WorldWideScience

Sample records for solar atmosphere implications

  1. Geology and photometric variation of solar system bodies with minor atmospheres: implications for solid exoplanets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yuka; Kimura, Jun; Dohm, James; Ohtake, Makiko

    2014-09-01

    A reasonable basis for future astronomical investigations of exoplanets lies in our best knowledge of the planets and satellites in the Solar System. Solar System bodies exhibit a wide variety of surface environments, even including potential habitable conditions beyond Earth, and it is essential to know how they can be characterized from outside the Solar System. In this study, we provide an overview of geological features of major Solar System solid bodies with minor atmospheres (i.e., the terrestrial Moon, Mercury, the Galilean moons, and Mars) that affect surface albedo at local to global scale, and we survey how they influence point-source photometry in the UV/visible/near IR (i.e., the reflection-dominant range). We simulate them based on recent mapping products and also compile observed light curves where available. We show a 5-50% peak-to-trough variation amplitude in one spin rotation associated with various geological processes including heterogeneous surface compositions due to igneous activities, interaction with surrounding energetic particles, and distribution of grained materials. Some indications of these processes are provided by the amplitude and wavelength dependence of variation in combinations of the time-averaged spectra. We also estimate the photometric precision needed to detect their spin rotation rates through periodogram analysis. Our survey illustrates realistic possibilities for inferring the detailed properties of solid exoplanets with future direct imaging observations. Key Words: Planetary environments-Planetary geology-Solar System-Extrasolar terrestrial planets.

  2. Generation of Electron Suprathermal Tails in the Upper Solar Atmosphere: Implications for Coronal Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinas, Adolfo F.; Wong, Hung K.; Klimas, Alexander J.

    1999-01-01

    We present a mechanism for the generation of non-Maxwellian electron distribution function in the upper regions of the solar atmosphere in the presence of collisional damping. It is suggested that finite amplitude, low frequency, obliquely propagating electromagnetic waves can carry a substantial electric field component parallel to the mean magnetic field that can be significantly larger than the Dreicer electric field. This long wavelength electric fluctuation is capable of generating high frequency electron plasma oscillations and low frequency ion acoustic-like waves. The analysis has been performed using 1-1/2D Vlasov and PIC numerical simulations in which both electrons and ions are treated kinetically and self consistently. The simulation results indicate that high frequency electron plasma oscillations and low frequency ion acoustic-like waves are generated. The high frequency electron plasma oscillation drives electron plasma turbulence, which subsequently is damped out by the background electrons. The turbulence damping results in electron acceleration and the generation of non-Maxwellian suprathermal tails on time scales short compared to collisional damping. Bulk heating also occurs if the fluctuating parallel electric field is strong enough. This study suggests that finite amplitude, low frequency, obliquely propagating, electromagnetic waves can play a significant role in the acceleration and heating of the solar corona electrons and in the coupling of medium and small-scale phenomena.

  3. Response of Earth's Atmosphere to Increases in Solar Flux and Implications for Loss of Water from Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, J. F.; Pollock, J. G.; Ackerman, T. P.

    1985-01-01

    A one dimensional radiative convective model is used to compute temperature and water vapor profiles as functions of solar flux for earthlike atmosphere. The troposphere is assumed to be fully saturated with a moist adiabatic lapse rate, and changes in cloudiness are neglected. Predicted surface temperatures increase monotonically from -1 to 111 C as the solar flux is increased from 0.81 to 1.45 times its present value. The results imply that the surface temperature of a primitive water rich Venus should have been at least 80-100 C and may have been much higher, water vapor should have been a major atmospheric constituent at all altitudes, leading to the rapid hydrodynamic escape of hydrogen. The oxygen left behind by this process was presumably consumed by reactions with reduced minerals in the crust.

  4. The lower solar atmosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    This "rapporteur" report discusses the solar photosphere and low chromosphere in the context of chemical composition studies. The highly dynamical nature of the photosphere does not seem to jeopardize precise determination of solar abundances in classical fashion. It is still an open question how

  5. Implications of the Detection of X-rays From Pluto by Chandra for Its Solar Wind - Neutral Atmosphere Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    Using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, we have obtained low-resolution imaging X-ray spectrophotometry of the Pluto system in support of the New Horizons (NH) flyby. In a total of 174 ksec of on-target time, we measured 8 photons from 0.31 to 0.60 keV in a co-moving 11 x 11 pixel2 box (the 90% flux aperture for fixed background sources in the field) measuring 121,000 x 121,000 km2 (or 100 x 100 RPluto) at Pluto. The Pluto photons do not have the spectral shape of the background, are coincident with a 90% flux aperture co-moving with Pluto, and are not confused with any background source, so we consider them as sourced from the Pluto system. Allowing for background, we find a net signal of 6.8 counts and a statistical noise level of 1.2 counts, for a detection of Pluto at > 99.95%. The mean 0.31 - 0.60 keV X-ray power from Pluto is 200 +200/-100 MW, in the middle range of X-ray power levels seen for other known solar system emission sources: auroral precipitation, solar X-ray scattering, and charge exchange (CXE) between solar wind (SW) ions and atmospheric neutrals. We eliminate auroral effects as a source, as Pluto has no known magnetic field and the NH/Alice UV spectrometer detected no airglow from Pluto during the flyby. Atmospheric haze particles could produce resonant scattering of solar X-rays from Pluto, but the energy signature of the detected photons does not match the solar spectrum and estimates of Pluto's scattered X-ray emission are 2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower than seen in our observations. CXE-driven emission from hydrogenic and heliogenic SW carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen ions can produce the energy signature seen, and the 6 x 1025 neutral gas escape rate from Pluto deduced from NH data (Gladstone et al. 2016) can support the 3.0 +3.0/-1.5 x 1024 X-ray photons/s emission rate required by our observations. Using the SW proton density and speed measured by the NH/SWAP instrument in the vicinity of Pluto at the time of the photon emissions, we find a

  6. The Solar Spectrum: An Atmospheric Remote Sensing Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    The solar spectrum not only contains information about the composition and structure of the sun, it also provides a bright and stable continuum source for earth remote sensing (atmosphere and surface). Many types of remote sensors use solar radiation. While high-resolution spaceborne sensors (e.g. ACE) can largely remove the effects of the solar spectrum by exo-atmospheric calibration, this isn't an option for sub-orbital sensors, such as the FTIR spectrometers used in the NDACC and TCCON networks. In this case the solar contribution must be explicitly included in the spectral analysis. In this talk the methods used to derive the solar spectrum are presented, and the underlying solar physics are discussed. Implication for remote sensing are described.

  7. Solar atmosphere wave dynamics generated by solar global oscillating eigenmodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, M. K.; Fedun, V.; Erdélyi, R.; Zheng, R.

    2018-01-01

    The solar atmosphere exhibits a diverse range of wave phenomena, where one of the earliest discovered was the five-minute global acoustic oscillation, also referred to as the p-mode. The analysis of wave propagation in the solar atmosphere may be used as a diagnostic tool to estimate accurately the physical characteristics of the Sun's atmospheric layers. In this paper, we investigate the dynamics and upward propagation of waves which are generated by the solar global eigenmodes. We report on a series of hydrodynamic simulations of a realistically stratified model of the solar atmosphere representing its lower region from the photosphere to low corona. With the objective of modelling atmospheric perturbations, propagating from the photosphere into the chromosphere, transition region and low corona, generated by the photospheric global oscillations the simulations use photospheric drivers mimicking the solar p-modes. The drivers are spatially structured harmonics across the computational box parallel to the solar surface. The drivers perturb the atmosphere at 0.5 Mm above the bottom boundary of the model and are placed coincident with the location of the temperature minimum. A combination of the VALIIIC and McWhirter solar atmospheres are used as the background equilibrium model. We report how synthetic photospheric oscillations may manifest in a magnetic field free model of the quiet Sun. To carry out the simulations, we employed the magnetohydrodynamics code, SMAUG (Sheffield MHD Accelerated Using GPUs). Our results show that the amount of energy propagating into the solar atmosphere is consistent with a model of solar global oscillations described by Taroyan and Erdélyi (2008) using the Klein-Gordon equation. The computed results indicate a power law which is compared to observations reported by Ireland et al. (2015) using data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly.

  8. Results from atmospheric and solar neutrinos experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Kearns, E T

    2001-01-01

    This paper is a summary of non-accelerator neutrino physics, concentrating on the latest experimental results using atmospheric and solar neutrinos to study neutrino oscillation. Neutrino oscillation is well-established in atmospheric neutrinos and current efforts aim to better measure and understand the phenomenon. Solar neutrinos continue to present an unsolved puzzle, with the latest data from Super-Kamiokande exhibiting a large flux deficit, but no significant day-night flux difference or spectral distortion. For both atmospheric and solar neutrinos, the data prefers oscillation between active flavors ( nu /sub e/ nu /sub mu / nu /sub tau /) and disfavors a 2-flavor oscillation to nu -sterile as the primary effect.

  9. Solar activity forcing of the middle atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mohanakumar

    Full Text Available Studies on the influence of solar activity in 11-year cycle on middle atmospheric thermodynamic parameters, such as temperature, pressure and density, and zonal and meridional wind components over three meteorological rocket launching stations, located in the tropics (Thumba, mid-latitude (Volgograd and high-latitude (Heiss Island regions of the northern hemisphere have been carried out. The temperature in all the three regions showed a negative response in the stratosphere and positive association in the mesosphere with the changes in solar activity. The temperature decreases by 2–3% from its mean value in the stratosphere and increases by 4–6% in the mesosphere for an increase in 100 units of solar radio flux. Atmospheric pressure is found to be more sensitive to solar changes. An average solar maximum condition enhances the pressure in the stratosphere by 5% and in the upper mesosphere by 16–18% compared to the respective mean values. Density also showed strong association with the changes in solar activity. Increase in the solar radio flux tends to strengthen winter westerlies in the upper stratosphere over the mid-latitude and summer easterlies in the middle stratosphere over tropics. Larger variability in the zonal wind is noted near stratopause height. Results obtained from the study indicate that there is an external force exerted on the Earth's atmosphere during the period of high solar activity. These results can be incorporated for further studies on the dynamics of the middle atmosphere in association with the changes in solar activity.

  10. Solar geoengineering reduces atmospheric carbon burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, David W.; Wagner, Gernot; Zabel, Claire L.

    2017-09-01

    Solar geoengineering is no substitute for cutting emissions, but could nevertheless help reduce the atmospheric carbon burden. In the extreme, if solar geoengineering were used to hold radiative forcing constant under RCP8.5, the carbon burden may be reduced by ~100 GTC, equivalent to 12-26% of twenty-first-century emissions at a cost of under US$0.5 per tCO2.

  11. Ninth Workshop 'Solar Influences on the Magnetosphere, Ionosphere and Atmosphere'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Kayta; Kirov, Boian; Danov, Dimitar

    2017-08-01

    The 9th Workshop "Solar Influences on the Magnetosphere, Ionosphere and Atmosphere" is an international forum for scientists working in the fields of: Sun and solar activity, Solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions, Solar influences on the lower atmosphere and climate, Solar effects in the biosphere, Instrumentation for space weather monitoring and Data processing and modelling.

  12. Atmospheric Solar Heating in Minor Absorption Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ming-Dah

    1998-01-01

    Solar radiation is the primary source of energy driving atmospheric and oceanic circulations. Concerned with the huge computing time required for computing radiative transfer in weather and climate models, solar heating in minor absorption bands has often been neglected. The individual contributions of these minor bands to the atmospheric heating is small, but collectively they are not negligible. The solar heating in minor bands includes the absorption due to water vapor in the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) spectral region from 14284/cm to 25000/cm, the ozone absorption and Rayleigh scattering in the near infrared, as well as the O2 and CO2 absorption in a number of weak bands. Detailed high spectral- and angular-resolution calculations show that the total effect of these minor absorption is to enhance the atmospheric solar heating by approximately 10%. Depending upon the strength of the absorption and the overlapping among gaseous absorption, different approaches are applied to parameterize these minor absorption. The parameterizations are accurate and require little extra time for computing radiative fluxes. They have been efficiently implemented in the various atmospheric models at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, including cloud ensemble, mesoscale, and climate models.

  13. Solar system astrophysics planetary atmospheres and the outer solar system

    CERN Document Server

    Milone, Eugene F

    2014-01-01

    The second edition of Solar System Astrophysics: Planetary Atmospheres and the Outer Solar System provides a timely update of our knowledge of planetary atmospheres and the bodies of the outer solar system and their analogs in other planetary systems. This volume begins with an expanded treatment of the physics, chemistry, and meteorology of the atmospheres of the Earth, Venus, and Mars, moving on to their magnetospheres and then to a full discussion of the gas and ice giants and their properties. From here, attention switches to the small bodies of the solar system, beginning with the natural satellites. Then comets, meteors, meteorites, and asteroids are discussed in order, and the volume concludes with the origin and evolution of our solar system. Finally, a fully revised section on extrasolar planetary systems puts the development of our system in a wider and increasingly well understood galactic context. All of the material is presented within a framework of historical importance. This book and its sist...

  14. The solar cyclone: A solar chimney for harvesting atmospheric water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashiwa, B.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS B216, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Kashiwa, Corey B. [191 University Blvd PMB 876, Denver, CO 80206 (United States)

    2008-02-15

    The Solar Cyclone has been introduced as a means of extracting fresh water from Earth's atmosphere. The conceptual device operates in the fashion of a Solar Chimney; it is composed of a greenhouse for collecting and storing solar energy as heat, with a central chimney that channels an updraft of surface air heated in the greenhouse. An expansion cyclone separator for condensing and removing atmospheric water is placed at the base of the chimney. The separator consists of a strongly rotating vortex in which the central temperature is well below the dew point for the greenhouse air. Power consumed in the expansion and separation is furnished by the motive potential of the chimney updraft. Turbulent flow conditions are established in the expansion cyclone separator to enhance the centrifugal separation. Excess updraft power is used to generate electricity, as is done in the Solar Chimney. The article furnishes a theoretical basis for the feasibility of the Solar Cyclone, suggesting that an experimental study of the separation device would be worthwhile. (author)

  15. Determining solar effects in Neptune's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aplin, K. L.; Harrison, R. G.

    2016-07-01

    Long-duration observations of Neptune's brightness at two visible wavelengths provide a disk-averaged estimate of its atmospheric aerosol. Brightness variations were previously associated with the 11-year solar cycle, through solar-modulated mechanisms linked with either ultraviolet or galactic cosmic ray (GCR) effects on atmospheric particles. Here, we use a recently extended brightness data set (1972-2014), with physically realistic modelling to show, rather than alternatives, ultraviolet and GCR are likely to be modulating Neptune's atmosphere in combination. The importance of GCR is further supported by the response of Neptune's atmosphere to an intermittent 1.5- to 1.9-year periodicity, which occurred preferentially in GCR (not ultraviolet) during the mid-1980s. This periodicity was detected both at Earth, and in GCR measured by Voyager 2, then near Neptune. A similar coincident variability in Neptune's brightness suggests nucleation onto GCR ions. Both GCR and ultraviolet mechanisms may occur more rapidly than the subsequent atmospheric particle transport.

  16. Possible Solar Influence On Atmospheric Electric Field

    OpenAIRE

    Sikka, Poonam; Selvam, A. Mary; Murty, A. S. Ramachandra; Murty, Bh. V. Ramana

    1998-01-01

    A cell dynamical system model for the troposphere - ionosphere coupling is proposed . Vertical mass exchange in the troposphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere takes place through a chain of eddy systems. Any perturbation in the troposphere would be transmitted to ionosphere and vice versa. A global perturbation in ionosphere, as the one caused by solar variability, is transmitted to troposphere influencing weather systems/geomagnetic/atmospheric electrification processes.

  17. Solar system astrophysics planetary atmospheres and the outer solar system

    CERN Document Server

    Milone, Eugene F

    2008-01-01

    Solar System Astrophysics opens with coverage of the atmospheres, ionospheres and magnetospheres of the Earth, Venus and Mars and the magnetosphere of Mercury. The book then provides an introduction to meteorology and treating the physics and chemistry of these areas in considerable detail. What follows are the structure, composition, particle environments, satellites, and rings of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, making abundant use of results from space probes. Solar System Astrophysics follows the history, orbits, structure, origin and demise of comets and the physics of meteors and provides a thorough treatment of meteorites, the asteroids and, in the outer solar system, the Kuiper Belt objects. The methods and results of extrasolar planet searches, the distinctions between stars, brown dwarfs, and planets, and the origins of planetary systems are examined. Historical introductions precede the development and discussion in most chapters. A series of challenges, useful as homework assignments or as foc...

  18. Cutoff frequencies for Alfven waves in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, B. L. Harsha Kalpanie

    theoretical evidence for the existence of local and global cutoff frequencies for Alfven waves propagating in both isothermal and in more realistic non-isothermal solar atmospheres. The existence of these cutoffs has profound implications on the energy and momentum transport in the solar atmosphere and the role of Alfven waves in heating of the solar atmosphere, as well as in acceleration of the solar wind.

  19. Atmospheric Renewable Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    ARL-TR-8155 ● SEP 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Atmospheric Renewable Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model... Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model) by Clayton Walker and Gail Vaucher Computational and Information Sciences Directorate, ARL...2017 June 28 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Atmospheric Renewable Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ROTC Internship

  20. RAPID FLUCTUATIONS IN THE LOWER SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J. K.; Cadavid, A. C.; Christian, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Northridge, Northridge, CA 91330-8268 (United States); Jess, D. B.; Mathioudakis, M., E-mail: john.lawrence@csun.edu [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-10

    The Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument reveals solar atmospheric fluctuations at high frequencies. Spectra of variations of the G-band intensity (I{sub G} ) and Ca II K-line intensity (I{sub K} ) show correlated fluctuations above white noise to frequencies beyond 300 mHz and 50 mHz, respectively. The noise-corrected G-band spectrum for f = 28-326 mHz shows a power law with exponent -1.21 {+-} 0.02, consistent with the presence of turbulent motions. G-band spectral power in the 25-100 mHz ('UHF') range is concentrated at the locations of magnetic bright points in the intergranular lanes and is highly intermittent in time. The intermittence of the UHF G-band fluctuations, shown by a positive kurtosis {kappa}, also suggests turbulence. Combining values of I{sub G} , I{sub K} , UHF power, and {kappa} reveals two distinct states of the solar atmosphere. State 1, including almost all the data, is characterized by low I{sub G} , I{sub K} , and UHF power and {kappa} Almost-Equal-To 6. State 2, including only a very small fraction of the data, is characterized by high I{sub G} , I{sub K} , and UHF power and {kappa} Almost-Equal-To 3. Superposed epoch analysis shows that the UHF power peaks simultaneously with spatio-temporal I{sub G} maxima in either state. For State 1, I{sub K} shows 3.5 minute chromospheric oscillations with maxima occurring 21 s after I{sub G} maxima implying a 150-210 km effective height difference. However, for State 2 the I{sub K} and I{sub G} maxima are simultaneous; in this highly magnetized environment sites of G-band and K-line emission may be spatially close together.

  1. Rapid Fluctuations in the Lower Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J. K.; Cadavid, A. C.; Christian, D. J.; Jess, D. B.; Mathioudakis, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instrument reveals solar atmospheric fluctuations at high frequencies. Spectra of variations of the G-band intensity (IG ) and Ca II K-line intensity (IK ) show correlated fluctuations above white noise to frequencies beyond 300 mHz and 50 mHz, respectively. The noise-corrected G-band spectrum for f = 28-326 mHz shows a power law with exponent -1.21 ± 0.02, consistent with the presence of turbulent motions. G-band spectral power in the 25-100 mHz ("UHF") range is concentrated at the locations of magnetic bright points in the intergranular lanes and is highly intermittent in time. The intermittence of the UHF G-band fluctuations, shown by a positive kurtosis κ, also suggests turbulence. Combining values of IG , IK , UHF power, and κ reveals two distinct states of the solar atmosphere. State 1, including almost all the data, is characterized by low IG , IK , and UHF power and κ ≈ 6. State 2, including only a very small fraction of the data, is characterized by high IG , IK , and UHF power and κ ≈ 3. Superposed epoch analysis shows that the UHF power peaks simultaneously with spatio-temporal IG maxima in either state. For State 1, IK shows 3.5 minute chromospheric oscillations with maxima occurring 21 s after IG maxima implying a 150-210 km effective height difference. However, for State 2 the IK and IG maxima are simultaneous; in this highly magnetized environment sites of G-band and K-line emission may be spatially close together.

  2. Wave heating of the solar atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arregui, Iñigo

    2015-05-28

    Magnetic waves are a relevant component in the dynamics of the solar atmosphere. Their significance has increased because of their potential as a remote diagnostic tool and their presumed contribution to plasma heating processes. We discuss our current understanding of coronal heating by magnetic waves, based on recent observational evidence and theoretical advances. The discussion starts with a selection of observational discoveries that have brought magnetic waves to the forefront of the coronal heating discussion. Then, our theoretical understanding of the nature and properties of the observed waves and the physical processes that have been proposed to explain observations are described. Particular attention is given to the sequence of processes that link observed wave characteristics with concealed energy transport, dissipation and heat conversion. We conclude with a commentary on how the combination of theory and observations should help us to understand and quantify magnetic wave heating of the solar atmosphere. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Recent results from atmospheric and solar neutrino experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajita, Takaaki [Research Center for Cosmic Neutrinos, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, Univ. of Tokyo, Kashiwa-no-ha 5-1-5, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    Recent results from atmospheric and solar neutrino experiments are discussed. Recently new SNO results with the whole salt phase data are published. Atmospheric neutrino analysis from Super-Kamiokande are also discussed.

  4. Preface: MHD wave phenomena in the solar interior and atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedun, Viktor; Srivastava, A. K.

    2018-01-01

    The Sun is our nearest star and this star produces various plasma wave processes and energetic events. These phenomena strongly influence interplanetary plasma dynamics and contribute to space-weather. The understanding of solar atmospheric dynamics requires hi-resolution modern observations which, in turn, further advances theoretical models of physical processes in the solar interior and atmosphere. In particular, it is essential to connect the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave processes with the small and large-scale solar phenomena vis-a-vis transport of energy and mass. With the advent of currently available and upcoming high-resolution space (e.g., IRIS, SDO, Hinode, Aditya-L1, Solar-C, Solar Orbiter), and ground-based (e.g., SST, ROSA, NLST, Hi-C, DKIST, EST, COSMO) observations, solar physicists are able to explore exclusive wave processes in various solar magnetic structures at different spatio-temporal scales.

  5. Role of the Atmospheric Sciences for Solar Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleissl, J. P.; Lave, M.; Urquhart, B. G.; Mathiesen, P. J.; Bosch, J. L.; Chow, C. W.; Luoma, J. K.; Jamaly, M.; Nottrott, A. A.; Wegener, J.

    2011-12-01

    Solar energy is the fastest growing renewable energy source. Public interest, practically unlimited solar resources, and dramatic cost reductions have fueled the hopes for grid parity of solar energy production and dramatic growth of the industry. However, the variability of the solar fuel presents perceived and real challenges that can increase grid-integration costs of solar energy. Variability in global irradiance at the surface is dominated by solar geometry and atmospheric transmissivity effects with clouds explaining the majority of the non-geometry variance. Atmospheric scientists can play a major role in quantifying resource variability and improving solar forecasting models. I will start by presenting the state of the solar energy industry. Various studies of scaling of solar variability in space and time will be reviewed. Solar forecasting tools such as satellites, sky imagery, and numerical weather prediction will be introduced and state-of-the-art applications in the solar forecasting industry will be reviewed. Directions for RD&D in the atmospheric sciences will be presented.

  6. Space weather events at Mars: atmospheric erosion during solar cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Shannon; Luhmann, Janet; Dong, Chuanfei; Thiemann, Ed; Gruesbeck, Jacob; Lee, Christina; DiBraccio, Gina A.; Ma, Yingjuan; Brain, David; Halekas, Jasper; Espley, Jared R.; Connerney, John E. P.

    2017-10-01

    The early Sun played a major role in the evolution of terrestrial atmospheres, with extreme EUV and X-ray fluxes, as well as a more intense solar wind and higher occurrences of powerful solar transient events. The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission has been observing the upper atmosphere and magnetic topology of Mars, and has made numerous measurements of solar transient events such as Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) and Stream Interaction Regions (SIRs) since November 2014. These events are characterized by dramatic changes in dynamic pressure, magnetic field strength and substantial increases in escaping and precipitating planetary ions. We will present MAVEN observations of ICMEs and SIRs and show three of the strongest solar transient events observed during solar cycle 24. We will also present global MHD and test particle simulations of these events and discuss their influence on the magnetic topology and atmospheric escape rates at Mars. Finally, using observations of the magnitude and frequency of M and X class flares at younger, Sun-like stars, we have extrapolated the frequency of ICMEs at earlier stages of the Sun and will present simulations of the Mars-early solar wind interaction. The extreme conditions in the Sun’s early history may have had a significant influence on the evolution of the Martian atmosphere and may also have implications for exoplanets interacting with the stellar winds of younger, more active stars.

  7. Atmosphere, Ocean, Land, and Solar Irradiance Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James; Ahmad, Suraiya

    2003-01-01

    The report present the atmosphere, ocean color, land and solar irradiation data sets. The data presented: total ozone, aerosol, cloud optical and physical parameters, temperature and humidity profiles, radiances, rain fall, drop size distribution.

  8. The Heating of the Solar Atmosphere: from the Bottom Up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The heating of the solar atmosphere remains a mystery. Over the past several decades, scientists have examined the observational properties of structures in the solar atmosphere, notably their temperature, density, lifetime, and geometry, to determine the location, frequency, and duration of heating. In this talk, I will review these observational results, focusing on the wealth of information stored in the light curve of structures in different spectral lines or channels available in the Solar Dynamic Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, Hinode's X-ray Telescope and Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer, and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. I will discuss some recent results from combined data sets that support the heating of the solar atmosphere may be dominated by low, near-constant heating events.

  9. Determining solar effects in Neptune’s atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Aplin, K. L.; Harrison, R Giles

    2016-01-01

    Long-duration observations of Neptune's brightness at two visible wavelengths provide a disk-averaged estimate of its atmospheric aerosol. Brightness variations were previously associated with the 11-year solar cycle, through solar-modulated mechanisms linked with either ultraviolet or galactic cosmic ray (GCR) effects on atmospheric particles. Here, we use a recently extended brightness data set (1972?2014), with physically realistic modelling to show, rather than alternatives, ultraviolet a...

  10. Update on Solar and Atmospheric Four-Neutrino Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    González-Garciá, M C; Peña-Garay, C

    2001-01-01

    In this talk we present the update (including the recent SNO results) of our analysis of the neutrino oscillation solutions of the solar and atmospheric neutrino problems in the framework of four-neutrino mixing where a sterile neutrino is added to the three standard ones and the mass spectra present two separated doublets. Such scenarios allow for simultaneous transitions of solar $\

  11. Regional atmospheric circulation shifts induced by a grand solar minimum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin-Puertas, C.; Matthes, K.; Brauer, A.; Muscheler, R.; Hansen, F.; Petrick, C.; Aldahan, A.; Possnert, G.; van Geel, B.

    2012-01-01

    Large changes in solar ultraviolet radiation can indirectly affect climate1 by inducing atmospheric changes. Specifically, it has been suggested that centennial-scale climate variability during the Holocene epoch was controlled by the Sun2, 3. However, the amplitude of solar forcing is small when

  12. Photospheric Variability and the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, R.

    Variations in the bolometric luminosity of the Sun (due to photospheric variability) have for some time been related to solar magnetic activity. Such variations are observed on both the solar rotational period and on much longer time scales; I will review the current work in this area, and discuss related work in observations of stellar photospheric variability tied to stellar magnetic activity.

  13. The atmospheric implications of radiation belt remediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Rodger

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available High altitude nuclear explosions (HANEs and geomagnetic storms can produce large scale injections of relativistic particles into the inner radiation belts. It is recognised that these large increases in >1 MeV trapped electron fluxes can shorten the operational lifetime of low Earth orbiting satellites, threatening a large, valuable population. Therefore, studies are being undertaken to bring about practical human control of the radiation belts, termed "Radiation Belt Remediation" (RBR. Here we consider the upper atmospheric consequences of an RBR system operating over either 1 or 10 days. The RBR-forced neutral chemistry changes, leading to NOx enhancements and Ox depletions, are significant during the timescale of the precipitation but are generally not long-lasting. The magnitudes, time-scales, and altitudes of these changes are no more significant than those observed during large solar proton events. In contrast, RBR-operation will lead to unusually intense HF blackouts for about the first half of the operation time, producing large scale disruptions to radio communication and navigation systems. While the neutral atmosphere changes are not particularly important, HF disruptions could be an important area for policy makers to consider, particularly for the remediation of natural injections.

  14. The atmospheric implications of radiation belt remediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Rodger

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available High altitude nuclear explosions (HANEs and geomagnetic storms can produce large scale injections of relativistic particles into the inner radiation belts. It is recognised that these large increases in >1 MeV trapped electron fluxes can shorten the operational lifetime of low Earth orbiting satellites, threatening a large, valuable population. Therefore, studies are being undertaken to bring about practical human control of the radiation belts, termed "Radiation Belt Remediation" (RBR. Here we consider the upper atmospheric consequences of an RBR system operating over either 1 or 10 days. The RBR-forced neutral chemistry changes, leading to NOx enhancements and Ox depletions, are significant during the timescale of the precipitation but are generally not long-lasting. The magnitudes, time-scales, and altitudes of these changes are no more significant than those observed during large solar proton events. In contrast, RBR-operation will lead to unusually intense HF blackouts for about the first half of the operation time, producing large scale disruptions to radio communication and navigation systems. While the neutral atmosphere changes are not particularly important, HF disruptions could be an important area for policy makers to consider, particularly for the remediation of natural injections.

  15. Photochemistry in Outer Solar System Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Darrell F.

    2005-01-01

    The photochemistries of the H2-He atmospheres of the gas giants Jupiter, Saturn and ice giants Uranus and Neptune and Titan’s mildly reducing N2 atmosphere are reviewed in terms of general chemical and physical principles. The thermochemical furnace regions in the deep atmospheres and the photochemical regions of the giant planets are coupled by vertical mixing to ensure efficient recyling of photochemical products. On Titan,mass loss of hydrogen ensures photochemical evolution of methane into less saturated hydrocarbons. A summary discussion of major dissociation paths and essential chemical reactions is given. The chapter ends with a overview of vertical transport processes in planetary atmospheres.

  16. Solar Magnetic Atmospheric Effects on Global Helioseismic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Balázs Pintér1. Solar System Research Group, Institute of Mathematics, Physics and Computer Science, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth, Penglais Campus, Physics Building, SY23 3BZ, Wales, UK.

  17. Report of the Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, H.; Bahcall, J.N.; Bernabeu, J.; Boulay, M.G.; Bowles, T.; Calaprice, F.; Champagne, A.; Freedman, S.; Gai, M.; Galbiati, C.; Gallagher, H.; Gonzalez-Garcia, C.; Hahn, R.L.; Heeger, K.M.; Hime, A.; Jung, C.K.; Klein, J.R.; Koike, M.; Lanou, R.; Learned, J.G.; Lesko, K.T.; Losecco, J.; Maltoni, M.; Mann, A.; McKinsey, D.; Palomares-Ruiz, S.; Pena-Garay, C.; Petcov, S.T.; Piepke, A.; Pitt, M.; Raghavan, R.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Scholberg, K.; Sobel, H.W.; Takeuchi, T.; Vogelaar, R.; Wolfenstein, L.

    2004-10-22

    The highest priority of the Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Experiment Working Group is the development of a real-time, precision experiment that measures the pp solar neutrino flux. A measurement of the pp solar neutrino flux, in comparison with the existing precision measurements of the high energy {sup 8}B neutrino flux, will demonstrate the transition between vacuum and matter-dominated oscillations, thereby quantitatively testing a fundamental prediction of the standard scenario of neutrino flavor transformation. The initial solar neutrino beam is pure {nu}{sub e}, which also permits sensitive tests for sterile neutrinos. The pp experiment will also permit a significantly improved determination of {theta}{sub 12} and, together with other solar neutrino measurements, either a measurement of {theta}{sub 13} or a constraint a factor of two lower than existing bounds. In combination with the essential pre-requisite experiments that will measure the {sup 7}Be solar neutrino flux with a precision of 5%, a measurement of the pp solar neutrino flux will constitute a sensitive test for non-standard energy generation mechanisms within the Sun. The Standard Solar Model predicts that the pp and {sup 7}Be neutrinos together constitute more than 98% of the solar neutrino flux. The comparison of the solar luminosity measured via neutrinos to that measured via photons will test for any unknown energy generation mechanisms within the nearest star. A precise measurement of the pp neutrino flux (predicted to be 92% of the total flux) will also test stringently the theory of stellar evolution since the Standard Solar Model predicts the pp flux with a theoretical uncertainty of 1%. We also find that an atmospheric neutrino experiment capable of resolving the mass hierarchy is a high priority. Atmospheric neutrino experiments may be the only alternative to very long baseline accelerator experiments as a way of resolving this fundamental question. Such an experiment could be a very

  18. Ions in the Terrestrial Atmosphere and Other Solar System Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R. Giles; Tammet, Hannes

    Charged molecular clusters, traditionally called small ions, carry electric currents in atmospheres. Charged airborne particles, or aerosol ions, play an important role in generation and evolution of atmospheric aerosols. Growth of ions depends on the trace gas content, which is highly variable in the time and space. Even at sub-ppb concentrations, electrically active organic compounds (e.g. pyridine derivatives) can affect the ion composition and size. The size and mobility are closely related, although the form of the relationship varies depending on the critical diameter, which, at 273 K, is about 1.6 nm. For ions smaller than this the separation of quantum levels exceeds the average thermal energy, allowing use of a molecular aggregate model for the size-mobility relation. For larger ions the size-mobility relation approaches the Stokes-Cunningham-Millikan law. The lifetime of a cluster ion in the terrestrial lower atmosphere is about one minute, determined by the balance between ion production rate, ion-ion recombination, and ion-aerosol attachment.

  19. A filter-wheel solar radiometer for atmospheric transmission studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, G. E.; Peck, R. L.; Allen, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    A filter-wheel solar radiometer has been developed for monitoring the atmospheric optical depth at multiple narrow-wavelength intervals in the visible and near IR regions of the spectrum. Measurements of the direct solar radiations are converted to a digital format and stored in punched tape for eventual analysis by a computer. During stable clear weather condition, the instrument is capable of providing monochromatic optical depths to an estimated rms accuracy of 0.005.

  20. Effects of solar eclipses in the surface atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernogor, L. F.

    2008-08-01

    The results of single-type optical observations, analysis, and comparison of dynamic characteristics of the effects in the surface atmosphere that accompanied four partial solar eclipses (August 11, 1999; May 31, 2003; October 3, 2005; March 29, 2006) near the city of Kharkiv (Ukraine) are presented. The effects observed in the morning, near-noon, and afternoon hours differed markedly. During the solar eclipses, the temperature of the surface atmosphere decreased by 1.3 7.3°. It was detected that, when the maximum value of the occultation function changed from 0.24 to 0.73, the standard deviation of solar-limb displacement σ S decreased by 0.14″ and 0.68″, respectively. The time of convection development was found to be 15 16 min. The parameters of dynamic processes in the surface atmosphere have been calculated and the parameters of mechanical and thermal turbulence have been estimated from the results of measurements of the statistical characteristics of the level of solar-limb tremor with invocation of theoretical relations. The solar eclipses were accompanied by quasi-periodic processes in the atmosphere, which were most likely associated with the generation and propagation of internal gravity waves.

  1. The radiation in the atmosphere during major solar particle events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clucas, Simon N.; Dyer, Clive S.; Lei, Fan

    Major solar particle events can give rise to greatly enhanced radiation throughout the entire atmosphere including at aircraft altitudes. These particle events are very hard to predict and their effect on aircraft is difficult to calculate. A comprehensive model of the energetic radiation in the atmosphere has been developed based on a response matrix of the atmosphere to energetic particle incidence. This model has previously been used to determine the spectral form of several ground level neutron events including February 1956 and September/October 1989. Significant validation of the model has been possible using CREAM data flying onboard Concorde during the September/October 1989 events. Further work has been carried out for the current solar maximum, including estimates of the solar particle spectra during the July 2000, April 2001, and October 2003 events and comparisons of predicted atmospheric measurements with limited flight data. Further CREAM data have been obtained onboard commercial airlines and high altitude business jets during quiet time periods. In addition, the atmospheric radiation model, along with solar particle spectra, have been used to calculate the neutron flux and dose rates along several commercial aircraft flight paths including London to Los Angeles. The influence of rigidity cut-off suppression by geomagnetic storms is examined and shows that the received flight dose during disturbed periods can be significantly enhanced compared with quiet periods.

  2. Atmospheric solar heating rate in the water vapor bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ming-Dah

    1986-01-01

    The total absorption of solar radiation by water vapor in clear atmospheres is parameterized as a simple function of the scaled water vapor amount. For applications to cloudy and hazy atmospheres, the flux-weighted k-distribution functions are computed for individual absorption bands and for the total near-infrared region. The parameterization is based upon monochromatic calculations and follows essentially the scaling approximation of Chou and Arking, but the effect of temperature variation with height is taken into account in order to enhance the accuracy. Furthermore, the spectral range is extended to cover the two weak bands centered at 0.72 and 0.82 micron. Comparisons with monochromatic calculations show that the atmospheric heating rate and the surface radiation can be accurately computed from the parameterization. Comparisons are also made with other parameterizations. It is found that the absorption of solar radiation can be computed reasonably well using the Goody band model and the Curtis-Godson approximation.

  3. Is magnetic topology important for heating the solar atmosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, Clare E; Stevenson, Julie E H; Threlfall, James; Edwards, Sarah J

    2015-05-28

    Magnetic fields permeate the entire solar atmosphere weaving an extremely complex pattern on both local and global scales. In order to understand the nature of this tangled web of magnetic fields, its magnetic skeleton, which forms the boundaries between topologically distinct flux domains, may be determined. The magnetic skeleton consists of null points, separatrix surfaces, spines and separators. The skeleton is often used to clearly visualize key elements of the magnetic configuration, but parts of the skeleton are also locations where currents and waves may collect and dissipate. In this review, the nature of the magnetic skeleton on both global and local scales, over solar cycle time scales, is explained. The behaviour of wave pulses in the vicinity of both nulls and separators is discussed and so too is the formation of current layers and reconnection at the same features. Each of these processes leads to heating of the solar atmosphere, but collectively do they provide enough heat, spread over a wide enough area, to explain the energy losses throughout the solar atmosphere? Here, we consider this question for the three different solar regions: active regions, open-field regions and the quiet Sun. We find that the heating of active regions and open-field regions is highly unlikely to be due to reconnection or wave dissipation at topological features, but it is possible that these may play a role in the heating of the quiet Sun. In active regions, the absence of a complex topology may play an important role in allowing large energies to build up and then, subsequently, be explosively released in the form of a solar flare. Additionally, knowledge of the intricate boundaries of open-field regions (which the magnetic skeleton provides) could be very important in determining the main acceleration mechanism(s) of the solar wind. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Solar energetic particle interactions with the Venusian atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plainaki, Christina; Grassi, Davide [INAF-IAPS, Rome (Italy); Paschalis, Pavlos; Mavromichalaki, Helen [National and Kapodistrian Univ., Athens (Greece). Nuclear and Particle Physics Dept.; Andriopoulou, Maria [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz (Austria). Space Research Science Inst.

    2016-11-01

    In the context of planetary space weather, we estimate the ion production rates in the Venusian atmosphere due to the interactions of solar energetic particles (SEPs) with gas. The assumed concept for our estimations is based on two cases of SEP events, previously observed in near-Earth space: the event in October 1989 and the event in May 2012. For both cases, we assume that the directional properties of the flux and the interplanetary magnetic field configuration would have allowed the SEPs' arrival at Venus and their penetration to the planet's atmosphere. For the event in May 2012, we consider the solar particle properties (integrated flux and rigidity spectrum) obtained by the Neutron Monitor Based Anisotropic GLE Pure Power Law (NMBANGLE PPOLA) model (Plainaki et al., 2010, 2014) applied previously for the Earth case and scaled to the distance of Venus from the Sun. For the simulation of the actual cascade in the Venusian atmosphere initiated by the incoming particle fluxes, we apply the DYASTIMA code, a Monte Carlo (MC) application based on the Geant4 software (Paschalis et al., 2014). Our predictions are afterwards compared to other estimations derived from previous studies and discussed. Finally, we discuss the differences between the nominal ionization profile due to galactic cosmic-ray-atmosphere interactions and the profile during periods of intense solar activity, and we show the importance of understanding space weather conditions on Venus in the context of future mission preparation and data interpretation.

  5. Models of the Solar Atmospheric Response to Flare Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Joel

    2011-01-01

    I will present models of the solar atmospheric response to flare heating. The models solve the equations of non-LTE radiation hydrodynamics with an electron beam added as a flare energy source term. Radiative transfer is solved in detail for many important optically thick hydrogen and helium transitions and numerous optically thin EUV lines making the models ideally suited to study the emission that is produced during flares. I will pay special attention to understanding key EUV lines as well the mechanism for white light production. I will also present preliminary results of how the model solar atmosphere responds to Fletcher & Hudson type flare heating. I will compare this with the results from flare simulations using the standard thick target model.

  6. Equilibrium model of thin magnetic flux tubes. [solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodo, G.; Ferrari, A.; Massaglia, S.; Kalkofen, W.; Rosner, R.

    1984-01-01

    The existence of a physically realizable domain in which approximations that lead to a self consistent solution for flux tube stratification in the solar atmosphere, without ad hoc hypotheses, is proved. The transfer equation is solved assuming that no energy transport other than radiative is present. Convective motions inside the tube are assumed to be suppressed by magnetic forces. Only one parameter, the plasma beta at tau = 0, must be specified, and this can be estimated from observations of spatially resolved flux tubes.

  7. Modeling atmospheric effects of the September 1859 Solar Flare

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Brian; Jackman, Charles,; Melott, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    We have modeled atmospheric effects, especially ozone depletion, due to a solar proton event which probably accompanied the extreme magnetic storm of 1-2 September 1859. We use an inferred proton fluence for this event as estimated from nitrate levels in Greenland ice cores. We present results showing production of odd nitrogen compounds and their impact on ozone. We also compute rainout of nitrate in our model and compare to values from ice core data.

  8. An investigation of aerosol optical properties: Atmospheric implications and influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penaloza-Murillo, Marcos A.

    An experimental, observational, and theoretical investigation of aerosol optical properties has been made in this work to study their implications and influences on the atmosphere. In the laboratory the scientific and instrumental methodology consisted of three parts, namely, aerosol generation, optical and mass concentration measurements, and computational calculations. In particular the optical properties of ammonium sulfate and caffeine aerosol were derived from measurements made with a transmissometer cell-reciprocal- integrating nephelometer (TCRIN), equipped with a laser beam at 632.8 nm, and by applying a Mie theory computer code The aerosol generators, optical equipment and calibration procedures were reviewed. The aerosol shape and size distribution were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy and the Gumprecht- Sliepcevich/Lipofsky-Green extinction-sedimentation method. In particular the spherical and cylindrical shape were considered. During this investigation, an alternative method for obtaining the optical properties of monodisperse spherical non-absorbing aerosol using a cell-transmissometer, which is based on a linearisation of the Lambert-Beer law, was found. In addition, adapting the TCRIN to electrooptical aerosol studies, the optical properties of a circular-cylindrical aerosol of caffeine were undertaken under the condition of random orientation in relation with the laser beam, and perpendicular orientation to it. A theoretical study was conducted to assess the sensitivity of aerosol to a change of shape under different polarisation modes. The aerosol optical properties, obtained previously in the laboratory, were then used to simulate the direct radiative forcing. The calculations and results were obtained by applying a one- dimensional energy-balance box model. The influence of atmospheric aerosol on the sky brightness due to a total solar eclipse was studied using the photometric and meteorological observations made during the

  9. Observations and Modeling of Plasma Waves in the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W.; Ofman, L.; Downs, C.

    2016-12-01

    The solar atmosphere, especially the extended corona, provides rich observations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves and plasma waves in general. Such waves can be used as seismological tools to probe the physical conditions of the medium in which they travel, such as the coronal magnetic field and plasma parameters. Recent high-resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and in UV by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) have opened a new chapter in understanding these waves and in utilizing them for coronal seismology. We will review such new observations of two intimately related phenomena - global EUV waves (so-called "EIT waves") associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and quasi-periodic, fast-mode magnetosonic wave trains associated with flares. We will focus on the generation and propagation of global EUV waves and their interaction with coronal structures, as well as the correlation of AIA-detected fast-mode wave trains with flare pulsations seen from radio to hard X-ray wavelengths. We will also present recent MHD modeling efforts in reproducing these waves using realistic, observationally-driven simulations. We will discuss the roles of such waves in energy transport within the solar atmosphere and in their associated CME/flare eruptions.

  10. Solar particle effects on minor components of the Polar atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damiani, A. [ICES - International Center for Earth Sciences c/o Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Rome (Italy). Ist. di Acustica ' O.M. Corbino' ; INAF, Roma (Italy). Ist. di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario; Storini, M.; Laurenza, M. [INAF, Roma (Italy). Ist. di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario; Rafanelli, C. [ICES - International Center for Earth Sciences c/o Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Rome (Italy). Ist. di Acustica ' O.M. Corbino'

    2008-07-01

    Solar activity can influence the Earth's environment, and in particular the ozone layer, by direct modulation of the e.m. radiation or through variability of the incoming cosmic ray flux (solar and galactic particles). In particular, solar energetic particles (SEPs) provide additional external energy to the terrestrial environment; they are able to interact with the minor constituents of the atmospheric layer and produce ionizations, dissociations, dissociative ionizations and excitations. This paper highlights the SEP effects on the chemistry of the upper atmosphere by analysing some SEP events recorded during 2005 in the descending phase of the current solar cycle. It is shown that these events can lead to short- (hours) and medium- (days) term ozone variations through catalytic cycles (e.g. HO{sub x} and NO{sub x} increases). We focus attention on the relationship between ozone and OH data (retrieved from MLS EOS AURA) for four SEP events: 17 and 20 January, 15 May and 8 September. We confirm that SEP effects are different on the night and day hemispheres at high latitudes. (orig.)

  11. Solar particle effects on minor components of the Polar atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Damiani

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Solar activity can influence the Earth's environment, and in particular the ozone layer, by direct modulation of the e.m. radiation or through variability of the incoming cosmic ray flux (solar and galactic particles. In particular, solar energetic particles (SEPs provide additional external energy to the terrestrial environment; they are able to interact with the minor constituents of the atmospheric layer and produce ionizations, dissociations, dissociative ionizations and excitations. This paper highlights the SEP effects on the chemistry of the upper atmosphere by analysing some SEP events recorded during 2005 in the descending phase of the current solar cycle. It is shown that these events can lead to short- (hours and medium- (days term ozone variations through catalytic cycles (e.g. HOx and NOx increases. We focus attention on the relationship between ozone and OH data (retrieved from MLS EOS AURA for four SEP events: 17 and 20 January, 15 May and 8 September. We confirm that SEP effects are different on the night and day hemispheres at high latitudes.

  12. Lifting Entry & Atmospheric Flight (LEAF) Applications at Solar System Bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, G.; Sen, B.; Polidan, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    Introduction: Northrop Grumman and L'Garde have continued the development of a hypersonic entry, maneuverable platform capable of performing long-duration (months to a year) in situ and remote measurements at any solar system body that possesses an atmosphere. The Lifting Entry & Atmospheric Flight (LEAF) family of vehicles achieve this capability by using a semi-buoyant, ultra-low ballistic coefficient vehicle whose lifting entry allows it to enter the atmosphere without an aeroshell. In this presentation, we discuss the application of the LEAF system at various solar system bodies: Venus, Titan, Mars, and Earth. We present the key differences in platform design as well as operational differences required by the various target environments. The Venus implementation includes propulsive capability to reach higher altitudes during the day and achieves full buoyancy in the "habitable layers" of Venus' atmosphere at night. Titan also offers an attractive operating environment, allowing LEAF designs that can target low, medium, or high altitude operations, also with propulsive capabilities to roam within each altitude regime. The Mars version is a glider that descends gradually, allowing targeted delivery of payloads to the surface. Finally, an Earth version could remain in orbit in a stowed state until activated, allowing rapid response type deployments to any region of the globe.

  13. On the response of the upper atmosphere to solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, David J.

    Over the past several decades, modern civilizations have become increasingly dependent on spacecraft that reside in the near-Earth space environment. For this reason, scientists and engineers have been interested in understanding the causes of perturbations to the background state of the Earth's upper atmosphere, and to quantify the impact of these events. As a result of the states of the thermosphere and ionosphere being directly dependent on the incident radiation from the sum, it is expected that sudden changes in the solar radiative output should cause significant changes in the upper atmosphere. Such dynamics are investigated in this study, specifically the manner in which solar flares affect the density, circulation, and temperature of the Earth's thermosphere and ionosphere. A global model of this region is used to examine how the upper atmosphere responds to such transient events. In order to quantify the response, the model is run during realistic events in order to understand the magnitudes of the resulting perturbations to the global ionosphere-thermosphere system. In the thermosphere, density perturbations of approximately 15% are found to occur on the dayside within 1.5 hours after the start of a solar flare. The addition of solar energy to the dayside launches a traveling atmospheric disturbance which propagates towards the night-side at the local sound speed plus the background velocity. As the disturbance converges on itself near the midnight sector, density enhancements almost as large as those seen on the day-side can occur. Furthermore, these night-side neutral perturbations cause both enhancements and depletions in the night-side electron density. In addition, theoretical simulations are performed to study the effects that the major characteristics of solar flares have on the atmosphere. In particular, dynamics resulting from changes in the total integrated energy, flare magnitude, and relevant time scales are investigated. The most important

  14. The Influence of Large Solar Proton Events on the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    Solar proton events (SPEs) can cause changes in constituents in the Earth s polar middle atmosphere. A number of large SPEs have occurred over the past 50 years and tend to happen most frequently near solar maximum. The highly energetic protons cause ionizations, excitations, dissociations, and dissociative ionizations of the background constituents. Complicated ion chemistry leads to HOx (H, OH, HO2) production and dissociation of N2 leads to NOy (N, NO, NO2, NO3, N2O5, HNO3, HO2NO2, ClONO2, BrONO2) production. Both the HOx and NOy increases can result in changes to ozone in the stratosphere and mesosphere. The HOx increases lead to short-lived (days) ozone decreases in the mesosphere and upper stratosphere. The NOy increases lead to long-lived (several months) stratospheric ozone changes because of the long lifetime of NOy constituents in this region. UARS HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) instrument observations showed SPE-caused polar stratospheric NOx (NO+NO2) increases over 10 ppbv in September 2000 due to the very large SPE of July 2000, which are reasonably well simulated with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). WACCM-computed SPE-caused polar stratospheric ozone decreases >10% continued for up to 5 months past the largest events in the past 50 years, however, SPE-caused total ozone changes were not found to be statistically significant. Small polar middle atmospheric temperature changes of <4 K have also been predicted to occur as a result of the larger SPEs. The polar atmospheric effects of large SPEs during solar cycle 23 and 24 will be emphasized in this presentation.

  15. Solar-Driven Variation in the Atmosphere of Uranus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aplin, K. L.; Harrison, R. G.

    2017-12-01

    Long-term measurements (1972-2015) of the reflectivity of Uranus at 472 and 551 nm display variability that is incompletely explained by seasonal effects. Spectral analysis shows that this nonseasonal variability tracks the 11 year solar cycle. Two mechanisms could cause solar modulation: (a) nucleation onto ions or electrons created by galactic cosmic rays (GCR) or (b) UV-induced aerosol color changes. Ion-aerosol theory is used to identify expected relationships between reflectivity fluctuations and GCR flux, tested with multiple regression and compared to the linear response predicted between reflectivity and solar UV flux. The statistics show that 24% of the variance in reflectivity fluctuations at 472 nm is explained by GCR ion-induced nucleation, compared to 22% for a UV-only mechanism. Similar GCR-related variability exists in Neptune's atmosphere; hence, the effects found at Uranus provide the first example of common variability in two planetary atmospheres driven through energetic particle modulation by their host star.

  16. The ancient oxygen exosphere of Mars - Implications for atmosphere evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M. H. G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Bougher, S. W.; Nagy, A. F.

    1993-01-01

    The paper considers absorption of oxygen (atoms and ions) by the surface as a mechanism for the early Martian atmosphere escape, due to the effect of high EUV flux of the ancient sun. Hot oxygen exosphere densities in ancient atmosphere and ionosphere are calculated for different EUV fluxes and the escape fluxes associated with these exposures. Using these densities, the ion production rate above the ionopause is calculated for different epochs including photoionization, charge exchange, and solar wind electron impact. It is found that, when the inferred high solar EUV fluxes of the past are taken into account, oxygen equivalent to that in several tens of meters of water, planet-wide, should have escaped Martian atmosphere to space over the last 3 Gyr.

  17. Atmospheric extinction in simulation tools for solar tower plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrieder, Natalie; Wilbert, Stefan; Schroedter-Homscheidt, Marion; Schnell, Franziska; Guevara, Diana Mancera; Buck, Reiner; Giuliano, Stefano; Pitz-Paal, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Atmospheric extinction causes significant radiation losses between the heliostat field and the receiver in a solar tower plants. These losses vary with site and time. State of the art is that in ray-tracing and plant optimization tools, atmospheric extinction is included by choosing between few constant standard atmospheric conditions. Even though some tools allow the consideration of site and time dependent extinction data, such data sets are nearly never available. This paper summarizes and compares the most common model equations implemented in several ray-tracing tools. There are already several methods developed and published to measure extinction on-site. An overview of the existing methods is also given here. Ray-tracing simulations of one exemplary tower plant at the Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA) are presented to estimate the plant yield deviations between simulations using standard model equations instead of extinction time series. For PSA, the effect of atmospheric extinction accounts for losses between 1.6 and 7 %. This range is caused by considering overload dumping or not. Applying standard clear or hazy model equations instead of extinction time series lead to an underestimation of the annual plant yield at PSA. The discussion of the effect of extinction in tower plants has to include overload dumping. Situations in which overload dumping occurs are mostly connected to high radiation levels and low atmospheric extinction. Therefore it can be recommended that project developers should consider site and time dependent extinction data especially on hazy sites. A reduced uncertainty of the plant yield prediction can significantly reduce costs due to smaller risk margins for financing and EPCs. The generation of extinction data for several locations in form of representative yearly time series or geographical maps should be further elaborated.

  18. Solar Wind Interaction with the Martian Upper Atmosphere at Early Mars/Extreme Solar Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, C.; Bougher, S. W.; Ma, Y.; Toth, G.; Lee, Y.; Nagy, A. F.; Tenishev, V.; Pawlowski, D. J.; Combi, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    The investigation of ion escape fluxes from Mars, resulting from the solar wind interaction with its upper atmosphere/ionosphere, is important due to its potential impact on the long-term evolution of Mars atmosphere (e.g., loss of water) over its history. In the present work, we adopt the 3-D Mars cold neutral atmosphere profiles (0 ~ 300 km) from the newly developed and validated Mars Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (M-GITM) and the 3-D hot oxygen profiles (100 km ~ 5 RM) from the exosphere Monte Carlo model Adaptive Mesh Particle Simulator (AMPS). We apply these 3-D model output fields into the 3-D BATS-R-US Mars multi-fluid MHD (MF-MHD) model (100 km ~ 20 RM) that can simulate the interplay between Mars upper atmosphere and solar wind by considering the dynamics of individual ion species. The multi-fluid MHD model solves separate continuity, momentum and energy equations for each ion species (H+, O+, O2+, CO2+). The M-GITM model together with the AMPS exosphere model take into account the effects of solar cycle and seasonal variations on both cold and hot neutral atmospheres. This feature allows us to investigate the corresponding effects on the Mars upper atmosphere ion escape by using a one-way coupling approach, i.e., both the M-GITM and AMPS model output fields are used as the input for the multi-fluid MHD model and the M-GITM is used as input into the AMPS exosphere model. In this study, we present M-GITM, AMPS, and MF-MHD calculations (1-way coupled) for 2.5 GYA conditions and/or extreme solar conditions for present day Mars (high solar wind velocities, high solar wind dynamic pressure, and high solar irradiance conditions, etc.). Present day extreme conditions may result in MF-MHD outputs that are similar to 2.5 GYA cases. The crustal field orientations are also considered in this study. By comparing estimates of past ion escape rates with the current ion loss rates to be returned by the MAVEN spacecraft (2013-2016), we can better constrain the

  19. Predicting Atmospheric Ionization and Excitation by Precipitating SEP and Solar Wind Protons Measured By MAVEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolitz, Rebecca; Dong, Chuanfei; Lee, Christina; Lillis, Rob; Brain, David; Curry, Shannon; Halekas, Jasper; Bougher, Stephen W.; Jakosky, Bruce

    2017-10-01

    Precipitating energetic particles ionize and excite planetary atmospheres, increasing electron content and producing aurora. At Mars, the solar wind and solar energetic particles (SEPs) can precipitate directly into the atmosphere because solar wind protons can charge exchange to become neutral and pass the magnetosheath, and SEPs are sufficiently energetic to cross the magnetosheath unchanged. We will compare ionization and Lyman alpha emission rates for solar wind and SEP protons during nominal solar activity and a CME shock front impact event on May 16 2016. We will use the Atmospheric Scattering of Protons and Energetic Neutrals (ASPEN) model to compare excitation and ionization rates by SEPs and solar wind protons currently measured by the SWIA (Solar Wind Ion Analyzer) and SEP instruments aboard the MAVEN spacecraft. Results will help quantify how SEP and solar wind protons influence atmospheric energy deposition during solar minimum.

  20. Theoretical studies of the physics of the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1992-01-01

    Significant advances in our theoretical basis for understanding several physical processes related to dynamical phenomena on the sun were achieved. We have advanced a new model for spicules and fibrils. We have provided a simple physical view of resonance absorption of MHD surface waves; this allowed an approximate mathematical procedure for obtaining a wealth of new analytical results which we applied to coronal heating and p-mode absorption at magnetic regions. We provided the first comprehensive models for the heating and acceleration of the transition region, corona, and solar wind. We provided a new view of viscosity under coronal conditions. We provided new insights into Alfven wave propagation in the solar atmosphere. And recently we have begun work in a new direction: parametric instabilities of Alfven waves.

  1. Helical Motion of Magnetic Flux Tubes in the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Skhirtladze, N.

    2008-08-01

    Photospheric granulation may excite transverse kink pulses in anchored vertical magnetic flux tubes. The pulses propagate upward along the tubes with the kink speed, while oscillating wakes are formed behind the wave front in a stratified atmosphere. The wakes oscillate at the kink cutoff frequency of stratified medium and gradually decay in time. When two or more consecutive kink pulses with different polarizations propagate in the same thin tube, then the wakes corresponding to different pulses may be superimposed. The superposition sets up helical motions of magnetic flux tubes in the photosphere/chromosphere as seen in recent Hinode movies. The energy carried by the pulses is enough to heat the solar chromosphere/corona and accelerate the solar wind.

  2. Solar Flux Deposition And Heating Rates In Jupiter's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2009-09-01

    We discuss here the solar downward net flux in the 0.25 - 2.5 µm range in the atmosphere of Jupiter and the associated heating rates under a number of vertical cloud structure scenarios focusing in the effect of clouds and hazes. Our numerical model is based in the doubling-adding technique to solve the radiative transfer equation and it includes gas absorption by CH4, NH3 and H2, in addition to Rayleigh scattering by a mixture of H2 plus He. Four paradigmatic Jovian regions have been considered (hot-spots, belts, zones and Polar Regions). The hot-spots are the most transparent regions with downward net fluxes of 2.5±0.5 Wm-2 at the 6 bar level. The maximum solar heating is 0.04±0.01 K/day and occurs above 1 bar. Belts and zones characterization result in a maximum net downward flux of 0.5 Wm-2 at 2 bar and 0.015 Wm-2 at 6 bar. Heating is concentrated in the stratospheric and tropospheric hazes. Finally, Polar Regions are also explored and the results point to a considerable stratospheric heating of 0.04±0.02 K/day. In all, these calculations suggest that the role of the direct solar forcing in the Jovian atmospheric dynamics is limited to the upper 1 - 2 bar of the atmosphere except in the hot-spot areas. Acknowledgments: This work has been funded by Spanish MEC AYA2006-07735 with FEDER support and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07.

  3. Lifting Entry & Atmospheric Flight (LEAF) System Concept Applications at Solar System Bodies With an Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Greg; Polidan, Ronald; Ross, Floyd; Sokol, Daniel; Warwick, Steve

    2015-11-01

    Northrop Grumman and L’Garde have continued the development of a hypersonic entry, semi-buoyant, maneuverable platform capable of performing long-duration (months to a year) in situ and remote measurements at any solar system body that possesses an atmosphere.The Lifting Entry & Atmospheric Flight (LEAF) family of vehicles achieves this capability by using a semi-buoyant, ultra-low ballistic coefficient vehicle whose lifting entry allows it to enter the atmosphere without an aeroshell. The mass savings realized by eliminating the heavy aeroshell allows significantly more payload to be accommodated by the platform for additional science collection and return.In this presentation, we discuss the application of the LEAF system at various solar system bodies: Venus, Titan, Mars, and Earth. We present the key differences in platform design as well as operational differences required by the various target environments. The Venus implementation includes propulsive capability to reach higher altitudes during the day and achieves full buoyancy in the mid-cloud layer of Venus’ atmosphere at night.Titan also offers an attractive operating environment, allowing LEAF designs that can target low or medium altitude operations, also with propulsive capabilities to roam within each altitude regime. The Mars version is a glider that descends gradually, allowing targeted delivery of payloads to the surface or high resolution surface imaging. Finally, an Earth version could remain in orbit in a stowed state until activated, allowing rapid response type deployments to any region of the globe.

  4. Solar, supernova, atmospheric and geo neutrino studies using JUNO detector

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Wan-lei; Li, Yufeng; Salamanna, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Aside from its primary purpose of shedding light on the mass hierarchy (MH) using reactor anti-neutrinos, the JUNO experiment in Jiangmen (China) will also contribute to study neutrinos from non-reactor sources. In this poster we review JUNO's goals in the realms of supernova, atmospheric, solar and geo-neutrinos; present the related experimental issues and provide the current estimates of its potential. For a typical galactic SN at a distance of 10 kpc, JUNO will record about 5000 events from inverse beta decay, 2000 events from elastic neutrino-proton scattering, 300 events from neutrino-electron scattering, and the charged current and neutral current interactions on the ${^{12}}{\\rm C}$ nuclei. For atmospheric neutrinos, JUNO should be able to detect $\

  5. Atmospheric environmental implications of propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, Allan J.; Bennett, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    Three independent studies have been conducted for assessing the impact of rocket launches on the earth's environment. These studies have addressed issues of acid rain in the troposphere, ozone depletion in the stratosphere, toxicity of chemical rocket exhaust products, and the potential impact on global warming from carbon dioxide emissions from rocket launches. Local, regional, and global impact assessments were examined and compared with both natural sources and anthropogenic sources of known atmospheric pollutants with the following conclusions: (1) Neither solid nor liquid rocket launches have a significant impact on the earth's global environment, and there is no real significant difference between the two. (2) Regional and local atmospheric impacts are more significant than global impacts, but quickly return to normal background conditions within a few hours after launch. And (3) vastly increased space launch activities equivalent to 50 U.S. Space Shuttles or 50 Russian Energia launches per year would not significantly impact these conclusions. However, these assessments, for the most part, are based upon homogeneous gas phase chemistry analysis; heterogeneous chemistry from exhaust particulates, such as aluminum oxide, ice contrails, soot, etc., and the influence of plume temperature and afterburning of fuel-rich exhaust products, need to be further addressed. It was the consensus of these studies that computer modeling of interactive plume chemistry with the atmosphere needs to be improved and computer models need to be verified with experimental data. Rocket exhaust plume chemistry can be modified with propellant reformulation and changes in operating conditions, but, based upon the current state of knowledge, it does not appear that significant environmental improvements from propellant formulation changes can be made or are warranted. Flight safety, reliability, and cost improvements are paramount for any new rocket system, and these important aspects

  6. Solar winds surfs waves in the Sun's atmosphere!

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    The fact that this electrified plasma speeds up to almost 3 million kilometres per hour as it leaves the Sun - twice as fast as originally predicted - has been known for years. The interpretation of how it happens is the real and surprising novelty: "The waves in the Sun's atmosphere are produced by vibrating solar magnetic field lines, which give solar wind particles a push just like an ocean wave gives a surfer a ride" said Dr John Kohl, principal investigator for the Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer (UVCS) - the instrument among the 12 aboard SOHO which gathered the data - and for the Spartan 201 mission. The outermost solar atmosphere, or corona, is only seen from Earth during a total eclipse of the Sun, when it appears as a shimmering, white veil surrounding the black lunar disc. The corona is an extremely tenuous, electrically charged gas, known as plasma, that flows throughout the solar system as the solar wind. The waves are formed by rapidly vibrating magnetic fields in the coronal plasma. They are called magneto - hydro - dynamic (MHD) waves and are believed to accelerate the solar wind. The solar wind is made up of electrons and ions, electrically charged atoms that have lost electrons. The electric charge of the solar wind particles forces them to travel along invisible lines of magnetic force in the corona. The particles spiral around the magnetic field lines as they rush into space. "The magnetic field acts like a violin string: when it's touched, it vibrates. When the Sun's magnetic field vibrates with a frequency equal to that of the particle spiraling around the magnetic field, it heats it up, producing a force that accelerates the particle upward and away from the Sun," says Dr. Ester Antonucci, an astronomer at the observatory of Turin, Italy, and co-investigator for SOHO's UVCS an instrument developed with considerable financial support by the Italian Space Agency, ASI. In a way this is similar to what happens if two people hold a string at

  7. Origin and Evolution of Planetary Atmospheres Implications for Habitability

    CERN Document Server

    Lammer, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Based on the author’s own work and results obtained by international teams he coordinated, this SpringerBrief offers a concise discussion of the origin and early evolution of atmospheres of terrestrial planets during the active phase of their host stars, as well as of the environmental conditions which are necessary in order for planets like the Earth to obtain N_2-rich atmospheres. Possible thermal and non-thermal atmospheric escape processes are discussed in a comparative way between the planets in the Solar System and exoplanets. Lastly, a hypothesis for how to test and study the discussed atmosphere evolution theories using future UV transit observations of terrestrial exoplanets within the orbits of dwarf stars is presented.

  8. The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Title, Alan M.; AIA Team

    2006-06-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on SDO will provide revolutionary coverage of the entire visible solar hemisphere, observed from photospheric to coronal temperatures, at 1-arcsecond resolution, with a characteristic cadence of 10 seconds for each channel. The AIA comprises four dual normal-incidence telescopes that enable it to cycle through a set of EUV channels centered on strong emission lines of iron (ranging from Fe IX through XXIII) and helium (304A), plus two UV channels near 1600A and a broad band visible channel. Combined with the (vector-)magnetic imagery from SDO/HMI, the AIA observations will significantly further our understanding of the dynamics of the magnetic field in the solar atmosphere and heliosphere, both in quiescent and eruptive stages. The comprehensive thermal coverage of the corona will open new avenues of study for coronal energetics and seismology, which will benefit from the excellent calibration against the SDO/EVE spectral irradiance measurements. The AIA data will be easily accessible on the web, with a time delay that is expected to be of the order of 15 minutes to 1 hour. Users will be able to browse the data through summary web pages that are complemented by a comprehensive metadata catalog. Data analysis will be supported through the freely available SolarSoft libraries and through modules in a flexible, evolving pipeline data analysis system to be operated at the AIA-HMI Joint Science Operations Center. We plan to incorporate feature recognition software, automated movie making, coronal field modeling, and other supporting analysis software. We invite the broad ILWS community to contact us with ideas to collaborate on any aspect of the AIA Investigation. Details on the AIA instrument, the Science Investigation, and related news can be found at http://aia.lmsal.com.

