows are still rare, and most events are observed at the solar limb, obscured by complex foregrounds, making their relationship to the flare ribbons, cusp field, and arcades formed in the lower atmosphere difficult to interpret. The disk location and favorable perspective of this event have removed these ambiguities giving a clear picture of the reconnection dynamics.

  9. Observations of Reconnection Flows in a Flare on the Solar Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juntao; Simões, P. J. A.; Jeffrey, N. L. S.; Fletcher, L.; Wright, P. J.; Hannah, I. G.

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a well-accepted part of the theory of solar eruptive events, though the evidence is still circumstantial. Intrinsic to the reconnection picture of a solar eruptive event, particularly in the standard model for two-ribbon flares (CSHKP model), are an advective flow of magnetized plasma into the reconnection region, expansion of field above the reconnection region as a flux rope erupts, retraction of heated post-reconnection loops, and downflows of cooling plasma along those loops. We report on a unique set of Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly imaging and Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer spectroscopic observations of the disk flare SOL2016-03-23T03:54 in which all four flows are present simultaneously. This includes spectroscopic evidence for a plasma upflow in association with large-scale expanding closed inflow field. The reconnection inflows are symmetric, and consistent with fast reconnection, and the post-reconnection loops show a clear cooling and deceleration as they retract. Observations of coronal reconnection flows are still rare, and most events are observed at the solar limb, obscured by complex foregrounds, making their relationship to the flare ribbons, cusp field, and arcades formed in the lower atmosphere difficult to interpret. The disk location and favorable perspective of this event have removed these ambiguities giving a clear picture of the reconnection dynamics.

  10. Unusual ionospheric effects observed during the intense 28 October 2003 solar flare in the Brazilian sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sahai

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The 28 October 2003 solar flare (X-ray Class X17.2 was one of the most intense solar flares observed in the recent past. In the present investigation we show the unusual ionospheric effects observed in the Brazilian sector during this solar flare, using both the ionospheric sounding observations obtained at the UNIVAP stations: Palmas (7–10.2° S, 48.2° W, dip lat. 5.5° S and Sao Jose dos Campos (23.2° S, 45.9° W, dip lat. 17.6° S, Brazil; and ground-based global positioning system (GPS data obtained at the "Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística" (IBGE stations: Imperatriz (5.5° S, 47.5° W, dip lat. 2.9° S, Brasilia (15.9° S, 47.9° W, dip lat. 11.7° S, Presidente Prudente (22.3° S, 51.4° W, dip lat. 14.9° S, and Porto Alegre (30.1° S, 51.1° W, dip lat. 20.7° S, Brazil; on two consecutive days, viz., 27 (without solar flare and 28 (with solar flare October 2003. It should be mentioned that the vertical total electron content (VTEC from the GPS observations obtained during the solar flare showed an unusual simultaneous increase in the VTEC values at about 11:00 UT at all four stations associated with the solar flare EUV enhancements and lasted for about 3 h. However, no ionograms were obtained at any of the two UNIVAP stations for a period of about 1 h between about 11:00 to 12:00 UT. Before 11:00 UT (from about 10:45 UT and after 12:00 UT (to about 16:00 UT, the ionograms were only partial, with the low frequency end missing. During this intense solar flare, hard X-rays (1 to 10 A, as observed by the GOES 12 satellite, were ejected by the Sun during a long period (several hours, with peak radiation at about 11:10 UT. These hard X-ray radiations can penetrate further into the ionosphere, causing an increase in ionization in the lower part of ionosphere (D-region. In this way, the lack of ionograms or partial ionograms, which indicates no echoes or partial echoes of the transmitted digital ionosonde signals, are

  11. Unusual ionospheric effects observed during the intense 28 October 2003 solar flare in the Brazilian sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sahai

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The 28 October 2003 solar flare (X-ray Class X17.2 was one of the most intense solar flares observed in the recent past. In the present investigation we show the unusual ionospheric effects observed in the Brazilian sector during this solar flare, using both the ionospheric sounding observations obtained at the UNIVAP stations: Palmas (7–10.2° S, 48.2° W, dip lat. 5.5° S and Sao Jose dos Campos (23.2° S, 45.9° W, dip lat. 17.6° S, Brazil; and ground-based global positioning system (GPS data obtained at the "Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística" (IBGE stations: Imperatriz (5.5° S, 47.5° W, dip lat. 2.9° S, Brasilia (15.9° S, 47.9° W, dip lat. 11.7° S, Presidente Prudente (22.3° S, 51.4° W, dip lat. 14.9° S, and Porto Alegre (30.1° S, 51.1° W, dip lat. 20.7° S, Brazil; on two consecutive days, viz., 27 (without solar flare and 28 (with solar flare October 2003. It should be mentioned that the vertical total electron content (VTEC from the GPS observations obtained during the solar flare showed an unusual simultaneous increase in the VTEC values at about 11:00 UT at all four stations associated with the solar flare EUV enhancements and lasted for about 3 h. However, no ionograms were obtained at any of the two UNIVAP stations for a period of about 1 h between about 11:00 to 12:00 UT. Before 11:00 UT (from about 10:45 UT and after 12:00 UT (to about 16:00 UT, the ionograms were only partial, with the low frequency end missing. During this intense solar flare, hard X-rays (1 to 10 A, as observed by the GOES 12 satellite, were ejected by the Sun during a long period (several hours, with peak radiation at about 11:10 UT. These hard X-ray radiations can penetrate further into the ionosphere, causing an increase in ionization in the lower part of ionosphere (D-region. In this way, the lack of ionograms or partial ionograms, which indicates no echoes or partial echoes of the transmitted digital ionosonde signals, are

  12. SOLAR FLARE CHROMOSPHERIC LINE EMISSION: COMPARISON BETWEEN IBIS HIGH-RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS AND RADIATIVE HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Fatima Rubio da; Petrosian, Vahé [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Kleint, Lucia [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Dalda, Alberto Sainz [Stanford-Lockheed Institute for Space Research, Stanford University, HEPL, 466 Via Ortega, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Liu, Wei, E-mail: frubio@stanford.edu [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Solar flares involve impulsive energy release, which results in enhanced radiation over a broad spectral range and a wide range of heights. In particular, line emission from the chromosphere can provide critical diagnostics of plasma heating processes. Thus, a direct comparison between high-resolution spectroscopic observations and advanced numerical modeling results could be extremely valuable, but has not yet been attempted. In this paper, we present such a self-consistent investigation of an M3.0 flare observed by the Dunn Solar Telescope’s Interferometric Bi-dimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) on 2011 September 24 which we have modeled using the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN. We obtained images and spectra of the flaring region with IBIS in Hα 6563 Å and Ca ii 8542 Å, and with RHESSI in X-rays. The latter observations were used to infer the non-thermal electron population, which was passed to RADYN to simulate the atmospheric response to electron collisional heating. We then synthesized spectral lines and compared their shapes and intensities to those observed by IBIS and found a general agreement. In particular, the synthetic Ca ii 8542 Å profile fits well to the observed profile, while the synthetic Hα profile is fainter in the core than for the observation. This indicates that Hα emission is more responsive to the non-thermal electron flux than the Ca ii 8542 Å emission. We suggest that it is necessary to refine the energy input and other processes to resolve this discrepancy.

  13. STEREO Observations of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms during the 5 December 2006 Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Barghouty, A. F.; Labrador, A. W.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms emitted during the X9 solar event of December 5, 2006. Beginning 1 hour following the onset of this E79 flare, the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on both the STEREO A and B spacecraft observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV protons beginning hours before the onset of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth. More than 70% of these particles arrived from a longitude within 10 of the Sun, consistent with the measurement resolution. The derived emission profile at the Sun had onset and peak times remarkably similar to the GOES soft X-ray profile and continued for more than an hour. The observed arrival directions and energy spectrum argue strongly that the particle events less than 5 MeV were due to energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs). To our knowledge, this is the first reported observation of ENA emission from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection. Possible origins for the production of ENAs in a large solar event are considered. We conclude that the observed ENAs were most likely produced in the high corona and that charge-transfer reactions between accelerated protons and partially-stripped coronal ions are an important source of ENAs in solar events.

  14. Thermodynamic Spectrum of Solar Flares Based on SDO/EVE Observations: Techniques and First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuming; Zhou, Zhenjun; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Kai; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong; Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2016-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) provides rich information on the thermodynamic processes of solar activities, particularly on solar flares. Here, we develop a method to construct thermodynamic spectrum (TDS) charts based on the EVE spectral lines. This tool could potentially be useful for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) astronomy to learn about the eruptive activities on distant astronomical objects. Through several cases, we illustrate what we can learn from the TDS charts. Furthermore, we apply the TDS method to 74 flares equal to or greater than the M5.0 class, and reach the following statistical results. First, EUV peaks are always behind the soft X-ray (SXR) peaks and stronger flares tend to have faster cooling rates. There is a power-law correlation between the peak delay times and the cooling rates, suggesting a coherent cooling process of flares from SXR to EUV emissions. Second, there are two distinct temperature drift patterns, called Type I and Type II. For Type I flares, the enhanced emission drifts from high to low temperature like a quadrilateral, whereas for Type II flares the drift pattern looks like a triangle. Statistical analysis suggests that Type II flares are more impulsive than Type I flares. Third, for late-phase flares, the peak intensity ratio of the late phase to the main phase is roughly correlated with the flare class, and the flares with a strong late phase are all confined. We believe that the re-deposition of the energy carried by a flux rope, which unsuccessfully erupts out, into thermal emissions is responsible for the strong late phase found in a confined flare. Furthermore, we show the signatures of the flare thermodynamic process in the chromosphere and transition region in the TDS charts. These results provide new clues to advance our understanding of the thermodynamic processes of solar flares and associated solar eruptions, e.g., coronal mass ejections.

  15. The solar flare myth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Many years of research have demonstrated that large, nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms, shock wave disturbances in the solar wind, and energetic particle events in interplanetary space often occur in close association with large solar flares. This result has led to a pradigm of cause and effect - that large solar flares are the fundamental cause of these events in the near-Earth space environmemt. This paradigm, which I call 'the solar flare myth,' dominates the popular perception of the relationship between solar activity and interplanetary and geomagnetic events and has provided much of the pragmatic rationale for the study of the solar flare phenomenon. Yet there is good evidence that this paradigm is wrong and that flares do not generally play a central role in producing major transient disturbances in the near-Earth space environment. In this paper I outline a different paradigm of cause and effect that removes solar flares from their central position in the chain of events leading from the Sun to near-Earth space. Instead, this central role is given to events known as coronal mass ejections.

  16. Solar Features - Solar Flares - Patrol

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The H-alpha Flare Patrol identifies time periods each day when the sun is being continuously monitored by select ground-based solar observatories.

  17. Electron distribution functions in solar flares from combined X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglia, M. [Institute of 4D Technologies, School of Engineering, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Kontar, E. P., E-mail: marina.battaglia@fhnw.ch [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-20

    Simultaneous solar flare observations with SDO and RHESSI provide spatially resolved information about hot plasma and energetic particles in flares. RHESSI allows the properties of both hot (≳8 MK) thermal plasma and non-thermal electron distributions to be inferred, while SDO/AIA is more sensitive to lower temperatures. We present and implement a new method to reconstruct electron distribution functions from SDO/AIA data. The combined analysis of RHESSI and AIA data allows the electron distribution function to be inferred over the broad energy range from 0.1 keV up to a few tens of keV. The analysis of two well-observed flares suggests that the distributions in general agree to within a factor of three when the RHESSI values are extrapolated into the intermediate range 1-3 keV, with AIA systematically predicting lower electron fluxes. Possible instrumental and numerical effects, as well as potential physical origins for this discrepancy, are discussed. The inferred electron distribution functions in general show one or two nearly Maxwellian components at energies below ∼15 keV and a non-thermal tail above.

  18. THERMODYNAMIC SPECTRUM OF SOLAR FLARES BASED ON SDO/EVE OBSERVATIONS: TECHNIQUES AND FIRST RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuming; Zhou, Zhenjun; Liu, Kai; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, Jie [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, MSN 6A2, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Chamberlin, Phillip C., E-mail: ymwang@ustc.edu.cn [Solar Physics Laboratory, Heliophysics Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) provides rich information on the thermodynamic processes of solar activities, particularly on solar flares. Here, we develop a method to construct thermodynamic spectrum (TDS) charts based on the EVE spectral lines. This tool could potentially be useful for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) astronomy to learn about the eruptive activities on distant astronomical objects. Through several cases, we illustrate what we can learn from the TDS charts. Furthermore, we apply the TDS method to 74 flares equal to or greater than the M5.0 class, and reach the following statistical results. First, EUV peaks are always behind the soft X-ray (SXR) peaks and stronger flares tend to have faster cooling rates. There is a power-law correlation between the peak delay times and the cooling rates, suggesting a coherent cooling process of flares from SXR to EUV emissions. Second, there are two distinct temperature drift patterns, called Type I and Type II. For Type I flares, the enhanced emission drifts from high to low temperature like a quadrilateral, whereas for Type II flares the drift pattern looks like a triangle. Statistical analysis suggests that Type II flares are more impulsive than Type I flares. Third, for late-phase flares, the peak intensity ratio of the late phase to the main phase is roughly correlated with the flare class, and the flares with a strong late phase are all confined. We believe that the re-deposition of the energy carried by a flux rope, which unsuccessfully erupts out, into thermal emissions is responsible for the strong late phase found in a confined flare. Furthermore, we show the signatures of the flare thermodynamic process in the chromosphere and transition region in the TDS charts. These results provide new clues to advance our understanding of the thermodynamic processes of solar flares and associated solar eruptions, e.g., coronal mass ejections.

  19. Extreme-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Observation of Direct Coronal Heating During a C-Class Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    With the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer operating in rapid cadence (9.8 s) stare mode during a C6.6 flare on the solar disk, we observed a sudden brightening of Fe xix line emission (formed at temperature T ˜ 8 MK) above the pre-flare noise without a corresponding brightening of emission from ions formed at lower temperatures, including He i (0.01 MK), Ov (0.25 MK), and Si xii (2 MK). The sudden brightening persisted as a plateau of Fe xix intensity that endured more than 11 minutes. The Fe xix emission at the rise and during the life of the plateau showed no evidence of significant bulk velocity flows, and hence cannot be attributed to chromospheric evaporation. However, the line width showed a significant broadening at the rise of the plateau, corresponding to nonthermal velocities of at least 89 km s-1 due to reconnection outflows or turbulence. During the plateau He i, Ov, and Si xii brightened at successively later times starting about 3.5 minutes after Fe xix, which suggests that these brightenings were produced by thermal conduction from the plasma that produced the Fe xix line emission; however, we cannot rule out the possibility that they were produced by a weak beam of nonthermal particles. We interpret an observed shortening of the Ov wavelength for about 1.5 minutes toward the middle of the plateau to indicate new upward motions driven by the flare, as occurs during gentle chromospheric evaporation; relative to a quiescent interval shortly before the flare, the Ov upward velocity was around -10 km s-1.

  20. IMPULSIVITY PARAMETER FOR SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo-Mendieta, W. G.; Alvarado-Gómez, J. D.; Calvo-Mozo, B. [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá (Colombia); Martinez-Oliveros, J. C., E-mail: wgfajardom@unal.edu.co, E-mail: bcalvom@unal.edu.co, E-mail: oliveros@ssl.berkeley.edu, E-mail: jalvarad@eso.org [Space Sciences Laboratory, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    Three phases are typically observed during solar flares: the preflare, impulsive, and decay phases. During the impulsive phase, it is believed that the electrons and other particles are accelerated after the stored energy in the magnetic field is released by reconnection. The impulsivity of a solar flare is a quantifiable property that shows how quickly this initial energy release occurs. It is measured via the impulsivity parameter, which we define as the inverse of the overall duration of the impulsive phase. We take the latter as the raw width of the most prominent nonthermal emission of the flare. We computed this observable over a work sample of 48 M-class events that occurred during the current Solar Cycle 24 by using three different methods. The first method takes into account all of the nonthermal flare emission and gives very accurate results, while the other two just cover fixed energy intervals (30–40 keV and 25–50 keV) and are useful for fast calculations. We propose an alternative way to classify solar flares according to their impulsivity parameter values, defining three different types of impulsivity, namely, high, medium, and low. This system of classification is independent of the manner used to calculated the impulsivity parameter. Lastly, we show the relevance of this tool as a discriminator of different HXR generation processes.

  1. Solar Indices - Solar Flares

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  2. A novel observational test of momentum balance in a solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Richard C.; Metcalf, Thomas R.; Strong, Keith T.; Zarro, Dominic M.

    1987-01-01

    A unique combination of SMM X-ray spectra and Sacramento Peak Observatory H-alpha imaging spectra has been used, for the first time, to measure and compare momentum values of upflowing and downflowing plasmas during the impulsive phase of a solar flare. The well-known blue asymmetry of X-ray spectral lines, indicative of upflow, was observed in the coronal Ca XIX line. The red asymmetry of H-alpha line profiles, indicative of downflow, was simultaneously observed in bright H-alpha kernels. It is found that, to within observational uncertainty, the momentum transported by the upflowing X-ray plasma was the same as that of the downflowing H-alpha material. Of the several physical mechanisms advanced to explain the observed blue asymmetry of X-ray lines, only explosive chromospheric evaporation predicts oppositely directed momenta of equal magnitude.

  3. The collisional relaxation of electrons in hot flaring plasma and inferring the properties of solar flare accelerated electrons from X-ray observations

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey, N. L. S.; Kontar, E. P.; Emslie, A. G.; Bian, N. H.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray observations are a direct diagnostic of fast electrons produced in solar flares, energized during the energy release process and directed towards the Sun. Since the properties of accelerated electrons can be substantially changed during their transport and interaction with the background plasma, a model must ultimately be applied to X-ray observations in order to understand the mechanism responsible for their acceleration. A cold thick target model is ubiquitously used for this task, si...

  4. Observation of quasi-periodic pulsations in the solar flare SF 900610

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terekhov, O.V.; Shevchenko, A.V.; Kuz'min, A.G.

    2002-01-01

    A quasi-periodic component was found at the maximum of the X-ray light curve for the June 10, 1990 solar flare detected by the Granat observatory. The pulsation period was 143.2 +/- 0.8 s. The intensity of the pulsing component is not constant; the maximum amplitude of the pulsations is similar to5......% of the total flare intensity. An analysis of the data showed the characteristic size of the magnetic loop responsible for these pulsations to be similar to(1-3) x 10(10) cm....

  5. Time Variations of Observed Hα Line Profiles and Precipitation Depths of Nonthermal Electrons in a Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falewicz, Robert; Radziszewski, Krzysztof; Rudawy, Paweł; Berlicki, Arkadiusz

    2017-10-01

    We compare time variations of the Hα and X-ray emissions observed during the pre-impulsive and impulsive phases of the C1.1-class solar flare on 2013 June 21 with those of plasma parameters and synthesized X-ray emission from a 1D hydrodynamic numerical model of the flare. The numerical model was calculated assuming that the external energy is delivered to the flaring loop by nonthermal electrons (NTEs). The Hα spectra and images were obtained using the Multi-channel Subtractive Double Pass spectrograph with a time resolution of 50 ms. The X-ray fluxes and spectra were recorded by RHESSI. Pre-flare geometric and thermodynamic parameters of the model and the delivered energy were estimated using RHESSI data. The time variations of the X-ray light curves in various energy bands and those of the Hα intensities and line profiles were well correlated. The timescales of the observed variations agree with the calculated variations of the plasma parameters in the flaring loop footpoints, reflecting the time variations of the vertical extent of the energy deposition layer. Our result shows that the fast time variations of the Hα emission of the flaring kernels can be explained by momentary changes of the deposited energy flux and the variations of the penetration depths of the NTEs.

  6. The Solar Flare Complex Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheibi, Akbar; Safari, Hossein; Javaherian, Mohsen

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the characteristics of the solar flare complex network. The limited predictability, nonlinearity, and self-organized criticality of the flares allow us to study systems of flares in the field of the complex systems. Both the occurrence time and the location of flares detected from 2006 January 1 to 2016 July 21 are used to design the growing flares network. The solar surface is divided into cells with equal areas. The cells, which include flares, are considered nodes of the network. The related links are equivalent to sympathetic flaring. The extracted features demonstrate that the network of flares follows quantitative measures of complexity. The power-law nature of the connectivity distribution with a degree exponent greater than three reveals that flares form a scale-free and small-world network. A large value for the clustering coefficient, a small characteristic path length, and a slow change of the diameter are all characteristics of the flares network. We show that the degree correlation of the flares network has the characteristics of a disassortative network. About 11% of the large energetic flares (M and X types in GOES classification) that occurred in the network hubs cover 3% of the solar surface.

  7. Hα and Hβ Emission in a C3.3 Solar Flare: Comparison between Observations and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capparelli, Vincenzo; Zuccarello, Francesca; Romano, Paolo; Simões, Paulo J. A.; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Kuridze, David; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Keys, Peter H.; Cauzzi, Gianna; Carlsson, Mats

    2017-11-01

    The hydrogen Balmer series is a basic radiative loss channel from the flaring solar chromosphere. We report here on the analysis of an extremely rare set of simultaneous observations of a solar flare in the {{H}}α and {{H}}β lines, at high spatial and temporal resolutions, that were acquired at the Dunn Solar Telescope. Images of the C3.3 flare (SOL2014-04-22T15:22) made at various wavelengths along the {{H}}α line profile by the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) and in the {{H}}β with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere (ROSA) broadband imager are analyzed to obtain the intensity evolution. The {{H}}α and {{H}}β intensity excesses in three identified flare footpoints are well-correlated in time. We examine the ratio of {{H}}α to {{H}}β flare excess, which was proposed by previous authors as a possible diagnostic of the level of electron-beam energy input. In the stronger footpoints, the typical value of the the {{H}}α /H β intensity ratio observed is ∼0.4–0.5, in broad agreement with values obtained from a RADYN non-LTE simulation driven by an electron beam with parameters constrained (as far as possible) by observation. The weaker footpoint has a larger {{H}}α /H β ratio, again consistent with a RADYN simulation, but with a smaller energy flux. The {{H}}α line profiles observed have a less prominent central reversal than is predicted by the RADYN results, but can be brought into agreement if the {{H}}α -emitting material has a filling factor of around 0.2–0.3.

  8. Multi-instrument observations of sub-minute quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominique, Marie; Zhukov, Andrei; Dolla, Laurent

    2017-08-01

    Since a decade, quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) have been regularly reported to be observed in EUV and SXR during solar flares, while they were previously mostly observed in HXR and radio wavelengths. These new detections can be credited to a new generation of EUV space radiometers (SDO/EVE, PROBA2/LYRA, etc.) that significantly enhanced the instrument performances in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and time resolution. These new instruments allow us to perform statistical analysis of QPPs, which could ultimately help solving the long-debated question of their origin. However, recently, the methods (mainly the way to pre-process data and to account for the noise) used to detect QPPs in those wavelengths were questioned. In this presentation, we will discuss our current understanding of QPPs and the difficulties inherent to their detection. I will particularly address the sub-minute QPPs in the EUV and analyze them in the broader picture of multi-wavelength detection. How do they compare to the pulsations observed in other wavelength ranges? Are sub-minute QPPs and QPPs with longer periods produced by the same processes? What can we learn from the analysis of QPPs? Possible answers to these questions will be presented and discussed.

  9. Solar Flares and the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Solar flares are the biggest explosions in the solar system. They are important both for understanding explosive events in the Universe and for their impact on human technology and communications. The satellite-based HESSI is designed to study the explosive release of energy and the acceleration of electrons, protons, and other charged particles to high energies in solar flares. HESSI produces "color" movies of the Sun in high-energy X rays and gamma rays radiated by these energetic particles. HESSI's X-ray and gamma-ray images of flares are obtained using techniques similar to those used in radio interferometry. Ground-based radio observations of the Sun provide an important complement to the HESSI observations of solar flares. I will describe the HESSI Project and the high-energy aspects of solar flares, and how these relate to radio astronomy techniques and observations.

  10. Fermi LAT observation of quiet gamma-ray emission from the Sun and first solar flares detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giglietto, N., E-mail: nicola.giglietto@ba.infn.it [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica Michelangelo Merlin dell' Universita degli Studi e del Politecnico di Bari, and INFN Sezione di Bari, Via Amendola 173, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Allafort, A. [SLAC (United States); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica Michelangelo Merlin dell' Universita degli Studi e del Politecnico di Bari, and INFN Sezione di Bari, Via Amendola 173, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Longo, F. [University of Trieste and INFN Sezione di Trieste (Italy); Omodei, N. [Stanford University (United States); Takahashi, H. [Hiroshima University (Japan); Tanaka, Y. [ISAS/JAXA (Japan)

    2012-11-11

    We show the latest results of Fermi-LAT observations of the quiescent Sun during the first 18 months of the mission. During this period the solar activity was at its minimum, hence the solar emission induced by cosmic rays was at its maximum. Two emission components are clearly distinguished: the point-like emission from the solar disk due to the cosmic-ray cascades in the solar atmosphere, and the extended emission due to inverse Compton scattering of cosmic ray electrons on solar photons in the heliosphere. We present the entire analysis, showing spectra and angular profiles of both components and discuss the comparison with models and future plans. Finally we report on Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) detection of the first solar flares and discussing the possible emission mechanisms.

  11. Solar Flare Magnetic Fields and Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, George

    2012-01-01

    This volume is devoted to the dynamics and diagnostics of solar magnetic fields and plasmas in the Sun’s atmosphere. Five broad areas of current research in Solar Physics are presented: (1) New techniques for incorporating radiation transfer effects into three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic models of the solar interior and atmosphere, (2) The connection between observed radiation processes occurring during flares and the underlying flare energy release and transport mechanisms, (3) The global balance of forces and momenta that occur during flares, (4) The data-analysis and theoretical tools needed to understand and assimilate vector magnetogram observations and (5) Connecting flare and CME phenomena to the topological properties of the magnetic field in the Solar Atmosphere. The role of the Sun’s magnetic field is a major emphasis of this book, which was inspired by a workshop honoring Richard C. (Dick) Canfield.  Dick has been making profound contributions to these areas of research over a long and pro...

  12. ULTRA-NARROW NEGATIVE FLARE FRONT OBSERVED IN HELIUM-10830 Å USING THE 1.6 m NEW SOLAR TELESCOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yan; Liu, Chang; Jing, Ju; Wang, Haimin [Space Weather Research Lab, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Blvd, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Cao, Wenda; Gary, Dale [Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology 323 Martin Luther King Blvd, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Ding, Mingde [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Kleint, Lucia [Fachhochschule Nordwestschweiz (FHNW), Institute of 4D technologies Bahnhofstr. 6, CH-5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Su, Jiangtao [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Ji, Haisheng [Purple Mountain Observatory, 2 Beijing Xi Lu, Nanjing, 210008 (China); Chae, Jongchul; Cho, Kyuhyoun [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyungsuk [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daedeokdae-ro 776, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-10

    Solar flares are sudden flashes of brightness on the Sun and are often associated with coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles that have adverse effects on the near-Earth environment. By definition, flares are usually referred to as bright features resulting from excess emission. Using the newly commissioned 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory, we show a striking “negative” flare with a narrow but unambiguous “dark” moving front observed in He i 10830 Å, which is as narrow as 340 km and is associated with distinct spectral characteristics in Hα and Mg ii lines. Theoretically, such negative contrast in He i 10830 Å can be produced under special circumstances by nonthermal electron collisions or photoionization followed by recombination. Our discovery, made possible due to unprecedented spatial resolution, confirms the presence of the required plasma conditions and provides unique information in understanding the energy release and radiative transfer in astronomical objects.

  13. Helium (3) Rich Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgate, S. A.; Audouze, J.; Fowler, W. A.

    1977-05-03

    The extreme enrichment of {sup 3} He {sup 4} He greater than or equal to 1 in some solar flares as due to spallation and the subsequent confinement of the products in a high temperature, kT approx. = 200 keV, high density, n{sub e} approx. = 3 x 10{sup 15} cm {sup -3} plasma associated with the magnetic instability producing the flare is interpreted. The pinch or filament is a current of high energy protons that creates the spallation and maintains the temperature that produces the high energy x-ray spectrum and depletes other isotopes D, Li, Be, and B as observed. Finally the high temperature plasma is a uniquely efficient spallation target that is powered by the interaction of stellar convection and self generated magnetic field.

  14. Flare Ribbons Approach Observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun; Hou, Yijun

    2017-10-01

    We report flare ribbons approach (FRA) during a multiple-ribbon M-class flare on 2015 November 4 in NOAA AR 12443, obtained by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The flare consisted of a pair of main ribbons and two pairs of secondary ribbons. The two pairs of secondary ribbons were formed later than the appearance of the main ribbons, with respective time delays of 15 and 19 minutes. The negative-polarity main ribbon spread outward faster than the first secondary ribbon with the same polarity in front of it, and thus the FRA was generated. Just before their encounter, the main ribbon was darkening drastically and its intensity decreased by about 70% in 2 minutes, implying the suppression of main-phase reconnection that produced two main ribbons. The FRA caused the deflection of the main ribbon to the direction of secondary ribbon with a deflection angle of about 60°. A post-approach arcade was formed about 2 minutes later and the downflows were detected along the new arcade with velocities of 35-40 km s-1, indicative of the magnetic restructuring during the process of FRA. We suggest that there are three topological domains with footpoints outlined by the three pairs of ribbons. Close proximity of these domains leads to deflection of the ribbons, which is in agreement with the magnetic field topology.

  15. EVIDENCE OF SIGNIFICANT ENERGY INPUT IN THE LATE PHASE OF A SOLAR FLARE FROM NuSTAR X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhar, Matej; Krucker, Säm [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Bahnhofstrasse 6, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Hannah, Iain G.; Wright, Paul J. [SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Glesener, Lindsay [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota—Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Hudson, Hugh S.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Grefenstette, Brian W.; Harrison, Fiona A. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, 1216 E. California Boulevard, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); White, Stephen M. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Smith, David M.; Marsh, Andrew J. [Physics Department and Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zhang, William W. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2017-01-20

    We present observations of the occulted active region AR 12222 during the third Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray ( NuSTAR ) solar campaign on 2014 December 11, with concurrent Solar Dynamics Observatory ( SDO )/AIA and FOXSI-2 sounding rocket observations. The active region produced a medium-size solar flare 1 day before the observations, at ∼18 UT on 2014 December 10, with the post-flare loops still visible at the time of NuSTAR observations. The time evolution of the source emission in the SDO/ AIA 335 Å channel reveals the characteristics of an extreme-ultraviolet late-phase event, caused by the continuous formation of new post-flare loops that arch higher and higher in the solar corona. The spectral fitting of NuSTAR observations yields an isothermal source, with temperature 3.8–4.6 MK, emission measure (0.3–1.8) × 10{sup 46} cm{sup −3}, and density estimated at (2.5–6.0) × 10{sup 8} cm{sup −3}. The observed AIA fluxes are consistent with the derived NuSTAR temperature range, favoring temperature values in the range of 4.0–4.3 MK. By examining the post-flare loops’ cooling times and energy content, we estimate that at least 12 sets of post-flare loops were formed and subsequently cooled between the onset of the flare and NuSTAR observations, with their total thermal energy content an order of magnitude larger than the energy content at flare peak time. This indicates that the standard approach of using only the flare peak time to derive the total thermal energy content of a flare can lead to a large underestimation of its value.

  16. Evidence of Significant Energy Input in the Late Phase of A Solar Flare from NuSTAR X-Ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhar, Matej; Krucker, Sam; Hannah, Iain G.; Glesener, Lindsay; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Hudson, Hugh S.; White, Stephen M.; Smith, David M.; Marsh, Andrew J.; hide

    2017-01-01

    We present observations of the occulted active region AR 12222 during the third Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) solar campaign on 2014 December 11, with concurrent Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/ AIA and FOXSI-2 sounding rocket observations. The active region produced a medium-size solar flare 1 day before the observations, at approximately 18 UT on 2014 December 10, with the post-flare loops still visible at the time of NuSTAR observations. The time evolution of the source emission in the SDO/AIA 335 Å channel reveals the characteristics of an extreme-ultraviolet late-phase event, caused by the continuous formation of new post-flare loops that arch higher and higher in the solar corona. The spectral fitting of NuSTAR observations yields an isothermal source, with temperature 3.8-4.6 MK, emission measure (0.3-1.8) × 1046 cm-3, and density estimated at (2.5-6.0) × 108 cm-3. The observed AIA fluxes are consistent with the derived NuSTAR temperature range, favoring temperature values in the range of 4.0-4.3 MK. By examining the post-flare loops' cooling times and energy content, we estimate that at least 12 sets of post-flare loops were formed and subsequently cooled between the onset of the flare and NuSTAR observations, with their total thermal energy content an order of magnitude larger than the energy content at flare peak time. This indicates that the standard approach of using only the flare peak time to derive the total thermal energy content of a flare can lead to a large underestimation of its value.

  17. Solar flares as harbinger of new physics

    CERN Document Server

    Zioutas, K; Semertzidis, Y.; Papaevangelou, T.; Georgiopoulou, E.; Gardikiotis, A.; Dafni, T.; Tsagri, M.; Semertzidis, Y.; Papaevangelou, T.; Dafni, T.

    2011-01-01

    This work provides additional evidence on the involvement of exotic particles like axions and/or other WISPs, following recent measurements during the quietest Sun and flaring Sun. Thus, SPHINX mission observed a minimum basal soft X-rays emission in the extreme solar minimum in 2009. The same scenario (with ~17 meV axions) fits also the dynamical behaviour of white-light solar flares, like the measured spectral components in the visible and in soft X-rays, and, the timing between them. Solar chameleons remain a viable candidate, since they may preferentially convert to photons in outer space.

  18. CORONAS-F observation of gamma-ray emission from the solar flare on 2003 October 29

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Victoria G.; Yushkov, Boris Yu.; Galkin, Vladimir I.; Kudela, Karel; Kashapova, Larisa K.

    2017-10-01

    Appreciable hard X-ray (HXR) and gamma-ray emissions in the 0.04-150 MeV energy range associated with the 2003 October 29 solar flare (X10/3B) were observed at 20:38-20:58 UT by the SONG instrument onboard the CORONAS-F mission. To restore flare gamma-ray spectra we fitted the SONG energy loss spectra with a three-component model of the incident spectrum: (1) a power law in energy, assumed to be due to electron bremsstrahlung; (2) a broad continuum produced by prompt nuclear de-excitation gamma-lines; and (3) a broad gamma-line generated from pion-decay. We also restored spectra from the RHESSI data, compared them with the SONG spectra and found a reasonable agreement between these spectra in the 0.1-10 MeV energy range. The pion-decay emission was observed from 20:44:20 UT and had its maximum at 20:48-20:51 UT. The power-law spectral index of accelerated protons estimated from the ratio between intensities of different components of gamma rays changed with time. The hardest spectrum with a power-law index S = -3.5 - 3.6 was observed at 20:48-20:51 UT. Time histories of the pion-decay emission and proton spectrum were compared with changes of the locations of flare energy release as shown by RHESSI hard X-ray images and remote and remote Hα brightenings. An apparent temporal correlation between processes of particle acceleration and restructuring of flare magnetic field was found. In particular, the protons were accelerated to subrelativistic energies after radical change of the character of footpoint motion from a converging motion to a separation motion.

  19. Solar flares increased in 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geomagnetic storms and solar flares occurred more frequently in 1982 (3 years after the solar maximum of the current 11-year sunspot cycle) than is usual for that portion of the cycle. Among the most notable events were two X-12 flares and one X-7 flare. Although less intense, the X-7 flare triggered the most fierce geomagnetic storm in a decade; it distorted the earth's magnetic field, disrupted long-range communications and low-frequency navigational systems, interfered with ham radio activities, and spread a brilliant auroral display over much of the nation.Solar flares are divided into three classes depending on the output of X radiation: the common C class, the moderate M class, and the intensive X class. The numerical designation indicates the level of radiation intensity; an X-12, which is t h e most intense that instruments can measure, is 12 times more intense than an X-1 . An X-1 flare releases 10 times more radiation than an M-1, and 100 times more than a C-1.

  20. Diagnostics of solar flare reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Karlický

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We present new diagnostics of the solar flare reconnection, mainly based on the plasma radio emission. We propose that the high-frequency (600-2000 MHz slowly drifting pulsating structures map the flare magnetic field reconnection. These structures correspond to the radio emission from plasmoids which are formed in the extended current sheet due to tearing and coalescence processes. An increase of the frequency drift of the drifting structures is interpreted as an increase of the reconnection rate. Using this model, time scales of slowly drifting pulsating structure observed during the 12 April 2001 flare by the Trieste radiopolarimeter with high time resolution (1 ms are interpreted as a radio manifestation of electron beams accelerated in the multi-scale reconnection process. For short periods Fourier spectra of the observed structure have a power-law form with power-law indices in the 1.3-1.6 range. For comparison the 2-D MHD numerical modeling of the multi-scale reconnection is made and it is shown that Fourier spectrum of the reconnection dissipation power has also a power-law form, but with power-law index 2. Furthermore, we compute a time evolution of plasma parameters (density, magnetic field etc in the 2-D MHD model of the reconnection. Then assuming a plasma radio emission from locations, where the 'double-resonance' instability generates the upper-hybrid waves due to unstable distribution function of suprathermal electrons, we model radio spectra. Effects of the MHD turbulence are included. The resulting spectra are compared with those observed. It is found, that depending on model parameters the lace bursts and the decimetric spikes can be reproduced. Thus, it is shown that the model can be used for diagnostics of the flare reconnection process. We also point out possible radio signatures of reconnection outflow termination shocks. They are detected as type II-like herringbone structures in the 200-700 MHz frequency range. Finally

  1. Solar flares as proxy for the young Sun: satellite observed thermosphere response to an X17.2 flare of Earth's upper atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krauss

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the measured thermospheric response of an extreme solar X17.2 flare that irradiated the Earth's upper atmosphere during the so-called Halloween events in late October/early November 2003. We suggest that such events can serve as proxies for the intense electromagnetic and corpuscular radiation environment of the Sun or other stars during their early phases of evolution. We applied and compared empirical thermosphere models with satellite drag measurements from the GRACE satellites and found that the Jacchia-Bowman 2008 model can reproduce the drag measurements very well during undisturbed solar conditions but gets worse during extreme solar events. By analyzing the peak of the X17.2 flare spectra and comparing it with spectra of young solar proxies, our results indicate that the peak flare radiation flux corresponds to a hypothetical Sun-like star or the Sun at the age of approximately 2.3 Gyr. This implies that the peak extreme ultraviolet (EUV radiation is enhanced by a factor of about 2.5 times compared to today's Sun. On the assumption that the Sun emitted an EUV flux of that magnitude and by modifying the activity indices in the Jacchia-Bowman 2008 model, we obtain an average exobase temperature of 1950 K, which corresponds with previous theoretical studies related to thermospheric heating and expansion caused by the solar EUV flux.

  2. Solar flares as proxy for the young Sun: satellite observed thermosphere response to an X17.2 flare of Earth's upper atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krauss

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the measured thermospheric response of an extreme solar X17.2 flare that irradiated the Earth's upper atmosphere during the so-called Halloween events in late October/early November 2003. We suggest that such events can serve as proxies for the intense electromagnetic and corpuscular radiation environment of the Sun or other stars during their early phases of evolution. We applied and compared empirical thermosphere models with satellite drag measurements from the GRACE satellites and found that the Jacchia-Bowman 2008 model can reproduce the drag measurements very well during undisturbed solar conditions but gets worse during extreme solar events. By analyzing the peak of the X17.2 flare spectra and comparing it with spectra of young solar proxies, our results indicate that the peak flare radiation flux corresponds to a hypothetical Sun-like star or the Sun at the age of approximately 2.3 Gyr. This implies that the peak extreme ultraviolet (EUV radiation is enhanced by a factor of about 2.5 times compared to today's Sun. On the assumption that the Sun emitted an EUV flux of that magnitude and by modifying the activity indices in the Jacchia-Bowman 2008 model, we obtain an average exobase temperature of 1950 K, which corresponds with previous theoretical studies related to thermospheric heating and expansion caused by the solar EUV flux.

  3. Gamma-Ray Imager Polarimeter for Solar Flares Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose here to develop the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS), the next-generation instrument for high-energy solar observations. GRIPS will...

  4. MULTITHERMAL REPRESENTATION OF THE KAPPA-DISTRIBUTION OF SOLAR FLARE ELECTRONS AND APPLICATION TO SIMULTANEOUS X-RAY AND EUV OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglia, Marina [Institute of 4D Technologies, School of Engineering, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, CH-5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Motorina, Galina; Kontar, Eduard P., E-mail: marina.battaglia@fhnw.ch, E-mail: eduard.kontar@glasgow.ac.uk, E-mail: g.motorina@gao.spb.ru [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-10

    Acceleration of particles and plasma heating is one of the fundamental problems in solar flare physics. An accurate determination of the spectrum of flare-energized electrons over a broad energy range is crucial for our understanding of aspects such as the acceleration mechanism and the total flare energy. Recent years have seen a growing interest in the kappa-distribution as a representation of the total spectrum of flare-accelerated electrons. In this work we present the kappa-distribution as a differential emission measure. This allows for inferring the electron distribution from X-ray observations and EUV observations by simultaneously fitting the proposed function to RHESSI and SDO/AIA data. This yields the spatially integrated electron spectra of a coronal source from less than 0.1 keV up to several tens of keV. The method is applied to a single-loop GOES C4.1 flare. The results show that the total energy can only be determined accurately by combining RHESSI and AIA observations. Simultaneously fitting the proposed representation of the kappa-distribution reduces the electron number density in the analyzed flare by a factor of ∼30 and the total flare energy by a factor of ∼5 compared with the commonly used fitting of RHESSI spectra. The spatially integrated electron spectrum of the investigated flare between 0.043 and 24 keV is consistent with the combination of a low-temperature (∼2 MK) component and a hot (∼11 MK) kappa-like component with spectral index 4, reminiscent of solar wind distributions.

  5. Solar Features - Solar Flares - SIDS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Sudden Ionospheric Disturbance (SID) is any of several radio propagation anomalies due to ionospheric changes resulting from solar or geophysical events.

  6. Solar Flare Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-20

    M., Huber, M. C. E. and Timothy, 1. G.: 1977;Appl. Optics 16, 837. Samain, 0., Bonnet , R.M., Gayr’t, R. and Lizambert, C.: 1975, Astron. Astrophys. 39...Simain, D.. Bonnet , R. M., Galet, R., and Lizanbert, G.: 1975,Astr. Atstlophys. 39, 71. Solar.Genphysical Data: 1971, No. 355 Part II. Wlhite, 0. k.: 1964...typically unity, within a factor of two. Acknowledgements We wish to thank those who contributed to the data reduction: Marc Allen and Dennis Ruff at

  7. Evidence of significant energy input in the late phase of a solar flare from NuSTAR x-ray observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhar, Matej; Krucker, Säm; Hannah, Iain G.

    2017-01-01

    -size solar flare 1 day before the observations, at ∼18 UT on 2014 December 10, with the post-flare loops still visible at the time of NuSTAR observations. The time evolution of the source emission in the SDO/AIA 335 Å channel reveals the characteristics of an extreme-ultraviolet late-phase event, caused...... by the continuous formation of new post-flare loops that arch higher and higher in the solar corona. The spectral fitting of NuSTAR observations yields an isothermal source, with temperature 3.8–4.6 MK, emission measure (0.3–1.8) × 1046 cm−3, and density estimated at (2.5–6.0) × 108 cm−3. The observed AIA fluxes......We present observations of the occulted active region AR 12222 during the third Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) solar campaign on 2014 December 11, with concurrent Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/AIA and FOXSI-2 sounding rocket observations. The active region produced a medium...

  8. The thermal infrared continuum in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Lyndsay; Simoes, Paulo; Kerr, Graham Stewart; Hudson, Hugh S.; Gimenez de Castro, C. Guillermo; Penn, Matthew J.

    2017-08-01

    Observations of the Sun with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array have now started, and the thermal infrared will regularly be accessible from the NSF’s Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope. Motivated by the prospect of these new observations, and by recent flare detections in the mid infrared, we set out here to model and understand the source of the infrared continuum in flares, and to explore its diagnostic capability for the physical conditions in the flare atmosphere. We use the 1D radiation hydrodynamics code RADYN to calculate mid-infrared continuum emission from model atmospheres undergoing sudden deposition of energy by non-thermal electrons. We identify and characterise the main continuum thermal emission processes relevant to flare intensity enhancement in the mid- to far-infrared (2-200 micron) spectral range as free-free emission on neutrals and ions. We find that the infrared intensity evolution tracks the energy input to within a second, albeit with a lingering intensity enhancement, and provides a very direct indication of the evolution of the atmospheric ionization. The prediction of highly impulsive emission means that, on these timescales, the atmospheric hydrodynamics need not be considered in analysing the mid-IR signatures.

  9. An Interactive Multi-instrument Database of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Kosovichev, Alexander G.; Oria, Vincent; Nita, Gelu M.

    2017-07-01

    Solar flares are complicated physical phenomena that are observable in a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio waves to γ-rays. For a more comprehensive understanding of flares, it is necessary to perform a combined multi-wavelength analysis using observations from many satellites and ground-based observatories. For an efficient data search, integration of different flare lists, and representation of observational data, we have developed the Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (IMIDSF, https://solarflare.njit.edu/). The web-accessible database is fully functional and allows the user to search for uniquely identified flare events based on their physical descriptors and the availability of observations by a particular set of instruments. Currently, the data from three primary flare lists (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites, RHESSI, and HEK) and a variety of other event catalogs (Hinode, Fermi GBM, Konus-W IND, the OVSA flare catalogs, the CACTus CME catalog, the Filament eruption catalog) and observing logs (IRIS and Nobeyama coverage) are integrated, and an additional set of physical descriptors (temperature and emission measure) is provided along with an observing summary, data links, and multi-wavelength light curves for each flare event since 2002 January. We envision that this new tool will allow researchers to significantly speed up the search of events of interest for statistical and case studies.

  10. Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (IMIDSF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Nita, Gelu M.; Oria, Vincent; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2017-08-01

    Solar flares represent a complicated physical phenomenon observed in a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum, from radiowaves to gamma-rays. For a complete understanding of the flares it is necessary to perform a combined multi-wavelength analysis using observations from many satellites and ground-based observatories. For efficient data search, integration of different flare lists and representation of observational data, we have developed the Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (https://solarflare.njit.edu/). The web database is fully functional and allows the user to search for uniquely-identified flare events based on their physical descriptors and availability of observations of a particular set of instruments. Currently, data from three primary flare lists (GOES, RHESSI and HEK) and a variety of other event catalogs (Hinode, Fermi GBM, Konus-Wind, OVSA flare catalogs, CACTus CME catalog, Filament eruption catalog) and observing logs (IRIS and Nobeyama coverage), are integrated. An additional set of physical descriptors (temperature and emission measure) along with observing summary, data links and multi-wavelength light curves is provided for each flare event since January 2002. Results of an initial statistical analysis will be presented.

  11. Excitation of XUV radiation in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, A. Gordon

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the proposed research was to understand the means by which XUV radiation in solar flares is excited, and to use this radiation as diagnostics of the energy release and transport processes occurring in the flare. Significant progress in both of these areas, as described, was made.

  12. Investigation of physical parameters in stellar flares observed by GINGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    This program involves analysis and interpretation of results from GINGA Large Area Counter (LAC) observations from a group of large stellar x-ray flares. All LAC data are re-extracted using the standard Hayashida method of LAC background subtraction and analyzed using various models available with the XSPEC spectral fitting program. Temperature-emission measure histories are available for a total of 5 flares observed by GINGA. These will be used to compare physical parameters of these flares with solar and stellar flare models.

  13. High-energy particles associated with solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, K.; Klimas, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    High-energy particles, the so-called solar cosmic rays, are often generated in association with solar flares, and then emitted into interplanetary space. These particles, consisting of electrons, protons, and other heavier nuclei, including the iron-group, are accelerated in the vicinity of the flare. By studying the temporal and spatial varation of these particles near the earth's orbit, their storage and release mechanisms in the solar corona and their propagation mechanism can be understood. The details of the nuclear composition and the rigidity spectrum for each nuclear component of the solar cosmic rays are important for investigating the acceleration mechanism in solar flares. The timing and efficiency of the acceleration process can also be investigated by using this information. These problems are described in some detail by using observational results on solar cosmic rays and associated phenomena.

  14. X-ray Emission from Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS), the first space-borne solar astronomy experiment of India was designed to improve our current understanding of X-ray emission from the Sun in general and solar flares in particular. SOXS mission is composed of two solid state detectors, viz., Si and CZT semiconductors ...

  15. Investigation of relationships between parameters of solar nano-flares and solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Hossein; Javaherian, Mohsen; Kaki, Bardia

    2016-07-01

    Solar flares are one of the important coronal events which are originated in solar magnetic activity. They release lots of energy during the interstellar medium, right after the trigger. Flare prediction can play main role in avoiding eventual damages on the Earth. Here, to interpret solar large-scale events (e.g., flares), we investigate relationships between small-scale events (nano-flares) and large-scale events (e.g., flares). In our method, by using simulations of nano-flares based on Monte Carlo method, the intensity time series of nano-flares are simulated. Then, the solar full disk images taken at 171 angstrom recorded by SDO/AIA are employed. Some parts of the solar disk (quiet Sun (QS), coronal holes (CHs), and active regions (ARs)) are cropped and the time series of these regions are extracted. To compare the simulated intensity time series of nano-flares with the intensity time series of real data extracted from different parts of the Sun, the artificial neural networks is employed. Therefore, we are able to extract physical parameters of nano-flares like both kick and decay rate lifetime, and the power of their power-law distributions. The procedure of variations in the power value of power-law distributions within QS, CH is similar to AR. Thus, by observing the small part of the Sun, we can follow the procedure of solar activity.

  16. Statistical methods for solar flare probability forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchia, D. F.; Tryon, P. V.; Caldwell, G. A.; Jones, R. W.

    1980-09-01

    The Space Environment Services Center (SESC) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration provides probability forecasts of regional solar flare disturbances. This report describes a statistical method useful to obtain 24 hour solar flare forecasts which, historically, have been subjectively formulated. In Section 1 of this report flare classifications of the SESC and the particular probability forecasts to be considered are defined. In Section 2 we describe the solar flare data base and outline general principles for effective data management. Three statistical techniques for solar flare probability forecasting are discussed in Section 3, viz, discriminant analysis, logistic regression, and multiple linear regression. We also review two scoring measures and suggest the logistic regression approach for obtaining 24 hour forecasts. In Section 4 a heuristic procedure is used to select nine basic predictors from the many available explanatory variables. Using these nine variables logistic regression is demonstrated by example in Section 5. We conclude in Section 6 with band broad suggestions regarding continued development of objective methods for solar flare probability forecasting.

  17. Statistical properties of solarflare activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Linhua

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic field structures on the solar atmosphere are not symmetric distribution in the northern and southern hemispheres, which is an important aspect of quasi-cyclical evolution of magnetic activity indicators that are related to solar dynamo theories. Three standard analysis techniques are applied to analyze the hemispheric coupling (north-south asymmetry and phase asynchrony of monthly averaged values of solarflare activity over the past 49 years (from 1966 January to 2014 December. The prominent results are as follows: (1 from a global point of view, solarflare activity on both hemispheres are strongly correlated with each other, but the northern hemisphere precedes the southern one with a phase shift of 7 months; (2 the long-range persistence indeed exists in solarflare activity, but the dynamical complexities in the two hemispheres are not identical; (3 the prominent periodicities of Hα flare activity are 17 years full-disk activity cycle and 11 years Schwabe solar cycle, but the short- and mid-term periodicities cannot determined by monthly time series; (4 by comparing the non-parametric rescaling behavior on a point-by-point basis, the hemispheric asynchrony of solarflare activity are estimated to be ranging from several months to tens of months with an average value of 8.7 months. The analysis results could promote our knowledge on the long-range persistence, the quasi-periodic variation, and the hemispheric asynchrony of solarflare activity on both hemispheres, and possibly provide valuable information for the hemispheric interrelation of solar magnetic activity.

  18. Adiabatic heating in impulsive solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maetzler, C.; Bai, T.; Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of adiabatic heating in two impulsive solar flares on the basis of dynamic X-ray spectra in the 28-254 keV range, H-alpha, microwave, and meter-wave radio observations. It is found that the X-ray spectra of the events are like those of thermal bremsstrahlung from single-temperature plasmas in the 10-60 keV range if photospheric albedo is taken into account. The temperature-emission correlation indicates adiabatic compression followed by adiabatic expansion and that the electron distribution remains isotropic. H-alpha data suggest compressive energy transfer. The projected areas and volumes of the flares are estimated assuming that X-ray and microwave emissions are produced in a single thermal plasma. Electron densities of about 10 to the 9th/cu cm are found for homogeneous, spherically symmetric sources. It is noted that the strong self-absorption of hot-plasma gyrosynchrotron radiation reveals low magnetic field strengths.

  19. Modeling the Soft X-Ray During Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaman, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Solar Radiation can effect our communication and navigation systems here on Earth. In particular, solar X-ray (SXR) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation is responsible for ionizing (charging) earth's upper atmosphere, and sudden changes in the ionosphere can disrupt high frequency communication systems (e.g. airplane-to-ground) and degrade the location accuracy for GPS navigation. New soft X-ray flare data are needed to study the sources for the SXR radiation and variability of the solar flares and thus help to answer questions if all flares follow the same trend or have different plasma characteristics? In December 2015, the Miniature X-Ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) launched from Cape Canaveral Florida to answer those questions. The MinXSS CubeSat is a miniature satellite that was designed to measure the soft X-ray spectra and study flares in the 1-15 Å wavelength range. So far, the CubeSat has observed more than ten flares. The MinXSS flare data are plotted in energy vs irradiance to display the soft X-ray spectra, and these spectra are compared with different types of CHIANTI models of the soft X-ray radiation. One comparison is for non-flaring spectra using AIA EUV images to identify solar features called active regions, coronal holes, and quiet sun, and then using the fractional area of each feature to calculate a CHIANTI-based spectrum. This comparison reveals how important the active region radiation is for the SXR spectra. A second comparison is for flare spectra to several isothermal models that were created using CHIANTI. The isothermal model comparisons were done with both the raw count spectra from MinXSS and the derived irradiance spectra. This dual comparison helps to validate the irradiance conversion algorithm for MinXSS. Comparisons of the MinXSS data to the models show that flares tend to follow a temperature pattern. Analysis of the MinXSS data can help us understand our sun better, could lead to better forecasts of solar flares, and thus

  20. Solar flare effects and storm sudden commencement even in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1998-05-08

    Variations in the three components of geomagnetic field were observed at the twenty-two geomagnetic Euro-African Observatories during the solar flare that occurred on the 6 May, 1998 at 0080UT and storm sudden commencement that took place on May 8, 1998 at 15.00 UT. The geomagnetic field on 6 May, 1998 was ...

  1. Measurements and Modeling of Total Solar Irradiance in X-class Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Christopher S.; Chamberlin, Phillip Clyde; Hock, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    The Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) from NASA's SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment can detect changes in the total solar irradiance (TSI) to a precision of 2 ppm, allowing observations of variations due to the largest X-class solar flares for the first time. Presented here is a robust algorithm for determining the radiative output in the TIM TSI measurements, in both the impulsive and gradual phases, for the four solar flares presented in Woods et al., as well as an additional flare measured on 2006 December 6. The radiative outputs for both phases of these five flares are then compared to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiance output from the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) in order to derive an empirical relationship between the FISM VUV model and the TIM TSI data output to estimate the TSI radiative output for eight other X-class flares. This model provides the basis for the bolometric energy estimates for the solar flares analyzed in the Emslie et al. study.

  2. Solar eruptions: The CME-flare relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vršnak, B.

    2016-11-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs), caused by large-scale eruptions of the coronal magnetic field, often are accompanied by a more localized energy release in the form of flares, as a result of dissipative magnetic-field reconfiguration. Morphology and evolution of such flares, also denoted as dynamical flares are often explained as a consequence of reconnection of the arcade magnetic field, taking place below the erupting magnetic flux rope. A close relationship of the CME acceleration and the flare energy release is evidenced by various statistical correlations between parameters describing CMEs and flares, as well as by the synchronization of the CME acceleration phase with the impulsive phase of the associated flare. Such behavior implies that there must be a feedback relation between the dynamics of the CME and the flare-associated reconnection process. From the theoretical standpoint, magnetic reconnection affects the CME dynamics in several ways. First, it reduces the tension of the overlying arcade magnetic field and increases the magnetic pressure below the flux rope, and in this way enhances the CME acceleration. Furthermore, it supplies the poloidal magnetic flux to the flux rope, which helps sustaining the electric current in the rope and prolonging the action of the driving Lorentz force to large distances. The role of these processes, directly relating solar flares and CMEs, is illustrated by employing a simple model, where the erupting structure is represented by a curved flux rope anchored at both sides in the dense/inert photosphere, being subject to the kink and torus instability. It is shown that in most strongly accelerated ejections, where values on the order of 10 km s-2 are attained, the poloidal flux supplied to the erupting rope has to be several times larger than was the initial flux.

  3. Impulsive Phase of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    10- WoOVtt Il/il octur quite often ltear thle netil.1 line of thle magnectic field. a% deteifned by lte Iitlatri/ation mapls of 6-cmn -a tive regions...totter material - C~tW~tittii~ito I c XXV 1.9 A .tpilean toi Lomte Iorn .ohics overlying this sitructurec. Ili a stow-tising flare. R~ust el al. (1975) t

  4. Prediction of M and X Solar flares by Using Machine Learning Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboonik, Abbas; Safari, Hossein; Dadashi, Neda; Alipour, Nasibeh

    2016-07-01

    The study and prediction of the solar flares are very important due to their thorough impact on the Earth's climate, space weather, and telecommunications. Flares are abrupt magnetic explosions in the atmosphere of the Sun. The exact mechanism(s) for the energy release and occurrence of the flares is(are) still unknown. The only way for prediction of the solar flares is based on the probabilistic methods. Observations strongly suggest that their occurrence is highly dependent on the magnetic structures of the solar atmospheric features. The occurrence probabilities for M and X class flares are calculated up to 18 hours before the ignition of them using solar magnetic field data recorded by HMI/SDO. To achieve this goal, Zernike moments and "Support Vector Machine algorithm" are applied to analyze the data. Our calculations guarantee almost 94 percent accuracy in the prediction of solar flares.

  5. A magnetic bald-patch flare in solar active region 11117

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao-Wei; Feng, Xue-Shang; Wu, Shi-Tsan; Hu, Qiang

    2017-09-01

    With SDO observations and a data-constrained magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model, we identify a confined multi-ribbon flare that occurred on 2010 October 25 in solar active region 11117 as a magnetic bald patch (BP) flare with strong evidence. From the photospheric magnetic field observed by SDO/HMI, we find there are indeed magnetic BPs on the polarity inversion lines (PILs) which match parts of the flare ribbons. From the 3D coronal magnetic field derived from an MHD relaxation model constrained by the vector magnetograms, we find strikingly good agreement of the BP separatrix surface (BPSS) footpoints with the flare ribbons, and the BPSS itself with the hot flaring loop system. Moreover, the triggering of the BP flare can be attributed to a small flux emergence under the lobe of the BPSS, and the relevant change of coronal magnetic field through the flare is reproduced well by the pre-flare and post-flare MHD solutions, which match the corresponding pre- and post-flare AIA observations, respectively. Our work contributes to the study of non-typical flares that constitute the majority of solar flares but which cannot be explained by the standard flare model.

