WorldWideScience

Sample records for soil-to-plant transfer factor

  1. Soil to plant transfer factor of radiocesium by pot experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalil, A.; Rahman, M.M.; Koddus, A.; Chand, M.M.; Zaman, M.A.; Ahmad, G.U.

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with the soil to plant transfer factor (TF) of radiocesium (Cs 137 ) considered to be an important parameter while calculating radiological doses due to the potential release of radionuclides into the environment. In the present work, TF values were measured for the main foodstuffs in Bangladesh such as leafy vegetables (Lalshak, Palangshak), Ladyfinger, Radish, Potato, Potato Plant, Paddy, Paddy plant, Grass, Ginger, Ginger plant, Turmeric, and Turmeric plant by pot experiments grown in the AERE soil. Soil characteristics have also been investigated to assist the measured values of the corresponding radionuclide. TF values of the leafy parts and products of the corresponding plants were found in the range of 2.02x10 -1 to 1.8x10 -2 , which are reasonably comparable with the value found in the literature. It has been observed that the TF values in the leafy part of the plants are higher than the products. (author)

  2. 3rd Report of the workgroup on soil-to-plant transfer factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This report presents about 2000 soil-to-plant transfer factors obtained in different countries. They are included in a data bank compiled by the different IUR working groups. Some remarks on organisation and present status of the data bank, are followed up with 11 contributions presented at the conference, of which 5 are included in Atomindex separately. (Auth.)

  3. A statistical approach to estimating soil-to-plant transfer factor of strontium in agricultural fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Nao; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2009-01-01

    Soil-to-plant transfer factor (TF) is one of the important parameters in radiation dose assessment models for the environmental transfer of radionuclides. Since TFs are affected by several factors, including radionuclides, plant species and soil properties, development of a method for estimation of TF using some soil and plant properties would be useful. In this study, we took a statistical approach to estimating the TF of stable strontium (TF Sr ) from selected soil properties and element concentrations in plants, which was used as an analogue of 90 Sr. We collected the plant and soil samples used for the study from 142 agricultural fields throughout Japan. We applied a multiple linear regression analysis in order to get an empirical equation to estimate TF Sr . TF Sr could be estimated from the Sr concentration in soil (C Sr soil ) and Ca concentration in crop (C Ca crop ) using the following equation: log TF Sr =-0.88·log C Sr soil +0.93·log C Ca crop -2.53. Then, we replaced our data with Ca concentrations in crops from a food composition database compiled by the Japanese government. Finally, we predicted TF Sr using Sr concentration in soil from our data and Ca concentration in crops from the database of food composition. (author)

  4. Cs-137 soil to plant transfer factors derived from pot experiments and field studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, O.; Gerzabek, M.H.; Mueck, K.

    1989-11-01

    Soil to plant transfer factors (TF) of 137 Cs for different crop plants were determined in pot experiments, in outdoor experiments with plastic containers of 50 l volume, and in field studies. In all cases the soil contamination with 137 Cs resulted from fallout after the Chernobyl reactor accident. Mean TF derived for outdoor plants on a fresh weight basis, ranged from 0,0017 (leaf vegetables) to 0,059 (rye straw) and showed characteristic differences depending on plant part and species. Generally, for fruits and potato tubers a lower TF was found than for vegetative plant parts. Moreover, the data were compared with those from former experiments, carried out before the Chernobyl accident. There is a good agreement for cereals (with exception of rye) fruit vegetables and fodder crops, while actual TF are substantially lower for potatoes, leaf and root vegetables, but higher for rye. A significant negative correlation was observed between the TF and the soil activity concentrations for 137 Cs. In container experiments the TF were found to be influenced mainly by the clay content of the soil. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs. (Authors)

  5. Dependence of soil-to-plant transfer factors of elements on their concentrations in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Hirofumi; Watabe, Teruhisa.

    1996-01-01

    Transfer factors (TFs) of 31 stable elements from soil to plant were determined by neutron activation analysis. Soil and plant samples were collected from 112 farm fields in Aomori prefecture, Japan. The elements described are those that could be detected by this method, which include essential elements for plant growth and nonessential elements. Several of these elements were divided into two groups, each having different TF characteristics. In the first group of elements there was an inverse correlation between the TFs and the soil concentrations of the elements, especially for Cl, K and Ca. The concentrations of these elements in plants were independent of their soil concentrations. However, in the second group, especially Sc and Co, the TFs were independent of the soil concentrations of the elements. The fluctuation of TFs observed in this study was smaller than that previously reported. This may be attributed to the relatively narrow geographic area of the present study. In addition, the TFs for the stable elements in this study were generally one to three orders of magnitude lower than those compiled for radioactive isotopes in previous publications. (author)

  6. Soil-to-Plant Transfer Factors of {sup 99}Tc for Korean Major Upland Crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong Ho; Lim, Kwang Muk; Jun, In; Keum, Dong Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Reserach Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    In order to investigate the soil-to-plant transfer factor (TF) of {sup 99}Tc for Korean major upland crops (soybean, radish and Chinese cabbage), pot experiments were performed in a greenhouse. Soils were collected from four upland fields (two for soybean and two for radish and Chinese cabbage) around Gyeongju radioactive-waste disposal site. Three to four weeks before sowing, dried soils were mixed with a {sup 99}Tc solution and the mixtures were put into pots and irrigated. TF values were expressed as the ratios of the {sup 99}Tc concentrations in plants (Bq kg{sup -1}-dry or fresh) to those in soils (Bq kg{sup -1}-dry). There was no great difference in the TF value between soils. The TF values for soybean seeds were extremely lower than those for the straws, indicating a very low mobility of {sup 99}Tc to seeds. As representative TF values of{sup 99}Tc,1.8 X 10{sup -1}, 1.2 X 10{sup 1}, 3.2 X 10{sup 2} and 1.3 X 10{sup 2} (for dry plants), arithmetic means for two soils, were proposed for soybean seeds, radish roots, radish leaves and Chinese cabbage leaves, respectively. In the case of the vegetables, proposals for fresh plants were also made. The proposed values are not sufficiently representative so successive updates are needed.

  7. Proposal for new best estimates of the soil-to-plant transfer factor of U, Th, Ra, Pb and Po

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenhove, H. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Biosphere Impact Studies, Mol (Belgium)], E-mail: hvandenh@sckcen.be; Olyslaegers, G. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Biosphere Impact Studies, Mol (Belgium); Sanzharova, N.; Shubina, O. [RIAREA, Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Reed, E. [SENES Oak Ridge Inc., Center for Risk Analysis, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shang, Z. [Nuclear Safety Center of SEPA, Beijing (China); Velasco, H. [GEA- IMASL, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina)

    2009-09-15

    There is increasing interest in radiological assessment of discharges of naturally occurring radionuclides into the terrestrial environment. Such assessments require parameter values for the pathways considered in predictive models. An important pathway for human exposure is via ingestion of food crops and animal products. One of the key parameters in environmental assessment is therefore the soil-to-plant transfer factor to food and fodder crops. The objective of this study was to compile data, based on an extensive literature survey, concerning soil-to-plant transfer factors for uranium, thorium, radium, lead, and polonium. Transfer factor estimates were presented for major crop groups (Cereals, Leafy vegetables, Non-leafy vegetables, Root crops, Tubers, Fruits, Herbs, Pastures/grasses, Fodder), and also for some compartments within crop groups. Transfer factors were also calculated per soil group, as defined by their texture and organic matter content (Sand, Loam, Clay and Organic), and evaluation of transfer factors' dependency on specific soil characteristics was performed following regression analysis. The derived estimates were compared with estimates currently in use.

  8. Report on a workshop on the measurement of soils to plant transfer factors for radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This report includes the proceedings of the workshop on soil-plant transfer factors of radionuclides. Part 1 deals with a general introduction of soil-plant transfer factors, recommendations for the determination of these transfer factors and computer listing of transfer factors specified according to nuclide; type of crop; type of soil; and type of experiment. The second part offers the 12 contributions presented, of which several are included in INIS separately. (G.J.P.)

  9. Soil-to-plant transfer factors for natural radionuclides in grass in the vicinity of a former uranium mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Štrok, Marko, E-mail: Marko.Strok@ijs.si; Smodiš, Borut, E-mail: Borut.Smodis@ijs.si

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: • Soil and grass samples were collected from sites at the uranium mill tailings pile. • {sup 238}U, {sup 230}Th, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 210}Pb activity concentrations were determined. • Soil-to-plant transfer factors were determined and are comparable with literature. • Potential use of grass as a monitor of radionuclide migration was evaluated. • Grass has potential in predicting {sup 238}U and {sup 226}Ra migration. -- Abstract: The activity concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 230}Th, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 210}Pb were determined in soil and grass samples collected from sites at the uranium mill tailings waste pile, which lies near the former uranium mine at Žirovski vrh in Slovenia. Soil-to-plant transfer factors were determined and the potential use of grass as a monitor of radionuclide migration from the waste pile was evaluated. It was found that grass was not suitable for monitoring {sup 230}Th and {sup 210}Pb migration (no linear correlation between soil and grass activity concentrations) but has potential in predicting {sup 238}U and {sup 226}Ra migration (linear correlation between soil and grass activity concentrations). Soil-to-plant transfer factors for grass were in the range from 0.0014 to 0.015 kg/kg DM for {sup 238}U, 0.0039 to 0.012 kg/kg DM for {sup 230}Th, 0.035 to 0.46 kg/kg DM for {sup 226}Ra and 0.098 to 1.5 kg/kg DM for {sup 210}Pb.

  10. Ressac program plants analytical experiments study of a code modelling the soil to plant transfer factor of cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouve, A.; Troesch, O.; Legrand, B.

    1989-10-01

    The available data about the soil to plant transfer factor of cesium are numerous but very variable. The variation conditions of the transfer factor are studied with the help of laboratory experiments and the results analysed with the help of a multiple linear regression calculation. The results are applied to the soils and plants types the most frequently present around the French nuclear sites. A calculation model including the plant life conditions such as pH, water-soluble potassium and the available part of cesium in the water of the soil, is proposed. This model allows to predict the transfer factor with a better accuracy (up to ten times) than using the single ratio issue from the experimental data [fr

  11. Soil-to-plant transfer factors for radiocaesium measured in different soil types in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tecl, J.; Mirchi, R.; Malatova, I.; Peskova, I.; Schlesingerova, E.

    2001-01-01

    This study was perform in frame of the SAVEC project (SAVEC = Spatial Analysis of Vulnerable Ecosystems in Central Europe; European Union project). The aim of the SAVEC project was to develop a user-friendly software package that will allow the identification of areas vulnerable or resilient to radiocesium deposition in the Central European countries: Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic. The software package will incorporate a semi- mechanistic soil-to-plant transfer model which uses commonly measured soil properties to estimate the dynamic behaviour of deposited radiocesium. This model was developed for the European Commission IV th Framework programme Spatial Analysis of Vulnerable Ecosystems (SAVE) project. In the SAVEC software package, spatially variable data (including 137 CS deposition, soil property , agricultural production and dietary data) can be used to assess the consequences of the deposition in the three Central European countries following nuclear accidents. The SAVEC project collates data of sufficient resolution specific to Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic for integration within the SAVE-IT software package to allow the identification of areas and population groups that may be vulnerable to radiocesium deposition. From this viewpoint the samples of soil and vegetation were collected (1999 and 2000; the locations of the sampling places are in Fig. 1.) in which the content of 137 CS by semiconductor gamma spectrometry were determined. The mass activity of 137 CS were used for calculation of soil-to-plant transfer factors. (authors)

  12. Linearity assumption in soil-to-plant transfer factors of natural uranium and radium in Helianthus annuus L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, P. Blanco; Tome, F. Vera; Fernandez, M. Perez; Lozano, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    The linearity assumption of the validation of soil-to-plant transfer factors of natural uranium and 226 Ra was tested using Helianthus annuus L. (sunflower) grown in a hydroponic medium. Transfer of natural uranium and 226 Ra was tested in both the aerial fraction of plants and in the overall seedlings (roots and shoots). The results show that the linearity assumption can be considered valid in the hydroponic growth of sunflowers for the radionuclides studied. The ability of sunflowers to translocate uranium and 226 Ra was also investigated, as well as the feasibility of using sunflower plants to remove uranium and radium from contaminated water, and by extension, their potential for phytoextraction. In this sense, the removal percentages obtained for natural uranium and 226 Ra were 24% and 42%, respectively. Practically all the uranium is accumulated in the roots. However, 86% of the 226 Ra activity concentration in roots was translocated to the aerial part

  13. Linearity assumption in soil-to-plant transfer factors of natural uranium and radium in Helianthus annuus L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, P. Blanco [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071 Badajoz (Spain); Tome, F. Vera [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071 Badajoz (Spain)]. E-mail: fvt@unex.es; Fernandez, M. Perez [Area de Ecologia, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071 Badajoz (Spain); Lozano, J.C. [Laboratorio de Radiactividad Ambiental, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008 Salamanca (Spain)

    2006-05-15

    The linearity assumption of the validation of soil-to-plant transfer factors of natural uranium and {sup 226}Ra was tested using Helianthus annuus L. (sunflower) grown in a hydroponic medium. Transfer of natural uranium and {sup 226}Ra was tested in both the aerial fraction of plants and in the overall seedlings (roots and shoots). The results show that the linearity assumption can be considered valid in the hydroponic growth of sunflowers for the radionuclides studied. The ability of sunflowers to translocate uranium and {sup 226}Ra was also investigated, as well as the feasibility of using sunflower plants to remove uranium and radium from contaminated water, and by extension, their potential for phytoextraction. In this sense, the removal percentages obtained for natural uranium and {sup 226}Ra were 24% and 42%, respectively. Practically all the uranium is accumulated in the roots. However, 86% of the {sup 226}Ra activity concentration in roots was translocated to the aerial part.

  14. Soil to plant transfer factor in the vicinity of coal fired power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolic, J.; Todorovic, D.; Jankovic, M.; Radenkovic, M.; Joksic, J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the monitoring of working and living environment results in 5 coal fired powered plants, for the period from 2004. to 2009. are presented. Soil-plant transfer factor, suitable for estimation of possible contamination of food chain was chosen, as a measure of influence of power plants on the environment. The results gathered over the years of monitoring of working and living environment in the vicinity of the coal fired power plant were analyzed, and it was determined that no significant discrepancy exists comparing to the results reported in world literature. Also, the basic mathematical analysis was conducted, in order to assess the model of the behavior of the results in respect to the frequency count. (author) [sr

  15. Soil-to-plant transfer factors for natural radionuclides in the Brazilian cerrado region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacomino, Vanusa M.F.; Oliveira, Kerley A.; Menezes, Maria Angela de B.; Mello, Jaime de; Silva, David F. da

    2009-01-01

    Large amounts of phosphogypsum produced have been attracting attention of Radiological Protection institutions and Environmental Protection agencies worldwide, given its high potential for environmental contamination. In Brazil, this material has been used for several decades, especially for agricultural purposes. Due to the presence of radionuclides in its composition, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms for natural radionuclide transfer in the soil/plant system and to evaluate if the use of phosphogypsum in soil contributes to increased exposition of humans to natural radioactivity. Experiments were accomplished in a greenhouse with lettuce cultivation in two types of soil (sandy and clayey) fertilized with four different amounts of phosphogypsum. Samples of phosphogypsum, soil, lettuce and drainage water were then analyzed for key radionuclides. 238 U and 232 Th analyses were carried out by Neutron Activation Analysis; 226 Ra, 228 Ra, and 210 Pb by analyzed by Gamma Spectrometry; and 210 Po by Alpha Spectrometry Technique. Finally, Transfer Factors of soil-plant were calculated as well as annual contribution to the effective dose due to the ingestion of lettuces. 22 '6Ra average specific activity in phosphogypsum samples (252 Bq kg -1 ) was below the maximum level recommended by USEPA, which is 370 Bq.kg -1 for agricultural use. Although most of the results for mean specific activity of radionuclides in lettuce presented values below the Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA), Transfer Factors were estimated for those conditions in which the mean specific activity proved to be superior to MDA. Values ranged from 1.8 10 -3 to 2.3 10 -2 for 232 Th; 3.5 10 - '2 to 4.1 10 -2 for 226 Ra, 2.4 10 -1 to 3.2 10 - '1 for 228 Ra, and 3.5 10 -2 to 8.5 10 -2 for 210 Po, depending on the type of soil used for planting vegetables. In general, results obtained in the present study indicated that mobility of radionuclides was low in both soils studied. Calculated effective

  16. Soil-to-plant transfer factors for natural radionuclides in the Brazilian cerrado region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacomino, Vanusa M.F.; Oliveira, Kerley A.; Menezes, Maria Angela de B., E-mail: vmfj@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Mello, Jaime de; Silva, David F. da, E-mail: jwvmello@ufv.b [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Solos; Siqueira, Maria C.; Taddei, Maria H.; Dias, Fabiana F., E-mail: mc_quimica@hotmail.co, E-mail: mhtaddei@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: fdias@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN-MG), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Pocos de Caldas (LAPOC)

    2009-07-01

    Large amounts of phosphogypsum produced have been attracting attention of Radiological Protection institutions and Environmental Protection agencies worldwide, given its high potential for environmental contamination. In Brazil, this material has been used for several decades, especially for agricultural purposes. Due to the presence of radionuclides in its composition, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms for natural radionuclide transfer in the soil/plant system and to evaluate if the use of phosphogypsum in soil contributes to increased exposition of humans to natural radioactivity. Experiments were accomplished in a greenhouse with lettuce cultivation in two types of soil (sandy and clayey) fertilized with four different amounts of phosphogypsum. Samples of phosphogypsum, soil, lettuce and drainage water were then analyzed for key radionuclides. {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th analyses were carried out by Neutron Activation Analysis; {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, and {sup 210}Pb by analyzed by Gamma Spectrometry; and {sup 210}Po by Alpha Spectrometry Technique. Finally, Transfer Factors of soil-plant were calculated as well as annual contribution to the effective dose due to the ingestion of lettuces. {sup 22}'6Ra average specific activity in phosphogypsum samples (252 Bq kg{sup -1}) was below the maximum level recommended by USEPA, which is 370 Bq.kg{sup -1} for agricultural use. Although most of the results for mean specific activity of radionuclides in lettuce presented values below the Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA), Transfer Factors were estimated for those conditions in which the mean specific activity proved to be superior to MDA. Values ranged from 1.8 10{sup -3} to 2.3 10{sup -2} for {sup 232}Th; 3.5 10{sup -}'2 to 4.1 10{sup -2} for {sup 226}Ra, 2.4 10{sup -1} to 3.2 10{sup -}'1 for {sup 228}Ra, and 3.5 10{sup -2} to 8.5 10{sup -2} for {sup 210}Po, depending on the type of soil used for planting vegetables. In general, results

  17. Soil-to-plant transfer factors of trace and major elements in rice plant (Oryza Sativa) at Kalpakkam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreedevi, K.R.; Rajaram, S.; Thulasi Brindha, J.; Venkataraman, S.; Hegde, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the distribution of trace and major elements in rice plant (Oryza Sativa) which is the staple diet of the public at Kalpakkam. The transfer factor from soil to various parts of plant was also studied. Trace and major elements such as Fe, Mn, Zn, Co, Cu, Ni, Cr, Cd, Pb , Sr, K, Ca and Mg were selected based on their role in nutrition and also to study the behaviour of their radioactive counterparts. Among the trace elements Fe concentration was observed to be maximum in soil, the mean value of which was 18394 mg/kg dry wt. Cadmium concentration was observed to be minimum with the mean value of 2 mg/kg dry wt. The maximum and minimum concentration observed in the rice grain were due to Zn and Cd and the values were found to be 9 and 0.044 mg/kg dry wt, respectively. In the stem and leaves part the maximum and minimum concentration was due to Fe and Cd and the values were found to be 26.8 and 0.12 mg/kg dry wt. Similarly in the root part Fe and Cd concentrations were found to be maximum and minimum, respectively. Among the different parts of the rice plant, trace elements concentration in root was maximum and in stem and leaves major elements concentration was maximum. Transfer factor from soil to plant parts was computed. In general, the transfer factor was maximum in root, followed by stem and leaves and grain for trace elements. The transfer factor computed for whole rice plant was maximum for Zn and minimum for Sr which is a significant observation from radiological point of view. (author)

  18. Soil-to-plant transfer factors of stable elements and naturally occurring radionuclides. (2) Rice collected in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shigeo; Tagami, Keiko; Hirai, Ikuko

    2007-01-01

    The critical paths of radionuclides and the critical foods in Japan are different from those in European and North American countries because agricultural products and food customs are different. Consequently, safety assessment in Japan is required to consider rice and vegetables as the critical foods. In this study, we measured soil-to-plant transfer factors (TFs) for rice using naturally existing elements as analogues of radionuclides under equilibrium conditions. Rice and associated soil samples were collected from 50 sampling sites throughout Japan and TFs of 36 and 34 elements for brown rice and white rice, respectively, were calculated on dry weight basis. Probability distributions of TFs of elements for brown rice and white rice were a log normal type. Except for As and Mo, the TFs for brown rice were usually lower than those for wheat and barley especially for K, Fe, Sr (t-test: p 90 Sr and 137 Cs observed in field experiments. Thus, the TFs of naturally existing elements can be used as TFs of those radionuclides which have been in contact with the environment for a long time and have reached equilibrium conditions. (author)

  19. Soil-to-plant transfer factors of natural radionuclides (226Ra and 40K) in selected Thai medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak; Phonchanthuek, Endu; Prasandee, Kamonkhuan

    2018-04-01

    A soil-to-plant transfer factor (TF) is an important parameter that could be used to estimate radionuclides levels in medicinal plants. This work reports concentrations of natural radionuclides ( 226 Ra and 40 K) and TFs in six Thai medicinal plants grown in central Thailand using an HPGe gamma ray spectrometer. Either root, leaf, or flower parts of each medicinal plant were selected for use in the investigation according to their practical uses in traditional medicine. The results showed that due to K being essential in plants, 40 K had higher arithmetic means of activity concentrations and geometric means of TFs (geometric standard deviations in parentheses) of 610 ± 260 Bq kg -1 dry weight (DW) and 2.0 (1.4), respectively, than 226 Ra, which had the activity concentrations and TFs of 4.8 ± 2.6 Bq kg -1 DW and 0.17 (1.8), respectively. The results also showed that the leaves of medicinal plants had higher activity concentrations and TFs than root and flower parts, probably due to higher metabolic activities in leaves. Furthermore, there was good agreement between the results from the current work and other similar reports on medicinal plants. The information obtained from this work could strengthen knowledge of natural radionuclides in plants and particularly increase available TF data on Thai medicinal plants. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Variability of the soil-to-plant radiocaesium transfer factor for Japanese soils predicted with soil and plant properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Shinichiro; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Sweeck, Lieve; Van Hees, May; Wannijn, Jean; Smolders, Erik

    2016-03-01

    Food chain contamination with radiocaesium (RCs) in the aftermath of the Fukushima accident calls for an analysis of the specific factors that control the RCs transfer. Here, soil-to-plant transfer factors (TF) of RCs for grass were predicted from the potassium concentration in soil solution (mK) and the Radiocaesium Interception Potential (RIP) of the soil using existing mechanistic models. The mK and RIP were (a) either measured for 37 topsoils collected from the Fukushima accident affected area or (b) predicted from the soil clay content and the soil exchangeable potassium content using the models that had been calibrated for European soils. An average ammonium concentration was used throughout in the prediction. The measured RIP ranged 14-fold and measured mK varied 37-fold among the soils. The measured RIP was lower than the RIP predicted from the soil clay content likely due to the lower content of weathered micas in the clay fraction of Japanese soils. Also the measured mK was lower than that predicted. As a result, the predicted TFs relying on the measured RIP and mK were, on average, about 22-fold larger than the TFs predicted using the European calibrated models. The geometric mean of the measured TFs for grass in the affected area (N = 82) was in the middle of both. The TFs were poorly related to soil classification classes, likely because soil fertility (mK) was obscuring the effects of the soil classification related to the soil mineralogy (RIP). This study suggests that, on average, Japanese soils are more vulnerable than European soils at equal soil clay and exchangeable K content. The affected regions will be targeted for refined model validation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Soil-to-plant transfer factors of stable elements and naturally occurring radionuclides. (1) Upland field crops collected in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shigeo; Tagami, Keiko; Hirai, Ikuko

    2007-01-01

    In long-term dose assessment models for radioactive waste disposal, an important exposure pathway to humans is via ingestion of contaminated foods. In order to obtain soil-to-plant transfer factors (TFs) of radionuclides under equilibrium conditions, naturally existing elements were measured as analogues of radionuclides. Crops grown in upland fields and associated soil samples were collected from 62 sampling sites throughout Japan. The total concentrations of 52 elements in the crops and 54 elements in the soil samples were measured. The TFs of 40 elements (Li, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Mo, Cd, Sn, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Pb, Th and U) were calculated on a dry weight basis. Among all the TF data, K showed the highest TF with a geometric mean (GM) of 2.1, followed by P. The GMs of TFs for rare earth elements, Th and U were on the order of 10 -4 . Most of the TF-GMs for green vegetables were higher than GMs of all crops for the elements. The obtained TFs of some elements for green vegetables and potatoes were compared with those in the technical report series-364 (TRS-364) compiled by IAEA in 1994. The TF-GMs were usually lower than the best estimates (expected values) listed in TRS-364; however, the GMs of TF for La and TF for Th observed for potatoes were slightly higher than the expected values. (author)

  2. Bioavailability and soil-to-plant transfer factors as indicators of potentially toxic element contamination in agricultural soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamo, Paola; Iavazzo, Pietro; Albanese, Stefano; Agrelli, Diana; De Vivo, Benedetto; Lima, Annamaria

    2014-01-01

    Soil pollution in agricultural lands poses a serious threat to food safety, and suggests the need for consolidated methods providing advisory indications for soil management and crop production. In this work, the three-step extraction procedure developed by the EU Measurement and Testing Programme and two soil-to-plant transfer factors (relative to total and bioavailable concentration of elements in soil) were applied on polluted agricultural soils from southern Italy to obtain information on the retention mechanisms of metals in soils and on their level of translocation to edible vegetables. The study was carried out in the Sarno river plain of Campania, an area affected by severe environmental degradation potentially impacting the health of those consuming locally produced vegetables. Soil samples were collected in 36 locations along the two main rivers flowing into the plain. In 11 sites, lettuce plants were collected at the normal stage of consumption. According to Italian environmental law governing residential soils, and on the basis of soil background reference values for the study area, we found diffuse pollution by Be, Sn and Tl, of geogenic origin, Cr and Cu from anthropogenic sources such as tanneries and intensive agriculture, and more limited pollution by Pb, Zn and V. It was found that metals polluting soils as a result of human activities were mainly associated to residual, oxidizable and reducible phases, relatively immobile and only potentially bioavailable to plants. By contrast, the essential elements Zn and Cu showed a tendency to become more readily mobile and bioavailable as their total content in soil increased and were more easily transported to the edible parts of lettuce than other pollutants. According to our results, current soil pollution in the studied area does not affect the proportion of metals taken up by lettuce plants and there is a limited health risk incurred. - Highlights: • Soil pollution in an intensively farmed area of

  3. Bioavailability and soil-to-plant transfer factors as indicators of potentially toxic element contamination in agricultural soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamo, Paola, E-mail: paola.adamo@unina.it [Dipartimento di Agraria, Università di Napoli Federico II, via Università 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); Iavazzo, Pietro [Dipartimento di Agraria, Università di Napoli Federico II, via Università 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); Albanese, Stefano [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, dell' Ambiente e delle Risorse, Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Mezzocannone 8, 80134 Napoli (Italy); Agrelli, Diana [Dipartimento di Agraria, Università di Napoli Federico II, via Università 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); De Vivo, Benedetto; Lima, Annamaria [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, dell' Ambiente e delle Risorse, Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Mezzocannone 8, 80134 Napoli (Italy)

    2014-12-01

    Soil pollution in agricultural lands poses a serious threat to food safety, and suggests the need for consolidated methods providing advisory indications for soil management and crop production. In this work, the three-step extraction procedure developed by the EU Measurement and Testing Programme and two soil-to-plant transfer factors (relative to total and bioavailable concentration of elements in soil) were applied on polluted agricultural soils from southern Italy to obtain information on the retention mechanisms of metals in soils and on their level of translocation to edible vegetables. The study was carried out in the Sarno river plain of Campania, an area affected by severe environmental degradation potentially impacting the health of those consuming locally produced vegetables. Soil samples were collected in 36 locations along the two main rivers flowing into the plain. In 11 sites, lettuce plants were collected at the normal stage of consumption. According to Italian environmental law governing residential soils, and on the basis of soil background reference values for the study area, we found diffuse pollution by Be, Sn and Tl, of geogenic origin, Cr and Cu from anthropogenic sources such as tanneries and intensive agriculture, and more limited pollution by Pb, Zn and V. It was found that metals polluting soils as a result of human activities were mainly associated to residual, oxidizable and reducible phases, relatively immobile and only potentially bioavailable to plants. By contrast, the essential elements Zn and Cu showed a tendency to become more readily mobile and bioavailable as their total content in soil increased and were more easily transported to the edible parts of lettuce than other pollutants. According to our results, current soil pollution in the studied area does not affect the proportion of metals taken up by lettuce plants and there is a limited health risk incurred. - Highlights: • Soil pollution in an intensively farmed area of

  4. Radionuclide transfer from soil to plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teufel, D.; Steinhilber-Schwab, B.; Hoepfner, U.; Ratka, R.; Sand, H. van de; Franke, B.

    1979-01-01

    The planned nuclear reprocessing plant (NEZ) Gorleben will fundamentally differ from actually operating nuclear power plants with regard to its radioactive emissions because relatively long-life isotopes will play a greater role in the emissions. The longevity of the radionuclides emitted in the planned NEZ implies that there will be an accumulation of radionuclides in the surroundings of the plant and long-term effects of the plant on the environment will get higher significance. As radionuclides mainly reach milk and meat via the food of farm animals the transfer of cesium and strontium from the ground into plants was amply investigated. The results show that the correlation calculations are suitable to describe the effect of different parameters on the transfer factor. They are not suited for a forecast of the transfer conditions on a certain location for the reasons explained before. Location-specific measurements seem to be indispensable for these purposes. Besides the greenhouse tests open air measurements of fall-out nuclides with and without elimination of external contamination seem to represent a realistic possibility for the determination of transfer factors. Great attention has to be paid in this kind of tests to the growth conditions (especially fertilization) which have to be accurately registered. (orig./MG) [de

  5. Evaluation and development of soil values for the pathway 'soil to plant'. Transfer factors soil to plant; Ueberpruefung und Fortentwicklung der Bodenwerte fuer den Boden-Pflanze-Pfad. Teilbericht 1: Transferfaktoren Boden-Pflanze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trapp, S.; Matthies, M.; Reiter, B.; Gaeth, S.

    2001-10-01

    Within the research project 'Ueberpruefung und Fortentwicklung der Bodenwerte fuer den Boden-Pflanzen-Pfad', transfer factors soil to plant were calculated for compounds of the substance classes PCB and PAH. Literature studies, experiments undertaken by the LUA/Essen at the lysimeter research station Waldfeucht, and model simulations were used. The transfer differs for the plant species. For kale and wheat straw, the dominant uptake is from air. For lettuce and spinach, a significant uptake from soil was found. The main transport seems to occur via soil resuspension and volatilization, followed by sorption to leaf surfaces. These processes act mainly on low growing harvest products. Uptake from the soil solution and translocation within the plant do not seem to play a role except for phenanthren. The carrots and potatoes investigated showed only a contamination of the peel. The transfer factors of the PCB were throughout higher than that of the PAH. We assume that photolytic processes of PAH on plant surfaces are responsible. Furthermore, there are hints in literature that the metabolism of PAH in plants is faster than that of the PCB. (orig.) [German] Im Rahmen des Forschungsvorhabens 'Ueberpruefung und Fortentwicklung der Bodenwerte fuer den Boden-Pflanze-Pfad' wurden fuer organische Schadstoffe aus den Stoffklassen PCB und PAK Transferfaktoren Boden-Pflanze errechnet. Hierzu wurden Literaturstudien, Experimente der LUA von der Lysimeteranlage Waldfeucht sowie Modellsimulationen eingesetzt. Der Transfer ist fuer die untersuchten Pflanzen nicht einheitlich. Fuer Gruenkohl und Weizenstroh wurde eine Dominanz des Eintrags aus der Luft festgestellt. Demgegenueber zeigte sich fuer Salatpflanzen und Spinat deutliche Aufnahme aus dem Boden. Als Haupttransportweg werden Resuspension von Bodenpartikeln und Ausgasung aus dem Boden mit nachfolgender Sorption an Blattflaechen vermutet. Diese Prozesse wirken vorwiegend auf niedrig wirkende Ernteprodukte

  6. Soil to plant transfer factors for Cs-137 and Pu-239+240 determined by field and glasshouse measurements in Great Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cawse, P.A.; Baker, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    Further data on soil to plant transfer factors is provided for Cs-137 and Pu-239+240, as an extension of results presented at the previous IUR Workshop at Wageningen in December 1982. Field crops of grass, barley and oats produced in 1982 at 11 locations in Britain were analysed for radionuclides. Analysis of soils that produced these crops showed that they contained 'background' nuclear weapons fallout concentrations of Cs-137 and plutonium which were elevated in regions with high rainfall. Analysis of basic soil properties was also made. In separate experiments, transfer factors were derived for 10 crop plants grown in pot trials under glasshouse conditions. In one trial the soil used contained low concentrations of radionuclides derived from nuclear weapons fallout. In a second trial a brown earth was used, which contained additional radionuclides from long-term deposition by nuclear fuel reprocessing. (orig.)

  7. Soil-to-plant halogens transfer studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashparov, V. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Str.7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Colle, C. [Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN/DEI/SECRE), Cadarache bat 159, BP 3, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)]. E-mail: claude.colle@irsn.fr; Zvarich, S. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Str.7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Yoschenko, V. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Str.7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Levchuk, S. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Str.7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Lundin, S. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Str.7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine)

    2005-07-01

    Long-term controlled experiments under natural conditions in the field have been carried out in the Chernobyl Exclusion zone in order to determine the parameters governing radioiodine transfer to plants from four types of soils (podzoluvisol, greyzem and typical and meadow chernozem) homogeneously contaminated in the 20-cm upper layer with an addition of {sup 125}I. An absence of {sup 125}I depletion in arable soil layers due to volatilization was noted up to one year after contamination. During one year, depletion due to the vertical migration of radioiodine from the arable layer of each of the soils did not exceed 4% of the total {sup 125}I content. Radioiodine concentration ratios (CR) were obtained in radish roots, lettuce leaves, bean pods, and wheat grain and straw. The highest CR values were observed in podzoluvisol: 0.01-0.03 for radish roots and lettuce leaves, 0.003-0.004 for bean pods and 0.001 for wheat grains. In the other three soils, these values were one order of magnitude lower. The parameters relating to changes in radioiodine bioavailability were determined, based on the contamination dynamics of plants in field conditions.

  8. Soil-to-plant transfer factors of technetium-99 for various plants collected in the Chernobyl area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2005-01-01

    Technetium-99 is thought to be highly soluble and rarely adsorbed onto soil, however, its mobility under natural environment is not well known because its scarcity and low levels in environmental samples has limited the available data. In this study, we determined 99 Tc contents in 27 plant samples collected in three forest sites in 1994 and 1995 around the Chernobyl area to obtain transfer factors (TFs) of Tc in the soil-plant system under environmental conditions. The samples were leaves of raspberry, strawberry and pink plants, black alder, birch, cowberry and oak trees, and ferns. After chemical separation, 99 Tc in the sample was measured by ICP-MS. Tc-95m was used as a yield tracer and the total recovery ranged from 0.48 to 0.92 with an average of 0.76. The determined 99 Tc concentrations in plants ranged from -1 (dry weight basis). TF values ranged from 99 Tc contents of the soil organic layers. The highest TF was found in the leaves of raspberry plants. The observed TFs were much lower than the values of 8.1 - 2600 compiled by IAEA for grass, fodder and leafy vegetables. (author)

  9. Activity concentration and transfer factor of 40K, from soil to plant and grass to milk/meat in Rajasthan Rawatbhata Site Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menaria, Tejpal; Tiwari, S.N.; Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2018-01-01

    Radionuclide uptake by plants is evaluated by transfer factor (TF) defined as the ratio between plant specific activity (Bqkg -1 fr.wt) and soil specific activity (Bqkg -1 fr.wt). It is widely used for calculating radiological human dose via the ingestion pathway. TF is regarded as one of the most important parameters in environmental safety assessment for nuclear facilities. The absorbance of radioactive substances by plants, man and animals can be direct and indirect. In the direct absorbance the plant, man and animals are directly incorporating the radioactive substances. Indirect presupposes the absorbance of radionuclides through the pathway soil - roots - plant -animal - man. The indirect way of intake is the most important and influences the food for greater period of time. Soil to plant transfer of various radionuclides are known to be affected by soil properties, organic matter content, variety of plant species, climatic condition and cultural practices. Study showed that absorption of 40 K by Cereals and Pulses are higher than vegetable because of smaller contiguity of 40 K with the carriers of the cellular membranes of the plant roots

  10. Study on the radioactivity and soil-to-plant transfer factor of 226Ra, 234U and 238U radionuclides in irrigated farms from the northwestern Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hamarneh, Ibrahim F.; Alkhomashi, N.; Almasoud, Fahad I.

    2016-01-01

    The present study addresses the soil-to-plant transfer factors (TFs) of 226 Ra, 234 U and 238 U for 13 types of vegetables and agricultural crops planted under semi-arid environment in the northwestern part of Saudi Arabia. Crop plants along with plant-growing soils were collected from selected farms, which are irrigated from the non-renewable Saq aquifer, and investigated for their radioactivity content by means of alpha spectrometry after applying a radiochemical separation procedure. Hence, TF data for plant roots, green parts (stem and leaves) and fruits were calculated and contrasted to those reported in the literature. Substantial differences were observed in the TFs of Ra and U radioisotopes among plant species. In crop fruits, eggplant exhibited the highest uptake of 226 Ra (TF value of 0.11), while beans (0.16) have the highest TF for 234 U and 238 U. The geometric mean TF values indicated that the crop roots tend to accumulate Ra and U about four to six-folds higher than fruits. The relation between TF values and soil concentrations showed a weak correlation. Activity ratios between radionuclides in crop plants indicated the preferential translocation of U in fruits than Ra even though Ra is more available for root uptake. The fruit/root (F/R) ratios obtained for the investigated plants shown that pepper had the smallest F/R ratios (0.07 ± 0.01, 0.12 ± 0.02 and 0.11 ± 0.02 for 226 Ra, 234 U and 238 U, respectively), while the highest F/R ratios were observed in potatoes (0.71 ± 0.15, 0.44 ± 0.10 and 0.40 ± 0.08 for 226 Ra, 234 U and 238 U, respectively). The TF and F/R ratios data of natural radionuclides in the study region can hopefully improve the scientific knowledge for future studies. - Highlights: • Ra and U isotopes were measured in soils and plant crops in farms in Saudi Arabia. • Ra and U activities in plant roots (R) slightly exceeded that in their fruits (F). • Ra/U activity ratios showed preferential translocation of U

  11. Determination of soil-to-plant transfer factors of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr in the tropical environment of Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mollah, A.S.; Begum, A. [Atomic Energy Research Establishment (AERE), Savar, Dacca (Bangladesh); Ullah, S.M. [University of Dhaka (Bangladesh). Department of Soil Science

    1998-07-01

    Soil-to-plant transfer factors (TF) of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr have been determined for different plants/crops, such as rice, beans, peanuts, pineapple, cabbage, tomato, spinach and grass. They were obtained from radioisotope experiments on plants grown in pots under outdoor ambient tropical conditions for three growing seasons (1994-1996). In the case of {sup 137}Cs and concerning the above mentioned plants/crops, the average TFs were found to be 0.28, 0.25, 0.77, 0.19, 0.23, 0.28, 0.59 and 0.18, respectively. In the case of {sup 90}Sr, the average TFs were found to be 0.82, 0.51, 0.20, 0.82, 0.69, 0.59, 0.91 and 0.84, respectively. A minor seasonal variation was observed. This study provides a database of TFs for tropical environments to be used, e.g., for radiological safety assessment models. (orig.) With 1 fig., 3 tabs., 12 refs.

  12. Radionuclide soil-to-plant transfer - experiences from the Chernobyl accident in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerzabek, M.H.

    1994-03-01

    In field studies after the Chernobyl fallout in Austria distinct differences in soil-to-plant transfer of 137 Cs and 90 Sr between crops were observed. However, within single plant species transfer values varied over one to three orders of magnitude. The main influencing factors are the soil properties, the soil adhesion phenomenon and probably the unhomogeneous vertical distribution of the radionuclides after plowing. On the basis of the presented results we should be aware of the uncertainties of the simple soil-to-plant transfer model, which partly mask the influence of soil parameters on root uptake and translocation. (author)

  13. Soil-to-plant concentration factors for radiological assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Y.C.; Thompson, S.E.; Colsher, C.S.

    1982-09-01

    This report presents the results of a literature review to derive soil-to-plant concentration factors to predict the concentration of a radionuclide in plants from that in soil. The concentration factor, B/sub v/ is defined as the ratio of the concentration of a nuclide in the edible plant part to that in dry soil. CR (the concentration ratio) is similarly defined to denote the concentration factor for dry feed consumed by livestock. B/sub v/ and CR values are used to assess the dose from radionuclides deposited onto soil and transferred into crop plants via roots. Approaches for deriving B/sub v/ and CR values are described, and values for food and feed are tabulated for individual elements. The sources of uncertainty are described, and the factors that contribute to the inherent variability of the B/sub v/ and CR values are discussed. Summary tables of elemental B/sub v/ and CR values and statistical parameters that characterize their distributions provide a basis for a systematic updating of many of the B/sub v/ values in Regulatory Guide 1.109. They also provide a basis for selecting B/sub v/ and CR values for other applications that involve the use of equilibrium models to predict the concentration of radionuclides in plants from that in soil

  14. Soil-to-Plant Transfer of Radiocesium in Ipomoea aquatica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmah Moosa; Anis Nadia Mohd Faisol Mahadeven; Mohd Noor Hidayat Adenan

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of the bio fertilizer regarding the growth promotion and radiocaesium ("1"3"7Cs) uptake was evaluated in Ipomoea aquatica. The growth of Ipomoea aquatica was enhanced with the application of bio fertilizer. The practice of bio fertilizer resulted in significant increase of "1"3"7Cs concentration in all plant parts and higher "1"3"7Cs transfer from soil to plants. TF values of "1"3"7Cs ranged from 0.555 to 6.726 for the species. The plant roots possessed the lightest weight after being harvest, and show a highest "1"3"7Cs concentration in plant roots. Ipomoea aquatica could be utilized for agricultural countermeasures and phyto remediation, to diminish the allocation of radiocaesium from soil to human. (author)

  15. 60Co, 63Ni and 94Nb soil-to-plant transfer in pot experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerzabek, M.H.; Mohamad, S.A.; Mueck, K.; Horak, O.

    1995-01-01

    Soil-to-plant transfer factors for 60 Co, 63 Ni and 94 Nb were obtained via pot experiments with a Dystric Cambisol and a Calcic Chernozem, both from Lower Austria. Investigated plants were greenrape (Brassica napus oleifera L.), bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The soil-to-plant transfer factors decreased from 63 Ni to 60 Co and 94 Nb. Mean values from all experiments ranged from 1.12 ( 63 Ni) to 0.0045 ( 94 Nb). The transfer values obtained for 60 Co and 63 Ni are comparable to literature values, but 94 Nb-transfer seems to be lower than previous estimates. All radionuclides showed differences between plant species and plant organs. Transfer values were also dependent on the soil type. (author)

  16. The effects of plant traits and phylogeny on soil-to-plant transfer of 99Tc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willey, N.J.; Tang, S.; McEwen, A.; Hicks, S.

    2010-01-01

    Assessments of the behaviour of 99 Tc in terrestrial environments necessitate predicting soil-to-plant transfer. An experiment with 116 plant taxa showed that 99 Tc transfer to plants was positively related to plant dry weight but negatively related to % dry matter and age at exposure. Activities of 99 Tc analysed by hierarchical ANOVA coded with an angiosperm phylogeny revealed significant effects, with 55% of the variance between species explained at the Ordinal level and above. Monocots had significantly lower transfer of 99 Tc than Eudicots, within which Caryophyllales > Solanales > Malvales > Brassicales > Asterales > Fabales. There was a significant phylogenetic signal in soil-to-plant transfer of 99 Tc. This phylogenetic signal is used to suggest that, for example, a nominal Tc Transfer Factor of 5 could be adjusted to 2.3 for Monocots and 5.3 for Eudicots.

  17. Characteristics of soil-to-plant transfer of elements relevant to radioactive waste in boreal forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roivainen, P.

    2011-01-01

    The use of nuclear energy generates large amounts of different types of radioactive wastes that can be accidentally released into the environment. Soil-to-plant transfer is a key process for the dispersion of radionuclides in the biosphere and is usually described by a concentration ratio (CR) between plant and soil concentrations in radioecological models. Our knowledge of the soil-to-plant transfer of many radionuclides is currently limited and concerns mainly agricultural species and temperate environments. The validity of radioecological modelling is affected by the accuracy of the assumptions and parameters used to describe soil-to-plant transfer. This study investigated the soil-to-plant transfer of six elements (cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), uranium (U) and zinc (Zn)) relevant to radioactive waste at two boreal forest sites and assessed the factors affecting the CR values. May lily (Maianthemum bifolium), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana) and blueberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) were selected as representatives of understory species, while rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) represented trees in this study. All the elements studied were found to accumulate in plant roots, indicating that separate CR values for root and aboveground plant parts are needed. The between-species variation in CR values was not clearly higher than the within-species variation, suggesting that the use of generic CR values for understory species and trees is justified. No linear relationship was found between soil and plant concentrations for the elements studied and a non-linear equation was found to be the best for describing the dependence of CR values on soil concentration. Thus, the commonly used assumption of a linear relationship between plant and soil concentrations may lead to underestimation of plant root uptake at low soil concentrations. Plant nutrients potassium, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus and sulphur were found to

  18. Characteristics of soil-to-plant transfer of elements relevant to radioactive waste in boreal forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roivainen, P.

    2011-07-01

    The use of nuclear energy generates large amounts of different types of radioactive wastes that can be accidentally released into the environment. Soil-to-plant transfer is a key process for the dispersion of radionuclides in the biosphere and is usually described by a concentration ratio (CR) between plant and soil concentrations in radioecological models. Our knowledge of the soil-to-plant transfer of many radionuclides is currently limited and concerns mainly agricultural species and temperate environments. The validity of radioecological modelling is affected by the accuracy of the assumptions and parameters used to describe soil-to-plant transfer. This study investigated the soil-to-plant transfer of six elements (cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), uranium (U) and zinc (Zn)) relevant to radioactive waste at two boreal forest sites and assessed the factors affecting the CR values. May lily (Maianthemum bifolium), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana) and blueberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) were selected as representatives of understory species, while rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) represented trees in this study. All the elements studied were found to accumulate in plant roots, indicating that separate CR values for root and aboveground plant parts are needed. The between-species variation in CR values was not clearly higher than the within-species variation, suggesting that the use of generic CR values for understory species and trees is justified. No linear relationship was found between soil and plant concentrations for the elements studied and a non-linear equation was found to be the best for describing the dependence of CR values on soil concentration. Thus, the commonly used assumption of a linear relationship between plant and soil concentrations may lead to underestimation of plant root uptake at low soil concentrations. Plant nutrients potassium, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus and sulphur were found to

  19. Soil to plant transfer values of 137 Cs in soils of tropical agro-ecological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, Maria Angelica; Ferreira, Ana Cristina Melo; Conti, Claudio Carvalho; Rochedo, Elaine Rua Rodriguez; Bartoly, Flavia; Viana, Aline Gonzalez; Moura, Glaucio Pereira; Poquet, Isabel; Perez, Daniel Vidal

    2002-01-01

    Recent radioecological studies have showed that some ecosystems present more suitable conditions for soil to plant transfer of some radionuclides, while others present lower transfer when compared with average values. Due to the difficulty to generate, experimentally, soil to plant transfer factors enough to cover the totality of existing soil and vegetation types, an alternative way has been the use of soil to reference plant transfer factor determined in various ecosystems. Trough the use of conversion factors, the reference transfer factor can be converted in values of transfer factor specific for a specific type of crop. These values can be used regionally to improve dose calculation and models for radiological risk assessments. This work presents experimental data for 137 Cs for reference crops grown up in Oxisol, Ultisol and Alfisol. These results allow the assessment of sensibility of main Brazilian soils regarding a radiological contamination with 137 Cs and provide regional parameters values. The results obtained in soils of tropical climate validate the international methodology aiming to derive generic transfer factor values for 137 Cs in reference crops based on a few soil properties such as fertility, pH and organic matter content. (author)

  20. Interpretation of soil-to-plant transfer on the basis of soil solution chemical composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lembrechts, J.F.; Van Loon, L.R.; Van Ginkel, J.H.; Desmet, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    Soil-to-plant translocation of a radionuclide depends on its availability on the one hand and on the efficiency of the uptake process on the other. Criticism on the use of transfer coefficients for the description of translocation mainly concerns the fact that the complex variety of processes, a.o. dependent on plant characteristics and soil type and treatment, is integrated in a single ratio. For the interpretation of the effect of counter-measures the static transfer coefficient proved to be hard to handle and knowledge of the separate underlying processes and their time dependence showed to be indispensible. Based upon translocation experiments with technetium, cobalt, strontium and zinc transfer was shown to be primarily related to the concentration of the plant available fraction in the soil solution as well as to the soil solution chemistry in general. The transfer factor of the first three elements expressed in the basis of soil solution activity (ml/g), was observed to decrease when the nutrient content of the soil solution -- reflected by its conductivity -- increased. The characteristics of the soil matrix (solid phase) furthermore showed to be of secondary importance for the explanation of the observed accumulation. Since the interstitial soil liquid phase mediates between solid phase and plant root, reliable interpretations of soil-to-plant transfer might as a rule be based on a separate study of the effect of soil properties on availability on the one hand of the uptake from nutrient solutions on the other

  1. Derivation of soil to plant transfer factors of radiocaesium in Northern Greece after the Chernobyl accident, and comparison with greenhouse experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonoloulos-Domis, M.; Clouvas, A.; Gagianas, A.

    1990-01-01

    Radiocesium contamination of cereals, due to the Chernobyl accident, was systematically studied in two selected experimental agricultural farms in Northern Greece for the years 1987, 1988 and 1989. Radiocesium contamination of all annual crops is very low, of the order of 1 Bq kg -1 , and appears to be, for the first 3 years after the Chernobyl accident, time independent, the differences lying within the experimental error. Transfer factors, relating radiocesium deposition to contamination of crops, are deduced from the experimental results. Results are also discussed in the framework of UNSCEAR's empirical model, and the corresponding parameters are deduced. In addition greenhouse experiments show that the Transfer Factors obtained are independent of the initial radiocesium deposition and that radiocesium from the Chernobyl fallout behaves differently from usual experimental sources, such as 137 CsCl. (author)

  2. Results of field studies on 90SR and stable SR soil-to-plant transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerzabek, M.H.; Artner, C.; Horak, O.; Mueck, K.

    1992-01-01

    In 1987 and 1988 at 35 sites plants ready to harvest and the corresponding soils (0 - 20 cm) were collected for 90 Sr and stable strontium analyses. Sample preparation and measurement led to a detection limit of 0.008 Bq 90 Sr kg -1 . The 90 Sr-contamination of Austrian soils ranged from 396 to 1998 Bq m -2 . Known from literature the contribution of the Chernobyl fallout amounted to app. 25 % of the total contamination. Stable strontium contents of the soils were between 6 and 62.5 mg kg -1 . Bariumtriethanolamine extracted 17.7 to 62.3 % of the total stable Sr in soil. 90 Sr-concentrations in cereal grains ranged from 0.03 to 0.67 Bq kg -1 (fresh wight) for maize and barley, respectively. The values for other foodstuff were between 0.15 (white cabbage) and 0.91 Bq kg -1 (spinach). Stable strontium contents were between 0.079 mg kg -1 (maize) and 72.5 mg kg -1 (celery shoot). The following mean 90 Sr soil-to-plant transfer factors for cereal grains were obtained: 0.010 (maize), 0.097 (rye), 0.049 (wheat), 0.095 (barley). Transfer factors for straw were up to 50 times higher (maize). The transfer of 90 Sr into vegetables and potatoes reached the same order of magnitude compared to the cereals. In all cases soil-to-plant transfer of stable Sr was clearly lower up to 60 % of the respective values for 90 Sr. Thus natural stable strontium is less plant available than 90 Sr. The influence of soil parameters on the 90 Sr transfer into plants was examinated by correlation analyses. Increasing exchangeable calcium contents of the soils resulted in a significant reduction of Sr soil-to-barley straw transfer. (authors)

  3. Soil to plant 137Cs transfer factors in Zea mays and Phaseolus vulgaris in a semi-arid ecosystem from a radioactive waste site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervantes, M.L.; Segovia, N.; Gaso, M.I.; Palacios, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    A study of 137 Cs in soil, maize plants, (Zea mays) and beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) has been performed at the confined Storage Centre for Radioactive Waste from Mexico. Under field conditions the site was divided in four zones with different soil contamination characteristics. The plants were grown 'in situ' reproducing the local agricultural practices without fertilizers, pesticides or artificial irrigation.The 137 Cs determinations were performed using a low background gamma spectrometry system with an HPGe detector. The results indicate that one of the zones had a striking 137 Cs contamination in the soil and the uptake by the grown plants showed the highest specific activities at the root. For the edible parts of the plants the amount of 137 Cs in the maize grains was one order of magnitude lower than for the beans. The transfer factors ranges for the different parts of the maize plants was from 0.001 in the grain to 0.6 in the root. (author)

  4. Hg transfer from contaminated soils to plants and animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, S.M.; Henriques, B.; Reis, A.T.; Duarte, A.C.; Pereira, E.; Romkens, P.F.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the transfer of mercury (Hg) from soil to crops is crucial due to Hg toxicity and Hg occurrence in terrestrial systems. Previous research has shown that available Hg in soils contributes to plant Hg levels. Plant Hg concentrations are related to soil conditions and plant

  5. [sup 60]Co, [sup 63]Ni and [sup 94]Nb soil-to-plant transfer in pot experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerzabek, M.H.; Mohamad, S.A.; Mueck, K.; Horak, O. (Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf (Austria). Div. of Life Sciences)

    1994-01-01

    Soil-to-plant transfer factors for [sup 60]Co, [sup 63]Ni and [sup 94]Nb were obtained via pot experiments with a Dystric Cambisol and a Calcic Chernozem, both from Lower Austria. Investigated plants were greenrape (Brassica napus oleifera L.), bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The soil-to-plant transfer factors decreased from [sup 63]Ni to [sup 60]Co and [sup 94]Nb. Mean values from all experiments ranged from 1.12 ([sup 63]Ni) to 0.0045 ([sup 94]Nb). The transfer values obtained for [sup 60]Co and [sup 63]Ni are comparable to literature values, but [sup 94]Nb-transfer seems to be lower than previous estimates. All radionuclides showed differences between plant species and plant organs. Transfer values were also dependent on the soil type. (author).

  6. Estimation of soil-to-plant transfer factors of radiocesium in 99 wild plant species grown in arable lands 1 year after the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Jun; Enomoto, Takashi; Yamada, Masao; Ono, Toshiro; Hanafusa, Tadashi; Nagamatsu, Tomohiro; Sonoda, Shoji; Yamamoto, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    One year after the deposition of radionuclides from the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant (A formal name is Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station) in March 2011, radiocesium (¹³⁴Cs, ¹³⁷Cs) concentrations ([Cs]) were comprehensively investigated in the wild plants of 99 species most of which were annual or summer green perennial herbs and started to grow from April 2012 at the heavily contaminated fields of paddy (three study sites) and upland (one study site) in Fukushima Prefecture. The survey was conducted three times (April, July and October) in the year. In each site, soils (soil cores of 5-cm depth) and plants (aerial shoots) were collected for determination of [Cs] on a dry weight basis, and then the transfer factor (TF) of radiocesium from soil to plant ([Cs]plant/[Cs]soil) was estimated in each species. The [Cs] values of both soils and plants largely varied. However, some species exhibited relatively high TF values (more than 0.4) (e.g., Athyrium yokoscense, Dryopteris tokyoensis, and Cyperus brevifolius), while others exhibited almost negligible values (less than 0.01) (e.g., Salix miyabeana, Humulus scandens, and Elymus tsukushiensis). In addition, judging from the 11 species grown in both paddy and upland fields, TF values were generally higher in the paddy fields. The estimation of phytoextraction efficiency of soil radiocesium by weed communities in the paddy fields suggests that the weed community is not a practical candidate for phytoremediation technique.

  7. Will global warming affect soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowdall, M.; Standring, W.; Shaw, G.; Strand, P.

    2008-01-01

    Recent assessments of global climate/environmental change are reaching a consensus that global climate change is occurring but there is significant uncertainty over the likely magnitude of this change and its impacts. There is little doubt that all aspects of the natural environment will be impacted to some degree. Soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides has long been a significant topic in radioecology, both for the protection of humans and the environment from the effects of ionising radiation. Even after five decades of research considerable uncertainty exists as to the interplay of key environmental processes in controlling soil-plant transfer. As many of these processes are, to a lesser or greater extent, climate-dependent, it can be argued that climate/environmental change will impact soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides and subsequent transfers in specific environments. This discussion attempts to highlight the possible role of climatic and climate-dependent variables in soil-to-plant transfer processes within the overall predictions of climate/environmental change. The work is speculative, and intended to stimulate debate on a theme that radioecology has either ignored or avoided in recent years

  8. Soil to plant transfer of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co in Ferralsol, Nitisol and Acrisol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasserman, M.A. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, CNEN, Av. Salvador Allende s/no, Recreio, CEP: 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: angelica@ird.gov.br; Bartoly, F.; Viana, A.G.; Silva, M.M.; Rochedo, E.R.R. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, CNEN, Av. Salvador Allende s/no, Recreio, CEP: 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Perez, D.V. [Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Solos, EMBRAPA, R. Jardim Botanico 1024, CEP: 22460-000, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Conti, C.C. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, CNEN, Av. Salvador Allende s/no, Recreio, CEP: 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-03-15

    In this study, soil to plant transfer factor values were determined for {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co in radish (Raphanus sativus), maize (Zea mays L.) and cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata) growing in gibbsite-, kaolinite- and iron-oxide-rich soils. After 3 years of experiment in lysimeters it was possible to identify the main soil properties able to modify the soil to plant transfer processes, e.g. exchangeable K and pH, for {sup 137}Cs, and organic matter for {sup 60}Co. Results of sequential chemical extraction were coherent with root uptake and allowed the recognition of the role of iron oxides on {sup 137}Cs behaviour and of Mn oxides on {sup 60}Co behaviour. This information should provide support for adequate choices of countermeasures to be applied on tropical soils in case of accident or for remediation purposes.

  9. Cesium-137 in soils and its soil-to-plant transfer rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papastefanou, C.; Manolopoulou, M.; Charalambous, S.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of fallout-derived 137 Cs in soils were made in the Valley of Ptolemais, North Greece after the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. The 137 Cs concentrations ranged between 290 Bq kg -1 and 7670 Bq kg -1 . It was found that the 137 Cs concentration is inversely proportional to 40 K concentration or potassium content of soils. Cesium-137 transfer coefficients from soil to plants (grass) ranged from 0.02 to 0.2

  10. Predicting soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides with a mechanistic model (BioRUR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casadesus, J. [Servei de Camps Experimentals, Universitat de Barcelona, Avda Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Sauras-Yera, T. [Departament de Biologia Vegetal, Facultat de Biologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avda Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: msauras@ub.edu; Vallejo, V.R. [Departament de Biologia Vegetal, Facultat de Biologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avda Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centro de Estudios Ambientales del Mediterraneo, Charles Darwin 14, Parc Tecnologic, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain)

    2008-05-15

    BioRUR model has been developed for the simulation of radionuclide (RN) transfer through physical and biological compartments, based on the available information on the transfer of their nutrient analogues. The model assumes that radionuclides are transferred from soil to plant through the same pathways as their nutrient analogues, where K and Ca are the analogues of Cs and Sr, respectively. Basically, the transfer of radionuclide between two compartments is calculated as the transfer of nutrient multiplied by the ratio of concentrations of RN to nutrient, corrected by a selectivity coefficient. Hydroponic experiments showed the validity of this assumption for root uptake of Cs and Sr and reported a selectivity coefficient around 1.0 for both. However, the application of this approach to soil-to-plant transfer raises some questions on which are the effective concentrations of RN and nutrient detected by the plant uptake mechanism. This paper describes the evaluation of two configurations of BioRUR, one which simplifies the soil as an homogeneous pool, and the other which considers that some concentration gradients develop around roots and therefore ion concentrations at the root surface are different from those of the bulk soil. The results show a good fit between the observed Sr transfer and the mechanistic simulations, even when a homogeneous soil is considered. On the other hand, Cs transfer is overestimated by two orders of magnitude if the development of a decreasing K profile around roots is not taken into account.