  9. Solar Wind Interaction and Impact on the Venus Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futaana, Yoshifumi; Stenberg Wieser, Gabriella; Barabash, Stas; Luhmann, Janet G.

    2017-11-01

    Venus has intrigued planetary scientists for decades because of its huge contrasts to Earth, in spite of its nickname of "Earth's Twin". Its invisible upper atmosphere and space environment are also part of the larger story of Venus and its evolution. In 60s to 70s, several missions (Venera and Mariner series) explored Venus-solar wind interaction regions. They identified the basic structure of the near-Venus space environment, for example, existence of the bow shock, magnetotail, ionosphere, as well as the lack of the intrinsic magnetic field. A huge leap in knowledge about the solar wind interaction with Venus was made possible by the 14-year long mission, Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO), launched in 1978. More recently, ESA's probe, Venus Express (VEX), was inserted into orbit in 2006, operated for 8 years. Owing to its different orbit from that of PVO, VEX made unique measurements in the polar and terminator regions, and probed the near-Venus tail for the first time. The near-tail hosts dynamic processes that lead to plasma energization. These processes in turn lead to the loss of ionospheric ions to space, slowly eroding the Venusian atmosphere. VEX carried an ion spectrometer with a moderate mass-separation capability and the observed ratio of the escaping hydrogen and oxygen ions in the wake indicates the stoichiometric loss of water from Venus. The structure and dynamics of the induced magnetosphere depends on the prevailing solar wind conditions. VEX studied the response of the magnetospheric system on different time scales. A plethora of waves was identified by the magnetometer on VEX; some of them were not previously observed by PVO. Proton cyclotron waves were seen far upstream of the bow shock, mirror mode waves were observed in magnetosheath and whistler mode waves, possibly generated by lightning discharges were frequently seen. VEX also encouraged renewed numerical modeling efforts, including fluid-type of models and particle-fluid hybrid type of models

  10. Solar Wind Interaction and Impact on the Venus Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futaana, Yoshifumi; Stenberg Wieser, Gabriella; Barabash, Stas; Luhmann, Janet G.

    2017-08-01

    Venus has intrigued planetary scientists for decades because of its huge contrasts to Earth, in spite of its nickname of "Earth's Twin". Its invisible upper atmosphere and space environment are also part of the larger story of Venus and its evolution. In 60s to 70s, several missions (Venera and Mariner series) explored Venus-solar wind interaction regions. They identified the basic structure of the near-Venus space environment, for example, existence of the bow shock, magnetotail, ionosphere, as well as the lack of the intrinsic magnetic field. A huge leap in knowledge about the solar wind interaction with Venus was made possible by the 14-year long mission, Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO), launched in 1978. More recently, ESA's probe, Venus Express (VEX), was inserted into orbit in 2006, operated for 8 years. Owing to its different orbit from that of PVO, VEX made unique measurements in the polar and terminator regions, and probed the near-Venus tail for the first time. The near-tail hosts dynamic processes that lead to plasma energization. These processes in turn lead to the loss of ionospheric ions to space, slowly eroding the Venusian atmosphere. VEX carried an ion spectrometer with a moderate mass-separation capability and the observed ratio of the escaping hydrogen and oxygen ions in the wake indicates the stoichiometric loss of water from Venus. The structure and dynamics of the induced magnetosphere depends on the prevailing solar wind conditions. VEX studied the response of the magnetospheric system on different time scales. A plethora of waves was identified by the magnetometer on VEX; some of them were not previously observed by PVO. Proton cyclotron waves were seen far upstream of the bow shock, mirror mode waves were observed in magnetosheath and whistler mode waves, possibly generated by lightning discharges were frequently seen. VEX also encouraged renewed numerical modeling efforts, including fluid-type of models and particle-fluid hybrid type of models

  11. Solar wind interaction with the Martian upper atmosphere: Crustal field orientation, solar cycle, and seasonal variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chuanfei; Bougher, Stephen W.; Ma, Yingjuan; Toth, Gabor; Lee, Yuni; Nagy, Andrew F.; Tenishev, Valeriy; Pawlowski, Dave J.; Combi, Michael R.; Najib, Dalal

    2015-09-01

    A comprehensive study of the solar wind interaction with the Martian upper atmosphere is presented. Three global models: the 3-D Mars multifluid Block Adaptive Tree Solar-wind Roe Upwind Scheme MHD code (MF-MHD), the 3-D Mars Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (M-GITM), and the Mars exosphere Monte Carlo model Adaptive Mesh Particle Simulator (M-AMPS) were used in this study. These models are one-way coupled; i.e., the MF-MHD model uses the 3-D neutral inputs from M-GITM and the 3-D hot oxygen corona distribution from M-AMPS. By adopting this one-way coupling approach, the Martian upper atmosphere ion escape rates are investigated in detail with the combined variations of crustal field orientation, solar cycle, and Martian seasonal conditions. The calculated ion escape rates are compared with Mars Express observational data and show reasonable agreement. The variations in solar cycles and seasons can affect the ion loss by a factor of ˜3.3 and ˜1.3, respectively. The crustal magnetic field has a shielding effect to protect Mars from solar wind interaction, and this effect is the strongest for perihelion conditions, with the crustal field facing the Sun. Furthermore, the fraction of cold escaping heavy ionospheric molecular ions [(O2+ and/or O2+)/Total] are inversely proportional to the fraction of the escaping (ionospheric and corona) atomic ion [O+/Total], whereas O2+ and O2+ ion escape fractions show a positive linear correlation since both ion species are ionospheric ions that follow the same escaping path.

  12. High-Resolution Views of the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vourlidas, A.; Korendyke, C.

    2003-05-01

    The study of many of the outstanding phenomena of the solar atmosphere (coronal heating, flares and coronal mass ejection) has persistently shown that observations of physical processes at ever smaller scales are needed for their understanding. Here I report on the results from the latest NRL sounding rocket payload, the Very Advanced ULtraviolet Telescope (VAULT). In two successful flights, the instrument achieved 0.33 arcsecond resolution, the highest ever from a space platform. VAULT obtained spectrally pure images of the upper chromosphere/lower transition region in the Lya line (1216A). A number of space-borne and ground-based obsrvatories supported the VAULT flights. The first results from the analysis of these datasets will be presented.

  13. On the efficiency of solar heating in the middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Solomon, Susan

    1991-01-01

    The efficiency at which solar ultraviolet radiation absorbed in the Hartley band of ozone is directly converted to heat in the terrestrial mesosphere and lower thermosphere (50-110 km) is calculated. The ozone molecule undergoes photolysis to yield the excited species O(1D) and O2(1Delta) with a quantum yield of about 0.9. Spontaneous emission from O2(1Delta) and from O2(1Sigma) (excited by energy transfer from O/1D/) significantly decreases the amount of energy available for heat. Similarly, the efficiency at which solar ultraviolet radiation absorbed by O2 in the Schumann-Runge continuum is directly converted to heat in the lower thermosphere (95-110 km) is calculated. The O2 undergoes photolysis and the excited product O(1D) is generated. Spontaneous emission from O2(1Sigma) (excited by energy transfer from O/1D/) reduces the amount of energy available for heat in the lower thermosphere. The consideration of these energy transfer and loss processes results in significantly reduced heating rates as compared to those conventionally calculated in models of the middle atmosphere.

  14. Thermal Mapping to Achieve 3-D Structure and Dynamics of Planetary Atmospheres Throughout the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greathouse, T. K.; Retherford, K. D.; Mandt, K. E.; Wyrick, D. Y.

    2017-02-01

    We have completed our first look at all planets in the solar system. It is now time to move forward with more complete studies of solar system planetary atmospheres to further our understanding of atmospheric dynamics of planets unlike the Earth.

  15. Results from solar, atmospheric and K2K experiments and future ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mixing angles based on results from solar, reactor, atmospheric and K2K neutrino ... interactions are updated, since the results were finalized soon after the conference. 2. Solar neutrinos. The missing solar neutrino problem has been solved by ..... The left and the right panels are for detectors in Kamioka and in Korea,.

  16. Cometary X-rays : solar wind charge exchange in cometary atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of the solar wind with the planets and the interstellar medium is of key importance for the evolution of our solar system. The interaction with Earth's atmosphere is best known for the northern light. In case of Mars, the interaction with the solar wind might have lead to the erosion

  17. Modeling pN2 through Geological Time: Implications for Planetary Climates and Atmospheric Biosignatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stüeken, E E; Kipp, M A; Koehler, M C; Schwieterman, E W; Johnson, B; Buick, R

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen is a major nutrient for all life on Earth and could plausibly play a similar role in extraterrestrial biospheres. The major reservoir of nitrogen at Earth's surface is atmospheric N2, but recent studies have proposed that the size of this reservoir may have fluctuated significantly over the course of Earth's history with particularly low levels in the Neoarchean-presumably as a result of biological activity. We used a biogeochemical box model to test which conditions are necessary to cause large swings in atmospheric N2 pressure. Parameters for our model are constrained by observations of modern Earth and reconstructions of biomass burial and oxidative weathering in deep time. A 1-D climate model was used to model potential effects on atmospheric climate. In a second set of tests, we perturbed our box model to investigate which parameters have the greatest impact on the evolution of atmospheric pN2 and consider possible implications for nitrogen cycling on other planets. Our results suggest that (a) a high rate of biomass burial would have been needed in the Archean to draw down atmospheric pN2 to less than half modern levels, (b) the resulting effect on temperature could probably have been compensated by increasing solar luminosity and a mild increase in pCO2, and (c) atmospheric oxygenation could have initiated a stepwise pN2 rebound through oxidative weathering. In general, life appears to be necessary for significant atmospheric pN2 swings on Earth-like planets. Our results further support the idea that an exoplanetary atmosphere rich in both N2 and O2 is a signature of an oxygen-producing biosphere. Key Words: Biosignatures-Early Earth-Planetary atmospheres. Astrobiology 16, 949-963.

  18. Cometary X-rays. Solar wind charge exchange in cometary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodewits, Dennis

    2007-06-01

    The interaction of the solar wind with the planets and the interstellar medium is of key importance for the evolution of our solar system. The interaction with Earth's atmosphere is best known for the northern light. In case of Mars, the interaction with the solar wind might have lead to the erosion of its atmosphere. Solar wind-atmosphere interactions can be studied particularly well in cometary atmospheres, because in that case the solar wind flow is not attenuated by a planetary magnetic field and interacts directly with its atmosphere, the coma. The size of the cometary atmosphere (in the order of 10(4-10^5) km) allows remote tracking of the ions as they penetrate into the comet's atmosphere, offering a unique window on the cometary atmosphere, the solar wind and the interaction of these two plasmas. When solar wind ions fly through an atmosphere they are neutralized via charge exchange reactions with the neutral gaseous species. These reactions depend strongly on target species and collision velocity. The resulting X-ray and Far-UV emission can therefore be regarded as a fingerprint of the underlying reaction, with many diagnostic qualities. My thesis studies have focussed on all aspects relevant for X-ray emission from comets: experimental studies of state-to-state charge exchange cross sections, observations of X-ray emission from comets with Chandra, XMM, and Swift, and theoretical modelling of the interaction of solar wind ions with cometary gasses and the resulting X-ray emission spectrum. Together, this has greatly improved our understanding of the interaction of the solar wind with solar system objects and in more general, of physical processes in wind-environment collisions. The thorough understanding of cometary charge exchange emission has opened the door to the direct observation of more complex solar wind interactions such as those with Mars and Venus.

  19. Production of hydrogen from solar zinc in steam atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishnevetsky, Irina; Epstein, Michael [Solar Research Facilities Unit, Weizmann Institute of Science, P.O. Box 26, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2007-09-15

    Production of hydrogen via hydrolysis of zinc with steam is an essential step in the Zn/ZnO thermochemical cycle for splitting of water. Recent studies on reducing ZnO to Zn metal with the aid of concentrated solar energy stimulated the interest in the hydrolysis of the zinc for hydrogen production. One of these studies was focusing on solar carbothermal reduction of ZnO to produce zinc powder (EC/FP5-SOLZINC project). The current paper deals with the hydrolysis process of this material which will be referred to, hereafter, as SOLZINC. Test results obtained during the hydrolysis of SOLZINC powder in batch experiments at atmospheric pressure demonstrate possibilities of fast and high conversion of SOLZINC powder with steam to ZnO powder and hydrogen without intermediate melting or evaporation of zinc and indicate that the reaction occurs in two different rates, depending on the preheating temperature. A slow reaction starts at about 250 {sup circle} C and the hydrogen output increases with reactor temperature. The fast stage starts as the reactor temperature approaches 400 {sup circle} C. Above this temperature, the reaction develops vigorously due to fast increase of the reaction rate with temperature resulting in releasing additional exothermic heat by the reacted powder. Increasing the preheating temperature (when the steam flow starts) from 200 to 550 {sup circle} C can improve the SOLZINC conversion during the fast stage from 24% to 81% and increase the hydrogen yield. When the fast stage decays, slow reaction can be continued on for a long time until the hydrogen production is fully achieved. (author)

  20. Modeling pN2 through Geological Time: Implications for Planetary Climates and Atmospheric Biosignatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stüeken, E. E.; Kipp, M. A.; Koehler, M. C.; Schwieterman, E. W.; Johnson, B.; Buick, R.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen is a major nutrient for all life on Earth and could plausibly play a similar role in extraterrestrial biospheres. The major reservoir of nitrogen at Earth's surface is atmospheric N2, but recent studies have proposed that the size of this reservoir may have fluctuated significantly over the course of Earth's history with particularly low levels in the Neoarchean - presumably as a result of biological activity. We used a biogeochemical box model to test which conditions are necessary to cause large swings in atmospheric N2 pressure. Parameters for our model are constrained by observations of modern Earth and reconstructions of biomass burial and oxidative weathering in deep time. A 1-D climate model was used to model potential effects on atmospheric climate. In a second set of tests, we perturbed our box model to investigate which parameters have the greatest impact on the evolution of atmospheric pN2 and consider possible implications for nitrogen cycling on other planets. Our results suggest that (a) a high rate of biomass burial would have been needed in the Archean to draw down atmospheric pN2 to less than half modern levels, (b) the resulting effect on temperature could probably have been compensated by increasing solar luminosity and a mild increase in pCO2, and (c) atmospheric oxygenation could have initiated a stepwise pN2 rebound through oxidative weathering. In general, life appears to be necessary for significant atmospheric pN2 swings on Earth-like planets. Our results further support the idea that an exoplanetary atmosphere rich in both N2 and O2 is a signature of an oxygen-producing biosphere.

  1. The Pechora River Runoff, Atmospheric Circulation and Solar Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovanov, O. F.

    This study presents an attempt to define and estimate the factors effecting and possi- bly, determining the spatial-temporal characteristics of the Pechora River hydrological regime. The time-series of hydrometeorological observations (runoff, precipitation, air temperature) carried out within the basin of the impact object U the Pechora River U are close to secular and include the year of the century maximum of the solar activ- ity (1957). The joint statistical analysis of these characteristics averaged both for a year and for the low water periods in spring (V-VII), summer-autumn (VIII-IX) and winter (X-IV) demonstrated the majority of integral curves to have minimums coin- ciding or slightly differing from the solar activity maximum in 1957. It is especially typical for the spring high water runoff along the entire length of the Pechora River. Only the curves of the air temperature in the summer-autumn low water period are in the opposite phase relative to all other elements. In the upper Pechora the inte- gral curves of winter and annual precipitation are synchronous to the runoff curves. The multiyear variability of the Pechora runoff corresponds to that of the atmospheric circulation in the northern hemisphere. This is clearly illustrated by the decrease of the Pechora runoff and increase of the climate continentality in its basin, that is ac- companied with predominating of the meridional circulation, anticyclone invasion and precipitation decrease while the solar activity grows. This process takes place at the background of the prevailing mass transport of E+C type, increase of number of the elementary synoptic processes (ESP). The maximum number of ESP (observed in 1963) was recorded soon after the century maximum of the solar activity. This fact may be explained by the anticyclone circulation prevalence which results in growth of the climate continentality in the Pechora basin in this period. The enumerated in- flection points of the integral curves of

  2. Origin and stability of exomoon atmospheres: implications for habitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammer, Helmut; Schiefer, Sonja-Charlotte; Juvan, Ines; Odert, Petra; Erkaev, Nikolai V; Weber, Christof; Kislyakova, Kristina G; Güdel, Manuel; Kirchengast, Gottfried; Hanslmeier, Arnold

    2014-09-01

    We study the origin and escape of catastrophically outgassed volatiles (H2O, CO2) from exomoons with Earth-like densities and masses of 0.1, 0.5 and 1 M⊕ orbiting an extra-solar gas giant inside the habitable zone of a young active solar-like star. We apply a radiation absorption and hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model to the three studied exomoon cases. We model the escape of hydrogen and dragged dissociation products O and C during the activity saturation phase of the young host star. Because the soft X-ray and EUV radiation of the young host star may be up to ~100 times higher compared to today's solar value during the first 100 Myr after the system's origin, an exomoon with a mass 0.5 M⊕, however, may evolve to habitats that are a mixture of Mars-like and Earth-analogue habitats, so that life may originate and evolve at the exomoon's surface.

  3. A Solar Radiation Parameterization for Atmospheric Studies. Volume 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Suarez, Max J. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The solar radiation parameterization (CLIRAD-SW) developed at the Goddard Climate and Radiation Branch for application to atmospheric models are described. It includes the absorption by water vapor, O3, O2, CO2, clouds, and aerosols and the scattering by clouds, aerosols, and gases. Depending upon the nature of absorption, different approaches are applied to different absorbers. In the ultraviolet and visible regions, the spectrum is divided into 8 bands, and single O3 absorption coefficient and Rayleigh scattering coefficient are used for each band. In the infrared, the spectrum is divided into 3 bands, and the k-distribution method is applied for water vapor absorption. The flux reduction due to O2 is derived from a simple function, while the flux reduction due to CO2 is derived from precomputed tables. Cloud single-scattering properties are parameterized, separately for liquid drops and ice, as functions of water amount and effective particle size. A maximum-random approximation is adopted for the overlapping of clouds at different heights. Fluxes are computed using the Delta-Eddington approximation.

  4. ENERGY CONTENT AND PROPAGATION IN TRANSVERSE SOLAR ATMOSPHERIC WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goossens, M.; Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Mathematics Department, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Soler, R. [Solar Physics Group, Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Verth, G., E-mail: tom.vandoorsselaere@wis.kuleuven.be [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Hounsfield Road, Hicks Building, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-10

    Recently, a significant amount of transverse wave energy has been estimated propagating along solar atmospheric magnetic fields. However, these estimates have been made with the classic bulk Alfven wave model which assumes a homogeneous plasma. In this paper, the kinetic, magnetic, and total energy densities and the flux of energy are computed for transverse MHD waves in one-dimensional cylindrical flux tube models with a piecewise constant or continuous radial density profile. There are fundamental deviations from the properties for classic bulk Alfven waves. (1) There is no local equipartition between kinetic and magnetic energy. (2) The flux of energy and the velocity of energy transfer have, in addition to a component parallel to the magnetic field, components in the planes normal to the magnetic field. (3) The energy densities and the flux of energy vary spatially, contrary to the case of classic bulk Alfven waves. This last property has the important consequence that the energy flux computed with the well known expression for bulk Alfven waves could overestimate the real flux by a factor in the range 10-50, depending on the flux tube equilibrium properties.

  5. Water loss from Venus: Implications for the Earth's early atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, S. M.; Pollack, J. B.; Reynolds, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    The atmosphere of Venus outgassed rapidly as a result of planetary heating during accretion, resulting in massive water loss. The processes affecting atmospheric chemistry following accretion have consisted largely of hydrogen escape and internal re-equilibrium. The initial bulk composition of Venus and Earth are assumed to have been roughly similar. Chemical speciation on Venus was controlled by the temperature and oxygen buffering capacity of the surface magma. It is also assumed that the surfaces of planetary bodies of the inner solar system were partly or wholly molten during accretion with a temperature estimated at 1273 to 1573 K. To investigate the range of reasonable initial atmospheric compositions on Venus, limits have to be set for the proportion of total hydrogen and the buffered fugacity of oxygen. Using the C/H ratio of 0.033 set for Earth, virtually all of the water generated during outgassing must later have been lost in order to bring the current CO2/H2O ratio for Venus up to its observed value of 10 sup 4 to 10 sup 5. The proportion of H2O decreases in model atmospheres with successfully higher C/H values, ultimately approaching the depleted values currently observed on Venus. Increasing C/H also results in a rapid increase in CO/H2O and provides an efficient mechanism for water loss by the reaction CO+H2O = CO2 + H2. This reaction, plus water loss mechanisms involving crustal iron, could have removed a very large volume of water from the Venusian atmosphere, even at a low C/H value.

  6. Solar dynamics and magnetism from the interior to the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Kosovichev, Alexander; Komm, Rudolf; Longcope, Dana

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission has provided a large amount of new data on solar dynamics and magnetic activities during the rising phase of the current and highly unusual solar cycle. These data are complemented by the continuing SOHO mission, and by ground-based observatories that include the GONG helioseismology network and the New Solar Telescope. Also, the observations are supported by realistic numerical simulations on supercomputers. This unprecedented amount of data provides a unique opportunity for multi-instrument investigations that address fundamental problems of the origin of solar magnetic activity at various spatial and temporal scales. This book demonstrates that the synergy of high-resolution multi-wavelength observations and simulations is a key to uncovering the long-standing puzzles of solar magnetism and dynamics. This volume is aimed at researchers and graduate students active in solar physics and space science. Previously published in Solar Physics journal, Vol. 287/1-2,...

  7. IMPLICATIONS OF THE RECENT LOW SOLAR MINIMUM FOR THE SOLAR WIND DURING THE MAUNDER MINIMUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockwood, M.; Owens, M. J., E-mail: m.lockwood@reading.ac.uk [Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Earley Gate, RG6 6BB (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-20

    The behavior of the Sun and near-Earth space during grand solar minima is not understood; however, the recent long and low minimum of the decadal-scale solar cycle gives some important clues, with implications for understanding the solar dynamo and predicting space weather conditions. The speed of the near-Earth solar wind and the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) embedded within it can be reliably reconstructed for before the advent of spacecraft monitoring using observations of geomagnetic activity that extend back to the mid-19th century. We show that during the solar cycle minima around 1879 and 1901 the average solar wind speed was exceptionally low, implying the Earth remained within the streamer belt of slow solar wind flow for extended periods. This is consistent with a broader streamer belt, which was also a feature of the recent low minimum (2009), and yields a prediction that the low near-Earth IMF during the Maunder minimum (1640-1700), as derived from models and deduced from cosmogenic isotopes, was accompanied by a persistent and relatively constant solar wind of speed roughly half the average for the modern era.

  8. Results from massive underground detectors on solar and atmospheric neutrino studies and proton decay searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajita, Takaaki, E-mail: kajita@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [ICRR and IPMU, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa-no-ha 5-1-5, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2011-07-25

    Massive underground detectors have been playing important roles in particle and astro-particle physics. Results from massive underground detectors on solar and atmospheric neutrino studies and proton decay searches are reviewed.

  9. MAVEN observations of the Mars upper atmosphere, ionosphere, and solar wind interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.

    2017-09-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission to Mars has been operating in orbit for more than a full Martian year. Observations are dramatically changing our view of the Mars upper atmosphere system, which includes the upper atmosphere, ionosphere, coupling to the lower atmosphere, magnetosphere, and interactions with the Sun and the solar wind. The data are allowing us to understand the processes controlling the present-day structure of the upper atmosphere and the rates of escape of gas to space. These will tell us the role that escape to space has played in the evolution of the Mars atmosphere and climate.

  10. Non-LTE H2+ as the source of missing opacity in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamy, K. S. K.; Stecher, T. P.

    1974-01-01

    The population of the various vibrational levels of the H2+ molecule has been calculated from the consideration of formation and destruction mechanisms. The resulting population is used in calculating the total absorption due to H2+ and is compared with the other known sources of opacity at several optical depths of the solar atmosphere. It is shown that the absorption due to H2+ can probably account for the missing ultraviolet opacity in the solar atmosphere.

  11. Advances in solar flare science through modeling of the magnetic field in the solar atmosphere (Arne Richter Award for Outstanding ECSs Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmann, Julia K.

    2017-04-01

    Ever since we know of the phenomenon of solar flares and coronal mass ejections, we try to unravel the secrets of the underlying physical processes. The magnetic field in the Sun's atmosphere is the driver of any solar activity. Therefore, the combined study of the surface (photosphere) magnetic field and the magnetic field in the atmosphere above (the chromosphere and corona) is essential. At present, direct measurements of the solar magnetic field are regularly available only for the solar surface, so that we have to rely on models to reconstruct the magnetic field in the corona. Corresponding model-based research on the magnetic field within flaring active regions is inevitable for the understanding of the key physical processes of flares and possibly associated mass ejections, as well as their time evolution. I will focus on recent advances in the understanding of the magnetic processes in solar flares based on quasi-static force-free coronal magnetic field modeling. In particular, I will discuss aspects such as the structure (topology) of the coronal magnetic field, its flare-induced reconfiguration, as well as the associated modifications to the inherent magnetic energy and helicity. I will also discuss the potential and limitations of studies trying to cover the complete chain of action, i.e., to relate the (magnetic) properties of solar flares to that of the associated disturbances measured in-situ at Earth, as induced by flare-associated coronal mass ejections after passage of the interplanetary space separating Sun and Earth. Finally, I will discuss future prospects regarding model-based research of the coronal magnetic field in the course of flares, including possible implications for improved future flare forecasting attempts.

  12. Stratospheric ozone changes under solar geoengineering: implications for UV exposure and air quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Nowack

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Various forms of geoengineering have been proposed to counter anthropogenic climate change. Methods which aim to modify the Earth's energy balance by reducing insolation are often subsumed under the term solar radiation management (SRM. Here, we present results of a standard SRM modelling experiment in which the incoming solar irradiance is reduced to offset the global mean warming induced by a quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide. For the first time in an atmosphere–ocean coupled climate model, we include atmospheric composition feedbacks for this experiment. While the SRM scheme considered here could offset greenhouse gas induced global mean surface warming, it leads to important changes in atmospheric composition. We find large stratospheric ozone increases that induce significant reductions in surface UV-B irradiance, which would have implications for vitamin D production. In addition, the higher stratospheric ozone levels lead to decreased ozone photolysis in the troposphere. In combination with lower atmospheric specific humidity under SRM, this results in overall surface ozone concentration increases in the idealized G1 experiment. Both UV-B and surface ozone changes are important for human health. We therefore highlight that both stratospheric and tropospheric ozone changes must be considered in the assessment of any SRM scheme, due to their important roles in regulating UV exposure and air quality.

  13. Generation of sound by Alfven waves with random phases in the solar atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrukhin, N.S.; Fainshtein, S.M.

    1976-11-01

    The problem of the excitation of sound by Alfven waves meeting in the solar plasma is discussed. Kinetic equations for the interacting waves are derived and analyzed on the assumption that the Alfven waves have random phases. Estimates are given which show the possibility of the generation of LF-pulsations in the solar atmosphere.

  14. Impact of atmospheric species on copper indium gallium selenide solar cell stability: An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.

    2016-01-01

    An overview of the measurement techniques and results of studies on the stability of copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) solar cells and their individual layers in the presence of atmospheric species is presented: in these studies, Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells, their molybdenum back contact, and their

  15. The Solar Atmosphere at Three Temperatures During a Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitnik, I.; Pertzov, A.; Oparin, S.; Oraevsky, V.; Slemzin, V.; Sobelman, I.; Feynman, J.; Goldstein, B.

    1998-01-01

    On April 14, 1994 a major coronal mass ejection (CME) occured while the solar atmosphere was being observed in XUV by the Terek C instrument aboard the CORONAS spacecraft. We here compare the TEREK data before and after the CME with the Yohkoh soft x-ray data and the National Solar Observatory He I 10830 data from April 13 and 14.

  16. Atmospheric Electrification in Dusty, Reactive Gases in the Solar System and Beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helling, C. (Christiane); Harrison, R.G. (R. Giles); Honary, F. (Farideh); Diver, D.A. (Declan A.); Aplin, K. (Karen); Dobbs-Dixon, I. (Ian); U. Ebert (Ute); Inutsuka, S.-I. (Shu-ichiro); F.J. Gordillo-Vazquez (Francisco); Littlefair, S. (Stuart)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractDetailed observations of the solar system planets reveal a wide variety of local atmospheric conditions. Astronomical observations have revealed a variety of extrasolar planets none of which resembles any of the solar system planets in full. Instead, the most massive amongst the

  17. Electrifying atmospheres charging, ionisation and lightning in the solar system and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Aplin, Karen L

    2013-01-01

    Electrical processes take place in all planetary atmospheres. There is evidence for lightning on Venus, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, it is possible on Mars and Titan, and cosmic rays ionise every atmosphere, leading to charged droplets and particles. Controversy surrounds the role of atmospheric electricity in physical climate processes on Earth; here, a comparative approach is employed to review the role of electrification in the atmospheres of other planets and their moons. This book reviews the theory, and, where available, measurements, of planetary atmospheric electricity, taken to include ion production and ion-aerosol interactions. The conditions necessary for a global atmospheric electric circuit similar to Earth’s, and the likelihood of meeting these conditions in other planetary atmospheres, are briefly discussed. Atmospheric electrification is more important at planets receiving little solar radiation, increasing the relative significance of electrical forces. Nucleation onto atmospheric ...

  18. Atmospheric neutrinos and the implications to cosmic ray interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajita, Takaaki [Research center for Cosmic Neutrinos, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, Univ. of Tokyo, Kashiwa-no-ha 5-1-5, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2008-01-15

    Atmospheric neutrinos have been used to study neutrino oscillations. Neutrino oscillation analyses with atmospheric neutrinos are discussed. With the increased statistics of the atmospheric neutrino data, it is more important to understand the atmospheric neutrino flux more accurately. Detailed calculations of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes calibrated by the atmospheric muon data show suggestions to the interaction of cosmic rays.

  19. Mars atmospheric losses induced by the solar wind: current knowledge and perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Vladimir; Zelenyi, Lev; Vaisberg, Oleg; Sementsov, Egor; Dubinin, Eduard

    2017-04-01

    Solar wind induced atmospheric losses have been studied since earlier 1970th. Several loss channels have been identified including pick-up of exospheric photo-ions and ionospheric ions escape. Measurements performed during several solar cycles showed variation of these losses by about factor of 10, being largest at maximum solar activity. MAVEN spacecraft equipped with comprehensive set of instruments with high temporal and mass resolution operating at Mars since fall 2014 ensures much better investigation of solar wind enforcing Martian environment, Mars atmospheric losses processes and mass loss rate. These issues are very important for understanding of Martian atmospheric evolution including water loss during cosmogonic time. Simultaneous observations by MAVEN and MEX spacecraft open the new perspective in study of Martian environment. In this report we discuss results of past and current missions and preliminary analysis of heavy ions escape using simultaneous measurements of MEX and MAVEN spacecraft.

  20. High resolution solar spectrometer system for measuring atmospheric constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcray, Frank J.; Kosters, J. J.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Olson, J.; Murcray, David G.

    1990-01-01

    A mid-IR Michelson interferometer capable of obtaining 0.002/cm resolution solar spectra has been developed for balloon use. The interferometer is based on the Bomem self-aligning instrument, and is equipped with a solar tracking system, telemetry, and recording systems, as well as temperature control and gondola orientation. The interferometer has made two successful flights in the 7-14-micron interval up to 40 km. The basic systems are described and sample spectra are presented.

  1. Origins of the Ambient Solar Wind: Implications for Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer, Steven R.; Gibson, Sarah E.; Riley, Pete

    2017-10-01

    The Sun's outer atmosphere is heated to temperatures of millions of degrees, and solar plasma flows out into interplanetary space at supersonic speeds. This paper reviews our current understanding of these interrelated problems: coronal heating and the acceleration of the ambient solar wind. We also discuss where the community stands in its ability to forecast how variations in the solar wind (i.e., fast and slow wind streams) impact the Earth. Although the last few decades have seen significant progress in observations and modeling, we still do not have a complete understanding of the relevant physical processes, nor do we have a quantitatively precise census of which coronal structures contribute to specific types of solar wind. Fast streams are known to be connected to the central regions of large coronal holes. Slow streams, however, appear to come from a wide range of sources, including streamers, pseudostreamers, coronal loops, active regions, and coronal hole boundaries. Complicating our understanding even more is the fact that processes such as turbulence, stream-stream interactions, and Coulomb collisions can make it difficult to unambiguously map a parcel measured at 1 AU back down to its coronal source. We also review recent progress—in theoretical modeling, observational data analysis, and forecasting techniques that sit at the interface between data and theory—that gives us hope that the above problems are indeed solvable.

  2. Origins of the Ambient Solar Wind: Implications for Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer, Steven R.; Gibson, Sarah E.; Riley, Pete

    2017-08-01

    The Sun's outer atmosphere is heated to temperatures of millions of degrees, and solar plasma flows out into interplanetary space at supersonic speeds. This paper reviews our current understanding of these interrelated problems: coronal heating and the acceleration of the ambient solar wind. We also discuss where the community stands in its ability to forecast how variations in the solar wind (i.e., fast and slow wind streams) impact the Earth. Although the last few decades have seen significant progress in observations and modeling, we still do not have a complete understanding of the relevant physical processes, nor do we have a quantitatively precise census of which coronal structures contribute to specific types of solar wind. Fast streams are known to be connected to the central regions of large coronal holes. Slow streams, however, appear to come from a wide range of sources, including streamers, pseudostreamers, coronal loops, active regions, and coronal hole boundaries. Complicating our understanding even more is the fact that processes such as turbulence, stream-stream interactions, and Coulomb collisions can make it difficult to unambiguously map a parcel measured at 1 AU back down to its coronal source. We also review recent progress -- in theoretical modeling, observational data analysis, and forecasting techniques that sit at the interface between data and theory -- that gives us hope that the above problems are indeed solvable.

  3. Origins of the Ambient Solar Wind: Implications for Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer, Steven R.; Gibson, Sarah E.; Riley, Pete

    2017-11-01

    The Sun's outer atmosphere is heated to temperatures of millions of degrees, and solar plasma flows out into interplanetary space at supersonic speeds. This paper reviews our current understanding of these interrelated problems: coronal heating and the acceleration of the ambient solar wind. We also discuss where the community stands in its ability to forecast how variations in the solar wind (i.e., fast and slow wind streams) impact the Earth. Although the last few decades have seen significant progress in observations and modeling, we still do not have a complete understanding of the relevant physical processes, nor do we have a quantitatively precise census of which coronal structures contribute to specific types of solar wind. Fast streams are known to be connected to the central regions of large coronal holes. Slow streams, however, appear to come from a wide range of sources, including streamers, pseudostreamers, coronal loops, active regions, and coronal hole boundaries. Complicating our understanding even more is the fact that processes such as turbulence, stream-stream interactions, and Coulomb collisions can make it difficult to unambiguously map a parcel measured at 1 AU back down to its coronal source. We also review recent progress—in theoretical modeling, observational data analysis, and forecasting techniques that sit at the interface between data and theory—that gives us hope that the above problems are indeed solvable.

  4. Solar power satellites - Technical, social and political implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knelman, F. H.

    Solar power satellite systems (SPS) are examined, together with their environmental and social impacts and the energy policies necessary for their construction. The energy source, the sun, is acceptable to advocates of decentralized technologies, while the conversion system is fitted to large institutions. However, large-scale power plants are subject to persistent malfunctions, and the approximately 50 sq km SPS solar array is projected to suffer from at least recurring cell contact failures. The power could also be generated by heat engines for transmission by either laser or microwaves. Numerous feasibility and cost-benefit studies are still required, including defining the transmission beam's effects on the atmosphere, ionosphere, and human health. Furthermore, the resource allocations, capital costs, insurance, and institutional problems still need clarification, as do the design, logistics, and development of an entire new, much larger launch system based on Shuttle technology. Finally, the military defensibility of the SPS power station is questioned.

  5. Realistic Modeling of Multi-Scale MHD Dynamics of the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitiashvili, Irina; Mansour, Nagi N.; Wray, Alan; Couvidat, Sebastian; Yoon, Seokkwan; Kosovichev, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Realistic 3D radiative MHD simulations open new perspectives for understanding the turbulent dynamics of the solar surface, its coupling to the atmosphere, and the physical mechanisms of generation and transport of non-thermal energy. Traditionally, plasma eruptions and wave phenomena in the solar atmosphere are modeled by prescribing artificial driving mechanisms using magnetic or gas pressure forces that might arise from magnetic field emergence or reconnection instabilities. In contrast, our 'ab initio' simulations provide a realistic description of solar dynamics naturally driven by solar energy flow. By simulating the upper convection zone and the solar atmosphere, we can investigate in detail the physical processes of turbulent magnetoconvection, generation and amplification of magnetic fields, excitation of MHD waves, and plasma eruptions. We present recent simulation results of the multi-scale dynamics of quiet-Sun regions, and energetic effects in the atmosphere and compare with observations. For the comparisons we calculate synthetic spectro-polarimetric data to model observational data of SDO, Hinode, and New Solar Telescope.

  6. Abundance analysis of neodymium in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkawy, Ali G. A.; Shaltout, Abdelrazek M. K.; Beheary, M. M.; Bakry, A.

    2017-10-01

    Based on non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) calculations, the solar neodymium (Nd) content was found based on a model atom of singly ionized neodymium (Nd II) containing 153 energy levels and 42 line transitions plus the ground state of Nd III. Here, we re-derive the solar Nd abundance using the model of the solar photosphere of Holweger & Müller.We succeed in selecting a good sample line list, relying on 20 Nd II solar lines together with the most accurate transition probabilities measured experimentally and available observational data. With damping parameters obtained from the literature, we find a mean NLTE solar photospheric Nd abundance of log ɛNd(1D) = 1.43 ± 0.16, which is in excellent agreement with the meteoritic value (log ɛNd = 1.45 ± 0.02). For a set of selected Nd II lines, the NLTE abundance correction is found to be +0.01 dex compared with the standard LTE effect. The influence of collisional interactions with electrons and neutral hydrogen atoms is investigated in detail.

  7. Parametric generation of Alfven and sound waves in the solar atmosphere. Isothermal atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrukhin, N.S.; Fajnshtejn, S.M. (Gor' kovskij Politekhnicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    The parametric instability of Alfven and sound waves in an isothermal layer of the solar plasma is investigated. Conditions of the wave generation are found under the condition that the velocities of Alfven waves and isothermal sound are constant. The results obtained are used for the interpretation of attenuation of Alfven wave fluxes in solar spots.

  8. Planetary science: Haze cools Pluto's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Robert A.

    2017-11-01

    Modelling suggests that Pluto's atmospheric temperature is regulated by haze, unlike the other planetary bodies in the Solar System. The finding has implications for our understanding of exoplanetary atmospheres. See Letter p.352

  9. Atmospheric extinction in solar tower plants: the Absorption and Broadband Correction for MOR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrieder, N.; Wilbert, S.; Pitz-Paal, R.; Emde, C.; Gasteiger, J.; Mayer, B.; Polo, J.

    2015-05-01

    Losses of reflected Direct Normal Irradiance due to atmospheric extinction in concentrating solar tower plants can vary significantly with site and time. The losses of the direct normal irradiance between the heliostat field and receiver in a solar tower plant are mainly caused by atmospheric scattering and absorption by aerosol and water vapor concentration in the atmospheric boundary layer. Due to a high aerosol particle number, radiation losses can be significantly larger in desert environments compared to the standard atmospheric conditions which are usually considered in raytracing or plant optimization tools. Information about on-site atmospheric extinction is only rarely available. To measure these radiation losses, two different commercially available instruments were tested and more than 19 months of measurements were collected at the Plataforma Solar de Almería and compared. Both instruments are primarily used to determine the meteorological optical range (MOR). The Vaisala FS11 scatterometer is based on a monochromatic near-infrared light source emission and measures the strength of scattering processes in a small air volume mainly caused by aerosol particles. The Optec LPV4 long-path visibility transmissometer determines the monochromatic attenuation between a light-emitting diode (LED) light source at 532 nm and a receiver and therefore also accounts for absorption processes. As the broadband solar attenuation is of interest for solar resource assessment for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP), a correction procedure for these two instruments is developed and tested. This procedure includes a spectral correction of both instruments from monochromatic to broadband attenuation. That means the attenuation is corrected for the actual, time-dependent by the collector reflected solar spectrum. Further, an absorption correction for the Vaisala FS11 scatterometer is implemented. To optimize the Absorption and Broadband Correction (ABC) procedure, additional

  10. Ellerman bombs—evidence for magnetic reconnection in the lower solar atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, C. J.; Doyle, J. G.; Madjarska, M. S. [Armagh Observatory, College Hill, Armagh BT61 9DG (United Kingdom); Shelyag, S. [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia); Mathioudakis, M. [Astrophysical Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Uitenbroek, H. [National Solar Observatory, Sacramento Peak, P.O. Box 62, Sunpsot, NM 88349 (United States); Erdélyi, R. [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre, University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-20

    The presence of photospheric magnetic reconnection has long been thought to give rise to short and impulsive events, such as Ellerman bombs (EBs) and Type II spicules. In this article, we combine high-resolution, high-cadence observations from the Interferometric BIdimensional Spectrometer and Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instruments at the Dunn Solar Telescope, National Solar Observatory, New Mexico, with co-aligned Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) data to observe small-scale events situated within an active region. These data are then compared with state-of-the-art numerical simulations of the lower atmosphere made using the MURaM code. It is found that brightenings, in both the observations and the simulations, of the wings of the Hα line profile, interpreted as EBs, are often spatially correlated with increases in the intensity of the Fe I λ6302.5 line core. Bipolar regions inferred from Hinode/SOT magnetic field data show evidence of flux cancellation associated, co-spatially, with these EBs, suggesting that magnetic reconnection could be a driver of these high-energy events. Through the analysis of similar events in the simulated lower atmosphere, we are able to infer that line profiles analogous to the observations occur co-spatially with regions of strong opposite-polarity magnetic flux. These observed events and their simulated counterparts are interpreted as evidence of photospheric magnetic reconnection at scales observable using current observational instrumentation.

  11. Atmospheric Effects During Solar Energetic Particle Events in Magnetized Regions of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolitz, R.; Lee, C. O.; Dong, C.; Brain, D. A.; Lillis, R. J.; Curry, S.; Larson, D. E.

    2016-12-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) represent an important if irregular source of energy to the Martian atmosphere. Volume rates of ionization and heating by SEP protons during intense solar events can be modeled to predict energy deposition from fluxes observed by the SEP instrument on MAVEN. ASPEN (Atmospheric Scattering of Protons and Energetic Neutrals) is a 3-D Monte Carlo simulation that tracks energy deposition by a population of protons in an atmosphere, accounting for three-dimensionally varying neutral densities and magnetic fields. ASPEN simulates proton motion using a Runge-Kutta solver to approximate Lorentz force and an adaptive trace algorithm to accurately model collisions in dense and sparse atmospheric regions. ASPEN can be generalized to study different ion fluxes in other regions of the Mars plasma environment, such as SEP oxygen in the atmosphere or penetrating solar wind protons in the corona. In this presentation, ASPEN is used to generate three-dimensional volume rates of ionization and heating using three-dimensionally-varying magnetic and electric fields from the Michigan Mars multi-fluid MHD model (MF-MHD) and altitude-varying neutral densities from the Mars Global Thermosphere Ionosphere Model (M-GITM). We present ionization rates over the crustal magnetic field anomalies in a 120° x 90° region in the Southern Lowlands and the progression of SEP ionization during a SEP ion event observed by MAVEN on 16 May 2016. Ultimately ASPEN results will help shape a comprehensive model of solar wind interactions with Mars.

  12. Sensitivity of upper atmospheric emissions calculations to solar/stellar UV flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barthelemy Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The solar UV (UltraViolet flux, especially the EUV (Extreme UltraViolet and FUV (Far UltraViolet components, is one of the main energetic inputs for planetary upper atmospheres. It drives various processes such as ionization, or dissociation which give rise to upper atmospheric emissions, especially in the UV and visible. These emissions are one of the main ways to investigate the upper atmospheres of planets. However, the uncertainties in the flux measurement or modeling can lead to biased estimates of fundamental atmospheric parameters, such as concentrations or temperatures in the atmospheres. We explore the various problems that can be identified regarding the uncertainties in solar/stellar UV flux by considering three examples. The worst case appears when the solar reflection component is dominant in the recorded spectrum as is seen for outer solar system measurements from HST (Hubble Space Telescope. We also show that the estimation of some particular line parameters (intensity and shape, especially Lyman α, is crucial, and that both total intensity and line profile are useful. In the case of exoplanets, the problem is quite critical since the UV flux of their parent stars is often very poorly known.

  13. Atmospheric Mining in the Outer Solar System: Resource Capturing, Storage, and Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric mining in the outer solar system has been investigated as a means of fuel production for high energy propulsion and power. Fusion fuels such as helium 3 and hydrogen can be wrested from the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune and either returned to Earth or used in-situ for energy production. Helium 3 and hydrogen (deuterium, etc.) were the primary gases of interest with hydrogen being the primary propellant for nuclear thermal solid core and gas core rocket-based atmospheric flight. A series of analyses were undertaken to investigate resource capturing aspects of atmospheric mining in the outer solar system. This included the gas capturing rate for hydrogen helium 4 and helium 3, storage options, and different methods of direct use of the captured gases. Additional supporting analyses were conducted to illuminate vehicle sizing and orbital transportation issues.

  14. The variations of geomagnetic energy and solar irradiance and their impacts on Earth's upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanshi

    2012-01-01

    The primary energy sources of Earth's upper atmosphere are the solar irradiance and geomagnetic energy including Joule heating and particle precipitation. Various data and models are utilized to investigate the variations of energy inputs and their influences on the coupled thermosphere-ionosphere system. First, the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) has been used and the data show that the solar irradiance enhancement has wavelength dependence during flare events, and it increased largest in the XUV range. NCAR Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM) simulations for the X17.2-class flare event on October 28th, 2003 (X17.2) show that the impact of solar irradiance enhancement on the high-altitude thermosphere (400 km) is largest in the EUV wavebands instead. Secondly, the energy transfer processes into the upper atmosphere associated with high-speed solar wind stream has been investigated. It is a combination of Joule heating and particle precipitation, while Joule heating may play a more important role. We studied the high-latitude forcing from the measurements of DMSP satellite, empirical model Weimer05 and Assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics (AMIE) model. The yearly average of the northern hemisphere integrated Joule heating (IJH) calculated from AMIE is 85% larger than that from Weimer05. Thirdly, the TIE-GCM model has been used to examine the altitudinal distribution of Joule heating and its influence on the upper atmosphere. The simulation results indicate that most of the Joule heating is deposited under 150 km. For solar minimum, Joule heating above 150 km (18% of total heat) causes about 60% of the total temperature variation and 50% of the total density variation, while for solar maximum, 34% of the total heat is above 150 km and results in 90% of the temperature variation and 80% density variation. This indicates that the high-altitude Joule heating has a stronger impact on the atmosphere at 400 km

  15. A Comparison among Solar Diameter Measurements Carried Out from the Ground and outside Earth's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djafer, D.; Thuillier, G.; Sofia, S.

    2008-03-01

    The solar diameter has been measured since the 17th century, using different methods and instruments, and without a clear strategy of measurement, which could explain the lack of coherence between the results obtained. The present study confirms that the discrepancies between solar diameter measurements are mostly due to differences in instrumental characteristics, the spectral domain of observation of each investigation, and atmospheric turbulence for ground measurements. We show that correcting the measurements for the effects introduced by the properties of each instrument reduces the differences between the radius measurements to the level of uncertainty of each instrument. This study makes use of simulated and real data. For the simulated data, we use an empirical model of the solar limb shape, and for observations, we use measurements carried out with the Solar Disk Sextant experiment, the CCD solar astrolabe of Calern Observatory, and the Michelson Doppler Imager on board SOHO.

  16. Climatic implications of a rapid wind/solar transition

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartzman, Peter D; Zhang, Xiaochun

    2016-01-01

    A transition to a fully global renewable energy infrastructure is potentially possible in no more than a few decades, even using current wind/solar technologies. We demonstrate that at its completion this transition would terminate anthropogenic carbon emissions to the atmosphere derived from energy consumption in roughly 25 years as well as double current global energy production. This result would provide all human energy needs worldwide and additional energy required for climate adaptation as well as carbon sequestration from the atmosphere to bring down the atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration to safer levels. The implementation of this energy transition in the near future would maximize the probability for achieving a less than 2 deg C, with a potential 1.5 deg C limit, increase to global temperature over the pre-industrial level by 2100. Our best case scenario utilizes less than 3% of current annual global energy consumption per year with an annual reinvestment of 10% of its growing renewable ...

  17. Instrument development for atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM): Status of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer - extended Resolution (AERI-X), the Solar Radiance Transmission Interferometer (SORTI), and the Absolute Solar Transmission Inferometer (ASTI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murcray, F.; Stephen, T.; Kosters, J. [Univ. of Denver, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes three instruments currently under developemnt for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program at the University of Denver: the AERI-X (Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer-Extended Resolution) and the SORTI (Solar R adiance Transmission Interferometer), and ASTI (Absolute Solar transmission Interferometer).

  18. Atmospheric Mining in the Outer Solar System:. [Aerial Vehicle Reconnaissance and Exploration Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric mining in the outer solar system has been investigated as a means of fuel production for high energy propulsion and power. Fusion fuels such as Helium 3 (3He) and hydrogen can be wrested from the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune and either returned to Earth or used in-situ for energy production. Helium 3 and hydrogen (deuterium, etc.) were the primary gases of interest with hydrogen being the primary propellant for nuclear thermal solid core and gas core rocket-based atmospheric flight. A series of analyses were undertaken to investigate resource capturing aspects of atmospheric mining in the outer solar system. This included the gas capturing rate, storage options, and different methods of direct use of the captured gases. Additional supporting analyses were conducted to illuminate vehicle sizing and orbital transportation issues. While capturing 3He, large amounts of hydrogen and 4He are produced. With these two additional gases, the potential for fueling small and large fleets of additional exploration and exploitation vehicles exists. Additional aerospacecraft or other aerial vehicles (UAVs, balloons, rockets, etc.) could fly through the outer planet atmospheres, for global weather observations, localized storm or other disturbance investigations, wind speed measurements, polar observations, etc. Deep-diving aircraft (built with the strength to withstand many atmospheres of pressure) powered by the excess hydrogen or helium 4 may be designed to probe the higher density regions of the gas giants. Outer planet atmospheric properties, atmospheric storm data, and mission planning for future outer planet UAVs are presented.

  19. Integrating Solar Power onto the Electric Grid - Bridging the Gap between Atmospheric Science, Engineering and Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghonima, M. S.; Yang, H.; Zhong, X.; Ozge, B.; Sahu, D. K.; Kim, C. K.; Babacan, O.; Hanna, R.; Kurtz, B.; Mejia, F. A.; Nguyen, A.; Urquhart, B.; Chow, C. W.; Mathiesen, P.; Bosch, J.; Wang, G.

    2015-12-01

    One of the main obstacles to high penetrations of solar power is the variable nature of solar power generation. To mitigate variability, grid operators have to schedule additional reliability resources, at considerable expense, to ensure that load requirements are met by generation. Thus despite the cost of solar PV decreasing, the cost of integrating solar power will increase as penetration of solar resources onto the electric grid increases. There are three principal tools currently available to mitigate variability impacts: (i) flexible generation, (ii) storage, either virtual (demand response) or physical devices and (iii) solar forecasting. Storage devices are a powerful tool capable of ensuring smooth power output from renewable resources. However, the high cost of storage is prohibitive and markets are still being designed to leverage their full potential and mitigate their limitation (e.g. empty storage). Solar forecasting provides valuable information on the daily net load profile and upcoming ramps (increasing or decreasing solar power output) thereby providing the grid advance warning to schedule ancillary generation more accurately, or curtail solar power output. In order to develop solar forecasting as a tool that can be utilized by the grid operators we identified two focus areas: (i) develop solar forecast technology and improve solar forecast accuracy and (ii) develop forecasts that can be incorporated within existing grid planning and operation infrastructure. The first issue required atmospheric science and engineering research, while the second required detailed knowledge of energy markets, and power engineering. Motivated by this background we will emphasize area (i) in this talk and provide an overview of recent advancements in solar forecasting especially in two areas: (a) Numerical modeling tools for coastal stratocumulus to improve scheduling in the day-ahead California energy market. (b) Development of a sky imager to provide short term

  20. Giant Planets of Our Solar System Atmospheres, Composition, and Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, Patrick G. J

    2009-01-01

    This book reviews the current state of knowledge of the atmospheres of the giant gaseous planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. The current theories of their formation are reviewed and their recently observed temperature, composition and cloud structures are contrasted and compared with simple thermodynamic, radiative transfer and dynamical models. The instruments and techniques that have been used to remotely measure their atmospheric properties are also reviewed, and the likely development of outer planet observations over the next two decades is outlined. This second edition has been extensively updated following the Cassini mission results for Jupiter/Saturn and the newest ground-based measurements for Uranus/Neptune as well as on the latest development in the theories on planet formation.

  1. Radiative 3D MHD simulations of the spontaneous small-scale eruptions in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitiashvili, Irina N.

    2015-08-01

    Studying non-linear turbulent dynamics of the solar atmosphere is important for understanding mechanism of the solar and stellar brightness variations. High-resolution observations of the quiet Sun reveal ubiquitous distributions of high-speed jets, which are transport mass and energy into the solar corona and feeding the solar wind. However, the origin of these eruption events is still unknown. Using 3D realistic MHD numerical simulations we find that small-scale eruptions are produced by ubiquitous magnetized vortex tubes generated by the Sun's turbulent convection in subsurface layers. The swirling vortex tubes (resembling tornadoes) penetrate into the solar atmosphere, capture and stretch background magnetic field, and push the surrounding material up, generating shocks. Our simulations reveal complicated high-speed flow patterns and thermodynamic and magnetic structure in the erupting vortex tubes and shows that the eruptions are initiated in the subsurface layers and are driven by high-pressure gradients in the subphotosphere and photosphere and by the Lorentz force in the higher atmosphere layers. I will discuss about properties of these eruptions, their effects on brightness and spectral variations and comparison with observations.

  2. Fabrication, performance and atmospheric stability of inverted ZnO nanoparticle/polymer solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhaolin

    2015-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs, ~5 nm) were first synthesized by a simple wet chemical method. A mixture of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):(6,6)-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) was used as the photoactive layer, and an inverted solar cell with a structure of ITO/ZnO NPs/P3HT:PCBM/MoO3/Ag was fabricated. Its performance and stability in the ambient atmosphere were investigated in detail. The results showed that the fabricated solar cell under 100 mW/cm2 AM1.5 illumination exhibited a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.28 %. In addition, illumination intensity had significant effect on open circuit voltage ( V oc), short circuit current ( J sc), fill factor (FF), and PCE of the fabricated solar cell. The dark storability (darkness, room temperature, and 50-60 % relative humidity) was shown to exceed 4,416 h without notable loss in PCE. The fabricated solar cell with excellent long-term stability was achieved in an ambient atmosphere; also, the stable mechanism of the solar cell in the ambient atmosphere was illuminated.

  3. Solar absorption in the atmosphere - estimates from collocated surface and satellite observations over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyta Hakuba, Maria; Folini, Doris; Wild, Martin; Schaepmann-Strub, Gabriela

    2014-05-01

    Solar radiation is the primary source of energy for the Earth's climate system. While the incoming and outgoing solar fluxes at the top-of-atmosphere can be quantified with high accuracy, large uncertainties still exist in the partitioning of solar absorption between surface and atmosphere. To compute best estimates of absorbed solar radiation at the surface and within the atmosphere representative for Europe during 2000-2010, we combine ground-based observations of surface downwelling solar radiation (GEBA, BSRN) with collocated satellite-retrieved surface albedo (MODIS) and top-of-atmosphere net irradiance (CERES EBAF, 1° resolution). The combination of these datasets over European land yields best estimates of annual mean surface and atmospheric absorption of 117 ±6 Wm¯² (42 ±2 % of TOA incident irradiance) and 65 ±3 Wm¯² (23 ±1 %). The fractional atmospheric absorption of 23% represents a robust estimate largely unaffected by variations in latitude and season, thus, making it a potentially useful quantity for first order validation of regional climate models. These estimates are based on quality assessed surface data. First of all, we examine the temporal homogeneity of the monthly GEBA time series beyond 2000 and find the vast majority to be suitable for our purposes. The spatial representativeness of the GEBA and BSRN sites for their collocated 1° CERES EBAF grid cells we assess by using a satellite-derived surface solar radiation product (CM SAF) at 0.03° spatial resolution. We find representation errors of on average 3 Wm¯² or 2% (normalized by point values). Care is taken to identify and quantify uncertainties, which arise mostly from the measurements themselves, in particular surface albedo and ground-based solar radiation data. Other sources of uncertainty, like the spatial coverage by surface sites, the multiplicative combination of spatially averaged surface solar radiation and surface albedo, and the spatial representativeness of the

  4. The Long-term Middle Atmospheric Influence of Very Large Solar Proton Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Marsh, Daniel R.; Vitt, Francis M.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Randall, Cora E.; Fleming, Eric L.; Frith, Stacey M.

    2008-01-01

    Long-term variations in ozone have been caused by both natural and humankind related processes. The humankind or anthropogenic influence on ozone originates from the chlorofluorocarbons and halons (chlorine and bromine) and has led to international regulations greatly limiting the release of these substances. Certain natural ozone influences are also important in polar regions and are caused by the impact of solar charged particles on the atmosphere. Such natural variations have been studied in order to better quantify the human influence on polar ozone. Large-scale explosions on the Sun near solar maximum lead to emissions of charged particles (mainly protons and electrons), some of which enter the Earth's magnetosphere and rain down on the polar regions. "Solar proton events" have been used to describe these phenomena since the protons associated with these solar events sometimes create a significant atmospheric disturbance. We have used the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) to study the long-term (> few months) influences of solar proton events from 1963 through 2004 on stratospheric ozone and temperature. There were extremely large solar proton events in 1972, 1989,2000,2001, and 2003. These events caused very distinctive polar changes in layers of the Earth's atmosphere known as the stratosphere (12-50 km; -7-30 miles) and mesosphere (50-90 km; 30-55 miles). The solar protons connected with these events created hydrogen- and nitrogen-containing compounds, which led to the polar ozone destruction. The nitrogen-containing compounds, called odd nitrogen, lasted much longer than the hydrogen-containing compounds and led to long-lived stratospheric impacts. An extremely active period for these events occurred in the five-year period, 2000- 2004, and caused increases in odd nitrogen which lasted for several months after individual events. Associated stratospheric ozone decreases of >lo% were calculated

  5. Newtonian CAFE: a new ideal MHD code to study the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, J. J.; Guzmán, F.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we present a new independent code designed to solve the equations of classical ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in three dimensions, submitted to a constant gravitational field. The purpose of the code centers on the analysis of solar phenomena within the photosphere-corona region. In special the code is capable to simulate the propagation of impulsively generated linear and non-linear MHD waves in the non-isothermal solar atmosphere. We present 1D and 2D standard tests to demonstrate the quality of the numerical results obtained with our code. As 3D tests we present the propagation of MHD-gravity waves and vortices in the solar atmosphere. The code is based on high-resolution shock-capturing methods, uses the HLLE flux formula combined with Minmod, MC and WENO5 reconstructors. The divergence free magnetic field constraint is controlled using the Flux Constrained Transport method.

  6. ANNEALING OF POLYCRYSTALLINE THIN FILM SILICON SOLAR CELLS IN WATER VAPOUR AT SUB-ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Pikna

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Thin film polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si solar cells were annealed in water vapour at pressures below atmospheric pressure. PN junction of the sample was contacted by measuring probes directly in the pressure chamber filled with steam during passivation. Suns-VOC method and a Lock-in detector were used to monitor an effect of water vapour to VOC of the solar cell during whole passivation process (in-situ. Tested temperature of the sample (55°C – 110°C was constant during the procedure. Open-circuit voltage of a solar cell at these temperatures is lower than at room temperature. Nevertheless, voltage response of the solar cell to the light flash used during Suns-VOC measurements was good observable. Temperature dependences for multicrystalline wafer-based and polycrystalline thin film solar cells were measured and compared. While no significant improvement of thin film poly-Si solar cell parameters by annealing in water vapour at under-atmospheric pressures was observed up to now, in-situ observation proved required sensitivity to changing VOC at elevated temperatures during the process.

  7. Limitation of Ground-based Estimates of Solar Irradiance Due to Atmospheric Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guoyong; Cahalan, Robert F.; Holben, Brent N.

    2003-01-01

    The uncertainty in ground-based estimates of solar irradiance is quantitatively related to the temporal variability of the atmosphere's optical thickness. The upper and lower bounds of the accuracy of estimates using the Langley Plot technique are proportional to the standard deviation of aerosol optical thickness (approx. +/- 13 sigma(delta tau)). The estimates of spectral solar irradiance (SSI) in two Cimel sun photometer channels from the Mauna Loa site of AERONET are compared with satellite observations from SOLSTICE (Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment) on UARS (Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite) for almost two years of data. The true solar variations related to the 27-day solar rotation cycle observed from SOLSTICE are about 0.15% at the two sun photometer channels. The variability in ground-based estimates is statistically one order of magnitude larger. Even though about 30% of these estimates from all Level 2.0 Cimel data fall within the 0.4 to approx. 0.5% variation level, ground-based estimates are not able to capture the 27-day solar variation observed from SOLSTICE.

  8. Impact of cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the Earth’s ionosphere and atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateev Lachezar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A brief review of the study during COST Action ES0803 of effects due to cosmic rays (CR and solar energetic particles (SEP in the ionosphere and atmosphere is presented. Models CORIMIA (COsmic Ray Ionization Model for Ionosphere and Atmosphere and application of CORSIKA (COsmic Ray SImulations for KAscade code are considered. They are capable to compute the cosmic ray ionization profiles at a given location, time, solar and geomagnetic activity. Intercomparison of the models, as well as comparison with direct measurements of the atmospheric ionization, validates their applicability for the entire atmosphere and for the different levels of the solar activity. The effects of CR and SEP can be very strong locally in the polar cap regions, affecting the physical-chemical and electrical properties of the ionosphere and atmosphere. Contributions here were also made by the anomalous CR, whose ionization is significant at high geomagnetic latitudes (above 65°–70°. Several recent achievements and application of CR ionization models are briefly presented. This work is the output from the SG 1.1 of the COST ES0803 action (2008–2012 and the emphasis is given on the progress achieved by European scientists involved in this collaboration.

  9. Towards Space Solar Power - Examining Atmospheric Interactions of Power Beams with the HAARP Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Leitgab, M

    2014-01-01

    In the most common space solar power (SSP) system architectures, solar energy harvested by large satellites in geostationary orbit is transmitted to Earth via microwave radiation. Currently, only limited information about the interactions of microwave beams with energy densities of several tens to hundreds of W/m$^2$ with the different layers of the atmosphere is available. Governmental bodies will likely require detailed investigations of safety and atmospheric effects of microwave power beams before issuing launch licenses for SSP satellite systems. This paper proposes to collect representative and comprehensive data of the interaction of power beams with the atmosphere by extending the infrastructure of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, USA. Estimates of the transmission infrastructure performance as well as measurement devices and scientific capabilities of possible upgrade scenarios will be discussed. The proposed upgrade of the HAARP facility is expected to d...

  10. Atmosphere and water loss from early Mars under extreme solar wind and extreme ultraviolet conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Naoki; Kulikov, Yuri N; Lammer, Helmut; Lichtenegger, Herbert I M; Tanaka, Takashi; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki; Zhang, Tielong

    2009-01-01

    The upper limits of the ion pickup and cold ion outflow loss rates from the early martian atmosphere shortly after the Sun arrived at the Zero-Age-Main-Sequence (ZAMS) were investigated. We applied a comprehensive 3-D multi-species magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model to an early martian CO(2)-rich atmosphere, which was assumed to have been exposed to a solar XUV [X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV)] flux that was 100 times higher than today and a solar wind that was about 300 times denser. We also assumed the late onset of a planetary magnetic dynamo, so that Mars had no strong intrinsic magnetic field at that early period. We found that, due to such extreme solar wind-atmosphere interaction, a strong magnetic field of about approximately 4000 nT was induced in the entire dayside ionosphere, which could efficiently protect the upper atmosphere from sputtering loss. A planetary obstacle ( approximately ionopause) was formed at an altitude of about 1000 km above the surface due to the drag force and the mass loading by newly created ions in the highly extended upper atmosphere. We obtained an O(+) loss rate by the ion pickup process, which takes place above the ionopause, of about 1.5 x 10(28) ions/s during the first water loss equivalent to a global martian ocean with a depth of approximately 8 m. Consequently, even if the magnetic protection due to the expected early martian magnetic dynamo is neglected, ion pickup and sputtering were most likely not the dominant loss processes for the planet's initial atmosphere and water inventory. However, it appears that the cold ion outflow into the martian tail, due to the transfer of momentum from the solar wind to the ionospheric plasma, could have removed a global ocean with a depth of 10-70 m during the first < or =150 million years after the Sun arrived at the ZAMS.

  11. Initial Results of Aperture Area Comparisons for Exo-Atmospheric Total Solar Irradiance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B. Carol; Litorja, Maritoni; Fowler, Joel B.; Butler, James J.

    2009-01-01

    In the measurement of exo-atmospheric total solar irradiance (TSI), instrument aperture area is a critical component in converting solar radiant flux to irradiance. In a May 2000 calibration workshop for the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE), the solar irradiance measurement community recommended that NASA and NISI coordinate an aperture area measurement comparison to quantify and validate aperture area uncertainties and their overall effect on TSI uncertainties. From May 2003 to February 2006, apertures from 4 institutions with links to the historical TSI database were measured by NIST and the results were compared to the aperture area determined by each institution. The initial results of these comparisons are presented and preliminary assessments of the participants' uncertainties are discussed.

  12. THE PRE-PENUMBRAL MAGNETIC CANOPY IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacTaggart, David [School of Mathematics and Statistics University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QW (United Kingdom); Guglielmino, Salvo L.; Zuccarello, Francesca [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia—Sezione Astrofisica, Università di Catania, via S. Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2016-11-01

    Penumbrae are the manifestation of magnetoconvection in highly inclined (to the vertical direction) magnetic field. The penumbra of a sunspot tends to form, initially, along the arc of the umbra antipodal to the main region of flux emergence. The question of how highly inclined magnetic field can concentrate along the antipodal curves of umbrae, at least initially, remains to be answered. Previous observational studies have suggested the existence of some form of overlying magnetic canopy that acts as the progenitor for penumbrae. We propose that such overlying magnetic canopies are a consequence of how the magnetic field emerges into the atmosphere and are, therefore, part of the emerging region. We show, through simulations of twisted flux tube emergence, that canopies of highly inclined magnetic field form preferentially at the required locations above the photosphere.