  6. CORONAS-F observation of gamma-ray emission from the solar flare on 2003 October 29

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kurt, V. G.; Yushkov, B. Y.; Galkin, V. I.; Kudela, Karel; Kashapova, L. K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 56, OCT (2017), s. 102-112 ISSN 1384-1076 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_003/0000481 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : sun * flares - sun * X-rays * gamma rays - sun * magnetic fields - acceleration of particles Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 0.938, year: 2016

  7. On the Importance of the Flare's Late Phase for the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Eparvier, Frank; Jones, Andrew R.; Hock, Rachel; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Klimchuk, James A.; Didkovsky, Leonid; Judge, Darrell; Mariska, John; Bailey, Scott; hide

    2011-01-01

    The new solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance observations from NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) have revealed a new class of solar flares that are referred to as late phase flares. These flares are characterized by the hot 2-5 MK coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI 33.5 nm) showing large secondary peaks that appear many minutes to hours after an eruptive flare event. In contrast, the cool 0.7-1.5 MK coronal emissions (e.g., Fe IX 17.1 nm) usually dim immediately after the flare onset and do not recover until after the delayed second peak of the hot coronal emissions. We refer to this period of 1-5 hours after the fl amrea sin phase as the late phase, and this late phase is uniquely different than long duration flares associated with 2-ribbon flares or large filament eruptions. Our analysis of the late phase flare events indicates that the late phase involves hot coronal loops near the flaring region, not directly related to the original flaring loop system but rather with the higher post-eruption fields. Another finding is that space weather applications concerning Earth s ionosphere and thermosphere need to consider these late phase flares because they can enhance the total EUV irradiance flare variation by a factor of 2 when the late phase contribution is included.

  8. Acceleration of runaway electrons and Joule heating in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, G. D.

    1985-01-01

    The electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the simultaneous Joule heating of the plasma are studied. Acceleration and heating timescales are derived and compared, and upper limits are obtained on the acceleration volume and the rate at which electrons can be accelerated. These upper limits, determined by the maximum magnetic field strength observed in flaring regions, place stringent restrictions upon the acceleration process. The role of the plasma resistivity in these processes is examined, and possible sources of anomalous resistivity are summarized. The implications of these results for the microwave and hard X-ray emission from solar flares are examined.

  9. Ensemble Forecasting of Major Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Guerra, J A; Uritsky, V M

    2015-01-01

    We present the results from the first ensemble prediction model for major solar flares (M and X classes). Using the probabilistic forecasts from three models hosted at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (NASA-GSFC) and the NOAA forecasts, we developed an ensemble forecast by linearly combining the flaring probabilities from all four methods. Performance-based combination weights were calculated using a Monte Carlo-type algorithm by applying a decision threshold $P_{th}$ to the combined probabilities and maximizing the Heidke Skill Score (HSS). Using the probabilities and events time series from 13 recent solar active regions (2012 - 2014), we found that a linear combination of probabilities can improve both probabilistic and categorical forecasts. Combination weights vary with the applied threshold and none of the tested individual forecasting models seem to provide more accurate predictions than the others for all values of $P_{th}$. According to the maximum values of HSS, a performance-based weights ...

  10. Elemental abundances of flaring solar plasma - Enhanced neon and sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Elemental abundances of two flares observed with the SMM Flat Crystal Spectrometer are compared and contrasted. The first had a gradual rise and a slow decay, while the second was much more impulsive. Simultaneous spectra of seven bright soft X-ray resonance lines provide information over a broad temperature range and are available throughout both flares, making these events unique in the SMM data base. For the first flare, the plasma seemed to be characterized by coronal abundances but, for the second, the plasma composition could not be coronal, photospheric, or a linear combination of both. A good differential emission measure fit required enhanced neon such that Ne/O = 0.32 +/- 0.02, a value which is inconsistent with the current models of coronal abundances based on the elemental first-ionization potential. Similar values of enhanced neon are found for flaring plasma observed by the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer, in (He-3)-rich solar energetic particle events, and in the decay phase of several long duration soft X-ray events. Sulfur is also enhanced in the impulsive flare, but not as dramatically as neon. These events are compared with two models which attempt to explain the enhanced values of neon and sulfur.

  11. Thermodynamics of supra-arcade downflows in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Liu, Rui; Deng, Na; Wang, Haimin

    2017-10-01

    Context. Supra-arcade downflows (SADs) have been frequently observed during the gradual phase of solar flares near the limb. In coronal emission lines sensitive to flaring plasmas, they appear as tadpole-like dark voids against the diffuse fan-shaped "haze" above, flowing toward the well-defined flare arcade. Aims: We aim to investigate the evolution of SADs' thermal properties, and to shed light on the formation mechanism and physical processes of SADs. Methods: We carefully studied several selected SADs from two flare events and calculated their differential emission measures (DEMs) as well as DEM-weighted temperatures using data obtained by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory. Results: Our analysis shows that SADs are associated with a substantial decrease in DEM above 4 MK, which is 1-3 orders of magnitude smaller than the surrounding haze as well as the region before or after the passage of SADs, but comparable to the quiet corona. There is no evidence for the presence of the SAD-associated hot plasma (>20 MK) in the AIA data, and this decrease in DEM does not cause any significant change in the DEM distribution as well as the DEM-weighted temperature, which supports this idea that SADs are density depletion. This depression in DEM rapidly recovers in the wake of the SADs studied, generally within a few minutes, suggesting that they are discrete features. In addition, we found that SADs in one event are spatio-temporally associated with the successive formation of post-flare loops along the flare arcade. Movies associated to Figs. A.1 and A.2 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Predicting the Where and the How Big of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Graham; Leka, K. D.; Gilchrist, Stuart

    2017-08-01

    The approach to predicting solar flares generally characterizes global properties of a solar active region, for example the total magnetic flux or the total length of a sheared magnetic neutral line, and compares new data (from which to make a prediction) to similar observations of active regions and their associated propensity for flare production. We take here a different tack, examining solar active regions in the context of their energy storage capacity. Specifically, we characterize not the region as a whole, but summarize the energy-release prospects of different sub-regions within, using a sub-area analysis of the photospheric boundary, the CFIT non-linear force-free extrapolation code, and the Minimum Current Corona model. We present here early results from this approach whose objective is to understand the different pathways available for regions to release stored energy, thus eventually providing better estimates of the where (what sub-areas are storing how much energy) and the how big (how much energy is stored, and how much is available for release) of solar flares.

  13. Center-to-Limb Variability of Hot Coronal EUV Emissions During Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, E. M. B.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Eparvier, F. G.; Epp, L.

    2018-02-01

    It is generally accepted that densities of quiet-Sun and active region plasma are sufficiently low to justify the optically thin approximation, and this is commonly used in the analysis of line emissions from plasma in the solar corona. However, the densities of solar flare loops are substantially higher, compromising the optically thin approximation. This study begins with a radiative transfer model that uses typical solar flare densities and geometries to show that hot coronal emission lines are not generally optically thin. Furthermore, the model demonstrates that the observed line intensity should exhibit center-to-limb variability (CTLV), with flares observed near the limb being dimmer than those occurring near disk center. The model predictions are validated with an analysis of over 200 flares observed by the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), which uses six lines, with peak formation temperatures between 8.9 and 15.8 MK, to show that limb flares are systematically dimmer than disk-center flares. The data are then used to show that the electron column density along the line of sight typically increases by 1.76 × 10^{19} cm^{-2} for limb flares over the disk-center flare value. It is shown that the CTLV of hot coronal emissions reduces the amount of ionizing radiation propagating into the solar system, and it changes the relative intensities of lines and bands commonly used for spectral analysis.

  14. Prediction of Solar Flares Using Unique Signatures of Magnetic Field Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboonik, Abbas; Safari, Hossein; Alipour, Nasibe; Wheatland, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Prediction of solar flares is an important task in solar physics. The occurrence of solar flares is highly dependent on the structure and topology of solar magnetic fields. A new method for predicting large (M- and X-class) flares is presented, which uses machine learning methods applied to the Zernike moments (ZM) of magnetograms observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory for a period of six years from 2010 June 2 to 2016 August 1. Magnetic field images consisting of the radial component of the magnetic field are converted to finite sets of ZMs and fed to the support vector machine classifier. ZMs have the capability to elicit unique features from any 2D image, which may allow more accurate classification. The results indicate whether an arbitrary active region has the potential to produce at least one large flare. We show that the majority of large flares can be predicted within 48 hr before their occurrence, with only 10 false negatives out of 385 flaring active region magnetograms and 21 false positives out of 179 non-flaring active region magnetograms. Our method may provide a useful tool for the prediction of solar flares, which can be employed alongside other forecasting methods.

  15. Solar flare associated coronal mass ejections causing geo-effectiveness and Forbush decreases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Beena; Chandra, Harish

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, we have selected 35 halo Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) associated with solar flares, Geomagnetic Storms (GSs) and Forbush decrease (Fd) chosen from 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2007 (i.e., the descending phase of solar cycle 23) observed by the Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) on board the SOHO spacecraft. Statistical analyses are performed to look at the distribution of solar flares associated with halo CMEs causing GSs and Fd and investigated the relationship between solar flare and halo CME parameters with GSs and Fd. Forbush decrease is the phenomenon of rapid decrease in cosmic ray intensity following the CME. Our analysis indicates that during 2000 to 2007 the northern region produced 44 % of solar flares associated with halo CMEs, GSs, and Fd, whereas 56 % solar flares associated with halo CMEs, GSs, and Fd were produced in the southern region. The northern and the southern hemispheres between 10° to 20° latitudinal belts are found to be more effective in producing events leading to Fd. From our selected events, we found that about 60 % of super-intense storms (Dst ≤ -200 nT) caused by halo CMEs are associated with X-class flares. Fast halo CMEs associated with X-class flares originating from 0° to 25° latitudes are better potential candidates in producing super-intense GSs than the slow halo CMEs associated with other classes of flares.

  16. Measuring X-ray anisotropy in solar flares. Prospective stereoscopic capabilities of STIX and MiSolFA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadei, Diego; Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2017-09-01

    Context. During a solar flare, a large percentage of the magnetic energy released goes into the kinetic energy of non-thermal particles, with X-ray observations providing a direct connection to keV flare-accelerated electrons. However, the electron angular distribution, a prime diagnostic tool of the acceleration mechanism and transport, is poorly known. Aims: During the next solar maximum, two upcoming space-borne X-ray missions, STIX on board Solar Orbiter and MiSolFA, will perform stereoscopic X-ray observations of solar flares at two different locations: STIX at 0.28 AU (at perihelion) and up to inclinations of 25°, and MiSolFA in a low-Earth orbit. The combined observations from these cross-calibrated detectors will allow us to infer the electron anisotropy of individual flares confidently for the first time. Methods: We simulated both instrumental and physical effects for STIX and MiSolFA including thermal shielding, background and X-ray Compton backscattering (albedo effect) in the solar photosphere. We predict the expected number of observable flares available for stereoscopic measurements during the next solar maximum. We also discuss the range of useful spacecraft observation angles for the challenging case of close-to-isotropic flare anisotropy. Results: The simulated results show that STIX and MiSolFA will be capable of detecting low levels of flare anisotropy, for M1-class or stronger flares, even with a relatively small spacecraft angular separation of 20-30°. Both instruments will directly measure the flare X-ray anisotropy of about 40 M- and X-class solar flares during the next solar maximum. Conclusions: Near-future stereoscopic observations with Solar Orbiter/STIX and MiSolFA will help distinguishing between competing flare-acceleration mechanisms, and provide essential constraints regarding collisional and non-collisional transport processes occurring in the flaring atmosphere for individual solar flares.

  17. Data Mining Solar X-Ray Flares Triggered by Emerging Magnetic Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Kaitlyn; Saar, Steven H.; Schanche, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the association between emerging magnetic flux and solar X-ray flares to identify, and if possible quantify, distinguishing physical properties of flares triggered by flux emergence versus those triggered by other sources. Our study uses as its basis GOES-classified solar flares from March 2011 through June 2016 that have been identified by the Space Weather Prediction Center’s flare detection algorithm. The basic X-ray flare data is then enriched with data about related EUV-spectrum flares, emerging fluxes, active regions, eruptions, and sigmoids, which are all characterized by event-specific keywords, identified via SDO feature finding tools, and archived in the Heliophysics Events Knowledgebase (HEK). Using appropriate spatial and temporal parameters for each event type to determine association, we create a catalogue of solar events associated with each GOES-classified flare. After accounting for the primitive state of many of these event detection algorithms, we statistically analyze the compiled dataset to determine the effects of an emerging flux trigger on flare properties. A two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test confirms with 99.9% confidence that flares triggered by emerging flux have a different peak flux distribution than non-emerging-flux-associated flares. We observe no linear or logarithmic correlations between flares’ and their associated emerging fluxes’ individual properties and find flares triggered by emerging flux are ~ 10% more likely to cause an eruption inside an active region while outside of an active region, the flare’s association with emerging flux has no effect on its likeliness to cause an eruption. We also compare the morphologies of the flares triggered by emerging flux and flares not via a superposed epoch analysis of lightcurves. Our results will be of interest for predicting flare behavior as a function of magnetic activity (where we can use enhanced rates of emerging flux as a proxy for heightened stellar

  18. Formation of the thermal infrared continuum in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Paulo J. A.; Kerr, Graham S.; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hudson, Hugh S.; Giménez de Castro, C. Guillermo; Penn, Matt

    2017-09-01

    Aims: Observations of the Sun with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array have now started, and the thermal infrared will regularly be accessible from the NSF's Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope. Motivated by the prospect of these new data, and by recent flare observations in the mid infrared, we set out here to model and understand the source of the infrared continuum in flares, and to explore its diagnostic capability for the physical conditions in the flare atmosphere. Methods: We use the one-dimensional (1D) radiation hydrodynamics code RADYN to calculate mid-infrared continuum emission from model atmospheres undergoing sudden deposition of energy by non-thermal electrons. Results: We identify and characterise the main continuum thermal emission processes relevant to flare intensity enhancement in the mid- to far-infrared (2-200 μm) spectral range as free-free emission on neutrals and ions. We find that the infrared intensity evolution tracks the energy input to within a second, albeit with a lingering intensity enhancement, and provides a very direct indication of the evolution of the atmospheric ionisation. The prediction of highly impulsive emission means that, on these timescales, the atmospheric hydrodynamics need not be considered in analysing the mid-IR signatures.

  19. Properties and relationship between solar eruptive flares and Coronal Mass Ejections during rising phase of Solar Cycles 23 and 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed Ibrahim, M.; Shanmugaraju, A.; Moon, Y.-J.; Vrsnak, B.; Umapathy, S.

    2018-01-01

    Statistical relationship between major flares and the associated CMEs during rising phases of Solar Cycles 23 and 24 are studied. Totally more than 6000 and 10,000 CMEs were observed by SOHO/LASCO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph) during 23rd [May 1996-June 2002] and 24th [December 2008-December 2014] solar cycles, respectively. In particular, we studied the relationship between properties of flares and CMEs using the limb events (longitude 70-85°) to avoid projection effects of CMEs and partial occultation of flares that occurred near 90°. After selecting a sample of limb flares, we used certain spatial and temporal constraints to find the flare-CME pairs. Using these constraints, we compiled 129 events in Solar Cycle 23 and 92 events in Solar Cycle 24. We compared the flare-CME relationship in the two solar cycles and no significant differences are found between the two cycles. We only found out that the CME mean width was slightly larger and the CME mean acceleration was slightly higher in cycle 24, and that there was somewhat a better relation between flare flux and CME deceleration in cycle 24 than in cycle 23.

  20. Statistical Studies of Solar White-light Flares and Comparisons with Superflares on Solar-type Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namekata, Kosuke; Sakaue, Takahito; Watanabe, Kyoko; Asai, Ayumi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Yuta; Notsu, Shota; Honda, Satoshi; Ishii, Takako T.; Ikuta, Kai; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2017-12-01

    Recently, many superflares on solar-type stars have been discovered as white-light flares (WLFs). The statistical study found a correlation between their energies (E) and durations (τ): τ \\propto {E}0.39, similar to those of solar hard/soft X-ray flares, τ \\propto {E}0.2{--0.33}. This indicates a universal mechanism of energy release on solar and stellar flares, i.e., magnetic reconnection. We here carried out statistical research on 50 solar WLFs observed with Solar Dynamics Observatory/HMI and examined the correlation between the energies and durations. As a result, the E–τ relation on solar WLFs (τ \\propto {E}0.38) is quite similar to that on stellar superflares (τ \\propto {E}0.39). However, the durations of stellar superflares are one order of magnitude shorter than those expected from solar WLFs. We present the following two interpretations for the discrepancy: (1) in solar flares, the cooling timescale of WLFs may be longer than the reconnection one, and the decay time of solar WLFs can be elongated by the cooling effect; (2) the distribution can be understood by applying a scaling law (τ \\propto {E}1/3{B}-5/3) derived from the magnetic reconnection theory. In the latter case, the observed superflares are expected to have 2–4 times stronger magnetic field strength than solar flares.

  1. Detection of the Acceleration Site in a Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Kontar, E. P.; Nita, G. M.; Gary, D. E.

    2011-05-01

    We report the observation of an unusual cold, tenuous solar flare (ApJL, v. 731, p. L19, 2011), which reveals itself via numerous and prominent non-thermal manifestations, while lacking any noticeable thermal emission signature. RHESSI hard X-rays and 0.1-18 GHz radio data from OVSA and Phoenix-2 show copious electron acceleration (1035 electrons per second above 10 keV) typical for GOES M-class flares with electrons energies up to 100 keV, but GOES temperatures not exceeding 6.1 MK. The HXR footpoints and coronal radio sources belong, supposedly, to a single magnetic loop, which departs strongly from the corresponding potential loop (obtained from a photospheric extrapolation) in agreement with the apparent need of a non-potential magnetic field structure to produce a flare. The imaging, temporal, and spectral characteristics of the flare have led us to a firm conclusion that the bulk of the microwave continuum emission from this flare was produced directly in the acceleration region. We found that the electron acceleration efficiency is very high in the flare, so almost all available thermal electrons are eventually accelerated. However, given a relatively small flaring volume and rather low thermal density at the flaring loop, the total energy release turned out to be insufficient for a significant heating of the coronal plasma or for a prominent chromospheric response giving rise to chromospheric evaporation. Some sort of stochastic acceleration process is needed to account for an approximately energy-independent lifetime of about 3 s for the electrons in the acceleration region. This work was supported in part by NSF grants AGS-0961867, AST-0908344, and NASA grants NNX10AF27G and NNX11AB49G to New Jersey Institute of Technology. This work was supported by a UK STFC rolling grant, STFC/PPARC Advanced Fellowship, and the Leverhulme Trust, UK. Financial support by the European Commission through the SOLAIRE and HESPE Networks is gratefully acknowledged.

  2. Non-neutralized Electric Currents in Solar Active Regions and Flare Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontogiannis, Ioannis; Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Park, Sung-Hong; Guerra, Jordan A.

    2017-11-01

    We explore the association of non-neutralized currents with solar flare occurrence in a sizable sample of observations, aiming to show the potential of such currents in solar flare prediction. We used the high-quality vector magnetograms that are regularly produced by the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager, and more specifically, the Space weather HMI Active Region Patches (SHARP). Through a newly established method that incorporates detailed error analysis, we calculated the non-neutralized currents contained in active regions (AR). Two predictors were produced, namely the total and the maximum unsigned non-neutralized current. Both were tested in AR time-series and a representative sample of point-in-time observations during the interval 2012 - 2016. The average values of non-neutralized currents in flaring active regions are higher by more than an order of magnitude than in non-flaring regions and correlate very well with the corresponding flare index. The temporal evolution of these parameters appears to be connected to physical processes, such as flux emergence and/or magnetic polarity inversion line formation, that are associated with increased solar flare activity. Using Bayesian inference of flaring probabilities, we show that the total unsigned non-neutralized current significantly outperforms the total unsigned magnetic flux and other well-established current-related predictors. It therefore shows good prospects for inclusion in an operational flare-forecasting service. We plan to use the new predictor in the framework of the FLARECAST project along with other highly performing predictors.

  3. Explosive Chromospheric Evaporation Driven by Nonthermal Electrons around One Footpoint of a Solar Flare Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D.; Ning, Z. J.; Huang, Y.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2017-05-01

    We explore the temporal relationship between microwave/hard X-ray (HXR) emission and Doppler velocity during the impulsive phase of a solar flare on 2014 October 27 (SOL2014-10-27) that displays a pulse on the light curves in the microwave (34 GHz) and HXR (25-50 keV) bands before the flare maximum. Imaging observation shows that this pulse mainly comes from one footpoint of a solar flare loop. The slit of the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) stays at this footpoint during this solar flare. The Doppler velocities of Fe xxi 1354.09 Å and Si iv 1402.77 Å are extracted from the Gaussian fitting method. We find that the hot line of Fe xxi 1354.09 Å (log T ˜ 7.05) in the corona exhibits blueshift, while the cool line of Si iv 1402.77 Å (log T ˜ 4.8) in the transition region exhibits redshift, indicating explosive chromospheric evaporation. Evaporative upflows along the flare loop are also observed in the AIA 131 Å image. To our knowledge, this is the first report of chromospheric evaporation evidence from both spectral and imaging observations in the same flare. Both microwave and HXR pulses are well correlated with the Doppler velocities, suggesting that the chromospheric evaporation is driven by nonthermal electrons around this footpoint of a solar flare loop.

  4. Explosive Chromospheric Evaporation Driven by Nonthermal Electrons around One Footpoint of a Solar Flare Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.; Ning, Z. J.; Huang, Y.; Zhang, Q. M., E-mail: lidong@pmo.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2017-05-20

    We explore the temporal relationship between microwave/hard X-ray (HXR) emission and Doppler velocity during the impulsive phase of a solar flare on 2014 October 27 (SOL2014-10-27) that displays a pulse on the light curves in the microwave (34 GHz) and HXR (25–50 keV) bands before the flare maximum. Imaging observation shows that this pulse mainly comes from one footpoint of a solar flare loop. The slit of the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ) stays at this footpoint during this solar flare. The Doppler velocities of Fe xxi 1354.09 Å and Si iv 1402.77 Å are extracted from the Gaussian fitting method. We find that the hot line of Fe xxi 1354.09 Å (log T ∼ 7.05) in the corona exhibits blueshift, while the cool line of Si iv 1402.77 Å (log T ∼ 4.8) in the transition region exhibits redshift, indicating explosive chromospheric evaporation. Evaporative upflows along the flare loop are also observed in the AIA 131 Å image. To our knowledge, this is the first report of chromospheric evaporation evidence from both spectral and imaging observations in the same flare. Both microwave and HXR pulses are well correlated with the Doppler velocities, suggesting that the chromospheric evaporation is driven by nonthermal electrons around this footpoint of a solar flare loop.

  5. A Statistical Study of Photospheric Magnetic Field Changes During 75 Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos Durán, J. S.; Kleint, L.; Calvo-Mozo, B.

    2018-01-01

    Abrupt and permanent changes of photospheric magnetic fields have been observed during solar flares. The changes seem to be linked to the reconfiguration of magnetic fields, but their origin is still unclear. We carried out a statistical analysis of permanent line-of-sight magnetic field ({B}{LOS}) changes during 18 X-, 37 M-, 19 C-, and 1 B-class flares using data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. We investigated the properties of permanent changes, such as frequency, areas, and locations. We detected changes of {B}{LOS} in 59/75 flares. We find that strong flares are more likely to show changes, with all flares ≥M1.6 exhibiting them. For weaker flares, permanent changes are observed in 6/17 C-flares. 34.3% of the permanent changes occurred in the penumbra and 18.9% in the umbra. Parts of the penumbra appeared or disappeared in 23/75 flares. The area where permanent changes occur is larger for stronger flares. Strong flares also show a larger change of flux, but there is no dependence of the magnetic flux change on the heliocentric angle. The mean rate of change of flare-related magnetic field changes is 20.7 Mx cm‑2 min‑1. The number of permanent changes decays exponentially with distance from the polarity inversion line. The frequency of the strength of permanent changes decreases exponentially, and permanent changes up to 750 Mx cm‑2 were observed. We conclude that permanent magnetic field changes are a common phenomenon during flares, and future studies will clarify their relation to accelerated electrons, white-light emission, and sunquakes to further investigate their origin.

  6. SWAP Observations of Post Flare Giant Arches and Evidence of Run-Away Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, M. J.; Seaton, D. B.; Savage, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    It was recently established that post-flare giant arches and regular post-flare loops are generated in the same way, with post-flare giant arches undergoing sustained magnetic reconnection allowing them to grow to heights of approximately 400000 km (>0.5 solar-radii). In this presentation we discuss how reconnection can be sustained to such great heights, and the role the background corona plays in maintaining this growth. We use observations from 14 October 2014, when the SWAP EUV solar telescope on-board the PROBA2 spacecraft observed an eruption that led to the formation of perhaps the largest post-flare loop system seen in the solar corona in solar cycle 24. We combine these observations with those of RHESSI and LASCO, as well as using a forward model to assess the reconnection and loop deposition rate in the post-eruptive loop system.

  7. Solar flares induced D-region ionospheric and geomagnetic perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvakumaran, R.; Maurya, Ajeet K.; Gokani, Sneha A.; Veenadhari, B.; Kumar, Sushil; Venkatesham, K.; Phanikumar, D. V.; Singh, Abhay K.; Siingh, Devendraa; Singh, Rajesh

    2015-02-01

    The D-region ionospheric perturbations caused by solar flares which occurred during January 2010-February 2011, a low solar activity period of current solar cycle 24, have been examined on NWC transmitter signal (19.8 kHz) recorded at an Indian low latitude station, Allahabad (Geographic lat. 25.75°N, long. 81.85°E). A total of 41 solar flares, including 21 C-class, 19 M-class and 01 X-class, occurred during the daylight part of the NWC-Allahabad transmitter receiver great circle path. The local time dependence of solar flare effects on the change in the VLF amplitude, time delay between VLF peak amplitude and X-ray flux peak have been studied during morning, noon and evening periods of local daytime. Using the Long Wave Propagation Capability code V 2.1 the D-region reference height (H/) and sharpness factor (β) for each class of solar flare (C, M and X) have been estimated. It is found that D-region ionospheric parameters (H/, β) strongly depend on the local time of flare's occurrence and their classes. The flare time electron density estimated by using H/ and β shows maximum increase in the electron density of the order of ~80 times as compared to the normal day values. The electron density was found to increase exponentially with increase in the solar flux intensity. The solar flare effect on horizontal component (H) of the Earth's magnetic field over an equatorial station, Tirunelveli (Geographic lat., 8.7°N, long., 77.8°E, dip lat., 0.4°N), shows a maximum increase in H of ~8.5% for M class solar flares. The increase in H is due to the additional magnetic field produced by the ionospheric electrojet over the equatorial station.

  8. On magnetic field stochasticity and nonthermal line broadening in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, E.; Rosner, R.; Tsinganos, K.

    1986-01-01

    Observations of nonthermal line broadening seen in solar flares by the Solar Maximum Mission satellite are discussed in light of recent results on the generation of magnetic field stochasticity. It is shown that a consistent model for the data can be constructed by assuming that the observations signal the destruction of an ambient magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium.

  9. High-resolution Observations of Photospheric Structural Evolution Associated with a Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Ahn, Kwangsu; Jing, Ju; Deng, Na; Cao, Wenda; Wang, Haimin

    2017-08-01

    The structural evolution of the photosphere not only play an important role in contributing to the accumulation of free energy in the corona that powers solar flares, but also may response to the restructuring of coronal field as a result of flare energy release. A better understanding of these issues may be achieved by high-resolution observations of the photospheric structure covering the entire flaring period, which are, however, still rare. Here we present photospheric vector magnetograms and TiO images (at 0.2" and 0.09" resolution, respectively) from before to after a major flare, taken by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory. In the pre-flare state, a small-scale magnetic structure of opposite-polarity configuration is seen near the footpoints of sheared magnetic loops; its magnetic fluxes and currents enhance till the flare start time and decline afterwards. During the main phase, as one flare ribbon sweeps across a sunspot, its different portions accelerate at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. We suggest that the small-scale flux emergence between the two sheared flux systems triggers the flare reconnection, and that the sunspot rotation is driven by the surface Lorentz-force change due to the coronal back reaction.

  10. On the acceleration of high-energy particles in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, K.

    1972-01-01

    The relationship is discussed between some characteristics of microwave Type 4 radio bursts and solar cosmic ray protons of MeV energy. It is shown that the peak flux intensity of those bursts is almost linearly correlated with MeV proton peak flux observed by satellites near the earth and that protons and electrons would be accelerated simultaneously by a similar mechanism during the explosive phase of solar flares. Brief discussion is given on the propagation of solar cosmic rays in the solar envelope after ejection from the flare regions.

  11. On the generation of high-energy particles in solar flares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, K.

    1973-01-01

    This paper discusses the relationship between some characteristics of microwave type IV radio bursts and solar cosmic ray protons of MeV energy. It is shown that the peak flux intensity of those bursts is almost linearly correlated with the MeV proton peak flux observed by satellites near the earth and that protons and electrons would be accelerated simultaneously by a similar mechanism during the explosive phase of solar flares. Brief discussion is given on the propagation of solar cosmic rays in the solar envelope after ejection from the flare regions.

  12. Models of the Solar Atmospheric Response to Flare Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Joel

    2011-01-01

    I will present models of the solar atmospheric response to flare heating. The models solve the equations of non-LTE radiation hydrodynamics with an electron beam added as a flare energy source term. Radiative transfer is solved in detail for many important optically thick hydrogen and helium transitions and numerous optically thin EUV lines making the models ideally suited to study the emission that is produced during flares. I will pay special attention to understanding key EUV lines as well the mechanism for white light production. I will also present preliminary results of how the model solar atmosphere responds to Fletcher & Hudson type flare heating. I will compare this with the results from flare simulations using the standard thick target model.

  13. Characteristics of the Polarity Inversion Line and Solar Flare Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2017-08-01

    Studying connection between solar flares and properties of magnetic field in active regions is very important for understanding the flare physics and developing space weather forecasts. In this work, we analyze relationship between the flare X-ray peak flux from the GOES satellite, and characteristics of the line-of-sight (LOS) magnetograms obtained by the SDO/HMI instrument during the period of April, 2010 - June, 2016. We try to answer two questions: 1) What characteristics of the LOS magnetic field are most important for the flare initiation and magnitude? 2) Is it possible to construct a reliable forecast of ≥ M1.0 and ≥ X1.0 class flares based only on the LOS magnetic field characteristics? To answer these questions, we apply a Polarity Inversion Line (PIL) detection algorithm, and derive various properties of the PIL and the corresponding Active Regions (AR). The importance of these properties for flare forecasting is determined by their ability to separate flaring cases from non-flaring, and their Fisher ranking score. It is found that the PIL characteristics are of special importance for the forecasts of both ≥ M1.0 and ≥ X1.0 flares, while the global AR characteristics become comparably discriminative only for ≥ X1.0 flares. We use the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier and train it on the six characteristics of the most importance for each case. The obtained True Skill Statistics (TSS) values of 0.70 for ≥ M1.0 flares and 0.64 for ≥ X1.0 flares are better than the currently-known expert-based predictions. Therefore, the results confirm the importance of the LOS magnetic field data and, in particular, the PIL region characteristics for flare forecasts.

  14. Particle Acceleration in High-Energy Solar Flares Detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omodei, N.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Liu, W.; Rubio da Costa, F.

    2016-12-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) is the most sensitive instrument ever deployed in space for observing gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV. LAT observations of the active Sun have increased the number of detected solar flares by almost a factor of 10 with respect to previous space observations. We will present an overview of these observations, which include detections of impulsive and sustained emission, extending up to 20 hours in the case of the X-class flare occurred on 2012 March 7. Of particular interest is the first detection of >100 MeV gamma-ray emission from three solar flares whose positions behind the limb were confirmed by the STEREO spacecrafts. These observations sample flares from active regions originating from behind both the eastern and western limbs and present a unique opportunity to diagnose the mechanisms of high-energy emission and particle acceleration in solar flares. We will present the Fermi-LAT, RHESSI and STEREO observations of these flares and discuss how these observations provide constrains on different emission mechanisms.

  15. The solar energetic particle propagation of solar flare events on 24th solar cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluk, P.; Khumlumlert, T.; Kanlayaprasit, N.; Aiemsa-ad, N.

    2017-09-01

    Now the Sun is in the 24th solar cycle. The peak of solar cycle correspond to the number of the Sun activities, which one of them is solar flare. The solar flare is the violent explosion at the solar atmosphere and releases the high energy ion from the Sun to the interplanetary medium. Solar energetic particles or solar cosmic ray have important effect on the Earth, such as disrupt radio communication. We analyze the particle transport of the solar flare events on August 9, 2011, January 27, 2012, and November 3, 2013 in 24th solar cycle. The particle data for each solar flare was obtained from SIS instrument on ACE spacecraft. We simulate the particle transport with the equation of Ruffolo 1995, 1998. We solve the transport equation with the numerical technique of finite different. We find the injection duration from the Sun to the Earth by the compared fitting method of piecewise linear function between the simulation results and particle data from spacecraft. The position of these solar flare events are on the west side of the Sun, which are N18W68, N33W85, and S12W16. We found that mean free path is roughly constant for a single event. This implies that the interplanetary scattering is approximately energy independent, but the level of scattering varies with time. The injection duration decreases with increasing energy. We found the resultant variation of the highest energy and lowest energy, because the effect of space environments and the number of the detected data was small. The high mean free path of the high energy particles showed the transport capability of particles along to the variable magnetic field line. The violent explosion of these solar flares didn’t affect on the Earth magnetic field with Kp-index less than 3.

  16. Global energetics of solar flares. I. Magnetic energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschwanden, Markus J. [Lockheed Martin, Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Org. A021S, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Xu, Yan; Jing, Ju, E-mail: aschwanden@lmsal.com, E-mail: yan.xu@njit.edu, E-mail: ju.jing@njit.edu [Space Weather Research Laboratory, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    We present the first part of a project on the global energetics of solar flares and coronal mass ejections that includes about 400 M- and X-class flares observed with Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We calculate the potential (E{sub p} ), the nonpotential (E {sub np}) or free energies (E {sub free} = E {sub np} – E{sub p} ), and the flare-dissipated magnetic energies (E {sub diss}). We calculate these magnetic parameters using two different NLFFF codes: the COR-NLFFF code uses the line-of-sight magnetic field component B{sub z} from HMI to define the potential field, and the two-dimensional (2D) coordinates of automatically detected coronal loops in six coronal wavelengths from AIA to measure the helical twist of coronal loops caused by vertical currents, while the PHOT-NLFFF code extrapolates the photospheric three-dimensional (3D) vector fields. We find agreement between the two codes in the measurement of free energies and dissipated energies within a factor of ≲ 3. The size distributions of magnetic parameters exhibit powerlaw slopes that are approximately consistent with the fractal-diffusive self-organized criticality model. The magnetic parameters exhibit scaling laws for the nonpotential energy, E{sub np}∝E{sub p}{sup 1.02}, for the free energy, E{sub free}∝E{sub p}{sup 1.7} and E{sub free}∝B{sub φ}{sup 1.0}L{sup 1.5}, for the dissipated energy, E{sub diss}∝E{sub p}{sup 1.6} and E{sub diss}∝E{sub free}{sup 0.9}, and the energy dissipation volume, V∝E{sub diss}{sup 1.2}. The potential energies vary in the range of E{sub p} = 1 × 10{sup 31}-4 × 10{sup 33} erg, while the free energy has a ratio of E {sub free}/E{sub p} ≈ 1%-25%. The Poynting flux amounts to F {sub flare} ≈ 5 × 10{sup 8}-10{sup 10} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} during flares, which averages to F {sub AR} ≈ 6 × 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} during the entire observation

  17. Dynamic evolution of the eruptive and confined flares observed by IRIS and RHESSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, N. H.; Yang, Y. H.; Kim, S.; Kim, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    The catastrophic eruption with huge energy released is the well-known characteristic of solar flares. Some flares followed by coronal mass ejection (CME) are named as eruptive flares while those CME-less are confined. In this study, we tracked the flare-productive active region 12297 from 2015 March 11 to 13. It produced a series of X and M flares during the disk passage, of which one X-class erupted flare and two M-class confined flares are investigated. We combine the Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) together with RHESSI hard X-ray observations to derive the flare energetics, including thermal and non-thermal energy of plasma in the transition region and above. IRIS FUV/NUV imaging spectroscopy and simultaneous HXR observations are used to characterize the flare kernels. The Fe XXI lines spectra obtained in IRIS, which represents the high temperature emission, shows highly blued-shifted in these kernels, suggesting hot plasma upflow. We also utilize the IRIS lines to diagnose the electron number density during the impulsive phase of flare.

  18. Evidence of significant energy input in the late phase of a solar flare from NuSTAR x-ray observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhar, Matej; Krucker, Säm; Hannah, Iain G.

    2017-01-01

    We present observations of the occulted active region AR 12222 during the third Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) solar campaign on 2014 December 11, with concurrent Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/AIA and FOXSI-2 sounding rocket observations. The active region produced a medium...

  19. Statistical properties of solar flares and coronal mass ejections through the solar cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telloni, Daniele; Antonucci, Ester [INAF-Astrophysical Observatory of Torino, Via Osservatorio 20, 10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Carbone, Vincenzo [University of Calabria, Department of Physics, Ponte P. Bucci Cubo 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy); CNR-Institute for Chemical-Physical Processes, Ponte P. Bucci Cubo 33B, 87036 Rende (Italy); Lepreti, Fabio [University of Calabria, Department of Physics, Ponte P. Bucci Cubo 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy)

    2016-03-25

    Waiting Time Distributions (WTDs) of solar flares are investigated all through the solar cycle. The same approach applied to Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) in a previous work is considered here for flare occurrence. Our analysis reveals that flares and CMEs share some common statistical properties, which result dependent on the level of solar activity. Both flares and CMEs seem to independently occur during minimum solar activity phases, whilst their WTDs significantly deviate from a Poisson function at solar maximum, thus suggesting that these events are correlated. The characteristics of WTDs are constrained by the physical processes generating those eruptions associated with flares and CMEs. A scenario may be drawn in which different mechanisms are actively at work during different phases of the solar cycle. Stochastic processes, most likely related to random magnetic reconnections of the field lines, seem to play a key role during solar minimum periods. On the other hand, persistent processes, like sympathetic eruptions associated to the variability of the photospheric magnetism, are suggested to dominate during periods of high solar activity. Moreover, despite the similar statistical properties shown by flares and CMEs, as it was mentioned above, their WTDs appear different in some aspects. During solar minimum periods, the flare occurrence randomness seems to be more evident than for CMEs. Those persistent mechanisms generating interdependent events during maximum periods of solar activity can be suggested to play a more important role for CMEs than for flares, thus mitigating the competitive action of the random processes, which seem instead strong enough to weaken the correlations among flare event occurrence during solar minimum periods. However, it cannot be excluded that the physical processes at the basis of the origin of the temporal correlation between solar events are different for flares and CMEs, or that, more likely, more sophisticated effects are

  20. Modelling Quasi-Periodic Pulsations in Solar and Stellar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, J. A.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Dominique, M.; Jelínek, P.; Takasao, S.

    2018-02-01

    Solar flare emission is detected in all EM bands and variations in flux density of solar energetic particles. Often the EM radiation generated in solar and stellar flares shows a pronounced oscillatory pattern, with characteristic periods ranging from a fraction of a second to several minutes. These oscillations are referred to as quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs), to emphasise that they often contain apparent amplitude and period modulation. We review the current understanding of quasi-periodic pulsations in solar and stellar flares. In particular, we focus on the possible physical mechanisms, with an emphasis on the underlying physics that generates the resultant range of periodicities. These physical mechanisms include MHD oscillations, self-oscillatory mechanisms, oscillatory reconnection/reconnection reversal, wave-driven reconnection, two loop coalescence, MHD flow over-stability, the equivalent LCR-contour mechanism, and thermal-dynamical cycles. We also provide a histogram of all QPP events published in the literature at this time. The occurrence of QPPs puts additional constraints on the interpretation and understanding of the fundamental processes operating in flares, e.g. magnetic energy liberation and particle acceleration. Therefore, a full understanding of QPPs is essential in order to work towards an integrated model of solar and stellar flares.

  1. The Dependence of Solar Flare Limb Darkening on Emission Peak Formation Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Edward; Epp, Luke; Eparvier, Francis; Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2017-08-01

    Solar limb effects are local brightening or darkening of an emission that depend on where in the Sun's atmosphere it forms. Near the solar limb, optically thick (thin) emissions will darken (brighten) as the column of absorbers (emitters) along the line-of-sight increases. Note that in limb brightening, emission sources are re-arranged whereas in limb darkening they are obscured. Thus, only limb darkening is expected to occur in disk integrated observations. Limb darkening also results in center-to-limb variations of disk-integrated solar flare spectra, with important consequences for how planetary atmospheres are affected by flares. Flares are typically characterized by their flux in the optically thin 0.1-0.8 nm band measured by the X-ray Sensor (XRS) on board the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). On the other hand, Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) line emissions can limb darken because they are sensitive to resonant scattering, resulting in a flare's location on the solar disk controlling the amount of ionizing radiation that reaches a planet. For example, an X-class flare originating from disk center may significantly heat a planet's thermosphere, whereas the same flare originating near the limb may have no effect because much of the effective emissions are scattered in the solar corona.To advance the relatively poor understanding of flare limb darkening, we use over 300 M-class or larger flares observed by the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to characterize limb darkening as a function of emission peak formation temperature, Tf. For hot coronal emissions (Tf>2 MK), these results show a linear relationship between the degree of limb darkening and Tf where lines with Tf=2 MK darken approximately 7 times more than lines with Tf=16 MK. Because the extent of limb darkening is dependent on the height of the source plasma, we use simple Beer-Lambert radiative transfer analysis to interpret these results

  2. Verification of operational solar flare forecast: Case of Regional Warning Center Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Yûki; Den, Mitsue; Ishii, Mamoru

    2017-08-01

    In this article, we discuss a verification study of an operational solar flare forecast in the Regional Warning Center (RWC) Japan. The RWC Japan has been issuing four-categorical deterministic solar flare forecasts for a long time. In this forecast verification study, we used solar flare forecast data accumulated over 16 years (from 2000 to 2015). We compiled the forecast data together with solar flare data obtained with the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). Using the compiled data sets, we estimated some conventional scalar verification measures with 95% confidence intervals. We also estimated a multi-categorical scalar verification measure. These scalar verification measures were compared with those obtained by the persistence method and recurrence method. As solar activity varied during the 16 years, we also applied verification analyses to four subsets of forecast-observation pair data with different solar activity levels. We cannot conclude definitely that there are significant performance differences between the forecasts of RWC Japan and the persistence method, although a slightly significant difference is found for some event definitions. We propose to use a scalar verification measure to assess the judgment skill of the operational solar flare forecast. Finally, we propose a verification strategy for deterministic operational solar flare forecasting. For dichotomous forecast, a set of proposed verification measures is a frequency bias for bias, proportion correct and critical success index for accuracy, probability of detection for discrimination, false alarm ratio for reliability, Peirce skill score for forecast skill, and symmetric extremal dependence index for association. For multi-categorical forecast, we propose a set of verification measures as marginal distributions of forecast and observation for bias, proportion correct for accuracy, correlation coefficient and joint probability distribution for association, the

  3. Fast-mode Coronal EUV Wave Trains Associated with Solar Flares and CMEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Ofman, Leon; Downs, Cooper; Karlicky, Marian; Chen, Bin

    2017-08-01

    As a new observational phenomenon, Quasi-periodic, Fast Propagating EUV wave trains (QFPs) are fast-mode magnetosonic waves closely related to quasi-periodic pulsations commonly detected in solar flares (traditionally with non-imaging observations). They can provide critical clues to flare energy release and serve as new tools for coronal seismology. We report recent advances in observing and modeling QFPs, including evidence of heating and cooling cycles revealed with differential emission measure (DEM) analysis that are consistent with alternating compression and rarefaction expected for magnetosonic waves. Through a statistical survey, we found a preferential association of QFPs with eruptive flares (with CMEs) rather than confined flares (without CMEs). We also identified some correlation with quasi-periodic radio bursts observed at JVLA and Ondrejov observatories. We will discuss the implications of these results and the potential roles of QFPs in coronal heating and energy transport.

  4. MOST OBSERVATIONS OF OUR NEAREST NEIGHBOR: FLARES ON PROXIMA CENTAURI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, James R. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, 516 High Street, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States); Kipping, David M. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Sasselov, Dimitar [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Matthews, Jaymie M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Cameron, Chris [Department of Mathematics, Physics and Geology, Cape Breton University, 1250 Grand Lake Road, Sydney, NS B1P 6L2 (Canada)

    2016-10-01

    We present a study of white-light flares from the active M5.5 dwarf Proxima Centauri using the Canadian microsatellite Microvariability and Oscillations of STars . Using 37.6 days of monitoring data from 2014 to 2015, we have detected 66 individual flare events, the largest number of white-light flares observed to date on Proxima Cen. Flare energies in our sample range from 10{sup 29} to 10{sup 31.5} erg. The flare rate is lower than that of other classic flare stars of a similar spectral type, such as UV Ceti, which may indicate Proxima Cen had a higher flare rate in its youth. Proxima Cen does have an unusually high flare rate given its slow rotation period, however. Extending the observed power-law occurrence distribution down to 10{sup 28} erg, we show that flares with flux amplitudes of 0.5% occur 63 times per day, while superflares with energies of 10{sup 33} erg occur ∼8 times per year. Small flares may therefore pose a great difficulty in searches for transits from the recently announced 1.27 M {sub ⊕} Proxima b, while frequent large flares could have significant impact on the planetary atmosphere.

  5. Comparing Solar-Flare Acceleration of >-20 MeV Protons and Electrons Above Various Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Albert Y.

    2010-01-01

    A large fraction (up to tens of percent) of the energy released in solar flares goes into accelerated ions and electrons, and studies indicate that these two populations have comparable energy content. RHESSI observations have shown a striking close linear correlation between the 2.223 MeV neutron-capture gamma-ray line and electron bremsstrahlung emission >300 keV, indicating that the flare acceleration of >^20 MeV protons and >300 keV electrons is roughly proportional over >3 orders of magnitude in fluence. We show that the correlations of neutron-capture line fluence with GOES class or with bremsstrahlung emission at lower energies show deviations from proportionality, primarily for flares with lower fluences. From analyzing thirteen flares, we demonstrate that there appear to be two classes of flares with high-energy acceleration: flares that exhibit only proportional acceleration of ions and electrons down to 50 keV and flares that have an additional soft, low-energy bremsstrahlung component, suggesting two separate populations of accelerated electrons. We use RHESSI spectroscopy and imaging to investigate a number of these flares in detail.

  6. DYNAMICS OF ELECTRIC CURRENTS, MAGNETIC FIELD TOPOLOGY, AND HELIOSEISMIC RESPONSE OF A SOLAR FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharykin, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G. [Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States)

    2015-07-20

    The solar flare on 2011 July 30 was of a modest X-ray class (M9.3), but it made a strong photospheric impact and produced a “sunquake,” which was observed with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory. In addition to the helioseismic waves, the flare caused a large expanding area of white-light emission and was accompanied by the rapid formation of a sunspot structure in the flare region. The flare produced hard X-ray (HXR) emission less then 300 keV and no coronal mass ejection (CME). The absence of CME rules out magnetic rope eruption as a mechanism of helioseismic waves. The sunquake impact does not coincide with the strongest HXR source, which contradicts the standard beam-driven mechanism of sunquake generation. We discuss the connectivity of the flare energy release with the electric currents dynamics and show the potential importance of high-speed plasma flows in the lower solar atmosphere during the flare energy release.

  7. Heating and acceleration of coronal and chromospheric ions during solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckean, M. E.; Winglee, Robert M.; Dulk, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    One-dimensional, electrostatic, particle-in-cell simulations are used to explore two mechanisms proposed to explain turbulent broadening of soft x ray emission lines of heavy ions observed during solar flares and the presence of blue-shifted components. Results from the simulations are in qualitative agreement with the observations.

  8. A static model of chromospheric heating in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricchiazzi, P. J.; Canfield, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    The response of the solar chromosphere to flare processes, namely nonthermal electrons, thermal conduction, and coronal pressure, is modeled. Finite difference methods employing linearization and iteration are used in obtaining simultaneous solutions to the equations of steady-state energy balance, hydrostatic equilibrium, radiative transfer, and atomic statistical equilibrium. The atmospheric response is assumed to be confined to one dimension by a strong vertical magnetic field. A solution is obtained to the radiative transfer equation for the most important optically thick transitions of hydrogen, magnesium, and calcium. The theoretical atmospheres discussed here are seen as elucidating the role of various physical processes in establishing the structure of flare chromospheres. At low coronal pressures, conduction is found to be more important than nonthermal electrons in establishing the position of the transition region. Only thermal conduction can adequately account for the chromospheric evaporation in compact flares. Of the mechanisms considered, only nonthermal electrons bring about significant heating below the flare transition region.

  9. Joule heating and runaway electron acceleration in a solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Kundu, Mukul R.; Kane, Sharad R.

    1989-01-01

    The hard and soft x ray and microwave emissions from a solar flare (May 14, 1980) were analyzed and interpreted in terms of Joule heating and runaway electron acceleration in one or more current sheets. It is found that all three emissions can be generated with sub-Dreicer electric fields. The soft x ray emitting plasma can only be heated by a single current sheet if the resistivity in the sheet is well above the classical, collisional resistivity of 10(exp 7) K, 10(exp 11)/cu cm plasma. If the hard x ray emission is from thermal electrons, anomalous resistivity or densities exceeding 3 x 10(exp 12)/cu cm are required. If the hard x ray emission is from nonthermal electrons, the emissions can be produced with classical resistivity in the current sheets if the heating rate is approximately 4 times greater than that deduced from the soft x ray data (with a density of 10(exp 10)/cu cm in the soft x ray emitting region), if there are at least 10(exp 4) current sheets, and if the plasma properties in the sheets are characteristic of the superhot plasma observed in some flares by Lin et al., and with Hinotori. Most of the released energy goes directly into bulk heating, rather than accelerated particles.

  10. High-energy particle production in solar flares (SEP, gamma-ray and neutron emissions). [solar energetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chupp, E. L.

    1987-01-01

    Electrons and ions, over a wide range of energies, are produced in association with solar flares. Solar energetic particles (SEPs), observed in space and near earth, consist of electrons and ions that range in energy from 10 keV to about 100 MeV and from 1 MeV to 20 GeV, respectively. SEPs are directly recorded by charged particle detectors, while X-ray, gamma-ray, and neutron detectors indicate the properties of the accelerated particles (electrons and ions) which have interacted in the solar atmosphere. A major problem of solar physics is to understand the relationship between these two groups of charged particles; in particular whether they are accelerated by the same mechanism. The paper reviews the physics of gamma-rays and neutron production in the solar atmosphere and the method by which properties of the primary charged particles produced in the solar flare can be deduced. Recent observations of energetic photons and neutrons in space and at the earth are used to present a current picture of the properties of impulsively flare accelerated electrons and ions. Some important properties discussed are time scale of production, composition, energy spectra, accelerator geometry. Particular attention is given to energetic particle production in the large flare on June 3, 1982.

  11. Solar Flare Termination Shock and Synthetic Emission Line Profiles of the Fe xxi 1354.08 Å Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Lijia [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Li, Gang [Department of Space Science and CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL (United States); Reeves, Kathy; Raymond, John, E-mail: gang.li@uah.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic phenomena that occur in the solar system. In the standard solar flare model, a fast mode shock, often referred to as the flare termination shock (TS), can exist above the loop-top source of hard X-ray emissions. The existence of the TS has been recently related to spectral hardening of a flare’s hard X-ray spectra at energies >300 keV. Observations of the Fe xxi 1354.08 Å line during solar flares by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ) spacecraft have found significant redshifts with >100 km s{sup −1}, which is consistent with a reconnection downflow. The ability to detect such a redshift with IRIS suggests that one may be able to use IRIS observations to identify flare TSs. Using a magnetohydrodynamic simulation to model magnetic reconnection of a solar flare and assuming the existence of a TS in the downflow of the reconnection plasma, we model the synthetic emission of the Fe xxi 1354.08 line in this work. We show that the existence of the TS in the solar flare may manifest itself in the Fe xxi 1354.08 Å line.

  12. Predicting Solar Flares Using SDO/HMI Vector Magnetic Data Product and Random Forest Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Wang, Jason; Wang, Haimin

    2017-08-01

    Adverse space weather effects can often be traced to solar flares, prediction of which has drawn significant research interests. Many previous forecasting studies used physical parameters derived from photospheric line-of-sight field or ground-based vector field observations. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory produces full-disk vector magnetograms with continuous high-cadence, while flare prediction efforts utilizing this unprecedented data source are still limited. Here we report results of flare prediction using physical parameters provided by the Space-weather HMI Active Region Patches (SHARP) and related data products. We survey X-ray flares occurred from 2010 May to 2016 December, and categorize their source regions into four classes (B, C, M, and X) according to the maximum GOES magnitude of flares they generated. We then retrieve SHARP related parameters for each selected region at the beginning of its flare date to build a database. Finally, we train a machine-learning algorithm, called random forest (RF), to predict the occurrence of a certain class of flares in a given active region within 24 hours, evaluate the classifier performance using the 10-fold cross validation scheme, and characterize the results using standard performace metrics. Compared to previous works, our experiments indicate that using the HMI parameters and RF is a valid method for flare forecasting with fairly reasonable prediction performance. We also find that the total unsigned quantities of vertical current, current helicity, and flux near polarity inversion line are among the most important parameters for classifying flaring regions into different classes.

  13. Magnetic-Island Contraction and Particle Acceleration in Simulated Eruptive Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidoni, S. E.; Devore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T.; Lynch, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed high-energy impulsive emission in solar flares is not well understood. Drake et al. proposed a mechanism for accelerating electrons in contracting magnetic islands formed by kinetic reconnection in multi-layered current sheets (CSs). We apply these ideas to sunward-moving flux ropes (2.5D magnetic islands) formed during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. A simple analytic model is used to calculate the energy gain of particles orbiting the field lines of the contracting magnetic islands in our ultrahigh-resolution 2.5D numerical simulation. We find that the estimated energy gains in a single island range up to a factor of five. This is higher than that found by Drake et al. for islands in the terrestrial magnetosphere and at the heliopause, due to strong plasma compression that occurs at the flare CS. In order to increase their energy by two orders of magnitude and plausibly account for the observed high-energy flare emission, the electrons must visit multiple contracting islands. This mechanism should produce sporadic emission because island formation is intermittent. Moreover, a large number of particles could be accelerated in each magneto hydro dynamic-scale island, which may explain the inferred rates of energetic-electron production in flares. We conclude that island contraction in the flare CS is a promising candidate for electron acceleration in solar eruptions.

  14. MAGNETIC-ISLAND CONTRACTION AND PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN SIMULATED ERUPTIVE SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidoni, S. E. [The Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue Northeast, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T. [Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Lynch, B. J., E-mail: silvina.e.guidoni@nasa.gov [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed high-energy impulsive emission in solar flares is not well understood. Drake et al. proposed a mechanism for accelerating electrons in contracting magnetic islands formed by kinetic reconnection in multi-layered current sheets (CSs). We apply these ideas to sunward-moving flux ropes (2.5D magnetic islands) formed during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. A simple analytic model is used to calculate the energy gain of particles orbiting the field lines of the contracting magnetic islands in our ultrahigh-resolution 2.5D numerical simulation. We find that the estimated energy gains in a single island range up to a factor of five. This is higher than that found by Drake et al. for islands in the terrestrial magnetosphere and at the heliopause, due to strong plasma compression that occurs at the flare CS. In order to increase their energy by two orders of magnitude and plausibly account for the observed high-energy flare emission, the electrons must visit multiple contracting islands. This mechanism should produce sporadic emission because island formation is intermittent. Moreover, a large number of particles could be accelerated in each magnetohydrodynamic-scale island, which may explain the inferred rates of energetic-electron production in flares. We conclude that island contraction in the flare CS is a promising candidate for electron acceleration in solar eruptions.

  15. Toward an Efficient Prediction of Solar Flares: Which Parameters, and How?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manolis K. Georgoulis

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Solar flare prediction has become a forefront topic in contemporary solar physics, with numerous published methods relying on numerous predictive parameters, that can even be divided into parameter classes. Attempting further insight, we focus on two popular classes of flare-predictive parameters, namely multiscale (i.e., fractal and multifractal and proxy (i.e., morphological parameters, and we complement our analysis with a study of the predictive capability of fundamental physical parameters (i.e., magnetic free energy and relative magnetic helicity. Rather than applying the studied parameters to a comprehensive statistical sample of flaring and non-flaring active regions, that was the subject of our previous studies, the novelty of this work is their application to an exceptionally long and high-cadence time series of the intensely eruptive National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA active region (AR 11158, observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Aiming for a detailed study of the temporal evolution of each parameter, we seek distinctive patterns that could be associated with the four largest flares in the AR in the course of its five-day observing interval. We find that proxy parameters only tend to show preflare impulses that are practical enough to warrant subsequent investigation with sufficient statistics. Combining these findings with previous results, we conclude that: (i carefully constructed, physically intuitive proxy parameters may be our best asset toward an efficient future flare-forecasting; and (ii the time series of promising parameters may be as important as their instantaneous values. Value-based prediction is the only approach followed so far. Our results call for novel signal and/or image processing techniques to efficiently utilize combined amplitude and temporal-profile information to optimize the inferred solar-flare probabilities.

  16. Numerical simulations of loops heated to solar flare temperatures. III - Asymmetrical heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, C.-C.; Doschek, G. A.; Karpen, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical model is defined for asymmetric full solar flare loop heating and comparisons are made with observational data. The Dynamic Flux Tube Model is used to describe the heating process in terms of one-dimensional, two fluid conservation equations of mass, energy and momentum. An adaptive grid allows for the downward movement of the transition region caused by an advancing conduction front. A loop 20,000 km long is considered, along with a flare heating system and the hydrodynamic evolution of the loop. The model was applied to generating line profiles and spatial X-ray and UV line distributions, which were compared with SMM, P78-1 and Hintori data for Fe, Ca and Mg spectra. Little agreement was obtained, and it is suggested that flares be treated as multi-loop phenomena. Finally, it is concluded that chromospheric evaporation is not an effective mechanism for generating the soft X-ray bursts associated with flares.

  17. Soft electron beams in solar active and flare region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korneev, V.V.; Mandelshtam, S.L.; Oparin, S.N.; Urnov, A.M.; Zhitnik, I.A.

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of the experimental data obtained from the high resolution X-ray spectra for solar flares and active regions the suprathermal electron model (SEM) was proposed. This model suggests the existance of the multi-temperature structure of the solar plasma emitting Fe and Ca X-rays and the presence of additional electrons with low energies (no more than 10 keV) and small densities of about 1-5 percent relative to the thermal component.

  18. A Parameter Study for Modeling Mg ii h and k Emission during Solar Flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio da Costa, Fatima [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Kleint, Lucia, E-mail: frubio@stanford.edu [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, 5210, Windisch (Switzerland)

    2017-06-20

    Solar flares show highly unusual spectra in which the thermodynamic conditions of the solar atmosphere are encoded. Current models are unable to fully reproduce the spectroscopic flare observations, especially the single-peaked spectral profiles of the Mg ii h and k lines. We aim to understand the formation of the chromospheric and optically thick Mg ii h and k lines in flares through radiative transfer calculations. We take a flare atmosphere obtained from a simulation with the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN as input for a radiative transfer modeling with the RH code. By iteratively changing this model atmosphere and varying thermodynamic parameters such as temperature, electron density, and velocity, we study their effects on the emergent intensity spectra. We reproduce the typical single-peaked Mg ii h and k flare spectral shape and approximate the intensity ratios to the subordinate Mg ii lines by increasing either densities, temperatures, or velocities at the line core formation height range. Additionally, by combining unresolved upflows and downflows up to ∼250 km s{sup −1} within one resolution element, we reproduce the widely broadened line wings. While we cannot unambiguously determine which mechanism dominates in flares, future modeling efforts should investigate unresolved components, additional heat dissipation, larger velocities, and higher densities and combine the analysis of multiple spectral lines.