  11. Predicting soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides with a mechanistic model (BioRUR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casadesus, J.; Sauras-Yera, T.; Vallejo, V.R.

    2008-01-01

    BioRUR model has been developed for the simulation of radionuclide (RN) transfer through physical and biological compartments, based on the available information on the transfer of their nutrient analogues. The model assumes that radionuclides are transferred from soil to plant through the same pathways as their nutrient analogues, where K and Ca are the analogues of Cs and Sr, respectively. Basically, the transfer of radionuclide between two compartments is calculated as the transfer of nutrient multiplied by the ratio of concentrations of RN to nutrient, corrected by a selectivity coefficient. Hydroponic experiments showed the validity of this assumption for root uptake of Cs and Sr and reported a selectivity coefficient around 1.0 for both. However, the application of this approach to soil-to-plant transfer raises some questions on which are the effective concentrations of RN and nutrient detected by the plant uptake mechanism. This paper describes the evaluation of two configurations of BioRUR, one which simplifies the soil as an homogeneous pool, and the other which considers that some concentration gradients develop around roots and therefore ion concentrations at the root surface are different from those of the bulk soil. The results show a good fit between the observed Sr transfer and the mechanistic simulations, even when a homogeneous soil is considered. On the other hand, Cs transfer is overestimated by two orders of magnitude if the development of a decreasing K profile around roots is not taken into account

  12. Uranium transfer in the food chain from soil to plants, animals and man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, R.; Betz, I.; Anke, M.; Witte, H.; Schilling, C.; Knoth, E.

    2010-01-01

    Our investigations aimed at following up the scientific basis of uranium transfer from the soils of different geological origins and from the immediate vicinity of uranium waste dumps in the vegetation, in waters (drinking water, mineral water and medicinal water), vegetable and animal foodstuffs and beverages; the regional human uranium intake, excretion, apparent absorption and balance in Germany and Mexico. Another aim of the investigations was to draw conclusions from the rules of transfer of this element from the rocks and soils to plants, animals and man. (authors)

  13. Soil-to-plant transfer of radiocaesium for selected tropical plant species in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.M.; Rahman, M.M.; Koddus, A.; Ahmad, G.U.; Voigt, G.

    2005-01-01

    Soil-to-plant transfer factors (TF) of radiocaesium ( 137 Cs) were determined under field condition for grassy vegetation grown in Bangladesh at contaminated land in the Atomic Energy Research Establishment (AERE) campus. TF values for rice, grass and grassy/root vegetations grown in the same type of soil were also measured under pot condition. TF values of 137 Cs for grassy vegetation (2.4 x 10 -2 -4.2 x 10 -2 with an average of 3.1 x 10 -2 ± 0.005) obtained under field condition were slightly lower than the values for grass and grassy/root vegetations (2.9 x 10 -2 -6.6 x 10 -2 with an average of 4.8 x 10 -2 ± 0.01 for grass and grassy vegetations and 2.3 x 10 -2 -5.6 x 10 -2 with an average of 4.0 x 10 -2 ± 0.009 for root vegetations, respectively) obtained under pot condition. However, TF values (9.0 x 10 -3 -2.6 x 10 -2 with an average of 1.9 x 10 -2 ± 0.004) obtained for rice were about a factor of 4 lower than the values obtained for grass and grassy/root vegetations. When the properties of the AERE soils as input parameters were used in the soil-plant transfer model of Absalom, the estimated TF values (4.5 x 10 -2 -6.7 x 10 -2 with an average of 5.3 x 10 -2 ± 0.006) were consistent with the measured values obtained for grass and grassy vegetations under pot condition, however, the model overestimates the TF values for rice

  14. Cesium-137 in soil texture fractions and its impact on Cesium-137 soil-to-plant transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerzabek, M.H.; Mohamad, S.A.; Mueck, K.

    1992-06-01

    Field studies at two sites contaminated by the Chernobyl fallout showed 137 Cesium (Cs) soil-to-plant transfer factors in wheat, rye and potato. Transfer values ranged from 0.0017 (potato tuber) to 0.07 (wheat straw). Generally transfer coefficients in cereal grains and potato tubers were significantly below the values of the shoots. A comparison of the two sites led to the conclusion that for all plants investigated 137 Cs transfer factors were higher in Lower Austria (Calcic Chernozem) than in Upper Austria (Eutric Cambisol). The specific activities of the texture fractions of the two soil types increased from sand to silt and clay. In the Calcic Chernozem the ratio of the 137 Cs activity in the silt fraction to the total activity in the soil was considerably higher than in the Eutric Cambisol. At the same time extractability of 137 Cs from the silt fraction of the latter soil was clearly lower. Both results mainly were attributed to the differences between the soils according to the organic matter content of the silt fractions, the Calcic Chernozem being seven times higher. Therefore, the differences in the 137 Cs-soil-to-plant transfer can be attributed partly to these soil characteristics. (authors)

  15. Soil availability, plant uptake and soil to plant transfer of 99Tc-- A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, Roy; Willey, Neil

    2003-01-01

    The fission yield of 99 Tc from 239 Pu and 235 U is similar to that of 137 Cs or 90 Sr and it is therefore an important component of nuclear weapons fall-out, nuclear waste and releases from nuclear facilities. There is particular current interest in 99 Tc transfer from soil to plants for: (a) environmental impact assessments for terrestrial nuclear waste repositories, and (b) assessments of the potential for phytoextraction of radionuclides from contaminated effluent and soil. Vascular plants have high 99 Tc uptake capacity, a strong tendency to transport it to shoot material and accumulate it in vegetative rather than reproductive structures. The mechanisms that control 99 Tc entry to plants have not been identified and there has been little discussion of the potential for phytoextraction of 99 Tc contaminated effluents or soil. Here we review soil availability, plant uptake mechanisms and soil to plant transfer of 99 Tc in the light of recent advances in soil science, plant molecular biology and phytoextraction technologies. We conclude that 99 Tc might not be highly available in the long term from up to 50% of soils worldwide, and that no single mechanism that might be easily targeted by recombinant DNA technologies controls 99 Tc uptake by plants. Overall, we suggest that Tc might be less available in terrestrial ecosystems than is often assumed but that nevertheless the potential of phytoextraction as a decontamination strategy is probably greater for 99 Tc than for any other nuclide of radioecological interest

  16. Nonlinear transfer of elements from soil to plants: impact on radioecological modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuovinen, Tiina S.; Kolehmainen, Mikko; Roivainen, Paeivi; Kumlin, Timo; Makkonen, Sari; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, P.O. Box 1627, Kuopio (Finland)

    2016-08-15

    In radioecology, transfer of radionuclides from soil to plants is typically described by a concentration ratio (CR), which assumes linearity of transfer with soil concentration. Nonlinear uptake is evidenced in many studies, but it is unclear how it should be taken into account in radioecological modeling. In this study, a conventional CR-based linear model, a nonlinear model derived from observed uptake into plants, and a new simple model based on the observation that nonlinear uptake leads to a practically constant concentration in plant tissues are compared. The three models were used to predict transfer of {sup 234}U, {sup 59}Ni and {sup 210}Pb into spruce needles. The predictions of the nonlinear and the new model were essentially similar. In contrast, plant radionuclide concentration was underestimated by the linear model when the total element concentration in soil was relatively low, but within the range commonly observed in nature. It is concluded that the linear modeling could easily be replaced by a new approach that more realistically reflects the true processes involved in the uptake of elements into plants. The new modeling approach does not increase the complexity of modeling in comparison with CR-based linear models, and data needed for model parameters (element concentrations) are widely available. (orig.)

  17. Soil-to-plant transfer of elements is not linear: Results for five elements relevant to radioactive waste in five boreal forest species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuovinen, Tiina S.; Roivainen, Paeivi, E-mail: paivi.roivainen@uef.fi; Makkonen, Sari; Kolehmainen, Mikko; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2011-12-01

    Element-specific concentration ratios (CRs) assuming that plant uptake of elements is linear are commonly used in radioecological modelling to describe the soil-to-plant transfer of elements. The goal of this study was to investigate the validity of the linearity assumption in boreal forest plants, for which only limited relevant data are available. The soil-to-plant transfer of three essential (Mo, Ni, Zn) and two non-essential (Pb, U) elements relevant to the safety of radioactive waste disposal was studied. Three understory species (blueberry, narrow buckler fern and May lily) and two tree species (Norway spruce and rowan) were included. Examining CRs as a function of soil concentration showed that CR was not constant but decreased with increasing soil concentrations for all elements and plant species. A non-linear equation fitted fairly well with the empirical data; the R{sup 2}-values for this equation were constantly higher than those for the linear fit. The difference between the two fits was most evident at low soil concentrations where the use of constant CRs underestimated transfer from soil to plants. Site-specific factors affected the transfer of Mo and Ni. The results suggested that systematic variation with soil concentrations explains a part of the large variation of empirically determined CRs, and the accuracy of modelling the soil-to-plant transfer might be improved by using non-linear methods. Non-linearity of soil-to-plant transfer has been previously reported for a few different species, elements and environments. The present study systematically tested the linearity assumption for five elements (both essential and non-essential) and in five boreal forest species representing different growth traits and phylogenies. The data supported non-linearity in all cases.

  18. Soil-to-plant transfer of elements is not linear: Results for five elements relevant to radioactive waste in five boreal forest species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuovinen, Tiina S.; Roivainen, Päivi; Makkonen, Sari; Kolehmainen, Mikko; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    Element-specific concentration ratios (CRs) assuming that plant uptake of elements is linear are commonly used in radioecological modelling to describe the soil-to-plant transfer of elements. The goal of this study was to investigate the validity of the linearity assumption in boreal forest plants, for which only limited relevant data are available. The soil-to-plant transfer of three essential (Mo, Ni, Zn) and two non-essential (Pb, U) elements relevant to the safety of radioactive waste disposal was studied. Three understory species (blueberry, narrow buckler fern and May lily) and two tree species (Norway spruce and rowan) were included. Examining CRs as a function of soil concentration showed that CR was not constant but decreased with increasing soil concentrations for all elements and plant species. A non-linear equation fitted fairly well with the empirical data; the R 2 -values for this equation were constantly higher than those for the linear fit. The difference between the two fits was most evident at low soil concentrations where the use of constant CRs underestimated transfer from soil to plants. Site-specific factors affected the transfer of Mo and Ni. The results suggested that systematic variation with soil concentrations explains a part of the large variation of empirically determined CRs, and the accuracy of modelling the soil-to-plant transfer might be improved by using non-linear methods. Non-linearity of soil-to-plant transfer has been previously reported for a few different species, elements and environments. The present study systematically tested the linearity assumption for five elements (both essential and non-essential) and in five boreal forest species representing different growth traits and phylogenies. The data supported non-linearity in all cases.

  19. Soil to plant transfer of radionuclides: predicting the fate of multiple radioisotopes in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willey, Neil J.

    2014-01-01

    Predicting soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides is restricted by the range of species for which concentration ratios (CRs) have been measured. Here the radioecological utility of meta-analyses of phylogenetic effects on alkali earth metals will be explored for applications such as ‘gap-filling’ of CRs, the identification of sentinel biomonitor plants and the selection of taxa for phytoremediation of radionuclide contaminated soils. REML modelling of extensive CR/concentration datasets shows that the concentrations in plants of Ca, Mg and Sr are significantly influenced by phylogeny. Phylogenetic effects of these elements are shown here to be similar. Ratios of Ca/Mg and Ca/Sr are known to be quite stable in plants so, assuming that Sr/Ra ratios are stable, phylogenetic effects and estimated mean CRs are used to predict Ra CRs for groups of plants with few measured data. Overall, there are well quantified plant variables that could contribute significantly to improving predictions of the fate radioisotopes in the soil-plant system

  20. Final report on a field study of soil-to-plant transfer radioactive caesium, strontium and zinc in Tropical Northern Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twining, J.; Payne, T.; Russell, R.; Wilde, K; McOrist, G.; Wong, H.; Shotton, P.; Tagami, K.; Itakura, T.

    2003-01-01

    Soil-to-plant radionuclide transfer factors for cesium ( 134 Cs), strontium ( 85 Sr) and zinc ( 65 Zn) into sorghum and mung plants grown in tropical Australia have been determined over a four-year study period. The crops were grown on two types of red earth soils. Transfer factors for Cs and Sr are not substantially different from the expected values based on previous studies, reported in the general literature and compiled in the IUR database, mainly performed within temperate climates. In contrast, the values for zinc (Zn) are more than an order of magnitude greater than anticipated. Most of the radioactivity added to the soils has been retained in the top 5 cm of both soils. There has been a general decline in soil-to-plant transfer of Cs and Zn as time has increased

  1. The soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides. Feasibilities and limits of the transfer concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerzabek, M.H.

    1993-01-01

    The present paper discusses the simple transfer model. After the Chernobyl fallout in Austria field investigations dealt with the behaviour of radionuclides in the soil-plant system. They led to the following conclusions: (1) A single plowing does not result in a homogeneous radionuclide distribution in the A p horizon. (2) Low plant availability of radionuclides (e.g. 137 Cs) led to a higher contribution of outer contamination (resuspension) to concentrations in plants in the first years after the fallout. Differences arose between high and low contamination areas. This was not true for 90 Sr, which exhibited three to ten times higher transfer factors as compared to 137 Cs. (3) The contamination source has a distinct impact on the plant availability of radionuclides. (4) In semi-natural environments radiocaesium can be bound to the biomass to a great extent, which results in significantly higher biological half-lives as compared to agricultural ecosystems. (author)

  2. Element interactions and soil properties affecting the soil-to-plant transfer of six elements relevant to radioactive waste in boreal forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roivainen, Paeivi; Makkonen, Sari; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2012-01-01

    Cobalt (Co), lead (Pb), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), uranium (U), and zinc (Zn) are among the elements that have radioactive isotopes in radioactive waste. Soil-to-plant transfer is a key process for possible adverse effects if these radionuclides are accidentally released into the environment. The present study aimed at investigating factors affecting such transfer in boreal forest. The plant species studied were blueberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), May lily (Maianthemum bifolium), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana), rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) and Norway spruce (Picea abies). Regression analyses were carried out to investigate the effects of the chemical composition and physical properties of soil on the soil-to-leaf/needle concentration ratios of Co, Mo, Ni, Pb, U and Zn. Soil potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), phosphorus (P) and sulphur (S) concentrations were the most important factors affecting the soil-to-plant transfer of the elements studied. Soil clay and organic matter contents were found to significantly affect plant uptake of Mo, Pb and U. Knowledge of the effects of these factors is helpful for interpretation of the predictions of radioecological models describing soil-to-plant transfer and for improving such models. (orig.)

  3. Element interactions and soil properties affecting the soil-to-plant transfer of six elements relevant to radioactive waste in boreal forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roivainen, Paeivi; Makkonen, Sari; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, Kuopio (Finland)

    2012-03-15

    Cobalt (Co), lead (Pb), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), uranium (U), and zinc (Zn) are among the elements that have radioactive isotopes in radioactive waste. Soil-to-plant transfer is a key process for possible adverse effects if these radionuclides are accidentally released into the environment. The present study aimed at investigating factors affecting such transfer in boreal forest. The plant species studied were blueberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), May lily (Maianthemum bifolium), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana), rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) and Norway spruce (Picea abies). Regression analyses were carried out to investigate the effects of the chemical composition and physical properties of soil on the soil-to-leaf/needle concentration ratios of Co, Mo, Ni, Pb, U and Zn. Soil potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), phosphorus (P) and sulphur (S) concentrations were the most important factors affecting the soil-to-plant transfer of the elements studied. Soil clay and organic matter contents were found to significantly affect plant uptake of Mo, Pb and U. Knowledge of the effects of these factors is helpful for interpretation of the predictions of radioecological models describing soil-to-plant transfer and for improving such models. (orig.)

  4. Investigation of the soil-to-plant transfer of Np-237, Pu-238, Am-241 and Cm-244

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimpl, M.

    1988-08-01

    Inside a greenhouse for radioecological studies the root uptake of Np, Pu, Am, and Cm from 5 different soils into 19 crop plants have been measured. The soils have been artificially contaminated with the 4 nuclides in range from 1-20 Bq/g dry soil. Within 7 vegetation periods about 380 transfer measurements have been performed. The obtained results show that the soil-to-plant transfer is mainly influenced by the following parameters: physical and chemical properties of the different radionuclides, plant species and variety, soil type, time of soil utilization and soil management. The transfer factors measured are compared with those data which are proposed for the calculation of the long term radiation burden of the population by ingestion of contaminated food inside the Federal Republic of Germany. The experiments have been performed from the beginning of 1983 to the end of 1986. The results summarized within this report have already been published in annual reports or as contributions to scientific meetings. (orig.) [de

  5. Soil to plant transfer of 134Cs for olive and orange trees after four years' experimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skarlou, V.; Nobeli, C.; Anoussis, J.; Haidouti, C.

    1998-01-01

    The transfer parameters of 134 Cs from soil to tree crops (olive and orange trees) were calculated within a long-term glass-house pot experiment which was started in 1994. The effect of the soil characteristics on 134 Cs uptake was also studied using two soils with different physical and chemical properties. Both evergreen trees exhibited a similar behavior in the two soils, showing that a higher or lower uptake is not crop specific. The capacity of the trees for 134 Cs absorption through the roots seems to be significantly influenced by the soil type. The transfer factors were very low in the calcareous heavy soil and much higher in the acid light soil (up to 10 times for olives and 40 for the edible part of oranges). The difference in the TFs is higher between the two soils than between the two tree species. 134 Cs concentration kept increasing in the orange trees up to the 4th year of growth, while it seems to reach an equilibrium, with no further increase, in the olive trees. Although the behavior of the two tree species is similar, the difference in the final processed product is extreme. A significant amount of 134 Cs was observed in olives grown in the light-acid soil whereas no transfer to the olive oil was detected. On the other hand, the edible part of the oranges showed the highest 134 Cs of nearly all the plant parts

  6. Soil to plant transfer of 134Cs for olive and orange trees: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skarlou, V.; Nobeli, C.; Anoussis, J.; Papanicolaou, E.; Haidouti, C.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this research programme was to calculate values of transfer parameters of 134 Cs from soil to tree crops (olive and orange trees) in a long term glasshouse pot experiment, started in 1994. Radiocaesium contamination in the different tree parts as well as the importance of the storage or cycling of 134 Cs will also be examined. The experiment was conducted in large pots filled with a calcareous, heavy soil (115 kg/pot) where olive and orange trees, two years after grafting were transplanted. The soil was added to the pot in layers ca. 2 cm thick on the top of which the radioactive solution was added in small drops. Caesium-134 as CsCl (0.5 mCi) was added to each pot. The soil in the pots was watered to field capacity and left to stand for eight weeks for the 134 Cs to reach equilibrium. Plant samples were taken at fruit maturity, eight months after transplanting. It is noticed that the length of experimentation is rather short for tree crops and the data should be considered as preliminary ones with indicative tendencies. Under these conditions plant contamination was generally very low in both plant species studied. The concentration ratios (CR) of 134 Cs for the studied crops did not differ much and they ranged from 0.0007 to 0.002 for olive trees and from 0.0006 to 0.001 for orange trees. Leaves compared to other plant parts showed the highest CR value in both crops. Furthermore new leaves and branches of the olive trees showed higher CR values than the old ones by approximately a factor of two. Potassium content of the different plant parts showed significant differences and they were higher in leaves and fruits. There is no correlation between K content and transfer factors of Cs in the different plant parts of both crops. To study the effect of soil type on CRs of 134 Cs for olive and orange trees a similar experiment was established two months later, using a sandy and acid soil. Based on first results, higher values of transfer factors of 134

  7. Soil to plant transfer of radiocesium: application to the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonopoulos-Domis, M.; Clouvas, A.; Gagianas, A.

    1990-01-01

    Radiocesium contamination of different annual crops, due to the Chernobyl accident, was systematically studied in two experimental agricultural farms in North Greece for the years 1987, 1988 and 1989. For the first three years after the Chernobyl accident it was generally observed that radiocesium contamination of almost all the annual crops appears to be time independent, the differences lying within the experimental error. Transfer Factors, relating radiocesium deposition to contamination of crops were found to be for cereals about 0.01, one order of magnitude smaller than those deduced from field experiments in Northern European Countries, mainly due to different soil characteristics. The results are also discussed in the framework of the UNSCEAR's empirical model and the corresponding parameters are deduced. (author)

  8. Transfer of 137Cs from soil to plants in different types of soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorovic, D.; Radenkovic, M.; Popovic, D.; Djuric, G.

    1998-01-01

    The investigations were carried out in two mountainous regions in the West and South region of the country). Three main types of soils were examined: shale, limestone and the mixed type, and several plants: grass, meadow flora, pinewood, blueberries, an endemic species of Mt. Sara and the bioindicators: moss and lichen. The transfer factors lay in the range of 0.1 - 2.0 in dependence on the type of soil and plant (3.0 - 10.0 for the bioindicator plants). The vertical distribution of 13' 7Cs in the first 15 cm layer of the soil indicates a slow migration of Chernobyl cesium through soil, except on riversides where the wash-out effect plays a role. Generally, the concentration of 137 Cs in soils strongly depends on the configuration of the ground

  9. Transfer of 137Cs from soil to plants in a wet montane forest in subtropical Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chih-Yu Chiu

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of 137 Cs in an undisturbed, multistoried, subtropical wet montane forest ecosystem surrounding Yuanyang Lake (lake surface level ca. 1670 m, in northeastern Taiwan), was investigated. The mossy forest here represents a currently-rare perhumid temperate environment in subtropical region. The radioactivity concentration of 137 Cs was determined by γ-spectroscopy with a Ge(Li) detector. Although the soil is extremely acidic (pH 3.3 to 3.6) and the rainfall is high, 137 Cs is evidently retained in the organic layer. The radioactivity concentration of 137 Cs in surface soil ranges from 28 to 71 Bq x kg -1 . The concentrations of 137 Cs in the ground moss layer and litter were much lower than that in the soil organic layer; this suggests that 137 Cs detected is not from the newly deposited radioactive fallout. The radioactivity concentration and transfer factor (TF) of 137 Cs varied with plant species. Shrubs and ferns have higher values than a coniferous tree (Taiwan cedar). The TF in this ecosystem is as high as 0.21 to 1.88. The high values of TF is attributed to the abundance of the organic matter in the forest soils. The rapid recycling of 137 Cs through the soil-plant system of this undisturbed multistoried ecosystem suggests the existence of an internal cycling that help the accumulation of 137 Cs in this ecosystem. (author)

  10. Non-linearity in radiocaesium soil to plant transfer: fact or fiction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beresford, N.A.; Scott, W.A.; Wright, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    The basis premise of many radiological assessments is the assumption that the transfer of many radionuclides from soil to herbage and hence animal derived food products is a positive linear relationship for a given set of ecological conditions. However, a number of authors have published results which they conclude demonstrate non-linear transfer of radiocaesium to plants and animals with transfer being highest when soil concentrations are lowest. Whilst we may expect non-linear transfer of radionuclides under homeostatic control or present in comparatively large chemical quantities there appears no credible hypothesis to support such an observation for radiocaesium. In this paper we review those articles which have reported non-linear radiocaesium transfer and also analyse novel data. Mechanisms for the observation as presented in the original works are critically assessed. For instance, some authors have speculated that radiocaesium root uptake is saturated. We suggest that this is unlikely as whilst saturation of root uptake of radiocaesium has been observed above 1.37 mg Cs + L -1 in growth solutions, concentrations of Cs + in soil solutions are typically -1 , and 1 MBq m -2 of 137 Cs will add only 0.3 mg Cs + m -2 . We discuss alternative hypotheses to explain the reported observations and suggest that sampling bias, countermeasure application and statistical chance all contribute to the reported non-linearity in radiocaesium transfer. (author)

  11. Effect of potassium fertilizers on 137Cs transfer from sandy soddy-podzolic soil to plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belova, N.V.; Sanzharova, N.I.; Shishulina, M.V.; Moiseenko, F.V.; Vorob'eva, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the work is to study the behavior of potassium in sandy soddy podzolic soil and its influence on the availability of 137 Cs to plants of winter rye and lupine when applying various doses of potassium fertilizers (PF) and turf-manure compost (TMC). A many-years stationary experiment was established in the Bryansk region in 1986-1988 on soddy podzolic soil contaminated by the accident at the Chernobyl Power Station. The influence of fertilizer was studied in 4-field crop rotation in an experimental plot: seeded fallow (lupine, bird's-foot) – winter rye – potato – spring grains. Potassium and mineral fertilizers were applied. It was shown that the application of potassium fertilizers (from 0 to 180 kg/ha) increased the content of exchangeable potassium in the soil by 1.7-2-7 times and its mobility by 2.5-4.0 times which resulted in a decrease of 137Cs transfer to plants by 5.8-14 times. The inverse proportional relationship was found between the potassium mobility and the content of its mobile form and the accumulation coefficient of 137Cs by lupine and wheat rye plants. A linear relationship was reveled between the accumulation coefficient of 137Cs and the content of exchangeable radionuclide

  12. Transfer from soil to plants of 106Ru as nitrosyl and as chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handl, J.

    1988-01-01

    The transfer of 106 Ru in a soil-plant ecosystem was investigated with respect to two chemical forms in compact soil samples under greenhouse conditions with surface and deep-layer contamination. Considerable differences in the uptake of 106 Ru were observed between 106 RuCl3 and 106 Ru-nitrosyl during the first 5-8 wk after the contamination of the soil. The translocation of 106 Ru in the soil showed an inhomogeneous distribution of the radioruthenium, with a great part of the total activity remaining in the upper soil layer between 0 and 5 cm even 10 mo after contamination of the soil surface. During the whole experiment, reemission of 106 Ru into the air was investigated by using special air collectors under different temperature and light conditions. Although a continuous checking out for a time of about 8 mo, no measurable concentrations of 106 Ru could be out for a time of about 8 mo, no measurable concentrations of 106 Ru could be found in examined air filters

  13. Soil-to-plant halogens transfer studies 2. Root uptake of radiochlorine by plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashparov, V. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Str.7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Colle, C. [Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN/DEI/SECRE), Cadarache bat 159, BP 3, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)]. E-mail: claude.colle@irsn.fr; Zvarich, S. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Str.7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Yoschenko, V. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Str.7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Levchuk, S. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Str.7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Lundin, S. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Str.7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine)

    2005-07-01

    Long-term field experiments have been carried out in the Chernobyl exclusion zone in order to determine the parameters governing radiochlorine ({sup 36}Cl) transfer to plants from four types of soil, namely, podzoluvisol, greyzem, and typical and meadow chernozem. Radiochlorine concentration ratios (CR) in radish roots (15 {+-} 10), lettuce leaves (30 {+-} 15), bean pods (15 {+-} 11) and wheat seed (23 {+-} 11) and straw (210 {+-} 110) for fresh weight of plants were obtained. These values correlate well with stable chlorine values for the same plants. One year after injection, {sup 36}Cl reached a quasi-equilibrium with stable chlorine in the agricultural soils and its behavior in the soil-plant system mimicked the behavior of stable chlorine (this behavior was determined by soil moisture transport in the investigated soils). In the absence of intensive vertical migration, more than half of {sup 36}Cl activity in arable layer of soil passes into the radish, lettuce and the aboveground parts of wheat during a single vegetation period.

  14. Soil-to-plant halogens transfer studies 2. Root uptake of radiochlorine by plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashparov, V.; Colle, C.; Zvarich, S.; Yoschenko, V.; Levchuk, S.; Lundin, S.

    2005-01-01

    Long-term field experiments have been carried out in the Chernobyl exclusion zone in order to determine the parameters governing radiochlorine ( 36 Cl) transfer to plants from four types of soil, namely, podzoluvisol, greyzem, and typical and meadow chernozem. Radiochlorine concentration ratios (CR) in radish roots (15 ± 10), lettuce leaves (30 ± 15), bean pods (15 ± 11) and wheat seed (23 ± 11) and straw (210 ± 110) for fresh weight of plants were obtained. These values correlate well with stable chlorine values for the same plants. One year after injection, 36 Cl reached a quasi-equilibrium with stable chlorine in the agricultural soils and its behavior in the soil-plant system mimicked the behavior of stable chlorine (this behavior was determined by soil moisture transport in the investigated soils). In the absence of intensive vertical migration, more than half of 36 Cl activity in arable layer of soil passes into the radish, lettuce and the aboveground parts of wheat during a single vegetation period

  15. Amelioration of soils contaminated with radionuclides: exploiting biodiversity to minimise or maximise soil to plant transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willey, N.

    2004-01-01

    Managing the transfer of radionuclides from soils into plants and thence food chains is an important immediate post-accident challenge for radio-ecologists. In the longer term, soil remediation is often necessary to eliminate the environmental impacts of accidents. Until the recent advent of molecular phylogenies for flowering plants there was no scientific framework through which to analyse the contribution of inter-species differences in radionuclide uptake by plants to these processes. We have already carried out such analyses for a variety of heavy metals and here report new biodiversity landscapes across the flowering plant phylum for radionuclides of Cs, Sr, S, Cl, I, Co and Ru that identify groups of plants with particularly low and high uptake. The plant groups are an untapped reservoir of biodiversity that might be exploited for minimising food chain contamination or maximising phyto-extraction of radionuclides. We have recently demonstrated the importance of biodiversity in minimising food chain contamination with 137 Cs and exploiting biodiversity has recently brought spectacular and unexpected advances in phyto-extraction of As. The UK Food Standards Agency food chain model and recent advances in our phyto-extraction field trial at Bradwell Nuclear Power Station, UK will be used to illustrate for the first time the use of biodiversity landscapes for post-accident management and soil remediation. Biodiversity landscapes of inter-species differences in radionuclide uptake are also a foundation for a variety of developments in the genetic engineering of plant uptake and response to radionuclides. Results building on recent work we have carried out using K transport mutants of Arabidopsis and its implications for transport processes and engineering them in flowering plants will be discussed. Further, novel ongoing genomic and proteomic work into the molecular responses of Arabidopsis to ionising radiation and its implications for selecting plants from

  16. Amelioration of soils contaminated with radionuclides: exploiting biodiversity to minimise or maximise soil to plant transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willey, N. [University of the West of England, Centre for Research in Plant Science, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    Managing the transfer of radionuclides from soils into plants and thence food chains is an important immediate post-accident challenge for radio-ecologists. In the longer term, soil remediation is often necessary to eliminate the environmental impacts of accidents. Until the recent advent of molecular phylogenies for flowering plants there was no scientific framework through which to analyse the contribution of inter-species differences in radionuclide uptake by plants to these processes. We have already carried out such analyses for a variety of heavy metals and here report new biodiversity landscapes across the flowering plant phylum for radionuclides of Cs, Sr, S, Cl, I, Co and Ru that identify groups of plants with particularly low and high uptake. The plant groups are an untapped reservoir of biodiversity that might be exploited for minimising food chain contamination or maximising phyto-extraction of radionuclides. We have recently demonstrated the importance of biodiversity in minimising food chain contamination with {sup 137}Cs and exploiting biodiversity has recently brought spectacular and unexpected advances in phyto-extraction of As. The UK Food Standards Agency food chain model and recent advances in our phyto-extraction field trial at Bradwell Nuclear Power Station, UK will be used to illustrate for the first time the use of biodiversity landscapes for post-accident management and soil remediation. Biodiversity landscapes of inter-species differences in radionuclide uptake are also a foundation for a variety of developments in the genetic engineering of plant uptake and response to radionuclides. Results building on recent work we have carried out using K transport mutants of Arabidopsis and its implications for transport processes and engineering them in flowering plants will be discussed. Further, novel ongoing genomic and proteomic work into the molecular responses of Arabidopsis to ionising radiation and its implications for selecting plants from

  17. Influence of soil parameters on the linearity of the soil-to-plant transfer process of {sup 238}U and {sup 226}Ra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco Rodriguez, P.; Vera Tome, F. [Natural Radioactivity Group. Universidad de Extremadura, 06071 Badajoz (Spain); Lozano, J.C. [Laboratorio de Radiactividad Ambiental. Universidad de Salamanca, 37008 Salamanca (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    Transfer from soil to plant is an important input of radionuclides into the food chain. Also, the mobility of radionuclides in soils is enhanced through their passage into the plant compartment. Thus, the soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides raises the potential human dose. In radiological risk assessment models, this process is usually considered to be an equilibrium process such that the activity concentration in plants is linearly related to the soil concentration through a constant transfer factor (TF). However, the large variability present by measured TF values leads to major uncertainties in the assessment of risks. One possible way to reduce this variability in TF values is to parametrize their determination. This paper presents correlations of TF with the major element concentrations in soils. The findings confirm the major influence of the chemical environment of a soil on the assimilation process. The variability of TF might be greatly reduced if only the labile fraction were considered. Experiments performed with plants (Helianthus annuus L.) growing in a hydroponic medium appear to confirm this suggestion, showing a linear correlation between the plant and the soil solution activity concentrations. Extracting the labile fraction of a real soil is no trivial task, however. A possible operationally definable method is to consider the water-soluble together with the exchangeable fractions of the soil. Studies performed in granitic soils showed that the labile concentration of uranium and radium strongly depended on the soil's textural characteristics. In this sense, a parametrization is proposed of the labile uranium and radium concentration as a function of the soil's granulometric parameters. (authors)

  18. Soil-to-plant, plant-to-milk and plant-to-meat transfers for the Oxi-sols in Tahiti, French Polynesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descamps, B.

    2006-01-01

    French Polynesia is included in the latitude band 10 -30 degrees S.. In this band the total deposition of 137 Cs is about 1000 Bq.m -2; the French tests represent 13 % of this total deposition. The radiological survey of the French Polynesia environment exists since the beginning of the French nuclear program in 1966.It concerns 7 islands: Hiva Oa in the north (10 degrees S), Tubuai in the south (25 degrees S) and, from east to west, Mangareva, Hao, Rangiroa, Tahiti and Maupiti. Tahiti is a recent, high and volcanic island;it is the largest of the French Polynesia as a whole.Under tropical humid climate with heavy rainfalls, high summer temperatures, and excessive air humidity, the strong relief has been considerably eroded with the formation of particular soils, the oxi-sols.On these soils, in the Taravao peninsula, a cattle breeding farm of about 400 hectares has been studied since more than 30 years. Local milk is an important contributor to the ingestion dose in Tahiti and also an excellent item for the determination of the effective decrease of long -lived radionuclides in the environment. During the 1974 -1994 period the long term decrease for milk shows an effective half-live of 14.8 years and an environmental half-live of 24.8 years.In west european zones the effective half-live is about 5 years. To explain this difference we must mainly consider that the pasture zone in Taravao peninsula is a natural area whereas it is semi-natural in Europe. Moreover we assume that a 137 Cs stocking zone exists with very humic soils in some higher summits; a progressive lixiviation of 137 Cs could take place then. For the 1974 -1994 period the effective half live for the beef meat is about 11.5 years against 18.5 years for the environmental half-live. The difference between effective half-live for milk and meat can be explain by a greater collection zone for meat than for milk. The soil-to-plant transfer factor (F.T.) is about 10 (reporting dry matter) for the genus

  19. Caesium-137 soil-to-plant transfer for representative agricultural crops of monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants in post-Chernobyl steppe landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramonova, Tatiana; Komissarova, Olga; Turykin, Leonid; Kuzmenkova, Natalia; Belyaev, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in 1986 had a large-scale action on more than 2.3 million hectares agricultural lands in Russia. The area of radioactively contaminated chernozems of semi-arid steppe zone with initial levels of Cs-137 185-555 kBq/m2 in Tula region received the name "Plavsky radioactive hotspot". Nowadays, after the first half-life period of Cs-137 arable chernozems of the region are still polluted with 3-6-fold excess above the radioactive safety standard (126-228 kBq/m2). Therefore, qualitative and quantitative characteristics of Cs-137 soil-to-plant transfer are currently a central problem for land use on the territory. The purpose of the present study was revealing the biological features of Cs-137 root uptake from contaminated arable chernozems by different agricultural crops. The components of a grass mixture growing at the central part of Plavsky radioactive hotspot with typical dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous plants - galega (Galega orientalis, Fabaceae family) and bromegrass (Bromus inermis, Gramineae family) respectively - were selected for the investigation, that was conducted during the period of harvesting in 2015. An important point was that the other factors influenced on Cs-137 soil-to-plant transfer - the level of soil pollution, soil properties, climatic conditions, vegetative phase, etc. - were equal. So, biological features of Cs-137 root uptake could be estimated the most credible manner. As a whole, general discrimination of Cs-137 root uptake was clearly shown for both agricultural crops. Whereas Cs-137 activity in rhizosphere 30-cm layer of arable chernozem was 371±74 Bq/kg (140±32 kBq/m2), Cs-137 activities in plant biomass were one-two orders of magnitude less, and transfer factor (TF) values (the ratio of the Cs-137 activities in vegetation and in soil) not exceeded 0.11. At the same time bioavailability of Cs-137 for bromegrass was significantly higher than for galega: TFs in total biomass of the

  20. Soil-to-plant transfer of 137Cs and 40K in an Atlantic blanket bog ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran-Hunter, C.; O'Dea, J.

    2008-01-01

    The transfer of 137 Cs and 40 K from soil to vegetation was studied in an Atlantic blanket bog ecosystem along the Atlantic coast of Ireland where the dominant vegetation is a mixture of Calluna vulgaris, Eriophorum vaginatum and Sphagnum mosses. The impact of soil chemistry and nutritional status of vegetation on the uptake of both radionuclides was also examined. Cesium-137 transfer factors values ranged from 1.9 to 9.6 and accumulation of 137 Cs was higher in the leaves of C. vulgaris than in the stems. Transfer factors values for 137 Cs in both C. vulgaris and E. vaginatum were similar indicating that for the vegetation studied, uptake is not dependent on plant species. The uptake of 137 Cs in bog vegetation was found to be positively correlated with the nutrient status of vegetation, in particular the secondary nutrients, calcium and magnesium. Potassium-40 transfer factors ranged from 0.9 to 13.8 and uptake was higher in E. vaginatum than in C. vulgaris, however, unlike 137 Cs, the concentrations of 40 K within the leaves and stems of C. vulgaris were similar. The concentration of both 137 Cs and 40 K found in moss samples were in general lower than those found in vascular plants. (author)

  1. Modelling soil and soil to plant transfer processes of radionuclides and toxic chemicals at long time scales for performance assessment of Radwaste disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Achim; Miquel, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    Performance assessments for surface nuclear waste disposal facilities require simulation of transfer processes from the waste canisters to a reference group living near-by. Such simulations need to be extended over several hundred to hundred thousand years, depending on waste type, restraining possibilities to represent short term system complexity and variability. Related modelling can be simplified as long as processes are represented conservatively with assessment endpoints estimated larger compared to more realistic modelling approaches. The indicators are doses for radionuclides (RN) and risk factors for toxic chemicals (TC, i.e. heavy metals, nitrate). We discuss a new simulation tool (SCM-Andra-multilayer-model, SAMM) that, among others, allows to model situations where RN/TC move through a soil profile characterised by temporal undersaturation and root growth (soil-plant subsystem of the biosphere model compared to the adjacent saturated geosphere). SAMM describes all relevant transfer and reaction processes (advection, diffusion, root transport, radioactive decay, chemical reactions incl. sorption - desorption) using well known differential equations solved numerically within MATLAB with scenario description and parameterisation defined in Excel sheets. With this conservative approach in mind, we apply global parameters for which the solid-solution (Kd) or soil-to-plant (TF) distribution coefficients are the most relevant. Empirical data are available for homogeneous situations, such as one compartment pot experiments, but rare for entire soil profiles. Similarly soil hydrology, in particular upward and downward advective fluxes are modelled using an empirical approach solely based on key soil hydrological parameters (precipitation, evapotranspiration, irrigation, water table level) and the soil porosity. Variability of soil hydrology in space and time, likely to change drastically even on hourly bases (i.e. intense precipitation event) or within a single

  2. Transfer of {sup 137}Cs from soil to plants and sheep at Tjoetta, Norway, 1988-1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amundsen, I. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteraes, (Norway)

    2002-12-01

    The effective ecological half-life for transfer to sheep at Tjoetta is 10 years for lambs and 7 years for ewes in the period 1988-1998. However the reduction in activity levels do not follow an exponential curve during the time of study and hence, the effective ecological half-life is dependent on the time period for which it is calculated. Hardly any decrease was observed during 1988-1993 while a significant decrease in activity levels in sheep was detected in 1994 and especially in 1995. Not surprisingly, this decrease was also observed in vegetation samples. In particular vegetation specious of Festuca spp and Rumex acetosa accumulate more {sup 137} Cs than the others, with maximum average levels of 4200 and 6200 Bq/kg respectively. In the time period from 1990-1994 Trifolium spp, Deschampsia cespitosa and Festuca spp showed a decrease in activity levels which was not observed in the other species studied in this period. During the time period of experiment the occurrence of mushrooms was low, and it was studied in closer details in the last three years. In collected specimens the activity levels of {sup 137} Cs has ranged from 1000 to 18.000 Bq/kg d.w. Consumption of mushrooms is not expected to explain the time variation of {sup 137} Cs levels in sheep at Tjoetta. (au)

  3. The transport of natural radionuclides from soil to plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bikit, I.; Conkic, Lj.; Slivka, J.; Krmar, M.

    1995-01-01

    The transport and accumulation processes of Ra-226, U-238, Th-232 and K-40 from soil to plants have been studied. Plant samples with consumable parts grown below surface have been bred in natural conditions on soil with enhanced levels of natural radioactivity (barren soil of the uranium mine Gabrovnica-Kalna). An intensive transport of heavy natural radionuclides from soil to the roots was established. The transfer factors for U-238 and Ra-226 have been much bigger than for Th-232. The most intensive uptake was registered for beet root. (author)

  4. Analysis, method and techniques for the studying of Cesium-137 transfer from soil to plants (maize and beans) (continuation of the technical report GSR-91-20)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervantes N, M.L.

    1992-12-01

    In this report the complete results of transfer of corn and bean whose objective is to determine the transfer of Cs-137 via: soil → root → plant, which is determined by the transfer factors or concentration factors (FC), which indicates the incorporation from Cs-137 to soil and plant starting from two models of compartments which were already described in the technical report GSR-91-20-1 that precedes to this are presented. These results correspond to that carried out during the agricultural cycle of 1991, as well as the first results corresponding to 1992 in the radioactive wastes storage center (CADER) in Mexico. (Author)

  5. Transfer of {sup 40}K, {sup 238}U, {sup 210}Pb, and {sup 210}Po from soil to plant in various locations in south of Syria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Masri, M.S. [Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, Damascus, P.O. Box 6091 (Syrian Arab Republic)], E-mail: scientific1@aec.org.sy; Al-Akel, B.; Nashawani, A.; Amin, Y.; Khalifa, K.H.; Al-Ain, F. [Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, Damascus, P.O. Box 6091 (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2008-02-15

    Transfer factors of {sup 40}K, {sup 238}U, {sup 210}Pb, and {sup 210}Po from soil to some agriculture crops in various locations in south of Syria (Dara'a and Assuwaydaa districts) have been determined. Soil and vegetable crops (green pepper, cucumber, tomato, and eggplant), legumes crops (lentil, chickpea, and broad bean), fruit trees (apple, grape, and olives) and cereals (barley and wheat) were collected and analyzed for {sup 238}U, {sup 210}Pb, and {sup 210}Po. The results have shown that higher transfer factors (calculated as Bq kg{sup -1} dry wt. plant material per Bq kg{sup -1} dry wt. soil) for {sup 210}Po, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 238}U were observed in vegetable leaves than fruits and cereals leaves; the highest values of transfer factor (TF) for {sup 238}U were found to be 0.1 for straw of chickpea. Transfer factors for {sup 210}Po varied between 2.8 x 10{sup -2} and 2 in fruits of eggplant and grain of barley, respectively. In addition, several parameters affecting transfer factors of the radionuclides were evaluated. The results can be considered as base values for TF of natural radionuclides in the region.

  6. Transfer of 40K, 238U, 210Pb, and 210Po from soil to plant in various locations in south of Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M.S.; Al-Akel, B.; Nashawani, A.; Amin, Y.; Khalifa, K.H.; Al-Ain, F.

    2008-01-01

    Transfer factors of 40 K, 238 U, 210 Pb, and 210 Po from soil to some agriculture crops in various locations in south of Syria (Dara'a and Assuwaydaa districts) have been determined. Soil and vegetable crops (green pepper, cucumber, tomato, and eggplant), legumes crops (lentil, chickpea, and broad bean), fruit trees (apple, grape, and olives) and cereals (barley and wheat) were collected and analyzed for 238 U, 210 Pb, and 210 Po. The results have shown that higher transfer factors (calculated as Bq kg -1 dry wt. plant material per Bq kg -1 dry wt. soil) for 210 Po, 210 Pb and 238 U were observed in vegetable leaves than fruits and cereals leaves; the highest values of transfer factor (TF) for 238 U were found to be 0.1 for straw of chickpea. Transfer factors for 210 Po varied between 2.8 x 10 -2 and 2 in fruits of eggplant and grain of barley, respectively. In addition, several parameters affecting transfer factors of the radionuclides were evaluated. The results can be considered as base values for TF of natural radionuclides in the region

  7. Studies on the transfer of Cs, Sr, Co, Mn and Zn from soil to plants and from medium to mushrooms by using radiotracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban-nai, Tadaaki; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Satoshi; Yanagisawa, Kei

    1996-01-01

    Radiotracer experiments were carried out to study radionuclide uptake by plants and mushrooms. Transfer factors of radionuclides from soil to leaf vegetables (cabbage, Chinese cabbage, komatsuna, spinach and lettuce) have been determined by radiotracers. The transfer factors of radioactive Cs, Sr, Mn, Co and Zn for edible parts of vegetables were 0.11, 0.24, 0.61, 0.05 and 0.52, respectively. The transfer factors of Mn, Co and Zn for spinach were higher than those for the other vegetables. The transfer factors of Cs for different organs of the leaf vegetables were rather homogeneous. The transfer factors of Sr and Mn were higher for older (outer) leaves than younger (inner) ones. In contrast to Sr and Mn, transfer factors of Zn for younger leaves were higher than those for older ones. In order to study radionuclide uptake by mushrooms, cultivation experiments in flasks were carried out using radiotracers, 137 Cs, 85 Sr, 60 Co, 54 Mn and 65 Zn. Four mushroom species Hebeloma vinosophyllum, Flammulina velutipes, Agrocybe cylindracea and Coprinus phlyctidosporus were used. In addition, Medicago sativa was also tested. Mushrooms tended to accumulate Cs, although there was a large difference between mushroom species. The concentration ratio had the highest value of 21 for Cs in vinosophyllum. The value was much higher than that in the plant sample. The present findings agreed with our previous observations in which Hebeloma species collected in forests contained large amount of 137 Cs. The effects of stable elements in the medium on the accumulations were investigated. The concentration ratios of Cs, Sr and Co were not influenced highly by coexisting stable elements in the medium. However, the ratio of Mn decreased as the amount of coexisting stable elements in the medium was increased. (J.P.N.)

  8. Transfer of technetium from soil to plant as a function of the type of soil, mode of contamination and vegetative cover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousny, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Study of the soil plant transfer of technetium-99 was made for two plant species (Trifolium pratense and Lolium multiflorum) either as a mixed or pure culture. The experiment was carried out in three European soils contaminated at the beginning of the test either on the surface or homogeneously, with recycling of the percolates. The work is aimed at studying changes in the transfer factors over time. Their gradual decrease is correlated with change in the physico-chemical form of TcO 4 - . (author)

  9. Progress report on a filed study of soil-to-plant transfer of radioactive caesium, strontium and zinc in tropical Northern Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twining, J.; McOrist, G.; Zawadzki, A.; Shotton, P.

    2000-09-01

    This report covers: background, study location, design and rationale, farming practice and application, climate monitoring, summaries of the results of chemical analyses, gamma spectrometry and other analyses performed on plants and soil samples and calculation of transfer factors. Comparison with data from the literature, and a brief discussion of the results and implications for the on-going study are also presented. A detailed evaluation of the results has not been performed at this stage as the study is in progress.The main general observations to date are as follows. Transfer factors for caesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) are not substantially different from the expected values based on the earlier studies mainly within temperate climates. In contrast, the values for zinc (Zn) are more than an order of magnitude greater than anticipated. Most of the radioactivity added to the soils has been retained in the top 5 cm of both soils. There has been a general decline in decay-corrected radioactivity in soils but also an indication of increased heterogeneity in surface distribution. Additional sampling will be undertaken to address this issue

  10. Investigation of the transfer of 90Sr, 137Cs, 60Co, and 54Mn from soil to plant, and of the main soil parameters that have influence on the transfer process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffens, W.; Fuehr, F.; Mittelstaedt, W.; Klaes, J.; Foerstel, H.

    1988-12-01

    In lysimetric field experiments with 2 soil types most common in the Federal Republic of Germany the effects of a continuous contamination as well as of a temporary contamination of the soil caused by a possible accident were simulated to allow forecastings on the resorption of radionuclides by farm plants. Parallel pot experiments (8 kg of soil) in greenhouses and in the field and small pot experiments under reproducible climatic chamber conditions were to examine wether or not transfer data from laboratory and pot experiments can be applied to field conditions. In addition to this, soil types representative according to soil mapping were taken from the locations of the nuclear power plants Biblis and Stade, and their properties were determined. In large-scale comparative pot experiments the relative transfer factors were determined. (orig./DG) [de

  11. Transfer Factors for Contaminant Uptake by Fruit and Nut Trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, Bruce A.; Fellows, Robert J.; Minc, Leah D.

    2013-11-20

    Transfer of radionuclides from soils into plants is one of the key mechanisms for long-term contamination of the human food chain. Nearly all computer models that address soil-to-plant uptake of radionuclides use empirically-derived transfer factors to address this process. Essentially all available soil-to-plant transfer factors are based on measurements in annual crops. Because very few measurements are available for tree fruits, samples were taken of alfalfa and oats and the stems, leaves, and fruits and nuts of almond, apple, apricot, carob, fig, grape, nectarine, pecan, pistachio (natural and grafted), and pomegranate, along with local surface soil. The samples were dried, ground, weighed, and analyzed for trace constituents through a combination of induction-coupled plasma mass spectrometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis for a wide range of naturally-occurring elements. Analysis results are presented and converted to soil-to-plant transfer factors. These are compared to commonly used and internationally recommended values. Those determined for annual crops are very similar to commonly-used values; those determined for tree fruits show interesting differences. Most macro- and micronutrients are slightly reduced in fruits; non-essential elements are reduced further. These findings may be used in existing computer models and may allow development of tree-fruit-specific transfer models.

  12. Applicability and reliability of the 'observed ratio' model as a means of describing the strontium and the cesium transfer from soil to plant. Eignung und Zuverlaessigkeit des 'observed ratio' Modells fuer die Beschreibung des Strontium- und Caesium-Transfers vom Boden in die Pflanze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leising, C.

    1986-12-01

    The report examines the suitability of the observed ratio, (OR), model as a means of describing the soil-to-plant transfer of cesium and strontium, and the reliability of results determined by this model. Literature studies have been made and are reported in order to show the discrimination between Sr and Ca, or Cs and K, respectively, and in order to show the magnitude of the OR value and the range of values it may cover. For the evaluation of results, care has been taken that only the physiologically relevant constituents of Sr, Ca, Cs, and K concentrations in the soil are taken into account, which are the water-soluble and the adsorptively bound forms. Non-mobile forms cannot be taken up by the plant and therefore are not considered in the model. In accordance with the literature reviewed, the report also differentiates between two experimental approaches: (1) hydroponics, and (2) greenhouse or field experiments.

  13. Transfer factors for nuclear emergency preparedness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostiainen, E.; Haenninen, R. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) (Finland); Rosen, K.; Haak, E.; Eriksson, Aa. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Science (Sweden); Nielsen, S.P.; Keith-Roach, M. [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark); Salbu, B. [Agricultural Univ. of Norway (Norway)

    2002-12-01

    This report by the NKS/BOK-1.4 project subgroup describes transfer factors for radiocaesium and radiostrontium for the fallout year and the years after the fallout. The intention has been to collect information on tools to assess the order of magnitude of radioactive contamination of agricultural products in an emergency situation in Nordic environment. The report describes transfer paths from fallout to plant, from soil to plant and to animal products. The transfer factors of radionuclides (Sr, Cs, I) given in the report are intended to be used for making rough estimates of the contamination of agricultural products soon after the heaviness and composition of the deposition (Bq m{sup -2}) is known. (au)

  14. Transfer factors for nuclear emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostiainen, E.; Haenninen, R.; Rosen, K.; Haak, E.; Eriksson, Aa.; Nielsen, S.P.; Keith-Roach, M.; Salbu, B.

    2002-12-01

    This report by the NKS/BOK-1.4 project subgroup describes transfer factors for radiocaesium and radiostrontium for the fallout year and the years after the fallout. The intention has been to collect information on tools to assess the order of magnitude of radioactive contamination of agricultural products in an emergency situation in Nordic environment. The report describes transfer paths from fallout to plant, from soil to plant and to animal products. The transfer factors of radionuclides (Sr, Cs, I) given in the report are intended to be used for making rough estimates of the contamination of agricultural products soon after the heaviness and composition of the deposition (Bq m -2 ) is known. (au)

  15. Screening plant species native to Taiwan for remediation of 137Cs-contaminated soil and the effects of K addition and soil amendment on the transfer of 137Cs from soil to plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, F.-I.; Chung, H.-P.; Teng, S.-P.; Sheu, S.-T.

    2005-01-01

    This study aims to screen plant species native to Taiwan that could be used to eliminate 137 Cs radionuclides from contaminated soil. Four kinds of vegetables and two kinds of plants known as green manures were used for the screening. The test plants were cultivated in 137 Cs-contaminated soil and amended soil which is a mixture of the contaminated one with a horticultural soil. The plant with the highest 137 Cs transfer factor was used for further examination on the effects of K addition on the transfer of 137 Cs from the soils to the plant. Experimental results revealed that plants cultivated in the amended soil produced more biomass than those in the contaminated soil. Rape exhibited the highest production of aboveground parts, and had the highest 137 Cs transfer factor among all the tested plants. The transfer of 137 Cs to the rape grown in the soil to which 100 ppm KCl commonly used in local fertilizers had been added, were restrained. Results of this study indicated that rape, a popular green manure in Taiwan, could remedy 137 Cs-contaminated soil

  16. Transfer factor values of 137 Cs from latosoils to vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, Maria Angelica Moreira; Belem, Lilia Maria Juacaba

    1996-01-01

    Transfer Factor values for black beams, radish and carrot were obtained for soils artificially and accidentally contaminated in Goiania during 1987. Differences of 137 Cs-soil-to-plant transfer were discussed in the light of pedology and crop type. These values were about one order of magnitude higher than mean values reported by IUR for temperature climate for the same crops. These results advertising for the peculiar dynamics of 137 Cs in tropical soils and for needs to obtain regional data to be used in assessment dose models. (author)

  17. Application of the International Union of Radioecologists soil-to-plant database to Canadian settings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, S C [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1995-12-01

    The International Union of Radioecologists (IUR) has compiled a very large database of soil-to-plant transfer factors. These factors are ratios of the radionuclide concentrations in dry plants divided by the corresponding concentrations in dry soil to a specified depth or thickness. In this report the factors are called CR values, for concentration ratio. The CR values are empirical and are considered element-specific. The IUR database has a lot of data for Cs, Sr, Co, Pu and Np, and contains records for Am, Ce, Cm, I, La, Mn, Ni, Pb, Po, Ra, Ru, Sb, Tc, Th, U and Zn. Where there was a large amount of data, interpolation for ranges of soil conditions was possible. The tables presented here summarize the data in a way that should be immediately useful to modellers. Values are averaged for a number of crop types and species. Correction factors are developed to facilitate interpolation among soil conditions. The data tables in this report do not substitute for site-specific measurements, but they will provide data where measurement is impossible and give a background to check more recent data. (author) 4 refs ., 48 tabs.

  18. Concentration ratios for BIOPATH: selection of the soil-to-plant concentration ratio database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grogan, H.A.

    1985-01-01

    In Switzerland, high-level radioactive waste is planned to be deposited in deep crystalline formations. 'BIOPATH' is the computer code which has been used to simulate the movement of radionuclides in the biosphere, in order to calculate the doses to man. The key parameter used in the model on which the code is based is the concentration ratio (CR). This specifies the transfer of individual radionuclides via the various foodchains, ultimately to man. Five types of CR are required for the model, namely soil to plant, intake by cattle to milk, intake by cattle to meat, intake by poultry to eggs and from water to fish. Each of these CR are discussed in turn; it is shown that soil to plant CR exhibit a variability that greatly exceeds that observed in the other types of CR and for this reason the report goes on to consider these in much closer detail. The different methods and experimental techniques used to derive soil to plant CR are examined and assessed, to allow evaluation of a meaningful data base for use in BIOPATH. The report concludes by examining the data available for each radionuclide in turn and listing a recommended CR for it, to input into the BIOPATH model. (author)

  19. Soil-plant transfer factors in forest ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strebl, F.; Gerzabek, M.H.

    1995-04-01

    Within scope of an extended study about 137 Cs behaviour in forest ecosystems several parameters were found to influence soil-plant transfer factors. TF-values of different plant species cover a range of two magnitudes. This is partly due to variations in rooting depth of plants and specific physiological adaptations of nutrient supply. Perrenial plants like trees (Picea abies) and dwarf shrubs (Vaccinium myrtillus) showed a distinct age - dependency of 137 Cs - transfer factors. In young plant parts caesium concentration is higher than in old, more signified twigs. A correlation analysis of physico-chemical soil parameters and TF-values to forest vegetation showed, that soil organic matter, especially the degree of humification and the ratio between extractable fulvic to humic acids are important influencing factors of 137 Cs transfer from forest soils to plants. (author)

  20. Transfer factors of Polonium from soil to parsley and mint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M.S.; Al-Hamwi, A.; Eadan, Z.; Amin, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Transfer factors of 210 Po from soil to parsley and mint have been determined. Artificial polonium isotope ( 208 Po) was used as a tracer to determine transfer factor of Po from soil to plant in pot experiments. Two plant growing systems were used for this study namely, an outdoor system and a sheltered system by a polyethylene tent. 208 Po and 210 Po were determined in soil and different parts of the studied plants (stem and leaf), using alpha spectroscopy. The results have shown that there was a clear uptake of 208 Po by roots to leaves and stems of both plants. Higher values of transfer factors using the 210 Po activity concentrations than the 208 Po activity concentration were observed. Transfer factors of 210 Po from soil to parsley varied between 20 x 10 -2 and 50 x 10 -2 and 22 x 10 -3 and 67 x 10 -3 in mint, while 208 Po transfer factors varied between 4 x 10 -2 and 12 x 10 -2 for parsley and 10 x 10 -2 and 22 x 10 -2 in mint. Transfer factors of Po were higher in those plants grown in the sheltered system than in the open system; about 75% of Po was transferred from atmosphere to parsley parts using the two systems. Ratios of transferred Po from soil to mint stem and leaf in the sheltered system were higher by 2 times from those in the open system.