  13. Is tropospheric weather influenced by solar wind through atmospheric vertical coupling downward control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prikryl, Paul; Tsukijihara, Takumi; Iwao, Koki; Muldrew, Donald B.; Bruntz, Robert; Rušin, Vojto; Rybanský, Milan; Turňa, Maroš; Šťastný, Pavel; Pastirčák, Vladimír

    2017-04-01

    More than four decades have passed since a link between solar wind magnetic sector boundary structure and mid-latitude upper tropospheric vorticity was discovered (Wilcox et al., Science, 180, 185-186, 1973). The link has been later confirmed and various physical mechanisms proposed but apart from controversy, little attention has been drawn to these results. To further emphasize their importance we investigate the occurrence of mid-latitude severe weather in the context of solar wind coupling to the magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere (MIA) system. It is observed that significant snowstorms, windstorms and heavy rain, particularly if caused by low pressure systems in winter, tend to follow arrivals of high-speed solar wind. Previously published statistical evidence that explosive extratropical cyclones in the northern hemisphere tend to occur after arrivals of high-speed solar wind streams from coronal holes (Prikryl et al., Ann. Geophys., 27, 1-30, 2009; Prikryl et al., J. Atmos. Sol.-Terr. Phys., 149, 219-231, 2016) is corroborated for the southern hemisphere. A physical mechanism to explain these observations is proposed. The leading edge of high-speed solar wind streams is a locus of large-amplitude magneto-hydrodynamic waves that modulate Joule heating and/or Lorentz forcing of the high-latitude lower thermosphere generating medium-scale atmospheric gravity waves that propagate upward and downward through the atmosphere. Simulations of gravity wave propagation in a model atmosphere using the Transfer Function Model (Mayr et al., Space Sci. Rev., 54, 297-375, 1990) show that propagating waves originating in the thermosphere can excite a spectrum of gravity waves in the lower atmosphere. In spite of significantly reduced amplitudes but subject to amplification upon reflection in the upper troposphere, these gravity waves can provide a lift of unstable air to release instabilities in the troposphere thus initiating convection to form cloud/precipitation bands

  14. Dynamics of Atmospheric Waves In a Hazy Atmosphere: Implications for Titan and Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matcheva, Katia

    2017-10-01

    We present a dynamical model of atmospheric gravity waves propagating in a stable atmosphere in the presence of small-size particulates. We consider a two-way interaction: (i) the effect of atmospheric mass-loading on the propagation of the waves and (ii) the dynamical forcing of the haze particle motion in the presence of variable atmospheric winds. The model illustrates the effect on the vertical distribution of haze particles due to wave-induces vertical winds and wind gradients. The results are presented in the context of Titan’s atmosphere and Cassini observations.

  15. Formation of a hybrid-type proto-atmosphere on Mars accreting in the solar nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hiroaki; Kuramoto, Kiyoshi

    2018-03-01

    Recent studies of the chronology of Martian meteorites suggest that the growth of Mars was almost complete within a few Myr after the birth of the Solar system. During such rapid accretion, proto-Mars likely gravitationally maintained both the solar nebula component and the impact degassing component, containing H2O vapour and reduced gas species, as a proto-atmosphere to be called a hybrid-type proto-atmosphere. Here we numerically analyse the mass and composition of the degassed component and the atmospheric thermal structure sustained by accretional heating. Our results predict that a growing Mars possibly acquired a massive and hot hybrid-type proto-atmosphere with surface pressure and temperature greater than several kbar and 2000 K, respectively, which is sufficient to produce a deep magma ocean. In such a high-temperature and high-pressure environment, a significant amount of H2O, CH4, CO, and H2 is expected to be partitioned into the planetary interior, although this would strongly depend on the dynamics of the magma ocean and mantle solidification. The dissolved H2O may explain the wet Martian mantle implied from basaltic Martian meteorites. Along with the remnant reduced atmosphere after the hydrodynamic atmospheric escape, dissolved reduced gas species may have maintained an earliest Martian surface environment that allowed prebiotic chemical evolution and liquid H2O activities.

  16. Fundamental (f) oscillations in a magnetically coupled solar interior-atmosphere system - An analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintér, Balázs; Erdélyi, R.

    2018-01-01

    Solar fundamental (f) acoustic mode oscillations are investigated analytically in a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. The model consists of three layers in planar geometry, representing the solar interior, the magnetic atmosphere, and a transitional layer sandwiched between them. Since we focus on the fundamental mode here, we assume the plasma is incompressible. A horizontal, canopy-like, magnetic field is introduced to the atmosphere, in which degenerated slow MHD waves can exist. The global (f-mode) oscillations can couple to local atmospheric Alfvén waves, resulting, e.g., in a frequency shift of the oscillations. The dispersion relation of the global oscillation mode is derived, and is solved analytically for the thin-transitional layer approximation and for the weak-field approximation. Analytical formulae are also provided for the frequency shifts due to the presence of a thin transitional layer and a weak atmospheric magnetic field. The analytical results generally indicate that, compared to the fundamental value (ω =√{ gk }), the mode frequency is reduced by the presence of an atmosphere by a few per cent. A thin transitional layer reduces the eigen-frequencies further by about an additional hundred microhertz. Finally, a weak atmospheric magnetic field can slightly, by a few percent, increase the frequency of the eigen-mode. Stronger magnetic fields, however, can increase the f-mode frequency by even up to ten per cent, which cannot be seen in observed data. The presence of a magnetic atmosphere in the three-layer model also introduces non-permitted propagation windows in the frequency spectrum; here, f-mode oscillations cannot exist with certain values of the harmonic degree. The eigen-frequencies can be sensitive to the background physical parameters, such as an atmospheric density scale-height or the rate of the plasma density drop at the photosphere. Such information, if ever observed with high-resolution instrumentation and inverted, could help to

  17. Ellerman bombs observed with the new vacuum solar telescope and the atmospheric imaging assembly onboard the solar dynamics observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yajie; Tian, Hui; Xu, Zhi; Xiang, Yongyuan; Fang, Yuliang; Yang, Zihao

    2017-12-01

    Ellerman bombs (EBs) are believed to be small-scale reconnection events occurring around the temperature minimum region in the solar atmosphere. They are often identified as significant enhancements in the extended Hα wings without obvious signatures in the Hα core. Here we explore the possibility of using the 1700 Å images taken by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to study EBs. From the Hα wing images obtained with the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) on 2015 May 2, we have identified 145 EBs and 51% of them clearly correspond to the bright points (BPs) in the AIA 1700 Å images. If we resize the NVST images using a linear interpolation to make the pixel sizes of the AIA and NVST images the same, some previously identified EBs disappear and about 71% of the remaining EBs are associated with BPs. Meanwhile, 66% of the compact brightenings in the AIA 1700 Å images can be identified as EBs in the Hα wings. The intensity enhancements of the EBs in the Hα wing images reveal a linear correlation with those of the BPs in the AIA 1700 Å images. Our study suggests that a significant fraction of EBs can be observed with the AIA 1700 Å filter, which is promising for large-sample statistical study of EBs as the seeing-free and full-disk SDO/AIA data are routinely available.

  18. Solar atmospheric neutrinos: A new neutrino floor for dark matter searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kenny C. Y.; Beacom, John F.; Peter, Annika H. G.; Rott, Carsten

    2017-11-01

    As is well known, dark matter direct detection experiments will ultimately be limited by a "neutrino floor," due to the scattering of nuclei by MeV neutrinos from, e.g., nuclear fusion in the Sun. Here we point out the existence of a new neutrino floor that will similarly limit indirect detection with the Sun, due to high-energy neutrinos from cosmic-ray interactions with the solar atmosphere. We have two key findings. First, solar atmospheric neutrinos ≲1 TeV cause a sensitivity floor for standard weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP) scenarios, for which higher-energy neutrinos are absorbed in the Sun. This floor will be reached once the present sensitivity is improved by just 1 order of magnitude. Second, for neutrinos ≳1 TeV , which can be isolated by muon energy loss rate, solar atmospheric neutrinos should soon be detectable in IceCube. Discovery will help probe the complicated effects of solar magnetic fields on cosmic rays. These events will be backgrounds to WIMP scenarios with long-lived mediators, for which higher-energy neutrinos can escape from the Sun.

  19. Atmospheric effects on the photovoltaic performance of hybrid perovskite solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Sheikh, Arif D.

    2015-06-01

    Organometal trihalide perovskite solar cells have recently attracted lots of attention in the photovoltaic community due to their escalating efficiency and solution processability. The most efficient organometallic mixed-halide sensitized solar cells often employ 2,2′7,7′-tetrakis-(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenyl-amine)-9,9′-spirobifluorene (spiro-MeOTAD) as the hole-transporting material. In this work, we investigated the effect of different atmospheric storage conditions, particularly vacuum, dry nitrogen, and dry air, on the photovoltaic performance of TiO2-CH3NH3PbI3-xClx-spiro-MeOTAD solar cells. We found that spin coating of spiro-MeOTAD in an oxygen atmosphere alone was not adequate to functionalize its hole-transport property completely, and our systematic experiments revealed that the device efficiency depends on the ambient atmospheric conditions during the drying process of spiro-MeOTAD. Complementary incident photon to current conversion efficiency (IPCE), light absorption and photoluminescence quenching measurements allowed us to attribute the atmosphere-dependent efficiency to the improved electronic characteristics of the solar cells. Furthermore, our Fourier transform infrared and electrical impedance measurements unambiguously detected modifications in the spiro-MeOTAD after the drying processes in different gas environments. Our findings demonstrate that proper oxidization and p-doping in functionalizing spiro-MeOTAD play a very critical role in determining device performance. These findings will facilitate the search for alternative hole-transporting materials in high-performance perovskite solar cells with long-term stability.

  20. Intermittent Reconnection and Plasmoids in UV Bursts in the Low Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouppe van der Voort, L.; De Pontieu, B.; Scharmer, G. B.; de la Cruz Rodríguez, J.; Martínez-Sykora, J.; Nóbrega-Siverio, D.; Guo, L. J.; Jafarzadeh, S.; Pereira, T. M. D.; Hansteen, V. H.; Carlsson, M.; Vissers, G.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is thought to drive a wide variety of dynamic phenomena in the solar atmosphere. Yet, the detailed physical mechanisms driving reconnection are difficult to discern in the remote sensing observations that are used to study the solar atmosphere. In this Letter, we exploit the high-resolution instruments Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and the new CHROMIS Fabry-Pérot instrument at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) to identify the intermittency of magnetic reconnection and its association with the formation of plasmoids in so-called UV bursts in the low solar atmosphere. The Si IV 1403 Å UV burst spectra from the transition region show evidence of highly broadened line profiles with often non-Gaussian and triangular shapes, in addition to signatures of bidirectional flows. Such profiles had previously been linked, in idealized numerical simulations, to magnetic reconnection driven by the plasmoid instability. Simultaneous CHROMIS images in the chromospheric Ca II K 3934 Å line now provide compelling evidence for the presence of plasmoids by revealing highly dynamic and rapidly moving brightenings that are smaller than 0.″2 and that evolve on timescales of the order of seconds. Our interpretation of the observations is supported by detailed comparisons with synthetic observables from advanced numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection and associated plasmoids in the chromosphere. Our results highlight how subarcsecond imaging spectroscopy sensitive to a wide range of temperatures combined with advanced numerical simulations that are realistic enough to compare with observations can directly reveal the small-scale physical processes that drive the wide range of phenomena in the solar atmosphere.

  1. Influence of solar activity on middle atmosphere associated with phases of equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanakumar, K.

    1989-01-01

    Earlier studies on the influence of solar activity variations within a 11-year solar cycle on temperature changes in the middle atmosphere revealed that while the temperature in the mesosphere showed strong responses to changes in solar activity, the stratosphere remained almost unaffected. Recent studies showed that when the temperature data were grouped into east or west phase of the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in stratospheric zonal wind, significant relationships of temperature in the lower stratosphere and troposphere could be obtained with 10.7 cm solar radio flux. Positive correlations in high latitude regions and negative correlations in mid-latitude and tropical regions were obtained during winter when the QBO was in its west phase. During the east phase, converse relationships were indicated. These results inspired this study on the response of solar activity in 11-year cycle on the temperature structure of the middle atmosphere in the two phases of equatorial QBO of zonal wind at 50 mb, in tropics, mid-latitude and antarctic regions.

  2. Rocket Measurements of the Direct Solar Lyman-alpha Radiation Penetrating in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guineva, V. H.; Witt, G.; Gumbel, J.; Khaplanov, M.; Tashev, V. L.

    2006-03-01

    The resonance transition 2P-2S of the atomic hydrogen (Lyman-alpha emission) is the strongest and most conspicuous feature in the solar EUV spectrum. The Lyman-alpha radiation transfer depends on the resonance scattering from the hydrogen atoms in the atmosphere and on the O2 absorption. Since the Lyman-alpha extinction in the atmosphere is a measure for the column density of the oxygen molecules, the atmospheric temperature profile can be calculated thereof. Rocket measurements of the direct Lyman-alpha radiation vertical profile in the summer mesosphere and thermosphere (up to 120 km), at high latitudes will be carried out in June 2006. The Lyman-alpha flux will be registered by a detector of solar Lyman-alpha radiation, manufactured in the Stara Zagora Department of the Solar-Terrestrial Influences Laboratory (STIL BAS). Its basic part is an ionization camera, filled in with NO. The scientific data analysis will include raw data reduction, radiative transfer simulations, temperature retrieval as well as co-analysis with other parameters, measured near the polar summer mesopause. This project is a scientific cooperation between STIL-BAS, Stara Zagora Department and the Atmospheric Physics Group at the Department of Meteorology (MISU), Stockholm University, Sweden. The joint project is part from the rocket experiment HotPay I, in the ALOMAR eARI Project, EU's 6th Framework Programme, Andoya Rocket Range, Andenes, Norway.

  3. Atmospheric pollution and its implications in the Eastern Transvaal highveld

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tyson, PD

    1988-04-01

    Full Text Available This report is a review of available information on the dispersion climatology, the degree of atmospheric pollution and the various impacts of that pollution on man and environment in the Eastern Transvaal Highveld (ETH) and adjacent regions...

  4. Rarefied gas flows through meshes and implications for atmospheric measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gumbel

    Full Text Available Meshes are commonly used as part of instruments for in situ atmospheric measurements. This study analyses the aerodynamic effect of meshes by means of wind tunnel experiments and numerical simulations. Based on the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method, a simple mesh parameterisation is described and applied to a number of representative flow conditions. For open meshes freely exposed to the flow, substantial compression effects are found both upstream and downstream of the mesh. Meshes attached to close instrument structures, on the other hand, cause only minor flow disturbances. In an accompanying paper, the approach developed here is applied to the quantitative analysis of rocket-borne density measurements in the middle atmosphere.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (instruments and techniques; middle atmosphere – composition and chemistry

  5. Atmospheric extinction in solar tower plants: absorption and broadband correction for MOR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrieder, N.; Wilbert, S.; Pitz-Paal, R.; Emde, C.; Gasteiger, J.; Mayer, B.; Polo, J.

    2015-08-01

    Losses of reflected Direct Normal Irradiance due to atmospheric extinction in concentrated solar tower plants can vary significantly with site and time. The losses of the direct normal irradiance between the heliostat field and receiver in a solar tower plant are mainly caused by atmospheric scattering and absorption by aerosol and water vapor concentration in the atmospheric boundary layer. Due to a high aerosol particle number, radiation losses can be significantly larger in desert environments compared to the standard atmospheric conditions which are usually considered in ray-tracing or plant optimization tools. Information about on-site atmospheric extinction is only rarely available. To measure these radiation losses, two different commercially available instruments were tested, and more than 19 months of measurements were collected and compared at the Plataforma Solar de Almería. Both instruments are primarily used to determine the meteorological optical range (MOR). The Vaisala FS11 scatterometer is based on a monochromatic near-infrared light source emission and measures the strength of scattering processes in a small air volume mainly caused by aerosol particles. The Optec LPV4 long-path visibility transmissometer determines the monochromatic attenuation between a light-emitting diode (LED) light source at 532 nm and a receiver and therefore also accounts for absorption processes. As the broadband solar attenuation is of interest for solar resource assessment for concentrated solar power (CSP), a correction procedure for these two instruments is developed and tested. This procedure includes a spectral correction of both instruments from monochromatic to broadband attenuation. That means the attenuation is corrected for the time-dependent solar spectrum which is reflected by the collector. Further, an absorption correction for the Vaisala FS11 scatterometer is implemented. To optimize the absorption and broadband correction (ABC) procedure, additional

  6. Atmospheric extinction in solar tower plants: absorption and broadband correction for MOR measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hanrieder

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Losses of reflected Direct Normal Irradiance due to atmospheric extinction in concentrated solar tower plants can vary significantly with site and time. The losses of the direct normal irradiance between the heliostat field and receiver in a solar tower plant are mainly caused by atmospheric scattering and absorption by aerosol and water vapor concentration in the atmospheric boundary layer. Due to a high aerosol particle number, radiation losses can be significantly larger in desert environments compared to the standard atmospheric conditions which are usually considered in ray-tracing or plant optimization tools. Information about on-site atmospheric extinction is only rarely available. To measure these radiation losses, two different commercially available instruments were tested, and more than 19 months of measurements were collected and compared at the Plataforma Solar de Almería. Both instruments are primarily used to determine the meteorological optical range (MOR. The Vaisala FS11 scatterometer is based on a monochromatic near-infrared light source emission and measures the strength of scattering processes in a small air volume mainly caused by aerosol particles. The Optec LPV4 long-path visibility transmissometer determines the monochromatic attenuation between a light-emitting diode (LED light source at 532 nm and a receiver and therefore also accounts for absorption processes. As the broadband solar attenuation is of interest for solar resource assessment for concentrated solar power (CSP, a correction procedure for these two instruments is developed and tested. This procedure includes a spectral correction of both instruments from monochromatic to broadband attenuation. That means the attenuation is corrected for the time-dependent solar spectrum which is reflected by the collector. Further, an absorption correction for the Vaisala FS11 scatterometer is implemented. To optimize the absorption and broadband correction (ABC procedure

  7. Atmospheric Mining in the Outer Solar System: Aerial Vehicle Mission and Design Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric mining in the outer solar system has been investigated as a means of fuel production for high energy propulsion and power. Fusion fuels such as Helium 3 (3He) and deuterium can be wrested from the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune and either returned to Earth or used in-situ for energy production. Helium 3 and deuterium were the primary gases of interest with hydrogen being the primary propellant for nuclear thermal solid core and gas core rocket-based atmospheric flight. A series of analyses were undertaken to investigate resource capturing aspects of atmospheric mining in the outer solar system. This included the gas capturing rate, storage options, and different methods of direct use of the captured gases. While capturing 3He, large amounts of hydrogen and 4He are produced. With these two additional gases, the potential for fueling small and large fleets of additional exploration and exploitation vehicles exists. The mining aerospacecraft (ASC) could fly through the outer planet atmospheres, for global weather observations, localized storm or other disturbance investigations, wind speed measurements, polar observations, etc. Analyses of orbital transfer vehicles (OTVs), landers, and in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) mining factories are included. Preliminary observations are presented on near-optimal selections of moon base orbital locations, OTV power levels, and OTV and lander rendezvous points.

  8. Solar wind and high energy particle effects in the middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastovicka, Jan

    1989-01-01

    The solar wind variability and high energy particle effects in the neutral middle atmosphere are not much known. These factors are important in the high latitude upper mesosphere, lower thermosphere energy budget. They influence temperature, composition (minor constituents of nitric oxide, ozone), circulation (wind system) and airflow. The vertical and latitudinal structures of such effects, mechanisms of downward penetration of energy and questions of energy abundance are largely to be solved. The most important recent finding seems to be the discovery of the role of highly relativistic electrons in the middle atmosphere at L = 3 - 8 (Baker et al., 1987). The solar wind and high energy particle flux variability appear to form a part of the chain of possible Sun-weather (climate) relationships. The importance of such studies in the nineties is emphasized by their role in big international programs STEP and IGBP - Global Change.

  9. Helium 584 Å and H Lyman-α Airglow in Giant Planetary Atmospheres: Modeling, Observations, and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Christopher; Esposito, Larry W.

    2016-07-01

    The atmosphere of the outer planets is mainly composed of H2 and neutral atomic helium. The study of He 584 Å and H Lyman-α brightnesses is interesting as the EUV and FUV (Extreme and Far Ultraviolet) planetary airglow have the potential to yield useful information about mixing and other important parameters in their thermospheres. Time variation, asymmetries, and polar enhancement of the airglow are also possible and analysis of the public archived NASA mission data sets (i.e. Voyager and Cassini) can help solve some of the outstanding problems associated with these phenomena. The comparison of observations with results from sophisticated photochemical and radiative transfer models can also help ameliorate unexplained differences in the dynamical processes operating within planetary upper atmospheres. Powerful analysis techniques allow us to extract information on atmospheric mixing, temperatures, and temporal changes due to the solar and seasonal cycles from the variations in distribution and intensity of airglow emissions that result. The presentation will discuss the implications of interpretations from comparison of modeling and observations in giant planetary atmospheres.

  10. Effect of atmospheric gases, surface albedo and cloud overlap on the absorbed solar radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Sinha

    Full Text Available Recent studies have provided new evidence that models may systematically underestimate cloud solar absorption compared to observations. This study extends previous work on this "absorption anomaly'' by using observational data together with solar radiative transfer parameterisations to calculate fs (the ratio of surface and top of the atmosphere net cloud forcings and its latitudinal variation for a range of cloud types. Principally, it is found that (a the zonal mean behaviour of fs varies substantially with cloud type, with the highest values obtained for low clouds; (b gaseous absorption and scattering can radically alter the pattern of the variation of fs with latitude, but gaseous effects cannot in general raise fs to the level of around 1.5 as recently determined; (c the importance of the gaseous contribution to the atmospheric ASR is such that whilst fs rises with surface albedo, the net cloud contribution to the atmospheric ASR falls; (d the assumed form of the degree of cloud overlap in the model can substantially affect the cloud contribution to the atmospheric ASR whilst leaving the parameter fs largely unaffected; (e even large uncertainties in the observed optical depths alone cannot account for discrepancies apparent between modelled and newly observed cloud solar absorption. It is concluded that the main source of the anomaly may derive from the considerable uncertainties regarding impure droplet microphysics rather than, or together with, uncertainties in macroscopic quantities. Further, variable surface albedos and gaseous effects may limit the use of contemporaneous satellite and ground-based measurements to infer the cloud solar absorption from the parameter fs.

  11. The exterior source surface for force-free fields. [solar atmosphere magnetic field model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    Consideration is given to the exterior source surface for force-free fields. The spherical harmonic expansion is presented for boundary values on two concentric spheres. An upper limit on a constant which measures the strength of coronal currents is found to be a function of the lowest multipole moment of the prescribed boundary values. The solar atmosphere is in the class of magnetic fields for which the study is applicable.

  12. Implications of "peak oil" for atmospheric CO2 and climate

    CERN Document Server

    Kharecha, P A

    2007-01-01

    Peaking of global oil production may have a large effect on future atmospheric CO2 amount and climate change, depending upon choices made for subsequent energy sources. We suggest that, if estimates of oil and gas reserves by the Energy Information Administration are realistic, it is feasible to keep atmospheric CO2 from exceeding approximately 450 ppm, provided that future exploitation of the huge reservoirs of coal and unconventional fossil fuels incorporates carbon capture and sequestration. Existing coal-fired power plants, without sequestration, must be phased out before mid-century to achieve this limit on atmospheric CO2. We also suggest that it is important to "stretch" oil reserves via energy efficiency, thus avoiding the need to extract liquid fuels from coal or unconventional fossil fuels. We argue that a rising price on carbon emissions is probably needed to keep CO2 beneath the 450 ppm ceiling.

  13. Newtonian CAFE: a new ideal MHD code to study the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Avilés, J. J.; Cruz-Osorio, A.; Lora-Clavijo, F. D.; Guzmán, F. S.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new code designed to solve the equations of classical ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in three dimensions, submitted to a constant gravitational field. The purpose of the code centres on the analysis of solar phenomena within the photosphere-corona region. We present 1D and 2D standard tests to demonstrate the quality of the numerical results obtained with our code. As solar tests we present the transverse oscillations of Alfvénic pulses in coronal loops using a 2.5D model, and as 3D tests we present the propagation of impulsively generated MHD-gravity waves and vortices in the solar atmosphere. The code is based on high-resolution shock-capturing methods, uses the Harten-Lax-van Leer-Einfeldt (HLLE) flux formula combined with Minmod, MC, and WENO5 reconstructors. The divergence free magnetic field constraint is controlled using the Flux Constrained Transport method.

  14. The influence of a semi-infinite atmosphere on solar oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Ángel De Andrea

    2014-06-01

    The influence of a semi-infinitive atmosphere on solar investigations is investigated using a model in which the corona is represented by a gravitationally stratified fluid. The solar corona can be modeled as a semi-infinitive region of plasma that occupies the space above the xy- plane in Cartesian coordinates with the z-axis taken along the gravitational acceleration vec g = gvec uz. This assumption is reasonable, as the plasma density of the atmosphere is much lower than the density of the photosphere. So, we consider the phostosphere as a solid and immobile boundary for the atmosphere. The standard mathematical procedures in Helioseismology field are based on normal mode approach for various solar models. The region is assumed quasi-isothermal and without magnetic fields. In this work, in order to show how the modes appear in the response to an initial perturbation, we consider the initial value problem (IPV). The p-modes and g-modes possess only continuous spectra -as opposed to discrete spectrum like that previous investigators found for this problem- and the solution to the initial value problem is obtained through an appropiate Green's function.

  15. Mid-latitude summer response of the middle atmosphere to short-term solar UV changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Keckhut

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and wind data obtained with Rayleigh lidar since 1979 and Russian rockets since 1964 are analyzed to deduce the summer response of the middle atmosphere to short-term solar UV changes. The equivalent width of the 1083 nm He I line is used as a proxy to monitor the short-term UV flux changes. Spectral analyses are performed on 108-day windows to extract the 27-day component from temperature, wind and solar data sets. Linear regressions between these spectral harmonics show some significant correlations around 45 km at mid-latitudes. For large 27-day solar cycles, amplitudes of 2 K and 6 m s-1 are calculated for temperature data series over the south of France (44°N, and on wind data series over Volgograd (49°N, respectively. Cross-spectrum analyses have indicated correlations between these atmospheric parameters and the solar proxy with a phase lag of less than 2 days. These statistically correlative results, which provide good qualitative agreement with numerical simulations, are both obtained at mid-latitude. However, the observed amplitudes are larger than expected, with numerical models suggesting that dynamical processes such as equatorial or gravity waves may be responsible.

  16. Mid-latitude summer response of the middle atmosphere to short-term solar UV changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Keckhut

    Full Text Available Temperature and wind data obtained with Rayleigh lidar since 1979 and Russian rockets since 1964 are analyzed to deduce the summer response of the middle atmosphere to short-term solar UV changes. The equivalent width of the 1083 nm He I line is used as a proxy to monitor the short-term UV flux changes. Spectral analyses are performed on 108-day windows to extract the 27-day component from temperature, wind and solar data sets. Linear regressions between these spectral harmonics show some significant correlations around 45 km at mid-latitudes. For large 27-day solar cycles, amplitudes of 2 K and 6 m s-1 are calculated for temperature data series over the south of France (44°N, and on wind data series over Volgograd (49°N, respectively. Cross-spectrum analyses have indicated correlations between these atmospheric parameters and the solar proxy with a phase lag of less than 2 days. These statistically correlative results, which provide good qualitative agreement with numerical simulations, are both obtained at mid-latitude. However, the observed amplitudes are larger than expected, with numerical models suggesting that dynamical processes such as equatorial or gravity waves may be responsible.

  17. Impact of Atmospheric Attenuations Time Resolutions in Solar Radiation Derived from Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cony, Marco; Liria, Juan; Weisenberg, Ralf; Serrano, Enrique

    2014-05-01

    Accurate knowledge of solar irradiance components at the earth surface is of highly interest in many scientific and technology branches concerning meteorology, climate, agriculture and solar energy applications. In the specific case of solar energy systems the solar resource analysis with accuracy is a first step in every project since it is a required data for design, power output estimations, systems simulations and risk assessments. Solar radiation measurement availability is increasing both in spatial density and in historical archiving. However, it is still quite limited and most of the situations cannot make use of a long term ground database of high quality since solar irradiance is not generally measured where users need data. Satellite-derived solar radiation estimations are a powerful and valuable tool for solar resource assessment studies that have achieved a relatively high maturity due to years of developments and improvements. However, several sources of uncertainty are still present in satellite-derived methods. In particular, the strong influence of atmospheric attenuation information as input to the method is one of the main topics of improvement. Since solar radiation attenuation by atmospheric aerosols, and water vapor in a second place, is, after clouds, the second most important factor determining solar radiation, and particularly direct normal irradiance, the accurate knowledge of aerosol optical depth and water vapor content is relevant in the final output of satellite-derived methods. This present work, two different datasets we are used for extract atmospheric attenuation information. On the one hand the monthly mean values of the Linke turbidity factor from Meteotest database, which are twelve unique values of the Linke turbidity worldwide with a spatial resolution of 1/12º. On the other hand, daily values of AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) at 550 nm, Angstrom alpha exponent and water vapor column were taken from a gridded database that

  18. TITAN’S UPPER ATMOSPHERE FROM CASSINI/UVIS SOLAR OCCULTATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capalbo, Fernando J.; Bénilan, Yves [Laboratoire Inter-Universitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques (LISA), UMR 7583 du CNRS, Universités Paris Est Créteil (UPEC) and Paris Diderot - UPD, 61 avenue du Général de Gaulle, F-94010, Créteil Cédex (France); Yelle, Roger V.; Koskinen, Tommi T., E-mail: fernando.capalbo@lisa.u-pec.fr [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 E. University Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Titan’s atmosphere is composed mainly of molecular nitrogen, methane being the principal trace gas. From the analysis of 8 solar occultations measured by the Extreme Ultraviolet channel of the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) on board Cassini, we derived vertical profiles of N{sub 2} in the range 1100–1600 km and vertical profiles of CH{sub 4} in the range 850–1300 km. The correction of instrument effects and observational effects applied to the data are described. We present CH{sub 4} mole fractions, and average temperatures for the upper atmosphere obtained from the N{sub 2} profiles. The occultations correspond to different times and locations, and an analysis of variability of density and temperature is presented. The temperatures were analyzed as a function of geographical and temporal variables, without finding a clear correlation with any of them, although a trend of decreasing temperature toward the north pole was observed. The globally averaged temperature obtained is (150 ± 1) K. We compared our results from solar occultations with those derived from other UVIS observations, as well as studies performed with other instruments. The observational data we present confirm the atmospheric variability previously observed, add new information to the global picture of Titan’s upper atmosphere composition, variability, and dynamics, and provide new constraints to photochemical models.

  19. Atmospheric data over a solar cycle: no connection between galactic cosmic rays and new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kulmala

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol particles affect the Earth's radiative balance by directly scattering and absorbing solar radiation and, indirectly, through their activation into cloud droplets. Both effects are known with considerable uncertainty only, and translate into even bigger uncertainties in future climate predictions. More than a decade ago, variations in galactic cosmic rays were suggested to closely correlate with variations in atmospheric cloud cover and therefore constitute a driving force behind aerosol-cloud-climate interactions. Later, the enhancement of atmospheric aerosol particle formation by ions generated from cosmic rays was proposed as a physical mechanism explaining this correlation. Here, we report unique observations on atmospheric aerosol formation based on measurements at the SMEAR II station, Finland, over a solar cycle (years 1996–2008 that shed new light on these presumed relationships. Our analysis shows that none of the quantities related to aerosol formation correlates with the cosmic ray-induced ionisation intensity (CRII. We also examined the contribution of ions to new particle formation on the basis of novel ground-based and airborne observations. A consistent result is that ion-induced formation contributes typically significantly less than 10% to the number of new particles, which would explain the missing correlation between CRII and aerosol formation. Our main conclusion is that galactic cosmic rays appear to play a minor role for atmospheric aerosol formation events, and so for the connected aerosol-climate effects as well.

  20. Neutral Middle Atmospheric Influences by the Extremely Large October 2003 Solar Proton Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, C. H.; Fleming, E. L.

    2004-01-01

    The huge coronal mass ejection (CME) on October 28,2003 caused an extremely large solar proton event (SPE) at the Earth, which impacted the middle atmospheric polar cap regions. The highly energetic protons produce ionizations, excitations, dissociations, and dissociative ionizations of the background constituents, which lead to the production of HOx (H, OH, HO2) and NOy (N, NO, NO2, NO3, N2O5, HNO3, HO2NO2, ClONO2, BrONO2). The total production of middle atmospheric NOy molecules by individual SPEs can be used to compare their sizes. Using this scale, the extremely large October 2003 SPE was the fourth largest in the past 40 years and the second largest of solar cycle 23. Only the October 1989, August 1972, and July 2000 SPEs were larger. The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Two-dimensional (2D) Model was used in computing the influence of this gigantic SPE. The NOy amount was increased by over two orders of magnitude in the mesosphere in both the GSFC 2D Model computations and Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) measurements as a result of this noteworthy SPE. The model also calculated polar middle mesospheric ozone decreases of over 70% during the SPE. Other atmospheric impacts from both model predictions and measurements as a result of this major SPE will be discussed in this paper.

  1. Neutral Middle Atmospheric Influences by the Extremely Large October 2003 Solar Proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, C. H.; Fleming, E. L.

    2004-01-01

    The huge coronal mass ejection (CME) on October 28, 2003 caused an extremely large solar proton event (SPE) 3t the Earth, which impacted the middle atmospheric polar cap regions. The highly energetic protons produce ionizations, excitations, dissociations, and dissociative ionizations of the background constituents, which lead to the production of HO(x) (H, OH, HO2) and NO(y) (N, NO, NO2, NO3, N2O5, HNO3, HO2NO2, ClONO2, BrONO2). The total production of middle atmospheric NO(y) molecules by individual SPEs can be used to compare their sizes. Using this scale, the extremely large October 2003 SPE was the fourth largest in the past 40 years and the second largest of solar cycle 23. Only the October 1989, August 1972, and July 2000 SPEs were larger. The Goddard Space Flight Center (CSFC) Two-dimensional (2D)) Model was used in computing the influence of this gigantic SPE The NO(y) amount was increased by over two orders of Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) measurements as a result of this noteworthy SPE. The model also calculated polar middle mesosphere ozone decreases of over 70% during the SPE. Other atmospheric impacts from both model predictions and measurements as a result of this major SPE will be discussed in this paper.

  2. Solar radiation transfer in the inhomogeneous atmosphere; Solarer Strahlungstransport in der inhomogenen Atmosphaere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheirer, R.

    2001-07-01

    A most profound knowledge about the radiative characteristics of clouds is required for the development of realistic atmospheric circulation models and cloud remote sensing algorithms. At present, cloud fields are treated extremely simplified in both application areas. Cloud radiative flux parameterizations in atmospheric circulation models as well as the correlation between radiance and cloud properties as required for remote sensing algorithm are usually based on the assumption of plane-parallel homogeneous (PPHOM) clouds. Compared to realistically 3D cloud fields, this simplification leads to large systematic errors. In order to quantify these errors a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model has been developed and applied to 3D cloud fields. The latter origin from the non-hydrostatic 3D atmospheric model GESIMA. Absorption and scattering properties of the cloud particles have been calculated by means of Mie-theory for spherical water droplets and a ray-tracing code for non-spherical ice, rain, and snow particles. Line by line calculations have been used to obtain the absorption properties of the relevant atmospheric gases. (orig.) [German] Die Erstellung realistischer Zirkulationsmodelle der Atmosphaere erfordert unter Anderem eine moeglichst genaue Kenntnis der Strahlungseigenschaften von Wolken. Auch fuer Ableitung und Korrektur von Fernerkundungsalgorithmen sind die Einfluesse der Wolken auf die zu messenden Strahldichten von grosser Bedeutung. In den beiden genannten Anwendungen werden Wolkenfelder zur Zeit nur in stark vereinfachter Weise beruecksichtigt. Parameterisierungen der Strahlungsfluesse bei bewoelkter Atmosphaere in atmosphaerischen Zirkulationsmodellen, sowie die Ableitung der Zusammenhaenge zwischen Strahldichten und optischen Wolkeneigenschaften basieren auf der Annahme von planparallelen und horizontal homogenen Wolken (PPHOM). Diese Approximation kann gegenueber der dreidimensionalen Strahlungstransportberechnung (3D) zu erheblichen Fehlern

  3. A visible solar occultation of Titan's atmosphere from Cassini-VIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aversa, Emiliano; Moriconi, Maria Luisa; Loison, Jean-Christophe; Dobrijevic, Michel; Oliva, Fabrizio; Sindoni, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    The VIMS (Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) instrument on board Cassini spacecraft was able to acquire several stellar and solar occultation measurements of Titan's atmosphere through the mission. VIMS is composed by two separate spectrometers (IR and V channels) covering wavelengths from 0.8 to 5.1 microns and from 0.35 to 1.05 micron respectively. Almost all the aforementioned occultation sequences involved the IR channel, keeping V channel off (see e.g. [1],[2]). In only one case VIMS-V acquired data during a Titan solar occultation and we will report here about the analysis of this data set. This sequence consists of 210 data cubes composed of 32 samples x 32 lines x 96 spectral bins, acquired through the solar entrance port of the VIS channel. The inbound phase of the occultation was registered, hence the Sun gradually disappears with time behind Titan's limb. Although the projected size of the Sun's disk is much smaller than the VIMS 0.5 mrad pixel, the solar signal during occultation is spread over the images mainly because of atmospheric scattering. Hence, a set of 96 occultation light curves, one for each of the 7 nm wide VIMS-V spectral bin, was obtained, by spatial integration over the full field of view. In the extracted light curves four phases can be clearly distinguished at nearly all wavelengths: 1) high constant level, 2) exponential drop, 3) short ledge at low level, 4) polynomial increase. These phases can be interpreted as 1) unocculted solar signal, 2) gas/haze extinction proportional to the atmosphere density, 3) extinction saturation due to thick aerosols layers, 4) solar forward and multiple scattering from dayside atmosphere becoming predominant. The phase 1) data allows estimating the unocculted solar signal average level and its fluctuations, useful to directly calculate the atmospheric transmission profiles. No radiometric calibration is needed in this process, reducing the uncertainties and biases related to it. Geometric

  4. The ancient oxygen exosphere of Mars: Implications for atmosphere evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M. H. G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Nagy, A. F.; Bougher, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    This study involves the calculation, by the 2-stream method of Nagy and Cravens, of 'hot' oxygen exosphere density profiles for 'ancient' atmospheres and ionospheres (e.g., different extreme ultraviolet fluxes) and the associated escaping fluxes. We computed the total production rates above different 'nominal' ionopause altitudes (not taking into account the fact that some will reenter the atmosphere). We do not consider the additional neutral escape due to the sputtering process described by Luhmann and Kozyra. The results presented here thus represent conservative estimations of the neutral escape fluxes, but generous estimates of ion loss rates (except that here we do not consider charge exchange and impact ionization ion production processes). Further work along the lines of Luhmann and Kozyra can lead to estimates of sputtering losses over time and the roles played by impact ionization and charge exchange.

  5. Atmospheric ozone determination by solar occultation using the UV spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikin, A. C.; Woodgate, B.; Smith, H. J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The UV spectrometer polarimeter instrument on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft has been used to measure ozone in the 53-75 km altitude interval by the technique of solar occultation. A 1 x 180 arcsec entrance aperture spectrometer with 0.04-A spectral resolution was employed. Resulting high-quality data are reduced by expressing measured UV attenuation as a Volterra integral equation. Solution of the equation is accomplished by expressing the integral in terms of a series representing the sum of ozone densities contained in concentric shells through tangent points separated by specified altitude increments. Sample ozone vs altitude profiles are presented for the equatorial region. These data show reproducibility to better than 10%. The density at 60 km is 7.3 + or - 0.15 x 10 to the 9th/cu cm for 2.5 deg latitude and longitudes between 81 and 105 deg west in September 1980. Density vs altitude profile exhibits changes in slope between 50 and 75 km.

  6. An analysis of couplings between solar activity and atmospheric opacity at the South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, John E.

    2017-11-01

    A spectral radiometer located at the South Pole has obtained a long-term record of ground-level solar irradiance at wavelengths from 315 to 600 nm. Data acquired during the sunlit periods from 1992 to 2016 provide information on the scattering properties of the atmosphere and their variation covering more than two solar cycles. Prior to the late 1990s the time-integrated solar energy received over an entire observing season, September to March, displayed no organized trend. However, between 1996 and 2000 the irradiances began a decline which persisted through the end of the record. The observations imply a small systematic increase in attenuation at the South Pole, presumably associated with cloudiness, during the current century. The dataset allows a search for links between atmospheric opacity and solar activity. There is no significant correlation between seasonally-integrated irradiances and the 11-year solar cycle as measured by the 10.7 cm radio flux or the ground-level neutron count. On a much shorter timescale, a statistically significant positive relationship exists between the geomagnetic activity index Ap on one day and ground-level irradiance on the following day. Two days that differ in Ap by 10 units are followed by days whose irradiances differ, on average, by about 0.25 ± 0.19% in the wavelength band 400-600 nm. The wavelength dependence of this effect from the near-ultraviolet into the visible is consistent with a small decrease in the optical thickness of tropospheric clouds or of scattering layers at higher altitudes following magnetic disturbances.

  7. Validation of the Earth atmosphere models using the EUV solar occultation data from the CORONAS and PROBA 2 instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemzin, Vladimir; Kuzin, Sergey; Berghmans, David; Pertsov, Andrey; Dominique, Marie; Ulyanov, Artyom; Gaikovich, Konstantin

    Absorption in the atmosphere below 500 km results in attenuation of the solar EUV flux, variation of its spectra and distortion of solar images acquired by solar EUV instruments operating on LEO satellites even on solar synchronous orbits. Occultation measurements are important for planning of solar observations from these satellites, and can be used for monitoring the upper atmosphere as well as for studying its response to the solar activity. We present the results of the occultation measurements of the solar EUV radiation obtained by the CORONAS-F/SPIRIT telescope at high solar activity (2002), by the CORONAS-Photon/TESIS telescope at low activity (2009), and by the SWAP telescope and LYRA radiometer onboard the PROBA 2 satellite at moderate activity (2010). The measured attenuation profiles and the retrieved linear extinction coefficients at the heights 200-500 km are compared with simulations by the NRLMSIS-00 and DTM2013 atmospheric models. It was shown that the results of simulations by the DTM2013 model are well agreed with the data of measurements at all stages of solar activity and in presence of the geomagnetic storm, whereas the results of the NRLMSISE-00 model significantly diverge from the measurements, in particular, at high and low activity. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Programme for Research, Technological Development and Demonstration under Grant Agreement “eHeroes” (project No.284461, www.eheroes.eu).

  8. Plasma Beta Stratification in the Solar Atmosphere: A Possible Explanation for the Penumbra Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdin, Ph.-A.

    2017-12-01

    Plasma beta is an important and fundamental physical quantity in order to understand plasma dynamics, particularly in the context of magnetically active stars, because it tells about the domination of magnetic versus thermodynamic processes on the plasma motion. We estimate the value ranges of plasma beta in different regions within the solar atmosphere and we describe a possible mechanism that helps forming a penumbra. For that we evaluate data from a 3D magnetohydrodynamic model of the solar corona above a magnetically active region. We compare our results with previously established data that is based on magnetic field extrapolations and that was matched for some observations. Our model data suggest that plasma beta in the photosphere should be considered to be larger than unity outside of sunspots. However, in the corona we also find that the beta value range reaches lower than previously thought, which coincides with a recent observation. We present an idea based on a gravity-driven process in a high-beta regime that might be responsible for the formation of the penumbra around sunspot umbra, where the vertical field strength reaches a given threshold. This process would also explain counter-Evershed flows. Regarding the thermal and magnetic pressure within the mixed-polarity solar atmosphere, including non-vertical magnetic field and quiet regions, plasma beta may reach unity at practically any height from the photosphere to the outer corona.

  9. Atmospheric Mining in the Outer Solar System: Resource Capturing, Exploration, and Exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric mining in the outer solar system (AMOSS) has been investigated as a means of fuel production for high-energy propulsion and power. Fusion fuels such as helium 3 (He-3) and hydrogen can be wrested from the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune and either returned to Earth or used in-situ for energy production. 3He and hydrogen (deuterium, etc.) were the primary gases of interest, with hydrogen being the primary propellant for nuclear thermal solid core and gas core rocket-based atmospheric flight. A series of analyses were undertaken to investigate resource capturing aspects of AMOSS. These analyses included the gas capturing rate, storage options, and different methods of direct use of the captured gases. Additional supporting analyses were conducted to illuminate vehicle sizing and orbital transportation issues. While capturing 3He, large amounts of hydrogen and helium 4 (He-4) are produced. With these two additional gases, the potential exists for fueling small and large fleets of additional exploration and exploitation vehicles. Additional aerospacecraft or other aerial vehicles (UAVs, balloons, rockets, etc.) could fly through the outer-planet atmosphere to investigate cloud formation dynamics, global weather, localized storms or other disturbances, wind speeds, the poles, and so forth. Deep-diving aircraft (built with the strength to withstand many atmospheres of pressure) powered by the excess hydrogen or 4He may be designed to probe the higher density regions of the gas giants.

  10. DYNAMO: a Mars upper atmosphere package for investigating solar wind interaction and escape processes, and mapping Martian fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chassefiere, E.; Nagy, A.; Mandea, M.

    2004-01-01

    of periapsis 170 km), and in a lesser extent 2a, offers an unprecedented opportunity to investigate by in situ probing the chemical and dynamical properties of the deep ionosphere, thermosphere, and the interaction between the atmosphere and the solar wind, and therefore the present atmospheric escape rate...

  11. Changes in atmospheric circulation between solar maximum and minimum conditions in winter and summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Nyung

    2008-10-01

    Statistically significant climate responses to the solar variability are found in Northern Annular Mode (NAM) and in the tropical circulation. This study is based on the statistical analysis of numerical simulations with ModelE version of the chemistry coupled Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) and National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis. The low frequency large scale variability of the winter and summer circulation is described by the NAM, the leading Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) of geopotential heights. The newly defined seasonal annular modes and its dynamical significance in the stratosphere and troposphere in the GISS ModelE is shown and compared with those in the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. In the stratosphere, the summer NAM obtained from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis as well as from the ModelE simulations has the same sign throughout the northern hemisphere, but shows greater variability at low latitudes. The patterns in both analyses are consistent with the interpretation that low NAM conditions represent an enhancement of the seasonal difference between the summer and the annual averages of geopotential height, temperature and velocity distributions, while the reverse holds for high NAM conditions. Composite analysis of high and low NAM cases in both the model and observation suggests that the summer stratosphere is more "summer-like" when the solar activity is near a maximum. This means that the zonal easterly wind flow is stronger and the temperature is higher than normal. Thus increased irradiance favors a low summer NAM. A quantitative comparison of the anti-correlation between the NAM and the solar forcing is presented in the model and in the observation, both of which show lower/higher NAM index in solar maximum/minimum conditions. The summer NAM in the troposphere obtained from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis has a dipolar zonal structure with maximum

  12. Multi-wavelength Observations of Two Explosive Events and Their Effects on the Solar Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustinus G. Admiranto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated two flares in the solar atmosphere that occurred on June 3, 2012 and July 6, 2012 and caused propagation of Moreton and EIT waves. In the June 3 event, we noticed a filament winking which presumably was caused by the wave propagation from the flare. An interesting feature of this event is that there was a reflection of this wave by a coronal hole located alongside the wave propagation, but not all of this wave was transmitted by the coronal hole. Using the running difference method, we calculated the speed of Moreton and EIT waves and we found values of 926 km/s before the reflection and 276 km/s after the reflection (Moreton wave and 1,127 km/s before the reflection and 46 km/s after the reflection (EIT wave. In the July 6 event, this phenomenon was accompanied by type II and type III solar radio bursts, and we also performed a running difference analysis to find the speed of the Moreton wave, obtaining a value of 988 km/s. The speed derived from the analysis of the solar radio burst was 1,200 km/s, and we assume that this difference was caused by the different nature of the motions in these phenomena, where the solar radio burst was caused by the propagating particles, not waves.

  13. Paleozoic Atmospheric CO2: Importance of Solar Radiation and Plant Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, R A

    1993-07-02

    Changes in solar radiation, as it affects the rate of weathering of silicates on the continents, and other changes involving weathering and the degassing of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) have been included in a long-term carbon-cycle model. These additions to the model show that the major controls on CO(2) concentrations during the Paleozoic era were solar and biological, and not tectonic, in origin. The model predictions agree with independent estimates of a large mid-Paleozoic (400 to 320 million years ago) drop in CO(2) concentrations, which led to large-scale glaciation. This agreement indicates that variations in the atmospheric greenhouse effect were important in global climate change during the distant geologic past.

  14. Heating Mechanisms in the Low Solar Atmosphere through Magnetic Reconnection in Current Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Lei; Lin, Jun; Roussev, Ilia I.; Schmieder, Brigitte

    2016-12-01

    We simulate several magnetic reconnection processes in the low solar chromosphere/photosphere; the radiation cooling, heat conduction and ambipolar diffusion are all included. Our numerical results indicate that both the high temperature (≳8 × 104 K) and low temperature (˜104 K) magnetic reconnection events can happen in the low solar atmosphere (100-600 km above the solar surface). The plasma β controlled by plasma density and magnetic fields is one important factor to decide how much the plasma can be heated up. The low temperature event is formed in a high β magnetic reconnection process, Joule heating is the main mechanism to heat plasma and the maximum temperature increase is only several thousand Kelvin. The high temperature explosions can be generated in a low β magnetic reconnection process, slow and fast-mode shocks attached at the edges of the well developed plasmoids are the main physical mechanisms to heat the plasma from several thousand Kelvin to over 8 × 104 K. Gravity in the low chromosphere can strongly hinder the plasmoid instability and the formation of slow-mode shocks in a vertical current sheet. Only small secondary islands are formed; these islands, however, are not as well developed as those in the horizontal current sheets. This work can be applied to understand the heating mechanism in the low solar atmosphere and could possibly be extended to explain the formation of common low temperature Ellerman bombs (˜104 K) and the high temperature Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) bombs (≳8 × 104) in the future.

  15. Diversity in solar photovoltaic energy: Implications for innovation and policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subtil Lacerda, J.; van den Bergh, J.C.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    We undertake a qualitative empirical study of the solar photovoltaic (PV) industry in order to investigate the role of diversity in stimulating innovation and diffusion. Based on evolutionary-economic concepts, we identify the main dimensions and components of diversity in the solar PV industry.

  16. Non-LTE profiles of the Al I autoionization lines. [for solar model atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, G. D.; Jefferies, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    A non-LTE formulation is given for the transfer of radiation in the autoionizing lines of neutral aluminum at 1932 and 1936 A through both the Bilderberg and Harvard-Smithsonian model atmospheres. Numerical solutions for the common source function of these lines and their theoretical line profiles are calculated and compared with the corresponding LTE profiles. The results show that the non-LTE profiles provide a better match with the observations. They also indicate that the continuous opacity of the standard solar models should be increased in this wavelength region if the center-limb variations of observed and theoretical profiles of these lines are to be in reasonable agreement.

  17. Science on Spacelab. [astronomy, high energy astrophysics, life sciences, and solar, atmospheric and space physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerling, E. R.

    1977-01-01

    Spacelab was developed by the European Space Agency for the conduction of scientific and technological experiments in space. Spacelab can be taken into earth orbit by the Space Shuttle and returned to earth after a period of 1-3 weeks. The Spacelab modular system of pallets, pressurized modules, and racks can contain large payloads with high power and telemetry requirements. A working group has defined the 'Atmospheres, Magnetospheres, and Plasmas-in-Space' project. The project objectives include the absolute measurement of solar flux in a number of carefully selected bands at the same time at which atmospheric measurements are made. NASA is committed to the concept that the scientist is to play a key role in its scientific programs.

  18. Atmospheric Mining in the Outer Solar System: Outer Planet Orbital Transfer and Lander Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric mining in the outer solar system has been investigated as a means of fuel production for high energy propulsion and power. Fusion fuels such as Helium 3 (3He) and deuterium can be wrested from the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune and either returned to Earth or used in-situ for energy production. Helium 3 and deuterium were the primary gases of interest with hydrogen being the primary propellant for nuclear thermal solid core and gas core rocket-based atmospheric flight. A series of analyses were undertaken to investigate resource capturing aspects of atmospheric mining in the outer solar system. This included the gas capturing rate, storage options, and different methods of direct use of the captured gases. While capturing 3He, large amounts of hydrogen and 4He are produced. Analyses of orbital transfer vehicles (OTVs), landers, and the issues with in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) mining factories are included. Preliminary observations are presented on near-optimal selections of moon base orbital locations, OTV power levels, and OTV and lander rendezvous points. For analyses of round trip OTV flights from Uranus to Miranda or Titania, a 10- Megawatt electric (MWe) OTV power level and a 200 metricton (MT) lander payload were selected based on a relative short OTV trip time and minimization of the number of lander flights. A similar optimum power level is suggested for OTVs flying from low orbit around Neptune to Thalassa or Triton. Several moon base sites at Uranus and Neptune and the OTV requirements to support them are also addressed.

  19. Remote monitoring of electroencephalogram, electrocardiogram, and behavior during controlled atmosphere stunning in broilers: Implications for welfare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, A.M.L.; Lankhaar, J.A.C.; Lowe, J.C.; McKeegan, D.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the welfare implications of euthanizing broilers with 3 gas mixtures relevant to the commercial application of controlled atmosphere stunning (CAS). Birds were implanted/equipped with electrodes to measure brain activity (electroencephalogram, EEG) and heart rate. These signals

  20. Galileo probe measurements of thermal and solar radiation fluxes in the Jovian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sromovsky, L. A.; Collard, A. D.; Fry, P. M.; Orton, G. S.; Lemmon, M. T.; Tomasko, M. G.; Freedman, R. S.

    1998-09-01

    The Galileo probe net flux radiometer (NFR) measured radiation fluxes in Jupiter's atmosphere from about 0.44 to 14 bars, using five spectral channels to separate solar and thermal components. Onboard calibration results confirm that the NFR responded to radiation approximately as expected. NFR channels also responded to a superimposed thermal perturbation, which can be approximately removed using blind channel measurements and physical constraints. Evidence for the expected NH3 cloud was seen in the spectral character of spin-induced modulations of the direct solar beam signals. These results are consistent with an overlying cloud of small NH3 ice particles (0.5-0.75 μm in radius) of optical depth 1.5-2 at 0.5 μm. Such a cloud would have so little effect on thermal fluxes that NFR thermal channels provide no additional constraints on its properties. However, evidence for heating near 0.45 bar in the NFR thermal channels would seem to require either an additional opacity source beyond this small-particle cloud, implying a heterogeneous cloud structure to avoid conflicts with solar modulation results, or a change in temperature lapse rate just above the probe measurements. The large thermal flux levels imply water vapor mixing ratios that are only 6% of solar at 10 bars, but possibly increasing with depth, and significantly subsaturated ammonia at pressures less than 3 bars. If deep NH3 mixing ratios at the probe entry site are 3-4 times ground-based inferences, as suggested by probe radio signal attenuation, then only half as much water is needed to match NFR observations. No evidence of a water cloud was seen near the 5-bar level. The 5-μm thermal channel detected the presumed NH4SH cloud base near 1.35 bars. Effects of this cloud were also seen in the solar channel upflux measurements but not in the solar net fluxes, implying that the cloud is a conservative scatterer of sunlight. The minor thermal signature of this cloud is compatible with particle radii near

  1. Atmospheric sulphuric acid and aerosol formation: implications from atmospheric measurements for nucleation and early growth mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-L. Sihto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the formation and early growth of atmospheric secondary aerosol particles building on atmospheric measurements. The measurements were part of the QUEST 2 campaign which took place in spring 2003 in Hyytiälä (Finland. During the campaign numerous aerosol particle formation events occurred of which 15 were accompanied by gaseous sulphuric acid measurements. Our detailed analysis of these 15 events is focussed on nucleation and early growth (to a diameter of 3 nm of fresh particles. It revealed that new particle formation seems to be a function of the gaseous sulphuric acid concentration to the power from one to two when the time delay between the sulphuric acid and particle number concentration is taken into account. From the time delay the growth rates of freshly nucleated particles from 1 nm to 3 nm were determined. The mean growth rate was 1.2 nm/h and it was clearly correlated with the gaseous sulphuric acid concentration. We tested two nucleation mechanisms – recently proposed cluster activation and kinetic type nucleation – as possible candidates to explain the observed dependences, and determined experimental nucleation coefficients. We found that some events are dominated by the activation mechanism and some by the kinetic mechanism. Inferred coefficients for the two nucleation mechanisms are the same order of magnitude as chemical reaction coefficients in the gas phase and they correlate with the product of gaseous sulphuric acid and ammonia concentrations. This indicates that besides gaseous sulphuric acid also ammonia has a role in nucleation.

  2. Small-scale heating events in the solar atmosphere. II. Lifetime, total energy, and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, N.; Haberreiter, M.; Hansteen, V.; Schmutz, W.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Small-scale heating events (SSHEs) are believed to play a fundamental role in understanding the process responsible for heating of the solar corona, the pervading redshifts in the transition region, and the acceleration of spicules. Aims: We determine the properties of the SSHEs and the atmospheric response to them in 3D magnetohydrodynamics (3D-MHD) simulations of the solar atmosphere. Methods: We developed a method for identifying and following SSHEs over their lifetime, and applied it to two simulation models. We identified the locations where the energy dissipation is greatest inside the SSHEs volume, and we traced the SSHEs by following the spatial and temporal evolution of the maximum energy dissipation inside the SSHEs volume. Results: The method is effective in following the SSHEs. We can determine their lifetime, total energy, and properties of the plasma, as well as the magnetic field orientation in the vicinity of the SSHEs. Conclusions: We determine that the SSHEs that have the potential to heat the corona live less than 4 min, and typically the energy they release ranges from 1020 to 1024 erg. In addition, the directional change of the field lines on the two sides of the current sheet constituting the SSHEs ranges from 5° to 15° at the moment of the absolute maximum energy dissipation.

  3. The role of aerosol absorption in solar dimming over East Asia and its implications for regional climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Yi; Persad, Geeta; Ramaswamy, Venkatachalam

    2014-05-01

    Surface-based observations have identified statistically significant trends in clear-sky surface solar radiation (SSR) over South and East Asia since the 1960s. The trends are generally negative, indicating a reduction in clear-sky SSR or a "dimming." The dimming is strongly driven by aerosol emissions over the region, but little work has been done to quantify the particular aerosol mechanisms that produce the trend or the contribution to the surface values from aerosol absorption within the atmospheric column. The redistribution of shortwave radiation that these aerosol effects imply has the potential to significantly impact regional circulation and precipitation. We conduct experiments over East Asia in two generations of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's Atmospheric General Circulation Model, AM2.1 and AM3, in order to analyze the characteristics of the SSR trends that the models produce and to understand the particular aerosol mechanisms responsible. AM2.1 and AM3 have significantly different aerosol treatments, including differences in aerosol mixing and interactivity with model meteorology. We use the models' standalone radiation module to analyze how various aerosol characteristics in the two models (such as aerosol mixing state, hygroscopicity, and seasonal distribution) contribute to the trends produced. We find that the two models produce similar trends in clear-sky SSR, comparable to the observed trend, but via significantly different aerosol mechanisms with different regional climate implications. Both models' dimming trends, however, are strongly driven by increased aerosol absorption since 1960. The implications of this redistribution of solar heating between the surface and atmosphere for Asia's regional climate will be discussed.

  4. Calculated resonance line profiles of [Mg II], [C II], and [Si IV] in the solar atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avrett, E.; McKillop, S. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Landi, E. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph space mission, launched 2013 June 27, is intended to study the structure of the solar chromosphere and the transition region between the chromosphere and corona. The spectral lines to be observed include the Mg II k line at 2796.5 Å, the C II 1334.5 Å line, and the Si IV line at 1393.8 Å, which are formed in the middle chromosphere, the upper chromosphere, and the lower transition region, respectively. Here we calculate the profiles of these lines from four models of the solar atmosphere, intended to represent the faint and mean internetwork, a network lane, and bright network. We show how the profiles change from the center of the solar disk toward the limb of the Sun and in response to outflows and inflows. These results are intended to cover the range of expected quiet-Sun observations and assist in their interpretation. We expect that the observations will lead to improvements in the models, which can then be used to estimate the required non-radiative heating in the different regions.

  5. On a possible nature of cross-shaped zebra patterns occasionally observed in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseeva, Liliya; Kshevetskii, Sergey P.

    The currently available detailed images of the Sun sometimes exhibit the presence of unusual clear-cut small-scale features. Mass media suggest an interpretation of these as "artificial objects'' that emerge near the Sun. Various shapes of such structures were observed. In particular, as found by solar physicists, dark circular areas may be prominences or chromospheric magnetic tornados viewed along their axes. Star-shaped structures, with thin rays of varyious lengths and different angles apart, may be associated with the pattern of decay of a cosmic particle entering the solar atmosphere. Cross-shaped sructures consisting of two perpendicular straight segments with alternating dark and light strips were also noted. Based on our numerical experiments, we show here that such a cruciform zebra pattern can emerge in the contact zone of oppositely directed magnetic fields as a result of a pinch instability at its nonlinear development stage. We numerically solve a self-consistent initial-value problem for the nonlinear two-dimensional (planar) system of MHD equations for a collisional plasma in a horizontal magnetic field taking into both the account electric and thermal conduction. The plasma is assumed to be initially motionless at a temperature of 50 000 K. The computation domain is 300 km high and 4200 km long. The cruciform zebra pattern emerges as a transient phenomena before the erosion of the magnetic-fields contact zone if the initial magnetic field is not very strong, so that the nonlinear development of the pinch effect is not very rapid. In our case, this occurred if the characteristic gas pressure at the above-mentioned temperature exceeded the initial magnetic pressure by a factor of two or more. If waves and instabilitied are able to make the plasma effectiively collisional, our inferences can be applied to more rarefied regions of the solar atmosphere. This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project no 12-02-00792-a).

  6. The New Solar System: China’s Evolving Solar Industry and Its Implications for Competitive Solar Power in the United States and the World

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, Jeffrey [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Reicher, Dan [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Sun, Xiaojing [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Pollock, Caitlin [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2017-03-08

    Solar power is undergoing a revolution. Over the past decade, an energy source as old as the planet and theoretically all but limitless has plummeted in cost and begun in some places to be harnessed in large volume. This dynamic is disrupting the modern energy system and, as energy disruptions always do, rattling the geopolitical order. In the process, the industry that produces the equipment to convert sunlight into electricity is simultaneously reeling, consolidating, and surging. These twin transformations—one of the global energy system, one of the global solar industry—carry profound implications for national economies and for the planet. At the center of both transformations sits China. The New Solar System illuminates key and little- understood changes that are remaking the solar enterprise—in China and thus in the world. Based on this analysis, it recommends changes in U.S. solar policy—particularly timely with a new U.S. administration and Congress—that would put solar power on a more economically sensible path toward environmentally significant growth. The New Solar System does not seek to enable any country to beat another in the global solar industry. It seeks instead to help all countries find their most effective places. By better understanding and playing to their comparative strengths in the solar business, countries would achieve two key objectives. They would reduce the cost for the world of scaling up solar power. And they would be better positioned to fashion policies that maximized the long-term benefit to their own economies from solar’s global growth.

  7. Regional sources of atmospheric formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, and implications for atmospheric modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecken, D. J.; Hutzell, W. T.; Strum, M. L.; Pouliot, G. A.

    2012-02-01

    Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentrations over the Eastern half of the United States are simulated with a 3-D air quality model to identify the most important chemical precursors under January and July conditions. We find that both aldehydes primarily result from photochemical production, although 25% or more result from direct emissions in urban areas during winter. Isoprene is the major precursor of formaldehyde in most areas during summer, contributing 20-60% of total production, with the magnitude being spatially variable. Other alkenes from anthropogenic and/or biogenic emissions dominate formaldehyde production in winter, contributing 60-85% of total formation, and are prominent contributors in summer. Alkenes, including biogenic alkenes, dominate acetaldehyde production during both seasons. These conclusions are based on the degradation of emitted VOCs described by the SAPRC07TB chemical mechanism, but even this detailed model has difficulty reproducing observed values better than a factor of 2. The substantial role of isoprene and other alkenes in aldehyde formation emphasizes that we examine and improve emission estimates of these compounds. Until we can estimate the emissions and understand the chemistry of VOC precursors to aldehyde formation with greater certainty, it will be difficult to accurately predict atmospheric concentrations of aldehydes and develop strategies to reduce their concentrations.

  8. GENERATION OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN LOW SOLAR ATMOSPHERIC FLUX TUBES BY PHOTOSPHERIC MOTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mumford, S. J.; Fedun, V.; Erdélyi, R., E-mail: s.mumford@sheffield.ac.uk [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), School of Mathematics and Statistics, The University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH UK (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-20

    Recent ground- and space-based observations reveal the presence of small-scale motions between convection cells in the solar photosphere. In these regions, small-scale magnetic flux tubes are generated via the interaction of granulation motion and the background magnetic field. This paper studies the effects of these motions on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave excitation from broadband photospheric drivers. Numerical experiments of linear MHD wave propagation in a magnetic flux tube embedded in a realistic gravitationally stratified solar atmosphere between the photosphere and the low choromosphere (above β = 1) are performed. Horizontal and vertical velocity field drivers mimic granular buffeting and solar global oscillations. A uniform torsional driver as well as Archimedean and logarithmic spiral drivers mimic observed torsional motions in the solar photosphere. The results are analyzed using a novel method for extracting the parallel, perpendicular, and azimuthal components of the perturbations, which caters to both the linear and non-linear cases. Employing this method yields the identification of the wave modes excited in the numerical simulations and enables a comparison of excited modes via velocity perturbations and wave energy flux. The wave energy flux distribution is calculated to enable the quantification of the relative strengths of excited modes. The torsional drivers primarily excite Alfvén modes (≈60% of the total flux) with small contributions from the slow kink mode, and, for the logarithmic spiral driver, small amounts of slow sausage mode. The horizontal and vertical drivers primarily excite slow kink or fast sausage modes, respectively, with small variations dependent upon flux surface radius.

  9. Solar cosmic ray effects in atmospheric chemistry evidenced from ground- based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumilov, O.; Kasatkina, E.; Turyansky, V.

    Solar protons with a relatively soft energy spectrum (E450 MeV) of Ground Level Event (GLE) type can penetrate below 30 km and cause neutron flow enhancement detected by ground-based neutron monitors. Atmospheric effects of such high-energy particles seem to be more pronounced and appeared variations of total content of some atmospheric parameters that can be detected by ground-based devices. It was shown earlier that some GLEs cause considerable ozone total content decreases (up to 25%), or so-called ozone "miniholes" at high latitudes. This work presents ground-based measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) total content made at Murmansk, Kola Peninsula (corrected geomagnetic latitude: 64.8) during and after GLE of 2 May 1998. Nitrogen dioxide was measured by zenith viewing spectrophotometer in wavelength region between 435-450 nm. An increase (about of 20%) in total column of NO2 has been recorded after 2 May 1998 GLE by this facility. Model calculations based on gas phase photochemical theory quantitatively agree with observations. In addition to satellite measurements the information obtained by ground-based devices will be helpful to study atmospheric effects of cosmic ray events. This work was supported by the RFBR grants 01-05-64850 and 01-05-26226).