  19. The Solar Flare 4: 10 keV X-ray Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, K. J. H.

    2004-01-01

    The 4-10 keV solar flare spectrum includes highly excited lines of stripped Ca, Fe, and Ni ions as well as a continuum steeply falling with energy. Groups of lines at approximately 7 keV and approximately 8 keV, observed during flares by the broad-band RHESSI spectrometer and called here the Fe-line and Fe/Ni-line features, are formed mostly of Fe lines but with Ni lines contributing to the approximately 8 keV feature. Possible temperature indicators of these line features are discussed - the peak or centroid energies of the Fe-line feature, the line ratio of the Fe-line to the Fe/Ni-line features, and the equivalent width of the Fe-line feature. The equivalent width is by far the most sensitive to temperature. However, results will be confused if, as is commonly believed, the abundance of Fe varies from flare to flare, even during the course of a single flare. With temperature determined from the thermal continuum, the Fe-line feature becomes a diagnostic of the Fe abundance in flare plasmas. These results are of interest for other hot plasmas in coronal ionization equilibrium such as stellar flare plasmas, hot gas in galaxies, and older supernova remnants.

  20. Downward Shift of the Acceleration/Injection Region during Solar Flares,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    ACCELERATION/INJECTION REGION By._ DURING SOLAR FLARES Distriut .j: AvaIjj.,j.1 L t.:S. R . K~an e’ Avs ; Sri ,. Dist Space Scinces Laboraory, Uni rsity of...cannot be ruled out, there is no direct observational evidence to support the density enhancements caused by these waves. To summarize, the present

  1. 3-D Structure of Arcade Type Flares Deduced from Soft X-Ray Observations of a Homologous Flare Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, S.; Uchida, Y.; Hirose, S.

    2002-01-01

    In the solar flare problems, no ultimate model that matches observations has been established. One of the reasons for this is due to the restrictions in the observational data lacking information about the third dimension. Thus, many researchers have tried to get information about the three dimensional (3-D) coronal structures by using various techniques or ideas; like movie analysis, calculations using vector or line-of-sight components of photospheric magnetic data, and etc.. In the near future, a mission named STEREO which will obtain information about the 3-D coronal structures from two satellites, is planned. In the present paper, we noted the homology in a homologous flare series of February 1992. We derived a 3-D coronal structures by making use of the images obtained from the three different sight-lines at some common phases in them with Yohkoh SXT. The result of this analysis has made it clear that the so-called ``cusped arcade'' at the maximum phase in the well-known 1992 February 21 flare is, contrary to the general views, an ``elongated arch'' seen with a shallow oblique angle. It is not the ``flare arcade'' seen axis-on as widely conceived. This elongated arch coincides roughly with a diagonal of the main body of the "soft X-ray arcade" that came up later. The magnetic structure causing the flare as a whole turned out in this analysis to be a structure with quadruple magnetic sources. The relative locations of these four characteristic sources stayed almost the same throughout the period of this homologous flare series, determining the fundamental shape of this homologous series. We also examined the corresponding features for other similar events, also using information from other satellites, and will report the results.

  2. Three-dimensional magnetic reconnection and its application to solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janvier, Miho

    2017-02-01

    Solar flares are powerful radiations occurring in the Sun's atmosphere. They are powered by magnetic reconnection, a phenomenon that can convert magnetic energy into other forms of energy such as heat and kinetic energy, and which is believed to be ubiquitous in the universe. With the ever increasing spatial and temporal resolutions of solar observations, as well as numerical simulations benefiting from increasing computer power, we can now probe into the nature and the characteristics of magnetic reconnection in three dimensions to better understand the phenomenon's consequences during eruptive flares in our star's atmosphere. We review in the following the efforts made on different fronts to approach the problem of magnetic reconnection. In particular, we will see how understanding the magnetic topology in three dimensions helps in locating the most probable regions for reconnection to occur, how the current layer evolves in three dimensions and how reconnection leads to the formation of flux ropes, plasmoids and flaring loops.

  3. High-Resolution Observations of Flares in an Arch Filament System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yingna; Liu, Rui; Li, Shangwei; Cao, Wenda; Ji, Haisheng

    2017-08-01

    We present high-resolution observations of five sequential solar flares occurring in NOAA Active Region (AR) 12396 taken with the 1.6-m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory, complemented by IRIS and SDO observations. The main flaring region is an arch filament system (AFS) consisting of multiple bundles of dark filament threads enclosed by scattered flare brightenings. We study the magnetic configuration and evolution of the active region by constructing coronal magnetic field models based on SDO/HMI magnetograms using two independent methods, i.e., the nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation and the flux rope insertion method. We are able to identify multiple flux ropes based on magnetic twist derived from the extrapolated NLFFF, which is consistent with the NST observations of multiple filaments. Both models suggest that the filament bundles may posses mixed signs of helicity, i.e., positive (negative) in the north (south). The footprints of quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) derived from the extrapolated NLFFF compare favorably with the observed flare ribbons. Moreover, magnetic field lines traced along the semi-circular footprint of a dome-like QSL surrounding the flaring region are connected to the regions of significant helicity and Poynting flux injection. An interesting double-ribbon fine structure located at the east border of the AFS is consistent with the fine structure of the QSL's footprint. The maps of magnetic twist show that positive twist became dominant as time progressed, which is consistent with the injection of positive helicity during a 26 hour interval before the flares. The trigger mechanisms and detailed dynamics of the observed flares are also discussed.

  4. SIGN SINGULARITY AND FLARES IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 11158

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorriso-Valvo, L.; De Vita, G. [IMIP-CNR, U.O.S. LICRYL di Cosenza, Ponte P. Bucci, Cubo 31C, I-87036 Rende (Italy); Kazachenko, M. D.; Krucker, S.; Welsch, B. T.; Fisher, G. H. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley 94720, California (United States); Primavera, L.; Servidio, S.; Lepreti, F.; Carbone, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, Ponte P. Bucci, Cubo 31C, I-87036 Rende (Italy); Vecchio, A., E-mail: sorriso@fis.unical.it [INGV, Sede di Cosenza, Ponte P. Bucci, Cubo 30C, I-87036 Rende (Italy)

    2015-03-01

    Solar Active Region NOAA 11158 has hosted a number of strong flares, including one X2.2 event. The complexity of current density and current helicity are studied through cancellation analysis of their sign-singular measure, which features power-law scaling. Spectral analysis is also performed, revealing the presence of two separate scaling ranges with different spectral index. The time evolution of parameters is discussed. Sudden changes of the cancellation exponents at the time of large flares and the presence of correlation with Extreme-Ultra-Violet and X-ray flux suggest that eruption of large flares can be linked to the small-scale properties of the current structures.

  5. Solar flares and variation of local geomagnetic field: Measurements by the Huancayo Observatory over 2001-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Reyes Rafael E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the local variation of the geomagnetic field measured by the Huancayo Geomagnetic Observatory, Peru, during 2001-2010. Initially, we sought to relate the SFI values, stored daily in the NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center, with the corresponding geomagnetic index; however, no relation was observed. Nonetheless, subsequently, a comparison between the monthly geomagnetic-activity index and the monthly SFI average allowed observing a temporal correlation between these average indices. This correlation shows that the effect of the solar flares does not simultaneously appear on the corresponding magnetic indices. To investigate this, we selected the most intense X-class flares; then, we checked the magnetic field disturbances observed in the Huancayo Geomagnetic Observatory magnetograms. We found some disturbances of the local geomagnetic field in the second and third day after the corresponding solar flare; however, the disturbance strength of the local geomagnetic field is not correlated with the X-class of the solar flare. Finally, there are some disturbances of the local geomagnetic field that are simultaneous with the X-class solar flares and they show a correlation with the total flux of the solar flare.

  6. Solar Flares and Variation of Local Geomagnetic Field: Measurements by the Huancayo Observatory over 2001-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos Reyes, Rafael E.; Gárate Ayesta, Gabriel A.; Reyes Navarro, Felipe A.

    2017-06-01

    We study the local variation of the geomagnetic field measured by the Huancayo Geomagnetic Observatory, Peru, during 2001-2010. Initially, we sought to relate the SFI values, stored daily in the NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center, with the corresponding geomagnetic index; however, no relation was observed. Nonetheless, subsequently, a comparison between the monthly geomagnetic-activity index and the monthly SFI average allowed observing a temporal correlation between these average indices. This correlation shows that the effect of the solar flares does not simultaneously appear on the corresponding magnetic indices. To investigate this, we selected the most intense X-class flares; then, we checked the magnetic field disturbances observed in the Huancayo Geomagnetic Observatory magnetograms. We found some disturbances of the local geomagnetic field in the second and third day after the corresponding solar flare; however, the disturbance strength of the local geomagnetic field is not correlated with the X-class of the solar flare. Finally, there are some disturbances of the local geomagnetic field that are simultaneous with the X-class solar flares and they show a correlation with the total flux of the solar flare.

  7. On the response of the upper atmosphere to solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, David J.

    Over the past several decades, modern civilizations have become increasingly dependent on spacecraft that reside in the near-Earth space environment. For this reason, scientists and engineers have been interested in understanding the causes of perturbations to the background state of the Earth's upper atmosphere, and to quantify the impact of these events. As a result of the states of the thermosphere and ionosphere being directly dependent on the incident radiation from the sum, it is expected that sudden changes in the solar radiative output should cause significant changes in the upper atmosphere. Such dynamics are investigated in this study, specifically the manner in which solar flares affect the density, circulation, and temperature of the Earth's thermosphere and ionosphere. A global model of this region is used to examine how the upper atmosphere responds to such transient events. In order to quantify the response, the model is run during realistic events in order to understand the magnitudes of the resulting perturbations to the global ionosphere-thermosphere system. In the thermosphere, density perturbations of approximately 15% are found to occur on the dayside within 1.5 hours after the start of a solar flare. The addition of solar energy to the dayside launches a traveling atmospheric disturbance which propagates towards the night-side at the local sound speed plus the background velocity. As the disturbance converges on itself near the midnight sector, density enhancements almost as large as those seen on the day-side can occur. Furthermore, these night-side neutral perturbations cause both enhancements and depletions in the night-side electron density. In addition, theoretical simulations are performed to study the effects that the major characteristics of solar flares have on the atmosphere. In particular, dynamics resulting from changes in the total integrated energy, flare magnitude, and relevant time scales are investigated. The most important

  8. The Solar Flare of the 14th of July 2000 (L3+C detector results)

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Van den Akker, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bähr, J; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, G J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, M; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chiarusi, T; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Dela Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; De Asmundis, R; Dglon, P; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Ding, L K; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Durán, I; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Faber, G; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, K; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grabosch, H J; Grimm, O; Groenstege, H; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; Guo, Y N; Gupta, S K; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Haller, C; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayashi, Y; He, Z X; Hebbeker, T; Herv, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, A; Hou, S R; Huo, A X; Ito, N; Jin, B N; Jindal, P; Jing, C L; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kantserov, V A; Kaur, M; Kawakami, S; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kok, E; Korn, A; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kraber, M; Kuang, H H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kuijpers, J; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Lei, Y; Leich, H; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Li, L; Li, Z C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma, W G; Ma, X H; Ma, Y Q; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Meng, X W; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Monteleoni, B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Nahnhauer, R; Naumov, V A; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Parriaud, J F; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, F; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Qing, C R; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Ravindran, K C; Razis, P; Rembeczki, S; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Rewiersma, P A M; Riemann, S; Rojkov, A; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schöneich, B; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shen, C Q; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, L; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Trowitzsch, G; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Unger, M; Valente, E; Verkooijen, H; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, G; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, G; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, X W; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Van Wijk, R; Wijnen, T A M; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Y P; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yang, X F; Yao, Z G; Yeh, S C; Yu, Z Q; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, C; Zhang, F; Zhang, J; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhou, S J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhu, Q Q; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M; Zwart, A N M

    2006-01-01

    Several experiments have reported observations on possible correlations between the flux of high energy muons and intense solar flares. If confirmed, these observations would have significant implications for acceleration processes in the heliosphere able to accelerate protons and other ions to energies of at least tens of GeV. The solar flare of the 14 July 2000 offers a unique opportunity for the L3+C experiment to search for a correlated enhancement in the flux of muons using the L3 precision muon spectrometer. Its capabilities for observing a directional excess in the flux of muons above 15 GeV (corresponding to primary proton energies above 40 GeV) are presented along with observations made on the 14th of July 2000. We report an excess which appeared at a time coincident with the peak increase of solar protons observed at lower energies. The probability that the excess is a background fluctuation is estimated to be 1%. No similar excess of the muon flux was observed up to 1.5 hours after the solar flare ...

  9. A time dependent relation between EUV solar flare light-curves from lines with differing formation temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiemann Edward M.B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Extreme ultraviolet (EUV solar flare emissions evolve in time as the emitting plasma heats and then cools. Although accurately modeling this evolution has been historically difficult, especially for empirical relationships, it is important for understanding processes at the Sun, as well as for their influence on planetary atmospheres. With a goal to improve empirical flare models, a new simple empirical expression is derived to predict how cool emissions evolve based on the evolution of a hotter emission. This technique is initially developed by studying 12 flares in detail observed by the EUV variability experiment (EVE onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO. Then, over 1100 flares observed by EVE are analyzed to validate these relationships. The Cargill and Enthalpy Based Thermal Evolution of Loops (EBTEL flare cooling models are used to show that this empirical relationship implies the energy radiated by a population of hotter formed ions is approximately proportional to the energy exciting a population of cooler formed ions emitting when the peak formation temperatures of the two lines are up to 72% of each other and above 2 MK. These results have practical implications for improving flare irradiance empirical modeling and for identifying key emission lines for future monitoring of flares for space weather operations; and also provide insight into the cooling processes of flare plasma.

  10. Solar flare particle acceleration in collapsing magnetic traps

    OpenAIRE

    Grady, Keith J.

    2012-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is a detailed investigation of different aspects of the particle acceleration mechanisms operating in Collapsing Magnetic Traps (CMTs), which have been suggested as one possible mechanism for particle acceleration during solar flares. The acceleration processes in CMTs are investigated using guiding centre test particle calculations. Results including terms of different orders in the guiding centre approximation are compared to help identify which of the terms a...

  11. Far-IR and Radio Thermal Continua in Solar Flares

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašparová, Jana; Heinzel, Petr; Karlický, Marian; Moravec, Z.; Varady, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 33, - (2009), s. 309-315 ISSN 1845-8319 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/04/0358; GA ČR GP205/06/P135; GA ČR GA205/07/1100 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : solar flares * radiative hydrodynamics * continuum emission Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  12. Magnetic Properties of Solar Active Regions that Govern Large Solar Flares and Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriumi, Shin; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Harra, Louise; Hudson, Hugh S.; Nagashima, Kaori

    2017-08-01

    Strong flares and CMEs are often produced from active regions (ARs). In order to better understand the magnetic properties and evolutions of such ARs, we conducted statistical investigations on the SDO/HMI and AIA data of all flare events with GOES levels >M5.0 within 45 deg from the disk center for 6 years from May 2010 (from the beginning to the declining phase of solar cycle 24). Out of the total of 51 flares from 29 ARs, more than 80% have delta-sunspots and about 15% violate Hale’s polarity rule. We obtained several key findings including (1) the flare duration is linearly proportional to the separation of the flare ribbons (i.e., scale of reconnecting magnetic fields) and (2) CME-eruptive events have smaller sunspot areas. Depending on the magnetic properties, flaring ARs can be categorized into several groups, such as spot-spot, in which a highly-sheared polarity inversion line is formed between two large sunspots, and spot-satellite, where a newly-emerging flux next to a mature sunspot triggers a compact flare event. These results point to the possibility that magnetic structures of the ARs determine the characteristics of flares and CMEs. In the presentation, we will also show new results from the systematic flux emergence simulations of delta-sunspot formation and discuss the evolution processes of flaring ARs.

  13. The isotopic composition of solar flare accelerated neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Spalding, J. D.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The individual isotopes of neon in energetic solar-flare particles have been clearly resolved with a rms mass resolution of 0.20 amu. The ratios found are Ne-20/Ne-22 = 7.6 (+2.0, -1.8) and Ne-21/Ne-22 of no more than about 0.11 in the 11-26 MeV per nucleon interval. This isotopic composition is essentially the same as that of meteoritic planetary neon-A and is significantly different from that of the solar wind.

  14. Effect of solar flares flux on the propagation and modal composition of VLF signal in the lower ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouderba, Yasmina; Nait Amor, Samir; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2015-04-01

    The VLF radio waves propagating in the Earth-Ionosphere waveguide are sensitive to the ionospheric disturbances due to X rays solar flux. In order to understand the VLF signal response to the solar flares, the LWPC code is used to simulate the signal perturbation parameters (amplitude and phase) at fixed solar zenith angle. In this work, we used the NRK-Algiers signal data and the study was done for different flares classes. The results show that the perturbed parameters increase with the increasing solar flares flux. This increases is due to the growth of the electron density resulting from the changes of the Wait's parameters. However, the behavior of the perturbation parameters as function of distance shows different forms of signal perturbations. It was also observed that the null points move towards the transmitter location when the flare flux increases which is related to the modal composition of the propagating signal. Effectively, for a given mode, the plot of the attenuation coefficient as function of the flare flux shows a decreases when the flux increases which is more significant for high modes. Thus, the solar flares effect is to amplify the VLF signal by reducing the attenuation coefficient.

  15. A Large-scale Plume in an X-class Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Nita, Gelu M.; Gary, Dale E.

    2017-08-01

    Ever-increasing multi-frequency imaging of solar observations suggests that solar flares often involve more than one magnetic fluxtube. Some of the fluxtubes are closed, while others can contain open fields. The relative proportion of nonthermal electrons among those distinct loops is highly important for understanding energy release, particle acceleration, and transport. The access of nonthermal electrons to the open field is also important because the open field facilitates the solar energetic particle (SEP) escape from the flaring site, and thus controls the SEP fluxes in the solar system, both directly and as seed particles for further acceleration. The large-scale fluxtubes are often filled with a tenuous plasma, which is difficult to detect in either EUV or X-ray wavelengths; however, they can dominate at low radio frequencies, where a modest component of nonthermal electrons can render the source optically thick and, thus, bright enough to be observed. Here we report the detection of a large-scale “plume” at the impulsive phase of an X-class solar flare, SOL2001-08-25T16:23, using multi-frequency radio data from Owens Valley Solar Array. To quantify the flare’s spatial structure, we employ 3D modeling utilizing force-free-field extrapolations from the line of sight SOHO/MDI magnetograms with our modeling tool GX_Simulator. We found that a significant fraction of the nonthermal electrons that accelerated at the flare site low in the corona escapes to the plume, which contains both closed and open fields. We propose that the proportion between the closed and open fields at the plume is what determines the SEP population escaping into interplanetary space.

  16. On the signatures of flare-induced global waves in the Sun: GOLF and VIRGO observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Brajesh; Mathur, Savita; García, Rafael A.; Jiménez, Antonio

    2017-11-01

    Recently, several efforts have been made to identify the seismic signatures of flares and magnetic activity in the Sun and Sun-like stars. In this work, we have analysed the disc-integrated velocity and intensity observations of the Sun obtained from the Global Oscillations at Low Frequencies (GOLF) and Variability of solar IRradiance and Gravity Oscillations/Sun photometers (VIRGO/SPM) instruments, respectively, on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory space mission covering several successive flare events, for the period from 2011 February 11 to 2011 February 17, of which 2011 February 11 remained a relatively quiet day and served as a `null test' for the investigation. Application of the spectral analysis to these disc-integrated Sun-as-a-star velocity and intensity signals indicates that there is enhanced power of the global modes of oscillations in the Sun during the flares, as compared to the quiet day. The GOLF instrument obtains velocity observations using the Na i D lines which are formed in the upper solar photosphere, while the intensity data used in our analysis are obtained by VIRGO/SPM instrument at 862 nm, which is formed within the solar photosphere. Despite the fact that the two instruments sample different layers of the solar atmosphere using two different parameters (velocity versus intensity), we have found that both these observations show the signatures of flare-induced global waves in the Sun. These results could suffice in identifying the asteroseismic signatures of stellar flares and magnetic activity in the Sun-like stars.

  17. Studies of Solar Flares and Erupting Filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    j eruption ot such a quiescent filament Is: P = 55 + 14Kf1 + 4Kf 2 - 1 8 Kf3 -. . .DD . JAN 73 1473 ._.,_. ._._._____ _ ,_ _._.- SECURITY...Harvey, J.W., Harvey, K.L. and Martin, S.F.: 1975, Solar Phys. 40, 87. Martin, S.F., Dezso, L., Antalova, A., Kucera , A.0 and Harvey, K.L.: 1982...Edberg, S.J., Hermans, L.M., and Dunn, J.4. 155th Meting of the American Astronomical Society, San Francisco, California, 13-18 Jan . 1980 7. On the

  18. Flare Energy Release: Internal Conflict, Contradiction with High Resolution Observations, Possible Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustilnik, L.

    2017-06-01

    All accepted paradigm of solar and stellar flares energy release based on 2 whales: 1. Source of energy is free energy of non-potential force free magnetic field in atmosphere above active region; 2. Process of ultrafast dissipation of magnetic fields is Reconnection in Thin Turbulent Current Sheet (RTTCS). Progress in observational techniques in last years provided ultra-high spatial resolution and in physics of turbulent plasma showed that real situation is much more complicated and standard approach is in contradiction both with observations and with problem of RTTCS stability. We present critical analysis of classic models of pre-flare energy accumulation and its dissipation during flare energy release from pioneer works Giovanelli (1939, 1947) up to topological reconnection. We show that all accepted description of global force-free fields as source of future flare cannot be agreed with discovered in last years fine and ultra-fine current-magnetic structure included numerouse arcs-threads with diameters up to 100 km with constant sequence from photosphere to corona. This magnetic skeleton of thin current magnetic threads with strong interaction between them is main source of reserved magnetic energy insolar atmosphere. Its dynamics will be controlled by percolation of magnetic stresses through network of current-magnetic threads with transition to flare state caused by critical value of global current. We show that thin turbulent current sheet is absolutely unstable configuration both caused by splitting to numerous linear currents by dissipative modes like to tearing, and as sequence of suppress of plasma turbulence caused by anomalous heating of turbulent plasma. In result of these factors primary RTTCS will be disrupted in numerous turbulent and normal plasma domains like to resistors network. Current propagation through this network will have percolation character with all accompanied properties of percolated systems: self-organization with formation power

  19. Summary of completed project. [Particle acceleration during solar flares: Particle interactions with ambient plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosian, Vahe

    1991-01-01

    The primary goal of the work in this proposal has been the determination of the requirement for acceleration of particles, especially electrons, during solar flares. This is one of the important and yet unsolved problems in solar flares and other astronomical objects. This is done by detailed theoretical investigation of interaction of accelerated particles with ambient plasma including interaction with particles, waves, and large scale magnetic fields. Comparison with observed impulsive phase radiation such as X-rays, gamma-rays, microwaves, and type III radiation is used for constraining the models and for determination of the characteristics of the accelerated particles. Steady state and time-dependent numerical codes have been developed based on the Fokker-Planck method for study of the particle acceleration and transport during a flare. Using these, the correlation between characteristics of radiation at various wavelengths have been investigated and some constraints have been set on the model parameters. During the last three year period of this grant, dissertation research of three graduate students have been partially supported by this grant. Each of these theses has dealt with various observed properties of flare emission with particular emphasis on the interrelationship between radiation in at least two energy bands: X-rays and gamma-rays, X-rays and microwaves, and X-rays and type III radiation. This has allowed considerable tightening of constraints on models, and inclusion of wave particle interaction has allowed direct calculations of acceleration processes.

  20. Max 1991: Flare Research at the Next Solar Maximum. Workshop 1: Scientific Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Richard C.; Dennis, Brian R.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the Max 1991 program is to gather coordinated sets of solar flare and active region data and to perform interpretive and theoretical research aimed at understanding flare energy storage and release, particle acceleration, flare energy transport, and the propagation of flare effects to Earth. The workshop was divided into four areas of concern: energy storage, energy release, particle acceleration, and energy transport.

  1. Temporal Evolution and Spatial Distribution of White-light Flare Kernels in a Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawate, Tomoko; Ishii, Takako; Nakatani, Yoshikazu; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Asai, Ayumi; Morita, Satoshi; Masuda, Satoshi

    2017-08-01

    On 2011 September 6, we observed an X2.1-class flare in continuum and Hα with a frame rate of about 30 Hz. After processing images of the event by using a speckle-masking image reconstruction, we identified white-light (WL) flare ribbons on opposite sides of the magnetic neutral line. We derive the light curve decay times of the WL flare kernels at each resolution element by assuming that the kernels consist of one or two components that decay exponentially, starting from the peak time. As a result, 42% of the pixels have two decay-time components with average decay times of 15.6 and 587 s, whereas the average decay time is 254 s for WL kernels with only one decay-time component. The peak intensities of the shorter decay-time component exhibit good spatial correlation with the WL intensity, whereas the peak intensities of the long decay-time components tend to be larger in the early phase of the flare at the inner part of the flare ribbons, close to the magnetic neutral line. The average intensity of the longer decay-time components is 1.78 times higher than that of the shorter decay-time components. If the shorter decay time is determined by either the chromospheric cooling time or the nonthermal ionization timescale and the longer decay time is attributed to the coronal cooling time, this result suggests that WL sources from both regions appear in 42% of the WL kernels and that WL emission of the coronal origin is sometimes stronger than that of chromospheric origin.

  2. Data-Driven Radiative Hydrodynamic Modeling of the 2014 March 29 X1.0 Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, Fatima Rubio; Kleint, Lucia; Petrosian, Vahe; Liu, Wei; Allred, Joel C.

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of solar flares provide critical diagnostics of the physical conditions in the flaring atmosphere. Some key features in observed spectra have not yet been accounted for in existing flare models. Here we report a data-driven simulation of the well-observed X1.0 flare on 2014 March 29 that can reconcile some well-known spectral discrepancies. We analyzed spectra of the flaring region from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) in Mg II hk, the Interferometric BIdimensional Spectropolarimeter at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DSTIBIS) in H(alpha) 6563A and Ca II 8542A, and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscope Imager (RHESSI) in hard X-rays. We constructed a multithreaded flare loop model and used the electron flux inferred from RHESSI data as the input to the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN to simulate the atmospheric response. We then synthesized various chromospheric emission lines and compared them with the IRIS and IBIS observations. In general, the synthetic intensities agree with the observed ones, especially near the northern footpoint of the flare. The simulated Mg II line profile has narrower wings than the observed one. This discrepancy can be reduced by using a higher microturbulent velocity (27 km/s) in a narrow chromospheric layer. In addition, we found that an increase of electron density in the upper chromosphere within a narrow height range of approx. 800 km below the transition region can turn the simulated Mg II line core into emission and thus reproduce the single peaked profile, which is a common feature in all IRIS flares.

  3. Solar flare forecasting from 1 to 7 days in the Kiev State University astronomic observatory during 1976-1980 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanchuk, P.R.; Izotova, I.Yu.; Krivodubskij, V.N.; Adamenko, A.S.; Babij, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    A study has been made of the relashionship between the daily solar flares of Importance <= 1 in sunspot groups and the average number of centers in a group during the group passage on the solar disk, and of the values for the total area of sunspots in the sunspot group evolution maximum. Presented is the information on the reliability of the predictions of the flare activity in the sunspot groups basing on this relationship as well as on two others (the dependence of the flare activity on the sunspot Zurich classes and on the sizes of convective elements). For the period since January 1, 1977 till June 3, 1979, that coincides with most complete data observed, the 60% and 80% confidence is shown for the prediction of subflares (525 predictions) and Importance 1 flares (388 predictions), respectively, with the systematic error taken into account.

  4. Closed coronal structures. V - Gasdynamic models of flaring loops and comparison with SMM observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, G.; Serio, S.; Vaiana, G.; Acton, L.; Leibacher, J.; Rosner, R.; Pallavicini, R.

    1983-01-01

    A time-dependent one-dimensional code incorporating energy, momentum and mass conservation equations, and taking the entire solar atmospheric structure into account, is used to investigate the hydrodynamic response of confined magnetic structures to strong heating perturbations. Model calculation results are compared with flare observations which include the light curves of spectral lines formed over a wide range of coronal flare temperatures, as well as determinations of Doppler shifts for the high temperature plasma. It is shown that the numerical simulation predictions are in good overall agreement with the observed flare coronal plasma evolution, correctly reproducing the temporal profile of X-ray spectral lines and their relative intensities. The predicted upflow velocities support the interpretation of the blueshifts as due to evaporation of chromospheric material.

  5. Solar Flare Track Exposure Ages in Regolith Particles: A Calibration for Transmission Electron Microscope Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Eve L.; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2015-01-01

    Mineral grains in lunar and asteroidal regolith samples provide a unique record of their interaction with the space environment. Space weathering effects result from multiple processes including: exposure to the solar wind, which results in ion damage and implantation effects that are preserved in the rims of grains (typically the outermost 100 nm); cosmic ray and solar flare activity, which result in track formation; and impact processes that result in the accumulation of vapor-deposited elements, impact melts and adhering grains on particle surfaces. Determining the rate at which these effects accumulate in the grains during their space exposure is critical to studies of the surface evolution of airless bodies. Solar flare energetic particles (mainly Fe-group nuclei) have a penetration depth of a few millimeters and leave a trail of ionization damage in insulating materials that is readily observable by transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging. The density of solar flare particle tracks is used to infer the length of time an object was at or near the regolith surface (i.e., its exposure age). Track measurements by TEM methods are routine, yet track production rate calibrations have only been determined using chemical etching techniques [e.g., 1, and references therein]. We used focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) sample preparation techniques combined with TEM imaging to determine the track density/exposure age relations for lunar rock 64455. The 64455 sample was used earlier by [2] to determine a track production rate by chemical etching of tracks in anorthite. Here, we show that combined FIB/TEM techniques provide a more accurate determination of a track production rate and also allow us to extend the calibration to solar flare tracks in olivine.

  6. Quasi-oscillatory dynamics observed in ascending phase of the flare on March 6, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philishvili, E.; Shergelashvili, B. M.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Kukhianidze, V.; Ramishvili, G.; Khodachenko, M.; Poedts, S.; De Causmaecker, P.

    2017-04-01

    Context. The dynamics of the flaring loops in active region (AR) 11429 are studied. The observed dynamics consist of several evolution stages of the flaring loop system during both the ascending and descending phases of the registered M-class flare. The dynamical properties can also be classified by different types of magnetic reconnection, related plasma ejection and aperiodic flows, quasi-periodic oscillatory motions, and rapid temperature and density changes, among others. The focus of the present paper is on a specific time interval during the ascending (pre-flare) phase. Aims: The goal is to understand the quasi-periodic behavior in both space and time of the magnetic loop structures during the considered time interval. Methods: We have studied the characteristic location, motion, and periodicity properties of the flaring loops by examining space-time diagrams and intensity variation analysis along the coronal magnetic loops using AIA intensity and HMI magnetogram images (from the Solar Dynamics Observatory). Results: We detected bright plasma blobs along the coronal loop during the ascending phase of the solar flare, the intensity variations of which clearly show quasi-periodic behavior. We also determined the periods of these oscillations. Conclusions: Two different interpretations are presented for the observed dynamics. Firstly, the oscillations are interpreted as the manifestation of non-fundamental harmonics of longitudinal standing acoustic oscillations driven by the thermodynamically non-equilibrium background (with time variable density and temperature). The second possible interpretation we provide is that the observed bright blobs could be a signature of a strongly twisted coronal loop that is kink unstable.

  7. Enhancement in electron and ion temperatures due to solar flares as measured by SROSS-C2 satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Sharma

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The observations on the ionospheric electron and ion temperatures (Te and Ti measured by the RPA payload aboard the SROSS-C2 satellite have been used to study the effect of solar flares on ionospheric heating. The data on solar flare has been obtained from the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC Boulder, Colorado (USA. It has been found that the electron and ion temperatures have a consistent enhancement during the solar flares on the dayside Earth's ionosphere. The estimated enhancement for the average electron temperature is from 1.3 to 1.9 times whereas for ion temperature it is from 1.2 to 1.4 times to the normal days average temperature. The enhancement of ionospheric temperatures due to solar flares is correlated with the diurnal variation of normal days' ionospheric temperatures. The solar flare does not have any significant effect on the nightside ionosphere. A comparison with the temperature obtained from the IRI-95 model also shows a similar enhancement.

  8. Enhancement in electron and ion temperatures due to solar flares as measured by SROSS-C2 satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Sharma

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The observations on the ionospheric electron and ion temperatures (Te and Ti measured by the RPA payload aboard the SROSS-C2 satellite have been used to study the effect of solar flares on ionospheric heating. The data on solar flare has been obtained from the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC Boulder, Colorado (USA. It has been found that the electron and ion temperatures have a consistent enhancement during the solar flares on the dayside Earth's ionosphere. The estimated enhancement for the average electron temperature is from 1.3 to 1.9 times whereas for ion temperature it is from 1.2 to 1.4 times to the normal days average temperature. The enhancement of ionospheric temperatures due to solar flares is correlated with the diurnal variation of normal days' ionospheric temperatures. The solar flare does not have any significant effect on the nightside ionosphere. A comparison with the temperature obtained from the IRI-95 model also shows a similar enhancement.

  9. A query into the source of proton emission from solar flares, report 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S. F.

    1979-01-01

    Seven solar flares that were followed by major proton events were examined to determine the diverse and common properties of major flares. The most probable site of primary proton acceleration is cospatial with the site and instant of formation of coronal loops. Because loop formation occurs through the entire duration of major solar flares over significantly large areas of active centers, it is proposed that proton injection occurs from a relatively large volume of space in the corona of active centers and is continuous throughout, and possibly even after, the visible duration of the related chromospheric flare. The flare veil is hypothesized to occur as a result of proton charge exchange taking place in the white-light transient. The Kopp and Pneuman model of loop formation by magnetic reconnection is suggested as an adequate and satisfactory model for all major flares with the provision that the beginning of rapid magnetic field reconnection is coincident with flare start.

  10. Properties of quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flares from a single active region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, C. E.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Broomhall, A.-M.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Myagkova, I. N.

    2017-12-01

    Context. Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) are a common feature of solar and stellar flares, and so the nature of these pulsations should be understood in order to fully understand flares. Aims: We investigate the properties of a set of solar flares originating from a single active region (AR) that exhibit QPPs, and in particular look for any indication of QPP periods relating to AR properties, as might be expected if the characteristic timescale of the pulsations corresponds to a characteristic length scale of the structure from which the pulsations originate. The three AR properties used for this study are the photospheric area, bipole separation distance, and average magnetic field strength at the photosphere. The AR studied, known as NOAA 12172/12192/12209, was unusually long-lived and persisted for over three Carrington rotations between September and November 2014. During this time a total of 181 flares were observed by GOES. Methods: Data from the GOES/XRS, SDO/EVE/ESP, Fermi/GBM, Vernov/DRGE and Nobeyama Radioheliograph observatories were used to determine if QPPs were present in the flares. For the soft X-ray GOES/XRS and EVE/ESP data, the time derivative of the signal was used so that any variability in the impulsive phase of the flare was emphasised. Periodogram power spectra of the time series data, without any form of detrending, were inspected and flares with a peak above the 95% confidence level in the power spectrum were labelled as having candidate QPPs. The confidence levels were determined taking full account of data uncertainties and the possible presence of red noise. Active region properties were determined using SDO/HMI line of sight magnetogram data. Results: A total of 37 flares, i.e. 20% of the sample, show good evidence of having stationary or weakly non-stationary QPPs, and some of the pulsations can be seen in data from multiple instruments and in different wavebands. Because the detection method used was rather conservative, this may be

  11. Influence of solar activity on fibrinolysis and fibrinogenolysis. [statistical correlation between solar flare and blood coagulation indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenko, V. I.

    1974-01-01

    During periods of high solar activity fibrinolysis and fibrinogenolysis are increased. A direct correlative relationship is established between the indices of fibrinolysis, fibrinogenolysis and solar flares which were recorded two days before the blood was collected for analysis.

  12. Understanding the connection between the energy released during solar flares and their emission in the lower atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, F. Rubio

    2017-10-01

    While progress has been made on understanding how energy is released and deposited along the solar atmosphere during explosive events such as solar flares, the chromospheric and coronal heating through the sudden release of magnetic energy remain an open problem in solar physics. Recent hydrodynamic models allow to investigate the energy deposition along a flare loop and to study the response of the chromosphere. These results have been improved with the consideration of transport and acceleration of particles along the loop. RHESSI and Fermi/GBM X-ray and gamma-ray observations help to constrain the spectral properties of the injected electrons. The excellent spatial, spectral and temporal resolution of IRIS will also help us to constrain properties of explosive events, such as the continuum emission during flares or their emission in the chromosphere.

  13. Turbulent Kinetic Energy in the Energy Balance of a Solar Flare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontar, E P; Perez, J E; Harra, L K; Kuznetsov, A A; Emslie, A G; Jeffrey, N L S; Bian, N H; Dennis, B R

    2017-04-14

    The energy released in solar flares derives from a reconfiguration of magnetic fields to a lower energy state, and is manifested in several forms, including bulk kinetic energy of the coronal mass ejection, acceleration of electrons and ions, and enhanced thermal energy that is ultimately radiated away across the electromagnetic spectrum from optical to x rays. Using an unprecedented set of coordinated observations, from a suite of instruments, we here report on a hitherto largely overlooked energy component-the kinetic energy associated with small-scale turbulent mass motions. We show that the spatial location of, and timing of the peak in, turbulent kinetic energy together provide persuasive evidence that turbulent energy may play a key role in the transfer of energy in solar flares. Although the kinetic energy of turbulent motions accounts, at any given time, for only ∼(0.5-1)% of the energy released, its relatively rapid (∼1-10  s) energization and dissipation causes the associated throughput of energy (i.e., power) to rival that of major components of the released energy in solar flares, and thus presumably in other astrophysical acceleration sites.

  14. Solar Flare Prediction Model with Three Machine-learning Algorithms using Ultraviolet Brightening and Vector Magnetograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizuka, N.; Sugiura, K.; Kubo, Y.; Den, M.; Watari, S.; Ishii, M.

    2017-02-01

    We developed a flare prediction model using machine learning, which is optimized to predict the maximum class of flares occurring in the following 24 hr. Machine learning is used to devise algorithms that can learn from and make decisions on a huge amount of data. We used solar observation data during the period 2010-2015, such as vector magnetograms, ultraviolet (UV) emission, and soft X-ray emission taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite. We detected active regions (ARs) from the full-disk magnetogram, from which ˜60 features were extracted with their time differentials, including magnetic neutral lines, the current helicity, the UV brightening, and the flare history. After standardizing the feature database, we fully shuffled and randomly separated it into two for training and testing. To investigate which algorithm is best for flare prediction, we compared three machine-learning algorithms: the support vector machine, k-nearest neighbors (k-NN), and extremely randomized trees. The prediction score, the true skill statistic, was higher than 0.9 with a fully shuffled data set, which is higher than that for human forecasts. It was found that k-NN has the highest performance among the three algorithms. The ranking of the feature importance showed that previous flare activity is most effective, followed by the length of magnetic neutral lines, the unsigned magnetic flux, the area of UV brightening, and the time differentials of features over 24 hr, all of which are strongly correlated with the flux emergence dynamics in an AR.

  15. Can we observe neutrino flares in coincidence with explosive transients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guépin, Claire; Kotera, Kumiko

    2017-07-01

    The new generation of powerful instruments is reaching sensitivities and temporal resolutions that will allow multi-messenger astronomy of explosive transient phenomena, with high-energy neutrinos as a central figure. We derive general criteria for the detectability of neutrinos from powerful transient sources for given instrument sensitivities. In practice, we provide the minimum photon flux necessary for neutrino detection based on two main observables: the bolometric luminosity and the time variability of the emission. This limit can be compared to the observations in specified wavelengths in order to target the most promising sources for follow-ups. Our criteria can also help distinguishing false associations of neutrino events with a flaring source. We find that relativistic transient sources such as high- and low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), blazar flares, tidal disruption events, and magnetar flares could be observed with IceCube, as they have a good chance to occur within a detectable distance. Of the nonrelativistic transient sources, only luminous supernovae appear as promising candidates. We caution that our criterion should not be directly applied to low-luminosity GRBs and type Ibc supernovae, as these objects could have hosted a choked GRB, leading to neutrino emission without a relevant counterpart radiation. We treat a set of concrete examples and show that several transients, some of which are being monitored by IceCube, are far from meeting the criterion for detectability (e.g., Crab flares or Swift J1644+57).

  16. Dynamic Spectral Imaging of Decimetric Fiber Bursts in an Eruptive Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhitao; Chen, Bin; Gary, Dale E.

    2017-10-01

    Fiber bursts are a type of fine structure that is often superposed on type IV radio continuum emission during solar flares. Although studied for many decades, its physical exciter, emission mechanism, and association with the flare energy release remain unclear, partly due to the lack of simultaneous imaging observations. We report the first dynamic spectroscopic imaging observations of decimetric fiber bursts, which occurred during the rise phase of a long-duration eruptive flare on 2012 March 3, as obtained by the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array in 1-2 GHz. Our results show that the fiber sources are located near and above one footpoint of the flare loops. The fiber source and the background continuum source are found to be co-spatial and share the same morphology. It is likely that they are associated with nonthermal electrons trapped in the converging magnetic fields near the footpoint, as supported by a persistent coronal hard X-ray source present during the flare rise phase. We analyze three groups of fiber bursts in detail with dynamic imaging spectroscopy and obtain their mean frequency-dependent centroid trajectories in projection. By using a barometric density model and magnetic field based on a potential field extrapolation, we further reconstruct the 3D source trajectories of fiber bursts, for comparison with expectations from the whistler wave model and two MHD-based models. We conclude that the observed fiber burst properties are consistent with an exciter moving at the propagation velocity expected for whistler waves, or models that posit similar exciter velocities.

  17. OBSERVATIONS OF A SERIES OF FLARES AND ASSOCIATED JET-LIKE ERUPTIONS DRIVEN BY THE EMERGENCE OF TWISTED MAGNETIC FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Kim, Sujin; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Kumar, Pankaj; Kim, Yeon-Han [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung-Hong [Institute for Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing (IAASARS), National Observatory of Athens, Penteli 15236 (Greece); Chae, Jongchul; Yang, Heesu; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Song, Donguk, E-mail: eklim@kasi.re.kr [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-20

    We studied temporal changes of morphological and magnetic properties of a succession of four confined flares followed by an eruptive flare using the high-resolution New Solar Telescope (NST) operating at the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) magnetograms and Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA) EUV images provided by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). From the NST/Hα and the SDO/AIA 304 Å observations we found that each flare developed a jet structure that evolved in a manner similar to evolution of the blowout jet: (1) an inverted-Y-shaped jet appeared and drifted away from its initial position; (2) jets formed a curtain-like structure that consisted of many fine threads accompanied by subsequent brightenings near the footpoints of the fine threads; and finally, (3) the jet showed a twisted structure visible near the flare maximum. Analysis of the HMI data showed that both the negative magnetic flux and the magnetic helicity have been gradually increasing in the positive-polarity region, indicating the continuous injection of magnetic twist before and during the series of flares. Based on these results, we suggest that the continuous emergence of twisted magnetic flux played an important role in producing successive flares and developing a series of blowout jets.

  18. Hydrogen Balmer Line Broadening in Solar and Stellar Flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, Adam F. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder, 2000 Colorado Avenue, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Allred, Joel C. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Uitenbroek, Han [National Solar Observatory, University of Colorado Boulder, 3665 Discovery Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV47AL (United Kingdom); Brown, Stephen [School of Physics and Astronomy, Kelvin Building, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Carlsson, Mats [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Osten, Rachel A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Wisniewski, John P. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Hawley, Suzanne L., E-mail: Adam.Kowalski@lasp.colorado.edu [University of Washington Department of Astronomy, 3910 15th Avenue NE, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2017-03-10

    The broadening of the hydrogen lines during flares is thought to result from increased charge (electron, proton) density in the flare chromosphere. However, disagreements between theory and modeling prescriptions have precluded an accurate diagnostic of the degree of ionization and compression resulting from flare heating in the chromosphere. To resolve this issue, we have incorporated the unified theory of electric pressure broadening of the hydrogen lines into the non-LTE radiative-transfer code RH. This broadening prescription produces a much more realistic spectrum of the quiescent, A0 star Vega compared to the analytic approximations used as a damping parameter in the Voigt profiles. We test recent radiative-hydrodynamic (RHD) simulations of the atmospheric response to high nonthermal electron beam fluxes with the new broadening prescription and find that the Balmer lines are overbroadened at the densest times in the simulations. Adding many simultaneously heated and cooling model loops as a “multithread” model improves the agreement with the observations. We revisit the three-component phenomenological flare model of the YZ CMi Megaflare using recent and new RHD models. The evolution of the broadening, line flux ratios, and continuum flux ratios are well-reproduced by a multithread model with high-flux nonthermal electron beam heating, an extended decay phase model, and a “hot spot” atmosphere heated by an ultrarelativistic electron beam with reasonable filling factors: ∼0.1%, 1%, and 0.1% of the visible stellar hemisphere, respectively. The new modeling motivates future work to understand the origin of the extended gradual phase emission.

  19. X-RAY SOURCE HEIGHTS IN A SOLAR FLARE: THICK-TARGET VERSUS THERMAL CONDUCTION FRONT HEATING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reep, J. W. [National Research Council Post-Doc Program, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Bradshaw, S. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Holman, G. D., E-mail: jeffrey.reep.ctr@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu, E-mail: gordon.d.holman@nasa.gov [Solar Physics Laboratory, Code 671, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    Observations of solar flares with RHESSI have shown X-ray sources traveling along flaring loops, from the corona down to the chromosphere and back up. The 2002 November 28 C1.1 flare, first observed with RHESSI by Sui et al. and quantitatively analyzed by O’Flannagain et al., very clearly shows this behavior. By employing numerical experiments, we use these observations of X-ray source height motions as a constraint to distinguish between heating due to a non-thermal electron beam and in situ energy deposition in the corona. We find that both heating scenarios can reproduce the observed light curves, but our results favor non-thermal heating. In situ heating is inconsistent with the observed X-ray source morphology and always gives a height dispersion with photon energy opposite to what is observed.

  20. Ultraviolet and Extreme-Ultraviolet Emissions at the Flare Footpoints Observed by Atmosphere Imaging Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jiong; Sturrock, Zoe; Longcope, Dana W.; Klimchuk, James A.; Liu, Wen-Juan

    2013-01-01

    A solar flare is composed of impulsive energy release events by magnetic reconnection, which forms and heats flare loops. Recent studies have revealed a two-phase evolution pattern of UV 1600 A emission at the feet of these loops: a rapid pulse lasting for a few seconds to a few minutes, followed by a gradual decay on timescales of a few tens of minutes. Multiple band EUV observations by the Atmosphere Imaging Assembly further reveal very similar signatures. These two phases represent different but related signatures of an impulsive energy release in the corona. The rapid pulse is an immediate response of the lower atmosphere to an intense thermal conduction flux resulting from the sudden heating of the corona to high temperatures (we rule out energetic particles due to a lack of significant hard X-ray emission). The gradual phase is associated with the cooling of hot plasma that has been evaporated into the corona. The observed footpoint emission is again powered by thermal conduction (and enthalpy), but now during a period when approximate steady-state conditions are established in the loop. UV and EUV light curves of individual pixels may therefore be separated into contributions from two distinct physical mechanisms to shed light on the nature of energy transport in a flare.We demonstrate this technique using coordinated, spatially resolved observations of UV and EUV emissions from the footpoints of a C3.2 thermal flare.

  1. Thermal and Nonthermal Emissions of a Composite Flare Derived from NoRH and SDO Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeongwoo; White, Stephen M.; Jing, Ju; Liu, Chang; Masuda, Satoshi; Chae, Jongchul

    2017-12-01

    Differential emission measure (DEM) derived from the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lines of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory is used in the analysis of a solar flare observed by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH). The target was a composite event consisting of an impulsive flare, SOL2015-06-21T01:42 (GOES class M2.0), and a gradual flare, SOL2015-06-21T02:36 (M2.6), for which separation of thermal plasma heating from nonthermal particle acceleration was of major interest. We have calculated the thermal free-free intensity maps with the AIA-derived DEM and compared them against the observed NoRH maps to attribute the difference to the nonthermal component. In this way, we were able to locate three distinct sources: the major source with thermal and nonthermal components mixed, a nonthermal source devoid of thermal particles, and a thermal source lacking microwave emission. Both the first and the second nonthermal sources produced impulsively rising 17 GHz intensities and moved away from the local magnetic polarization inversion lines in correlation with the flare radiation. In contrast, the thermal sources stay in fixed locations and show temporal variations of the temperature and emission measure uncorrelated with the flare radiation. We interpret these distinct properties as indicating that nonthermal sources are powered by magnetic reconnection and thermal sources passively receive energy from the nonthermal donor. The finding of these distinct properties between thermal and nonthermal sources demonstrates the microwave and EUV emission measure combined diagnostics.

  2. “Dandelion” Filament Eruption and Coronal Waves Associated with a Solar Flare on 2011 February 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabezas, Denis P.; Ishitsuka, Mutsumi; Ishitsuka, José K. [Geophysical Institute of Peru, Calle Badajoz 169, Mayorazgo IV Etapa, Ate Vitarte, Lima (Peru); Martínez, Lurdes M.; Buleje, Yovanny J. [Centro de Investigación del Estudio de la Actividad Solar y sus Efectos Sobre la Tierra, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional San Luis Gonzaga de Ica, Av. Los Maestros S/N, Ica (Peru); Morita, Satoshi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Asai, Ayumi [Unit of Synergetic Studies for Space, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); UeNo, Satoru; Ishii, Takako T.; Kitai, Reizaburo; Takasao, Shinsuke; Yoshinaga, Yusuke; Otsuji, Kenichi; Shibata, Kazunari, E-mail: denis@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto, 607-8471 (Japan)

    2017-02-10

    Coronal disturbances associated with solar flares, such as H α Moreton waves, X-ray waves, and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) coronal waves, are discussed herein in relation to magnetohydrodynamic fast-mode waves or shocks in the corona. To understand the mechanism of coronal disturbances, full-disk solar observations with high spatial and temporal resolution over multiple wavelengths are of crucial importance. We observed a filament eruption, whose shape is like a “dandelion,” associated with the M1.6 flare that occurred on 2011 February 16 in H α images taken by the Flare Monitoring Telescope at Ica University, Peru. We derive the three-dimensional velocity field of the erupting filament. We also identify winking filaments that are located far from the flare site in the H α images, whereas no Moreton wave is observed. By comparing the temporal evolution of the winking filaments with those of the coronal wave seen in the EUV images data taken by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory-Ahead , we confirm that the winking filaments were activated by the EUV coronal wave.

  3. Comparing SSN Index to X-ray Flare and Coronal Mass Ejection Rates from Solar Cycles 22-24

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, Lisa M.; Pernak, Rick; Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    The newly revised sunspot number series allows for placing historical geoeffective storms in the context of several hundred years of solar activity. Using statistical analyses of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) X-ray observations from the past ~30 years and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) catalog (1996-present), we present sunspot-number-dependent flare and CME rates. In p...

  4. Flare-induced changes of the photospheric magnetic field in a δ-spot deduced from ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gömöry, P.; Balthasar, H.; Kuckein, C.; Koza, J.; Veronig, A. M.; González Manrique, S. J.; Kučera, A.; Schwartz, P.; Hanslmeier, A.

    2017-06-01

    Aims: Changes of the magnetic field and the line-of-sight velocities in the photosphere are being reported for an M-class flare that originated at a δ-spot belonging to active region NOAA 11865. Methods: High-resolution ground-based near-infrared spectropolarimetric observations were acquired simultaneously in two photospheric spectral lines, Fe i 10783 Å and Si i 10786 Å, with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter at the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) in Tenerife on 2013 October 15. The observations covered several stages of the M-class flare. Inversions of the full-Stokes vector of both lines were carried out and the results were put into context using (extreme)-ultraviolet filtergrams from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Results: The active region showed high flaring activity during the whole observing period. After the M-class flare, the longitudinal magnetic field did not show significant changes along the polarity inversion line (PIL). However, an enhancement of the transverse magnetic field of approximately 550 G was found that bridges the PIL and connects umbrae of opposite polarities in the δ-spot. At the same time, a newly formed system of loops appeared co-spatially in the corona as seen in 171 Å filtergrams of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board SDO. However, we cannot exclude that the magnetic connection between the umbrae already existed in the upper atmosphere before the M-class flare and became visible only later when it was filled with hot plasma. The photospheric Doppler velocities show a persistent upflow pattern along the PIL without significant changes due to the flare. Conclusions: The increase of the transverse component of the magnetic field after the flare together with the newly formed loop system in the corona support recent predictions of flare models and flare observations. The movie associated to Figs. 4 and 5 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  5. A note on the acceleration phase of high-energy particles in the solar flare on 7 July, 1966.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, K.

    1971-01-01

    The acceleration phase of solar cosmic rays and relativistic electrons is studied on the basis of the observational data available on the optical, radio, X-ray, and particle events associated with the solar flare that occurred on July 7, 1966. The generating process of hydromagnetic shock waves which excited the type-II radio burst detected at a frequency below about 100 MHz is also discussed. The results of the study suggest that no secondary acceleration process after the explosive phase can contribute much to the generation of high energy particles. The ejection of solar cosmic rays and relativistic electrons seems to be related to the expansion of the magnetic bulge which can trap accelerated electrons from the triggering region of solar flares.

  6. RHESSI observation of the M4.0 flare on 17 March 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, W. Q.; Li, Y. P.; Yu, X. X.; Feng, L.

    The M4.0/SF flare on 17 March 2002 is a good example of the early observations with RHESSI. We presenthard X-ray images, light curves and energy spectra of individual hard X-ray sources, the spatial relationship between the hard X-ray sources and the H α emission regions, and comparisons of light curves observed by RHESSI and GOES. We found that the picture exhibited by RHESSI is consistent with the general cartoon of a solar flare. In particular, we showed that the hard X-ray image spectra could be explained by a power-law electron beam with a lower energy cutoff E c. The derived E c could be as high as 40 keV, larger than the usually value of 20 keV.

  7. Can we observe neutrino flares in coincidence with explosive transients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guépin, C.; Kotera, K.

    2017-12-01

    The new generation of powerful instruments is reaching sensitivities and temporal resolutions that will allow multi-messenger astronomy of explosive transient phenomena, with high-energy neutrinos as a central figure. We derive general criteria for the detectability of neutrinos from powerful transient sources for given instrument sensitivities. In practice, we provide the minimum photon flux necessary for neutrino detection based on two main observables: the bolometric luminosity and the time variability of the emission. This limit can be compared to the observations in specified wavelengths in order to target the most promising sources for follow-ups. Our criteria can also help distinguishing false associations of neutrino events with a flaring source. We find that relativistic transient sources such as high- and low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), blazar flares, tidal disruption events, and magnetar flares could be observed with IceCube, as they have a good chance to occur within a detectable distance. Of the nonrelativistic transient sources, only luminous supernovae appear as promising candidates. We caution that our criterion should not be directly applied to low-luminosity GRBs and type Ibc supernovae, as these objects could have hosted a choked GRB, leading to neutrino emission without a relevant counterpart radiation. We treat the concrete example of PKS 1424-418 major outburst and the possible association with an IceCube event IC 35.

  8. Spectroscopic Inversions of the Ca ii 8542 Å Line in a C-class Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuridze, D.; Henriques, V.; Mathioudakis, M.; Koza, J.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Rybák, J.; Hanslmeier, A.; Keenan, F. P.

    2017-09-01

    We study the C8.4-class solar flare SOL2016-05-14T11:34 UT using high-resolution spectral imaging in the Ca ii 8542 Å line obtained with the CRISP imaging spectropolarimeter on the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. Spectroscopic inversions of the Ca ii 8542 Å line using the non-LTE code NICOLE are used to investigate the evolution of the temperature and velocity structure in the flaring chromosphere. A comparison of the temperature stratification in flaring and non-flaring areas reveals strong footpoint heating during the flare peak in the lower atmosphere. The temperature of the flaring footpoints between {log} {τ }500 ≈ -2.5 {and} -3.5, where τ 500 is the continuum optical depth at 500 nm, is ˜ 5{--}6.5 {kK} close to the flare peak, reducing gradually to ˜ 5 {kK}. The temperature in the middle and upper chromosphere, between {log} {τ }500≈ -3.5 and -5.5, is estimated to be ˜6.5-20 kK, decreasing to preflare temperatures, ˜5-10 kK, after approximately 15 minutes. However, the temperature stratification of the non-flaring areas is unchanged. The inverted velocity fields show that the flaring chromosphere is dominated by weak downflowing condensations at the formation height of Ca ii 8542 Å.

  9. FLARE FOOTPOINT REGIONS AND A SURGE OBSERVED BY HINODE/EIS, RHESSI, AND SDO/AIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Dennis, B. R. [Solar Physics Laboratory, Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Reep, J. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Caspi, A. [Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft observed flare footpoint regions coincident with a surge for an M3.7 flare observed on 2011 September 25 at N12 E33 in active region 11302. The flare was observed in spectral lines of O vi, Fe x, Fe xii, Fe xiv, Fe xv, Fe xvi, Fe xvii, Fe xxiii, and Fe xxiv. The EIS observations were made coincident with hard X-ray bursts observed by RHESSI. Overlays of the RHESSI images on the EIS raster images at different wavelengths show a spatial coincidence of features in the RHESSI images with the EIS upflow and downflow regions, as well as loop-top or near-loop-top regions. A complex array of phenomena were observed, including multiple evaporation regions and the surge, which was also observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly telescopes. The slit of the EIS spectrometer covered several flare footpoint regions from which evaporative upflows in Fe xxiii and Fe xxiv lines were observed with Doppler speeds greater than 500 km s{sup −1}. For ions such as Fe xv both evaporative outflows (∼200 km s{sup −1}) and downflows (∼30–50 km s{sup −1}) were observed. Nonthermal motions from 120 to 300 km s{sup −1} were measured in flare lines. In the surge, Doppler speeds are found from about 0 to over 250 km s{sup −1} in lines from ions such as Fe xiv. The nonthermal motions could be due to multiple sources slightly Doppler-shifted from each other or turbulence in the evaporating plasma. We estimate the energetics of the hard X-ray burst and obtain a total flare energy in accelerated electrons of ≥7 × 10{sup 28} erg. This is a lower limit because only an upper limit can be determined for the low-energy cutoff to the electron spectrum. We find that detailed modeling of this event would require a multithreaded model owing to its complexity.

  10. Energy release and transfer in solar flares: simulations of three-dimensional reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birn, Joachim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fletches, L [UNIV OF GLASGOW; Hesse, M [HGSFC; Neukirch, T [UNIV OF ST. ANDREWS

    2008-01-01

    Using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations we investigate energy release and transfer in a three-dimensional extension of the standard two-ribbon flare picture. In this scenario reconnection is initiated in a thin current sheet (suggested to form below a departing coronal mass ejection) above a bipolar magnetic field. Two cases are contrasted: an initially force-free current sheet (low beta) and a finite-pressure current sheet (high beta). The energy conversion process from reconnect ion consists of incoming Poynting flux (from the release of magnetic energy) turned into up-and downgoing Poynting flux, enthalpy flux and bulk kinetic energy flux. In the low-beta case, the outgoing Poynting flux is the dominant contribution, whereas the outgoing enthalpy flux dominates in the high-beta case. The bulk kinetic energy flux is only a minor contribution, particularly in the downward direction. The dominance of the downgoing Poynting flux in the low-beta case is consistent with an alternative to the thick target electron beam model for solar flare energy transport, suggested recently by Fletcher and Hudson. For plausible characteristic parameters of the reconnecting field configuration, we obtain energy release time scales and and energy output rates that compare favorably with those inferred from observations for the impulsive phase of flares.