  1. Transfer and concentration factors in laboratory and environmental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoa, A.S.; Amaral, E.C.S.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental transfer factors, as well as concentration and accumulation factors, have been increasingly used in environmental dosimetric models. These models are often the basis for decision-making processes concerning radiological protection. However, the uncertainties associated with measured and default values of transfer and concentration factors are usually not taken into account in the decision making processes. In addition, laboratory-based values for these factors do not necessarily agree with site-specific and species-specific transfer and concentration factors. Soil-to-plant transfer factors and water-to-aquatic-organisms concentration factors are not only time and concentration-dependent, but also species-and site-specific environment-dependent. These uncertainties and dependencies may make the decision-making process, based on models, quite a difficult exercise. The current work examines, as an example, the time-dependent variations in the accumulation of 226 Ra in zooplankton in a laboratory experiment as compared with the concentration factor measured in a natural environment. In addition, the work reviews differences in 228 Ra and 226 Ra concentration factors for several plant families measured in a highly radioactive environment. (author). 9 refs, 3 figs, 3 tabs

  2. Analysis, method and techniques for the studying of Cesium-137 transfer from soil to plants (maize and beans) (continuation of the technical report GSR-91-20); Analisis, metodo y tecnicas para estudio de transferencia de Cesio-137 de suelo a plantas (maiz y frijol) (continuacion del informe tecnico GSR-91-20)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes N, M L

    1992-12-15

    In this report the complete results of transfer of corn and bean whose objective is to determine the transfer of Cs-137 via: soil {yields} root {yields} plant, which is determined by the transfer factors or concentration factors (FC), which indicates the incorporation from Cs-137 to soil and plant starting from two models of compartments which were already described in the technical report GSR-91-20-1 that precedes to this are presented. These results correspond to that carried out during the agricultural cycle of 1991, as well as the first results corresponding to 1992 in the radioactive wastes storage center (CADER) in Mexico. (Author)

  3. Transfer factors of polonium from soil to parsley and mint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Masri, M S; Al-Hamwi, A; Eadan, Z; Amin, Y

    2010-12-01

    Transfer factors of (210)Po from soil to parsley and mint have been determined. Artificial polonium isotope ((208)Po) was used as a tracer to determine transfer factor of Po from soil to plant in pot experiments. Two plant growing systems were used for this study namely, an outdoor system and a sheltered system by a polyethylene tent. (208)Po and (210)Po were determined in soil and different parts of the studied plants (stem and leaf), using alpha spectroscopy. The results have shown that there was a clear uptake of (208)Po by roots to leaves and stems of both plants. Higher values of transfer factors using the (210)Po activity concentrations than the (208)Po activity concentration were observed. Transfer factors of (210)Po from soil to parsley varied between 20 × 10⁻² and 50 × 10⁻² and 22 × 10⁻³ and 67 × 10⁻³ in mint, while (208)Po transfer factors varied between 4 × 10⁻² and 12 × 10⁻² for parsley and 10 × 10⁻² and 22 × 10⁻² in mint. Transfer factors of Po were higher in those plants grown in the sheltered system than in the open system; about 75% of Po was transferred from atmosphere to parsley parts using the two systems. Ratios of transferred Po from soil to mint stem and leaf in the sheltered system were higher by 2 times from those in the open system. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Transfer factors of Polonium from soil to parsley and mint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Masri, M.S., E-mail: prscientific@aec.org.s [Department of Protection and Safety, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, Damascus, P.O. Box 6091 (Syrian Arab Republic); Al-Hamwi, A. [Department of Protection and Safety, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, Damascus, P.O. Box 6091 (Syrian Arab Republic); Eadan, Z. [Physics Department, Damascus University (Syrian Arab Republic); Amin, Y. [Department of Protection and Safety, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, Damascus, P.O. Box 6091 (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2010-12-15

    Transfer factors of {sup 210}Po from soil to parsley and mint have been determined. Artificial polonium isotope ({sup 208}Po) was used as a tracer to determine transfer factor of Po from soil to plant in pot experiments. Two plant growing systems were used for this study namely, an outdoor system and a sheltered system by a polyethylene tent. {sup 208}Po and {sup 210}Po were determined in soil and different parts of the studied plants (stem and leaf), using alpha spectroscopy. The results have shown that there was a clear uptake of {sup 208}Po by roots to leaves and stems of both plants. Higher values of transfer factors using the {sup 210}Po activity concentrations than the {sup 208}Po activity concentration were observed. Transfer factors of {sup 210}Po from soil to parsley varied between 20 x 10{sup -2} and 50 x 10{sup -2} and 22 x 10{sup -3} and 67 x 10{sup -3} in mint, while {sup 208}Po transfer factors varied between 4 x 10{sup -2} and 12 x 10{sup -2} for parsley and 10 x 10{sup -2} and 22 x 10{sup -2} in mint. Transfer factors of Po were higher in those plants grown in the sheltered system than in the open system; about 75% of Po was transferred from atmosphere to parsley parts using the two systems. Ratios of transferred Po from soil to mint stem and leaf in the sheltered system were higher by 2 times from those in the open system.

  5. Use of rice seedlings to estimate uptake of radiocesium from soil to plants in Fukushima Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Shigeto; Suzuki, Yasukazu; Ohno, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    The uptake of radiocesium to plants from the soil is affected by many environmental factors, and it is difficult to determine the contribution of uptake among these factors. In addition, these environmental factors should be investigated independently for each field. The aim of this study was to develop a practical and simple method for the estimate of uptake of radiocesium from soil to plants. Rice seedlings were used to estimate the root uptake of radiocesium from seven different soils. To confirm that the seedlings were the effective indicator, the concentration of "1"3"7Cs in the seedlings was compared with that in brown rice and sunflower. The seedlings were cultivated for a week from germination in a phytotron and the concentrations of "1"3"7Cs in the seedlings above ground were determined. To obtain brown rice and sunflower, rice and sunflower were cultivated either in a pot (1/5000 a Wagner pot, 4000 cm"3) placed in a glasshouse or in a paddy field in Fukushima prefecture for two to four months. The concentration of "1"3"7Cs in the rice seedlings ranged from 150 to 1900 Bq kg"-"1, and that in brown rice and sunflower ranged from 2 to 880 Bq kg"-"1 and from 580 to 3900 Bq kg"-"1, respectively. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient between the measured concentration of "1"3"7Cs in rice seedlings and the measured concentration of "1"3"7Cs in brown rice and sunflower was 1.0 (p < 0.001 and p = 0.09, respectively). This suggests that the use of rice seedlings in this experiment over a period of two weeks provides an effective indicator for the uptake of "1"3"7Cs from soil to plants over a longer period of time. (author)

  6. Use of rice seedlings to estimate uptake of radiocesium from soil to plants in Fukushima Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Shigeto; Suzuki, Yasukazu; Ohno, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    The uptake of radiocesium to plants from the soil is affected by many environmental factors, and it is difficult to determine the contribution of uptake among these factors. In addition, these environmental factors should be investigated independently for each field. The aim of this study was to develop a practical and simple method for the estimate of uptake of radiocesium from soil to plants. Rice seedlings were used to estimate the root uptake of radiocesium from seven different soils. To confirm that the seedlings were the effective indicator, the concentration of 137 Cs in the seedlings was compared with that in brown rice and sunflower. The seedlings were cultivated for a week from germination in a phytotron and the concentrations of 137 Cs in the seedlings above ground were determined. To obtain brown rice and sunflower, rice and sunflower were cultivated either in a pot (1/5000 a Wagner pot, 4000 cm 3 ) placed in a glasshouse or in a paddy field in Fukushima prefecture for two to four months. The concentration of 137 Cs in the rice seedlings ranged from 150 to 1900 Bq kg -1 , and that in brown rice and sunflower ranged from 2 to 880 Bq kg -1 and from 580 to 3900 Bq kg -1 , respectively. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient between the measured concentration of 137 Cs in rice seedlings and the measured concentration of 137 Cs in brown rice and sunflower was 1.0 (p < 0.001 and p = 0.09, respectively). This suggests that the use of rice seedlings in this experiment over a period of two weeks provides an effective indicator for the uptake of 137 Cs from soil to plants over a longer period of time. (author)

  7. Analytic of elements for the determination of soil->plant transfer factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liese, T.

    1985-02-01

    This article describes a part of the conventional analytical work, which was done to determine soil to plant transfer factors. The analytical methods, the experiments to find out the best way of sample digestion and the resulting analytical procedures are described. Analytical methods are graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). In case of ICP-AES the necessity of right background correction and correction of the spectral interferences is shown. The reliability of the analytical procedure is demonstrated by measuring different kinds of standard reference materials and by comparison of AAS and AES. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Soil-to-Plant Concentration Ratios for Assessing Food Chain Pathways in Biosphere Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, Bruce A.; Fellows, Robert J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.

    2007-10-01

    This report describes work performed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s project Assessment of Food Chain Pathway Parameters in Biosphere Models, which was established to assess and evaluate a number of key parameters used in the food-chain models used in performance assessments of radioactive waste disposal facilities. Section 2 of this report summarizes characteristics of samples of soils and groundwater from three geographical regions of the United States, the Southeast, Northwest, and Southwest, and analyses performed to characterize their physical and chemical properties. Because the uptake and behavior of radionuclides in plant roots, plant leaves, and animal products depends on the chemistry of the water and soil coming in contact with plants and animals, water and soil samples collected from these regions of the United States were used in experiments at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to determine radionuclide soil-to-plant concentration ratios. Crops and forage used in the experiments were grown in the soils, and long-lived radionuclides introduced into the groundwater provide the contaminated water used to water the grown plants. The radionuclides evaluated include 99Tc, 238Pu, and 241Am. Plant varieties include alfalfa, corn, onion, and potato. The radionuclide uptake results from this research study show how regional variations in water quality and soil chemistry affect radionuclide uptake. Section 3 summarizes the procedures and results of the uptake experiments, and relates the soil-to-plant uptake factors derived. In Section 4, the results found in this study are compared with similar values found in the biosphere modeling literature; the study’s results are generally in line with current literature, but soil- and plant-specific differences are noticeable. This food-chain pathway data may be used by the NRC staff to assess dose to persons in the reference biosphere (e.g., persons who live and work in an area potentially affected by

  9. Transfer-factors for radionuclides in the coal-fired power plants environments in Serbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorovic, Dragana; Jankovic, Marija; Joksic, Jasminka; Radenkovic, Mirjana

    2008-01-01

    Full text: During the coal combustion in power plants, radionuclides are distributed in solid and gaseous combustion products and discharged into environment. Radioactivity monitoring of coal-fired power-plants environments (PP Nikola Tesla, PP Kolubara, PP Morava and PP Kostolac) in Serbia was carried out during 2003-2006. Here are presented results concerning the soil-plant and ash-plant systems. Plant samples growing at the soil and ash disposals are analyzed by gamma spectrometry (HPGe detector, relative efficiency 23%) and corresponding transfer factors (TF) for natural isotopes 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K were calculated and discussed. Obtained concentrations values of naturally occurring radionuclides are in following ranges: (0.4 - 29) Bq/kg 226 Ra, (0.16 - 23) Bq/kg 232 Th, (245 - 1274) Bq/kg 40 K, (1.7 - 30) Bq/kg 238 U, (0.08 - 4.7) Bq/kg 235 U, (5.6 - 95) Bq/kg 210 Pb; (28 - 288) Bq/kg 7 Be and man-made 137 Cs in range 0.06 - 2.8 Bq/kg. Ash-to-plant and soil-to-plant transfer factors for 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K are calculated for several sampling points. Values for both ash-to-plant and soil-to-plant transfer factors are much higher for 40 K than 226 Ra and 232 Th probably due to different assimilation mechanisms of these elements by plants. Analyzed radionuclides have higher concentrations in the ash disposal than soil, and corresponding transfer-factors values obtained for ash-plant systems (ranged from 0,007 to 0,179 for 226 Ra, from 0,015 to 0,174 for 232 Th and from 0,418 to 2,230 for 40 K) are higher, indicating that there is no limit value for absorption in plants. (author)

  10. Transfer factors for assessing the dose from radionuclides in agricultural products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Y.C.; Colsher, C.S.; Thompson, S.E.

    1979-01-01

    Transfer factors to predict the environmental transport of radionuclides through terrestrial foodchains to man were derived from the literature for radionuclides associated with the nuclear fuel cycle. We present updated transfer coefficients to predict the concentration of a radionuclide in cow's milk and other animal products and concentration factors (CF) to predict the concentration in a food or feed crop from that in soil. Where possible we note the variation of the transfer factor with physical and chemical form of the radionuclide and environmental factors, and characterize the distribution and uncertainty in the estimate. The updated transfer factors are compared with those listed in regulatory guides. The new estimates lead to recommended changes (both increases and decreases) in the listed transfer coefficients for milk and meat and to the suggested practice of adopting multiple soil-to-plant CF's that vary with the type of crop and soil in the place of a single generic CF to predict the concentration of a radionuclide in a crop from that in soil. The updated transfer factors will be useful to assess the dose from radionuclides released from nuclear facilities and evaluating compliance with regulations governing the release of radionuclides

  11. Gut transfer factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    A Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Expert Group has proposed values for the absorbed fractions (f 1 values) of radionuclides ingested in food and drinking water by members of the public. The f 1 values for adults, which are also taken to apply to children from 1 year of age, are increased from those given in ICRP Publication 30 for occupationally exposed adults for 7 elements out of the 31 considered. Since the publication of the NEA report, further information has become available that is relevant to the choice of f 1 values for polonium and thorium. These data suggest that for the present the f 1 value for polonium currently recommended by ICRP (0.1) should be retained, and that for thorium a reasonable f 1 value is 0.0005. With these exceptions, the NRPB endorses the revisions in f 1 values proposed by the NEA Expert Group for adults and children from 1 year of age. Higher f 1 values are proposed by the NEA expert Group for absorption in the first year of life. For adult values of between 0.01 and 0.5, an increase by a factor of two is assumed, and for adult values of 0.001 or less, absorption by infants is taken to be ten times greater. This approach is consistent with, and extends, that applied to the actinides in ICRP Publication 48 and represents a reasonable interpretation of current evidence. The NRPB therefore endorses the approach proposed by the NEA Expert Group for the calculation of doses to infants. (author)

  12. Soil-plant transfer factors of Co-60 for alfalfa lettuce and spinach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitru, Radu Octavian

    1997-01-01

    The transfer of Co-60 from soil into plants is a less studied problem. Soil-plant transfer factors for Co-60 known from literature vary by about four orders of magnitude for each kind of plants. We have calculated the average values and have determined the field of variability of the known transfer factors. These indicated us that alfalfa, lettuce and spinach have in this order the greatest absorption capacity of Co-60 from soil. We have determined the physical, chemical and mineralogical properties of the utilized soil. This is a brown reddish forest type soil. The plants have been cultivated in pots by plantlet method of Neubauer and Schneider. The results of our measurements of soil-to-plant transfer factors of 60-Co are the followings: 0.0612 ± 0.0047 for alfalfa, 0.0960 ± 0.0072 for lettuce and 0.1446 ± 0.0107 for spinach. These values prove the strong dependence of the type of soil and plant of the soil-plant transfer factors for Co-60. (author)

  13. Major controlling factors and predictions for cadmium transfer from the soil into spinach plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhenfei; Ding, Qiong; Wei, Dongpu; Li, Jumei; Chen, Shibao; Ma, Yibing

    2013-07-01

    Predicting the mobility, bioavailability and transfer of cadmium (Cd) in the soil-plant system is of great importance with regards to food safety and environmental management. In this study, the transfer characteristics of Cd (exogenous salts) from a wide range of Chinese soils to spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) were investigated. The major controlling factors and prediction equations for Cd transfer in the soil-plant system were also investigated. The results showed that plant Cd concentration was positively correlated with soil Cd concentration. The maximum transfer factor (ratio of the Cd concentration in the plant to that in the soil) was found in acid soils. The extended Freundlich-type function was able to describe the Cd transfer from soil to spinach plants. Combining soil total Cd, pH and organic carbon (OC) content in the prediction equation greatly improved the correlation performance compared with predictions based on total Cd only. A slight protection effect of OC on Cd uptake was observed at low soil Cd concentrations. The results are a useful tool that can be used to predict Cd transfer from soil to plant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Transfer factors of radionuclides 137Cs and 65Zn from soil to pearl millet and sorghum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachdev, P.; Sachdev, M.S.; Deb, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    The soil to plant transfer factors (TF) of 137 Cs and 65 Zn were determined for two crops, sorghum and pearl millet, under irrigated conditions in greenhouse and under rain fed conditions in field. In the greenhouse experiment, the accumulation of 137 Cs was almost doubled when the soil contamination level was doubled. Under field conditions, 137 Cs concentration in both pearl millet and sorghum grains as well as straw was nearly four times more at 148 kBq Kg -1 level of soil contamination as compared to lower level of 74 kBq kg -1 soil. The TF values for 65 Zn determined under greenhouse conditions for both the crops were nearly a hundred-fold higher as compared to 137 Cs. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs

  15. An analysis of domestic experimental results for soil-to-crops transfer factors of radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, In; Choi, Young Ho; Keum, Dong Kwon; Kang, Hee Seok; Lee, Han Soo; Lee, Chang Woo [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    For more realistic assessment of Korean food chain radiation doses due to the operation of nuclear facilities, it is required to use domestically produced data for radionuclide transfer parameters in crop plants. This paper analyzed results of last about 10 year's studies on radionuclide transfer parameters in major crop plants by the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute, comparing with the published international data, and consequently suggested the proper parameters to use. The trends of transfer parameter shows normal distributions if we have a lot of experimental data, but some radionuclides showed enormous variations with the environment of experimental, crops and soils. These transfer factors can be used to assess realistic radiation doses or to predict the doses in crops for normal operation or accidental release. Some kinds of parameter can be produced as conservatives or fragmentary results because soil-to-plant transfer factors were measured through greenhouse experiments which sometimes showed improper field situations. But these parameters mentioned in this paper can be representative of the status of Korean food chain than that of foreign country.

  16. An analysis of domestic experimental results for soil-to-crops transfer factors of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, In; Choi, Young Ho; Keum, Dong Kwon; Kang, Hee Seok; Lee, Han Soo; Lee, Chang Woo

    2006-01-01

    For more realistic assessment of Korean food chain radiation doses due to the operation of nuclear facilities, it is required to use domestically produced data for radionuclide transfer parameters in crop plants. This paper analyzed results of last about 10 year's studies on radionuclide transfer parameters in major crop plants by the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute, comparing with the published international data, and consequently suggested the proper parameters to use. The trends of transfer parameter shows normal distributions if we have a lot of experimental data, but some radionuclides showed enormous variations with the environment of experimental, crops and soils. These transfer factors can be used to assess realistic radiation doses or to predict the doses in crops for normal operation or accidental release. Some kinds of parameter can be produced as conservatives or fragmentary results because soil-to-plant transfer factors were measured through greenhouse experiments which sometimes showed improper field situations. But these parameters mentioned in this paper can be representative of the status of Korean food chain than that of foreign country

  17. Transfer factors of radionuclides and elements in the terrestrial and fresh water environment of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegde, A.G.; Hemalatha, P.; Desai, M.V.M.

    2004-04-01

    This document presents the transfer factor values such as Bioaccumulation factors B p , Transfer coefficient K d , Soil to plant transfer coefficient B v etc. generated in the terrestrial and fresh water environmental matrices of India. This attempt is made with a view to provide site and species specific values in comparison with IAEA default values from Safety Series(SS) No.57 and IAEA Technical Report Series (TRS) No.364. Our recommended B p values for 137 Cs and 90 Sr are matching well with IAEA reported values. B p value for 228 Ra also match well with IAEA values. While the freshwater sediment K d values for 137 Cs is 5000 which is closer to TRS 364 value, 90 Sr K d value is lower than IAEA value. Natural radionuclides Ra, Th and U values are also found to be higher than IAEA values which indicates the site specificity. B p values for stable elements such as Cu, Pb, Mn and Cd are comparable with IAEA whereas the recommended K d value for Zn is higher than IAEA reported value. Transfer factors for cereals, pulses and vegetables are also tabulated in this report in comparison with IAEA reported values. (author)

  18. Quantitative regularities of magnesium, calcium, radium-226, and thorium migration from soils to plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashkinazi, Eh.I.

    1980-01-01

    Concentrations of magnesium, calcium, radium 226, thorium 228 in podsolized chernozem and grey medium-loamy soils were determined under conditions of ordinary farming. Concentrations of these elements were determined in soils and main agricultural plants: wheat, barley, peas, potatoes, beets, and carrots. Transition coefficients of magnesium, calcium, and radium 226 from soils to plants were calculated and the following series of transition coefficients were determined: to Mg> to Ca> to Ra. Transition coefficients from dern-podsolic soils were 3-27 times higher than from chernozem

  19. Biota Modeling in EPA's Preliminary Remediation Goal and Dose Compliance Concentration Calculators for Use in EPA Superfund Risk Assessment: Explanation of Intake Rate Derivation, Transfer Factor Compilation, and Mass Loading Factor Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, Karessa L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dolislager, Fredrick G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bellamy, Michael B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The Preliminary Remediation Goal (PRG) and Dose Compliance Concentration (DCC) calculators are screening level tools that set forth Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) recommended approaches, based upon currently available information with respect to risk assessment, for response actions at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites, commonly known as Superfund. The screening levels derived by the PRG and DCC calculators are used to identify isotopes contributing the highest risk and dose as well as establish preliminary remediation goals. Each calculator has a residential gardening scenario and subsistence farmer exposure scenarios that require modeling of the transfer of contaminants from soil and water into various types of biota (crops and animal products). New publications of human intake rates of biota; farm animal intakes of water, soil, and fodder; and soil to plant interactions require updates be implemented into the PRG and DCC exposure scenarios. Recent improvements have been made in the biota modeling for these calculators, including newly derived biota intake rates, more comprehensive soil mass loading factors (MLFs), and more comprehensive soil to tissue transfer factors (TFs) for animals and soil to plant transfer factors (BV's). New biota have been added in both the produce and animal products categories that greatly improve the accuracy and utility of the PRG and DCC calculators and encompass greater geographic diversity on a national and international scale.

  20. Biota Modeling in EPA's Preliminary Remediation Goal and Dose Compliance Concentration Calculators for Use in EPA Superfund Risk Assessment: Explanation of Intake Rate Derivation, Transfer Factor Compilation, and Mass Loading Factor Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning, Karessa L.; Dolislager, Fredrick G.; Bellamy, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    The Preliminary Remediation Goal (PRG) and Dose Compliance Concentration (DCC) calculators are screening level tools that set forth Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) recommended approaches, based upon currently available information with respect to risk assessment, for response actions at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites, commonly known as Superfund. The screening levels derived by the PRG and DCC calculators are used to identify isotopes contributing the highest risk and dose as well as establish preliminary remediation goals. Each calculator has a residential gardening scenario and subsistence farmer exposure scenarios that require modeling of the transfer of contaminants from soil and water into various types of biota (crops and animal products). New publications of human intake rates of biota; farm animal intakes of water, soil, and fodder; and soil to plant interactions require updates be implemented into the PRG and DCC exposure scenarios. Recent improvements have been made in the biota modeling for these calculators, including newly derived biota intake rates, more comprehensive soil mass loading factors (MLFs), and more comprehensive soil to tissue transfer factors (TFs) for animals and soil to plant transfer factors (BV's). New biota have been added in both the produce and animal products categories that greatly improve the accuracy and utility of the PRG and DCC calculators and encompass greater geographic diversity on a national and international scale.

  1. Values of soil-plant transfer factor of 226Ra and 228Ra: agricultural areas versus areas of high natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, Maria Angelica; Lauria, Dejanira; Perez, Daniel Vidal; Schuch, Luiz Alexandre; Zago, Ari

    2000-01-01

    In this work, soil to plant transfer factor of 226 Ra and 228 Ra obtained in areas of traditional agricultural practices varied as a function of the considered cultivated species but little variation was observed as a function of the soil type. Beans and soybeans presented more important absorption than cereals (corn, rice and wheat). In our work legumes (bean and soybean) presented transfer factors up to one order of magnitude higher than average values for regions where natural radioactivity is high. On the other hand, the results for cereals did not presented such clear differences. It can be concluded that cultural inputs of 226 Ra and 228 Ra are occurring in agricultural areas, but few species can concentrate it. The transfer factor values obtained in this work for 226 Ra and 228 Ra can be applied in risk assessment models. (author)

  2. Evaluation of the results of the IAEA/FAO CRP on tropical transfer factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twining, J.

    1998-01-01

    Future development of tropical countries will include nuclear power. This is particularly true following the recent attention given to the urgent need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. From this, it is apparent that there is a need to have the ability to undertake dose assessments within tropical and sub-tropical regions. This includes knowledge of appropriate biological transfer factors for the region. However, most previous transfer factor studies were undertaken within temperate regions, predominantly in the Northern Hemisphere. Following a preliminary data survey, there was thus found to be a paucity of data for tropical and sub-tropical regions (excluding marine ecosystems). In an attempt to rectify this situation, the IAEA and FAO instigated a cooperative research program (CRP) entitled 'Transfer of radionuclides from air, soil and freshwater to the food chain of man in tropical and subtropical environments.' This paper is a synopsis of the findings of the three year CRP project. It is important to recognize that the data used in this presentation are derived from contributors and their colleagues in several countries. A list of chief investigators is given. Dr Martin Frissel, Secretary, European IUR, deserves a special mention for his collation of the CRP data. Some of his figures were used in the presentation or reproduced in this synopsis. The participants undertook regional literature and data surveys, field sampling and experimental investigations. The experimental studies were run by following, as closely as practicable, a suite of standard protocols that helped to reduce variability and errors. The experimental studies comprised two main groups: soil to plant, and: freshwater to fish. Quality assurance on analytical work was performed using intercomparison tests with standard reference materials. The reporting of data was also standardised to facilitate collation and subsequent multivariate statistical analysis. The statistical analysis of the entire

  3. Transfer factors for the „soil-cereals” system in the region of Pcinja, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Jelena S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper was to estimate the values of transfer factors for natural radionuclides (40K, 226Ra, 232Th, 235U, and 238U and 137Cs from soil to plants (cereals: wheat, corn and barley as important parameters for the agricultures in the selection of the location and the sort of cereals to be planted on. The results presented in this paper refer to the „soil-cereals” system in the region of Pcinja, Serbia. Total of 9 samples of soil and 7 samples of cereals were measured in the Department of Radiation and Environmental Protection, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, using three high-purity germanium detectors for gamma spectrometry measurements. In all the samples, transfer factors for 226Ra are significantly lower than for 40K, but they are all in good agreement with the literature data. On the three investigated locations, the calculated values of transfer factors for 40K were in the range of 0.144 to 0.392, while in the case of 226Ra, the transfer factors ranged from 0.008 to 0.074. Only one value (0.051 was obtained for transfer factor of 232Th. Specific activities of 137Cs, as well as uranium isotopes, in all the investigated cereal samples, were below minimal detectable activity concentrations. Also, the absorbed dose rate and the annual absorbed dose from the natural radionuclides in the soil, were calculated. The absorbed dose rate ranged from 49-86 nSv/h, while the annual absorbed dose ranged from 0.061-0.105 mSv. The measurements presented in this manuscript are the first to be conducted in the region of Pcinja, thus providing the results that can be used as a baseline for future measurements and monitoring.

  4. Literature Review and Assessment of Plant and Animal Transfer Factors Used in Performance Assessment Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, David E.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Napier, Bruce A.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Sasser, Lyle B.

    2003-01-01

    A literature review and assessment was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to update information on plant and animal radionuclide transfer factors used in performance-assessment modeling. A group of 15 radionuclides was included in this review and assessment. The review is composed of four main sections, not including the Introduction. Section 2.0 provides a review of the critically important issue of physicochemical speciation and geochemistry of the radionuclides in natural soil-water systems as it relates to the bioavailability of the radionuclides. Section 3.0 provides an updated review of the parameters of importance in the uptake of radionuclides by plants, including root uptake via the soil-groundwater system and foliar uptake due to overhead irrigation. Section 3.0 also provides a compilation of concentration ratios (CRs) for soil-to-plant uptake for the 15 selected radionuclides. Section 4.0 provides an updated review on radionuclide uptake data for animal products related to absorption, homeostatic control, approach to equilibration, chemical and physical form, diet, and age. Compiled transfer coefficients are provided for cow's milk, sheep's milk, goat's milk, beef, goat meat, pork, poultry, and eggs. Section 5.0 discusses the use of transfer coefficients in soil, plant, and animal modeling using regulatory models for evaluating radioactive waste disposal or decommissioned sites. Each section makes specific suggestions for future research in its area.

  5. Literature Review and Assessment of Plant and Animal Transfer Factors Used in Performance Assessment Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, David E.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Napier, Bruce A.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Sasser, Lyle B.

    2003-07-20

    A literature review and assessment was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to update information on plant and animal radionuclide transfer factors used in performance-assessment modeling. A group of 15 radionuclides was included in this review and assessment. The review is composed of four main sections, not including the Introduction. Section 2.0 provides a review of the critically important issue of physicochemical speciation and geochemistry of the radionuclides in natural soil-water systems as it relates to the bioavailability of the radionuclides. Section 3.0 provides an updated review of the parameters of importance in the uptake of radionuclides by plants, including root uptake via the soil-groundwater system and foliar uptake due to overhead irrigation. Section 3.0 also provides a compilation of concentration ratios (CRs) for soil-to-plant uptake for the 15 selected radionuclides. Section 4.0 provides an updated review on radionuclide uptake data for animal products related to absorption, homeostatic control, approach to equilibration, chemical and physical form, diet, and age. Compiled transfer coefficients are provided for cow’s milk, sheep’s milk, goat’s milk, beef, goat meat, pork, poultry, and eggs. Section 5.0 discusses the use of transfer coefficients in soil, plant, and animal modeling using regulatory models for evaluating radioactive waste disposal or decommissioned sites. Each section makes specific suggestions for future research in its area.

  6. Comparison of transfer factors of Sr-85 and Cs-134 for soils and crops of Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skarlou, V.; Papanicolaou, E. P.; Nobeli, C.

    1994-01-01

    The transfer of Sr-85 and Cs-134 from soil to plant (CR) was studied in two successive and similar in design glasshouse experiments. Six plant species (wheat, alfalfa, radish, string bean, cucumber, lettuce - only for Sr-85 - and endives - only for Cs-134), were grown in pots on eight Greek soils differing significantly in their physical and chemical properties. After the necessary measurements and analyses, big differences were detected in the transfer factors of both radionuclides with the soil types. The CRs of Sr-85 were higher than those of Cs-134 and for the tested crops and soils ranged between 0.3 and 36.5 for Sr-85 and between < 0.01 and 1.72 for Cs-134. The CRs of grains and seeds were much lower than those of leafy material for Sr-85 while the difference was not so high for Cs-134. The correlation between CRs and pH, negative in all cases, was significant or highly significant for all tested crops or plant parts (for Sr-85 r-bar = - 0.89, for Cs-134 r-bar = - 0.82). The values of CRs indicated a trend for negative correlation with other soil properties (cation exchange capacity-CEC, clay %). From exchangeable cations, exchangeable (Ca + Mg) as well as exchangeable bases, expressed as percentages of CEC, gave a significant or highly significant correlation with CRs of both radionuclides. (author)

  7. A preliminary assessment on the use of biochar as a soil additive for reducing soil-to-plant uptake of cesium isotopes in radioactively contaminated environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, T.F.; Martinelli, R.E.; Kehl, S.R.; Peters, S.K.G.; Tamblin, M.W.; Schmitt, C.L.; Hawk, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    A series of K d tracer batch experiments were conducted to assess the absorptive-desorption properties of Biochar as a potential agent to selectively sequester labile soil Cs or otherwise help reduce the uptake of Cs isotopes into plants. A parallel experiment was conducted for strontium. Fine-grained fractionated Woodlands tree Biochar was found to have a relatively high affinity for Cs ions (K d > 100) relative to coral soil (K d < 10) collected from the Marshall Islands. The Biochar material also contains an abundance of K (and Mg). These findings support a hypothesis that the addition of Biochar as a soil amendment may provide a simple yet effective method for reducing soil-to-plant transfer of Cs isotopes in contaminated environments. (author)

  8. Feed/meat transfer factor determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoepfner, U.

    1981-01-01

    The transfer of cesium from the feed to bovine meat is taken as an example to discuss natural environmental conditions and their effects on the determination of the transfer factor. Criteria for estimating the validity of experimentally determined transfer factors are given and used for a critical evaluation of significant literature data. The evaluation presented in this report is not a merely statistical evaluation of transfer data, indicating one single value as the correct one (sometimes within a certain margin), but rather scans the data available for incertainties and drawbacks of the experimental methods applied, finally stating a range of variation within which transfer factors can be considered to be correct. (orig./DG) [de

  9. Transfer factors of radioiodine from volcanic-ash soil (Andosol) to crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban-Nai, Tadaaki; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki

    2003-01-01

    In order to obtain soil-to-plant transfer factors (TFs) of radioiodine from volcanic-ash soil to agricultural crops, we carried out radiotracer experiments. The mean values of TFs (on a wet weight basis) of radioiodine from Andosol to edible parts of crops were as follows: water dropwort, 0.24; lettuce, 0.00098; onion, 0.0011; radish, 0.0044; turnip, 0.0013 and eggplant, 0.00010. The mean value of the TFs of radioiodine for edible parts of wheat (on a dry weight basis) was 0.00015. We also studied the distributions of iodine in crops. There was a tendency for the TFs of leaves to be higher than those of tubers, fruits and grains. A very high TF was found for water dropwort, because this plant was cultivated under a waterlogged condition, in which iodine desorbed from soil into soil solution with a drop in the Eh value. The data obtained in this study should be helpful to assess the long-lived 129 I (half life: 1.57 x l0 7 yr) pathway related to the fuel cycle. (author)

  10. Transfer factors of radioiodine from volcanic-ash soil (Andosol) to crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban-Nai, Tadaaki; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Environmental and Toxicological Sciences Research Group

    2003-03-01

    In order to obtain soil-to-plant transfer factors (TFs) of radioiodine from volcanic-ash soil to agricultural crops, we carried out radiotracer experiments. The mean values of TFs (on a wet weight basis) of radioiodine from Andosol to edible parts of crops were as follows: water dropwort, 0.24; lettuce, 0.00098; onion, 0.0011; radish, 0.0044; turnip, 0.0013 and eggplant, 0.00010. The mean value of the TFs of radioiodine for edible parts of wheat (on a dry weight basis) was 0.00015. We also studied the distributions of iodine in crops. There was a tendency for the TFs of leaves to be higher than those of tubers, fruits and grains. A very high TF was found for water dropwort, because this plant was cultivated under a waterlogged condition, in which iodine desorbed from soil into soil solution with a drop in the Eh value. The data obtained in this study should be helpful to assess the long-lived {sup 129}I (half life: 1.57 x l0{sup 7} yr) pathway related to the fuel cycle. (author)

  11. Evaluation and development of soil values for the pathway 'soil to plant'. Significance of mercury evaporation for the burden of plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaeth, S.; Schlueter, K.

    1998-05-01

    In cooperation with the Ad-hoc working group 'Transfer of heavy metals from soil to plant' of the Laenderarbeitsgemeinschaft Bodenschutz (LABO) the significance of mercury evaporation for the deduction of threshold values in respect of the impact via the pathway soil to plant was investigated. Mercury contamination of food- and feeding stuff plants was examined with special emphasis. For these purposes a lab experiment including three different soils with varying initial mercury load (background level, geogenic and anthropogenic contamination) and two different plant species (parsely and spinach) was carried out under defined conditions in closed lysimeters. Mercury uptake via the roots was minimised since the plants grew in isolated customary substrate which showed a low concentration of mercury. Thus, only the surrounding soil evaporated mercury. The concentrations of mercury in the plants in the background level treatment (0.1 mg Hg/kg dry soil) were 0.15 mg/kg dry matter (spinach) and 0.44 mg/kg dry matter (parsely). The treatment with anthropogenic contaminated soil (111 mg Hg/kg dry soil) resulted in concentrations in the two plants of 2.0 and 2.6 mg/kg dry matter, respectively. A comparable order of magnitude was achieved in the geogenic contaminated treatment (34 mg Hg/kg dry soil) with 2.1 mg/kg dry matter. Experiments conducted with radioactive 203 Hg showed in each case recoveries of 20 to 34% in the leaves regarding the evaporated Hg-tracer. Also in the stem and in the roots Hg-tracer could be detected, indicating a translocation within the plant from leaf to root. By means of a comprehensive literature study the state of the art for Hg-evaporation and Hg-uptake of plants was compiled. Comparing the experimental results with data derived from literature, the Hg-concentrations found are confirmed by results of other authors. (orig.) [de

  12. Soil Plant and plant mammal transfer factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Nijs ACM; Vermeire TG

    1990-01-01

    In order to assess the lifetime hazard of ingestion exposure of man to new substances, the RIVM Assessment System for New Substances links environmental concentrations in water and soil to human exposure applying transfer factors. This report discusses indirect human exposure to new substances via

  13. Soil - plant experimental radionuclide transfer factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrin, R.I.; Dulama, C.N.; Toma, Al.

    2006-01-01

    Some experimental research was performed in our institute to assess site specific soil-plant transfer factors. A full characterization of an experimental site was done both from pedo-chemical and radiological point of view. Afterwards, a certain number of culture plants were grown on this site and the evolution of their radionuclide burden was then recorded. Using some soil amendments one performed a parallel experiment and the radionuclide root uptake was evaluated and recorded. Hence, transfer parameters were calculated and some conclusions were drawn concerning the influence of site specific conditions on the root uptake of radionuclides. (authors)

  14. Neubauer's plantlet method - an alternative procedure for evaluating the effectiveness of potassium based fertilizers in reducing radiocaesium from soil to plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mocanu, N.; Cotarlea, M.; Boldor, O.

    1996-01-01

    Accidental releases of radiocaesium into the environment have necessitated the search for effective soil-based countermeasures to reduce its transfer along food-chains. As field experiments can be impractical and protracted to predict rapidly the effectiveness of chemical treatments of radioactive contaminated soils to reduce soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides, laboratory experiments are a suitable alternative for rapid evaluation of the most appropriate countermeasure to apply under a range of different circumstances in the event of accidental radioactive contamination of agricultural lands. Taking into account these considerations our study focuses on the use of a laboratory experiment based on Neubauer's plantlet method to evaluate the effectiveness of potassic salt 30 % applied on two soil types (alluvial and brown-reddish forest type) contaminated with 137 Cs for reducing uptake of the radionuclide to wheat plants grown-up on these soils. The experimental results evidence diminished values for 137 Cs/K quotient in wheat plantlets grown-up on soils treated with potassic salt 30 %, compared to those registered for wheat plantlets grown-up on untreated soils. The diminished values of 137 Cs/K quotient result from the reduced uptake of 137 Cs to plantlets accompanied by the enhanced uptake of potassium. (author)

  15. Transfer factor for 210Pb from soil to vegetables in the surrounding environment of Kaiga nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Chetan; Karunakara, N.; Yashodhara, I.; Ravi, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents a detailed study on site specific soil to vegetable (leafy, fruit and root) transfer factors for 210 Pb for Kaiga region, India where a PHWR, nuclear power plant is in operation. An experimental vegetable field was developed at about 500 m aerial distance from the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) site at Kaiga to study the site-specific soil to plant transfer factors. Different types of vegetables were grown in the experimental field, during different seasons of the year, using the discharge water from the Kaiga nuclear power plant. The development of the experimental vegetable fields helped in evaluating accurate site-specific data. For a comparative study of the transfer factors obtained for the experimental field, samples cultivated using normal water resources by the local farmers of nearby villages, were also collected and analysed. The soil to leafy vegetable transfer factor of 210 Pb varied in the range of < 1.5 x 10 -2 - 1.6 x 10 -1 with a mean value of 6.0 x 10 -2 . Similarly the soil to fruit vegetable varied in the range of < 1.0 x 10 -2 - 3.4 x 10 -1 and the soil to root vegetable varied in the range of < 1.0 x 10 -2 - 4.0 x 10 -2 with corresponding mean values of 6.0 x 10 -2 and 3.0 x 10 -2 respectively. The annual effective dose due to intake of 210 Pb through leafy vegetables varied in the range of 7.9 - 76.0 μSv a -1 with a mean value of 35.2 ìSv a -1 . And through fruit and root vegetables, it varied in the range of 34.9 - 207 μSv a -1 with a mean value of 119 ìSv a -1 . It was found that radionuclide concentration in plants was not linearly related to soil concentration. (author)

  16. Evolution of factors affecting placental oxygen transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, A M

    2009-01-01

    A review is given of the factors determining placental oxygen transfer and the oxygen supply to the fetus. In the case of continuous variables, such as the rate of placental blood flow, it is not possible to trace evolutionary trends. Discontinuous variables, for which we can define character sta......, where fetal and adult haemoglobin are not different, developmental regulation of 2, 3-diphosphoglycerate ensures the high oxygen affinity of fetal blood. Oxygen diffusing capacity is dependent on diffusion distance, which may vary with the type of interhaemal barrier. It has been shown...

  17. Transfer of radium from soil to plants in an area of high natural radioactivity in Ramsar, Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khademi, B.; Alemi, A.A.; Nasseri, A.

    1980-01-01

    A section of Ramsar, a town located in the northern part of Iran, is considered to be a high natural radioactivity area. Over 1 km 2 of the area, with an approximate population of 2000, was investigated. Radium concentrations in the soil are not homogeneous; they ranged from 17 to 9000 pCi/g. Environmental exposure rates ranged from 0.08 to 5.5mR/hr, and radium concentrations in plants in this area ranged from 0.2 to 360 pCi/g of ash

  18. Multitracer study on the soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides in komatsuna at different growth stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambe, S.; Ozaki, T.; Enomoto, S.; Shinonaga, T.

    1999-01-01

    The selective absorption coefficient, which is a parameter of an uptake model of radionuclides by plants, was determined for various radionuclides by a multitracer technique. Komatsuna, Brassica rapa var. perviridis, was hydroponically cultivated in a nutrient solution containing a multitracer for 1 day. Nutrient concentration dependence of the selective absorption coefficient of various elements from Be to Re was obtained separately for leaves and roots. The selective absorption coefficients of these elements were, in general, found to decrease with an increase in the concentration of nutrient solutions. Regression equations of the power function for the selective absorption coefficients and the concentration of nutrient solutions were obtained for the leaves and roots. The effects of photon flux and growth stage of plants on the selective absorption coefficients were also studied. It was found that the photon flux influenced the accumulation of radionuclides in the roots but had no significant effect on the selective absorption coefficients for the leaves in 1-day cultivation with the multitracer. The selective absorption coefficients of Mn and Zn in the leaves of the plants at the development stage were higher than those at the maturation stage. For the other elements, no significant effects of the growth stage on the selective absorption coefficients were observed. (author)

  19. Effect of decontamination of planting soil using zeolite slurry that inhibits transition of radioactive cesium from soil to plant bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yutaka; Akita, Hiroyuki; Kikawada, Kazuya

    2013-01-01

    The accident of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear energy plant by the tsunami resulting from the Great Eastern Japan Earthquake in 2011 caused the radiation contamination of cultivated field in Fukushima Prefecture. Some decontamination techniques such as surface soil grab, deep cultivation, and adding zeolite to the soil were tested in the rice fields of Fukushima Prefecture. Zeolite is usually used in the form of particle. It inhibits the transition of radioactive cesium from soil to plant bodies. Here, zeolite slurry was also used. The inhibition effect of the zeolite slurry was checked not only in the field but also in a laboratory experiment using some vegetables. The laboratory test results proved the effect of decontamination for vegetable; however, the field test showed uncertainness owing to the low passage coefficient of rice. (author)

  20. Studies of transport pathways of Th, rare earths, Ra-228, and Ra-226 from soil to plants and farm animals. Progress report, April 1, 1985-February 28, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsalata, P.

    1986-02-01

    The field study is to assess the soil-to-plant and soil-to-animal concentration factors of the naturally occurring radionuclides 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 232 Th, 230 Th, and 228 Th, as well as of the light rare earth elements (REE), La, Ce and Nd. Farms situated near the center of a deeply weathered alkalic intrusive known as the Pocos de Caldas (PC) plateau were selected for study because of their proximity (i.e., within a few kilometers) to what may be the largest single near-surface deposit of Th (approx.30,000 tonnes) and REE's (>100,000 tonnes) situated near the summit of a hill (the Morro do Ferro (MF)). An ancillary field study is being conducted in Orange County, New York, where a local cattleman has permitted sampling members of the herd as well as soil and feeds which are all grown on the premises. Vegetable samples and soil have also been analyzed from five additional farms in Orange County, NY. 64 refs., 25 figs., 45 tabs

  1. Values of soil-plant transfer factor of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra: agricultural areas versus areas of high natural radioactivity; Valores de fator de transferencia solo-planta do {sup 226}Ra e {sup 228}Ra: areas agricolas versus areas de radioatividade natural elevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasserman, Maria Angelica; Lauria, Dejanira [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Perez, Daniel Vidal [Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Solos; Schuch, Luiz Alexandre [Santa Maria Univ., RS (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Zago, Ari [Santa Maria Univ., RS (Brazil). Dept. de Solos

    2000-07-01

    In this work, soil to plant transfer factor of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra obtained in areas of traditional agricultural practices varied as a function of the considered cultivated species but little variation was observed as a function of the soil type. Beans and soybeans presented more important absorption than cereals (corn, rice and wheat). In our work legumes (bean and soybean) presented transfer factors up to one order of magnitude higher than average values for regions where natural radioactivity is high. On the other hand, the results for cereals did not presented such clear differences. It can be concluded that cultural inputs of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra are occurring in agricultural areas, but few species can concentrate it. The transfer factor values obtained in this work for {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra can be applied in risk assessment models. (author)

  2. TRANSFER PRICING AS A SYSTEM-FACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Guisin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is proposed that transfer pricing plays a system-building role for multi-profile commercial banks of today. Bank transfer pricing system properties are outlined. Examples of practical implementation of the transfer pricing to bank activities are brought about. Impact of transferprices on key aspects of the bank management and control system is discussed.

  3. Reducing the bioavailability of PCBs in soil to plant by biochars assessed with triolein-embedded cellulose acetate membrane technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Yu-Jun; Wang, Lei; Fang, Guo-Dong; Cang, Long; Herath, H.M.S.K.; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Coupling with triolein-embedded cellulose acetate membrane (TECAM) technique, hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrins (HPCD) extraction method, and the greenhouse pot experiments, the influences of biochars on polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) bioavailability in soil to plant (Brassica chinensis L. and Daucus carota) were investigated. Addition of 2% biochars to soils significantly reduced the uptake of PCBs in plant, especially for di-, tri- and tetra-chlorobiphenyls. PCBs concentrations in the roots of B. chinensis and D. carota were reduced for 61.5–93.7%, and 12.7–62.4%, respectively in the presence of biochars. The kinetic study showed that in the soils amended with/without biochars, PCBs concentrations accumulated in TECAM, as well as in the HPCD extraction solution, followed significant linear relationships with those in plant roots. Application of biochars to soil is a potentially promising method to reduce PCBs bioavailability whereas TECAM technique can be a useful tool to predict the bioavailability of PCBs in soil. -- Highlights: ► Application of biochars significantly reduced the uptake of PCBs in plant. ► TECAM was a new and effective method to predict the PCBs bioavailability in soil. ► PCBs accumulated in TECAM followed significant linear relationships with plant. ► PCBs in TECAM were more similar with the plant uptake than HPCD solution. -- The reduced PCBs concentrations in plant roots by biochars show good linear relationship with those in TECAM

  4. Variability of soil-to-crop transfer factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shigeo; Kamada, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Setsuko; Ohmomo, Yoichiro

    1987-01-01

    Many European countries have nuclear facilities in inland areas, where extremely low level radioactive waste liquid is discharged to rivers. In those nations, therefore, many studies have been made oncerning the transfer of radioisotopes into plants. In Japan, greater attention has been attracted to such radioisotope transfer into plants and then into human bodies. Thus the present report reviews various studies on this issue. The key parameter for this process is the transfer factor (also called concentration factor, coefficient or ratio). The factor largely depends on various other factors including the characteristics of different nuclides, properties of soil (pH, oxidation-reduction potential, grain size distribution, contents of clay minerals, contents of organic matters, water content, etc.), characteristics of crops and cultivation conditions. It has been reported that I is absorbed by plants more rapidly than IO 3 . Of the various soil parameters, the pH of soil has the greatest effect on the transfer factor. Soil is mostly alkaline in Europe and America while acid soil account for a great part in Japan, suggesting that the transfer factor would be greater in Japan. The total potassium content in soil has the second largest effect on the factor. Radioactive iodine has shown to be transferred into soy beans and spinach 30 times more rapidly than into fruit vegetables. The oxidation-reduction potential also has a significant influence on the transfer factor. (Nogami, K.)

  5. Ingestion Pathway Transfer Factors for Plutonium and Americium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-01-01

    Overall transfer factors for major ingestion pathways are derived for plutonium and americium. These transfer factors relate the radionuclide concentration in a given foodstuff to deposition on the soil. Equations describing basic relationships consistent with Regulatory Guide 1.109 are followed. Updated values and coefficients from IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 364 are used when a available. Preference is given to using factors specific to the Savannah River Site

  6. Factors influencing training transfer in nursing profession: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fang; Bai, Yangjing; Bai, Yangjuan; Ma, Weiguang; Yang, Xiangyu; Li, Jiping

    2018-03-20

    There is a growing recognition that training is not translated into performance and the 'transfer problem' exists in organization training today. Although factors contributing to training transfer have been identified in business and industry, the factors influencing training transfer in nursing profession remain less clear. A qualitative descriptive study was undertaken in two tertiary referral hospitals in China from February 2013 to September 2013. Purposeful sampling of 24 nursing staffs were interviewed about the factors influencing training transfer. Seven themes evolved from the analysis, categorized in 4 main domains, which described the factors influencing training transfer in nursing profession in trainee characteristics, training design, work environment and profession domain. The trainee characteristics domain included attitude and ability. The training design domain included training content and instruction method. The work environment domain included supports as facilitators and opposition as hindrance. The theme pertaining to the profession domain was professional development. Health care managers need to understand the factors influencing training transfer for maximizing the benefits of training. The right beliefs and values about training, the rigorous employee selection for training, the relevance of training content, training instructions facilitating learning and transfer, supports from peer, supervisors and the organization, organizational culture such as change, sharing, learning and support, and professional development are key to successful training transfer. Furthermore, managers should be aware of the opposition from co-workers and find ways to prevent it.

  7. Potential side effects of ammonium-ferric-hexacyano-ferrate application: enhanced radiostrontium transfer and free cyanide release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Hees, May van; Vandecasteele, Christian

    2000-01-01

    The effect of the application of ammonium-ferric-hexacyano-ferrate (AFCF), effective in reducing soil-to-plant radiocaesium transfer, on radiostrontium transfer was tested for ryegrass grown under greenhouse conditions on sandy soil for 310 days. Identical radiostrontium transfer factors (9.4 kg kg -1 ) were obtained with 0 or 10 g AFCF m -2 applied. Amending AFCF to planted or uncovered sandy or loamy soils in quantities of up to 100 g AFCF m -2 did not result in detectable levels of free cyanide. Negative side effects of AFCF application to soil are hence unlikely

  8. Study of the possibility of attenuating soil-plant transfer after an accident, by application of manure to the soil and by foliar spraying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauby, Andre; Jouve, Andre; Legrand, Bernard

    1990-01-01

    This study focuses on the possibility of attenuating soil to plant transfer factor of cesium and strontium by fertilisation. It is based on the correlation analysis of the transfer factor and stable element levels in soils. Results for potassium and cesium show that in most of the soils studied a supply of 5000 Kg of K2S04 per hectare allows a division of the transfer factor to beans by a factor of 10. In the soils with a low cationic exchange capacity, an excess addition of potassium produces an increase in the transfer factor. The ammonium phosphate supply in all soils produces an increase of the transfer factor of cesium to grass. The calcium and potassium supply which affect the transfer factor of cesium do not affect that of strontium. The foliar supply of potassium to bean leaves leads to a reduction of pod contamination by a factor 2. (author)

  9. An ISM approach for analyzing the factors in technology transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mahdavi Mazdeh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Technology transfer, from research and technology organizations (RTOs toward local industries, is considered as one of important and significant strategies for countries' industrial development. In addition to recover the enormous costs of research and development for RTOs, successful technology transfer from RTOs toward local firms forms technological foundations and develops the ability to enhance the competitiveness of firms. Better understanding of factors influencing process of technology transfer helps RTOs and local firms prioritize and manage their resources in an effective and efficient way to maximize the success of technology transfer. This paper aims to identify important effective factors in technology transfer from Iranian RTOs and provides a comprehensive model, which indicate the interactions of these factors. In this regard, first, research background is reviewed and Cummings and Teng’s model (2003 [Cummings, J. L., & Teng, B.-S. (2003. Transferring R&D knowledge: The key factors affecting knowledge transfer success. Journal of Engineering and Technology Management, 20(1-2, 39-68.] was selected as the basic model in this study and it was modified through suggesting new factors identified from literature of inter-organizational knowledge and technology transfer and finally a Delphi method was applied for validation of modified model. Then, research conducted used Interpretive Structural Modeling (ISM to evaluate the relationship between the factors of final proposed model. Results indicate that there were twelve factors influencing on technology transfer process from Iranian RTOs to local firms and also the intensity of absorption capability in transferee could influence on the intensity of desorption capability in transferor.

  10. Soil-water distribution coefficients and plant transfer factors for {sup 134}Cs, {sup 85}Sr and {sup 65}Zn under field conditions in tropical Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twining, J.R. E-mail: jrt@ansto.gov.au; Payne, T.E.; Itakura, T

    2004-07-01

    Measurements of soil-to-plant transfer of {sup 134}Cs, {sup 85}Sr and {sup 65}Zn from two tropical red earth soils ('Blain' and 'Tippera') to sorghum and mung crops have been undertaken in the north of Australia. The aim of the study was to identify factors that control bioaccumulation of these radionuclides in tropical regions, for which few previous data are available. Batch sorption experiments were conducted to determine the distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) of the selected radionuclides at pH values similar to natural pH values, which ranged from about 5.5 to 6.7. In addition, K{sub d} values were obtained at one pH unit above and below the soil-water equilibrium pH values to determine the effect of pH. The adsorption of Cs showed no pH dependence, but the K{sub d} values for the Tippera soils (2300-4100 ml/g) exceeded those for the Blain soils (800-1200 ml/g) at equilibrium pH. This was related to the greater clay content of the Tippera soil. Both Sr and Zn were more strongly adsorbed at higher pH values, but the K{sub d} values showed less dependence on the soil type. Strontium K{sub d}s were 30-60 ml/g whilst Zn ranged from 160 to 1630 ml/g for the two soils at equilibrium pH. With the possible exception of Sr, there was no evidence for downward movement of radionuclides through the soils during the course of the growing season. There was some evidence of surface movement of labelled soil particles. Soil-to-plant transfer factors varied slightly between the soils. The average results for sorghum were 0.1-0.3 g/g for Cs, 0.4-0.8 g/g for Sr and 18-26 g/g for Zn (dry weight) with the initial values relating to Blain and the following values to Tippera. Similar values were observed for the mung bean samples. The transfer factors for Cs and Sr were not substantially different from the typical values observed in temperate studies. However, Zn transfer factors for plants grown on both these tropical soils were greater than for soils in

  11. Factors affecting radiocaesium transfer to ruminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, G.; Howard, B.J.; Vandecasteele, C.; Mayes, R.W.; Belli, M.; Sansone, U.; Stakelum, G.; Colgan, P.A.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Crout, N.M.J.; Jones, B.E.V., Hove, K.; ITE, Merlewood; CEN, Mol; MLURI, Aberdeen; ENEA-DISP, Rome; MPRC, Fermoy; RPII, Dublin; Ioannina Univ., Nuclear Physics; Nottingham Univ., Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala; Agricultural Univ., Aas

    1993-01-01

    The studies performed in the 2 year CEG/DG XII Radiation Protection Programme described here have tried to identify and quantify some of the most important factors influencing the radiocaesium levels in animal food products. The programme involved 9 laboratories in 6 countries: Belgium, Ireland, Greece, Italy, Sweden and the UK. Scientists from Norway and Germany also participated on an informal basis and are formally involved in a subsequent project. Experimental studies have largely been conducted using sheep, although some comparative studies have been performed with dairy cattle. In parallel to the experimental studies, a number of research models have been developed by participants in Greece and the UK to be interactively used with a number of different aspects in the programme. This presentation gives a short overview and discussion of the main findings of this project. (orig./DG)

  12. Transfer factor of caesium-137 in natural and agricultural grass ecosystems in the area of Plavsk radioactive spot, Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paramonova, Tatiana A.; Machaeva, Ekaterina N. [Radioecology and Ecotoxicology Department of Soil Science Faculty, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119234 Moscow (Russian Federation); Belyaev, Vladimir R. [Laboratory of soil erosion and fluvial processes of Geography Faculty, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119234 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    Root uptake and translocation of ¹³⁷Cs from soil to plant is the key for estimation of general ecological situation and land use on radioactive contaminated territories. There are numerous researches concerning the relationship between the level of the radionuclide presence in soils and its accumulation in vegetation that usually describes as transfer factor (TF) for ¹³⁷Cs (the ratio of the specific ¹³⁷Cs activity in the plant tissue and the soil). But in most cases only edible organs or above-ground parts of plants are taken into account in evaluating TF. It is reasonable from the standpoint of practical use, but does not provide accurate information in the study of ¹³⁷Cs biogeochemical cycle features. The study of the ¹³⁷Cs root uptake from the radioactive contaminated chernozem soil and its distribution between above-ground and below-ground fractions of grass vegetation was conducted in the natural conditions on the territory of Plavsk radioactive spot (Tula region, Russia)~25 years after Chernobyl accident. The main crops of field rotation in this landscape (wheat, barley, potatoes, rape, maize) which occupy watersheds and slopes with arable chernozems contaminated at a level 460-670 Bq/kg (170-220 kBq/m²) and natural grassland ecosystems which occupy lower parts of slopes and flood plains with dry and wet meadows contaminated at a level 620-710 Bq/kg (210-250 kBq/m²) were examined. Total accumulation of ¹³⁷Cs in vegetation strongly depends on the level of soil radioactive contamination (correlation coefficient 0.87). So specific ¹³⁷Cs activity in vegetation of meadows (103-160 Bq/kg) in general more than one in agricultural crops (9-92 Bq/kg). Other reason may be the predominance of perennial herbs in natural meadows whereas agricultural systems contain annual crops. The values of ¹³⁷Cs TF in the studied ecosystems vary within a relatively narrow range: from 0.01 (rape) to 0.20 (wet meadow), that confirms the discrimination of

  13. Technetium and diazotrophic organisms: toxicity, localization, transfer factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandecasteele, C.M.; Delmotte, A.; Roucoux, P.; Hove, C. van

    1982-01-01

    Three diazotrophic organisms, together with one leguminous organism in symbiosis with one of them, were cultivated in the presence of various quantities of technetium, of which the localization, transfer factors and toxicity were studied in relation to the age of the organisms and their type of metabolism. The paper discusses the biochemical aspects of the results. (author)

  14. University Technology Transfer Factors as Predictors of Entrepreneurial Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Dorothy M.

    2011-01-01

    University technology transfer is a collaborative effort between academia and industry involving knowledge sharing and learning. Working closely with their university partners affords biotechnology firms the opportunity to successfully develop licensed inventions and gain access to novel scientific and technological discoveries. These factors may…

  15. Governance factors enabling knowledge transfer in interorganisational development projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch-Sijtsema, Petra M.; Postma, Theo J. B. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this study we examine governance factors affecting knowledge transfer in interorganisational development projects. There is a gap in the literature indicating a need for more insights into processes of knowledge sharing and governance of interorganisational development projects. By using cases

  16. The transfer of radionuclides from soil to animal feed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frissel, M.J.; Ginkel, J.H. van; Stoutjesdijk, J.F.; Koester, H.W.

    1986-01-01

    Non volatile radioactive compounds which become released into the atmosphere will finally accumulate in the top layer of soils. The soil-to-plant transfer is therefore a key process for the contamination of food and animal feed. The spread of the uptake factors is large; even so large that a worst case approach for estimating the contamination may lead to very unrealistic conclusions. The Int. Union of Radioecologists (IUR) has established a working group to approach this problem. By means of a joint programme of many institutions sufficient transfer data are being collected to allow a sophisticated statistical evaluation resulting in predictions of transfer factor values and confidence levels. Possible counter measures against the uptake of radionuclides are discussed. (author)

  17. The transfer of radionuclides from soil to animal feed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frissel, M J; Ginkel, J.H. van; Stoutjesdijk, J F; Koester, H W [Lab. of Radiation Research, Nat. Inst. of Public Health and Environmental Hygiene, Bilthoven (Netherlands)

    1986-07-01

    Non volatile radioactive compounds which become released into the atmosphere will finally accumulate in the top layer of soils. The soil-to-plant transfer is therefore a key process for the contamination of food and animal feed. The spread of the uptake factors is large; even so large that a worst case approach for estimating the contamination may lead to very unrealistic conclusions. The Int. Union of Radioecologists (IUR) has established a working group to approach this problem. By means of a joint programme of many institutions sufficient transfer data are being collected to allow a sophisticated statistical evaluation resulting in predictions of transfer factor values and confidence levels. Possible counter measures against the uptake of radionuclides are discussed. (author)

  18. A new approach for soil-plant transfer calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorp, F. van; Eleveld, R.; Frissel, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    Models to calculate radiation doses to man caused by normal or accidental release of radionuclides from nuclear industries often include the transfer of these nuclides from soil to plant. This soil-plant transfer is mostly described with a black box approach by using concentration factors. This approach has several disadvantages, the most important being the lack of physical meaning of a concentration factor. We propose to describe the soil-plant transfer of radionuclides as a function of plant and soil parameters all having a physical meaning. The separate parameters are open to experimental determination but a realistic estimation of the parameters is also possible, or the use of a combination of both. Depending on the purpose of the calculation, realistic or conservative values of the parameters can be used and the degree of conservatism can be indicated. (author)

  19. Transfer of radionuclides in soil-plant systems following aerosol simulation of accidental release: design and first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauret, G.; Real, J.

    1995-01-01

    The behaviour of 134 Cs, 110m Ag and 85 Sr was studied in different soil-plant systems, using two types of Mediterranean soil with contrasting properties (sandy and sandy-loam soils). The plant species used was lettuce (Lactuca sativa). Contamination was induced at different stages of plant growth, using a synthetic aerosol which simulated a distant contamination source. Characterisation of aerosol and soils, interception factors in the various growth stages, foliar and root uptake, leaching from leaves by irrigation and distribution and migration of radionuclides of soils were studied, in an attempt to understand the key factors involving radionuclide soil-to-plant transferance. (author)

  20. Transfer of radionuclides in soil-plant systems following aerosol simulation of accidental release: design and first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauret, G. [Universitat de Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Quimica Analitica; Vallejo, V.R. [Universitat de barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Biologia Vegetal; Cancio, D. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Real, J. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    1995-12-31

    The behaviour of {sup 134}Cs, {sup 110m}Ag and {sup 85}Sr was studied in different soil-plant systems, using two types of Mediterranean soil with contrasting properties (sandy and sandy-loam soils). The plant species used was lettuce (Lactuca sativa). Contamination was induced at different stages of plant growth, using a synthetic aerosol which simulated a distant contamination source. Characterisation of aerosol and soils, interception factors in the various growth stages, foliar and root uptake, leaching from leaves by irrigation and distribution and migration of radionuclides of soils were studied, in an attempt to understand the key factors involving radionuclide soil-to-plant transferance. (author).