  10. Influence of the Atmospheric Mass on the High Energy Cosmic Ray Muons during a Solar Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Maghrabi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate of the detected cosmic ray muons depends on the atmospheric mass, height of pion production level, and temperature. Corrections for the changes in these parameters are importance to know the properties of the primary cosmic rays. In this paper, the effect of atmospheric mass, represented here by the atmospheric pressure, on the cosmic ray was studied using data from the KACST muon detector during the 2002–2012 period. The analysis was conducted by calculating the barometric coefficient (α using regression analysis between the two parameters. The variation of α over different time scales was investigated. The results revealed a seasonal cycle of α with a maximum in September and a minimum in March. Data from Adelaide muon detector were used, and different monthly variation was found. The barometric coefficient displays considerable variability at the interannual scale. Study of the annual variations of α indicated cyclic variation with maximums between 2008 and 2009 and minimums between 2002 and 2003. This variable tendency is found to be anticorrelated with the solar activity, represented by the sunspot number. This finding was compared with the annual trend of α for the Adelaide muon detector for the same period of time, and a similar trend was found.

  11. Atmospheric Processing of Perovskite Solar Cells Using Intense Pulsed Light Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankireddy, Krishnamraju; Lavery, Brandon W.; Druffel, Thad

    2018-02-01

    Atmospheric processing of metal-organic halide perovskite materials is highly desirable for large-scale manufacturing of solar cells. Atmospheric deposition and thermal processing of perovskite thin films for photovoltaic applications facilitated via rapid intense pulsed light (IPL) processing have been carried out. The interplay between the deposition chemistry, process, and IPL parameters to produce a functional photoactive thin film is discussed. Further addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as functional surfactant is explored to influence grain growth during the IPL process. Structural analysis by x-ray diffraction revealed formation of mixed-phase perovskite crystals from methylammonium chloride and lead iodide precursors. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy indicated that the light absorption by the perovskite films lay within a narrow band of the visible spectrum with bandgap of 2.9 eV. Scanning electron microscopy characterization of the surface morphology of the perovskite films revealed that addition of PVP to the ink chemistry assisted the IPL process in forming a fully covered surface with clearly defined grains. Functional devices with perovskite thin film processed by IPL under fully atmospheric conditions were demonstrated.

  12. Atmospheric Processing of Perovskite Solar Cells Using Intense Pulsed Light Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankireddy, Krishnamraju; Lavery, Brandon W.; Druffel, Thad

    2017-11-01

    Atmospheric processing of metal-organic halide perovskite materials is highly desirable for large-scale manufacturing of solar cells. Atmospheric deposition and thermal processing of perovskite thin films for photovoltaic applications facilitated via rapid intense pulsed light (IPL) processing have been carried out. The interplay between the deposition chemistry, process, and IPL parameters to produce a functional photoactive thin film is discussed. Further addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as functional surfactant is explored to influence grain growth during the IPL process. Structural analysis by x-ray diffraction revealed formation of mixed-phase perovskite crystals from methylammonium chloride and lead iodide precursors. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy indicated that the light absorption by the perovskite films lay within a narrow band of the visible spectrum with bandgap of 2.9 eV. Scanning electron microscopy characterization of the surface morphology of the perovskite films revealed that addition of PVP to the ink chemistry assisted the IPL process in forming a fully covered surface with clearly defined grains. Functional devices with perovskite thin film processed by IPL under fully atmospheric conditions were demonstrated.

  13. Implications of solar energy alternatives for community design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, A.; Steinitz, C.

    1980-06-01

    A graduate-level studio at the Harvard School of Design explored how a policy of solar-based energy independence will influence the design of a new community of approximately 4500 housing units and other uses. Three large sites outside Tucson (a cooling problem), Atlanta (a humidity problem), and Boston (a heating problem) were selected. Each is typical of its region. A single program was assumed and designed for. Each site had two teams, one following a compact approach and one following a more dispersed approach. Each was free to choose the most appropriate mix of (solar) technology and scale, and was free to integrate energy and community in the design as it saw fit. These choice and integration issues are key areas where our experience may be of interest to those involved in community design and solar energy.

  14. Solar variability and its implications for the human environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, G. C.

    1999-01-01

    Solar variability can affect human activities in a variety of ways, from changing our climate to disrupting power distribution facilities and shortening the orbital lifetime of satellites. This tutorial paper will be concerned only with effects on the surface environment that can have a direct impact on our everyday life, such as variations in the stratospheric ozone layer that shields us from harmful ultraviolet radiation, and changes in global climate that can hinder or delay the detection of climate changes that might result from our own technological activities. The emphasis is on potential mechanisms, rather than on reported correlations between solar and terrestrial parameters, but reference to certain observations will be made. Realization of a potential impact of solar variability on our local environment has progressed a long way in the last few decades, from denial to partial acceptance, but a complete assessment of its reality and magnitude remains a distant goal.

  15. Atmospheric electric field anomalies associated with solar flare/coronal mass ejection events and solar energetic charged particle "Ground Level Events"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasatkina, E. A.; Shumilov, O. I.; Rycroft, M. J.; Marcz, F.; Frank-Kamenetsky, A. V.

    2009-10-01

    We discuss the fair weather atmospheric electric field signatures of three major solar energetic charged particle events which occurred in on 15 April 2001, 18 April and 4 November, and their causative solar flares/coronal mass ejections (SF/CMEs). Only the 15 April 2001 shows clear evidence for Ez variation associated to SF/CME events and the other two events may support this hypothesis as well although for them the meteorological data were not available. All three events seem to be associated with relativistic solar protons (i.e. protons with energies >450 MeV) of the Ground Level Event (GLE) type. The study presents data on variations of the vertical component of the atmospheric electric field (Ez) measured at the auroral station Apatity (geomagnetic latitude: 63.8°, the polar cap station Vostok (geomagnetic latitude: -89.3°) and the middle latitude stations Voyeikovo (geomagnetic latitude: 56.1°) and Nagycenk (geomagnetic latitude: 47.2°). A significant disturbance in the atmospheric electric field is sometimes observed close to the time of the causative solar flare; the beginning of the electric field perturbation at Apatity is detected one or two hours before the flare onset and the GLE onset. Atmospheric electric field records at Vostok and Voyeikovo show a similar disturbance at the same time for the 15 April 2001 event. Some mechanisms responsible for the electric field perturbations are considered.

  16. Complex Permittivity Model of Venus Atmosphere and Implications for Design of Imaging Altimeter and INSAR Orbiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, X.; Moghaddam, M.; Smrekar, S.; Wenkert, D.; Jordan, R.

    2008-12-01

    To design altimeter and interferometric SAR (InSAR) systems for measuring Venus' topography, the effects of Venus' atmosphere on the signals need to be investigated. These radar systems are envisioned to operate at X-band, and therefore, a model of Venus atmosphere permittivity profile at X-band is required and has been developed in this work. The effect of signal propagation through this atmosphere and its implication in designing the altimeter and the InSAR instruments are also investigated. The model was constructed for the complex dielectric constant of the atmosphere. Using relations between permittivity and polarization of polar material, the real part of the atmosphere dielectric constant was obtained by calculating the total polarization of the mixture of known atmospheric components including CO2, N2, H2O, SO2, H2SO4, CO, and OCS. The contribution of each atmospheric component to the mixture polarization was calculated based on given temperatures and component densities in the mixture. For each atmospheric component, the polarization was modeled as a function of frequency, temperature, and pressure based on available information in literature. Imaginary part of the atmospheric dielectric constant was calculated by superposing the measured absorptions of mixture components. The temperature and pressure dependences of absorption of each component were modeled according to measurement data and published information. Hence, based on several datasets inferred or directly measured from previous explorations of Venus, the complex dielectric constant profile has been constructed. The validity of the atmosphere permittivity model has been verified by comparing simulation results with measurement data of Venus atmosphere, e.g., from nadir refractivity and absorption measured by the Magellan mission for a portion of the profile. Using this simulated dielectric constant profile, the X-band electromagnetic wave propagation in Venus atmosphere has been modeled, in

  17. 1D Atmosphere Models from Inversion of Fe i 630 nm Observations with an Application to Solar Irradiance Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristaldi, Alice; Ermolli, Ilaria

    2017-06-01

    Present-day semi-empirical models of solar irradiance (SI) variations reconstruct SI changes measured on timescales greater than a day by using spectra computed in one dimensional atmosphere models (1D models), which are representative of various solar surface features. Various recent studies have pointed out, however, that the spectra synthesized in 1D models do not reflect the radiative emission of the inhomogenous atmosphere revealed by high-resolution solar observations. We aimed to derive observation-based atmospheres from such observations and test their accuracy for SI estimates. We analyzed spectropolarimetric data of the Fe i 630 nm line pair in photospheric regions that are representative of the granular quiet-Sun pattern (QS) and of small- and large-scale magnetic features, both bright and dark with respect to the QS. The data were taken on 2011 August 6, with the CRisp Imaging Spectropolarimeter at the Swedish Solar Telescope, under excellent seeing conditions. We derived atmosphere models of the observed regions from data inversion with the SIR code. We studied the sensitivity of results to spatial resolution and temporal evolution, and discuss the obtained atmospheres with respect to several 1D models. The atmospheres derived from our study agree well with most of the 1D models we compare our results with, both qualitatively and quantitatively (within 10%), except for pore regions. Spectral synthesis computations of the atmosphere obtained from the QS observations return an SI between 400 and 2400 nm that agrees, on average, within 2.2% with standard reference measurements, and within -0.14% with the SI computed on the QS atmosphere employed by the most advanced semi-empirical model of SI variations.

  18. Solar/Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottman, Gary J.; Woods, Thomas N.; London, Julius; Ayres, Thomas R.

    2003-01-01

    A final report on the operational activities related to the UARS Solar Stellar irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) is presented. Scientific activities of SOLSTICE has also been supported. The UARS SOLSTICE originated at the University of Colorado in 1981. One year after the UARS launch in 1991, the operations and research support activities for SOLSTICE were moved to the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The SOLSTICE program continued at HAO with the National Science Foundation, and after four years, it was moved once again back to the University of Colorado. At the University after 1997 this subject grant was issued to further extend the operations activities from July 2001 through September 2002. Although this is a final report for one particular activity, in fact the SOLSTICE operations activity -first at the University, then at HAO, and now again at the University -has continued in a seamless fashion.

  19. Highlights from the First Ever Demographic Study of Solar Physics, Space Physics, and Upper Atmospheric Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldwin, M.; Morrow, C. A.; White, S. C.; Ivie, R.

    2014-12-01

    Members of the Education & Workforce Working Group and the American Institute of Physics (AIP) conducted the first ever National Demographic Survey of working professionals for the 2012 National Academy of Sciences Solar and Space Physics Decadal Survey to learn about the demographics of this sub-field of space science. The instrument contained questions for participants on: the type of workplace; basic demographic information regarding gender and minority status, educational pathways (discipline of undergrad degree, field of their PhD), how their undergraduate and graduate student researchers are funded, participation in NSF and NASA funded spaceflight missions and suborbital programs, and barriers to career advancement. Using contact data bases from AGU, the American Astronomical Society's Solar Physics Division (AAS-SPD), attendees of NOAA's Space Weather Week and proposal submissions to NSF's Atmospheric, Geospace Science Division, the AIP's Statistical Research Center cross correlated and culled these data bases resulting in 2776 unique email addresses of US based working professionals. The survey received 1305 responses (51%) and generated 125 pages of single space answers to a number of open-ended questions. This talk will summarize the highlights of this first-ever demographic survey including findings extracted from the open-ended responses regarding barriers to career advancement which showed significant gender differences.

  20. Update of GALLEX solar neutrino results and implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirsten, T. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    1995-01-01

    The galliumchloride detector operated by the GALLEX-collaboration in the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory responds primarily to pp-neutrinos. They are produced in the primary fusion reaction of hydrogen into deuterium and directly coupled to the solar luminosity. Standard Solar Models predict ca. 58% of the total signal expected in GALLEX (123-132 SNU) to be due to pp-neutrinos. The relative pp-neutrino dominance becomes even larger if the deficit of higher energy neutrinos (as observed in the Homestake- and Kamiokande experiments) is considered. During the first data taking period, 15 solar runs had been performed within the exposure period 14.5.1991 - 29.4.1992. The result, 81 {+-} 17 {+-} 9 SNU provided the first experimental evidence for pp-neutrinos from the Sun. At the same time, it confirmed the depression of higher energy neutrino fluxes relative to the model predictions. Here the authors report the results of 15 more solar neutrino runs, covering the period 19.8.92 - 13.10.93. They obtain 78 {+-} 13 {+-} 5 SNU. Evaluated together, the result for all 30 runs is 79 {+-} 10 {+-} 6 SNU. While the SNU rate of GALLEX I is well reproduced the statistical error has been reduced so substantially that a value of signal +2{sigma} is required to accommodate not only pp-and pep- but also the {sup 7}Be-neutrino induced {sup 71}Ge-production. Contrary, the fate of {sup 8}B-neutrinos has only little discernible effect on the GALLEX data. In conclusion, with the present errors GALLEX constitutes a 2.5 {sigma} problem for {sup 7}Be neutrinos within the frame of {open_quotes}astrophysical{close_quotes} solutions. Alternatively, the particle physics solution (MSW-effect) can consistently explain all available solar neutrino results, leading to a most probable mass scale with the muon-neutrino at approximately 3 meV (milli-eV). However, since the GALLEX result allows the presence of pp and pep neutrinos at full strength. the latter explanation of the data is not forced.

  1. Lunar-solar tide effects in the Earth's crust and atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adushkin, V. V.; Riabova, S. A.; Spivak, A. A.

    2017-07-01

    The gravitational interaction in the Earth-Moon-Sun system is considered from the standpoint of influencing the formation of time variations in the geophysical fields and some natural processes. The analysis of the results of instrumental observations revealed the main periodicities and cycles in the time variations of subsoil radon volumetric activity with the same periods as the vertical component of the variations of the tidal force. The amplitude modulation of seismic noise by the lunar-solar tide is demonstrated. It is shown that the intensity of relaxation processes in the Earth's crust has a near-diurnal periodicity, whereas the spectrum of groundwater level fluctuations includes clearly expressed tidal waves. Based on the data on the tilts of the Earth's surface, the role of tidal deformation in the formation of the block motions in the Earth's crust is analyzed. A new approach is suggested for identifying tidal waves in the atmosphere by analyzing micropulsations of the atmospheric pressure with the use of adaptive rejection filters.

  2. Mass matrix ansatz for degenerate neutrinos consistent with solar and atmospheric neutrino data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyungsik; Kang, Sin Kyu; Kim, Jihn E.; Ko, Pyungwon

    1998-12-01

    We suggest mass matrices for neutrinos and charged leptons that can explain solar and atmospheric neutrino data. The resulting flavor mixing matrix Vν has a property that (Vν)13=0, thus making νeνμ and νμντ oscillations to be effectively a two-channel problem. Phenomenological consequences of the lepton mass matrix ansatze are consistent with the current data on various type of neutrino oscillation experiments except the LSND measurement. Three neutrinos, being almost degenerate with ∑mνiconflict with the constraint from neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. The νμντ oscillation, sin22θμτ, is predicted to be 0.86-0.97 with Δm2μτ~=2x10-3 eV2, which is consistent with the atmospheric neutrino data and can be tested further at the planned MINOS and K2K experiments searching for νμ-->ντ oscillation.

  3. Total solar eclipse of 16 February 1980 and the vertical profiles of atmospheric parameters in the lowest 200M

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshBabu, V.; Sastry, J.S.

    Vertical profiles of air temperature, wind and humidity at Raichur (16 degrees 12'N and 77 degrees 21'E) in the lowest 200m of the atmosphere are presented for the period 15-18 February 1980. The effect of the total solar eclipse, on 16 February...

  4. The impact of solar flares and magnetic storms on the Earth's atmospheric electrical parameters and VLF electromagnetic waves propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasheninnikov, Alexey; Poklad, Yuri; Rybakov, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Boris; Ermak, Vladimir; Ryakhovskiy, Ilya; Soloviev, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    Changes in solar activity lead to fluctuations in the speed of the solar wind, the appearance of cosmic rays flare and perturbations of the interplanetary magnetic field. Streams of solar cosmic rays directly alter profile of the atmospheric ionization rate and modulate the flux of galactic cosmic rays penetrating into the atmosphere. Changes in the conduction profile lead to increased atmospheric electric field at altitudes of 15 km and below, where formed and electrified clouds. In addition, the change in resistance of the air column above the thunderstorm generators of the global electric circuit leads to a change in the potential difference between the surface of the Earth and the ionosphere. The "Mikhnevo" observatory near Moscow, Russia carried out monitoring measurements of amplitude and phase characteristics of VLF radio signals, the near surface electric field and the vertical current of the atmosphere. Variation of the electric field and currents modulated by solar flares were revealed. The effect of the temporary increase in the electrical parameters noticeable on smooth curves. During strong magnetic storm of March 17, 2015 perturbation of amplitudes and the phases of VLF radio signals were recorded that associated with the disturbance D-layer of the ionosphere on the paths of radio signals propagation. Analysis of the amplitude and phase characteristics of the VLF radio signals for the 2014-2016 has showed perturbations during geomagnetic storms and substorms with Kp=7 or below. Such perturbations are usually have local or regional character.

  5. Solar radiation absorption in the atmosphere due to water and ice clouds: Sensitivity experiments with plane-parallel clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautier, C. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    One cloud radiation issue that has been troublesome for several decades is the absorption of solar radiation by clouds. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain the discrepancies between observations and modeling results. A good review of these often-competing hypotheses has been provided by Stephens and Tsay. They characterize the available hypotheses as failing into three categories: (1) those linked to cloud microphysical and consequent optical properties; (2) those linked to the geometry and heterogeneity of clouds; and (3) those linked to atmospheric absorption.Current modeling practice is seriously inconsistent with new observational inferences concerning absorption of solar radiation in the atmosphere. The author and her colleagues contend that an emphasis on R may, therefore, not be the optimal way of addressing the cloud solar absorption issue. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Northern Hemisphere atmospheric influence of the solar proton events and ground level enhancement in January 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Jackman

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Solar eruptions in early 2005 led to a substantial barrage of charged particles on the Earth's atmosphere during the 16–21 January period. Proton fluxes were greatly increased during these several days and led to the production of HOx (H, OH, HO2 and NOx (N, NO, NO2, which then caused the destruction of ozone. We focus on the Northern polar region, where satellite measurements and simulations with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM3 showed large enhancements in mesospheric HOx and NOx constituents, and associated ozone reductions, due to these solar proton events (SPEs. The WACCM3 simulations show enhanced short-lived OH and HO2 concentrations throughout the mesosphere in the 60–82.5° N latitude band due to the SPEs for most days in the 16–21 January 2005 period, somewhat higher in abundance than those observed by the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS. These HOx enhancements led to huge predicted and MLS-measured ozone decreases of greater than 40 % throughout most of the northern polar mesosphere during the SPE period. Envisat Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS measurements of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 show increases throughout the stratosphere with highest enhancements of about 60 pptv in the lowermost mesosphere over the 16–18 January 2005 period due to the solar protons. WACCM3 predictions indicate H2O2 enhancements over the same time period of about three times that amount. Measurements of nitric acid (HNO3 by both MLS and MIPAS show an increase of about 1 ppbv above background levels in the upper stratosphere during 16–29 January 2005. WACCM3 simulations show only minuscule HNO3 increases (<0.05 ppbv in the upper stratosphere during this time period. Polar mesospheric enhancements of NOx are computed to be greater than 50

  7. Northern Hemisphere Atmospheric Influence of the Solar Proton Events and Ground Level Enhancement in January 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, C. H.; Marsh, D. R.; Vitt, F. M.; Roble, R. G.; Randall, C. E.; Bernath, P. F.; Funke, B.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Versick, S.; Stiller, G. P.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Solar eruptions in early 2005 led substantial barrage of charged particles on the Earth's atmosphere during the January 16-21 period. Proton fluxes were greatly increased during these several days and led to the production ofHO(x)(H, OH, BO2)and NO(x)(N, NO, NO2), which then caused the destruction of ozone. We focus on the Northern polar region, where satellite measurements and simulations with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM3) showed large enhancements in mesospheric HO(x) and NO(x) constituents, and associated ozone reductions, due 10 these solar proton events (SPEs). The WACCM3 simulations show enhanced short-lived OH throughout the mesosphere in the 60-82.5degN latitude band due to the SPEs for most days in the Jan.16-2l,2005 period, in reasonable agreement with the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) measurements. Mesospheric HO2 is also predicted to be increased by the SPEs, however, the modeled HO2 results are somewhat larger than the MLS measurements. These HO(x) enhancements led to huge predicted and MLS-measured ozone decreases of greater than 40% throughout most of the Northern polar mesosphere during the SPE period. Envisat Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) measurements of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) show increases throughout the stratosphere with highest enhancements of about 60 ppt y in the lowermost mesosphere over the Jan. 16-18, 2005 period due to the solar protons. WACCM3 predictions indicate H2O2 enhancements over the same time period of more than twice that amount. Measurements of nitric acid (HNO3) by both MLS and MIPAS show an increase of about 1 ppbv above background levels in the upper stratosphere during January 16-29, 2005. WACCM3 simulations show only minuscule HNO3 changes in the upper stratosphere during this time period. However due to the small loss rates during winter, polar mesospheric enhancements of NO(x) are computed to be greater than 50 ppbv during the SPE period. Computed NO

  8. Impact of Atmospheric Aerosols on Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Generation in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Mauzerall, D. L.; Wagner, F.; Peng, W.; Yang, J.

    2016-12-01

    Solar photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation has been expanding rapidly in China. Total capacity quintupled from 8 to 43 GW between 2012 and 2015. The Chinese government aims to increase total capacity to 400 GW, fulfilling about 10% of total electricity demand, by 2030. However, severe aerosol pollution in China reduces solar radiation reaching the surface by scattering and absorbing sunlight. We estimate the aerosol impact on solar PV electricity generation in China by examining the 12-year (2003-2014) average reduction in surface solar irradiance due to aerosols in the atmosphere. We apply the PVLIB-Python model, a PV performance tool, to calculate point-of-array irradiance (POAI), radiation incident on a PV panel of 220W and 1.7 m2, and the capacity factor (CF) every 3 hours from 2003-2014 at spatial resolution of 1° latitude x 1° longitude. For model input, we use (1) satellite-derived surface irradiance data from the NASA Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) -SYN1deg for POAI, and (2) observation-constrained reanalysis weather data (temperature and wind speed at 2 meters) from the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, Version 2 (MERRA2) for system operating temperature that affects power output. We use the CERES irradiance data for multiple aerosol and cloud conditions to evaluate the impact of aerosols versus clouds on power output. Our results show that removing aerosols over Northern and Eastern China, the most polluted regions, increases annual average POAI on a fixed panel by up to 1.5 kWh/m2/day relative to current aerosol levels. This corresponds to an increase up to 35%. Over Northern China, aerosols, which influence POAI by up to 20%, are as important as clouds, and annually reduce POAI by about 25%. We evaluate the seasonal and diurnal variability of the impact and find that aerosols outperform clouds in reducing surface radiation in early morning and late afternoon during winter over both Northern and

  9. Validation of Earth atmosphere models using solar EUV observations from the CORONAS and PROBA2 satellites in occultation mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemzin, Vladimir; Ulyanov, Artyom; Gaikovich, Konstantin; Kuzin, Sergey; Pertsov, Andrey; Berghmans, David; Dominique, Marie

    2016-02-01

    Aims: Knowledge of properties of the Earth's upper atmosphere is important for predicting the lifetime of low-orbit spacecraft as well as for planning operation of space instruments whose data may be distorted by atmospheric effects. The accuracy of the models commonly used for simulating the structure of the atmosphere is limited by the scarcity of the observations they are based on, so improvement of these models requires validation under different atmospheric conditions. Measurements of the absorption of the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation in the upper atmosphere below 500 km by instruments operating on low-Earth orbits (LEO) satellites provide efficient means for such validation as well as for continuous monitoring of the upper atmosphere and for studying its response to the solar and geomagnetic activity. Method: This paper presents results of measurements of the solar EUV radiation in the 17 nm wavelength band made with the SPIRIT and TESIS telescopes on board the CORONAS satellites and the SWAP telescope on board the PROBA2 satellite in the occulted parts of the satellite orbits. The transmittance profiles of the atmosphere at altitudes between 150 and 500 km were derived from different phases of solar activity during solar cycles 23 and 24 in the quiet state of the magnetosphere and during the development of a geomagnetic storm. We developed a mathematical procedure based on the Tikhonov regularization method for solution of ill-posed problems in order to retrieve extinction coefficients from the transmittance profiles. The transmittance profiles derived from the data and the retrieved extinction coefficients are compared with simulations carried out with the NRLMSISE-00 atmosphere model maintained by Naval Research Laboratory (USA) and the DTM-2013 model developed at CNES in the framework of the FP7 project ATMOP. Results: Under quiet and slightly disturbed magnetospheric conditions during high and low solar activity the extinction coefficients

  10. Validation of Earth atmosphere models using solar EUV observations from the CORONAS and PROBA2 satellites in occultation mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slemzin Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Knowledge of properties of the Earth’s upper atmosphere is important for predicting the lifetime of low-orbit spacecraft as well as for planning operation of space instruments whose data may be distorted by atmospheric effects. The accuracy of the models commonly used for simulating the structure of the atmosphere is limited by the scarcity of the observations they are based on, so improvement of these models requires validation under different atmospheric conditions. Measurements of the absorption of the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV radiation in the upper atmosphere below 500 km by instruments operating on low-Earth orbits (LEO satellites provide efficient means for such validation as well as for continuous monitoring of the upper atmosphere and for studying its response to the solar and geomagnetic activity. Method: This paper presents results of measurements of the solar EUV radiation in the 17 nm wavelength band made with the SPIRIT and TESIS telescopes on board the CORONAS satellites and the SWAP telescope on board the PROBA2 satellite in the occulted parts of the satellite orbits. The transmittance profiles of the atmosphere at altitudes between 150 and 500 km were derived from different phases of solar activity during solar cycles 23 and 24 in the quiet state of the magnetosphere and during the development of a geomagnetic storm. We developed a mathematical procedure based on the Tikhonov regularization method for solution of ill-posed problems in order to retrieve extinction coefficients from the transmittance profiles. The transmittance profiles derived from the data and the retrieved extinction coefficients are compared with simulations carried out with the NRLMSISE-00 atmosphere model maintained by Naval Research Laboratory (USA and the DTM-2013 model developed at CNES in the framework of the FP7 project ATMOP. Results: Under quiet and slightly disturbed magnetospheric conditions during high and low solar activity the

  11. Solar wind implication on dust ion acoustic rogue waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelghany, A. M., E-mail: asmaaallah20@yahoo.com; Abd El-Razek, H. N., E-mail: hosam.abdelrazek@yahoo.com; El-Labany, S. K., E-mail: skellabany@hotmail.com [Theoretical Physics Group, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta 34517 (Egypt); Moslem, W. M., E-mail: wmmoslem@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-06-15

    The relevance of the solar wind with the magnetosphere of Jupiter that contains positively charged dust grains is investigated. The perturbation/excitation caused by streaming ions and electron beams from the solar wind could form different nonlinear structures such as rogue waves, depending on the dominant role of the plasma parameters. Using the reductive perturbation method, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and further modified (KdV) equation. Assuming that the frequency of the carrier wave is much smaller than the ion plasma frequency, these equations are transformed into nonlinear Schrödinger equations with appropriate coefficients. Rational solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation shows that rogue wave envelopes are supported by the present plasma model. It is found that the existence region of rogue waves depends on the dust-acoustic speed and the streaming temperatures for both the ions and electrons. The dependence of the maximum rogue wave envelope amplitude on the system parameters has been investigated.

  12. Influence of atmospheric phenomenon in the evaluation of solar plate collectors efficiency; Influencia de los episodios de calima en la evaluacion de la eficiencia de captadores solares planos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, R. P.

    2004-07-01

    Canary Islands are occasionally affected by an atmospheric phenomenon produced when a haze of sand or dust microscope particles filled the atmosphere. It can be as light as mist or as thick as smog. This paper describes the influence of this phenomenon in the thermal performance of already installed solar collectors and in the results of efficiency tests (according to EN-12975-2), which are necessary in order to calculate the efficiency curve. The Solar Collector Test Laboratory of Canary Islands Institute of Technology has verified that this phenomenon is sometimes compatible with the climatic conditions detailed in EN 12975-2. This study is made with the purpose of assure the test results. (Author)

  13. Short- and Medium-Term Induced Ionization in the Earth Atmosphere by Galactic and Solar Cosmic Rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Mishev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The galactic cosmic rays are the main source of ionization in the troposphere of the Earth. Solar energetic particles of MeV energies cause an excess of ionization in the atmosphere, specifically over polar caps. The ionization effect during the major ground level enhancement 69 on January 20, 2005 is studied at various time scales. The estimation of ion rate is based on a recent numerical model for cosmic-ray-induced ionization. The ionization effect in the Earth atmosphere is obtained on the basis of solar proton energy spectra, reconstructed from GOES 11 measurements and subsequent full Monte Carlo simulation of cosmic-ray-induced atmospheric cascade. The evolution of atmospheric cascade is performed with CORSIKA 6.990 code using FLUKA 2011 and QGSJET II hadron interaction models. The atmospheric ion rate is explicitly obtained for various latitudes, namely, 40°N, 60°N and 80°N. The time evolution of obtained ion rates is presented. The short- and medium-term ionization effect is compared with the average effect due to galactic cosmic rays. It is demonstrated that ionization effect is significant only in subpolar and polar atmosphere during the major ground level enhancement of January 20, 2005. It is negative in troposphere at midlatitude, because of the accompanying Forbush effect.

  14. Small-scale dynamo magnetism as the driver for heating the solar atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amari, Tahar; Luciani, Jean-François; Aly, Jean-Jacques

    2015-06-11

    The long-standing problem of how the solar atmosphere is heated has been addressed by many theoretical studies, which have stressed the relevance of two specific mechanisms, involving magnetic reconnection and waves, as well as the necessity of treating the chromosphere and corona together. But a fully consistent model has not yet been constructed and debate continues, in particular about the possibility of coronal plasma being heated by energetic phenomena observed in the chromosphere. Here we report modelling of the heating of the quiet Sun, in which magnetic fields are generated by a subphotospheric fluid dynamo intrinsically connected to granulation. We find that the fields expand into the chromosphere, where plasma is heated at the rate required to match observations (4,500 watts per square metre) by small-scale eruptions that release magnetic energy and drive sonic motions. Some energetic eruptions can even reach heights of 10 million metres above the surface of the Sun, thereby affecting the very low corona. Extending the model by also taking into account the vertical weak network magnetic field allows for the existence of a mechanism able to heat the corona above, while leaving unchanged the physics of chromospheric eruptions. Such a mechanism rests on the eventual dissipation of Alfvén waves generated inside the chromosphere and that carry upwards the required energy flux of 300 watts per square metre. The model shows a topologically complex magnetic field of 160 gauss on the Sun's surface, agreeing with inferences obtained from spectropolarimetric observations, chromospheric features (contributing only weakly to the coronal heating) that can be identified with observed spicules and blinkers, and vortices that may be possibly associated with observed solar tornadoes.

  15. The transverse and rotational motions of magnetohydrodynamic kink waves in the solar atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goossens, M.; Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, bus 2400, B-3001 Herverlee (Belgium); Soler, R.; Terradas, J. [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Verth, G., E-mail: marcel.goossens@wis.kuleuven.be [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), The University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-10

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink waves have now been observed to be ubiquitous throughout the solar atmosphere. With modern instruments, they have now been detected in the chromosphere, interface region, and corona. The key purpose of this paper is to show that kink waves do not only involve purely transverse motions of solar magnetic flux tubes, but the velocity field is a spatially and temporally varying sum of both transverse and rotational motion. Taking this fact into account is particularly important for the accurate interpretation of varying Doppler velocity profiles across oscillating structures such as spicules. It has now been shown that, as well as bulk transverse motions, spicules have omnipresent rotational motions. Here we emphasize that caution should be used before interpreting the particular MHD wave mode/s responsible for these rotational motions. The rotational motions are not necessarily signatures of the classic axisymmetric torsional Alfvén wave alone, because kink motion itself can also contribute substantially to varying Doppler velocity profiles observed across these structures. In this paper, the displacement field of the kink wave is demonstrated to be a sum of its transverse and rotational components, both for a flux tube with a discontinuous density profile at its boundary, and one with a more realistic density continuum between the internal and external plasma. Furthermore, the Doppler velocity profile of the kink wave is forward modeled to demonstrate that, depending on the line of sight, it can either be quite distinct or very similar to that expected from a torsional Alfvén wave.

  16. Parametric study on kink instabilities of twisted magnetic flux ropes in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Z. X.; Keppens, R.; Roussev, I. I.; Lin, J.

    2018-01-01

    Aims: Twisted magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) in the solar atmosphere have been researched extensively because of their close connection to many solar eruptive phenomena, such as flares, filaments, and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In this work, we performed a set of 3D isothermal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulations, which use analytical twisted MFR models and study dynamical processes parametrically inside and around current-carrying twisted loops. We aim to generalize earlier findings by applying finite plasma β conditions. Methods: Inside the MFR, approximate internal equilibrium is obtained by pressure from gas and toroidal magnetic fields to maintain balance with the poloidal magnetic field. We selected parameter values to isolate best either internal or external kink instability before studying complex evolutions with mixed characteristics. We studied kink instabilities and magnetic reconnection in MFRs with low and high twists. Results: The curvature of MFRs is responsible for a tire tube force due to its internal plasma pressure, which tends to expand the MFR. The curvature effect of toroidal field inside the MFR leads to a downward movement toward the photosphere. We obtain an approximate internal equilibrium using the opposing characteristics of these two forces. A typical external kink instability totally dominates the evolution of MFR with infinite twist turns. Because of line-tied conditions and the curvature, the central MFR region loses its external equilibrium and erupts outward. We emphasize the possible role of two different kink instabilities during the MFR evolution: internal and external kink. The external kink is due to the violation of the Kruskal-Shafranov condition, while the internal kink requires a safety factor q = 1 surface inside the MFR. We show that in mixed scenarios, where both instabilities compete, complex evolutions occur owing to reconnections around and within the MFR. The S-shaped structures in current distributions

  17. Estimation of the reaction rate for the formation of CH3O from H + H2CO - Implications for chemistry in the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Yuk L.; Drew, William A.; Pinto, Joseph P.; Friedl, Randall R.

    1988-01-01

    Troe's (1977) approximate theory is presently used in conjunction with transition state theory to estimate the rate coefficient of the reaction by which CO is reduced to CH4; attention is given to the role that may be played in the reduction process by the formation of the CH3O radical from H + H2CO. Attention is given to the implications of such a reaction (1) for the CO chemistry on Jupiter and within the solar nebula, (2) for the interpretation of such experimental results as those of Bar-Nun and Shaviv (1975) and Bar-Nun and Chang (1983), and (3) for organic synthesis in the prebiotic terrestrial atmosphere.

  18. Reconstruction of the solar spectral UV irradiance for nowcasting of the middle atmosphere state on the basis of LYRA measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Egorova

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The LYRA instrument onboard ESA PROBA2 satellite will provide 6-hourly solar irradiance at the Lyman-alpha (121.6 nm and the Herzberg continuum (~200–220 nm wavelength range. Because the nowcasting of the neutral and ionic state of the middle atmosphere requires the solar irradiance for the wide spectral range (120–680 nm we have developed the statistical tool for the reconstruction of the full spectrum from the LYRA measurements. The accuracy of the reconstructed irradiance has been evaluated with 1-D transient radiative-convective model with neutral and ion chemistry using the daily solar spectral irradiance measured with SUSIM and SOLSTICE instruments onboard UARS satellite. We compared the results of transient 1-year long model simulations for 2000 driven by the observed and reconstructed solar irradiance and showed that the reconstruction of the full spectrum using linear regression equation based on the solar irradiance in two LYRA channels can be successfully used for nowcasting of the middle atmosphere. We have also identified conditions when the proposed approach does not yield spectral reconstruction with sufficient accuracy.

  19. Black carbon solar absorption suppresses turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Eric M; Thomas, Rick M; Praveen, Puppala S; Pistone, Kristina; Bender, Frida A-M; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran

    2016-10-18

    The introduction of cloud condensation nuclei and radiative heating by sunlight-absorbing aerosols can modify the thickness and coverage of low clouds, yielding significant radiative forcing of climate. The magnitude and sign of changes in cloud coverage and depth in response to changing aerosols are impacted by turbulent dynamics of the cloudy atmosphere, but integrated measurements of aerosol solar absorption and turbulent fluxes have not been reported thus far. Here we report such integrated measurements made from unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) during the CARDEX (Cloud Aerosol Radiative Forcing and Dynamics Experiment) investigation conducted over the northern Indian Ocean. The UAV and surface data reveal a reduction in turbulent kinetic energy in the surface mixed layer at the base of the atmosphere concurrent with an increase in absorbing black carbon aerosols. Polluted conditions coincide with a warmer and shallower surface mixed layer because of aerosol radiative heating and reduced turbulence. The polluted surface mixed layer was also observed to be more humid with higher relative humidity. Greater humidity enhances cloud development, as evidenced by polluted clouds that penetrate higher above the top of the surface mixed layer. Reduced entrainment of dry air into the surface layer from above the inversion capping the surface mixed layer, due to weaker turbulence, may contribute to higher relative humidity in the surface layer during polluted conditions. Measurements of turbulence are important for studies of aerosol effects on clouds. Moreover, reduced turbulence can exacerbate both the human health impacts of high concentrations of fine particles and conditions favorable for low-visibility fog events.

  20. Composition Changes After the "Halloween" Solar Proton Event: The High-Energy Particle Precipitation in the Atmosphere (HEPPA) Model Versus MIPAS Data Intercomparison Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, B.; Baumgaertner, A.; Calisto, M.; Egorova, T.; Jackman, C. H.; Kieser, J.; Krivolutsky, A.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Marsh. D. R.; Reddmann, T.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We have compared composition changes of NO, NO2, H2O2,O3, N2O, HNO3 , N2O5, HNO4, ClO, HOCl, and ClONO2 as observed by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) on Envisat in the aftermath of the "Halloween" solar proton event (SPE) in October/November 2003 at 25-0.01 hPa in the Northern hemisphere (40-90 N) and simulations performed by the following atmospheric models: the Bremen 2D model (B2dM) and Bremen 3D Chemical Transport Model (B3dCTM), the Central Aerological Observatory (CAO) model, FinROSE, the Hamburg Model of the Neutral and Ionized Atmosphere (HAMMONIA), the Karlsruhe Simulation Model of the Middle Atmosphere (KASIMA), the ECHAM5/MESSY Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model, the modeling tool for SO1ar Climate Ozone Links studies (SOCOL and SOCOLi), and the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM4). The large number of participating models allowed for an evaluation of the overall ability of atmospheric models to reproduce observed atmospheric perturbations generated by SPEs, particularly with respect to NOS, and ozone changes. We have further assessed the meteorological conditions and their implications on the chemical response to the SPE in both the models and observations by comparing temperature and tracer (CH4 and CO) fields. Simulated SPE-induced ozone losses agree on average within 5% with the observations. Simulated NO(y) enhancements around 1 hPa, however, are typically 30% higher than indicated by the observations which can be partly attributed to an overestimation of simulated electron-induced ionization. The analysis of the observed and modeled NO(y) partitioning in the aftermath of the SPE has demonstrated the need to implement additional ion chemistry (HNO3 formation via ion-ion recombination and water cluster ions) into the chemical schemes. An overestimation of observed H2O2 enhancements by all models hints at an underestimation of the OH/HO2 ratio in the upper polar stratosphere during the SPE. The

  1. Acoustic waves in the solar atmosphere. VII - Non-grey, non-LTE H(-) models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, F.; Ulmschneider, P.; Kalkofen, W.

    1985-01-01

    The propagation and shock formation of radiatively damped acoustic waves in the solar chromosphere are studied under the assumption that H(-) is the only absorber; the opacity is non-grey. Deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) are permitted. The results of numerical simulations show the depth dependence of the heating by the acoustic waves to be insensitive to the mean state of the atmosphere. After the waves have developed into shocks, their energy flux decays exponentially with a constant damping length of about 1.4 times the pressure scale height, independent of initial flux and wave period. Departures from LTE have a strong influence on the mean temperature structure in dynamical chromosphere models; this is even more pronounced in models with reduced particle density - simulating conditions in magnetic flux tubes - which show significantly increased temperatures in response to mechanical heating. When the energy dissipation of the waves is sufficiently large to dissociate most of the H(-) ions, a strong temperature rise is found that is reminiscent of the temperature structure in the transition zone between chromosphere and corona; the energy flux remaining in the waves then drives mass motions.

  2. Backscatter of hard X-rays in the solar atmosphere. [Calculating the reflectance of solar x ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, T.; Ramaty, R.

    1977-01-01

    The solar photosphere backscatters a substantial fraction of the hard X rays from solar flares incident upon it. This reflection was studied using a Monte Carlo simulation which takes into account Compton scattering and photo-electric absorption. Both isotropic and anisotropic X ray sources are considered. The bremsstrahlung from an anisotropic distribution of electrons are evaluated. By taking the reflection into account, the inconsistency is removed between recent observational data regarding the center-to-limb variation of solar X ray emission and the predictions of models in which accelerated electrons are moving down toward the photosphere.

  3. Evaluation of Attenuation of Solar Radiation by Space System for Regulate the Thermal Conditions of Earth's Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Starovoitov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Global warming in the future is an existential threat to human civilization. To prevent further changes in the Earth's climate is intended of space system for regulate the temperature of Earth's atmosphere, proposed of G.A. Sizentsev. In this system, the main role is played by the solar-sailing ship (SSS arranged in a Lagrange point L1 of the Earth-Sun system. Due to the large area of sails SSS, drifting in the plane normal to the flow of sunlight, reduces the amount of solar radiation incident on the Earth. For practical implementation of space system for regulate the temperature of Earth's atmosphere is necessary to solve complex problems related primarily to the efficiency of attenuation of solar radiation flux. In this paper we study the solar limb darkening on the reduce of the outgoing radiation flux from sun with using the SSS. On the basis of well-known law of solar limb darkening, expressions are obtained for attenuation of the radiation flux when the SSS is at the center of the solar disk, and with deviation the SSS from center of the solar disk at a certain angle. Evaluation is made for the total stream and separate sections the spectral range (from average UV- to the near IR-range. Found that attenuation will decrease at the displacement of SSS to solar disk center, because from there comes the most intense radiation flux. For constant attenuation values of the radiation flux is necessary to ensure a stable position of the SSS with respect to the center of the solar disk, or design should allow the SSS to regulate the transmission amount of the radiation flux. Is shown, that the greatest attenuation occurs in the spectral range of 260 ... 300 nm, corresponding to middle UV-range. Currently, there are published data on the significant effect of fluctuations in the UV radiation on the Earth's climate. Conclusion, that more research is needed of possible effects of reduce UV-radiation on the Earth's climate when regulating of the solar

  4. A contribution to the study of the influence of the energy of solar wind upon the atmospheric processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Milan M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the satellite observing of solar wind, and as well according the development of certain weather conditions it is realized that their interactive connections could have important role on the development of atmospheric processes. In this paper is given several of such situations. We have tried to point to a very important significance of new methodological approach in understanding development of meteorological conditions. Researching the influence of the solar wind on the changes of conditions in the atmosphere could develop in several ways but in any case for the further steps a multidiscipline approach is needed. Karen Labitske in Germany has done a lot of research in this area. "The physics is still highly speculative at this point though".

  5. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere VII. Further Insights into the Chromosphere and Corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the liquid metallic hydrogen model of the Sun, the chromosphere is responsible for the capture of atomic hydrogen in the solar atmosphere and its eventual re-entry onto the photospheric surface (P.M. Robitaille. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere IV. On the Nature of the Chromosphere. Prog. Phys., 2013, v. 3, L15–L21. As for the corona, it represents a diffuse region containing both gaseous plasma and condensed matter with elevated electron affinity (P.M. Robitaille. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere V. On the Nature of the Corona. Prog. Phys., 2013, v. 3, L22–L25. Metallic hydrogen in the corona is thought to enable the continual harvest of electrons from the outer reaches of the Sun, thereby preserving the neutrality of the solar body. The rigid rotation of the corona is offered as the thirty-third line of evidence that the Sun is comprised of condensed matter. Within the context of the gaseous models of the Sun, a 100 km thick transition zone has been hypothesized to exist wherein temperatures increase dramatically from 104–106 K. Such extreme transitional temperatures are not reasonable given the trivial physical scale of the proposed transition zone, a region adopted to account for the ultra-violet emission lines of ions such as C IV, O IV, and Si IV. In this work, it will be argued that the transition zone does not exist. Rather, the intermediate ionization states observed in the solar atmosphere should be viewed as the result of the simultaneous transfer of protons and electrons onto condensed hydrogen structures, CHS. Line emissions from ions such as C IV, O IV, and Si IV are likely to be the result of condensation reactions, manifesting the involvement of species such as CH4, SiH4, H3O+ in the synthesis of CHS in the chromosphere. In addition, given the presence of a true solar surface at the level of the photosphere in the liquid metallic hydrogen model

  6. Characterizing Impacts and Implications of Proposals for Solar Radiation Management, a Form of Climate Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricke, Katharine L.

    Even under optimistic emissions scenarios, rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will result in significant increases in global mean temperatures and associated effects for the foreseeable future (IPCC, 2007a,b). Concerns that mitigation may be too slow in coming have lead to renewed dialogue within the scientific community regarding potential strategies for counteracting global warming through geoengineering, defined as "the deliberate large-scale intervention in the Earth's climate system, in order to moderate global warming." (Shepherd et al., 2009) The geoengineering schemes that are considered most feasible today involve planetary albedo modification, or "solar radiation management" (SRM). This thesis addresses several outstanding questions regarding uncertainty in global and regional effects of SRM activities. The technical components of this work are centered on two modeling experiments which use a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) implemented through climate prediction.net. Drawing upon knowledge gained through these experiments and interaction with the broader research community, I explore the international relations implications of SRM and the global governance issues associated with it. The first experiment explored regional differences in climate modified by SRM using a large-ensemble modeling experiment that examines the effects of 54 global temperature stabilization scenarios. Our results confirm other research that shows a world with SRM would generally have less extreme temperature and precipitation anomalies than one with unmitigated greenhouse gas emissions and no SRM, but illustrate the physical unfeasibility of simultaneously stabilizing global precipitation and temperature as long as greenhouse gases continue to rise. Over time, simulated temperature and precipitation in large regions such as China and India vary significantly with different SRM trajectories and diverge from historic baselines in

  7. Trace gas retrievals for the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter Atmospheric Chemistry Suite mid-infrared solar occultation spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, K. S.; Montmessin, F.; Fedorova, A.; Trokhimovskiy, A.; Korablev, O.

    2017-09-01

    Here we present preparations for retrieving trace gas volume mixing ratio vertical profiles from the Atmospheric Chemistry Suite (ACS) mid-infrared channel operating in solar occultation mode. ACS is a cross-dispersion spectrometer on the ESA/Roscosmos ExoMars Trace Gas orbiter which entered Mars orbit in October 2016. It is mid-way through an aerobreaking compaign and science operations will commence around March 2o18.

  8. A Model Study on the Role of Ocean-Atmosphere Coupling for the 11-year Solar Signal in the Troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubin, Anne; Abalichin, Janna; Langematz, Ulrike

    2017-04-01

    The 11-year solar cycle is known to influence the stratospheric circulation and even tropospheric conditions on a hemispheric and seasonal scale. However, large uncertainties exist with respect to the top-down influence of radiative-chemical interactions as well as bottom-up ocean-atmosphere interactions for the tropospheric signal. Here, effects of the 11-year solar cycle on the tropospheric climate are studied by analyzing integrations of the chemistry climate model EMAC that has been coupled to the MPIOM ocean model. A series of experiments has been tailored to investigate the role of atmosphere-ocean coupling for the formation of the near-surface response to the 11-year solar irradiance variability. The focus is on the north Atlantic region in the northern winter season. The model output is analyzed with a multiple linear regression technique. It is found that there is a tendency towards a positive phase of the North-Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) at maxima of the Sunspot cycle. The signal is enhanced when the atmosphere-ocean interaction is suppressed by prescribed sea surface temperatures. Additional sensitivity simulations with either the sea surface temperatures or the middle atmosphere being free from 11-year solar influence reveal a key role for the stratospheric forcing in shaping the tropospheric response in the North Atlantic-European region. The robustness of the signals is tested by varying the length of the analyzed time series as well as by varying the set of basis functions used in the regression. The NAO response shows substantial variation of magnitude and even sign when subsets of the analysis period are examined.

  9. Understanding the connection between the energy released during solar flares and their emission in the lower atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, F. Rubio

    2017-10-01

    While progress has been made on understanding how energy is released and deposited along the solar atmosphere during explosive events such as solar flares, the chromospheric and coronal heating through the sudden release of magnetic energy remain an open problem in solar physics. Recent hydrodynamic models allow to investigate the energy deposition along a flare loop and to study the response of the chromosphere. These results have been improved with the consideration of transport and acceleration of particles along the loop. RHESSI and Fermi/GBM X-ray and gamma-ray observations help to constrain the spectral properties of the injected electrons. The excellent spatial, spectral and temporal resolution of IRIS will also help us to constrain properties of explosive events, such as the continuum emission during flares or their emission in the chromosphere.

  10. Silica nanoparticles capture atmospheric lead: implications in the treatment of environmental heavy metal pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xifei; Shen, Zhiguo; Zhang, Bing; Yang, Jianping; Hong, Wen-Xu; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Liu, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    Lead (Pb) contamination in the air is a severe global problem, most notably in China. Removal of Pb from polluted air remains a significant challenge. It is unclear what potential effects silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) exposure can have on atmospheric Pb. Here we first characterized the features of SiNPs by measuring the particle size, zeta potential and the specific surface area of SiO(2) particles using a Nicomp 380/ZLS submicron particle sizer, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). We measured the content of the metal Pb adsorbed by SiNPs exposed to two Pb polluted electric battery plants using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). It is found that SiNPs exposed to two Pb polluted electric battery plants absorb more atmospheric Pb compared to either blank control or micro-sized SiO(2) particles in a time-dependent manner. This is the first study demonstrating that SiNPs exposure can absorb atmospheric Pb in the polluted environment. These novel findings indicate that SiNPs have potential to serve as a significant adsorbent of Pb from industrial pollution, implicating a potentially novel application of SiNPs in the treatment of environmental heavy metal pollution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A long-term study of aerosol modulation of atmospheric and surface solar heating over Pune, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Implications of aerosol characteristics, observed during a five-year (2004–2009 period over Pune (a tropical urban location, to short-wave radiation budget are reported. A discrete ordinate radiative transfer (DISORT model with a code, namely, Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART, has been used to carry out the radiative transfer computations. The validity of the method is demonstrated using independent ground-based remote sensing observations. Uncertainties in the estimates are also quantified. Clear-sky forcing reveals the points that include (1 Large negative bottom-of-the-atmosphere (BOA forcing (more than−30 Wm−2 in all the months with peaks during October, December and March when the surface forcing exceeds~−40 Wm−2, and (2 Surface forcing values are higher for pre-monsoon months, while they are comparable for winter and post-monsoon months. The top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA forcing is found to be negative during all the seasons. Large differences between TOA and BOA forcing during pre-monsoon, winter and post-monsoon indicate large absorption of radiant energy (~30 Wm−2 within the atmosphere during these seasons, thus increasing atmospheric heating by~1 K/d. These values imply that aerosols have considerable impact on the atmosphere–surface system by causing substantial warming/cooling at the atmosphere/surface. This persistent trend in strong atmospheric absorption is likely to alter atmospheric thermodynamic conditions and thus affects circulation considerably.

  12. Mars Solar Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Scheiman, David A.

    2004-01-01

    NASA missions to Mars, both robotic and human, rely on solar arrays for the primary power system. Mars presents a number of challenges for solar power system operation, including a dusty atmosphere which modifies the spectrum and intensity of the incident solar illumination as a function of time of day, degradation of the array performance by dust deposition, and low temperature operation. The environmental challenges to Mars solar array operation will be discussed and test results of solar cell technology operating under Mars conditions will be presented, along with modeling of solar cell performance under Mars conditions. The design implications for advanced solar arrays for future Mars missions is discussed, and an example case, a Martian polar rover, are analyzed.

  13. Climate responses to SATIRE and SIM-based spectral solar forcing in a 3D atmosphere-ocean coupled GCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Guoyong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We apply two reconstructed spectral solar forcing scenarios, one SIM (Spectral Irradiance Monitor based, the other the SATIRE (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction modeled, as inputs to the GISS (Goddard Institute for Space Studies GCMAM (Global Climate Middle Atmosphere Model to examine climate responses on decadal to centennial time scales, focusing on quantifying the difference of climate response between the two solar forcing scenarios. We run the GCMAM for about 400 years with present day trace gas and aerosol for the two solar forcing inputs. We find that the SIM-based solar forcing induces much larger long-term response and 11-year variation in global averaged stratospheric temperature and column ozone. We find significant decreasing trends of planetary albedo for both forcing scenarios in the 400-year model runs. However the mechanisms for the decrease are very different. For SATIRE solar forcing, the decreasing trend of planetary albedo is associated with changes in cloud cover. For SIM-based solar forcing, without significant change in cloud cover on centennial and longer time scales, the apparent decreasing trend of planetary albedo is mainly due to out-of-phase variation in shortwave radiative forcing proxy (downwelling flux for wavelength >330 nm and total solar irradiance (TSI. From the Maunder Minimum to present, global averaged annual mean surface air temperature has a response of ~0.1 °C to SATIRE solar forcing compared to ~0.04 °C to SIM-based solar forcing. For 11-year solar cycle, the global surface air temperature response has 3-year lagged response to either forcing scenario. The global surface air 11-year temperature response to SATIRE forcing is about 0.12 °C, similar to recent multi-model estimates, and comparable to the observational-based evidence. However, the global surface air temperature response to 11-year SIM-based solar forcing is insignificant and inconsistent with observation-based evidence.

  14. Modeling the Atmosphere of Solar and Other Stars: Radiative Transfer with PHOENIX/3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Edward

    The chemical composition of stars is an important ingredient in our understanding of the formation, structure, and evolution of both the Galaxy and the Solar System. The composition of the sun itself is an essential reference standard against which the elemental contents of other astronomical objects are compared. Recently, redetermination of the elemental abundances using three-dimensional, time-dependent hydrodynamical models of the solar atmosphere has led to a reduction in the inferred metal abundances, particularly C, N, O, and Ne. However, this reduction in metals reduces the opacity such that models of the Sun no longer agree with the observed results obtained using helioseismology. Three dimensional (3-D) radiative transfer is an important problem in physics, astrophysics, and meteorology. Radiative transfer is extremely computationally complex and it is a natural problem that requires computation on the exascale. We intend to calculate the detailed compositional structure of the Sun and other stars at high resolution with full NLTE, treating the turbulent velocity flows in full detail in order to compare results from hydrodynamics and helioseismology, and understand the nature of the discrepancies found between the two approaches. We propose to perform 3-D high-resolution radiative transfer calculations with the PHOENIX/3D suite of solar and other stars using 3-D hydrodynamic models from different groups. While NLTE radiative transfer has been treated by the groups doing hydrodynamics, they are necessarily limited in their resolution to the consideration of only a few (4-20) frequency bins, whereas we can calculate full NLTE including thousands of wavelength points, resolving the line profiles, and solving the scattering problem with extremely high angular resolution. The code has been used for the analysis of supernova spectra, stellar and planetary spectra, and for time-dependent modeling of transient objects. PHOENIX/3D runs and scales very well on Cray

  15. Atmospheric Mining in the Outer Solar System: Outer Planet In-Space Bases and Moon Bases for Resource Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric mining in the outer solar system has been investigated as a means of fuel production for high energy propulsion and power. Fusion fuels such as Helium 3 (3He) and deuterium can be wrested from the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune and either returned to Earth or used in-situ for energy production. Helium 3 and deuterium were the primary gases of interest with hydrogen being the primary propellant for nuclear thermal solid core and gas core rocket-based atmospheric flight. A series of analyses were undertaken to investigate resource capturing aspects of atmospheric mining in the outer solar system. This included the gas capturing rate, storage options, and different methods of direct use of the captured gases. While capturing 3He, large amounts of hydrogen and 4He are produced. The propulsion and transportation requirements for all of the major moons of Uranus and Neptune are presented. Analyses of orbital transfer vehicles (OTVs), landers, factories, and the issues with in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) low gravity processing factories are included. Preliminary observations are presented on near-optimal selections of moon base orbital locations, OTV power levels, and OTV and lander rendezvous points. Several artificial gravity in-space base designs and orbital sites at Uranus and Neptune and the OTV requirements to support them are also addressed.

  16. Solar Indices - Solar Ultraviolet

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  17. Solar Indices - Solar Flares

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  18. Solar Indices - Solar Corona

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  19. Solar Indices - Solar Irradiance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  20. Solar-Storm/Lunar Atmosphere Model (SSLAM): An overview of the effort and description of the driving storm environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, W. M.; Halekas, J. S.; Killen, R. M.; Delory, G. T.; Gross, N.; Bleacher, L. V.; Krauss-Varben, D.; Travnicek, P.; Hurley, D.; Stubbs, T. J.; Zimmerman, M. I.; Jackson, T. L.

    2012-10-01

    On 29 April 1998, a coronal mass ejection (CME) was emitted from the Sun that had a significant impact at Earth. The terrestrial magnetosphere became more electrically active during the storm passage. Less explored is the effect of such a storm on an exposed rocky body like our Moon. The solar-storm/lunar atmosphere modeling effort (SSLAM) brings together surface interactions, exosphere, plasma, and surface charging models all run with a common driver - the solar storm and CME passage occurring from 1 to 4 May 1998. We present herein an expanded discussion on the solar driver during the 1-4 May 1998 period that included the passage of an intense coronal mass ejection (CME) that had >10 times the solar wind density and had a compositional component of He++ that exceeded 20%. During this time, the plasma mass flux to the exposed lunar surface increased by over 20 times compared to the nominal solar wind, to a value near 10-13 kg/m2-s. Over a two day CME passage by the Moon, this amount approaches 300 tons of added mass to the Moon in the form of individual proton and helium ions. Such an increase in ion flux should have a profound impact on sputtering loss rates from the surface, since this process scales as the mass, energy, and charge state of the incident ion. Associated loss processes were addressed by SSLAM and will be discussed herein.

  1. Composition changes after the "Halloween" solar proton event: the High Energy Particle Precipitation in the Atmosphere (HEPPA model versus MIPAS data intercomparison study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Funke

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We have compared composition changes of NO, NO2, H2O2, O3, N2O, HNO3, N2O5, HNO4, ClO, HOCl, and ClONO2 as observed by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS on Envisat in the aftermath of the "Halloween" solar proton event (SPE in late October 2003 at 25–0.01 hPa in the Northern Hemisphere (40–90° N and simulations performed by the following atmospheric models: the Bremen 2-D model (B2dM and Bremen 3-D Chemical Transport Model (B3dCTM, the Central Aerological Observatory (CAO model, FinROSE, the Hamburg Model of the Neutral and Ionized Atmosphere (HAMMONIA, the Karlsruhe Simulation Model of the Middle Atmosphere (KASIMA, the ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC model, the modeling tool for SOlar Climate Ozone Links studies (SOCOL and SOCOLi, and the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM4. The large number of participating models allowed for an evaluation of the overall ability of atmospheric models to reproduce observed atmospheric perturbations generated by SPEs, particularly with respect to NOy and ozone changes. We have further assessed the meteorological conditions and their implications for the chemical response to the SPE in both the models and observations by comparing temperature and tracer (CH4 and CO fields.

    Simulated SPE-induced ozone losses agree on average within 5 % with the observations. Simulated NOy enhancements around 1 hPa, however, are typically 30 % higher than indicated by the observations which are likely to be related to deficiencies in the used ionization rates, though other error sources related to the models' atmospheric background state and/or transport schemes cannot be excluded. The analysis of the observed and modeled NOy partitioning in the aftermath of the SPE has demonstrated the need to implement

  2. Theoretical oscillation frequencies for solar-type dwarfs from stellar models with 〈3D〉-atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Andreas Christ Sølvsten; Weiss, Achim; Mosumgaard, Jakob Rørsted; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Sahlholdt, Christian Lundsgaard

    2017-12-01

    We present a new method for replacing the outermost layers of stellar models with interpolated atmospheres based on results from 3D simulations, in order to correct for structural inadequacies of these layers. This replacement is known as patching. Tests, based on 3D atmospheres from three different codes and interior models with different input physics, are performed. Using solar models, we investigate how different patching criteria affect the eigenfrequencies. These criteria include the depth, at which the replacement is performed, the quantity, on which the replacement is based, and the mismatch in Teff and log g between the un-patched model and patched 3D atmosphere. We find the eigenfrequencies to be unaltered by the patching depth deep within the adiabatic region, while changing the patching quantity or the employed atmosphere grid leads to frequency shifts that may exceed 1 μHz. Likewise, the eigenfrequencies are sensitive to mismatches in Teff or log g. A thorough investigation of the accuracy of a new scheme, for interpolating mean 3D stratifications within the atmosphere grids, is furthermore performed. Throughout large parts of the atmosphere grids, our interpolation scheme yields sufficiently accurate results for the purpose of asteroseismology. We apply our procedure in asteroseismic analyses of four Kepler stars and draw the same conclusions as in the solar case: Correcting for structural deficiencies lowers the eigenfrequencies, this correction is slightly sensitive to the patching criteria, and the remaining frequency discrepancy between models and observations is less frequency dependent. Our work shows the applicability and relevance of patching in asteroseismology.

  3. Solar Modulation of Inner Trapped Belt Radiation Flux as a Function of Atmospheric Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhi, M. A. K.

    2005-01-01

    No simple algorithm seems to exist for calculating proton fluxes and lifetimes in the Earth's inner, trapped radiation belt throughout the solar cycle. Most models of the inner trapped belt in use depend upon AP8 which only describes the radiation environment at solar maximum and solar minimum in Cycle 20. One exception is NOAAPRO which incorporates flight data from the TIROS/NOAA polar orbiting spacecraft. The present study discloses yet another, simple formulation for approximating proton fluxes at any time in a given solar cycle, in particular between solar maximum and solar minimum. It is derived from AP8 using a regression algorithm technique from nuclear physics. From flux and its time integral fluence, one can then approximate dose rate and its time integral dose.

  4. Modes of variability of the vertical temperature profile of the middle atmosphere at mid-latitude: Similarities with solar forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain; Kerzenmacher, Tobias; Angot, Guillaume

    2012-02-01

    A long and continuous temperature data set from ground to mesopause was obtained in merging lidar and radiosonde data at mid-latitude over south of France (44°N). The analyses using Empirical Orthogonal Functions has been applied on vertical temperature profiles to investigate the variability differently than it has been done in previous investigations. This study reveals as the first mode in winter, a strong anti-correlation between upper stratosphere and mesosphere that is most probably link with planetary waves propagation and associated stratospheric warmings. While in summer the variability is located in the mesosphere and associated with mesospheric inversions that are probably generated by gravity waves breaking. This study shows that even if the daily temperature variability appears to be complex, a large part (30%) can be modeled, each season, using the first EOF. These vertical patterns exhibit some similarities with solar-atmospheric responses, suggesting a potential feedback of the dynamic. This is already observed for winter response, but during summer the contribution of gravity waves on the mesospheric solar response suggests future investigations to explore the role of this potential mechanism in solar-atmospheric connections.

  5. Solar Energetic Particle Acceleration by a Shock Wave Accompanying a Coronal Mass Ejection in the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukhova, A. S.; Petukhov, I. S.; Petukhov, S. I.; Ksenofontov, L. T.

    2017-02-01

    Solar energetic particle acceleration by a shock wave accompanying a coronal mass ejection (CME) is studied. The description of the accelerated particle spectrum evolution is based on the numerical calculation of the diffusive transport equation with a set of realistic parameters. The relation between the CME and shock speeds, which depend on the initial CME radius, is determined. Depending on the initial CME radius, its speed, and the magnetic energy of the scattering Alfvén waves, the accelerated particle spectrum is established 10-60 minutes from the beginning of CME motion. The maximum energies of particles reach 0.1-10 GeV. The CME radii of 3-5 {R}⊙ and the shock radii of 5-10 {R}⊙ agree with observations. The calculated particle spectra agree with the observed ones in events registered by ground-based detectors if the turbulence spectrum in the solar corona significantly differs from the Kolmogorov one.

  6. Relationships between solar activity and climate change. [sunspot cycle effects on lower atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, W. O.

    1974-01-01

    Recurrent droughts are related to the double sunspot cycle. It is suggested that high solar activity generally increases meridional circulations and blocking patterns at high and intermediate latitudes, especially in winter. This effect is related to the sudden formation of cirrus clouds during strong geomagnetic activity that originates in the solar corpuscular emission.

  7. The Solar Photospheric Nitrogen Abundance : Determination with 3D and 1D Model Atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maiorca, E.; Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.; Busso, M.; Faraggiana, R.; Steffen, M.; Ludwig, H. -G.; Kamp, I.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new determination of the solar nitrogen abundance making use of 3D hydrodynamical modelling of the solar photosphere, which is more physically motivated than traditional static 1D models. We selected suitable atomic spectral lines, relying on equivalent width measurements already

  8. Solar-Storm/Lunar Atmosphere Model (SSLAM): An Overview of the Effort and Description of the Driving Storm Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, W. M.; Halekas, J. S.; Killen, R. M.; Delroy, G. T.; Gross, N.; Bleacher, V; Krauss-Varben, D.; Hurley, D; Zimmerman, M. I.

    2012-01-01

    On 29 April 1998, a coronal mass ejection (CME) was emitted from the Sun that had a significant impact on bodies located at 1 AU. The terrestrial magnetosphere did indeed become more electrically active during the storm passage but an obvious question is the effect of such a storm on an exposed rocky body like our Moon. The solar-storm/lunar atmosphere modeling effort (SSLAM) brings together surface interactions, exosphere, plasma, and surface charging models all run with a common driver - the solar storm and CME passage occurring from 1-4 May 1998. We present herein an expanded discussion on the solar driver during the 1-4 May 1998 period that included the passage of an intense coronal mass ejection (CME) that had> 10 times the solar wind density and had a compositional component of He++ that exceeded 20%. We also provide a very brief overview oflhe SSLAM system layout and overarching results. One primary result is that the CME driver plasma can greatly increase the exospheric content via sputtering, with total mass loss rates that approach 1 kg/s during the 2-day CME passage. By analogy, we suggest that CME-related sputtering increases might also be expected during a CME passage by a near-earth asteroid or at the Mars exobase, resulting in an enhanced loss of material.

  9. Remote sensing as a tool for watershed-wide estimation of net solar radiation and water loss to the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorram, S.; Thomas, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for a study intended to develop a general remote sensing-aided cost-effective procedure to estimate watershed-wide water loss to the atmosphere via evapotranspiration and to estimate net solar radiation over the watershed. Evapotranspiration estimation employs a basic two-stage two-phase sample of three information resolution levels. Net solar radiation is taken as one of the variables at each level of evapotranspiration modeling. The input information for models requiring spatial information will be provided by Landsat digital data, environmental satellite data, ground meteorological data, ground sample unit information, and topographic data. The outputs of the sampling-estimation/data bank system will be in-place maps of evapotranspiration on a data resolution element basis, watershed-wide evapotranspiration isopleths, and estimates of watershed and subbasin total evapotranspiration with associated statistical confidence bounds. The methodology developed is being tested primarily on the Spanish Creek Watershed Plumas County, California.

  10. Analysis of coherent structures and atmosphere-canopy coupling strength during the CABINEX field campaign: implications for atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, A. L.; Pressley, S. N.; Botros, A.; Jones, E.; Chung, S. H.; Edburg, S. L.