  11. Flare-CME characteristics from Sun to Earth combining observations and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temmer, Manuela; Thalmann, Julia K.; Dissauer, Karin; Veronig, Astrid M.; Tschernitz, Johannes; Hinterreiter, Jürgen; Rodriguez, Luciano

    2017-04-01

    We analyze the well observed flare-CME event from October 1, 2011 (SOL2011-10-01T09:18) covering the complete chain of action - from Sun to Earth - for a better understanding of the dynamic evolution of the CME and its embedded magnetic field. We study in detail the solar surface and atmosphere from SDO and ground-based instruments associated to the flare-CME and also track the CME signature offlimb from combined EUV and white-light data with STEREO. By applying 3D reconstruction techniques (GCS, total mass) to stereoscopic STEREO-SoHO coronagraph data, we track the temporal and spatial evolution of the CME in interplanetary space and derive its geometry and 3D-mass. We combine the GCS and Lundquist model results to derive the axial flux and helicity of the MC from in situ measurements (Wind). This is compared to nonlinear force-free (NLFF) model results as well as to the reconnected magnetic flux derived from the flare ribbons (flare reconnection flux) and the magnetic flux encompassed by the associated dimming (dimming flux). We find that magnetic reconnection processes were already ongoing before the start of the impulsive flare phase, adding magnetic flux to the flux rope before its final eruption. The dimming flux increases by more than 25% after the end of the flare, indicating that magnetic flux is still added to the flux rope after eruption. Hence, the derived flare reconnection flux is most probably a lower limit for estimating the magnetic flux within the flux rope. We obtain that the magnetic helicity and axial magnetic flux are reduced in interplanetary space by ˜50% and 75%, respectively, possibly indicating to an erosion process. A mass increase of 10% for the CME is observed over the distance range from about 4-20 Rs. The temporal evolution of the CME associated core dimming regions supports the scenario that fast outflows might supply additional mass to the rear part of the CME.

  12. Solar Flare Five-Day Predictions from Quantum Detectors of Dynamical Space Fractal Flow Turbulence: Gravitational Wave Diminution and Earth Climate Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Space speed fluctuations, which have a 1 / f spectrum, are shown to be the cause of solar flares. The direction and magnitude of the space flow has been detected from numer- ous different experimental techniques, and is close to the normal to the plane of the ecliptic. Zener diode data shows that the fluctuations in the space speed closely match the Sun Solar Cycle 23 flare count, and reveal that major solar flares follow major space speed fluctuations by some 6 days. This implies that a warning period of some 5 days in predicting major solar flares is possible using such detectors. This has significant conse- quences in being able to protect various spacecraft and Earth located electrical systems from the subsequent arrival of ejected plasma from a solar flare. These space speed fluctuations are the actual gravitational waves, and have a significant magnitude. This discovery is a significant application of the dynamical space phenomenon and theory. We also show that space flow turbulence impacts on the Earth’s climate, as such tur- bulence can input energy into systems, which is the basis of the Zener Diode Quantum Detector. Large scale space fluctuations impact on both the sun and the Earth, and as well explain temperature correlations with solar activity, but that the Earth temperatures are not caused by such solar activity. This implies that the Earth climate debate has been missing a key physical process. Observed diminishing gravitational waves imply a cooling epoch for the Earth for the next 30 years.

  13. A flare observed in coronal, transition region, and helium I 10830 Å emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Zhicheng; Cao, Wenda [Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Qiu, Jiong [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 (United States); Judge, Philip G. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    On 2012 June 17, we observed the evolution of a C-class flare associated with the eruption of a filament near a large sunspot in the active region NOAA 11504. We obtained high spatial resolution filtergrams using the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory in broadband TiO at 706 nm (bandpass: 10 Å) and He I 10830 Å narrow band (bandpass: 0.5 Å, centered 0.25 Å to the blue). We analyze the spatio-temporal behavior of the He I 10830 Å data, which were obtained over a 90''×90'' field of view with a cadence of 10 s. We also analyze simultaneous data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft, and data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and GOES spacecrafts. Non-thermal effects are ignored in this analysis. Several quantitative aspects of the data, as well as models derived using the '0D' enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops model code, indicate that the triplet states of the 10830 Å multiplet are populated by photoionization of chromospheric plasma followed by radiative recombination. Surprisingly, the He II 304 Å line is reasonably well matched by standard emission measure calculations, along with the C IV emission which dominates the Atmosphere Imaging Assembly 1600 Å channel during flares. This work lends support to some of our previous work combining X-ray, EUV, and UV data of flares to build models of energy transport from corona to chromosphere.

  14. Statistical analysis of tiny SXR flares observed by SphinX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryciuk, Magdalena; Siarkowski, Marek; Sylwester, Janusz; Kepa, Anna; Gburek, Szymon; Mrozek, Tomasz; Podgórski, Piotr

    2015-08-01

    The Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) was designed to observe soft X-ray solar emission in the energy range between ~1 keV and 15 keV with the resolution better than 0.5 keV. The instrument operated from February until November 2009 aboard CORONAS-Photon satellite, during the phase of exceptionally low minimum of solar activity. Here we use SphinX data for analysis of micro-flares and brightenings. Despite a very low activity more than a thousand small X-ray events have been recognized by semi-automatic inspection of SphinX light curves. A catalogue of temporal and physical characteristics of these events is shown and discussed and results of the statistical analysis of the catalogue data are presented.

  15. The influence of active region information on the prediction of solar flares: an empirical model using data mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Núñez

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Predicting the occurrence of solar flares is a challenge of great importance for many space weather scientists and users. We introduce a data mining approach, called Behavior Pattern Learning (BPL, for automatically discovering correlations between solar flares and active region data, in order to predict the former. The goal of BPL is to predict the interval of time to the next solar flare and provide a confidence value for the associated prediction. The discovered correlations are described in terms of easy-to-read rules. The results indicate that active region dynamics is essential for predicting solar flares.

  16. The two solar flares diagnostics based on the soft X-ray emission recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail I. Savchenko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The time history of the temperature and the emission measure of the solar flare plasma have been studied relying upon the experimental data on the soft X-rays recorded by the IRIS spectrometer on June 29, 2002 (F1 and March 27, 2003 (F2. F1 was a thermal flare and was not accompanied by hard X-rays. This data analysis revealed that at least two sequential energy-release processes occurred during the F1 event. The F2 event took place behind the limb, so only the top part of the flare loop being the soft X-ray source was recorded by the satellite-based spectrometer. From this data analysis it appeared that fast plasma heating occurred in the initial stage of F2 and then the flare region expanded and the emission measure of flare plasma increased.

  17. Solar flare neon and solar cosmic ray fluxes in the past using gas-rich meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nautiyal, C. M.; Rao, M. N.

    1986-01-01

    Methods were developed earlier to deduce the composition of solar flare neon and to determine the solar cosmic ray proton fluxes in the past using etched lunar samples and at present, these techniques are extended to gas rich meteorites. By considering high temperature Ne data points for Pantar, Fayetteville and other gas rich meteorites and by applying the three component Ne-decomposition methods, the solar cosmic ray and galactic cosmic ray produced spallation Ne components from the trapped SF-Ne was resolved. Using appropiate SCR and GCR production rates, in the case of Pantar, for example, a GCR exposure age of 2 m.y. was estimated for Pantar-Dark while Pantar-Light yielded a GCR age of approx. 3 m.y. However the SCR exposure age of Pantar-Dark is two orders of magnitude higher than the average surface exposure ages of lunar soils. The possibility of higher proton fluxes in the past is discussed.

  18. FIRST DETECTION OF >100 MeV GAMMA-RAYS ASSOCIATED WITH A BEHIND-THE-LIMB SOLAR FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesce-Rollins, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Omodei, N.; Petrosian, V.; Liu, Wei; Costa, Fatima Rubio da; Allafort, A.; Chen, Qingrong, E-mail: melissa.pesce.rollins@pi.infn.it, E-mail: nicola.omodei@stanford.edu, E-mail: vahep@stanford.edu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    We report the first detection of >100 MeV gamma-rays associated with a behind-the-limb solar flare, which presents a unique opportunity to probe the underlying physics of high-energy flare emission and particle acceleration. On 2013 October 11 a GOES M1.5 class solar flare occurred ∼9.°9 behind the solar limb as observed by STEREO-B. RHESSI observed hard X-ray (HXR) emission above the limb, most likely from the flare loop-top, as the footpoints were occulted. Surprisingly, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) detected >100 MeV gamma-rays for ∼30 minutes with energies up to 3 GeV. The LAT emission centroid is consistent with the RHESSI HXR source, but its uncertainty does not constrain the source to be located there. The gamma-ray spectra can be adequately described by bremsstrahlung radiation from relativistic electrons having a relatively hard power-law (PL) spectrum with a high-energy exponential cutoff, or by the decay of pions produced by accelerated protons and ions with an isotropic pitch-angle distribution and a PL spectrum with a number index of ∼3.8. We show that high optical depths rule out the gamma-rays originating from the flare site and a high-corona trap model requires very unusual conditions, so a scenario in which some of the particles accelerated by the CME shock travel to the visible side of the Sun to produce the observed gamma-rays may be at work.

  19. Predicting Solar Flares Using SDO/HMI Vector Magnetic Data Products and the Random Forest Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Wang, Jason T. L.; Wang, Haimin

    2017-07-01

    Adverse space-weather effects can often be traced to solar flares, the prediction of which has drawn significant research interests. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) produces full-disk vector magnetograms with continuous high cadence, while flare prediction efforts utilizing this unprecedented data source are still limited. Here we report results of flare prediction using physical parameters provided by the Space-weather HMI Active Region Patches (SHARP) and related data products. We survey X-ray flares that occurred from 2010 May to 2016 December and categorize their source regions into four classes (B, C, M, and X) according to the maximum GOES magnitude of flares they generated. We then retrieve SHARP-related parameters for each selected region at the beginning of its flare date to build a database. Finally, we train a machine-learning algorithm, called random forest (RF), to predict the occurrence of a certain class of flares in a given active region within 24 hr, evaluate the classifier performance using the 10-fold cross-validation scheme, and characterize the results using standard performance metrics. Compared to previous works, our experiments indicate that using the HMI parameters and RF is a valid method for flare forecasting with fairly reasonable prediction performance. To our knowledge, this is the first time that RF has been used to make multiclass predictions of solar flares. We also find that the total unsigned quantities of vertical current, current helicity, and flux near the polarity inversion line are among the most important parameters for classifying flaring regions into different classes.

  20. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF A SLOW-RISE, MULTISTEP X1.6 FLARE AND THE ASSOCIATED ERUPTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurchyshyn, V. [Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States); Kumar, P.; Cho, K.-S.; Lim, E.-K. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Abramenko, V. I. [Central Astronomical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences at Pulkovo, 196140, Pulkovskoye chaussee 65, Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-20

    Using multiwavelength observations, we studied a slow-rise, multistep X1.6 flare that began on 2014 November 7 as a localized eruption of core fields inside a δ-sunspot and later engulfed the entire active region (AR). This flare event was associated with formation of two systems of post-eruption arcades (PEAs) and several J-shaped flare ribbons showing extremely fine details, irreversible changes in the photospheric magnetic fields, and it was accompanied by a fast and wide coronal mass ejection. Data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory and IRIS spacecraft, along with the ground-based data from the New Solar Telescope, present evidence that (i) the flare and the eruption were directly triggered by a flux emergence that occurred inside a δ-sunspot at the boundary between two umbrae; (ii) this event represented an example of the formation of an unstable flux rope observed only in hot AIA channels (131 and 94 Å) and LASCO C2 coronagraph images; (iii) the global PEA spanned the entire AR and was due to global-scale reconnection occurring at heights of about one solar radius, indicating the global spatial and temporal scale of the eruption.

  1. Comparison of long-term trend of solar radius with sunspot activity and flare index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, H.; Golbasi, O.

    2011-07-01

    Results are presented from a study of solar radius measurements taken with the solar astrolabe at the TUBITAK National Observatory (TUG) over seven years, 2001-2007. The data series with standard deviation of 0.35 arcsec shows the long-term variational trend with 0.04 arcsec/year. On the other hand, the data series of solar radius are compared with the data of sunspot activity and H- α flare index for the same period. Over the seven year trend, we have found significant linear anti-correlations between the solar radius and other indicators such as sunspot numbers, sunspot areas, and H- α flare index. While the solar radius displays the strongest anti-correlation (-0.7676) with sunspot numbers, it shows a significant anti-correlation of -0.6365 with sunspot areas. But, the anti-correlation between the solar radius and H- α flare index is found to be -0.4975, slightly lower than others. In addition, we computed Hurst exponent of the data sets ranging between 0.7214 and 0.7996, exhibiting the persistent behavior for the long term trend. In the light of the strong correlations with high significance, we may suggest that there are a causal relationship between the solar radius and solar time series such as sunspot activity and H- α flare index.

  2. North–South Distribution of Solar Flares during Cycle 23 Bhuwan ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, we investigate the spatial distribution of solar flares in the northern and southern hemispheres of the Sun that occurred during the period 1996 to 2003. This period of investigation includes the ascending phase, the maximum and part of the descending phase of solar cycle 23. It is revealed that the ...

  3. Physics of solar neutron production: Questionable detection of neutrons from the 31 December 2007 flare

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Share, Gerald H; Murphy, Ronald J; Tylka, Allan J; Kozlovsky, Benz; Ryan, James M; Gwon, Chul

    2011-01-01

    ...–10 MeV solar neutrons. We discuss the cross sections for neutron production in solar flares and calculate the escaping neutron spectra for monoenergetic and power law particle spectra at the Sun and at the distance (0.48 AU...

  4. Statistical study of free magnetic energy and flare productivity of solar active regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, J. T.; Jing, J.; Wang, S.; Wang, H. M. [Space Weather Research Laboratory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, University Heights, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Wiegelmann, T., E-mail: sjt@bao.ac.cn [Max-Planck-Institut fur Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Strasse 2, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

    2014-06-20

    Photospheric vector magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory are utilized as the boundary conditions to extrapolate both nonlinear force-free and potential magnetic fields in solar corona. Based on the extrapolations, we are able to determine the free magnetic energy (FME) stored in active regions (ARs). Over 3000 vector magnetograms in 61 ARs were analyzed. We compare FME with the ARs' flare index (FI) and find that there is a weak correlation (<60%) between FME and FI. FME shows slightly improved flare predictability relative to the total unsigned magnetic flux of ARs in the following two aspects: (1) the flare productivity predicted by FME is higher than that predicted by magnetic flux and (2) the correlation between FI and FME is higher than that between FI and magnetic flux. However, this improvement is not significant enough to make a substantial difference in time-accumulated FI, rather than individual flare, predictions.

  5. Logistic Avalanche Processes, Elementary Time Structures, and Frequency Distributions in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Dennis, Brian R.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1998-04-01

    We analyze the elementary time structures (on timescales of ~0.1-3.0 s) and their frequency distributions in solar flares using hard X-ray (HXR) data from the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) and radio data from the radio spectrometers of Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule (ETH) Zurich. The four analyzed data sets are gathered from over 600 different solar flares and include about (1) 104 HXR pulses at >=25 and >=50 keV, (2) 4000 radio type III bursts, (3) 4000 pulses of decimetric quasi-periodic broadband pulsation events, and (4) 104 elements of decimetric millisecond spike events. The time profiles of resolved elementary time structures have a near-Gaussian shape and can be modeled with the logistic equation, which provides a quantitative measurement of the exponential growth time τG and the nonlinear saturation energy level WS of the underlying instability. Assuming a random distribution (Poisson statistics) of saturation times tS (with an e-folding constant tSe), the resulting frequency distribution of saturation energies WS or peak energy dissipation rates FS = (dW/dt)t=tS has the form of a power-law function, i.e., N(FS)~F-αS, where the power-law index α is directly related to the number of e-folding amplifications by the relation α = (1 + τG/tSe). The same mathematical formalism is used to generate power-law distributions, as in Rosner & Vaiana, but the distribution of energies released in elementary flare instabilities is not related to the global energy storage process. We assume Poissonian noise for the unamplified energy levels in unstable flare cells, implying an exponential frequency distribution of avalanche energies WS or fluxes FS in the absence of coherent amplifications. Also, in the case of coherent amplification, the Poissonian noise introduces exponential rollovers of the power law at the low and high ends of the frequency distributions. We fit both power-law and exponential functions to the observed frequency distributions of

  6. RE-EVALUATION OF THE NEUTRON EMISSION FROM THE SOLAR FLARE OF 2005 SEPTEMBER 7, DETECTED BY THE SOLAR NEUTRON TELESCOPE AT SIERRA NEGRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, L. X. [SCiESMEX, Instituto de Geofísica Unidad Michoacán, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 58190, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Musalem, O.; Hurtado, A. [Instituto de Geofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacán, 04510, D. F. Mexico (Mexico); Sánchez, F. [Instituto de Tecnologías en Detección de Astropartículas, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, 1429, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Muraki, Y.; Sako, T.; Matsubara, Y.; Nagai, Y. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Watanabe, K. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Yoshinodai, chuo-ku, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan); Shibata, S. [College of Engineering, Chubu University, Kasugai, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan); Sakai, T. [College of Industrial Technologies, Nihon University, Narashino 275-0005 (Japan)

    2015-12-01

    The X17.0 solar flare of 2005 September 7 released high-energy neutrons that were detected by the Solar Neutron Telescope (SNT) at Sierra Negra, Mexico. In three separate and independent studies of this solar neutron event, several of its unique characteristics were studied; in particular, a power-law energy spectra was estimated. In this paper, we present an alternative analysis, based on improved numerical simulations of the detector using GEANT4, and a different technique for processing the SNT data. The results indicate that the spectral index that best fits the neutron flux is around 3, in agreement with previous works. Based on the numerically calculated neutron energy deposition on the SNT, we confirm that the detected neutrons might have reached an energy of 1 GeV, which implies that 10 GeV protons were probably produced; these could not be observed at Earth, as their parent flare was an east limb event.

  7. Physics of ion acceleration in the solar flare on 2003 October 28 determines gamma-ray and neutron production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Murphy, R. J.; Share, G. H.; Stoker, P. H.; Lin, R. P.

    Observations of gamma-rays and neutrons provide information about acceleration and transport of ions in solar flares. Neutrons from the X17.2 flare on 2003 October 28 were observed by the ground-based neutron monitor at Tsumeb in Namibia. This observation was made 5 minutes before the GLE event produced by the energetic protons. The full time history of gamma rays for this event was observed by the INTEGRAL satellite, while the RHESSI satellite observed gamma-rays during the decay phase. Gamma-ray lines at 2.2, 4.4, and 6.1 MeV were observed by both detectors, and a 2.2 MeV gamma-ray image was also obtained by RHESSI. Based on these gamma-ray line observations, we calculate predicted time-dependent neutron spectra arriving at Earth using the solar flare magnetic loop transport and interaction model of Hua et al. (2002). These spectra are then convolved with the response functions of the Earth's atmosphere and the neutron monitor to provide predicted neutron monitor count rates. We compare these predicted and observed rates to determine the accelerated ion spectrum and magnetic-loop transport properties.

  8. Thermal characteristics of a B8.3 flare observed on July 04, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Arun Kumar; Sylwester, Barbara; Sylwester, Janusz; Jain, Rajmal

    We explore the temporal evolution of flare plasma parameters including temperature (T) - differential emission measure (DEM) relationship by analyzing high spectral and temporal cadence of X-ray emission in 1.6-8.0 keV energy band, recorded by SphinX (Polish) and Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS; Indian) instruments, during a B8.3 flare which occurred on July 04, 2009. SphinX records X-ray emission in 1.2-15.0 keV energy band with the temporal and spectral cadence as good as 6 μs and 0.4 keV, respectively. On the other hand, SOXS provides X-ray observations in 4-25 keV energy band with the temporal and spectral resolution of 3 s and 0.7 keV, respectively. We derive the thermal plasma parameters during impulsive phase of the flare employing well-established Withbroe-Sylwester DEM inversion algorithm.

  9. The fading behavior of the propagating VLF signal during the recovery time of solar flares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouderba, Yasmina; Tribeche, Mouloud; Nait Amor, Samir

    2016-07-01

    The VLF radio signal propagating in the waveguide delimited by the Earth's surface and the D-layer of the ionosphere undergoes important modifications due to solar flares. In this work we focus on the NRK (37.5 kHz) VLF transmitter signal that propagates along the medium path to Algiers receiver (distance=3495 km). The signal analysis of two different flare classes shows that the perturbation due to a week flare of C2.1 (I _{max}=2.1 x 10 ^{-6} W/m ^{2}) class are less important than the medium one of M3.2 (I _{max}=3.2 x 10 ^{-5} W/m ^{2}) class. This leads to the fast recovery to the normal ionospheric condition after the weak solar flare while the medium solar flare takes more time. Additionally, the study of the signal amplitude behaviors by means of the LWPC code shows that the fading displacement toward the transmitter is more significant in the case of M3.2 flare than C2.1 class.

  10. Signals for invisible matter from solar-terrestrial observations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    We observe a strong correlation between the orbital position of the planets with solar phenomena like flares or the variation of EUV irradiance. Similarly, a correlation is found in the study of the ionization content of the Earth atmosphere. Planetary gravitational lensing of one (or more) streams of slow moving invisible matter is proposed as an explanation of such a behaviour.

  11. Very Large Array Observations of Solar Active Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-30

    solar corona with longitudinal magnetic field ponds to a longitudinal magnetic field strength of H, - strengths H, t 1800 gauss (n =03 provided that the...source of flare energy (Gold and Hoyle , 1960; Heyvaerts et al., 1977; Rust, 1972, 1976). Recent VLA observations at 6 cm wavelength (Kundu et al., 1982

  12. Table-top solar flares produced with laser driven magnetic reconnections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong J.Y.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The American Nuclear Society (ANS has presented the prestigious Edward Teller award to Dr. Bruce A. Remington during the 2011 IFSA conference due to his “pioneering scientific work in the fields of inertial confinement fusion (ICF, and especially developing an international effort in high energy density laboratory astrophysics” [1,2]. This is a great acknowledgement to the subject of high energy density laboratory astrophysics. In this context, we report here one experiment conducted to model solar flares in the laboratory with intense lasers [3]. The mega-gauss –scale magnetic fields produced by laser produced plasmas can be used to make magnetic reconnection topology. We have produced one table-top solar flare in our laboratory experiment with the same geometric setup as associated with solar flares.

  13. Solar Prominences: Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Parenti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Solar prominences are one of the most common features of the solar atmosphere. They are found in the corona but they are one hundred times cooler and denser than the coronal material, indicating that they are thermally and pressure isolated from the surrounding environment. Because of these properties they appear at the limb as bright features when observed in the optical or the EUV cool lines. On the disk they appear darker than their background, indicating the presence of a plasma absorption process (in this case they are called filaments. Prominence plasma is embedded in a magnetic environment that lies above magnetic inversion lines, denoted a filament channel. This paper aims at providing the reader with the main elements that characterize these peculiar structures, the prominences and their environment, as deduced from observations. The aim is also to point out and discuss open questions on prominence existence, stability and disappearance. The review starts with a general introduction of these features and the instruments used for their observation. Section 2 presents the large scale properties, including filament morphology, thermodynamical parameters, magnetic fields, and the properties of the surrounding coronal cavity, all in stable conditions. Section 3 is dedicated to small-scale observational properties, from both the morphological and dynamical points of view. Section 4 introduces observational aspects during prominence formation, while Section 5 reviews the sources of instability leading to prominence disappearance or eruption. Conclusions and perspectives are given in Section 6.

  14. Hard X-ray bremsstrahlung production in solar flares by high-energy proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, A. G.; Brown, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility that solar hard X-ray bremsstrahlung is produced by acceleration of stationary electrons by fast-moving protons, rather than vice versa, as commonly assumed, was investigated. It was found that a beam of protons which involves 1836 times fewer particles, each having an energy 1836 times greater than that of the electrons in the equivalent electron beam model, has exactly the same bremsstrahlung yield for a given target, i.e., the mechanism has an energetic efficiency equal to that of conventional bremsstrahlung models. Allowance for the different degrees of target ionization appropriate to the two models (for conventional flare geometries) makes the proton beam model more efficient than the electron beam model, by a factor of order three. The model places less stringent constraints than a conventional electron beam model on the flare energy release mechanism. It is also consistent with observed X-ray burst spectra, intensities, and directivities. The altitude distribution of hard X-rays predicted by the model agrees with observations only if nonvertical injection of the protons is assumed. The model is inconsistent with gamma-ray data in terms of conventional modeling.

  15. Using Supra-Arcade Downflows as Probes of Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2012-01-01

    Extracting information from coronal features above flares has become more reliable with the availability of increasingly higher spatial- and temporal-resolution data in recent decades. We are now able to sufficiently probe the region high above long-duration flaring active regions where reconnection is expected to be continually occurring. Flows in the supra-arcade region, first observed with Yohkoh/SXT, have been theorized to be associated with newly-reconnected outflowing loops. High resolution data appears to confirm these assertions. Assuming that these flows are indeed reconnection outflows, then the detection of those directed toward the solar surface (i.e. downflowing) should be associated with particle acceleration between the current sheet and the loop footpoints rooted in the chromosphere. RHESSI observations of highly energetic particles with respect to downflow detections could potentially constrain electron acceleration models. We provide measurements of these supra-arcade downflows (SADs) in relation to reconnection model parameters and present preliminary findings comparing the downflow timings with high-energy RHESSI lightcurves.

  16. Using Supra-Arcade Downflows as Probes of Electron Acceleration During Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Sabrina L.

    2011-01-01

    Extracting information from coronal features above flares has become more reliable with the availability of increasingly higher spatial and temporal-resolution data in recent decades. We are now able to sufficiently probe the region high above long-duration flaring active regions where reconnection is expected to be continually occurring. Flows in the supra-arcade region, first observed with Yohkoh/SXT, have been theorized to be associated with newly-reconnected outflowing loops. High resolution data appears to confirm these assertions. Assuming that these flows are indeed reconnection outflows, then the detection of those directed toward the solar surface (i.e. downflowing) should be associated with particle acceleration between the current sheet and the loop footpoints rooted in the chromosphere. RHESSI observations of highly energetic particles with respect to downflow detections could potentially constrain electron acceleration models. I will discuss measurements of these supra-arcade downflows (SADs) in relation to reconnection model parameters and present preliminary findings comparing the downflow timings with high-energy RHESSI lightcurves.

  17. On the transport and acceleration of solar flare particles in a coronal loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, James M.; Lee, Martin A.

    1991-01-01

    The turbulent environment of a flaring solar coronal loop directly affects the population of particles to be accelerated or already accelerated. Under the assumption of a uniform turbulent MHD wave field within the loop, the behavior of a particle distribution as it interacts with the turbulence is discussed, including particle precipitation to the footpoints of the loop and the evolution of the energy distribution as the particles undergo second-order stochastic acceleration. Two cases are discussed in detail: (1) particles spatially diffusing within the loop and precipitating with minimal acceleration in the short time scale of an impulsive event and (2) particles diffusing in both real and momentum space in a long duration event. Collisional losses due to ambient electrons are included. The gamma-ray flare of June 3, 1982 is modeled, and good agreement is obtained between predicted and observed time profiles if the loop length is 100,000 km with an intrinsic spatial diffusion time of 100-450 s. It follows that the production of high-energy neutrons and pi mesons extends over a time scale of 1000 s as observed.

  18. Can Substorm Particle Acceleration Be Applied to Solar Flares?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn, J.; Battaglia, M.; Fletcher, L.; Hesse, M.; Neukirch, T.

    2017-10-01

    Using test particle studies in the electromagnetic fields of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of magnetic reconnection, we study the energization of charged particles in the context of the standard two-ribbon flare picture in analogy to the standard magnetospheric substorm paradigm. In particular, we investigate the effects of the collapsing field (“collapsing magnetic trap”) below a reconnection site, which has been demonstrated to be the major acceleration mechanism that causes energetic particle acceleration and injections observed in Earth’s magnetotail associated with substorms and other impulsive events. We contrast an initially force-free, high-shear field (low beta) with low and moderate shear, finite-pressure (high-beta) arcade structures, where beta represents the ratio between gas (plasma) and magnetic pressure. We demonstrate that the energization affects large numbers of particles, but the acceleration is modest in the presence of a significant shear field. Without incorporating loss mechanisms, the effect on particles at different energies is similar, akin to adiabatic heating, and thus is not a likely mechanism to generate a power-law tail onto a (heated or not heated) Maxwellian velocity distribution.

  19. Lunar surface phenomena - Solar flare track gradients, microcraters, and accretionary particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanford, G. E.; Fruland, R. M.; Mckay, D. S.; Morrison, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Data are presented concerning the energy spectra of solar flare particles and the distribution of particles producing submicron diameter craters. Processes which alter the albedo and possibly the chemistry of exposed lunar surfaces are also considered. Measurements are reported of solar flare track gradients in rock 64455 which is sufficiently young to have uneroded surfaces on its sides. Attention is also given to accretionary particles adhering to host surfaces, microcraters on soil particles, and microcraters on the oriented surfaces of sample 76015 from a boulder at Station 6 of the Apollo 17 site.

  20. Hard X-Ray Flare Source Sizes Measured with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Pernak, Rick L.

    2009-01-01

    Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations of 18 double hard X-ray sources seen at energies above 25 keV are analyzed to determine the spatial extent of the most compact structures evident in each case. The following four image reconstruction algorithms were used: Clean, Pixon, and two routines using visibilities maximum entropy and forward fit (VFF). All have been adapted for this study to optimize their ability to provide reliable estimates of the sizes of the more compact sources. The source fluxes, sizes, and morphologies obtained with each method are cross-correlated and the similarities and disagreements are discussed. The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the major axes of the sources with assumed elliptical Gaussian shapes are generally well correlated between the four image reconstruction routines and vary between the RHESSI resolution limit of approximately 2" up to approximately 20" with most below 10". The FWHM of the minor axes are generally at or just above the RHESSI limit and hence should be considered as unresolved in most cases. The orientation angles of the elliptical sources are also well correlated. These results suggest that the elongated sources are generally aligned along a flare ribbon with the minor axis perpendicular to the ribbon. This is verified for the one flare in our list with coincident Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) images. There is evidence for significant extra flux in many of the flares in addition to the two identified compact sources, thus rendering the VFF assumption of just two Gaussians inadequate. A more realistic approximation in many cases would be of two line sources with unresolved widths. Recommendations are given for optimizing the RHESSI imaging reconstruction process to ensure that the finest possible details of the source morphology become evident and that reliable estimates can be made of the source dimensions.

  1. Atmospheric electric field anomalies associated with solar flare/coronal mass ejection events and solar energetic charged particle "Ground Level Events"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasatkina, E. A.; Shumilov, O. I.; Rycroft, M. J.; Marcz, F.; Frank-Kamenetsky, A. V.

    2009-10-01

    We discuss the fair weather atmospheric electric field signatures of three major solar energetic charged particle events which occurred in on 15 April 2001, 18 April and 4 November, and their causative solar flares/coronal mass ejections (SF/CMEs). Only the 15 April 2001 shows clear evidence for Ez variation associated to SF/CME events and the other two events may support this hypothesis as well although for them the meteorological data were not available. All three events seem to be associated with relativistic solar protons (i.e. protons with energies >450 MeV) of the Ground Level Event (GLE) type. The study presents data on variations of the vertical component of the atmospheric electric field (Ez) measured at the auroral station Apatity (geomagnetic latitude: 63.8°, the polar cap station Vostok (geomagnetic latitude: -89.3°) and the middle latitude stations Voyeikovo (geomagnetic latitude: 56.1°) and Nagycenk (geomagnetic latitude: 47.2°). A significant disturbance in the atmospheric electric field is sometimes observed close to the time of the causative solar flare; the beginning of the electric field perturbation at Apatity is detected one or two hours before the flare onset and the GLE onset. Atmospheric electric field records at Vostok and Voyeikovo show a similar disturbance at the same time for the 15 April 2001 event. Some mechanisms responsible for the electric field perturbations are considered.

  2. The heating of the thermal plasma with energetic electrons in small solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H. A.; Lin, R. P.

    1986-01-01

    The energetic electrons deduced from hard X-rays in the thick target model may be responsible for heating of soft X-ray plasma in solar flares. It is shown from OSO-7 studies that if a cutoff of 10 keV is assumed, the total electron is comparable to the thermal plasma energy. However, (1) the soft X-ray emission often appears to begin before the hard X-ray burst, (2) in about one-third of flares there is no detectable hard X-ray emission, and (3) for most events the energy content (assuming constant density) of soft X-ray plasma continues to rise after the end of the hard X-ray burst. To understand these problems we have analyzed the temporal relationship between soft X-rays and hard X-rays for 20 small events observed by ISEE-3 during 1980. One example is shown. The start of soft X-ray and hard X-ray bursts is defined as the time when the counting rates of the 4.8 to 5. keV and 25.8 to 43.2 keV channels, respectively, exceed the background by one standard deviation.

  3. Realistic radiative MHD simulation of a solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, Matthias D.; Cheung, Mark; Chintzoglou, Georgios; Chen, Feng; Testa, Paola; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Sainz Dalda, Alberto; DeRosa, Marc L.; Viktorovna Malanushenko, Anna; Hansteen, Viggo H.; De Pontieu, Bart; Carlsson, Mats; Gudiksen, Boris; McIntosh, Scott W.

    2017-08-01

    We present a recently developed version of the MURaM radiative MHD code that includes coronal physics in terms of optically thin radiative loss and field aligned heat conduction. The code employs the "Boris correction" (semi-relativistic MHD with a reduced speed of light) and a hyperbolic treatment of heat conduction, which allow for efficient simulations of the photosphere/corona system by avoiding the severe time-step constraints arising from Alfven wave propagation and heat conduction. We demonstrate that this approach can be used even in dynamic phases such as a flare. We consider a setup in which a flare is triggered by flux emergence into a pre-existing bipolar active region. After the coronal energy release, efficient transport of energy along field lines leads to the formation of flare ribbons within seconds. In the flare ribbons we find downflows for temperatures lower than ~5 MK and upflows at higher temperatures. The resulting soft X-ray emission shows a fast rise and slow decay, reaching a peak corresponding to a mid C-class flare. The post reconnection energy release in the corona leads to average particle energies reaching 50 keV (500 MK under the assumption of a thermal plasma). We show that hard X-ray emission from the corona computed under the assumption of thermal bremsstrahlung can produce a power-law spectrum due to the multi-thermal nature of the plasma. The electron energy flux into the flare ribbons (classic heat conduction with free streaming limit) is highly inhomogeneous and reaches peak values of about 3x1011 erg/cm2/s in a small fraction of the ribbons, indicating regions that could potentially produce hard X-ray footpoint sources. We demonstrate that these findings are robust by comparing simulations computed with different values of the saturation heat flux as well as the "reduced speed of light".

  4. Detection of Three-minute Oscillations in Full-disk Ly α Emission during a Solar Flare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milligan, Ryan O.; Fletcher, Lyndsay [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Fleck, Bernhard [ESA Directorate of Science, Operations Department, c/o NASA/GSFC Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20071 (United States); Ireland, Jack; Dennis, Brian R. [Solar Physics Laboratory (Code 671), Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2017-10-10

    In this Letter we report the detection of chromospheric 3-minute oscillations in disk-integrated EUV irradiance observations during a solar flare. A wavelet analysis of detrended Ly α (from GOES /EUVS) and Lyman continuum (from Solar Dynamics Observatory ( SDO )/EVE) emission from the 2011 February 15 X-class flare (SOL2011-02-15T01:56) revealed a ∼3 minute period present during the flare’s main phase. The formation temperature of this emission locates this radiation at the flare’s chromospheric footpoints, and similar behavior is found in the SDO /Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 1600 and 1700 Å channels, which are dominated by chromospheric continuum. The implication is that the chromosphere responds dynamically at its acoustic cutoff frequency to an impulsive injection of energy. Since the 3-minute period was not found at hard X-ray (HXR) energies (50–100 keV) in Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager data we can state that this 3-minute oscillation does not depend on the rate of energization of non-thermal electrons. However, a second period of 120 s found in both HXR and chromospheric lightcurves is consistent with episodic electron energization on 2-minute timescales. Our finding on the 3-minute oscillation suggests that chromospheric mechanical energy should be included in the flare energy budget, and the fluctuations in the Ly α line may influence the composition and dynamics of planetary atmospheres during periods of high activity.

  5. Classification of X-ray solar flares regarding their effects on the lower ionosphere electron density profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Grubor

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The classification of X-ray solar flares is performed regarding their effects on the Very Low Frequency (VLF wave propagation along the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. The changes in propagation are detected from an observed VLF signal phase and amplitude perturbations, taking place during X-ray solar flares. All flare effects chosen for the analysis are recorded by the Absolute Phase and Amplitude Logger (AbsPal, during the summer months of 2004–2007, on the single trace, Skelton (54.72 N, 2.88 W to Belgrade (44.85 N, 20.38 E with a distance along the Great Circle Path (GCP D≈2000 km in length. The observed VLF amplitude and phase perturbations are simulated by the computer program Long-Wavelength Propagation Capability (LWPC, using Wait's model of the lower ionosphere, as determined by two parameters: the sharpness (β in 1/km and reflection height (H' in km. By varying the values of β and H' so as to match the observed amplitude and phase perturbations, the variation of the D-region electron density height profile Ne(z was reconstructed, throughout flare duration. The procedure is illustrated as applied to a series of flares, from class C to M5 (5×10−5 W/m2 at 0.1–0.8 nm, each giving rise to a different time development of signal perturbation. The corresponding change in electron density from the unperturbed value at the unperturbed reflection height, i.e. Ne(74 km=2.16×108 m−3 to the value induced by an M5 class flare, up to Ne(74 km=4×1010 m−3 is obtained. The β parameter is found to range from 0.30–0.49 1/km and the reflection height H' to vary from 74–63 km. The changes in Ne(z during the flares, within height range z=60 to 90 km are determined, as well.

  6. Classification of X-ray solar flares regarding their effects on the lower ionosphere electron density profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Grubor

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The classification of X-ray solar flares is performed regarding their effects on the Very Low Frequency (VLF wave propagation along the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. The changes in propagation are detected from an observed VLF signal phase and amplitude perturbations, taking place during X-ray solar flares. All flare effects chosen for the analysis are recorded by the Absolute Phase and Amplitude Logger (AbsPal, during the summer months of 2004–2007, on the single trace, Skelton (54.72 N, 2.88 W to Belgrade (44.85 N, 20.38 E with a distance along the Great Circle Path (GCP D≈2000 km in length.

    The observed VLF amplitude and phase perturbations are simulated by the computer program Long-Wavelength Propagation Capability (LWPC, using Wait's model of the lower ionosphere, as determined by two parameters: the sharpness (β in 1/km and reflection height (H' in km. By varying the values of β and H' so as to match the observed amplitude and phase perturbations, the variation of the D-region electron density height profile Ne(z was reconstructed, throughout flare duration. The procedure is illustrated as applied to a series of flares, from class C to M5 (5×10−5 W/m2 at 0.1–0.8 nm, each giving rise to a different time development of signal perturbation.

    The corresponding change in electron density from the unperturbed value at the unperturbed reflection height, i.e. Ne(74 km=2.16×108 m−3 to the value induced by an M5 class flare, up to Ne(74 km=4×1010 m−3 is obtained. The β parameter is found to range from 0.30–0.49 1/km and the reflection height H' to vary from 74–63 km. The changes in Ne(z during the flares, within height range z=60 to 90 km are determined, as well.

  7. NICER and MAXI Observations of Two Large X-ray Flares from RS CVn Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Stephen A.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael Francis; Iwakiri, Wataru; Sasaki, Ryo; Kawai, Hiroki; Tsuboi, Yohko; Enoto, Teruaki; NICER Science Team

    2018-01-01

    NICER has observed two giant X-ray flares on the active binary systems, GT Mus and UX Ari, in response to their detections by the MAXI all-sky X-ray monitor onboard the ISS, with a delay of about a day in each case. The large effective area of the NICER X-ray optics means that high signal-to-noise spectra with more than 200,000 counts were obtained in relatively short exposures totaling less than an hour in each set of observations.MAXI detected a transient of 5.5 x 10^-10 erg/s/cm2 at the position of the active RS CVn binary GT Mus (G5/8 III + ?) early on 2017 July 19. NICER started its observations about 1 day later, and intermittently monitored the decay for the next 2.5 days, accumulating about 1,600 seconds exposure. The NICER light curve shows a smooth, gradual flux decline by a factor of two for the first 2 days, followed by an apparent flattening in the last half day. The dominant plasma temperature remained at ~40 million K during this period, suggesting an ongoing continuous heating during the decay phase.NICER also followed up another MAXI-detected flare in October 2017, this one from the nearby active system, UX Ari. NICER's X-ray spectrum shows clear neon and oxygen lines, while the emissionfrom iron ions is not as prominent as it is in most flares, implying an abundance of only ~10% solar which is significantly lower than previous inferred coronal Fe abundances for this star, although this result is dependent on the NICER gain correction.

  8. High-Energy Solar Energetic Particles & Long Duration Gamma-Ray Flares — Is there a Connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Nolfo, G. A.; Boezio, M.; Bruno, A.; Christian, E. R.; Martucci, M.; Mergè, M.; Mocchiutti, E.; Munini, R.; Ricci, M.; Ryan, J. M.; Share, G. H.; Stochaj, S.

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about the origin of the high-energy and sustained emission from Long Duration Gamma-Ray Flares (LDGRFs), identified with Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO), the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), and now Fermi. Though Fermi/LAT has identified dozens of flares with LDGRF emission, the nature of this emission has been a challenge to explain both due to the extreme energies and long durations. The highest energy emission has generally been attributed to pion production from the interaction of high-energy protons with the ambient matter, suggesting that particle acceleration occurs over large volumes extending high in the corona, either from stochastic acceleration within large coronal loops or from back precipitation from CME-driven shocks. It is possible to test these models by making direct comparisons between the accelerated ion population at the flare derived from the observations of Fermi/LAT with PAMELA measurements of solar energetic particles in the energy range corresponding to the pion-related emission observed with Fermi. For nine SEP events, we compare the two populations (SEPs in space and the interacting population at the Sun) and discuss the implications in terms of the contending theories for LDGF emission. On behalf of the PAMELA Collaboration

  9. Editorial: solar radiophysics — recent results on observations and theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakariakov, Valery M.; Kashapova, Larisa K.; Yan, Yi-Hua

    2014-07-01

    Solar radiophysics is a rapidly developing branch of solar physics and plasma astrophysics. Solar radiophysics has the goal of analyzing observations of radio emissions from the Sun and understanding basic physical processes operating in quiet and active regions of the solar corona. In the near future, the commissioning of a new generation of solar radio observational facilities, which include the Chinese Spectral Radio Heliograph (CSRH) and the upgrade of the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT), and the beginning of solar observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), is expected to bring us new breakthrough results of a transformative nature. The Marie-Curie International Research Staff Exchange (MC IRSES) “RadioSun” international network aims to create a solid foundation for the successful exploitation of upcoming solar radio observational facilities, as well as intensive use of the existing observational tools, advanced theoretical modeling of relevant physical processes and observables, and training a new generation of solar radio physicists. The RadioSun network links research teams from China, Czech Republic, Poland, Russia and the UK. This mini-volume presents research papers based on invited reviews and contributed talks at the 1st RadioSun workshop in China. These papers cover a broad range of research topics and include recent observational and theoretical advances in solar radiophysics, MHD seismology of the solar corona, physics of solar flares, generation of radio emission, numerical modeling of MHD and plasma physics processes, charged-particle acceleration and novel instrumentation.

  10. Forecasting Solar Flares Using Magnetogram-based Predictors and Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florios, Kostas; Kontogiannis, Ioannis; Park, Sung-Hong; Guerra, Jordan A.; Benvenuto, Federico; Bloomfield, D. Shaun; Georgoulis, Manolis K.

    2018-02-01

    We propose a forecasting approach for solar flares based on data from Solar Cycle 24, taken by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission. In particular, we use the Space-weather HMI Active Region Patches (SHARP) product that facilitates cut-out magnetograms of solar active regions (AR) in the Sun in near-realtime (NRT), taken over a five-year interval (2012 - 2016). Our approach utilizes a set of thirteen predictors, which are not included in the SHARP metadata, extracted from line-of-sight and vector photospheric magnetograms. We exploit several machine learning (ML) and conventional statistics techniques to predict flares of peak magnitude {>} M1 and {>} C1 within a 24 h forecast window. The ML methods used are multi-layer perceptrons (MLP), support vector machines (SVM), and random forests (RF). We conclude that random forests could be the prediction technique of choice for our sample, with the second-best method being multi-layer perceptrons, subject to an entropy objective function. A Monte Carlo simulation showed that the best-performing method gives accuracy ACC=0.93(0.00), true skill statistic TSS=0.74(0.02), and Heidke skill score HSS=0.49(0.01) for {>} M1 flare prediction with probability threshold 15% and ACC=0.84(0.00), TSS=0.60(0.01), and HSS=0.59(0.01) for {>} C1 flare prediction with probability threshold 35%.

  11. Effect of solar flare on the equatorial electrojet in eastern Brazil region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of solar flare, sudden commencement of magnetic storm and of the disturbances ring current on the equatorial electrojet in the Eastern Brazil region, where the ground magnetic declination is as large as 20∘W is studied based on geomagnetic data with one minute resolution from Bacabal during ...

  12. Ionospheric response to X-class solar flares in the ascending half of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A03307. Zhang D H, Mo X H, Cai L, Zhang W, Feng M, Hao Y. Q and Xiao Z 2011 Impact factor for the ionospheric total electron content response to solar flare irradiation;. J. Geophys. Res. 116 A04311. MS received 21 December 2015; revised 22 May 2016; accepted 24 May 2016. Corresponding editor: K Krishnamoorthy.

  13. Analysis of Hard X-Ray, Microwave and Millimeter Emission in Solar Flare Plasma on 5 July 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Smirnova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bauman Moscow State Technical University’s (BMSTU’s radiotelescope RT-7.5 is in continuous operation to observe the active regions on the Sun at frequencies of 93 and 140 GHz (3.2 and 2.2 mm, respectively. A special attention is focused on the observations of solar flares. The given frequency range is understudied, but it allows us to have the unique information about the physical parameters of the chromospheric plasma of flare loops (Shustikov et al. 2015. The paper is aimed at a detailed study and interpretation of the characteristic features of the spectrum of solar flare radio emission observed using the BMSTU radio telescope RT-7.5 at frequencies of 93 and 140 GHz in case there is a radio flux density growth with frequency. A positive slope of the sub-THz spectrum of radio emission was earlier observed only from time to time at frequencies of 200 and 400 GHz (Kaufmann et al., 2009. Currently, the interpretation of this effect is still under discussion due to a lack of sufficient observational material with the desired frequency resolution in the sub-THz range (Krucker et al., 2013. The paper, using the July 5, 2012 flare event of X-class GOES M6.1 as an example, through numerical simulation of the radio flux density spectrum shows that the observed positive spectral slope of this flare between the frequencies of 93 and 140 GHz can be explained by available single population of low- and high-energy electrons, the generation of which occurs in the solar chromosphere-transition region of the Sun. It could be suggested that the effective Science & Education of the Bauman MSTU 95 electron acceleration occurs in the chromosphere, rather than, as previously thought, only at the coronal level. The section 1 briefly describes the observational data and methods of their obtaining and processing. The section 2 presents the main result of numerical modelling of the radio spectrum. The section 3 offers discussion of results and conclusions. The work

  14. Ionospheric response to X-class solar flares in the ascending half of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... of 11 X-class solar flares that occurred during the ascending half of the present subdued solar cycle 24 from 2009 to 2013 on the ionosphere over the low- and mid-latitude station, Dibrugarh (27.5◦N, 95◦E; magnetic latitude 17.6◦N), are examined. Total electron content (TEC) data derived from Global Positioning System ...

  15. Enabling Solar Flare Forecasting at an Unprecedented Level: the FLARECAST Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Pariat, Etienne; Massone, Anna Maria; Vilmer, Nicole; Jackson, David; Buchlin, Eric; Csillaghy, Andre; Bommier, Veronique; Kontogiannis, Ioannis; Gallagher, Peter; Gontikakis, Costis; Guennou, Chloé; Murray, Sophie; Bloomfield, D. Shaun; Alingery, Pablo; Baudin, Frederic; Benvenuto, Federico; Bruggisser, Florian; Florios, Konstantinos; Guerra, Jordan; Park, Sung-Hong; Perasso, Annalisa; Piana, Michele; Sathiapal, Hanna; Soldati, Marco; Von Stachelski, Samuel; Argoudelis, Vangelis; Caminade, Stephane

    2016-07-01

    We attempt a brief but informative description of the Flare Likelihood And Region Eruption Forecasting (FLARECAST) project, European Commission's first large-scale investment to explore the limits of reliability and accuracy for the forecasting of major solar flares. The consortium, objectives, and first results of the project - featuring an openly accessible, interactive flare forecasting facility by the end of 2017 - will be outlined. In addition, we will refer to the so-called "explorative research" element of project, aiming to connect solar flares with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and possibly pave the way for CME, or eruptive flare, prediction. We will also emphasize the FLARECAST modus operandi, namely the diversity of expertise within the consortium that independently aims to science, infrastructure development and dissemination, both to stakeholders and to the general public. Concluding, we will underline that the FLARECAST project responds squarely to the joint COSPAR - ILWS Global Roadmap to shield society from the adversities of space weather, addressing its primary goal and, in particular, its Research Recommendations 1, 2 and 4, Teaming Recommendations II and III, and Collaboration Recommendations A, B, and D. The FLARECAST project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 640216.

  16. Observational and Model Analysis of a Two-ribbon Flare Possibly Induced by a Neighboring Blowout Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Bhuwan; Thalmann, Julia K.; Mitra, Prabir K.; Chandra, Ramesh; Veronig, Astrid M.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we present unique observations of a blowout coronal jet that possibly triggered a two-ribbon confined C1.2 flare in bipolar solar active region NOAA 12615 on 2016 December 5. The jet activity initiates at chromospheric/transition region heights with a small brightening that eventually increases in volume, with well-developed standard morphological jet features, viz., base and spire. The spire widens up with a collimated eruption of cool and hot plasma components, observed in the 304 and 94 Å channels of AIA, respectively. The speed of the plasma ejection, which forms the jet’s spire, was higher for the hot component (˜200 km s-1) than the cooler one (˜130 km s-1). The NLFF model of coronal fields at the pre- and post-jet phases successfully reveals openings of previously closed magnetic field lines with a rather inclined/low-lying jet structure. The peak phase of the jet emission is followed by the development of a two-ribbon flare that shows coronal loop emission in HXRs up to ˜25 keV energy. The coronal magnetic fields rooted at the location of EUV flare ribbons, derived from the NLFF model, demonstrate the pre-flare phase to exhibit an “X-type” configuration, while the magnetic fields at the post-flare phase are more or less oriented parallel. Comparisons of multi-wavelength measurements with the magnetic field extrapolations suggest that the jet activity likely triggered the two-ribbon flare by perturbing the field in the interior of the active region.

  17. Block-induced Complex Structures Building the Flare-productive Solar Active Region 12673

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun [CAS Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhu, Xiaoshuai [Max-Planck Institute for Solar System Research, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Song, Qiao, E-mail: shuhongyang@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Center for Space Weather, China Meteorological Administration, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2017-11-10

    Solar active region (AR) 12673 produced 4 X-class, 27 M-class, and numerous lower-class flares during its passage across the visible solar disk in 2017 September. Our study is to answer the questions why this AR was so flare-productive and how the X9.3 flare, the largest one of the past decade, took place. We find that there was a sunspot in the initial several days, and then two bipolar regions emerged nearby it successively. Due to the standing of the pre-existing sunspot, the movement of the bipoles was blocked, while the pre-existing sunspot maintained its quasi-circular shaped umbra only with the disappearance of a part of penumbra. Thus, the bipolar patches were significantly distorted, and the opposite polarities formed two semi-circular shaped structures. After that, two sequences of new bipolar regions emerged within the narrow semi-circular zone, and the bipolar patches separated along the curved channel. The new bipoles sheared and interacted with the previous ones, forming a complex topological system, during which numerous flares occurred. At the highly sheared region, a great deal of free energy was accumulated. On September 6, one negative patch near the polarity inversion line began to rapidly rotate and shear with the surrounding positive fields, and consequently the X9.3 flare erupted. Our results reveal that the block-induced complex structures built the flare-productive AR and the X9.3 flare was triggered by an erupting filament due to the kink instability. To better illustrate this process, a block-induced eruption model is proposed for the first time.

  18. Block-induced Complex Structures Building the Flare-productive Solar Active Region 12673

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Zhu, Xiaoshuai; Song, Qiao

    2017-11-01

    Solar active region (AR) 12673 produced 4 X-class, 27 M-class, and numerous lower-class flares during its passage across the visible solar disk in 2017 September. Our study is to answer the questions why this AR was so flare-productive and how the X9.3 flare, the largest one of the past decade, took place. We find that there was a sunspot in the initial several days, and then two bipolar regions emerged nearby it successively. Due to the standing of the pre-existing sunspot, the movement of the bipoles was blocked, while the pre-existing sunspot maintained its quasi-circular shaped umbra only with the disappearance of a part of penumbra. Thus, the bipolar patches were significantly distorted, and the opposite polarities formed two semi-circular shaped structures. After that, two sequences of new bipolar regions emerged within the narrow semi-circular zone, and the bipolar patches separated along the curved channel. The new bipoles sheared and interacted with the previous ones, forming a complex topological system, during which numerous flares occurred. At the highly sheared region, a great deal of free energy was accumulated. On September 6, one negative patch near the polarity inversion line began to rapidly rotate and shear with the surrounding positive fields, and consequently the X9.3 flare erupted. Our results reveal that the block-induced complex structures built the flare-productive AR and the X9.3 flare was triggered by an erupting filament due to the kink instability. To better illustrate this process, a block-induced eruption model is proposed for the first time.

  19. Modeling D region Electron Density Enhancement Due to Solar Flares and Comparison with Algiers VLF Receiver Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouderba, Yasmina; Nait Amor, Samir; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-05-01

    Solar flares cause additional ionization in the D layer of the ionosphere (60-90 Km), which appears as amplitude and phase perturbations on the VLF signal. In this work, we present results of the properties of the VLF signals perturbations (amplitude, phase, h' and β) and their dependences with solar flares flux (For the period: 2007-2012). In this analysis two VLF transmitters paths are chosen, a short path: NSC (45.9 KHz, 941 Km) and long path NRK (37.5 KHz, 3495 km). In addition to the VLF data analysis, a numerical modeling of the D layer ionization due to solar flares was made at different heights (65-80 km). Qualitatively, the data analysis showed that the perturbed signal behavior is different from one path to another. In fact, some solar flares are associated with decreasing amplitude and increasing phase, increasing amplitude and decreasing phase, and finally decreasing or increasing in both amplitude and phase. This behavior is independent on the solar flares flux, but it is closely related to the modal structure of the VLF signal.Numerical results show that the increasing solar flares flux leads to the increasing of electron density and thus reducing the reflection height of VLF signal. Therefore, the recovery times of perturbed signal depend on the reflection height lifetime. The comparison between the calculated and measured densities as a function of solar flares flux at different heights gives similar profiles.

  20. Microwave type III pair bursts in solar flares

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tan, B.; Mészárosová, Hana; Karlický, Marian; Huang, G.; Tan, C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 819, č. 1 (2016), 42/1-42/9 ISSN 0004-637X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/12/0103 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 295272 - Radiosun Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Sun * corona * flares Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics; BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics (ASU-R) Impact factor: 5.533, year: 2016

  1. Study of the Effect of Solar Flares and the Solar Position on the NRK - Algiers VLF Signal Path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouderba, Yasmina; Tribeche, Mouloud; Amor Samir, Nait

    X-ray and UV radiations emitted from the sun during solar flares, may cause enhancement of the ionization in the lower ionosphere. To study the effect of solar flares and their occurrence in the daytime on the D layer of the ionosphere (60-90 Km), we used Very Low Frequency (VLF) data of the NRK-ALG GCP (NRK: 63.85 N, 22.45 W, 37.5 KHz; Algiers: 36.16 N, 3.13 E; Distance: 3495 Km). Since any ionospheric electron density change, VLF signal perturbations in both of amplitude (∆A) and phase (∆ϕ) are measured. However, from the measured ∆A and ∆ϕ, the ionospheric parameters: H’ (the reflecting height in Km) and β (the increasing conductivity in Km-1) are then deduced using the Long wave probability code (LWPC). The results show that the signal perturbations parameters (∆A and ∆ϕ) increased with the X-ray flux. Thus, as a function of the solar flux, H’ decreases to lower altitudes, but B increases up to a saturation value. From the H’ and β parameters, the electron density enhancement is then deduced. In addition to the experimental results, a numerical simulation of the D region disturbances due to solar flares was developed. Therefore, a comparison between the experimentally measured electron density and numerically determined is done as function of the solar flux and the solar zenith angle.

  2. Application of digital image processing techniques to faint solar flare phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glackin, D. L.; Martin, S. F.

    1980-01-01

    Digital image processing of eight solar flare events was performed using the Video Information Communication and Retrieval language in order to study moving emission fronts, flare halos, and Moreton waves. The techniques used include contrast enhancement, isointensity contouring, the differencing of images, spatial filtering, and geometrical registration. The spatial extent and temporal behavior of the faint phenomena is examined along with the relation of the three types of phenomena to one another. The image processing techniques make possible the detailed study of the history of the phenomena and provide clues to their physical nature.

  3. THE NONPOTENTIALITY OF CORONAE OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS, THE DYNAMICS OF THE SURFACE MAGNETIC FIELD, AND THE POTENTIAL FOR LARGE FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrijver, Carolus J., E-mail: schrijver@lmsal.com [Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center (A021S, Bldg. 252), 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Flares and eruptions from solar active regions (ARs) are associated with atmospheric electrical currents accompanying distortions of the coronal field away from a lowest-energy potential state. In order to better understand the origin of these currents and their role in M- and X-class flares, I review all AR observations made with Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager and SDO/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly from 2010 May through 2014 October within ≈40° from the disk center. I select the roughly 4% of all regions that display a distinctly nonpotential coronal configuration in loops with a length comparable to the scale of the AR, and all that emit GOES X-class flares. The data for 41 regions confirm, with a single exception, that strong-field, high-gradient polarity inversion lines (SHILs) created during emergence of magnetic flux into, and related displacement within, pre-existing ARs are associated with X-class flares. Obvious nonpotentiality in the AR-scale loops occurs in six of ten selected regions with X-class flares, all with relatively long SHILs along their primary polarity inversion line, or with a long internal filament there. Nonpotentiality can exist in ARs well past the flux-emergence phase, often with reduced or absent flaring. I conclude that the dynamics of the flux involved in the compact SHILs is of pre-eminent importance for the large-flare potential of ARs within the next day, but that their associated currents may not reveal themselves in AR-scale nonpotentiality. In contrast, AR-scale nonpotentiality, which can persist for many days, may inform us about the eruption potential other than those from SHILs which is almost never associated with X-class flaring.

  4. WebGL-enabled 3D visualization of a Solar Flare Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, A.; Cheung, C. M. M.; Chintzoglou, G.

    2016-12-01

    The visualization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of astrophysical systems such as solar flares often requires specialized software packages (e.g. Paraview and VAPOR). A shortcoming of using such software packages is the inability to share our findings with the public and scientific community in an interactive and engaging manner. By using the javascript-based WebGL application programming interface (API) and the three.js javascript package, we create an online in-browser experience for rendering solar flare simulations that will be interactive and accessible to the general public. The WebGL renderer displays objects such as vector flow fields, streamlines and textured isosurfaces. This allows the user to explore the spatial relation between the solar coronal magnetic field and the thermodynamic structure of the plasma in which the magnetic field is embedded. Plans for extending the features of the renderer will also be presented.

  5. Observations of a Radio-Quiet Solar Preflare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Battaglia, Marina; Güdel, Manuel

    2017-10-01

    The preflare phase of the flare SOL2011-08-09T03:52 is unique in its long duration, in that it was covered by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and because it showed three well-developed soft X-ray (SXR) peaks. No hard X-rays (HXR) are observed in the preflare phase. Here we report that no associated radio emission at 17 GHz was found either, despite the higher sensitivity of the radio instrument. The ratio between the SXR peaks and the upper limit of the radio peaks is higher by more than one order of magnitude than the ratio in regular flares. The result suggests that the ratio between acceleration and heating in the preflare phase was different than in regular flares. Acceleration to relativistic energies, if any, occurred with lower efficiency.