  1. Acquisition and validation of transfer data for Ru from reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasius, E.; Huth, R.; Krumrey, R.; Neumann, W.; Woll, G.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the investigation is to determine the ruthenium transfer factor from soil to plants on the basis of selected useful plants and food plants, namely potatoes, summer wheat and pasture grass. For this purpose ruthenium is used in the form of dioxide, chloride and nitrosyl complexes. Tests are made in field patches with inactive ruthenium and in isotope laboratories with Ru-106 or Ru-103. After the harvest of the plants the ruthenium is determined by means of electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry in pyrolytically coated graphite pipes. (orig./RB) [de

  2. Transferring aviation human factors technology to the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montemerlo, M.D.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the availability of aviation safety technology and research on problems which are sufficiently similar to those faced by the nuclear power industry that an agressive effort to adapt and transfer that technology and research is warranted. Because of time and space constraints, the scope of this paper is reduced from a discussion of all of aviation safety technology to the human factors of air carrier safety. This area was selected not only because of similarities in the human factors challenges shared by both industries (e.g. selection, training, evaluation, certification, etc.) but because experience in aviation has clearly demonstrated that human error contributes to a substantially greater proportion of accidents and incidents than does equipment failure. The Congress of the United States has placed a great deal of emphasis on investigating and solving human factors problems in aviation. A number of recent examples of this interest and of the resulting actions are described. The opinions of prominent aviation organizations as to the human factors problems most in need of research are presented, along with indications of where technology transfer to the nuclear power industry may be viable. The areas covered include: fatigue, crew size, information transfer, resource management, safety data-bases, the role of automation, voice and data recording systems, crew distractions, the management of safety regulatory agencies, equipment recertification, team training, crew work-load, behavioural factors, human factors of equipment design, medical problems, toxicological factors, the use of simulators for training and certification, determining the causes of human errors, the politics of systems improvement, and importance of both safety and public perception of safety if the industry is to be viable. (author)

  3. Transfer factors of radionuclides from Andosols to crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban-nai, Tadaaki; Muramatsu Yasuyuki

    2004-01-01

    Transfer factors (TFs) of some selected radionuclides from Andosols, a typical soil type in Japan, to several crops (leaf vegetables and root vegetables) have been studied by radiotracer experiments. Cabbages, komatsuna, spinach and lettuce were used as leaf vegetables and radish, carrot and turnip were used as root vegetables. The mean values of TFs (on a wet weight basis) of radionuclides such as 137 Cs, 85 Sr, 60 Co, 54 Mn, 65 Zn and 125 I for edible parts of leaf vegetables were 0.11, 0.24, 0.046, 0.60, 0.51 and 0.0054, respectively. Respective values for edible parts of root vegetables were 0.02, 0.14, 0.004. 0.09, 0.13 and 0.0022. The obtained TFs were, in most cases in the order Mn, Zn, Sr>Cs>Co>I. The TFs of 125 I were much lower than the other nuclides. The transfer factors obtained for the edible part of root vegetables were markedly lower than those for leaf vegetables. The transfer factors of Sr and Mn for leaf vegetables were generally higher for older (outer) leaves than younger (inner) ones. In the root vegetables, TFs for leaf parts were typically higher than those for tubers. (author)

  4. Deuteron form factor measurements at low momentum transfers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlimme B. S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A precise measurement of the elastic electron-deuteron scattering cross section at four-momentum transfers of 0.24 fm−1 ≤ Q ≤ 2.7 fm−1 has been performed at the Mainz Microtron. In this paper we describe the utilized experimental setup and the necessary analysis procedure to precisely determine the deuteron charge form factor from these data. Finally, the deuteron charge radius rd can be extracted from an extrapolation of that form factor to Q2 = 0.

  5. Transfer characteristics of cadmium and lead from soil to the edible parts of six vegetable species in southeastern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guo; Su Miaoyu; Chen Yanhui; Lin Fenfang; Luo Dan; Gao Shufang

    2006-01-01

    The transfer characteristics of Cd and Pb from soils to the edible parts of six vegetable species were calculated from plant and corresponding surface soil samples collected from the fields in Fujian Province, southeastern China. The soil-to-plant transfer factors (TF) calculated from both total and DTPA-extractable Cd and Pb in the soils decreased with increasing total or DTPA-extractable Cd and Pb, indicating that the TF values of Cd and Pb depend on the soil metal content. For most plants studied, there was a significant relation between the TF values and the corresponding soil metal concentrations (total or DTPA-extractable) that was best described by an exponential equation (y = ax b ). We recommend that the representative TF value for a given crop-metal system should be estimated from the regression models between the transfer factors and the corresponding soil metal concentrations and at a given soil metal concentration. - Soil-to-plant transfer factors of Cd and Pb decreased with increasing soil contents of Cd and Pb

  6. Site specific transfer factor studies for Kaiga region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karunakara, N.

    2012-01-01

    The Radioecology Laboratory of University Science Instrumentation Centre, Mangalore University is engaged in frontline research studies on different aspects of environmental radioactivity and radiation protection for the last 20 years. Extensive studies have been carried out on radiation levels, radionuclides distribution, and transfer of radionuclides through terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric pathways in the environment of West Coast of India including the Kaiga nuclear power plant. The baseline studies on radioactivity levels around Kaiga region was carried out well before the nuclear power plant became operational and the data generated under these studies are considered to be highly valuable for future impact assessments. The nuclear power plant became operational in the year 1999 and since then this laboratory is involved in radiological impact assessment studies around the nuclear power plant. Detailed Kaiga specific studies are now ongoing to estimate the transfer factors and transfer coefficients for radionuclides for different pathways, such as, (i) soil to rice (ii) soil to different types of vegetables (iii) water/sediment to fish (iv) soil to grass (v) grass to cow milk and (vi) milk to child. For these studies, rice and vegetable fields were developed very close to the nuclear power plant in Kaiga to study the transfer of radionuclides. The water required for this field was drawn from coolant water discharge canal of the power plant. Rice and different types of vegetables were grown in the experimental fields in different seasons of the year and the uptake of radionuclides was studied. For a comparative study, rice and vegetables were also collected from the fields of farmers of nearby villages and analysed. The transfer of artificial radionuclides through pathway involving cow milk was also studied in detail. A grass field was developed and cows were adopted specifically for this study. The cows were allowed to graze freely in this grass field

  7. AAV5-Factor VIII Gene Transfer in Severe Hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, Savita; Walsh, Liron; Lester, Will; Perry, David; Madan, Bella; Laffan, Michael; Yu, Hua; Vettermann, Christian; Pierce, Glenn F; Wong, Wing Y; Pasi, K John

    2017-12-28

    Patients with hemophilia A rely on exogenous factor VIII to prevent bleeding in joints, soft tissue, and the central nervous system. Although successful gene transfer has been reported in patients with hemophilia B, the large size of the factor VIII coding region has precluded improved outcomes with gene therapy in patients with hemophilia A. We infused a single intravenous dose of a codon-optimized adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5) vector encoding a B-domain-deleted human factor VIII (AAV5-hFVIII-SQ) in nine men with severe hemophilia A. Participants were enrolled sequentially into one of three dose cohorts (low dose [one participant], intermediate dose [one participant], and high dose [seven participants]) and were followed through 52 weeks. Factor VIII activity levels remained at 3 IU or less per deciliter in the recipients of the low or intermediate dose. In the high-dose cohort, the factor VIII activity level was more than 5 IU per deciliter between weeks 2 and 9 after gene transfer in all seven participants, and the level in six participants increased to a normal value (>50 IU per deciliter) that was maintained at 1 year after receipt of the dose. In the high-dose cohort, the median annualized bleeding rate among participants who had previously received prophylactic therapy decreased from 16 events before the study to 1 event after gene transfer, and factor VIII use for participant-reported bleeding ceased in all the participants in this cohort by week 22. The primary adverse event was an elevation in the serum alanine aminotransferase level to 1.5 times the upper limit of the normal range or less. Progression of preexisting chronic arthropathy in one participant was the only serious adverse event. No neutralizing antibodies to factor VIII were detected. The infusion of AAV5-hFVIII-SQ was associated with the sustained normalization of factor VIII activity level over a period of 1 year in six of seven participants who received a high dose, with

  8. Soil-to-plant transfer of 99mTc: how to determine Tc-species in uptake and transport processes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krijger, G. C.; Van Elswijk, D. A.; Wolterbeek, H. Th.

    1995-01-01

    Selective extraction, filtration and capillary electrophoresis were used to recognize problems dealing with complexation, oxidation and ligand-exchange processes during collection and analysis of Tc-species in xylem exudates, while 99m Tc-citrate was used as a marker complex. Relatively unstable Tc-species were synthesized in xylem exudates. Oxidation of relative unstable Tc-species during the collection of xylem exudates was suggested, requiring new, better procedures to recognize Tc-species representative for the plant interior. (author)

  9. Transfer of some trace metals from water and soil to plants in coastal region of syria using instrumental neutron activation analysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassem, A.; Sarhil, A.

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this research to identify the trace elements of the impact on soil samples, plants and water in the coastal basin. Select the racial focus of the basic elements and the elements of impact in each of the samples of soil, some plants and irrigation water (underground and surface) in different parts of the basin, including the Syrian coast between the Lebanese border in the south and Turkey in the north using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The results showed that the concentrations of elements were high in some areas of the basin as a result ease of movement through surface and groundwater, due to nature of the geological cost area which is cracked and many faults and porous rock formations. The Large precipitation rain washed quickly the major agricultural soils, including fertilizers and sewage and municipal waste and some of them leak into the groundwater directly or moving from rivers and dams to these ground waters and agricultural soils to fall within the hydrological cycle and increase of this pollutant in the coastal strip, and adversely affect the marine environment through supplying them with many industrial contaminants: such as cement plants, oil and phosphate estuarine, thermal power plant, Baniyas's refinery and ports of ships. The method of neutron activation analysis considers as a reference method and is very effective in the study of environmental samples. 15 element concentrations were calculated using the relative method of INAA, data indicates that there is significant difference in the concentrations of study elements (As, Br, Co, Cr, Fe, K, Mn, Ni, Sb, Sc, Sr, Th, Ti, V, and Zn), depending on the nature of the site geography of irrigation water which used and the proximity of human events scattered along the study area. It is also a big difference in the concentration of these elements in the same soils and plants and the region between the closed systems of agriculture and open one, the increase of excessive pesticide and fertilizer affect in the concentration of some elements in the closed system. Research shows the role of geological and climatic conditions and the nature of the rocks and soils in the transition elements and the impact concentration in the soil, water and vegetation in the coastal zone, The results shown a good agreement in element concentration between the water samples and soil, plant samples to demonstrate the impact of human activities or pollution and salinization caused by the arrival of surface pollutants into the groundwater from leakage ranges from direct irrigation. (author)

  10. Caesium contamination in human milk and transfer factor from diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risica, S.; Campos Venuti, G.; Rogani, A.; Baronciani, D.; Petrone, M.

    1992-01-01

    A study on caesium contamination in human milk, as a consequence of the Chernobyl fallout, was conducted in 1989 on a group of women from one of the areas of northern Italy most heavily affected by the radioactive fallout. Their diet was studied, and the caesium intake was calculated by using the mean food activity concentration in that area. The caesium transfer factor was evaluated both as the ratio of caesium concentration in mother's milk to the daily intake, and by using a simplified milk compartment model. (author)

  11. Transfer factor - hypotheses for its structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifrine, M; Scibienski, R

    1975-01-01

    Transfer factor (TF) is a dialyzable extract from primed lymphocytes that is able to transfer specific delayed hypersensitivity from one animal to another. On the basis of available data we suggest that TF is a polypeptide with a molecular weight below 15,000 daltons. We hypothesize that TF is the variable light or heavy chain domain of immunoglobulin: such a molecule conforms with the accepted properties of TF and also has the necessary specificity requirements. We also hypothesize that TF is part of a receptor site. beta-2-microglobulin, a molecule that is an integral part of cell surfaces, could be the anchor for TF. beta-2-microglobulin has homologies with the constant portion of immunoglobulin light or heavy chain and thus would combine with the variable domain (TF) to form a complete receptor site for a specific antigen. The properties of TF suggest its mode of action, which is discussed in detail in the text. The biologic advantages of TF is its ability to confer immediate (immunologie specific) protection while the 'normal' immune response develops.

  12. Pion form factor in QCD at intermediate momentum transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, V. M.; Khodjamirian, A.; Maul, M.

    2000-04-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of the electromagnetic pion form factor in the light-cone sum rule approach, including radiative corrections and higher-twist effects. The comparison to the existing data favors the asymptotic profile of the pion distribution amplitude and allows us to estimate the deviation: [∫du/uφπ(u)]/[∫du/uφasπ(u)]=1.1+/-0.1 at the scale of 1 GeV. Special attention is paid to the precise definition and interplay of soft and hard contributions at intermediate momentum transfer, and to the matching of the sum rule to the perturbative QCD prediction. We observe a strong numerical cancellation between the soft (end-point) contribution and power-suppressed hard contributions of higher twist, so that the total nonperturbative correction to the usual PQCD result turns out to be of the order of 30% for Q2~1 GeV2.

  13. Transfer factors of radionuclides from Andsols to some selected crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban-nai, Tadaaki; Yoshida, Satoshi; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki

    2007-01-01

    In order to obtain the applicable transfer factor for Japanese environment, we performed radiotracer experiments on the uptake of 137 Cs, 85 Sr, 54 Mn, 60 Co and 65 Zn by leaf vegetables (two cabbages, komatsuna, spinach and lettuce), root vegetables (radish and carrot) and other crops (wheat, soy bean sweet potato and tomato) using the Andosol (Kuroboku soil), the most common of Japanese arable soils. The ranges of TFs (on a dry weight basis) of 137 Cs, 85 Sr, 60 Co, 54 Mn and 65 Zn for edible parts of crops (leaf vegetables, root vegetables, wheat and soy bean) were 0.09 - 1.42, 0.24 - 3.7, 0.019 - 1.5, 0.31 - 12 and 0.68 - 14, respectively. TFs were, in most cases in the order Mn, Zn, Sr > Cs > Co. (author)

  14. Analysis of transfer reactions: determination of spectroscopic factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeley, N. [CEA Saclay, Dept. d' Astrophysique, de Physique des Particules de Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee (DSM/DAPNIA/SPhN), 91- Gif sur Yvette (France); The Andrzej So an Institute for Nuclear Studies, Dept. of Nuclear Reactions, Warsaw (Poland)

    2007-07-01

    An overview of the most popular models used for the analysis of direct reaction data is given, concentrating on practical aspects. The 4 following models (in order of increasing sophistication): the distorted wave born approximation (DWBA), the adiabatic model, the coupled channels born approximation, and the coupled reaction channels are briefly described. As a concrete example, the C{sup 12}(d,p)C{sup 13} reaction at an incident deuteron energy of 30 MeV is analysed with progressively more physically sophisticated models. The effect of the choice of the reaction model on the spectroscopic information extracted from the data is investigated and other sources of uncertainty in the derived spectroscopic factors are discussed. We have showed that the choice of the reaction model can significantly influence the nuclear structure information, particularly the spectroscopic factors or amplitudes but occasionally also the spin-parity, that we wish to extract from direct reaction data. We have also demonstrated that the DWBA can fail to give a satisfactory description of transfer data but when the tenets of the theory are fulfilled DWBA can work very well and will yield the same results as most sophisticated models. The use of global rather than fitted optical potentials can also lead to important differences in the extracted spectroscopic factors.

  15. Uptake and transfer factors of 137Cs by mushrooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, G.

    1991-01-01

    The 137 Cs content of 118 species (668 samples) of higher fungi collected in the period from August 1984 to October 1989 at three different locations in Styria, Austria, was determined by gamma-spectrometry. The Cs-content of most mushrooms has been increasing since September 1986. In order to find out which factors determine the 137 Cs-contamination of mushrooms and the transfer-value soil to mushroom, the concentration of total and plant-available radiocesium in soils as well as the pH-value, the content of humus, clay, silt, sand, exchangeable cations, the composition of the clay minerals, and the particle size distribution of the soils of two different locations were examined. The higher the 137 Cs contamination of the soil, the thicker the layer of humus and the higher the content of humus, the lower the pH-value, and the lower the amount of essential cations, especially of K + , the higher the amount of 137 Cs plant-available will be. Therefore, the contamination of the mushrooms in the coniferous forest of Koralpenblick (1000 m) is higher than in the mixed forest at the Rosenberg around Graz at approx. 500 m height. Of 26 different species of mushrooms measured at both sites, only 61% show the highest TF-values soil to mushrooms also at the Koralpenblick. In the spruce forest at Koralpenblick there are many species of mushrooms with high 137 Cs-contamination which were not found at the Rosenberg. However, the properties of the species to which a mushroom belongs are more important than environmental conditions and soil properties. The transfer values of 40 K stay within narrow bounds, whereas those of 137 Cs differ widely. (orig.)

  16. A metabolic derivation of tritium transfer factors in animal products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeriu, D.; Melintescu, A.; Crout, N. M. J.; Bersford, N. A.; Peterson, S. R.; Hess, M. van

    2001-01-01

    Tritium is a potentially important environmental contaminant arising from the nuclear industry. Because tritium is an isotope of hydrogen, its behaviour in the environment is controlled by the behaviour of hydrogen. Chronic releases of tritium to the atmosphere, in particular, will result in tritium-to-hydrogen (T/H) ratios in plants and animals that are more or less in equilibrium with T/H ratios in the air moisture. Tritium is thus a potentially important contaminant of plant and animal food products. The transfer of tritium from air moisture to plants is quite well understood. In contrast, although a number of regulatory agencies have published transfer coefficient values for diet tritium transfer for a limited number of animal products, a fresh evaluation of these transfers needs to be made In this paper we present an approach for the derivation of tritium transfer coefficients which is based on the metabolism of hydrogen in animals in conjunction with experimental data on tritium transfer. The derived transfer coefficients separately account for transfer to and from free (i.e. water) and organically bound tritium. The predicted transfer coefficients are compared to available data independent of model development. Agreement is good, with the exception of the transfer coefficient for transfer from tritiated water to organically bound tritium in ruminants, which may be attributable to the particular characteristics of ruminant digestion. We show that transfer coefficients will vary in response to the metabolic status of an animal (e.g. stage of lactation, digestibility of diet, etc.) and that the use of a single transfer coefficient from diet to animal product is not appropriate for tritium. It is possible to derive concentration ratio values which relate the concentration of tritiated water and organically bound tritium in an animal product to the corresponding concentrations in the animals diet. These concentration ratios are shown to be less subject to

  17. Transfer factor for 137Cs in fresh water aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varughese, K.G.; Ramkumar, S.; John, Jaison T.; Rajan, M.P.; Gurg, R.P.

    2002-01-01

    137 Cs is one of the most abundant radionuclides produced in nuclear fission and due to its long radiological half-life and chemical similarity to potassium it has greater biological significance. Radioactive waste materials generated at nuclear facilities are generally disposed within the plant premises under its administrative control for effective radiation protection practices. However trace quantities of radionuclides are released into the environment through liquid and gaseous releases under the guidelines of regulatory agencies. The concentration of these radioactive elements in the environment is not detectable under normal circumstances due to the large dispersion and dilutions available in the environment. But these radionuclides can get accumulated in environmental matrices like silt, weed etc. and indicate the presence of radioactivity in the environment. This paper presents the results of a face-controlled studies conducted at Environmental Survey Laboratories at the Rajasthan Atomic Power Station (RAPS) and Kakrapar Atomic Power Station (KAPS) to estimate distribution of low-level radioactivity in the fresh water system. An attempt has been made to derive the Transfer Factor for 137 Cs in fish, weed, and silt and to evaluate the concentration of 137 Cs in water samples, which is otherwise not detectable under normal procedure of measurement. (author)

  18. Soil-to-potato transfer factors of elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Hirofumi; Watabe, Teruhisa.

    1996-01-01

    Transfer factors (TFs) of stable elements from soil to potato were determined for 26 pairs of samples which were collected at different sites in Aomori prefecture, Japan. The concentrations of 31 elements in both soil and potato samples were determined by neutron activation analysis. Several of these elements were divided into two groups, each having different TF characteristics. In the first group of elements, such as Cl, K, Ca, etc., an inverse correlation was seen between the TFs for each element and their concentrations in the soil. The relatively constant concentrations of these elements in potato were independent of the concentrations of the same elements in soil. However, in the second group, the TFs for other elements, such as Sc, Co and so on, in potato were independent of their concentrations in the soil. The fluctuation of TF observed in this study was smaller than that previously reported. It may be attributed to the fact that the experiment was done in a relatively narrow geographic area. In addition, the TFs for stable elements in this study were generally one to three orders of magnitude lower than those compiled for radioactive isotopes in IAEA publications. These differences should be precisely examined hereafter. (author)

  19. The transfer factors of I, Ba, Sr, Y and Zr from soil to leafy vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Daling; Li Mianfeng; Weng Senhan; Wen Guanghao; Liu Xiaowei; Zhang Cunxiang; Zhang Zeng; Yu Junyue

    1996-01-01

    The transfer factors of I, Ba, Sr, Y and Zr from soil to leafy vegetables have been determined using method of radioisotope tracers and element content analysis. The effects of growth period, size of the vegetables, contents of the isotopes in the soil and other climatic factors on the transfer factors have also been studied

  20. Factors affecting conception rates in cattle following embryo transfer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Embryo Transfer Technology (ETT) plays an important role in improving productivity of dairy cattle (Bos indicus). Embryo Transfer Technology allows top quality female livestock to improve a herd or flock in much the same way that artificial insemination has allowed greater use of superior sires. The technology hastens ...

  1. Concentration factors and aggregated transfer factors in selected bio-indicators from Sweden[Radioecology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, E.; Samuelsson, C.; Holstensson, M. [Lund Univ. (Sweden)

    2006-04-15

    Previously most common has been to use lichens and mosses in the terrestrial environment and mussels and algae in the marine environment. Several plants are promising and less commonly used such as ferns (e.g. Bracken, Pteridium aquilinum) and the fresh water plant, Water horsetail (Equisetum fluviatile). These show high uptake of radiocaesium but also accumulate plutonium and americium. Even if the uptake of transuranic elements is low, this behaviour is rather unique for plants. On bases of available data we have calculated concentration factors Cf and aggregated transfer factors, ATF according to their definitions i.e. Bq kg{sup -1} (biota)/Bq kg{sup -1}(water) and Bq kg{sup -1} (biota)/Bq m{sup -2} respectively. For earlier samples the water concentrations can only roughly be estimated while deposition data are rather well known. For fresh water samples it is a little awkward to use concentration factors since the uptake generally is not from water. Therefore a kind of Aggregated Transfer Factor has also been calculated on basis of using the same areal deposition in sediments as on land. We have used dry weight concentrations for biota. Data are presented for samples of various bio-medicator organisms. (LN)

  2. Korean experimental studies on the radionuclide transfer in crop plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Y.H.; Lim, K.M.; Choi, G.S.; Choi, H.J.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, C.W.

    2003-01-01

    In Korea, data on the radionuclide transfer in crop plants have been produced almost exclusively at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), where experimental studies have been carried out for last about 20 years. These works are briefly outlined in this paper which shows results with emphasis on rice data. Soil-to-plant transfer factors of radionuclides including radiocesium and radiostrontium were measured through greenhouse experiments for various crop species. Not only conventional transfer factors but also those based on the activity applied to unit area of the soil surface were investigated. Field studies on the transfer of fallout 137 Cs were carried out for rice and Chinese cabbage. As for parameters in relation to direct plant contamination, interception factors and translocation factors were obtained through greenhouse experiments. Plants were sprayed with radioactive solutions containing 54 Mn, 57 Co, 85 Sr, 103 Ru and 134 Cs at different growth stages. Experiments on the plant exposure to airborne HTO and I 2 vapor were also carried out. The transfer parameters generally showed great variations with soils, crops, radionuclides and isotope application times. Most experiments were designed for acute releases of radioactivity but some results are applicable to steady-state conditions, too. Many of the produced data would be of use also in other countries including Japan. (author)

  3. Standard protocol for evaluation of environmental transfer factors around NPP sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegde, A.G.; Verma, P.C.; Rao, D.D.

    2009-01-01

    This document presents the standard procedures for evaluation of site specific environmental transfer factors around NPP sites. The scope of this document is to provide standard protocol to be followed for evaluation of environmental transfer factors around NPP sites. The studies on transfer factors are being carried out at various NPP sites under DAE-BRNS projects for evaluation of site specific transfer factors for radionuclides released from power plants. This document contains a common methodology in terms of sampling, processing, measurements and analysis of elemental/radionuclides, while keeping the site specific requirements also in place. (author)

  4. An Empirical Examination of the Effects of Personality Traits and Transfer Climate Factors on Transfer of Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Imran

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Personality has been considered an important factor influencing trainee efficiency & organizational productivity. Similarly, work climate factors have been recognized as primary influencers in post training context influencing productivity. But research concerning the impact of personality and work climate on trainees’ learning motivation has been very scant and mostly conducted in the western context. The present study was an attempt therefore, to extend this line of research in the Indian context involving educational sector of the State of Jammu & Kashmir. A sample of 517 teacher trainees was drawn for the present study using convenience sampling method. Results indicate that personality traits (i.e., conscientiousness, openness to experience, and internal locus of control do not influence training transfer directly or indirectly, while, transfer climate factors do affect training transfer both directly as well as indirectly via learning motivation. The implications of the results are discussed and the limitations of the study are noted, along with suggested avenues for future research.

  5. Solubility is the most important mass transfer factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slobodov, A.A.; Zarembo, V.I.

    1992-01-01

    The existence of the quantitative correlation between mass transfer and equilibrium solubility of corrosion products of construction materials in water circuits of power plants is shown. Thermodynamic and mathematical methods of modeling and calculating for these processes are developed. The results for iron based materials - aqueous solution systems in a wide range of temperature, pH, oxygen-hydrogen concentrations are presented. The optimization conditions for mass transfer, sedimentation of corrosion products for BWR, PWR reactors, etc. have been obtained

  6. Cloning animals by somatic cell nuclear transfer – biological factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, X Cindy; Kubota, Chikara; Enright, Brian; Yang, Xiangzhong

    2003-01-01

    Cloning by nuclear transfer using mammalian somatic cells has enormous potential application. However, somatic cloning has been inefficient in all species in which live clones have been produced. High abortion and fetal mortality rates are commonly observed. These developmental defects have been attributed to incomplete reprogramming of the somatic nuclei by the cloning process. Various strategies have been used to improve the efficiency of nuclear transfer, however, significant breakthroughs are yet to happen. In this review we will discuss studies conducted, in our laboratories and those of others, to gain a better understanding of nuclear reprogramming. Because cattle are a species widely used for nuclear transfer studies, and more laboratories have succeeded in cloning cattle than any other specie, this review will be focused on somatic cell cloning of cattle. PMID:14614770

  7. Transfer of 137Cs in Zea mays and Phaseolus vulgaris in a semi-arid ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervantes, M.L.; Segovia, N.; Gaso P, M.I.; Palacios, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    With the objective to analyse the transference of 137 Cs from soil to plants, it is realized a study in maize and bean plants in the Radioactive Waste Storage Center (CADER). This site is located in a semi-arid region with a characteristic vegetation of a sub humid temperature zone. So those plants maize and beans were cultivated in four zones near CADER during a four years period. The obtained results for 1991 to 1994 for 137 Cs in soil samples for those zones showed an evident contamination in zone 1, due to a rupture of an industrial source. In 1994 the effect of decontamination was evident since the values of specific activity found in roots were around magnitude lesser than found in 1992. In spite of exhaustive studies have been reported about the transference factors for 137 Cs in different agricultural foods, relatively few of them have paid attention to the interactions between cereals and leguminous associated in semiarid ecosystems. (Author)

  8. Transfer of Patients in a Telestroke Network: What Are the Relevant Factors for Making This Decision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingner, Carsten M; Brodoehl, Stefan; Funck, Laura; Klingner, Caroline C; Berrouschot, Jörg; Witte, Otto W; Günther, Albrecht

    2018-02-01

    Background/Introduction: Current telestroke network consultations are focused on decision-making in the hyperacute stage of stroke management. The two main questions in telestroke consultations are whether thrombolysis should be initiated and whether the patient should be transferred to a hub hospital. Although guidelines exist for initiating intravenous thrombolytic therapy, the question of whether patients should be transferred is far more elusive. In this study, we investigated the factors involved in the decision to transfer stroke patients to a hub hospital. We were particularly interested in identifying factors that promote or impede the transfer of patients. We enrolled 1,615 cases of telestroke consultation of the University Hospital Jena. The two main factors that independently influenced the probability of transferring a patient were the patient's age and the identification of a proximal vessel occlusion. Interestingly, factors such as the severity of symptoms and the time elapsed from symptom onset were not found to have an independent influence on the decision to transfer a patient. The transfer of most patients was justified by the possibility of performing interventional reperfusion therapy. We discuss the effectiveness of the current decision-making process and possible ways to improve decision-making for a more effective selection of patients who would benefit from transfer. The decision-making process to a transfer patient is not standardized and constitutes a trade-off between the intention to treat all possible patients while avoiding the transfer of patients without treatment options.

  9. Factors predisposing nursing home resident to inappropriate transfer to emergency department. The FINE study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélie Perrin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Each year, around one out of two nursing home (NH residents are hospitalized in France, and about half to the emergency department (ED. These transfers are frequently inappropriate. This paper describes the protocol of the FINE study. The first aim of this study is to identify the factors associated with inappropriate transfers to ED. Methods/design: FINE is a case-control observational study. Sixteen hospitals participate. Inclusion period lasts 7 days per season in each center for a total period of inclusion of one year. All the NH residents admitted in ED during these periods are included. Data are collected in 4 times: before transfer in the NH, at the ED, in hospital wards in case of patient's hospitalization and at the patient's return to NH. The appropriateness of ED transfers (i.e. case versus control NH residents is determined by a multidisciplinary team of experts. Results: Our primary objective is to determine the factors predisposing NH residents to inappropriate transfer to ED. Our secondary objectives are to assess the cost of the transfers to ED; study the evolution of NH residents' functional status and the psychotropic and inappropriate drugs prescription between before and after the transfer; calculate the prevalence of potentially avoidable transfers to ED; and identify the factors predisposing NH residents to potentially avoidable transfer to ED. Discussion: A better understanding of the determinant factors of inappropriate transfers to ED of NH residents may lead to proposals of recommendations of better practice in NH and would allow implementing quality improvement programs in the health organization. Keywords: Inappropriate transfer, Nursing home resident, Emergency department transfer, Potentially avoidable transfer, Appropriateness of transfer, Inappropriate hospitalization

  10. Transfer of chemicals from feed to animal products: The use of transfer factors in risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeman, W.R.; Berg, K.J. van den; Houben, G.F.

    2007-01-01

    The human risk assessment of feed contaminants has often been hampered by a lack of knowledge concerning their behaviour when consumed by livestock. To gain a better understanding of the transfer of contaminants from animal feed to animal products, a meta-analysis of public literature was made. Data

  11. Soil-plant-transfer factors for I-129 and pasture vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisch, A.; Schuettelkopf, H.

    1993-07-01

    The transfer factors for soil/plant, I-129 and I-127 and pasture vegetation have been measured with soils developed by wethering of granite, jura and cretaceous formations. Greenhouse (Karlsruhe) and field experiments (Munich) have been performed using lysimeters. Three ground water levels and the influence of a six weeks flooding was measured. About 90% of the transfer factors ranged from 0.000 to 0.020. The highest values have been determined with soils from granite wethering. The flooding of the lysimeters caused an important increase of the transfer factors after the end of flooding. (orig.) [de

  12. Efficiency of porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer – a retrospective study of factors related to embryo recipient and embryos transferred

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongye Huang

    2013-10-01

    The successful generation of pigs via somatic cell nuclear transfer depends on reducing risk factors in several aspects. To provide an overview of some influencing factors related to embryo transfer, the follow-up data related to cloned pig production collected in our laboratory was examined. (i Spring showed a higher full-term pregnancy rate compared with winter (33.6% vs 18.6%, P = 0.006. Furthermore, a regression equation can be drawn between full-term pregnancy numbers and pregnancy numbers in different months (y = 0.692x−3.326. (ii There were no significant differences detected in the number of transferred embryos between surrogate sows exhibiting full-term development compared to those that did not. (iii Non-ovulating surrogate sows presented a higher percentage of full-term pregnancies compared with ovulating sows (32.0% vs 17.5%, P = 0.004; respectively. (iv Abortion was most likely to take place between Day 27 to Day 34. (v Based on Life Table Survival Analysis, delivery in normally fertilized and surrogate sows is expected to be completed before Day 117 or Day 125, respectively. Additionally, the length of pregnancy in surrogate sows was negatively correlated with the average litter size, which was not found for normally fertilized sows. In conclusion, performing embryo transfer in appropriate seasons, improving the quality of embryos transferred, optimizing the timing of embryo transfer, limiting the occurrence of abortion, combined with ameliorating the management of delivery, is expected to result in the harvest of a great number of surviving cloned piglets.

  13. The influence of national level factors on international kaizen transfer: an exploratory study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yokozawa, Kodo; Steenhuis, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research study was to examine the international transfer of kaizen or continuous improvement. The central research question was formulated as: what national level factors influence the transfer of kaizen, and how? Design/methodology/approach: In the study, a survey

  14. Perception of Transfer Climate Factors in the Macro and Micro Organizational Work Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diggs, Byron Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study was designed to provide insight on the perceived transfer climate factors in the macro and micro organizational work environment that may influence an employee's willingness to transfer what was learned in a training program to the job. More specifically, the purpose of the study was to delineate descriptive patterns and…

  15. Radiocesium storage in soil microbial biomass of undisturbed alpine meadow soils and its relation to 137Cs soil-plant transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stemmer, Michael; Hromatka, Angelika; Lettner, Herbert; Strebl, Friederike

    2005-01-01

    This study focuses on radiocesium storage in soil microbial biomass of undisturbed alpine meadow sites and its relation to the soil-to-plant transfer. Soil and plant samples were taken in August 1999 from an altitude transect (800-1600 m.a.s.l.) at Gastein valley, Austria. Soil samples were subdivided into 3-cm layers for analyses of total, K 2 SO 4 -extractable and microbially stored 137 Cs. Microbial biomass was measured by the fumigation extraction method, and fungal biomass was quantified using ergosterol as biomarker molecule. In general, the quantity of 137 Cs stored in the living soil microbial biomass was relatively small. At the high-altitude meadows, showing high amounts of fungal biomass, microbially stored 137 Cs amounted to 0.64 ± 0.14 kBq m -2 which corresponds to about 1.2-2.7% of the total 137 Cs soil inventory. At lower altitudes, microbial 137 Cs content was distinctly smaller and in most cases not measurable at all using the fumigation extraction method. However, a positive correlation between the observed soil-to-plant aggregated transfer factor, microbially stored 137 Cs and fungal biomass was found, which indicates a possible role of fungal biomass in the storage and turnover of 137 Cs in soils and in the 137 Cs uptake by plants

  16. Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Aarkrog, Vibe

    Bogen er den første samlede indføring i transfer på dansk. Transfer kan anvendes som praksis-filosofikum. Den giver en systematisk indsigt til den studerende, der spørger: Hvordan kan teoretisk viden bruges til at reflektere over handlinger i situationer, der passer til min fremtidige arbejdsplads?...

  17. Experimental study on condensation heat transfer enhancement and pressure drop penalty factors in four microfin tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D [Korea University, Seoul (Korea). Institute of Advanced Machinery Design; Lee, Kyu-Jung [Korea University, Seoul (Korea). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2005-08-01

    Heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of four microfin tubes were experimentally investigated for condensation of refrigerants R134a, R22, and R410A in four different test sections. The microfin tubes examined during this study consisted of 8.92, 6.46, 5.1, and 4 mm maximum inside diameter. The effect of mass flux, vapor quality, and refrigerants on condensation was investigated in terms of the heat transfer enhancement factor and the pressure drop penalty factor. The pressure drop penalty factor and the heat transfer enhancement factor showed a similar tendency for each tube at given vapor quality and mass flux. Based on the experimental data and the heat-momentum analogy, correlations for the condensation heat transfer coefficients in an annular flow regime and the frictional pressure drops are proposed. (author)

  18. 137Cs Transfer Factor from Latosol Soil to Swamp Gabbages (Ipomea Reptans Poir)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leli-Nirwani; Yurfida; Buchori

    2001-01-01

    A study of 137 Cs transfer factor from Latosol soil to swamp cabbages plant has been conducted using pot treatment system with complete random design. The aim of the research is to determine transfer factor of 137 Cs from latosol soil to swamp cabbages plant. Cs-137 concentration administered was 7.5287 kBq/pot. The number of swamp cabbages planted in 137 Cs treated soil and in cannot soil respectively was 12 pots filled with 1 kg soil/pot. After harvest, the weight of dried plant was measured. Transfer factor was determined according to the accumulation of 137 Cs concentration in swamp cabbages and soil and counted using Spectrometer Gamma. It was found that is a significant difference between 137 Cs concentration in swamp cabbages planted inthe treated soil and that of control soil. Transfer factor ranges between 0.02 and 0.13 with the averageof 0.08. (author)

  19. Parameters on the radionuclide transfer in crop plants for Korean food chain dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong Ho; Lim, K. M.; Cho, Y. H.

    2001-12-01

    For more realistic assessment of Korean food chain radiation doses due to the operation of nuclear facilities, it is required to use domestically produced data for radionuclide transfer parameters in crop plants. In this report, results of last about 15 years' studies on radionuclide transfer parameters in major crop plants by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, were summarized and put together. Soil-to-plant transfer factors, parameters quantifying the root uptake of radionuclides, were measured through greenhouse experiments and field studies. In addition to traditional transfer factors, which are based on the activity in unit weight of soil, those based on the activity applied to unit area of soil surface were also investigated. Interception factors, translocation factors and weathering half lives, parameters in relation to direct plant contamination, were investigated through greenhouse experiments. The levels of initial plant contamination with HTO and I2 vapor were described with absorption factors. Especially for HTO vapor, 3H levels in crop plants at harvest were expressed with TFWT (tissue free water tritium) reduction factors and OBT (organically bound tritium) production factors. The above-mentioned parameters generally showed great variations with soils, crops and radionuclide species and application times. On the basis of summarized results, the points to be amended or improved in food chain dose assessment models were discussed both for normal operation and for accidental release

  20. Baryon form factors at high momentum transfer and generalized parton distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoler, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Nucleon form factors at high momentum transfer t are treated in the framework of generalized parton distributions (GPD's). The possibility of obtaining information about parton high transverse momentum components by application of GPD's to form factors is discussed. This is illustrated by applying an ad hoc 2-body parton wave function to elastic nucleon form factors F 1 and F 2 , the N→Δ transition magnetic form factor G M * , and the wide angle Compton scattering form factor R 1

  1. Effect of AFCF on the soil-plant transfer of Cs-134

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenhove, H; Van Hees, M; Vandecasteele, C

    1996-09-18

    The possible use of ammonium-ferric-hexaCynano-Ferrate (AFCF) as a countermeasure for radiocaesium soil-to-plant transfer is evaluated. On a sandy agricultural soil, an AFCF application dose of 10 and 100 g of AFCF m{sup -2} reduced the radiocaesium transfer to ryegrass with a factor of respectively 25 and 225 without affecting plant growth. Even additions of one gram of AFCF m{sup -2} resulted in a fourfold reduction of the radiocaesium transfer factor. Additions of less than one gram of AFCF m{sup -2} are hardly effective in reducing radiocaesium transfer to ryegrass. Depending on the soil radiocaesium contamination level, the cost of AFCF application can be out-leveled by the benefits due to the decrease averted dose. The decrease in averted dose when man is consuming less contaminated food due to the AFCF application was assessed using a simple cost-benefit model. For a loamy soil with an intrinsically higher radiocaesium fixation capacity than a sandy soil, AFCF additions of 10 g m{sup -2} only reduced transfer with a factor of 3, which is on this soil type only as effective as ploughing in reducing transfer to ryegrass. It is concluded that AFCF application is not recommended as countermeasure for contaminated loamy soils.

  2. Soil to rice transfer factors for 210Pb: a study on rice grown in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karunakara, N.; Rao, Chetan; Ujwal, P.; Yashodhara, I.; Sudeep Kumara; Somashekarappa, H.M.; Bhaskara Shenoy, K.; Ravi, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    India is the second largest producer of rice (Oryza sativa L.) in the world and rice is the essential component of the diet for the majority of the population of India. However, detailed studies aimed at evaluation of radionuclide transfer factors (F v ) for rice grown in India are almost non-existent. This paper presents soil to rice transfer factors for 210 Pb for rice grown in natural field conditions on the West Coast of India. A rice field was developed very close to the Kaiga nuclear power plant for the field studies. For a comparative study of radionuclide transfer factors, rice samples were also collected from the rice fields of nearby villages. The soil to un-hulled rice grain 210 Pb varied in the range <1.2 x10 -2 to 8.1 x 10 -1 with a mean of 1.4 x 10 -1 . The mean values of un-hulled grain to white rice processing retention factors (F r ) was 0.03 for 210 Pb. Using the processing retention factors the soil to white rice transfer factor was estimated and found to have the mean value of 4.2 x 10 -3 . The study has shown that the transfer of 210 Pb was retained in the root and its transfer to above ground organs of rice plant is significantly lower. (author)

  3. Modeling the factors that influence knowledge transfer in mergers and acquisitions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Haiyan; LIANG Zhanping

    2010-01-01

    This paper constructs a model on the factors that influence knowledge transfer in mergers and acquisitions (M&A) and validates it via questionnaire surveys.Using 125 valid collected questionnaires,multiple linear regression analysis and hierarchical regression analysis showed that five out of the ten factors had a positive effect on knowledge transfer effect.The ranking of factor importance,from high to low,was knowledge explicitness,relationship quality,learning intent,advanced transfer activities,and learning capability,which is fairly consistent with positive factors observed in other interorganizational knowledge transfer researches.Our results also showed that one of the control variables (size of acquired firm) had neither a direct or indirect effect on knowledge transfer in M&A.Additionally,our research found that knowledge distance and degree of M&A integration had a positive influence on knowledge transfer effect at the early stage after M&A,but had a negative influence at the late stage.Based on this research,several suggestions for knowledge transfer in M&A are proposed.

  4. Modeling the factors that influence knowledge transfer in mergers and acquisitions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU; Haiyan; LIANG; Zhanping

    2010-01-01

    This paper constructs a model on the factors that influence knowledge transfer in mergers and acquisitions(M&A)and validates it via questionnaire surveys.Using 125valid collected questionnaires,multiple linear regression analysis and hierarchical regression analysis showed that five out of the ten factors had a positive effect on knowledge transfer effect.The ranking of factor importance,from high to low,was knowledge explicitness,relationship quality,learning intent,advanced transfer activities,and learning capability,which is fairly consistent with positive factors observed in other interorganizational knowledge transfer researches.Our results also showed that one of the control variables(size of acquired firm)had neither a direct or indirect effect on knowledge transfer in M&A.Additionally,our research found that knowledge distance and degree of M&A integration had a positive influence on knowledge transfer effect at the early stage after M&A,but had a negative influence at the late stage.Based on this research,several suggestions for knowledge transfer in M&A are proposed.

  5. Describing the nucleon electromagnetic form factors at high momentum transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theussl, L.; Desplanques, B.; Silvestre-Brac, B.; Varga, K.

    1999-01-01

    Electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon are calculated within the framework of a non-relativistic constituent-quark model. The emphasis is put on the reliability and accuracy of present day numerical methods used to solve the three-body problem. The high-q 2 behaviour of the form factors is determined by the form of the wave function at short distances and, due to the small absolute values that one deals with, an accurate solution is essential. Refs. 5, figs. 2 (author)

  6. Calculation of transfer factors for the transfer of caesium-137 from feedingstuffs to the meat of farm animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirna, A.

    1979-01-01

    To calculate the radiation exposure of the population in the surroundings of nuclear technical plants, the knowledge of the transfer of emitted radionuclides to plants, animals, and food is an essential precondition. Recent data from the literature about transfer factors (food/meat) of cesium-137 (Cs-137) for calves, cattle, and pigs have revealed considerable differences between the species mentioned and the value in the 'general calculation fundaments for the determination of radiation exposure by emission of radioactive substances with waste air' (12). In the FR of Germany mainly pork is eaten, therefore, it is interesting to know if the transfer of Cs-137 in the individual animal species is so far the same that it is justified to only use the exposure path grass-cattle for calculation. The values presented here have suggested for the transfer of fall-out Cs-137 from the food into the meat a value, on an average, six times as high as had been assumed up to day. In pork meat, there was even an increase by 2 tenth powers. (orig.) [de

  7. Study of the transfer of radionuclides in trees at a forest site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barci-Funel, G.; Dalmasso, J.; Barci, V.L.; Ardisson, G.

    1995-01-01

    The transfer of radionuclides such as 137 Cs and 90 Sr from soil to trees (conifers) was studied in a forest area, the Boreon massif, 30 km north of Nice in South Eastern France. This area has been highly contaminated after the Chernobyl accident. Besides the γ-emitting fission products, the α-emitters 238 Pu and 239+240 Pu and the pure β-emitter 90 Sr were measured in different parts of the studied trees (roots, branches, twigs, etc.). As has already been reported by other authors, the radionuclide activities in the tree rings are not correlated with the fallout deposition. They were found varying according to the sap flux in the tree and higher in sapwood than in heartwood. For cesium the root absorption was found to be lower than the atmospheric deposition. Soil-to-plant concentration factors were calculated for 137 Cs, 90 Sr and 239+240 Pu

  8. Measurements of the nucleon form factors at large momentum transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andivahis, L.; Bosted, P.; Lung, A.; Arnold, R.; Keppel, C.; Rock, S.; Spengos, M.; Szalata, Z.; Tao, L.; Stuart, L.; Dietrich, F.; Alster, J.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Chang, C.; Dodge, W.; Gearhart, R.; Kuhn, S.; Gomez, J.; Griffioen, K.; Hicks, R.; Miskimen, R.; Peterson, G.; Rokni, S.; Hyde-Wright, C.; Swartz, K.; Petratos, G.; Sakumoto, W.

    1992-12-01

    New measurements of the electric G E (Q 2 ) and magnetic G M (Q 2 ) form factors of the nucleons are reported. The proton data cover the Q 2 range from 1.75 to 8.83 (GeV/c) 2 and the neutron data from 1.75 to 4.00 (GeV/c) 2 , more than doubling the range of previous data. Scaled by the dipole fit, G D (Q 2 ), the results for G Mp (Q 2 )/μ p G D (Q 2 ) decrease smoothly from 1.05 to 0.92, while G Ep (Q 2 )/G D (Q 2 ) is consistent with unity. The preliminary results for Gm.(Q2)1 GD(Q2) consistent with unity, while F En 2 is consistent with zero at all values of Q 2 . Comparisons are made to QCD Sum Rule, diquark, constituent quark, and VMD models, none of which agree with all of the new data

  9. Analytical expressions for two-nucleon transfer spectroscopic factors in sdg interacting boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devi, Y.D.; Kota, V.K.B.

    1991-01-01

    Analytical expressions for two-nucleon (l = 0,2 and 4) transfer spectroscopic factors are derived in the SU sdg (3) limit of the sdg interacting boson model. In addition, large N (boson number) limit expressions for the ratio of summed l = 0 transfer strength to excited 0 + states to that of ground state are derived in all the symmetry limits of the sdg model. Some comparisons with data are made. (author)

  10. Analytical expressions for two-nucleon transfer spectroscopic factors in sdg interacting boson model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devi, Y.D.; Kota, V.K.B. (Physical Research Lab., Ahmedabad (India))

    1991-11-01

    Analytical expressions for two-nucleon (l = 0,2 and 4) transfer spectroscopic factors are derived in the SU{sub sdg}(3) limit of the sdg interacting boson model. In addition, large N (boson number) limit expressions for the ratio of summed l = 0 transfer strength to excited 0{sup +} states to that of ground state are derived in all the symmetry limits of the sdg model. Some comparisons with data are made. (author).

  11. TRANSFER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on further studies on long range energy transfer between curcumine as donor and another thiazine dye, thionine, which is closely related to methylene blue as energy harvester (Figure 1). Since thionine is known to have a higher quantum yield of singlet oxygen sensitization than methylene blue [8], it is ...

  12. Fuel-element temperature nonstationary distribution caused by local pulsations of the factor of heat transfer to a coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pupko, V.Ya.

    1978-01-01

    The equation of nonstationary heat transfer caused by the appearance of a local pulse jump in the factor of heat transfer to a coolant is solved analytically for a cylindrical fuel element. The problem solution is generalized to a case of the periodically pulsating factor of heat transfer according to its value in an arbitrary point of the fuel element surface

  13. Accumulation of 137Cs in Brazilian soils and its transfer to plants under different climatic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handl, J.; Sachse, R.; Jakob, D.; Michel, R.; Evangelista, H.; Goncalves, A.C.; Freitas, A.C. de

    2008-01-01

    The spatial distribution and behaviour of the global fallout 137 Cs in the tropical, subtropical and equatorial soil-plant systems were investigated at several upland sites in Brazil selected according to their climate characteristics, and to the agricultural importance. To determine the 137 Cs deposition density, undisturbed soil profiles were taken from 23 environments situated between the latitudes of 02 o N and 30 o S. Sampling sites located along to the equator exhibited 137 Cs deposition densities with an average value of 219 Bq m -2 . Extremely low deposition densities of 1.3 Bq m -2 were found in the Amazon region. In contrast, the southern part of Brazil, located between latitudes of 20 o S and 34 o S, exhibited considerably higher deposition densities ranging from 140 Bq m -2 to 1620 Bq m -2 . To examine the 137 Cs soil-to-plant transfer in the Brazilian agricultural products, 29 mainly tropical plant species, and corresponding soil samples were collected at 43 sampling locations in nine federal states of Brazil. Values of the 137 Cs concentration factor plant/soil exhibited a large range from 0.020 (beans) to 6.2 (cassava). Samples of some plant species originated from different collecting areas showed different concentration factors. The 137 Cs content of some plants collected was not measurable due to a very low 137 Cs concentration level found in the upper layers of the incremental soils. Globally, the soil-to-plant transfer of 137 Cs can be described by a logarithmic normal distribution with a geometric mean of 0.3 and a geometric standard deviation of 3.9

  14. Environmental factors influencing gene transfer agent (GTA mediated transduction in the subtropical ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren D McDaniel

    Full Text Available Microbial genomic sequence analyses have indicated widespread horizontal gene transfer (HGT. However, an adequate mechanism accounting for the ubiquity of HGT has been lacking. Recently, high frequencies of interspecific gene transfer have been documented, catalyzed by Gene Transfer Agents (GTAs of marine α-Proteobacteria. It has been proposed that the presence of bacterial genes in highly purified viral metagenomes may be due to GTAs. However, factors influencing GTA-mediated gene transfer in the environment have not yet been determined. Several genomically sequenced strains containing complete GTA sequences similar to Rhodobacter capsulatus (RcGTA, type strain were screened to ascertain if they produced putative GTAs, and at what abundance. Five of nine marine strains screened to date spontaneously produced virus-like particles (VLP's in stationary phase. Three of these strains have demonstrated gene transfer activity, two of which were documented by this lab. These two strains Roseovarius nubinhibens ISM and Nitratireductor 44B9s, were utilized to produce GTAs designated RnGTA and NrGTA and gene transfer activity was verified in culture. Cell-free preparations of purified RnGTA and NrGTA particles from marked donor strains were incubated with natural microbial assemblages to determine the level of GTA-mediated gene transfer. In conjunction, several ambient environmental parameters were measured including lysogeny indicated by prophage induction. GTA production in culture systems indicated that approximately half of the strains produced GTA-like particles and maximal GTA counts ranged from 10-30% of host abundance. Modeling of GTA-mediated gene transfer frequencies in natural samples, along with other measured environmental variables, indicated a strong relationship between GTA mediated gene transfer and the combined factors of salinity, multiplicity of infection (MOI and ambient bacterial abundance. These results indicate that GTA

  15. Requirement for Vibrio cholerae Integration Host Factor in Conjugative DNA Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    McLeod, Sarah M.; Burrus, Vincent; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2006-01-01

    The requirement for host factors in the transmission of integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) has not been extensively explored. Here we tested whether integration host factor (IHF) or Fis, two host-encoded nucleoid proteins, are required for transfer of SXT, a Vibrio cholerae-derived ICE that can be transmitted to many gram-negative species. Fis did not influence the transfer of SXT to or from V. cholerae. In contrast, IHF proved to be required for V. cholerae to act as an SXT donor. I...

  16. Energy transfer between a nanosystem and its host fluid: A multiscale factorization approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereda, Yuriy V.; Espinosa-Duran, John M.; Ortoleva, Peter J.

    2014-02-01

    Energy transfer between a macromolecule or supramolecular assembly and a host medium is considered from the perspective of Newton's equations and Lie-Trotter factorization. The development starts by demonstrating that the energy of the molecule evolves slowly relative to the time scale of atomic collisions-vibrations. The energy is envisioned to be a coarse-grained variable that coevolves with the rapidly fluctuating atomistic degrees of freedom. Lie-Trotter factorization is shown to be a natural framework for expressing this coevolution. A mathematical formalism and workflow for efficient multiscale simulation of energy transfer is presented. Lactoferrin and human papilloma virus capsid-like structure are used for validation.

  17. Energy transfer between a nanosystem and its host fluid: A multiscale factorization approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sereda, Yuriy V.; Espinosa-Duran, John M.; Ortoleva, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Energy transfer between a macromolecule or supramolecular assembly and a host medium is considered from the perspective of Newton's equations and Lie-Trotter factorization. The development starts by demonstrating that the energy of the molecule evolves slowly relative to the time scale of atomic collisions-vibrations. The energy is envisioned to be a coarse-grained variable that coevolves with the rapidly fluctuating atomistic degrees of freedom. Lie-Trotter factorization is shown to be a natural framework for expressing this coevolution. A mathematical formalism and workflow for efficient multiscale simulation of energy transfer is presented. Lactoferrin and human papilloma virus capsid-like structure are used for validation

  18. Ultrastructural Study on Ultra-Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields and Transfer Factor Effects on Skin Ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadena, M. S. Reyes; Chapul, L. Sanchez; Perez, Javier; Garcia, M. N. Jimenez; Lopez, M. A. Jimenez; Espindola, M. E. Sanchez; Perez, R. Paniagua; Hernandez, N. A.; Paniagua, G.; Uribe, F.; Nava, J. J. Godina; Segura, M. A. Rodriguez

    2008-01-01

    We determined the effect of 120Hz ultra low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF) on the healing process of skin in 20 Wistar rats distributed in four groups in which chronic dermal ulcers had been produced. The first two groups received a dose of the transfer factor and interferon-beta (IFN-β) every 24 h during 12 days. The third group (positive control) received only electromagnetic field (ELF) sessions, and in the fourth group (negative control), no treatment was applied. The electromagnetic field was applied through a Helmholtz coils; 30 Gauss of intensity. Results shown histological changes that improve the healing process in animals subjected to ELF together with the transfer factor

  19. Physical and chemical factors influencing radionuclide behaviour in arable soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauret, G.; Vidal, M.; Alexakhin, R.M.; Kruglov, S.V.; Cremers, A.; Wauters, J.; Valcke, E.; Ivanov, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides integrates plant physiological and soil chemical aspects. Therefore, it is necessary to study the factors affecting the equilibrium of the radionuclides between solid and soil solution phases. Desorption and adsorption studies were applied to the podsolic and peat soils considered in the ECP-2 project. In the desorption approach, both sequential extraction and 'infinite bath' techniques were used. In the adsorption approach, efforts were directed at predicting Cs and Sr-K D on the basis of soil properties and soil solution composition. Desorption approach predicts time-dynamics of transfer with time but it is un sufficient for comparatively predicting transfer. Adsorption studies informs about which are the key factors affecting radionuclide transfer. For Sr, availability depends on the CEC and on the concentration of the Ca + Mg in the soil solution. For Cs, availability is mainly dependent on the partitioning between FES -frayed edge sites-, which are highly specific and REC -regular exchange complex-, with low selectivity for Cs. Moreover, availability depends on the K and NH 4 , levels in the soil solution and fixation properties of the soil. Considering these factors, the calculation of the in situ K D values helps to predict the relative transfer of radionuclides. The calculation of the K D of the materials that could be used as countermeasures could permit the prediction of its suitability to decrease transfer and therefore to help in producing cleaner agricultural products

  20. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON HEAT TRANSFER AND FRICTION FACTOR OF AL2O3 NANOFLUID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.V. Sharma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available L. Syam Sundar1 and K.V. Sharma2This paper reports experimental investigations of fully developed laminar convective heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of different volume concentrations of Al2O3 nanofluid in a plain tube, fitted with different twist ratios of twisted tape inserts. Experiments are conducted with water and nanofluid in the range of 700transfer coefficient of the nanofluid is high compared with water, and further enhancement of heat transfer is observed with the twisted tape inserts. Pressure drop is slightly increased with the inserts, but is comparatively negligible. A generalized regression equation is developed based on the experimental data for the estimation of the Nusselt number and friction factor for water and nanofluid in a plain tube with twisted tape inserts.

  1. Factors affecting the transfer of radionuclides from the environment to plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golmakani, S.; Moghaddam, V.M.; Hosseini, T.

    2008-01-01

    Much of our food directly or indirectly originates from plant material; thus, detailed studies on plant contamination processes are an essential part of international environmental research. This overview attempts to identify and describe the most important parameters and processes affecting the behaviour of radionuclide transfer to plants. Many parameters influence these processes. These parameters are related to: (1) plant, (2) soil, (3) radionuclide, (4) climate and (5) time. Often there is no boundary between the factors and they are linked to each other. Knowledge of important factors in radionuclide transfer to plants can help to assess and prevent radiological exposure of humans. This knowledge can also help to guide researches and modelling related to transfer of radionuclides to food chain. (authors)

  2. 60Co Transfer Factor From Lutosol Soil To Leafy Vegetable (Ipomea reptans poir)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leli-Nirwani; Jumaher; Wahyudi

    2003-01-01

    It has been conducted 60 Co transfer study from Lutosol soil to leafy vegetable plant by using pot treatment system. The aim of the research is to obtain data of the transfer factor of 60 Co from lutosol soil to leafy vegetable plant. Pot experiment was carried out by using the complete random design to evaluate two treatment, namely soil with 60 Co and without 60 Co (as a control). 60 Co concentration was with 6.1371 kBq/pot. Tested plant and control plant amount to 12 pots. Each pot contains 1 kg of soil. After harvesting, the weight of dry plant was determined and was conducted with Spectrometer Gamma to 60 Co concentration in dry plant and dry soil. Transfer factor was found to between 0.02 and 0.68 and the average is 0.2068. (author)

  3. Transfer of radioactive cesium from soil to rape plants, rape blossoms and rape honey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molzahn, D.; Klepsch, A.; Assmann-Wertmueller, U.

    1989-01-01

    Due to the test of atomic weapons and the accident in the nuclear power plant at Chernobyl, the vegetation in Germany has been exposed to cesium contamination in the soil. It was to be expected that activity would migrate from soil to plants and to food products. In this work, the transfer of radioactive cesium from soil to rape plants (Brassica napus var. oleifera), rape blossoms and further to rape honey was investigated. By measuring the gamma activity of cesium using germanium detectors with measuring capacity up to 30 h per sample (limit of detection about 0.14 Bq/kg to 0.19 Bq/kg), we determined a mean transfer factor f cs = 0,116 ± 0,080 for the system soil-rape plant, f cs = 0.065 + 0.075 for the system soil-rape blossom and F!S = 0.098 + 0.044 for the system soil-rape honey (plants and honey wet mass, soil dry mass) (Table IV). Additionally, for the transfer of cesium from rape plants to rape honey, a factor of f cs = 2.04 ± 7.23 (both wet mass) was determined. Due to some environmental circumstances, which can hardly ever be taken into account, the results obtained sometimes differ considerably. Nevertheless, the mean transfer factors are within the range of values found in literature (Table V) [de

  4. Transfer factors of 134Cs for olive and orange trees grown on different soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skarlou, V.; Nobeli, C.; Anoussis, J.; Haidouti, C.; Papanicolaou, E.