    2011-07-01

    Intermittent coherent structures can be responsible for a large fraction of the chemical exchange between the vegetation canopy and the atmosphere. Quantifying their contribution to fluxes is necessary to interpret measurements of trace gases and aerosols within and above forest canopies. The primary objective of the Community Atmosphere-Biosphere Interactions Experiment (CABINEX) field campaign (10 July 2009 to 9 August 2009) was to study the chemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOC) within and above a forest canopy. In this manuscript, we provide an analysis of coherent structures and canopy-atmosphere exchange during CABINEX to support in-canopy gradient measurements of VOC. We quantify the number and duration of coherent structure events and their percent contribution to momentum and heat fluxes with two methods: (1) quadrant-hole analysis and (2) wavelet analysis. Despite differences in the duration and number of events, both methods predict that coherent structures contribute 40-50 % to total momentum fluxes and 44-65 % to total heat fluxes during the CABINEX campaign. Contributions associated with coherent structures are slightly greater under stable rather than unstable conditions. By comparing heat fluxes within and above the canopy, we determine the degree of coupling between upper canopy and atmosphere and find that they are coupled to the majority of the campaign time period. Uncoupled canopy-atmosphere events occur in the early morning (04:00-08:00 LT) approximately 30 % of the time. This study confirms that coherent structures contribute significantly to the exchange of heat and momentum between the canopy and atmosphere at the CABINEX site, and indicates the need to include these transport processes when studying the mixing and chemical reactions of trace gases and aerosols between a forest canopy and the atmosphere.

  11. Queensborough Community College of the City University of New York (CUNY) Solar and Atmospheric Research and Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantale Damas, M.

    2015-08-01

    The Queensborough Community College (QCC) of the City University of New York (CUNY), a Hispanic and minority-serving institution, is the recipient of a 2-year NSF EAGER (Early Concept Grants for Exploratory Research) grant to design and implement a high-impact practice integrated research and education program in solar, geospace and atmospheric physics. Proposed is a year-long research experience with two components: 1) during the academic year, students are enrolled in a course-based introductory research (CURE) where they conduct research on real-world problems; and 2) during the summer, students are placed in research internships at partner institutions. Specific objectives include: 1) provide QCC students with research opportunities in solar and atmospheric physics as early as their first year; 2) develop educational materials in solar and atmospheric physics; 3) increase the number of students, especially underrepresented minorities, that transfer to 4-year STEM programs. A modular, interdisciplinary concept approach is used to integrate educational materials into the research experience. The project also uses evidence-based best practices (i.e., Research experience, Mentoring, Outreach, Recruitment, Enrichment and Partnership with 4-year colleges and institutions) that have proven successful at increasing the retention, transfer and graduation rates of community college students. Through a strong collaboration with CUNY’s 4-year colleges (Medgar Evers College and the City College of New York’s NOAA CREST program); Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research (CCAR) at the University of Colorado, Boulder; and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), the project trains and retains underrepresented community college students in geosciences-related STEM fields. Preliminary results will be presented at this meeting.*This project is supported by the National Science Foundation Geosciences Directorate under NSF Award

  12. Impacts of Stratospheric Dynamics on Atmospheric Behavior from the Ground to Space Solar Minimum and Solar Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-15

    tropical zonal accelerations are consistent with Rossby wave encountering a surf zone at low latitudes, resulting in Rossby wave breaking and... simulation results are publicly available. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT In this work, we have achieved the project goal by (1) enhancing, testing...research plan is to provide a fiducial simulation of the whole atmosphere up to 500 km which will allow the community to investigate in detail the

  13. Magneto-static modeling of the mixed plasma Beta solar atmosphere based on SUNRISE/IMaX data

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegelmann, Thomas; Neukirch, Thomas; Nickeler, Dieter; Solanki, Sami; Martinez Pillet, Valentin; Borrero, Juan Manule

    2015-01-01

    TN acknowledges support by the U.K.’s Science and Technology Facilities Council and would like to thank the MPS for its hospitality during a visit in December 2014. Our aim is to model the 3D magnetic field structure of the upper solar atmosphere, including regions of non-negligible plasma beta. We use high-resolution photospheric magnetic field measurements from SUNRISE/IMaX as boundary condition for a magneto-static magnetic field model. The high resolution of IMaX allows us to resolve t...

  14. Modification of wave propagation and wave travel-time by the presence of magnetic fields in the solar network atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutto, C.; Steiner, O.; Schaffenberger, W.; Roth, M.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Observations of waves at frequencies above the acoustic cut-off frequency have revealed vanishing wave travel-times in the vicinity of strong magnetic fields. This detection of apparently evanescent waves, instead of the expected propagating waves, has remained a riddle. Aims: We investigate the influence of a strong magnetic field on the propagation of magneto-acoustic waves in the atmosphere of the solar network. We test whether mode conversion effects can account for the shortening in wave travel-times between different heights in the solar atmosphere. Methods: We carry out numerical simulations of the complex magneto-atmosphere representing the solar magnetic network. In the simulation domain, we artificially excite high frequency waves whose wave travel-times between different height levels we then analyze. Results: The simulations demonstrate that the wave travel-time in the solar magneto-atmosphere is strongly influenced by mode conversion. In a layer enclosing the surface sheet defined by the set of points where the Alfvén speed and the sound speed are equal, called the equipartition level, energy is partially transferred from the fast acoustic mode to the fast magnetic mode. Above the equipartition level, the fast magnetic mode is refracted due to the large gradient of the Alfvén speed. The refractive wave path and the increasing phase speed of the fast mode inside the magnetic canopy significantly reduce the wave travel-time, provided that both observing levels are above the equipartition level. Conclusions: Mode conversion and the resulting excitation and propagation of fast magneto-acoustic waves is responsible for the observation of vanishing wave travel-times in the vicinity of strong magnetic fields. In particular, the wave propagation behavior of the fast mode above the equipartition level may mimic evanescent behavior. The present wave propagation experiments provide an explanation of vanishing wave travel-times as observed with multi

  15. Comparison of performance and stability of perovskite solar cells with CuInS2 and PH1000 hole transport layers fabricated in a humid atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yong; Li, Fumin; Guo, Mingxuan; Chen, Chong

    2017-12-01

    The stability of perovskite solar cell has been a problem which prevents the commercialization process. Herein, the perovskite solar cells with CuInS2 and PH1000 films as hole transport materials are fabricated and the device performances are compared with each other in ambient atmosphere with air and 55% relative humidity. The results show that the perovskite solar cell with CuInS2 as hole transport material have better stability and higher energy conversion efficiency compared to the cell with the PH1000, indicating that CuInS2 is a better hole-transporting material which can keep the stability of the perovskite solar cells.

  16. Atmospheric Retrieval Algorithms for Long-Wave Infrared and Solar Radiance Scenarios

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hackett, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    .... In particular, consider the retrieval of temperature and humidity profiles, and aerosol size distribution and the scattering refractive index from long-wave infrared and solar radiance spectra, respectively...

  17. Influence of solar forcing, climate variability and modes of low-frequency atmospheric variability on summer floods in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, J. C.; Schulte, L.; Badoux, A.; Barriendos, M.; Barrera-Escoda, A.

    2015-09-01

    The higher frequency of severe flood events in Switzerland in recent decades has given fresh impetus to the study of flood patterns and their possible forcing mechanisms, particularly in mountain environments. This paper presents a new index of summer flood damage that considers severe and catastrophic summer floods in Switzerland between 1800 and 2009, and explores the influence of external forcings on flood frequencies. In addition, links between floods and low-frequency atmospheric variability patterns are examined. The flood damage index provides evidence that the 1817-1851, 1881-1927, 1977-1990 and 2005-present flood clusters occur mostly in phase with palaeoclimate proxies. The cross-spectral analysis documents that the periodicities detected in the coherency and phase spectra of 11 (Schwabe cycle) and 104 years (Gleissberg cycle) are related to a high frequency of flooding and solar activity minima, whereas the 22-year cyclicity detected (Hale cycle) is associated with solar activity maxima and a decrease in flood frequency. The analysis of low-frequency atmospheric variability modes shows that Switzerland lies close to the border of the principal summer mode. The Swiss river catchments situated on the centre and southern flank of the Alps are affected by atmospherically unstable areas defined by the positive phase of the pattern, while those basins located in the northern slope of the Alps are predominantly associated with the negative phase of the pattern. Furthermore, a change in the low-frequency atmospheric variability pattern related to the major floods occurred over the period from 1800 to 2009; the summer principal mode persists in the negative phase during the last cool pulses of the Little Ice Age (1817-1851 and 1881-1927 flood clusters), whereas the positive phases of the mode prevail during the warmer climate of the last 4 decades (flood clusters from 1977 to present).

  18. Middle Atmosphere Response to Different Descriptions of the 11-Year Solar Cycle in Spectral Irradiance in a Chemistry-Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, W. H.; Stolarski, R. S.; Oman, L. D.; Fleming, E. L.; Jackman, C. H.

    2012-01-01

    The 11-year solar cycle in solar spectral irradiance (SSI) inferred from measurements by the SOlar Radiation & Climate Experiment (SORCE) suggests a much larger variation in the ultraviolet than previously accepted. We present middle atmosphere ozone and temperature responses to the solar cycles in SORCE SSI and the ubiquitous Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) SSI reconstruction using the Goddard Earth Observing System chemistry-climate model (GEOS CCM). The results are largely consistent with other recent modeling studies. The modeled ozone response is positive throughout the stratosphere and lower mesosphere using the NRL SSI, while the SORCE SSI produces a response that is larger in the lower stratosphere but out of phase with respect to total solar irradiance above 45 km. The modeled responses in total ozone are similar to those derived from satellite and ground-based measurements, 3-6 Dobson Units per 100 units of 10.7-cm radio flux (F10.7) in the tropics. The peak zonal mean tropical temperature response 50 using the SORCE SSI is nearly 2 K per 100 units 3 times larger than the simulation using the NRL SSI. The GEOS CCM and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 2-D coupled model are used to examine how the SSI solar cycle affects the atmosphere through direct solar heating and photolysis processes individually. Middle atmosphere ozone is affected almost entirely through photolysis, whereas the solar cycle in temperature is caused both through direct heating and photolysis feedbacks, processes that are mostly linearly separable. Further, the net ozone response results from the balance of ozone production at wavelengths less than 242 nm and destruction at longer wavelengths, coincidentally corresponding to the wavelength regimes of the SOLar STellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) and Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) on SORCE, respectively. A higher wavelength-resolution analysis of the spectral response could allow for a better prediction of the

  19. ESA STSE Project “Sea Surface Temperature Diurnal Variability: Regional Extend – Implications in Atmospheric Modelling”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna

    , atmospheric and oceanic modelling, bio-chemical processes and oceanic CO2 studies. The diurnal variability of SST, driven by the coincident occurrence of low enough wind and solar heating, is currently not properly understood. Atmospheric, oceanic and climate models are currently not adequately resolving...... present the final project findings regarding the analysis of hourly SEVIRI SSTs from SEVIRI over the Atlantic Ocean and the European Seas, revealing the regional extend of diurnal warming. As satellite SSTs are representative of the upper centimetre of the water column, they do not provide information...... the daily SST variability, resulting in biases of the total heat budget estimates and therefore, demised model accuracies. The ESA STSE funded project SSTDV:R.EX.-IM.A.M. aimed at characterising the regional extend of diurnal SST signals and their impact in atmospheric modelling. This study will briefly...

  20. Overview of Solar Wind-Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Atmosphere Coupling and the Generation of Magnetospheric Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, S. E.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Coxon, J. C.; Carter, J. A.; Walach, M.-T.; Laundal, K.; Østgaard, N.; Tenfjord, P.; Reistad, J.; Snekvik, K.; Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.

    2017-03-01

    We review the morphology and dynamics of the electrical current systems of the terrestrial magnetosphere and ionosphere. Observations from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) over the three years 2010 to 2012 are employed to illustrate the variability of the field-aligned currents that couple the magnetosphere and ionosphere, on timescales from minutes to years, in response to the impact of solar wind disturbances on the magnetosphere and changes in the level of solar illumination of the polar ionospheres. The variability is discussed within the context of the occurrence of magnetic reconnection between the solar wind and terrestrial magnetic fields at the magnetopause, the transport of magnetic flux within the magnetosphere, and the onset of magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail. The conditions under which the currents are expected to be weak, and hence minimally contaminate measurements of the internally-produced magnetic field of the Earth, are briefly outlined.

  1. Implications of the atmosphere-soil interaction for the design of earth retaining structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruge Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of most geotechnical structures is highly governed by environmental factors, particularly in tropical regions where there are very pronounced dry and wet seasons. Design of earth retaining structures generally tend to be too conservative due to the uncertainty generated by the incorporation of environmental variables. Those variables control the soil unsaturated response and in addition to the known insufficiency of the basic models used in traditional designs they are responsible for conservative designs. Rainfall is the main aspect that affects the soil properties of a particular site. It modifies the soil suction potential, according to the degree of saturation caused by the soil-atmosphere interaction. Currently, state-of-the-art numerical tools allow to simulate the influence of those variables in the behaviour of earth retaining structures. This paper analyses the possible implications of the use of numerical simulations for the design, which include, in the mathematical formulation, the suction as a main parameter. The hypoplastic model for unsaturated response was used. Numerical simulations performed with the use of traditional and modern constitutive models obtained encouraging results that reveal the importance of include suction in design processes.

  2. Analysis of the influence of solar activity and atmospheric factors on 7Be air concentration by seasonal-trend decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, M. C.; Ortiz, J.; Ballesteros, L.; Martorell, S.

    2016-11-01

    7Be air concentrations were measured at the Universitat Politècnica de Valencia campus (in the east of Spain) during the period 2007-2014. The mean values of monthly 7Be concentrations ranged from 2.65 to 8.11 mBq/m3, showing significant intra and interannual variability. A seasonal-trend decomposition methodology was applied to identify the trend-cycle, seasonal and irregular components of the 7Be time series. The decomposition model makes it possible to estimate the influence of solar activity and atmospheric factors on the independent components, in order to find the different sources of 7Be variability. The results show that solar activity is a factor with a high inverse influence on the trend-cycle pattern of 7Be variability. Solar radiation, temperature and relative humidity are positive influential factors on the seasonal 7Be variation with a regular pattern over the years. Finally, the irregular component presents a significant negative correlation with precipitation and wind speed parameters, which have an irregular behavior over the years and seasons.

  3. SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY/ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY OBSERVATIONS OF A REFLECTING LONGITUDINAL WAVE IN A CORONAL LOOP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Pankaj [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Innes, D. E.; Inhester, B., E-mail: pankaj@kasi.re.kr [Max-Planck Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

    2013-12-10

    We report high resolution observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) of intensity oscillations in a hot, T ∼ 8-10 MK, loop. The AIA images show a large coronal loop that was rapidly heated following plasma ejection from one of the loop's footpoints. A wave-like intensity enhancement, seen very clearly in the 131 and 94 Å channel images, propagated ahead of the ejecta along the loop, and was reflected at the opposite footpoint. The wave reflected four times before fading. It was only seen in the hot, 131 and 94 Å channels. The characteristic period and the decay time of the oscillation were ∼630 and ∼440 s, respectively. The phase speed was about 460-510 km s{sup –1} which roughly matches the sound speed of the loop (430-480 km s{sup –1}). The observed properties of the oscillation are consistent with the observations of Dopper-shift oscillations discovered by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation and with their interpretation as slow magnetoacoustic waves. We suggest that the impulsive injection of plasma, following reconnection at one of the loop footpoints, led to rapid heating and the propagation of a longitudinal compressive wave along the loop. The wave bounces back and forth a couple of times before fading.

  4. The atmosphere of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko diagnosed by charge-exchanged solar wind alpha particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon Wedlund, C.; Kallio, E.; Alho, M.; Nilsson, H.; Stenberg Wieser, G.; Gunell, H.; Behar, E.; Pusa, J.; Gronoff, G.

    2016-03-01

    Context. The ESA/Rosetta mission has been orbiting comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since August 2014, measuring its dayside plasma environment. The ion spectrometer onboard Rosetta has detected two ion populations, one energetic with a solar wind origin (H+, He2+, He+), the other at lower energies with a cometary origin (water group ions such as H2O+). He+ ions arise mainly from charge-exchange between solar wind alpha particles and cometary neutrals such as H2O. Aims: The He+ and He2+ ion fluxes measured by the Rosetta Plasma Consortium Ion Composition Analyser (RPC-ICA) give insight into the composition of the dayside neutral coma, into the importance of charge-exchange processes between the solar wind and cometary neutrals, and into the way these evolve when the comet draws closer to the Sun. Methods: We combine observations by the ion spectrometer RPC-ICA onboard Rosetta with calculations from an analytical model based on a collisionless neutral Haser atmosphere and nearly undisturbed solar wind conditions. Results: Equivalent neutral outgassing rates Q can be derived using the observed RPC-ICA He+/He2+ particle flux ratios as input into the analytical model in inverse mode. A revised dependence of Q on heliocentric distance Rh in AU is found to be Rh-7.06 between 1.8 and 3.3 AU, suggesting that the activity in 2015 differed from that of the 2008 perihelion passage. Conversely, using an outgassing rate determined from optical remote sensing measurements from Earth, the forward analytical model results are in relatively good agreement with the measured RPC-ICA flux ratios. Modelled ratios in a 2D spherically-symmetric plane are also presented, showing that charge exchange is most efficient with solar wind protons. Detailed cometocentric profiles of these ratios are also presented. Conclusions: In conclusion, we show that, with the help of a simple analytical model of charge-exchange processes, a mass-capable ion spectrometer such as RPC-ICA can be used as a

  5. The influence of solar wind on extratropical cyclones – Part 2: A link mediated by auroral atmospheric gravity waves?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Prikryl

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cases of mesoscale cloud bands in extratropical cyclones are observed a few hours after atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs are launched from the auroral ionosphere. It is suggested that the solar-wind-generated auroral AGWs contribute to processes that release instabilities and initiate slantwise convection thus leading to cloud bands and growth of extratropical cyclones. Also, if the AGWs are ducted to low latitudes, they could influence the development of tropical cyclones. The gravity-wave-induced vertical lift may modulate the slantwise convection by releasing the moist symmetric instability at near-threshold conditions in the warm frontal zone of extratropical cyclones. Latent heat release associated with the mesoscale slantwise convection has been linked to explosive cyclogenesis and severe weather. The circumstantial and statistical evidence of the solar wind influence on extratropical cyclones is further supported by a statistical analysis of high-level clouds (<440 mb extracted from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP D1 dataset. A statistically significant response of the high-level cloud area index (HCAI to fast solar wind from coronal holes is found in mid-to-high latitudes during autumn-winter and in low latitudes during spring-summer. In the extratropics, this response of the HCAI to solar wind forcing is consistent with the effect on tropospheric vorticity found by Wilcox et al. (1974 and verified by Prikryl et al. (2009. In the tropics, the observed HCAI response, namely a decrease in HCAI at the arrival of solar wind stream followed by an increase a few days later, is similar to that in the northern and southern mid-to-high latitudes. The amplitude of the response nearly doubles for stream interfaces associated with the interplanetary magnetic field BZ component shifting southward. When the IMF BZ after the stream interface shifts northward, the autumn-winter effect weakens or shifts to lower (mid latitudes

  6. Effect of cloud cover and atmospheric circulation patterns on the observed surface solar radiation in Europe

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chiacchio, Marc; Vitolo, Renato

    2012-01-01

    ...) in Europe including cloud cover and atmospheric circulation patterns. The role of observed cloud cover on DSW was analyzed through generalized linear models using DSW measurements obtained from the Global Energy Balance Archive during 1971–1996...

  7. Lightning-driven inner radiation belt energy deposition into the atmosphere: implications for ionisation-levels and neutral chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Rodger

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Lightning-generated whistlers lead to coupling between the troposphere, the Van Allen radiation belts and the lower-ionosphere through Whistler-induced electron precipitation (WEP. Lightning produced whistlers interact with cyclotron resonant radiation belt electrons, leading to pitch-angle scattering into the bounce loss cone and precipitation into the atmosphere. Here we consider the relative significance of WEP to the lower ionosphere and atmosphere by contrasting WEP produced ionisation rate changes with those from Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR and solar photoionisation. During the day, WEP is never a significant source of ionisation in the lower ionosphere for any location or altitude. At nighttime, GCR is more significant than WEP at altitudes <68 km for all locations, above which WEP starts to dominate in North America and Central Europe. Between 75 and 80 km altitude WEP becomes more significant than GCR for the majority of spatial locations at which WEP deposits energy. The size of the regions in which WEP is the most important nighttime ionisation source peaks at ~80 km, depending on the relative contributions of WEP and nighttime solar Lyman-α. We also used the Sodankylä Ion Chemistry (SIC model to consider the atmospheric consequences of WEP, focusing on a case-study period. Previous studies have also shown that energetic particle precipitation can lead to large-scale changes in the chemical makeup of the neutral atmosphere by enhancing minor chemical species that play a key role in the ozone balance of the middle atmosphere. However, SIC modelling indicates that the neutral atmospheric changes driven by WEP are insignificant due to the short timescale of the WEP bursts. Overall we find that WEP is a significant energy input into some parts of the lower ionosphere, depending on the latitude/longitude and altitude, but does not play a significant role in the neutral chemistry of the mesosphere.

  8. Influence of heating rate on the condensational instability. [in outer layers of solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Mariska, J. T.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis and numerical simulation are used to determine the effect that various heating rates have on the linear and nonlinear evolution of a typical plasma within a solar magnetic flux tube subject to the condensational instability. It is found that linear stability depends strongly on the heating rate. The results of numerical simulations of the nonlinear evolution of the condensational instability in a solar magnetic flux tube are presented. Different heating rates lead to quite different nonlinear evolutions, as evidenced by the behavior of the global internal energy.

  9. On Modeling the Kelvin–Helmholtz Instability in Solar Atmosphere I ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tohydrodynamic (MHD) waves propagating in various solar magnetic structures. The main description is on the modeling of KH instability developing in the coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and contributes to the triggering of wave turbulence subsequently, leading to the coronal heat- ing. KH instability of MHD waves in ...

  10. Solar and geomagnetic effects on the frequency of atmospheric circulation types over Europe: an analysis based on a large number of classifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth, Radan; Cahynová, Monika; Kyselý, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Recently, effects of the 11-year solar cycle on various aspects of tropospheric circulation in the Northern Hemisphere in winter have been recognized. One of our previous studies showed a significant solar effect on the frequency of synoptic types from the Hess-Brezowsky catalogue. Here, we use a large collection of varied classifications of circulation patterns, assembled within the COST733 Action "Harmonization and Applications of Weather Types Classifications for European Regions" to detect the solar effect on the frequency of synoptic types. The collection contains both objective and subjective classifications. The advantage of this multi-classification approach is that peculiarities or biases of any single classification (catalogue) that might influence the detected solar signal vanish once a large ensemble of classifications is used. We divide winter months (December to March) into three groups according to the mean monthly solar activity, quantified by the F10.7 flux. The three groups correspond to the minima of the 11-year solar cycle, a moderate solar activity, and solar maxima. Within each group, frequencies of occurrence of individual circulation types are calculated. Differences in the occurrence of individual classes between solar activity groups indicate the presence of a solar activity effect on atmospheric circulation over Europe. Statistical significance of these differences is estimated by a block resampling method. The research is supported by the Grant Agency of the Czech Academy of Sciences, project A300420805, and by the Ministry of Education, Youth, and Sports of the Czech Republic, contract OC115.

  11. A Monte Carlo model of crustal field influences on solar energetic particle precipitation into the Martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolitz, R. D.; Dong, C. F.; Lee, C. O.; Lillis, R. J.; Brain, D. A.; Curry, S. M.; Bougher, S.; Parkinson, C. D.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2017-05-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) can precipitate directly into the atmospheres of weakly magnetized planets, causing increased ionization, heating, and altered neutral chemistry. However, strong localized crustal magnetism at Mars can deflect energetic charged particles and reduce precipitation. In order to quantify these effects, we have developed a model of proton transport and energy deposition in spatially varying magnetic fields, called Atmospheric Scattering of Protons and Energetic Neutrals. We benchmark the model's particle tracing algorithm, collisional physics, and heating rates, comparing against previously published work in the latter two cases. We find that energetic nonrelativistic protons precipitating in proximity to a crustal field anomaly will primarily deposit energy at either their stopping altitude or magnetic reflection altitude. We compared atmospheric ionization in the presence and absence of crustal magnetic fields at 50°S and 182°E during the peak flux of the 29 October 2003 "Halloween storm" SEP event. The presence of crustal magnetic fields reduced total ionization by 30% but caused ionization to occur over a wider geographic area.

  12. Atmospheric Circulation of Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showman, A. P.; Cho, J. Y.-K.; Menou, K.

    2010-12-01

    We survey the basic principles of atmospheric dynamics relevant to explaining existing and future observations of exoplanets, both gas giant and terrestrial. Given the paucity of data on exoplanet atmospheres, our approach is to emphasize fundamental principles and insights gained from solar system studies that are likely to be generalizable to exoplanets. We begin by presenting the hierarchy of basic equations used in atmospheric dynamics, including the Navier-Stokes, primitive, shallow-water, and two-dimensional nondivergent models. We then survey key concepts in atmospheric dynamics, including the importance of planetary rotation, the concept of balance, and simple scaling arguments to show how turbulent interactions generally produce large-scale east-west banding on rotating planets. We next turn to issues specific to giant planets, including their expected interior and atmospheric thermal structures, the implications for their wind patterns, and mechanisms to pump their east-west jets. Hot Jupiter atmospheric dynamics are given particular attention, as these close-in planets have been the subject of most of the concrete developments in the study of exoplanetary atmospheres. We then turn to the basic elements of circulation on terrestrial planets as inferred from solar system studies, including Hadley cells, jet streams, processes that govern the large-scale horizontal temperature contrasts, and climate, and we discuss how these insights may apply to terrestrial exoplanets. Although exoplanets surely possess a greater diversity of circulation regimes than seen on the planets in our solar system, our guiding philosophy is that the multidecade study of solar system planets reviewed here provides a foundation upon which our understanding of more exotic exoplanetary meteorology must build.

  13. Multifractal Solar EUV Intensity Fluctuations and their Implications for Coronal Heating Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadavid, A. C.; Rivera, Y. J.; Lawrence, J. K.; Christian, D. J.; Jennings, P. J.; Rappazzo, A. F.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the scaling properties of the long-range temporal evolution and intermittency of Atmospheric Imaging Assembly/Solar Dynamics Observatory intensity observations in four solar environments: an active region core, a weak emission region, and two core loops. We use two approaches: the probability distribution function (PDF) of time series increments and multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). Noise taints the results, so we focus on the 171 Å waveband, which has the highest signal-to-noise ratio. The lags between pairs of wavebands distinguish between coronal versus transition region (TR) emission. In all physical regions studied, scaling in the range of 15-45 minutes is multifractal, and the time series are anti-persistent on average. The degree of anti-correlation in the TR time series is greater than that for coronal emission. The multifractality stems from long-term correlations in the data rather than the wide distribution of intensities. Observations in the 335 Å waveband can be described in terms of a multifractal with added noise. The multiscaling of the extreme-ultraviolet data agrees qualitatively with the radiance from a phenomenological model of impulsive bursts plus noise, and also from ohmic dissipation in a reduced magnetohydrodynamic model for coronal loop heating. The parameter space must be further explored to seek quantitative agreement. Thus, the observational “signatures” obtained by the combined tests of the PDF of increments and the MF-DFA offer strong constraints that can systematically discriminate among models for coronal heating.

  14. Computation of Solar Radiative Fluxes by 1D and 3D Methods Using Cloudy Atmospheres Inferred from A-train Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Howard W.; Kato, Serji; Wehr, T.

    2012-01-01

    The main point of this study was to use realistic representations of cloudy atmospheres to assess errors in solar flux estimates associated with 1D radiative transfer models. A scene construction algorithm, developed for the EarthCARE satellite mission, was applied to CloudSat, CALIPSO, and MODIS satellite data thus producing 3D cloudy atmospheres measuring 60 km wide by 13,000 km long at 1 km grid-spacing. Broadband solar fluxes and radiances for each (1 km)2 column where then produced by a Monte Carlo photon transfer model run in both full 3D and independent column approximation mode (i.e., a 1D model).

  15. Middle atmosphere response to different descriptions of the 11-yr solar cycle in spectral irradiance in a chemistry-climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. H. Swartz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The 11-yr solar cycle in solar spectral irradiance (SSI inferred from measurements by the SOlar Radiation & Climate Experiment (SORCE suggests a much larger variation in the ultraviolet than previously accepted. We present middle atmosphere ozone and temperature responses to the solar cycles in SORCE SSI and the ubiquitous Naval Research Laboratory (NRL SSI reconstruction using the Goddard Earth Observing System chemistry-climate model (GEOSCCM. The results are largely consistent with other recent modeling studies. The modeled ozone response is positive throughout the stratosphere and lower mesosphere using the NRL SSI, while the SORCE SSI produces a response that is larger in the lower stratosphere but out of phase with respect to total solar irradiance above 45 km. The modeled responses in total ozone are similar to those derived from satellite and ground-based measurements, 3–6 Dobson Units per 100 units of 10.7-cm radio flux (F10.7 in the tropics. The peak zonal mean tropical temperature response using the SORCE SSI is nearly 2 K per 100 units F10.7 – 3 times larger than the simulation using the NRL SSI. The GEOSCCM and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC 2-D coupled model are used to examine how the SSI solar cycle affects the atmosphere through direct solar heating and photolysis processes individually. Middle atmosphere ozone is affected almost entirely through photolysis, whereas the solar cycle in temperature is caused both through direct heating and photolysis feedbacks, processes that are mostly linearly separable. This is important in that it means that chemistry-transport models should simulate the solar cycle in ozone well, while general circulation models without coupled chemistry will underestimate the temperature response to the solar cycle significantly in the middle atmosphere. Further, the net ozone response results from the balance of ozone production at wavelengths less than 242 nm

  16. Solar Wind Strahl Observations and Their Implication to the Core-Halo Formation due to Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinas, Adolfo F.

    2011-01-01

    A study of the kinetic properties of the strahl electron velocity distribution functions (VDF?s) in the solar wind is presented. This study focuses on the mechanisms that control and regulate the electron VDF?s and the stability of the strahl electrons in the solar wind; mechanisms that are not yet well understood. Various parameters are investigated such as the strahl-electron density, temperature anisotropy, and electron heat-flux. These parameters are used to investigate the stability of the strahl population. The analysis check for whether the strahl electrons are constrained by some instability (e.g., the whistler or KAW instabilities), or are maintained by other types of processes. The electron heat-flux and temperature anisotropy are determined by modeling of the 3D-VDF?s from which the moments properties of the various populations are obtained. The results of this study have profound implication on the current hypothesis about the probable formation of the solar wind halo electrons produced from the scattering of the strahl population. This hypothesis is strengthened by direct observations of the strahl electrons being scattered into the core-halo in an isolated event. The observation implies that the scattering of the strahl is not a continuous process but occurs in bursts in regions where conditions for wave growth providing the scattering are optimum. Sometimes, observations indicate that the strahl component is anisotropic (Tper/Tpal approx. 2). This provides a possible free energy source for the excitation of whistler waves as a possible scattering mechanism, however this condition is not always observed. The study is based on high time resolution data from the Cluster/PEACE electron spectrometer.

  17. Nitrogen fractionation in the atmospheres of Pluto and Titan - implications for the origin of nitrogen in KBOs and comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandt, Kathleen; Luspay-Kuti, Adrienn; Jessup, Kandis Lea; Hue, Vincent; Kammer, Josh; Filwett, Rachael

    2017-04-01

    Recent observations of the composition of Pluto's atmosphere made by the Alice Ultraviolet Spectrometer on New Horizons and by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) have shown that Pluto's nitrogen chemistry differs significantly from that observed in Titan's upper atmosphere. The isotope ratios, 14N/15N, in N2 and HCN in Titan's atmosphere are 167.6 and 68, respectively. They differ by more than a factor of two because photodissociation of molecular nitrogen in Titan's atmosphere leads to a significant enrichment of the heavy nitrogen isotope, 15N, in HCN. However, ALMA observations were not able to detect HC15N in Pluto's atmosphere, setting a lower limit of 125 for 14N/15N in HCN. We have applied our model for simulating nitrogen isotope chemistry in Titan's atmosphere to Pluto, constrained by New Horizons observations, and explore possible explanations of the lower limit provided by ALMA. These results have implications for the origin of nitrogen on Pluto, other Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs), and for comets like the Rosetta mission target 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, which is thought to originate in the Kuiper Belt.

  18. Missing Data Imputation of Solar Radiation Data under Different Atmospheric Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción Crespo Turrado

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Global solar broadband irradiance on a planar surface is measured at weather stations by pyranometers. In the case of the present research, solar radiation values from nine meteorological stations of the MeteoGalicia real-time observational network, captured and stored every ten minutes, are considered. In this kind of record, the lack of data and/or the presence of wrong values adversely affects any time series study. Consequently, when this occurs, a data imputation process must be performed in order to replace missing data with estimated values. This paper aims to evaluate the multivariate imputation of ten-minute scale data by means of the chained equations method (MICE. This method allows the network itself to impute the missing or wrong data of a solar radiation sensor, by using either all or just a group of the measurements of the remaining sensors. Very good results have been obtained with the MICE method in comparison with other methods employed in this field such as Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW and Multiple Linear Regression (MLR. The average RMSE value of the predictions for the MICE algorithm was 13.37% while that for the MLR it was 28.19%, and 31.68% for the IDW.

  19. Effect of Atmospheric Absorption Bands on the Optimal Design of Multijunction Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, William E.; Friedman, Daniel J.; Geisz, John F.

    2017-06-26

    Designing terrestrial multijunction (MJ) cells with 5+ junctions is challenging, in part because the presence of atmospheric absorption bands creates a design space with numerous local maxima. Here we introduce a new taxonomical structure which facilitates both numerical convergence and the visualization of the resulting designs.

  20. Snow carrots after the Chelyabinsk event and model implications for highly porous solar system objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Robert; Artemieva, Natalia; Ivanova, Marina; Lorenz, Cyril; Wünnemann, Kai

    2017-05-01

    After the catastrophic disruption of the Chelyabinsk meteoroid, small fragments formed funnels in the snow layer covering the ground. We constrain the pre-impact characteristics of the fragments by simulating their atmospheric descent with the atmospheric entry model. Fragments resulting from catastrophic breakup may lose about 90% of their initial mass due to ablation and reach the snow vertically with a free-fall velocity in the range of 30-90 m s-1. The fall time of the fragments is much longer than their cooling time, and, as a consequence, fragments have the same temperature as the lower atmosphere, i.e., of about -20 °C. Then, we use the shock physics code iSALE to model the penetration of fragments into fluffy snow, the formation of a funnel and a zone of denser snow lining its walls. We examine the influence of several material parameters of snow and present our best-fit model by comparing funnel depth and funnel wall characteristics with observations. In addition, we suggest a viscous flow approximation to estimate funnel depth dependence on the meteorite mass. We discuss temperature gradient metamorphism as a possible mechanism which allows to fill the funnels with denser snow and to form the observed "snow carrots." This natural experiment also helps us to calibrate the iSALE code for simulating impacts into highly porous matter in the solar system including tracks in the aerogel catchers of the Stardust mission and possible impact craters on the 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko comet observed recently by the Rosetta mission.

  1. Long-term solar activity and its implications to the heliosphere, geomagnetic activity, and the Earth’s climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanskanen Eija

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Sun’s long-term magnetic variability is the primary driver of space climate. This variability is manifested not only in the long-observed and dramatic change of magnetic fields on the solar surface, but also in the changing solar radiative output across all wavelengths. The Sun’s magnetic variability also modulates the particulate and magnetic fluxes in the heliosphere, which determine the interplanetary conditions and impose significant electromagnetic forces and effects upon planetary atmospheres. All these effects due to the changing solar magnetic fields are also relevant for planetary climates, including the climate of the Earth. The ultimate cause of solar variability, at time scales much shorter than stellar evolutionary time scales, i.e., at decadal to centennial and, maybe, even millennial or longer scales, has its origin in the solar dynamo mechanism. Therefore, in order to better understand the origin of space climate, one must analyze different proxies of solar magnetic variability and develop models of the solar dynamo mechanism that correctly produce the observed properties of the magnetic fields. This Preface summarizes the most important findings of the papers of this Special Issue, most of which were presented in the Space Climate-4 Symposium organized in 2011 in Goa, India.

  2. Atmospheric loss from the dayside open polar region and its dependence on geomagnetic activity: implications for atmospheric escape on evolutionary timescales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Slapak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the total O+ escape rate from the dayside open polar region and its dependence on geomagnetic activity, specifically Kp. Two different escape routes of magnetospheric plasma into the solar wind, the plasma mantle, and the high-latitude dayside magnetosheath have been investigated separately. The flux of O+ in the plasma mantle is sufficiently fast to subsequently escape further down the magnetotail passing the neutral point, and it is nearly 3 times larger than that in the dayside magnetosheath. The contribution from the plasma mantle route is estimated as  ∼ 3. 9 × 1024exp(0. 45 Kp [s−1] with a 1 to 2 order of magnitude range for a given geomagnetic activity condition. The extrapolation of this result, including escape via the dayside magnetosheath, indicates an average O+ escape of 3 × 1026 s−1 for the most extreme geomagnetic storms. Assuming that the range is mainly caused by the solar EUV level, which was also larger in the past, the average O+ escape could have reached 1027–28 s−1 a few billion years ago. Integration over time suggests a total oxygen escape from ancient times until the present roughly equal to the atmospheric oxygen content today.

  3. Solar wind interaction with Mars Upper atmosphere: Results from the one-way coupling between the Multi-fluid MHD model and the M-TGCM model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, C.; Bougher, S. W.; Ma, Y.; Toth, G.; Nagy, A. F.; Brain, D. A.; Najib, D.

    2012-12-01

    The study of the solar wind interaction with Mars upper atmosphere/ionosphere has triggered great interest in recent years. Among the large number of topics in this research area, the investigation of ion escape rates has become increasingly important due to its potential impact on the long-term evolution of Mars atmosphere (e.g., loss of water) over its history. In the present work, we adopt the 3D Mars neutral atmosphere profiles from the well-regarded Mars Thermospheric Global Circulation Model (M-TGCM) and one-way couple it with the 3D BATS-R-US Mars multi-fluid MHD model that solves separate momentum equations for each ion species. The M-TGCM model takes into account the effects of the solar cycle (solar minimum: F10.7=70 and solar maximum: F10.7=200 with equinox condition: Ls=0), allowing us to investigate the effects of the solar cycle on the Mars upper atmosphere ion escape by using a one-way coupling, i.e., the M-TGCM model outputs are used as inputs for the multi-fluid MHD model. A case for solar maximum with extremely high solar wind parameters is also investigated to estimate how high the escape flux can be for such an extreme case. Moreover, the ion escape flux along a satellite trajectory will be studied. This has the potential to provide predictions of ion escape rates for comparison to future data to be returned by the MAVEN mission (2012-2016). In order to make the code run more efficiently, we adopt a more appropriate grid structure compared to the one used previously. This new grid structure will benefit us to investigate the effects of some dynamic events (such as CME and dust storm) on the ion escape flux.

  4. Prebiotic Synthesis from CO Atmospheres: Implications for the origins of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor); Miyakawa, Shin; Yamanashi, Hiroto; Kobayashi, Kensei; Cleaves, H. James; Miller, Stanley L.

    2002-01-01

    Most models of the primitive atmosphere around the time life originated suggest that the atmosphere was dominated by carbon dioxide, largely based on the notion that the atmosphere was derived via volcanic outgassing, and that those gases were similar to those found in modern volcanic effluent. These models tend to downplay the possibility of a strongly reducing atmosphere, which had been thought to be important for prebiotic synthesis and thus the origin of life. However, there is no definitive geologic evidence for the oxidation state of the early atmosphere and bioorganic compounds are not efficiently synthesized from CO2 atmospheres. In the present study, it was shown that a CO-CO2-N2-H2O atmosphere can give a variety of bioorganic compounds with yields comparable to those obtained from a strongly reducing atmosphere. Atmospheres containing carbon monoxide might therefore have been conducive to prebiotic synthesis and perhaps the origin of life. CO-dominant atmospheres could have existed if the production rate of CO from impacts of extraterrestrial materials were high or if the upper mantle had been more reduced than today.

  5. Surges and Si IV Bursts in the Solar Atmosphere: Understanding IRIS and SST Observations through RMHD Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbrega-Siverio, D.; Martínez-Sykora, J.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.

    2017-12-01

    Surges often appear as a result of the emergence of magnetized plasma from the solar interior. Traditionally, they are observed in chromospheric lines such as Hα 6563 \\mathringA and Ca II 8542 \\mathringA . However, whether there is a response to the surge appearance and evolution in the Si IV lines or, in fact, in many other transition region lines has not been studied. In this paper, we analyze a simultaneous episode of an Hα surge and a Si IV burst that occurred on 2016 September 03 in active region AR 12585. To that end, we use coordinated observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. For the first time, we report emission of Si IV within the surge, finding profiles that are brighter and broader than the average. Furthermore, the brightest Si IV patches within the domain of the surge are located mainly near its footpoints. To understand the relation between the surges and the emission in transition region lines like Si IV, we have carried out 2.5D radiative MHD (RMHD) experiments of magnetic flux emergence episodes using the Bifrost code and including the nonequilibrium ionization of silicon. Through spectral synthesis, we explain several features of the observations. We show that the presence of Si IV emission patches within the surge, their location near the surge footpoints and various observed spectral features are a natural consequence of the emergence of magnetized plasma from the interior to the atmosphere and the ensuing reconnection processes.

  6. Electrodeposition of ZnO window layer for an all-atmospheric fabrication process of chalcogenide solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsin, Fabien; Venerosy, Amélie; Vidal, Julien; Collin, Stéphane; Clatot, Johnny; Lombez, Laurent; Paire, Myriam; Borensztajn, Stephan; Broussillou, Cédric; Grand, Pierre Philippe; Jaime, Salvador; Lincot, Daniel; Rousset, Jean

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the low cost electrodeposition of a transparent and conductive chlorine doped ZnO layer with performances comparable to that produced by standard vacuum processes. First, an in-depth study of the defect physics by ab-initio calculation shows that chlorine is one of the best candidates to dope the ZnO. This result is experimentally confirmed by a complete optical analysis of the ZnO layer deposited in a chloride rich solution. We demonstrate that high doping levels (>1020 cm−3) and mobilities (up to 20 cm2 V−1 s−1) can be reached by insertion of chlorine in the lattice. The process developed in this study has been applied on a CdS/Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 p-n junction produced in a pilot line by a non vacuum process, to be tested as solar cell front contact deposition method. As a result efficiency of 14.3% has been reached opening the way of atmospheric production of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 solar cell. PMID:25753657

  7. Parametric generation of Alfven and sound waves in the solar atmosphere. A homogeneous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrukhin, N.S.; Fajnshtejn, S.M. (Gor' kovskij Politekhnicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    The parametric generation of Alfven and sound waves in a homogeneous plasma layer with constant values of Alfven (Csub(A)) and sound (Csub(S)) velocities is considered. The two cases are studied. In the first case Csub(A) > Csub(S) which one is realized in active regions. The second one Csub(S) > Csub(A) is taken place in the quiet chromosphere. Conditions are found out for excitation of waves at different ratios of magnetic and gas-kinetic pressures. Coefficients of the nonlinear wave scattering in a layer of the solar plasma have been found.

  8. Propagation of nonlinear, radiatively damped longitudinal waves along magnetic flux tubes in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbold, G.; Ulmschneider, P.; Spruit, H. C.; Rosner, R.

    1985-01-01

    For solar magnetic flux tubes three types of waves are compared: longitudinal MHD tube waves, acoustic tube waves propagating in the same tube geometry but with rigid walls and ordinary acoustic waves in plane geometry. It is found that the effect of the distensibility of the tube is small and that longitudinal waves are essentially acoustic tube waves. Due to the tube geometry there is considerable difference between longitudinal waves or acoustic tube waves and ordinary acoustic waves. Longitudinal waves as well as acoustic tube waves show a smaller amplitude growth, larger shock formation heights, smaller mean chromospheric temperature but a steeper dependence of the temperature gradient on wave period.

  9. Polarized Light from the Sun: Unification of the Corona and Analysis of the Second Solar Spectrum — Further Implications of a Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Solar Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to account for the slight polarization of the continuum towards the limb, propo- nents of the Standard Solar Model (SSM must have recourse to electron or hydrogen- based scattering of light, as no other mechanism is possible in a gaseous Sun. Con- versely, acceptance that the solar body is comprised of condensed matter opens up new avenues in the analysis of this problem, even if the photospheric surface itself is viewed as incapable of emitting polarized light. Thus, the increased disk polarization, from the center to the limb, can be explained by invoking the scattering of light by the at- mosphere above the photosphere. The former is reminiscent of mechanisms which are known to account for the polarization of sunlight in the atmosphere of the Earth. Within the context of the Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Solar Model (LMHSM, molecules and small particles, not electrons or hydrogen atoms as required by the SSM, would primarily act as scattering agents in regions also partially comprised of condensed hy- drogen structures (CHS. In addition, the well-known polarization which characterizes the K-corona would become a sign of emission polarization from an anisotropic source, without the need for scattering. In the LMHSM, the K, F, and T- coronas can be viewed as emissive and reflective manifestations of a single corona l entity adopting a radially anisotropic structure, while slowly cooling with altitude above the photosphere. The presence of “dust particles”, advanced by proponents of the SSM, would no longer be required to explain the F and T-corona, as a single cooling structure would account for the properties of the K, F, and T coronas. At the same time, the polarized “Second Solar Spectrum”, characterized by the dominance of certain elemental or ionic spectral lines and an abundance of molecular lines, could be explained in the LMHSM, by first invoking interface polarization and coordination of these species with condensed matter

  10. Nitrate records of a shallow ice core from East Antarctica: Atmospheric processes, preservation and climatic implications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Laluraj, C.M.; Thamban, M.; Naik, S.S.; Redkar, B.L.; Chaturvedi, A.; Ravindra, R.

    and its comparison with 10Be record from a core collected from South Pole suggest that a reduction in solar activity influenced the NO sub(3) sup(-) accumulation in Antarctica through enhanced production of odd nitrogen species...

  11. Solar Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of solar feature datasets contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide.

  12. Solar Indices

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  13. Solar Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of solar photographic and illustrated datasets contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide....

  14. Effect of Solar Radiation on the Optical Properties and Molecular Composition of Laboratory Proxies of Atmospheric Brown Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Ji; Aiona, Paige K.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2014-09-02

    Sources, optical properties, and chemical composition of atmospheric brown carbon (BrC) aerosol are uncertain, making it challenging to estimate its contribution to radiative forcing. Furthermore, optical properties of BrC may change significantly during its atmospheric aging. We examined the effect of solar photolysis on the molecular composition, mass absorption coefficient, and fluorescence of secondary organic aerosol prepared by high-NOx photooxidation of naphthalene (NAP SOA). The aqueous solutions of NAP SOA was observed to photobleach with an effective half-time of ~15 hours (with sun in its zenith) for the loss of the near-UV (300 -400 nm) absorbance. The molecular composition of NAP SOA was significantly modified by photolysis, with the average SOA formula changing from C14.1H14.5O5.1N0.08 to C11.8H14.9O4.5N0.02 after 4 hours of irradiation. The average O/C ratio did not change significantly, however, suggesting that it is not a good metric for assessing the extent of photolysis-driven aging in NAP SOA (and in BrC in general). In contrast to NAP SOA, the photolysis of BrC material produced by aqueous reaction of limonene+O3 SOA (LIM/O3 SOA) with ammonium sulfate was much faster, but it did not result in a significant change in the molecular level composition. The characteristic absorbance of the aged LIM/O3 SOA in the 450-600 nm range decayed with an effective half-time of <0.5 hour. This result emphasizes the highly variable and dynamic nature of different types of atmospheric BrC.

  15. Variations in the temperature and circulation of the atmosphere during the 11-year cycle of solar activity derived from the ERA-Interim reanalysis data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruzdev, A. N.

    2017-07-01

    Using the data of the ERA-Interim reanalysis, we have obtained estimates of changes in temperature, the geopotential and its large-scale zonal harmonics, wind velocity, and potential vorticity in the troposphere and stratosphere of the Northern and Southern hemispheres during the 11-year solar cycle. The estimates have been obtained using the method of multiple linear regression. Specific features of response of the indicated atmospheric parameters to the solar cycle have been revealed in particular regions of the atmosphere for a whole year and depending on the season. The results of the analysis indicate the existence of a reliable statistical relationship of large-scale dynamic and thermodynamic processes in the troposphere and stratosphere with the 11-year solar cycle.

  16. Solar forcing and atmospheric control of paleoflood dynamics in the Bernese Alps, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Lothar; Peña, Juan Carlos; Burjachs, Francesc; Carvalho, Filipe; Llorca, Jaime; Julià, Ramon; Lomax, Johanna; Schmidt, Thomas; Rubio, Patricio; Losada, Justino; Veit, Heinz

    2014-05-01

    A multidisciplinary approach provides data from natural, historical, and instrumental time series, for the study of potential effects of climatic changes on alpine floods outside the known range of extreme events. The research focuses on the densely populated Bernese Alps, which are a true "hot spot" of hydrological risk. For the reconstruction of climate variability and floods, interdecadal-resolution alluvial delta plain records were examined. The multi-proxy approach affords insight into alpine flood dynamics of mid-scale catchments during the last three millennia. Spectral analysis of the geochemical and pollen time series records and climate proxies (δ14C, δ18O isotopes from the Greenland ice, NAO) evidence similar periodicities of 60, 85, 105 and 200 yrs. Thus, the mechanisms of the flood processes are strongly influenced by the North Atlantic dynamics and solar activity. The proxies indicate that cooler climate pulses and transitions from cool to warm climate pulses were an important external driving force of floods. This hypothesis is supported by the reconstructed floods of the Aare and Lütschine rivers from local documentary sources during the last 500 yrs. Flood periods inferred from sedimentary archives (flood layers, geochemical proxies and shifts of river channel) were calibrated by local documentary flood records and compared with the pattern of settlement on flood prone landforms. The generated data series shows also a good correlation with climate proxies, such as the annual temperatures of Europe (Luterbacher et al., 2004), tree ring based summer temperatures of Central Europe (Büntgen et al., 2011) and total solar irradiance according to the model of Steinhilber et al. (2009). With regard to the last two centuries flood magnitude and frequencies (exact dating) as well as driving mechanisms were reconstructed with more precision. Furthermore, a summer flood index of Switzerland (INU) based on damages recorded from 1800 to 2008 AD was performed

  17. Physiological responses to low atmospheric pressure stunning and the implications for welfare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mckeegan, D.E.F.; Sandercock, D.A.; Gerritzen, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    In low atmospheric pressure stunning (LAPS), poultry are rendered unconscious before slaughter by gradually reducing oxygen tension in the atmosphere to achieve a progressive anoxia. The effects of LAPS are not instantaneous, so there are legitimate welfare concerns around the experience of birds

  18. Solar wind interaction with Mars upper atmosphere: Results from the one-way coupling between the multifluid MHD model and the MTGCM model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chuanfei; Bougher, Stephen W.; Ma, Yingjuan; Toth, Gabor; Nagy, Andrew F.; Najib, Dalal

    2014-04-01

    The 3-D multifluid Block Adaptive Tree Solar-wind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) MHD code (MF-MHD) is coupled with the 3-D Mars Thermospheric general circulation model (MTGCM). The ion escape rate from the Martian upper atmosphere is investigated by using a one-way coupling approach, i.e., the MF-MHD model incorporates the effects of 3-D neutral atmosphere profiles from the MTGCM model. The calculations are carried out for two cases with different solar cycle conditions. The calculated total ion escape flux (the sum of three major ionospheric species, O+, O2+, and CO2+) for solar cycle maximum conditions (6.6×1024 s-1) is about 2.6 times larger than that of solar cycle minimum conditions (2.5×1024 s-1). Our simulation results show good agreement with recent observations of 2-3×1024 s-1 (O+, O2+, and CO2+) measured near solar cycle minimum conditions by Mars Express. An extremely high solar wind condition is also simulated which may mimic the condition of coronal mass ejections or corotating interaction regions passing Mars. Simulation results show that it can lead to a significant value of the escape flux as large as 4.3×1025s-1.

  19. Wavelength Dependence of Solar Irradiance Enhancement During X-Class Flares and Its Influence on the Upper Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanshi; Richmond, Arthur D.; Deng, Yue; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Qian, Liying; Solomon, Stanley C.; Roble, Raymond G.; Xiao, Zuo

    2013-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of solar irradiance enhancement during flare events is one of the important factors in determining how the Thermosphere-Ionosphere (T-I) system responds to flares. To investigate the wavelength dependence of flare enhancement, the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) was run for 61 X-class flares. The absolute and the percentage increases of solar irradiance at flare peaks, compared to pre-flare conditions, have clear wavelength dependences. The 0-14 nm irradiance increases much more (approx. 680% on average) than that in the 14-25 nm waveband (approx. 65% on average), except at 24 nm (approx. 220%). The average percentage increases for the 25-105 nm and 122-190 nm wavebands are approx. 120% and approx. 35%, respectively. The influence of 6 different wavebands (0-14 nm, 14-25 nm, 25-105 nm, 105- 120 nm, 121.56 nm, and 122-175 nm) on the thermosphere was examined for the October 28th, 2003 flare (X17-class) event by coupling FISM with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM) under geomagnetically quiet conditions (Kp=1). While the enhancement in the 0-14 nm waveband caused the largest enhancement of the globally integrated solar heating, the impact of solar irradiance enhancement on the thermosphere at 400 km is largest for the 25-105 nm waveband (EUV), which accounts for about 33 K of the total 45 K temperature enhancement, and approx. 7.4% of the total approx. 11.5% neutral density enhancement. The effect of 122-175 nm flare radiation on the thermosphere is rather small. The study also illustrates that the high-altitude thermospheric response to the flare radiation at 0-175 nm is almost a linear combination of the responses to the individual wavebands. The upper thermospheric temperature and density enhancements peaked 3-5 h after the maximum flare radiation.

  20. Spring-fall asymmetry of substorm strength, geomagnetic activity and solar wind: Implications for semiannual variation and solar hemispheric asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsula, K.; Tanskanen, E.; Love, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    We study the seasonal variation of substorms, geomagnetic activity and their solar wind drivers in 1993–2008. The number of substorms and substorm mean duration depict an annual variation with maxima in Winter and Summer, respectively, reflecting the annual change of the local ionosphere. In contradiction, substorm mean amplitude, substorm total efficiency and global geomagnetic activity show a dominant annual variation, with equinoctial maxima alternating between Spring in solar cycle 22 and Fall in cycle 23. The largest annual variations were found in 1994 and 2003, in the declining phase of the two cycles when high-speed streams dominate the solar wind. A similar, large annual variation is found in the solar wind driver of substorms and geomagnetic activity, which implies that the annual variation of substorm strength, substorm efficiency and geomagnetic activity is not due to ionospheric conditions but to a hemispherically asymmetric distribution of solar wind which varies from one cycle to another. Our results imply that the overall semiannual variation in global geomagnetic activity has been seriously overestimated, and is largely an artifact of the dominant annual variation with maxima alternating between Spring and Fall. The results also suggest an intimate connection between the asymmetry of solar magnetic fields and some of the largest geomagnetic disturbances, offering interesting new pathways for forecasting disturbances with a longer lead time to the future.

  1. New Setup of the UAS ALADINA for Measuring Boundary Layer Properties, Atmospheric Particles and Solar Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Bärfuss

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The unmanned research aircraft ALADINA (Application of Light-weight Aircraft for Detecting in situ Aerosols has been established as an important tool for boundary layer research. For simplified integration of additional sensor payload, a flexible and reliable data acquisition system was developed at the Institute of Flight Guidance, Technische Universität (TU Braunschweig. The instrumentation consists of sensors for temperature, humidity, three-dimensional wind vector, position, black carbon, irradiance and atmospheric particles in the diameter range of ultra-fine particles up to the accumulation mode. The modular concept allows for straightforward integration and exchange of sensors. So far, more than 200 measurement flights have been performed with the robustly-engineered system ALADINA at different locations. The obtained datasets are unique in the field of atmospheric boundary layer research. In this study, a new data processing method for deriving parameters with fast resolution and to provide reliable accuracies is presented. Based on tests in the field and in the laboratory, the limitations and verifiability of integrated sensors are discussed.

  2. Solar Indices - Solar Radio Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  3. New insights into the atmospheric mercury cycling in central Antarctica and implications on a continental scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Angot

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Under the framework of the GMOS project (Global Mercury Observation System atmospheric mercury monitoring has been implemented at Concordia Station on the high-altitude Antarctic plateau (75°06′ S, 123°20′ E, 3220 m above sea level. We report here the first year-round measurements of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg(0 in the atmosphere and in snowpack interstitial air on the East Antarctic ice sheet. This unique data set shows evidence of an intense oxidation of atmospheric Hg(0 in summer (24-hour daylight due to the high oxidative capacity of the Antarctic plateau atmosphere in this period of the year. Summertime Hg(0 concentrations exhibited a pronounced daily cycle in ambient air with maximal concentrations around midday. Photochemical reactions and chemical exchange at the air–snow interface were prominent, highlighting the role of the snowpack on the atmospheric mercury cycle. Our observations reveal a 20 to 30 % decrease of atmospheric Hg(0 concentrations from May to mid-August (winter, 24 h darkness. This phenomenon has not been reported elsewhere and possibly results from the dry deposition of Hg(0 onto the snowpack. We also reveal the occurrence of multi-day to weeklong atmospheric Hg(0 depletion events in summer, not associated with depletions of ozone, and likely due to a stagnation of air masses above the plateau triggering an accumulation of oxidants within the shallow boundary layer. Our observations suggest that the inland atmospheric reservoir is depleted in Hg(0 in summer. Due to katabatic winds flowing out from the Antarctic plateau down the steep vertical drops along the coast and according to observations at coastal Antarctic stations, the striking reactivity observed on the plateau most likely influences the cycle of atmospheric mercury on a continental scale.

  4. Solar Features - Solar Flares

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A solar flare is a short-lived sudden increase in the intensity of radiation emitted in the neighborhood of sunspots. For many years it was best monitored in the...

  5. Deriving the slit functions from OMI solar observations and its implications for ozone-profile retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kang; Liu, Xiong; Huang, Guanyu; González Abad, Gonzalo; Cai, Zhaonan; Chance, Kelly; Yang, Kai

    2017-10-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) has been successfully measuring the Earth's atmospheric composition since 2004, but the on-orbit behavior of its slit functions has not been thoroughly characterized. Preflight measurements of slit functions have been used as a static input in many OMI retrieval algorithms. This study derives on-orbit slit functions from the OMI irradiance spectra assuming various function forms, including standard and super-Gaussian functions and a stretch to the preflight slit functions. The on-orbit slit functions in the UV bands show U-shaped cross-track dependences that cannot be fully represented by the preflight ones. The full widths at half maximum (FWHM) of the stretched preflight slit functions for detector pixels at large viewing angles are up to 30 % larger than the nadir pixels for the UV1 band, 5 % larger for the UV2 band, and practically flat in the VIS band. Nonetheless, the on-orbit changes of OMI slit functions are found to be insignificant over time after accounting for the solar activity, despite of the decaying of detectors and the occurrence of OMI row anomaly. Applying the derived on-orbit slit functions to ozone-profile retrieval shows substantial improvements over the preflight slit functions based on comparisons with ozonesonde validations.

  6. The behavior of transverse waves in nonuniform solar flux tubes. II. Implications for coronal loop seismology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, Roberto; Terradas, Jaume; Oliver, Ramón [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Goossens, Marcel, E-mail: roberto.soler@uib.es [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-02-01

    The seismology of coronal loops using observations of damped transverse oscillations in combination with results from theoretical models is a tool to indirectly infer physical parameters in the solar atmospheric plasma. Existing seismology schemes based on approximations of the period and damping time of kink oscillations are often used beyond their theoretical range of applicability. These approximations assume that the variation of density across the loop is confined to a nonuniform layer much thinner than the radius of the loop, but the results of the inversion problem often do not satisfy this preliminary hypothesis. Here, we determine the accuracy of the analytic approximations of the period and damping time, and the impact on seismology estimates when largely nonuniform loops are considered. We find that the accuracy of the approximations when used beyond their range of applicability is strongly affected by the form of the density profile across the loop, that is observationally unknown and so must be arbitrarily imposed as part of the theoretical model. The error associated with the analytic approximations can be larger than 50% even for relatively thin nonuniform layers. This error directly affects the accuracy of approximate seismology estimates compared to actual numerical inversions. In addition, assuming different density profiles can produce noncoincident intervals of the seismic variables in inversions of the same event. The ignorance about the true shape of density variation across the loop is an important source of error that may dispute the reliability of parameters seismically inferred assuming an ad hoc density profile.

  7. Solar Radio

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Scientists monitor the structure of the solar corona, the outer most regions of the Sun's atmosphere, using radio waves (100?s of MHz to 10?s of GHz). Variations in...

  8. Atmospheric escape from the TRAPPIST-1 planets and implications for habitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chuanfei; Jin, Meng; Lingam, Manasvi; Airapetian, Vladimir S; Ma, Yingjuan; van der Holst, Bart

    2018-01-09

    The presence of an atmosphere over sufficiently long timescales is widely perceived as one of the most prominent criteria associated with planetary surface habitability. We address the crucial question of whether the seven Earth-sized planets transiting the recently discovered ultracool dwarf star TRAPPIST-1 are capable of retaining their atmospheres. To this effect, we carry out numerical simulations to characterize the stellar wind of TRAPPIST-1 and the atmospheric ion escape rates for all of the seven planets. We also estimate the escape rates analytically and demonstrate that they are in good agreement with the numerical results. We conclude that the outer planets of the TRAPPIST-1 system are capable of retaining their atmospheres over billion-year timescales. The consequences arising from our results are also explored in the context of abiogenesis, biodiversity, and searches for future exoplanets. In light of the many unknowns and assumptions involved, we recommend that these conclusions must be interpreted with due caution.

  9. HOMOLOGOUS FLUX ROPES OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun, E-mail: liting@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2013-12-01

    We present the first Solar Dynamics Observatory observations of four homologous flux ropes in the active region (AR) 11745 on 2013 May 20-22. The four flux ropes are all above the neutral line of the AR, with endpoints anchoring at the same region, and have a generally similar morphology. The first three flux ropes rose with a velocity of less than 30 km s{sup –1} after their appearance, and subsequently their intensities at 131 Å decreased and the flux ropes became obscure. The fourth flux rope erupted last, with a speed of about 130 km s{sup –1} and formed a coronal mass ejection (CME). The associated filament showed an obvious anti-clockwise twist motion at the initial stage, and the twist was estimated at 4π. This indicates that kink instability possibly triggers the early rise of the fourth flux rope. The activated filament material was spatially within the flux rope and showed consistent evolution in the early stages. Our findings provide new clues for understanding the characteristics of flux ropes. Firstly, multiple flux ropes are successively formed at the same location during an AR evolution process. Secondly, a slow-rise flux rope does not necessarily result in a CME, and a fast-eruption flux rope does result in a CME.

  10. Galactic cosmic rays on extrasolar Earth-like planets. II. Atmospheric implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grießmeier, J.-M.; Tabataba-Vakili, F.; Stadelmann, A.; Grenfell, J. L.; Atri, D.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Theoretical arguments indicate that close-in terrestial exoplanets may have weak magnetic fields. As described in the companion article (Paper I), a weak magnetic field results in a high flux of galactic cosmic rays to the top of the planetary atmosphere. Aims: We investigate effects that may result from a high flux of galactic cosmic rays both throughout the atmosphere and at the planetary surface. Methods: Using an air shower approach, we calculate how the atmospheric chemistry and temperature change under the influence of galactic cosmic rays for Earth-like (N2-O2 dominated) atmospheres. We evaluate the production and destruction rate of atmospheric biosignature molecules. We derive planetary emission and transmission spectra to study the influence of galactic cosmic rays on biosignature detectability. We then calculate the resulting surface UV flux, the surface particle flux, and the associated equivalent biological dose rates. Results: We find that up to 20% of stratospheric ozone is destroyed by cosmic-ray protons. The effect on the planetary spectra, however, is negligible. The reduction of the planetary ozone layer leads to an increase in the weighted surface UV flux by two orders of magnitude under stellar UV flare conditions. The resulting biological effective dose rate is, however, too low to strongly affect surface life. We also examine the surface particle flux: For a planet with a terrestrial atmosphere (with a surface pressure of 1033 hPa), a reduction of the magnetic shielding efficiency can increase the biological radiation dose rate by a factor of two, which is non-critical for biological systems. For a planet with a weaker atmosphere (with a surface pressure of 97.8 hPa), the planetary magnetic field has a much stronger influence on the biological radiation dose, changing it by up to two orders of magnitude. Conclusions: For a planet with an Earth-like atmospheric pressure, weak or absent magnetospheric shielding against galactic cosmic

  11. Fate of Chloromethanes in the Atmospheric Environment: Implications for Human Health, Ozone Formation and Depletion, and Global Warming Impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wen-Tien

    2017-09-21

    Among the halogenated hydrocarbons, chloromethanes (i.e., methyl chloride, CH₃Cl; methylene chloride, CH₂Cl₂; chloroform, CHCl₃; and carbon tetrachloride, CCl₄) play a vital role due to their extensive uses as solvents and chemical intermediates. This article aims to review their main chemical/physical properties and commercial/industrial uses, as well as the environment and health hazards posed by them and their toxic decomposition products. The environmental properties (including atmospheric lifetime, radiative efficiency, ozone depletion potential, global warming potential, photochemical ozone creation potential, and surface mixing ratio) of these chlorinated methanes are also reviewed. In addition, this paper further discusses their atmospheric fates and human health implications because they are apt to reside in the lower atmosphere when released into the environment. According to the atmospheric degradation mechanism, their toxic degradation products in the troposphere include hydrogen chloride (HCl), carbon monoxide (CO), chlorine (Cl₂), formyl chloride (HCOCl), carbonyl chloride (COCl₂), and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂). Among them, COCl₂ (also called phosgene) is a powerful irritating gas, which is easily hydrolyzed or thermally decomposed to form hydrogen chloride.

  12. Long-term decline of global atmospheric ethane concentrations and implications for methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Isobel J; Sulbaek Andersen, Mads P; Meinardi, Simone; Bruhwiler, Lori; Blake, Nicola J; Helmig, Detlev; Rowland, F Sherwood; Blake, Donald R

    2012-08-23

    After methane, ethane is the most abundant hydrocarbon in the remote atmosphere. It is a precursor to tropospheric ozone and it influences the atmosphere's oxidative capacity through its reaction with the hydroxyl radical, ethane's primary atmospheric sink. Here we present the longest continuous record of global atmospheric ethane levels. We show that global ethane emission rates decreased from 14.3 to 11.3 teragrams per year, or by 21 per cent, from 1984 to 2010. We attribute this to decreasing fugitive emissions from ethane's fossil fuel source--most probably decreased venting and flaring of natural gas in oil fields--rather than a decline in its other major sources, biofuel use and biomass burning. Ethane's major emission sources are shared with methane, and recent studies have disagreed on whether reduced fossil fuel or microbial emissions have caused methane's atmospheric growth rate to slow. Our findings suggest that reduced fugitive fossil fuel emissions account for at least 10-21 teragrams per year (30-70 per cent) of the decrease in methane's global emissions, significantly contributing to methane's slowing atmospheric growth rate since the mid-1980s.

  13. Web-Based Data Processing System for Automated Detection of Oscillations with Applications to the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sych, R. A.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Anfinogentov, S. A.; Ofman, L.