  6. Short-term solar flare prediction using multi-model integration method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Fu; Li, Fei; Wan, Jie; Yu, Da-Ren

    2017-03-01

    A multi-model integration method is proposed to develop a multi-source and heterogeneous model for short-term solar flare prediction. Different prediction models are constructed on the basis of extracted predictors from a pool of observation databases. The outputs of the base models are normalized first because these established models extract predictors from many data resources using different prediction methods. Then weighted integration of the base models is used to develop a multi-model integrated model (MIM). The weight set that single models assign is optimized by a genetic algorithm. Seven base models and data from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager longitudinal magnetograms are used to construct the MIM, and then its performance is evaluated by cross validation. Experimental results showed that the MIM outperforms any individual model in nearly every data group, and the richer the diversity of the base models, the better the performance of the MIM. Thus, integrating more diversified models, such as an expert system, a statistical model and a physical model, will greatly improve the performance of the MIM.

  7. Solar flares, coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particle event characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Athanasios; Sandberg, Ingmar; Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Kouloumvakos, Athanasios; Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Tziotziou, Kostas; Tsiropoula, Georgia; Jiggens, Piers; Hilgers, Alain

    2016-12-01

    A new catalogue of 314 solar energetic particle (SEP) events extending over a large time span from 1984 to 2013 has been compiled. The properties as well as the associations of these SEP events with their parent solar sources have been thoroughly examined. The properties of the events include the proton peak integral flux and the fluence for energies above 10, 30, 60 and 100 MeV. The associated solar events were parametrized by solar flare (SF) and coronal mass ejection (CME) characteristics, as well as related radio emissions. In particular, for SFs: the soft X-ray (SXR) peak flux, the SXR fluence, the heliographic location, the rise time and the duration were exploited; for CMEs the plane-of-sky velocity as well as the angular width were utilized. For radio emissions, type III, II and IV radio bursts were identified. Furthermore, we utilized element abundances of Fe and O. We found evidence that most of the SEP events in our catalogue do not conform to a simple two-class paradigm, with the 73% of them exhibiting both type III and type II radio bursts, and that a continuum of event properties is present. Although, the so-called hybrid or mixed events are found to be present in our catalogue, it was not possible to attribute each SEP event to a mixed/hybrid sub-category. Moreover, it appears that the start of the type III burst most often precedes the maximum of the SF and thus falls within the impulsive phase of the associated SF. At the same time, type III bursts take place within ≈5.22 min, on average, in advance from the time of maximum of the derivative of the SXR flux (Neupert effect). We further performed a statistical analysis and a mapping of the logarithm of the proton peak flux at E > 10 MeV, on different pairs of the parent solar source characteristics. This revealed correlations in 3-D space and demonstrated that the gradual SEP events that stem from the central part of the visible solar disk constitute a significant radiation risk. The velocity of

  8. Simulations of Lateral Transport and Dropout Structure of Energetic Particles from Impulsive Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Tooprakai, P.; Seripienlert, A.; Chuychai, P.

    2016-12-01

    We simulate trajectories of energetic particles from impulsive solar flares for 2D+slab models of magnetic turbulence in spherical geometry to study dropout features, i.e., sharp, repeated changes in the particle density, and the particles' lateral transport. Among random-phase realizations of 2D turbulence, a spherical harmonic expansion can generate homogeneous turbulence over a sphere, but a 2D fast Fourier transform (FFT) locally mapped onto the lateral coordinates in the region of interest is much faster computationally, and we show that the results are qualitatively similar. We then use the 2D FFT field as input to a 2D MHD simulation, which dynamically generates realistic features of turbulence such as coherent structures. The magnetic field lines and particles spread non-diffusively (ballistically) to a patchy distribution reaching up to 25° from the injection longitude and latitude at r 1 AU. This dropout pattern in field line trajectories has sharper features in the case of the more realistic 2D MHD model, in better qualitative agreement with observations. The initial dropout pattern in particle trajectories is relatively insensitive to particle energy, though the energy affects the pattern's evolution with time. We make predictions for future observations of solar particles near the Sun (e.g., at 0.25 AU), for which we expect a sharp pulse of outgoing particles along the dropout pattern, followed by backscattering that first remains close to the dropout pattern and later exhibits cross-field transport to a distribution that is more diffusive, yet mostly contained within the dropout pattern found at greater distances. Partially supported by the Thailand Research Fund (Grants BRG5880009 and RTA5980003), the U.S. NSF (AGS-1063439), NASA (NNX14AI63G & NNX15AB88G), and the Solar Probe Plus/ISIS project.

  9. Radiative Transfer Study of Exposure of Terrestrial and Martian Organisms During a Large Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalo, J.; Smith, D. S.; Wheeler, J. C.

    2003-05-01

    We have developed a Monte Carlo code for calculations of the transport of high-energy irradiation of the atmospheres of ancient and contemporary Earth and Mars by solar flares and stellar explosions. We have calculated the dose spectrum to which surface organisms would be exposed during a large solar flare. We include details of Compton scattering and X-ray photoabsorption and an approximate treatment of the redistribution of the incident energy to ultraviolet and visible radiation by secondary electron excitation of atmospheric molecules, and its transfer to the surface, using Rayleigh scattering and scaled terrestrial ozone distribution as examples of UV shields. We find that for thick atmospheres (column densities greater than about 100 g/cm2 much of the incident ionizing radiation can be redistributed to biologically and chemically important ultraviolet wavelengths, a significant fraction of which can reach the surface. This radiation will consist primarily of a large number of auroral-like emission bands. This result is relevant to Earth and early Mars. For contemporary Mars, most of the energy reaches the surface as X-rays due to Compton scattering and photoabsorption, with a characteristic spectrum that is essentially independent of atmospheric composition. We calculate the dose per unit flare energy for water and for a DNA action spectrum, and we estimate the frequency of biologically significant flares from the Sun at Mars as a function of time using present-day flare statistics and studies of solar proxies of various ages. The question of sterilization of exposed organisms at the Martian surface is discussed using lethal dose data for prokaryotic and eukaryotic terrestrial organisms.

  10. Statistical properties of correlated solar flares and coronal mass ejections in cycles 23 and 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarnio, Alicia

    2018-01-01

    Outstanding problems in understanding early stellar systems include mass loss, angular momentum evolution, and the effects of energetic events on the surrounding environs. The latter of these drives much research into our own system's space weather and the development of predictive algorithms for geomagnetic storms. So dually motivated, we have leveraged a big-data approach to combine two decades of GOES and LASCO data to identify a large sample of spatially and temporally correlated solar flares and CMEs. In this presentation, we revisit the analysis of Aarnio et al. (2011), adding 10 years of data and further exploring the relationships between correlated flare and CME properties. We compare the updated data set results to those previously obtained, and discuss the effects of selecting smaller time windows within solar cycles 23 and 24 on the empirically defined relationships between correlated flare and CME properties. Finally, we discuss a newly identified large sample of potentially interesting correlated flares and CMEs perhaps erroneously excluded from previous searches.

  11. Observations and Modeling of Plasma Waves in the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W.; Ofman, L.; Downs, C.

    2016-12-01

    The solar atmosphere, especially the extended corona, provides rich observations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves and plasma waves in general. Such waves can be used as seismological tools to probe the physical conditions of the medium in which they travel, such as the coronal magnetic field and plasma parameters. Recent high-resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and in UV by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) have opened a new chapter in understanding these waves and in utilizing them for coronal seismology. We will review such new observations of two intimately related phenomena - global EUV waves (so-called "EIT waves") associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and quasi-periodic, fast-mode magnetosonic wave trains associated with flares. We will focus on the generation and propagation of global EUV waves and their interaction with coronal structures, as well as the correlation of AIA-detected fast-mode wave trains with flare pulsations seen from radio to hard X-ray wavelengths. We will also present recent MHD modeling efforts in reproducing these waves using realistic, observationally-driven simulations. We will discuss the roles of such waves in energy transport within the solar atmosphere and in their associated CME/flare eruptions.

  12. Self-organized criticality in solar flares: a cellular automata approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Morales

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We give an overview of a novel lattice-based avalanche model that reproduces well a number of observed statistical properties of solar flares. The anisotropic lattice is defined as a network of vertically-connected nodes subjected to horizontal random displacements mimicking the kinks introduced by random motions of the photospheric footpoints of magnetic fieldlines forming a coronal loop. We focus here on asymmetrical driving displacements, which under our geometrical interpretation of the lattice correspond to a net direction of twist of the magnetic fieldlines about the loop axis. We show that a net vertical electrical current density does build up in our lattice, as one would expect from systematic twisting of a loop-like magnetic structure, and that the presence of this net current has a profound impact on avalanche dynamics. The presence of an additional energy reservoir tends to increase the mean energy released by avalanches, and yield a probability distribution of released energy in better agreement with observational inferences than in its absence. Symmetrical driving displacements are in better conceptual agreement with a random shuffling of photospheric footpoint, and yield a power-law distribution of energy release with exponent larger than 2, as required in Parker's nanoflare model of coronal heating. On the other hand, moderate asymmetrical driving generate energy distribution exponents that are similar to those obtained from SOHO EUV observations.

  13. Rates of Large Flares in Old Solar-like Stars in Kepler Clusters NGC 6811 and 6819 With Implications for the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saar, Steven H.; Wright, Paul J.; Meibom, Soren; Kashyap, Vinay; Drake, Jeremy J.

    2014-06-01

    We hope to better estimate the rate of very strong (Carrington event-type) flares in the Sun by studying flares of stars in several open clusters with well determined ages using Kepler data. Here we derive white light flare distributions for a sample of near-solar-mass (G0-G5) dwarfs in NGC 6811 (age ~ 1 Gyr) and NGC 6819 2.5 Gyr). We compare these with solar white light flare rates and, by estimating X-ray emission from the same flares using a solar-based relationship, we compare the Kepler results to other solar and stellar X-ray flare data. We explore implications of our results for the rates of large solar flares. This research was supported by Kepler grant NNX13AC29G.

  14. Ion acceleration and abundance enhancements by electron beam instabilities in impulsive solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James A.; Vinas, Adolfo F.

    1993-01-01

    We show that a nonrelativistic electron beam in a hydrogen-helium solar flare plasma will excite H(+) electromagnetic ion cyclotron, shear Alfven, and R-X waves, in addition to waves resulting from the two-stream instability. The H(+) electromagnetic ion cyclotron and shear Alfven waves are able to selectively accelerate ambient He-3 and Fe, respectively, to MeV energies through first harmonic gyroresonance, and thereby account for the large (He-3)/(He-4) and Fe/C ratios seen in the energetic particles from impulsive solar flares. In this model, separate heating and acceleration mechanisms for either He-3 or Fe are not required, and Fe acceleration is quite efficient since it does not need to occur by second harmonic gyroresonance. The combination of the other two unstable modes is able to accelerate ions to hundreds of MeV if the particles become trapped in an electrostatic potential well of a two-stream wave.

  15. The high accuracy model of the 19 July 2012 solar flare: kinetic description, calculations of X-Ray and microwave emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsyk, Pavel; Somov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    The limb white-light solar flare M7.7 class was observed at the 19 July 2012 at 05:58UT by RHESSI, GOES and SDO with high spectral, spatial and temporal resolution. These new data make possible to test modern models of solar flares. The flare, which considered here, locates in the picture plane, so we well see two different hard X-ray sources: footpoint and above-the-loop-top. The loop was observed in whit-light and microwave wavelengths. The key part of the presented work is high accuracy kinetic model, which describe behavior of electrons in the target - solar flare loop. We interpret the footpoint source in approximation of the thick target model with reverse current and above-the-loop-top source - in the thin target approximation. The microwave spectrum in the range from 1 to 50 GHz was calculated. Our results fit well the observational data, particularly so important parameter as hard X-Ray spectral index. But intensity of emission of the coronal source was estimated incorrect, it was low than observed. This problem can be solved by taking into account effects of particles acceleration in the collapsing magnetic trap, when fast electrons receive additional energy without changing the index of their energy spectrum. In the result we have flux ~ 5 1010 erg cm-2 s-1 for electrons with energies more then 15 keV, that ~ 5 times larger then in the case classical thick target model. Accordingly , so high flux of electrons to the Chromosphere provides effective heating of the cold plasma in the target, but the reverse current electric field restrict depth of the electron penetration. Received in this work estimates may be used for interpretation of the solar flare optical source formation and evolution.

  16. Deka-keV X-ray observations of solar bursts with WATCH/GRANAT: frequency distributions of burst parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crosby, N.; Vilmer, N.; Lund, Niels

    1998-01-01

    is described and some examples of solar observations are given. The estimated energy releases in the flares presented here are found to extend below the range of hard X-ray flares which were previously studied by ISEE-3 and HXRBS/SMM detectors. The X-ray emitting component cannot be exclusively explained...

  17. Observed characteristics of flare energy release. I. Magnetic structure at the energy release site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, M.E.; Moore, R.L.; Hagyard, M.J.; Hernandez, A.M.; Rovira, M.G.

    1988-03-01

    It is shown that flaring activity as seen in X-rays usually encompasses two or more interacting magnetic bipoles within an active region. Soft and hard X-ray spatiotemporal evolution is considered as well as the time dependence of the thermal energy content in different magnetic bipoles participating in the flare, the hardness and impulsivity of the hard X-ray emission, and the relationship between the X-ray behavior and the strength and observable shear of the magnetic field. It is found that the basic structure of a flare usually consists of an initiating closed bipole plus one or more adjacent closed bipoles impacted against it. 119 references.

  18. On the variation of solar flare coronal X-ray source sizes with energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Bian, Nicolas H. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ Glasgow (United Kingdom); Emslie, A. Gordon, E-mail: n.jeffrey@physics.gla.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    Observations with RHESSI have enabled the detailed study of the structure of dense hard X-ray coronal sources in solar flares. The variation of source extent with electron energy has been discussed in the context of streaming of non-thermal particles in a one-dimensional cold target model and the results used to constrain both the physical extent of, and density within, the electron acceleration region. Here, we extend this investigation to a more physically realistic model of electron transport that takes into account the finite temperature of the ambient plasma, the initial pitch angle distribution of the accelerated electrons, and the effects of collisional pitch angle scattering. The finite temperature results in the thermal diffusion of electrons, which leads to the observationally inferred value of the acceleration region volume being an overestimate of its true value. The different directions of the electron trajectories, a consequence of both the non-zero injection pitch angle and scattering within the target, cause the projected propagation distance parallel to the guiding magnetic field to be reduced, so that a one-dimensional interpretation can overestimate the actual density by a factor of up to ∼6. The implications of these results for the determination of acceleration region properties (specific acceleration rate, filling factor, etc.) are discussed.

  19. SWIFT AND FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF X-RAY FLARES: THE CASE OF LATE INTERNAL SHOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troja, E. [Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Piro, L. [INAF-IAPS, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Vasileiou, V. [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, and CNRS/IN2P3, Montpellier (France); Omodei, N. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Burgess, J. M.; Connaughton, V. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Cutini, S. [ASI Science Data Center, via Galileo Galilei, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); McEnery, J. E., E-mail: eleonora.troja@nasa.gov, E-mail: luigi.piro@iaps.inaf.it, E-mail: Vlasios.Vasileiou@lupm.in2p3.fr [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2015-04-10

    Simultaneous Swift and Fermi observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer a unique broadband view of their afterglow emission, spanning more than 10 decades in energy. We present the sample of X-ray flares observed by both Swift and Fermi during the first three years of Fermi operations. While bright in the X-ray band, X-ray flares are often undetected at lower (optical), and higher (MeV to GeV) energies. We show that this disfavors synchrotron self-Compton processes as the origin of the observed X-ray emission. We compare the broadband properties of X-ray flares with the standard late internal shock model, and find that in this scenario, X-ray flares can be produced by a late-time relativistic (Γ > 50) outflow at radii R ∼ 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} cm. This conclusion holds only if the variability timescale is significantly shorter than the observed flare duration, and implies that X-ray flares can directly probe the activity of the GRB central engine.

  20. Swift and Fermi Observations of X-Ray Flares: The Case of Late Internal Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troja, E.; Piro, L.; Vasileiou, V.; Omodei, N.; Burgess, J. M.; Cutini, S.; Connaughton, V.; McEnery, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous Swift and Fermi observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer a unique broadband view of their afterglow emission, spanning more than 10 decades in energy. We present the sample of X-ray flares observed by both Swift and Fermi during the first three years of Fermi operations. While bright in the X-ray band, X-ray flares are often undetected at lower (optical), and higher (MeV to GeV) energies. We show that this disfavors synchrotron self-Compton processes as the origin of the observed X-ray emission. We compare the broadband properties of X-ray flares with the standard late internal shock model, and find that in this scenario, X-ray flares can be produced by a late-time relativistic (gamma greater than 50) outflow at radii R approximately 10(exp 13) - 10(exp 14) cm. This conclusion holds only if the variability timescale is significantly shorter than the observed flare duration, and implies that X-ray flares can directly probe the activity of the GRB central engine.

  1. Neutron-decay Protons from Solar Flares as Seed Particles for CME-shock Acceleration in the Inner Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ronald J.; Ko, Yuan-Kuen

    2017-09-01

    The protons in large solar energetic particle events are accelerated in the inner heliosphere by fast shocks produced by coronal mass ejections. Unless there are other sources, the protons these shocks act upon would be those of the solar wind (SW). The efficiency of the acceleration depends on the kinetic energy of the protons. For a 2000 km s-1 shock, the most effective proton energies would be 30-100 keV; I.e., within the suprathermal tail component of the SW. We investigate one possible additional source of such protons: those resulting from the decay of solar-flare-produced neutrons that escape from the Sun into the low corona. The neutrons are produced by interactions of flare-accelerated ions with the solar atmosphere. We discuss the production of low-energy neutrons in flares and their decay on a interplanetary magnetic field line near the Sun. We find that even when the flaring conditions are optimal, the 30-100 keV neutron-decay proton density produced by even a very large solar flare would be only about 10% of that of the 30-100 keV SW suprathermal tail. We discuss the implication of a seed-particle source of more frequent, small flares.

  2. Hot spine loops and the nature of a late-phase solar flare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xudong; Todd Hoeksema, J.; Liu, Yang [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Aulanier, Guillaume [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Univ. Paris Diderot, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92190 Meudon (France); Su, Yingna [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hannah, Iain G. [SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Hock, Rachel A., E-mail: xudong@sun.stanford.edu [Space Vehicle Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland Air Force Base, NM 87116 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The fan-spine magnetic topology is believed to be responsible for many curious features in solar explosive events. A spine field line links distinct flux domains, but direct observation of such a feature has been rare. Here we report a unique event observed by the Solar Dynamic Observatory where a set of hot coronal loops (over 10 MK) connected to a quasi-circular chromospheric ribbon at one end and a remote brightening at the other. Magnetic field extrapolation suggests that these loops are partly tracers of the evolving spine field line. Continuous slipping- and null-point-type reconnections were likely at work, energizing the loop plasma and transferring magnetic flux within and across the fan quasi-separatrix layer. We argue that the initial reconnection is of the 'breakout' type, which then transitioned to a more violent flare reconnection with an eruption from the fan dome. Significant magnetic field changes are expected and indeed ensued. This event also features an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) late phase, i.e., a delayed secondary emission peak in warm EUV lines (about 2-7 MK). We show that this peak comes from the cooling of large post-reconnection loops beside and above the compact fan, a direct product of eruption in such topological settings. The long cooling time of the large arcades contributes to the long delay; additional heating may also be required. Our result demonstrates the critical nature of cross-scale magnetic coupling—topological change in a sub-system may lead to explosions on a much larger scale.

  3. Solar Flare Physics Enlivened by TRACE and RHESSI

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) gave us the highest EUV spatial resolution and the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectrometric Imager ... Current Sheets,; Footpoint Motion and Reconnection Rate,; Evidence for Tripolar Magnetic Reconnection,; Displaced Electron and Ion Acceleration Sources.

  4. Why Is the Great Solar Active Region 12192 Flare-rich but CME-poor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xudong; Bobra, Monica G.; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Liu, Yang; Li, Yan; Shen, Chenglong; Couvidat, Sebastien; Norton, Aimee A.; Fisher, George H.

    2015-05-01

    Solar active region (AR) 12192 of 2014 October hosts the largest sunspot group in 24 years. It is the most prolific flaring site of Cycle 24 so far, but surprisingly produced no coronal mass ejection (CME) from the core region during its disk passage. Here, we study the magnetic conditions that prevented eruption and the consequences that ensued. We find AR 12192 to be “big but mild” its core region exhibits weaker non-potentiality, stronger overlying field, and smaller flare-related field changes compared to two other major flare-CME-productive ARs (11429 and 11158). These differences are present in the intensive-type indices (e.g., means) but generally not the extensive ones (e.g., totals). AR 12192's large amount of magnetic free energy does not translate into CME productivity. The unexpected behavior suggests that AR eruptiveness is limited by some relative measure of magnetic non-potentiality over the restriction of background field, and that confined flares may leave weaker photospheric and coronal imprints compared to their eruptive counterparts.

  5. Pion-decay radiation and two-phase acceleration in the June 3, 1982 solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaty, R.; Dermer, C. D.; Murphy, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    The June 3, 1982 flare is unique in the wealth of observed neutron, gamma-ray and energetic-particle emission that it produced. Using calculations of high-energy emissions to fit the various time-dependent gamma-ray fluxes, a self-consistent interaction model for the June 3 flare is constructed in which the observed fluxes are produced by two distinct particle populations with different acceleration and interaction time histories as well as different but time-independent energy spectra. The two populations are associated with first- and second-phase particle acceleration, respectively.

  6. Advances in solar flare science through modeling of the magnetic field in the solar atmosphere (Arne Richter Award for Outstanding ECSs Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmann, Julia K.

    2017-04-01

    Ever since we know of the phenomenon of solar flares and coronal mass ejections, we try to unravel the secrets of the underlying physical processes. The magnetic field in the Sun's atmosphere is the driver of any solar activity. Therefore, the combined study of the surface (photosphere) magnetic field and the magnetic field in the atmosphere above (the chromosphere and corona) is essential. At present, direct measurements of the solar magnetic field are regularly available only for the solar surface, so that we have to rely on models to reconstruct the magnetic field in the corona. Corresponding model-based research on the magnetic field within flaring active regions is inevitable for the understanding of the key physical processes of flares and possibly associated mass ejections, as well as their time evolution. I will focus on recent advances in the understanding of the magnetic processes in solar flares based on quasi-static force-free coronal magnetic field modeling. In particular, I will discuss aspects such as the structure (topology) of the coronal magnetic field, its flare-induced reconfiguration, as well as the associated modifications to the inherent magnetic energy and helicity. I will also discuss the potential and limitations of studies trying to cover the complete chain of action, i.e., to relate the (magnetic) properties of solar flares to that of the associated disturbances measured in-situ at Earth, as induced by flare-associated coronal mass ejections after passage of the interplanetary space separating Sun and Earth. Finally, I will discuss future prospects regarding model-based research of the coronal magnetic field in the course of flares, including possible implications for improved future flare forecasting attempts.

  7. Signals for invisible matter from solar - terrestrial observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertolucci Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gravitational lensing of invisible streaming matter towards the Sun or the Earth could be the explanation of puzzling solar/terrestrial phenomena. We have analyzed solar flares, EUV emission and also the global ionization content of the Earth atmosphere. Assuming that this invisible matter has some form of interaction with normal matter and that there exist preferred directions in its flow, then one would expect an enhanced activity at certain planetary longitudes, which is also observed. The broad velocity spectrum of the assumed constituents makes it difficult at this stage to identify the origin of the stream(s or the nature of its constituents.

  8. Magnetic storms and solar flares: can be analysed within similar mathematical framework with other extreme events?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasis, Georgios; Potirakis, Stelios M.; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Zitis, Pavlos I.; Eftaxias, Konstantinos

    2015-04-01

    The field of study of complex systems considers that the dynamics of complex systems are founded on universal principles that may be used to describe a great variety of scientific and technological approaches of different types of natural, artificial, and social systems. We apply concepts of the nonextensive statistical physics, on time-series data of observable manifestations of the underlying complex processes ending up to different extreme events, in order to support the suggestion that a dynamical analogy characterizes the generation of a single magnetic storm, solar flare, earthquake (in terms of pre-seismic electromagnetic signals) , epileptic seizure, and economic crisis. The analysis reveals that all the above mentioned different extreme events can be analyzed within similar mathematical framework. More precisely, we show that the populations of magnitudes of fluctuations included in all the above mentioned pulse-like-type time series follow the traditional Gutenberg-Richter law as well as a nonextensive model for earthquake dynamics, with similar nonextensive q-parameter values. Moreover, based on a multidisciplinary statistical analysis we show that the extreme events are characterized by crucial common symptoms, namely: (i) high organization, high compressibility, low complexity, high information content; (ii) strong persistency; and (iii) existence of clear preferred direction of emerged activities. These symptoms clearly discriminate the appearance of the extreme events under study from the corresponding background noise.

  9. Preferential Heating and Acceleration of Heavy Ions in Impulsive Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rahul; Eichler, David; Gaspari, Massimo; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2017-02-01

    We simulate decaying turbulence in a homogeneous pair plasma using a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell method. A uniform background magnetic field permeates the plasma such that the magnetic pressure is three times larger than the thermal pressure and the turbulence is generated by counter-propagating shear Alfvén waves. The energy predominately cascades transverse to the background magnetic field, rendering the turbulence anisotropic at smaller scales. We simultaneously move several ion species of varying charge to mass ratios in our simulation and show that the particles of smaller charge to mass ratios are heated and accelerated to non-thermal energies at a faster rate. This is in accordance with the enhancement of heavy ions and a non-thermal tail in their energy spectrum observed in the impulsive solar flares. We further show that the heavy ions are energized mostly in the direction perpendicular to the background magnetic field, with a rate consistent with our analytical estimate of the rate of heating due to cyclotron resonance with the Alfvén waves, of which a large fraction is due to obliquely propagating waves.

  10. RAPID PENUMBRA AND LORENTZ FORCE CHANGES IN AN X1.0 SOLAR FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhe; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayang; Yang, Bo; Bi, Yi, E-mail: xuzhe6249@ynao.ac.cn [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2016-03-20

    We present observations of the violent changes in photospheric magnetic structures associated with an X1.1 flare, which occurred in a compact δ-configuration region in the following part of AR 11890 on 2013 November 8. In both central and peripheral penumbra regions of the small δ sunspot, these changes took place abruptly and permanently in the reverse direction during the flare: the inner/outer penumbra darkened/disappeared, where the magnetic fields became more horizontal/vertical. Particularly, the Lorentz force (LF) changes in the central/peripheral region had a downward/upward and inward direction, meaning that the local pressure from the upper atmosphere was enhanced/released. It indicates that the LF changes might be responsible for the penumbra changes. These observations can be well explained as the photospheric response to the coronal field reconstruction within the framework of the magnetic implosion theory and the back reaction model of flares.

  11. Solar Acoustic Oscillations Observations in SDO AIA and HMI around AR 12192

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsue, Teresa; Pesnell, W. Dean; Hill, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Solar flares are dynamic objects occurring randomly and yet unannounced in nature. In order to find an efficient detection method, we require a greater breadth of knowledge of the system. One such mode is to observe flares in different frequency bands at different depths and study their temporal evolution through the flaring event. In this project we obtain acoustic observations of an X3 flare occurring on October 24, 2014 at 21:41UT. We employ the study of active regions, near sunspots, in which flaring activity is taking place. Our wavelet analysis utilizes time series data to create Fourier power spectra of individual pixels spatially resolved around the flare region, to study the frequency bands. In order to study the power distribution in regions around the flare and compare the measurements to magnetograms to search for any correlation, we combine observations of oscillations in three SDO AIA wavelengths: the 1600Å, 1700 Å and 304Å, and combine them with HMI data. We then study how the frequency distribution evolves temporally by constructing a Power Map Movie (PMM) of the regions. From these PMMs we can partition sub-regions in our main flaring region and take a survey of the oscillations for each frequency band.

  12. Modeling atmospheric effects of the September 1859 Solar Flare

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Brian; Jackman, Charles,; Melott, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    We have modeled atmospheric effects, especially ozone depletion, due to a solar proton event which probably accompanied the extreme magnetic storm of 1-2 September 1859. We use an inferred proton fluence for this event as estimated from nitrate levels in Greenland ice cores. We present results showing production of odd nitrogen compounds and their impact on ozone. We also compute rainout of nitrate in our model and compare to values from ice core data.

  13. Time-Evolution of a White Light Flare: Observations in Optical, Microwave, Soft X-Ray, H alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E.; Li, J.

    2003-12-01

    Since Richard Carrington's 1859 discovery of White Light Flares (WLFs), only fifty other WLFs have been observed. While the predicted frequency was 15.5 (± 4.5) per year for solar cycle 20, the lack of sensitive instruments makes WLFs extremely rare. Past observations suggest that WLFs do not accompany all high-energy events, and that some specific initial conditions and mechanisms produce WLFs. To analyze this claim, we found a WLF by combing through a list of X class events. This X5.6 flare occurred at AR 9415 on April 6th, 2001 (UT 19:14) and was accompanied by a halo CME. After confirming this event to be a WLF using Imaging Vector Magnetograph data, we found microwave, EUV, optical, soft X-ray, and magnetogram data. Our data suggests that this WLF erupted through the same mechanisms as the standard flare models, but was more energetic. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation's Research Experience for Undergraduates program.

  14. Observation and Interpretation of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms from the December 5, 2006 Solar Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Barghouty, A. F.; Shih, A. Y.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Labrador, A. W.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Cummings, A. C.

    2009-01-01

    We report the first observations of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection event. The observations were made during the December 5, 2006 X9 solar flare, located at E79, by the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on the STEREO A and B spacecraft. Within 1-2 hours of the flare onset, both LETs observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV protons arriving hours before the onset of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth. More than 70% of these particles arrived from a longitude within +-10 degrees of the Sun. The derived emission profile at the Sun lasted for more than an hour and had a profile remarkably similar to the GOES soft X-ray profile. The observed arrival directions and energy spectrum argue strongly that the particle events atoms that were stripped of their electrons upon entering the LET sensor. To our knowledge, this is the first reported observation of ENA emission from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection. We discuss possible origins for the production of ENAs in solar events, including charge-transfer reactions involving both flare and shock-accelerated protons. Assuming isotropic emission, we find that 2 x 10E28 ENAs escaped from the Sun in the upper hemisphere. Based on the 2.2 MeV gamma-ray emission observed by RHESSI in this event, and using measured and theoretical cross sections, we estimate that 3 x 10E31 ENAs with 1.8 - 5 MeV could be produced by protons accelerated in the flare. CME-driven shock acceleration is also a possible ENA source, but unfortunately there were no CME observations available from this event. Taking into account ENA losses, we conclude that the observed ENAs were most likely produced in the high corona at heliocentric distances 1.6 solar radii.

  15. The 2010 Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Flare and 10 Years of Multi-Wavelength Observations of M87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowski, A.; Acero, F.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A G.; Anton, G.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Becherini, Y.; Becker, J.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The giant radio galaxy M87 with its proximity (16 Mpc), famous jet, and very massive black hole ((3-6) X 10(exp 9) Solar Mass) provides a unique opportunity to investigate the origin of very high energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) gamma-ray emission generated in relativistic outflows and the surroundings of super-massive black holes. M87 has been established as a VHE gamma -ray emitter since 2006. The VHE gamma -ray emission displays strong variability on timescales as short as a day. In this paper, results from a joint VHE monitoring campaign on M87 by the MAGIC and VERITAS instruments in 2010 are reported. During the campaign, a flare at VHE was detected. triggering further observations at VHE (H.E.S.S.), X-rays (Chandra), and radio (43 GHz VLBA). The excellent sampling of the VHE gamma-ray light curve enables one to derive a precise temporal characterization of the flare: the single, isolated flare is well described by a two-sided exponential function with significantly different flux rise and decay times of rise tau ((sup rise sub d) = (1:69 +/- 0:30) days and tau(sup decay sub d = (0:611 +/- 0:080) days, respectively. While the overall variability pattern of the 2010 flare appears somewhat different from that of previous VHE flares in 2005 and 2008, they share very similar timescales (approx day), peak fluxes (Phi (sub > 0:35 TeV) approx. equals (1 - 3) X 10(exp -11) ph / square cm/s), and VHE spectra. 43 GHz VLBA radio observations of the inner jet regions indicate no enhanced flux in 2010 in contrast to observations in 2008, where an increase of the radio flux of the innermost core regions coincided with a VHE flare. On the other hand, Chandra X-ray observations taken approx 3 days after the peak of the VHE gamma -ray emission reveal an enhanced flux from the core (flux increased by factor approx 2; variability timescale < 2 days). The long-term (2001-2010) multi-wavelength (MWL) light curve of M87, spanning from radio to VHE and including data from HST, LT, VLA and

  16. Single-dish and VLBI observations of Cygnus X-3 during the 2016 giant flare episode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egron, E.; Pellizzoni, A.; Giroletti, M.; Righini, S.; Stagni, M.; Orlati, A.; Migoni, C.; Melis, A.; Concu, R.; Barbas, L.; Buttaccio, S.; Cassaro, P.; De Vicente, P.; Gawroński, M. P.; Lindqvist, M.; Maccaferri, G.; Stanghellini, C.; Wolak, P.; Yang, J.; Navarrini, A.; Loru, S.; Pilia, M.; Bachetti, M.; Iacolina, M. N.; Buttu, M.; Corbel, S.; Rodriguez, J.; Markoff, S.; Wilms, J.; Pottschmidt, K.; Cadolle Bel, M.; Kalemci, E.; Belloni, T.; Grinberg, V.; Marongiu, M.; Vargiu, G. P.; Trois, A.

    2017-11-01

    In 2016 September, the microquasar Cygnus X-3 underwent a giant radio flare, which was monitored for 6 d with the Medicina Radio Astronomical Station and the Sardinia Radio Telescope. Long observations were performed in order to follow the evolution of the flare on an hourly scale, covering six frequency ranges from 1.5 to 25.6 GHz. The radio emission reached a maximum of 13.2 ± 0.7 Jy at 7.2 GHz and 10 ± 1 Jy at 18.6 GHz. Rapid flux variations were observed at high radio frequencies at the peak of the flare, together with rapid evolution of the spectral index: α steepened from 0.3 to 0.6 (with Sν ∝ ν-α) within 5 h. This is the first time that such fast variations are observed, giving support to the evolution from optically thick to optically thin plasmons in expansion moving outward from the core. Based on the Italian network (Noto, Medicina and SRT) and extended to the European antennas (Torun, Yebes, Onsala), very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations were triggered at 22 GHz on five different occasions, four times prior to the giant flare, and once during its decay phase. Flux variations of 2 h duration were recorded during the first session. They correspond to a mini-flare that occurred close to the core 10 d before the onset of the giant flare. From the latest VLBI observation we infer that 4 d after the flare peak the jet emission was extended over 30 mas.

  17. Five years of gas flaring by country, oil field or flare observed by the Suomi NPP satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhizhin, M. N.; Elvidge, C.; Baugh, K.; Hsu, F. C.

    2016-12-01

    We will present a new methodology and the resulting interactive map and statistical estimates of flared gas volumes in 2012-2016 using multispectral infrared images from VIIRS radiometer at the Suomi NPP satellite. The high temperature gas flares are detected at the night side of the Earth with the Nightfire algorithm. Gas flares are distinct from biomass burning and industrial heat sources because they have higher temperatures. Sums of the radiative heat from the detected flares are calibrated with country-level flared volumes reported by CEDIGAZ. Statistical analysis of the database with accumulated 5 years of the Nightfire detections makes it possible to estimate instant flow rate for an individual flare, as well as integral flared volumes and long term trends for all the countries or oil and gas fields.

  18. Solar System Observations with JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwood, James; Hammel, Heidi; Milam, Stefanie; Stansberry, John; Lunine, Jonathan; Chanover, Nancy; Hines, Dean; Sonneborn, George; Tiscareno, Matthew; Brown, Michael; hide

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope will enable a wealth of new scientific investigations in the near- and mid- infrared, with sensitivity and spatial-spectral resolution greatly surpassing its predecessors. In this paper, we focus upon Solar System science facilitated by JWST, discussing the most current information available concerning JWST instrument properties and observing techniques relevant to planetary science. We also present numerous example observing scenarios for a wide variety of Solar System targets to illustrate the potential of JWST science to the Solar System community. This paper updates and supersedes the Solar System white paper published by the JWST Project in 2010 (Lunine et al., 2010). It is based both on that paper and on a workshop held at the annual meeting of the Division for Planetary Sciences in Reno, NV in 2012.

  19. Empirical studies of solar flares: Comparison of X-ray and H alpha filtergrams and analysis of the energy balance of the X-ray plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The physics of solar flares was investigated through a combined analysis of X-ray filtergrams of the high temperature coronal component of flares and H alpha filtergrams of the low temperature chromospheric component. The data were used to study the magnetic field configuration and its changes in solar flares, and to examine the chromospheric location and structure of X-ray bright points (XPB) and XPB flares. Each topic and the germane data are discussed. The energy balance of the thermal X-ray plasma in flares, while not studied, is addressed.

  20. Long- and Mid-Term Variations of the Soft X-ray Flare Type in Solar Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, I. M.; Belov, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    Using data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) spacecraft in the 1 - 8 Å wavelength range for Solar Cycles 23, 24, and part of Cycles 21 and 22, we compare mean temporal parameters (rise and decay times, and duration) and the proportion of impulsive short-duration events (SDE) and gradual long-duration events (LDE) among C- and ≥ M1.0-class flares. It is found that the fraction of the SDE ≥ M1.0-class flares (including spikes) in Cycle 24 exceeds that in Cycle 23 in all three temporal parameters at the maximum phase and in the decay time during the ascending cycle phase. However, Cycles 23 and 24 barely differ in the fraction of the SDE C-class flares. The temporal parameters of SDEs, their fraction, and consequently the relationship between the SDE and LDE flares do not remain constant, but reveal regular changes within individual cycles and during the transition from one cycle to another. In all phases of all four cycles, these changes have the character of pronounced, large-amplitude "quasi-biennial" oscillations (QBOs). In different cycles and at the separate phases of individual cycles, such QBOs are superimposed on various systematic trends displayed by the analyzed temporal flare parameters. In Cycle 24, the fraction of the SDE ≥ M1.0-class flares from the N- and S-hemispheres displays the most pronounced synchronous QBOs. The QBO amplitude and general variability of the intense ≥ M1.0-class flares almost always markedly exceeds those of the moderate C-class flares. The ordered quantitative and qualitative variations of the flare type revealed in the course of the solar cycles are discussed within the framework of the concept that the SDE flares are associated mainly with small sunspots (including those in developed active regions) and that small and large sunspots behave differently during cycles and form two distinct populations.

  1. Localization of the solar flare SF900610 in X-rays with the WATCH instrument of the GRANAT observatory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terekhov, O.V.; Kuzmin, A.G.; Shevchenko, A.V.

    2002-01-01

    -ray source do not coincide with the coordinates of the Ha-line flare. The X-ray source moved over the solar disk during the flare. This probably implies that, as the X-ray emission was generated, different parts of one loop or a system of magnetic loops dominated at different flare times.......During the solar flare of June 10, 1990, the WATCH instrument of the GRANAT space observatory obtained 110 localizations of the X-ray source in the X-ray range 8-20 keV. Its coordinates were measured with an accuracy of similar to2 arcmin at a 3sigma confidence level. The coordinates of the X...

  2. X-ray Emission from Solar Flares Rajmal Jain, Malini Aggarwal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ray line and thermal ... and during the flare provide a wonderful opportunity to study the soft X-ray characteristics of active region. 125 .... observed spectrum. The multi-thermal power-law function enables us to measure the emission measure,.

  3. Evidence that magnetic energy shedding in solar filament eruptions is the drive in accompanying flares and coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ronald L.

    1988-01-01

    The dependence of the magnetic energy on the field expansion and untwisting of the flux tube in which an erupting solar filament is embedded has been determined in order to evaluate the energy decrease in the erupting flux tube. Magnetic energy shedding by the filament-field eruption is found to be the driving mechanism in both filament-eruption flares and coronal mass ejections. Confined filament-eruption flares, filament-eruption flares with sprays and coronal mass ejections, and coronal mass ejections from quiescent filament eruptions are all shown to be similar types of events.

  4. The analysis and the three-dimensional, forward-fit modeling of the X-ray and the microwave emissions of major solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Natsuha; Wang, Haimin; Gary, Dale E.

    2017-08-01

    It is well known that the time profiles of the hard X-ray (HXR) emission and the microwave (MW) emission during the impulsive phase of the solar flare are well correlated, and that their analysis can lead to the understandings of the flare-accelerated electrons. In this work, we first studied the source locations of seven distinct temporal peaks observed in HXR and MW lightcurves of the 2011-02-15 X2.2 flare using the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and Nobeyama Radioheliograph. We found that the seven emission peaks did not come from seven spatially distinct sites in HXR and MW, but rather in HXR we observed a sudden change in location only between the second and the third peak, with the same pattern occurring, but evolving more slowly in MW, which is consistent with the tether-cutting model of solar flares. Next, we closely examine the widely-used notion of a "common population" of the accelerated electrons producing the HXR and the MW, which has been challenged by some studies suggesting the differences in the inferred energy spectral index and emitting energies of the HXR- and MW- producing electrons. We use the Non-linear Force Free Field model extrapolated from the observed photospheric magnetogram in the three-dimensional, multi-wavelength modeling platform GX Simulator, and attempt to create a unified electron population model that can simultaneously reproduce the observed X-ray and MW observations of the 2015-06-22 M6.5 flare. We constrain the model parameters by the observations made by the highest-resolving instruments currently available in two wavelengths, the RHESSI for X-ray and the Expanded Owens Valley Solar Array for MW. The results suggest that the X-ray emitting electron population model fits to the standard flare model with the broken, hardening power-law spectrum at ~300 keV that simultaneously produces the HXR footpoint emission and the MW high frequency emission, and also reveals that there could be a

  5. NuSTAR Observations of X-Ray Flares from Young Stellar Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vievering, Juliana; Glesener, Lindsay; Grefenstette, Brian; Smith, David

    2018-01-01

    Young stellar objects (YSOs), which tend to flare more frequently and at higher temperatures than what is typically observed on Sun-like stars, are excellent targets for studying the physical processes behind large flaring events. In the hard x-ray regime, radiation can penetrate through dense circumstellar material, and it is possible to measure thermal emission from hot plasma and to search for nonthermal emission from accelerated particles, which are key components for understanding the nature of energy release in these flares. Additionally, high-energy x-ray emission can ionize material in the disk, which may have implications for planet formation. To investigate hard x-ray emission from YSOs, three 50ks observations of a star-forming region called rho Ophiuchi have been taken with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). Through use of direct focusing optics, NuSTAR provides unprecedented sensitivity in the hard x-ray regime, making these YSO observations the first of their kind. Multiple stellar flares have been identified in the data set; here we present the current spectral and timing analyses of the brightest of the these events, exploring the way energy is released as well as the effects of these large flares on the surrounding environment.

  6. Modeling of very low frequency (VLF radio wave signal profile due to solar flares using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation coupled with ionospheric chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Palit

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available X-ray photons emitted during solar flares cause ionization in the lower ionosphere (~60 to 100 km in excess of what is expected to occur due to a quiet sun. Very low frequency (VLF radio wave signals reflected from the D-region of the ionosphere are affected by this excess ionization. In this paper, we reproduce the deviation in VLF signal strength during solar flares by numerical modeling. We use GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code to compute the rate of ionization due to a M-class flare and a X-class flare. The output of the simulation is then used in a simplified ionospheric chemistry model to calculate the time variation of electron density at different altitudes in the D-region of the ionosphere. The resulting electron density variation profile is then self-consistently used in the LWPC code to obtain the time variation of the change in VLF signal. We did the modeling of the VLF signal along the NWC (Australia to IERC/ICSP (India propagation path and compared the results with observations. The agreement is found to be very satisfactory.

  7. The Effects of Flare Definitions on the Statistics of Derived Flare Distrubtions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Daniel; Dominique, Marie; Seaton, Daniel B.; Stegen, Koen; White, Arthur

    2016-05-01

    The statistical examination of solar flares is crucial to revealing their global characteristics and behaviour. However, statistical flare studies are often performed using standard but basic flare detection algorithms relying on arbitrary thresholds which may affect the derived flare distributions. We explore the effect of the arbitrary thresholds used in the GOES event list and LYRA Flare Finder algorithms. We find that there is a small but significant relationship between the power law exponent of the GOES flare peak flux frequency distribution and the algorithms’ flare start thresholds. We also find that the power law exponents of these distributions are not stable but appear to steepen with increasing peak flux. This implies that the observed flare size distribution may not be a power law at all. We show that depending on the true value of the exponent of the flare size distribution, this deviation from a power law may be due to flares missed by the flare detection algorithms. However, it is not possible determine the true exponent from GOES/XRS observations. Additionally we find that the PROBA2/LYRA flare size distributions are clearly non-power law. We show that this is consistent with an insufficient degradation correction which causes LYRA absolute irradiance values to be unreliable. This means that they should not be used for flare statistics or energetics unless degradation is adequately accounted for. However they can be used to study time variations over shorter timescales and for space weather monitoring.

  8. North–South Distribution of Solar Flares during Cycle 23

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Author Affiliations. Bhuwan Joshi1 P. Pant1 P. K. Manoharan2. Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences, Nainital 263 129, India. Radio Astronomy Centre, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Ooty 643 001, India.

  9. Quantifying Dynamical Complexity of Magnetic Storms and Solar Flares via Nonextensive Tsallis Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Eftaxias

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the last couple of decades nonextensive Tsallis entropy has shown remarkable applicability to describe nonequilibrium physical systems with large variability and multifractal structure. Herein, we review recent results from the application of Tsallis statistical mechanics to the detection of dynamical changes related with the occurrence of magnetic storms. We extend our review to describe attempts to approach the dynamics of magnetic storms and solar flares by means of universality through Tsallis statistics. We also include a discussion of possible implications on space weather forecasting efforts arising from the verification of Tsallis entropy in the complex system of the magnetosphere.

  10. Simulation of hard X-ray time delays in solar flares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri E. Charikov

    2015-06-01

    The spectra were derived from HXR integral over the active region. They were interpreted on the basis of a model of kinetics of accelerated electrons propagating in the flaring loop with the given plasma concentration distribution and magnetic field configuration. The kinetics in question is governed by the processes of Coulomb scattering, reflecting in the converging magnetic field, and with the return current factored in. Solving the time-dependent relativistic Fokker–Planck equation for the given initial conditions allowed to find the time-dependent electron distribution function along the loop. The brightness distribution of the bremsstrahlung of HXR derived from the electron distribution functions was calculated for different quantum energies along the flaring loop and used to plot the time-delays spectra. The calculated data showed that decreasing time-delay spectra were tractable assuming regions of electrons acceleration and injection were separated. The distinction between time-delays spectra from the looptop and footpoints was established. Hence the measurements with high resolving power may produce comprehensive data on the processes of electron transport and acceleration during solar flares.

  11. Wavelength Dependence of Solar Irradiance Enhancement During X-Class Flares and Its Influence on the Upper Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanshi; Richmond, Arthur D.; Deng, Yue; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Qian, Liying; Solomon, Stanley C.; Roble, Raymond G.; Xiao, Zuo

    2013-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of solar irradiance enhancement during flare events is one of the important factors in determining how the Thermosphere-Ionosphere (T-I) system responds to flares. To investigate the wavelength dependence of flare enhancement, the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) was run for 61 X-class flares. The absolute and the percentage increases of solar irradiance at flare peaks, compared to pre-flare conditions, have clear wavelength dependences. The 0-14 nm irradiance increases much more (approx. 680% on average) than that in the 14-25 nm waveband (approx. 65% on average), except at 24 nm (approx. 220%). The average percentage increases for the 25-105 nm and 122-190 nm wavebands are approx. 120% and approx. 35%, respectively. The influence of 6 different wavebands (0-14 nm, 14-25 nm, 25-105 nm, 105- 120 nm, 121.56 nm, and 122-175 nm) on the thermosphere was examined for the October 28th, 2003 flare (X17-class) event by coupling FISM with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM) under geomagnetically quiet conditions (Kp=1). While the enhancement in the 0-14 nm waveband caused the largest enhancement of the globally integrated solar heating, the impact of solar irradiance enhancement on the thermosphere at 400 km is largest for the 25-105 nm waveband (EUV), which accounts for about 33 K of the total 45 K temperature enhancement, and approx. 7.4% of the total approx. 11.5% neutral density enhancement. The effect of 122-175 nm flare radiation on the thermosphere is rather small. The study also illustrates that the high-altitude thermospheric response to the flare radiation at 0-175 nm is almost a linear combination of the responses to the individual wavebands. The upper thermospheric temperature and density enhancements peaked 3-5 h after the maximum flare radiation.

  12. Solar Observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedemeyer, Sven

    2015-08-01

    The interferometric Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has already demonstrated its impressive capabilities by observing a large variety of targets ranging from protoplanetary disks to galactic nuclei. ALMA is also capable of observing the Sun and has been used for five solar test campaigns so far. The technically challenging solar observing modes are currently under development and regular observations are expected to begin in late 2016.ALMA consists of 66 antennas located in the Chilean Andes at an altitude of 5000 m and is a true leap forward in terms of spatial resolution at millimeter wavelengths. The resolution of reconstructed interferometric images of the Sun is anticipated to be close to what current optical solar telescopes can achieve. In combination with the high temporal and spectral resolution, these new capabilities open up new parameter spaces for solar millimeter observations.The solar radiation at wavelengths observed by ALMA originates from the chromosphere, where the height of the sampled layer increases with selected wavelength. The continuum intensity is linearly correlated to the local gas temperature in the probed layer, which makes ALMA essentially a linear thermometer. During flares, ALMA can detect additional non-thermal emission contributions. Measurements of the polarization state facilitate the valuable determination of the chromospheric magnetic field. In addition, spectrally resolved observations of radio recombination and molecular lines may yield great diagnostic potential, which has yet to be investigated and developed.Many different scientific applications for a large range of targets from quiet Sun to active regions and prominences are possible, ranging from ultra-high cadence wave studies to flare observations. ALMA, in particular in combination with other ground-based and space-borne instruments, will certainly lead to fascinating new findings, which will advance our understanding of the atmosphere of our Sun

  13. Three-dimensional MHD simulation of interplanetary magnetic field changes at 1 AU as a consequence of simulated solar flares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-C. Wu

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available A fully three-dimensional (3D, time-dependent, MHD interplanetary global model (3D IGM has been used, for the first time, to study the relationship between different forms of solar activity and transient variations of the north-south component, Bz, of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF at 1 AU. One form of solar activity, the flare, is simulated by using a pressure pulse at different locations near the solar surface and observing the simulated IMF evolution of Bθ (=–Bz at 1 AU. Results show that, for a given pressure pulse, the orientation of the corresponding transient variation of Bz has a strong relationship to the location of the pressure pulse and the initial conditions of the IMF. Two initial IMF conditions are considered: a unipolar Archimedean spiral with outward polarity and a flat heliospheric current sheet (HCS with outward polarity in the northern hemisphere and which gradually reverses polarity in the solar equatorial plane to inward polarity in the southern heliospheric hemisphere. The wave guide effect of the HCS is also demonstrated.

  14. Three-dimensional MHD simulation of interplanetary magnetic field changes at 1 AU as a consequence of simulated solar flares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-C. Wu

    Full Text Available A fully three-dimensional (3D, time-dependent, MHD interplanetary global model (3D IGM has been used, for the first time, to study the relationship between different forms of solar activity and transient variations of the north-south component, Bz, of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF at 1 AU. One form of solar activity, the flare, is simulated by using a pressure pulse at different locations near the solar surface and observing the simulated IMF evolution of Bθ (=–Bz at 1 AU. Results show that, for a given pressure pulse, the orientation of the corresponding transient variation of Bz has a strong relationship to the location of the pressure pulse and the initial conditions of the IMF. Two initial IMF conditions are considered: a unipolar Archimedean spiral with outward polarity and a flat heliospheric current sheet (HCS with outward polarity in the northern hemisphere and which gradually reverses polarity in the solar equatorial plane to inward polarity in the southern heliospheric hemisphere. The wave guide effect of the HCS is also demonstrated.

  15. Analysis of selected microflares observed by SphinX over the last minimum of solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siarkowski, Marek; Sylwester, Janusz; Sylwester, Barbara; Gryciuk, Magdalena

    The Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) was designed to observe soft X-ray solar emission in the energy range between 1 keV and 15 keV with the resolution better than 0.5 keV. The instrument operated from February until November 2009 aboard CORONAS-Photon satellite, during the phase of exceptionally low minimum of solar activity. Here we use SphinX data for analysis of selected microflare-class events. We selected events of unusual lightcurves or location. Our study involves determination of temporal characteristics (times of start, maximum and end of flares) and analysis of physical conditions in flaring plasma (temperature, emission measure). Dedicated method has been used in order to remove emission not related to flare. Supplementary information about morphology and evolution of investigated events has been derived from the analysis of XRT/Hinode and SECCHI /STEREO images.

  16. Flare Characteristics from X-ray Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryciuk, M.; Siarkowski, M.; Sylwester, J.; Gburek, S.; Podgorski, P.; Kepa, A.; Sylwester, B.; Mrozek, T.

    2017-06-01

    A new methodology is given to determine basic parameters of flares from their X-ray light curves. Algorithms are developed from the analysis of small X-ray flares occurring during the deep solar minimum of 2009, between Solar Cycles 23 and 24, observed by the Polish Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) on the Complex Orbital Observations Near-Earth of Activity of the Sun-Photon (CORONAS- Photon) spacecraft. One is a semi-automatic flare detection procedure that gives start, peak, and end times for single ("elementary") flare events under the assumption that the light curve is a simple convolution of a Gaussian and exponential decay functions. More complex flares with multiple peaks can generally be described by a sum of such elementary flares. Flare time profiles in the two energy ranges of SphinX (1.16 - 1.51 keV, 1.51 - 15 keV) are used to derive temperature and emission measure as a function of time during each flare. The result is a comprehensive catalogue - the SphinX Flare Catalogue - which contains 1600 flares or flare-like events and is made available for general use. The methods described here can be applied to observations made by Geosynchronous Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES), the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and other broad-band spectrometers.

  17. TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF X-RAY SOLAR FLARE LOOPS: LENGTH, CORPULENCE, POSITION, TEMPERATURE, PLASMA PRESSURE, AND SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Kontar, Eduard P., E-mail: n.jeffrey@physics.gla.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-01

    The spatial and spectral properties of three solar flare coronal X-ray loops are studied before, during, and after the peak X-ray emission. Using observations from the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), we deduce the temporal changes in emitting X-ray length, corpulence, volume, position, number density, and thermal pressure. We observe a decrease in the loop length, width, and volume before the X-ray peak, and an increasing number density and thermal pressure. After the X-ray peak, volume increases and loop corpulence grows due to increasing width. The volume variations are more pronounced than the position variations, often known as magnetic field line contraction. We believe this is the first dedicated study examining the temporal evolution of X-ray loop lengths and widths. Collectively, the observations also show for the first time three temporal phases given by peaks in temperature, X-ray emission, and thermal pressure, with the minimum volume coinciding with the X-ray peak. Although the volume of the flaring plasma decreases before the peak in X-ray emission, the relationship between temperature and volume does not support simple compressive heating in a collapsing magnetic trap model. Within a low {beta} plasma, shrinking loop widths perpendicular to the guiding field can be explained by squeezing the magnetic field threading the region. Plasma heating leads to chromospheric evaporation and growing number density. This produces increasing thermal pressure and decreasing loop lengths as electrons interact at shorter distances and we believe after the X-ray peak, the increasing loop corpulence.

  18. First Flight of the Gamma-Ray Imager Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Nicole; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Shih, A. Y.; Hurford, G. J.; Bain, H. M.; Amman, M.; Mochizuki, A. B.; Hoberman, J.; Olson, J.; Maruca, B. A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar ares (GRIPS) instrument is a balloon-borne telescope designed to study solar-flare particle acceleration and transport. We describe GRIPS's first Antarctic long-duration flight in January 2016 and report preliminary calibration and science results. Electron and ion dynamics, particle abundances and the ambient plasma conditions in solar flares can be understood by examining hard X-ray (HXR) and gamma-ray emission (20 keV to 10 MeV). Enhanced imaging, spectroscopy and polarimetry of flare emissions in this energy range are needed to study particle acceleration and transport questions. The GRIPS instrument is specifically designed to answer questions including: What causes the spatial separation between energetic electrons producing hard X-rays and energetic ions producing gamma-ray lines? How anisotropic are the relativistic electrons, and why can they dominate in the corona? How do the compositions of accelerated and ambient material vary with space and time, and why? GRIPS's key technological improvements over the current solar state of the art at HXR/gamma-ray energies, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), include 3D position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs) and a single-grid modulation collimator, the multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM). The 3D-GeDs have spectral FWHM resolution of a few hundred keV and spatial resolution less than 1cu mm. For photons that Compton scatter, usually greater or equal to 150 keV, the energy deposition sites can be tracked, providing polarization measurements as well as enhanced background reduction through Compton imaging. Each of GRIPS's detectors has 298 electrode strips read out with ASIC/FPGA electronics. In GRIPS's energy range, indirect imaging methods provide higher resolution than focusing optics or Compton imaging techniques. The MPRM grid-imaging system has a single-grid design which provides twice the throughput of a bi-grid imaging system

  19. Energetic Phenomena on the Sun: The Solar Maximum Mission Flare Workshop. Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Mukul (Editor); Woodgate, Bruce (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The general objectives of the conference were as follows: (1) Synthesize flare studies after three years of Solar Maximum Mission (SSM) data analysis. Encourage a broader participation in the SMM data analysis and combine this more fully with theory and other data sources-data obtained with other spacecraft such as the HINOTORI, p78-1, and ISEE-3 spacecrafts, and with the Very Large Array (VLA) and many other ground-based instruments. Many coordinated data sets, unprecedented in their breadth of coverage and multiplicity of sources, had been obtained within the structure of the Solar Maximum Year (SMY). (2) Stimulate joint studies, and publication in the general scientific literature. The intended primary benefit was for informal collaborations to be started or broadened at the Workshops with subsequent publications. (3) Provide a special publication resulting from the Workshop.

  20. Behaviour of Electron Content in the Ionospheric D-Region During Solar X-Ray Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorović Drakul, M.; Čadež, V. M.; Bajčetić, J.; Popović, L. Č.; Blagojević, D.; Nina, A.

    2016-12-01

    One of the most important parameters in ionospheric plasma research, also having a wide practical application in wireless satellite telecommunications, is the total electron content (TEC) representing the columnal electron number density. The F-region with high electron density provides the biggest contribution to TEC while the relatively weakly ionized plasma of the D-region (60 km - 90 km above Earth's surface) is often considered as a negligible cause of satellite signal disturbances. However, sudden intensive ionization processes, like those induced by solar X-ray flares, can cause relative increases of electron density that are significantly larger in the D-region than in regions at higher altitudes. Therefore, one cannot exclude a priori the D-region from investigations of ionospheric influences on propagation of electromagnetic signals emitted by satellites. We discuss here this problem which has not been sufficiently treated in literature so far. The obtained results are based on data collected from the D-region monitoring by very low frequency radio waves and on vertical TEC calculations from the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signal analyses, and they show noticeable variations in the D-region's electron content (TEC_{D) during activity of a solar X-ray flare (it rises by a factor of 136 in the considered case) when TEC_{D} contribution to TEC can reach several percent and which cannot be neglected in practical applications like global positioning procedures by satellites.

  1. Quantitative Examination of a Large Sample of Supra-Arcade Downflows in Eruptive Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Sabrina L.; McKenzie, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Sunward-flowing voids above post-coronal mass ejection flare arcades were first discovered using the soft X-ray telescope aboard Yohkoh and have since been observed with TRACE (extreme ultraviolet (EUV)), SOHO/LASCO (white light), SOHO/SUMER (EUV spectra), and Hinode/XRT (soft X-rays). Supra-arcade downflow (SAD) observations suggest that they are the cross-sections of thin flux tubes retracting from a reconnection site high in the corona. Supra-arcade downflowing loops (SADLs) have also been observed under similar circumstances and are theorized to be SADs viewed from a perpendicular angle. Although previous studies have focused on dark flows because they are easier to detect and complementary spectral data analysis reveals their magnetic nature, the signal intensity of the flows actually ranges from dark to bright. This implies that newly reconnected coronal loops can contain a range of hot plasma density. Previous studies have presented detailed SAD observations for a small number of flares. In this paper, we present a substantial SADs and SADLs flare catalog. We have applied semiautomatic detection software to several of these events to detect and track individual downflows thereby providing statistically significant samples of parameters such as velocity, acceleration, area, magnetic flux, shrinkage energy, and reconnection rate. We discuss these measurements (particularly the unexpected result of the speeds being an order of magnitude slower than the assumed Alfven speed), how they were obtained, and potential impact on reconnection models.