    1999-01-01

    Transfer factors (TF) of 134 Cs to olive and citrus trees grown on two different soils, were determined for a 3-year greenhouse experiment. Two-year-old trees were transplanted with their entire rootball into large pots containing the contaminated soil (110 kg pot -1 ). The soil was transferred to each pot in layers on the top of which 134 Cs as CsCl was dripped (18.5 MBq pot -1 ). For both evergreen trees, soil type significantly influenced radiocaesium transfer. 134 Cs concentration was lower for the calcareous-heavy soil than for the acid-light soil. Transfer factors of orange trees were higher than those of olive trees in the acid-light soil. Although a significant amount of 134 Cs was measured in olives grown on the acid-light soil, no 134 Cs was detected in the unprocessed olive oil when an oil fraction (5% f.w.) was extracted. On the contrary the edible part of the oranges showed the highest 134 Cs concentration of all plant parts. The relationship between 134 Cs uptake and potassium content in the different plant compartments was also studied when selected trees were cut down. The potassium concentration in the plants was not significantly different between the trees growing in the two types of soil in spite of the big differences in the 134 Cs uptake in the two soils. TF values and potassium content in the different plant compartments of each tree were highly correlated. For both crops transfer factors as well as potassium content were the highest in the developing plant parts (new leaves and branches, flowers). The transfer factors of 134 Cs for the studied trees are in the same order of magnitude as the values of annual crops grown under similar conditions. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  5. Meson widths and form factor at intermediate momentum transfer in nonperturbative QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioffe, B.L.; Smilga, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    A general method is proposed for the QCD based calculations of form factors at intermediate momentum transfer Q 2 and of the partial widths of the low-lying meson resonances. The basic idea is to use the QCD sum rules for the vertex functions. With this method the pion electromagnetic form factor along with electromagnetic form factors of rho- and A 1 mesons and transition form factors γπ → A 1 at 0.5 2 2 are calculated. The widths rho+2π and A 1 → rhoπ are also determined. +.he results are in a good agreement with experiment

  6. What's Working: Program Factors Influencing California Community College Basic Skills Mathematics Students' Advancement to Transfer Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiero, Diane M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine which basic skills program factors were exhibited by successful basic skills programs that helped students advance to transfer-level mathematics. This study specifically examined California community college basic skills programs that assist students who place in mathematics courses 2 levels…

  7. A Transfer Learning Approach for Applying Matrix Factorization to Small ITS Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voß, Lydia; Schatten, Carlotta; Mazziotti, Claudia; Schmidt-Thieme, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Machine Learning methods for Performance Prediction in Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS) have proven their efficacy; specific methods, e.g. Matrix Factorization (MF), however suffer from the lack of available information about new tasks or new students. In this paper we show how this problem could be solved by applying Transfer Learning (TL),…

  8. Transfer factors of 137Cs and 9Sr from soil to trees in arid regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Oudat, M.; Asfary, A.F.; Mukhalallti, H.; Al-Hamwi, A.; Kanakri, S.

    2006-01-01

    Transfer factors of 137 Cs and 9 Sr from contaminated soil (Aridisol) to olive, apricot trees and grape vines were determined under irrigated field conditions for four successive years. The transfer factors (calculated as Bq kg -1 dry plant material per Bq kg -1 dry soil) of both radionuclides varied among tree parts and were highest in olive and apricot fruits. However, the values for 9 Sr were much higher than those for 137 Cs in all plant parts. The geometric mean of the transfer factors in olives, apricots and grapes were 0.007, 0.095 and 0.0023 for 137 Cs and 0.093, 0.13 and 0.08 for 9 Sr, respectively, and were negligible in olive oil for both radionuclides. The transfer factors of both radionuclides were similar to, or in the lower limits of, those obtained in other areas of the world. This could be attributed to differences in soil characteristics: higher pH, lower organic matter, high clay content, and higher exchangeable potassium and calcium

  9. Transfer factors of 137Cs and 90Sr from soil to some trees in Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Oudat, M.; Al-Asfary, A. F.; Mukalati, H.; Hamwi, A.; Kanakri, S.

    2004-12-01

    The transfer factor of Cs 137 and 90 Sr from contaminated soil (Aridisol = Yermosol according to FAO - UNESCO) to some common trees (olive, apricot, grape, pine, apple and lemon) were investigated under field condition for 3 to 6 years. There were large variation in transfer factors values among tree species, and between different parts of tree. The values in fruits for 137 Cs were: 0.011 (highest) in Apricot, 0.0071 in olive, and 0.0025 in vine, and about 0.0012 in olive oil (lowest). The mean transfer factor of 137 Cs in the one year old leaves and stems, ranged between 0.011 and 0.0093 in lemon (highest) and 0.0016 and 0.0015 in pine (lowest). The transfer factor values of 90 Sr were much higher than that of 137 Cs, they were in fruits: 0.13 in apricot, 0.093 in olive, and 0.075 in vine and 0.0053 in olive oil. The transfer factors values of 90 Sr ranged in one year old leaves between 2.89 (apple) and 0.1 (pine), while they ranged in one year old stems between 1.91 (apricot) and 0.16 (pine). The transfer factor of both 137 Cs and 90 Sr decrease in most trees parts with time especially in the one year old leaves, due to aging effects. The transfer factor values of 137 Cs and 90 Sr were lower than that reported for other areas. This might be due to the physical and chemical properties of the soil, where the soil used had a loamy clay structure with high ph (7.8) and high CEC (25.9 meq/100g), exchangeable potassium (1.6 meq/100g) and calcium (14.9 meq/100g), further more, climatic condition in the area, like high light intensity, high temperature and low air humidity, can lead to decrease the uptake of both 137 Cs and 90 Sr. (Authors)

  10. Factors that affect the reproductive efficiency of the recipient within a bovine embryo transfer program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Duica A.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The embryo transfer is a biotechnological technique that allows increasing the descendant of animals with high genetic value. The positive results, represented in pregnancy after the application of this technique, are affected by some factors that are inherent to the donor, the embryo, the technique, and the recipients which receive a strange embryo in the uterus allowing pregnancy. This review describes some factors affecting the reproductive efficiency of the recipients of bovine embryos within a program of embryo transfer. Its important to evaluate the parameters in this kind of recipients, as race, age, physiological status, health status, weight, reproductive tract integrity and management, and also too monitoring the ovarian structures while the estrus synchronization, and within previous and posterior stages in embryo transfer procedure. Therefore an optimum follicular development will be determinant to corpus luteum formation which generates enough serum progesterone concentrations to offer a right uterine environment allowing the optimum embryo development. Controlling the factors that affect the efficiency of the embryo transfer, it will obtain an increasing of positive results represented in pregnancies and births of individuals come from animals with high genetic value.

  11. Factors Analysis of Spontaneous Abortion after Thawed-vitrified Blastocysts Transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong YANG; Zheng-yi SUN; Cheng-yan DENG; Qi YU; Fang-fang HE

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the factors resulting in spontaneous abortion after transferring frozen-thawing blastocysts. Methods A total of 108 cases transferring vitrified blastocysts were divided into two groups: abortion group (n =20) and ongoing group (n=88). Cytogenetic analysis of apoblemas was performed in 12 cases of the abortion.Results The overall spontaneous abortion rate was 18.50%(20/108) and the early spontaneous rate was 16.67%(18/108). ,4 significant difference in maternal age was observed (abortion group: 33.3±4.0 years, ongoing group: 31.0±3.6 years, P=0.02). No difference in other parameters was found. Cytogenetic analysis of apoblemas was obtained for 12 cases, and 2 specimens were contaminated. Seven of ten patients had abnormal karyotypes. Conclusion The underlying cause of spontaneous abortion after transferring frozen thawing blastocysts appears to be abnormal karyotypes.Advancing maternal age seems to increase the risk of spontaneous abortion.

  12. Soil-plant transfer factors of radionuclides in mangroves in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva, J.D.S.; França, E.J. de

    2017-01-01

    Mangroves are the main inputs of chemical substances, considering the Brazilian estuarine environments. Natural radionuclides such as 40 K and 228 Ra can be transferred to vegetation. The objective of this work is to determine the transfer factors (TF) and aggregate transfer (TF ag ) of radionuclides 40 K and 228 Ra in the soil-plant system of mangroves in the State of Pernambuco , Brazil. Concentrations of 40 K and 228 Ra activity in the soil of mangroves and in samples composed of leaves of individuals of the native plant species Rhizophora mangle, Laguncularia racemosa and Aviccenia Schaueriana were determined from Gamma Spectrometry with hyper-pure germanium detector (HPGe). The transfer and aggregate transfer factors were calculated according to the methodology proposed in the literature. The respective TF and TF ag values for the 40 K radionuclide were 0.384 and 2.13 x 10 -3 for R. mangle; 0.394 and 2.05 x 10 -3 for L. racemosa and 1.348 and 3.44 x 10 -3 for Avicennia sp. For the radionuclide 228 Ra, the results were lower for R. mangle (TF = 0.089; TF ag = 1.95 x 10 -4 ) and L. race-mosa (TF = 0.142; TF ag = 3.46 x 10 -4 ). For Avicennia schaueriana, the concentrations of 228 Ra activity in the leaves were below the detection limit. The TF values found demonstrated a greater 40 K transfer in Avicennia and 228 Ra dominated mangroves for mangroves where the L. racemosa distribution predominates

  13. Measured elemental transfer factors for boreal hunter/gatherer scenarios: fish, game and berries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, S.C.; Long, J.M.; Sanipelli, B.

    2010-01-01

    The environmental assessment of long-term nuclear waste management requires data to estimate food chain transfers for radionuclides in various environmental settings. For key elements such as iodine (I) and chlorine (Cl), there is a paucity of transfer factor data, particularly outside of agricultural food chains. This study dealt with transfers of I, Cl and 28 other elements to foods that would be typical of boreal hunter/gatherer lifestyles, as well as being common foods for modern recreational and subsistence hunters. Food/substrate concentration ratios (CRs) and related transfer factors for eight species of widely distributed fish, whitetail deer (Odocoileus virginianus), Canada geese (Branta canadensis) and wild blueberries (Vaccinium myrtilloides) were measured and compared to the literature. Limited data were obtained for caribou (Rangifer tarandus), elk (Cervus elaphus) and moose (Alces americanus). Freshwater sediment Kd values and CRs for a ubiquitous freshwater macrophyte were also obtained. The CRs for I in fish were 29 L kg -1 in edible muscle (fillets) of large-bodied species and 85 L kg -1 for whole, small-bodied fish. The log CRs for fish and macrophytes were correlated across elements. For several elements, the Kds for sediments in deep water were ∼4-fold higher than for littoral samples. The elemental transfers to wild animals for some elements were notably different than the literature indicates for domestic animals. It is argued that the transfer data obtained using indigenous elements from real environmental settings, as opposed to contaminant elements in experimental or impacted environments, are especially relevant to assessment of long-term impacts.

  14. Measured elemental transfer factors for boreal hunter/gatherer scenarios: fish, game and berries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, S.C., E-mail: sheppards@ecomatters.co [ECOMatters Inc., WB Lewis Business Centre, 24 Aberdeen Avenue, Pinawa, Manitoba R0E 1L0 (Canada); Long, J.M.; Sanipelli, B. [ECOMatters Inc., WB Lewis Business Centre, 24 Aberdeen Avenue, Pinawa, Manitoba R0E 1L0 (Canada)

    2010-11-15

    The environmental assessment of long-term nuclear waste management requires data to estimate food chain transfers for radionuclides in various environmental settings. For key elements such as iodine (I) and chlorine (Cl), there is a paucity of transfer factor data, particularly outside of agricultural food chains. This study dealt with transfers of I, Cl and 28 other elements to foods that would be typical of boreal hunter/gatherer lifestyles, as well as being common foods for modern recreational and subsistence hunters. Food/substrate concentration ratios (CRs) and related transfer factors for eight species of widely distributed fish, whitetail deer (Odocoileus virginianus), Canada geese (Branta canadensis) and wild blueberries (Vaccinium myrtilloides) were measured and compared to the literature. Limited data were obtained for caribou (Rangifer tarandus), elk (Cervus elaphus) and moose (Alces americanus). Freshwater sediment Kd values and CRs for a ubiquitous freshwater macrophyte were also obtained. The CRs for I in fish were 29 L kg{sup -1} in edible muscle (fillets) of large-bodied species and 85 L kg{sup -1} for whole, small-bodied fish. The log CRs for fish and macrophytes were correlated across elements. For several elements, the Kds for sediments in deep water were {approx}4-fold higher than for littoral samples. The elemental transfers to wild animals for some elements were notably different than the literature indicates for domestic animals. It is argued that the transfer data obtained using indigenous elements from real environmental settings, as opposed to contaminant elements in experimental or impacted environments, are especially relevant to assessment of long-term impacts.

  15. Magnetic field emission comparison at different quality factors with series-series compensation network for inductive power transfer to vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batra, Tushar; Schaltz, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Inductive power transfer is non-contact transfer of energy by means of magnetic fields. A higher secondary side quality factor at fixed input current ensures a linear increase in power transfer across the air gap. But also at the same time magnetic emissions to the surroundings increase. First...... of all in this paper an analytic expression for comparing the magnetic emissions at different quality factors is introduced. It is shown with help of simulations on Comsol that emissions have a lower increase as compared to linear increase in the power transferred with the quality factor as suggested...

  16. Strand transfer and elongation of HIV-1 reverse transcription is facilitated by cell factors in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Warrilow

    Full Text Available Recent work suggests a role for multiple host factors in facilitating HIV-1 reverse transcription. Previously, we identified a cellular activity which increases the efficiency of HIV-1 reverse transcription in vitro. Here, we describe aspects of the activity which shed light on its function. The cellular factor did not affect synthesis of strong-stop DNA but did improve downstream DNA synthesis. The stimulatory activity was isolated by gel filtration in a single fraction of the exclusion volume. Velocity-gradient purified HIV-1, which was free of detectable RNase activity, showed poor reverse transcription efficiency but was strongly stimulated by partially purified cell proteins. Hence, the cell factor(s did not inactivate an RNase activity that might degrade the viral genomic RNA and block completion of reverse transcription. Instead, the cell factor(s enhanced first strand transfer and synthesis of late reverse transcription suggesting it stabilized the reverse transcription complex. The factor did not affect lysis of HIV-1 by Triton X-100 in the endogenous reverse transcription (ERT system, and ERT reactions with HIV-1 containing capsid mutations, which varied the biochemical stability of viral core structures and impeded reverse transcription in cells, showed no difference in the ability to be stimulated by the cell factor(s suggesting a lack of involvement of the capsid in the in vitro assay. In addition, reverse transcription products were found to be resistant to exogenous DNase I activity when the active fraction was present in the ERT assay. These results indicate that the cell factor(s may improve reverse transcription by facilitating DNA strand transfer and DNA synthesis. It also had a protective function for the reverse transcription products, but it is unclear if this is related to improved DNA synthesis.

  17. Evaluation and development of soil values for the pathway 'soil to plant'. Significance of mercury evaporation for the burden of plants; Ueberpruefung und Fortentwicklung der Bodenwerte fuer den Boden-Pflanze-Pfad. Teilbericht 2: Evaporation von Quecksilber aus kontaminierten Boeden und deren Bedeutung fuer die Hg-Aufnahme von Kulturpflanzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlueter, K; Gaeth, S

    2001-10-01

    In cooperation with the Ad-hoc working group 'Transfer of heavy metals from soil to plant' of the Laenderarbeitsgemeinschaft Bodenschutz (LABO) the significance of mercury evaporation for the deduction of threshold values in respect of the impact via the pathway soil to plant was investigated. Mercury contamination of food- and feeding stuff plants was examined with special emphasis. For these purposes a lab experiment including three different soils with varying initial mercury load (background level, geogenic and anthropogenic contamination) and two different plant species (parsley and spinach) was carried out under defined conditions in closed lysimeters. Mercury uptake via the roots was minimised since the plants grew in isolated customary substrate which showed a low concentration of mercury. Thus, only the surrounding soil evaporated mercury. The concentrations of mercury in the plants in the background level treatment (0.1 mg Hg/kg dry soil) were 0.15 mg/kg dry matter (spinach). The treatment with anthropogenic contaminated soil (111 mg Hg/kg dry soil) resulted in concentrations in the two plants of 2.0 and 2.6 mg/kg dry matter, respectively. A comparable order of magnitude was achieved in the geogenic contaminated treatment (34 mg Hg/kg dry soil) with 2.1 mg/kg dry matter (spinach) and 0.44 mg/kg dry matter (parsley). Experiments conducted with radioactive {sup 203}Hg showed in each case Hg-tracer in the leaves, in the stem and in the roots, indicating a translocation within the plant from leaf to root. By means of a comprehensive literature study the state of the art for Hg-evaporation and Hg-uptake of plants was compiled. Comparing the experimental results with data derived from literature, the Hg-concentrations found are confirmed by results of other authors. (orig.) [German] In fachlicher Zusammenarbeit mit der Ad-hoc-Arbeitsgruppe 'Schwermetalltransfer Boden/Pflanze' der Laenderarbeitsgemeinschaft Bodenschutz (LABO) wurde fuer die Ableitung von Pruef

  18. Evaluation and development of soil values for the pathway 'soil to plant'. Significance of mercury evaporation for the burden of plants; Ueberpruefung und Fortentwicklung der Bodenwerte fuer den Boden-Pflanze-Pfad. Teilbericht 2: Evaporation von Quecksilber aus kontaminierten Boeden und deren Bedeutung fuer die Hg-Aufnahme von Kulturpflanzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlueter, K.; Gaeth, S.

    2001-10-01

    In cooperation with the Ad-hoc working group 'Transfer of heavy metals from soil to plant' of the Laenderarbeitsgemeinschaft Bodenschutz (LABO) the significance of mercury evaporation for the deduction of threshold values in respect of the impact via the pathway soil to plant was investigated. Mercury contamination of food- and feeding stuff plants was examined with special emphasis. For these purposes a lab experiment including three different soils with varying initial mercury load (background level, geogenic and anthropogenic contamination) and two different plant species (parsley and spinach) was carried out under defined conditions in closed lysimeters. Mercury uptake via the roots was minimised since the plants grew in isolated customary substrate which showed a low concentration of mercury. Thus, only the surrounding soil evaporated mercury. The concentrations of mercury in the plants in the background level treatment (0.1 mg Hg/kg dry soil) were 0.15 mg/kg dry matter (spinach). The treatment with anthropogenic contaminated soil (111 mg Hg/kg dry soil) resulted in concentrations in the two plants of 2.0 and 2.6 mg/kg dry matter, respectively. A comparable order of magnitude was achieved in the geogenic contaminated treatment (34 mg Hg/kg dry soil) with 2.1 mg/kg dry matter (spinach) and 0.44 mg/kg dry matter (parsley). Experiments conducted with radioactive {sup 203}Hg showed in each case Hg-tracer in the leaves, in the stem and in the roots, indicating a translocation within the plant from leaf to root. By means of a comprehensive literature study the state of the art for Hg-evaporation and Hg-uptake of plants was compiled. Comparing the experimental results with data derived from literature, the Hg-concentrations found are confirmed by results of other authors. (orig.) [German] In fachlicher Zusammenarbeit mit der Ad-hoc-Arbeitsgruppe 'Schwermetalltransfer Boden/Pflanze' der Laenderarbeitsgemeinschaft Bodenschutz (LABO) wurde fuer die

  19. Energy transfer between a nanosystem and its host fluid: A multiscale factorization approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sereda, Yuriy V.; Espinosa-Duran, John M.; Ortoleva, Peter J., E-mail: ortoleva@indiana.edu [Center for Cell and Virus Theory, Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, 800 E. Kirkwood Ave, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States)

    2014-02-21

    Energy transfer between a macromolecule or supramolecular assembly and a host medium is considered from the perspective of Newton's equations and Lie-Trotter factorization. The development starts by demonstrating that the energy of the molecule evolves slowly relative to the time scale of atomic collisions-vibrations. The energy is envisioned to be a coarse-grained variable that coevolves with the rapidly fluctuating atomistic degrees of freedom. Lie-Trotter factorization is shown to be a natural framework for expressing this coevolution. A mathematical formalism and workflow for efficient multiscale simulation of energy transfer is presented. Lactoferrin and human papilloma virus capsid-like structure are used for validation.

  20. CS-137 transfer factors soil-plant and density of hyphae in soil of spruce forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemt, E.; Deuss, H.; Drissner, J.; Krapf, M.; Miller, R.; Zibold, G.

    1999-01-01

    Samples of soil and plants were taken at spruce stand sites in southern Baden-Wuerttemberg. Fern always had the highest aggregated Cs-137 transfer factor (T ag ) varying between 0.01 and 0.27 m 2 kg -1 . There is a tendency for higher T ag s in soils with thicker raw humus layers, lower pH, lower cation exchange capacity (CEC) in the O h horizon, and lower clay content below the organic deposit. The density of hyphae is determined by the season and its weather conditions and it usually decreases continuously from O f to top B horizon. In analyzing our data no correlation between aggregated or horizon-specific transfer factors of different plants and density of hyphae could be found. Refs. 5 (author)

  1. Relevant factors for tacit knowledge transfer within organizations: an exploratory study

    OpenAIRE

    Lemos,Bernardo; Joia,Luiz Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge and management of such knowledge have been studied for some time now in the field of Management. However, in the 1990s, with the growth in the economy based on intangible assets, companies needed more than an unstructured approach to corporate knowledge management to succeed in this new competitive environment. Therefore, this article aims to identify, in an exploratory way, the relevant factors for tacit knowledge transfer within a major Brazilian oil company trough a case study. T...

  2. Parameter values for the estimation of radionuclide transfer to major food crops in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong-Ho; Lim, Kwang-Muk; Jun, In; Keum, Dong-Kwon; Lee, Chang-Woo

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the radiotracer experiments and field studies performed in Korea for the past 20 years to obtain parameter values for estimating the environmental transfer of radionuclides to food crops. With regards to direct plant contamination, the interception fractions, weathering half-lives and translocation factors of Cs, Sr, Mn, Co and Ru were measured for depositions at different growth stages of selected food crops. In order to investigate an indirect contamination pathway, the soil-to-plant transfer factors (TF m , dimensionless) of Cs, Sr, Mn, Co and/or Zn were measured for rice, Chinese cabbage, radish, soybean, barley, lettuce and so on in one or more soils. In addition, the transfer factors (TF a , m 2 kg -1 ) based on a deposition density were also measured following depositions at different times during the growth periods of several food crops. Particularly for rice and Chinese cabbage, tritium experiments were also carried out for the TF a . The obtained parameter values varied considerably with the soils, crops, radionuclides and deposition times. These data would be applicable to both normal and acute releases not only in Korea but also in many other countries. (author)

  3. Use of the neutron activation technique: soil-plant transfer factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Wellington Ferrari da; Menezes, Maria Ângela de B.C.; Marques, Douglas José

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of the soil-plant transfer factor in the absorption and translocation of chemical elements, thus, it is possible to evaluate a better decision-making in the consecutive plantations. To determine these values, the content of a chemical element present in the plant or part of it with the total content present in the same soil where it is grown is considered. The objective of this study was to determine the concentrations of the chemical elements present in soil, leaf and grains corn, by neutron activation analysis and to compare the different soil-plant transfer factors. The samples were collected in a property located in the region of Biquinhas, MG, and irradiated in the TRIGA MARK I IPR-R1 CDTN / CNEN nuclear reactor. Thus, the concentrations of Br, Ce Fe, K, La, Na, Rb, Zn were determined. The soil-plant transfer factors for the elements found were varied, indicating a greater potassium absorption capacity (K). (author)

  4. Use of the neutron activation technique: soil-plant transfer factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Wellington Ferrari da, E-mail: wferrari250@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências e Técnicas Nucleares; Menezes, Maria Ângela de B.C., E-mail: menezes@cdtn.br [Centro Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (SERTA/CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Serviço de Técnicas Analíticas. Laboratório de Ativação Neutrônica; Marques, Douglas José, E-mail: douglasjmarques81@yahoo.com.br [Universidade José do Rosário Vellano, Alfenas, MG (Brazil). Setor de Olericultura e Experimentação em Agricultura Orgânica

    2017-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of the soil-plant transfer factor in the absorption and translocation of chemical elements, thus, it is possible to evaluate a better decision-making in the consecutive plantations. To determine these values, the content of a chemical element present in the plant or part of it with the total content present in the same soil where it is grown is considered. The objective of this study was to determine the concentrations of the chemical elements present in soil, leaf and grains corn, by neutron activation analysis and to compare the different soil-plant transfer factors. The samples were collected in a property located in the region of Biquinhas, MG, and irradiated in the TRIGA MARK I IPR-R1 CDTN / CNEN nuclear reactor. Thus, the concentrations of Br, Ce Fe, K, La, Na, Rb, Zn were determined. The soil-plant transfer factors for the elements found were varied, indicating a greater potassium absorption capacity (K). (author)

  5. Concentration and measuring Platinum Group Elements (PGE) Transfer Factor in soil and vegetations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adibah Sakinah Oyub

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the concentration and to measure platinum group elements (PGE) transfer factor in environmental samples of roadside soil and vegetation. The use of vehicle catalytic converter has released platinum group elements (PGE) and other gases into the environment. Thus, roadside soil and plants were exposed to this element and has become the medium for the movement of this elements. Samples of roadside soil and vegetation were taken at various locations in UKM Bangi Toll and the concentration of platinum group elements (PGE) is determined using mass spectrometry-inductively coupled plasma (ICP-MS). Overall, the concentrations of platinum group elements (PGE), which is the element platinum (Pt) in soil was 0.016 ± 0.036 μgg -1 . While the concentration of the elements palladium (Pd) was 0.079 ± 0.019 μgg -1 and element rhodium (Rh) is at a concentration of 0.013 ± 0.020 μgg -1 . Overall, the transfer factor for the element platinum (Pt) is 1. While the transfer factor of the element palladium (Pd) is 0.96 and the element rhodium (Rh) is 1.11. In conclusion, the concentration of platinum group elements (PGE) in soils have increased. (author)

  6. Constructing Nucleon Operators on a Lattice for Form Factors with High Momentum Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syritsyn, Sergey [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Gambhir, Arjun S. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Musch, Bernhard U. [Univ. of Regensburg (Germany); Orginos, Konstantinos [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    We present preliminary results of computing nucleon form factor at high momentum transfer using the 'boosted' or 'momentum' smearing. We use gauge configurations generated with N f = 2 + 1dynamical Wilson-clover fermions and study the connected as well as disconnected contributions to the nucleon form factors. Our initial results indicate that boosted smearing helps to improve the signal for nucleon correlators at high momentum. However, we also find evidence for large excited state contributions, which will likely require variational analysis to isolate the boosted nucleon ground state.

  7. High energy approximations for nuclear knockout form factors at small momentum transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amado, R.D.; Cannata, F.; Dedonder, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    We obtain an explicit approximate expression for the nucleon knockout form factor at small momentum transfer induced by a scalar probe in a single particle model in terms of the momentum space bound state wave function. Our form preserves the orthogonality constraint without using explicitly the final state scattering wave function. We examine the leading large momentum behavior of the momentum space wave function and of correction terms to our expression for the form factor in the case where the bound state is an s state

  8. Radiative transfer configuration factor catalog: A listing of relations for common geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, John R.; Menguec, M. Pinar

    2011-01-01

    An on-line compilation of radiation configuration factors for over 300 common geometries is provided as a supplementary material from the JQSRT web site at doi: (10.1016/j.jqsrt.2010.10.002). The factors are gathered from references across the radiative transfer and illumination engineering literature, as well as from applications in such diverse fields from combustion systems to human factors engineering. These factors are useful in standard surface-surface radiation exchange calculations, and are based on the assumptions that the surfaces exchanging radiation are diffuse, and that the radiosity from each surface is uniform across that surface. The catalog is updated annually, and can be downloaded from JQSRT in .PDF format.

  9. 28th annual meeting of the European Society for New Methods in Agricultural Research and International Union of Radioecology (IUR) Working Group Soil-to-Plant Transfer annual meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    Forty-three contributions presented at the Meeting were input to INIS; these fall largely in the working groups Radiation Technology, Advanced Methods in Animal Sciences, and Soil-Plant Relationships. (P.A.)

  10. Interrelationships of metal transfer factor under wastewater reuse and soil pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, D; Kalavrouziotis, I K; Koukoulakis, P H; Papadopoulos, F; Psoma, P

    2018-06-15

    The transfer of heavy metals under soil pollution wastewater reuse was studied in a Greenhouse experiment using a randomized block design, including 6 treatments of heavy metals mixtures composed of Zn, Mn, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Ni, and Pb, where each metal was taking part in the mixture with 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 mg/kg respectively, in four replications. The Beta vulgaris L (beet) was used as a test plant. It was found that the metal transfer factors were statistically significantly related to the: (i) DTPA extractable soil metals, (ii) the soil pollution level as assessed by the pollution indices, (iii) the soil pH, (iv) the beet dry matter yield and (v) the interactions between the heavy metals in the soil. It was concluded that the Transfer Factor is subjected to multifactor effects and its real nature is complex, and there is a strong need for further study for the understanding of its role in metal-plant relationships. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Carryover of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) from soil to plant and distribution to the different plant compartments studied in cultures of carrots (Daucus carota ssp. Sativus), potatoes (Solanum tuberosum), and cucumbers (Cucumis Sativus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Mareike; Knapp, Holger

    2011-10-26

    A vegetation study was carried out to investigate the carryover of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) and Perfluorooctane Sulfonate (PFOS) from soil mixed with contaminated sewage sludge to potato, carrot, and cucumber plants. Analysis was done by liquid-extraction using acetonitrile with dispersive SPE cleanup and subsequent HPLC-MS/MS. In order to assess the transfer potential from soil, transfer factors (TF) were calculated for the different plant compartments: TF = [PFC](plant (wet substance))/[PFC](soil (dry weight)). The highest TF were found for the vegetative plant compartments with average values for PFOS below those for PFOA: cucumber, 0.17 (PFOS), 0.88 (PFOA); potato, 0.36 (PFOS), 0.40 (PFOA); carrot, 0.38 (PFOS), 0.53 (PFOA). Transfer of PFOA and PFOS into potato peelings (average values of TF: PFOA 0.03, PFOS 0.04) exceeded the carryover to the peeled tubers (PFOA 0.01, PFOS potatoes (TF < 0.01). For PFOA, it was higher (TF: 0.03).

  12. Uranium and radium in Finnsjoen - an experimental approach for calculation of transfer factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, S.; Bergman, R.

    1981-01-01

    The radiological safety studies for underground disposal of HLW show that the future individual and collective doses to an important extent may originate from groundwater borne radium and uranium which reach the biosphere. Indications that the dispersion rates presently used give rise to overestimations of calculated doses justified an investigation for more realistic turnover rates of radium and uranium than those which now are in use. Within one of the sites selected for testing, the area around lake Finnsjoen, a small number of environmental samples were collected and analyzed with respect to radium and uranium and the new transfer coefficients between soil and lake water were derived. The dose rates obtained with the new transfer factors show a close agreement for radium and a slight increase for uranium compared with earlier calculations. (Auth.)

  13. 100% classification accuracy considered harmful: the normalized information transfer factor explains the accuracy paradox.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Valverde-Albacete

    Full Text Available The most widely spread measure of performance, accuracy, suffers from a paradox: predictive models with a given level of accuracy may have greater predictive power than models with higher accuracy. Despite optimizing classification error rate, high accuracy models may fail to capture crucial information transfer in the classification task. We present evidence of this behavior by means of a combinatorial analysis where every possible contingency matrix of 2, 3 and 4 classes classifiers are depicted on the entropy triangle, a more reliable information-theoretic tool for classification assessment. Motivated by this, we develop from first principles a measure of classification performance that takes into consideration the information learned by classifiers. We are then able to obtain the entropy-modulated accuracy (EMA, a pessimistic estimate of the expected accuracy with the influence of the input distribution factored out, and the normalized information transfer factor (NIT, a measure of how efficient is the transmission of information from the input to the output set of classes. The EMA is a more natural measure of classification performance than accuracy when the heuristic to maximize is the transfer of information through the classifier instead of classification error count. The NIT factor measures the effectiveness of the learning process in classifiers and also makes it harder for them to "cheat" using techniques like specialization, while also promoting the interpretability of results. Their use is demonstrated in a mind reading task competition that aims at decoding the identity of a video stimulus based on magnetoencephalography recordings. We show how the EMA and the NIT factor reject rankings based in accuracy, choosing more meaningful and interpretable classifiers.

  14. A Study of the Factors Associated with Successful Technology Transfer and their Applicability to Air Force Technology Transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    transfer project. (D) 8a Organization has a technology transfer organization. (D,A) 10a Marketing and advertising of technologies targeted to relevant...Entrepreneurial (D) Developer: 10A: Marketing and advertising of technologies targeted to relevant industries. Most developers indicate that they marketed...regard to marketing and advertising . 10B: Technology maturation supported by internal units or by contracting out. Technology maturation is the

  15. Soil-plant transfer factors for Pu in the field and laboratory in relation to desorption from the solid phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mudge, S.; Kelly, M.; Hamilton-Taylor, J.; Horrill, A.D.

    1990-01-01

    Laboratory hydroponics experiments using an environmentally contaminated sediment as source of Pu, were carried out to determine the soil-plant, soil solution-plant and root-plant transfer factors. Soil-plant transfer factors, calculated from field observations, varied according to the degree of animal usage and were more than two orders of magnitude larger than those from the laboratory experiments. The discrepancies between field and laboratory measurements are probably due to the complex sediment speciation and desorption chemistry of Pu. The transfer factors based on the solution or root activities are likely to provided a better estimate of the vegetation activity than those based on the solid phase activity. (author)

  16. g-factor of the 9/2+ isomeric state in 65Ni from transfer reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiev, G.; Matea, I.; Balabanski, D.L.; Daugas, J.M.; Meot, V.; Morel, P.; Oliveira Santos, F. de; Lewitowicz, M.; Franchoo, S.; Ibrahim, F.; Le Blanc, F.; Sorlin, O.; Stanoiu, M.; Verney, D.; Lo Bianco, G.; Saltarelli, A.; Lukyanov, S.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.E.; Neyens, G.; Vermeulen, N.; Yordanov, D.; Tarisien, M.

    2006-01-01

    We report a measurement of the g-factor of the I π =9/2 + , t 1/2 =22 ns isomer in 65 Ni. The state of interest was populated and spin-oriented using a single-neutron transfer on an enriched 64 Ni target. The value, which was obtained, g(9/2 + , 65m Ni)=-0.296(3) is well in agreement with the g-factors of the other 9/2 + states in the region and with large-basis shell model calculations. The known g-factor of the 9/2 + isomer in 63 Ni was used in order to verify the strength of the hyperfine field of Ni(Ni) at room temperature. (orig.)

  17. An Evaluation of Effective Factors in Learning Transfer of Nursing On-the-Job Training Courses in Work-Environment Based on Holton’s Transfer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mehdi mohammadi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background of Objective: Nursing is one of the health care jobs. In addition to health care, they need to continue education for individual development and be aware of the latest medical science achievements. The main purpose of this study was an evaluation of effective factors in learning transfer of nursing on the job training courses in work environment based on Holton’s transfer model. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study in which the population was all of Jahrom University of Medical Sciences nurses. Passing on-the-job training courses in 2015 was inclusion criterion. Using random sampling method and Cocran formula, 95 nurses were selected. Research instrument was learning transfer system inventory that was distributed after its validity and reliability were calculated. Data was analyzed by inferential statistical methods and SPSS21. Results: The results showed that effective individual, organizational and educational factors in learning transfer of on-the-job training courses in work environment are important. Also, they showed that individual was the most dominant effective factor (P< 0.05. Conclusion: With special attention to the nurse's on- the -job training courses, it is possible to transfer learning to work environment.

  18. Requirement for Vibrio cholerae integration host factor in conjugative DNA transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Sarah M; Burrus, Vincent; Waldor, Matthew K

    2006-08-01

    The requirement for host factors in the transmission of integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) has not been extensively explored. Here we tested whether integration host factor (IHF) or Fis, two host-encoded nucleoid proteins, are required for transfer of SXT, a Vibrio cholerae-derived ICE that can be transmitted to many gram-negative species. Fis did not influence the transfer of SXT to or from V. cholerae. In contrast, IHF proved to be required for V. cholerae to act as an SXT donor. In the absence of IHF, V. cholerae displayed a modest defect for serving as an SXT recipient. Surprisingly, SXT integration into or excision from the V. cholerae chromosome, which requires an SXT-encoded integrase related to lambda integrase, did not require IHF. Therefore, the defect in SXT transmission in the V. cholerae IHF mutant is probably not related to IHF's ability to promote DNA recombination. The V. cholerae IHF mutant was also highly impaired as a donor of RP4, a broad-host-range conjugative plasmid. Thus, the V. cholerae IHF mutant appears to have a general defect in conjugation. Escherichia coli IHF mutants were not impaired as donors or recipients of SXT or RP4, indicating that IHF is a V. cholerae-specific conjugation factor.

  19. Selection of terrestrial transfer factors for radioecological assessment models and regulatory guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Y.C.; Hoffman, F.O.

    1983-01-01

    A parameter value for a radioecological assessment model is not a single value but a distribution of values about a central value. The sources that contribute to the variability of transfer factors to predict foodchain transport of radionuclides are enumerated. Knowledge of these sources, judgement in interpreting the available data, consideration of collateral information, and established criteria that specify the desired level of conservatism in the resulting predictions are essential elements when selecting appropriate parameter values for radioecological assessment models and regulatory guides. 39 references, 4 figures, 5 tables

  20. Cluster transfer form factor and intercluster relative motion in the orthogonality-condition model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovas, R.G.; Pal, K.F.

    1984-01-01

    The orthogonality-condition model (OCM), as an approximation method for calculating the overlap and potential overlap functions involved in the form factor of transfer reactions, is tested against microscopic cluster calculations for the 7 Li=α+t system. The OCM overlap and potential overlap turned out to depend strongly on the OCM potential although the potentials are chosen so as to produce the same asymptotic phase. Excellent approximations to microscopic overlaps and potential overlaps are, however, obtained by optimizing the OCM potential so that the OCM may reproduce the microscopic energy surface. This way the dependence on the OCM potential is traced back to the underlying nucleon-nucleon force. (author)

  1. Selection of terrestrial transfer factors for radioecological assessment models and regulatory guides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Y.C.; Hoffman, F.O.

    1983-01-01

    A parameter value for a radioecological assessment model is not a single value but a distribution of values about a central value. The sources that contribute to the variability of transfer factors to predict foodchain transport of radionuclides are enumerated. Knowledge of these sources, judgement in interpreting the available data, consideration of collateral information, and established criteria that specify the desired level of conservatism in the resulting predictions are essential elements when selecting appropriate parameter values for radioecological assessment models and regulatory guides. 39 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

  2. Intermedia transfer factors for fifteen toxic pollutants released to air basins in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.; Daniels, J.I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Chiao, F.F.; Hsieh, D.P.H. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    This report provides a summary definition of the intermedia-transfer factors (ITFs). Methods are discussed for estimating these parameters in the absence of measured values, and the estimation errors inherent in these estimation methods are considered. A detailed summary is provided of measured and estimated ITF values for fifteen air contaminants. They include: 1,3 butadiene; cadmium; cellosolve; cellosolve acetate; chloroform; di-2-ethylhexylphthalate; 1,4-dioxame; hexachlorobenzene; inorganic arsenic; inorganic lead; nickel; tetrachloroethylene; toluene; toluene-2,4-diisocyanate; and 1,3-xylene. Recommendations are made regarding the expected value and variance in these values for use in exposure models.

  3. Organizational Factors that Affect the University-Industry Technology Transfer Processes of a Private University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisiane Closs

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This case study researched organizational factors that affect the university-industry technology transfer (UITT processes of a private university, chosen by its success and uniqueness in the Brazilian context. Stood out as factors: innovation among pillars of management; valuing of research and intellectual property; qualified students, teachers and managers; multidisciplinary research groups; stability of governing body; performance of the TTO, Technology Management Agency and Technology Park. Difficulties highlighted were: reconciliation of time between activities of professors-researchers, bureaucracy and centralization of administrative and legal support; valuation of research results; approach and negotiation with companies. Among suggestions are: granting greater independence to the structures in charge of UITT and making them self-sustainable; training agents in technology marketing, sale, and negotiation skills.

  4. Specifics of heat and mass transfer in spherical dimples under the effect of external factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchukin, A. V.; Il'inkov, A. V.; Takmovtsev, V. V.; Khabibullin, I. I.

    2017-06-01

    The specifics are examined of heat transfer enhancement with spherical dimples under the effect of factors important for practice and characteristic of cooling systems of gas-turbine engines and power units. This experimental investigation deals with the effect of the following factors on the flow in a channel with hemispherical dimples: continuous air swirl in an annulus with dimples on its concave wall, dimples on the convex or concave wall of a curved rectangular channel, imposition of regular velocity fluctuations on the external flow in a straight rectangular channel, and adverse or favorable pressure gradient along the flow direction. The flow is turbulent. Reynolds numbers based on the channel hydraulic diameter are on the order of 104. Results of the investigation of a model of a two-cavity diffuser dimple proposed by the authors are presented. It has been found that results for channels with spherical dimples and for smooth channels differ not only quantitatively but also qualitatively. Thus, if the effect of centrifugal mass forces on convex and concave surfaces with hemispherical dimples and in a smooth channel is almost the same (quantitative and qualitative indicators are identical), the pressure gradient in the flow direction brings about the drastically opposite results. At the same time, the quantitative contribution to a change in heat transfer in hemispherical dimples is different and depends on the impact type. The results are discussed with the use of physical models created on the basis of the results of flow visualization studies and data on the turbulence intensity, pressure coefficient, etc. Results of the investigations suggest that application of spherical dimples under nonstandard conditions requires the calculated heat transfer to be corrected to account for one or another effect.

  5. Effects of transforming growth factor-beta1 and vascular endothelial growth factor 165 gene transfer on Achilles tendon healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yu; Mao, ZeBin; Wei, XueLei; Lin, Lin; Chen, LianXu; Wang, HaiJun; Fu, Xin; Zhang, JiYing; Yu, Changlong

    2009-07-01

    Repaired Achilles tendons typically take weeks before they are strong enough to handle physiological loads. Gene therapy is a promising treatment for Achilles tendon defects. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the histological/biomechanical effects of Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) and vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF(165)) gene transfer on Achilles tendon healing in rabbits. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (BMSCs) were transduced with adenovirus carrying human TGF-beta1 cDNA (Ad-TGF-beta1), human VEGF(165) cDNA (Ad-VEGF(165)), or both (PIRES-TGF-beta1/VEGF(165)) Viruses, no cDNA (Ad-GFP), and the BMSCs without gene transfer and the intact tendon were used as control. BMSCs were surgically implanted into the experimentally injured Achilles tendons. TGF-beta1 distribution, cellularity, nuclear aspect ratio, nuclear orientation angle, vascular number, collagen synthesis, and biomechanical features were measured at 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks after surgery. The TGF-beta1 and TGF beta 1/VEGF(165) co-expression groups exhibited improved parameters compared with other groups, while the VEGF(165) expression group had a negative impact. In the co-expression group, the angiogenesis effects of VEGF(165) were diminished by TGF-beta1, while the collagen synthesis effects of TGF-beta1 were unaltered by VEGF(165). Thus treatment with TGF-beta1 cDNA-transduced BMSCs grafts is a promising therapy for acceleration and improvement of tendon healing, leading to quicker recovery and improved biomechanical properties of Achilles tendons.

  6. Factor IX expression in skeletal muscle of a severe hemophilia B patient 10 years after AAV-mediated gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchlis, George; Podsakoff, Gregory M; Radu, Antonetta; Hawk, Sarah M; Flake, Alan W; Mingozzi, Federico; High, Katherine A

    2012-03-29

    In previous work we transferred a human factor IX-encoding adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) into skeletal muscle of men with severe hemophilia B. Biopsy of injected muscle up to 1 year after vector injection showed evidence of gene transfer by Southern blot and of protein expression by IHC and immunofluorescent staining. Although the procedure appeared safe, circulating F.IX levels remained subtherapeutic (< 1%). Recently, we obtained muscle tissue from a subject injected 10 years earlier who died of causes unrelated to gene transfer. Using Western blot, IHC, and immunofluorescent staining, we show persistent factor IX expression in injected muscle tissue. F.IX transcripts were detected in injected skeletal muscle using RT-PCR, and isolated whole genomic DNA tested positive for the presence of the transferred AAV vector sequence. This is the longest reported transgene expression to date from a parenterally administered AAV vector, with broad implications for the future of muscle-directed gene transfer.

  7. Effect of waste mica on transfer factors of 134Cs to spinach and lettuce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenivasa Chari, M.; Manjaiah, K.M.; Sachdev, P.; Sachdev, M.S.

    2011-01-01

    A greenhouse pot culture experiment was conducted to study the effect of graded levels of waste mica (0, 10, 20 and 40 g kg -1 ) on reducing the radiocesium uptake by spinach (Spinacia olerecea L) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) grown in 134 Cs-contaminated (at 37 k Bq kg -1 soil) Inceptisols, Vertisols and Ultisols. The biomass yield, and potassium content and its uptake by crops have been significantly improved by waste mica application. The crops grown in Vertisols recorded higher biomass yield, and K content and its uptake as compared with Inceptisols and Ultisols. The average 134 Cs transfer factor values recorded were: 0.21, 0.17 and 0.26 at the first cutting, 0.15, 0.12 and 0.28 at the second cutting and 0.07, 0.05 and 0.23 at the third cutting from Inceptisols, Vertisols and Ultisols, respectively. Waste mica significantly suppressed radiocesium uptake, the effect being more pronounced at 40 g mica kg -1 soil. There exists an inverse relationship between the 134 Cs transfer factors with plant potassium content and also the K uptake by the crops. (authors)

  8. Aggregated Transfer Factors For Small Mammals Collected From the Exposed Sediments Of A 137 Cs Contaminated Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paller, Michael H.; Jannika, G. Timothy; Wike, Lynn D

    2005-10-04

    {sup 137}Cs transfer factors were computed for small mammals collected from the dried sediment areas of a partially drained, contaminated reservoir. Soil {sup 137}Cs concentrations were heterogeneous on small and large spatial scales, with a geometric mean of 253.1 Bq/kg dry weight. About 50% of the variance in cotton rat Sigmodon hispidus tissue {sup 137}Cs levels was explained by variation in soil {sup 137}Cs levels. Soil to animal transfer factors (whole body dry weight) averaged 6.0 for cotton rats and 1.2 for cotton mice Peromyscus gossypinus. These values are similar to {sup 137}Cs transfer factors for herbivorous, homeothermic animals from other contaminated ecosystems. Site-specific transfer factors can significantly affect the estimation of dose. In the RESRAD-BIOTA dose model, the default transfer factor for {sup 137}Cs in terrestrial animals is 110 resulting in an estimate of radiation dose to terrestrial biota that is 16 times more than the dose calculated with the actual measured transfer factor.

  9. Transfer factors of some selected radionuclides (radioactive Cs, Sr, Mn, Co and Zn) from soil to leaf vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban-nai, Tadaaki; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Yanagisawa, Kei

    1995-01-01

    Transfer factors of radionuclides from soil to leaf vegetables (cabbage, Chinese cabbage, komatsuna, spinach and lettuce) have been studied by radiotracer experiments using Andosol as a representative of Japanese soils. The transfer factors of radioactive Cs, Sr, Mn, Co and Zn for edible parts of vegetables (average of five vegetables) were 0.11, 0.24, 0.61, 0.05 and 0.52, respectively. These values should be used in safety assessment for Japanese agricultural environment. The transfer factors of Mn, Co and Zn for spinach were higher than those for the other vegetables. The transfer factors of Cs for different organs of the leaf vegetables were rather homogeneous. The transfer factors of Sr and Mn were higher for older (outer) leaves than younger (inner) ones. In contrast to Sr and Mn, transfer factors of Zn for younger leaves were higher than those for older ones. The distribution ratios of the elements between soil-solution and soil were in the order Sr>Mn>Cs>Co>Zn, whereas the distribution ratios of the elements between plant and soil-solution were in the order Zn>Cs>Mn>Co>Sr. These results indicate that the selectivity for Sr by plants from the soil-solution was low and that for Zn was very high. (author)

  10. Measurement of the proton form factor ratio at low momentum transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Moshe [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2016-08-01

    Experiment E08-007-II measured the proton elastic form factor ratio μGE=GM in the momentum transfer range of Q2 ~ 0.02 - 0.08 GeV2, the lowest ever measured by polarization transfer techniques. The experiment was performed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Virginia, USA during 2012. A polarized electron beam with energies of 1.1, 1.7, and 2.2 GeV was elastically scattered off a polarized solid NH3 target. The asymmetries between the cross section of positive and negative helicity states of the beam were determined. These asymmetries can be used to determine the form factor ratio. In this thesis, we present the asymmetry analysis of the experiment, discuss the main challenges and show preliminary results for part of the data. Preliminary asymmetries indicate an increase in the form factor ratio above unity. However, a complete analysis is required before any conclusion can be made. Further analysis is ongoing, and final asymmetry results and form factor extraction is expected during 2017. We also present first results for 14N asymmetries for elastic and quasi-elastic scattering. The measured asymmetries are in agreement with the shell model approximation, within the low accuracy of the measurement. A change in the asymmetry sign between the elastic and the quasi-elastic processes is seen, and should motivate further theoretical studies. These experimental asymmetries will also be useful for systematic studies of other experiments using polarized NH3 targets.

  11. Influence of concentration and hydrodynamic factors in sorption of iodine by anion-exchangers of the mass-transfer rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, V.V.; Smirnov, N.N.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation of the joint influence of hydrodynamic and concentration factors in sorption of iodine by AV-17-8 and anion exchange resins on the mass-transfer coefficient is the subject of this report. The method of central composite rotatable experimental design was used for quantitative assessment and derivation of the appropriate equations. The investigation yielded the necessary regression equations satisfactorily describing the influence of all the factors in the mass-transfer coefficient. the optimal mass-transfer conditions were determined. On the basis of the values obtained, recommendations are made on the optimal hydrodynamic conditions of operation of equipment with pneumatic circulation of the ion-exchanger

  12. Variations in soil-to-red pepper transfer factors of radionuclides with time of their application and fruit harvest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong Ho; Lee, Won Yun; Lim, Kwang Muk; Park, Soo Won; Lee, Myung Ho; Lee, Chang Woo; Lee, Hyun Duk; Lee, Jeong Ho

    1997-01-01

    A mixed solution of 54 Mn, 60 Co, 85 Sr and 137 Cs was applied to the soil of culture boxes in a greenhouse 2 days before transplanting red pepper and at 3 different times during its growth for investigating transfer factors (m 2 /kg-dry) for its green and red fruits. Transfer factors varied with radionuclide, application time and harvest time by factors of about 20-100. They decreased mostly radionuclide, application time and harvest time by factors of about 20-100. They decreased mostly in the order of 85 Sr> 54 Mn> 60 Co> 137 Cs while 54 Mn and 60 Co was higher than 85 Sr when time lapse between application and harvest was short. Transfer factors of 85 Sr and 137 Cs at the last application were lower than those at the previous one by factors of 3-20 depending on harvest time. Variations in 54 Mn and 60 Co transfer factors with application time after transplanting were comparatively low. Transfer factors of 54 Mn, 60 Co and 85 Sr mixed with topsoil before transplanting were up to 3-9 times higher than those for the application onto soil surface 2 days after transplanting root-uptake concentrations of the radionuclides in red pepper fruit and taking proper measures for its harvest and consumption at the event of an accidental release during the growing season of red pepper

  13. Modification of "1"3"7Cs transfer to rape (Brassica napus L.) phytomass under the influence of soil microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareniuk, O.; Shavanova, K.; Laceby, J.P.; Illienko, V.; Tytova, L.; Levchuk, S.; Gudkov, I.; Nanba, K.

    2015-01-01

    After nuclear accidents, such as those experienced in Chernobyl and Fukushima, microorganisms may help purify contaminated soils by changing the mobility of radionuclides and their availability for plants by altering the physical and chemical properties of the substrate. Here, using model experiments with quartz sand as a substrate we investigate the influence of microorganisms on "1"3"7Cs transfer from substrate to plants. The highest transition of "1"3"7Cs from substrate to plants (50% increase compared to the control) was observed after Brassica napus L. seeds were inoculated by Azotobacter chroococcum. The best results for reducing the accumulation of "1"3"7Cs radionuclides (30% less) were noted after the inoculation by Burkholderia sp.. Furthermore, Bacillus megaterium demonstrated an increased ability to accumulate "1"3"7Cs. This research improves our prediction of the behavior of radionuclides in soil and may contribute towards new, microbiological countermeasures for soil remediation following nuclear accidents. - Highlights: • Representatives of soil bacteria can alter "1"3"7Cs soil-to-plant transfer factor. • This ability does not depend on the localization of bacteria on the root surface. • Selection of bacteria to increase or decrease the "1"3"7Cs transfer factor is possible.

  14. Evaluation of data on the transfer of radionuclides in the food chain post-Chernobyl action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desmet, G.; Sinnaeve, J.

    1992-01-01

    During the accident at Chernobyl large amounts of radioactive materials were released into the atmosphere and distributed all over Europe. Depending on the trajectories of the radioactive clouds and the large variation of rainfall during its passage through, large local and regional differences in deposition were observed, leading to an enhanced contamination of soil and plants. Consequently, the radionuclides entered the foodchain by several pathways. The radiological consequences of radionuclides discharged from nuclear installations usually are evaluated using doses assessment models. In these models the passage from one compartment into another, e.g. the transfer from soil into plants, from plants into milk or meat is defined by transfer factors, which are influenced by various parameters. From the long term point of view only the long-lived nuclides like 134/137 Cs are important for long term radiation risk assessment after the Chernobyl accident. In this accident the release of radioactive materials took place over a longer time period and varied in rate and radionuclide composition. Some regions of Europe were contaminated several times. To improve radiation dose prediction the CEC has initiated the Post-Chernobyl radiation protection programme 'Evaluation of Data on the Transfer of Radionuclides in the Foodchain' including five main items to be studied by different laboratories: 1. Impact of chemical speciation on the radionuclide transfer in terrestrial ecosystems after a core disruptive accident, especially in soils and plants. 2. Transfer paths of radionuclides in seminatural and natural ecosystems and their role in contaminating the foodchain. 3. Validation of soil-to-plant parameters. 4. Transfer of radionuclides to animals and animal products. 5. Transfer paths in aquatic systems and their importance for the contamination of the foodchain

  15. Transfer factors across the human gut for plutonium and americium in shellfish from near Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, G.J.; Leonard, D.R.P.; Lovett, M.B.

    1988-01-01

    Data on gut transfer factors for environmental forms of radionuclides are essential for estimates of public radiation exposures following ingestion, and thus in decisions on controlling waste disposals. Dose estimates for transuranic nuclides are particularly sensitive to uncertainties stemming from gut transfer data being related to non-environmental forms and/or derived from animal experiments. The main parameter in question is f 1 , the fraction of intake reaching human body fluids following ingestion, as applied in the model of the gastro-intestinal tract used by the ICRP. The ICRP have recently reviewed the metabolism of plutonium and related elements (ICRP, 1986). Values of f 1 were derived from animal data; limited verification was provided by the only human data then available which was based on the low levels of fallout in foodstuffs. The ICRP proposed a cautious value of f 1 of 10 -3 for unknown or mixed compounds of Pu and for other actinides. However, it was recognised that this cautious value may not be appropriate in all situations where a best estimate of absorption is required; in such cases, if a different value more suitable to the specific situation can be justified, it should be employed

  16. Iodine transfer from agricultural soils to edible part of crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, S.; Tagami, K.

    2011-01-01

    Information about the distribution and cycling of stable iodine (I) in the environment is useful for dose estimation from its long-lived radioiodisotope, 129 I, which is one of the most critical radionuclides to be managed for the safe disposal of nuclear fuel waste. The soil-to-plant transfer factor (TF) is an important parameter to predict internal radiation exposure pathways through the food chains using mathematical models. Therefore, we have measured stable I and bromine (Br) for comparison, in 142 crop samples and associated agricultural field soil samples collected throughout Japan. The crops were classified into eight groups, i.e. leafy vegetables, white part of leeks, fruit vegetables, tubers, root crops, legumes, wheat and barley (WB), and rice. The results showed that Br and I concentrations were higher in upland field soil samples than in paddy field soil samples. However, when we compared TF values of WB and brown rice, no statistical difference was observed. The highest geometric mean of TF for I, 1.4 x 10 -2 , was obtained for leafy vegetables and fruit vegetables and that for Br, 1.5, was for fruit vegetables. TF for I was much lower than Br, as reported previously, maybe due to their different chemical forms in soil and uptake behaviors by plant roots. (orig.)

  17. Transfer of heavy metals through terrestrial food webs: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Jillian E; Boyd, Robert S; Rajakaruna, Nishanta

    2015-04-01

    Heavy metals are released into the environment by both anthropogenic and natural sources. Highly reactive and often toxic at low concentrations, they may enter soils and groundwater, bioaccumulate in food webs, and adversely affect biota. Heavy metals also may remain in the environment for years, posing long-term risks to life well after point sources of heavy metal pollution have been removed. In this review, we compile studies of the community-level effects of heavy metal pollution, including heavy metal transfer from soils to plants, microbes, invertebrates, and to both small and large mammals (including humans). Many factors contribute to heavy metal accumulation in animals including behavior, physiology, and diet. Biotic effects of heavy metals are often quite different for essential and non-essential heavy metals, and vary depending on the specific metal involved. They also differ for adapted organisms, including metallophyte plants and heavy metal-tolerant insects, which occur in naturally high-metal habitats (such as serpentine soils) and have adaptations that allow them to tolerate exposure to relatively high concentrations of some heavy metals. Some metallophyte plants are hyperaccumulators of certain heavy metals and new technologies using them to clean metal-contaminated soil (phytoextraction) may offer economically attractive solutions to some metal pollution challenges. These new technologies provide incentive to catalog and protect the unique biodiversity of habitats that have naturally high levels of heavy metals.

  18. Enrichment of Cs-137 in some wild plants and determination of the transfer factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molzahn, D.

    1993-01-01

    As a consequence of the nuclear weapons tests and the accident in the Chernobyl nuclear power plant some wild plants exhibit a relatively high enrichment in Cs-137. The examples cited here include heather, forest grown grass, ferns, needles and cones of spruces and firs and, obviously, also some species of mushrooms. While the transfer factors of cultivated plants range from 0.001 to 0.1 according to the literature and measurements of our own, values from 1 to 38 have been measured for heather, depending on the nature of the soil. One of the consequences of this relatively high enrichment is the enhanced cesium content in honeys produced from heather. It is intended to continue the relevant measurements in 1993. (orig.) [de

  19. Mycoremediation. The study of transfer factor for plutonium and americium uptake from the ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusan Galanda; Lubomir Matel; Jana Strisovska; Silvia Dulanska

    2014-01-01

    In our scientific research we have monitored mycoremediation's properties of oyster mushrooms in cultivation on the soil what is contaminated by solutions with radioactive isotopes of 239 Pu and 241 Am with known activity. We monitored specific activities of absorbed radionuclides in fruiting bodies and chemical forms of radionuclides which were compared to calculated specific activities of two background samples of oyster mushrooms intended for consumer purpose. We determined distributive coefficients between the ground and the fruiting body of oyster mushrooms. The average value which was obtained for the transfer factor for plutonium was 0.72 and for americium 3.97. To evaluate a quantity of absorbed radionuclides we used a method of liquid extraction. The emitting alpha radiation of alpha radionuclides was detected by spectrometry. For defining individual fractions of plutonium and americium that are contained in mushroom bodies was used the sequential leaching method. (author)

  20. Lifetime and g-factor measurements of excited states using Coulomb excitation and alpha transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guevara, Z. E., E-mail: zjguevaram@unal.edu.co; Torres, D. A., E-mail: datorresg@unal.edu.co [Physics Department, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá D.C. (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    In this contribution the challenges in the use of a setup to simultaneously measure lifetimes and g-factor values will be presented. The simultaneous use of the transient field technique and the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method, to measure magnetic moments and lifetimes respectively, allows to obtain a complete characterization of the currents of nucleons and the deformation in excited states close to the ground state. The technique is at the moment limited to Coulomb excitation and alpha-transfer reactions, what opens an interesting perspective to consider this type of experiments with radioactive beams. The use of deep-inelastic and fusion-evaporation reactions will be discussed. An example of a setup that makes use of a beam of {sup 106}Cd to study excited states of {sup 110}Sn and the beam nuclei itself will be presented.

  1. Mass transfer rate through liquid membranes: interfacial chemical reactions and diffusion as simultaneous permeability controlling factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danesi, P.R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Chiarizia, R.