    2010-10-01

    A web-based, interactive system for the remote processing of imaging data sets ( i.e., EUV, X-ray, and microwave) and the automated interactive detection of wave and oscillatory phenomena in the solar atmosphere is presented. The system targets localized, but spatially resolved, phenomena such as kink, sausage, and longitudinal propagating and standing waves. The system implements the methods of Periodmapping for pre-analysis, and Pixelized Wavelet Filtering for detailed analysis of the imaging data cubes. The system is implemented on the dedicated data-processing server http://pwf.iszf.irk.ru , which is situated at the Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, Irkutsk, Russia. Input data in the .sav, .fits, or .txt formats can be submitted via the local and/or global network (the Internet). The output data can be in the png, jpeg, and binary formats, on the user’s request. The output data are periodmaps; narrowband amplitude, power, phase and correlation maps of the wave’s sources at significant harmonics and in the chosen spectral intervals, and mpeg movies of their evolution. The system was tested by the analysis of the EUV and microwave emission from the active region NOAA 10756 on 4 May 2005 observed with TRACE and the Nobeyama Radioheliograph. The similarity of the spatial localization of three-minute propagating waves, near the footpoint of locally open magnetic-field lines determined by the potential-field extrapolation, in both the transition region and the corona was established. In the transition region the growth of the three-minute amplitude was found to be accompanied by the decrease in the line-of-sight angle to the wave-propagation direction.

  14. Large-scale travelling atmospheric disturbances in the night ionosphere during the solar terrestrial event of 23 May 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, K. J. W.; Gardiner-Garden, R.; Sjarifudin, M.; Terkildsen, M.; Shi, J.; Harris, T. J.

    2008-12-01

    This paper examines the night of 23 May 2002 as observed by a large number of Australian ionosondes (19) as well as others situated in New Guinea, Indonesia and China. The arrival of a solar Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) and subsequent negative Bz turnings in the solar wind resulted in a magnetic storm with two bursts of energy inputs into the auroral zones. The energy depositions produced two successive rise and falls in ionospheric height over a 300 km height range within the period 12.30-21.00 UT. The two events were seen in the night-side hemisphere by all ionosondes at Southeast Asian longitudes in the southern hemisphere, as well as in the northern hemisphere. In this paper, the simultaneity and spatial variability of these events is investigated. The first event, after an initial expansion towards the equator, ended with a retreat in the area of height rise back towards the auroral zone. The second event was of greater complexity and did not show such a steady variation in rise and fall times with latitude. Such events are often described as large-scale travelling atmospheric/ionospheric disturbances (LTADs or LTIDs). In the southern hemisphere, the front of the initial height rise was found to move at a speed up to 1300 m/s as was also measured by Tsugawa et al. [2006. Geomagnetic conjugate observations of large-scale travelling ionospheric disturbances using GPS networks in Japan and Australia. Journal of Geophysical Research 111, A02302] from small changes in GPS TEC. The front was uniform across the widest longitudinal range of observation (52° or 5360 km).The relationship between the subsequent fall in ionospheric height and an associated temporary increase in foF2 was found to be consistent with previous observations. Ionospheric drivers that move ionization up and down magnetic field lines are suggested as the common cause of the relationship between foF2 and height.

  15. Global analysis of Solar neutrino oscillation evidence including SNO and implications for Borexino

    CERN Document Server

    Aliani, P; Picariello, M; Torrente-Lujan, E

    2002-01-01

    An updated analysis of all available neutrino oscillation evidence in Solar experiments including the latest $SNO$ data is presented. Predictions for total rates and day-night asymmetry in Borexino are calculated. Our analysis features the use of exhaustive computation of the neutrino oscillation probabilities and the use of an improved statistical $\\chi^2$ minimization. In the framework of two neutrino oscillations we conclude that the best fit to the data is obtained in the LMA region with parameters $(\\Delta m^2, \\tan^2\\theta) = (5.2 \\times 10^{-5} \\eV^2, 0.47)$, ($\\chi^2_{min}/n=0.82$, $n=38$ degrees of freedom). Although less favored, solutions in the LOW and VAC regions are still possible with a reasonable statistical significance. The best possible solution in the SMA region gets as maximum a statistical significance as low as $\\sim 3%$. We study the implications of these results for the prospects of Borexino and the possibility of discriminating between the different solutions. The expected normalized...

  16. Implications of Switching Fossil Fuel Subsidies to Solar: A Case Study for the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Sampedro

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Fossil fuel subsidies (FFS constitute one of the most obvious barriers to tackling climate change, as they encourage inefficient energy consumption and divert investment away from clean energy sources. According to the International Monetary Fund, FFS amounted globally to $233 billion in 2014, over four times the value of subsidies awarded to promote renewable energy. In this study an integrated assessment model is used to analyse the CO2 implications in the European Union of eliminating FFS and recycling the revenues to promote rooftop PV. It is found that eliminating FFS would give rise to a small reduction in CO2 due to fuel-switching from coal to gas. If the revenues were recycled to promote solar, then the CO2 reduction would increase from 1.8% to 2.2% by 2030. Eliminating FFS is not a panacea from the mitigation point of view, even if the revenues are recycled, but other important objectives, such as those related to renewable energy promotion and the reduction of air pollution, are advanced at zero cost for the government.

  17. Lessons from our Own Solar System: Generation Mechanisms of Radio Emissions from Earth, Saturn and Jupiter and Atmospheric Loss from Magnetized versus non-magnetized planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Pontus

    2017-05-01

    The understanding of the engines and mechanisms behind kilometric and decametric radio emissions from the planets in our own solar system have taken great leaps with missions such as the NASA/Cassini, IMAGE and Galileo missions. The periodic Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR), the Auroral Kilometric Radiation (AKR) at Earth and the periodic decametric radio emissions from Jupiter all point to the same generation mechanisms: very large-scale explosive plasma heating events in the magnetotail of each of the planets. The character and periodicity of the associated radio emissions not only tells us about the presence of a magnetic field but also about the plasma content and size of the planetary magnetosphere, and the nature of the interaction with the solar wind.The presence of a planetary magnetic field, as could be established for exoplanets by the positive detection of low-frequency exoplanetary radio emissions, has been thought to shield a planet from atmospheric loss to space. However, recent data from Mars Express, MAVEN, and Venus Express, together with the wealth of terrestrial measurements of atmospheric escape to space has brought a surprising question in to light: Does a planetary magnetic field suppress or enhance atmospheric loss? While at the non-magnetized planets such as Mars and Venus, the solar wind has a more direct access to the ionized upper atmosphere, these planets do set up self shielding currents that do limit escape. Furthermore, it is not clear if Mars have lost the majority of its atmosphere by condensation in to surface and sub-surface frost, or through atmospheric escape. At Earth, the geomagnetic field sets up a relatively large cross section to the solar wind, that allows the induced solar-wind electric field to transfer substantial energy to the upper ionosphere and atmosphere resulting in substantial loss. It is therefore not clear how a planetary magnetic field correlates to the atmospheric loss, or if it does at all.In this

  18. Modeling Solar Atmospheric Phenomena with AtomDB and PyAtomDB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Marcus; Foster, Adam

    2018-01-01

    Taking advantage of the modeling tools made available by PyAtomDB (Foster 2015), we evaluated the impact of changing atomic data on solar phenomena, in particular their effects on models of coronal mass ejections (CME). Intitially, we perform modifications to the canonical SunNEI code (Murphy et al. 2011) in order to include non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) processes that occur in the CME modeled in SunNEI. The methods used involve the consideration of radiaitive cooling as well as ion balance calculations. These calculations were subsequently implemented within the SunNEI simulation. The insertion of aforementioned processes and parameter customizaton produced quite similar results of the original except for the case of iron. These differences were traced to inconsistencies in the recombination rates for Argon-like iron ions between the CHIANTI and AtomDB databases, even though they in theory use the same data. The key finding was that theoretical models are greatly impacted by the relative atomic database update cycles.Following the SunNEI comparison, we then use the AtomDB database to model the time depedencies of intensity flux spikes produced by a coronal shock wave (Ma et al. 2011). We produced a theretical representation for an ionizing plasma that interpolated over the intensity in four Astronomical Imaging Assembly (AIA) filters. Specifically, the 171 A (Fe IX) ,193 A (Fe XII, FeXXIV),211 A (Fe XIV),and 335 A (Fe XVI) wavelengths in order to assess the comparative spectral emissions between AtomDB and the observed data. The results of the theoretical model, in principle, shine light on both the equilibrium conditions before the shock and the non-equilibrium response to the shock front, as well as discrepancies introduced by changing the atomic data.

  19. Solar radiation transport in the cloudy atmosphere: a 3D perspective on observations and climate impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Anthony B.; Marshak, Alexander

    2010-02-01

    The interplay of sunlight with clouds is a ubiquitous and often pleasant visual experience, but it conjures up major challenges for weather, climate, environmental science and beyond. Those engaged in the characterization of clouds (and the clear air nearby) by remote sensing methods are even more confronted. The problem comes, on the one hand, from the spatial complexity of real clouds and, on the other hand, from the dominance of multiple scattering in the radiation transport. The former ingredient contrasts sharply with the still popular representation of clouds as homogeneous plane-parallel slabs for the purposes of radiative transfer computations. In typical cloud scenes the opposite asymptotic transport regimes of diffusion and ballistic propagation coexist. We survey the three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric radiative transfer literature over the past 50 years and identify three concurrent and intertwining thrusts: first, how to assess the damage (bias) caused by 3D effects in the operational 1D radiative transfer models? Second, how to mitigate this damage? Finally, can we exploit 3D radiative transfer phenomena to innovate observation methods and technologies? We quickly realize that the smallest scale resolved computationally or observationally may be artificial but is nonetheless a key quantity that separates the 3D radiative transfer solutions into two broad and complementary classes: stochastic and deterministic. Both approaches draw on classic and contemporary statistical, mathematical and computational physics.

  20. Planetcam: A Visible And Near Infrared Lucky-imaging Camera To Study Planetary Atmospheres And Solar System Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin; Rojas, J.; Hueso, R.; Perez-Hoyos, S.; de Bilbao, L.; Murga, G.; Ariño, J.; Mendikoa, I.

    2012-10-01

    PlanetCam is a two-channel fast-acquisition and low-noise camera designed for a multispectral study of the atmospheres of the planets (Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune) and the satellite Titan at high temporal and spatial resolutions simultaneously invisible (0.4-1 μm) and NIR (1-2.5 μm) channels. This is accomplished by means of a dichroic beam splitter that separates both beams directing them into two different detectors. Each detector has filter wheels corresponding to the characteristic absorption bands of each planetary atmosphere. Images are acquired and processed using the “lucky imaging” technique in which several thousand images of the same object are obtained in a short time interval, coregistered and ordered in terms of image quality to reconstruct a high-resolution ideally diffraction limited image of the object. Those images will be also calibrated in terms of intensity and absolute reflectivity. The camera will be tested at the 50.2 cm telescope of the Aula EspaZio Gela (Bilbao) and then commissioned at the 1.05 m at Pic-duMidi Observatory (Franca) and at the 1.23 m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory in Spain. Among the initially planned research targets are: (1) The vertical structure of the clouds and hazes in the planets and their scales of variability; (2) The meteorology, dynamics and global winds and their scales of variability in the planets. PlanetCam is also expected to perform studies of other Solar System and astrophysical objects. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by the Spanish MICIIN project AYA2009-10701 with FEDER funds, by Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07 and by Universidad País Vasco UPV/EHU through program UFI11/55.

  1. Thermal infrared laser heterodyne spectroradiometry for solar occultation atmospheric CO2 measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Alex; Macleod, Neil A.; Huebner, Marko; Weidmann, Damien

    2016-12-01

    This technology demonstration paper reports on the development, demonstration, performance assessment, and initial data analysis of a benchtop prototype quantum cascade laser heterodyne spectroradiometer, operating within a narrow spectral window of ˜ 1 cm-1 around 953.1 cm-1 in transmission mode and coupled to a passive Sun tracker. The instrument has been specifically designed for accurate dry air total column, and potentially vertical profile, measurements of CO2. Data from over 8 months of operation in 2015 near Didcot, UK, confirm that atmospheric measurements with noise levels down to 4 times the shot noise limit can be achieved with the current instrument. Over the 8-month period, spectra with spectral resolutions of 60 MHz (0.002 cm-1) and 600 MHz (0.02 cm-1) have been acquired with median signal-to-noise ratios of 113 and 257, respectively, and a wavenumber calibration uncertainty of 0.0024 cm-1.Using the optimal estimation method and RFM as the radiative transfer forward model, prior analysis and theoretical benchmark modelling had been performed with an observation system simulator (OSS) to target an optimized spectral region of interest. The selected narrow spectral window includes both CO2 and H2O ro-vibrational transition lines to enable the measurement of dry air CO2 column from a single spectrum. The OSS and preliminary retrieval results yield roughly 8 degrees of freedom for signal (over the entire state vector) for an arbitrarily chosen a priori state with relatively high uncertainty ( ˜ 4 for CO2). Preliminary total column mixing ratios obtained are consistent with GOSAT monthly data. At a spectral resolution of 60 MHz with an acquisition time of 90 s, instrumental noise propagation yields an error of around 1.5 ppm on the dry air total column of CO2, exclusive of biases and geophysical parameters errors at this stage.

  2. Measurements of isotope effects in the photoionization of N2 and implications for Titan's atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, Philip; Randazzo, John B.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Liang, Mao-Chang; Yung, Yuk L.; Boering, Kristie A.

    2010-12-30

    Isotope effects in the non-dissociative photoionization of molecular nitrogen (N2 + h nu -> N2+ + e-) may play a role in determining the relative abundances of isotopic species containing nitrogen in interstellar clouds and planetary atmospheres but have not been previously measured. Measurements of the photoionization efficiency spectra of 14N2, 15N14N, and 15N2 from 15.5 to 18.9 eV (65.6-80.0 nm) using the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory show large differences in peak energies and intensities, with the ratio of the energy-dependent photoionization cross-sections, sigma(14N2)/sigma(15N14N), ranging from 0.4 to 3.5. Convolving the cross-sections with the solar flux and integrating over the energies measured, the ratios of photoionization rate coefficients are J(15N14N)/J(14N2)=1.00+-0.02 and J(15N2)/J(14N2)=1.00+-0.02, suggesting that isotopic fractionation between N2 and N2+ should be small under such conditions. In contrast, in a one-dimensional model of Titan's atmosphere, isotopic self-shielding of 14N2 leads to values of J(15N14N)/J(14N2) as large as ~;;1.17, larger than under optically thin conditions but still much smaller than values as high as ~;;29 predicted for N2 photodissociation. Since modeled photodissociation isotope effects overpredict the HC15N/HC14N ratio in Titan's atmosphere, and since both N atoms and N2+ ions may ultimately lead to the formation of HCN, estimates of the potential of including N2 photoionization to contribute to a more quantitative explanation of 15N/14N for HCN in Titan's atmosphere are explored.

  3. Long-Term cosmic ray experiment in the atmosphere: Energetic electron precipitation events during the 20-23 solar activity cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhmutov, V. S.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Krainev, M. B.; Storini, M.

    2001-08-01

    More than 400 energetic electron precipitation events (EPEs) were observed in the Earth's Northern polar atmosphere (Murmansk region, 68°57'N, 33°03'E) during a long-term cosmic ray balloon experiment (from 1957 up to now). It is shown that the significant X-ray fluxes, caused by precipitating electrons at the top of the atmosphere, sometimes penetrated down to the atmospheric depth of ~60 g· cm-2 (about 20 km). It means that primary energy of precipitating electrons was more than ~ 6 10 MeV. Here we summarize only the characteristics of the energetic electron precipitation events recorded during solar activity cycles 20 to 23. We dis cuss results from the analyses of the interplanetary and geomagnetic conditions related to these events in the atmosphere.

  4. Kinetic Theory of Meteor Plasma in the Earth's atmosphere: Implications for Radar Head Echo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimant, Y. S.; Oppenheim, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Every second millions of tiny meteoroids hit the Earth from space, vast majority too small to be observed visually. However, radars detect the plasma they generate and use the collected data to characterize the incoming meteoroids and the atmosphere in which they disintegrate. This diagnostics requires a detailed quantitative understanding of formation of the meteor plasma and how it interacts with the Earth's atmosphere. Fast-descending meteoroids become detectable to radars after they heat due to collisions with atmospheric molecules sufficiently and start ablating. The ablated material then collides into atmospheric molecules and forms plasma around the meteoroid. Reflection of radar pulses from this plasma produces a localized signal called a head echo often accompanied by a much longer non-specular trail (see the Figure). Using first principles, we have developed a consistent collisional kinetic theory of the near-meteoroid plasma responsible for the radar head echo. This theory produces analytic expressions describing the ion and neutral velocity distributions along with the detailed 3-D spatial structure of the near-meteoroid plasma. These expressions predict a number of unexpected features such as shell-like velocity distributions. This theory shows that the meteoroid plasma develops over a length-scale close to the ion mean free path with a strongly non-Maxwellian velocity distribution. The spatial distribution of the plasma density shows significant deviations from a Gaussian law usually employed in head-echo modeling. This analytical model will serve as a basis for a more accurate quantitative interpretation of radar measurements, estimates of the ionization efficiency, and should help calculate meteoroid and atmosphere parameters from radar head-echo observations. This theory could also help clarify the physical nature of electromagnetic pulses observed during recent meteor showers and associated with the passage of fast-moving meteors through the

  5. Implications of atmospheric conditions for analysis of surface temperature variability derived from landscape-scale thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerle, Albin; Meier, Fred; Heinl, Michael; Egger, Angelika; Leitinger, Georg

    2017-04-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) cameras perfectly bridge the gap between (i) on-site measurements of land surface temperature (LST) providing high temporal resolution at the cost of low spatial coverage and (ii) remotely sensed data from satellites that provide high spatial coverage at relatively low spatio-temporal resolution. While LST data from satellite (LSTsat) and airborne platforms are routinely corrected for atmospheric effects, such corrections are barely applied for LST from ground-based TIR imagery (using TIR cameras; LSTcam). We show the consequences of neglecting atmospheric effects on LSTcam of different vegetated surfaces at landscape scale. We compare LST measured from different platforms, focusing on the comparison of LST data from on-site radiometry (LSTosr) and LSTcam using a commercially available TIR camera in the region of Bozen/Bolzano (Italy). Given a digital elevation model and measured vertical air temperature profiles, we developed a multiple linear regression model to correct LSTcam data for atmospheric influences. We could show the distinct effect of atmospheric conditions and related radiative processes along the measurement path on LSTcam, proving the necessity to correct LSTcam data on landscape scale, despite their relatively low measurement distances compared to remotely sensed data. Corrected LSTcam data revealed the dampening effect of the atmosphere, especially at high temperature differences between the atmosphere and the vegetated surface. Not correcting for these effects leads to erroneous LST estimates, in particular to an underestimation of the heterogeneity in LST, both in time and space. In the most pronounced case, we found a temperature range extension of almost 10 K.

  6. Implications of atmospheric conditions for analysis of surface temperature variability derived from landscape-scale thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerle, Albin; Meier, Fred; Heinl, Michael; Egger, Angelika; Leitinger, Georg

    2017-04-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) cameras perfectly bridge the gap between (i) on-site measurements of land surface temperature (LST) providing high temporal resolution at the cost of low spatial coverage and (ii) remotely sensed data from satellites that provide high spatial coverage at relatively low spatio-temporal resolution. While LST data from satellite (LSTsat) and airborne platforms are routinely corrected for atmospheric effects, such corrections are barely applied for LST from ground-based TIR imagery (using TIR cameras; LSTcam). We show the consequences of neglecting atmospheric effects on LSTcam of different vegetated surfaces at landscape scale. We compare LST measured from different platforms, focusing on the comparison of LST data from on-site radiometry (LSTosr) and LSTcam using a commercially available TIR camera in the region of Bozen/Bolzano (Italy). Given a digital elevation model and measured vertical air temperature profiles, we developed a multiple linear regression model to correct LSTcam data for atmospheric influences. We could show the distinct effect of atmospheric conditions and related radiative processes along the measurement path on LSTcam, proving the necessity to correct LSTcam data on landscape scale, despite their relatively low measurement distances compared to remotely sensed data. Corrected LSTcam data revealed the dampening effect of the atmosphere, especially at high temperature differences between the atmosphere and the vegetated surface. Not correcting for these effects leads to erroneous LST estimates, in particular to an underestimation of the heterogeneity in LST, both in time and space. In the most pronounced case, we found a temperature range extension of almost 10 K.

  7. MAGNETO-STATIC MODELING OF THE MIXED PLASMA BETA SOLAR ATMOSPHERE BASED ON SUNRISE/IMaX DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegelmann, T.; Solanki, S. K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Neukirch, T. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Nickeler, D. H. [Astronomical Institute, AV CR, Fricova 298, 25165 Ondrejov (Czech Republic); Pillet, V. Martínez [National Solar Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Borrero, J. M., E-mail: wiegelmann@mps.mpg.de [Kiepenheuer-Institut für Sonnenphysik, Schöneckstrasse 6, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)

    2015-12-10

    Our aim is to model the three-dimensional magnetic field structure of the upper solar atmosphere, including regions of non-negligible plasma beta. We use high-resolution photospheric magnetic field measurements from SUNRISE/IMaX as the boundary condition for a magneto-static magnetic field model. The high resolution of IMaX allows us to resolve the interface region between the photosphere and corona, but modeling this region is challenging for the following reasons. While the coronal magnetic field is thought to be force-free (the Lorentz force vanishes), this is not the case in the mixed plasma β environment in the photosphere and lower chromosphere. In our model, pressure gradients and gravity forces are self-consistently taken into account and compensate for the non-vanishing Lorentz force. Above a certain height (about 2 Mm) the non-magnetic forces become very weak and consequently the magnetic field becomes almost force-free. Here, we apply a linear approach where the electric current density consists of a superposition of a field-line parallel current and a current perpendicular to the Sun's gravity field. We illustrate the prospects and limitations of this approach and give an outlook for an extension toward a nonlinear model.

  8. Magneto-static Modeling of the Mixed Plasma Beta Solar Atmosphere Based on Sunrise/IMaX Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegelmann, T.; Neukirch, T.; Nickeler, D. H.; Solanki, S. K.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Borrero, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Our aim is to model the three-dimensional magnetic field structure of the upper solar atmosphere, including regions of non-negligible plasma beta. We use high-resolution photospheric magnetic field measurements from SUNRISE/IMaX as the boundary condition for a magneto-static magnetic field model. The high resolution of IMaX allows us to resolve the interface region between the photosphere and corona, but modeling this region is challenging for the following reasons. While the coronal magnetic field is thought to be force-free (the Lorentz force vanishes), this is not the case in the mixed plasma β environment in the photosphere and lower chromosphere. In our model, pressure gradients and gravity forces are self-consistently taken into account and compensate for the non-vanishing Lorentz force. Above a certain height (about 2 Mm) the non-magnetic forces become very weak and consequently the magnetic field becomes almost force-free. Here, we apply a linear approach where the electric current density consists of a superposition of a field-line parallel current and a current perpendicular to the Sun's gravity field. We illustrate the prospects and limitations of this approach and give an outlook for an extension toward a nonlinear model.

  9. Rapid atmospheric pressure plasma jet processed reduced graphene oxide counter electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsiao-Wei; Liang, Sheng-Ping; Wu, Ting-Jui; Chang, Haoming; Kao, Peng-Kai; Hsu, Cheng-Che; Chen, Jian-Zhang; Chou, Pi-Tai; Cheng, I-Chun

    2014-09-10

    In this work, we present the use of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) as the counter electrode materials in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). rGO was first deposited on a fluorine-doped tin oxide glass substrate by screen-printing, followed by post-treatment to remove excessive organic additives. We investigated the effect of atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) treatment on the DSSC performance. A power conversion efficiency of 5.19% was reached when DSSCs with an rGO counter electrode were treated by APPJs in the ambient air for a few seconds. For comparison, it requires a conventional calcination process at 400 °C for 15 min to obtain comparable efficiency. Scanning electron micrographs show that the APPJ treatment modifies the rGO structure, which may reduce its conductivity in part but simultaneously greatly enhances its catalytic activity. Combined with the rapid removal of organic additives by the highly reactive APPJ, DSSCs with APPJ-treated rGO counter electrode show comparable efficiencies to furnace-calcined rGO counter electrodes with greatly reduced process time. This ultrashort process time renders an estimated energy consumption per unit area of 1.1 kJ/cm(2), which is only one-third of that consumed in a conventional furnace calcination process. This new methodology thus saves energy, cost, and time, which is greatly beneficial to future mass production.

  10. Anoxic atmospheres on Mars driven by volcanism: Implications for past environments and life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholes, Steven F.; Smith, Megan L.; Claire, Mark W.; Zahnle, Kevin J.; Catling, David C.

    2017-07-01

    Mars today has no active volcanism and its atmosphere is oxidizing, dominated by the photochemistry of CO2 and H2O. Mars experienced widespread volcanism in the past and volcanic emissions should have included reducing gases, such as H2 and CO, as well as sulfur-bearing gases. Using a one-dimensional photochemical model, we consider whether plausible volcanic gas fluxes could have switched the redox-state of the past martian atmosphere to reducing conditions. In our model, the total quantity and proportions of volcanic gases depend on the water content, outgassing pressure, and oxygen fugacity of the source melt. We find that, with reasonable melt parameters, the past martian atmosphere (∼3.5 Gyr to present) could have easily reached reducing and anoxic conditions with modest levels of volcanism, >0.14 km3 yr-1, which are well within the range of estimates from thermal evolution models or photogeological studies. Counter-intuitively we also find that more reducing melts with lower oxygen fugacity require greater amounts of volcanism to switch a paleo-atmosphere from oxidizing to reducing. The reason is that sulfur is more stable in such melts and lower absolute fluxes of sulfur-bearing gases more than compensate for increases in the proportions of H2 and CO. These results imply that ancient Mars should have experienced periods with anoxic and reducing atmospheres even through the mid-Amazonian whenever volcanic outgassing was sustained at sufficient levels. Reducing anoxic conditions are potentially conducive to the synthesis of prebiotic organic compounds, such as amino acids, and are therefore relevant to the possibility of life on Mars. Also, anoxic reducing conditions should have influenced the type of minerals that were formed on the surface or deposited from the atmosphere. We suggest looking for elemental polysulfur (S8) as a signature of past reducing atmospheres. Finally, our models allow us to estimate the amount of volcanically sourced atmospheric

  11. Isotopic composition of nitrogen - Implications for the past history of Mars' atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcelroy, M. B.; Yung, Y. L.; Nier, A. O.

    1976-01-01

    Models are presented for the past history of nitrogen on Mars, based on Viking measurements showing that the atmosphere is enriched in N-15. The enrichment is attributed to selective escape, with fast atoms formed in the exosphere by electron impact dissociation of N2 and by dissociative recombination of N2(+). The initial partial pressure of N2 should have been at least as large as several millibars and could have been as large as 30 millibars if surface processes were to represent an important sink for atmospheric HNO2 and HNO3.

  12. Scaling Characteristics of Mesoscale Wind Fields in the Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer: Implications for Wind Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliyanpilakkil, Velayudhan Praju

    Atmospheric motions take place in spatial scales of sub-millimeters to few thousands of kilometers with temporal changes in the atmospheric variables occur in fractions of seconds to several years. Consequently, the variations in atmospheric kinetic energy associated with these atmospheric motions span over a broad spectrum of space and time. The mesoscale region acts as an energy transferring regime between the energy generating synoptic scale and the energy dissipating microscale. Therefore, the scaling characterizations of mesoscale wind fields are significant in the accurate estimation of the atmospheric energy budget. Moreover, the precise knowledge of the scaling characteristics of atmospheric mesoscale wind fields is important for the validation of the numerical models those focus on wind forecasting, dispersion, diffusion, horizontal transport, and optical turbulence. For these reasons, extensive studies have been conducted in the past to characterize the mesoscale wind fields. Nevertheless, the majority of these studies focused on near-surface and upper atmosphere mesoscale regimes. The present study attempt to identify the existence and to quantify the scaling of mesoscale wind fields in the lower atmospheric boundary layer (ABL; in the wind turbine layer) using wind observations from various research-grade instruments (e.g., sodars, anemometers). The scaling characteristics of the mesoscale wind speeds over diverse homogeneous flat terrains, conducted using structure function based analysis, revealed an altitudinal dependence of the scaling exponents. This altitudinal dependence of the wind speed scaling may be attributed to the buoyancy forcing. Subsequently, we use the framework of extended self-similarity (ESS) to characterize the observed scaling behavior. In the ESS framework, the relative scaling exponents of the mesoscale atmospheric boundary layer wind speed exhibit quasi-universal behavior; even far beyond the inertial range of turbulence (Delta

  13. A new approach for deriving the solar irradiance from non-flaring solar upper atmosphere plasmas at 2 x 10^4<-T<-2 x 10^7 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgan, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abdallaf, Jr., Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fontes, Christopher J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sherrill, Manolo E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Feldmn, U [NON LANL; Landi, E [NON LANL; Brown, C M [NON LANL; Seely, J F [NON LANL; Doschek, G A [NON LANL; Dammasch, I E [NON LANL

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new approach for deriving the solar irradiance in the X-ray to VUV range due to the emission by solar upper atmosphere plasmas at 2 x 10{sup 4} {le} T {le} 2 x 10{sup 7} K. Our approach is based on new understanding of the properties of the solar upper atmosphere; specifically, the discovery that the majority of emission from the non-flaring solar upper transition region and corona in the temperature range 3 x 10{sup 5} {le} T {le} 3 x 10{sup 6} K arises from isothermal plasmas that have four distinct temperatures: 0.35, 0.9, 1.4 and 3 x 10{sup 6} K. In the lower transition region (2 x 10{sup 4} {le} T {le} 2 x 10{sup 5} K) of coronal holes, quiet regions or active regions, although multithermal and variable in brightness, the shape of emission measure vs. temperature curves is almost constant. Flaring plasmas are for most part isothermal, although their emission measure and temperature continuously change. In this paper we review these recent results and propose a set of simple spectrometers for recording the solar spectrum in several narrow bands. The solar emission measure, average plasma temperature, and composition can be derived using the measured line fluxes. By combining the emission measure and other plasma properties with the output of a suite of atomic physics codes, which are also described here, the solar irradiance in the temperature range 2 x 10{sup 4} {le} T {le} 2 x 10{sup 7} K can be calculated.

  14. The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter NOMAD Spectrometer Suite for Nadir and Solar Occultation Observations of Mars' Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ian; Carine Vandaele, Ann; López-Moreno, José Juan; Patel, Manish; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Drummond, Rachel; Neefs, Eduard; Depiesse, Cedric; Daerden, Frank; Rodriguez-Gómez, Julio; Neary, Lori; Robert, Séverine; Willame, Yannick; Mahieux, Arnaud

    2015-04-01

    NOMAD (Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery) is one of four instruments on board the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter, scheduled for launch in January 2016 and to begin nominal science mission around Mars in late 2017. It consists of a suite of three high-resolution spectrometers - Solar Occultation (SO), LNO (Limb Nadir and Occultation) and UVIS (Ultraviolet-Visible) - which will generate a huge dataset of Martian atmospheric observations during the mission, across a wide spectral range. Specifically, the SO spectrometer channel will perform occultation measurements, operating between 2.2-4.3μm at a resolution of 0.15cm-1, with 180-1000m vertical spatial resolution and an SNR of 1500-3000. LNO will perform limb scanning, nadir and occultation measurements, operating between 2.2-3.8μm at a resolution of 0.3cm-1. In nadir, global coverage will extend between ±74O latitude with an IFOV of 0.5x17km on the surface. This channel can also make occultation measurements should the SO channel fail. UVIS will make limb, nadir and occultation measurements between 200-650nm, at a resolution of 1nm. It will have 300-1000m vertical resolution during occultation and 5x60km ground resolution during 15s nadir observations. An order-of-magnitude increase in spectral resolution over previous instruments will allow NOMAD to map previously unresolvable gas species, such as important trace gases and isotopes. CO, CO2, H2O, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, H2CO, CH4, SO2, H2S, HCl, O3 and several isotopologues of methane and water will be detectable, providing crucial measurements of the Martian D/H and methane isotope ratios. It will also be possible to map the sources and sinks of these gases, such as regions of surface volcanism/outgassing and atmospheric production, over the course of an entire Martian year, to further constrain atmospheric dynamics and climatology. NOMAD will also continue to monitor the Martian water, carbon, ozone and dust cycles, extending existing datasets made by successive

  15. Rising global atmospheric CO2 concentration and implications for crop productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is incontestable evidence that the concentration of atmospheric CO2 is increasing. Regardless of the potential impact of this increase on climate change, CO2 will have a direct effect on plants since it is a primary input for growth. Herein, we discuss relative CO2 responses of C3 and C4 plant...

  16. Atmospheric Delay Reduction Using KARAT for GPS Analysis and Implications for VLBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Hobiger, Thomas; Koyama, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Tetsuro

    2010-01-01

    We have been developing a state-of-the-art tool to estimate the atmospheric path delays by raytracing through mesoscale analysis (MANAL) data, which is operationally used for numerical weather prediction by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). The tools, which we have named KAshima RAytracing Tools (KARAT)', are capable of calculating total slant delays and ray-bending angles considering real atmospheric phenomena. The KARAT can estimate atmospheric slant delays by an analytical 2-D ray-propagation model by Thayer and a 3-D Eikonal solver. We compared PPP solutions using KARAT with that using the Global Mapping Function (GMF) and Vienna Mapping Function 1 (VMF1) for GPS sites of the GEONET (GPS Earth Observation Network System) operated by Geographical Survey Institute (GSI). In our comparison 57 stations of GEONET during the year of 2008 were processed. The KARAT solutions are slightly better than the solutions using VMF1 and GMF with linear gradient model for horizontal and height positions. Our results imply that KARAT is a useful tool for an efficient reduction of atmospheric path delays in radio-based space geodetic techniques such as GNSS and VLBI.

  17. Atmosphere-Surface Exchange of Reactive Nitrogen and its Implications for PM2.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth, G.; Murphy, J. G.; Gregoire, P.; Tevlin, A.; Hems, R.; Cheyne, C.

    2012-12-01

    Recently it has been suggested that the surface-atmosphere exchange of both ammonia (NH3) and nitrous acid (HONO) can occur in a bidirectional fashion governed by a compensation point (i.e. the atmospheric mixing ratio where the flux changes direction). The compensation point corresponds to the gas phase mixing ratio that is in equilibrium with the dissolved constituents at the surface (soil water, plant tissue), governed by solubility and acid dissociation constants. Direct calculation of compensation point values is not trivial, because of the dependence on soil temperature, moisture, pH and the nitrogen distribution in the system. The presence of atmospheric particulate matter can further influence surface flux by providing a reactive sink for trace gases in the atmosphere. An accurate understanding of the factors governing bidirectional flux is required in order for air quality models to accurately predict trace gas mixing ratios, aerosol composition and spatial patterns of nitrogen deposition. A field study was conducted in southwestern Ontario during the summer of 2012 to measure the atmospheric and surface components of the system to provide observational constraints to test our understanding of the bi-directional exchange of reactive nitrogen. An Ambient Ion Monitor Ion Chromatograph (AIM-IC) was used to quantify the water-soluble trace gases (NH3, SO2, HNO3, HCl, and HONO) as well as water-soluble ions in PM2.5 with hourly time resolution. The same IC methods were used in an offline fashion to monitor soil ammonium, nitrite and nitrate composition. Challenges in selecting sampling and extraction protocols that can provide representative soil pH and nitrogen content are discussed.

  18. Analysis of coherent structures during the 2009 CABINEX field campaign: Implications for atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, S. N.; Steiner, A. L.; Chung, S. H.; Edburg, S. L.; Jones, E.; Botros, A.

    2010-12-01

    Intermittent coherent structures are an important component of turbulent exchange of mass, momentum, and energy at the biosphere-atmosphere interface. Specifically, above forested canopies, coherent structures can be responsible for a large fraction of the exchange of trace gases and aerosols between the sub-canopy (ground surface), canopy and the atmosphere. This study quantifies the coherent structures and associated turbulence intensity at the canopy interface for the Community Atmosphere-Biosphere Interactions Experiment (CABINEX) field campaign (July 1 - Aug 10, 2009) at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS), and determines the effect of coherent structures on canopy air-parcel residence times and importance for atmospheric chemistry. Two different methods of analysis are used to estimate the coherent exchange: 1) wavelet analysis and 2) quadrant-hole (Q-H) analysis (also referred to as conditional sampling). Wavelet analysis uses wavelet transforms to detect non-periodic signals with a variable duration. Using temperature ramp structures, the timing and magnitude of individual coherent ‘events’ can be evaluated over the duration of the campaign. Conversely, the Q-H analysis detects ‘events’ when │u'w'│≥ H×urmswrms, where H is a threshold parameter, u is the stream-wise velocity and w is the vertical velocity. Events are primarily comprised of high momentum air penetrating into the canopy (sweeps, u’> 0; w’0). Results from both techniques are compared under varying stability classes, and the number of events, total duration, and contribution to the total flux are analyzed for the full campaign. The contribution of coherent structures to the total canopy-atmosphere exchange is similar between the two methods, despite a greater number of events estimated from the Q-H analysis. These analyses improve the quantification of canopy mixing time at the UMBS site during CABINEX, and will aid in interpreting in-canopy processes

  19. Implications of climate variability for the detection of multiple equilibria and for rapid transitions in the atmosphere-vegetation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bathiany, S. [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany); Claussen, M. [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany); Universitaet Hamburg, Meteorologisches Institut, Hamburg (Germany); Fraedrich, K. [Universitaet Hamburg, Meteorologisches Institut, Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    Paleoclimatic records indicate a decline of vegetation cover in the Western Sahara at the end of the African Humid Period (about 5,500 years before present). Modelling studies have shown that this phenomenon may be interpreted as a critical transition that results from a bifurcation in the atmosphere-vegetation system. However, the stability properties of this system are closely linked to climate variability and depend on the climate model and the methods of analysis. By coupling the Planet Simulator (PlaSim), an atmosphere model of intermediate complexity, with the simple dynamic vegetation model VECODE, we assess previous methods for the detection of multiple equilibria, and demonstrate their limitations. In particular, a stability diagram can yield misleading results because of spatial interactions, and the system's steady state and its dependency on initial conditions are affected by atmospheric variability and nonlinearities. In addition, we analyse the implications of climate variability for the abruptness of a vegetation decline. We find that a vegetation collapse can happen at different locations at different times. These collapses are possible despite large and uncorrelated climate variability. Because of the nonlinear relation between vegetation dynamics and precipitation the green state is initially stabilised by the high variability. When precipitation falls below a critical threshold, the desert state is stabilised as variability is then also decreased. (orig.)

  20. Surface/bulk partitioning and acid/base speciation of aqueous decanoate: direct observations and atmospheric implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Prisle

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Dilute aqueous solutions of the atmospheric organic surfactant sodium decanoate have been studied using surface sensitive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with synchrotron radiation. We studied the decanoate/decanoic acid speciation and preferential adsorption at the vapor–liquid interface, and the responses to mixing in solution with some of the most common atmospheric inorganic ions, Na+, NH4+, Cl, and SO42−. We observe little or no influence of Na+, Cl, or SO42− ions, on neither the relative speciation nor the individual adsorption properties of decanoate and decanoic acid. In particular, no significant salting-out effect due to common Na+ cations of the organic and inorganic salts was observed for these solutions. On the other hand, mixing with NH4+ cations resulted in a pronounced surface enhancement of decanoic acid, which is attributed to surface specific acid–base chemistry. These changes in surface/bulk partitioning and surface speciation may significantly affect properties of aqueous droplets containing decanoate/decanoic acid, and potential implications for several processes critical to the climate effects of atmospheric aerosols are discussed.

  1. Improvement of the self-cleaning capabilities and transparency of cover glasses for solar cell applications by modification with atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Duksun; Ahn, Seoung Kyu; Park, Sangho; Moon, Se Youn

    2016-07-01

    Using a cover glass is indispensable for protecting solar cells in photovoltaic systems. Herein, the surface of the cover glass was modified by atmospheric pressure plasma to enhance the self-cleaning effect without degrading the transmittance. A lower surface energy was achieved by depositing fluorocarbon polymers, and a micro-nano multi-scale morphology was built on the cover glass within 50 s. These two properties led to an increase in the hydrophobicity, which enhanced the self-cleaning effect of the surface. The morphology of the surface also helped to improve the transparency by reducing reflections. Both the enhanced self-cleaning effect and the improved transparency induced by the atmospheric pressure plasma treatment were confirmed by analyzing the total conversion efficiency of a solar cell by outdoor field testing.

  2. Trends in Downward Solar Radiation at the Surface over North America from Climate Model Projections and Implications for Solar Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Andres Saenz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The projected changes in the downward solar radiation at the surface over North America for late 21st century are deduced from global climate model simulations with greenhouse-gas (GHG forcing. A robust trend is found in winter over the United States, which exhibits a simple pattern of a decrease of sunlight over Northern USA. and an increase of sunlight over Southern USA. This structure was identified in both the seasonal mean and the mean climatology at different times of the day. It is broadly consistent with the known poleward shift of storm tracks in winter in climate model simulations with GHG forcing. The centennial trend of the downward shortwave radiation at the surface in Northern USA. is on the order of 10% of the climatological value for the January monthly mean, and slightly over 10% at the time when it is midday in the United States. This indicates a nonnegligible influence of the GHG forcing on solar energy in the long term. Nevertheless, when dividing the 10% by a century, in the near term, the impact of the GHG forcing is relatively minor such that the estimate of solar power potential using present-day climatology will remain useful in the coming decades.

  3. The solar photospheric nitrogen abundance Analysis of atomic transitions with 3D and 1D model atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caffau, E.; Maiorca, E.; Bonifacio, P.; Faraggiana, R.; Steffen, M.; Ludwig, H. -G.; Kamp, I.; Busso, M.

    Context. In recent years, the solar chemical abundances have been studied in considerable detail because of discrepant values of solar metallicity inferred from different indicators, i. e., on the one hand, the "sub-solar" photospheric abundances resulting from spectroscopic chemical composition

  4. Solar Tides in the Upper Equatorial Thermosphere: A Comparison between AE-E (Atmosphere Explorer-E Satellite) Data and the NCAR Thermospheric General Circulation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    serves to increase the resolution of the binning scheme without seriously lowering the number of data points collected in any particular bin. This...binning scheme has 7 rows of bins corresponding to different latitudes and 24 columns of bins corresponding to different local solar times making a total...National Center for Atmospheric Research for her excellent work in running the NCAR TGCM. 13 * ... . REFERENCES Broglio, L., C. Buongiorno, U. Ponzi

  5. Investigation of Boron Thermal Diffusion from Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposited Boron Silicate Glass for N-Type Solar Cell Process Application

    OpenAIRE

    Ikuo Kurachi; Kentaro Yoshioka

    2016-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (AP-CVD) system has been newly developed for boron silicate glass (BSG) film deposition dedicating to solar cell manufacturing. Using the system, thermal boron diffusion from the BSG film is investigated and confirmed in terms of process stability for surface property before BSG deposition and BSG thickness. No degradation in carrier lifetime is also confirmed. A boron diffusion simulator has been newly developed and demonstrated for optimizat...

  6. Impacts from ice-nucleating bacteria on deep convection: implications for the biosphere-atmosphere interaction in climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, V. T. J.; Andronache, C.; Morris, C. E.; Sands, D. C.

    2008-03-01

    A cloud modeling framework is described to simulate ice nucleation by biogenic aerosol particles, as represented by airborne ice-nucleation active (INA) bacteria. It includes the empirical parameterization of heterogeneous ice nucleation. The formation of cloud liquid by soluble material coated on such insoluble aerosols is represented and determines their partial removal from deep convective clouds by accretion onto precipitation. Preliminary simulations are performed for a case of deep convection over Oklahoma. If present at high enough concentrations, as might occur in proximity to land sources, INA bacteria are found to influence significantly: - (1) the average numbers and sizes of crystals in the clouds; (2) the horizontal cloud coverage in the free troposphere; and (3) precipitation and incident solar insolation at the surface, which influence rates of bacterial growth. At lower concentrations, the corresponding responses of cloud fields appear much lower or are ambiguous. In nature, the growth rates of INA bacteria on leaves prior to emission into the atmosphere are known to be highly dependent on temperature, precipitation and plant species. Consequently, the open question emerges of whether emissions of such ice-nucleating biogenic particles can then be modified by their own effects on clouds and atmospheric conditions, forming a weak feedback in climate or microclimate systems.

  7. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere VI. Helium in the Chromosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Molecular hydrogen and hydrides have recently been advanced as vital agents in the generation of emission spectra in the chromosphere. This is a result of the role they play in the formation of condensed hydrogen structures (CHS within the chromosphere (P.M. Robitaille. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere IV. On the Nature of the Chromosphere. Progr. Phys., 2013, v. 3, 15–21. Next to hydrogen, helium is perhaps the most intriguing component in this region of the Sun. Much like other elements, which combine with hydrogen to produce hydrides, helium can form the well-known helium hydride molecular ion, HeH+, and the excited neutral helium hydride molecule, HeH∗. While HeH+ is hypothesized to be a key cosmologicalmolecule, its possible presence in the Sun, and that of its excited neutral counterpart, has not been considered. Still, these hydrides are likely to play a role in the synthesis of CHS, as the He I and He II emission lines strongly suggest. In this regard, the study of helium emission spectra can provide insight into the condensed nature of the Sun, especially when considering the 10830 Å line associated with the 23P→2 3S triplet state transition. This line is strong in solar prominences and can be seen clearly on the disk. The excessive population of helium triplet states cannot be adequately explained using the gaseous models, since these states should be depopulated by collisional processes. Conversely, when He-based molecules are used to build CHS in a liquid metallic hydrogen model, an ever increasing population of the 23S and 23P states might be expected. The overpopulation of these triplet states leads to the conclusion that these emission lines are unlikely to be produced through random collisional or photon excitation, as required by the gaseous models. This provides a significant hurdle for these models. Thus, the strong 23P→2 3S lines and the overpopulation of the helium triplet

  8. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere IV. On the Nature of the Chromosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The chromosphere is the site of weak emission lines characterizing the flash spectrum observed for a few seconds during a total eclipse. This layer of the solar atmosphere is known to possess an opaque Hα emission and a great number of spicules, which can extend well above the photosphere. A stunning variety of hydrogen emission lines have been observed in this region. The production of these lines has provided the seventeenth line of evidence that the Sun is comprised of condensed matter (Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metallic Hydrogen II: A critical assessment of current and primordial helium levels in Sun. Progr. Phys., 2013, v. 2, 35–47. Contrary to the gaseous solar models, the simplest mechanism for the production of emission lines is the evaporation of excited atoms from condensed surfaces existing within the chromosphere, as found in spicules. This is reminiscent of the chemiluminescence which occurs during the condensation of silver clusters (Konig L., Rabin I., Schultze W., and Ertl G. Chemiluminescence in the Agglomeration of Metal Clusters. Science, v. 274, no. 5291, 1353–1355. The process associated with spicule formation is an exothermic one, requiring the transport of energy away from the site of condensation. As atoms leave localized surfaces, their electrons can occupy any energy level and, hence, a wide variety of emission lines are produced. In this regard, it is hypothesized that the presence of hydrides on the Sun can also facilitate hydrogen condensation in the chromosphere. The associated line emission from main group and transition elements constitutes the thirtieth line of evidence that the Sun is condensed matter. Condensation processes also help to explain why spicules manifest an apparently constant temperature over their entire length. Since the corona supports magnetic field lines, the random orientations associated with spicule formation suggests that the hydrogen condensates in the chromosphere are not metallic in

  9. Recent Advances in Atmospheric, Solar-Terrestrial Physics and Space Weather From a North-South network of scientists [2006-2016] PART B : Results and Capacity Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amory-Mazaudier, C.; Fleury, R.; Petitdidier, M.; Soula, S.; Masson, F.; Davila, J.; Doherty, P.; Elias, A.; Gadimova, S.; Makela, J.; Nava, B.; Radicella, S.; Richardson, J.; Touzani, A.; Girgea Team

    2017-12-01

    This paper reviews scientific advances achieved by a North-South network between 2006 and 2016. These scientific advances concern solar terrestrial physics, atmospheric physics and space weather. This part B is devoted to the results and capacity building. Our network began in 1991, in solar terrestrial physics, by our participation in the two projects: International Equatorial Electrojet Year IEEY [1992-1993] and International Heliophysical Year IHY [2007-2009]. These two projects were mainly focused on the equatorial ionosphere in Africa. In Atmospheric physics our research focused on gravity waves in the framework of the African Multidisciplinary Monsoon Analysis project n°1 [2005-2009 ], on hydrology in the Congo river basin and on lightning in Central Africa, the most lightning part of the world. In Vietnam the study of a broad climate data base highlighted global warming. In space weather, our results essentially concern the impact of solar events on global navigation satellite system GNSS and on the effects of solar events on the circulation of electric currents in the earth (GIC). This research began in the framework of the international space weather initiative project ISWI [2010-2012]. Finally, all these scientific projects have enabled young scientists from the South to publish original results and to obtain positions in their countries. These projects have also crossed disciplinary boundaries and defined a more diversified education which led to the training of specialists in a specific field with knowledge of related scientific fields.

  10. Atmospheric oxygen levels affect mudskipper terrestrial performance: implications for early tetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jew, Corey J; Wegner, Nicholas C; Yanagitsuru, Yuzo; Tresguerres, Martin; Graham, Jeffrey B

    2013-08-01

    The Japanese mudskipper (Periophthalmus modestus), an amphibious fish that possesses many respiratory and locomotive specializations for sojourns onto land, was used as a model to study how changing atmospheric oxygen concentrations during the middle and late Paleozoic Era (400-250 million years ago) may have influenced the emergence and subsequent radiation of the first tetrapods. The effects of different atmospheric oxygen concentrations (hyperoxia = 35%, normoxia = 21%, and hypoxia = 7% O2) on terrestrial performance were tested during exercise on a terrestrial treadmill and during recovery from exhaustive exercise. Endurance and elevated post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC; the immediate O2 debt repaid post-exercise) correlated with atmospheric oxygen concentration indicating that when additional oxygen is available P. modestus can increase oxygen utilization both during and following exercise. The time required post-exercise for mudskippers to return to a resting metabolic rate did not differ between treatments. However, in normoxia, oxygen consumption increased above hyperoxic values 13-20 h post-exercise suggesting a delayed repayment of the incurred oxygen debt. Finally, following exercise, ventilatory movements associated with buccopharyngeal aerial respiration returned to their rest-like pattern more quickly at higher concentrations of oxygen. Taken together, the results of this study show that P. modestus can exercise longer and recover quicker under higher oxygen concentrations. Similarities between P. modestus and early tetrapods suggest that increasing atmospheric oxygen levels during the middle and late Paleozoic allowed for elevated aerobic capacity and improved terrestrial performance, and likely led to an accelerated diversification and expansion of vertebrate life into the terrestrial biosphere.

  11. Effects of solar zenith angles on CO Cameron bands emission intensities in the dayside atmosphere of Mars: MEX/SPICAM observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothuraju, Thirupathaiah; Haider, Syed A.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a model to calculate the photoelectron energy fluxes and emission intensities of the CO Cameron bands in the upper atmosphere of Mars between solar zenith angles 0° to 90°. The production and loss mechanisms of CO (a ^{3}Π) are incorporated in the model. The atmospheric neutral parameters are adopted from the Mars Climate Database (v5.2). The required solar EUV fluxes are taken from the Solar2000 model (v2.37) and scaled to Mars. The photoelectron fluxes are calculated at different solar zenith angles using an analytical yield spectrum approach based on the Monte Carlo method. In this model we have assumed that crustal magnetic fields are horizontal in direction. Thus, photoelectrons are losing their energy at the same height where they are produced. This assumption is valid at mid and high latitudes where magnetic fields are mostly horizontal. We have also developed a coupled chemistry model to calculate the ion and electron density at different solar zenith angles, which are used in the airglow model. The model results are compared with the observations provided by the SPICAM onboard MEX. Our model reproduces the observed intensity profiles quite well. The CO (a ^{3}Π) is produced due to photoelectron excitation/dissociation, photodissociation, and dissociative recombination processes. It is destroyed by CO _{2}, CO and radiative decay. It is found that photon and photoelectron dissociation are dominant production processes of CO (a ^{3}Π), while radiative decay is a major loss mechanism of this state. The estimated photoelectron fluxes, production rates and intensities are decreasing with increasing solar zenith angles.

  12. Enhanced terrestrial carbon uptake: global drivers and implications for the growth rate of atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Trevor F.; Prentice, Colin; Canadell, Josep; Williams, Christopher; Han, Wang; Riley, William; Zhu, Qing; Koven, Charlie; Chambers, Jeff

    2017-04-01

    In this presentation we will focus on using decadal changes in the global carbon cycle to better understand how ecosystems respond to changes in CO2 concentration, temperature, and water and nutrient availability. Using global carbon budget estimates, ground, atmospheric and satellite observations, and multiple process-based global vegetation models, we examine the causes and consequences of the long-term changes in the terrestrial carbon sink. We show that over the past century the sink has been greatly enhanced, largely due to the effect of elevated CO2 on photosynthesis dominating over warming induced increases in respiration. We also examine the relative roles of greening, water and nutrients, along with individual events such as El Nino. We show that a slowdown in the rate of warming over land since the start of the 21st century likely led to a large increase in the sink, and that this increase was sufficient to lead to a pause in the growth rate of atmospheric CO2. We also show that the recent El Nino resulted in the highest growth rate of atmospheric CO2 ever recorded. Our results provide evidence of the relative roles of CO2 fertilization and warming induced respiration in the global carbon cycle, along with an examination of the impact of climate extremes.

  13. Atmospheric Flow Patterns Around the Southern Alps of New Zealand and Implications for Paleoaltimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, L. B.; Galewsky, J.

    2017-11-01

    The development of relief may generate leeside rain shadows where precipitation δ18O values are lower due to rainout on the windward side. The magnitude of lowering in paleo-δ18O sampled from the leeside of a mountain range should, at least, in principle, be related to the elevation of the mountain range. In order for leeside proxies to record the highest elevations, the majority of air masses need to travel up and over the ridge crest before raining out on the leeside. If atmospheric flow patterns around the mountain range are dominated by flow deflection, air masses that reach the leeside are less likely to record the highest elevations. Using the Weather Research and Forecasting model and Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model, we demonstrate that modern atmospheric flow patterns in the Southern Alps of New Zealand are not dominated by flow deflection. The lack of flow deflection around the Southern Alps and the relatively low relief throughout the uplift history supports the use of leeside isotope records to constrain the timing of uplift, and that uplift likely occurred 5 Ma based on leeside isotope records. In contrast, orogens that are characterized by high elevations and strong flow deflection, like the Sierra Nevada of California, may not be good candidates for leeside isotope-based paleoaltimetry studies. Ideal candidates for such studies should be characterized by relatively low elevations, low atmospheric flow deflection, and relatively low relief throughout the period of uplift.

  14. Unusual Atmospheric Processes: Implications for the Unusual Isotope Effect in Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, S.; Krishnamurthy, R. V.

    2016-12-01

    Several samples associated in particular with thunderstorms collected from Kalamazoo, Michigan reveal oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios that are not compatible with known thermodynamic fractionation or the so-called Raleigh Distillation Effect. Data gathered from April 2014 to February 2016 can be separated into two categories: (1) samples with expected isotopic values based on previous work, (2) samples with unusually high δ18O and δ2H values. Values as high as 42‰ and 25‰ for δ2H and δ18O respectively are obtained. Recent studies suggest that precipitation produced by deep convection can produce moderately enriched oxygen isotopic values, although no hydrogen values for those precipitations are available. Moreover, no values have been recorded that are as high as some of those presented here. The unusual isotope values cannot be attributed to air mass contributions. It is argued that changes in atmospheric chemistry, most likely induced by lightning associated with thunderstorms are responsible. This is likely since temperatures associated with lightning can reach 40000°K. Several studies have indicated that lightning can significantly impact atmospheric chemistry producing, among other species, ozone and NOx. Atmospheric ozone has enriched isotopic values and likely contributes to enriched Oxygen-18 seen in precipitation. An explanation for enrichment in hydrogen is somewhat elusive, but a likely candidate is ion molecular reactions produced by extremely high temperatures in the corona of lightning.

  15. Internal Gravity Wave Activity Hotspot and Implications for the Middle Atmospheric Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacha, Petr; Pisoft, Petr; Lilienthal, Friederike; Jacobi, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    Internal gravity waves are widely recognized to contribute significantly to the energy and angular momentum transport. They play a significant role in affecting many of the middle atmospheric phenomena (like the QBO or Brewer-Dobson circulation). Using GPS RO density profiles, we have discovered a localized area of enhanced IGW activity and breaking in the lower stratosphere of Eastern Asia/North-western Pacific region.With a 3D primitive equation model of the middle atmosphere we studied the effects of such a localized breaking region on large-scale dynamics and transport. Possible forcing and propagation directions of planetary waves caused by such a localized IGW forcing were investigated and consequences for the polar vortex stability and stratosphere-troposphere exchange in the tropical region were discussed.Finally, applying 3D EP flux and 3D residual circulation diagnostics, we investigated the possible role of this area in the longitudinal variability of the Brewer- Dobson circulation with a hypothesis of its enhanced downwelling branch in this region. In the proces, model results were compared with the ozone and tracer distribution data from GOME, GOMOS, MIPAS and SCIAMACHY further confirming the importance of the Eastern Asia/North-western Pacific region for middle atmospheric dynamics.

  16. Estimativa de radiação solar via modelagem atmosférica de mesoescala aplicada à região nordeste do Brasil Estimation of solar radiation by mesoscale atmospheric modeling applied to the northeast Brazil region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otacilio Leandro De Menezes Neto

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A utilização de fontes alternativas de energias, como a solar, a eólica e a biomassa, vem crescendo significativamente nos últimos anos, sendo a energia solar, em particular, uma fonte abundante na região Nordeste do Brasil. O conhecimento preciso da radiação solar incidente é, assim, de grande importância para o planejamento energético brasileiro, servindo de base para o desenvolvimento de futuros projetos de plantas fotovoltaicas e de aproveitamento da energia solar. Este trabalho apresenta uma metodologia para o mapeamento da energia solar incidente ao nível do solo para a região Nordeste do Brasil, utilizando um modelo atmosférico de mesoescala (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System - RAMS, validado e ajustado por meio dos dados medidos pela rede de plataformas de coleta de dados (PCDs da Fundação Cearense de Meteorologia e Recursos Hídricos (FUNCEME. Os resultados mostraram que o modelo apresenta erros sistemáticos, sobreestimando a radiação na superfície, porém após as devidas correções estatísticas, utilizando-se uma relação entre a fração de cobertura de nuvens prevista pelo modelo e a radiação observada na superfície e estimada no topo da atmosfera, encontram-se correlações de 0,92 com intervalos de confiança de 13,5 W/m² para dados com base mensal. Usando essa metodologia, a estimativa do valor médio anual (após ajustes da radiação solar incidente no estado do Ceará é de 215 W/m² (máximo em outubro: 260 W/m².The use of renewable energy sources, like solar, wind and biomass is rapidly increasing in recent years, with solar radiation being a particularly abundant energy source over Northeast Brazil. Thus, the proper quantitative knowledge of the incoming solar radiation is of great importance for energy generation planning in Brazil, serving as basis for developing future projects of photovoltaic power plants and solar energy exploration. This work presents a methodology for mapping the

  17. The Implications of 3D Thermal Structure on 1D Atmospheric Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian; Greene, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Using the atmospheric structure from a 3D global radiation-hydrodynamic simulation of HD 189733b and the open-source Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) code, we investigate the difference between the secondary-eclipse temperature structure produced with a 3D simulation and the best-fit 1D retrieved model. Synthetic data are generated by integrating the 3D models over the Spitzer, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and the James Web Space Telescope (JWST) bandpasses, covering the wavelength range between 1 and 11 μm where most spectroscopically active species have pronounced features. Using the data from different observing instruments, we present detailed comparisons between the temperature-pressure profiles recovered by BART and those from the 3D simulations. We calculate several averages of the 3D thermal structure and explore which particular thermal profile matches the retrieved temperature structure. We implement two temperature parameterizations that are commonly used in retrieval to investigate different thermal profile shapes. To assess which part of the thermal structure is best constrained by the data, we generate contribution functions for our theoretical model and each of our retrieved models. Our conclusions are strongly affected by the spectral resolution of the instruments included, their wavelength coverage, and the number of data points combined. We also see some limitations in each of the temperature parametrizations, as they are not able to fully match the complex curvatures that are usually produced in hydrodynamic simulations. The results show that our 1D retrieval is recovering a temperature and pressure profile that most closely matches the arithmetic average of the 3D thermal structure. When we use a higher resolution, more data points, and a parametrized temperature profile that allows more flexibility in the middle part of the atmosphere, we find a better match between the retrieved temperature and pressure profile and the

  18. Modeling Exoplanetary Atmospheres using BART, TEA, and Drift-RHD; Theoretical studies and Observational Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs-Dixon, Ian

    The explosion in the number of exoplanets detected to date has revealed a surprising diversity. When attempting to model this diversity, it is crucial to account for the uncertainties resulting from our limited knowledge of chemical, dynamical, and cloud formation processes in their atmospheres. Combining a retrieval technique with theorydriven models is a particularly promising way to address these processes and constrain a physically plausible atmospheric structure. In particular, a detailed micro-physical treatment of clouds and the longitudinal and latitudinal assessments of temperature and chemical profiles, have yet to be addressed in the field. Our team members are experts in radiative-hydrodynamic modeling (Dr. Ian DobbsDixon), cloud kinetics (Dr. Christiana Helling), retrievals and thermo-equilibrium chemistry (Dr. Jasmina Blecic), and observational diagnostics and predictions (Dr. Thomas Greene). The key goals of this proposal are to extend our understanding of the 3D atmospheric structure of gas-giant exoplanets by coupling state-of-the-art selfconsistent models together with a retrieval framework to 1) address cloud kinetics in retrievals, 2) assess 3D temperature and chemical structures in retrievals, 3) model a suite of well-observed planets within the framework of our models, and 4) make observational predictions for current and future NASA missions. To address these goals we have developed a number of tools: Drift-RHD, TEA, BART, and OBS. Drift-RHD solves both the 3D radiative-hydrodynamic equations and a time dependent kinetic cloud model. TEA, Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances, calculates abundances of chemical species present in the atmosphere. BART, a Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer code, is a statistical retrieval framework to explore the parameter space of atmospheric chemical abundances and thermal profiles. OBS is a suite of tools developed to simulate observations. Though these tools exist and have been utilized independently in

  19. A general circulation model study of the effects of faster rotation rate, enhanced CO2 concentration, and reduced solar forcing: Implications for the faint young sun paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Gregory S.

    1993-01-01

    Solar energy at the top of the atmosphere (solar constant), rotation rate, and carbon dioxide (CO2) may have varied significantly over Earth's history, especially during the earliest times. The sensitivity of a general circulation model to faster rotation, enhanced CO2 concentration, and reduced solar constant is presented. The control simulation of this study has a solar constant reduced by 10% the present amount, zero land fraction using a swamp ocean surface, CO2 concentrations of 330 ppmv, present-day rotation rate, and is integrated under mean diurnal and seasonal solar forcing. Four sensitivity test are performed under zero land fraction and reduced solar constant conditions by varying the earth's rotation rate atmospheric CO2 concentration and solar constant. The global mean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) compared to the control simulation: were 6.6 K to 12 K higher than the control's global mean temperature of 264.7 K. Sea ice is confined to higher latitudes in each experiment compared to the control, with ice-free areas equatorward of the subtropics. The warm SSTs are associated with a 20% reduction in clouds for the rotation rate experiments and higher CO2 concentrations in the other experiments. These results are in contrast to previous studies that have used energy balance and radiative convective models. Previous studies required a much larger atmospheric CO2 increase to prevent an ice-covered Earth. The results of the study, suggest that because of its possible feedback with clouds, the general circulation of the atmosphere should be taken into account in understanding the climate of early Earth. While higher CO2 concentrations are likely in view of the results, very large atmospheric CO2 concentrations may not be necessary to counterbalance the lower solar constant that existed early in Earth's history.

  20. Microbiome of the upper troposphere: Species composition and prevalence, effects of tropical storms, and atmospheric implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLeon-Rodriguez, Natasha; Lathem, Terry L.; Rodriguez-R, Luis M.; Barazesh, James M.; Anderson, Bruce E.; Beyersdorf, Andreas J.; Ziemba, Luke D.; Bergin, Michael; Nenes, Athanasios; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.

    2013-01-01

    The composition and prevalence of microorganisms in the middle-to-upper troposphere (8–15 km altitude) and their role in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions represent important, unresolved questions for biological and atmospheric science. In particular, airborne microorganisms above the oceans remain essentially uncharacterized, as most work to date is restricted to samples taken near the Earth’s surface. Here we report on the microbiome of low- and high-altitude air masses sampled onboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration DC-8 platform during the 2010 Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes campaign in the Caribbean Sea. The samples were collected in cloudy and cloud-free air masses before, during, and after two major tropical hurricanes, Earl and Karl. Quantitative PCR and microscopy revealed that viable bacterial cells represented on average around 20% of the total particles in the 0.25- to 1-μm diameter range and were at least an order of magnitude more abundant than fungal cells, suggesting that bacteria represent an important and underestimated fraction of micrometer-sized atmospheric aerosols. The samples from the two hurricanes were characterized by significantly different bacterial communities, revealing that hurricanes aerosolize a large amount of new cells. Nonetheless, 17 bacterial taxa, including taxa that are known to use C1–C4 carbon compounds present in the atmosphere, were found in all samples, indicating that these organisms possess traits that allow survival in the troposphere. The findings presented here suggest that the microbiome is a dynamic and underappreciated aspect of the upper troposphere with potentially important impacts on the hydrological cycle, clouds, and climate. PMID:23359712

  1. Aerosol lidar observations of atmospheric mixing in Los Angeles: Climatology and implications for greenhouse gas observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, John; Kort, Eric A.; DeCola, Phil; Duren, Riley

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric observations of greenhouse gases provide essential information on sources and sinks of these key atmospheric constituents. To quantify fluxes from atmospheric observations, representation of transport—especially vertical mixing—is a necessity and often a source of error. We report on remotely sensed profiles of vertical aerosol distribution taken over a 2 year period in Pasadena, California. Using an automated analysis system, we estimate daytime mixing layer depth, achieving high confidence in the afternoon maximum on 51% of days with profiles from a Sigma Space Mini Micropulse LiDAR (MiniMPL) and on 36% of days with a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. We note that considering ceilometer data on a logarithmic scale, a standard method, introduces, an offset in mixing height retrievals. The mean afternoon maximum mixing height is 770 m Above Ground Level in summer and 670 m in winter, with significant day-to-day variance (within season σ = 220m≈30%). Taking advantage of the MiniMPL's portability, we demonstrate the feasibility of measuring the detailed horizontal structure of the mixing layer by automobile. We compare our observations to planetary boundary layer (PBL) heights from sonde launches, North American regional reanalysis (NARR), and a custom Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model developed for greenhouse gas (GHG) monitoring in Los Angeles. NARR and WRF PBL heights at Pasadena are both systematically higher than measured, NARR by 2.5 times; these biases will cause proportional errors in GHG flux estimates using modeled transport. We discuss how sustained lidar observations can be used to reduce flux inversion error by selecting suitable analysis periods, calibrating models, or characterizing bias for correction in post processing.