  2. Simultaneous NIR/sub-mm observation of flare emission from Sagittarius A*

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eckart, A.; Schödel, R.; García-Marín, M.; Witzel, G.; Weiss, A.; Baganoff, F.K.; Morris, M.R.; Bertram, T.; Dovčiak, M.; Duschl, W.J.; Karas, V.; König, S.; Krichbaum, T.P.; Krips, M.; Kunneriath, D.; Lu, R.-S.; Markoff, S.; Mauerhan, J.; Meyer, L.; Moultaka, J.; Mužić, K.; Najarro, F.; Pott, J.-U.; Schuster, K.F.; Sjouwerman, L.O.; Straubmeier, C.; Thum, C.; Vogel, S.N.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Zamaninasab, M.; Zensus, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Context. We report on a successful, simultaneous observation and modeling of the sub-millimeter to near-infrared flare emission of the Sgr A* counterpart associated with the super-massive (4 x 10(6) M-circle dot) black hole at the Galactic center. Aims. We study and model the physical processes

  3. RADIOEMISSÕES SOLARES TIPO II ASSOCIADAS A FLARES E CMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Douglas Cunha-Silva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Atribuídas a ondas de choque e a ejeções de plasmoide, as emissões solares tipo II são ondaseletromagnéticas geradas a partir de oscilações do plasma coronal. A origem dos choques associados a essasemissões é ainda uma questão em aberto da física solar. Enquanto alguns trabalhos sugerem os flares solarescomo seus acionadores, outros fornecem indícios de serem as ejeções de massa coronal (CMEs sua origemmais provável. Este trabalho apresenta os resultados da análise de duas emissões tipo II, registradas por doisespectrômetros da rede e-CALLISTO (extended-Compound Astronomical Low-cost Low-frequency Instrument forSpectroscopy and Transportable Observatory, os quais operam na faixa de frequências de 45-870 MHz. Oprimeiro evento, observado em 13 de junho de 2010, às 05:38 UT, apresentou uma taxa de deriva em frequênciade -0,2 MHz s-1, correspondente a uma velocidade de choque de 528 km s-1, estando, temporalmente, associadoa uma CME lenta (~320 km s-1 e a um flare solar em raios-X, classe M1.0. O segundo evento, observado em 09de Agosto de 2011, às 08:02 UT, apresentou uma taxa de deriva em frequência de -1,4 MHz s-1, correspondentea uma velocidade de choque de 1375 km s-1, estando, temporalmente, associado a uma CME tipo halo (~1610km s-1 e a um flare solar em raios-X, classe X6.9. Os resultados obtidos, para os parâmetros observacionais dasemissões tipo II e para os parâmetros físicos de suas fontes, são discutidos no contexto de sua relação com seuflares e CMEs associados.

  4. High resolution spectroscopy of solar activity. I - Observing procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cram, L. E.; Robinson, R. D.; Mauter, H. A.; Mann, G. R.; Phillis, G. L.

    1981-06-01

    The considered project represents an attempt to provide critical spectroscopic data during the current solar maximum period. The program exploits the possibility of obtaining simultaneous observations in widely separated spectral lines. The lines selected span the height range accessible with ground-based observations, and are suitable for diagnosing the physical conditions in active region sources. The present program is similar in concept to the successful HIRKHAD project reported by Beckers et al. (1972), the main difference being a selection of lines more appropriate for work on solar activity. It is proposed to make observational material available to interested astronomers. High quality spectra of a variety of active region phenomena are obtained, giving attention to flares, plages, surges, sunspots, filaments, and Ellerman bombs.

  5. VLF Remote -Sensing of the Lower Ionosphere with AWESOME Receivers: Solar Flares, Lightning-induced Electron Precipitation, Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances, Sprites, Gravity Waves and Gamma-ray Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, U. S.; Cohen, M.; Scherrer, P.; Scherrer, D.

    2006-11-01

    Stanford University Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio receivers have been used extensively for remote sensing of the ionosphere and the magnetosphere. Among the phenomena that can be uniquely measured via VLF receivers are radio atmospherics, whistlers, electron precipitation, solar flares, sudden ionospheric disturbances, gravity waves, sprites, and cosmic gamma-ray flares. With the use of simple square air-core magnetic loop antennas of a couple of meters in size, the sensitivity of these instruments allows the measurement of magnetic fields as low as several tens of femtoTesla per root Hz, in the frequency range of ~300 Hz to 50 kHz. This sensitivity well exceeds that required to detect any event above the ambient atmospheric noise floor, determined by the totality of lightning activity on this planet. In recent years, as cost of production, timing accuracy (due to low cost GPS cards), and data handling flexibility of the systems has improved, it has become possible to distribute many of these instruments in the form of arrays, to perform interferometric and holographic imaging of the lower ionosphere. These goals can be achieved using the newest version of the Stanford VLF receiver, known as AWESOME: Atmospheric Weather Educational System for Observation and Modeling of Electromagnetics. In the context of the IHY/UNBSS program for 2007, the AWESOME receivers can be used extensively as part of the United Nations initiative to place scientific instruments in developing countries. Drawing on the Stanford experiences from setting up arrays of VLF receivers, including an interferometer in Alaska, the Holographic Array for Ionospheric and Lightning research (HAIL) consisting of instruments at 13 different high schools in mid-western United States, a broader set of ELF/VLF receivers in Alaska, and various receivers abroad, including in France, Japan, Greece, Turkey, and India, a global network of ELF/VLF receivers offer possibilities for a wide range of scientific topics

  6. Observations of recent flares of the blazar 1ES1959+650 with VERITAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuyang; Santander, Marcos; VERITAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    VERITAS (Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System) is a an array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes that carries out an extensive observation program of the gamma-ray sky at energies above 0.1 TeV. Blazars, active galactic nuclei powered by supermassive black holes, are gamma-ray sources of major interest. The relativistic jets they emit are among the most energetic phenomena in the universe and constitute a significant amount of study in high energy astrophysics. In particular, the blazar 1ES 1959+650 (z=0.048) has garnered special attention due to its emission of an ``orphan'' flare in 2002. An orphan flare is an extremely bright emission in gamma rays that is not coupled to X-rays. This phenomenon is incompatible with our current model of gamma-ray production, the self-synchrotron Compton (SSC) process. This study aims to characterize recent TeV flares of this source by analyzing the time variability of its light curve and spectrum and comparing these findings to observations made in other wavelengths. We hope to determine if these recent flares have also been orphan in nature, put an upper limit on the size of the emission region, and understand the nature of the gamma-ray emission in the source.

  7. Observation of a Large-scale Quasi-circular Secondary Ribbon Associated with Successive Flares and a Halo CME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Kumar, Pankaj; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Jiang, Chaowei; Kim, Sujin; Yang, Heesu; Chae, Jongchul; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Lee, Jeongwoo

    2017-12-01

    Solar flare ribbons provide an important clue to the magnetic reconnection process and associated magnetic field topology in the solar corona. We detected a large-scale secondary flare ribbon of a circular shape that developed in association with two successive M-class flares and one coronal mass ejection. The ribbon revealed interesting properties such as (1) a quasi-circular shape and enclosing the central active region (AR); (2) the size as large as 500″ by 650″ (3) successive brightenings in the clockwise direction at a speed of 160 km s-1 starting from the nearest position to the flaring sunspots; (4) radial contraction and expansion in the northern and the southern part, respectively, at speeds of ≤10 km s-1. Using multi-wavelength data from Solar Dynamics Observatory, RHESSI, XRT, and Nobeyama, along with magnetic field extrapolations, we found that: (1) the secondary ribbon location is consistent with those of the field line footpoints of a fan-shaped magnetic structure that connects the flaring region and the ambient decaying field; (2) the second M2.6 flare occurred when the expanding coronal loops driven by the first M2.0 flare encountered the background decayed field; (3) immediately after the second flare, the secondary ribbon developed along with dimming regions. Based on our findings, we suggest that interaction between the expanding sigmoid field and the overlying fan-shaped field triggered the secondary reconnection that resulted in the field opening and formation of the quasi-circular secondary ribbon. We thus conclude that interaction between the AR and the ambient large-scale fields should be taken into account to fully understand the entire eruption process.

  8. The magnetic connectivity of coronal shocks from behind-the-limb flares to the visible solar surface during γ-ray events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, I.; Rouillard, A. P.; Share, G. H.

    2017-12-01

    Context. The observation of >100 MeV γ-rays in the minutes to hours following solar flares suggests that high-energy particles interacting in the solar atmosphere can be stored and/or accelerated for long time periods. The occasions when γ-rays are detected even when the solar eruptions occurred beyond the solar limb as viewed from Earth provide favorable viewing conditions for studying the role of coronal shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the acceleration of these particles. Aims: In this paper, we investigate the spatial and temporal evolution of the coronal shocks inferred from stereoscopic observations of behind-the-limb flares to determine if they could be the source of the particles producing the γ-rays. Methods: We analyzed the CMEs and early formation of coronal shocks associated with γ-ray events measured by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) from three eruptions behind the solar limb as viewed from Earth on 2013 Oct. 11, 2014 Jan. 06 and Sep. 01. We used a 3D triangulation technique, based on remote-sensing observations to model the expansion of the CME shocks from above the solar surface to the upper corona. Coupling the expansion model to various models of the coronal magnetic field allowed us to derive the time-dependent distribution of shock Mach numbers and the magnetic connection of particles produced by the shock to the solar surface visible from Earth. Results: The reconstructed shock fronts for the three events became magnetically connected to the visible solar surface after the start of the flare and just before the onset of the >100 MeV γ-ray emission. The shock surface at these connections also exhibited supercritical Mach numbers required for significant particle energization. The strongest γ-ray emissions occurred when the flanks of the shocks were connected in a quasi-perpendicular geometry to the field lines reaching the visible surface. Multipoint, in situ, measurements of solar energetic particles (SEPs) were

  9. Study of the solar flares effect on VLF radio signal propagating along NRK-ALG path using LWPC code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouderba, Y.; NaitAmor, S.; Tribeche, M.

    2016-07-01

    The X-ray solar flare emissions penetrate down into the D region of the ionosphere (60-90 km of altitude) and affect the propagating very low frequency (VLF) radio signal. In this paper, we will present the effect of the solar flares on the signal mode composition of the NRK-ALG path during the period from 2007 to 2013. In the Long Wave Propagating Capability (LWPC) code theory, the VLF signal is a sum of discrete modes that propagate to the receiver with different attenuation coefficients. Therefore, an interest is given to the behavior of these coefficients under solar flares. Effectively, from the simulation, we give more explanations about the role of the signal mode composition on the fading displacement since this later is a consequence of the destructive modes interferences. Thus, the sign (positive or negative) of the perturbed signal parameters (amplitude and phase) is found to be depending on the distance between the transmitter and the receiver. Finally, we give the Wait parameters and the electron density variations as a function of solar flares.

  10. Multiwavelength Observations of an Eruptive Flare: Evidence for Blast Waves and Break-Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Innes, D. E.

    2013-11-01

    Images of an east-limb flare on 3 November 2010 taken in the 131 Å channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory provide a convincing example of a long current sheet below an erupting plasmoid, as predicted by the standard magnetic reconnection model of eruptive flares. However, the 171 Å and 193 Å channel images hint at an alternative scenario. These images reveal that large-scale waves with velocity greater than 1000 km s-1 propagated alongside and ahead of the erupting plasmoid. Just south of the plasmoid, the waves coincided with type-II radio emission, and to the north, where the waves propagated along plume-like structures, there was increased decimetric emission. Initially, the cavity around the hot plasmoid expanded. Later, when the erupting plasmoid reached the height of an overlying arcade system, the plasmoid structure changed, and the lower parts of the cavity collapsed inwards. Hot loops appeared alongside and below the erupting plasmoid. We consider a scenario in which the fast waves and the type-II emission were a consequence of a flare blast wave, and the cavity collapse and the hot loops resulted from the break-out of the flux rope through an overlying coronal arcade.

  11. The magnetohydrodynamic development of two-ribbon flares or a five-finger theory for solar flares

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaastra, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    A semi-analytical model for the electrodynamic development of two-ribbon flares is presented. A current filament above a bipolar active region starts rising according to the model of Van Tend and Kuperus. Due to this motion large induced electric fields arise at a magnetic neutral line far below the

  12. Gamma-ray radiation of solar flares in October-November 2003 according to the data obtained with the AVS-F instrument onboard the CORONAS-F satellite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelsky, A. I.; Kotov, Yu. D.; Kuznetsov, S. N.; Glyanenko, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    Thirty active regions were observed on the Sun during the period from October 19 to November 20, 2003. Hard X-ray and gamma-ray radiation was detected from four active regions (10484, 10486, 10488, and 10490): 14 solar flares stronger than M5.0 according to the GOES classification were recorded

  13. Application of a deep-learning method to the forecast of daily solar flare occurrence using Convolution Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seulki; Moon, Yong-Jae; Chu, Hyoungseok

    2017-08-01

    As the application of deep-learning methods has been succeeded in various fields, they have a high potential to be applied to space weather forecasting. Convolutional neural network, one of deep learning methods, is specialized in image recognition. In this study, we apply the AlexNet architecture, which is a winner of Imagenet Large Scale Virtual Recognition Challenge (ILSVRC) 2012, to the forecast of daily solar flare occurrence using the MatConvNet software of MATLAB. Our input images are SOHO/MDI, EIT 195Å, and 304Å from January 1996 to December 2010, and output ones are yes or no of flare occurrence. We select training dataset from Jan 1996 to Dec 2000 and from Jan 2003 to Dec 2008. Testing dataset is chosen from Jan 2001 to Dec 2002 and from Jan 2009 to Dec 2010 in order to consider the solar cycle effect. In training dataset, we randomly select one fifth of training data for validation dataset to avoid the overfitting problem. Our model successfully forecasts the flare occurrence with about 0.90 probability of detection (POD) for common flares (C-, M-, and X-class). While POD of major flares (M- and X-class) forecasting is 0.96, false alarm rate (FAR) also scores relatively high(0.60). We also present several statistical parameters such as critical success index (CSI) and true skill statistics (TSS). Our model can immediately be applied to automatic forecasting service when image data are available.

  14. Study of non-thermal photon production under different scenarios in solar flares. 1: Scenarios and formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez, M.; Gallegos, A.

    1985-01-01

    In order to study the overall phenomenology involved in solar flares, it is necessary to understand their individual manifestation before building a corresponding description of the global phenomenon. Here the concern is with the production of X and gamma rays in solar flares. Flares are initiated very often within the closed magnetic field configurations of active centers. According (2) when beta = kinetic energy density/magnetic energy density approximately 0.2, the magnetic trap configuration is destructed within the time scale of the impulsive phase of flares ( 100 s). A first particle acceleration stage occurs during this phase as indicated by impulsive microwave and hard X-rays bursts. In some flare events, when the field strength beta is very high, the broken field lines may close again, such that later, in the course of the flash and main phases more hot plasma of very high conductivity is created, and so, the field and frozen plasma expand outward, as the kinetic pressure inside the closed loops increases. The magnetically trapped particles excite strong Alfven wave turbulence of small transverse scale.

  15. Catalog of hard X-ray solar flares detected with Mars Odyssey/HEND from the Mars orbit in 2001-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livshits, M. A.; Zimovets, I. V.; Golovin, D. V.; Nizamov, B. A.; Vybornov, V. I.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; Tretyakov, V. I.

    2017-09-01

    The study of nonstationary processes in the Sun is of great interest, and multi-wavelength observations and the registration of magnetic fields have been carried out using both ground-based telescopes and several specialized spacecraft in near-Earth orbits in recent years. However, the acquisition of new, reliable information on their hard X-ray radiation remains necessary, in particular, if the corresponding spacecraft provide additional information, e.g., in regard to flare observations from directions other than the Sun-Earth direction. This paper presents a catalog of powerful solar flares registered by the High Energy Neutron Detector (HEND) designed at the Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences. HEND is mounted onboard the 2001Mars Odyssey spacecraft. It operated successfully during the flight to Mars and is currently operating in near-Mars orbit. Apart from neutrons, HEND is sensitive to hard X-ray (up to 300 keV) and gamma-ray radiation (above 300 keV). This radiation is registered by two scintillators: an outer one that is sensitive to photons above 40 keV and an inner one sensitive to photons above 200 keV. The catalog was created using a new procedure for calibration of the data. For the most powerful 60 solar flares in the visible and far sides of the Sun (for a terrestrial observer), time profiles of the flare radiation summed over all channels of the X-ray, and in some cases the gamma-ray, bands are provided, as well as spectra and characteristics of power-law fits. The results of previous studies of the Sun using HEND and the potential for further use of these data are discussed.

  16. EVIDENCE OF THERMAL CONDUCTION SUPPRESSION IN A SOLAR FLARING LOOP BY CORONAL SEISMOLOGY OF SLOW-MODE WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon; Provornikova, Elena [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Sun, Xudong [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Davila, Joseph M., E-mail: tongjiang.wang@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20770 (United States)

    2015-09-20

    Analysis of a longitudinal wave event observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory is presented. A time sequence of 131 Å images reveals that a C-class flare occurred at one footpoint of a large loop and triggered an intensity disturbance (enhancement) propagating along it. The spatial features and temporal evolution suggest that a fundamental standing slow-mode wave could be set up quickly after meeting of two initial disturbances from the opposite footpoints. The oscillations have a period of ∼12 minutes and a decay time of ∼9 minutes. The measured phase speed of 500 ± 50 km s{sup −1} matches the sound speed in the heated loop of ∼10 MK, confirming that the observed waves are of slow mode. We derive the time-dependent temperature and electron density wave signals from six AIA extreme-ultraviolet channels, and find that they are nearly in phase. The measured polytropic index from the temperature and density perturbations is 1.64 ± 0.08 close to the adiabatic index of 5/3 for an ideal monatomic gas. The interpretation based on a 1D linear MHD model suggests that the thermal conductivity is suppressed by at least a factor of 3 in the hot flare loop at 9 MK and above. The viscosity coefficient is determined by coronal seismology from the observed wave when only considering the compressive viscosity dissipation. We find that to interpret the rapid wave damping, the classical compressive viscosity coefficient needs to be enhanced by a factor of 15 as the upper limit.

  17. Observations and Interpretations of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms from the December 5, 2006 Solar Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Shih, A. Y.; Stone, E. C.; Barghouty, A. f.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. c.; Labrador, A. W.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss recently reported observations of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs) from an X9 solar flare/coronal mass ejection event on 5 December 2006, located at E79. The observations were made by the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on STEREO A and B. Prior to the arrival of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth, both LETs observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV energetic neutral hydrogen atoms produced by either flare or shock-accelerated protons. RHESSI measurements of the 2.2-MeV gamma-ray line provide an estimate of the number of interacting flare-accelerated protons in this event, which leads to an improved estimate of ENA production by flare-accelerated protons. Taking into account ENA losses, we find that the observed ENAs must have been produced in the high corona at heliocentric distances > or equal to 2 solar radii. Although there are no CME images from this event, it is shown that CME-shock-accelerated protons can, in principle, produce a time-history consistent with the observations.

  18. Thermal instability of a reconnecting current layer as a trigger for solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledentsov, L. S.; Somov, B. V.

    2017-08-01

    The stability of small perturbations of a reconnecting current layer (CL) in a plasma with a strong magnetic field has been investigated in the approximation of dissipative magnetohydrodynamics. The case where the wavevector of the perturbations is parallel to the electric current in the CL has been considered. The suppression of plasma heat conduction by a magnetic field perturbation inside the CL is shown to be responsible for the instability. At the linear stage of instability development, the perturbations grow with the characteristic radiative plasma cooling time calculated in the approximation of an optically thin plasma with cosmic abundances of elements. The formation of a periodic structure of cold and hot magnetic flux tubes, viz., filaments, located across the direction of the electric current, should be expected at the nonlinear stage of the instability in the CL. The proposed mechanism of the thermal CL instability can explain the sequential brightening (ignition) in the arcades of magnetic loops in solar flares.

  19. Lower hybrid resonance acceleration of electrons and ions in solar flares and the associated microwave emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclements, K. G.; Bingham, R.; Su, J. J.; Dawson, J. M.; Spicer, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    The particle acceleration processes here studied are driven by the relaxation of unstable ion ring distributions; these produce strong wave activity at the lower hybrid resonance frequency which collapses, and forms energetic electron and ion tails. The results obtained are applied to the problem posed by the production of energetic particles by solar flares. The numerical simulation results thus obtained by a 2 1/2-dimensional particle-in-cell code show a simultaneous acceleration of electrons to 10-500 keV energies, and of ions to as much as the 1 MeV range; the energy of the latter is still insufficient to account for gamma-ray emission in the 4-6 MeV range, but furnish a seed population for further acceleration.

  20. Combined Modeling of Acceleration, Transport, and Hydrodynamic Response in Solar Flares. 1; The Numerical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Petrosian, Vahe; Mariska, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Acceleration and transport of high-energy particles and fluid dynamics of atmospheric plasma are interrelated aspects of solar flares, but for convenience and simplicity they were artificially separated in the past. We present here self consistently combined Fokker-Planck modeling of particles and hydrodynamic simulation of flare plasma. Energetic electrons are modeled with the Stanford unified code of acceleration, transport, and radiation, while plasma is modeled with the Naval Research Laboratory flux tube code. We calculated the collisional heating rate directly from the particle transport code, which is more accurate than those in previous studies based on approximate analytical solutions. We repeated the simulation of Mariska et al. with an injection of power law, downward-beamed electrons using the new heating rate. For this case, a -10% difference was found from their old result. We also used a more realistic spectrum of injected electrons provided by the stochastic acceleration model, which has a smooth transition from a quasi-thermal background at low energies to a non thermal tail at high energies. The inclusion of low-energy electrons results in relatively more heating in the corona (versus chromosphere) and thus a larger downward heat conduction flux. The interplay of electron heating, conduction, and radiative loss leads to stronger chromospheric evaporation than obtained in previous studies, which had a deficit in low-energy electrons due to an arbitrarily assumed low-energy cutoff. The energy and spatial distributions of energetic electrons and bremsstrahlung photons bear signatures of the changing density distribution caused by chromospheric evaporation. In particular, the density jump at the evaporation front gives rise to enhanced emission, which, in principle, can be imaged by X-ray telescopes. This model can be applied to investigate a variety of high-energy processes in solar, space, and astrophysical plasmas.

  1. A New Paradigm for Flare Particle Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidoni, Silvina E.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2017-08-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed high-energy impulsive emission and its spectra in solar flares is not well understood. Here, we propose a first-principle-based model of particle acceleration that produces energy spectra that closely resemble those derived from hard X-ray observations. Our mechanism uses contracting magnetic islands formed during fast reconnection in solar flares to accelerate electrons, as first proposed by Drake et al. (2006) for kinetic-scale plasmoids. We apply these ideas to MHD-scale islands formed during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. A simple analytic model based on the particles’ adiabatic invariants is used to calculate the energy gain of particles orbiting field lines in our ultrahigh-resolution, 2.5D, MHD numerical simulation of a solar eruption (flare + coronal mass ejection). Then, we analytically model electrons visiting multiple contracting islands to account for the observed high-energy flare emission. Our acceleration mechanism inherently produces sporadic emission because island formation is intermittent. Moreover, a large number of particles could be accelerated in each macroscopic island, which may explain the inferred rates of energetic-electron production in flares. We conclude that island contraction in the flare current sheet is a promising candidate for electron acceleration in solar eruptions. This work was supported in part by the NASA LWS and H-SR programs..

  2. On the Analytical Model of Charge Evolution of Solar Flare Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Peraza, Jorge; Balderas-Avilez, Gabriel; Rodriguez-Frias, Dolores; Del Peral, Luis; Hebrero, Gema; Cruz, Ricardo

    Models attempting to describe the charge state of solar flare ions are in general of numerical nature, where the involved physics is masked by their high mathematical complexity. There is however, the oldest of the models, developed long ago for one of us, which is of analytical nature, and based in very simple physical concepts, namely hereafter the High Energy Crosssections Model (HECSM). In this model definition of the charge state of the energetic ions occurs during the acceleration process at the flare source. It is assumed the atomic interactions between a population which is being accelerated getting an exponential (or power law) spectrum, namely the ions projectiles, and another population which is in thermodynamic equilibrium (TE), with a Maxwellian spectrum, namely the targets. In contrast with other models that use thermal cross-sections (ionization and recombination) even for energetic ions which are out of the (TE), in our model we employ High Energy Cross-sections for electron capture and loss, since the population which is being accelerated acquires a non-thermal spectrum. First, we have built temperature-dependent cross-sections. Then, we have developed criteria for charge interchange establishment, it is determined whether there is establishment of (1) both processes, capture and los, or (2) only one of them, or even (3) none of them. In case (1) charge equilibrium is reached. In case (2) when only electron capture is established, at the beginning of the acceleration process, the local charge value will decrease up to an energy where both crosssection becomes of the same order, or when only electron loss is established the effective charge goes faster toward the nuclear charge value than in conditions of charge equilibrium. In case (3) ions keep the local thermal charge at the source temperature. After, we derivate an analytical expression for the Effective Charge (equilibrium charge), qef f, on basis to direct and simple physical concepts. We

  3. Effect of the X5.4 Class Solar Flare Event of Solar Cycle 24 ON the GPS Signal Reception in Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, S.; Musa, T. A.; Aris, W. A. W.; Gopir, G.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we examine the effect of solar flare event on the Global Positioning System (GPS) signal reception in Peninsular Malaysia during the X5.4 class solar flare on 7th March 2012, 00:24 UT at active region AR1429. GPS data from six MyRTKnet stations that cover the northern, southern, western and eastern regions of Peninsular Malaysia were used, namely Langkawi (Kedah), Bandar Baharu (Pulau Pinang), Pekan (Pahang), Mersing (Johor), Tanjung Pengelih (Johor) and Malacca (Malacca). The total electron content (TEC) was estimated based on the single layer ionospheric model. Next, the ionospheric delay for each GPS frequency of L1 (1575.42 MHz), L2 (1227.60 MHz) and L5 (1176.45 MHz) was then calculated. The results show that solar flare event can influence the GPS signal reception in Peninsular Malaysia where the X5.4 class solar flare shows significant effect of the ionospheric delay within the range of 9 m - 20 m. These research findings will significantly contribute to space weather study and its effects on space-based positioning system such as the GPS.

  4. EFFECT OF THE X5.4 CLASS SOLAR FLARE EVENT OF SOLAR CYCLE 24 ON THE GPS SIGNAL RECEPTION IN PENINSULAR MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ismail

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we examine the effect of solar flare event on the Global Positioning System (GPS signal reception in Peninsular Malaysia during the X5.4 class solar flare on 7th March 2012, 00:24 UT at active region AR1429. GPS data from six MyRTKnet stations that cover the northern, southern, western and eastern regions of Peninsular Malaysia were used, namely Langkawi (Kedah, Bandar Baharu (Pulau Pinang, Pekan (Pahang, Mersing (Johor, Tanjung Pengelih (Johor and Malacca (Malacca. The total electron content (TEC was estimated based on the single layer ionospheric model. Next, the ionospheric delay for each GPS frequency of L1 (1575.42 MHz, L2 (1227.60 MHz and L5 (1176.45 MHz was then calculated. The results show that solar flare event can influence the GPS signal reception in Peninsular Malaysia where the X5.4 class solar flare shows significant effect of the ionospheric delay within the range of 9 m – 20 m. These research findings will significantly contribute to space weather study and its effects on space-based positioning system such as the GPS.

  5. The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSats: instrument capabilities and early science analysis on the quiet Sun, active regions, and flares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Christopher S.; Woods, Tom; Caspi, Amir; Dennis, Brian R.; MinXSS Instrument Team, NIST-SURF Measurement Team

    2018-01-01

    Detection of soft X-rays (sxr) from the Sun provide direct information on coronal plasma at temperatures in excess of ~1 MK, but there have been relatively few solar spectrally resolved measurements from 0.5 – 10. keV. The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat is the first solar science oriented CubeSat mission flown for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, and has provided measurements from 0.8 -12 keV, with resolving power ~40 at 5.9 keV, at a nominal ~10 second time cadence. MinXSS design and development has involved over 40 graduate students supervised by professors and professionals at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Instrument radiometric calibration was performed at the National Institute for Standard and Technology (NIST) Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF) and spectral resolution determined from radioactive X-ray sources. The MinXSS spectra allow for determining coronal abundance variations for Fe, Mg, Ni, Ca, Si, S, and Ar in active regions and during flares. Measurements from the first of the twin CubeSats, MinXSS-1, have proven to be consistent with the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) 0.1 – 0.8 nm energy flux. Simultaneous MinXSS-1 and Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations have provided the most complete sxr spectral coverage of flares in recent years. These combined measurements are vital in estimating the heating flare loops by non-thermal accelerated electrons. MinXSS-1 measurements have been combined with the Hinode X-ray Telescope (XRT) and Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO-AIA) to further constrain the coronal temperature distribution during quiescent times. The structure of the temperature distribution (especially for T > 5 MK) is important for deducing heating processes in the solar atmosphere. MinXSS-1 observations yield some of the tightest constraints on the high temperature component of the coronal plasma, in the

  6. Characteristics of Gamma-Ray Line Flares,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    extended-burst flares (Royng, Brown, and van Beek 1976). The R a classifications of these flares are 3B. The next veill -observed gamma-ray line flare...R.., Kiplinger, A. L., Orwig, L. K., and Frost, K. J. 1983a, Solar Phys. (in press ). Bai, T., Hudson, H. S., Pelling, R. M., Lin, R. P., Schwartz, R...409. 32 112________k__________ ____________1983, Solar Phys. (in press ). Chupp, E. L., Forrest, D. J., Higbie, P. R., Suni, A. N., Tsai, C., and Dunphy

  7. Analysis of Enhanced Velocity Signals Observed during Solar Flares ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2003-10-28

    Oct 28, 2003 ... Using non-LTE calculations, Ding et al. (2002) found that the Ni I 6768Å line may appear in emission in the presence of strong electron beams in a cool atmo- sphere like sunspots. They also found that even if the atmosphere gets hot in the absence of energetic particles, the line profile may not turn into ...

  8. A Comparative Study of the Eruptive and Non-eruptive Flares Produced by the Largest Active Region of Solar Cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Ranadeep; Srivastava, Nandita

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the morphological and magnetic characteristics of solar active region (AR) NOAA 12192. AR 12192 was the largest region of Solar Cycle 24; it underwent noticeable growth and produced 6 X-class flares, 22 M-class flares, and 53 C-class flares in the course of its disc passage. However, the most peculiar fact of this AR is that it was associated with only one CME in spite of producing several X-class flares. In this work, we carry out a comparative study between the eruptive and non-eruptive flares produced by AR 12192. We find that the magnitude of abrupt and permanent changes in the horizontal magnetic field and Lorentz force are significantly smaller in the case of the confined flares compared to the eruptive one. We present the areal evolution of AR 12192 during its disc passage. We find the flare-related morphological changes to be weaker during the confined flares, whereas the eruptive flare exhibits a rapid and permanent disappearance of penumbral area away from the magnetic neutral line after the flare. Furthermore, from the extrapolated non-linear force-free magnetic field, we examine the overlying coronal magnetic environment over the eruptive and non-eruptive zones of the AR. We find that the critical decay index for the onset of torus instability was achieved at a lower height over the eruptive flaring region, than for the non-eruptive core area. These results suggest that the decay rate of the gradient of overlying magnetic-field strength may play a decisive role to determine the CME productivity of the AR. In addition, the magnitude of changes in the flare-related magnetic characteristics are found to be well correlated with the nature of solar eruptions.

  9. Measurements of the spatial structure and directivity of 100 KeV photon sources in solar flares using PVO and ISEE-3 spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kinsey A.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this grant was to measure the spatial structure and directivity of the hard X-ray and low energy gamma-ray (100 keV-2 MeV) continuum sources in solar flares using stereoscopic observations made with spectrometers aboard the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) and Third International Sun Earth Explorer (ISEE-3) spacecraft. Since the hard X-ray emission is produced by energetic electrons through the bremsstrahlung process, the observed directivity can be directly related to the 'beaming' of electrons accelerated during the flare as they propagate from the acceleration region in the corona to the chromosphere/transition region. Some models (e.g., the thick-target model) predict that most of the impulsive hard X-ray/low energy gamma-ray source is located in the chromosphere, the effective height of the X-ray source above the photosphere increasing with the decrease in the photon energy. This can be verified by determining the height-dependence of the photon source through stereoscopic observations of those flares which are partially occulted from the view of one of the two spacecraft. Thus predictions about beaming of electrons as well as their spatial distributions could be tested through the analysis proposed under this grant.

  10. Observational capabilities of solar satellite "Coronas-Photon"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotov, Yu.

    Coronas-Photon mission is the third satellite of the Russian Coronas program on solar activity observation The main goal of the Coronas-Photon is the study of solar hard electromagnetic radiation in the wide energy range from UV up to high energy gamma-radiation sim 2000MeV Scientific payload for solar radiation observation consists of three type of instruments 1 monitors Natalya-2M Konus-RF RT-2 Penguin-M BRM Phoka Sphin-X Sokol for spectral and timing measurements of full solar disk radiation with timing in flare burst mode up to one msec Instruments Natalya-2M Konus-RF RT-2 will cover the wide energy range of hard X-rays and soft Gamma rays 15keV to 2000MeV and will together constitute the largest area detectors ever used for solar observations Detectors of gamma-ray monitors are based on structured inorganic scintillators with energy resolution sim 5 for nuclear gamma-line band to 35 for GeV-band PSD analysis is used for gamma neutron separation for solar neutron registration T 30MeV Penguin-M has capability to measure linear polarization of hard X-rays using azimuth are measured by Compton scattering asymmetry in case of polarization of an incident flux For X-ray and EUV monitors the scintillation phoswich detectors gas proportional counter CZT assembly and Filter-covered Si-diodes are used 2 Telescope-spectrometer TESIS for imaging solar spectroscopy in X-rays with angular resolution up to 1 in three spectral lines and RT-2 CZT assembly of CZT

  11. Multi-instrument observations of a failed flare eruption associated with MHD waves in a loop bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisticò, G.; Polito, V.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Del Zanna, G.

    2017-04-01

    Context. We present observations of a B7.9-class flare that occurred on the 24th January, 2015, using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and the X-Ray Telescope of Hinode. The flare triggers the eruption of a dense cool plasma blob as seen in AIA 171 Å, which is unable to completely break out and remains confined within a local bundle of active region loops. During this process, transverse oscillations of the threads are observed. The cool plasma is then observed to descend back to the chromosphere along each loop strand. At the same time, a larger diffuse co-spatial loop observed in the hot wavebands of SDO/AIA and Hinode/XRT is formed, exhibiting periodic intensity variations along its length. Aims: The formation and evolution of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves depend upon the values of the local plasma parameters (e.g. density, temperature and magnetic field), which can hence be inferred by coronal seismology. In this study we aim to assess how the observed MHD modes are affected by the variation of density and temperature. Methods: We combined analysis of EUV/X-ray imaging and spectroscopy using SDO/AIA, Hinode/EIS and XRT. Results: The transverse oscillations of the cool loop threads are interpreted in terms of vertically polarised kink oscillations. The fitting procedure applied to the loop displacement time series gives a period of 3.5 to 4 min, and an amplitude of 5 Mm. The oscillations are strongly damped showing very low quality factor (1.5-2), which is defined as the ratio of the damping time and the oscillation period. The weak variation of the period of the kink wave, which is estimated from the fitting analysis, is in agreement with the density variations due to the presence of the plasma blob inferred from the intensity light curve at 171 Å. The coexisting intensity oscillations along the hot loop are interpreted as a slow MHD wave with a period of 10 min and phase

  12. An Airborne Infrared Spectrometer for Solar Eclipse Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samra, Jenna; DeLuca, Edward E.; Golub, Leon; Cheimets, Peter; Philip, Judge

    2016-05-01

    The airborne infrared spectrometer (AIR-Spec) is an innovative solar spectrometer that will observe the 2017 solar eclipse from the NSF/NCAR High-Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER). AIR-Spec will image five infrared coronal emission lines to determine whether they may be useful probes of coronal magnetism.The solar magnetic field provides the free energy that controls coronal heating, structure, and dynamics. Energy stored in coronal magnetic fields is released in flares and coronal mass ejections and ultimately drives space weather. Therefore, direct coronal field measurements have significant potential to enhance understanding of coronal dynamics and improve solar forecasting models. Of particular interest are observations of field lines in the transitional region between closed and open flux systems, providing important information on the origin of the slow solar wind.While current instruments routinely observe only the photospheric and chromospheric magnetic fields, AIR-Spec will take a step toward the direct observation of coronal fields by measuring plasma emission in the infrared at high spatial and spectral resolution. During the total solar eclipse of 2017, AIR-Spec will observe five magnetically sensitive coronal emission lines between 1.4 and 4 µm from the HIAPER Gulfstream V at an altitude above 14.9 km. The instrument will measure emission line intensity, width, and Doppler shift, map the spatial distribution of infrared emitting plasma, and search for waves in the emission line velocities.AIR-Spec consists of an optical system (feed telescope, grating spectrometer, and infrared detector) and an image stabilization system, which uses a fast steering mirror to correct the line-of-sight for platform perturbations. To ensure that the instrument meets its research goals, both systems are undergoing extensive performance modeling and testing. These results are shown with reference to the science requirements.

  13. Multiwavelength Observations of Strong Flares from the TeV Blazar 1ES 1959+650

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczynski, H.; Hughes, S. B.; Horan, D.; Aharonian, F.; Aller, M. F.; Aller, H.; Boltwood, P.; Buckley, J.; Coppi, P.; Fossati, G.; Götting, N.; Holder, J.; Horns, D.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Marscher, A. P.; Nikolashvili, M.; Remillard, R. A.; Sadun, A.; Schröder, M.

    2004-01-01

    Following the detection of strong TeV γ-ray flares from the BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650 with the Whipple 10 m Cerenkov telescope on 2002 May 16 and 17, we performed intensive target of opportunity radio, optical, X-ray, and TeV γ-ray observations from 2002 May 18 to August 14. Observations with the X-ray telescope Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer and the Whipple and HEGRA γ-ray telescopes revealed several strong flares, enabling us to sensitively test the X-ray-γ-ray flux correlation properties. Although the X-ray and γ-ray fluxes seemed to be correlated in general, we found an ``orphan'' γ-ray flare that was not accompanied by an X-ray flare. While we detected optical flux variability with the Boltwood and Abastumani observatories, the data did not give evidence for a correlation of the optical flux variability with the observed X-ray and γ-ray flares. Within statistical errors of about 0.03 Jy at 14.5 GHz and 0.05 Jy at 4.8 GHz, the radio fluxes measured with the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory stayed constant throughout the campaign; the mean values agreed well with the values measured on 2002 May 7 and June 7 at 4.9 and 15 GHz with the Very Large Array and at 4.8 GHz with archival flux measurements. After describing in detail the radio, optical, X-ray and γ-ray light curves, and spectral energy distributions (SEDs), we present initial modeling of the SED with a simple synchrotron self-Compton model. With the addition of another TeV blazar with good broadband data, we consider the set of all TeV blazars, to begin to look for a connection of the jet properties to the properties of the central accreting black hole thought to drive the jet. Remarkably, the temporal and spectral X-ray and γ-ray emission characteristics of TeV blazars are very similar, even though the mass estimates of their central black holes differ by up to 1 order of magnitude.

  14. Time-resolved UVES observations of a stellar flare on the planet host HD 189733 during primary transit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocová, T.; Czesla, S.; Khalafinejad, S.; Wolter, U.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2017-11-01

    Context. HD 189733 is an exoplanetary system consisting of a transiting hot Jupiter and an active K2V-type main sequence star. Rich manifestations of a stellar activity, like photometric spots or chromospheric flares were repeatedly observed in this system in optical, UV and X-rays. Aims: We aim to use VLT/UVES high resolution (R = 60 000) echelle spectra to study a stellar flare. Methods: We have performed simultaneous analyses of the temporal evolution in several chromospheric stellar lines, namely, the Ca ii H & K lines (3933, 3968 Å), H α (6563 Å), H β (4861 Å), H γ (4341 Å), H δ (4102 Å), H ɛ (3970 Å), the Ca ii infrared triplet lines (8498, 8542 and 8662 Å), and He i D3 (5875.6 Å). Observations were carried out with a time resolution of approximately 1 min for a duration of four hours, including a complete planetary transit. Results: We determine the energy released during the flare in all studied chromospheric lines combined to be about 8.7 × 1031 erg, which puts this event at the upper end of flare energies observed on the Sun. Our analysis does not reveal any significant delay of the flare peak observed in the Balmer and Ca ii H & K lines, although we find a clear difference in the temporal evolution of these lines. The He i D3 shows additional absorption possibly related to the flare event. Based on the flux released in Ca ii H & K lines during the flare, we estimate the soft X-ray flux emission to be 7 × 1030 erg. Conclusions: The observed flare can be ranked as a moderate flare on a K-type star and confirms a rather high activity level of HD 189733 host star. The cores of the studied chromospheric lines demonstrate the same behavior and let us study the flare evolution. We demonstrate that the activity of an exoplanet host star can play an important role in the detection of exoplanet atmospheres, since these are frequently discovered as an additional absorption in the line cores. A possible star-planet interaction responsible for a flare

  15. SIMULATION OF DESCENDING MULTIPLE SUPRA-ARCADE RECONNECTION OUTFLOWS IN SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecere, M.; Schneiter, M.; Costa, A.; Elaskar, S. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Maglione, S. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto, Rio Cuarto, Cordoba (Argentina)

    2012-11-10

    After recent Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations by Savage, McKenzie, and Reeves, we revisit the scenario proposed by us in previous papers. We have shown that sunward, generally dark plasma features that originated above posteruption flare arcades are consistent with a scenario where plasma voids (which we identify as supra-arcade reconnection outflows, SAROs) generate the bouncing and interfering of shocks and expansion waves upstream of an initial localized deposition of energy that is collimated in the magnetic field direction. In this paper, we analyze the multiple production and interaction of SAROs and their individual structures that make them relatively stable features while moving. We compare our results with observations and with the scenarios proposed by other authors.

  16. EBL effect on the observation of multi-TeV flaring of 2009 from Markarian 501

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Sarira; Lemus Yanez, Marco Vladimir; Salvador Miranda, Luis; Rosales de Leon, Alberto [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares (Mexico); Gupta, Virendra [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzandos del IPN Unidad Merida, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Yucatan (Mexico)

    2017-01-15

    Markarian 501 is a high-peaked BL Lacertae object and has undergone many major outbursts since its discovery in 1996. As a part of the multiwavelength campaign, in the year 2009 this blazar was observed for 4.5 months from March 9 to August 1 and during the period April 17 to May 5 it was observed by both space and ground based observatories covering the entire electromagnetic spectrum. A very strong high energy γ-ray flare was observed on May 1 by Whipple telescope in the energy range 317 GeV to 5 TeV and the flux was about 10 times higher than the average baseline flux. Previously during 1997 Markarian 501 had undergone another long outburst, which was observed by HEGRA telescopes and the energy spectrum was well beyond 10 TeV. The photohadronic model complemented by the extragalactic background radiation (EBL) correction fits well with the flares data observed by both Whipple and HEGRA. Our model predicts a steeper slope of the energy spectrum beyond 10 TeV, which is compatible with the improved analysis of the HEGRA data. (orig.)

  17. ERRATIC FLARING OF BL LAC IN 2012–2013: MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehrle, Ann E. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Grupe, Dirk [Space Science Center, Morehead State University, 235 Martindale Drive, Morehead, KY 40351 (United States); Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Marscher, Alan P. [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Gurwell, Mark [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA-02138 (United States); Baloković, Mislav; Hovatta, Talvikki; Harrison, Fiona H. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Madejski, Grzegorz M. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Stern, Daniel, E-mail: awehrle@spacescience.org [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2016-01-10

    BL Lac, the eponymous blazar, flared to historically high levels at millimeter, infrared, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths in 2012. We present observations made with Herschel, Swift, NuSTAR, Fermi, the Submillimeter Array, CARMA, and the VLBA in 2012–2013, including three months with nearly daily sampling at several wavebands. We have also conducted an intensive campaign of 30 hr with every-orbit observations by Swift and NuSTAR, accompanied by Herschel, and Fermi observations. The source was highly variable at all bands. Time lags, correlations between bands, and the changing shapes of the spectral energy distributions can be explained by synchrotron radiation and inverse Compton emission from nonthermal seed photons originating from within the jet. The passage of four new superluminal very long baseline interferometry knots through the core and two stationary knots about 4 pc downstream accompanied the high flaring in 2012–2013. The seed photons for inverse Compton scattering may arise from the stationary knots and from a Mach disk near the core where relatively slow-moving plasma generates intense nonthermal radiation. The 95 spectral energy distributions obtained on consecutive days form the most densely sampled, broad wavelength coverage for any blazar. The observed spectral energy distributions and multi-waveband light curves are similar to simulated spectral energy distributions and light curves generated with a model in which turbulent plasma crosses a conical shock with a Mach disk.

  18. On the Solution of the Continuity Equation for Precipitating Electrons in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, A. Gordon; Holman, Gordon D.; Litvinenko, Yuri E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrons accelerated in solar flares are injected into the surrounding plasma, where they are subjected to the influence of collisional (Coulomb) energy losses. Their evolution is modeled by a partial differential equation describing continuity of electron number. In a recent paper, Dobranskis & Zharkova claim to have found an "updated exact analytical solution" to this continuity equation. Their solution contains an additional term that drives an exponential decrease in electron density with depth, leading them to assert that the well-known solution derived by Brown, Syrovatskii & Shmeleva, and many others is invalid. We show that the solution of Dobranskis & Zharkova results from a fundamental error in the application of the method of characteristics and is hence incorrect. Further, their comparison of the "new" analytical solution with numerical solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation fails to lend support to their result.We conclude that Dobranskis & Zharkova's solution of the universally accepted and well-established continuity equation is incorrect, and that their criticism of the correct solution is unfounded. We also demonstrate the formal equivalence of the approaches of Syrovatskii & Shmeleva and Brown, with particular reference to the evolution of the electron flux and number density (both differential in energy) in a collisional thick target. We strongly urge use of these long-established, correct solutions in future works.

  19. Flare magnetic reconnection fluxes as possible signatures of flare contributions to gradual SEP events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, S. W.; Kazachenko, M.; Lynch, B. J.; Welsch, B. T.

    2017-09-01

    The primary sources of solar energetic (E > 20 MeV) particle (SEP) events are flares and CME-driven shocks. Some studies claim that even up to GeV energies solar flares are major contributors to SEP events. There are several candidate flare processes for producing SEPs, but acceleration in magnetic reconnection regions is probably the most efficient. Previous studies have relied on flare radiation signatures to determine the times and locations of SEP injections. An alternative approach is to use the amount of magnetic flux that gets reconnected during solar flares. The photospheric magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons is thought to be directly related to the amount of magnetic reconnection in the corona and is therefore a key diagnostic tool for understanding the physical processes in flares and CMEs. We use the database of flare magnetic reconnection fluxes to compare these parameters with peak intensities of SEP events. We find that while sizes of 15 ∼25-MeV SEP events in the western hemisphere correlate with both CME speeds and reconnection fluxes, there are many cases of large reconnection fluxes with no observed SEP events. The occurrence of large reconnection fluxes accompanied by slow CMEs but no SEP events suggests that the CME shocks are the primary, if not the only, sources of high energy (E > 100 MeV) SEP events.

  20. Cloudy with a Chance of Solar Flares: The Sun as a Natural Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellish, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Space weather is a naturally occurring phenomenon that represents a quantifiable risk to space- and ground-based infrastructure as well as society at large. Space weather hazards include permanent and correctable faults in computer systems, Global Positioning System (GPS) and high-frequency communication disturbances, increased airline passenger and astronaut radiation exposure, and electric grid disruption. From the National Space Weather Strategy, published by the Office of Science and Technology Policy in October 2015, space weather refers to the dynamic conditions of the space environment that arise from emissions from the Sun, which include solar flares, solar energetic particles, and coronal mass ejections. These emissions can interact with Earth and its surrounding space, including the Earth's magnetic field, potentially disrupting technologies and infrastructures. Space weather is measured using a range of space- and ground-based platforms that directly monitor the Sun, the Earth's magnetic field, the conditions in interplanetary space and impacts at Earth's surface, like neutron ground-level enhancement. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Space Weather Research Center and their international collaborators in government, industry, and academia are working towards improved techniques for predicting space weather as part of the strategy and action plan to better quantify and mitigate space weather hazards. In addition to accurately measuring and predicting space weather, we also need to continue developing more advanced techniques for evaluating space weather impacts on space- and ground-based infrastructure. Within the Earth's atmosphere, elevated neutron flux driven by atmosphere-particle interactions from space weather is a primary risk source. Ground-based neutron sources form an essential foundation for quantifying space weather impacts in a variety of systems.

  1. Behaviour of electron content in the ionospheric D-region during solar X-ray flares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todorović-Drakul M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important parameters in ionospheric plasma research, also having a wide practical application in wireless satellite telecommunications, is the total electron content (TEC representing the columnal electron number density. The F-region with high electron density provides the biggest contribution to TEC while the relatively weakly ionized plasma of the D-region (60 km { 90 km above Earth's surface is often considered as a negligible cause of satellite signal disturbances. However, sudden intensive ionization processes, like those induced by solar X-ray flares, can cause relative increases of electron density that are significantly larger in the D-region than in regions at higher altitudes. Therefore, one cannot exclude a priori the D-region from investigations of ionospheric influences on propagation of electromagnetic signals emitted by satellites. We discuss here this problem which has not been sufficiently treated in literature so far. The obtained results are based on data collected from the D-region monitoring by very low frequency radio waves and on vertical TEC calculations from the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS signal analyses, and they show noticeable variations in the D-region's electron content (TECD during activity of a solar X-ray °are (it rises by a factor of 136 in the considered case when TECD contribution to TEC can reach several percent and which cannot be neglected in practical applications like global positioning procedures by satellites. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III-44002, 176001, 176002, 176004 and TR36020

  2. Electron and proton kinetics and dynamics in flaring atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Zharkova, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    This timely book presents new research results on high-energy particle physics related to solar flares, covering the theory and applications of the reconnection process in a clear and comprehensible way. It investigates particle kinetics and dynamics in flaring atmospheres and their diagnostics from spectral observations, while providing an analysis of the observation data and techniques and comparing various models. Written by an internationally acclaimed expert, this is vital reading for all solar, astro-, and plasma physicists working in the field.

  3. An Airborne Infrared Telescope and Spectrograph for Solar Eclipse Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, Edward E.; Cheimets, Peter; Golub, Leon

    2014-06-01

    The solar infrared spectrum offers great possibilities for direct spatially resolved measurements of the solar coronal magnetic fields, via imaging of the plasma that is constrained to follow the magnetic field direction and via spectro-polarimetry that permits measurement of the field strength in the corona. Energy stored in coronal magnetic fields is released in flares and coronal mass ejections (CME) and provides the ultimate source of energy for space weather. The large scale structure of the coronal field, and the opening up of the field in a transition zone between the closed and open corona determines the speed and structure of the solar wind, providing the background environment through which CMEs propagate. At present our only direct measurements of the solar magnetic fields are in the photosphere and chromosphere. The ability to determine where and why the corona transitions from closed to open, combined with measurements of the field strength via infrared coronal spectro-polarimetry will give us a powerful new tool in our quest to develop the next generation of forecasting models.We describe a first step in achieving this goal: a proposal for a new IR telescope, image stabilization system, and spectrometer, for the NCAR HIPER GV aircraft. The telescope/spectrograph will operate in the 2-6micron wavelength region, during solar eclipses, starting with the trans-north American eclipse in August 2017. The HIAPER aircraft flying at ~35,000 ft will provide an excellent platform for IR observations. Our imaging and spectroscopy experiment will show the distribution and intensity of IR forbidden lines in the solar corona.

  4. Multiwavelength Observations of Markarian 421 During a TeV/X-Ray Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertsch, D. L.; Bruhweiler, F.; Macomb, D. J.; Cheng, K.-P.; Carter-Lewis, D. A.; Akerlof, C. W.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Buckley, J. H.; Cawley, M. F.

    1995-01-01

    A TeV flare from the BL Lac object Mrk 421 was detected in May of 1994 by the Whipple Observatory air Cherenkov experiment during which the flux above 250 GeV increased by nearly an order of magnitude over a 2-day period. Contemporaneous observations by ASCA showed the X-ray flux to be in a very high state. We present these results, combined with the first ever simultaneous or nearly simultaneous observations at GeV gamma-ray, UV, IR, mm, and radio energies for this nearest BL Lac object. While the GeV gamma-ray flux increased slightly, there is little evidence for variability comparable to that seen at TeV and X-ray energies. Other wavelengths show even less variability. This provides important constraints on the emission mechanisms at work. We present the multiwavelength spectrum of this gamma-ray blazar for both quiescent and flaring states and discuss the data in terms of current models of blazar emission.

  5. Simultaneous, multi-wavelength flare observations of nearby low-mass stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, Beverly; Barclay, Thomas; Quintana, Elisa; Villadsen, Jacqueline; Wofford, Alia; Schlieder, Joshua; Boyd, Patricia

    2018-01-01

    Low-mass stars are the most common stars in the Galaxy and have been targeted in the tens-of-thousands by K2, the re-purposed Kepler mission, as they are prime targets to search for and characterize small, Earth-like planets. Understanding how these fully convective stars drive magnetic activity that manifests as stochastic, short-term brightenings, or flares, provides insight into the prospects of planetary habitability. High energy radiation and energetic particle emission associated with these stars can erode atmospheres, and impact habitability. An innovative campaign to study low mass stars through simultaneous multi-wavelength observations is currently underway with observations ongoing in the X-ray, UV, optical, and radio. I will present early results of our pilot study of the nearby M-Dwarf star Wolf 359 (CN Leo) using K2, SWIFT, and ground based radio observatories, forming a comprehensive picture of flare activity from an M-Dwarf, and discuss the potential impact of these results on exoplanets. "This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant No. DGE1322106. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation."

  6. The impact of solar flares and magnetic storms on the Earth's atmospheric electrical parameters and VLF electromagnetic waves propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasheninnikov, Alexey; Poklad, Yuri; Rybakov, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Boris; Ermak, Vladimir; Ryakhovskiy, Ilya; Soloviev, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    Changes in solar activity lead to fluctuations in the speed of the solar wind, the appearance of cosmic rays flare and perturbations of the interplanetary magnetic field. Streams of solar cosmic rays directly alter profile of the atmospheric ionization rate and modulate the flux of galactic cosmic rays penetrating into the atmosphere. Changes in the conduction profile lead to increased atmospheric electric field at altitudes of 15 km and below, where formed and electrified clouds. In addition, the change in resistance of the air column above the thunderstorm generators of the global electric circuit leads to a change in the potential difference between the surface of the Earth and the ionosphere. The "Mikhnevo" observatory near Moscow, Russia carried out monitoring measurements of amplitude and phase characteristics of VLF radio signals, the near surface electric field and the vertical current of the atmosphere. Variation of the electric field and currents modulated by solar flares were revealed. The effect of the temporary increase in the electrical parameters noticeable on smooth curves. During strong magnetic storm of March 17, 2015 perturbation of amplitudes and the phases of VLF radio signals were recorded that associated with the disturbance D-layer of the ionosphere on the paths of radio signals propagation. Analysis of the amplitude and phase characteristics of the VLF radio signals for the 2014-2016 has showed perturbations during geomagnetic storms and substorms with Kp=7 or below. Such perturbations are usually have local or regional character.

  7. Radio follow-up observations of stellar tidal disruption flares: Constraints on off-axis jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Körding E.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Observations of active galactic nuclei (AGN and X-ray binaries have shown that relativistic jets are ubiquitous when compact objects accrete. One could therefore anticipate the launch of a jet after a star is disrupted and accreted by a massive black hole. This birth of a relativistic jet may have been observed recently in two stellar tidal disruption flares (TDFs, which were discovered in gamma-rays by Swift. Yet no transient radio emission has been detected from the tens of TDF candidates that were discovered at optical to soft X-ray frequencies. Because the sample that was followed-up at radio frequencies is small, the non-detections can be explained by Doppler boosting, which reduces the jet flux for off-axis observers. Plus, the existing followup observation are mostly within ∼ 10 months of the discovery, so the non-detections can also be due to a delay of the radio emission with respect to the time of disruption. To test the conjecture that all TDFs launch jets, we obtained 5 GHz follow-up observations with the Jansky VLA of six known TDFs. To avoid missing delayed jet emission, our observations probe 1–8 years since the estimated time of disruption. None of the sources are detected, with very deep upper limits at the 10 micro Jansky level. These observations rule out the hypothesis that these TDFs launched jets similar to radio-loud quasars. We also constrain the possibility that the flares hosted a jet identical to Sw 1644+57.

  8. High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission From Solar Flares: Summary of Fermi LAT Detections and Analysis of Two M-Class Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; hide

    2013-01-01

    We present the detections of 19 solar flares detected in high-energy gamma rays (above 100 MeV) with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its rst four years of operation. Interestingly, all ares are associated with fairly fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and are not all powerful X-ray ares. We then describe the detailed temporal, spatial and spectral characteristics of the rst two long-lasting events: the 2011 March 7 are, a moderate (M3.7) impulsive are followed by slowly varying gamma-ray emission over 13 hours, and the 2011 June 7 M2.5 are, which was followed by gamma-ray emission lasting for 2 hours. We compare the Fermi-LAT data with X-ray and proton data measurements from GOES and RHESSI. We argue that a hadronic origin of the gamma rays is more likely than a leptonic origin and nd that the energy spectrum of the proton distribution softens after the 2011 March 7 are, favoring a scenario with continuous acceleration at the are site. This work suggests that proton acceleration in solar ares is more common than previously thought, occurring for even modest X-ray ares, and for longer durations.

  9. Multiwavelength Observations of a TeV-Flare from W Comae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acciari, V. A.; Aliu, E.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Böttcher, M.; Boltuch, D.; Buckley, J. H.; Bradbury, S. M.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cogan, P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Falcone, A.; Finley, J. P.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Gibbs, K.; Gillanders, G. H.; Grube, J.; Guenette, R.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Hui, C. M.; Humensky, T. B.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Le Bohec, S.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; McCutcheon, M.; Millis, J.; Moriarty, P.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pichel, A.; Pohl, M.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rose, H. J.; Sembroski, G. H.; Smith, A. W.; Steele, D.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.; Wissel, S.; Wood, M.; Pian, E.; Vercellone, S.; Donnarumma, I.; D'Ammando, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Chen, A. W.; Giuliani, A.; Longo, F.; Pacciani, L.; Pucella, G.; Vittorini, V.; Tavani, M.; Argan, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Caraveo, P.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cocco, V.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; De Paris, G.; Di Cocco, G.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Fiorini, M.; Froysland, T.; Frutti, M.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Gianotti, F.; Labanti, C.; Lapshov, I.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lipari, P.; Marisaldi, M.; Mastropietro, M.; Mereghetti, S.; Morelli, E.; Morselli, A.; Pellizzoni, A.; Perotti, F.; Piano, G.; Picozza, P.; Pilia, M.; Porrovecchio, G.; Prest, M.; Rapisarda, M.; Rappoldi, A.; Rubini, A.; Sabatini, S.; Soffitta, P.; Trifoglio, M.; Trois, A.; Vallazza, E.; Zambra, A.; Zanello, D.; Pittori, C.; Santolamazza, P.; Verrecchia, F.; Giommi, P.; Colafrancesco, S.; Salotti, L.; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Arkharov, A. A.; Efimova, N. V.; Larionov, V. M.; Leto, P.; Ligustri, R.; Lindfors, E.; Pasanen, M.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Tetradze, S. D.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Kotiranta, M.; Cucchiara, A.; Romano, P.; Nesci, R.; Pursimo, T.; Heidt, J.; Benitez, E.; Hiriart, D.; Nilsson, K.; Berdyugin, A.; Mujica, R.; Dultzin, D.; Lopez, J. M.; Mommert, M.; Sorcia, M.; de la Calle Perez, I.