    1981-01-01

    Equations describing the permeability of a liquid membrane to metal cations have been derived taking into account aqueous diffusion, membrane diffusion, and interfacial chemical reactions as simultaneous permeability controlling factors. Diffusion and chemical reactions have been coupled by a simple model analogous to the one previously described by us to represent liquid-liquid extraction kinetics. The derived equations, which make use of experimentally determined interfacial reaction mechanisms, qualitatively fit unexplained literature data regarding Cu 2+ transfer through liquid membranes. Their use to predict and optimize membrane permeability in practical separation processes by setting the appropriate concentration of the membrane carrier [LIX 64 (General Mills), a commercial β-hydroxy-oxime] and the pH of the aqueous copper feed solution is briefly discussed. 4 figures

  2. Twisting dependent properties of twisted carbon nanotube fibers: microstructure and strain transfer factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jinyuan; Xie, Erqing; Sun, Gengzhi; Zhan, Zhaoyao; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-01-01

    The dependences of twisting parameters on the electric and mechanical properties of twisted CNT fibers were systematically studied. Results from electric and mechanical measurements showed that twisting intensity is very effective to improve the electric and mechanical properties of CNT fibers. Further calculations combined with Raman results indicate that the twisting treatments, to a certain extent, can greatly enhance the strain transfer factors of the samples, which dominates the mechanical properties of CNT fibers. In addition, studies on the effect of twisting speeds suggested that lower twisting speed can lead to higher uniformity but lower performances in the electric and mechanical properties, higher twisting speed to higher Young’s modulus and higher conductance but lower uniformities. Ultra-strong uniform CNT fibers need to be prepared with a suitable twisting speed. (paper)

  3. Statistical data on transfer factors of iodine isotopes from the diet to milk of cows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khomutinin, Yu.V.; Kashparov, V.A.; Lazarev, N.M.; Otreshko, L.N.; Joshchenko, L.V.

    2017-01-01

    The transfer factors of iodine isotopes from the daily diet to milk of the cows in the pasture period for different soil and landscape conditions of Ukraine were evaluated and analyzed. It was shown that the possible values of the considered coefficient of the transition is a random variable, which is satisfactorily described by the lognormal distribution law of probabilities. The resulting estimates of medians (GM = 0.046 +- 0.003) and the geometric standard deviation (GSD = 1.79) for possible iodine conversion coefficient of the daily diet in cow milk were obtained. They refine the IAEA reference data for specific soil-landscape conditions of continental Ukraine and allow obtaining less conservative estimates when predicting the specific content of iodine isotopes in the milk of cows in the pasture period.

  4. Soil-to-crop transfer factors of radium in Japanese agricultural fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, S.; Tagami, K.

    2007-01-01

    The concentrations of 226 Ra in upland field crops (e.g., cabbage, leek, onion, potato, and so on) and associated soils collected from 45 locations throughout Japan were determined in order to obtain soil-to-crop transfer factors (TFs). Concentrations of 226 Ra in the soils collected in southwestern Japan were higher than those in northeastern Japan; however, no correlations between 226 Ra concentrations in crops and soils were observed. The TFs ranged from -3 to 5.8 x 10 -2 with a geometric mean of 6.4 x 10 -3 . These data were within the 95% confidential range of TF-Ra for several crops as reported in the IAEA Technical Reports Series No.364. Among the alkaline earth metals. TF-Ba was similar to TF-Ra. (author)

  5. Single-Phase Active Boost Rectifier with Power Factor Correction for Wireless Power Transfer Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan [ORNL; Onar, Omer C [ORNL; Miller, John M [ORNL; Tang, Lixin [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) technology is a novel research area in the charging technology that bridges utility and the automotive industries. There are various solutions that are currently being evaluated by several research teams to find the most efficient way to manage the power flow from the grid to the vehicle energy storage system. There are different control parameters that can be utilized to compensate for the change in the impedance. To understand the power flow through the system this paper presents a novel approach to the system model and the impact of different control parameters on the load power. The implementation of an active front-end rectifier on the grid side for power factor control and voltage boost capability for load power regulation is also discussed.

  6. Risk Factors Influencing Conception Rate in Holstein Heifers before Artificial Insemination or Embryo Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yusuf

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to show the risk factors affecting the conception rate in Holstein heifers after synchronization of estrus. A total of 275 Holstein heifers housed in a free barn were used for the experiment. The herd was visited regularly at four week intervals for synchronization of estrus using Heatsynch and CIDR-Heatsynch protocols. A group of four to 14 animals, depending on the availability, were referred to the experiment at each visit. Estrus induction rates in the two protocols were 93.9% and 94.9%, respectively. There was no difference in the conception rate between the two protocols. Conception rate after artificial insemination (AI or embryo transfer (ET were 46.3% and 51.4%, respectively. The risk factors affecting conception rate in heifers were daily weight gain (odds ratio [OR]= 4.673; P= 0.036 and body condition score (BCS (OR= 3.642; P= 0.018. Furthermore, estrus synchronization protocol (OR= 1.774; P= 0.083 and the absence of corpus luteum (CL at the initiation of treatment (OR= 0.512; P= 0.061 had a tendency to affect the conception rate, while age (OR= 0.715; P= 0.008 was a protective factor to conception rate.  In conclusion, positive daily weight gain before AI or ET, higher BCS, younger age, and the presence of CL at the initiation of estrus synchronization in dairy heifers increased the likelihood to conceive.

  7. Modification of an impulse-factoring orbital transfer technique to account for orbit determination and maneuver execution errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibler, J. F.; Green, R. N.; Young, G. R.; Kelly, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    A method has previously been developed to satisfy terminal rendezvous and intermediate timing constraints for planetary missions involving orbital operations. The method uses impulse factoring in which a two-impulse transfer is divided into three or four impulses which add one or two intermediate orbits. The periods of the intermediate orbits and the number of revolutions in each orbit are varied to satisfy timing constraints. Techniques are developed to retarget the orbital transfer in the presence of orbit-determination and maneuver-execution errors. Sample results indicate that the nominal transfer can be retargeted with little change in either the magnitude (Delta V) or location of the individual impulses. Additonally, the total Delta V required for the retargeted transfer is little different from that required for the nominal transfer. A digital computer program developed to implement the techniques is described.

  8. Chemical elements in pearl oysters (Paxyodon ponderosus), phytoplankton and estuarine sediments from eastern Amazon (Northern Brazil): Bioaccumulation factors and trophic transfer factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhena, Maria P. S. P.; Costa, Marcondes L.; Berrêdo, José F.; Paiva, Rosildo S.; Souza, Crisvaldo C. S.

    2016-04-01

    The current study was conducted near Barcarena County, which is a mid-sized urban center where aluminum ore processing industries (bauxite) and Vila do Conde cargo terminal are located. It aims to discuss the bioaccumulation factors as well as factors related to the trophic transfer of chemical elements in water, oyster, phytoplankton and bottom sediments from an estuary in the Brazilian Northern coast. The bioaccumulation factor (BAF), trophic transfer factor (TTF) and biota-sediment-water were used to correlate the contents of chemical elements found in organisms. The sediment, surface water, phytoplankton and pearl oysters chemical composition was analyzed by ICP-OES and ICP-MS. Pearl oysters showed K, Ca, Mg, P, Mn, Fe, Zn, Al, Ba and Pb accumulation, which concentration increase is associated with their diet (phytoplankton). Al concentrations are 14 times higher in pearl oysters (Paxyodon ponderosus), assuming that they are associated with wastewater emissions and with industrialization processes in the area. BAF and BSAF values are 1000 times higher than the metal concentrations in water and bioavailable fraction concentrations. The oyster-phytoplankton trophic transfer factor indicates that P, Ba, Ca, Na, Cd and Zn showed the largest transfers (from 5 to 19). These trophic transfers may be sufficient to cause significant ecotoxicological effects on the region biota.

  9. Factor IX expression in skeletal muscle of a severe hemophilia B patient 10 years after AAV-mediated gene transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Buchlis, George; Podsakoff, Gregory M.; Radu, Antonetta; Hawk, Sarah M.; Flake, Alan W.; Mingozzi, Federico; High, Katherine A.

    2012-01-01

    In previous work we transferred a human factor IX–encoding adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) into skeletal muscle of men with severe hemophilia B. Biopsy of injected muscle up to 1 year after vector injection showed evidence of gene transfer by Southern blot and of protein expression by IHC and immunofluorescent staining. Although the procedure appeared safe, circulating F.IX levels remained subtherapeutic (< 1%). Recently, we obtained muscle tissue from a subject injected 10 years earlier ...

  10. The Factors That Influence Transfer of Training and Its Effect on Organizational Citizenship Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nik Nazli, Nik Nadian Nisa; Sheikh Khairudin, Sheikh Muhamad Hizam

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to identify the relationship between organizational learning culture, psychological contract breach, work engagement, training simulation and transfer of training, to examine the effect of transfer of training on organizational citizenship behaviour and to determine the mediating effect of transfer of training on the…

  11. Classification of soil systems on the basis of transfer factors of radionuclides from soil to reference plants. Report of the final research coordination meeting organized by the Joint FAO/IAEA Programme of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    The IAEA Basic Safety Standards for Radiation Protection include the general requirement to keep all doses as low as reasonably achievable, taking account of economic and social considerations, within the overall constraint of individual dose limits. National and Regional authorities have to set release limits for radioactive effluent and also to establish contingency plans to deal with an uncontrolled release following an accident or terrorist activity. It is normal practice to assess radiation doses to man by means of radiological assessment models. In this context the IAEA published (1994), in cooperation with the International Union of Radioecologists (IUR), a Handbook of Parameter Values for the Prediction of Radionuclide Transfer in Temperate Environments to facilitate such calculations. The obvious limitation of the Handbook is that the data on soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides are strictly relevant only to temperate climates. Therefore, the IAEA, together with the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization and the IUR, conducted a coordinated research project (CRP), to obtain similar data in tropical and sub-tropical regions. A conclusion of this research was that some combinations of ecosystems and radionuclides do not behave as might be expected. A consultants meeting held in May 1998 produced a proposal for a CRP to address the issue of identifying such situations in temperate as well as tropical and sub-tropical conditions

  12. Intraocular gene transfer of ciliary neurotrophic factor rescues photoreceptor degeneration in RCS rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shun-Ping; Lin, Po-Kang; Liu, Jorn-Hon; Khor, Chin-Ni; Lee, Yih-Jing

    2004-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is known as an important factor in the regulation of retinal cell growth. We used both recombinant CNTF and an adenovirus carrying the CNTF gene to regulate retinal photoreceptor expression in a retinal degenerative animal, Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats. Cells in the outer nuclear layer of the retinae from recombinant-CNTF-treated, adenoviral-CNTF-treated, saline-operated, and contralateral untreated preparations were examined for those exhibiting CNTF photoreceptor protective effects. Cell apoptosis in the outer nuclear layer of the retinae was also detected. It was found that CNTF had a potent effect on delaying the photoreceptor degeneration process in RCS rats. Furthermore, adenovirus CNTF gene transfer was proven to be better at rescuing photoreceptors than that when using recombinant CNTF, since adenoviral CNTF prolonged the photoreceptor protection effect. The function of the photoreceptors was also examined by taking electroretinograms of different animals. Adenoviral-CNTF-treated eyes showed better retinal function than did the contralateral control eyes. This study indicates that adenoviral CNTF effectively rescues degenerating photoreceptors in RCS rats. Copyright 2004 National Science Council, ROC and S. Karger AG, Basel

  13. Measurements of the deuteron and proton magnetic form factors at large momentum transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosted, P.E.; Katramatou, A.T.; Arnold, R.G.; Benton, D.; Clogher, L.; DeChambrier, G.; Lambert, J.; Lung, A.; Petratos, G.G.; Rahbar, A.; Rock, S.E.; Szalata, Z.M.; Debebe, B.; Frodyma, M.; Hicks, R.S.; Hotta, A.; Peterson, G.A.; Gearhart, R.A.; Alster, J.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Dietrich, F.; van Bibber, K.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of the deuteron elastic magnetic structure function B(Q 2 ) are reported at squared four-momentum transfer values 1.20≤Q 2 ≤2.77 (GeV/c) 2 . Also reported are values for the proton magnetic form factor G Mp (Q 2 ) at 11 Q 2 values between 0.49 and 1.75 (GeV/c) 2 . The data were obtained using an electron beam of 0.5 to 1.3 GeV. Electrons backscattered near 180 degree were detected in coincidence with deuterons or protons recoiling near 0 degree in a large solid-angle double-arm spectrometer system. The data for B(Q 2 ) are found to decrease rapidly from Q 2 =1.2 to 2 (GeV/c) 2 , and then rise to a secondary maximum around Q 2 =2.5 (GeV/c) 2 . Reasonable agreement is found with several different models, including those in the relativistic impulse approximation, nonrelativistic calculations that include meson-exchange currents, isobar configurations, and six-quark configurations, and one calculation based on the Skyrme model. All calculations are very sensitive to the choice of deuteron wave function and nucleon form factor parametrization. The data for G Mp (Q 2 ) are in good agreement with the empirical dipole fit

  14. Analysis of the heat transfer and friction factor correlations influence in the prediction of evaporating flows inside tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raush, G.; Rigola, J.; Morales-Ruiz, S.; Oliva, A.; Perez-Segarra, C.D. [Centre Tecnologic de Transferencia de Calor (CTTC), Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), ETSEIAT, C. Colom 11, 08222 Terrassa (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2009-11-15

    A methodology for analysing the influence of the heat transfer and friction factor correlations in the prediction of the two-phase flows inside horizontal ducts under evaporation phenomena is presented. An experimental unit based on single stage vapor compression refrigerating system with two parallel evaporation devices has been built to work under real refrigeration conditions. The first evaporation device consists of a double pipe evaporator which allows determining the heat flux through the pipe. The second device is an electrically heated pipe evaporator with uniformly distributed temperature and pressure sensors along the fluid path. The experimental data of temperature and pressure distribution along the smooth heated duct is compared with a selected set of heat transfer and friction factor correlations through a detailed numerical evaporation model. The aim of this paper is to determine possible criteria to select the most suitable heat transfer and friction factor correlations available. (author)

  15. Plasmid Transfer of Plasminogen K1-5 Reduces Subcutaneous Hepatoma Growth by Affecting Inflammatory Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea A. Koch

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that plasminogen K1-5 (PlgK1-5 directly affects tumour cells and inflammation. Therefore, we analysed if PlgK1-5 has immediate effects on hepatoma cells and inflammatory factors in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, effects of plasmid encoding PlgK1-5 (pK1-5 on Hepa129, Hepa1-6, and HuH7 cell viability, apoptosis, and proliferation as well as VEGF and TNF-alpha expression and STAT3-phosphorylation were investigated. In vivo, tumour growth, proliferation, vessel density, and effects on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha expression were examined following treatment with pK1-5. In vivo, pK1-5 halved cell viability; cell death was increased by up to 15% compared to the corresponding controls. Proliferation was not affected. VEGF, TNF-alpha, and STAT3-phosphorylation were affected following treatment with pK1-5. In vivo, ten days after treatment initiation, pK1-5 reduced subcutaneous tumour growth by 32% and mitosis by up to 77% compared to the controls. Vessel density was reduced by 50%. TNF-alpha levels in tumour and liver tissue were increased, whereas VEGF levels in tumours and livers were reduced after pK1-5 treatment. Taken together, plasmid gene transfer of PlgK1-5 inhibits hepatoma (cell growth not only by reducing vessel density but also by inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation, and triggering inflammation.

  16. Comparison of Zygote Intrafallopian Transfer and Intrauterine Embryo Transfer for Male-factor Infertility After Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hui Lin

    2004-03-01

    Conclusion: The data presented in this report demonstrate that there was no therapeutic improvement associated with the increased complexity of ZIFT as compared with intrauterine ET after ICSI for the treatment of male-factor infertility. With the advent of improvements in culture techniques in the IVF laboratory, intrauterine ET remains the technique of choice.

  17. Evaluation of small scale laboratory and pot experiments to determine realistic transfer factors for the radionuclides 90Sr, 137Cs, 60Co and 54Mn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffens, W.; Fuehr, F.; Mittelstaedt, W.

    1980-01-01

    Transfer factors for the root uptake of 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 60 Co and 54 Mn were compared using outdoor lysimeters, Kick-Brauckmann experimental pots under greenhouse conditions and Neubauer cups under growth chamber conditions. The uptake was studied in barley, potatoes, sugar beet and salad vegetables grown on either podsolic or loess soil. The transfer factors for these radionuclides under the specific conditions of the small scale Neubauer cup experiments differed greatly from those obtained from the outdoor lysimeter. In the pot experiments, the transfer factors for 90 Sr, 137 Cs and 54 Mn showed less deviation from the lysimeter results especially in crops grown on podsolic soil. For 60 Co, the transfer factors varied for the different crops grown. Transfer factors obtained in pot experiments can only be applicable to a limited extent to field conditions; factors influencing the transfer factors in pot experiments include soil volume, root density, root/shoot ratio, water supply and fertilizer application rate. (UK)

  18. The critical success factors and impact of prior knowledge to nursing students when transferring nursing knowledge during nursing clinical practise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Tien; Tsai, Ling-Long

    2005-11-01

    Nursing practise plays an important role in transferring nursing knowledge to nursing students. From the related literature review, prior knowledge will affect how learners gain new knowledge. There has been no direct examination of the prior knowledge interaction effect on students' performance and its influence on nursing students when evaluating the knowledge transfer success factors. This study explores (1) the critical success factors in transferring nursing knowledge, (2) the impact of prior knowledge when evaluating the success factors for transferring nursing knowledge. This research utilizes in-depth interviews to probe the initial success factor phase. A total of 422 valid questionnaires were conducted by the authors. The data were analysed by comparing the mean score and t-test between two groups. Seventeen critical success factors were identified by the two groups of students. Twelve items were selected to examine the diversity in the two groups. Students with prior knowledge were more independent than the other group. They also preferred self-directed learning over students without prior knowledge. Students who did not have prior knowledge were eager to take every opportunity to gain experience and more readily adopted new knowledge.

  19. Factors that Influence the Dissemination of Knowledge in Technology Transfer among Malaysian Manufacturing Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mughaneswari ap Sahadevan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The meaning of technology transfer is so wide but mostly involving some form of technology-re- lated exchange. However, in this particular paper, technology transfer is consider as a concept to examine the process of disseminating knowledge and skills that a person owned to another per- son in order to generate higher productivity with new approach of producing a particular prod- uct or service. Although, many researchers have explored the evolution of technology transfer, nonetheless some drivers are yet to be explored in a Malaysian manufacturing industry. This study, therefore attempts to determine the relationship between absorptive capacity, transfer capacity, communication motivation and learning intent and technology transfer performance. A survey methodology was used in a Japanese multinational company based in Klang Valley, Malaysia. A total of 117 questionnaires were received. Results show that absorptive capacity is the most signifi- cant to influence technology transfer performance.

  20. Internal and external factors on firms? transfer pricing decisions: Insights from organization studies

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Li; Manuel Portugal Ferreira

    2007-01-01

    Well understood in economics, accounting, finance, and legal research, transfer pricing has rarely been comprehensively explored in organization management literature. This paper explores some theoretical explanations of transfer pricing within multidivisional firms drawing insights from various organizational theories – primarily institutional theory, transaction cost economics, and social networks – to develop a conceptual model of transfer pricing. This model focuses on the nature of multi...

  1. Transfer factor, lung volumes, resistance and ventilation distribution in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbanck, Sylvia; Van Muylem, Alain; Schuermans, Daniel; Bautmans, Ivan; Thompson, Bruce; Vincken, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring of chronic lung disease requires reference values of lung function indices, including putative markers of small airway function, spanning a wide age range.We measured spirometry, transfer factor of the lung for carbon monoxide (TLCO), static lung volume, resistance and ventilation distribution in a healthy population, studying at least 20 subjects per sex and per decade between the ages of 20 and 80 years.With respect to the Global Lung Function Initiative reference data, our subjects had average z-scores for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV1/FVC of -0.12, 0.04 and -0.32, respectively. Reference equations were obtained which could account for a potential dependence of index variability on age and height. This was done for (but not limited to) indices that are pertinent to asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease studies: forced expired volume in 6 s, forced expiratory flow, TLCO, specific airway conductance, residual volume (RV)/total lung capacity (TLC), and ventilation heterogeneity in acinar and conductive lung zones.Deterioration in acinar ventilation heterogeneity and lung clearance index with age were more marked beyond 60 years, and conductive ventilation heterogeneity showed the greatest increase in variability with age. The most clinically relevant deviation from published reference values concerned RV/TLC values, which were considerably smaller than American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society-endorsed reference values. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  2. Gene Transfer of Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Prevents Neurodegeneration Triggered by FXN Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsu-Jiménez, Yurika; Loría, Frida; Corona, Juan Carlos; Díaz-Nido, Javier

    2016-05-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is a predominantly neurodegenerative disease caused by recessive mutations that produce a deficiency of frataxin (FXN). Here, we have used a herpesviral amplicon vector carrying a gene encoding for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to drive its overexpression in neuronal cells and test for its effect on FXN-deficient neurons both in culture and in the mouse cerebellum in vivo. Gene transfer of BDNF to primary cultures of mouse neurons prevents the apoptosis which is triggered by the knockdown of FXN gene expression. This neuroprotective effect of BDNF is also observed in vivo in a viral vector-based knockdown mouse cerebellar model. The injection of a lentiviral vector carrying a minigene encoding for a FXN-specific short hairpin ribonucleic acid (shRNA) into the mouse cerebellar cortex triggers a FXN deficit which is accompanied by significant apoptosis of granule neurons as well as loss of calbindin in Purkinje cells. These pathological changes are accompanied by a loss of motor coordination of mice as assayed by the rota-rod test. Coinjection of a herpesviral vector encoding for BDNF efficiently prevents both the development of cerebellar neuropathology and the ataxic phenotype. These data demonstrate the potential therapeutic usefulness of neurotrophins like BDNF to protect FXN-deficient neurons from degeneration.

  3. Technology transfer of hearing aids to low and middle income countries: policy and market factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelman, Katherine D; Werner, Roye

    2014-09-01

    The competitive market advantages of industry and the balancing force of international governmental organizations (IGOs) are examined to identify market and policy in support of sustainable technology transfer of hearing aids to low and middle income countries. A second purpose is to examine the usefulness of findings for other assistive technologies (AT). Searches of electronic databases, IGO documents, industry reports and journals were supplemented by informal discussions with industry and IGO staff and audiologists. The value chain is used to examine the competitive advantage of industry and the balancing tools of certain IGOs. Both industry and IGOs engage in intellectual property (IP) and competition activities and are active in each segment of the hearing aid value chain. Their market and policy objectives and strategies are different. IGOs serve as balancing forces for the competitive advantages of industry. The hearing aid market configuration and hearing aid fitting process are not representative of other AT products but IP, trade and competition policy tools used by IGOs and governments are relevant to other AT. The value chain is a useful tool to identify the location of price mark-ups and the influence of actors. Market factors and reimbursement and subsidization policies drive hearing aid innovation. UN-related international government organization activities are responsive to the needs of disability populations who cannot afford assistive technology. Policy tools used by international governmental organizations are applicable across assistive technology. A partnership model is important to distribution of hearing aids to low and middle income countries.

  4. Application of gamma ray spectrometry for evaluation of transfer factors in environmental matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, D.D.

    2008-01-01

    Gamma Ray Spectrometry (GRS) is performed using a variety of radiation detectors, to identify and determine radioactivity concentration of gamma emitting radionuclides qualitatively, in a wide range of samples. The samples can be of a high inventory power plant origin, NORM category or low level environmental samples, around a power plant. The method is usually applied to non-destructive analysis of environmental samples. However, it can also be applied to destructive analysis i.e. following extraction/separation of the analyte from the sample, if there is a need to pre-concentrate the analyte. The accuracy and precision of the method, depends on the quality of calibration, correction methods employed, stability of the system components, computational algorithms used, analysis of sources of uncertainties etc. The transfer factors among the environmental matrices are simple ratios, but the methodologies used in generating the respective concentrations have to be appropriately documented, including the validity of measurements. Validation mechanisms can include the results of international inter-comparison exercises, the certificates of standards issued by quality-accredited international laboratories. A few parameters involved in the qualitative analysis of gamma spectrometry are discussed here

  5. Simple estimation of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) orientation factor distribution in membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loura, Luís M S

    2012-11-19

    Because of its acute sensitivity to distance in the nanometer scale, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) has found a large variety of applications in many fields of chemistry, physics, and biology. One important issue regarding the correct usage of FRET is its dependence on the donor-acceptor relative orientation, expressed as the orientation factor k(2). Different donor/acceptor conformations can lead to k(2) values in the 0 ≤ k(2) ≤ 4 range. Because the characteristic distance for FRET, R(0), is proportional to (k(2))1/6, uncertainties in the orientation factor are reflected in the quality of information that can be retrieved from a FRET experiment. In most cases, the average value of k(2) corresponding to the dynamic isotropic limit ( = 2/3) is used for computation of R(0) and hence donor-acceptor distances and acceptor concentrations. However, this can lead to significant error in unfavorable cases. This issue is more critical in membrane systems, because of their intrinsically anisotropic nature and their reduced fluidity in comparison to most common solvents. Here, a simple numerical simulation method for estimation of the probability density function of k(2) for membrane-embedded donor and acceptor fluorophores in the dynamic regime is presented. In the simplest form, the proposed procedure uses as input the most probable orientations of the donor and acceptor transition dipoles, obtained by experimental (including linear dichroism) or theoretical (such as molecular dynamics simulation) techniques. Optionally, information about the widths of the donor and/or acceptor angular distributions may be incorporated. The methodology is illustrated for special limiting cases and common membrane FRET pairs.

  6. An exploration of the perceived factors that affect the learning and transfer of skills taught to student midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longworth, Mary K

    2013-08-01

    the aim of this study was to examine the attitudes of student midwives towards skills training and practise. The objectives were to explore the factors in the skills laboratory environment and in clinical practice which affect how successfully student midwives transfer into clinical practice the various skills they have learnt in preparation for an Objective Structured Clinical Examination. a review of the background literature revealed that there were many variables related to successful transfer of skills in general but there appeared to be a gap around perceived factors affecting transfer of skills of student midwives. a mixed methods design was conducted using both questionnaires and semi-structured interviews between June and August 2010. questionnaires were administered to all midwifery students at one university in Wales. These were later followed by semi-structured interviews for 6 student midwives who were purposively selected from all year groups. the results from the questionnaires revealed that a majority of students had positive attitudes to educators and mentors and to their skills acquisition experience in the skills laboratory and to the available opportunities to practise in clinical practice. Although students believed in the transferability of skills from the laboratory setting to clinical practice, a majority thought that clinical practice provided them with a better opportunity to learn clinical skills. The semi-structured interviews demonstrated that facilitating factors in the skills laboratory included having adequate instruction as well as having a designated space. Hindering factors included unrealistic models and equipment. In clinical practice, facilitating factors included having the opportunities to practise skills and support and feedback from the mentor. Hindering factors included deficits in the student-mentor relationship. this study highlighted that midwifery students must be adequately prepared to carry out clinical skills

  7. Compilation and evaluation of radioecological data on soil/plant transfer in consideration of local variabilities in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cierjacks, A.; Albers, B.

    2004-01-01

    Publications on soil-to-plant transfer factors (TFs) for radiocesium, radiostrontium, plutonium and iodine-129 in Germany were evaluated. Over 100 publications with relevant TFs were identified, whereof 54 were intensively analyzed and rated according to quality criteria. A database was created which gives a comprehensive survey of the transfer factors, important related soil and plant parameters and peculiarities of sampling and analyses. For better comparability, TFs were standardized and expressed in units of [Bq kg -1 plant dry matter / Bq kg -1 soil dry matter]. To enable statistical analyses, soil and plant parameters were standardized, too. Standardization also prepares data as input for modelling. The database contains 4800 records which represent singular and aggregated values of more than 7300 samples taken in Germany. Mean values of individual combinations radionuclide/crop can be queried easily using a special software module. Additional information about the experimental design, nuclide contents in plants and soil, important parameters and detailed remarks allow a classification of each record

  8. The uptake and transfer of caesium-137, strontium-90 and zinc-65 from soil to food crops in tropical environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachdev, P.; Sachdev, M.S.; Deb, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    The soil to plant transfer factors (TF) of 137 Cs, 90 Sr and 65 Zn were determined for two crops, pearlmillet (Pennisetum typhoides) and sorghum (Sorghum vulgare) under irrigated conditions in greenhouse and in natural conditions of rain in field. The accumulation of 137 Cs was almost doubled when the soil contamination level was doubled. Under the field conditions, 137 Cs concentration in both pearlmillet and sorghum grains as well as straw was nearly four times more at a higher level of soil contamination (148 kBq/kg soil) compared to that at a lower level of 74 kBq/kg soil. 90 Sr absorption by both the crops was nearly 50 to 100 times more compared to 137 Cs under identical conditions of crop growth and soil contamination. 65 Zn concentration was higher in pearlmillet grains than in straw portions, whereas in sorghum it was otherwise. The TF values for 137 Cs decreased nearly ten fold in the second year both under field and pot culture conditions, while those for 90 Sr reduced by half and for 65 Zn by about five times. Under irrigated conditions in field the transfer factors for 137 Cs were nearly four times larger both for pearlmillet and sorghum (1996 experiment) and for 90 Sr more than two times, compared to those under rain fed conditions obtained in 1994. (author)

  9. Transfer factor of Radium -226, lead-210 and Polonium-210 from Norm contaminated soil to Atriplex, Afelfa and Bermuda grasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M.S.; Mukhallati, H.; Al-Hamwi, A.

    2011-10-01

    transfer factors of Radium -226, lead-210 and Polonium-210 from contaminated soil with oil coproduced water to grazing plants in the north eastern region of Syria have been determined. contaminated soil was collected from one of the AL-Furat Petroleum Oil company oil fields;soil was distributed into several pots where the studied plants were planted in order to study the transfer factors of radioisotopes to them. Results have shown that the mean transfer factors of radium to green parts have reached has reached 0.0016 in Atriplex halimus L.,0.0021 in Atriplex canescens Nutt, 0.0025 in Atriplex Leucoclada Bioss,0.0082 in Bermuda grass and 0.0167 in Medicago Sativ L,which was the highest,while the transfer factors of polonium and lead were ten times higher than those for radium and reacted 0.012 in Atriplex Leucoclada Bioss, 0.011 in Atriplex canescens Nutt, 0.007 in Atriplex halimus L.0.32 in bermuda grass and 0.025 in Afelfa.(author)

  10. Perceptions of a Learning Organization and Factors within the Work Environment That Influence Transfer of Training in Law Enforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter-Johnson, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine law enforcement officers' perception of factors within the workplace that influence transfer of training and their perception of the organization being a learning organization. The study actually had three parts. First, it intended to investigate the perception of law enforcement officers regarding…

  11. Transfer Factor of Radioactive Cs and Sr from Egyptian Soils to Roots and Leafs of Wheat Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Khadra, S.A.; Abdel Fattah, A.T.; Eissa, H.S.; Abdel Sabour, M.F.

    2009-01-01

    Transfer factors (TFs) of long lived radionuclide such as 137 Cs and 90 Sr from three different Egyptian soils type to wheat plant have been studied by radiotracer experiments. Most typical Egyptian soils (sandy, sandy loam and clayey) from three different locations (Al -Oboor, Abu- Zaabal and Shebeen cities) were selected for the experiments carried out under outdoor conditions. The plant selected was wheat because the high consumption of wheat in Egypt. In the present study radioactive strontium and caesium uptake from different types of soil was investigated .These radionuclide showed a considerable difference in their distribution within the plant .The results showed that soil type influences the transfer factors. Sandy soil resulted in the highest transfer factor for both (Cs and Sr) from soil to wheat. TFs for leafs were higher than those for roots in case of 90 Sr (for all types of soil). However, TFs of ( 137 Cs) for roots were higher than those for leafs for all soils. Grains of the wheat showed the lowest transfer factor for the Cs and Sr (for all types of soil)

  12. Relativistic quark model and behaviour of the meson electromagnetic form factors at small and intermediate momentum transfer Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagdasaryan, A.S.; Esaybegyan, S.V.; Ter-Isaakyan, N.L.

    1982-01-01

    In a model of hadrons composed of relativistic quarks a description of meson static characteristics and pion electromagnetic form factor in the range of small and intermediate values of momentum transfer 0 2 2 have obtained. It is shown that in such a model the data available on the pion electromagnetic form factor may be described basing on a simplest quark without gluon exchange. The contribution of a one-gluon exchange diagram in such a model cannot exceed 30%

  13. Predisposition Factors of Career and Technical Education Transfer Students: A Hermeneutic Phenomenology Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hioki, Warren; Lester, Derek; Martinez, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Six college students, who were career and technical education (CTE) transfer students in the state of Nevada, were interviewed Spring Semester of 2009. The study used a hermeneutic phenomenology framework as the method to identify those predisposition variables that heavily influenced the students in their decision to transfer to a senior…

  14. Evaluation in practice: identifying factors for improving transfer of training in technical domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barnard, Y.F.; Veldhuis, G.J.; Rooij, J.C.G.M. van

    2001-01-01

    The main goal of training is to prepare trainees for the tasks they are going to perform on their jobs. In other words, training aims at transfer from the classroom to the work floor. Transfer of training can be defined as the extent to which trainees are able to use effectively in their work

  15. Risk Factors for Gaps in Care during Transfer from Pediatric to Adult Cystic Fibrosis Programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, Gregory S; Ostrenga, Joshua; Petren, Kristofer; Fink, Aliza K; D'Agostino, Emma; Strassle, Camila; Schechter, Michael S; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    2018-02-01

    With improved survival into adulthood, the number of dedicated adult cystic fibrosis (CF) care programs has expanded in the United States over the past decade. Transfer from pediatric to adult CF programs represents a potential time for lapses in recommended health care. To describe variability in transfer between pediatric and adult CF care programs and to identify factors associated with prolonged gaps in care. Using the U.S. CF Foundation Patient Registry, we identified individuals with CF who transferred care from a pediatric to an adult CF care program during 2007 to 2013. A gap in care was defined as the time in days between the last recorded pediatric encounter and the first recorded adult encounter. A hierarchical multivariable regression model was applied to investigate the effect of program- and patient-level factors on gaps in care. There were 1,946 individuals at 155 pediatric CF programs who transferred to an adult CF program during the analytic period. The mean age at transfer was 21.1 years, with 68% transferring care between ages 18 and 21 years. The mean gap in care during transfer was 183 days (median, 106 d; range, 2-1,843 d); 47% had a less than 100-day gap, and 13% had a greater than or equal to 365-day gap (prolonged gap). Prolonged gaps in care were more likely to occur among those younger than age 18 years (odds ratio, 3.33; 95% confidence interval, 2.06-5.37) at the time of transfer and those who transferred to an adult program that was in a different city from their pediatric or affiliate program (odds ratio, 2.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.48-3.17). Having any health insurance coverage was associated with decreased likelihood of prolonged gaps (private insurance vs. no insurance [odds ratio, 0.15; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-0.23] or any government insurance versus no insurance [odds ratio, 0.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.07-0.18]). Lung function, nutritional status, and receipt of intravenous antibiotics in the final year of

  16. Factors that Influence the Dissemination of Knowledge in Technology Transfer among Malaysian Manufacturing Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mughaneswari ap Sahadevan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The meaning of technology transfer is so wide but mostly involving some form of technology-related exchange. However, in this particular paper, technology transfer is consider as a concept to examine the process of  disseminating knowledge and skills that a person owned to another person in order to generate higher productivity with new approach of producing a particular product or service. Although, many researchers have explored the evolution of technology transfer, nonetheless some drivers are yet to be explored in a Malaysian manufacturing industry. This study, therefore attempts to determine the relationship between absorptive capacity, transfer capacity, communication motivation and learning intent and technology transfer performance. A survey methodology was used in a Japanese multinational company based in Klang Valley, Malaysia. A total of 117 questionnaires were received. Results show that absorptive capacity is the most significant to influence technology transfer performance. Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE Key words: Technology transfer, absorptive capacity, Malaysia.   Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT AND FRICTION FACTOR OF Al2O3 NANOFLUID IN A PACKED BED COLUMN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Srinivasa Rao

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The forced convection heat transfer coefficient and friction factor are determined for the flow of water and nanofluid in a vertical packed bed column. The analysis is undertaken in the laminar and transition Reynolds number range. The column is filled with spherical glass beads as the bed material. The heat transfer coefficients with Al2O3 nanofluid increased by 12% to 15% with the increase of volume concentration from 0.02% to 0.5% compared with water. The experimental values of axial temperature are in good agreement with the NTU-ε method proposed by Schumann’s model.

  17. Assessing the model transferability for prediction of transcription factor binding sites based on chromatin accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng; Zibetti, Cristina; Wan, Jun; Wang, Guohua; Blackshaw, Seth; Qian, Jiang

    2017-07-27

    Computational prediction of transcription factor (TF) binding sites in different cell types is challenging. Recent technology development allows us to determine the genome-wide chromatin accessibility in various cellular and developmental contexts. The chromatin accessibility profiles provide useful information in prediction of TF binding events in various physiological conditions. Furthermore, ChIP-Seq analysis was used to determine genome-wide binding sites for a range of different TFs in multiple cell types. Integration of these two types of genomic information can improve the prediction of TF binding events. We assessed to what extent a model built upon on other TFs and/or other cell types could be used to predict the binding sites of TFs of interest. A random forest model was built using a set of cell type-independent features such as specific sequences recognized by the TFs and evolutionary conservation, as well as cell type-specific features derived from chromatin accessibility data. Our analysis suggested that the models learned from other TFs and/or cell lines performed almost as well as the model learned from the target TF in the cell type of interest. Interestingly, models based on multiple TFs performed better than single-TF models. Finally, we proposed a universal model, BPAC, which was generated using ChIP-Seq data from multiple TFs in various cell types. Integrating chromatin accessibility information with sequence information improves prediction of TF binding.The prediction of TF binding is transferable across TFs and/or cell lines suggesting there are a set of universal "rules". A computational tool was developed to predict TF binding sites based on the universal "rules".

  18. Processes governing the transfer of radionuclides into crops following the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebenshchikova, N.V.; Firsakova, S.K.; Timofeyev, S.F.; Novik, A.A.; Palekshanova, G.I.

    1991-01-01

    Given that the Chernobyl accident contaminated large areas of Byelorussia, we studied the processes governing - and the quantitative features of - radionuclide accumulation in meadow herbage and staple agricultural crops grown by farms in the Gomel Region. The fields are situated on soddy-podzolic sandy and sandy-loam soils where radiocaesium contamination varied between 15 and 80 Ci/km 2 . The quantitative features detected in radionuclide accumulation levels in crops (depending on soil composition and plant biological properties) confirmed the previously established basic mechanisms governing the transfer of radionuclides from soil to plants. Proportionality coefficients were determined for prediction purposes, and in 1987 these were (expressed in units of 10 -9 Ci/kg per Ci/km 2 ) 0.24 for grains of winter rye, 0.19 for barley and 0.65 for oats, 0.16 for potato tubers, 0.10 for beetroot and 0.23 for silage maize. These values were a factor of 4-5 lower in 1989. Depending on meadow type and soil properties, contamination levels in meadow herbage differed by up to two orders of magnitude. When the contaminated turf was reploughed or disc-harrowed and lime and potassium phosphate fertilizers added, contamination levels in the cultivated herbage fell by a factor of 4-7. (author)

  19. Report of the Nuclear Energy Agency expert group on gut transfer factors: implications for dose per unit intake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This note describes the gut transfer factors recommended by an Expert Group of the Nuclear Energy Agency for intakes of certain important elements in food and drinking water. The evidence behind the recommendations is discussed and their implications for dose per unit intake is investigated. It is found that in many cases the dose per unit intake calculated using the gut uptake factor recommended by the Expert Group is similar to that calculated using the recommendations of ICRP Publication 30. However, in some cases there are substantial increases in dose per unit intake. The largest increases are by a factor of fifty for intakes of certain thorium isotopes by infants. (author)

  1. Transfer of 137Cs, essential and trace elements from soil to potato plants in an agricultural field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, H.; Hasegawa, H.

    2000-01-01

    The concentrations of 137 Cs, essential and trace elements were measured in soils and potato tubers collected from 26 agricultural fields in Aomori, Japan, and soil-to-potato transfer factors were determined. The elements were divided into two groups. The first group (Cl, K, Ca, etc.) showed an inverse correlation between the transfer factors and the concentrations of the elements in the soils, while for the second group (Sc, Co, etc.) the transfer factors were independent of the soil concentrations of the elements. The transfer factors of 137 Cs (0.0037-0.16), derived from global fallout, were well correlated with those of naturally stable Cs (0.00052-0.080). These transfer factors showed a negative correlation with the soil concentrations of K and Cs, but they were independent of the organic material contents in the soils. These results suggest that the transfer of stable Cs could serve as a natural analog to predict the behavior of radiocesium in the soil-plant pathway. The distributions of these elements were determined for the entire potato plant. The concentrations of the elements were lower in the tubers than in leaves, petioles and stems. During the harvesting of potatoes the elements in the non-edible portions of the potato plants are returned to the soil, where they may again be utilized in the soil-potato pathways. Therefore, the distributions of elements in plant components can provide useful information for understanding the transfer of radionuclides and elements from the soil to plants in agricultural fields. The concentration ratios for Sr/Ca in potato plant components showed relatively constant values while those for Cs/K varied. These findings suggest that the translocation rates of both Ca and Sr were similar within a potato plant, whereas those of K and Cs were different. Consequently, the transfers of both Ca and Sr may predict the behavior of radiostrontium. The transfer of Cs could be used to predict the behavior of radiocesium, whereas the

  2. Verification of radionuclide transfer factors to domestic-animal food products, using indigenous elements and with emphasis on iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, S.C., E-mail: sheppards@ecomatters.co [ECOMatters Inc., WB Lewis Business Centre, 24 Aberdeen Avenue, Pinawa, Manitoba, R0E 1L0 (Canada); Long, J.M.; Sanipelli, B. [ECOMatters Inc., WB Lewis Business Centre, 24 Aberdeen Avenue, Pinawa, Manitoba, R0E 1L0 (Canada)

    2010-11-15

    Recent reviews have established benchmark values for transfer factors that describe radionuclide transfer from plants to animal food product such as milk, eggs and meat. They also illustrate the paucity of data for some elements and some food products. The present study quantified transfer data using indigenous elements measured in dairy, poultry and other livestock farms in Canada. Up to 62 elements are reported, with particular emphasis on iodine (I) because of the need to accurately assess the behaviour of {sup 129}I from disposal of nuclear fuel waste. There was remarkable agreement with the literature values, and for many elements the present study involved many more observations than were previously available. Perhaps the most important observation was that product/substrate concentration ratios (CR) were quite consistent across species, whereas the traditional fractional transfer factors (TF, units of d kg{sup -1} or d L{sup -1}) necessarily vary with body mass (feed intake). This suggests that for long-term assessments, it may be advisable to change the models to use CR rather than TF.

  3. Verification of radionuclide transfer factors to domestic-animal food products, using indigenous elements and with emphasis on iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, S.C.; Long, J.M.; Sanipelli, B.

    2010-01-01

    Recent reviews have established benchmark values for transfer factors that describe radionuclide transfer from plants to animal food product such as milk, eggs and meat. They also illustrate the paucity of data for some elements and some food products. The present study quantified transfer data using indigenous elements measured in dairy, poultry and other livestock farms in Canada. Up to 62 elements are reported, with particular emphasis on iodine (I) because of the need to accurately assess the behaviour of 129 I from disposal of nuclear fuel waste. There was remarkable agreement with the literature values, and for many elements the present study involved many more observations than were previously available. Perhaps the most important observation was that product/substrate concentration ratios (CR) were quite consistent across species, whereas the traditional fractional transfer factors (TF, units of d kg -1 or d L -1 ) necessarily vary with body mass (feed intake). This suggests that for long-term assessments, it may be advisable to change the models to use CR rather than TF.

  4. Verification of radionuclide transfer factors to domestic-animal food products, using indigenous elements and with emphasis on iodine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, S C; Long, J M; Sanipelli, B

    2010-11-01

    Recent reviews have established benchmark values for transfer factors that describe radionuclide transfer from plants to animal food product such as milk, eggs and meat. They also illustrate the paucity of data for some elements and some food products. The present study quantified transfer data using indigenous elements measured in dairy, poultry and other livestock farms in Canada. Up to 62 elements are reported, with particular emphasis on iodine (I) because of the need to accurately assess the behaviour of (129)I from disposal of nuclear fuel waste. There was remarkable agreement with the literature values, and for many elements the present study involved many more observations than were previously available. Perhaps the most important observation was that product/substrate concentration ratios (CR) were quite consistent across species, whereas the traditional fractional transfer factors (TF, units of d kg(-1) or d L(-1)) necessarily vary with body mass (feed intake). This suggests that for long-term assessments, it may be advisable to change the models to use CR rather than TF.

  5. Transfer of {sup 238}U, {sup 230}Th, {sup 226}Ra, and {sup 210}Pb from soils to tree and shrub species in a Mediterranean area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco Rodriguez, P. [Natural Radioactivity Group, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Extremadura, Avda. de Elvas s/n, 06071 Badajoz (Spain); Vera Tome, F. [Natural Radioactivity Group, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Extremadura, Avda. de Elvas s/n, 06071 Badajoz (Spain)], E-mail: fvt@unex.es; Lozano, J.C. [Natural Radioactivity Group, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Extremadura, Avda. de Elvas s/n, 06071 Badajoz (Spain); Laboratorio de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Perez Fernandez, M.A. [Natural Radioactivity Group, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Extremadura, Avda. de Elvas s/n, 06071 Badajoz (Spain); Area de Ecologia, Universidad Pablo Olavide, Carretera de Utrera km. 1, 41013 Sevilla (Spain)

    2010-06-15

    The soil-to-plant transfer factors of natural uranium isotopes ({sup 238}U and {sup 234}U), {sup 230}Th, {sup 226}Ra, and {sup 210}Pb were studied in a disused uranium mine located in the Extremadura region in the south-west of Spain. The plant samples included trees (Quercus ilex, Quercus suber, and Eucalyptus cameldulensis) and one shrub (Cytisus multiflorus). All of them are characteristic of Mediterranean environments. The activity concentrations in leaves and fruit were determined for the tree species at different stages of growth. For the shrub, the total above-ground fraction was considered in three seasons. For old leaves and fruit, the highest activity concentrations were found in Eucalyptus cameldulensis for all the radionuclides studied, except in the case of {sup 230}Th that presented similar activity concentrations in all of the tree species studied. In every case, the transfer to fruit was less than the transfer to leaves. In the shrub, the results depended on the season of sampling, with the highest value obtained in spring and the lowest in autumn. Important correlations were obtained for {sup 238}U and {sup 226}Ra between the activity ratio in soils with that in leaves or fruit.

  6. Transfer of 238U, 230Th, 226Ra, and 210Pb from soils to tree and shrub species in a Mediterranean area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Rodriguez, P.; Vera Tome, F.; Lozano, J.C.; Perez Fernandez, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    The soil-to-plant transfer factors of natural uranium isotopes ( 238 U and 234 U), 230 Th, 226 Ra, and 210 Pb were studied in a disused uranium mine located in the Extremadura region in the south-west of Spain. The plant samples included trees (Quercus ilex, Quercus suber, and Eucalyptus cameldulensis) and one shrub (Cytisus multiflorus). All of them are characteristic of Mediterranean environments. The activity concentrations in leaves and fruit were determined for the tree species at different stages of growth. For the shrub, the total above-ground fraction was considered in three seasons. For old leaves and fruit, the highest activity concentrations were found in Eucalyptus cameldulensis for all the radionuclides studied, except in the case of 230 Th that presented similar activity concentrations in all of the tree species studied. In every case, the transfer to fruit was less than the transfer to leaves. In the shrub, the results depended on the season of sampling, with the highest value obtained in spring and the lowest in autumn. Important correlations were obtained for 238 U and 226 Ra between the activity ratio in soils with that in leaves or fruit.

  7. Model of the long-term transfer of radionuclides in forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila, Rodolfo

    2006-05-01

    rate and the radionuclide concentration in the soil solution might not hold. For these radionuclides, and in particular for analogues of plant macronutrients, an alternative approach was implemented based on the assumption that their uptake by plants is modulated by the plant uptake of the nutrient. This means that the radionuclide and its corresponding analogue nutrient are taken up by plants in an identical manner via the same carrier molecules. Assuming that only ions in the soil solution near the roots, where the radionuclide concentrations are much lower than analogue concentrations, are available for transition into the roots, the transition of radionuclides from soil to plants can be represented as an independent Poisson process. In this case, the uptake rate of the radionuclide will be proportional to the uptake rate of the analogue nutrient and the concentration of the radionuclide in the soil solution near the roots and inversely proportional to the analogue concentration in the soil solution near the roots. Transfer factors to forest wild animals are lacking for many of the relevant radionuclides. Hence, an alternative approach was introduced which uses an allometric equation relating the radionuclide concentration in the animal diet to the radionuclide concentration in the animal body. In order to test the model, predictions of the transfer factor (TF) from soil to herbivores (expressed in Bq/kg fresh weight per Bq/kg dry weight) were compared with empirical values found in the literature. For Caesium and Strontium the predicted TFs were within the range of empirical observations. The model predictions were slightly higher for Radium and Uranium and slightly lower for Thorium. However, it should be noted that the intervals given for these three elements are based on few empirical data

  8. Model of the long-term transfer of radionuclides in forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, Rodolfo [Facilia AB, Bromma (Sweden)

    2006-05-15

    rate and the radionuclide concentration in the soil solution might not hold. For these radionuclides, and in particular for analogues of plant macronutrients, an alternative approach was implemented based on the assumption that their uptake by plants is modulated by the plant uptake of the nutrient. This means that the radionuclide and its corresponding analogue nutrient are taken up by plants in an identical manner via the same carrier molecules. Assuming that only ions in the soil solution near the roots, where the radionuclide concentrations are much lower than analogue concentrations, are available for transition into the roots, the transition of radionuclides from soil to plants can be represented as an independent Poisson process. In this case, the uptake rate of the radionuclide will be proportional to the uptake rate of the analogue nutrient and the concentration of the radionuclide in the soil solution near the roots and inversely proportional to the analogue concentration in the soil solution near the roots. Transfer factors to forest wild animals are lacking for many of the relevant radionuclides. Hence, an alternative approach was introduced which uses an allometric equation relating the radionuclide concentration in the animal diet to the radionuclide concentration in the animal body. In order to test the model, predictions of the transfer factor (TF) from soil to herbivores (expressed in Bq/kg fresh weight per Bq/kg dry weight) were compared with empirical values found in the literature. For Caesium and Strontium the predicted TFs were within the range of empirical observations. The model predictions were slightly higher for Radium and Uranium and slightly lower for Thorium. However, it should be noted that the intervals given for these three elements are based on few empirical data.

  9. Transfer Factor of Co-60 and Cs-137 from Agricultural Soil to Agricultural Plant of Rice and Beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzie, D; Cerdas, T; Susilah, S; Umbara, H

    1996-01-01

    A study to estimate transfer factor of Co-60 and Cs-137 radionuclides from agricultural soil to agricultural plant of beans and rice in Serpong Nuclear Research Center Complex has been carried out. The soil used was that from off site Serpong Nuclear Research Center Complex, the agricultural plant samples were rice with variety of Cisadane, Situgintung, Seratus Malam, and Atomita 4, and for beans were peanut with variety of AH 1781 SI (parent) and A 20 psj (daughter), soybean with variety of Kerinci (parent) and Camar (daughter), and greenbean with variety of Manyar (parent) and Camar (daughter), which obtained from PAIR-BATAN Pasar Jumat. 10 kg of soil was put on the container which layered with plastic. The soil was contaminated with Co-60 and Cs-137 with activity concentration of 10 Bq/kg. Samples were counted with gamma spectrometer. The value of transfer factor was obtained by comparing activity concentration of agricultural plant with that of agricultural soil. The results of transfer factor of Co-60 for rice and beans were 0.12 x 10-2 and 1.05 x 10-2, respectively and the transfer factor of Cs-137 for rice and beans were 0.83 x 10-2 and 2.09 x 10-2, respectively. The gamma emmitter radionuclides counted from the soil of Serpong Nuclear Research Center Complex were Th-228, U-235, Ra-226, Ac-228 and K-40, with activities concentration as background were 35.39 - 101.60; 32.14 - 74.50; 23.37 - 28.57; 20.90 - 31.28 and 5.97 - 8.13 Bq/kg, respectively

  10. Measurements of the Proton Elastic-Form-Factor Ratio μpGEp/GMp at Low Momentum Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ron, G.; Piasetzky, E.; Pomerantz, I.; Shneor, R.; Glister, J.; Lee, B.; Choi, Seonho; Kang, H.; Oh, Y.; Song, J.; Yan, X.; Allada, K.; Dutta, C.; Armstrong, W.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Yao, H.; Arrington, J.; Solvignon, P.; Beck, A.; May-Tal Beck, S.

    2007-01-01

    High-precision measurements of the proton elastic form-factor ratio, μ p G E p /G M p , have been made at four-momentum transfer, Q 2 , values between 0.2 and 0.5 GeV 2 . The new data, while consistent with previous results, clearly show a ratio less than unity and significant differences from the central values of several recent phenomenological fits. By combining the new form-factor ratio data with an existing cross-section measurement, one finds that in this Q 2 range the deviation from unity is primarily due to G E p being smaller than expected

  11. Physicochemical factors influencing bacterial transfer from contact lenses to surfaces with different roughness and wettability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeltfoort, Pit B J; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J; Hooymans, Johanna M M; Bruinsma, Gerda M

    2004-11-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the transfer of Pseudomonas aeruginosa No. 3 and Staphylococcus aureus 835 from contact lenses to surfaces with different hydrophobicity and roughness. Bacteria were allowed to adhere to contact lenses (Surevue, PureVision, or Focus Night & Day) by incubating the lenses in a bacterial suspension for 30 min. The contaminated lenses were put on a glass, poly(methylmethacrylate), or silicone rubber substratum, shaped to mimic the eye. After 2 and 16 h, lenses were separated from the substrata and bacteria were swabbed off from the respective surfaces and resuspended in saline. Appropriate serial dilutions of these suspensions were made, from which aliquots were plated on agar for enumeration. Bacterial transfer varied between 4 and 60%, depending on the combination of strain, contact time, contact lens, and substratum surface. For P. aeruginosa No. 3, transfer was significantly higher after 16 h than after 2 h, whereas less increase with time was seen for S. aureus 835. Bacterial transfer from all tested contact lenses was least to silicone rubber, the most hydrophobic and roughest substratum surface included. (c) 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Physicochernical factors influencing bacterial transfer from contact lenses to surfaces with different roughness and Wettability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeltfoort, PBJ; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Hooymans, JMM; Bruinsma, GM

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the transfer of Pseudomonas aeruginosa No. 3 and Staphylococcus aureus 835 from contact lenses to surfaces with different hydrophobicity and roughness. Bacteria were allowed to adhere to contact lenses (Surevue, PureVision, or Focus Night & Day) by incubating

  13. Critical Success Factors for Knowledge Transfer Collaborations between University and Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    In a fast moving business environment university-industry collaborations play a critical role in contributing to national economies and furthering a competitive advantage. Knowledge transfer from university to industry is supported by national governments as part of their innovation, national growth and competitiveness agenda. A…

  14. University, Knowledge and Regional Development: Factors Affecting Knowledge Transfer in a Developing Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fongwa, Neba Samuel; Marais, Lochner

    2016-01-01

    The role of knowledge in the current knowledge economy cannot be overly emphasised. Successful regions are continuously being linked to excellence in the production, accumulation, and application of knowledge. Universities have increasingly been at the centre of such knowledge production, application and transfer. Yet, there is little research and…

  15. Factors affecting knowledge transfer from continuing professional education to clinical practice: Development and psychometric properties of a new instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasli, Parvaneh; Dehghan-Nayeri, Nahid; Khosravi, Laleh

    2018-01-01

    Despite the emphasis placed on the implementation of continuing professional education programs in Iran, researchers or practitioners have not developed an instrument for assessing the factors that affect the knowledge transfer from such programs to clinical practice. The aim of this study was to design and validate such instrument for the Iranian context. The research used a three-stage mix method. In the first stage, in-depth interviews with nurses and content analysis were conducted, after which themes were extracted from the data. In the second stage, the findings of the content analysis and literature review were examined, and preliminary instrument options were developed. In the third stage, qualitative content validity, face validity, content validity ratio, content validity index, and construct validity using exploratory factor analysis was conducted. The reliability of the instrument was measured before and after the determination of construct validity. Primary tool instrument initially comprised 53 items, and its content validity index was 0.86. In the multi-stage factor analysis, eight questions were excluded, thereby reducing 11 factors to five and finally, to four. The final instrument with 43 items consists of the following dimensions: structure and organizational climate, personal characteristics, nature and status of professionals, and nature of educational programs. Managers can use the Iranian instrument to identify factors affecting knowledge transfer of continuing professional education to clinical practice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Time-dependent transfer of 54Mn, 60Co, 85Sr and 137Cs from a sandy soil to soybean plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong-Ho; Lim, Kwang-Muk; Jun, In; Keum, Dong-Kwon; Han, Moon-Hee

    2011-01-01

    Greenhouse experiments were performed to investigate the dependence of 54 Mn, 60 Co, 85 Sr and 137 Cs transfer from sandy soil to soybean plants on the growth stage when a radioactive deposition occurs. A solution containing 54 Mn, 60 Co, 85 Sr and 137 Cs was applied onto the soil surfaces in the lysimeters at six different times -2 d before sowing and 13, 40, 61, 82 and 96 d after sowing. Soil-to-plant transfer was quantified with a transfer factor (m 2 kg -1 -dry) specified for the deposition time. The transfer factor values of 54 Mn, 60 Co, 85 Sr and 137 Cs for the seeds were in the range of 1.5×10 -3 -1.0×10 -2 , 4.7×10 -4 -3.2×10 -3 , 5.7×10 -4 -1.0×10 -2 and 3.0×10 -5 -2.7×10 -4 , respectively, for different deposition times. The corresponding values for the leaves were 6.4×10 -3 -3.2×10 -2 , 4.3×10 -4 -2.0×10 -3 , 5.1×10 -3 -5.3×10 -2 and 9.2×10 -5 -1.9×10 -4 , respectively. The values for the seeds were on the whole highest following the middle-growth-stage deposition. After the pre-sowing deposition, the transfer factor values of 54 Mn, 60 Co and 137 Cs for the seeds decreased annually so those in the fourth year were 53%, 75% and 34% of those in the first year, respectively. The present results may be useful for predicting the radionuclide concentrations in soybean plants due to their root uptake following an acute soil-deposition during the vegetation period, and for validating a relevant model. (author)

  17. Approaches to modelling radionuclide transfer in agricultural systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, N. G.

    1995-01-01

    Radiological dose assessment requires information describing the concentration and distribution of radionuclides in the environment. This information can be obtained from monitoring but is also evaluated with the aid of mathematical models. In such models the pathways of radionuclides from the release point to man are described in terms of transfer between compartments. The main pathways to be considered include: deposition to vegetation and soils; transfer from soil-to-plant; uptake and turnover in domestic animals; and, intake by man. The development of mathematical models for simulating transfer via these pathways depends on: an understanding of the system under study, in particular for those processes that are most important in the overall transfer to man; the availability of data to determine the structure and parameters for the model; the computing systems available; the knowledge of the user of the model; and, the application of the model. (author)

  18. Determination of friction factors and heat transfer coefficients for flow past artificially roughened surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.

    1979-12-01

    Because convective heat transfer is enhanced in flow past rough surfaces, much experimental and analytical effort over the past several decades has been devoted to the evaluation of artificial roughening for potential application to the heat transfer surfaces of gas-cooled reactors. Unfortunately, much of the analytical development in this field has been inadequately explained in the literature; this has led to misinterpretation of some of the subsequent experimental findings, compounding the uncertainty. This work provides a critical review of the underlying assumptions, theoretical foundations, and supporting experimental evidence for the analytical procedures in current use for the evaluation of roughness effects. It is a concise presentation of the available formulations with recommendations concerning their applicability to rough rod bundles

  19. Two neutron transfer form factor for the reaction 42Ca(p,t)40Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    In an attempt to better interpret experimental data concerning the two-neutron pickup process 42 Ca(p,t) 40 Ca, a detailed study of the form factors associated with the reaction is carried out. A set of coupled integro-differential equations describing these form factors is derived, starting from a microscopic, model-independent Hamiltonian. These equations allow contributions to the form factors from hole terms as well as from the particle and so-called ''continuum'' states, which were previously studied. An approximate solution of the form factor equations is obtained by neglecting the coupling terms and expressing the form factor in terms of a set of Sturmian states. Form factors for the transition to the 40 Ca ground state (O 1 + ) are calculated using various sets of Sturmian states. The inclusion of hole states is found to have a major effect upon both the shape of the form factor and the size of the related cross section. Finally, a comparison is made between the O 1 + form factors calculated using Sturmian states and a O 1 + form factor obtained using Sturmian states and a O 1 + form factor obtained using the coexistence model. It is found that a form factor based on Sturmian particle and hole states is very similar to the form factor obtained from the coexistence model calculation

  20. Mass transfer coefficient factor in pipe bend - 3 D CFD analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Mahendra; Gaikwad, Avinash J.; Madasamy, P.; Krishnamohan, T.V.; Velumurugan, S.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Parida, Smrutiranjan

    2015-01-01

    In power industries Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) has been a concern for pipe wall thinning where high velocity fluid at elevated temperatures is used. Even straight pipes are found to have non uniform corrosion and this is enhanced in junctions such as bends, orifices etc. Mass transfer coefficient (MTC) which defines the amount of corrosion changes from its value in straight pipe (with same fluid parameters) for flow in bends, orifice etc due to changes in velocity profile in axial direction. In this paper, 3 D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation is carried out for an experiment on 58° bend angle and 2D bend radius circular carbon steel pipe carrying water at 120°C under neutral pH conditions. The turbulent model K-ω with shear stress transport was used for this purpose. The mass transfer boundary layer (MTBL) thickness δ mtbl depends on Schmidt number (Sc), as δ mtbl ∼ δ h /(Sc 1/3 ). MTBL is significantly smaller than hydrodynamic boundary layer δ h for large Sc, hence boundary layer meshing was carried out deep into δ mtbl . Uniform velocity was applied at the inlet. The flow velocity was 3 m/s at room temperature while the experimental fluid velocity was 7 m/s. Lower value of fluid velocity is chosen due to the limitations of grid size since it depends inversely on fluid velocity. The ratio of MTC in bend to straight pipe is not strongly dependent on Sc. CFD simulation at lower temperature is sufficient to get approximate MTC in bends. The ratio of the mass transfer coefficient at some locations in bend to the straight pipe coefficient (MTCR) is determined through simulation. The MTC increased in the extrados of the bend towards the outlet. (author)

  1. ELECTRIC FACTORS INFLUENCING THE COMPLEX EROSION PROCESSING BY INTRODUCING THE ELECTROLYTE THROUGH THE TRANSFER OBJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alin Nioata

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The electric and electrochemical complex erosion processing is influenced by a great number of factors acting in tight interdependence and mutually influencing one another for achieving the stability of the processing process and achieving the final technological characteristics.The values taking part in developing the fundamental phenomena of the mechanism of complex erosion prevailing and contributes to the definition of technological characteristics, are factors.The paper presents the U potential difference and electric strength I as determining factors of the complex erosion process as well as other factors deriving from them: the current density, the power of the supply source.