  2. Aerosol lidar observations of atmospheric mixing in Los Angeles: Climatology and implications for greenhouse gas observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, John; Kort, Eric A; DeCola, Phil; Duren, Riley

    2016-08-27

    Atmospheric observations of greenhouse gases provide essential information on sources and sinks of these key atmospheric constituents. To quantify fluxes from atmospheric observations, representation of transport-especially vertical mixing-is a necessity and often a source of error. We report on remotely sensed profiles of vertical aerosol distribution taken over a 2 year period in Pasadena, California. Using an automated analysis system, we estimate daytime mixing layer depth, achieving high confidence in the afternoon maximum on 51% of days with profiles from a Sigma Space Mini Micropulse LiDAR (MiniMPL) and on 36% of days with a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. We note that considering ceilometer data on a logarithmic scale, a standard method, introduces, an offset in mixing height retrievals. The mean afternoon maximum mixing height is 770 m Above Ground Level in summer and 670 m in winter, with significant day-to-day variance (within season σ = 220m≈30%). Taking advantage of the MiniMPL's portability, we demonstrate the feasibility of measuring the detailed horizontal structure of the mixing layer by automobile. We compare our observations to planetary boundary layer (PBL) heights from sonde launches, North American regional reanalysis (NARR), and a custom Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model developed for greenhouse gas (GHG) monitoring in Los Angeles. NARR and WRF PBL heights at Pasadena are both systematically higher than measured, NARR by 2.5 times; these biases will cause proportional errors in GHG flux estimates using modeled transport. We discuss how sustained lidar observations can be used to reduce flux inversion error by selecting suitable analysis periods, calibrating models, or characterizing bias for correction in post processing.

  3. Oxygen isotopes in the Martian atmosphere - Implications for the evolution of volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcelroy, M. B.; Yung, Y. L.

    1976-01-01

    Nonthermal escape of oxygen by recombination of exospheric O2(+) combined with diffusive separation of gases at lower altitude provides a mechanism through which the Martian atmosphere may be enriched in O-18 relative to O-16. Measurement of the abundance of O-18 relative to O-16 together with a determination of the turbopause may be used to develop important constraints on the history of Martian volatiles. Models for the interpretation of these data are developed and discussed in light of present information.

  4. Mercury concentrations of the Mazama ash : implications for the atmospheric mercury budget

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, A.K.; Telmer, K.; Spence, J. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada). School of Earth and Ocean Sciences

    2005-07-01

    This study examined the mercury concentrations found in the large quantity of ash that was produced when Mount Mazama erupted. The objective was to better quantify volcanic emissions of mercury in terms of the global mercury budget. The ash plume included a proximal consolidated facies that contained much lower mercury concentrations than the distal unconsolidated facies. Two possible reasons for this were suggested. First, it was suggested that mercury's low volatilization temperature resulted in its thermal release during the volcanic eruption, thereby accounting for the low values of mercury observed within the proximal unit due to its high temperature at the time of deposition. A portion of the thermally released mercury (Hg0) would have been oxidized in the atmosphere to Hg{sup 2+}, rendering it more reactive. Ash particles traveling with the eruption plume would have cooled enough to allow for readsorption of the oxidized mercury. The deposited cooled particles within the distal facies would therefore have contained higher mercury levels compared to the proximal facies. The second possibility was that thermal release occurred for both facies and that the low concentrations found within the proximal unit represent the original concentrations of the whole ash deposit. Concentrations in the distal facies were increased due to postdepositional processes that left the proximal facies unchanged due to buffering by its consolidated nature and its thickness. Mercury mass calculations gave values of 6 megagrams (Mg) of mercury for the consolidated facies and 924 Mg for the unconsolidated facies, for a total of 930 Mg for the whole deposit. The volcano was estimated to contain 12392 Mg of mercury, with 11462 Mg released to the atmosphere. On average, volcanic eruptions around the world account for 70 Mg of mercury/year which is currently unaccounted for in the global mercury budgets. This study demonstrated the mobile nature of the global mercury cycle and showed

  5. Solar flares as proxy for the young Sun: satellite observed thermosphere response to an X17.2 flare of Earth's upper atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krauss

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the measured thermospheric response of an extreme solar X17.2 flare that irradiated the Earth's upper atmosphere during the so-called Halloween events in late October/early November 2003. We suggest that such events can serve as proxies for the intense electromagnetic and corpuscular radiation environment of the Sun or other stars during their early phases of evolution. We applied and compared empirical thermosphere models with satellite drag measurements from the GRACE satellites and found that the Jacchia-Bowman 2008 model can reproduce the drag measurements very well during undisturbed solar conditions but gets worse during extreme solar events. By analyzing the peak of the X17.2 flare spectra and comparing it with spectra of young solar proxies, our results indicate that the peak flare radiation flux corresponds to a hypothetical Sun-like star or the Sun at the age of approximately 2.3 Gyr. This implies that the peak extreme ultraviolet (EUV radiation is enhanced by a factor of about 2.5 times compared to today's Sun. On the assumption that the Sun emitted an EUV flux of that magnitude and by modifying the activity indices in the Jacchia-Bowman 2008 model, we obtain an average exobase temperature of 1950 K, which corresponds with previous theoretical studies related to thermospheric heating and expansion caused by the solar EUV flux.

  6. Solar flares as proxy for the young Sun: satellite observed thermosphere response to an X17.2 flare of Earth's upper atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krauss

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the measured thermospheric response of an extreme solar X17.2 flare that irradiated the Earth's upper atmosphere during the so-called Halloween events in late October/early November 2003. We suggest that such events can serve as proxies for the intense electromagnetic and corpuscular radiation environment of the Sun or other stars during their early phases of evolution. We applied and compared empirical thermosphere models with satellite drag measurements from the GRACE satellites and found that the Jacchia-Bowman 2008 model can reproduce the drag measurements very well during undisturbed solar conditions but gets worse during extreme solar events. By analyzing the peak of the X17.2 flare spectra and comparing it with spectra of young solar proxies, our results indicate that the peak flare radiation flux corresponds to a hypothetical Sun-like star or the Sun at the age of approximately 2.3 Gyr. This implies that the peak extreme ultraviolet (EUV radiation is enhanced by a factor of about 2.5 times compared to today's Sun. On the assumption that the Sun emitted an EUV flux of that magnitude and by modifying the activity indices in the Jacchia-Bowman 2008 model, we obtain an average exobase temperature of 1950 K, which corresponds with previous theoretical studies related to thermospheric heating and expansion caused by the solar EUV flux.

  7. Implications of Wide-Area Geographic Diversity for Short- Term Variability of Solar Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan

    2010-08-23

    Worldwide interest in the deployment of photovoltaic generation (PV) is rapidly increasing. Operating experience with large PV plants, however, demonstrates that large, rapid changes in the output of PV plants are possible. Early studies of PV grid impacts suggested that short-term variability could be a potential limiting factor in deploying PV. Many of these early studies, however, lacked high-quality data from multiple sites to assess the costs and impacts of increasing PV penetration. As is well known for wind, accounting for the potential for geographic diversity can significantly reduce the magnitude of extreme changes in aggregated PV output, the resources required to accommodate that variability, and the potential costs of managing variability. We use measured 1-min solar insolation for 23 time-synchronized sites in the Southern Great Plains network of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program and wind speed data from 10 sites in the same network to characterize the variability of PV with different degrees of geographic diversity and to compare the variability of PV to the variability of similarly sited wind. The relative aggregate variability of PV plants sited in a dense 10 x 10 array with 20 km spacing is six times less than the variability of a single site for variability on time scales less than 15-min. We find in our analysis of wind and PV plants similarly sited in a 5 x 5 grid with 50 km spacing that the variability of PV is only slightly more than the variability of wind on time scales of 5-15 min. Over shorter and longer time scales the level of variability is nearly identical. Finally, we use a simple approximation method to estimate the cost of carrying additional reserves to manage sub-hourly variability. We conclude that the costs of managing the short-term variability of PV are dramatically reduced by geographic diversity and are not substantially different from the costs for managing the short-term variability of similarly sited wind in

  8. The atmospheric signal of terrestrial carbon isotopic discrimination and its implication for partitioning carbon fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, John B.; Tans, Pieter P.; Conway, Thomas J. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory; White, James W.C.; Vaughn, Bruce W. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Inst. for Arctic and Alpine Research

    2003-04-01

    The {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio in atmospheric carbon dioxide has been measured in samples taken in the NOAA/CMDL network since 1991. By examining the relationship between weekly anomalies in {sup 13}C and CO{sub 2} at continental sites in the network, we infer temporal and spatial values for the isotopic signature of terrestrial CO{sub 2} fluxes. We can convert these isotopic signatures to values of discrimination if we assume the atmospheric starting point for photosynthesis. The average discrimination in the Northern Hemisphere between 30 and 50 deg N is calculated to be 16.6 {+-} 0.2 per mil. In contrast to some earlier modeling studies, we find no strong latitudinal gradient in discrimination. However, we do observe that discrimination in Eurasia is larger than in North America, which is consistent with two modeling studies. We also observe a possible trend in the North American average of discrimination toward less discrimination. There is no apparent trend in the Eurasian average or at any individual sites. However, there is interannual variability on the order of 2 per mil at several sites and regions. Finally, we calculate the northern temperate terrestrial CO{sub 2} flux replacing our previous discrimination values of about 18 per mil with the average value of 16.6 calculated in this study. We find this enhances the terrestrial sink by about 0.4 GtC/yr.

  9. Reactions between Criegee Intermediates and the Inorganic Acids HCl and HNO3 : Kinetics and Atmospheric Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Elizabeth S; Kapnas, Kara M; Murray, Craig

    2016-08-22

    Criegee intermediates (CIs) are a class of reactive radicals that are thought to play a key role in atmospheric chemistry through reactions with trace species that can lead to aerosol particle formation. Recent work has suggested that water vapor is likely to be the dominant sink for some CIs, although reactions with trace species that are sufficiently rapid can be locally competitive. Herein, we use broadband transient absorption spectroscopy to measure rate constants for the reactions of the simplest CI, CH2 OO, with two inorganic acids, HCl and HNO3 , both of which are present in polluted urban atmospheres. Both reactions are fast; at 295 K, the reactions of CH2 OO with HCl and HNO3 have rate constants of 4.6×10(-11)  cm(3)  s(-1) and 5.4×10(-10)  cm(3)  s(-1) , respectively. Complementary quantum-chemical calculations show that these reactions form substituted hydroperoxides with no energy barrier. The results suggest that reactions of CIs with HNO3 in particular are likely to be competitive with those with water vapor in polluted urban areas under conditions of modest relative humidity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Dissolved total hydrolyzable enantiomeric amino acids in precipitation: Implications on bacterial contributions to atmospheric organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ge; Kim, Guebuem; Kim, Jeonghyun; Jeong, Yu-Sik; Kim, Young Il

    2015-03-01

    We analyzed dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and dissolved enantiomeric amino acids in precipitation samples collected at two sites in Korea over a one-year period. The average concentrations of DOC, DON, and total hydrolyzable amino acids at Seoul (an inland urban area) were lower than those at Uljin (a coastal rural area). The different bulk compositions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) at these two sites (reflected by qualitative indicators) were mainly attributed to differences in contributing sources. The D-enantiomers of four individual amino acids (aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and alanine) were ubiquitously present, with average enantiomeric (D/L) ratios of 0.34, 0.26, 0.21, and 0.61 for Seoul, and 0.18, 0.11, 0.09, and 0.31 for Uljin, respectively. The much higher D/L ratios observed at Seoul than at Uljin might result from more advanced diagenetic stages as well as higher contributions from bacteria inhabiting terrestrial environments. The C- and N-normalized yields of D-alanine in DOM of our samples were found to be comparable to literature values reported for aquatic systems, where a significant portion of DOM was suggested to be of bacterial origin. Our study suggests that bacteria and their remnants might constitute an important fraction of OM in the atmosphere, contributing significantly to the quality of atmospheric OM and its post-depositional bioavailability in the surface ecosystems.

  11. Development and Implementation of Critical Loads for Atmospheric Deposition: Federal Land Management Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, E. M.

    2004-12-01

    Critical loads for atmospheric deposition have been widely developed and used in Europe, Canada, and other countries. Critical loads are used to influence air pollution emissions reductions, thereby protecting and restoring aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. In the United States, federal land management agencies are adopting the critical load concept as a potentially valuable resource management tool. Certain parks and wilderness areas are currently being affected by anthropogenic nitrogen and sulfur deposition. Effects of excess deposition include acidification, nitrogen enrichment, toxicity, and changes in biotic communities. Streams in both Shenandoah and Great Smoky Mountains National Parks are experiencing chronic and episodic acidification and brook trout fisheries in Shenandoah have been affected. High elevation ecosystems in Rocky Mountain National Park are undergoing subtle changes in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems attributable to atmospheric deposition. Natural resources in many other federal areas have been affected or are at risk from deposition. Federal land managers are refining strategies for critical loads that include working with scientists to identify resources sensitive to deposition, defining resource protection criteria that will meet management objectives, and estimating and implementing critical loads. Critical loads will be used in resource management decisions and federal land management planning. They will be used to evaluate management actions and assess progress towards meeting management goals. Federal land managers will also communicate critical loads information to air pollution regulatory agencies to inform emissions management strategies for clean air.

  12. Chemical dynamics of triacetylene formation and implications to the synthesis of polyynes in Titan's atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, X; Kim, Y S; Kaiser, R I; Mebel, A M; Liang, M C; Yung, Y L

    2009-09-22

    For the last four decades, the role of polyynes such as diacetylene (HCCCCH) and triacetylene (HCCCCCCH) in the chemical evolution of the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan has been a subject of vigorous research. These polyacetylenes are thought to serve as an UV radiation shield in planetary environments; thus, acting as prebiotic ozone, and are considered as important constituents of the visible haze layers on Titan. However, the underlying chemical processes that initiate the formation and control the growth of polyynes have been the least understood to date. Here, we present a combined experimental, theoretical, and modeling study on the synthesis of the polyyne triacetylene (HCCCCCCH) via the bimolecular gas phase reaction of the ethynyl radical (CCH) with diacetylene (HCCCCH). This elementary reaction is rapid, has no entrance barrier, and yields the triacetylene molecule via indirect scattering dynamics through complex formation in a single collision event. Photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere imply that triacetylene may serve as a building block to synthesize even more complex polyynes such as tetraacetylene (HCCCCCCCCH).

  13. Reactions of Azine Anions with Nitrogen and Oxygen Atoms: Implications for Titan's Upper Atmosphere and Interstellar Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe-Chen; Cole, Callie A; Demarais, Nicholas J; Snow, Theodore P; Bierbaum, Veronica M

    2015-08-26

    Azines are important in many extraterrestrial environments, from the atmosphere of Titan to the interstellar medium. They have been implicated as possible carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands in astronomy, indicating their persistence in interstellar space. Most importantly, they constitute the basic building blocks of DNA and RNA, so their chemical reactivity in these environments has significant astrobiological implications. In addition, N and O atoms are widely observed in the ISM and in the ionospheres of planets and moons. However, the chemical reactions of molecular anions with abundant interstellar and atmospheric atomic species are largely unexplored. In this paper, gas-phase reactions of deprotonated anions of benzene, pyridine, pyridazine, pyrimidine, pyrazine, and s-triazine with N and O atoms are studied both experimentally and computationally. In all cases, the major reaction channel is associative electron detachment; these reactions are particularly important since they control the balance between negative ions and free electron densities. The reactions of the azine anions with N atoms exhibit larger rate constants than reactions of corresponding chain anions. The reactions of azine anions with O atoms are even more rapid, with complex product patterns for different reactants. The mechanisms are studied theoretically by employing density functional theory; spin conversion is found to be important in determining some product distributions. The rich gas-phase chemistry observed in this work provides a better understanding of ion-atom reactions and their contributions to ionospheric chemistry as well as the chemical processing that occurs in the boundary layers between diffuse and dense interstellar clouds.

  14. Peroxyacetic acid in urban and rural atmosphere: concentration, feedback on PAN-NOx cycle and implication on radical chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxyacetic acid (PAA is one of the most important atmospheric organic peroxides, which have received increasing attention for their potential contribution to the oxidation capacity of the troposphere and the formation of secondary aerosols. We report here, for the first time, a series of data for atmospheric PAA concentrations at urban and rural sites, from five field campaigns carried out in China in summer 2006, 2007 and 2008. For these five measurements, daytime mean (08:00–20:00 LT PAA concentrations on sunlit days were 21.4–148.0 pptv with a maximum level of ~1 ppbv. The various meteorological and chemical parameters influencing PAA concentrations were examined using Principal Factor Analysis. This statistical analysis shows that the local photochemical production was the major source of PAA, and its concentration increased with increasing temperature, solar radiation and ozone but decreased with increasing NOx (NO and NO2, CO, SO2, and relative humidity. Based on the dataset, several issues are highlighted in this study: (i Because PAA is a product from the photochemical oxidation of some specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs that lead to acetyl peroxy radicals, the importance of various VOCs with respect to the PAA formation is therefore ranked using the incremental reactivity method. (ii The contribution of PAN thermal degradation to PAA formation under conditions of different NOx concentrations is estimated based on the chemical kinetics analysis. The result shows that PAN seems to play an important role in the formation of PAA when the NO/NO2 concentration ratio was less than 0.2 and PAA would correspondingly have feedback on the PAN-NOx cycle. (iii PAA and other peroxides, such as methyl hydroperoxide (MHP and H2O2, usually exhibited a similar asymmetric shape typically shifted to the afternoon. However, under some conditions, H2O2 diurnal cycle was out of phase with MHP and PAA. The combination of linear regression and

  15. Charge-Transfer Dynamics in the Lowest Excited State of a Pentacene–Fullerene Complex: Implications for Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Joseph, Saju

    2017-10-02

    We characterize the dynamic nature of the lowest excited state in a pentacene/C60 complex on the femtosecond time scale, via a combination of ab initio molecular dynamics and time-dependent density functional theory. We analyze the correlations between the molecular vibrations of the complex and the oscillations in the electron-transfer character of its lowest excited state, which point to vibration-induced coherences between the (pentacene-based) local-excitation (LE) state and the complex charge-transfer (CT) state. We discuss the implications of our results on this model system for the exciton-dissociation process in organic solar cells.

  16. Global Modelling of the total OH reactivity: validation against measurements and atmospheric implications of the 'missing' sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracci, Valerio; Archibald, Alexander T.; Pyle, John A.

    2017-04-01

    The removal of most trace gases emitted into the atmosphere is primarily initiated by reaction with the hydroxyl radical, OH. A number of field campaigns over the last two decades have observed the presence of a "missing" sink of the OH radical in a variety of regions across the planet, from urban areas to remote forests: comparison of the direct measurements of the OH loss rate, also known as total OH reactivity, with the sum of individual known OH sinks (obtained via the simultaneous detection of species such as volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides) indicated that, in some cases, up to 80% of the total OH loss rate was unaccounted for. The implications of this finding are significant, as a potentially major OH sink operating in the atmosphere is not currently accounted for in atmospheric models: the presence of an additional OH sink might, for instance, lead to an increase in the atmospheric lifetime of a number of trace species, including high-impact greenhouse gases such as methane. The only modelling of the total OH reactivity is currently performed on a regional scale; a thorough assessment of the impact of the missing sink on the chemistry and climate of the planet by global modelling is therefore highly desirable. In this work a chemistry-climate model (the Met Office's Unified Model with the United Kingdom Chemistry and Aerosols scheme, UM-UKCA) was used to calculate the total OH reactivity at the planetary boundary layer. The model output was validated against available field measurements to verify that the known OH sinks observed in the field were reproduced correctly by the model: a good agreement was found between the data from more than 30 field campaigns and the model output. Following this, the effects of introducing novel OH sinks in the chemistry scheme were investigated. The first step was the introduction in the model of the newly characterised reactions of peroxy radicals (RO2) with OH, the kinetics and products of which have only

  17. A study of the dissociative recombination of CaO+ with electrons: Implications for Ca chemistry in the upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bones, D. L.; Gerding, M.; Höffner, J.; Martín, Juan Carlos Gómez; Plane, J. M. C.

    2016-12-01

    The dissociative recombination of CaO+ ions with electrons has been studied in a flowing afterglow reactor. CaO+ was generated by the pulsed laser ablation of a Ca target, followed by entrainment in an Ar+ ion/electron plasma. A kinetic model describing the gas-phase chemistry and diffusion to the reactor walls was fitted to the experimental data, yielding a rate coefficient of (3.0 ± 1.0) × 10-7 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 at 295 K. This result has two atmospheric implications. First, the surprising observation that the Ca+/Fe+ ratio is 8 times larger than Ca/Fe between 90 and 100 km in the atmosphere can now be explained quantitatively by the known ion-molecule chemistry of these two metals. Second, the rate of neutralization of Ca+ ions in a descending sporadic E layer is fast enough to explain the often explosive growth of sporadic neutral Ca layers.

  18. Theoretical Kinetic Study of the Formic Acid Catalyzed Criegee Intermediate Isomerization: Multistructural Anharmonicity and Atmospheric Implications

    KAUST Repository

    Monge Palacios, Manuel

    2018-01-29

    We performed a theoretical study on the double hydrogen shift isomerization reaction of a six carbon atom Criegee intermediate (C6-CI), catalyzed by formic acid (HCOOH), to produce vinylhydroperoxide (VHP), C6-CI+HCOOH→VHP+HCOOH. This Criegee intermediate can serve as a surrogate for larger CIs derived from important volatile organic compounds like monoterpenes, whose reactivity is not well understood and are difficult to handle computationally. The reactant HCOOH exerts a pronounced catalytic effect on the studied reaction by lowering the barrier height, but the kinetic enhancement is hindered by the multistructural anharmonicity. First, the rigid ring-structure adopted by the saddle point to facilitate simultaneous transfer of two atoms does not allow formation of as many conformers as those formed by the reactant C6-CI. And second, the flexible carbon chain of C6-CI facilitates the formation of stabilizing intramolecular C–H···O hydrogen bonds; this stabilizing effect is less pronounced in the saddle point structure due to its tightness and steric effects. Thus, the contribution of the reactant C6-CI conformers to the multistructural partition function is larger than that of the saddle point conformers. The resulting low multistructural anharmonicity factor partially cancels out the catalytic effect of the carboxylic acid, yielding in a moderately large rate coefficient, k(298 K) = 4.9·10-13 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. We show that carboxylic acids may promote the conversion of stabilized Criegee intermediates into vinylhydroperoxides in the atmosphere, which generates OH radicals and leads to secondary organic aerosol, thereby affecting the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere and ultimately the climate.

  19. Physiological responses to low atmospheric pressure stunning and the implications for welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeegan, D E F; Sandercock, D A; Gerritzen, M A

    2013-04-01

    In low atmospheric pressure stunning (LAPS), poultry are rendered unconscious before slaughter by gradually reducing oxygen tension in the atmosphere to achieve a progressive anoxia. The effects of LAPS are not instantaneous, so there are legitimate welfare concerns around the experience of birds before loss of consciousness. Using self-contained telemetry logging units, high-quality continuous electroencephalogram (EEG) and electrocardiogram (EKG) recordings were obtained from 28 broiler chickens during exposure to LAPS in a commercial poultry processing plant. Application of LAPS was associated with changes in the EEG pattern in the form of increases in total power, decreases in mean frequency, and in particular, increases in slow-wave (delta) activity, indicating a gradual loss of consciousness. Increased delta wave activity was seen within 10 s of LAPS onset and consistently thereafter, peaking at 30 s into LAPS at which point the EEG signal shared characteristics with that of birds in a surgical plane of anesthesia. During LAPS, heart rate consistently decreased, with more pronounced bradycardia and arrhythmia observed after 30 s. No heart rate increases were observed in the period when the birds were potentially conscious. After an initial quiescent period, brief body movements (presumed to be ataxia/loss of posture) were seen on average at 39 s into the LAPS process. Later (after 120 s on average), artifacts related to clonic (wing flapping) and tonic (muscle spasms) convulsions were observed in the EKG recordings. Based on EEG analysis and body movement responses, a conservative estimate of time to loss of consciousness is approximately 40 s. The lack of behavioral responses indicating aversion or escape and absence of heart rate elevation in the conscious period strongly suggest that birds do not find LAPS induction distressing. Collectively, the results suggest that LAPS is a humane approach that has the potential to improve the welfare of poultry at

  20. The isotopic record of Northern Hemisphere atmospheric carbon monoxide since 1950: implications for the CO budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Wang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a 60-year record of the stable isotopes of atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO from firn air samples collected under the framework of the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM project. CO concentration, δ13C, and δ18O of CO were measured by gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (gc-IRMS from trapped gases in the firn. We applied LGGE-GIPSA firn air models (Witrant et al., 2011 to correlate gas age with firn air depth and then reconstructed the trend of atmospheric CO and its stable isotopic composition at high northern latitudes since 1950. The most probable firn air model scenarios show that δ13C decreased slightly from −25.8‰ in 1950 to −26.4‰ in 2000, then decreased more significantly to −27.2‰ in 2008. δ18O decreased more regularly from 9.8‰ in 1950 to 7.1‰ in 2008. Those same scenarios show CO concentration increased gradually from 1950 and peaked in the late 1970s, followed by a gradual decrease to present day values (Petrenko et al., 2012. Results from an isotope mass balance model indicate that a slight increase, followed by a large reduction, in CO derived from fossil fuel combustion has occurred since 1950. The reduction of CO emission from fossil fuel combustion after the mid-1970s is the most plausible mechanism for the drop of CO concentration during this time. Fossil fuel CO emissions decreased as a result of the implementation of catalytic converters and the relative growth of diesel engines, in spite of the global vehicle fleet size having grown several fold over the same time period.

  1. Articulating Atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinch, Sofie

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an architectural approach to designing computational interfaces by articulating the notion of atmosphere in the field of interaction design. It draws upon the concept of kinesthetic interaction and a philosophical notion on atmosphere emphasizing the importance of bodily exper......” implications and qualities of the approach are identified through concrete examples of a design case, which also investigates the qualities and implications of addressing atmospheres both as design concern and user experience.......This paper presents an architectural approach to designing computational interfaces by articulating the notion of atmosphere in the field of interaction design. It draws upon the concept of kinesthetic interaction and a philosophical notion on atmosphere emphasizing the importance of bodily...... experience in space, presented as middle ground experience. In the field of HCI, middle ground experiences complete the unarticulated spectrum between designing for foreground of attention or background awareness. When “Articulating Atmospheres through Middle Ground Experiences in Interaction Design...

  2. On the structure of atmospheric warming in models and observations: Implications for the lapse rate feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Po-Chedley, Stephen D.

    This dissertation investigates the structure of atmospheric warming in observations and general circulation models (GCMs). Theory and GCMs suggest that warming is amplified in the tropical upper troposphere relative to the lower troposphere and the surface--a phenomenon known as vertical amplification. We assess model and observational agreement using several amplification metrics derived from the satellite-borne microwave sounding unit (MSU) atmospheric temperature trends. An important correction to the satellite microwave record is the removal of temperature drifts caused by changes in diurnal sampling. This correction the principal source of uncertainty in microwave temperature datasets. Furthermore, in three existing datasets, the ratio of tropical warming between the upper troposphere (T24 channel) and the surface (dT24/dTs 0.6-1.3) is lower than that of GCMs ( 1.4-1.6). To better understand these issues, we produced an alternate MSU dataset with an improved diurnal correction. We show that existing MSU datasets likely underestimate tropical mid-tropospheric temperature trends. Subsequent improvements to MSU datasets using similar diurnal correction techniques leads to amplification ratios (between T24 and the surface) that are in accord with models. Another measure of tropical tropospheric amplification is the relative warming between the upper troposphere (T24) and the lower-middle troposphere (TLT). We show that most GCMs have excessive T24/TLT amplification compared to satellite microwave observations, even when models are forced with prescribed sea-surface temperatures (SSTs). A number of possible reasons for this discrepancy are assessed. Observational uncertainty in the satellite microwave record is substantial and, when taken into account, many models agree with observations within the observational uncertainty range, though about half of the model ensemble members considered still have significant discrepancies compared to observations. Our findings

  3. Early solar physics

    CERN Document Server

    Meadows, A J

    1970-01-01

    Early Solar Physics reviews developments in solar physics, particularly the advent of solar spectroscopy and the discovery of relationships between the various layers of the solar atmosphere and between the different forms of solar activity. Topics covered include solar observations during 1843; chemical analysis of the solar atmosphere; the spectrum of a solar prominence; and the solar eclipse of December 12, 1871. Spectroscopic observations of the sun are also presented. This book is comprised of 30 chapters and begins with an overview of ideas about the sun in the mid-nineteenth century, fo

  4. A late Holocene record of solar-forced atmospheric blocking variability over Northern Europe inferred from varved lake sediments of Lake Kuninkaisenlampi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarni, Saija; Muschitiello, Francesco; Weege, Stefanie; Brauer, Achim; Saarinen, Timo

    2016-12-01

    This study presents a new varved lake sediment sequence from Lake Kuninkaisenlampi, Eastern Finland. The record is constituted by alternations of clastic and biogenic laminae and provides a precise chronology extending back to 3607 ± 94 varve yrs. BP. The seasonality of the boreal climatic zone, with cold winters and mild summers, is reflected in the varve structure as a succession of three laminae from bottom to top, (i) a coarse to fine-grained detrital lamina marked by detrital catchment material transported by spring floods; (ii) a biogenic lamina with diatoms, plant and insect remnants reflecting biological productivity during the season of lake productivity; and (iii) a very fine amorphous organic lamina deposited during the winter stratification. The thickness of the detrital lamina in the lake reflects changes in the rate of spring snow melt in the catchment and is, therefore, considered a proxy for winter conditions. Hence, the record allows reconstructing local climate and environmental conditions on inter-annual to the multi-centennial timescales. We find that minerogenic accumulation reflected in the detrital lamina exhibits a high multi-decadal to centennial-scale spectral coherency with proxies for solar activity, such as Δ14C, and Total Solar Irradiance, suggesting a strong link between solar variability and sediment transport to the lake basin. Increased catchment erosion is observed during periods of low solar activity, which we ascribe to the development of more frequent atmospheric winter blocking circulation induced by solar-forced changes in the stratosphere. We suggest that soil frost in the catchment of Lake Kuninkaisenlampi related to more frequent winter blocking led to increased surface run-off and ultimately to increased catchment erosion during spring. We conclude that, during the past ca 3600 years, solar forcing may have modulated multi-decadal to centennial variations in sedimentation regimes in lakes from Eastern Finland and

  5. Atmospheric Mercury in the Barnett Shale Area, Texas: Implications for Emissions from Oil and Gas Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xin; Talbot, Robert; Laine, Patrick; Torres, Azucena; Lefer, Barry; Flynn, James

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric mercury emissions in the Barnett Shale area were studied by employing both stationary measurements and mobile laboratory surveys. Stationary measurements near the Engle Mountain Lake showed that the median mixing ratio of total gaseous mercury (THg) was 138 ppqv (140 ± 29 ppqv for mean ± S.D.) during the June 2011 study period. A distinct diurnal variation pattern was observed in which the highest THg levels appeared near midnight, followed by a monotonic decrease until midafternoon. The influence of oil and gas (ONG) emissions was substantial in this area, as inferred from the i-pentane/n-pentane ratio (1.17). However, few THg plumes were captured by our mobile laboratory during a ∼3700 km survey with detailed downwind measurements from 50 ONG facilities. One compressor station and one natural gas condensate processing facility were found to have significant THg emissions, with maximum THg levels of 963 and 392 ppqv, respectively, and the emissions rates were estimated to be 7.9 kg/yr and 0.3 kg/yr, respectively. Our results suggest that the majority of ONG facilities in this area are not significant sources of THg; however, it is highly likely that a small number of these facilities contribute a relatively large amount of emissions in the ONG sector.

  6. Atmospheric Feedback of Urban Boundary Layer with Implications for Climate Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Marissa S; Keener, Timothy C

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric structure changes in response to the urban form, land use, and the type of land cover (LULC). This interaction controls thermal and air pollutant transport and distribution. The interrelationships among LULC, ambient temperature, and air quality were analyzed and found to be significant in a case study in Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A. Within the urban canopy layer (UCL), traffic-origin PM2.5 and black carbon followed Gaussian dispersion in the near road area in the daytime, while higher concentrations, over 1 order of magnitude, were correlated to the lapse rate under nocturnal inversions. In the overlying urban boundary layer (UBL), ambient temperature and PM2.5 variations were correlated among urban-wide locations indicating effective thermal and mass communications. Beyond the spatial correlation, LULC-related local urban heat island effects are noteworthy. The high-density urbanized zone along a narrow highway-following corridor is marked by higher nighttime temperature by ∼1.6 °C with a long-term increase by 2.0 °C/decade, and by a higher PM2.5 concentration, than in the low-density residential LULC. These results indicate that the urban LULC may have contributed to the nocturnal thermal inversion affecting urban air circulation and air quality in UCL and UBL. Such relationships point to the potentials of climate adaptation through urban planning.

  7. Implications of Detection Methods on Characterizing Atmospheric River Contribution to Seasonal Snowfall Across Sierra Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huning, Laurie S.; Margulis, Steven A.; Guan, Bin; Waliser, Duane E.; Neiman, Paul J.

    2017-10-01

    This study investigates the extent to which the diagnosed contribution of atmospheric rivers (ARs) to the seasonal cumulative snowfall (CS) is related to the AR detection approach utilized. Using both satellite integrated water vapor (IWV)-based and reanalysis integrated vapor transport (IVT)-based methodologies, the corresponding AR-derived CS distributions were characterized over the Sierra Nevada (USA) from 1998 to 2015. AR detection methods indicated that ARs yield greater orographic enhancement of the seasonal CS than non-AR storms above 2,100-2,300 m for the IWV-based approach and over all elevations for the IVT-based detection approach across the western (i.e., windward) Sierra Nevada. Due to differences in the methodologies, the IWV-based approach diagnosed 2.1 times fewer ARs than the IVT-based approach. As a result, the ARs diagnosed using the IWV-based detection method yielded an average 33% of the total range-wide CS annually as opposed to 56% from the IVT-based detection method.

  8. Mirador - Atmospheric Composition

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Earth Science data access made simple. Atmospheric Composition is focused on the composition of Earth's atmosphere in relation to climate prediction, solar effects,...

  9. A 3D Multi-fluid MHD Study of the Interaction of the Solar Wind with the Ionosphere/Atmosphere System of Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najib, Dalal; Nagy, Andrew; Toth, Gabor; Ma, Yingjuan

    We use our new four species multi-fluid model to study the interaction of the solar wind with Mars. The lower boundary of our model is at 100 km, below the main ionospheric peak, and the radial resolution is about 10 km in the ionosphere, thus the model does a very good job in reproducing the ionosphere and the associated processes. We carry out calculations for high and low solar activity conditions and establish the importance of mass loading by the extended exosphere of Mars. We also calculate the atmospheric escape of the ionospheric species, including pick up ions. Finally, we compare our model results with the Viking, MGS and Mars Express observations.

  10. A 3D Multi-fluid MHD Study of the Interaction of the Solar Wind with the Ionosphere/Atmosphere System of Venus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najib, D.; Nagy, A.; Toth, G.; Ma, Y.-J.

    2011-10-01

    We use the latest version of our four species multifluid model to study the interaction of the solar wind with Venus. The model solves simultaneously the continuity, momentum and energy equations of the different ions. The lower boundary of our model is at 100 km, below the main ionospheric peak, and the radial resolution is about 10 km in the ionosphere, thus the model does a very good job in reproducing the ionosphere and the associated processes. We carry out calculations for high and low solar activity conditions and establish the importance of mass loading by the extended exosphere of Venus. We demonstrate the importance of using the multi-fluid rather than a single fluid model. We also calculate the atmospheric escape of the ionospheric species and compare our model results with the observed parameters from Pioneer Venus and Venus Express.

  11. Response of an aerosol mass spectrometer to organonitrates and organosulfates and implications for atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, D. K.; Matsunaga, A.; Docherty, K. S.; Surratt, J. D.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Ziemann, P. J.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Organonitrates (ON) are important products of gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds in the troposphere; some models predict, and laboratory studies show, the formation of large, multifunctional ON with vapor pressures low enough to partition to the particle phase. Organosulfates (OS) have also been recently detected in secondary organic aerosol. Despite their potential importance, ON and OS remain a nearly unexplored aspect of atmospheric chemistry because few studies have quantified particulate ON or OS in ambient air. We report the response of a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to aerosol ON and OS standards and mixtures. We quantify the potentially substantial underestimation of organic aerosol O/C, commonly used as a metric for aging, and N/C. Most of the ON-nitrogen appears as ions in the AMS, which are typically dominated by inorganic nitrate. Minor organonitrogen ions are observed although their identity and intensity vary between standards. We evaluate the potential for using fragment ratios, organonitrogen ions, ions, the ammonium balance of the nominally inorganic ions, and comparison to ion-chromatography instruments to constrain the concentrations of ON for ambient datasets, and apply these techniques to a field study in Riverside, CA. OS manifests as separate organic and sulfate components in the AMS with minimal organosulfur fragments and little difference in fragmentation from inorganic sulfate. The low thermal stability of ON and OS likely causes similar detection difficulties for other aerosol mass spectrometers using vaporization and/or ionization techniques with similar or larger energy, which has likely led to an underappreciation of these species. PMID:20194777

  12. Saturn's Titan: Surface change, ammonia, and implications for atmospheric and tectonic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R.M.; Kamp, L.W.; Matson, D.L.; Irwin, P.G.J.; Baines, K.H.; Boryta, M.D.; Leader, F.E.; Jaumann, R.; Smythe, W.D.; Sotin, Christophe; Clark, R.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Pearl, J.C.; Hapke, B.W.; Lunine, J.; Combes, M.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Coradini, A.; Formisano, V.; Filacchione, G.; Langevin, R.Y.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.

    2009-01-01

    Titan is known to have a young surface. Here we present evidence from the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer that it is currently geologically active. We report that changes in the near-infrared reflectance of a 73,000 km2 area on Titan (latitude 26° S, longitude 78° W) occurred between July 2004 and March of 2006. The reflectance of the area increased by a factor of two between July 2004 and March–April 2005; it then returned to the July 2004 level by November 2005. By late December 2005 the reflectance had surged upward again, establishing a new maximum. Thereafter, it trended downward for the next three months. Detailed spectrophotometric analyses suggest these changes happen at or very near the surface. The spectral differences between the region and its surroundings rule out changes in the distribution of the ices of reasonably expected materials such as H2O, CO2, and CH4 as possible causes. Remarkably, the change is spectrally consistent with the deposition and removal of NH3 frost over a water ice substrate. NH3 has been proposed as a constituent of Titan's interior and has never been reported on the surface. The detection of NH3 frost on the surface might possibly be explained by episodic effusive events occur which bring juvenile ammonia from the interior to the surface. If so, its decomposition would feed nitrogen to the atmosphere now and in the future. The lateral extent of the region exceeds that of active areas on the Earth (Hawaii) or Io (Loki).

  13. A 20 year decline in solar photospheric magnetic fields: Inner-heliospheric signatures and possible implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardhan, P.; Bisoi, Susanta Kumar; Ananthakrishnan, S.; Tokumaru, M.; Fujiki, K.; Jose, L.; Sridharan, R.

    2015-07-01

    We report observations of a steady 20 year decline of solar photospheric fields at latitudes ≥45° starting from ˜1995. This prolonged and continuing decline, combined with the fact that cycle 24 is already past its peak, implies that magnetic fields are likely to continue to decline until ˜2020, the expected minimum of the ongoing solar cycle 24. In addition, interplanetary scintillation observations of the inner heliosphere for the period 1983-2013 and in the distance range 0.2-0.8 AU have also shown a similar and steady decline in solar wind microturbulence levels, in sync with the declining photospheric fields. Using the correlation between the polar field and heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) at solar minimum, we have estimated the value of the HMF in 2020 to be 3.9 (±0.6) nT and a floor value of the HMF of ˜3.2 (±0.4) nT. Given this floor value for the HMF, our analysis suggests that the estimated peak sunspot number for solar cycle 25 is likely to be 62 (±12).

  14. Spatial Atmospheric Pressure Atomic Layer Deposition of Tin Oxide as an Impermeable Electron Extraction Layer for Perovskite Solar Cells with Enhanced Thermal Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Lukas; Brinkmann, Kai O; Malerczyk, Jessica; Rogalla, Detlef; Becker, Tim; Theirich, Detlef; Shutsko, Ivan; Görrn, Patrick; Riedl, Thomas

    2018-02-14

    Despite the notable success of hybrid halide perovskite-based solar cells, their long-term stability is still a key-issue. Aside from optimizing the photoactive perovskite, the cell design states a powerful lever to improve stability under various stress conditions. Dedicated electrically conductive diffusion barriers inside the cell stack, that counteract the ingress of moisture and prevent the migration of corrosive halogen species, can substantially improve ambient and thermal stability. Although atomic layer deposition (ALD) is excellently suited to prepare such functional layers, ALD suffers from the requirement of vacuum and only allows for a very limited throughput. Here, we demonstrate for the first time spatial ALD-grown SnO x at atmospheric pressure as impermeable electron extraction layers for perovskite solar cells. We achieve optical transmittance and electrical conductivity similar to those in SnO x grown by conventional vacuum-based ALD. A low deposition temperature of 80 °C and a high substrate speed of 2.4 m min -1 yield SnO x layers with a low water vapor transmission rate of ∼10 -4 gm -2 day -1 (at 60 °C/60% RH). Thereby, in perovskite solar cells, dense hybrid Al:ZnO/SnO x electron extraction layers are created that are the key for stable cell characteristics beyond 1000 h in ambient air and over 3000 h at 60 °C. Most notably, our work of introducing spatial ALD at atmospheric pressure paves the way to the future roll-to-roll manufacturing of stable perovskite solar cells.

  15. Rates of Large Flares in Old Solar-like Stars in Kepler Clusters NGC 6811 and 6819 With Implications for the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saar, Steven H.; Wright, Paul J.; Meibom, Soren; Kashyap, Vinay; Drake, Jeremy J.

    2014-06-01

    We hope to better estimate the rate of very strong (Carrington event-type) flares in the Sun by studying flares of stars in several open clusters with well determined ages using Kepler data. Here we derive white light flare distributions for a sample of near-solar-mass (G0-G5) dwarfs in NGC 6811 (age ~ 1 Gyr) and NGC 6819 2.5 Gyr). We compare these with solar white light flare rates and, by estimating X-ray emission from the same flares using a solar-based relationship, we compare the Kepler results to other solar and stellar X-ray flare data. We explore implications of our results for the rates of large solar flares. This research was supported by Kepler grant NNX13AC29G.

  16. Photodegradation of antibiotics under simulated solar radiation: implications for their environmental fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchu, Sudha Rani; Panditi, Venkata R; O'Shea, Kevin E; Gardinali, Piero R

    2014-02-01

    Roxithromycin, erythromycin, ciprofloxacin and sulfamethoxazole are frequently detected antibiotics in environmental waters. Direct and indirect photolysis of these problematic antibiotics were investigated in pure and natural waters (fresh and salt water) under irradiation of different light sources. Fundamental photolysis parameters such as molar absorption coefficient, quantum yield and first order rate constants are reported and discussed. The antibiotics are degraded fastest under ultraviolet 254 nm, followed by 350 nm and simulated solar radiation. The composition of the matrix (pH, dissolved organic content, chloride ion concentration) played a significant role in the observed photodegradation. Under simulated solar radiation, ciprofloxacin and sulfamethoxazole degrade relatively quickly with half-lives of 0.5 and 1.5h, respectively. However, roxithromycin and erythromycin, macrolides are persistent (half-life: 2.4-10 days) under solar simulation. The transformation products (15) of the targeted antibiotics produced under irradiation experiments were identified using high resolution mass spectrometry and degradation pathways were proposed. © 2013.

  17. Improving the Ginkgo CO2 barometer: Implications for the early Cenozoic atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Richard S.; Wing, Scott L.

    2016-04-01

    Stomatal properties of fossil Ginkgo have been used widely to infer the atmospheric concentration of CO2 in the geological past (paleo-pCO2). Many of these estimates of paleo-pCO2 have relied on the inverse correlation between pCO2 and stomatal index (SI - the proportion of epidermal cells that are stomata) observed in recent Ginkgo biloba, and therefore depend on the accuracy of this relationship. The SI - pCO2 relationship in G. biloba has not been well documented, however. Here we present new measurements of SI for leaves of G. biloba that grew under pCO2 from 290 to 430 ppm. We prepared and imaged all specimens using a consistent procedure and photo-documented each count. As in prior studies, we found a significant inverse relationship between SI and pCO2, however, the relationship is more linear, has a shallower slope, and a lower correlation coefficient than previously reported. We examined leaves of G. biloba grown under pCO2 of 1500 ppm, but found they had highly variable SI and a large proportion of malformed stomata. We also measured stomatal dimensions, stomatal density, and the carbon isotope composition of G. biloba leaves in order to test a mechanistic model for inferring pCO2. This model overestimated observed pCO2, performing less well than the SI method between 290 and 430 ppm. We used our revised SI-pCO2 response curve, and new observations of selected fossils, to estimate late Cretaceous and Cenozoic pCO2 from fossil Ginkgo adiantoides. All but one of the new estimates is below 800 ppm, and together they show little long-term change in pCO2 or relation to global temperature. The low Paleogene pCO2 levels indicated by the Ginkgo SI proxy are not consistent with the high pCO2 inferred by some climate and carbon cycle models. We cannot currently resolve the discrepancy, but greater agreement between proxy data and models may come from a better understanding of the stomatal response of G. biloba to elevated pCO2, better counts and measurements of

  18. Solar irradiance in the stratosphere - Implications for the Herzberg continuum absorption of O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, J. E.; Mentall, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    A set of solar irradiance observations is analyzed that were performed from the third Solar Absorption Balloon Experiment (SABE-3) as the payload ascended through the stratosphere from 32 to 39 km. Comparison of these data with calculations of the attenuated irradiance based on simultaneous ozone and pressure measurements made from the payload suggests a refinement of the cross section values used in photochemical models. More ultraviolet radiation in the 200-210 nm spectral region reaches the middle stratosphere than is predicted by the absorption data presently available. It is suggested that significantly smaller values for the Herzberg continuum of O2 be used in future models.

  19. Midwestern streamflow, precipitation, and atmospheric vorticity influenced by Pacific sea-surface temperatures and total solar-irradiance variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    A solar effect on streamflow in the Midwestern United States is described and supported in a six-step physical connection between total solar irradiance (TSI), tropical sea-surface temperatures (SSTs), extratropical SSTs, jet-stream vorticity, surface-layer vorticity, precipitation, and streamflow. Variations in the correlations among the individual steps indicate that the solar/hydroclimatic mechanism is complex and has a time element (lag) that may not be constant. Correct phasing, supported by consistent spectral peaks between 0.092 and 0.096 cycles per year in all data sets within the mechanism is strong evidence for its existence. A significant correlation exists between total solar irradiance and the 3-year moving average of annual streamflow for Iowa (R = 0.67) and for the Mississippi River at St Louis, Missouri (R = 0.60), during the period 1950-2000. Published in 2005 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Forest-atmosphere exchange of ozone: sensitivity to very reactive biogenic VOC emissions and implications for in-canopy photochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Wolfe

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the fate of ozone within and above forested environments is vital to assessing the anthropogenic impact on ecosystems and air quality at the urban-rural interface. Observed forest-atmosphere exchange of ozone is often much faster than explicable by stomatal uptake alone, suggesting the presence of additional ozone sinks within the canopy. Using the Chemistry of Atmosphere-Forest Exchange (CAFE model in conjunction with summer noontime observations from the 2007 Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX-2007, we explore the viability and implications of the hypothesis that ozonolysis of very reactive but yet unidentified biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC can influence the forest-atmosphere exchange of ozone. Non-stomatal processes typically generate 67 % of the observed ozone flux, but reactions of ozone with measured BVOC, including monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, can account for only 2 % of this flux during the selected timeframe. By incorporating additional emissions and chemistry of a proxy for very reactive VOC (VRVOC that undergo rapid ozonolysis, we demonstrate that an in-canopy chemical ozone sink of ~2 × 108 molec cm−3 s−1 can close the ozone flux budget. Even in such a case, the 65 min chemical lifetime of ozone is much longer than the canopy residence time of ~2 min, highlighting that chemistry can influence reactive trace gas exchange even when it is "slow" relative to vertical mixing. This level of VRVOC ozonolysis could enhance OH and RO2 production by as much as 1 pptv s−1 and substantially alter their respective vertical profiles depending on the actual product yields. Reaction products would also contribute significantly to the oxidized VOC budget and, by extension, secondary organic aerosol mass. Given the potentially significant ramifications of a chemical ozone flux for both in-canopy chemistry and estimates of ozone

  1. Measurements of the atmospheric neutrino flux by Super-Kamiokande: energy spectra, geomagnetic effects, and solar modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Richard, E; Abe, K; Haga, Y; Hayato, Y; Ikeda, M; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Kishimoto, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakajima, T; Nakano, Y; Nakayama, S; Orii, A; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Takeda, A; Tanaka, H; Tomura, T; Wendell, R A; Akutsu, R; Irvine, T; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; Nishimura, Y; Labarga, L; Fernandez, P; Gustafson, J; Kachulis, C; Kearns, E; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Berkman, S; Nantais, C M; Tanaka, H A; Tobayama, S; Goldhaber, M; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Weatherly, P; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Takhistov, V; Ganezer, K S; Hartfiel, B L; Hill, J; Hong, N; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Park, R G; Himmel, A; Li, Z; OSullivan, E; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wongjirad, T; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Jang, J S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Smith, S N; Friend, M; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Takeuchi, Y; Yano, T; Cao, S V; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Huang, K; Kikawa, T; Minamino, A; Nakaya, T; Suzuki, K; Fukuda, Y; Choi, K; Itow, Y; Suzuki, T; Mijakowski, P; Frankiewicz, K; Hignight, J; Imber, J; Jung, C K; Li, X; Palomino, J L; Wilking, M J; Yanagisawa, C; Fukuda, D; Ishino, H; Kayano, T; Kibayashi, A; Koshio, Y; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Xu, C; Kuno, Y; Tacik, R; Kim, S B; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Totsuka, Y; Suda, Y; Yokoyama, M; Bronner, C; Hartz, M; Martens, K; Marti, Ll; Suzuki, Y; Vagins, M R; Martin, J F; Konaka, A; Chen, S; Zhang, Y; Wilkes, R J

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive study on the atmospheric neutrino flux in the energy region from sub-GeV up to several TeV using the Super-Kamiokande water Cherenkov detector is presented in this paper. The energy and azimuthal spectra of the atmospheric ${\

  2. The Solar Spectral Irradiance as a Function of the Mg II Index for Atmosphere and Climate Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuillier, Gerard; DeLand, Matthew; Shapiro, Alexander; Schmutz, Werner; Bolsee, David; Melo, Stella

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a new method to reconstruct the solar spectrum irradiance in the Ly alpha-400 nm region, and its variability, based on the Mg II index and neutron monitor. Measurements of the solar spectral irradiance available in the literature have been made with different instruments at different times and different spectral ranges. However, climate studies require harmonized data sets. This new approach has the advantage of being independent of the absolute calibration and aging of the instruments. First, the Mg II index is derived using solar spectra from Ly alpha (121 nm) to 410 nm measured from 1978 to 2010 by several space missions. The variability of the spectra with respect to a chosen reference spectrum as a function of time and wavelength is scaled to the derived Mg II index. The set of coefficients expressing the spectral variability can be applied to the chosen reference spectrum to reconstruct the solar spectra within a given time frame or Mg II index values. The accuracy of this method is estimated using two approaches: by direct comparison with particular cases where solar spectra are available from independent measurements, and by calculating the standard deviation between the measured spectra and their reconstruction. From direct comparisons with measurements we obtain an accuracy of about 1 to 2 %, which degrades towards Ly alpha. In a further step, we extend our solar spectral irradiance reconstruction back to the Maunder Minimum introducing the relationship between the Mg II index and the neutron monitor data. Consistent measurements of the Mg II index are not available prior to 1978. However, we observe that over the last three solar cycles, the Mg II index shows strong correlation with the modulation potential determined from the neutron monitor data. Assuming that this correlation can be applied to the past, we reconstruct the Mg II index from the modulation potential back to the Maunder Minimum, and obtain the corresponding solar

  3. Experimental and Model Study of Changes in Spectral Solar Irradiance in the Atmosphere of Large City due to Tropospheric NO2 Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubarova, N. Ye.; Larin, I. K.; Lebedev, V. V.; Partola, V. S.; Lezina, Ye. A.; Rublev, A. N.

    2009-03-01

    An experimental and model approach has been used to study the NO2 vertical profiles and its effect on solar irradiance. The profiles of NO2 were obtained using gas analyzers, which had been installed at different levels at the Moscow State University (MSU) located at the south-western part of Moscow and at the Ostankino tower located at the north of Moscow up to the height of 350 m. Using these data diurnal and spatial variability of the NO2 content in the most polluted part of planetary boundary layer (PBL) has been analyzed within the large megalopolis. On the base of photochemical modeling we have simulated the diurnal cycle of NO2 vertical profiles for summer and winter conditions and have compared the results with the experimental ones. Using the RT modeling with input gaseous and aerosol parameters of the atmosphere obtained from the MSU Meteorological Observatory we have estimated the attenuation of spectral solar irradiance in UV and visible region of spectrum due to the NO2 content in the polluted atmosphere for different seasons.

  4. Involvement of end-users in multi-user solar hybrid grids - implications for professionals in the field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer-Ries, P.; Villalobos Montoya, C. [Otto-von-Guericke Univ. Magdeburg, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Environmental psychology is concerned with different environments like natural, social and cultural environments, including the constructed ones as well as technical instruments, which are influencing and are influenced by people. On the use of solar energy technology, the article describes the application of the social design theory, derived from architectural psychology on the one hand and on the other hand from the socio-technical system design theory, which is originated in organizational psychology. Using a phase model, implications for professionals in the field are presented. The five different phases are: concept, contact, preparation, implementation and follow up. Social issues are important in every single phase, but nevertheless they are often ignored. Participation and action research can be very helpful: Firstly in order to further elaborate the human factor in rural energy supply and secondly in order to spread the knowledge on how to take people into account for a sustainable development into social as well as engineering sciences. (authors)

  5. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere I. Continuous Emission and Condensed Matter Within the Chromosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The continuous spectrum of the solar photosphere stands as the paramount observation with regard to the condensed nature of the solar body. Studies relative to Kirchhoff’s law of thermal emission (e.g. Robitaille P.-M. Kirchhoff’s law of thermal emission: 150 years. Progr. Phys., 2009, v. 4, 3–13. and a detailed analysis of the stellar opacity problem (Robitaille P.M. Stellar opacity: The Achilles’ heel of the gaseous Sun. Progr. Phys., 2011, v. 3, 93–99 have revealed that gaseous models remain unable to properly account for the generation of this spectrum. Therefore, it can be stated with certainty that the photosphere is comprised of condensed matter. Beyond the solar surface, the chromospheric layer of the Sun also generates a weak continuous spectrum in the visible region. This emission exposes the presence of material in the condensed state. As a result, above the level of the photosphere, matter exists in both gaseous and condensed forms, much like within the atmosphere of the Earth. The continuous visible spectrum associated with the chromosphere provides the twenty-sixth line of evidence that the Sun is condensed matter.

  6. High-Performance Flexible Perovskite Solar Cells on Ultrathin Glass: Implications of the TCO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dou, Benjia [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Department; Miller, Elisa M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Christians, Jeffrey A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Sanehira, Erin M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Department; Klein, Talysa R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Barnes, Frank S. [Department; Shaheen, Sean E. [Department; Renewable; Garner, Sean M. [Corning Research & amp, Development Corporation, Corning, New York 14830, United States; Ghosh, Shuvaraj [Solid State; Mallick, Arindam [Solid State; Basak, Durga [Solid State; van Hest, Maikel F. A. M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States

    2017-09-27

    For halide perovskite solar cells (PSCs) to fulfill their vast potential for combining low-cost, high efficiency, and high throughput production they must be scaled using a truly transformative method, such as roll-to-roll processing. Bringing this reality closer to fruition, the present work demonstrates flexible perovskite solar cells with 18.1% power conversion efficiency on flexible Willow Glass substrates. We highlight the importance of the transparent conductive oxide (TCO) layers on device performance by studying various TCOs. While tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) and indium zinc oxide (IZO) based PSC devices demonstrate high photovoltaic performances, aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) based devices underperformed in all device parameters. Analysis of X-ray photoemission spectroscopy data shows that the stoichiometry of the perovskite film surface changes dramatically when it is fabricated on AZO, demonstrating the importance of the substrate in perovskite film formation.

  7. Structure of deformed silicon and implications for low-cost solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardesich, N.; Leipold, M. H.; Turner, G. B.; Digges, T. G., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reports on an investigation of the microstructure and minority carrier lifetime of silicon in uniaxially compressed silicon samples, the objective of which was to determine if it is feasible to produce silicon solar cells from sheet formed by high temperature deformation. It is reported that recrystallization was found to be incomplete in both fine and large grained materials, and that the major mode of recrystallization appears to be migration of existing boundaries into the deformed regions. Also, minority carrier diffusion length was found to be drastically reduced after deformation, perhaps due to contamination or cooling rate, and recovered only slightly with annealing. It is concluded that these results suggest that high temperature deformation of silicon for direct production of sheet for high efficiency solar cells is not practical. It is noted that potential may exist for its use as a coarse grained substrate.

  8. Solar Features - Solar Flares - Patrol

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The H-alpha Flare Patrol identifies time periods each day when the sun is being continuously monitored by select ground-based solar observatories.

  9. Solar Features - Solar Flares - SIDS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Sudden Ionospheric Disturbance (SID) is any of several radio propagation anomalies due to ionospheric changes resulting from solar or geophysical events.

  10. Multi-decade Measurements of the Long-Term Trends of Atmospheric Species by High-Spectral-Resolution Infrared Solar Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Chiou, Linda; Goldman, Aaron; Hannigan, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Solar absorption spectra were recorded for the first time in 5 years with the McMath Fourier transform spectrometer at the US National solar Observatory on Kitt Peak in southern Arizona, USA (31.91 N latitude, 111.61 W longitude, 2.09 km altitude). The solar absorption spectra cover 750-1300 and 1850-5000 cm(sup -1) and were recorded on 20 days during March-June 2009. The measurements mark the continuation of a long-term record of atmospheric chemical composition measurements that have been used to quantify seasonal cycles and long-term trends of both tropospheric and stratospheric species from observations that began i 1977. Fits to the measured spectra have been performed, and they indicate the spectra obtained since return to operational status are nearly free of channeling and the instrument line shape function is well reproduced taking into account the measurement parameters. We report updated time series measurements of total columns for six atmospheric species and their analysis for seasonal cycles and long-term trends. An sn example, the time series fit shows a decrease in the annual increase rate i Montreal-Protocol-regulated chlorofluorocarbon CCL2F2 from 1.51 plus or minus 0.38% yr(sup -1) at the beginning of the time span to -1.54 plus or minus 1.28 yr(sup -1) at the end of the time span, 1 sigma, and hence provides evidence for the impact of those regulations on the trend.

  11. Impact of 2007 and 2008 Arctic ice anomalies on the atmospheric circulation: Implications for long‐range predictions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Balmaseda, Magdalena A; Ferranti, Laura; Molteni, Franco; Palmer, Tim N

    2010-01-01

    The impact on the atmospheric circulation of the unprecedented Arctic sea‐ice anomalies during the summers 2007 and 2008 is evaluated using the atmospheric model of the ECMWF operational seasonal forecasting system...

  12. On the strong and selective isotope effect in the UV excitation of N2 with implications toward the nebula and Martian atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muskatel, B H; Remacle, F; Thiemens, Mark H; Levine, R D

    2011-04-12

    Isotopic effects associated with molecular absorption are discussed with reference to natural phenomena including early solar system processes, Titan and terrestrial atmospheric chemistry, and Martian atmospheric evolution. Quantification of the physicochemical aspects of the excitation and dissociation processes may lead to enhanced understanding of these environments. Here we examine a physical basis for an additional isotope effect during photolysis of molecular nitrogen due to the coupling of valence and Rydberg excited states. The origin of this isotope effect is shown to be the coupling of diabatic electronic states of different bonding nature that occurs after the excitation of these states. This coupling is characteristic of energy regimes where two or more excited states are nearly crossing or osculating. A signature of the resultant isotope effect is a window of rapid variation in the otherwise smooth distribution of oscillator strengths vs. frequency. The reference for the discussion is the numerical solution of the time dependent Schrödinger equation for both the electronic and nuclear modes with the light field included as part of the Hamiltonian. Pumping is to all extreme UV dipole-allowed, valence and Rydberg, excited states of N(2). The computed absorption spectra are convoluted with the solar spectrum to demonstrate the importance of including this isotope effect in planetary, interstellar molecular cloud, and nebular photochemical models. It is suggested that accidental resonance with strong discrete lines in the solar spectrum such as the CIII line at 97.703 nm can also have a marked effect.

  13. Structure of deformed silicon and implications for low cost solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardesich, N.; Leipold, M. H.; Turner, G. B.; Digges, T. G., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The microstructure and minority carrier lifetime of silicon were investigated in uniaxially compressed silicon samples. The objective of the investigation was to determine if it is feasible to produce silicon solar cells from sheet formed by high temperature rolling. The initial structure of the silicon samples ranged from single crystal to fine-grained polycrystals. The samples had been deformed at strain rates of 0.1 to 8.5/sec and temperatures of 1270-1380 C with subsequent annealing at 1270-1380 C. The results suggest that high temperature rolling of silicon to produce sheet for cells of high efficiency is not practical.

  14. Mars atmospheric loss to space: Observations of present-day loss and implications for long-term volatile evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce; Brain, David; Luhmann, Janet; Grebowsky, Joe

    2017-04-01

    MAVEN completed its first Mars year of science mapping in October 2016. Results show loss of gas to space by multiple processes, including solar-wind pick-up, sputtering, photochemical loss, and thermal escape, along with their responses to changing solar and solar-wind boundary conditions and to discrete solar events. By understanding the current loss rates and the processes controlling them, we are able to examine the long-term loss to space, including the effects of different solar conditions early in history; in addition, we are able to use stable-isotope ratios to derive the integrated loss to space through time. Preliminary results suggest that loss to space was a dominant, if not the dominant, mechanism that drove the changing climate through time. We will present a framework for analyzing and interpreting the results, along with preliminary results on the extrapolation to long timescales.

  15. Unusual Polar Conditions in Solar Cycle 24 and Their Implications for Cycle 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Yashiro, Seiji; Akiyama, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    We report on the prolonged solar-maximum conditions until late 2015 at the north-polar region of the Sun indicated by the occurrence of high-latitude prominence eruptions (PEs) and microwave brightness temperature close to the quiet-Sun level. These two aspects of solar activity indicate that the polarity reversal was completed by mid-2014 in the south and late 2015 in the north. The microwave brightness in the south-polar region has increased to a level exceeding the level of the Cycle 23/24 minimum, but just started to increase in the north. The northsouth asymmetry in the polarity reversal has switched from that in Cycle 23. These observations lead us to the hypothesis that the onset of Cycle 25 in the northern hemisphere is likely to be delayed with respect to that in the southern hemisphere. We find that the unusual condition in the north is a direct consequence of the arrival of poleward surges of opposite polarity from the active region belt. We also find that multiple rush-to-the-pole episodes were indicated by the PE locations that lined up at the boundary between opposite-polarity surges. The high-latitude PEs occurred in the boundary between the incumbent polar flux and the insurgent flux of opposite polarity.

  16. Role of the QBO in Modulating the Influence of the 11 Year Solar Cycle on the Atmosphere Using Constant Forcings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    about 3% as well (not shown). Significant solar ozone anomalies exist for the QBO east and west experiment in the tropical to midlatitude troposphere ... ozone and temperature, J. Geophys. Res. 113, D11306, doi:10.1029/2007JD009391. Balachandran, N., and D. Rind (1995), Modeling the effects of UV vari...Tilmes, S., R. R. Garcia, D. E. Kinnison, A. Gettelman, and P. J. Rasch (2009), Impact of geoengineered aerosols on the troposphere and strato

  17. Solar Neutrons and Related Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Dorman, Lev

    2010-01-01

    This book presents the first comprehensive compilation and review of the extensive body of experimental and theoretical material on solar neutrons and related phenomena published in the scientific literature over the last sixty years. Phenomena related to solar neutrons are more specifically: the decay products of solar neutrons solar gamma rays generated in processes like nuclear reactions between solar energetic charged particles and matter of the solar atmosphere, as well as by the capture of solar neutrons by hydrogen atoms in the solar atmosphere the propagation of solar neutrons, solar gamma rays and other secondary particles through the solar photosphere, chromosphere and corona, as well as through interplanetary space and through the Earth's atmosphere. Models and simulations of particle acceleration, interactions, and propagation processes show that observations of solar neutrons and gamma rays in space and in the Earth's atmosphere yield essential and unique information on the source function of ene...

  18. Single isotope fractionation of (16)O(-) implications for early history of solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrhenius, G.

    1980-01-01

    Chemical fractionation processes are investigated with emphasis on selective single isotope fractionation in polyisotopic systems, particularly in oxygen. The related temperature parameters of meteoritic condensates and of their source medium are investigated by a thermometric method that is independent of assumptions regarding temperatures and pressures in the solar nebula. The crucial nonlinear chemical fractionation of O-16 was demonstrated experimentally. The effect was achieved in condensed CO2 formed from CO with C-12 O-16 selectively excited by H Ly alpha. The effect was verified by mass spectrometric measurements. The meteorite paleotemperature estimates were advanced from defining only thermal exposure to evaluating time and temperature independently. Grain temperatures at condensation of refractory inclusion materials are indicated to be less than 900 K in agreement with radiation temperature considerations and observations in circumstellar dust shells.

  19. Neutrino physics and the mirror world: how exact parity symmetry explains the solar neutrino deficit, the atmospheric neutrino anomaly and the LSND experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foot, R.; Volkas, R.R.

    1996-03-01

    Evidence for {nu}-bar{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}-bar{sub e} oscillations has been reported at LAMPF using the LSND detector. Further evidence for neutrino mixing comes from the solar neutrino deficit and the atmospheric neutrino anomaly. All of these anomalies require new physics. It is shown that all of these anomalies can be explained if the standard model is enlarged so that an unbroken parity symmetry can be defined. This explanation holds independently of the actual model for neutrino masses. Thus, it is argued that parity symmetry is not only a beautiful candidate for a symmetry beyond the standard model, but it can also explain the known neutrino physics anomalies. 41 refs.

  20. A long-term study of new particle formation in a coastal environment: Meteorology, gas phase and solar radiation implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorribas, M., E-mail: sorribas@ugr.es [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Granada, 18071 (Spain); Andalusian Institute for Earth System Research (IISTA), University of Granada, 18006 (Spain); Adame, J.A. [‘El Arenosillo’ — Atmospheric Sounding Station, Atmospheric Research and Instrumentation Branch, National Institute for Aerospace Technology (INTA), Mazagón, Huelva, 21130 (Spain); Olmo, F.J. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Granada, 18071 (Spain); Andalusian Institute for Earth System Research (IISTA), University of Granada, 18006 (Spain); Vilaplana, J.M.; Gil-Ojeda, M. [‘El Arenosillo’ — Atmospheric Sounding Station, Atmospheric Research and Instrumentation Branch, National Institute for Aerospace Technology (INTA), Mazagón, Huelva, 21130 (Spain); Alados-Arboledas, L. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Granada, 18071 (Spain); Andalusian Institute for Earth System Research (IISTA), University of Granada, 18006 (Spain)

    2015-04-01

    particle formation (NPF) was observed over 4-years in the South-western Spain. • New particle formation events showed a frequency of 24% of the total days analysed. • NPF was more frequent in cold seasons and less frequent in summer time. • NPF parameters were different under synoptic or regional-scale atmospheric patterns. • Formation and growth rates were dependent on the solar radiation and gas levels.