    2009-12-01

    We report results from an intensive multiwavelength campaign on the intermediate-frequency-peaked BL Lacertae object W Com (z = 0.102) during a strong outburst of very high energy gamma-ray emission in 2008 June. The very high energy gamma-ray signal was detected by VERITAS on 2008 June 7-8 with a flux F(>200 GeV) =(5.7 ± 0.6) × 10-11 cm-2 s-1, about three times brighter than during the discovery of gamma-ray emission from W Com by VERITAS in 2008 March. The initial detection of this flare by VERITAS at energies above 200 GeV was followed by observations in high-energy gamma rays (AGILE; E γ>= 100 MeV), X-rays (Swift and XMM-Newton), and at UV, and ground-based optical and radio monitoring through the GASP-WEBT consortium and other observatories. Here we describe the multiwavelength data and derive the spectral energy distribution of the source from contemporaneous data taken throughout the flare.

  10. Magnetospheric disturbances associated with the 13 December 2006 solar flare and their ionospheric effects over North-East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotukhina, N.; Polekh, N.; Kurkin, V.; Pirog, O.; Samsonov, S.; Moiseyev, A.

    2012-03-01

    We present an observational study of magnetospheric and ionospheric disturbances during the December 2006 intense magnetic storm associated with the 4В/Х3.4 class solar flare. To perform the study we utilize the ground data from North-East Asian ionospheric and magnetic observatories (60-72°N, 88-152°E) and in situ measurements from LANL, GOES, Geotail and ACE satellites. The comparative analysis of ionospheric, magnetospheric and heliospheric disturbances shows that the interaction of the magnetosphere with heavily compressed solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field caused the initial phase of the magnetic storm. It was accompanied by the intense sporadic E and F2 layers and the total black-out in the nocturnal subauroral ionosphere. During the storm main phase, LANL-97A, LANL 1994_084, LANL 1989-046 and GOES_11 satellites registered a compression of the dayside magnetosphere up to their orbits. In the morning-noon sector the compression was accompanied by an absence of reflections from ionosphere over subauroral ionospheric station Zhigansk (66.8°N, 123.3°E), and a drastic decrease in the F2 layer critical frequency (foF2) up to 54% of the quite one over subauroral Yakutsk station (62°N, 129.7°E). At the end of the main phase, these stations registered a sharp foF2 increase in the afternoon sector. At Yakutsk the peak foF2 was 1.9 time higher than the undisturbed one. The mentioned ionospheric disturbances occurred simultaneously with changes in the temperature, density and temperature anisotropy of particles at geosynchronous orbit, registered by the LANL-97A satellite nearby the meridian of ionospheric and magnetic measurements. The whole complex of disturbances may be caused by radial displacement of the main magnetospheric domains (magnetopause, cusp/cleft, plasma sheet) with respect to the observation points, caused by changes in the solar wind dynamic pressure, the field of magnetospheric convection, and rotation of the Earth.

  11. A Comparison of Ground Level Event e/p and Fe/O Ratios with Associated Solar Flare and CME Characteristics (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    the solar corona . When this picture was challenged by a survey of large SEP events through 2005 showing a broad range of event Fe/O values at E > 25...which requires the higher seed particle threshold energies of remnant flare particles in the corona (Tylka and Lee 2006). If the concept of extending...analytic approach is to compare the particle abundance parameters statistically with various flare, active region (AR), and CME param- eters given in Table

  12. Solar Flares and Magnetospheric Particles: Investigations Based upon the ONR-602 and ONR-604 Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-10

    with particle data measured in the magnetospheres of Saturn and Uranus . His experience and insight will be invaluable for both the ONR-602 analysis and...Observations" has now been accepted for publication in Solar Physics during 1988. 2. Dr. John P. Wefel wrote an invited review paper entitled "An Overview

  13. Future Satellite Observations of Solar Irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalan, R. F.; Rottman, G.; Woods, T.; Lawrence, G.; Harder, J.; McClintock, W.; Kopp, G.

    2003-01-01

    Required solar irradiance measurements for climate studies include those now being made by the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) and the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) onboard the SORCE satellite, part of the Earth Observing System fleet of NASA satellites. Equivalent or better measures of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and Spectral Solar Irradiance (SSI, 200 to 2000 nm) are planned for the post-2010 satellites of the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System ("OESS). The design life of SORCE is 5 years, so a "Solar Irradiance Gap Filler" EOS mission is being planned for launch in the 2007 time frame, to include the same TSI and SSI measurements. Besides avoiding any gap, overlap of the data sources is also necessary for determination of possible multi-decadal trends in solar irradiance. We discuss these requirements and the impacts of data gaps, and data overlaps, that may occur in the monitoring of the critical solar radiative forcing.

  14. Multi-wavelength Observations of Solar Acoustic Waves Near Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsue, Teresa; Pesnell, Dean; Hill, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Active region areas on the Sun are abundant with a variety of waves that are both acoustically helioseismic and magnetohydrodynamic in nature. The occurrence of a solar flare can disrupt these waves, through MHD mode-mixing or scattering by the excitation of these waves. We take a multi-wavelength observational approach to understand the source of theses waves by studying active regions where flaring activity occurs. Our approach is to search for signals within a time series of images using a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm, by producing multi-frequency power map movies. We study active regions both spatially and temporally and correlate this method over multiple wavelengths using data from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory. By surveying the active regions on multiple wavelengths we are able to observe the behavior of these waves within the Solar atmosphere, from the photosphere up through the corona. We are able to detect enhancements of power around active regions, which could be acoustic power halos and of an MHD-wave propagating outward by the flaring event. We are in the initial stages of this study understanding the behaviors of these waves and could one day contribute to understanding the mechanism responsible for their formation; that has not yet been explained.

  15. Influence of the solar flares in March 2012 on the conductivity profile of the high-latitude lower ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebed O. M.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The ionospheric D-layer affects the electromagnetic waves propagated in the Earth – ionosphere waveguide. It is known that the propagation velocity of atmospherics – electromagnetic pulses from lightning discharge depends on the conductivity profile of the lower ionosphere. In this paper the authors have considered the influence of solar flares in March 2012 on the propagation velocity of atmospherics and thus the state of the high-latitude lower ionosphere. The possibility to estimate the conductivity profiles of the daytime ionosphere under disturbed and undisturbed geomagnetic conditions using the measurements of the propagation velocity of atmospherics along the high-latitude path has been demonstrated

  16. Common observations of solar X-rays from SPHINX/CORONAS-PHOTON and XRS/MESSENGER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepa, Anna; Sylwester, Janusz; Sylwester, Barbara; Siarkowski, Marek; Mrozek, Tomasz; Gryciuk, Magdalena; Phillips, Kenneth

    SphinX was a soft X-ray spectrophotometer constructed in the Space Research Centre of Polish Academy of Sciences. The instrument was launched on 30 January 2009 aboard CORONAS-PHOTON satellite as a part of TESIS instrument package. SphinX measured total solar X-ray flux in the energy range from 1 to 15 keV during the period of very low solar activity from 20 February to 29 November 2009. For these times the solar detector (X-ray Spectrometer - XRS) onboard MESSENGER also observed the solar X-rays from a different vantage point. XRS measured the radiation in similar energy range. We present results of the comparison of observations from both instruments and show the preliminary results of physical analysis of spectra for selected flares.

  17. INFERRING THE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC STRUCTURE OF SOLAR FLARE SUPRA-ARCADE PLASMAS FROM A DATA-ASSIMILATED FIELD TRANSPORT MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Roger B.; McKenzie, David E.; Longcope, Dana W. [Montana State University, P.O. Box 173840, Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Supra-arcade fans are highly dynamic structures that form in the region above post-reconnection flare arcades. In these features the plasma density and temperature evolve on the scale of a few seconds, despite the much slower dynamics of the underlying arcade. Further, the motion of supra-arcade plasma plumes appears to be inconsistent with the low-beta conditions that are often assumed to exist in the solar corona. In order to understand the nature of these highly debated structures, it is, therefore, important to investigate the interplay of the magnetic field with the plasma. Here we present a technique for inferring the underlying magnetohydrodynamic processes that might lead to the types of motions seen in supra-arcade structures. Taking as a case study the 2011 October 22 event, we begin with extreme-ultraviolet observations and develop a time-dependent velocity field that is consistent with both continuity and local correlation tracking. We then assimilate this velocity field into a simplified magnetohydrodynamic simulation, which deals simultaneously with regions of high and low signal-to-noise ratio, thereby allowing the magnetic field to evolve self-consistently with the fluid. Ultimately, we extract the missing contributions from the momentum equation in order to estimate the relative strength of the various forcing terms. In this way we are able to make estimates of the plasma beta, as well as predict the spectral character and total power of Alfvén waves radiated from the supra-arcade region.

  18. Prior Flaring as a Complement to Free Magnetic Energy for Forecasting Solar Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ronald L.; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Khazanov, Igor

    2012-01-01

    From a large database of (1) 40,000 SOHO/MDI line-of-sight magnetograms covering the passage of 1,300 sunspot active regions across the 30 deg radius central disk of the Sun, (2) a proxy of each active region's free magnetic energy measured from each of the active region's central-disk-passage magnetograms, and (3) each active region's full-disk-passage history of production of major flares and fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we find new statistical evidence that (1) there are aspects of an active region's magnetic field other than the free energy that are strong determinants of the active region's productivity of major flares and fast CMEs in the coming few days, (2) an active region's recent productivity of major flares, in addition to reflecting the amount of free energy in the active region, also reflects these other determinants of coming productivity of major eruptions, and (3) consequently, the knowledge of whether an active region has recently had a major flare, used in combination with the active region's free-energy proxy measured from a magnetogram, can greatly alter the forecast chance that the active region will have a major eruption in the next few days after the time of the magnetogram. The active-region magnetic conditions that, in addition to the free energy, are reflected by recent major flaring are presumably the complexity and evolution of the field.

  19. Observations of Magnetic Evolution and Network Flares Driven by Photospheric Flows in the Quiet Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attie, Raphael; Thompson, Barbara J.

    2017-08-01

    The quiet Sun may be the biggest laboratory to study physical elementary processes of fundamental importance to space plasma. The advantage is the continuous availability of small-scale events, carrying the hidden microphysics that is responsible for larger-scale phenomena. By small-scale events, we mean spatial dimensions of a few Mm at most, and durations of less than an hour. I present here an attempt to describe and understand the coupling between the photospheric flows, the photospheric magnetic flux, and small-scale energetic transient events. By adapting and improving the highly efficient Balltracking technique for Hinode/SOT data, we relate the fine structures of the supergranular flow fields with the magnetic flux evolution. For studying the dynamics of the latter, and more precisely, the magnetic flux cancellation at sites of energy releases, we applied a new feature tracking algorithm called "Magnetic Balltracking" -- which tracks photospheric magnetic elements -- to high-resolution magnetograms from Hinode/SOT.Using observations of the low corona in soft X-rays with Hinode/XRT, we analyse the triggering mechanism of small-scale network flares. By tracking both the flow fields on the one hand, and the magnetic motions on the other hand, we relate the flows with cancelling magnetic flux. We identify two patterns of horizontal flows that act as catalysts for efficient magnetic reconnection: (i) Funnel-shaped streamlines in which the magnetic flux is carried, and (ii) large-scale vortices (~10 Mm and above) at the network intersections, in which distant magnetic features of opposite polarities seem to be sucked in and ultimately vanish. The excess energy stored in the stressed magnetic field of the vortices is sufficient to power network flares.Prospects for determining the magnetic energy budget in the quiet sun are discussed.

  20. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: first results from SCUBA-2 observations of the Cepheus Flare region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattle, K.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Kirk, J. M.; Di Francesco, J.; Kirk, H.; Mottram, J. C.; Keown, J.; Buckle, J.; Beaulieu, S. F.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Hatchell, J.; Jenness, T.; Johnstone, D.; Nutter, D.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Walker-Smith, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Bastien, P.; Bresnahan, D.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coudé, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Mowat, C.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Rumble, D.; Sadavoy, S.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2017-02-01

    We present observations of the Cepheus Flare obtained as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Legacy Survey (GBLS) with the SCUBA-2 instrument. We produce a catalogue of sources found by SCUBA-2, and separate these into starless cores and protostars. We determine masses and densities for each of our sources, using source temperatures determined by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey. We compare the properties of starless cores in four different molecular clouds: L1147/58, L1172/74, L1251 and L1228. We find that the core mass functions for each region typically show shallower-than-Salpeter behaviour. We find that L1147/58 and L1228 have a high ratio of starless cores to Class II protostars, while L1251 and L1174 have a low ratio, consistent with the latter regions being more active sites of current star formation, while the former are forming stars less actively. We determine that if modelled as thermally supported Bonnor-Ebert spheres, most of our cores have stable configurations accessible to them. We estimate the external pressures on our cores using archival 13CO velocity dispersion measurements and find that our cores are typically pressure confined, rather than gravitationally bound. We perform a virial analysis on our cores, and find that they typically cannot be supported against collapse by internal thermal energy alone, due primarily to the measured external pressures. This suggests that the dominant mode of internal support in starless cores in the Cepheus Flare is either non-thermal motions or internal magnetic fields.

  1. Reconstruction of a Large-scale Pre-flare Coronal Current Sheet Associated with a Homologous X-shaped Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chaowei; Yan, Xiaoli; Feng, Xueshang; Duan, Aiying; Hu, Qiang; Zuo, Pingbing; Wang, Yi

    2017-11-01

    As a fundamental magnetic structure in the solar corona, electric current sheets (CSs) can form either prior to or during a solar flare, and they are essential for magnetic energy dissipation in the solar corona because they enable magnetic reconnection. However, the static reconstruction of a CS is rare, possibly due to limitations that are inherent in the available coronal field extrapolation codes. Here we present the reconstruction of a large-scale pre-flare CS in solar active region 11967 using an MHD-relaxation model constrained by the SDO/HMI vector magnetogram. The CS is associated with a set of peculiar homologous flares that exhibit unique X-shaped ribbons and loops occurring in a quadrupolar magnetic configuration.This is evidenced by an ’X’ shape, formed from the field lines traced from the CS to the photosphere. This nearly reproduces the shape of the observed flare ribbons, suggesting that the flare is a product of the dissipation of the CS via reconnection. The CS forms in a hyperbolic flux tube, which is an intersection of two quasi-separatrix layers. The recurrence of the X-shaped flares might be attributed to the repetitive formation and dissipation of the CS, as driven by the photospheric footpoint motions. These results demonstrate the power of a data-constrained MHD model in reproducing a CS in the corona as well as providing insight into the magnetic mechanism of solar flares.

  2. Resource Letter OSE-1: Observing Solar Eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Fraknoi, Andrew

    2017-07-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the available literature, listing selected books, articles, and online resources about scientific, cultural, and practical issues related to observing solar eclipses. It is timely, given that a total solar eclipse will cross the continental United States on August 21, 2017. The next total solar eclipse path crossing the U.S. and Canada will be on April 8, 2024. In 2023, the path of annularity of an annular eclipse will cross Mexico, the United States, and Canada, with partial phases visible throughout those countries.

  3. Hα LINE PROFILE ASYMMETRIES AND THE CHROMOSPHERIC FLARE VELOCITY FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Kennedy, M.; Keenan, F. P. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Simões, P. J. A.; Voort, L. Rouppe van der; Fletcher, L. [SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Carlsson, M.; Jafarzadeh, S. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Allred, J. C.; Kowalski, A. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Graham, D. [INAF-Ossevatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2015-11-10

    The asymmetries observed in the line profiles of solar flares can provide important diagnostics of the properties and dynamics of the flaring atmosphere. In this paper the evolution of the Hα and Ca ii λ8542 lines are studied using high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution ground-based observations of an M1.1 flare obtained with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. The temporal evolution of the Hα line profiles from the flare kernel shows excess emission in the red wing (red asymmetry) before flare maximum and excess in the blue wing (blue asymmetry) after maximum. However, the Ca ii λ8542 line does not follow the same pattern, showing only a weak red asymmetry during the flare. RADYN simulations are used to synthesize spectral line profiles for the flaring atmosphere, and good agreement is found with the observations. We show that the red asymmetry observed in Hα is not necessarily associated with plasma downflows, and the blue asymmetry may not be related to plasma upflows. Indeed, we conclude that the steep velocity gradients in the flaring chromosphere modify the wavelength of the central reversal in the Hα line profile. The shift in the wavelength of maximum opacity to shorter and longer wavelengths generates the red and blue asymmetries, respectively.

  4. Effects of flare definitions on the statistics of derived flare distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, D. F.; Dominique, M.; Seaton, D.; Stegen, K.; White, A.

    2016-08-01

    The statistical examination of solar flares is crucial to revealing their global characteristics and behaviour. Such examinations can tackle large-scale science questions or give context to detailed single-event studies. However, they are often performed using standard but basic flare detection algorithms relying on arbitrary thresholds. This arbitrariness may lead to important scientific conclusions being drawn from results caused by subjective choices in algorithms rather than the true nature of the Sun. In this paper, we explore the effect of the arbitrary thresholds used in the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) event list and Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) Flare Finder algorithms. We find that there is a small but significant relationship between the power law exponent of the GOES flare peak flux frequency distribution and the flare start thresholds of the algorithms. We also find that the power law exponents of these distributions are not stable, but appear to steepen with increasing peak flux. This implies that the observed flare size distribution may not be a power law at all. We show that depending on the true value of the exponent of the flare size distribution, this deviation from a power law may be due to flares missed by the flare detection algorithms. However, it is not possible determine the true exponent from GOES/XRS observations. Additionally we find that the PROBA2/LYRA flare size distributions are artificially steep and clearly non-power law. We show that this is consistent with an insufficient degradation correction. This means that PROBA2/LYRA should not be used for flare statistics or energetics unless degradation is adequately accounted for. However, it can be used to study variations over shorter timescales and for space weather monitoring.

  5. Improved modeling of midlatitude D-region ionospheric absorption of high frequency radio signals during solar X-ray flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumer, Evelyn A.

    High frequency (HF) radio communication is widely used for real-time, medium to long range communications due to its low cost of operation and maintenance. However, HF communication is strongly dependent on the state of the ionosphere, which is sensitive to solar X-ray flares. The lowest region of the ionosphere, the D-region, is the region in which the majority of the absorption of HF radio wave energy occurs. D-region HF absorption depends on the local electron density, which is enhanced during a solar X-ray flare. HF propagation data obtained during the HF Investigation of D-region Ionospheric Variation Experiment (HIDIVE) and obtained at the Canadian Space Agency NORSTAR riometer in Pinawa, Manitoba, Canada and X-ray flux data, as reported by GOES satellites, are analyzed here for the purpose of validating and improving the performance of two HF absorption models, the operational Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) D-region Absorption model and the physical AbbyNormal model. The SWPC D-region absorption model is an empirical model providing real-time global predictions of D-region absorption, and the physical Absorption by the D and E Region of HF Signals with Normal Incidence (AbbyNormal) model is based on simple D-region chemistry and provides near real-time predictions of midlatitude D-region HF absorption. Analysis of the HIDIVE data revealed an absorption dependence on signal frequency of f-1.24 where f is signal frequency, and a Cos 0.9(chi) dependence on solar zenith angle, chi. These relations differ from what is used in the SWPC model, and from these relations, a new empirical model, the Empirical HIDIVE Absorption (EHA) model, is developed. The EHA model can be used to improve the SWPC model performance. NO density data obtained with the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) and during the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) are used to improve the method by which the AbbyNormal model defines the nitric oxide (NO) profile within the atmosphere

  6. A Tool for Empirical Forecasting of Major Flares, Coronal Mass Ejections, and Solar Particle Events from a Proxy of Active-Region Free Magnetic Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Falconer, D. A.; Adams, J. H., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation describes a new forecasting tool developed for and is currently being tested by NASA s Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG) at JSC, which is responsible for the monitoring and forecasting of radiation exposure levels of astronauts. The new software tool is designed for the empirical forecasting of M and X-class flares, coronal mass ejections, as well as solar energetic particle events. Its algorithm is based on an empirical relationship between the various types of events rates and a proxy of the active region s free magnetic energy, determined from a data set of approx.40,000 active-region magnetograms from approx.1,300 active regions observed by SOHO/MDI that have known histories of flare, coronal mass ejection, and solar energetic particle event production. The new tool automatically extracts each strong-field magnetic areas from an MDI full-disk magnetogram, identifies each as an NOAA active region, and measures a proxy of the active region s free magnetic energy from the extracted magnetogram. For each active region, the empirical relationship is then used to convert the free magnetic energy proxy into an expected event rate. The expected event rate in turn can be readily converted into the probability that the active region will produce such an event in a given forward time window. Descriptions of the datasets, algorithm, and software in addition to sample applications and a validation test are presented. Further development and transition of the new tool in anticipation of SDO/HMI is briefly discussed.

  7. Further Exploration of Post-Flare Giant Arches

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Matthew; Seaton, Daniel B.; Dennis, Brian R.; feng, Li

    2017-08-01

    Recent observations from the SWAP EUV imager on-board PROBA2 and SXI X-ray observations from the GOES satellite have shown that post-flare giant arches and regular post-flare loops are one and the same thing. However, it is still not clear how certain loop systems are able to sustain prolonged growth to heights of approximately 400000 km (>0.5 solar-radii). In this presentation we further explore the energy deposition rate above post-flare loop systems through high-energy RHESSI observations. We also explore the difference between the loop systems through a multi-wavelength epoch analysis.

  8. THE 2010 VERY HIGH ENERGY {gamma}-RAY FLARE AND 10 YEARS OF MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF M 87

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowski, A. [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, D 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Acero, F. [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, CNRS/IN2P3, CC 72, Place Eugene Bataillon, F-34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Aharonian, F.; Bernloehr, K.; Bochow, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, P.O. Box 103980, D 69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Akhperjanian, A. G. [National Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Armenia, 24 Marshall Baghramian Avenue, 0019 Yerevan (Armenia); Anton, G.; Balzer, A. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, D 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Barnacka, A. [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); Barres de Almeida, U. [Department of Physics, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Becherini, Y. [Astroparticule et Cosmologie (APC), CNRS, Universite Paris 7 Denis Diderot, 10, rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, F-75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Becker, J. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum und Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D 44780 Bochum (Germany); Behera, B. [Landessternwarte, Universitaet Heidelberg, Koenigstuhl, D 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Birsin, E. [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, D 12489 Berlin (Germany); Biteau, J. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Boisson, C. [LUTH, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92190 Meudon (France); Bolmont, J. [LPNHE, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Universite Denis Diderot Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75252, Paris Cedex 5 (France); Bordas, P., E-mail: martin.raue@desy.de [Institut fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik, Universitaet Tuebingen, Sand 1, D 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Collaboration: H.E.S.S. Collaboration; MAGIC Collaboration; VERITAS Collaboration; and others

    2012-02-20

    The giant radio galaxy M 87 with its proximity (16 Mpc), famous jet, and very massive black hole ((3 - 6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }) provides a unique opportunity to investigate the origin of very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) {gamma}-ray emission generated in relativistic outflows and the surroundings of supermassive black holes. M 87 has been established as a VHE {gamma}-ray emitter since 2006. The VHE {gamma}-ray emission displays strong variability on timescales as short as a day. In this paper, results from a joint VHE monitoring campaign on M 87 by the MAGIC and VERITAS instruments in 2010 are reported. During the campaign, a flare at VHE was detected triggering further observations at VHE (H.E.S.S.), X-rays (Chandra), and radio (43 GHz Very Long Baseline Array, VLBA). The excellent sampling of the VHE {gamma}-ray light curve enables one to derive a precise temporal characterization of the flare: the single, isolated flare is well described by a two-sided exponential function with significantly different flux rise and decay times of {tau}{sup rise}{sub d} = (1.69 {+-} 0.30) days and {tau}{sup decay}{sub d} = (0.611 {+-} 0.080) days, respectively. While the overall variability pattern of the 2010 flare appears somewhat different from that of previous VHE flares in 2005 and 2008, they share very similar timescales ({approx}day), peak fluxes ({Phi}{sub >0.35TeV} {approx_equal} (1-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}), and VHE spectra. VLBA radio observations of 43 GHz of the inner jet regions indicate no enhanced flux in 2010 in contrast to observations in 2008, where an increase of the radio flux of the innermost core regions coincided with a VHE flare. On the other hand, Chandra X-ray observations taken {approx}3 days after the peak of the VHE {gamma}-ray emission reveal an enhanced flux from the core (flux increased by factor {approx}2; variability timescale <2 days). The long-term (2001-2010) multi-wavelength (MWL

  9. Multi-wavelength Observations of the Flaring Gamma-ray Blazar 3C 66A in 2008 October

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Costamante, L.; Cutini, S.; Davis, D. S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fuhrmann, L.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Itoh, R.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nestoras, I.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reyes, L. C.; Ripken, J.; Ritz, S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Scargle, J. D.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.; Acciari, V. A.; Aliu, E.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Böttcher, M.; Boltuch, D.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Christiansen, J. L.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; de la Calle Perez, I.; Dickherber, R.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Gillanders, G. H.; Godambe, S.; Grube, J.; Guenette, R.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Hui, C. M.; Humensky, T. B.; Imran, A.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; LeBohec, S.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; McCutcheon, M.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pichel, A.; Pohl, M.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rose, H. J.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Senturk, G. Demet; Smith, A. W.; Steele, D.; Swordy, S. P.; Tešić, G.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.; Wissel, S.; Wood, M.; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Gurwell, M. A.; Larionov, V. M.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Aller, M. F.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Chen, W. P.; Berduygin, A.; Agudo, I.; Aller, H. D.; Arkharov, A. A.; Bach, U.; Bachev, R.; Beltrame, P.; Benítez, E.; Buemi, C. S.; Dashti, J.; Calcidese, P.; Capezzali, D.; Carosati, D.; Da Rio, D.; Di Paola, A.; Diltz, C.; Dolci, M.; Dultzin, D.; Forné, E.; Gómez, J. L.; Hagen-Thorn, V. A.; Halkola, A.; Heidt, J.; Hiriart, D.; Hovatta, T.; Hsiao, H.-Y.; Jorstad, S. G.; Kimeridze, G. N.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Kopatskaya, E. N.; Koptelova, E.; Leto, P.; Ligustri, R.; Lindfors, E.; Lopez, J. M.; Marscher, A. P.; Mommert, M.; Mujica, R.; Nikolashvili, M. G.; Nilsson, K.; Palma, N.; Pasanen, M.; Roca-Sogorb, M.; Ros, J. A.; Roustazadeh, P.; Sadun, A. C.; Saino, J.; Sigua, L. A.; Sillanää, A.; Sorcia, M.; Takalo, L. O.; Tornikoski, M.; Trigilio, C.; Turchetti, R.; Umana, G.; Belloni, T.; Blake, C. H.; Bloom, J. S.; Angelakis, E.; Fumagalli, M.; Hauser, M.; Prochaska, J. X.; Riquelme, D.; Sievers, A.; Starr, D. L.; Tagliaferri, G.; Ungerechts, H.; Wagner, S.; Zensus, J. A.; Fermi LAT Collaboration; VERITAS Collaboration; GASP-WEBT Consortium

    2011-01-01

    The BL Lacertae object 3C 66A was detected in a flaring state by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and VERITAS in 2008 October. In addition to these gamma-ray observations, F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, PAIRITEL, MDM, ATOM, Swift, and Chandra provided radio to X-ray coverage. The available light curves show variability and, in particular, correlated flares are observed in the optical and Fermi-LAT gamma-ray band. The resulting spectral energy distribution can be well fitted using standard leptonic models with and without an external radiation field for inverse Compton scattering. It is found, however, that only the model with an external radiation field can accommodate the intra-night variability observed at optical wavelengths.

  10. Within the International Collaboration CHAIN: a Summary of Events Observed with Flare Monitoring Telescope (FMT) in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishitsuka, J.; Asai, A.; Morita, S.; Terrazas, R.; Cabezas, D.; Gutierrez, V.; Martinez, L.; Buleje, Y.; Loayza, R.; Nakamura, N.; Takasao, S.; Yoshinaga, Y.; Hillier, A.; Otsuji, K.; Shibata, K.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ueno, S.; Kitai, R.; Ishii, T.; Ichimoto, K.; Nagata, S.; Narukage, N.

    2014-02-01

    In 2008 we inaugurated the new Solar Observatory in collaboration with Faculty of Sciences of San Luis Gonzaga de Ica National University, 300 km south of Lima. In March of 2010 a Flare Monitoring Telescope of Hida Observatory of Kyoto University arrived to Ica, part of CHAIN Project (Continuous H-alpha Imaging Network). In October of the same year we hosted the First FMT Workshop in Ica, then in July of 2011 the Second FMT Workshop was opened. Since that we are focused on two events registered by FMT in Peru to publish results. FMT is a good tool to introduce young people from universities into scientific knowledge; it is good also for education in Solar Physics and outreach. Details of this successful collaboration will be explained in this presentation.

  11. Effective electron recombination coefficient in ionospheric D-region during the relaxation regime after solar flare from February 18, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nina, A. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 57, Belgrade (Serbia); Cadez, V. [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11060 Belgrade (Serbia); Sulic, D., E-mail: dsulic@ipb.ac.rs [Faculty of Ecology and Environmental Protection, Union - Nikola Tesla University, Cara Dusana 62, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Sreckovic, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 57, Belgrade (Serbia); Zigman, V. [University of Nova Gorica, Vipavska 13, Rona Dolina, SI-5000 Nova Gorica (Slovenia)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, we present a model for determination of a weakly time dependent effective recombination coefficient for the perturbed terrestrial ionospheric D-region plasma. We study consequences of a class M1.0 X-ray solar flare, recorded by GOES-15 satellite on February 18, 2011 between 14:00 and 14:15 UT, by analyzing the amplitude and phase real time variations of very low frequency (VLF) radio waves emitted by transmitter DHO (located in Germany) at frequency 23.4 kHz and recorded by the AWESOME receiver in Belgrade (Serbia). Our analysis is limited to ionospheric perturbations localized at altitudes around 70 km where the dominant electron gain and electron loss processes are the photo-ionization and recombination, respectively.

  12. Data-driven MHD simulation of a solar eruption observed in NOAA Active Region 12158

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwanhee; Magara, Tetsuya; Kang, Jihye

    2017-08-01

    We present a data-driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of a solar eruption where the dynamics of a background solar wind is incorporated. The background solar wind exists in the real solar atmosphere, which continuously transports magnetized plasma toward the interplanetary space. This suggests that it may play a role in producing a solar eruption. We perform a simulation for NOAA AR 12158 accompanied with X1.6-class flare and CME on 2014 September 10. We construct a magnetohydrostatic state used as the initial state of data-driven simulation, which is composed of a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) derived from observation data of photospheric vector magnetic field and a hydrostatic atmosphere with prescribed distributions of temperature and gravity. We then reduce the gas pressure well above the solar surface to drive a solar wind. As a result, a magnetic field gradually evolves during an early phase, and eventually eruption is observed. To figure out what causes the transition from gradual evolution to eruption, we analyze the temporal development of force distribution and geometrical shape of magnetic field lines. The result suggests that the curvature and the scale height of a coronal magnetic field play an important role in determining its dynamic state.

  13. Estimating the contribution from different ionospheric regions to the TEC response to the solar flares using data from the international GPS network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Leonovich

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new method for estimating the contribution from different ionospheric regions to the response of total electron content variations to the solar flare, based on data from the international network of two-frequency multichannel receivers of the navigation GPS system. The method uses the effect of partial "shadowing" of the atmosphere by the terrestrial globe. The study of the solar flare influence on the atmosphere uses GPS stations located near the boundary of the shadow on the ground in the nightside hemisphere. The beams between the satellite-borne transmitter and the receiver on the ground for these stations pass partially through the atmosphere lying in the region of total shadow, and partially through the illuminated atmosphere. The analysis of the ionospheric effect of a powerful solar flare of class X5.7/3B that was recorded on 14 July 2000 (10:24 UT, N22 W07 in quiet geomagnetic conditions (Dst = -10 nT has shown that about 75% of the TEC increase corresponds to the ionospheric region lying below 300 km and about 25% to regions lying above 300 km.

    Key words. Ionosphere (solar radiation and cosmic ray effects; instruments and techniques – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (ultraviolet emissions

  14. Estimating the contribution from different ionospheric regions to the TEC response to the solar flares using data from the international GPS network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Leonovich

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new method for estimating the contribution from different ionospheric regions to the response of total electron content variations to the solar flare, based on data from the international network of two-frequency multichannel receivers of the navigation GPS system. The method uses the effect of partial "shadowing" of the atmosphere by the terrestrial globe. The study of the solar flare influence on the atmosphere uses GPS stations located near the boundary of the shadow on the ground in the nightside hemisphere. The beams between the satellite-borne transmitter and the receiver on the ground for these stations pass partially through the atmosphere lying in the region of total shadow, and partially through the illuminated atmosphere. The analysis of the ionospheric effect of a powerful solar flare of class X5.7/3B that was recorded on 14 July 2000 (10:24 UT, N22 W07 in quiet geomagnetic conditions (Dst = -10 nT has shown that about 75% of the TEC increase corresponds to the ionospheric region lying below 300 km and about 25% to regions lying above 300 km.Key words. Ionosphere (solar radiation and cosmic ray effects; instruments and techniques – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (ultraviolet emissions

  15. Living on a Flare: Relativistic Reflection in V404 Cyg Observed by NuSTAR during Its Summer 2015 Outburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, D. J.; Mooley, K.; King, A. L.; Tomsick, J. A.; Miller, J. M.; Dauser, T.; García, J. A.; Bachetti, M.; Brightman, M.; Fabian, A. C.; Forster, K.; Fürst, F.; Gandhi, P.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Harrison, F. A.; Madsen, K. K.; Meier, D. L.; Middleton, M. J.; Natalucci, L.; Rahoui, F.; Rana, V.; Stern, D.

    2017-04-01

    We present first results from a series of NuSTAR observations of the black hole X-ray binary V404 Cyg obtained during its summer 2015 outburst, primarily focusing on observations during the height of this outburst activity. The NuSTAR data show extreme variability in both the flux and spectral properties of the source. This is partly driven by strong and variable line-of-sight absorption, similar to previous outbursts. The latter stages of this observation are dominated by strong flares, reaching luminosities close to Eddington. During these flares, the central source appears to be relatively unobscured and the data show clear evidence for a strong contribution from relativistic reflection, providing a means to probe the geometry of the innermost accretion flow. Based on the flare properties, analogies with other Galactic black hole binaries, and also the simultaneous onset of radio activity, we argue that this intense X-ray flaring is related to transient jet activity during which the ejected plasma is the primary source of illumination for the accretion disk. If this is the case, then our reflection modeling implies that these jets are launched in close proximity to the black hole (as close as a few gravitational radii), consistent with expectations for jet launching models that tap either the spin of the central black hole, or the very innermost accretion disk. Our analysis also allows us to place the first constraints on the black hole spin for this source, which we find to be {a}* > 0.92 (99% statistical uncertainty, based on an idealized lamp-post geometry).

  16. Study of non-thermal photon production under different scenarios in solar flares. 2: The Compton inverse and Bremsstrahlung models and fittings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez, M.; Laville, A.; Gallegos, A.

    1985-01-01

    Energy spectra of photons emitted from Bremsstrahlung (BR) of energetic electrons with matter, is obtained from the deconvolution of the electron energy spectra. It can be inferred that the scenario for the production of X-rays and gamma rays in solar flares may vary from event to event. However, it is possible in many cases to associated low energy events to impulsive acceleration, and the high energy phase of some events to stochastic acceleration. In both cases, flare particles seem to be strongly modulated by local energy losses. Electric field acceleration, associated to neutral current sheets is a suitable candidate for impulsive acceleration. Finally, that the predominant radiation process of this radiation is the inverse Compton effect due to the local flare photon field.

  17. Observations of the Crab Nebula with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory During the Gamma-Ray Flare of 2011 April

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, using the AGILE and Fermi satellites, gamma-ray flares have been discovered from the direction of the Crab Nebula (Tavani et al. 2011, Abdo et al. 2011). We have been using the Chandra X-Ray observatory to monitor the Crab on a monthly cadence since just after the 2010 September gamma-ray flare. We were fortunate to trigger series of pre-planned target of opportunity observations during the 2011 April flare. We present the results of these observations and address some implications both for now and for the future.

  18. Magnetic vector rotation in response to the energetic electron beam during a flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Kwangsu, Ahn; Jing, Ju; Liu, Chang; Chae, Jongchul; Huang, Nengyi; Deng, Na; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Haimin

    2017-08-01

    As one of the most violent forms of eruption on the Sun, flares are believed to be powered by magnetic reconnection, by which stored magnetic energy is released. The fundamental physical processes involving the release, transfer and deposition of energy in multiple layers of the solar atmosphere have been studied extensively with significant progress. Taking advantage of recent developments in observing facilities, new phenomena are continually revealed, bringing new understanding of solar flares. Here we report the discovery of a transient rotation of vector magnetic fields associated with a flare observed by the 1.6-m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory. After ruling out the possibility that the rotation is caused by line profile changes due to flare heating, our observation shows that the transverse field rotateded by about 12-20 degrees counterclockwise, and returned quickly to previous values after the flare ribbons swept through. More importantly, as a consequence of the rotation, the flare loops untwisted and became more potential. The vector magnetograms were obtained in the near infrared at 1560 nm, which is minimally affected by flare emission and no intensity profile change was detected. Therefore, we believe that these transient changes are real, and conclude the high energy electron beams play an crucial role in the field changes. A straightforward and instructive explanation is that the induced magnetic field of the electron beam superimposed on the pre-flare field leads to a transient rotation of the overall field.

  19. Probing quantum gravity using photons from a flare of the active galactic nucleus Markarian 501 observed by the MAGIC telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, J; Anderhub, H; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Backes, M; Baixeras, C; Barrio, J A; Bartko, H; Bastieri, D; Becker, J K; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Bigongiari, C; Biland, A; Bock, R K; Bordas, P; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bretz, T; Britvitch, I; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Chilingarian, A; Commichau, S; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Costado, M T; Covino, S; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Cea del Pozo, E; Delgado Mendez, C; de los Reyes, R; De Lotto, B; De Maria, M; De Sabata, F; Dominguez, A; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Errando, M; Fagiolini, M; Ferenc, D; Fernández, E; Firpo, R; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Galante, N; García-López, R J; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Göbel, F; Hayashida, M; Herrero, A; Höhne, D; Hose, J; Hsu, C C; Huber, S; Jogler, T; Kranich, D; La Barbera, A; Laille, A; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Meyer, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moles, M; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Ninkovic, J; Otte, N; Oya, I; Panniello, M; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Pasanen, M; Pascoli, D; Pauss, F; Pegna, R; Pérez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Piccioli, A; Prada, F; Puchades, N; Raymers, A; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rissi, M; Robert, A; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saitô, T; Salvati, M; Sanchez-Conde, M; Sartori, P; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schmitt, R; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shinozaki, K; Sidro, N; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A; Sillanpää, A; Spanier, F; Stamerra, A; Stark, L S; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Tluczykont, M; Torres, D F; Turini, N; Vankov, H; Venturini, A; Vitale, V; Wagner, R M; Wittek, W; Zabalza, M; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Mavromatos, N E; Nanopoulos, D V; Sakharov, Alexander S; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E

    2008-01-01

    We use the timing of photons observed by the MAGIC gamma-ray telescope during a flare of the active galaxy Markarian 501 to probe a vacuum refractive index ~ 1-(E/M_QGn)^n, n = 1,2, that might be induced by quantum gravity. The peaking of the flare is found to maximize for quantum-gravity mass scales M_QG1 ~ 0.4x10^18 GeV or M_QG2 ~ 0.6x10^11 GeV, and we establish lower limits M_QG1 > 0.26x10^18 GeV or M_QG2 > 0.39x10^11 GeV at the 95% C.L. Monte Carlo studies confirm the MAGIC sensitivity to propagation effects at these levels. Thermal plasma effects in the source are negligible, but we cannot exclude the importance of some other source effect.

  20. Reconnection Fluxes in Eruptive and Confined Flares and Implications for Superflares on the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschernitz, Johannes; Veronig, Astrid M.; Thalmann, Julia K.; Hinterreiter, Jürgen; Pötzi, Werner

    2018-01-01

    We study the energy release process of a set of 51 flares (32 confined, 19 eruptive) ranging from GOES class B3 to X17. We use Hα filtergrams from Kanzelhöhe Observatory together with Solar Dynamics Observatory HMI and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory MDI magnetograms to derive magnetic reconnection fluxes and rates. The flare reconnection flux is strongly correlated with the peak of the GOES 1–8 Å soft X-ray flux (c = 0.92, in log–log space) for both confined and eruptive flares. Confined flares of a certain GOES class exhibit smaller ribbon areas but larger magnetic flux densities in the flare ribbons (by a factor of 2). In the largest events, up to ≈50% of the magnetic flux of the active region (AR) causing the flare is involved in the flare magnetic reconnection. These findings allow us to extrapolate toward the largest solar flares possible. A complex solar AR hosting a magnetic flux of 2 × 1023 Mx, which is in line with the largest AR fluxes directly measured, is capable of producing an X80 flare, which corresponds to a bolometric energy of about 7 × 1032 erg. Using a magnetic flux estimate of 6 × 1023 Mx for the largest solar AR observed, we find that flares of GOES class ≈X500 could be produced (E bol ≈ 3 × 1033 erg). These estimates suggest that the present day’s Sun is capable of producing flares and related space weather events that may be more than an order of magnitude stronger than have been observed to date.

  1. Direct Observations of GPS L1 Signal-to-Noise Degradation due to Solar Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerruti, A. P.; Kintner, P. M.; Gary, D.; Lanzerotti, L.

    2006-05-01

    GPS signals, systems, and navigation accuracy are vulnerable to a variety of space weather effects mostly caused by the ionosphere. This paper considers a different class of space weather effects on GPS signals: solar radio bursts. We present the first direct observations of GPS L1 (1.6 GHz) carrier-to-noise degradation on two different models of GPS receivers due to the solar radio burst associated with the 7 September, 2005 solar flare. The solar radio burst consisted of two periods of 1.6 GHz activity at approximately 17:40 UT and again at 18:30 UT. All the receivers that were affected by the solar radio burst were in the sun-lit hemisphere: three identical receivers were collocated at the Arecibo Observatory, and four identical receivers of a different model were located in Brazil. For both models, all GPS satellites in view were affected similarly. In some cases the decrease in the GPS L1 signal-to-noise agreed perfectly with the solar radio burst amplitudes, while in other cases there was no association. Further analysis indicated that only the right hand circularly polarized (RHCP) emissions affected the GPS signals. Since GPS signals are RHCP and GPS antennas are also RHCP, the null effect of the LHCP power confirms our hypothesis that the solar radio bursts are causal. The maximum solar radio burst power associated with the 7 September 2005 flare had a peak intensity of about 8,700 solar flux units (SFU) RHCP at 1,600 MHz, which caused a corresponding decrease in the signal- to-noise of about 2.5 dB across all visible satellites. Furthermore, an event with a peak intensity of 5,000 SFU RHCP at 1,600 MHz caused a 2 dB fade for nearly 15 minutes. To further investigate the effect of solar radio bursts, we also examined the emissions associated with the 28 October 2003 flare. Although polarization data was not available for this even, a similar association was found between 1,400 MHz solar radio power and GPS signal-to-noise degradation. The maximum

  2. Simulated Solar Flare X-Ray and Thermal Cycling Durability Evaluation of Hubble Space Telescope Thermal Control Candidate Replacement Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Scheiman, David A.

    1998-01-01

    During the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) second servicing mission (SM2), astronauts noticed that the multilayer insulation (MLI) covering the telescope was damaged. Large pieces of the outer layer of MLI (aluminized Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (Al-FEP)) were torn in several locations around the telescope. A piece of curled up Al-FEP was retrieved by the astronauts and was found to be severely embrittled, as witnessed by ground testing. Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) organized a HST MLI Failure Review Board (FRB) to determine the damage mechanism of FEP in the HST environment, and to recommend replacement insulation material to be installed on HST during the third servicing mission (SM3) in 1999. Candidate thermal control replacement materials were chosen by the FRB and tested for environmental durability under various exposures and durations. This paper describes durability testing of candidate materials which were exposed to charged particle radiation, simulated solar flare x-ray radiation and thermal cycling under load. Samples were evaluated for changes in solar absorptance and tear resistance. Descriptions of environmental exposures and durability evaluations of these materials are presented.

  3. Neutron techniques. [for study of high-energy particles produced in large solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Glenn M., Jr.; Dunphy, Philip P.; Chupp, Edward L.; Evenson, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Three experimental methods are described which hold the most promise for improved energy resolution, time resolution and sensitivity in the detection of solar neutrons on satellites and/or long duration balloon flights: the neutron calorimeter, the solar neutron track chamber, and the solar neutron decay proton detector. The characteristics of the three methods as to energy range, energy resolution, time resolution, detection efficiency, and physical properties are delineated. Earlier techniques to measure the intensity of high-energy cosmic-ray neutrons at the top of the atmosphere and to search for solar neutrons are described. The past three decades of detector development has now reached the point where it is possible to make comprehensive and detailed measurements of solar neutrons on future space missions.

  4. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Restructuring in Two Homologous Solar Flares in the Seismically Active NOAA AR 11283

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Wiegelmann, Thomas; JIang, Chaowei; Dennis, Brian R.; Su, Yang; Donea, Alina; Wang, Haimin

    2014-01-01

    We carry out a comprehensive investigation comparing the three-dimensional magnetic field restructuring, flare energy release, and the helioseismic response of two homologous flares, the 2011 September 6 X2.1 (FL1) and September 7 X1.8 (FL2) flares in NOAA AR 11283. In our analysis, (1) a twisted flux rope (FR) collapses onto the surface at a speed of 1.5 km s(exp-1) after a partial eruption in FL1. The FR then gradually grows to reach a higher altitude and collapses again at 3 km s(exp-1) after a fuller eruption in FL2. Also, FL2 shows a larger decrease of the flux-weighted centroid separation of opposite magnetic polarities and a greater change of the horizontal field on the surface. These imply a more violent coronal implosion with corresponding more intense surface signatures in FL2. (2) The FR is inclined northward and together with the ambient fields, it undergoes a southward turning after both events. This agrees with the asymmetric decay of the penumbra observed in the peripheral regions. (3) The amounts of free magnetic energy and nonthermal electron energy released during FL1 are comparable to those of FL2 within the uncertainties of the measurements. (4) No sunquake was detected in FL1; in contrast, FL2 produced two seismic emission sources S1 and S2 both lying in the penumbral regions. Interestingly, S1 and S2 are connected by magnetic loops, and the stronger source S2 has a weaker vertical magnetic field. We discuss these results in relation to the implosion process in the low corona and the sunquake generation.

  5. FLARE STARS—A FAVORABLE OBJECT FOR STUDYING MECHANISMS OF NONTHERMAL ASTROPHYSICAL PHENOMENA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oks, E. [Physics Department, 206 Allison Lab., Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Gershberg, R. E. [Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, Nauchny, Bakhchisaray region, Crimea, 298409 (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-01

    We present a spectroscopic method for diagnosing a low-frequency electrostatic plasma turbulence (LEPT) in plasmas of flare stars. This method had been previously developed by one of us and successfully applied to diagnosing the LEPT in solar flares. In distinction to our previous applications of the method, here we use the latest advances in the theory of the Stark broadening of hydrogen spectral lines. By analyzing observed emission Balmer lines, we show that it is very likely that the LEPT was developed in several flares of AD Leo, as well as in one flare of EV Lac. We found the LEPT (though of different field strengths) both in the explosive/impulsive phase and at the phase of the maximum, as well as at the gradual phase of the stellar flares. While for solar flares our method allows diagnosing the LEPT only in the most powerful flares, for the flare stars it seems that the method allows revealing the LEPT practically in every flare. It should be important to obtain new and better spectrograms of stellar flares, allowing their analysis by the method outlined in the present paper. This can be the most favorable way to the detailed understanding of the nature of nonthermal astrophysical phenomena.

  6. A Hybrid Supervised/Unsupervised Machine Learning Approach to Solar Flare Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenuto, Federico; Piana, Michele; Campi, Cristina; Massone, Anna Maria

    2018-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel method for flare forecasting, combining prediction accuracy with the ability to identify the most relevant predictive variables. This result is obtained by means of a two-step approach: first, a supervised regularization method for regression, namely, LASSO is applied, where a sparsity-enhancing penalty term allows the identification of the significance with which each data feature contributes to the prediction; then, an unsupervised fuzzy clustering technique for classification, namely, Fuzzy C-Means, is applied, where the regression outcome is partitioned through the minimization of a cost function and without focusing on the optimization of a specific skill score. This approach is therefore hybrid, since it combines supervised and unsupervised learning; realizes classification in an automatic, skill-score-independent way; and provides effective prediction performances even in the case of imbalanced data sets. Its prediction power is verified against NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center data, using as a test set, data in the range between 1996 August and 2010 December and as training set, data in the range between 1988 December and 1996 June. To validate the method, we computed several skill scores typically utilized in flare prediction and compared the values provided by the hybrid approach with the ones provided by several standard (non-hybrid) machine learning methods. The results showed that the hybrid approach performs classification better than all other supervised methods and with an effectiveness comparable to the one of clustering methods; but, in addition, it provides a reliable ranking of the weights with which the data properties contribute to the forecast.

  7. Fibromyalgia Flares: A Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Ann; Whipple, Mary O; Rhudy, Lori M

    2016-03-01

    Patients with fibromyalgia report periods of symptom exacerbation, colloquially referred to as "flares" and despite clinical observation of flares, no research has purposefully evaluated the presence and characteristics of flares in fibromyalgia. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe fibromyalgia flares in a sample of patients with fibromyalgia. Using seven open-ended questions, patients were asked to describe how they perceived fibromyalgia flares and triggers and alleviating factors associated with flares. Patients were also asked to describe how a flare differs from their typical fibromyalgia symptoms and how they cope with fibromyalgia flares. Content analysis was used to analyze the text. A total of 44 participants completed the survey. Responses to the seven open-ended questions revealed three main content areas: causes of flares, flare symptoms, and dealing with a flare. Participants identified stress, overdoing it, poor sleep, and weather changes as primary causes of flares. Symptoms characteristic of flares included flu-like body aches/exhaustion, pain, fatigue, and variety of other symptoms. Participants reported using medical treatments, rest, activity and stress avoidance, and waiting it out to cope with flares. Our results demonstrate that periods of symptom exacerbation (i.e., flares) are commonly experienced by patients with fibromyalgia and symptoms of flares can be differentiated from every day or typical symptoms of fibromyalgia. Our study is the first of its kind to qualitatively explore characteristics, causes, and management strategies of fibromyalgia flares. Future studies are needed to quantitatively characterize fibromyalgia flares and evaluate mechanisms of flares. © 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. X-ray Flares Observed from Six Young Stars Located in the Region ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-12-27

    Dec 27, 2013 ... atures up to 100 MK (e.g. Skinner et al. 1997; Tsuboi et al. 1998; Imanishi et al. 2003; Feigelson et al. 2002; Skinner et al. 2003; Preibisch et al. 2005). Wolk et al. 2005 studied the properties of flares of PMS stars in the Orion Nebula cluster and reported the median peak luminosity of 1030.97 erg s. −1.

  9. MICROWAVE IMAGING OF A HOT FLUX ROPE STRUCTURE DURING THE PRE-IMPULSIVE STAGE OF AN ERUPTIVE M7.7 SOLAR FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhao; Chen, Yao; Song, Hongqiang; Chandrashekhar, Kalugodu; Jiao, Fangran [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, and Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai, Shandong 264209 (China); Huang, Guangli [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Nanjing, 210008 (China); Nakajima, Hiroshi [Nobeyama Radio Observatory, NAOJ, 462-2 Nobeyama, Minamimaki, Minamisaku, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Melnikov, Victor [Central Astronomical Observatory at Pulkovo, Russian Academy of Sciences, Saint Petersburg 196140 (Russian Federation); Liu, Wei [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Li, Gang, E-mail: yaochen@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Space Science and CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Corona structures and processes during the pre-impulsive stage of solar eruption are crucial to understanding the physics leading to the subsequent explosive energy release. Here we present the first microwave imaging study of a hot flux rope structure during the pre-impulsive stage of an eruptive M7.7 solar flare, with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph at 17 GHz. The flux rope is also observed by the SDO/AIA in its hot passbands of 94 and 131 Å. In the microwave data, it is revealed as an overall arcade-like structure consisting of several intensity enhancements bridged by generally weak emissions, with brightness temperatures (T{sub B}) varying from ∼10,000 K to ∼20,000 K. Locations of microwave intensity enhancements along the structure remain relatively fixed at certain specific parts of the flux rope, indicating that the distribution of emitting electrons is affected by the large-scale magnetic configuration of the twisted flux rope. Wavelet analysis shows a pronounced 2 minute period of the microwave T{sub B} variation during the pre-impulsive stage of interest. The period agrees well with that reported for AIA sunward-contracting loops and upward ejective plasmoids (suggested to be reconnection outflows). This suggests that both periodicities are controlled by the same reconnection process that takes place intermittently at a 2 minute timescale. We infer that at least a part of the emission is excited by non-thermal energetic electrons via the gyro-synchrotron mechanism. The study demonstrates the potential of microwave imaging in exploring the flux rope magnetic geometry and relevant reconnection process during the onset of solar eruption.

  10. Open Surface Solar Irradiance Observations - A Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Lionel; Nüst, Daniel; Jirka, Simon; Maso, Joan; Ranchin, Thierry; Wald, Lucien

    2015-04-01

    The newly started project ConnectinGEO funded by the European Commission aims at improving the understanding on which environmental observations are currently available in Europe and subsequently providing an informational basis to close gaps in diverse observation networks. The project complements supporting actions and networking activities with practical challenges to test and improve the procedures and methods for identifying observation data gaps, and to ensure viability in real world scenarios. We present a challenge on future concepts for building a data sharing portal for the solar energy industry as well as the state of the art in the domain. Decision makers and project developers of solar power plants have identified the Surface Solar Irradiance (SSI) and its components as an important factor for their business development. SSI observations are crucial in the process of selecting suitable locations for building new plants. Since in-situ pyranometric stations form a sparse network, the search for locations starts with global satellite data and is followed by the deployment of in-situ sensors in selected areas for at least one year. To form a convincing picture, answers must be sought in the conjunction of these EO systems, and although companies collecting SSI observations are willing to share this information, the means to exchange in-situ measurements across companies and between stakeholders in the market are still missing. We present a solution for interoperable exchange of SSI data comprising in-situ time-series observations as well as sensor descriptions based on practical experiences from other domains. More concretely, we will apply concepts and implementations of the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) framework of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The work is based on an existing spatial data infrastructure (SDI), which currently comprises metadata, maps and coverage data, but no in-situ observations yet. This catalogue is already registered in the

  11. On the solar origin of interplanetary disturbances observed in the vicinity of the Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vilmer

    Full Text Available The solar origin of 40 interplanetary disturbances observed in the vicinity of the Earth between January 1997 and June 1998 is investigated in this paper. Analysis starts with the establishment of a list of Interplanetary Mass Ejections or ICMEs (magnetic clouds, flux ropes and ejecta and of Interplanetary Shocks measured at WIND for the period for which we had previously investigated the coupling of the interplanetary medium with the terrestrial ionospheric response. A search for associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs observed by LASCO/SOHO is then performed, starting from an estimation of the transit time of the inter-planetary perturbation from the Sun to the Earth, assumed to be achieved at a constant speed (i.e. the speed measured at 1 AU. EIT/SOHO and Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH observations are also used as proxies in this identification for the cases when LASCO observations do not allow one to firmly establish the association. The last part of the analysis concerns the identification of the solar source of the CMEs, performed using a large set of solar observations from X-ray to radio wavelengths. In the present study, this association is based on a careful examination of many data sets (EIT, NRH and H images and not on the use of catalogs and of Solar Geophysical Data reports. An association between inter-planetary disturbances and LASCO/CMEs or proxies on the disk is found for 36 interplanetary events. For 32 events, the solar source of activity can also be identified. A large proportion of cases is found to be associated with a flare signature in an active region, not excluding of course the involvement of a filament. Conclusions are finally drawn on the propagation of the disturbances in the interplanetary medium, the preferential association of disturbances detected close to the Earth’s orbit with halos or wide CMEs and the location on the solar disk of solar sources of the interplanetary disturbances during that period

  12. Gamma-Ray Flaring Activity from the Gravitationally Lensed Blazar PKS 1830-211 Observed by Fermi LAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A. A.; et al.

    2015-01-23

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope routinely detects the MeV-peaked flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS 1830–211 (z = 2.507). Its apparent isotropic γ-ray luminosity (E > 100 MeV), averaged over ~3 years of observations and peaking on 2010 October 14/15 at 2.9 × 10(50) erg s(–)(1), makes it among the brightest high-redshift Fermi blazars. No published model with a single lens can account for all of the observed characteristics of this complex system. Based on radio observations, one expects time-delayed variability to follow about 25 days after a primary flare, with flux about a factor of 1.5 less. Two large γ-ray flares of PKS 1830–211 have been detected by the LAT in the considered period, and no substantial evidence for such a delayed activity was found. This allows us to place a lower limit of about 6 on the γ-ray flux ratio between the two lensed images. Swift XRT observations from a dedicated Target of Opportunity program indicate a hard spectrum with no significant correlation of X-ray flux with the γ-ray variability. The spectral energy distribution can be modeled with inverse Compton scattering of thermal photons from the dusty torus. The implications of the LAT data in terms of variability, the lack of evident delayed flare events, and different radio and γ-ray flux ratios are discussed. Microlensing effects, absorption, size and location of the emitting regions, the complex mass distribution of the system, an energy-dependent inner structure of the source, and flux suppression by the lens galaxy for one image path may be considered as hypotheses for understanding our results.

  13. Ulysses COSPIN observations of cosmic rays and solar energetic particles from the South Pole to the North Pole of the Sun during solar maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. McKibben

    Full Text Available In 2000–2001 Ulysses passed from the south to the north polar regions of the Sun in the inner heliosphere, providing a snapshot of the latitudinal structure of cosmic ray modulation and solar energetic particle populations during a period near solar maximum.  Observations from the COSPIN suite of energetic charged particle telescopes show that latitude variations in the cosmic ray intensity in the inner heliosphere are nearly non-existent near solar maximum, whereas small but clear latitude gradients were observed during the similar phase of Ulysses’ orbit near the 1994–95 solar minimum. At proton energies above ~10 MeV and extending up to >70 MeV, the intensities are often dominated by Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs accelerated near the Sun in association with intense solar flares and large Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs. At lower energies the particle intensities are almost constantly enhanced above background, most likely as a result of a mix of SEPs and particles accelerated by interplanetary shocks. Simultaneous high-latitude Ulysses and near-Earth observations show that most events that produce large flux increases near Earth also produce flux increases at Ulysses, even at the highest latitudes attained. Particle anisotropies during particle onsets at Ulysses are typically directed outwards from the Sun, suggesting either acceleration extending to high latitudes or efficient cross-field propagation somewhere inside the orbit of Ulysses. Both cosmic ray and SEP observations are consistent with highly efficient transport of energetic charged particles between the equatorial and polar regions and across the mean interplanetary magnetic fields in the inner heliosphere.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (cosmic rays – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (energetic particles; flares and mass ejections

  14. Determination of Differential Emission Measure Distribution of Coronal Structures Observed by SphinX During Recent Minimum of Solar Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepa, Anna; Gburek, Szymon; Siarkowski, Marek; Sylwester, Barbara; Sylwester, Janusz; Kowalinski, Miroslaw

    SphinX is a high-sensitivity soft X-ray spectrophotometer which measures soft X-ray spectra in the energy range between 0.8 keV and 15 keV. From February to November 2009 the instrument has observed unusually quiet solar coronal emission as well as a number of weak solar flares. Based on SphinX spectra it is possible to study the differential emission measure distributions (DEM) in the temperature range roughly between 1 MK and 10 MK. The aim of the present study is to unveil DEM plasma distributions for selected activity conditions and analyze their variability.