  2. The use of iteration factors in the solution of the NLTE line transfer problem-II. Multilevel atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmanovska-Barandovska, O.; Atanackovic, O.

    2010-01-01

    The iteration factors method (IFM) developed in Paper I (Atanackovic-Vukmanovic and Simonneau, 1994) to solve the NLTE line transfer problem for a two-level atom model, is extended here to deal with a multilevel atom case. At the beginning of each iteration step, for each line transition, angle and frequency averaged depth-dependent iteration factors are computed from the formal solution of radiative transfer (RT) equation and used to close the system of the RT equation moments, non-linearly coupled with the statistical equilibrium (SE) equations. Non-linear coupling of the atomic level populations and the corresponding line radiation field intensities is tackled in two ways. One is based on the linearization of the equations with respect to the relevant variables, and the other on the use of the old (known from the previous iteration) level populations in the line-opacity-like terms of the SE equations. In both cases the use of quasi-invariant iteration factors provided very fast and accurate solution. The properties of the proposed procedures are investigated in detail by applying them to the solution of the prototype multilevel RT problem of Avrett and Loeser , and compared with the properties of some other methods.

  3. Factors impacting on nurses' transference of theoretical knowledge of holistic care into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Saras

    2002-12-01

    Since nurse education moved to universities, a reoccurring concern of health consumers, health administrators, and some practising nurses is that nurses are not able to transfer the theoretical knowledge of holistic care into practice. Much has been written about this concern usually under the heading of the theory-practice gap. A common reason that has been highlighted as the cause of this gap is that the theoretical knowledge that nurses learn in academia is predicated on concepts such as humanism and holistic caring. In contrast, the bureaucratic organisation where nurses provide care tends to be based on management concepts where cost containment and outcome measures are more acceptable. Hence nurses' learned values of holistic caring are pitted against the reality of the practice setting. So what is this practice reality? This paper attempts to provide an insider view of why the theoretical knowledge of holistic care may be difficult to enact in the clinical setting. In-depth taped interviews with nurses and participant observation were conducted in acute care hospitals in Western Australia. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the constant comparative method. The findings indicated that utilitarian nursing and role models had impacted on the transference of theoretical knowledge of holistic care into practice. The paper outlines some measures that nurses themselves can undertake to ensure the narrowing of the theory-practice gap in this area.

  4. Evaluation of soil-plant transfer factors of iodine. Estimation of annual ingestion for iodine from the diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saas, Arsene.

    1980-11-01

    The author presents the iodine middle contents of the soils and vegetables. A synthesis on the iodine evolution in the soils and vegetables allows to conclude that the vegetable absorption of this isotope is correlated with the isotopiquely exchangeable iodine of the soil. The soil-plant transfer-factors are calculated for the vegetables, cereals, fruits from the stable iodine quantitative analysis. The annual iodine ingestion has been estimated from the dietary of the European Communites areas. This one is a little different of the quantity estimated by CRESTA-LACOURLY-R 2979, yet the contribution by consummation unity is different [fr

  5. Transfer students in STEM majors at a Midwestern University: Academic and social involvement factors that influence student success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Carlos

    There is soon-to-be a shortage of qualified U.S. workers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). As a result, many science-related jobs are being filled by technically-skilled foreign workers. If the U.S wants to maintain its global economic leadership, then it must ensure a continuous growth of highly-trained individuals in STEM disciplines. Therefore, American institutions of higher education, including community colleges, must identify potential factors that contribute to the lack of interest in STEM majors, as well as the low rate of success of students who enter STEM majors but struggle to finish their degrees. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the perceptions of community college transfer students who are pursuing bachelor degrees in STEM majors at Iowa State University (ISU). What were their transfer experiences and what influenced their academic success in STEM. Participants were encouraged to share their transfer experiences while at the community college as well as their experiences on the ISU campus. They were also asked about their level of academic involvement, their relationships with faculty, and their participation in peer group activities prior to and after transferring. The research design included both quantitative and qualitative components, which provided an in-depth look at the experiences of STEM non-engineering and engineering students. Quantitative data include students' background characteristics, demographic information, and college activities at the community college and ISU. Qualitative data were used to illuminate students' overall transfer experience and their successful journey in STEM fields. The combination of quantitative and qualitative methods allowed a better understanding of the strategies students put into practice once they transfer from a community college to a four-year institution in pursuit of a STEM bachelor's degree. The results of this study suggest that there is an association among the

  6. An Evaluation of Organizational and Experience Factors Affecting the Perceived Transfer of U.S. Air Force Basic Combat Skills Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crow, Shirley D

    2007-01-01

    ... they learned in training on the job or in a hostile environment. The analysis used structural equation modeling to evaluate the paths between each of the factors and perceived training transfer...

  7. An Evaluation of Organizational and Experience Factors Affecting the Perceived Transfer of U.S. Air Force Basic Combat Skills Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crow, Shirley D

    2007-01-01

    .... In this study, basic combat skills training was evaluated using a number of training factors that potentially affect trainees' perception of training transfer, or their ability to apply the skills...

  8. Study on the transfer factor of plant available form of zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmomo, Yoichiro; Uchida, Shigeo; Yokosuka, Setsuko; Honma, Yoshifumi

    1989-01-01

    Method for the determination of labile pool Zn (Lp Zn), which was presented by Lauer, was examined to adapt it for that of another labile pool element (Lp E). It was suggested that the Lp E should be more accurately obtained by correcting error due to aging of the relevant radioisotope added to soil. A modified equation is given as following; Lp E = (net Lp * E)/(specific activity in extract) The net Lp * E is calculated as product after subtracting radioactivity not extracted by 0.1 M HCl from that initially added to soil. It was also suggested that substantial extracting reagent and conditions, by which nearly whole quantity of an element in labile pool was extracted, could be found out using thus obtained Lp E as an index. Transfer coefficients and those based on plant available form of Zn were experimentally obtained for several kinds of crops. (author)

  9. Factors enhancing Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egnin, M.; Mora, A.; Prakash, C. S.; Mortley, D. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Parameters enhancing Agrobacterium-mediated transfer of foreign genes to peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cells were investigated. An intron-containing beta-glucuronidase uidA (gusA) gene under the transcriptional control of CaMV 35S promoter served as a reporter. Transformation frequency was evaluated by scoring the number of sectors expressing GUS activity on leaf and epicotyl explants. The 'Valencia Select' market type cv. New Mexico was more amenable to Agrobacterium transformation than the 'runner' market type cultivars tested (Florunner, Georgia Runner, Sunrunner, or South Runner). The disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA101 was superior in facilitating the transfer of uidA gene to peanut cells compared to the disarmed strain C58. Rinsing of explants in half-strength Murashige-Skoog (MS) media prior to infection by Agrobacterium significantly increased the transformation efficiency. The use of cocultivation media containing high auxin [1.0 or 2.5 mg/l (4.53 micromolar or 11.31 micromolar) 2,4-D] and low cytokinin [0.25 or 0.5 mg/l (1.0 micromolar or 2.0 micromolar) BA] promoted higher transformation than either hormone-free or thidiazuron-containing medium. The polarity of the epicotyl during cocultivation was important; explants incubated in an inverted (vertically) manner followed by a vertically upright position resulted in improved transformation and shoot regeneration frequencies. Preculture of explants in MS basal medium or with 2.5 mg thidiazuron per l prior to infection drastically decreased the number of transformed zones. The optimized protocol was used to obtain transient transformation frequencies ranging from 12% to 36% for leaf explants, 15% to 42% for epicotyls. Initial evidence of transformation was obtained by polymerase chain reaction and subsequently confirmed by Southern analysis of regenerated plants.

  10. Application of of artificial neural networks for estimation of soil-plant transfer factor for "1"3"7Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Anna Karla Gomes dos

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of radionuclide behavior in soils is fundamental to calculate the dose due to food ingestion and to evaluate the risks of radioactive exposure of the population. This knowledge associated to the socio-economic characteristics of the affected region will set the radio protective measures to be taken in case of radioactive contamination of rural areas. The soil-plant transfer factor (TF) is the specific parameter value of radiological models to numerically integrate the dynamic processes that occur within the radionuclides in the soil plant system. This measurement, specific to each radionuclide and soil type, is defined ratio between a specific radionuclide activity in the edible part of the plant and its soil activity. However, the absence of linearity between soil concentrations and the measurements in plants indicate the complexity of the transfer process of radionuclide from soil to a plant, making it difficult to forecast the TF ratio in a specific scenario. One of the main radionuclides associated to nuclear accidents impacting rural areas is "1"3"7Cs. This is one of the most worrisome radionuclides because of its physiochemical properties and its chemical similarity with potassium (K) and its extended physical mid-life (t1/2 = 30,17 years) that allows great environmental dispersion, ecological mobility and environmental endurance. Radiological studies related to "1"3"7Cs transfer factor show that pedological parameters that considerably explain the behavior of "1"3"7Cs in soil-plant system are: exchangeable K, clayed minerals, organic matter content and pH in soils. In this work, the computational method of artificial neural network (ANN) was applied to evaluate the possibility to forecast the TF of "1"3"7Cs in cereals, associated to pedological parameters considered potential indicators of its phyto availability: cationic exchange capacity (CEC), exchangeable K and pH. This study demonstrated that the ANN, having only as entry data the

  11. SiC MOSFET Based Single Phase Active Boost Rectifier with Power Factor Correction for Wireless Power Transfer Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onar, Omer C [ORNL; Tang, Lixin [ORNL; Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan [ORNL; Campbell, Steven L [ORNL; Miller (JNJ), John M. [JNJ-Miller PLC

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) technology is a novel research area in the charging technology that bridges the utility and the automotive industries. There are various solutions that are currently being evaluated by several research teams to find the most efficient way to manage the power flow from the grid to the vehicle energy storage system. There are different control parameters that can be utilized to compensate for the change in the impedance due to variable parameters such as battery state-of-charge, coupling factor, and coil misalignment. This paper presents the implementation of an active front-end rectifier on the grid side for power factor control and voltage boost capability for load power regulation. The proposed SiC MOSFET based single phase active front end rectifier with PFC resulted in >97% efficiency at 137mm air-gap and >95% efficiency at 160mm air-gap.

  12. Satisfaction Levels and Factors Influencing Satisfaction With Use of a Social App for Neonatal and Pediatric Patient Transfer Information Systems: A Questionnaire Study Among Doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Iee; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kim, Sun Jun; Cho, Soo Chul; Kim, Il Nyeo

    2016-08-04

    The treatment of neonatal and pediatric patients is limited to certain medical institutions depending on treatment difficulty. Effective patient transfers are necessary in situations where there are limited medical resources. In South Korea, the government has made a considerable effort to establish patient transfer systems using various means, such as websites, telephone, and so forth. However, in reality, the effort has not yet been effective. In this study, we ran a patient transfer information system using a social app for effective patient transfer. We analyzed the results, satisfaction levels, and the factors influencing satisfaction. Naver Band is a social app and mobile community application which in Korea is more popular than Facebook. It facilitates group communication. Using Naver Band, two systems were created: one by the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and the other by the Department of Pediatrics at Chonbuk National University Children's Hospital, South Korea. The information necessary for patient transfers was provided to participating obstetricians (n=51) and pediatricians (n=90). We conducted a survey to evaluate the systems and reviewed the results retrospectively. The number of patients transferred was reported to increase by 65% (26/40) obstetricians and 40% (23/57) pediatricians. The time taken for transfers was reported to decrease by 72% (29/40) obstetricians and 59% (34/57) pediatricians. Satisfaction was indicated by 83% (33/40) obstetricians and 89% (51/57) pediatricians. Regarding factors influencing satisfaction, the obstetricians reported communication with doctors in charge (P=.03) and time reduction during transfers (P=.02), whereas the pediatricians indicated review of the diagnosis and treatment of transferred patients (P=.01) and the time reduction during transfers (P=.007). The users were highly satisfied and different users indicated different factors of satisfaction. This finding implies that users' requirements should be

  13. Satisfaction Levels and Factors Influencing Satisfaction With Use of a Social App for Neonatal and Pediatric Patient Transfer Information Systems: A Questionnaire Study Among Doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Iee; Kim, Sun Jun; Cho, Soo Chul; Kim, Il Nyeo

    2016-01-01

    Background The treatment of neonatal and pediatric patients is limited to certain medical institutions depending on treatment difficulty. Effective patient transfers are necessary in situations where there are limited medical resources. In South Korea, the government has made a considerable effort to establish patient transfer systems using various means, such as websites, telephone, and so forth. However, in reality, the effort has not yet been effective. Objective In this study, we ran a patient transfer information system using a social app for effective patient transfer. We analyzed the results, satisfaction levels, and the factors influencing satisfaction. Methods Naver Band is a social app and mobile community application which in Korea is more popular than Facebook. It facilitates group communication. Using Naver Band, two systems were created: one by the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and the other by the Department of Pediatrics at Chonbuk National University Children's Hospital, South Korea. The information necessary for patient transfers was provided to participating obstetricians (n=51) and pediatricians (n=90). We conducted a survey to evaluate the systems and reviewed the results retrospectively. Results The number of patients transferred was reported to increase by 65% (26/40) obstetricians and 40% (23/57) pediatricians. The time taken for transfers was reported to decrease by 72% (29/40) obstetricians and 59% (34/57) pediatricians. Satisfaction was indicated by 83% (33/40) obstetricians and 89% (51/57) pediatricians. Regarding factors influencing satisfaction, the obstetricians reported communication with doctors in charge (P=.03) and time reduction during transfers (P=.02), whereas the pediatricians indicated review of the diagnosis and treatment of transferred patients (P=.01) and the time reduction during transfers (P=.007). Conclusions The users were highly satisfied and different users indicated different factors of satisfaction. This finding

  14. Translocation of iodine-129 in soil and transfer to vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handl, J.

    1989-01-01

    The translocation of I-129 in the soil and its long-term transfer from soil to plant have been investigated using an undisturbed soil column and a pasture on a river bank. The I-129 profiles in the soils of the monolith and the pasture exhibit clear differences in the distribution of radioiodine after 52 and 47 months, respectively. At those times after surface contamination of both soil types 88% (monolith) and 66% (pasture) of the total I-129 activity were found in the top soil layer of 10 cm, indicating that translocation in the pasture soil is faster than in the monolith. Apart from soil-specific parameters this behaviour may be explained by anaerobic conditions created in the soil due to high water levels in the nearby river attecting the chemical form of iodine. The distribution of stable iodine was found rather homogeneous in both soils with mean contents of 3 mg I-127 kg -1 d.w. in the upper 15 cm and 4 mg I-127 kg -1 d.w. in deeper layers in case of the monolith. For the pasture soil the corresponding values are about 4 and 5 mg I-127 kg -1 d.w. Transfer factors plant/soil (dry weight basis) of I-129 obtained from the monolith 39 g and 52 months after contamination are 1.5x10 -3 and 2.1x10 -3 , respectively. Data from the pasture 35 and 47 months after contamination show values of 9.0x10 -3 and 8.4x10 -3 , respectively. Transfer factors of stable iodine are significantly higher in both soils yielding an average value of 1.0 for the monolith and 0.3 for the pasture. Delay constants (related to a top soil layer of 10 cm) calculated for I-129 using data obtained from the long-term translocation processes to deeper soil layers in the monolith and in the pasture show values of 1x10 -9 s -1 and 4x10 -9 s -1 , respectively. (orig.) [de

  15. Astrophysical S factors determined from asymptotic normalization coefficients measured in peripheral transfer reactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gagliardi, C. A.; Azhari, A.; Burjan, Václav; Carstoiu, F.; Kroha, Václav; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Tang, X.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 688, - (2001), s. 536c-538c ISSN 0375-9474 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/01/0709; GA MŠk ME 385; GA AV ČR KSK1048102 Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 2.074, year: 2001

  16. Asymptotic normalization coefficients from direct transfer reactions and astrophysical S factors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gagliardi, C. A.; Azhari, A.; Bém, Pavel; Burjan, Václav; Carstoiu, F.; Cejpek, Jan; Clark, H. L.; Kroha, Václav; Lui, Z. W.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Novák, Jan; Piskoř, Štěpán; Sattarov, A.; Šimečková, Eva; Tang, X.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.; Vincour, Jiří

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 682, - (2001), s. 369C-374C ISSN 0375-9474 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/01/0709; GA AV ČR KSK1048102 Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 2.074, year: 2001

  17. Risk Factors Influencing Conception Rate in Holstein Heifers before Artificial Insemination or Embryo Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    M. Yusuf; T. Nakao; S. T. Long; S. Fujita

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to show the risk factors affecting the conception rate in Holstein heifers after synchronization of estrus. A total of 275 Holstein heifers housed in a free barn were used for the experiment. The herd was visited regularly at four week intervals for synchronization of estrus using Heatsynch and CIDR-Heatsynch protocols. A group of four to 14 animals, depending on the availability, were referred to the experiment at each visit. Estrus induction rates in the two ...

  18. Transfer factors of trace elements and radionuclides in the marine environment of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, M.V.M.; Pulhani, Vandana; Padmanabhan, Hemalatha

    1998-11-01

    The document presents the data base on Bioaccumulation Factor, B p and Distribution Coefficient, K d values generated in the eastern and western coastal marine waters of India with a view to develop site-specific or species-specific values. Comparison with the IAEA default values from Safety Series No. 57 and Technical Report Series No. 247 values is made. Generally, the B p values for trace elements do not vary by more than a factor of 3 except for some specific cases like Fe in molluscs, crustaceans and fish, Ni in molluscs and Zn in sea weeds and molluscs. The same is true for the B p values of fission nuclides viz., 137 Cs and 90 Sr in molluscs, crustaceans and sea weeds except for the B p of 137 Cs in fish which is significantly lower in the Indian context. The fission nuclide 144 Ce shows distinctly higher accumulation factors in all organisms. The B p values of natural radionuclides such as 210 Pb , 210 Po, Ra and U are close to the IAEA default values except for the high value of U in fish. Similarly, B p values of Pu in fish and crustaceans are significantly higher than that of the IAEA default values. The report presents B p values for Cu and Cd in different marine organisms and K d values in marine sediments. K d values for suspended particles are also presented. B p values for plankton and porifera are also given. (author)

  19. The effects of trophic transfer and environmental factors on microplastic uptake by plaice, Pleuronectes plastessa, and spider crab, Maja squinado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welden, Natalie Ann; Abylkhani, Bexultan; Howarth, Leigh Michael

    2018-04-16

    Microplastic pollution is apparent throughout the marine environment from deep ocean sediments to coastal habitats. Most of this is believed to originate on land, although marine activities, such as fishing and shipping, also contribute to the release and redistribution of microplastic. The relative importance of these maritime plastic sources, the manner by which they are distributed in the environment, and their effect on uptake by marine organisms are yet to be fully quantified. In this study, the relative impact of fishing activities on microplastic uptake by demersal fish and crustaceans was explored. Local fishing intensity, proximity to land and mean water velocity are compared to microplastic uptake in plaice, Pleuronectes platessa, and spider crab, Maja squinado, from the Celtic Sea. Observations were also made of microplastic contamination in ingested sand eels, Ammodytes tobianus, to establish a potential route of trophic transfer. This study is the first to identify microplastic contamination in spider crab and to document trophic transfer in the wild. Individuals were sampled from sites of varied fishing intensity in the Celtic Sea, and their stomach contents examined for the presence of microplastic. Contamination was observed in 50% of P. platessa, 42.4% of M. squinado, and 44.4% of A. tobianus. Locations of highest plastic abundance varied between P. platessa and M. squinado, indicating that different factors influence the uptake of microplastic in these two taxa. No significant link was observed between fishing effort and microplastic abundance; however, proximity to land was linked to increased abundance in M. squinado and Observations of whole prey demonstrate ongoing trophic transfer from A. tobianus to P. platessa. The lack of significant difference in microplastic abundance between predator and prey suggests that microplastic is not retained by P. platessa. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Official ERS technical standards: Global Lung Function Initiative reference values for the carbon monoxide transfer factor for Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanojevic, Sanja; Graham, Brian L; Cooper, Brendan G; Thompson, Bruce R; Carter, Kim W; Francis, Richard W; Hall, Graham L

    2017-09-01

    There are numerous reference equations available for the single-breath transfer factor of the lung for carbon monoxide ( T  LCO ); however, it is not always clear which reference set should be used in clinical practice. The aim of the study was to develop the Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI) all-age reference values for T  LCO Data from 19 centres in 14 countries were collected to define T  LCO reference values. Similar to the GLI spirometry project, reference values were derived using the LMS (lambda, mu, sigma) method and the GAMLSS (generalised additive models for location, scale and shape) programme in R.12 660 T  LCO measurements from asymptomatic, lifetime nonsmokers were submitted; 85% of the submitted data were from Caucasians. All data were uncorrected for haemoglobin concentration. Following adjustments for elevation above sea level, gas concentration and assumptions used for calculating the anatomic dead space volume, there was a high degree of overlap between the datasets. Reference values for Caucasians aged 5-85 years were derived for T  LCO , transfer coefficient of the lung for carbon monoxide and alveolar volume.This is the largest collection of normative T  LCO data, and the first global reference values available for T  LCO . Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  1. The Effective Contributing Factors in Knowledge Sharing and Knowledge Transfer among Academic Staff at Tehran University of Medical Sciences: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Ghodsian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knowledge transfer is known as a core process in knowledge management. Its decent and influential function in organizations would result in regeneration and innovation of knowledge.Due to this importance, the most recent research in knowledge management has been inclined toward knowledge transfer concept. We aimed to investigate the most influencing contributing factors in knowledge transfer and knowledge sharing within the faculty members at Tehran University of Medical Sciences.Method: This investigation has been conducted with a qualitative approach using grounded theory. Data were collected using semi- structured interview with 17 faculty members of ten distinct departments of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The data has been transcribed and analyzed.Results: By carefully analyzing the interviews from 272 preliminary open codes after sequential analogies and induction, 54 concepts have been extracted that were categorized into one of eleven classes constituting the effective items and factors in knowledge transfer among faculty members,respectively. These categories could be placed into , non-communication factors and communication factors. The non-communication factors were knowledge actors (professors, organization (university, the knowledge, and surroundings. The communication factors are the factors that are formed in the dual relationships between the relevant factors.Conclusion: A decent knowledge flow in working groups and collaborative societies of faculty members within a department or through different university departments would lead to a better research and education management. This could also bring about some advantages: the research in each department falls in a well-defined, pre-missioned channel, avoiding scattered research works, and enhancing the training and research. The awareness of university senior managers about influencing contributing factors of knowledge transfer and their functions provide a

  2. Textiles: Some technocal information and data II: Conversion factors, fibre properties, spinning limits, typical twist factors, weaving performannce and transfer printing temperatures.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hunter, L

    1978-07-01

    Full Text Available OF THE CSIR P.O. B O X 1 1 2 4 P O R T E L I Z A B E T H R E P U B L I C O F S O U T H A F R I C A WOL 47 ISBN 0 7988 1360 1 Contents INTRODUCTION ........................................................... Page .; ... 1 CONVERSION FACTORSAND... ........................................................................................ 118 REFERENCES TEXTILES: SOME TECHNICAL INFORMATION AND DATA 11: CONVERSION FACTORS, FIBRE PROPERTIES, SPINNING L I M I T S , T Y P I C A L T W I S T F A C T O R S , W E A V I N G PERFORMANCE A N D TRANSFER PRINTING TEMPERATURES 6.5, L...

  3. Soil- to-Whole Body Transfer Factors of Radionuclides for Terrestrial Wild Animals Living around the Gyeongju Nuclear Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Kwang-Muk; Choi, Yong-Ho; Jun, In; Kim, Byung-Ho; Keum, Dong-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In the Gyeongju nuclear site, a low and medium level radioactive waste repository and five nuclear reactors are currently operating. The IAEA and ICRP consider it necessary to demonstrate that not only men but also wild organisms are protected from ionizing radiations. Therefore, it may not be long before the dose assessment for wildlife should be carried out in Korea. The transfer factor (TF) defined as the concentration ratio between an organism and an environmental medium is a key parameter in assessing the radiation dose to wildlife. For eight animal species inhabiting mountainous areas around the Gyeongju nuclear site, the TF values of 22 stable elements were measured. The acquired values varied considerably with the elements and animal species. Further TF data need to be produced for various Korean wild animal and plant species in preparation for future governmental regulations of wildlife exposure to ionizing radiations.

  4. Transferring disease management and health promotion programs to other countries: critical success factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarmina, Pejman; Prestwich, Graham; Rosenquist, Joel; Singh, Debbie

    2008-12-01

    Governments and health service providers around the world are under pressure to improve health outcomes while containing rising healthcare costs. In response to such challenges, many regions have implemented services that have been successful in other countries-but 'importing' initiatives has many challenges. This article summarizes factors found to be critical to the success of adapting a US disease management and health promotion programme for use in Italy and the UK. Using three illustrative case studies, it describes how in each region the programme needed to adapt (i) the form and content of the disease management service, (ii) the involvement and integration with local clinicians and services and (iii) the evaluation of programme outcomes. We argue that it is important to implement evidence-based practice by learning lessons from other countries and service initiatives, but that it is equally important to take into consideration the '3Ps' that are critical for successful service implementation: payers, practitioners and patients.

  5. Individual Difference Factors in the Learning and Transfer of Patterning Discriminations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Maes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In an associative patterning task, some people seem to focus more on learning an overarching rule, whereas others seem to focus on acquiring specific relations between the stimuli and outcomes involved. Building on earlier work, we further investigated which cognitive factors are involved in feature- vs. rule-based learning and generalization. To this end, we measured participants' tendency to generalize according to the rule of opposites after training on negative and positive patterning problems (i.e., A+/B+/AB− and C−/D−/CD+, their tendency to attend to global aspects or local details of stimuli, their systemizing disposition and their score on the Raven intelligence test. Our results suggest that while intelligence might have some influence on patterning learning and generalization, visual processing style and systemizing disposition do not. We discuss our findings in the light of previous observations on patterning.

  6. Dose conversion factors and linear energy transfer for irradiation of thin blood layers with low-energy X rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhaegen, F.; Seuntjens, J.

    1994-01-01

    For irradiation of thin samples of biological material with low-energy X rays, conversion of measured air kerma, free in air to average absorbed dose to the sample is necessary. In the present paper, conversion factors from measured air kerma to average absorbed dose in thin blood samples are given for four low-energy X-ray qualities (14-50 kVp). These factors were obtained by Monte Carlo simulation of a practical sample holder. Data for different thicknesses of the blood and backing layer are presented. The conversion factors are found to depend strongly on the thicknesses of the blood layer and backing layer. In radiobiological work, knowledge of linear energy transfer (LET) values for the radiation quality used is often required. Track-averaged LET values for low-energy X rays are presented in this work. It is concluded that the thickness of the sample does not influence the LET value appreciably, indicating that for all radiobiological purposes this value can be regarded as a constant throughout the sample. Furthermore, the large difference between the LET value for a 50 kV spectrum found in this work and the value given in ICRU Report 16 is pointed out. 16 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  7. Growth-inhibition patterns and transfer-factor profiles in arsenic-stressed rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ha-Il; Lee, Jinwook; Chae, Mi-Jin; Kong, Myung-Suk; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Kang, Seong-Soo; Kim, Yoo-Hak

    2017-11-16

    Arsenic (As) accumulation in rice owing to uptake from the soil is a critical human health issue. Here, we studied the chemical properties of As-treated soils, growth inhibition patterns of As-stressed rice plants, changes in the As content of soil and soil solutions, and the relationship between As accumulation and As transfer factor from the soil to the rice organs. Rice plants were cultivated in a greenhouse under four concentrations of As: 0 (control), 25, 50, and 75 mg kg -1 . A significant positive correlation was found between available P 2 O 5 and exchangeable K and between As concentration and available P 2 O 5 or exchangeable K. The As concentration for 50% shoot growth inhibition was 50 mg kg -1 . As levels in roots and shoots were positively correlated with the growth stages of rice. The transfer factor (TF) root/soil increased with As concentration at the tillering stage but decreased at the heading stage. TF root/soil and TF shoot/soil were higher at the heading stage than at the tillering stage. As accumulation in the 25 mg kg -1 treatment was higher during the heading stage, whereas no difference was found at the tillering stage. As accumulation was related to plant biomass and soil As concentration. We found that As accumulation was greater at As concentrations that allowed for plant growth and development. Thus, species-specific threshold concentrations must be determined based on As phytotoxicity for the phytoremediation of As-contaminated soils. Hence, developing practical approaches for managing safe crop production in farmlands with an As contamination of 25 mg kg -1 or less is necessary.

  8. Factors Associated with the Use of Elective Single Embryo Transfer And Pregnancy Outcomes in the United States, 2004–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styer, Aaron K.; Luke, Barbara; Vitek, Wendy; Christianson, Mindy S.; Baker, Valerie L.; Christy, Alicia Y.; Polotsky, Alex J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate factors associated with elective single embryo transfer (eSET) utilization and its effect on assisted reproductive technology (ART) outcomes in the United States. Design Historical cohort Setting Not applicable Patient(s) Fresh IVF cycles of women 18–37 years using autologous oocytes with either one (SET) or two (DET) embryos transferred and reported to the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System between 2004 and 2012. Cycles were categorized into four groups with[+] or without[−] supernumerary embryos cryopreserved. The SET group with embryos cryopreserved was designated as eSET. Interventions None Main Outcomes Measure(s) The likelihood of eSET utilization, live birth, and singleton non-low birthweight term live birth, modeled using logistic regression. Presented as adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Result(s) The study included 263,375 cycles (21,917 SET[−]cryopreservation, 20,996 SET [+]cryopreservation, 103,371 DET[−]cryopreservation, and 117,091 DET[+]cryopreservation). The utilization of eSET (SET[+]cryopreservation) increased from 1.8% in 2004 to 14.9% in 2012 (aOR 7.66, 95% CI 6.87, 8.53), and was more likely with ART insurance coverage (1.60, 1.54–1.66), Asian race (1.26, 1.20–1.33), uterine factor diagnosis (1.48, 1.37–1.59), retrieval of ≥ 16 oocytes (2.85, 2.55–3.19), and the transfer of day 5–6 embryos (4.23, 4.06–4.40); eSET was less likely in women ages 35–37 years (0.76, 0.73–0.80). Compared to DET cycles, the likelihood of the ideal outcome, term non-low birthweight singleton live birth, was increased 45–52% with eSET. Conclusions Expanding insurance coverage for IVF would facilitate the broader use of eSET, and reduce the morbidity and healthcare costs associated with multiple pregnancies. PMID:26997248

  9. The transfer of radionuclides in the terrestrial environments. Recent research results in monsoon tropical condition of Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binh, Nguyen Thanh; Y, Truong; Sieu, Le Nhu; Ngo, Nguyen Trong; Phuc, Nguyen Van; Huong, Mai Thi; Quang, Nguyen Hao; Nhan, Dang Duc

    2003-01-01

    The data on Radionuclide transfer parameters in the environments, which are used in radioecological models, are very necessary for setting release limits of radioactive effluent and assessing the radiation dose to Man related to the releases of radionuclides from nuclear facilities. They strongly depend on climatic, geographic, environmental and pedological conditions. For temperate environments, they are abundant and have been established fairly well. Meanwhile the literature data are still scare and dispersal for Tropical and Sub-tropical zones. Besides, the improvement of Environmental Transfer Models and Parameters is an important problem so that they may be adapted for Southeast Asian countries including Japan as environmental conditions and foodstuffs in this Region are significantly different from those in Europe and North America. The paper presents measurements results of the dry deposition velocities of atmospheric aerosols carrying 7 Be, 137 Cs radionuclides and measurements results of soil to plant transfer factors (TF) for 60 Co, 65 Zn, 85 ASr and 134 Cs resulted from the out door radiotracer experiments with large pots. The selected soil types (Podzolic, Ferralitic, Ferralic Acrisols, Eutric Fluvisols and Orthi-thionic Fluvisols soil) and the plants (rice, black bean, cabbage, lettuce, tomato, cucumber, carrot, white radish, potato) used for the research are the most common in Vietnam. The measured Vg values (cm/s) are in the range of 0.01 - 1.84 for 7 Be and 1.95 - 49.77 for 137 Cs. An analysis of the associated meteorological parameters showed some correlations between 7 Be Vg with humidity and 137 Cs Vg with wind velocity. More than 400 TF (edible part) values were determined and their dependences on some soil parameters have been shown. (author)

  10. Transfer of {sup 137}Cs in Zea mays and Phaseolus vulgaris in a semi-arid ecosystem; Transferencia de {sup 137}Cs en Zea mays y Phaseolus vulgaris en un ecosistema semiarido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes, M.L.; Segovia, N.; Gaso P, M.I.; Palacios, J.C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Laboratorio de Vigilancia Radiologica Ambiental, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    With the objective to analyse the transference of {sup 137} Cs from soil to plants, it is realized a study in maize and bean plants in the Radioactive Waste Storage Center (CADER). This site is located in a semi-arid region with a characteristic vegetation of a sub humid temperature zone. So those plants maize and beans were cultivated in four zones near CADER during a four years period. The obtained results for 1991 to 1994 for {sup 137} Cs in soil samples for those zones showed an evident contamination in zone 1, due to a rupture of an industrial source. In 1994 the effect of decontamination was evident since the values of specific activity found in roots were around magnitude lesser than found in 1992. In spite of exhaustive studies have been reported about the transference factors for {sup 137} Cs in different agricultural foods, relatively few of them have paid attention to the interactions between cereals and leguminous associated in semiarid ecosystems. (Author)

  11. Overpotential-induced lability of the electronic overlap factor in long-range electrochemical electron transfer: charge and distance dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornyshev, A. A.; Kuznetsov, A. M.; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik

    2000-01-01

    Long-distance electrochemical electron transfer exhibits approximately exponential dependence on the electron transfer distance. On the basis of a jellium model of the metal surface we show that the slope of the logarithm of the current vs. the transfer distance also depends strongly...

  12. Modification of the activity of lymphocytes by xenotransplantation of thyroid gland tissue and by the transfer factor of immune reactivity in the case of radiation-induced hypothyrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goleva, O.G.; Paster, Yi.P.; Lyubchenko, T.A.; Kholodna, L.S.; Paster, Je.U.; Donyich, S.F.; Grodzins'kij, D.M.

    1999-01-01

    Transplantation of a thyroid tissue is one of the possible methods for the curing of functional disorders of thyroid gland that appear due to the influence of insufficient environmental conditions on organism. By the micro method of lymphocyte blast transformation reaction, the functional activity of Wistar rat's splenocytes is studied. In the case of radiation-induced hypothyrosis before and after xenotransplantation of the organic cell culture of thyroid gland of newborn pigs, the opportunities for correction of immunological disorders with the help of transfer factor preparations are investigated. The transfer factor is a low-molecular weight leukocyte extract (≤ 10kD) with immuno modulating activities. The reducing of self and PHA-stimulated proliferation of rat's splenocytes with [J131]-induced hypothyrosis is found. Bovine and human transfer factor preparations activate the proliferation of splenocytes from animals with hypothyrosis and animals with xenotransplantation

  13. Assessing student expertise in introductory physics with isomorphic problems. II. Effect of some potential factors on problem solving and transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandralekha Singh

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we explore the use of isomorphic problem pairs (IPPs to assess introductory physics students’ ability to solve and successfully transfer problem-solving knowledge from one context to another in mechanics. We call the paired problems “isomorphic” because they require the same physics principle to solve them. We analyze written responses and individual discussions for a range of isomorphic problems. We examine potential factors that may help or hinder transfer of problem-solving skills from one problem in a pair to the other. For some paired isomorphic problems, one context often turned out to be easier for students in that it was more often correctly solved than the other. When quantitative and conceptual questions were paired and given back to back, students who answered both questions in the IPP often performed better on the conceptual questions than those who answered the corresponding conceptual questions only. Although students often took advantage of the quantitative counterpart to answer a conceptual question of an IPP correctly, when only given the conceptual question, students seldom tried to convert it into a quantitative question, solve it, and then reason about the solution conceptually. Even in individual interviews when students who were given only conceptual questions had difficulty and the interviewer explicitly encouraged them to convert the conceptual question into the corresponding quantitative problem by choosing appropriate variables, a majority of students were reluctant and preferred to guess the answer to the conceptual question based upon their gut feeling. Misconceptions associated with friction in some problems were so robust that pairing them with isomorphic problems not involving friction did not help students discern their underlying similarities. Alternatively, from the knowledge-in-pieces perspective, the activation of the knowledge resource related to friction was so strongly and automatically

  14. Technology transfer by multinationals

    OpenAIRE

    Kostyantyn Zuzik

    2003-01-01

    The paper analyses the issue of technology transfer by multinational corporations. The following questions are explored: (a) world market of technologies, the role of MNCs (b) Choice of the technology transfer mode, Dunning's OLI-theory as a factor of the choice of the mode of transfer (c) measurement and profitability of technology transfer (d) transfer of technology through partnerships, JVs, alliances and through M&As (e) aspects of technology transfer by services multinationals. Paper uti...

  15. Lung transfer factor and KCO at cardiac frequency 100 beats/min as a guide to impaired function of lung parenchyma.

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, S S; Cotes, J E

    1984-01-01

    Transfer factor (TL) and KCO have been measured by the single breath carbon monoxide method in 39 patients with confirmed or suspected lung disease, mostly of occupational origin, and 37 healthy subjects. TL and KCO at an exercise cardiac frequency of 100 beats/min (TL100 and KCO100) and the slopes of the regression of exercise transfer factor and KCO on exercise cardiac frequency (delta TL/delta fC and delta KCO/delta fC) were obtained. The discriminatory performance of these indices in dete...

  16. Soil-plant transfer factors of radionuclides in mangroves in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil; Fatores de transferência solo-planta de radionuclídeos em manguezais do Estado de Pernambuco, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, J.D.S.; França, E.J. de, E-mail: paivajds@gmail.com [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Mangroves are the main inputs of chemical substances, considering the Brazilian estuarine environments. Natural radionuclides such as {sup 40}K and {sup 228}Ra can be transferred to vegetation. The objective of this work is to determine the transfer factors (TF) and aggregate transfer (TF{sub ag}) of radionuclides {sup 40}K and {sup 228}Ra in the soil-plant system of mangroves in the State of Pernambuco , Brazil. Concentrations of {sup 40}K and {sup 228}Ra activity in the soil of mangroves and in samples composed of leaves of individuals of the native plant species Rhizophora mangle, Laguncularia racemosa and Aviccenia Schaueriana were determined from Gamma Spectrometry with hyper-pure germanium detector (HPGe). The transfer and aggregate transfer factors were calculated according to the methodology proposed in the literature. The respective TF and TF{sub ag} values for the {sub 40}K radionuclide were 0.384 and 2.13 x 10{sup -3} for R. mangle; 0.394 and 2.05 x 10{sup -3} for L. racemosa and 1.348 and 3.44 x 10{sup -3} for Avicennia sp. For the radionuclide {sup 228}Ra, the results were lower for R. mangle (TF = 0.089; TF{sub ag} = 1.95 x 10{sup -4}) and L. race-mosa (TF = 0.142; TF{sub ag} = 3.46 x 10{sup -4}). For Avicennia schaueriana, the concentrations of {sup 228}Ra activity in the leaves were below the detection limit. The TF values found demonstrated a greater {sup 40}K transfer in Avicennia and {sup 228}Ra dominated mangroves for mangroves where the L. racemosa distribution predominates.

  17. Soil to rice transfer factors for 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb, 40K and 137Cs: a study on rice grown in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karunakara, N.; Rao, Chetan; Ujwal, P.; Yashodhara, I.; Kumara, Sudeep; Ravi, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    India is the second largest producer of rice (Oryza sativa L.) in the world and rice is an essential component of the diet for a majority of the population in India. However, detailed studies aimed at the evaluation of radionuclide transfer factors (F v ) for the rice grown in India are almost non-existent. This paper presents the soil to rice transfer factors for natural ( 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 40 K, and 210 Pb) and artificial ( 137 Cs) radionuclides for rice grown in natural field conditions on the West Coast of India. A rice field was developed very close to the Kaiga nuclear power plant and the water required for this field was drawn from the cooling water discharge canal of the power plant. For a comparative study of the radionuclide transfer factors, rice samples were also collected from the rice fields of nearby villages. The study showed that the 226 Ra and 228 Ra activity concentrations were below detection levels in different organs of the rice plant. The soil to un-hulled rice grain 40 K transfer factor varied in the range of 6.5 × 10 −1 to 2.9 with a mean of 0.15 × 10 1 , and of 210 Pb varied in the range of −2 to 8.1 × 10 −1 with a mean of 1.4 × 10 −1 , and of 137 Cs varied in the range of 6.6 × 10 −2 to 3.4 × 10 −1 with a mean of 2.1 × 10 −1 . The mean values of un-hulled grain to white rice processing retention factors (F r ) were 0.12 for 40 K, 0.03 for 210 Pb, and 0.14 for 137 Cs. Using these processing retention factors, the soil to white rice transfer factors were estimated and these were found to have mean values of 1.8 × 10 −1 , 4.2 × 10 −3 , and 3.0 × 10 −2 for 40 K, 210 Pb, and 137 Cs, respectively. The study has shown that the transfer of 40 K was higher for above the ground organs than for the root, but 210 Pb and 137 Cs were retained in the root and their transfer to above the ground organs of the rice plant is significantly lower. -- Highlights: ► Soil to rice (Oryza sativa L.) transfer factors for radionuclides

  18. Soil-to-soybean transfer of 99Tc and its underground distribution in differently contaminated upland soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong-Ho; Lim, Kwang-Muk; Jun, In; Kim, Byung-Ho; Keum, Dong-Kwon; Kim, In-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Pot experiments were performed in a greenhouse to investigate the soil-to-soybean transfer of 99 Tc in two different upland soils labeled with 99 TcO 4 − in two contrasting ways. One was to mix the soil with a 99 TcO 4 − solution 26 d before sowing (pre-sowing deposition: PSD), and the other was to apply the solution onto the soil surface 44 d after sowing (growing-period deposition: GPD). The soil-to-plant transfer was quantified with the transfer factor (TF, ratio of the plant concentration to the average of at-planting and at-harvest soil concentrations) or the aggregated transfer factor (TF ag , ratio of the plant concentration to the deposition density). For both the depositions, the transfer of 99 Tc to aerial parts decreased in the order of leaf > stem > pod > seed. TF values (dimensionless) from the PSD were 0.22 and 0.27 (no statistically significant difference) for mature dry seeds in the respective soils, whereas a 600-fold higher value occurred for dry leaves. The post-harvest concentrations of the PSD 99 Tc in the top 20 cm soils as a whole were about half the initial concentrations. Around 25% of the total applied activity remained in the GPD soils after the harvest. The post-harvest depth profiles of the GPD 99 Tc in the two soils showed similar patterns of logarithmic activity decrease with increasing soil depths. Only 1.5–4.3% of the total applied activity was removed through the harvested biomass (seeds, pods and stems), and it was estimated that a great part of the total pant uptake returned to the soil through the fallen leaves. TF ag values (m 2 kg −1 ) were about 2–4 times higher for the GPD than for the PSD. This finding and generally high root uptake of Tc may indicate that the use of empirical deposition time-dependent TF ag data is particularly important for predicting the plant concentrations of Tc after its growing-period deposition. - Highlights: • Soybean TF values of 99 Tc were markedly lower for the seed than for the

  19. Transfer factor of the radionuclides in food crops from high-background radiation area of south west India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanthi, G.; Thampi Thanka kumaran, J.; Allen Gnana raj, G.; Maniyan, C. G.

    2012-01-01

    It is necessary to obtain the transfer factor (TF) of long-lived radionuclides because soil type and vegetation can affect TF. We studied the food crops commonly consumed by the general public of Kanyakumari district of south India. The main focus was on rice, fruits, vegetables and tapioca because the consumption of these is high. The soil to rice TF for the radionuclides, 226 Ra, 232 Th, 238 U and 40 K are 8.8 x 10. -2 , 14.2 x 10. -2 , 5.8 x 10. -2 and 6.3 x 10. -2 , respectively. The TF of tapioca for 226 Ra, 232 Th, 238 U and 40 K are 6.2 x 10 -2 , 11 x 10 -2 , 1.9 x 10 -2 and 8.9 x 10 -2 , respectively. For fruits and vegetables, the TFs are low. In the majority of the crops the non-edible parts accumulate more radionuclides than the edible parts. (authors)

  20. Transfer Factors of Nuclides for Five Fish Species Inhabiting the Sea near the Yonggwang Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Kwangmuk; Choi, Yongho; Jun, In; Kim, Byungho; Keum, Dongkwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The IAEA is going to publish a handbook of the TF values of various radionuclides for a number of plant and animal species. However, it is recommended that they be used in case there is no site-specific data. This is because TF values can vary considerably with wild-life species and environmental conditions. Therefore, it is necessary to urgently establish our own database of wild-life transfer factors for use in the wild-life dose assessment probably in the near future. In the present study, TF values of various radionuclides were investigated for several marine fish species living around the Younggwang NPP. It was done by measuring the concentrations of stable isotopes in fish and seawater samples. TF values of 21 nuclides were measured for five fish species inhabiting the sea near the Younggwang NPP. They showed considerable variations with the nuclides and fish species. Determination of TF values needs to be extended to various kinds of domestic wild lives so as to establish an input data file for a Korean assessment model such as K-BIOTA.

  1. Biochemist's view of the mediators of cellular immunity, with special reference to transfer factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novelli, G.D.

    1975-01-01

    The results of attempts to fractionate tumor-specific transfer factor by two chromatographic procedures that differ greatly in their basic separation principles have been presented. The behavior of the TF in these separation procedures led to the suggestion that TF prepared by the Lawrence procedure does not contain a single unique molecular species, but rather consists of a multiple collection of different molecular species differing from each other in both size and charge. Since each of these separated fractions have specific biological activity, it suggests that each of the different molecular species contains a common unique property that results in the conversion of a null or negative lymphocyte into a tumor specific killer cell. These facts led to the suggestion of a theory that TF prepared by the Lawrence procedure is derived by enzymatic degradation of a larger, non-dialyzable molecule, possibly the so-called immune RNA, by degradative enzymes released from lysozomes during the preparative procedures. These enzymatically derived products share a common unique property that causes them to be recognized by the appropriate lymphocyte so that they are taken up by the cell. Once these products are inside of the lymphocyte they are then converted, by as yet unknown steps, to the larger molecule which then causes the lymphocyte to develop specific cytotoxicity. (auth)

  2. Comparative effects of cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibition, statin or ezetimibe on lipid factors: The ACCENTUATE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Stephen J; Ray, Kausik K; Ballantyne, Christie M; Beacham, Lauren A; Miller, Debra L; Ruotolo, Giacomo; Nissen, Steven E; Riesmeyer, Jeffrey S

    2017-06-01

    The optimal approaches to management of patients treated with moderate statin doses on lipid parameters are unknown. The ACCENTUATE study aimed to compare the effects of adding the cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitor (CETP) evacetrapib, ezetimibe or increasing statin dose in atorvastatin-treated high-vascular risk patients on lipid parameters. 366 patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) and/or diabetes were treated with atorvastatin 40 mg/day for 28 days prior to randomization to atorvastatin 40 mg plus evacetrapib 130 mg, atorvastatin 80 mg, atorvastatin 40 mg plus ezetimibe 10 mg or atorvastatin 40 mg plus placebo, daily for 90 days at 64 centers in the United States. Lipid parameters, safety and tolerability were measured. Addition of evacetrapib significantly reduced LDL-C (-33%) compared with ezetimibe (-27%, p=0.045), increasing statin dose (-6%) and statin alone (0%, pstatin dose (pstatin dose, and p=0.004 vs. statin alone). Addition of evacetrapib to atorvastatin produced an increase in hsCRP compared with ezetimibe (p=0.02). While evacetrapib improved traditional atherogenic and putative protective lipid measures compared with ezetimibe and increasing statin dose in patients with ASCVD and/or diabetes, it also adversely affected novel atherogenic risk factors. These findings may contribute to the lack of clinical benefit observed in the ACCELERATE trial. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Two protocols to treat thin endometrium with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor during frozen embryo transfer cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Zhang, Qiong; Hao, Jie; Xu, Dabao; Li, Yanping

    2015-04-01

    The efficacy of two granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) protocols for thin endometrium were investigated. Eighty-two patients were diagnosed with thin endometrium (endometrial scratch subgroups. Compared with previous cycles, endometrial thickness increased from 5.7 ± 0.7 mm to 8.1 ± 2.1 mm after G-CSF treatment (P Endometrial thickness increases were not significantly different between the two subgroups. The G-CSF with endometrial scratch subgroup established nominally higher though non-significant clinical pregnancy and live birth rates than the G-CSF only subgroup (53.8 % versus 42.9% and 38.5% versus 28.6%, respectively). Fifty-two patients underwent FET despite edometrial thickness less than 7 mm, and were included as controls. Significantly higher embryo implantation and clinical pregnancy rates were observed in the G-CSF group compared with the control group (31.5% versus 13.9%; P Endometrial scracth did not impair G-CSF treatment for thin endometrium and favoured pregnancy and live birth rates. For patients with thin endometrium, embryo transfer cancellation and G-CSF treatment in subsequent FET cycles is beneficial. Copyright © 2014 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Studies of radioactivity of vegetables: determination of transfer factors 85Sr and 134Cs in some vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oncsik, M.B.

    1999-01-01

    The radioisotope uptake of potato and culinary dry bean was studied in field experiments on meadow soil enriched with vermiculite and humanite by artificial soil contamination. The isotope uptake from the soil was characterized by a transfer factor (TF). Based on the results of the potato experiment it was found that the TF value characterizing the 134 Cs contamination of the crop, changed between 1.31 - 0.77*10 -4 m 2 (kg dry matter) -1 on high humus content soil (treated with humanite) and on soil treated with vermiculite, while it was 22-45 % higher in plants grown on the radioactive control plots. lt was 1.69*10 -4 m 2 (kg dry matter)2 -1 in average. The TF values of 85 Sr uptake of potato are several times higher than those of experiments treated by isotope 134 Cs. The TF values fluctuated between 5.30-7.33*10 -4 m 2 (kg dry matter) -1 in soils treated with the additives, while on the plots with radioactive contamination it was 8.42*10 -4 m 2 (kg dry matter) -1 . Based on the results of 134 Cs studies of edible part of dry bean, it could be stated that after the soil contamination the TF value was 0.99*10 -4 m 2 (kg dry matter) -1 in average. According to the activity results of the experiments there was significant difference between the contamination of the plant parts. Refs. 6 (author)

  5. Experimental description and stochastic modelling of transfers using a scaling factor for the hydrodynamic properties of the soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vauclin, M.; Vachaud, G.; Imbernon, J.; Dancette, C.

    1983-01-01

    It is well known that natural soils do not have constant hydrodynamic properties on the plot scale. Experimentally, this means that a water balance obtained in an access tube by means of a neutron moisture gauge and tensiometers is not necessarily representative of the whole range studied. For modelling purposes the deterministic aspect of transfers should be associated with a stochastic description of the hydrodynamic parameters (pressure, water content, hydraulic conductivity). An experiment was carried out in a one-hectare plot of bare soil at Bambey (Senegal) in order to characterize its variability: 28 infiltration tests were performed at the points of a 23x23 m grid. At each of these points, the insertion of a neutron access tube to a depth of 2.0 m, and the positioning of three tensiometers at depths of 100, 110 and 120 cm made it possible also to monitor the redistribution of water and to derive the pressure-water content relationships. In addition, internal drainage tests were made in four 1.5x1.5 m soil monoliths so as to find the hydraulic conductivity-water content relationships at different depths. On the assumption of similarity in porous media (verified in this study) all the results were analysed in terms of the theory of scaling factors. The data obtained in bare soil were then used as the basis for solving the stochastic equations for infiltration and drainage. The results show that, apart from satisfactory agreement, with the experiment, the mean solution obtained from the mean parameters (deterministic solution) is clearly different from the mean of the solutions (stochastic solution). These differences, as well as the variance, depend strongly on the variability of the soil, expressed here as the coefficient of variation of the scaling factors. This obviously calls in question the concept of equivalent porous media. (author)

  6. Post-fusion treatment with MG132 increases transcription factor expression in somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jinyoung; Lee, Joohyeong; Kim, Jinyoung; Park, Junhong; Lee, Eunsong

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of post-fusion treatment of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) oocytes with the proteasomal inhibitor MG132 on maturation promoting factor (MPF) activity, nuclear remodeling, embryonic development, and gene expression of cloned pig embryos. Immediately after electrofusion, SCNT oocytes were treated with MG132 and/or caffeine for 2 hr, vanadate for 0.5 hr, or vanadate for 0.5 hr followed by MG132 for 1.5 hr. Of the MG132 concentrations tested (0-5 microM), the 1 microM concentration showed a higher rate of blastocyst formation (25.9%) than 0 (14.2%), 0.5 (16.9%), and 5 microM (16.9%). Post-fusion treatment with MG132, caffeine, and both MG132 and caffeine improved blastocyst formation (22.1%, 21.4%, and 24.4%, respectively), whereas vanadate treatment inhibited blastocyst formation (6.5%) compared to the control (11.1%). When examined 2 hr after fusion and 1 hr after activation, MPF activity remained at a higher (P fusion with caffeine and/or MG132, but it was decreased by vanadate. The rate of oocytes showing premature chromosome condensation was not altered by MG132 but was decreased by vanadate treatment. In addition, formation of single pronuclei was increased by MG132 compared to control and vanadate treatment. MG132-treated embryos showed increased expression of POU5F1, DPPA2, DPPA3, DPPA5, and NDP52l1 genes compared to control embryos. Our results demonstrate that post-fusion treatment of SCNT oocytes with MG132 prevents MPF degradation and increases expression of transcription factors in SCNT embryos, which are necessary for normal development of SCNT embryos. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. A review of factors affecting the transfer of sexual and reproductive health training into practice in low and lower-middle income country humanitarian settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beek, Kristen; Dawson, Angela; Whelan, Anna

    2017-01-01

    A lack of access to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) care is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among displaced women and girls of reproductive age. Efforts to address this public health emergency in humanitarian settings have included the widespread delivery of training programmes to address gaps in health worker capacity for SRH. There remains a lack of data on the factors which may affect the ability of health workers to apply SRH knowledge and skills gained through training programmes in humanitarian contexts. We searched four electronic databases and ten key organizations' websites to locate literature on SRH training for humanitarian settings in low and lower-middle income countries. Papers were examined using content analysis to identify factors which contribute to health workers' capacity to transfer SRH knowledge, skills and attitudes learned in training into practice in humanitarian settings. Seven studies were included in this review. Six research papers focused on the response stage of humanitarian crises and five papers featured the disaster context of conflict. A range of SRH components were addressed including maternal, newborn health and sexual violence. The review identified factors, including appropriate resourcing, organisational support and confidence in health care workers that were found to facilitate the transfer of learning. The findings suggest the presence of factors that moderate the transfer of training at the individual, training, organisational, socio-cultural, political and health system levels. Supportive strategies are necessary to best assist trainees to apply newly acquired knowledge and skills in their work settings. These interventions must address factors that moderate the success of learning transfer. Findings from this review suggest that these are related to the individual trainee, the training program itself and the workplace as well as the broader environmental context. Organisations which provide SRH

  8. Trace element mobility and transfer to vegetation within the Ethiopian Rift Valley lake areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassaye, Yetneberk A; Skipperud, Lindis; Meland, Sondre; Dadebo, Elias; Einset, John; Salbu, Brit

    2012-10-26

    To evaluate critical trace element loads in native vegetation and calculate soil-to-plant transfer factors (TFs), 11 trace elements (Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Mo, Cd, Pb and Mn) have been determined in leaves of 9 taxonomically verified naturally growing terrestrial plant species as well as in soil samples collected around 3 Ethiopian Rift Valley lakes (Koka, Ziway and Awassa). The Cr concentration in leaves of all the plant species was higher than the "normal" range, with the highest level (8.4 mg per kg dw) being observed in Acacia tortilis from the Lake Koka area. Caper species (Capparis fascicularis) and Ethiopian dogstooth grass (Cynodon aethiopicus) from Koka also contained exceptionally high levels of Cd (1 mg per kg dw) and Mo (32.8 mg per kg dw), respectively. Pb, As and Cu concentrations were low in the plant leaves from all sites. The low Cu level in important fodder plant species (Cynodon aethiopicus, Acacia tortilis and Opuntia ficus-indicus) implies potential deficiency in grazing and browsing animals. Compared to the Canadian environmental quality guideline and maximum allowable concentration in agricultural soils, the total soil trace element concentrations at the studied sites are safe for agricultural crop production. Enrichment factor was high for Zn in soils around Lakes Ziway and Awassa, resulting in moderate to high transfer of Zn to the studied plants. A six step sequential extraction procedure on the soils revealed a relatively high mobility of Cd, Se and Mn. Strong association of most trace elements with the redox sensitive fraction and mineral lattice was also confirmed by partial redundancy analysis. TF (mg per kg dw plants/mg per kg dw soil) values based on the total (TF(total)) and mobile fractions (TF(mobile)) of soil trace element concentrations varied widely among elements and plant species, with the averaged TF(total) and TF(mobile) values ranging from 0.01-2 and 1-60, respectively. Considering the mobile fraction in soils should

  9. Soil-to-Rice Seeds Transfer Factors of Radioiodine and Technetium for Paddy Fields around the Radioactive-Waste Disposal Site in Gyeongju

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong Ho; Lim, Kwang Muk; Jun, In; Park, Doo Won; Keum, Dong Kwon; Han, Moon Hee

    2010-01-01

    Radiotracer experiments were performed over two years using pot cultures in a greenhouse to investigate soil-torice seeds transfer factors of radioiodine and technetium for paddy fields around the radioactive-waste disposal site in Gyeongju. Before transplanting rice seedlings, the top about 20 cm soils were thoroughly mixed with 125 I (2007) and 99 Tc (2008), and the pots were irrigated to simulate flooded rice fields. Transfer factors were determined as the ratios of the radionuclide concentrations in dry rice seeds (brown rice) to those in dry soils. Transfer factors of radioiodine and technetium were in the ranges of 1.1 x 10 -3 ∼ 6.4 x 10 -3 (three soils) and 5.4 x 10 -4 ∼ 2.5 x 10 -3 (four soils), respectively, for different soils. It seems that the differences in the clay content among soils played a more important role for such variations than those in the organic matter content and pH. As the representative values of radioiodine and technetium transfer factors for rice seeds, 2.9 x 10 -3 and 1.1 x 10 -3 , respectively, were proposed. In order to obtain more highly representative values in the future, investigations for the sites of interest need to be carried out continuously

  10. Transfer factors of 226Ra, 210Pb and 210Po from NORM-contaminated oil field soil to some Atriplex species, Alfalfa and Bermuda grass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masria, M.S.; Mukalallati, H.; Al-Hamwi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Transfer factors of 226 Ra, 210 Pb and 210 Po from soil contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in oil fields to some grazing plants were determined using pot experiments. Contaminated soil was collected from a dry surface evaporation pit from a Syrian oil field in the Der Ezzor area. Five types of plants (Atriplex halimus L., Atriplex canescens, Atriplex Leucoclada Bioss, Alfalfa and Bermuda grass) were grown and harvested three times over two years. The results show that the mean transfer factors of 226 Ra from the contaminated soil to the studied plant species were 1.6 x 10 -3 for Atriplex halimus L., 2.1 x 10 -3 for Atriplex canescens, 2.5 x 10 -3 for Atriplex Leucoclada Bioss, 8.2 x 10 -3 for Bermuda grass, and the highest value was 1.7 x 10 -2 for Alfalfa. Transfer factors of 210 Pb and 210 Po were higher than 226 Ra TFs by one order of magnitude and reached 7 x 10 -3 , 1.1 x 10 -2 , 1.2 x 10 -2 , 3.2 x 10 -2 and 2.5 x 10 -2 for Atriplex halimus, Atriplex canescens, Atriplex Leucoclada Bioss, Bermuda grass and Alfalfa, respectively. The results can be considered as base values for transfer factors of 226 Ra, 210 Pb and 210 Po in semiarid regions. (authors)

  11. Transference factor of radiocaesium for the different compartments of a mediterranean forest and the relation between the radiocaesium and the organic matter content in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauret, G.; Sanchez-Reyes, A.F.; Febrian, I.; Llaurado, M.; Tejada, J.