  1. Comparisons between the diverse electron radiation belts of the solar system; Implications for radiation belt studies at Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, B. H.; Fox, N. J.

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that several different processes limit the most intense relativistic electron intensities within the diverse radiation belts in the solar system. Specifically, the most intense radiation belt intensities at Earth, Uranus and Jupiter all appear to be limited by a differential and relativistic version of the so-called Kennel-Petschek limit, which relies on strong whistler-wave-stimulated losses acting in a non-linear feedback mode through reflection of the waves back into the system. The most intense observed intensities at Netune and Saturn reside below those allowed by the Kennel-Petschek limit. At Neptune the absence of dynamic injection phenomena may be limiting the acceleration of relativistic electrons. At Saturn, scattering and absorption by dense clouds of gas and dust from the plumes of the moon Enceladus appear to be responsible for limiting radiation belt intensities. Even given this diversity of behaviors within the solar system, the substantial consistency of electron spectral behaviors within the very different magnetospheres of Earth, Jupiter, and Uranus is rather remarkable. For Earth studies, the utilization of the Kennel-Petschek limit has fallen on disfavor as some of the simplifying assumptions that have gone into that original theory have been challenged by observations, specifically of the behavior of whistler waves within Earth’s inner and middle magnetosphere. Our results suggest strongly that the Kennel-Petschek theory is robust to the diversity of magnetospheric and whistler mode behaviors and that it still has important implications for the behavior of Earth’s radiation belts.

  2. Interactions of methylamine and ammonia with atmospheric nucleation precursor H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and common organic acids: Thermodynamics and atmospheric implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y.; Jiang, L.; Bai, Z. [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Nadykto, A. B., E-mail: anadykto@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Department of Applied Mathematics, Moscow State University of Technology “STANKIN”, Vadkovsky per. 1, Moscow 127055 (Russian Federation); Atmospheric Science Research Center, State University of New York at Albany, 251 Fuller Road, Albany, NY 12203 (United States)

    2016-06-08

    Interactions of the two common atmospheric bases, ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and methylamine MA (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}), which are considered to be important stabilizers of binary clusters in the Earth’s atmosphere, with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, the key atmospheric precursor, and 14 common atmospheric organic acids (COA) (formic (CH{sub 2}O{sub 2}), acetic (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O{sub 2}), oxalic (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}O{sub 4}), malonic (C{sub 3}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}), succinic (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 4}), glutaric acid (C{sub 5}H{sub 8}O{sub 4}), adipic (C{sub 6}H{sub 10}O{sub 4}), benzoic (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}COOH), phenylacetic (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}COOH), pyruvic (C{sub 3}H{sub 4}O{sub 3}), maleic acid (C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}), malic (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 5}), tartaric (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 6}) and pinonic acid (C{sub 10}H{sub 16}O{sub 3})) have been studied using the composite high-accuracy G3MP2 method. The thermodynamic stability of mixed (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), (COA)(B1) and (COA)(B2) dimers and (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) (B1) and (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) (B1) trimers, where B1 and B2 represent methylamine (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}), respectively, have been investigated and their impacts on the thermodynamic stability of clusters containing H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} have been analyzed. It has been shown that in many cases the interactions of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} with COA, ammonia and methylamine lead to the formation of heteromolecular dimers and trimers, which are certainly more stable than (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}){sub 2} and (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}){sub 3}. It has also been found that free energies of (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4})+ CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}⇔(COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4})(CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}) reactions exceed 10-15 kcal mol{sup −1}. This is a clear indication that mixed trimers composed of COA, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and methylamine are very stable and can thus serve as possible nucleation sites. The present study leads us to conclude that the interactions of COA coexisting with H

  3. Solar Indices - Sunspot Numbers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  4. Solar Indices - Plage Regions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  5. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere VIII. "Futile" Processes in the Chromosphere (Letters to Progress in Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the liquid metallic hydrogen solar model (LMHSM, the chr omosphere is the site of hydrogen condensation (P.M. Robitaille. The Liquid Metall ic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere IV. On the Nature of the Chromosp here. Progr. Phys. , 2013, v. 3, L15–L21. Line emission is associated with the di ssipation of energy from condensed hydrogen structures, CHS. Previously considere d reactions resulted in hy- drogen atom or cluster addition to the site of condensation. In this work, an additional mechanism is presented, wherein atomic or molecular specie s interact with CHS, but do not deposit hydrogen. These reactions channel heat away f rom CHS, enabling them to cool even more rapidly. As a result, this new class of proce sses could complement true hydrogen condensation reactions by providing an auxil iary mechanism for the re- moval of heat. Such ‘futile’ reactions lead to the formation of activated atoms, ions, or molecules and might contribute to line emission from such sp ecies. Evidence that com- plimentary ‘futile’ reactions might be important in the chr omosphere can be extracted from lineshape analysis.

  6. The Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun and the Solar Atmosphere II. Continuous Emission and Condensed Matter Within the Corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The K-corona, a significant portion of the solar atmosphere, displays a continuous spectrum which closely parallels photospheric emission, though without the presence of overlying Fraunhofer lines. The E-corona exists in the same region and is characterized by weak emission lines from highly ionized atoms. For instance, the famous green emission line from coronium (FeXIV is part of the E-corona. The F-corona exists beyond the K/E-corona and, like the photospheric spectrum, is characterized by Fraunhofer lines. The F-corona represents photospheric light scattered by dust particles in the interplanetary medium. Within the gaseous models of the Sun, the K-corona is viewed as photospheric radiation which has been scattered by relativistic electrons. This scattering is thought to broaden the Fraunhofer lines of the solar spectrum such that they can no longer be detected in the K-corona. Thus, the gaseous models of the Sun account for the appearance of the K-corona by distorting photospheric light, since they are unable to have recourse to condensed matter to directly produce such radiation. Conversely, it is now advanced that the continuous emission of the K-corona and associated emission lines from the E-corona must be interpreted as manifestations of the same phenomenon: condensed matter exists in the corona. It is well-known that the Sun expels large amounts of material from its surface in the form of flares and coronal mass ejections. Given a liquid metallic hydrogen model of the Sun, it is logical to assume that such matter, which exists in the condensed state on the solar surface, continues to manifest its nature once expelled into the corona. Therefore, the continuous spectrum of the K-corona provides the twenty-seventh line of evidence that the Sun is composed of condensed matter.

  7. Effects on surface atmospheric photo-oxidants over Greece during the total solar eclipse event of 29 March 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Zanis

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effects of the total solar eclipse of 29 March 2006 on surface air-quality levels over Greece based on observations at a number of sites in conjunction with chemical box modelling and 3-D air-quality modelling. Emphasis is given on surface ozone and other photooxidants at four Greek sites Kastelorizo, Finokalia (Crete, Pallini (Athens and Thessaloniki, which are located at gradually increasing distances from the path of the eclipse totality and are characterized by different air pollution levels. The eclipse offered the opportunity to test our understanding of air pollution build-up and the response of the gas-phase chemistry of photo-oxidants during a photolytical perturbation using both a photochemical box model and a regional air-quality offline model based on the modeling system WRF/CAMx. At the relatively unpolluted sites of Kastelorizo and Finokalia no clear signal of the solar eclipse on surface O3, NO2 and NO concentrations can be deduced from the observations while there is no correlation of observed O3, NO2 and NO with observed global radiation. The box and regional model simulations for the two relatively unpolluted sites indicate that the calculated changes in net ozone production rates between eclipse and non eclipse conditions are rather small compared to the observed short-term ozone variability. Furthermore the simulated ozone lifetime is in the range of a few days at these sites and hence the solar eclipse effects on ozone can be easily masked by local and regional transport. At the polluted sites of Thessaloniki and Pallini, the solar eclipse effects on O3, NO2 and NO concentrations are revealed from both the measurements and modeling with the net effect being a decrease in O3 and NO and an increase in NO2 as NO2 formed from the reaction of O3 with NO while at the same time NO2 is

  8. Diurnal and nocturnal variations of PAHs in the Lhasa atmosphere, Tibetan Plateau: Implication for local sources and the impact of atmospheric degradation processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junwen; Li, Jun; Lin, Tian; Liu, Di; Xu, Yue; Chaemfa, Chakra; Qi, Shihua; Liu, Fobang; Zhang, Gan

    2013-04-01

    Due to the unique characteristics, such as intensive radiation, high altitude and low humidity, plateau climate importantly affects the airborne organic contaminants' behavior in the environment. In this study, USEPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and benzo[e]pyrene were detected in the air samples collected at two suburban sites in Lhasa city. The total concentrations of USEPA priority fifteen PAHs (except naphthalene) in the particulate phase ranged from 4.4 to 60 ng/m3, while in the gas phase from 79 to 350 ng/m3. Integrated results of the multiple diagnostic ratios indicated that the major potential sources of PAHs in Lhasa city were local incomplete combustion of wood and cow dung cake. Particulate and gaseous PAH levels in this study displayed two clear and different diurnal and nocturnal concentration patterns, however, no distinct diurnal and nocturnal variation was observed for the total suspended particles (TSP) concentrations. No significant correlation was found between TSP concentrations and particle-bound PAHs, meaning physicochemical processes play an important role in diurnal and nocturnal variations of PAHs in the atmosphere except emission sources in this study. Based on the diurnal and nocturnal changes of the percentage of particulate phase PAHs in total PAHs, it suggested that gas-particle partitioning driven by temperature makes a great contribution to the variations of PAHs concentrations. The most susceptible to transformation between gas and particle phase chemicals are PHE, ANT, FLA, PYR, BaA and CHR. In addition, our observation suggested that atmospheric reaction and photolytic degradation also exert an important impact on the variations of PAHs in both phases in the atmosphere of Lhasa city.

  9. The Case for Rarity of Chondrules and Calcium-Aluminum-rich Inclusions in the Early Solar System and Some Implications for Astrophysical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Derek W. G.

    1998-05-01

    The high-temperature materials in chondritic meteorites, the chondrules (silicate spherules produced by flash heating) and refractory inclusions (the CAI, or calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions), have been used to place major constraints on astrophysical models for the early solar system. Among the meteorites falling to Earth, the CAI are rare, being only 15% by volume of a class that constitutes 0.84% of observed falls, however chondrules are ubiquitous. Here it is pointed out ~96% of the meteorites entering the atmosphere contain few or no chondrules because atmospheric passage destroys such meteorites 1000 times more effectively than the tougher chondrule-rich material. Furthermore, the mechanisms for transferring meteorites from the asteroid belt to Earth do not sample the belt representatively, so that even the 4% of chondrule-rich material entering the atmosphere may be an overestimate. Most asteroids have surfaces resembling meteorite classes that are chondrule-poor or chondrule-free. Foreign clasts in meteorites, which are an independent sampling of asteroidal material, usually resemble chondrule-poor or chondrule-free carbonaceous chondrites. Cosmic-ray ages and gas-retention ages for meteorites indicate that most stony meteorites are coming from just a few asteroids. A strong case can thus be made that chondrules and CAI were rare in the inner solar system during planet and planetesimal formation and that they do not provide a strong constraint on astrophysical ideas for the evolution of the early solar nebula.

  10. The Catalytic Potential of Cosmic Dust: Implications for Prebiotic Chemistry in the Solar Nebula and Other Protoplanetary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Hugh G. M.; Nuth, Joseph A.

    2003-06-01

    The synthesis of important prebiotic molecules is fundamentally reliant on basic starting ingredients: water, organic species [e.g., methane (CH4)], and reduced nitrogen compounds [e.g., ammonia (NH3), methyl cyanide (CH3CN) etc.]. However, modern studies conclude that the primordial Earth's atmosphere was too rich in CO, CO2, and water to permit efficient synthesis of such reduced molecules as envisioned by the classic Miller-Urey experiment. Other proposed sources of terrestrial nitrogen reduction, like those within submarine vent systems, also seem to be inadequate sources of chemically reduced C-H-O-N compounds. Here, we demonstrate that nebular dust analogs have impressive catalytic properties for synthesizing prebiotic molecules. Using a catalyst analogous to nebular iron silicate condensate, at temperatures ranging from 500K to 900K, we catalyzed both the Fischer-Tropsch conversion of CO and H2 to methane and water, and the corresponding Haber-Bosch synthesis of ammonia from N2 and H2. Remarkably, when CO, N2, and H2 were allowed to react simultaneously, these syntheses also yielded nitrogen-containing organics such as methyl amine (CH3NH2), acetonitrile (CH3CN), and N-methyl methylene imine (H3CNCH2). A fundamental consequence of this work for astrobiology is the potential for a natural chemical pathway to produce complex chemical building blocks of life throughout our own Solar System and beyond.

  11. Turbulent Fluctuations in G-band and K-line Intensities Observed with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere (ROSA) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadavid, A. C.; Lawrence, J. K.; Christian, D. J.; Jess, D. B.; Mathioudakis, M.

    2012-12-01

    Using the Rapid Oscillation in the Solar Atmosphere (ROSA) instrument at the Dunn Solar Telescope we have found that the spectra of fluctuations of the G-band (cadence 1.05 s) and Ca II K-line (cadence 4.2 s) intensities show correlated fluctuations above white noise out to frequencies beyond 300 mHz and up to 70 mHz, respectively. The noise-corrected G-band spectrum presents a scaling range (Ultra High Frequency “UHF”) for f = 25-100 mHz, with an exponent consistent with the presence of turbulent motions. The UHF power, is concentrated at the locations of magnetic bright points in the intergranular lanes, it is highly intermittent in time and characterized by a positive kurtosis κ. Combining values of G-band and K-line intensities, the UHF power, and κ, reveals two distinct “states” of the internetwork solar atmosphere. State 1, with κ ≍ 6, which includes almost all the data, is characterized by low intensities and low UHF power. State 2, with κ ≍ 3, including a very small fraction of the data, is characterized by high intensities and high UHF power. Superposed epoch analysis shows that for State 1, the K-line intensity presents 3.5 min chromospheric oscillations with maxima occurring 21 s after G-band intensity maxima implying a 150-210 km effective height difference. For State 2, the G-band and K-line intensity maxima are simultaneous, suggesting that in the highly magnetized environment sites of G-band and K-line emission may be spatially close together. Analysis of observations obtained with Hinode/SOT confirm a scaling range in the G-band spectrum up to 53 mHz also consistent with turbulent motions as well as the identification of two distinct states in terms of the H-line intensity and G-band power as functions of G-band intensity.

  12. Pickup ion processes associated with spacecraft thrusters: Implications for solar probe plus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemens, Adam, E-mail: a.j.clemens@qmul.ac.uk; Burgess, David [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    Chemical thrusters are widely used in spacecraft for attitude control and orbital manoeuvres. They create an exhaust plume of neutral gas which produces ions via photoionization and charge exchange. Measurements of local plasma properties will be affected by perturbations caused by the coupling between the newborn ions and the plasma. A model of neutral expansion has been used in conjunction with a fully three-dimensional hybrid code to study the evolution and ionization over time of the neutral cloud produced by the firing of a mono-propellant hydrazine thruster as well as the interactions of the resulting ion cloud with the ambient solar wind. Results are presented which show that the plasma in the region near to the spacecraft will be perturbed for an extended period of time with the formation of an interaction region around the spacecraft, a moderate amplitude density bow wave bounding the interaction region and evidence of an instability at the forefront of the interaction region which causes clumps of ions to be ejected from the main ion cloud quasi-periodically.

  13. Atmospheric spatial atomic-layer-deposition of Zn(O, S) buffer layer for flexible Cu(In, Ga)Se2 solar cells: From lab-scale to large area roll to roll processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijters, C.H.; Bolt, P.J.; Poodt, P.W.G.; Knaapen, R.; Brink, J. van den; Ruth, M.; Bremaud, D.; Illiberi, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this manuscript we present the first successful application of a spatial atomic-layer-deposition process to thin film solar cells. Zn(O,S) has been grown by spatial atomic layer deposition (S-ALD) at atmospheric pressure and applied as buffer layer in rigid and flexible CIGS cells by a lab-scale

  14. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional model simulations, measurements, and interpretation of the influence of the October 1989 solar proton events on the middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Cerniglia, Marck C.; Nielsen, J. Eric; Allen, Dale J.; Zawodny, Joseph M.; McPeters, Richard D.; Douglass, Anne R.; Rosenfield, Joan E.; Rood, Richard B.

    1995-06-01

    The very large solar proton events (SPEs) which occurred from October 19 to 27, 1989, earned substantial middle-atmospheric HOx and NOx constituent increases. Although no measurements of HOx increases were made during these SPEs, increases in NO were observed by rocket instruments which are in good agreement with calculated NO increases from our proton energy degradation code. Both the HOx and the NOx increases can cause ozone decreases; however, the HOx-induced ozone changes are relatively short-lived because HOx species have lifetimes of only hours in the middle atmosphere. Our two-dimensional model, when used to simulate effects of the longer-lived NOx, predicted lower-stratospheric polar ozone decreases of greater than 2% persisting for one and a half years past these SPEs. Previous three-dimensional model simulations of these SPEs (Jackman et al., 1993) indicated the importance of properly representing the polar vortices and warming events when accounting for the ozone decreases observed by the solar backscattered ultraviolet 2 instrument two months past these atmospheric perturbations. In an expansion of that study, we found that it was necessary to simulate the November 1, 1989, to April 2, 1990, time period and the November 1, 1986, to April 2, 1987, time period with our three-dimensional model in order to more directly compare to the stratospheric aerosol and gas experiment (SAGE) II observations of lower stratospheric NO2 and ozone changes between the end of March 1987 and 1990 at 70°N. Both the NOx increases from the October 1989 SPEs and the larger downward transport in the 1989-1990 northern winter compared to the 1986-1987 northern winter contributed to the large enhancements in NO2 in the lower stratosphere observed in the SAGE II measurements at the end of March 1990. Our three-dimensional model simulations predict smaller ozone decreases than those observed by SAGE II in the lower stratosphere near the end of March 1990, indicating that other

  15. Effect of solar radiation on the optical properties and molecular composition of laboratory proxies of atmospheric brown carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Ji Julie; Aiona, Paige Kuuipo; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2014-09-02

    Sources, optical properties, and chemical composition of atmospheric brown carbon (BrC) aerosol are uncertain, making it challenging to estimate its contribution to radiative forcing. Furthermore, optical properties of BrC may change significantly during its atmospheric aging. We examined the effect of photolysis on the molecular composition, mass absorption coefficient, and fluorescence of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) prepared by high-NOx photooxidation of naphthalene (NAP SOA). Our experiments were designed to model photolysis processes of NAP SOA compounds dissolved in cloud or fog droplets. Aqueous solutions of NAP SOA were observed to photobleach (i.e., lose their ability to absorb visible radiation) with an effective half-life of ∼15 h (with sun in its zenith) for the loss of near-UV (300-400 nm) absorbance. The molecular composition of NAP SOA was significantly modified by photolysis, with the average SOA formula changing from C14.1H14.5O5.1N0.085 to C11.8H14.9O4.5N0.023 after 4 h of irradiation. However, the average O/C ratio did not change significantly, suggesting that it is not a good metric for assessing the extent of photolysis-driven aging in NAP SOA (and in BrC in general). In contrast to NAP SOA, the photobleaching of BrC material produced by the reaction of limonene + ozone SOA with ammonia vapor (aged LIM/O3 SOA) was much faster, but it did not result in a significant change in average molecular composition. The characteristic absorbance of the aged LIM/O3 SOA in the 450-600 nm range decayed with an effective half-life of atmospheric BrC.

  16. Perpendicular Diffusion of Solar Energetic Particles: Model Results and Implications for Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, R. Du Toit; Dresing, Nina; Engelbrecht, N. Eugene

    2017-03-01

    The processes responsible for the effective longitudinal transport of solar energetic particles (SEPs) are still not completely understood. We address this issue by simulating SEP electron propagation using a spatially 2D transport model that includes perpendicular diffusion. By implementing, as far as possible, the most reasonable estimates of the transport (diffusion) coefficients, we compare our results, in a qualitative manner, to recent observations at energies of 55-105 keV, focusing on the longitudinal distribution of the peak intensity, the maximum anisotropy, and the onset time. By using transport coefficients that are derived from first principles, we limit the number of free parameters in the model to (i) the probability of SEPs following diffusing magnetic field lines, quantified by a\\in [0,1], and (ii) the broadness of the Gaussian injection function. It is found that the model solutions are extremely sensitive to the magnitude of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient and relatively insensitive to the form of the injection function as long as a reasonable value of a = 0.2 is used. We illustrate the effects of perpendicular diffusion on the model solutions and discuss the viability of this process as a dominant mechanism by which SEPs are transported in longitude. Lastly, we try to quantity the effectiveness of perpendicular diffusion as an interplay between the magnitude of the relevant diffusion coefficient and the SEP intensity gradient driving the diffusion process. It follows that perpendicular diffusion is extremely effective early in an SEP event when large intensity gradients are present, while the effectiveness quickly decreases with time thereafter.

  17. MSG-7: Molecular absorption processes related to the penetration of ultraviolet solar radiation into the middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, J. E.; Blake, A. J.; Freeman, D. E.; Nicholls, R. W.; Ogawa, T.; Simon, P. C.

    1983-01-01

    The information presently available on the absorption cross sections of O2 and O3 with attention to the application of these data in middle atmospheric science is reviewed. The cross sections values reported by different groups are intercompared in tabular form where feasible, and specific values are recommended when there is a basis for preferring a particular set of results over other available data. When no such basis exists, the differences among published cross sections then serve to indicate a range of uncertainty. In these cases the need for additional work is indicated. Specific topics addressed are the absorption of molecular oxygen at Lyman alpha, in the Schumann-Runge continuum, in the Schumann-Runge bands, and in the Herzberg continuum. For ozone, the Hartley and Huggins bands are considered.

  18. Astrospheres and Solar-like Stellar Winds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood Brian E.

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Stellar analogs for the solar wind have proven to be frustratingly difficult to detect directly. However, these stellar winds can be studied indirectly by observing the interaction regions carved out by the collisions between these winds and the interstellar medium (ISM. These interaction regions are called "astrospheres", analogous to the "heliosphere" surrounding the Sun. The heliosphere and astrospheres contain a population of hydrogen heated by charge exchange processes that can produce enough H I Ly alpha absorption to be detectable in UV spectra of nearby stars from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST. The amount of astrospheric absorption is a diagnostic for the strength of the stellar wind, so these observations have provided the first measurements of solar-like stellar winds. Results from these stellar wind studies and their implications for our understanding of the solar wind are reviewed here. Of particular interest are results concerning the past history of the solar wind and its impact on planetary atmospheres.

  19. Atmospheric and Aqueous Deposition of Polycrystalline Metal Oxides Using Mist-CVD for Highly Efficient Inverted Polymer Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaodan; Kawaharamura, Toshiyuki; Stieg, Adam Z; Biswas, Chandan; Li, Lu; Ma, Zhu; Zurbuchen, Mark A; Pei, Qibing; Wang, Kang L

    2015-08-12

    Large scale, cost-effective processing of metal oxide thin films is critical for the fabrication of many novel thin film electronics. To date, however, most of the reported solution-based techniques require either extended thermal anneals or additional synthetic steps. Here we report mist chemical vapor deposition as a solution-based, readily scalable, and open-air method to produce high-quality polycrystalline metal oxide thin films. Continuous, smooth, and conformal deposition of metal oxide thin films is achieved by tuning the solvent chemistry of Leidenfrost droplets to promote finer control over the surface-local dissociation process of the atomized zinc-bearing precursors. We demonstrate the deposited ZnO as highly efficient electron transport layers for inverted polymer solar cells to show the power of the approach. A highest efficiency of 8.7% is achieved with a fill factor of 73%, comparable to that of conventional so-gel ZnO, which serves as an indication of the efficient vertical transport and electron collection achievable using this material.

  20. A Direct Measurement of Atmospheric Dispersion in N-band Spectra: Implications for Mid-IR Systems on ELTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Hinz, Philip M.; Hoffmann, William F.; Close, Laird M.; Kendrew, Sarah; Mathar, Richard J.; Stuik, Remko; Greene, Thomas P.; Woodward, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael S.

    This paper is modified from [A.J. Skemer, P.M. Hinz, W.F. Hoffmann, L.M. Close, S. Kendrew, R.J. Mathar, R. Stuik, T.P. Greene, C.E. Woodward, M.S. Kelley, PASP 121, 897 (2009)]. Adaptive optics will almost completely remove the effects of atmospheric turbulence at 10µm on the Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) generation of telescopes. In this paper, we observationally confirm that the next most important limitation to image quality is atmospheric dispersion, rather than telescope diffraction. By using the 6.5 meter MMT with its unique mid-IR adaptive optics system, we measure atmospheric dispersion in the N-band with the newly commissioned spectroscopic mode on MIRAC4BLINC. Our results indicate that atmospheric dispersion is generally linear in the N-band, although there is some residual curvature. We compare our measurements to theory, and make predictions for ELT Strehls and image FHWM with and without an atmospheric dispersion corrector (ADC). We find that for many mid-IR applications, an ADC will be necessary on ELTs. The observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a facility operated jointly by the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona

  1. Electrostatic Precipitation of Dust in the Martian Atmosphere: Implications for the Utilization of Resources During Future Manned Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Carlos I.; Clements, Judson S.; Thompson, Samuel M.; Cox, Nathan D.; Hogue, Michael D.; Johansen, Michael R.; Williams, Blakeley S.

    2011-01-01

    Future human missions to Mars will require the utilization of local resources for oxygen, fuel. and water. The In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project is an active research endeavor at NASA to develop technologies that can enable cost effective ways to live off the land. The extraction of oxygen from the Martian atmosphere. composed primarily of carbon dioxide, is one of the most important goals of the Mars ISRU project. The main obstacle is the relatively large amount of dust present in the Martian atmosphere. This dust must be efficiently removed from atmospheric gas intakes for ISRU processing chambers. A common technique to achieve this removal on earth is by electrostatic precipitation, where large electrostatic fields are established in a localized region to precipitate and collect previously charged dust particles. This technique is difficult to adapt to the Martian environment, with an atmospheric pressure of about one-hundredth of the terrestrial atmosphere. At these low pressures. the corona discharges required to implant an electrostatic charge to the particles to be collected is extremely difficult to sustain and the corona easily becomes biopolar. which is unsuitable for particle charging. In this paper, we report on our successful efforts to establish a stable corona under Martian simulated conditions. We also present results on dust collecting efficiencies with an electrostatic precipitator prototype that could be effectively used on a future mission to the red planet

  2. Electrostatic precipitation of dust in the Martian atmosphere: Implications for the utilization of resources during future manned exploration missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, C. I.; Thompson, S. M.; Cox, N. D.; Johansen, M. R.; Williams, B. S.; Hogue, M. D.; Clements, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    Future human missions to Mars will require the utilization of local resources for oxygen, fuel, and water. The In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project is an active research endeavor at NASA to develop technologies that can enable cost effective ways to live off the land. The extraction of oxygen from the Martian atmosphere, composed primarily of carbon dioxide, is one of the most important goals of the Mars ISRU project. The main obstacle is the relatively large amount of dust present in the Martian atmosphere. This dust must be efficiently removed from atmospheric gas intakes for ISRU processing chambers. A common technique to achieve this removal on earth is by electrostatic precipitation, where large electrostatic fields are established in a localized region to charge, precipitate and collect dust particles. This technique is difficult to adapt to the Martian environment, with an atmospheric pressure of about one-hundredth of the terrestrial atmosphere. At these low pressures, the corona discharges required to implant an electrostatic charge to the particles to be collected is extremely difficult to sustain and the corona easily transitions to a glow/streamer discharge, which is unsuitable for particle charging. In this paper, we report on our successful efforts to establish a stable corona under Martian simulated conditions. We also present results on dust collecting efficiencies with an electrostatic precipitator prototype that could be effectively used on a future mission to the red planet.

  3. Link between local scale BC emissions in the Indo-Gangetic Plains and large scale atmospheric solar absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Praveen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Project Surya has documented indoor and outdoor concentrations of black carbon (BC from traditional biomass burning cook stoves in a rural village located in the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP region of N. India from November 2009–September 2010. In this paper, we systematically document the link between local scale aerosol properties and column averaged regional aerosol optical properties and atmospheric radiative forcing. We document observations from the first phase of Project Surya and estimate the source dependent (biomass and fossil fuels aerosol optical properties from local to regional scale. Data were collected using surface based observations of BC, organic carbon (OC, aerosol light absorption, scattering coefficient at the Surya village (SVI_1 located in IGP region and integrated with satellite and AERONET observations at the regional scale (IGP. The daily mean BC concentrations at SVI_1 showed a large increase of BC during the dry season (December to February with values reaching 35 μg m−3. Space based LIDAR data revealed how the biomass smoke was trapped within the first kilometer during the dry season and extended to above 5 km during the pre-monsoon season. As a result, during the dry season, the variance in the daily mean single scattering albedo (SSA, the ratio of scattering to extinction coefficient, and column aerosol optical properties at the local IGP site correlated (with slopes in the range of 0.85 to 1.06 and R2>0.4 well with the "IGP_AERONET" (mean of six AERONET sites. The statistically significant correlation suggested that in-situ observations can be used to derive spatial mean forcing, at least for the dry season. The atmospheric forcing due to BC and OC exceeded 20 Wm−2 during all months from November to May, supporting the deduction that elimination of cook stove smoke emissions through clean cooking technologies will likely have a major positive impact not only on human

  4. A reconstruction of radiocarbon production and total solar irradiance from the Holocene 14C and CO2 records: implications of data and model uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Raphael; Joos, Fortunat

    2013-04-01

    Past atmospheric CO2 concentrations reconstructed from polar ice cores [Monnin et al., 2004] combined with its Δ14C signature as conserved in tree-rings [Reimer et al., 2009] provide important information both on the cycling of carbon as well as the production of radiocarbon in the atmosphere. As the 14C production rate (Q) is modulated by changes in the strength of the magnetic field enclosed in solar wind, it serves as a valuable proxy for past changes in solar activity. Using the Bern3D-LPX, a fully featured Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity (EMIC) with a 3D ocean and a dynamic vegetation model component, we perform transient carbon-cycle simulations spanning the past 21 kyr. By solving the atmospheric 14C budget, the radiocarbon production rate over the Holocene is reconstructed. Applying different deglacial forcings, as well as a control-simulation with constant climate, the sensitivity of Q to carbon-cycle changes is discussed. The error in the terrestrial 14C record is translated into an uncertainty in Q using a Monte-Carlo approach. In addition, uncertainties in the global carbon inventory, GPP and air-sea gas-exchange are taken into account. The estimated modern (1950-2005) production rate of 1.55±0.20 atoms/cm2/s is close to a recent theoretical calculations by Kovaltsov et al. (2012) yielding a modern production rate of 1.64 atoms/cm2/s but considerably lower than the estimated 2 atoms/cm2/s by Masarik and Beer (2009). The newly produced production rate record is then interpreted as a proxy for solar activity changes in the past 10 kyrs. To do so, we use published results from particle simulations [Masarik and Beer, 1999] together with the latest reconstruction of the geomagnetic dipole moment [Knudsen et al., 2008] to calculate the past history of the so-called solar modulation potential (Φ). The 14C based Φ is extended to 2005 A.D. with instrumental data [Usoskin et al., 2011]. In a subsequent step, Φ is translated into past

  5. On the possibility for laboratory simulation of generation of Alfven disturbances in magnetic tubes in the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopov, Pavel; Zaharov, Yuriy; Tishchenko, Vladimir; Boyarintsev, Eduard; Melehov, Aleksandr; Ponomarenko, Arnold; Posuh, Vitaliy; Shayhislamov, Ildar

    2016-03-01

    The paper deals with generation of Alfven plasma disturbances in magnetic flux tubes through exploding laser plasma in magnetized background plasma. Processes with similar effect of excitation of torsion-type waves seem to provide energy transfer from the solar photosphere to corona. The studies were carried out at experimental stand KI-1 represented a high-vacuum chamber of 1.2 m diameter, 5 m long, external magnetic field up to 500 Gs along the chamber axis, and up to 2×10^-6 Torr pressure in operating mode. Laser plasma was produced when focusing the CO2 laser pulse on a flat polyethylene target, and then the laser plasma propagated in θ-pinch background hydrogen (or helium) plasma. As a result, the magnetic flux tube of 15-20 cm radius was experimentally simulated along the chamber axis and the external magnetic field direction. Also, the plasma density distribution in the tube was measured. Alfven wave propagation along the magnetic field was registered from disturbance of the magnetic field transverse component B_ψ and field-aligned current J_z. The disturbances propagate at near-Alfven velocity of 70-90 km/s and they are of left-hand circular polarization of the transverse component of magnetic field. Presumably, Alfven wave is generated by the magnetic laminar mechanism of collisionless interaction between laser plasma cloud and background. The right-hand polarized high-frequency whistler predictor was registered which have been propagating before Alfven wave at 300 km/s velocity. The polarization direction changed with Alfven wave coming. Features of a slow magnetosonic wave as a sudden change in background plasma concentration along with simultaneous displacement of the external magnetic field were found. The disturbance propagates at ~20-30 km/s velocity, which is close to that of ion sound at low plasma beta value. From preliminary estimates, the disturbance transfers about 10 % of the original energy of laser plasma.

  6. Analysis of reaction products formed in the gas phase reaction of E,E-2,4-hexadienal with atmospheric oxidants: Reaction mechanisms and atmospheric implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenar, I.; Martin, P.; Cabañas, B.; Salgado, S.; Martinez, E.

    2018-03-01

    An analysis of reaction products for the reaction of E,E-2,4-hexadienal with chlorine atoms (Cl) and OH and NO3 radicals has been carried out at the first time with the aim of obtaining a better understanding of the tropospheric reactivity of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry with a Time of Flight detector (GC-TOFMS) were used to carry out the qualitative and/or quantitative analyses. Reaction products in gas and particulate phase were observed from the reactions of E,E-2,4- hexadienal with all oxidants. E/Z-Butenedial and maleic anhydride were the main products identified in gas phase. E-butenedial calculated molar yield ranging from 4 to 10%. A significant amount of multifunctional compounds (chloro and hydroxy carbonyls) was identified. These compounds could be formed in particulate phase explaining the ∼90% of unaccounted carbon in gas phase. The reaction with Cl atoms in the presence of NOx with a long reaction time gave Peroxy Acetyl Nitrate (PAN) as an additional product, which is known for being an important specie in the generation of the photochemical smog. Nitrated compounds were the major organic products from the reaction with the NO3 radical. Based on the identified products, the reaction mechanisms have been proposed. In these mechanisms a double bond addition of the atmospheric oxidant at C4/C5 of E,E-2,4-hexadienal is the first step for tropospheric degradation.

  7. Ion Microprobe Measurements of Comet Dust and Implications for Models of Oxygen Isotope Heterogeneity in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead, C. J.; McKeegan, K. D.; Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.

    2017-01-01

    ]. These studies have been largely focused on the coarse-grained terminal particles extracted from aerogel collectors; hypervelocity capture into aerogel resulted in fine-grained material that was melted and intimately mixed with the SiO2 capture medium. Hypervelocity impacts into Al foils surrounding the aerogel tiles produced impact craters that captured material from the impactor without significant oxygen contamination, allowing for analysis of both the coarse and fine-grained components of the Wild 2 dust. To date, no particles with definitive hydrated mineralogy have been observed in Stardust samples, though this may be a result of alteration due to hypervelocity capture. High-carbon hydrated CS-IDPs have been suggested as resulting from the aqueous alteration of CP-IDPs [7], and may retain evidence for interaction with O-17, O-18-enriched "cometary" water predicted by CO self-shielding. Here we present results of oxygen isotope measurements of twelve Stardust foil craters and four C-rich hydrated IDPs [8, 9], and discuss implications for models of oxygen isotope heterogeneity in the early solar system.

  8. Atmospheric processes of organic pollutants over a remote lake on the central Tibetan Plateau: implications for regional cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jiao; Wang, Xiaoping; Wang, Chuanfei; Gong, Ping; Yao, Tandong

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric processes (air-surface exchange, and atmospheric deposition and degradation) are crucial for understanding the global cycling and fate of organic pollutants (OPs). However, such assessments over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) remain uncertain. More than 50 % of Chinese lakes are located on the TP, which exerts a remarkable influence on the regional water, energy, and chemical cycling. In this study, air and water samples were simultaneously collected in Nam Co, a large lake on the TP, to test whether the lake is a secondary source or sink of OPs. Lower concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were observed in the atmosphere and lake water of Nam Co, while the levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were relatively higher. Results of fugacity ratios and chiral signatures both suggest that the lake acted as the net sink of atmospheric hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), following their long-range transport driven by the Indian monsoon. Different behaviours were observed in the PAHs, which primarily originated from local biomass burning. Acenaphthylene, acenaphthene, and fluorene showed volatilization from the lake to the atmosphere, while other PAHs were deposited into the lake due to the integrated deposition process (wet/dry and air-water gas deposition) and limited atmospheric degradation. As the dominant PAH compound, phenanthrene exhibited a seasonal reversal of air-water gas exchange, which was likely related to the melting of the lake ice in May. The annual input of HCHs from the air to the entire lake area (2015 km2) was estimated as 1.9 kg yr-1, while input estimated for ∑ 15PAHs can potentially reach up to 550 kg yr-1. This study highlights the significance of PAH deposition on the regional carbon cycling in the oligotrophic lakes of the TP.

  9. Atmospheric mercury concentration and chemical speciation at a rural site in Beijing, China: implications of mercury emission sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Continuous measurements of atmospheric mercury concentration and speciation play a key role in identifying mercury sources and its behavior in the atmosphere. In this study, speciated atmospheric mercury including gaseous elemental mercury (GEM, reactive gaseous mercury (RGM and particle-bound mercury (PBM were continuously measured at Miyun, a rural site in Beijing, China, from December 2008 to November 2009. The average GEM, RGM and PBM concentrations were found to be 3.22 ± 1.74, 10.1 ± 18.8 and 98.2 ± 112.7 pg m−3, respectively, about 2–20 times higher than the background concentration of the Northern Hemisphere. The results indicated that atmospheric mercury concentrations in northern China were highly affected by anthropogenic emissions. The atmospheric mercury showed obvious seasonal variations, with the highest seasonal average GEM concentration in summer (3.48 ng m−3 and the lowest value in winter (2.66 ng m−3. In autumn and winter a diurnal variation of GEM was observed, with peak levels in the late afternoon till midnight. Most of the high RGM concentration values occurred in the afternoon of all seasons due to the higher oxidation. The PBM concentration was higher in early morning of all seasons because of the the temperature inversion that increases in depth as the night proceeds. The ratio of GEM to CO indicates that residential boilers play an important role in the elevation of GEM in winter. The ratio of RGM to O3 could be an indicator of the contribution of local primary sources. The ratio of PBM to PM2.5 reveals that the air mass from the east and southwest of the site in spring and summer carries more atmospheric mercury. The HYSPLIT back-trajectory analysis indicated that the monitoring site is affected by local, regional and interregional sources simultaneously during heavy pollution episodes. The results from the potential source contribution function (PSCF model indicate that the atmospheric transport

  10. Instability of coupled gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a β-plane in solar system atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. McKenzie

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an analysis of the combined theory of gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a β-plane in the Boussinesq approximation. The wave equation for the system is fifth order in space and time and demonstrates how gravity-inertial waves on the one hand are coupled to Rossby waves on the other through the combined effects of β, the stratification characterized by the Väisälä-Brunt frequency N, the Coriolis frequency f at a given latitude, and vertical propagation which permits buoyancy modes to interact with westward propagating Rossby waves. The corresponding dispersion equation shows that the frequency of a westward propagating gravity-inertial wave is reduced by the coupling, whereas the frequency of a Rossby wave is increased. If the coupling is sufficiently strong these two modes coalesce giving rise to an instability. The instability condition translates into a curve of critical latitude Θc versus effective equatorial rotational Mach number M, with the region below this curve exhibiting instability. "Supersonic" fast rotators are unstable in a narrow band of latitudes around the equator. For example Θc~12° for Jupiter. On the other hand slow "subsonic" rotators (e.g. Mercury, Venus and the Sun's Corona are unstable at all latitudes except very close to the poles where the β effect vanishes. "Transonic" rotators, such as the Earth and Mars, exhibit instability within latitudes of 34° and 39°, respectively, around the Equator. Similar results pertain to Oceans. In the case of an Earth's Ocean of depth 4km say, purely westward propagating waves are unstable up to 26° about the Equator. The nonlinear evolution of this instability which feeds off rotational energy and gravitational buoyancy may play an important role in atmospheric dynamics.

  11. Instability of coupled gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a {beta}-plane in solar system atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, J.F. [KwaZulu-Natal Univ., Durban (South Africa). Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences; Alabama Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Physics, CSPAR; King' s College, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the combined theory of gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a {beta}-plane in the Boussinesq approximation. The wave equation for the system is fifth order in space and time and demonstrates how gravity-inertial waves on the one hand are coupled to Rossby waves on the other through the combined effects of {beta}-, the stratification characterized by the Vaeisaelae-Brunt frequency N, the Coriolis frequency f at a given latitude, and vertical propagation which permits buoyancy modes to interact with westward propagating Rossby waves. The corresponding dispersion equation shows that the frequency of a westward propagating gravity-inertial wave is reduced by the coupling, whereas the frequency of a Rossby wave is increased. If the coupling is sufficiently strong these two modes coalesce giving rise to an instability. The instability condition translates into a curve of critical latitude {theta}{sub c} versus effective equatorial rotational Mach number M, with the region below this curve exhibiting instability. ''Supersonic'' fast rotators are unstable in a narrow band of latitudes around the equator. For example {theta}{sub c}{proportional_to}12 for Jupiter. On the other hand slow ''subsonic'' rotators (e.g. Mercury, Venus and the Sun's Corona) are unstable at all latitudes except very close to the poles where the {beta}- effect vanishes. ''Transonic'' rotators, such as the Earth and Mars, exhibit instability within latitudes of 34 and 39 , respectively, around the Equator. Similar results pertain to Oceans. In the case of an Earth's Ocean of depth 4km say, purely westward propagating waves are unstable up to 26 about the Equator. The nonlinear evolution of this instability which feeds off rotational energy and gravitational buoyancy may play an important role in atmospheric dynamics. (orig.)

  12. Instability of coupled gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a β-plane in solar system atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. McKenzie

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an analysis of the combined theory of gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a β-plane in the Boussinesq approximation. The wave equation for the system is fifth order in space and time and demonstrates how gravity-inertial waves on the one hand are coupled to Rossby waves on the other through the combined effects of β, the stratification characterized by the Väisälä-Brunt frequency N, the Coriolis frequency f at a given latitude, and vertical propagation which permits buoyancy modes to interact with westward propagating Rossby waves. The corresponding dispersion equation shows that the frequency of a westward propagating gravity-inertial wave is reduced by the coupling, whereas the frequency of a Rossby wave is increased. If the coupling is sufficiently strong these two modes coalesce giving rise to an instability. The instability condition translates into a curve of critical latitude Θc versus effective equatorial rotational Mach number M, with the region below this curve exhibiting instability. "Supersonic" fast rotators are unstable in a narrow band of latitudes around the equator. For example Θc~12° for Jupiter. On the other hand slow "subsonic" rotators (e.g. Mercury, Venus and the Sun's Corona are unstable at all latitudes except very close to the poles where the β effect vanishes. "Transonic" rotators, such as the Earth and Mars, exhibit instability within latitudes of 34° and 39°, respectively, around the Equator. Similar results pertain to Oceans. In the case of an Earth's Ocean of depth 4km say, purely westward propagating waves are unstable up to 26° about the Equator. The nonlinear evolution of this instability which feeds off rotational energy and gravitational buoyancy may play an important role in atmospheric dynamics.

  13. The role of impact cratering in planetary environmental change and implications for the search for life in the solar system (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinski, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    Beginning in the late 18th century with the work of James Hutton, uniformitarianism emerged as a central tenet of the natural sciences and remained so well into the 20th century. Central to the idea of uniformitarianism is the concept of gradualism whereby processes throughout time occur at the same, or similar rates. In the 20th century, the idea that asteroids and comets have struck, and continue to strike, planetary bodies throughout geological time, has revolutionized our understanding of Solar System history and evolution. Indeed, it is now widely recognized that impact cratering is one of the most important and fundamental geological process in the Solar System. It is also now apparent that impact events have profoundly affected the origin and evolution of Earth, its environment, and the habitability of our planet. The extreme physical conditions (e.g., 10's of thousands of K and 100's of GPa), the concentrated nature of the energy release at a single point on a planetary surface, and the virtually instantaneous nature of the impact process sets apart impact events from all other geological processes. It should not be surprising then that such a rapid geological process can cause rapid environmental change. The destructive geological, environmental, and biological effects of meteorite impact events are well studied and well known. This is largely due to the discovery of the ~180 km diameter Chicxulub impact structure, Mexico, and its link to the mass extinction event that marks the end of the Cretaceous Period 65 Myr. ago. While the main driver for this mass extinction event remains debated, a long list of possible causes of environmental change have been proposed, including: heat from the impact explosion, tsunamis, earthquakes, global forest fires, dust injection in the upper atmosphere, production of vast quantities of N2O, and release of CO2 and sulfur species from the target rocks. Any one of these effects could potentially cause the annihilation of a

  14. The solar ionisation rate deduced from Ulysses measurements and its implications to interplanetary Lyman alpha-intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summanen, T.; Kyroelae, E.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a computer code which can be used to study 3-dimensional and time-dependent effects of the solar cycle on the interplanetary (IP) hydrogen distribution. The code is based on the inverted Monte Carlo simulation. In this work we have modelled the temporal behaviour of the solar ionisation rate. We have assumed that during the most of the time of the solar cycle there is an anisotopic latitudinal structure but right at the solar maximum the anisotropy disappears. The effects of this behaviour will be discussed both in regard to the IP hydrogen distribution and IP Lyman a a-intensity.

  15. Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Jet Processed Pt-Decorated Reduced Graphene Oxides for Counter-Electrodes of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Hao Wan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ processed Pt-decorated reduced graphene oxides (rGOs were used as counter-electrodes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs. Pastes containing rGO, ethyl cellulose, terpineol, and chloroplatinic acid were screen-printed and sintered by nitrogen dc-pulse APPJs. Pt nanodots were uniformly distributed on the rGO flakes. When using Pt-decorated rGOs as the counter electrodes of DSSCs, the efficiency of the DSSC first increased and then decreased as the APPJ processing time increased. Nitrogen APPJs can effectively remove organic binders and can reduce chloroplatinic acid to Pt, thereby improving the efficiency of DSSCs. However, over-calcination by APPJ can damage the graphenes and degrade the DSSCs. The addition of Pt mainly improves the fill factor, which thereby increases the efficiency of DSSCs. The optimized APPJ processing time was merely 9 s owing to the vigorous interaction among the rGOs, chloroplatinic acid and nitrogen APPJs.

  16. Oscillations in the open solar magnetic flux with a period of 1.68 years: imprint on galactic cosmic rays and implications for heliospheric shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rouillard

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of how the heliosphere modulates galactic cosmic ray (GCR fluxes and spectra is important, not only for studies of their origin, acceleration and propagation in our galaxy, but also for predicting their effects (on technology and on the Earth's environment and organisms and for interpreting abundances of cosmogenic isotopes in meteorites and terrestrial reservoirs. In contrast to the early interplanetary measurements, there is growing evidence for a dominant role in GCR shielding of the total open magnetic flux, which emerges from the solar atmosphere and enters the heliosphere. In this paper, we relate a strong 1.68-year oscillation in GCR fluxes to a corresponding oscillation in the open solar magnetic flux and infer cosmic-ray propagation paths confirming the predictions of theories in which drift is important in modulating the cosmic ray flux. Key words. Interplanetary physics (Cosmic rays, Interplanetary magnetic fields

  17. Solar and Interplanetary Signatures of a Maunder-like Grand Solar Minimum around the Corner - Implications to Near-Earth Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardhan, P.; Bisoi, S. K.; Ananthakrishnan, S.; Sridharan, R.; Jose, L.

    2015-12-01

    Our study of a steady decline of solar high-latitude (?45?) photospheric magnetic fields for the past 20 years combined with the fact that cycle 24 is already past its peak, implies that high-latitude fields are likely to decline until ˜2020, the expected minimum of cycle 24.Also, interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations, at 327 MHz, of solar wind micro-turbulence levels during 1983-2013, have shown a steady decline, in sync with the declining solar high-latitude fields. An estimateof both the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) strength in 2020 and the floor value of the HMF, using the correlation between the polar field and the HMF at solar minimum, was found to be 4.0 (±0.6) nT and 3.2 (±0.4) nT, respectively. Using the estimated value of the HMF in 2020, the peak sunspot number for solar Cycle 25 was estimated to be 69 (±12). These results and the fact that solar magnetic fields continue to decline at present, begs the question as to whether we are headed towards a long period of very low sunspot activity similar to the well known Maunder minimum between 1645-1715. An assessment of possible impact of such a likely grand minimum on terrestrial ionospheric current systems, based on the one-to-one correlation of sunspot number and night time F-region maximum electron density, reveals that the period post 2020 will be useful for undertaking systematic ground based low-frequency radio astronomy observations, as the night time ionospheric cutoff-frequency could be well below 10 MHz.

  18. The oleic acid-ozone heterogeneous reaction system: products, kinetics, secondary chemistry, and atmospheric implications of a model system – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zahardis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneous processing of organic aerosols by trace oxidants has many implications to atmospheric chemistry and climate regulation. This review covers a model heterogeneous reaction system (HRS: the oleic acid-ozone HRS and other reaction systems featuring fatty acids, and their derivatives. The analysis of the commonly observed aldehyde and organic acid products of ozonolysis (azelaic acid, nonanoic acid, 9-oxononanoic acid, nonanal is described. The relative product yields are noted and explained by the observation of secondary chemical reactions. The secondary reaction products arising from reactive Criegee intermediates are mainly peroxidic, notably secondary ozonides and α-acyloxyalkyl hydroperoxide oligomers and polymers, and their formation is in accord with solution and liquid-phase ozonolysis. These highly oxygenated products are of low volatility and hydrophilic which may enhance the ability of particles to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN. The kinetic description of this HRS is critically reviewed. Most kinetic studies suggest this oxidative processing is either a near surface reaction that is limited by the diffusion of ozone or a surface based reaction. Internally mixed particles and coatings represent the next stage in the progression towards more realistic proxies of tropospheric organic aerosols and a description of the products and the kinetics resulting from the ozonolysis of these proxies, which are based on fatty acids or their derivatives, is presented. Finally, the main atmospheric implications of oxidative processing of particulate containing fatty acids are presented. These implications include the extended lifetime of unsaturated species in the troposphere facilitated by the presence of solids, semi-solids or viscous phases, and an enhanced rate of ozone uptake by particulate unsaturates compared to corresponding gas-phase organics. Ozonolysis of oleic acid enhances its CCN activity, which implies that

  19. Induced emission of Alfvén waves in inhomogeneous streaming plasma: implications for solar corona heating and solar wind acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinsky, V L; Shevchenko, V I

    2013-07-05

    The results of a self-consistent kinetic model of heating the solar corona and accelerating the fast solar wind are presented for plasma flowing in a nonuniform magnetic field configuration of near-Sun conditions. The model is based on a scale separation between the large transit or inhomogeneity scales and the small dissipation scales. The macroscale instability of the marginally stable particle distribution function compliments the resonant frequency sweeping dissipation of transient Alfvén waves by their induced emission in inhomogeneous streaming plasma that provides enough energy for keeping the plasma temperature decaying not faster than r(-1) in close agreement with in situ heliospheric observations.

  20. Orbit dynamics and geographical coverage capabilities of satellite-based solar occultation experiments for global monitoring of stratospheric constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Orbit dynamics of the solar occultation technique for satellite measurements of the Earth's atmosphere are described. A one-year mission is simulated and the orbit and mission design implications are discussed in detail. Geographical coverage capabilities are examined parametrically for a range of orbit conditions. The hypothetical mission is used to produce a simulated one-year data base of solar occultation measurements; each occultation event is assumed to produce a single number, or 'measurement' and some statistical properties of the data set are examined. A simple model is fitted to the data to demonstrate a procedure for examining global distributions of atmospheric constitutents with the solar occultation technique.

  1. Climatic, tectonic, and biological factors affecting the oxidation state of the atmosphere and oceans: Implications for Phanerozoic O2 evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, K.; Tajika, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's atmosphere and oceans have seen fundamental changes in its oxidation state in response to the climatic, tectonic and geochemical variations. Over the past decade, several geochemical proxies have led to significant progress in understanding the paleredox states of ancient oceans. However, a quantitative interpretation of these data for atmospheric O2 levels remain unclear because the relationship between atmospheric O2 levels (pO2) and oceanic redox state depends on several environmental factors, such as terrestrial weathering rate, sea-level stands, and sinking rate of particulate organic matter (POM) in the water column and so on. It is widely thought that the redox-dependent P cycling also plays a crucial role in regulating pO2 because it acts as a negative feedback on a geological timescale. It is important that strength of this feedback for a given pO2 is also modulated by environmental factors, affecting not only O2 levels at steady state but also its susceptibility to environmental changes. In this study, a quantitative role of environmental factors in the oxidation state of Earth's surface environment is evaluated with an oceanic biogeochemical cycle model (CANOPS) coupled with global C cycle model, which enables us to understand the ancient CO2 and O2 evolution. Our results demonstrate that atmospheric O2 level at steady state is affected by CO2 input flux from Earth's interior via changes in biogeochemical cycles, but its response is modulated by several internal factors such as shelf area and POM sinking rate. We also found that early Paleozoic atmospheric O2 levels before the advent of land plant would be determined so that oceans may locate at the "edge of anoxia (EoA)" where the redox-dependency of marine P cycle plays a crucial role in regulating O2 cycle, and that POM sinking rate has a great impact on the EoA. Our findings provide insights into the O2 cycle over the Phanerozoic in response to the climatic and tectonic variations and

  2. Modification of land-atmosphere interactions by CO2 effects: Implications for summer dryness and heat wave amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemordant, Léo.; Gentine, Pierre; Stéfanon, Marc; Drobinski, Philippe; Fatichi, Simone

    2016-10-01

    Plant stomata couple the energy, water, and carbon cycles. We use the framework of Regional Climate Modeling to simulate the 2003 European heat wave and assess how higher levels of surface CO2 may affect such an extreme event through land-atmosphere interactions. Increased CO2 modifies the seasonality of the water cycle through stomatal regulation and increased leaf area. As a result, the water saved during the growing season through higher water use efficiency mitigates summer dryness and the heat wave impact. Land-atmosphere interactions and CO2 fertilization together synergistically contribute to increased summer transpiration. This, in turn, alters the surface energy budget and decreases sensible heat flux, mitigating air temperature rise. Accurate representation of the response to higher CO2 levels and of the coupling between the carbon and water cycles is therefore critical to forecasting seasonal climate, water cycle dynamics, and to enhance the accuracy of extreme event prediction under future climate.

  3. A REVISED SOLAR TRANSFORMITY FOR TIDAL ENERGY RECEIVED BY THE EARTH AND DISSIPATED GLOBALLY: IMPLICATIONS FOR EMERGY ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solar transformities for the tidal energy received by the earth and the tidal energy dissipated globally can be calculated because both solar energy and the gravitational attraction of the sun and moon drive independent processes that produce an annual flux of geopotential energy...

  4. NEPTUNE’S DYNAMIC ATMOSPHERE FROM KEPLER K2 OBSERVATIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR BROWN DWARF LIGHT CURVE ANALYSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Jason F.; Gaulme, Patrick; Hammel, Heidi B.; Casewell, Sarah L.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Gizis, John E.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Morales-Juberias, Raul; Orton, Glenn S.; Wong, Michael H.; Marley, Mark S.

    2017-01-01

    Observations of Neptune with the Kepler Space Telescope yield a 49 day light curve with 98% coverage at a 1 minute cadence. A significant signature in the light curve comes from discrete cloud features. We compare results extracted from the light curve data with contemporaneous disk-resolved imaging of Neptune from the Keck 10-m telescope at 1.65 microns and Hubble Space Telescope visible imaging acquired nine months later. This direct comparison validates the feature latitudes assigned to the K2 light curve periods based on Neptune’s zonal wind profile, and confirms observed cloud feature variability. Although Neptune’s clouds vary in location and intensity on short and long timescales, a single large discrete storm seen in Keck imaging dominates the K2 and Hubble light curves; smaller or fainter clouds likely contribute to short-term brightness variability. The K2 Neptune light curve, in conjunction with our imaging data, provides context for the interpretation of current and future brown dwarf and extrasolar planet variability measurements. In particular we suggest that the balance between large, relatively stable, atmospheric features and smaller, more transient, clouds controls the character of substellar atmospheric variability. Atmospheres dominated by a few large spots may show inherently greater light curve stability than those which exhibit a greater number of smaller features. PMID:28127087

  5. Atmospheric Circulation of Exoplanets

    OpenAIRE

    Showman, Adam P.; Cho, James Y-K.; Menou, Kristen

    2009-01-01

    We survey the basic principles of atmospheric dynamics relevant to explaining existing and future observations of exoplanets, both gas giant and terrestrial. Given the paucity of data on exoplanet atmospheres, our approach is to emphasize fundamental principles and insights gained from Solar-System studies that are likely to be generalizable to exoplanets. We begin by presenting the hierarchy of basic equations used in atmospheric dynamics, including the Navier-Stokes, primitive, shallow-wate...

  6. Impact of vegetation on land-atmosphere coupling strength and its implication for desertification mitigation over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myoung, Boksoon; Choi, Yong-Sang; Choi, Suk-Jin; Park, Seon Ki

    2012-06-01

    Desertification of the East Asian drylands and the consequent dust transport have been serious concerns for adjacent Asian countries as well as the western United States. Tree planting has been considered one applicable strategy to mitigate the desertification. However, the desired effect of the tree planting would not be brought to fruition unless the newly planted trees change the coupling characteristics between the land and the atmosphere. Based on this perception, we attempt to clarify the effects of vegetation on the coupling strength between the atmosphere and land surface, and we suggest the most efficient areas of tree planting for desertification mitigation in East Asia. Using regional vegetation-atmosphere coupled model simulations, coupling strength with and without vegetation was computed and compared with each other. An increased vegetation fraction reduces the coupling strength in June, July, and August (JJA), primarily due to decreased evapotranspiration variability. This effect is pronounced over the Manchurian Plains and the highly populated areas of Beijing and Tianjin. The reduced coupling strength tends to weaken feedback between soil moisture and precipitation as a maintenance mechanism of warm season droughts in the midlatitudes and subsequently decrease the probability of droughts, a finding that is reflected in the enhanced JJA mean soil moisture. However, some drylands like the eastern edges of the Gobi desert present marginal or even opposite changes in coupling strength, meaning a limited effect of vegetation on relieving droughts. Therefore, given limited financial and human resources, acupuncture-like afforestation, i.e., concentrated tree planting in a particular region where the coupling strength can be substantially reduced by vegetation, is an effective strategy to secure long-standing desertification mitigation.

  7. Non-LTE calculation of HCL earthlimb emission and implication for detection of HCl in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumer, J. B.; James, T. C.

    1982-01-01

    Calculation results are presented for the contribution of the non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium process of resonant scattering of sunlight in the 1-0 band of HCl to the earthlimb radiance, for the case of tangent altitudes from 20 to 90 km. It is established that the mechanism in question is a significant contributor to radiance at altitudes as low as 20 km, and that it becomes greater than the Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium contribution above 40 km. Attention is given to the prospects for detection of HCl at altitudes approaching 80 km, by means of the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer scheduled for deployment by the NASA Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite.

  8. On the chronology of lunar origin and evolution. Implications for Earth, Mars and the Solar System as a whole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiss, Johannes; Rossi, Angelo Pio

    2013-11-01

    terrestrial planets, including Mars and possibly early Earth. The Moon holds a historic record of Galactic cosmic-ray intensity, solar wind composition and fluxes and composition of solids of any size in the region of the terrestrial planets. Some of this record has been deciphered. Secular mixing of the Sun was constrained by determining 3He/4He of solar wind helium stored in lunar fines and ancient breccias. For checking the presumed constancy of the impact rate over the past ≈3.1 Ga, samples of the youngest mare basalts would be needed for determining their radiometric ages. Radiometric dating and stratigraphy has revealed that many of the large basins on the near side of the Moon were created by impacts about 4.1 to 3.8 Ga ago. The apparent clustering of ages called "Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB)" is thought to result from migration of planets several 100 million years after their accretion. The bombardment, unexpectedly late in solar system history, must have had a devastating effect on the atmosphere, hydrosphere and habitability on Earth during and following this epoch, but direct traces of this bombardment have been eradicated on our planet by plate tectonics. Indirect evidence about the course of bombardment during this epoch on Earth must therefore come from the lunar record, especially from additional data on the terminal phase of the LHB. For this purpose, documented samples are required for measuring precise radiometric ages of the Orientale Basin and the Nectaris and/or Fecunditatis Basins in order to compare these ages with the time of the earliest traces of life on Earth. A crater count chronology is presently being built up for planet Mars and its surface features. The chronology is based on the established lunar chronology whereby differences between the impact rates for Moon and Mars are derived from local fluxes and impact energies of projectiles. Direct calibration of the Martian chronology will have to come from radiometric ages and cosmic-ray exposure

  9. Climate change and climate systems influence and control the atmospheric dispersion of desert dust: implications for human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dale W.; Ragaini, Richard C.

    2010-01-01

    The global dispersion of desert dust through Earth’s atmosphere is greatly influenced by temperature. Temporal analyses of ice core data have demonstrated that enhanced dust dispersion occurs during glacial events. This is due to an increase in ice cover, which results in an increase in drier terrestrial cover. A shorter temporal analysis of dust dispersion data over the last 40 years has demonstrated an increase in dust transport. Climate systems or events such as the North Atlantic Oscillation, the Indian Ocean subtropical High, Pacific Decadal Oscillation, and El Nino-Sothern Oscillation are known to influence global short-term dust dispersion occurrence and transport routes. Anthropogenic influences on dust transport include deforestation, harmful use of topsoil for agriculture as observed during the American Dust Bowl period, and the creation of dry seas (Aral Sea) and lakes (Lake Owens in California and Lake Chad in North Africa) through the diversion of source waters (for irrigation and drinking water supplies). Constituents of desert dust both from source regions (pathogenic microorganisms, organic and inorganic toxins) and those scavenged through atmospheric transport (i.e., industrial and agricultural emissions) are known to directly impact human and ecosystem health. This presentation will present a review of global scale dust storms and how these events can be both a detriment and benefit to various organisms in downwind environments.

  10. Eukaryotic stromatolite builders in acid mine drainage: Implications for Precambrian iron formations and oxygenation of the atmosphere?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brake, S.S.; Hasiotis, S.T.; Dannelly, H.K.; Connors, K.A. [Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN (United States). Dept. of Geography, Geology & Anthropology

    2002-07-01

    Biological activity of Euglena mutabilis, an acidophilic, photosynthetic protozoan, contributes to the formation of Fe-rich stromatolites in acid mine drainage systems. E. mutabilis is the dominant microbe in bright green benthic mats (biofilm), coating drainage channels at abandoned coal mine sites in Indiana. It builds biolaminates through phototactic and aerotactic behavior, similar to prokaryotes, by moving through precipitates that periodically cover the mats. E. mutabilis also contributes to formation of Fe-rich stromatolites by (1) intracellularly storing Fe compounds released after death, contributing to the solid material of stromatolites and acting as nucleation sites for precipitation of authigenic Fe minerals, and (2) generating 02 via photosynthesis that further facilitates precipitation of reduced Fe, any excess 02 not consumed by Fe precipitation being released to the atmosphere. Recognition of E. mutabilis-dominated biofilm in acidic systems raises a provocative hypothesis relating processes involved in formation of Fe-rich stromatolites by E. mutabilis to those responsible for development of Precambrian stromatolitic Fe formations and oxygenation of the early atmosphere.

  11. THE FORMATION OF IRIS DIAGNOSTICS. VII. THE FORMATION OF THE O i 135.56 NM LINE IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Hsiao-Hsuan; Carlsson, Mats, E-mail: h.h.lin@astro.uio.no, E-mail: mats.carlsson@astro.uio.no [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2015-11-01

    The O i 135.56 nm line is covered by NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) small explorer mission which studies how the solar atmosphere is energized. We study here the formation and diagnostic potential of this line by means of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium modeling employing both 1D semi-empirical and 3D radiation magnetohydrodynamic models. We study the basic formation mechanisms and derive a quintessential model atom that incorporates essential atomic physics for the formation of the O i 135.56 nm line. This atomic model has 16 levels and describes recombination cascades through highly excited levels by effective recombination rates. The ionization balance O i/O ii is set by the hydrogen ionization balance through charge exchange reactions. The emission in the O i 135.56 nm line is dominated by a recombination cascade and the line is optically thin. The Doppler shift of the maximum emission correlates strongly with the vertical velocity in its line forming region, which is typically located at 1.0–1.5 Mm height. The total intensity of the line emission is correlated with the square of the electron density. Since the O i 135.56 nm line is optically thin, the width of the emission line is a very good diagnostic of non-thermal velocities. We conclude that the O i 135.56 nm line is an excellent probe of the middle chromosphere, and compliments other powerful chromospheric diagnostics of IRIS such as the Mg ii h and k lines and the C ii lines around 133.5 nm.

  12. Planetary Atmospheric Electricity

    CERN Document Server

    Leblanc, F; Yair, Y; Harrison, R. G; Lebreton, J. P; Blanc, M

    2008-01-01

    This volume presents our contemporary understanding of atmospheric electricity at Earth and in other solar system atmospheres. It is written by experts in terrestrial atmospheric electricity and planetary scientists. Many of the key issues related to planetary atmospheric electricity are discussed. The physics presented in this book includes ionisation processes in planetary atmospheres, charge generation and separation, and a discussion of electromagnetic signatures of atmospheric discharges. The measurement of thunderstorms and lightning, including its effects and hazards, is highlighted by articles on ground and space based instrumentation, and new missions.Theory and modelling of planetary atmospheric electricity complete this review of the research that is undertaken in this exciting field of space science. This book is an essential research tool for space scientists and geoscientists interested in electrical effects in atmospheres and planetary systems. Graduate students and researchers who are new to t...

  13. Seasonal changes in Titan's middle-atmosphere chemistry and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Nixon, C. A.; de Kok, R.; Vinatier, S.; Coustenis, A.; Sefton-Nash, E.; Calcutt, S. B.; Flasar, F. M.

    2013-09-01

    Titan is the largest satellite of Saturn and is the only moon in our solar system with a significant atmo- sphere. Titan's middle-atmosphere (stratosphere and mesosphere) circulation usually comprises a single hemisphere to hemisphere meridional circulation cell, with upwelling air in the summer hemisphere and sub- siding air at the winter pole with an associated winter polar vortex. Titan has an axial tilt (obliquity) of 26.7°, so during its 29.5 Earth year annual cycle pronounced seasonal effects are encountered as the relative solar insolation in each hemisphere changes. The most dramatic of these changes is the reversal in global meridional circulation as the peak solar heating switches hemispheres after an equinox. Titan's northern spring equinox occurred in August 2009, and since then many middle-atmosphere changes have been observed by Cassini that were previously impossible to study (1,2,3,4). Here we present a detailed analysis of the post equinox changes in middle-atmosphere temperature and composition measured with Cassini's Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS), use these to infer changes in atmospheric circulation, and explore implications for atmospheric photochemical and dynamical processes. Our results show that the meridional circulation has now reversed (1).

  14. Formation and diffusion of metal impurities in perovskite solar cell materials CH3NH3PbI3: implications on the choice of the electrode and the solar cell degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Wenmei; Du, Mao-Hua

    Hybrid organic-inorganic lead