  15. Evolution of flare ribbons, electric currents, and quasi-separatrix layers during an X-class flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janvier, M.; Savcheva, A.; Pariat, E.; Tassev, S.; Millholland, S.; Bommier, V.; McCauley, P.; McKillop, S.; Dougan, F.

    2016-07-01

    Context. The standard model for eruptive flares has been extended to three dimensions (3D) in the past few years. This model predicts typical J-shaped photospheric footprints of the coronal current layer, forming at similar locations as the quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs). Such a morphology is also found for flare ribbons observed in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) band, and in nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) magnetic field extrapolations and models. Aims: We study the evolution of the photospheric traces of the current density and flare ribbons, both obtained with the Solar Dynamics Observatory instruments. We aim to compare their morphology and their time evolution, before and during the flare, with the topological features found in a NLFFF model. Methods: We investigated the photospheric current evolution during the 06 September 2011 X-class flare (SOL2011-09-06T22:20) occurring in NOAA AR 11283 from observational data of the magnetic field obtained with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We compared this evolution with that of the flare ribbons observed in the EUV filters of the Atmospheric Imager Assembly. We also compared the observed electric current density and the flare ribbon morphology with that of the QSLs computed from the flux rope insertion method-NLFFF model. Results: The NLFFF model shows the presence of a fan-spine configuration of overlying field lines, due to the presence of a parasitic polarity, embedding an elongated flux rope that appears in the observations as two parts of a filament. The QSL signatures of the fan configuration appear as a circular flare ribbon that encircles the J-shaped ribbons related to the filament ejection. The QSLs, evolved via a magnetofrictional method, also show similar morphology and evolution as both the current ribbons and the EUV flare ribbons obtained several times during the flare. Conclusions: For the first time, we propose a combined analysis of the photospheric

  16. Using Gamma-Ray and Neutron Emission to Determine Solar Flare Accelerated Particle Spectra and Composition and the Conditions Within the Flare Magnetic Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    due to Coulomb collisions, removal by nuclear reactions, magnetic mirroring in the convergent flux tube, and MHD pitch-angle scattering in the corona ...analysis of high-energy flare data that provides an optimum set of param- eters with meaningful uncertainties. To illustrate this approach, the...reactions magnetic mirroring in the convergent flux tube, and MHD pitch-angle scattering in the corona . The accelerated ions are assumed to have a given

  17. Multiwavelength observations of the γ-ray flaring quasar S4 1030+61 in 2009-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, E. V.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Hovatta, T.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2016-11-01

    We present a study of the parsec-scale multifrequency properties of the quasar S4 1030+61 during a prolonged radio and γ-ray activity. Observations were performed within Fermi γ-ray telescope, Owens Valley Radio Observatory 40-m telescope and MOJAVE Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) monitoring programmes, covering five years from 2009. The data are supplemented by four-epoch VLBA observations at 5, 8, 15, 24 and 43 GHz, which were triggered by the bright γ-ray flare, registered in the quasar in 2010. The S4 1030+61 jet exhibits an apparent superluminal velocity of (6.4 ± 0.4)c and does not show ejections of new components in the observed period, while decomposition of the radio light curve reveals nine prominent flares. The measured variability parameters of the source show values typical for Fermi-detected quasars. Combined analysis of radio and γ-ray emission implies a spatial separation between emitting regions at these bands of about 12 pc and locates the γ-ray emission within a parsec from the central engine. We detected changes in the value and direction of the linear polarization and the Faraday rotation measure. The value of the intrinsic brightness temperature of the core is above the equipartition state, while its value as a function of distance from the core is well approximated by the power law. Altogether these results show that the radio flaring activity of the quasar is accompanied by injection of relativistic particles and energy losses at the jet base, while S4 1030+61 has a stable, straight jet well described by standard conical jet theories.

  18. Real-Time flare detection using guided filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiaben; Deng, Yuanyong; Yuan, Fei; Guo, Juan

    2017-04-01

    A procedure is introduced for the automatic detection of solar flare using full-disk solar images from Huairou Solar Observing Station (HSOS), National Astronomical Observatories of China. In image preprocessing, median filter is applied to remove the noises. And then we adopt guided filter, which is first introduced into the astronomical image detection, to enhance the edges of flares and restrain the solar limb darkening. Flares are then detected by modified Otsu algorithm and further threshold processing technique. Compared with other automatic detection procedure, the new procedure has some advantages such as real time and reliability as well as no need of image division and local threshold. Also, it reduces the amount of computation largely, which is benefited from the efficient guided filter algorithm. The procedure has been tested on one month sequences (December 2013) of HSOS full-disk solar images and the result of flares detection shows that the number of flares detected by our procedure is well consistent with the manual one.

  19. Physics of erupting solar flux ropes: Coronal mass ejections (CMEs)—Recent advances in theory and observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, James

    2017-09-01

    Solar eruptions, observed as flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), are the most energetic visible plasma phenomena in the solar system. CMEs are the central component of solar eruptions and are detected as coherent magnetized plasma structures expanding in the solar wind (SW). If they reach the Earth, their magnetic fields can drive strong disturbances in the ionosphere, causing deleterious effects on terrestrial technological systems. The scientific and practical importance of CMEs has led to numerous satellite missions observing the Sun and SW. This has culminated in the ability to continuously observe CMEs expanding from the Sun to 1 AU, where the magnetic fields and plasma parameters of the evolved structures ("ejecta") can be measured in situ. Until recently, the physical mechanisms responsible for eruptions were major unanswered questions in solar and by extension stellar physics. New observations of CME dynamics and associated eruptive phenomena are now providing more stringent constraints on models, and quantitative theory-data comparisons are helping to establish the correct mechanism of solar eruptions, particularly the driving force of CMEs and the evolution of their magnetic fields in three dimensions. Recent work has demonstrated that theoretical results can simultaneously replicate the observed CME position-time data, temporal profiles of associated solar flare soft X-ray emissions, and the magnetic field and plasma parameters of CME ejecta measured at 1 AU. Thus, a new theoretical framework with testable predictions is emerging to model eruptions and the coupling of CME ejecta to geomagnetic disturbances. The key physics in CME dynamics is the Lorentz hoop force acting on toroidal "flux ropes," scalable from tokamaks and similar laboratory plasma structures. The present paper reviews the latest advances in observational and theoretical understanding of CMEs with the emphasis on quantitative comparisons of theory and observation.

  20. X-radiation /E greater than 10 keV/, H-alpha and microwave emission during the impulsive phase of solar flares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorpahl, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    A study has been made of the variation in hard (E greater than 10 keV) X-radiation, H-alpha and microwave emission during the impulsive phase of solar flares. Analysis shows that the rise-time in the 20-30-keV X-ray spike depends on the electron hardness. The impulsive phase is also marked by an abrupt, very intense increase in H-alpha emission in one or more knots of the flare. Properties of these H-alpha kernels include: (1) a luminosity several times greater than the surrounding flare, (2) an intensity rise starting about 20-30 sec before, peaking about 20-25 sec after, and lasting about twice as long as the hard spike, (3) a location lower in the chromosphere than the remaining flare, (4) essentially no expansion prior to the hard spike, and (5) a position within 6000 km of the boundary separating polarities, usually forming on both sides of the neutral line near both feet of the same tube of force. Correspondingly, impulsive microwave events are characterized by: (1) great similarity in burst structure with 20-32 keV X-rays but only above 5000 MHz, (2) typical low frequency burst cutoff between 1400-3800 MHz, and (3) maximum emission above 7500 MHz.

  1. Spectroscopy of Very Hot Plasma in Non-flaring Parts of a Solar Limb Active Region: Spatial and Temporal Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenti, Susanna; del Zanna, Giulio; Petralia, Antonino; Reale, Fabio; Teriaca, Luca; Testa, Paola; Mason, Helen E.

    2017-09-01

    In this work we investigate the thermal structure of an off-limb active region (AR) in various non-flaring areas, as it provides key information on the way these structures are heated. In particular, we concentrate on the very hot component (> 3 {MK}) as it is a crucial element to distinguish between different heating mechanisms. We present an analysis using Fe and Ca emission lines from both the Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode. A data set covering all ionization stages from Fe x to Fe xix has been used for the thermal analysis (both differential emission measure and emission measure, EM). Ca xiv is used for the SUMER-EIS radiometric cross calibration. We show that the very hot plasma is present and persistent almost everywhere in the core of the limb AR. The off-limb AR is clearly structured in Fe xviii. Almost everywhere, the EM analysis reveals plasma at 10 MK (visible in Fe xix emission), which is down to 0.1% of EM of the main 3 {MK} plasma. We estimate the power-law index of the hot tail of the EM to be between -8.5 and -4.4. However, the question about the possible existence of a small minor peak at around 10 {MK} remains open. The absence in some part of the AR of the Fe xix and Fe xxiii lines (which fall into our spectral range) enables us to determine an upper limit on the EM at these temperatures. Our results include a new Ca xiv 943.59 Å atomic model.

  2. Flare Comparisons of the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) to Preliminary SDO EVE Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlon, Phillip C.

    2010-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) launched February 11, 2010 from Kennedy Space Center and started normal science operations in April 2010. One of the instruments onboard SDO, the EUV Variability- Experiment (EVE), will measure the solar EUV irradiance from 0.1-105 nm with 0.1 nm spectral resolution as well as a measure of the broad-band Lyman-Alpha emission (121.0 rim), all with less than 10 percent uncertainties. One of the biggest improvements of EVE over its predecessors is its ability to continuously measure the complete spectrum ever y 10 seconds, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. This temporal coverage and cadence will greatly enhance the knowledge of the solar EUV variations during solar flares. This paper will present a comparison of the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM), which can produce an estimated EUV spectrum at 10 seconds temporal resolution, to the preliminary flare observation results from SDO EVE. The discussion will focus on the short-term EUV flare variations and evolution.

  3. Observations of solar-cell metallization corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mon, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    The Engineering Sciences Area of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Flat-Plate Solar Array Project is performing long term environmental tests on photovoltaic modules at Wyle Laboratories in Huntsville, Alabama. Some modules have been exposed to 85 C/85% RH and 40 C/93% RH for up to 280 days. Other modules undergoing temperature-only exposures ( 3% RH) at 85 C and 100 C have been tested for more than 180 days. At least two modules of each design type are exposed to each environment - one with, and the other without a 100-mA forward bias. Degradation is both visually observed and electrically monitored. Visual observations of changes in appearance are recorded at each inspection time. Significant visual observations relating to metallization corrosion (and/or metallization-induced corrosion) include discoloration (yellowing and browning) of grid lines, migration of grid line material into the encapsulation (blossoming), the appearance of rainbow-like diffraction patterns on the grid lines, and brown spots on collectors and grid lines. All of these observations were recorded for electrically biased modules in the 280-day tests with humidity.

  4. Solar Coronal Jets: Observations, Theory, and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raouafi, N. E.; Patsourakos, S.; Pariat, E.; Young, P. R.; Sterling, A.; Savcheva, A.; Shimojo, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Devore, C. R.; Archontis, V.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Chromospheric and coronal jets represent important manifestations of ubiquitous solar transients, which may be the source of signicant mass and energy input to the upper solar atmosphere and the solar wind. While the energy involved in a jet-like event is smaller than that of nominal solar ares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), jets share many common properties with these major phenomena, in particular, the explosive magnetically driven dynamics. Studies of jets could, therefore, provide critical insight for understanding the larger, more complex drivers of the solar activity. On the other side of the size-spectrum, the study of jets could also supply important clues on the physics of transients closeor at the limit of the current spatial resolution such as spicules. Furthermore, jet phenomena may hint to basic process for heating the corona and accelerating the solar wind; consequently their study gives us the opportunity to attack a broadrange of solar-heliospheric problems.

  5. Effects of Energetic Solar Emissions on the Lower Ionosphere as seen in Ionosonde Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, V.; Satori, G.; Williams, E.

    2016-12-01

    The sudden increase of X-radiation and EUV emission following solar flares causes extra ionization in the sunlit hemisphere in the D- and E-regions of the Earth's ionosphere. In addition, solar flares are also accompanied by energetic particles (protons and electrons) with energies from tens of keV to hundreds of MeV result additional ionization. The impact of two exceptional solar events - the Bastille Day event (July 14, 2000) and the Halloween event (Oct/Nov2003) on the lowest region of the ionosphere (European stations (Juliusruh, 53.6°N, 13.4°E; Chilton, 51.5°N, 359.4°E; Rome, 41.9°N, 12.5°E; SanVito 40.6°N, 17.8°E) during the Halloween event. This ionosonde response increases with increasing latitude. Simultaneously the absence of the foE parameter was observed. The sharply increased values (2-4 MHz) of the fmin parameters and the co-occurring absence of the foE parameters were detected in the case of the Bastille Day event as well, but only at high latitude stations (Loparskaya, 68°N, 33°E; St. Petersburg, 59.9°N, 30.3°E; Juliusruh, 53.6°N, 13.4°E). These results suggest that the latitude-dependent change of the fmin and foE parameters is related to energetic solar particles penetrating to the lower ionosphere.

  6. Multi-Wavelength Spectroscopic Observations of a White Light Flare Produced Directly by Non-thermal Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung-Sun; Imada, Shinsuke; Watanabe, Kyoko; Bamba, Yumi; Brooks, David

    2017-08-01

    An X1.6 flare on 2014 October 22 was observed by multiple spectrometers in UV, EUV and X-ray (Hinode/EIS, IRIS, and RHESSI), and multi-wavelength imaging observations (SDO/AIA and HMI). We analyze a bright kernel that produces a white light (WL) flare with continuum enhancement and a hard X-ray (HXR) peak. Taking advantage of the spectroscopic observations of IRIS and Hinode/EIS, we measure the temporal variation of the plasma properties in the bright kernel in the chromosphere and corona. We find that explosive evaporation was observed when the WL emission occurred. The temporal correlation of the WL emission, HXR peak, and evaporation flows indicates that the WL emission was produced by accelerated electrons. We calculated the energy flux deposited by non-thermal electrons (observed by RHESSI) and compared it to the dissipated energy estimated from a chromospheric line (Mg II triplet) observed by IRIS. The deposited energy flux from the non-thermal electrons is about (3-7.7)x1010 erg cm-2 s-1 for a given low-energy cutoff of 30-40 keV, assuming the thick-target model. The energy flux estimated from the changes in temperature in the chromosphere measured using the Mg II subordinate line is about (4.6-6.7)×109 erg cm-2 s-1: ˜6%-22% of the deposited energy. This comparison of estimated energy fluxes implies that the continuum enhancement was directly produced by the non-thermal electrons.

  7. Energetic Particle Estimates for Stellar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblood, Allison; Chamberlin, Phil; Woods, Tom

    2018-01-01

    In the heliosphere, energetic particles are accelerated away from the Sun during solar flares and/or coronal mass ejections where they frequently impact the Earth and other solar system bodies. Solar (or stellar) energetic particles (SEPs) not only affect technological assets, but also influence mass loss and chemistry in planetary atmospheres (e.g., depletion of ozone). SEPs are increasingly recognized as an important factor in assessing exoplanet habitability, but we do not yet have constraints on SEP emission from any stars other than the Sun. Until indirect measurements are available, we must assume solar-like particle production and apply correlations between solar flares and SEPs detected near Earth to stellar flares. We present improved scaling relations between solar far-UV flare flux and >10 MeV proton flux near Earth. We apply these solar scaling relations to far-UV flares from exoplanet host stars and discuss the implications for modeling chemistry and mass loss in exoplanet atmospheres.

  8. Explosive Chromospheric Evaporation and Warm Rain in a C3.1 Flare Observed by IRIS, Hinode/EIS, and RHESSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Inglis, Andrew R.

    2017-10-01

    IRIS and EIS observed a GOES C3.1 flare in stare mode on 2014 March 15. The GOES flare started at 00:21:35 and peaked at 00:26:30 UT. The IRIS slit pointed near the center of the flare, while the EIS slit pointed 35\\prime\\prime to its west. About 4 minutes before the GOES flare start, the IRIS C II and Si IV intensities became (and remained) greater than their pre-flare averages, indicating that the flare had begun and that the chromosphere and transition region were involved. IRIS first detected blueshifted Fe xxi emission at 00:22:42 UT, by which time the C II and Si IV intensities had increased by factors around 100 and their profiles were redshifted. Simultaneous, cospatial blueshifted Fe xxi emission with redshifted C II and Si IV emission indicates explosive chromospheric evaporation. EIS spectra reveal Fe xxiii emission that is too weak to measure velocities, and intensity enhancements by factors about 1.7 in the Fe xiv and Fe xvi emission. Lines from both of these coronal ions show redshifts ≈9 km s-1 around 00:24:00 UT, and the Fe xiv 264.7/274.2 intensity ratio reveals an increase of n e from (1.03+/- 0.20)× {10}9 before to (3.58+/- 0.68)× {10}9 cm-3 during the flare. The redshifted coronal line emission and increased n e are consistent with warm rain falling and accumulating in the remote area observed by EIS. A fit to the RHESSI hard X-ray spectrum yields a nonthermal energy injection rate of 4.9× {10}26 erg s-1, from which we estimate a HXR beam energy flux range consistent with explosive evaporation.

  9. Improving Flare Irradiance Models with the Low Pass Filter Relation Between EUV Flare Emissions with Differing Formation Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Edward M. B.; Eparvier, Francis G.

    2016-10-01

    Solar flares are the result of magnetic reconnection in the solar corona which converts magnetic energy into kinetic energy resulting in the rapid heating of solar plasma. As this plasma cools, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) line emission intensities evolve as the plasma temperature passes through line formation temperatures, resulting in emission lines with cooler formation temperatures peaking after those with hotter formation temperatures. At the 2016 American Astronomical Society Solar Physics Division Meeting in Boulder (SPD2016), we showed that Fe XVIII solar flare light curves are highly correlated with Fe XXIII light curves that have been subjected to the single-pole Low Pass Filter Equation (LPFE) with a time constant equal to the time difference between the peak emissions. The single-pole (or equivalently, RC) LPFE appears frequently in analyses of systems which both store and dissipate heat, and the flare LPFE effect is believed to be related to the underlying cooling processes. Because the LPFE is constrained by a single parameter, this effect has implications for both operational EUV flare irradiance models and understanding thermal processes that occur in post-flare loops. At the time of SPD2016, it was ambiguous as to whether the LPFE effect relates hot thermal bremsstrahlung soft x-ray (SXR) or EUV line emissions with cooler EUV line emissions since Fe XXIII flare light curves are highly correlated with SXR flare light curves. In this study, we present new results characterizing the LPFE relation between multiple emission lines with differing formation temperatures ranging from 107.2 to 105.7 K observed by SDO/EVE and SXR thermal bremsstrahlung emissions observed by GOES/XRS. We show that the LPFE equation relates Fe XVIII with cooler EUV line emissions, providing unambiguous evidence that the LPFE effect exists between EUV line emissions rather than thermal bremsstrahlung and line emissions exclusively. The exact nature of this effect remains an open

  10. Comparison of emission properties of two homologous flares in AR 11283

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yan; Jing, Ju; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Haimin, E-mail: yx2@njit.edu [Space Weather Research Lab, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    Large, complex, active regions may produce multiple flares within a certain period of one or two days. These flares could occur in the same location with similar morphologies, commonly referred to as 'homologous flares'. In 2011 September, active region NOAA 11283 produced a pair of homologous flares on the 6th and 7th, respectively. Both of them were white-light (WL) flares, as captured by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory in visible continuum at 6173 Å which is believed to originate from the deep solar atmosphere. We investigate the WL emission of these X-class flares with HMI's seeing-free imaging spectroscopy. The durations of impulsive peaks in the continuum are about 4 minutes. We compare the WL with hard X-ray (HXR) observations for the September 6 flare and find a good correlation between the continuum and HXR both spatially and temporally. In absence of RHESSI data during the second flare on September 7, the derivative of the GOES soft X-ray is used and also found to be well correlated temporally with the continuum. We measure the contrast enhancements, characteristic sizes, and HXR fluxes of the twin flares, which are similar for both flares, indicating analogous triggering and heating processes. However, the September 7 flare was associated with conspicuous sunquake signals whereas no seismic wave was detected during the flare on September 6. Therefore, this comparison suggests that the particle bombardment may not play a dominant role in producing the sunquake events studied in this paper.

  11. Solar spectral irradiance variability in cycle 24: observations and models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchenko Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing the excellent stability of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI, we characterize both short-term (solar rotation and long-term (solar cycle changes of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI between 265 and 500 nm during the ongoing cycle 24. We supplement the OMI data with concurrent observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2 and Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE instruments and find fair-to-excellent, depending on wavelength, agreement among the observations, and predictions of the Naval Research Laboratory Solar Spectral Irradiance (NRLSSI2 and Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era (SATIRE-S models.

  12. Solar spectral irradiance variability in cycle 24: observations and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenko, Sergey V.; DeLand, Matthew T.; Lean, Judith L.

    2016-12-01

    Utilizing the excellent stability of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), we characterize both short-term (solar rotation) and long-term (solar cycle) changes of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) between 265 and 500 nm during the ongoing cycle 24. We supplement the OMI data with concurrent observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) and Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) instruments and find fair-to-excellent, depending on wavelength, agreement among the observations, and predictions of the Naval Research Laboratory Solar Spectral Irradiance (NRLSSI2) and Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era (SATIRE-S) models.

  13. Analysis of flares in the chromosphere and corona of main- and pre-main-sequence M-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Chacón, I.

    2015-11-01

    This Ph.D. Thesis revolves around flares on main- and pre-main-sequence M-type stars. We use observations in different wavelength ranges with the aim of analysing the effects of flares at different layers of stellar atmospheres. In particular, optical and X-ray observations are used so that we can study how flares affect, respectively, the chromosphere and the corona of stars. In the optical range we carry out a high temporal resolution spectroscopic monitoring of UV Ceti-type stars aimed at detecting non-white-light flares (the most typical kind of solar flares) in stars other than the Sun. With these data we confirm that non-white-light flares are a frequent phenomenon in UV Ceti-type stars, as observed in the Sun. We study and interpret the behaviour of different chromospheric lines during the flares detected on AD Leo. By using a simplified slab model of flares (Jevremović et al. 1998), we are able to determine the physical parameters of the chromospheric flaring plasma (electron density and electron temperature), the temperature of the underlying source, and the surface area covered by the flaring plasma. We also search for possible relationships between the physical parameters of the flaring plasma and other properties such as the flare duration, area, maximum flux and released energy. This work considerably extends the existing sample of stellar flares analysed with good quality spectroscopy in the optical range. In X-rays we take advantage of the great sensitivity, wide energy range, high energy resolution, and continuous time coverage of the EPIC detectors - on-board the XMMNewton satellite - in order to perform time-resolved spectral analysis of coronal flares. In particular, in the UV Ceti-type star CC Eri we study two flares that are weaker than those typically reported in the literature (allowing us to speculate about the role of flares as heating agents of stellar atmospheres); while in the pre-main-sequence M-type star TWA 11B (with no signatures of

  14. Form and formation of flares and parabolae based on new observations of the internal shell structure in lytoceratid and perisphinctid ammonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Radtke

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ultrastructure of pristine shells of Jurassic and Cretaceous lytoceratid and perisphinctid ammonoids indicates that flares and parabolae represent homologous structures. Both mark an interruption of shell growth. We dismiss earlier interpretations of parabolae as actual aperture, relics of resorbed apophyses or superstructure of the musculature associated to a semi-internal shell. Instead we propose an episodic growth model including several growth stops at the aperture during the formation of a frill-like aperture for parabolae and flares. Such an aperture is composed of the outer prismatic layer, the nacreous layer and an apertural prismatic coating. Here, we observed the apertural prismatic coating for the first time as an integral part of flares and parabolae. The apertural prismatic coating covers only the inner surface of the frill and was secreted by a permanent mantle cover indicating a prolonged period without the production of new shell material. Parabolae differ from flares by their general shape and the presence of ventro-lateral parabolic notches and nodes. The notches were formed by folding of the frill and had the potential to form semi-open spines. The corresponding parabolic nodes are caused by an outward swelling of the shell-secreting mantle tissue producing new shell material at the position of the folding. New shell material that belongs to the conch tube is attached to the base of flares and parabolae after withdrawal of the mantle edge representing the continuation of shell growth. Usually, the frilled aperture associated with flares and parabolae were removed during lifetime. This study reports on flares in Argonauticeras for the first time. In this genus they are typically associated with varices.

  15. Arrival times of Flare/Halo CME associated shocks at the Earth: comparison of the predictions of three numerical models with these observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. P. McKenna-Lawlor

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The arrival times at L1 of eleven travelling shocks associated both with X-ray flaring and with halo CMEs recorded aboard SOHO/LASCO have been considered. Close to the Sun the velocities of these events were estimated using either Type II radio records or CME speeds. Close to the Earth the shocks were detected in the data of various solar wind plasma, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF and energetic particle experiments aboard SOHO, ACE, WIND, INTERBALL-1 and IMP-8. The real-time shock arrival predictions of three numerical models, namely the Shock Time of Arrival Model (STOA, the Interplanetary Shock Propagation Model (ISPM and the Hakamada-Akasofu-Fry Solar Wind Model (HAFv.2 were tested against these observations. This is the first time that energetic protons (tens of keV to a few MeV have been used to complement plasma and IMF data in validating shock propagation models. The models were all generally successful in predicting shock arrivals. STOA provided the smallest values of the "predicted minus measured" arrival times and displayed a typical predictive precision better than about 8 h. The ratio of the calculated standard deviation of the transit times to Earth to the standard deviation of the measurements was estimated for each model (treating interacting events as composite shocks and these ratios turned out to be 0.60, 1.15 and 1.02 for STOA, ISPM and HAFv.2, respectively. If an event in the sample for which the shock velocity was not well known is omitted from consideration, these ratios become 0.36, 0.76 and 0.81, respectively. Larger statistical samples should now be tested. The ratio of the in situ shock velocity and the "Sun to L1" transit velocity (Vsh /Vtr was in the range of 0.7–0.9 for individual, non-interacting, shock events. HAFv.2 uniquely provided information on those changes in the COBpoint (the moving Connection point on the shock along the IMF to the OBserver which directly influenced energetic particle rise times

  16. Studies on Longer Wavelength Type II Radio Bursts Associated with Flares and CMEs during the Rise and Decay Phase of 23rd Solar Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Vasanth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A statistical study on the properties of CMEs and flares associated with DH-type II bursts in the 23rd solar cycle during the period 1997–2008 is carried out. A sample of 229 events from our recent work is used for the present study (Vasanth and Umapathy, 2013. The collected events are divided into two groups as (i solar cycle rise phase events and (ii solar cycle decay phase events. The properties of CMEs in the two groups were compared and the results are presented. It is noted that there is no difference in the properties of type II burst like start frequency and end frequency between the solar cycle rise phase events and decay phase events. The mean CME speed of solar cycle decay phase events (1373 km s−1 is slightly higher than the solar cycle rise phase events (1058 km s−1. The mean CME acceleration of solar cycle decay phase events (−15.18 m s−2 is found to be higher than that of the solar cycle rise phase events (−1.32 m s−2. There exists good correlation between (i CME speed and width and (ii CME speed and acceleration for solar cycle decay phase events (R=0.79, R=-0.80 compared to solar cycle rise phase events (R=0.60, R=-0.57. These results indicate that the type II bursts parameters do not depend upon the time of appearance in the solar cycle.

  17. Observations of a Two-Stage Solar Eruptive Event (SEE): Evidence for Secondary Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yang; Dennis, Brian R.; Holman, Gordon D.; Wang, Tongjiang; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Savage, Sabrina; Veronig, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    We present RHESSI, SDO/AIA, SOHO/LASCO, STEREO, and GOES observations of a partially occulted solar eruptive event (SEE) that occurred at the South-West limb on 8 March, 2011. The GOES X-ray light curve shows two peaks separated by almost two hours that we interpret as two stages of a single event associated with the delayed eruption of a CME. A hot flux rope formed during the first stage and continued expanding and rising throughout the event. The speed of the flux rope decreased from approx.120 to 14 km/s during the decay phase of the first stage and increased again during the second stage to become the CME with a speed of approx.516 km/s. RHESSI and GOES data analyses show that the plasma temperature reached over 20 MK in the first stage, then decreased to approx.10 MK and increased to 15 MK in the second stage. This event provides clear evidence for a secondary heating phase. The enhanced EUV and X-ray emission came from the high corona ( approx.60 arcsec above the limb) in the second stage, approx.40 arcsec higher than the site of the initial flare emission. STEREO-A on-disk observations indicate that the post-flare loops during this stage were of larger scale sizes and spatially distinct from those in the first stage.

  18. Observed ices in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Roger N.; Grundy, Will; Carlson, Robert R.; Noll, Keith; Gudipati, Murthy; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.

    2013-01-01

    Ices have been detected and mapped on the Earth and all planets and/or their satellites further from the sun. Water ice is the most common frozen volatile observed and is also unambiguously detected or inferred in every planet and/or their moon(s) except Venus. Carbon dioxide is also extensively found in all systems beyond the Earth except Pluto although it sometimes appears to be trapped rather than as an ice on some objects. The largest deposits of carbon dioxide ice is on Mars. Sulfur dioxide ice is found in the Jupiter system. Nitrogen and methane ices are common beyond the Uranian system. Saturn’s moon Titan probably has the most complex active chemistry involving ices, with benzene (C6H6) and many tentative or inferred compounds including ices of Cyanoacetylene (HC3N), Toluene (C7H8), Cyanogen (C2N2), Acetonitrile (CH3CN), H2O, CO2, and NH3. Confirming compounds on Titan is hampered by its thick smoggy atmosphere. Ammonia was predicted on many icy moons but is notably absent among the definitively detected ices with the possible exception of Enceladus. Comets, storehouses of many compounds that could exist as ices in their nuclei, have only had small amounts of water ice definitively detected on their surfaces. Only one asteroid has had a direct detection of surface water ice, although its presence can be inferred in others. This chapter reviews some of the properties of ices that lead to their detection, and surveys the ices that have been observed on solid surfaces throughout the Solar System.

  19. Observational and theoretical investigations in solar seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    This is the final report on a project to develop a theoretical basis for interpreting solar oscillation data in terms of the interior dynamics and structure of the Sun. The topics covered include the following: (1) studies of the helioseismic signatures of differential rotation and convection in the solar interior; (2) wave generation by turbulent convection; and (3) the study of antipodal sunspot imaging of an active region tomography.

  20. Expanding CME-flare relations to other stellar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschou, Sofia P.; Drake, Jeremy J.; Cohen, Ofer

    2017-05-01

    Stellar activity is one of the main parameters in exoplanet habitability studies. While the effects of UV to X-ray emission from extreme flares on exoplanets are beginning to be investigated, the impact of coronal mass ejections is currently highly speculative because CMEs and their properties cannot yet be directly observed on other stars. An extreme superflare was observed in X-rays on the Algol binary system on August 30 1997, emitting a total of energy 1.4x 10^{37} erg and making it a great candidate for studying the upper energy limits of stellar superflares in solar-type (GK) stars. A simultaneous increase and subsequent decline in absorption during the flare was also observed and interpretted as being caused by a CME. Here we investigate the dynamic properties of a CME that could explain such time-dependent absorption and appeal to trends revealed from solar flare and CME statistics as a guide. Using the ice-cream cone model that is extensively used in solar physics to describe the three-dimensional CME structure, in combination with the temporal profile of the hydrogen column density evolution, we are able to characterize the CME and estimate its kinetic energy and mass. We examine the mass, kinetic and flare X-ray fluence in the context of solar relations to examine the extent to which such relations can be extrapolated to much more extreme stellar events.

  1. Coronal extension of flaring region magnetic fields inferred from high-resolution microwave and type III burst observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantos, P.; Pick, M.; Kundu, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of three solar radio bursts, obtained with the Very Large Array of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory at 6 cm wavelength, have been combined with meter observations from the Mark III Nancay Radioheliograph. There is a good correlation between solar activity observed at the two wavelength domains. A small change by about 10 sec in the centimetric burst location corresponds to a large change, by about 0.5 solar radius, in the related metric type III burst location. This indicates discrete injection/acceleration regions and the presence of very divergent magnetic fields. The bursts come from two distinct active regions. With two-dimensional spatial resolution, it is shown that, in this sample, each active region possesses a coronal extension that is separated from that of the neighboring active region.

  2. Simultaneous Observation of High Temperature Plasma of Solar Corona By TESIS CORONAS-PHOTON and XRT Hinode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, A.; Kuzin, S.; Bogachev, S.; Shestov, S.

    2012-05-01

    The Mg XII spectroheliograph is a part of instrumentation complex TESIS (satellite CORONAS-PHOTON). This instrument builds monochromatic images of hot plasma of the solar corona (λ = 8.42 Å, T>5 MK). The Mg XII spectroheliograph observed hot plasma in the non-flaring active-region NOAA 11019 during nine days. We reconstructed DEM of this active region with the help of genetic algorithm (we used data of the Mg XII spectroheliograph, XRT and EIT). Emission measure of the hot component amounts 1 % of the emission measure of the cool component.

  3. Which of Kepler's Stars Flare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-12-01

    The habitability of distant exoplanets is dependent upon many factors one of which is the activity of their host stars. To learn about which stars are most likely to flare, a recent study examines tens of thousands of stellar flares observed by Kepler.Need for a Broader SampleArtists rendering of a flaring dwarf star. [NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center/S. Wiessinger]Most of our understanding of what causes a star to flare is based on observations of the only star near enough to examine in detail the Sun. But in learning from a sample size of one, a challenge arises: we must determine which conclusions are unique to the Sun (or Sun-like stars), and which apply to other stellar types as well.Based on observations and modeling, astronomers think that stellar flares result from the reconnection of magnetic field lines in a stars outer atmosphere, the corona. The magnetic activity is thought to be driven by a dynamo caused by motions in the stars convective zone.HR diagram of the Kepler stars, with flaring main-sequence (yellow), giant (red) and A-star (green) stars in the authors sample indicated. [Van Doorsselaere et al. 2017]To test whether these ideas are true generally, we need to understand what types of stars exhibit flares, and what stellar properties correlate with flaring activity. A team of scientists led by Tom Van Doorsselaere (KU Leuven, Belgium) has now used an enormous sample of flares observed by Kepler to explore these statistics.Intriguing TrendsVan Doorsselaere and collaborators used a new automated flare detection and characterization algorithm to search through the raw light curves from Quarter 15 of the Kepler mission, building a sample of 16,850 flares on 6,662 stars. They then used these to study the dependence of the flare occurrence rate, duration, energy, and amplitude on the stellar spectral type and rotation period.This large statistical study led the authors to several interesting conclusions, including:Flare star incidence rate as a a

  4. The Effect of Magnetic Topology on the Escape of Flare Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Masson, S.; DeVore, C. R.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection in the solar atmosphere is believed to be the driver of most solar explosive phenomena. Therefore, the topology of the coronal magnetic field is central to understanding the solar drivers of space weather. Of particular importance to space weather are the impulsive Solar Energetic particles that are associated with some CME/eruptive flare events. Observationally, the magnetic configuration of active regions where solar eruptions originate appears to agree with the standard eruptive flare model. According to this model, particles accelerated at the flare reconnection site should remain trapped in the corona and the ejected plasmoid. However, flare-accelerated particles frequently reach the Earth long before the CME does. We present a model that may account for the injection of energetic particles onto open magnetic flux tubes connecting to the Earth. Our model is based on the well-known 2.5D breakout topology, which has a coronal null point (null line) and a four-flux system. A key new addition, however, is that we include an isothermal solar wind with open-flux regions. Depending on the location of the open flux with respect to the null point, we find that the flare reconnection can consist of two distinct phases. At first, the flare reconnection involves only closed field, but if the eruption occurs close to the open field, we find a second phase involving interchange reconnection between open and closed. We argue that this second reconnection episode is responsible for the injection of flare-accelerated particles into the interplanetary medium. We will report on our recent work toward understanding how flare particles escape to the heliosphere. This work uses high-resolution 2.5D MHD numerical simulations performed with the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS).

  5. Sizes of flaring kernels in various parts of the Hα line profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Radziszewski

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present new results of spectra-photometrical investigations of the flaring kernels' sizes and their intensities measured simultaneously in various parts of the Hα line profile. Our investigations were based on the very high temporal resolution spectral-imaging observations of the solar flares collected with Large Coronagraph (LC, Multi-channel Subtractive Double Pass Spectrograph and Solar Eclipse Coronal Imaging System (MSDP-SECIS at Białkow Observatory (University of Wrocław, Poland.

    We have found that the areas of the investigated individual flaring kernels vary in time and in wavelengths, as well as the intensities and areas of the Hα flaring kernels decreased systematically when observed in consecutive wavelengths toward the wings of the Hα line. Our result could be explained as an effect of the cone-shaped lower parts of the magnetic loops channeling high energy particle beams exciting chromospheric plasma.

  6. Solar radiation observation stations updated to 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, E.A.; Cristina, J.R.; Williams, B.B.

    1979-04-01

    The type of sensing and recording equipment for 420 stations in the US are listed alphabetically by states. The stations are divided according to whether or not they are in the basic National Weather Service, NOAA, network. Reports of summarized solar radiation data are listed in an appendix. (MHR)

  7. Solar neon abundances from gamma-ray spectroscopy and He-3-rich particle events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reames, D. V.; Ramaty, R.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1988-01-01

    Ambient solar atmospheric abundances derived from gamma-ray spectroscopy are compared with observations of solar energetic particles. Agreement is found between the gamma-ray-derived Ne/O ratio and the corresponding mean ratio for He-3-rich flares. Both of these values are significantly higher than inferred coronal Ne/O ratios. It is suggested that the mean Ne/O ratio in He-3-rich flares reflects the composition of the flare plasma rather than the acceleration process.

  8. Beam electrons as a source of Hα flare ribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druett, Malcolm; Scullion, Eamon; Zharkova, Valentina; Matthews, Sarah; Zharkov, Sergei; Rouppe Van der Voort, Luc

    2017-06-27

    The observations of solar flare onsets show rapid increase of hard and soft X-rays, ultra-violet emission with large Doppler blue shifts associated with plasma upflows, and Hα hydrogen emission with red shifts up to 1-4 Å. Modern radiative hydrodynamic models account well for blue-shifted emission, but struggle to reproduce closely the red-shifted Hα lines. Here we present a joint hydrodynamic and radiative model showing that during the first seconds of beam injection the effects caused by beam electrons can reproduce Hα line profiles with large red-shifts closely matching those observed in a C1.5 flare by the Swedish Solar Telescope. The model also accounts closely for timing and magnitude of upward motion to the corona observed 29 s after the event onset in 171 Å by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly/Solar Dynamics Observatory.

  9. Beam electrons as a source of Hα flare ribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druett, Malcolm; Scullion, Eamon; Zharkova, Valentina; Matthews, Sarah; Zharkov, Sergei; Rouppe Van der Voort, Luc

    2017-01-01

    The observations of solar flare onsets show rapid increase of hard and soft X-rays, ultra-violet emission with large Doppler blue shifts associated with plasma upflows, and Hα hydrogen emission with red shifts up to 1–4 Å. Modern radiative hydrodynamic models account well for blue-shifted emission, but struggle to reproduce closely the red-shifted Hα lines. Here we present a joint hydrodynamic and radiative model showing that during the first seconds of beam injection the effects caused by beam electrons can reproduce Hα line profiles with large red-shifts closely matching those observed in a C1.5 flare by the Swedish Solar Telescope. The model also accounts closely for timing and magnitude of upward motion to the corona observed 29 s after the event onset in 171 Å by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly/Solar Dynamics Observatory. PMID:28653670

  10. The influence of albedo on the size of hard X-ray flare sources

    OpenAIRE

    Battaglia, Marina; Kontar, Eduard P.; Hannah, Iain G.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Hard X-rays from solar flares are an important diagnostic of particle acceleration and transport in the solar atmosphere. Any observed X-ray flux from on-disc sources is composed of direct emission plus Compton backscattered photons (albedo). This affects both the observed spectra and images as well as the physical quantities derived from them such as the spatial and spectral distributions of accelerated electrons or characteristics of the solar atmosphere. Aims: We propose a new ind...

  11. A new approach for deriving the solar irradiance from non-flaring solar upper atmosphere plasmas at 2 x 10^4<-T<-2 x 10^7 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgan, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abdallaf, Jr., Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fontes, Christopher J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sherrill, Manolo E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Feldmn, U [NON LANL; Landi, E [NON LANL; Brown, C M [NON LANL; Seely, J F [NON LANL; Doschek, G A [NON LANL; Dammasch, I E [NON LANL

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new approach for deriving the solar irradiance in the X-ray to VUV range due to the emission by solar upper atmosphere plasmas at 2 x 10{sup 4} {le} T {le} 2 x 10{sup 7} K. Our approach is based on new understanding of the properties of the solar upper atmosphere; specifically, the discovery that the majority of emission from the non-flaring solar upper transition region and corona in the temperature range 3 x 10{sup 5} {le} T {le} 3 x 10{sup 6} K arises from isothermal plasmas that have four distinct temperatures: 0.35, 0.9, 1.4 and 3 x 10{sup 6} K. In the lower transition region (2 x 10{sup 4} {le} T {le} 2 x 10{sup 5} K) of coronal holes, quiet regions or active regions, although multithermal and variable in brightness, the shape of emission measure vs. temperature curves is almost constant. Flaring plasmas are for most part isothermal, although their emission measure and temperature continuously change. In this paper we review these recent results and propose a set of simple spectrometers for recording the solar spectrum in several narrow bands. The solar emission measure, average plasma temperature, and composition can be derived using the measured line fluxes. By combining the emission measure and other plasma properties with the output of a suite of atomic physics codes, which are also described here, the solar irradiance in the temperature range 2 x 10{sup 4} {le} T {le} 2 x 10{sup 7} K can be calculated.

  12. Low-energy solar electrons and ions observed at Ulysses February-April, 1991 - The inner heliosphere as a particle reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelof, E. C.; Gold, R. E.; Simnett, G. M.; Tappin, S. J.; Armstrong, T. P.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    Ulysses observations at 2.5 AU of 38-315 keV electrons and 61-4752 keV ions during February-April 1991 suggest in several ways that, during periods of sustained high solar activity, the inner heliosphere serves as a 'reservoir' for low-energy solar particles. Particle increases were not associated one-to-one with large X-ray flares because of their poor magnetic connection, yet intensities in March-April remained well above their February levels. The rise phase of the particle event associated with the great flare of 2245UT March 22 lasted most of two days, while throughout the one-week decay phase, the lowest-energy ion fluxes were nearly equal at Ulysses and earth (IMP-8).

  13. Observation of Hysteresis between Solar Activity Indicators and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using intermediate degree p-mode frequency data sets for solar cycle 22, we find that the frequency shifts and magnetic activity indicators show a ``hysteresis" phenomenon. It is observed that the magnetic indices follow different paths for the ascending and descending phases of the solar cycle while for radiative indices, ...

  14. Observation of Hysteresis between Solar Activity Indicators and p ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Observation of Hysteresis between Solar Activity Indicators and p-mode Frequency Shifts for Solar Cycle 22 ... find a "hysteresis" phenomenon between the centroid frequency changes and magnetic activity indicators. 2. ... 1 and 2, we have also shown the trend of variation in frequency shifts with activity indices for cycle 23 ...

  15. Interplanetary shock waves and the structure of solar wind disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundhausen, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    Observations and theoretical models of interplanetary shock waves are reviewed, with emphasis on the large-scale characteristics of the associated solar wind disturbances and on the relationship of these disturbances to solar activity. The sum of observational knowledge indicates that shock waves propagate through the solar wind along a broad, roughly spherical front, ahead of plasma and magnetic field ejected from solar flares. Typically, the shock front reaches 1 AU about two days after its flare origin, and is of intermediate strength. Not all large flares produce observable interplanetary shock waves; the best indicator of shock production appears to be the generation of both type 2 and type 4 radio bursts by a flare. Theoretical models of shock propagation in the solar wind can account for the typically observed shock strength, transit time, and shape.

  16. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF BLAZAR AO 0235+164 IN THE 2008-2009 FLARING STATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ballet, J.; Casandjian, J. M. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D.; Buson, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' M. Merlin' dell' Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bruel, P. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Caliandro, G. A. [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (IEEE-CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Caraveo, P. A., E-mail: eduardo@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: madejski@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: fabio.gargano@ba.infn.it, E-mail: silvia.raino@ba.infn.it, E-mail: lreyes04@calpoly.edu, E-mail: knalew@colorado.edu, E-mail: sikora@camk.edu.pl [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Collaboration: Fermi-LAT Collaboration; GASP-WEBT consortium; F-GAMMA; Iram-PdBI; Kanata; RXTE; SMARTS; Swift-XRT; and others

    2012-06-01

    The blazar AO 0235+164 (z = 0.94) has been one of the most active objects observed by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) since its launch in Summer 2008. In addition to the continuous coverage by Fermi, contemporaneous observations were carried out from the radio to {gamma}-ray bands between 2008 September and 2009 February. In this paper, we summarize the rich multi-wavelength data collected during the campaign (including F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, Kanata, OVRO, RXTE, SMARTS, Swift, and other instruments), examine the cross-correlation between the light curves measured in the different energy bands, and interpret the resulting spectral energy distributions in the context of well-known blazar emission models. We find that the {gamma}-ray activity is well correlated with a series of near-IR/optical flares, accompanied by an increase in the optical polarization degree. On the other hand, the X-ray light curve shows a distinct 20 day high state of unusually soft spectrum, which does not match the extrapolation of the optical/UV synchrotron spectrum. We tentatively interpret this feature as the bulk Compton emission by cold electrons contained in the jet, which requires an accretion disk corona with an effective covering factor of 19% at a distance of 100 R{sub g}. We model the broadband spectra with a leptonic model with external radiation dominated by the infrared emission from the dusty torus.

  17. Multi-wavelength Observations of Blazar AO 0235+164 in the 2008-2009 Flaring State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Fuhrmann, L.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Hughes, R. E.; Itoh, R.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Lee, S.-H.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nishino, S.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Pelassa, V.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Rastawicki, D.; Razzano, M.; Readhead, A.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reyes, L. C.; Richards, J. L.; Sbarra, C.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Szostek, A.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Zimmer, S.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration; Moderski, R.; Nalewajko, K.; Sikora, M.; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Arkharov, A. A.; Benítez, E.; Berdyugin, A.; Blinov, D. A.; Boettcher, M.; Bravo Calle, O. J. A.; Buemi, C. S.; Carosati, D.; Chen, W. P.; Diltz, C.; Di Paola, A.; Dolci, M.; Efimova, N. V.; Forné, E.; Gurwell, M. A.; Heidt, J.; Hiriart, D.; Jordan, B.; Kimeridze, G.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Kopatskaya, E. N.; Koptelova, E.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Larionova, E. G.; Larionova, L. V.; Larionov, V. M.; Leto, P.; Lindfors, E.; Lin, H. C.; Morozova, D. A.; Nikolashvili, M. G.; Nilsson, K.; Oksman, M.; Roustazadeh, P.; Sievers, A.; Sigua, L. A.; Sillanpää, A.; Takahashi, T.; Takalo, L. O.; Tornikoski, M.; Trigilio, C.; Troitsky, I. S.; Umana, G.; GASP-WEBT Consortium; Angelakis, E.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Nestoras, I.; Riquelme, D.; F-GAMMA; Krips, M.; Trippe, S.; Iram-PdBI; Arai, A.; Kawabata, K. S.; Sakimoto, K.; Sasada, M.; Sato, S.; Uemura, M.; Yamanaka, M.; Yoshida, M.; Kanata; Belloni, T.; Tagliaferri, G.; RXTE; Bonning, E. W.; Isler, J.; Urry, C. M.; SMARTS; Hoversten, E.; Falcone, A.; Pagani, C.; Stroh, M.; (Swift-XRT

    2012-06-01

    The blazar AO 0235+164 (z = 0.94) has been one of the most active objects observed by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) since its launch in Summer 2008. In addition to the continuous coverage by Fermi, contemporaneous observations were carried out from the radio to γ-ray bands between 2008 September and 2009 February. In this paper, we summarize the rich multi-wavelength data collected during the campaign (including F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, Kanata, OVRO, RXTE, SMARTS, Swift, and other instruments), examine the cross-correlation between the light curves measured in the different energy bands, and interpret the resulting spectral energy distributions in the context of well-known blazar emission models. We find that the γ-ray activity is well correlated with a series of near-IR/optical flares, accompanied by an increase in the optical polarization degree. On the other hand, the X-ray light curve shows a distinct 20 day high state of unusually soft spectrum, which does not match the extrapolation of the optical/UV synchrotron spectrum. We tentatively interpret this feature as the bulk Compton emission by cold electrons contained in the jet, which requires an accretion disk corona with an effective covering factor of 19% at a distance of 100 R g. We model the broadband spectra with a leptonic model with external radiation dominated by the infrared emission from the dusty torus.

  18. Auroral kilometric radiation triggered by type II solar radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, W.

    1985-01-01

    The previously-reported triggering of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) during type III solar radio bursts was attributed to the incoming radio waves rather than other aspects of the burst's causative solar flare. This conclusion has now been confirmed by ISEE-1 and ISEE-3 observations showing AKR which seems to have been triggered also by a subsequent type II solar radio burst, up to eleven hours after the flare.

  19. PRECURSOR FLARES IN OJ 287

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pihajoki, P.; Berdyugin, A.; Lindfors, E.; Reinthal, R.; Sillanpaeae, A.; Takalo, L. [Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-21500 Piikkioe (Finland); Valtonen, M.; Nilsson, K. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO, University of Turku, FI-21500 Piikkioe (Finland); Zola, S.; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D. [Astronomical Observatory, Jagiellonian University, ul. Orla 171, PL-30-244 Krakow (Poland); Liakos, A. [Department of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, University of Athens, GR 157 84 Zografos, Athens, Hellas (Greece); Drozdz, M.; Winiarski, M.; Ogloza, W. [Mount Suhora Observatory, Pedagogical University, ul. Podchorazych 2, PL-30-084 Krakow (Poland); Provencal, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Santangelo, M. M. M. [O.A.C. Osservatorio Astronomico di Capannori, Via di Valle, I-55060 Vorno, Capannori (Italy); Salo, H. [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FI-90014 University of Oulu (Finland); Chandra, S.; Ganesh, S.; Baliyan, K. S., E-mail: popiha@utu.fi [Astronomy and Astrophysics Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380009 (India); and others

    2013-02-10

    We have studied three most recent precursor flares in the light curve of the blazar OJ 287 while invoking the presence of a precessing binary black hole in the system to explain the nature of these flares. Precursor flare timings from the historical light curves are compared with theoretical predictions from our model that incorporate effects of an accretion disk and post-Newtonian description for the binary black hole orbit. We find that the precursor flares coincide with the secondary black hole descending toward the accretion disk of the primary black hole from the observed side, with a mean z-component of approximately z{sub c} = 4000 AU. We use this model of precursor flares to predict that precursor flare of similar nature should happen around 2020.96 before the next major outburst in 2022.

  20. Solar wind ion trends and signatures: STEREO PLASTIC observations approaching solar minimum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Galvin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available STEREO has now completed the first two years of its mission, moving from close proximity to Earth in 2006/2007 to more than 50 degrees longitudinal separation from Earth in 2009. During this time, several large-scale structures have been observed in situ. Given the prevailing solar minimum conditions, these structures have been predominantly coronal hole-associated solar wind, slow solar wind, their interfaces, and the occasional transient event. In this paper, we extend earlier solar wind composition studies into the current solar minimum using high-resolution (1-h sampling times for the charge state analysis. We examine 2-year trends for iron charge states and solar wind proton speeds, and present a case study of Carrington Rotation 2064 (December 2007 which includes minor ion (He, Fe, O kinetic and Fe composition parameters in comparison with proton and magnetic field signatures at large-scale structures observed during this interval.

  1. Flux rope, hyperbolic flux tube, and late extreme ultraviolet phases in a non-eruptive circular-ribbon flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Sophie; Pariat, Étienne; Valori, Gherardo; Deng, Na; Liu, Chang; Wang, Haimin; Reid, Hamish

    2017-08-01

    Context. The dynamics of ultraviolet (UV) emissions during solar flares provides constraints on the physical mechanisms involved in the trigger and the evolution of flares. In particular it provides some information on the location of the reconnection sites and the associated magnetic fluxes. In this respect, confined flares are far less understood than eruptive flares generating coronal mass ejections. Aims: We present a detailed study of a confined circular flare dynamics associated with three UV late phases in order to understand more precisely which topological elements are present and how they constrain the dynamics of the flare. Methods: We perform a non-linear force-free field extrapolation of the confined flare observed with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instruments on board Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). From the 3D magnetic field we compute the squashing factor and we analyse its distribution. Conjointly, we analyse the AIA extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light curves and images in order to identify the post-flare loops, and their temporal and thermal evolution. By combining the two analyses we are able to propose a detailed scenario that explains the dynamics of the flare. Results: Our topological analysis shows that in addition to a null-point topology with the fan separatrix, the spine lines and its surrounding quasi-separatix layer (QSL) halo (typical for a circular flare), a flux rope and its hyperbolic flux tube (HFT) are enclosed below the null. By comparing the magnetic field topology and the EUV post-flare loops we obtain an almost perfect match between the footpoints of the separatrices and the EUV 1600 Å ribbons and between the HFT field line footpoints and bright spots observed inside the circular ribbons. We show, for the first time in a confined flare, that magnetic reconnection occurred initially at the HFT below the flux rope. Reconnection at the null point between the flux rope and the

  2. Photospheric Current Spikes as Possible Predictors of Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Michael L.; Kwan, Chiman; Ayhan, Bulent; Shang, Eric L.

    2016-01-01

    Flares involve generation of the largest current densities in the solar atmosphere. This suggests the hypothesis that prior to a large (M,X) flare there are related time dependent changes in the photospheric current distribution, and hence in the resistive heating rate in neutral line regions (NLRs). If this is true, these changes might be useful predictors of flares. Preliminary evidence supporting this hypothesis is presented. Results from a data driven, near photospheric, 3D magnetohydrodynamic type model suggest the model might be useful for predicting M and X flares several hours to several days in advance. The model takes as input the photospheric magnetic field observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite. The model computes quantities in every active region (AR) pixel for 14 ARs, with spurious Doppler periods due to SDO orbital motion filtered out of the time series of the magnetic field for each pixel. Spikes in the NLR resistive heating rate Q, appearing as increases by orders of magnitude above background values in the time series of Q are found to occur, and appear to be correlated with the occurrence of M or X flares a few hours to a few days later. The subset of spikes analyzed at the pixel level are found to occur on HMI and granulation scales of 1 arcsec and 12 minutes. Spikes are found in NLRs with and without M or X flares, and outside as well as inside NLRs, but the largest spikes are localized in the NLRs of ARs with M or X flares, and associated with horizontal magnetic field strengths approximately several hG, and vertical magnetic field strengths several orders of magnitude smaller. The spikes may be signatures of horizontal current sheets associated with emerging magnetic flux.

  3. Slipping Magnetic Reconnection, Chromospheric Evaporation, Implosion, and Precursors in the 2014 September 10 X1.6-Class Solar Flare

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dudík, Jaroslav; Polito, V.; Janvier, M.; Mulay, S.M.; Karlický, Marian; Aulanier, G.; Del Zanna, G.; Dzifčáková, Elena; Mason, H. E.; Schmieder, B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 823, č. 1 (2016), 41/1-41/21 ISSN 0004-637X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/12/1652; GA ČR GAP209/12/0103 Grant - others:The Royal Society/Newton Fellowship(GB) NFAluminiNF120818 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Sun * flares * magnetic reconnection Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.533, year: 2016

  4. STEREO Observations of Turbulent Solar Wind Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Paul J.; Goetz, Keith; Monson, Steven J.

    2017-04-01

    Studies of solar wind turbulence have heretofore concentrated on Kolmogorov-type studies of the full MHD equations, without regard to the separate modes of the possible solutions. Further understanding of the nonlinear processes of the cascade, and especially transference of wave energy to particles, would seem to depend on more detailed understanding of the waves, their modes and their separate electric and magnetic fields. . A part of the SWAVES experiment on the STEREO spacecraft was designed to study the waves in the dissipation region of the turbulence spectrum. However, compatibility with SECCHI, the optical sensors, required that only monopole antennas could be accommodated, and these respond both to electric fields and to density fluctuations. This seemed to require that one measure four quantities with only three signals. After several years, the response of the antennas to density fluctuations was reduced, due to changes in photoemission coefficients, and measurement of separate electric fields became possible. It is found that sometimes there are short periods when a sinusoidal waveform appears which seems sufficiently pure to represent a single mode. Results of study of the fields of such waves will be presented.

  5. Arrival times of Flare/Halo CME associated shocks at the Earth: comparison of the predictions of three numerical models with these observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. P. McKenna-Lawlor

    Full Text Available The arrival times at L1 of eleven travelling shocks associated both with X-ray flaring and with halo CMEs recorded aboard SOHO/LASCO have been considered. Close to the Sun the velocities of these events were estimated using either Type II radio records or CME speeds. Close to the Earth the shocks were detected in the data of various solar wind plasma, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF and energetic particle experiments aboard SOHO, ACE, WIND, INTERBALL-1 and IMP-8. The real-time shock arrival predictions of three numerical models, namely the Shock Time of Arrival Model (STOA, the Interplanetary Shock Propagation Model (ISPM and the Hakamada-Akasofu-Fry Solar Wind Model (HAFv.2 were tested against these observations. This is the first time that energetic protons (tens of keV to a few MeV have been used to complement plasma and IMF data in validating shock propagation models. The models were all generally successful in predicting shock arrivals. STOA provided the smallest values of the "predicted minus measured" arrival times and displayed a typical predictive precision better than about 8 h. The ratio of the calculated standard deviation of the transit times to Earth to the standard deviation of the measurements was estimated for each model (treating interacting events as composite shocks and these ratios turned out to be 0.60, 1.15 and 1.02 for STOA, ISPM and HAFv.2, respectively. If an event in the sample for which the shock velocity was not well known is omitted from consideration, these ratios become 0.36, 0.76 and 0.81, respectively. Larger statistical samples should now be tested. The ratio of the in situ shock velocity and the "Sun to L1" transit velocity (Vsh /Vtr was in the range of 0.7–0.9 for individual, non-interacting, shock events. HAFv.2 uniquely provided information on those changes in the COBpoint (the moving Connection point on the shock along the IMF to the OBserver which directly influenced energetic

  6. Parameterizations of Chromospheric Condensations in dG and dMe Model Flare Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Allred, Joel C.

    2018-01-01

    The origin of the near-ultraviolet and optical continuum radiation in flares is critical for understanding particle acceleration and impulsive heating in stellar atmospheres. Radiative-hydrodynamic (RHD) simulations in 1D have shown that high energy deposition rates from electron beams produce two flaring layers at T ∼ 104 K that develop in the chromosphere: a cooling condensation (downflowing compression) and heated non-moving (stationary) flare layers just below the condensation. These atmospheres reproduce several observed phenomena in flare spectra, such as the red-wing asymmetry of the emission lines in solar flares and a small Balmer jump ratio in M dwarf flares. The high beam flux simulations are computationally expensive in 1D, and the (human) timescales for completing NLTE models with adaptive grids in 3D will likely be unwieldy for some time to come. We have developed a prescription for predicting the approximate evolved states, continuum optical depth, and emergent continuum flux spectra of RHD model flare atmospheres. These approximate prescriptions are based on an important atmospheric parameter: the column mass ({m}{ref}) at which hydrogen becomes nearly completely ionized at the depths that are approximately in steady state with the electron beam heating. Using this new modeling approach, we find that high energy flux density (>F11) electron beams are needed to reproduce the brightest observed continuum intensity in IRIS data of the 2014 March 29 X1 solar flare, and that variation in {m}{ref} from 0.001 to 0.02 g cm‑2 reproduces most of the observed range of the optical continuum flux ratios at the peak