    1988-01-01

    The new amount of radiocesium coming from Chernobyl may allow to study the soil-plant transfer factor for this element. The radiocesium distribution as well as the soil-plant transfer factor were studied for two zones located at the north east of Spain: the first one is a forest zone near the Catalan coast (Cabrils) and the second one is a mountainous zone 20 km far from the mediterranean Sea (Montseny). From the samples collected at Cabrils and at the Montseny zone, it is suggested to take the 134 Cs as a new indicator for the contamination originated after the Chernobyl accident. It seems reasonable to calculate the soil-plant transfer factor for this radioisotope instead of for 137 Cs, because of the 137 Cs double origin: the sixties fallout and the Chernobyl accident. The soil-plant 134 Cs transfer factor (T.F.) was calculated for different samples from the same sampling point and with similar organic matter content. The results for the Cabrils and Montseny zones are presented. It is observed that for aromatic plants the T.F. is about 0.6 while for green plants the T.F. is less than the above values. For moss, lichen and trumpery, the values obtained are in the range between 4 and 18, while for braken and mushrooms the T. F. values are less than 1

  12. In-Hospital Mortality among Rural Medicare Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: The Influence of Demographics, Transfer, and Health Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muus, Kyle J.; Knudson, Alana D.; Klug, Marilyn G.; Wynne, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Context/Purpose: Most rural hospitals can provide medical care to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, but a need for advanced cardiac care requires timely transfer to a tertiary hospital. There is little information on AMI in-hospital mortality predictors among rural transfer patients. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective analyses on…

  13. Factors That Contribute to Transfer and Bachelor's Degree Attainment of Low-Income Community College Beginners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Andrea Darlene

    2016-01-01

    Transfer and bachelor's degree attainment rates of low-income community college beginners lag behind their middle- and high-income peers. As community college continues to be an affordable and accessible route to higher education, consideration should be given to how to close the gap in transfer and bachelor's degree attainment rates of low-income…

  14. Numerical investigation of heat transfer and friction factor characteristics in a circular tube fitted with V-cut twisted tape inserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Sami D; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H; Takriff, Mohd S; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2013-01-01

    Numerical investigation of the heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of a circular fitted with V-cut twisted tape (VCT) insert with twist ratio (y = 2.93) and different cut depths (w = 0.5, 1, and 1.5 cm) were studied for laminar flow using CFD package (FLUENT-6.3.26). The data obtained from plain tube were verified with the literature correlation to ensure the validation of simulation results. Classical twisted tape (CTT) with different twist ratios (y = 2.93, 3.91, 4.89) were also studied for comparison. The results show that the enhancement of heat transfer rate induced by the classical and V-cut twisted tape inserts increases with the Reynolds number and decreases with twist ratio. The results also revealed that the V-cut twisted tape with twist ratio y = 2.93 and cut depth w = 0.5 cm offered higher heat transfer rate with significant increases in friction factor than other tapes. In addition the results of V-cut twist tape compared with experimental and simulated data of right-left helical tape inserts (RLT), it is found that the V-cut twist tape offered better thermal contact between the surface and the fluid which ultimately leads to a high heat transfer coefficient. Consequently, 107% of maximum heat transfer was obtained by using this configuration.

  15. Study on heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of γ-Al2O3/water through circular tube with twisted tape inserts with different thicknesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmaeilzadeh, E.; Almohammadi, H.; Nokhosteen, A.; Motezaker, A.; Omrani, A.N.

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of γ-Al 2 O 3 /water nano-fluid through circular tube with twisted tape inserts with various thicknesses at constant heat flux. In this work, γ-Al 2 O 3 /water nano-fluids with two volume concentrations of 0.5% and 1% were used as the working fluid. The twist ratio of twisted tape remained constant at 3.21, while the thicknesses were changed through three values of 0.5 mm, 1 mm and 2 mm. The experiments were performed in laminar flow regime from 150 to 1600 Reynolds numbers. Results indicated that twisted tape inserts enhanced the average convective heat transfer coefficient, and also more the thickness of twisted tape is more the enhancement of convective heat transfer coefficient is. Also, the highest enhancement was achieved at maximum volume concentration. Results showed that nano-fluids have better heat transfer performance when utilized with thicker twisted tapes. At the same time, the increase in twisted tape thickness leads to an increase in friction factor. In the end, the combined results of these two phenomena result in enhanced convective heat transfer coefficient and thermal performance. Finally, two new correlations were offered for Nusselt number and thermal performance based on our experimental observation. (authors)

  16. Canadian database for radionuclide transfer in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, S.C.; Corbett, B.J.

    1995-04-01

    The transfer of radionuclides throughout the biosphere is described in models that rely on a series of transfer parameters. These parameters are typically based on experimental or monitoring observations, and describe processes such as soil-to-plant transfer, soil-to-atmosphere transfer, and water-to-fish transfer. The parameters values used in many applications to date have come from around the world. However, data from Canadian settings are generally preferable for Canadian safety assessment applications. This is particularly true for geographically unique parameters relating to specific soils and environments. This database was constructed to record future radionuclide transfer parameter data systematically and completely, and to record particularly valuable existing data. The database supports element-specific parameters. Because the emphasis is on Canadian data, the data are indexed by geographic and physiographic region. In addition to the specific transfer parameter values, there is provision for a substantial amount of ancillary data. The database now operates with dBase software. (author). 1 tab

  17. Canadian database for radionuclide transfer in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, S C; Corbett, B J [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1995-04-01

    The transfer of radionuclides throughout the biosphere is described in models that rely on a series of transfer parameters. These parameters are typically based on experimental or monitoring observations, and describe processes such as soil-to-plant transfer, soil-to-atmosphere transfer, and water-to-fish transfer. The parameters values used in many applications to date have come from around the world. However, data from Canadian settings are generally preferable for Canadian safety assessment applications. This is particularly true for geographically unique parameters relating to specific soils and environments. This database was constructed to record future radionuclide transfer parameter data systematically and completely, and to record particularly valuable existing data. The database supports element-specific parameters. Because the emphasis is on Canadian data, the data are indexed by geographic and physiographic region. In addition to the specific transfer parameter values, there is provision for a substantial amount of ancillary data. The database now operates with dBase software. (author). 1 tab.

  18. Transfer of 137Cs to agricultural products in southern Sweden after a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haak, E.; Eriksson, Aake; Loensjoe, H.; Rosen, K.

    1998-12-01

    This report contains calculations of expected 137 Cs transfer from contaminated agricultural land to crop and animal products in the southern part of Sweden; Skaane and Blekinge. The fallout has been simulated to be 1 MBq per m 2 , uniformly deposited on the ground surface in the spring of 1995. The report covers a period of 20 years or the years 1996-2015. The calculations of 137 Cs transfer to crop products are based on official crop statistics of the year 1996 and earlier observed soil/plant transfer ratios. These ratios vary with crop and soil type. The sensitivity for 137 Cs-transfer from soil to plant varies between the counties. This variability depends on smaller root uptake in loamy than in sandy soils and less in sandy than in organic soils, and to a different distribution of these three soil types. The 137 Cs-transfer to crop products decreases considerably during a 20 years period. This depends on nuclide decay and on decreased root availability. As shown in tables and figures, the decrease is larger during the first years after fallout than later. This depends on successive ploughing of grass land during the crop rotation, which drastically decreases the root availability. Agricultural land is used for cultivating sale and fodder crops. The fodder crops are the main bases for transfer to animal products. The passage through the animal body will cause the main part of the 137 Cs intake to be linked off before the transfer to the animal products. The 137 Cs-content in a certain product will finally determine if it can be used for human intake. The 137 Cs-transfer to cow feed in MBq per 100 hectare decreases with time and, in analogy with the mean transfer to all crop products, more in the first years than in later years due to successive ploughing of grassland in the existing crop rotations. The calculations for the counties, which were made against the background of earlier Swedish micro plot and field experiments, clearly show that it will be effective

  19. Enhancing immune responses to inactivated porcine parvovirus oil emulsion vaccine by co-inoculating porcine transfer factor in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui-ning; Wang, Ya-bin; Geng, Jing-wei; Guo, Dong-hui; Liu, Fang; Chen, Hong-ying; Zhang, Hong-ying; Cui, Bao-an; Wei, Zhan-yong

    2012-07-27

    Inactivated porcine parvovirus (PPV) vaccines are available commercially and widely used in the breeding herds. However, inactivated PPV vaccines have deficiencies in induction of specific cellular immune response. Transfer factor (TF) is a material that obtained from the leukocytes, and is a novel immune-stimulatory reagent that as a modulator of the immune system. In this study, the immunogenicity of PPV oil emulsion vaccine and the immuno-regulatory activities of TF were investigated. The inactivated PPV oil emulsion vaccines with or without TF were inoculated into BALB/c mice by subcutaneous injection. Then humoral and cellular immune responses were evaluated by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), fluorescence-activated cell sorter analyses (FACS). The results showed that the PPV specific immune responses could be evoked in mice by inoculating with PPV oil emulsion vaccine alone or by co-inoculation with TF. The cellular immune response levels in the co-inoculation groups were higher than those groups receiving the PPV oil emulsion vaccine alone, with the phenomena of higher level of IFN-γ, a little IL-6 and a trace of IL-4 in serum, and a vigorous T-cell response. However, there was no significant difference in antibody titers between TF synergy inactivated vaccine and the inactivated vaccine group (P>0.05). In conclusion, these results suggest that TF possess better cellular immune-enhancing capability and would be exploited into an effective immune-adjuvant for inactivated vaccines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 137Cs Inter-Plant Concentration Ratios Provide a Predictive Tool for Coral Atolls with Distinct Benefits Over Transfer Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F; Bogen, K; Corado, C L; Kehl, S R

    2007-07-17

    Inter-plant concentration ratios (IPCR), [Bq g{sup -1} {sup 137}Cs in coral atoll tree food-crops/Bq g{sup -1} {sup 137}Cs in leaves of native plant species whose roots share a common soil volume], can replace transfer factors (TF) to predict {sup 137}Cs concentration in tree food-crops in a contaminated area with an aged source term. The IPCR strategy has significant benefits relative to TF strategy for such purposes in the atoll ecosystem. IPCR strategy applied to specific assessments takes advantage of the fact tree roots naturally integrate 137Cs over large volumes of soil. Root absorption of {sup 137}Cs replaces large-scale, expensive soil sampling schemes to reduce variability in {sup 137}Cs concentration due to inhomogeneous radionuclide distribution. IPCR [drinking-coconut meat (DCM)/Scaevola (SCA) and Tournefortia (TOU) leaves (native trees growing on all atoll islands)] are log normally distributed (LND) with geometric standard deviation (GSD) = 1.85. TF for DCM from Enewetak, Eneu, Rongelap and Bikini Atolls are LND with GSD's of 3.5, 3.0, 2.7, and 2.1, respectively. TF GSD for Rongelap copra coconut meat is 2.5. IPCR of Pandanus fruit to SCA and TOU leaves are LND with GSD = 1.7 while TF GSD is 2.1. Because IPCR variability is much lower than TF variability, relative sampling error of an IPCR field sample mean is up 6- to 10-fold lower than that of a TF sample mean if sample sizes are small (10 to 20). Other IPCR advantages are that plant leaf samples are collected and processed in far less time with much less effort and cost than soil samples.

  1. Transfer factor of (90)Sr and (137)Cs to lettuce and winter wheat at different growth stage applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Attar, Lina; Al-Oudat, Mohammad; Safia, Bassam; Ghani, Basem Abdul

    2015-12-01

    The effect of clay soil contamination time on the transfer factors (Fvs) of (137)Cs and (90)Sr was investigated in four different growth stages of winter wheat and lettuce crops. The experiment was performed in an open field using lysimeters. The Fvs were the ratio of the activity concentrations of the radionuclides in crops to those in soil, both as dry weight (Bq kg(-1)). Significant difference of log-Fvs was evaluated using one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Basically, Fvs of (90)Sr were higher than those of (137)Cs, despite of the application stage or crop' variety. Higher Fvs for both radionuclides were observed for lettuce in comparison to winter wheat. Fvs of (90)Sr showed comparable trends for both crops with enhanced Fvs obtained when contamination occurred in early stages, i.e. 1.20 for lettuce and 0.88 and 0.02 for winter wheat, straw and grains, respectively. Despite the fluctuation noted in the pattern of Fvs for (137)Cs, soil contaminated at the second stage gave the highest Fvs for lettuce and grains, with geometric means of 0.21 and 0.01, respectively. However, wheat-straw showed remarkable increase in Fv for the latest contamination (ripening stage), about 0.06. It could be concluded that soil contamination at early growth stages would represent high radiological risk for the scenarios studied with an exception to (137)Cs in winter wheat-straw which reflected greater hazard at the latest application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. 137Cs inter-plant concentration ratios provide a predictive tool for coral atolls with distinct benefits over transfer factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robison, William L.; Hamilton, Terry F.; Bogen, Kenneth T.; Conrado, Cynthia L.; Kehl, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    Inter-plant concentration ratios (IPCR) [Bq g -1137 Cs in coral atoll tree food crops/Bq g -1137 Cs in leaves of native plant species whose roots share a common soil volume] can replace transfer factors (TF) to predict 137 Cs concentration in tree food crops in a contaminated area with an aged source term. The IPCR strategy has significant benefits relative to TF strategy for such purposes in the atoll ecosystem. IPCR strategy applied to specific assessments takes advantage of the fact that tree roots naturally integrate 137 Cs over large volumes of soil. Root absorption of 137 Cs replaces large-scale, expensive soil sampling schemes to reduce variability in 137 Cs concentration due to inhomogeneous radionuclide distribution. IPCR [drinking-coconut meat (DCM)/Scaevola (SCA) and Tournefortia (TOU) leaves (native trees growing on all atoll islands)] are log-normally distributed (LND) with geometric standard deviation (GSD) = 1.85. TF for DCM from Enewetak, Eneu, Rongelap and Bikini Atolls are LND with GSDs of 3.5, 3.0, 2.7, and 2.1, respectively. TF GSD for Rongelap copra coconut meat is 2.5. IPCR of Pandanus fruit to SCA and TOU leaves are LND with GSD = 1.7 while TF GSD is 2.1. Because IPCR variability is much lower than TF variability, relative sampling error of an IPCR field sample mean is up 6- to 10-fold lower than that of a TF sample mean if sample sizes are small (10-20). Other IPCR advantages are that plant leaf samples are collected and processed in far less time with much less effort and cost than soil samples

  3. Determination of Radium transfer factor from soil to vegetables by Gamma spectrometry in high levels of natural radiation areas of Ramsar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reza-nejad, F.

    2000-01-01

    One of the most important and prevalent radioactive contaminants in the environment is radium-226 from uranium-238 decay series. This radionuclide after entering in to the food chain, especially through consumed drinking water and vegetables is transferred to man. In order to determine the transfer factor of 226 Ra from soil to veg tables and to assess the effective dose due to ingestion of vegetables by the critical group of Talesh-Mahaleh which is one of the high levels natural radiation areas of Ramsar, more than 90 samples of soil, seed and vegetable were collected and analysed by gamma spectrometry using a High Purity Germanium detector coupled to a Canberra Mca-series 100. The concentrations of 226 Ra were determined by 609 KeV photopeak of bismuth-214 in secular equilibrium with 226 Ra. Concentrations of 226 Ra in dried soil samples were ranged from a minimum of 733 ± 25 to a maximum of 45100 ± 37 Bq Kg -1 . The maximum and minimum transfer factor of 226 Ra were determined in leafy and root vegetables respectively. The average transfer factor of 226 RA were calculated 1.2 * 10 -2 for all 14 kind of vegetables. The results indicated that by increasing the 226 Ra concentration in substrate, the uptake of this radionuclide has exponentially increased while, the transfer factors were decreased. Also there is a positive correlation between uptake of 226 Ra and Ca in vegetable. The highest and lowest ratio of 226 Ra/Ca were measured 127.8 Bq Kg -1 and 8 Bq Kg -1 and 8 Bq Kg -1 in carrot and tomato samples respectively. The effective dose resulting from 226 Ra due to consumption of vegetables for critical group was 51.6 μ Sv a -1 which is 13 times more than average of effective dose resulting from this radionuclide due to intake of all kind of foods and water in background region

  4. Examining factors affecting beginning teachers' transfer of learning of ICT-enhanced learning activities in their teaching practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agyei, D.D.; Voogt, J.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined 100 beginning teachers’ transfer of learning when utilising Information Communication Technology-enhanced activity-based learning activities. The beginning teachers had participated in a professional development program that was characterised by ‘learning technology by

  5. Analysis of linear energy transfers and quality factors of charged particles produced by spontaneous fission neutrons from 252Cf and 244Pu in the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, A.; Sato, T.

    2013-01-01

    Absorbed doses, linear energy transfers (LETs) and quality factors of secondary charged particles in organs and tissues, generated via the interactions of the spontaneous fission neutrons from. 252 Cf and. 244 Pu within the human body, were studied using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System (PHITS) coupled with the ICRP Reference Phantom. Both the absorbed doses and the quality factors in target organs generally decrease with increasing distance from the source organ. The analysis of LET distributions of secondary charged particles led to the identification of the relationship between LET spectra and target-source organ locations. A comparison between human body-averaged mean quality factors and fluence-averaged radiation weighting factors showed that the current numerical conventions for the radiation weighting factors of neutrons, updated in ICRP103, and the quality factors for internal exposure are valid. (authors)

  6. Chemical speciation of technetium in soil and plants: impact on soil-plant-animal transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandecasteele, C.M.; Bruwaene, R. van; Janssens, J.; Kirchmann, R.; Myttenaere, C.

    1986-01-01

    Considerable uncertainties are associated with the environmental behaviour of technetium-99 and its transfer from soil to plants and then to animals and man. For this reason, most of the mathematical models built to simulate the environmental transport of Tc and to calculate the dose to man are associated with conservative simplifications and produce overestimates of the calculated dose. In order to follow the new ICRP recommendations, transfer models are needed that estimate as accurately as possible the dose to the population; this implies a better knowledge of the behaviour of Tc in the environment, especially concerning its long-term behaviour. At this time, most of the available data deal with the short-term and only scanty results have been obtained regarding the plant-animal transfer, especially in the case of polygastric mammals. (author)

  7. Chemical speciation of technetium in soil and plants: Impact on soil-plant-animal transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandecasteele, C.M.; Garten, C.T. Jr.; Van Bruwaene, R.; Janssens, J.; Kirchmann, R.; Myttenaere, C.

    1985-01-01

    Considerable uncertainties are associated with the environmental behaviour of technetium-99 and its transfer from soil to plants and then to animals and man. For this reason, most of the mathematical models built to simulate the environmental transport of Tc and to calculate the dose to man are associated with conservative simplifications and produce overestimates of the calculated dose. In order to follow the new ICRP recommendations, transfer models are needed that estimate as accurately as possible the dose to the population; this implies a better knowledge of the behaviour of Tc in the environment, especially concerning its long-term behaviour. At this time, most of the available data deals with the short-term and only scanty results have been obtained regarding the plant-animal transfer, especially in the case of polygastric mammals

  8. Transfer analysis of 210Po and 210Pb in the terrestrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, B.R.R.

    2013-01-01

    The transfer of 210 Po and 210 Pb between various compartments in the terrestrial environment has been analysed by using published data. The average activity concentration of 210 Po in dry soil is 61 ± 14 Bq.kg -1 (median 44 Bq.kg -1 ). Ground water concentrations of 210 Po in drilled wells might be as high as 6.5 Bq/l. But in regular drinking water it is just about 3-5 mBq/l. The uptake of radionuclides from soil to plant is usually given as the ratio of dry matter radionuclide-activity concentrations of plant (AC plant ) and soil (AC soil ) respectively. This ratio is called the soil transfer factor: STF = AC plant /AC soil . The soil transfer factor varies widely between various types of crops with an average of about 0.056±0.003. The activity concentrations in leafy plants are, however highly affected by the atmospheric deposition of 210 Pb and 210 Po. By comparing the activity concentrations in plants grown on an open field with those grown on a field sheltered by a polyethylene tent, it has been possible to estimate a deposition transfer factor: DTF = Difference of the dry matter activity concentration (Bq.kg -1 ) of plant grown in open field and plants grown in tent shelter, divided by the atmospheric deposition during the vegetation period (Bq.m -2 ). The deposition transfer factor for 210 Pb thus estimated is in the order of 0.5-1.0 (m 2 .kg -1 dry matter) for leafy plants like grass and 0.1-0.5 for less leafy plant and straw. For various grains it is < 0.2 and for root fruits it is < 0.003 (m 2 .kg -1 dry matter). Corresponding values for 210 Po are about a factor 3 times higher. The world average activity concentration of 210 Po in fresh leafy vegetable is estimated to 320±190 mBq.kg -1 , and in cereals and grain products 240±80 mBq.kg -1 . The average activity concentration in milk products is 59 ± 13 mBq.kg -1 and in meat products about 70 ± 39 mBq.kg -1 . The dietary intake of milk and meat products is 170 kg.a - which is the highest of all food

  9. Transfer of Ni, Cr, Zn, Cu and 99mTc to plant biomass of Raphanus sativus L. Role of 125I-fulvic acid and the influence of different treatments on urban soil in Havana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana Romero, Jorge Luis; Diaz Velazquez, Alberto; Garcia Cespedes, Damaris; Lima Cazorla, Lazaro; Saborit Sanchez, Israel; Olivares Rieumont, Susana; Rivas, Edgar; Manduca, Michel

    2011-01-01

    The importance of studying the transfer of heavy metals from soil to plant biomass is a current scientific topic. The global economic changes have caused accelerated environmental degradation processes in urban soils, in which important amount of agricultural production is obtained. The application of 'ecological' techniques on these soils, including the use of vermicompost, is be-coming more and more extensive and common. The question is: Is always safe and pertinent to apply vermicompost to urban soils?. Hence the importance of studying the heavy metal mobility and bioavailability to plant biomass in these conditions. In the present work, using different analytical techniques, a sample of Havana urban soil is characterized by determination of ph, electrical conductivity, organic material content and the total and EDTA extractable Ni, Cr, Zn and Cu levels. Fulvic acid was extracted from vermicompost and chemically characterized as well as its ability to chelate metals. The conditional stability constant, K of the fulvic acid-copper complex at different ph values was determined (log K cond = 7.39) using size-exclusion chromatography method. The Ni, Cr, Zn and Cu transfer study was conducted using biomass of Raphanus sativus L. The result shows significative statistical agreement with proposed experimental design 2 4-1 and allowed us to recognize the significant positive influence of factors such as the addition of Cu as possible pollutant in soil, ph, addition of fulvic acid and the time of addition of fulvic acid (vermicompost) at different physiological stages of plant development in increasing the bioavailability of Cu into plant biomass studied. The application of radiochemical methods with the use of fulvic acid labeled with 99mTc and 125I respectively allowed to ratify the influence of the factors studied on the transfer of heavy metals into biomass in terms of urban soil. It was possible to determine that the fulvic acid acts as a heavy metals transporter in

  10. Theories Supporting Transfer of Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamnill, Siriporn; McLean, Gary N.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews theories about factors affecting the transfer of training, including theories on motivation (expectancy, equity, goal setting), training transfer design (identical elements, principle, near and far), and transfer climate (organizational). (Contains 36 references.) (SK)

  11. The transfer factor of dairy milk from fallout of nuclear explosions to the activity concentration in milk with respect to 137Cs and 90Sr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moere, H.

    1979-06-01

    In the 1977 UNSCEAR report a model has been used to describe the transfer of fallout from nuclear explosions to the activity in milk. Swedish data on milk was fitted to this model by regression analysis. Out data consist of regular countrywide measurements since 1962 for 137 Cs and 1966 for 90 Sr in milk. Fallout measurements of 137 Cs have been made since 1962. To get a better fit, the fallout data has been supplemented with fallout data of 90 Sr derived from data of fallout on the northern hemisphere for the years 1957 - 61. The transfer factors which describe the transfer from fallout to activity in milk were found to be for the countrywide mean values of 137 Cs 8.1 Bqyear/gK/kBq/m 2 and of 90 Sr 5.1 Bqyear/gCa/kBq/m 2 . The transfer factors for 137 Cs for Stockholm, Malmoe and Gothenburg were 5.9, 4.4 and 8.7 Bqyear/gK/kBq/m 2 . These values agree closely to the values found in a survey made by the Institute in 1972. They also seem to agree with the values from Denmark and Norway in the 1977 UNSCEAR report. (author)

  12. Effect of human vascular endothelial growth factor gene transfer on endogenous vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA expression in a rat fibroblast and osteoblast culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ru; Li, Claire H; Nauth, Aaron; McKee, Michael D; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2010-09-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in promoting angiogenesis and osteogenesis during fracture repair. Our previous studies have shown that cell-based VEGF gene therapy enhances bone healing of a rabbit tibia segmental bone defect in vivo. The aim of this project was to examine the effect of exogenous human VEGF on the endogenous rat VEGF messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in a cell-based gene transfer model. Rat fibroblasts and osteoblasts were harvested from the dermal tissue and periosteum, respectively, of Fisher 344 rats. The cells were then cultured and transfected with pcDNA-human VEGF using Superfect reagent (Qiagen). Four experimental groups were created: 1) fibroblast-VEGF; 2) osteoblast-VEGF; 3) nontransfected fibroblast controls; and 4) nontransfected osteoblast controls. The cultured cells were harvested at 1, 3, and 7 days after the gene transfection. The total mRNA was extracted (Trizol; Invitrogen); both human VEGF and rat VEGF mRNA were measured by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and quantified by VisionWorksLS. The human VEGF165 mRNA was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction from transfected fibroblasts and osteoblasts at 1, 3, and 7 days after gene transfection. The human VEGF165 levels peaked at Day 1 and then gradually reduced expression in both transfected fibroblasts and osteoblasts. Two endogenous rat VEGF isoforms were detected in this cell culture model: rat VEGF120 and rat VEGF164. We compared the rat VEGF120 and rat VEGF164 expression level of the fibroblasts or osteoblasts that were transfected with human VEGF165, with nontransfected control cells. Both the transfected fibroblasts and osteoblasts showed greater expression of rat VEGF164 than nontransfected controls at Day 1 (peak level) and Day 3, but not at Day 7. The expression of rat VEGF120 was lower in transfected fibroblasts, but higher in transfected osteoblasts, than the relevant control groups at any time point

  13. Technology Transfer Issues and a New Technology Transfer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee Jun

    2009-01-01

    The following are major issues that should be considered for efficient and effective technology transfer: conceptions of technology, technological activity and transfer, communication channels, factors affecting transfer, and models of transfer. In particular, a well-developed model of technology transfer could be used as a framework for…

  14. Relevant factors for tacit knowledge transfer within organizations: an exploratory study Fatores relevantes à transferência de conhecimento tácito em organizações: um estudo exploratório

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Lemos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge and management of such knowledge have been studied for some time now in the field of Management. However, in the 1990s, with the growth in the economy based on intangible assets, companies needed more than an unstructured approach to corporate knowledge management to succeed in this new competitive environment. Therefore, this article aims to identify, in an exploratory way, the relevant factors for tacit knowledge transfer within a major Brazilian oil company trough a case study. This study reviews the literature concerning tacit knowledge transfer within organizations, and using a quantitative approach based on exploratory factorial analysis, it collects facts in order to identify the relevant factors for tacit knowledge transfer within the organization under study. It can be said that idiosyncratic factors, the knowledge management strategy adopted by the company, and its organizational structure are the critical elements for the success of tacit knowledge transfer within the organization under analysis. Finally, three propositions arising from the results obtained are then consolidated and presented in order that they may be tested in a future explanatory study and the research limitation are unveiled.O conhecimento tem sido estudado há bastante tempo dentro da área de Gestão. Entretanto, a partir da década de 1990, com o crescimento da economia baseada em ativos intangíveis, as empresas passaram a preocupar-se com o conhecimento existente em suas organizações, assim como com o seu gerenciamento. Assim, o objetivo deste trabalho é identificar, exploratoriamente, por meio de um estudo de caso, quais são os fatores relevantes à transferência de conhecimento tácito em uma grande empresa petrolífera brasileira. A presente pesquisa analisa parte relevante da bibliografia acerca da transferência de conhecimento tácito em organiza��ões e, usando abordagem quantitativa baseada em análise fatorial exploratória, coleta

  15. A compilation of radionuclide transfer factors for the plant, meat, milk, and aquatic food pathways and the suggested default values for the RESRAD code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.Y.; Biwer, B.M.; Yu, C.

    1993-08-01

    The ongoing development and revision of the RESRAD computer code at Argonne National Laboratory requires update of radionuclide transfer factors for the plant, meat, milk, and aquatic food pathways. Default values for these transfer factors used in published radiological assessment reports are compiled and compared with values used in RESRAD. The differences among the reported default values used in different radiological assessment codes and reports are also discussed. In data comparisons, values used in more recent reports are given more weight because more recent experimental work tends to be conducted under better-defined laboratory or field conditions. A new default value is suggested for RESRAD if one of the following conditions is met: (1) values used in recent reports are an order of magnitude higher or lower than the default value currently used in RESRAD, or (2) the same default value is used in several recent radiological assessment reports.

  16. Evaluation of the gauge factor for single-walled carbon nanonets on the flexible plastic substrates by nano-transfer-printing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, C C; Chao, R M; Liu, C W; Liang, Steven Y

    2011-01-01

    Nano-transfer-printing (nTP) is increasingly used for the micro-fabrication of nanoscale materials onto flexible plastic substrates. This paper reports a nTP process for single-walled carbon nanonets (SWCNNs) for use in strain sensors. Traditional SWCNNs grown on a silicon substrate by alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition (ACCVD) can serve as strain-sensing elements in strain sensors and nano-electromechanical system (NEMS) sensors, but ACCVD is not well suited to the task. To improve SWCNN fabrication, this work deposits a parylene-C thin film on SWCNNs for transfer-printing onto flexible plastic substrates with polyimide tape. Quantification of the fabricated SWCNN strain-sensing ability (gauge factor) is performed by comparing two specimens with different pattern features and substrates. The gauge factor is measured by tensile testing. SWCNN density variations relative to the observed gauge factors are discussed. Results show that SWCNN gauge factors range from 1.46 to 8.22, depending on the substrate and pattern width. It is further observed that the gauge factor of the presented SWCNN thin film increases when the width of the SWCNN decreases to the low micro-dimensions, i.e. below 40 µm, indicating a significant scaling factor

  17. The influence of the key limiting factors on the limitations of heat transfer in heat pipes with various working fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melnyk R. S.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium and copper heat pipes with grooved and metal fibrous capillary structure are high effective heat transfer devices. They are used in different cooling systems of electronic equipment like a LED modules, microprocessors, receive-transmit modules and so on. However thus heat pipes have heat transfer limitations. There are few types of this limitations: hydraulic limitation, boiling limitation, liquid entrainment by vapor flow and sonic limitation. There is necessity to know which one of these limitations is determinant for heat pipe due to design process. At a present article calculations of maximum heat transfer ability represented. All these calculations were made for LED cooling by using heat pipes with grooved and metal fibrous capillary structures. Pentane, acetone, isobutane and water were used as a coolants. It was shown that the main operation limit for axial grooved heat pipe, which determinate maximum heat transfer ability due to inclination angle for location of cooling zone higher than evaporation zone case, is entrainment limit for pentane and acetone coolants. Nevertheless, for isobutane coolant the main limitation is a boiling limit. However, for heat pipes with metal fibrous capillary structure the main limitation is a capillary limit. This limitation was a determinant for all calculated coolants: water, pentane and acetone. For high porosity range of capillary structure, capillary limit transfer to sonic limit for heat pipes with water, that means that the vapor velocity increases to sonic velocity and can't grow any more. Due to this, coolant cant in a needed quantity infill condensation zone and the last one drained. For heat pipes with acetone and pentane, capillary limit transfer to boiling limit. All calculations were made for vapor temperature equal to 50°C, and for porosity range from 30% to 90%.

  18. Factors in the Effective Transfer of Knowledge from Multinational Enterprises to Their Foreign Subsidiaries: A Mozambican Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte Moleiro Martins, José

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to better understand the role of internal stakeholders in subsidiaries of multinational companies (MNCs) in order to offer potential insights into the cross-border transfer of knowledge from those companies' headquarters to their subsidiaries. The focus is upon subsidiaries in developing countries, here Mozambique.…

  19. In-situ biogas upgrading in thermophilic granular UASB reactor: key factors affecting the hydrogen mass transfer rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassani, Ilaria; Kougias, Panagiotis; Angelidaki, Irini

    2016-01-01

    in the biogas into CH4, via hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. The setup consisted of a granular reactor connected to a separate chamber, where H2 was injected. Different packing materials (rashig rings and alumina ceramic sponge) were tested to increase gas-liquid mass transfer. This aspect was optimized...

  20. ELEVATED CHOLESTERYL ESTER TRANSFER PROTEIN-ACTIVITY IN IDDM MEN WHO SMOKE - POSSIBLE FACTOR FOR UNFAVORABLE LIPOPROTEIN PROFILE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DULLAART, RPF; GROENER, JEM; DIKKESCHEI, BD; ERKELENS, DW; DOORENBOS, H

    Objectives: To determine the effect of cigarette smoking on the activity of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and high-density (HDL), low-density (LDL), and very-low-density (VLDL) lipoproteins in insulin-dependent diabetic (IDDM) men with microvascular complications. Research Design and

  1. Factors Affecting Transfer of Pyrethroid Residues from Herbal Teas to Infusion and Influence of Physicochemical Properties of Pesticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Jing Xiao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of pesticide residues from herbal teas to their infusion is a subject of particular interest. In this study, a multi-residue analytical method for the determination of pyrethroids (fenpropathrin, beta-cypermethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, and fenvalerate in honeysuckle, chrysanthemum, wolfberry, and licorice and their infusion samples was validated. The transfer of pyrethroid residues from tea to infusion was investigated at different water temperatures, tea/water ratios, and infusion intervals/times. The results show that low amounts (0–6.70% of pyrethroids were transferred under the different tea brewing conditions examined, indicating that the infusion process reduced the pyrethroid content in the extracted liquid by over 90%. Similar results were obtained for the different tea varieties, and pesticides with high water solubility and low octanol–water partition coefficients (log Kow exhibited high transfer rates. Moreover, the estimated values of the exposure risk to the pyrethroids were in the range of 0.0022–0.33, indicating that the daily intake of the four pyrethroid residues from herbal tea can be regarded as safe. The present results can support the identification of suitable tea brewing conditions for significantly reducing the pesticide residue levels in the infusion.

  2. TRANSFERENCE BEFORE TRANSFERENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaminio, Vincenzo

    2017-10-01

    This paper is predominantly a clinical presentation that describes the transmigration of one patient's transference to another, with the analyst functioning as a sort of transponder. It involves an apparently accidental episode in which there was an unconscious intersection between two patients. The author's aim is to show how transference from one case may affect transference in another, a phenomenon the author calls transference before transference. The author believes that this idea may serve as a tool for understanding the unconscious work that takes place in the clinical situation. In a clinical example, the analyst finds himself caught up in an enactment involving two patients in which he becomes the medium of what happens in session. © 2017 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  3. Variability of 137Cs and 40K soil-to-fruit transfer factor in tropical lemon trees during the fruit development period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasco, H.; Cid, A.S.; Anjos, R.M.; Zamboni, C.B.; Rizzotto, M.; Valladares, D.L.; Juri Ayub, J.

    2012-01-01

    In this investigation we evaluate the soil uptake of 137 Cs and 40 K by tropical plants and their consequent translocation to fruits, by calculating the soil-to-fruit transfer factors defined as F v = [concentration of radionuclide in fruit (Bq kg −1 dry mass)/concentration of radionuclide in soil (Bq kg −1 dry mass in upper 20 cm)]. In order to obtain F v values, the accumulation of these radionuclides in fruits of lemon trees (Citrus limon B.) during the fruit growth was measured. A mathematical model was calibrated from the experimental data allowing simulating the incorporation process of these radionuclides by fruits. Although the fruit incorporates a lot more potassium than cesium, both radionuclides present similar absorption patterns during the entire growth period. F v ranged from 0.54 to 1.02 for 40 K and from 0.02 to 0.06 for 137 Cs. Maximum F v values are reached at the initial time of fruit growth and decrease as the fruit develops, being lowest at the maturation period. As a result of applying the model a decreasing exponential function is derived for F v as time increases. The agreement between the theoretical approach and the experimental values is satisfactory. - Highlights: ► We assessed the transfer of 137 Cs and 40 K from soil to fruits in tropical plants. ► A mathematical model was developed to describe the dry mass growth of lemon fruits. ► The transfer factors ranged from 0.54 to 1.02 for 40 K and from 0.02 to 0.06 for 137 Cs. ► Maximum values of transfer factors were reached in the initial phase of fruit growth. ► The agreement between the theoretical and the experimental results was satisfactory.

  4. Evaluation of food chain transfer data for use in accident consequence assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughtrey, P.J.; Kirton, J.A.; Mitchell, N.G.

    1991-01-01

    Input data for the food chain transport component of radiological assessment models are summarised in the context of the sources of information available prior to the Chernobyl accident and those derived after the accident. Particular attention is devoted to interception and retention soil-to-plant, and plant-to-animal transfer, and to the applicability of environmental data to both equilibrium and time-dependent models. It is argued that much of the current uncertainty in parameter values for use in radiological assessment models reflects lack of understanding of processes involved in the various stages of transfer of radionuclides to man. The Chernobyl accident highlighted this lack of fundamental knowledge and illustrated a number of areas where further research and model development is justified. These areas are identified and suggestions given for appropriate research to support model development

  5. Experimental investigation of heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of thermosyphon solar water heater system fitted with spacer at the trailing edge of Left-Right twisted tapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaisankar, S.; Radhakrishnan, T.K.; Sheeba, K.N.; Suresh, S.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental investigation of heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of thermosyphon solar water heater with full length Left-Right twist, twist fitted with rod and spacer at the trailing edge for lengths of 100, 200 and 300 mm for twist ratio 3 and 5 has been studied. The experimental data for plain tube collector has been compared with fundamental equation within a discrepancy of ±7.41% and ±14.97% for Nusselt number and friction factor, respectively. Result shows that the Nusselt number decreases by 11% and 19% for twist fitted with rod and twist with spacer, respectively, when compared with full length twist. Friction factor also decreases by 18% and 29% for twist fitted with rod and spacer, respectively, as compared with full length twist. The heat enhancement in twist fitted with rod at the trailing edge is maximum when compared with twist fitted with spacer because the swirl flow is maintained throughout the length of rod.

  6. Experimental determination of average turbulent heat transfer and friction factor in stator internal rib-roughened cooling channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, L; Baggio, P

    2001-05-01

    In gas turbine cooling design, techniques for heat extraction from the surfaces exposed to the hot stream are based on the increase of the inner heat transfer areas and on the promotion of the turbulence of the cooling flow. This is currently obtained by casting periodic ribs on one or more sides of the serpentine passages into the core of the blade. Fluid dynamic and thermal behaviour of the cooling flow have been extensively investigated by means of experimental facilities and many papers dealing with this subject have appeared in the latest years. The evaluation of the average value of the heat transfer coefficient most of the time is inferred from local measurements obtained by various experimental techniques. Moreover the great majority of these studies are not concerned with the overall average heat transfer coefficient for the combined ribs and region between them, but do focus just on one of them. This paper presents an attempt to collect information about the average Nusselt number inside a straight ribbed duct. Series of measurements have been performed in steady state eliminating the error sources inherently connected with transient methods. A low speed wind tunnel, operating in steady state flow, has been built to simulate the actual flow condition occurring in a rectilinear blade cooling channel. A straight square channel with 20 transverse ribs on two sides has been tested for Re of about 3 x 10(4), 4.5 x 10(4) and 6 x 10(4). The ribbed wall test section is electrically heated and the heat removed by a stationary flow of known thermal and fluid dynamic characteristics.

  7. Spectroscopic factors measurement of the five first energy levels of lead 208 nucleus using the 208Pb(e,e'p207Tl* huge pulse transfer reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medaglia, R.

    1999-08-01

    In this work, the spectral functions and the spectroscopic factors of the first five energy levels of the lead 208 nucleus have been measured using the 208 Pb(e,e'p) 207 Tl * reaction. The aim is to characterize the effect of the nuclear environment on pulse and energy distributions of protons. In order to minimize the ejected proton-residual nucleus interactions in the final state, the measurement has been performed at 750 and 570 MeV/c pulse transfers, and thus for proton kinetic energies of 263 MeV and 161 MeV, contrarily to a previous measurement performed at 100 MeV. A kinematics with a transverse electromagnetic coupling, instead of a longitudinal one, has been used because of the important coupling dependence observed for medium nuclei. The experiment has been carried out at the NIKHEF electron accelerator and smoothing ring. The pulse distributions of the first five energy levels for a proton pulse range of 0 to 300 MeV/c have been extracted from the (e,e'p) cross sections. An integration of model-dependent distributions gives the spectroscopic factors which indicate the number of protons of each level. These data rae compared to models that include both the proton interactions in the final state and the coulomb distortions. The Pavie model reproduces well the observed distributions and the transfer dependence, while the Ohio model does not. The spectroscopic factors obtained with the Pavie model are the same for both transfers and are 20% higher as an average than the previous experiment performed at 450 MeV/c. However, they are 30% below the shell model. The uncertain estimation of the reaction mechanisms does not allow to consider this reduction as being due exclusively to nuclear structure effects. (J.S.)

  8. Magnetic Field Emission Comparison at Different Quality Factors with Series-Parallel Compensation Network for Wireless Power Transfer to Vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batra, Tushar; Schaltz, Erik

    2014-01-01

    to the surroundings also increase with increase in the quality factor. In this paper, first analytical expressions are developed for comparing magnetic emissions at different quality factors. Theoretical and simulation (Comsol) results show comparatively lower increase for the magnetic field emissions to the linear...

  9. In-situ biogas upgrading in thermophilic granular UASB reactor: key factors affecting the hydrogen mass transfer rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassani, Ilaria; Kougias, Panagiotis G; Angelidaki, Irini

    2016-12-01

    Biological biogas upgrading coupling CO 2 with external H 2 to form biomethane opens new avenues for sustainable biofuel production. For developing this technology, efficient H 2 to liquid transfer is fundamental. This study proposes an innovative setup for in-situ biogas upgrading converting the CO 2 in the biogas into CH 4 , via hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. The setup consisted of a granular reactor connected to a separate chamber, where H 2 was injected. Different packing materials (rashig rings and alumina ceramic sponge) were tested to increase gas-liquid mass transfer. This aspect was optimized by liquid and gas recirculation and chamber configuration. It was shown that by distributing H 2 through a metallic diffuser followed by ceramic sponge in a separate chamber, having a volume of 25% of the reactor, and by applying a mild gas recirculation, CO 2 content in the biogas dropped from 42 to 10% and the final biogas was upgraded from 58 to 82% CH 4 content. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Naturally occurring radionuclides transfer factor on aquatic flora and fauna in Nagarjuna Sagar Dam near proposed uranium mining site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arunachalam, Kantha Deivi

    2015-04-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive element can be found in low levels within all rock, soil, and water. The present work aims to understand the transfer of naturally occurring radionuclides in different compartments of environment reflecting its behaviour in different tropic levels. The understanding and evaluation of the possible interactions of various naturally occurring radionuclides were done in the world's third largest man-made dam, Nagarjuna Sagar, built on river Krishna located in Andhra Pradesh, India. The naturally occurring radionuclides such as Uranium ( 238 U), Polonium ( 210 Po), Radium ( 226 Ra), and Lead ( 210 Pb) were analyzed in different matrices (i.e) sediment, water, and fish. The measurement of the naturally occurring radionuclides in the environment can be used as a reference baseline for long-term monitoring in the entire aquatic ecosystem

  11. Lipid-mediated glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene transfer to cultured porcine ventral mesencephalic tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Matthias; Meyer, Morten; Brevig, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Transplantation of dopaminergic ventral mesencephalic (VM) tissue into the basal ganglia of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) shows at best moderate symptomatic relief in some of the treated cases. Experimental animal studies and clinical trials with allogenic and xenogenic pig-derived VM...... tissue grafts to PD patients indicate that one reason for the poor outcome of neural transplantation is the low survival and differentiation of grafted dopaminergic neurons. To improve dopaminergic cell survival through a gene-therapeutic approach we have established and report here results of lipid-mediated...... numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons in the cultured VM tissue. We conclude that lipid-mediated gene transfer employed on embryonic pig VM explant cultures is a safe and effective method to improve survival of dopaminergic neurons and may become a valuable tool to improve allo...

  12. Relação entre características empresariais e fatores da transferência de conhecimentos entre projetos de produto The relationship between company characteristics and influence factors of the inter-product project knowledge transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Germán Frank

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta uma análise das relações existentes entre as características das empresas e a importância que estas atribuem aos fatores que influenciam na transferência de conhecimentos (TC entre projetos de produtos. A análise é baseada num levantamento (survey realizado com 58 empresas no Brasil. As características estudadas foram: (i tamanho da empresa; (ii tamanho da equipe de projetos; (iii localização das equipes; (iv número de projetos simultâneos; (v tempo de duração dos projetos; (vi grau de inovação; e (vii complexidade dos projetos. Através de uma análise de aglomerados, foi identificado que as características (ii, (iv e (vii são significativas na determinação das importâncias atribuídas aos fatores da TC. Os resultados apontam que as empresas que possuem um perfil de gestão mais complexo enfatizam os fatores de influência pertencentes ao ambiente externo. Já empresas com um perfil de gestão mais simples atribuem maior importância aos fatores internos da empresa.This paper presents an analysis of the relationship between company characteristics and the importance that companies attribute to the main factors that have influence on inter-product project knowledge transfer (KT. The analysis was based on a survey carried out on a sample of 58 companies that operate in Brazil. The studied characteristics of the companies were: (i company size; (ii project team size; (iii team localization; (iv number of concurrent projects; (v project duration; (vi project innovation and (vii project complexity. It was possible to identify, using a cluster analysis, that project team size; number of concurrent projects and project complexity are statistically significant regarding the determination of attributed importance for the KT influence factors. The results revealed that companies that have a more complex management profile are more interested in influence factors of the external environment. On the other hand

  13. Development of a method for analyzing traces of ruthenium in plant materials and determination of the transfer factors soil/plant for ruthenium compounds from reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasius, E.; Huth, R.; Neumann, W.

    1988-01-01

    In an artificial humous and sandy soil spiked with 106 Ru as RuO 2 and RuCl 3 , pasture grass was grown under artificial illumination in our laboratory. The amounts of ruthenium taken up by the plants were determined by γ-spectrometry. For open-air investigations with pasture grass, wheat and potatoes inactive ruthenium(III) chloride and ruthenium nitrosylchloride were used. Ruthenium was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) after destroying the organic material and concentrating the solution. The concentration and chemical form of the ruthenium exert an unimportant influence on the transfer factor. For the pasture-grass, the stems of wheat and the weed of potatoes it amounts to 0.00005 to 0.0015, for the ear of wheat to about 0.00005. In peeled potatoes there was no ruthenium detectable, therefore the limit of detection leads to a transfer factor ≤ 0.00001. So it is evident that ruthenium is little available for the roots of the plants. In the event of an accident in a nuclear plant the uptake of radioactive ruthenium by roots has only negligible radioecological consequences. This applies even if 50 years of ruthenium enrichment in the soil are assumed. (orig./RB)

  14. A comparative study of transfer factors of water, iodine and strontium on rye-grass and clover. Development of a model of evaluation of the limits of foliar contamination by wet deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeletti, Livio; Levi, Emilio.

    1977-07-01

    Transfer factors of water, iodine ( 131 I) and strontium ( 85 Sr) on above-ground parts of rye-grass and clover were determined as a function of aspersion intensities. An analysis of the results showed the effect of aspersion intensities, nature of the chemical element and plant species on the values of transfer factors of iodine and strontium. It also made it possible to propose a simple method of evaluation of contamination limits of the aerial parts of plants by wet deposit, based on transfer values of water on plants only [fr

  15. Excitation and charge transfer in He/sup +/ + H collisions. A molecular approach including two-electron translation factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1983-06-01

    In a previous paper we have pointed out that the common-translation-factor (CTF) method is the only one which, at present, and within the framework of the molecular model of atomic collisions, can be shown to be both convergent and computationally fast, even for many-electron systems. In this Communication we check that this second statement is correct, presenting, for the first time, a molecular calculation involving two-electron translation factors, for He/sup +/ + H collisions. A careful study of the sensitivity of the calculated cross sections to the choice of the CTF is performed, and conclusions on that sensitivity are drawn, for several types of processes.

  16. Excitation and charge transfer in He+ + H collisions. A molecular approach including two-electron translation factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1983-01-01

    In a previous paper we have pointed out that the common-translation-factor (CTF) method is the only one which, at present, and within the framework of the molecular model of atomic collisions, can be shown to be both convergent and computationally fast, even for many-electron systems. In this Communication we check that this second statement is correct, presenting, for the first time, a molecular calculation involving two-electron translation factors, for He + + H collisions. A careful study of the sensitivity of the calculated cross sections to the choice of the CTF is performed, and conclusions on that sensitivity are drawn, for several types of processes

  17. Effect of ferrite addition above the base ferrite on the coupling factor of wireless power transfer for vehicle applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batra, Tushar; Schaltz, Erik; Ahn, Seungyoung

    2015-01-01

    and reduce magnetic emissions to the surroundings. Effect of adding extra ferrite above the base ferrite at different physical locations on the self-inductance, mutual inductance and coupling factor is under investigation in this paper. The addition can increase or decrease the mutual inductance depending...

  18. Stimulation of chondrocytes in vitro by gene transfer with plasmids coding for epidermal growth factor (hEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, H; Mehlhorn, A T; Zwingmann, J

    2005-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) influence critical characteristics of chondrocytes. The effects on metabolism and differentiation were evaluated following transfection using specific plasmids coding for both cytokines. Chondrocytes were isolated from...... of recombinant hEGF and bFGF resulted in a significant increase in cell proliferation and glucosaminoglycan production. Chondrocytes were transfected with vectors coding for either hEGF or bFGF and the production of these proteins was measured in supernatants by ELISA. Expression kinetics showed different...... patterns: hEGF was detectable 2.5 days following transfection and peaked at day 5.5, whereas bFGF-production reached its maximum 1.5 days after transfection, declining thereafter. Chondrocytes endogenously produced significant amounts of bFGF within 5 days following isolation. Proliferation of h...

  19. A Measurement of the neutron electric form factor at very large momentum transfer using polaried electrions scattering from a polarized helium-3 target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelleher, Aidan [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Knowledge of the electric and magnetic elastic form factors of the nucleon is essential for an understanding of nucleon structure. Of the form factors, the electric form factor of the neutron has been measured over the smallest range in Q2 and with the lowest precision. Jefferson Lab experiment 02-013 used a novel new polarized 3 He target to nearly double the range of momentum transfer in which the neutron form factor has been studied and to measure it with much higher precision. Polarized electrons were scattered off this target, and both the scattered electron and neutron were detected. Gn E was measured to be 0.0242 ± 0.0020(stat) ± 0.0061(sys) and 0.0247 ± 0.0029(stat) ± 0.0031(sys) at Q2 = 1.7 and 2.5 GeV2 , respectively.

  20. Geometric radiation exchange factors for axial radiative transfer in an LWR core filled with absorbing-emitting gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, S.H.; Cho, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    A reactor core filled with an emitting-absorbing mixture (like steam, hydrogen gas and fission gases) is considered. Analysis is provided to evaluate axial radiative heat exchange of a rod bundle with a nonuniform axial temperature distribution. The necessary radiation exchange shape factors (geometric mean absorptance, emittance and transmittance) between segments of the complex rod bundle arrangement are presented. They are applicable to arbitrary sizes of segments, well suited for numerical computations

  1. Efectos adversos asociados al tratamiento con factor de transferencia: Ciudad de La Habana, 2004 Adverse drug effects associated to the treatment of patients with transfer factor: City of Havana , 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Aida Cruz Barrios

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available El factor de transferencia (Hebertrans constituye un inmunoestimulante que se emplea en una amplia gama de enfermedades. Su seguridad ha sido evaluada en los ensayos clínicos pre-registro, pero no así en investigaciones poscomercialización, por tal motivo se realizó un estudio observacional y multicéntrico de vigilancia activa, en pacientes tratados con factor de transferencia en 11 hospitales de la Ciudad de La Habana , para identificar los eventos presentados durante el tratamiento, así como clasificarlos según su causalidad y gravedad. La información fue recogida por el médico inmunólogo de cada hospital y supervisada por el farmacoepidemiólogo hospitalario. Durante el tratamiento se obtuvo información de 387 pacientes y se reportaron 133 eventos en 86 casos (22,2 %. Los más frecuentes fueron fiebre, dolor y eritema en el sitio de la inyección, cefalea y diarrea; el 92,5 % de los eventos observados fueron leves. El 27,8 % se clasificó como definitivamente provocados por el fármaco, estos últimos relacionados con la vía de administración. El factor de transferencia resultó un medicamento seguro en los pacientes observadosTransfer factor called Hebertrans is an immunostimulant used in a wide range of diseases. The safety of this drug has been assessed in several clinical assays prior to registration, but not in aftermarket research studies. Therefore, a multicenter observational study of active surveillance was carried out in patients treated with transfer factor in 11 hospitals located in the City of Havana to detect adverse events in the course of treatment, and then to classify them by cause and severity. Data was collected by the immunologist in each hospital and supervised by the pharmacological epidemiologist. During the treatment, information was gathered from 387 patients where 133 events were reported in 86 cases (22,2%. The most frequent were fever, pain, erythema at the site of injection, headache and diarrhea; 92

  2. Migration and transfer of transuranium elements (Pu, Am) and longliving fission products (Sr, Ru, Sb, Cs, Ce, Eu) in natural forest ecosystems of the 30-km-zone around Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lux, D.; Kammerer, L.; Simko, M.; Hiersche, L.; Wirth, E.

    1993-01-01

    In the framework of the C.E.C. research project ECP-5 entitled ''The behaviour of radionuclides in natural and semi-natural ecosystems'' our institute carried out investigations on selected sites of forest ecosystems in the 30-km-zone of Chernobyl in cooperation with research instituts of the C.I.S. states Russia and Ukraine. Our research is concentrated on the transfer of radionuclides from soil to plants of the understorey, especially species of farns and berries, as this plants take up their nutrients mainly from the upper organic horizons. (orig.) [de

  3. Factors affecting nursing staff use of a communication tool to reduce potentially preventable acute care transfers in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Stephanie A; Peretti, Matteo; Lungu, Ovidiu; Voyer, Philippe; Tabamo, Fruan; Alfonso, Linda; Cetin-Sahin, Deniz; Johnson, Sarasa M A; Wilchesky, Machelle

    Although specialized communication tools can effectively reduce acute care transfers, few studies have assessed the factors that may influence the use of such tools by nursing staff at the individual level. We evaluated the associations between years of experience, tool-related training, nursing attitudes, and intensity of use of a communication tool developed to reduce transfers in a long-term care facility. We employed a mixed methods design using data from medical charts, electronic records, and semi-structured interviews. Experienced nurses used the tool significantly less than inexperienced nurses, and training had a significant positive impact on tool use. Nurses found the purpose of the tool to be confusing. No significant differences in attitude were observed based on years of experience or intensity of use. Project findings indicate that focused efforts to enrich training may increase intervention adherence. Experienced nurses in particular should be made aware of the benefits of utilizing communication tools. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative genomics reveals cotton-specific virulence factors in flexible genomic regions in Verticillium dahliae and evidence of horizontal gene transfer from Fusarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie-Yin; Liu, Chun; Gui, Yue-Jing; Si, Kai-Wei; Zhang, Dan-Dan; Wang, Jie; Short, Dylan P G; Huang, Jin-Qun; Li, Nan-Yang; Liang, Yong; Zhang, Wen-Qi; Yang, Lin; Ma, Xue-Feng; Li, Ting-Gang; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Bao-Li; Bao, Yu-Ming; Subbarao, Krishna V; Zhang, Geng-Yun; Dai, Xiao-Feng

    2018-01-01

    Verticillium dahliae isolates are most virulent on the host from which they were originally isolated. Mechanisms underlying these dominant host adaptations are currently unknown. We sequenced the genome of V. dahliae Vd991, which is highly virulent on its original host, cotton, and performed comparisons with the reference genomes of JR2 (from tomato) and VdLs.17 (from lettuce). Pathogenicity-related factor prediction, orthology and multigene family classification, transcriptome analyses, phylogenetic analyses, and pathogenicity experiments were performed. The Vd991 genome harbored several exclusive, lineage-specific (LS) genes within LS regions (LSRs). Deletion mutants of the seven genes within one LSR (G-LSR2) in Vd991 were less virulent only on cotton. Integration of G-LSR2 genes individually into JR2 and VdLs.17 resulted in significantly enhanced virulence on cotton but did not affect virulence on tomato or lettuce. Transcription levels of the seven LS genes in Vd991 were higher during the early stages of cotton infection, as compared with other hosts. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that G-LSR2 was acquired from Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum through horizontal gene transfer. Our results provide evidence that horizontal gene transfer from Fusarium to Vd991 contributed significantly to its adaptation to cotton and may represent a significant mechanism in the evolution of an asexual plant pathogen. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Improvement of heart function in postinfarct heart failure swine models after hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer: comparison of low-, medium- and high-dose groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-jian; Chen, Bo; Sheng, Zhang; Zhang, Ding-guo; Jia, En-zhi; Wang, Wei; Ma, Dong-chao; Zhu, Tie-bing; Wang, Lian-sheng; Li, Chun-jian; Wang, Hui; Cao, Ke-jiang; Ma, Wen-zhu

    2010-04-01

    Despite advances in surgical and reperfusion therapy, there is no effective therapy currently exists to prevent the progressive decline in cardiac function following myocardial infarction. Hepatocyte growth factor has potent angiogenic and anti-apoptotic activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effect and dose-effect relationship on postinfarction heart failure with different doses of adenovirus-mediated human hepatocyte growth factor (Ad(5)-HGF) transference in swine models. Totally twenty swine were randomly divided into four groups: (a) control group (null- Ad(5), 1 ml); (b) low-dose group (1 x 10(9) Pfu/ml Ad(5)-HGF, 1 ml); (c) medium-dose group (5 x 10(9) Pfu/ml Ad(5)-HGF, 1 ml); (d) high-dose group (1 x 10(10) Pfu/ml Ad(5)-HGF, 1 ml). Four weeks after left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) ligation, different doses of Ad(5)-HGF were transferred in three therapeutic groups via right coronary artery. Four and seven weeks after LAD ligation, gate cardiac perfusion imaging was performed to evaluate cardiac perfusion and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Seven weeks after surgery, the apoptotic index of cardiocyte was observed by TUNEL, the expression of Bcl-2, Bax, alpha-SMA and Factor VIII in the border zones were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, respectively. Four weeks after myocardial infarction, no significant difference was observed among four groups. Three weeks after Ad(5)-HGF transfer, the improvement of cardiac perfusion and LVEF was obviously observed, especially after 1 x 10(10) Pfu Ad(5)-HGF transfer. TUNEL assay showed that 5 x 10(9) Pfu and 1 x 10(10) Pfu Ad(5)-HGF treatment had a obvious reduction in the apoptotic index compared with the null-Ad(5) group, especially after 1 x 10(10) Pfu Ad(5)-HGF treatment. The expression of Bcl-2 protein was increased and the expression of Bax protein was inhibited in the 5 x 10(9) Pfu and 1 x 10(10) Pfu Ad(5)-HGF groups compared with the null-Ad(5) group. The vessel

  6. Determination of transfer factors and effective half-times in several domestic animals for cesium 137 from the Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrich, E.; Schoener, W.

    1987-01-01

    In the wake of the Chernobyl accident contaminated fodder-hey and grass has been fed to cows, bulls, calves, lambs and swine (fed with whey). The problem was to decide if or not the animals could be slaughtered with confidence that their meat had contaminations below the legal limits. On the one hand, transfer factors fodder-to-meat and fodder-to-milk as well as the efficiency of radioactivity reducing additives had to be determined. On the other hand the correlation of live-animals measurements with the meat contamination was investigated. The correlation was satisfactory except with swine. The high-resolution Ge detectors have strong advantages as compared to Na detectors, though too expensive for general applications in slaughter-houses. 10 refs., 14 figs., 12 tabs. (qui)

  7. Long-term correction of canine hemophilia B by gene transfer of blood coagulation factor IX mediated by adeno-associated viral vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, R W; Yang, E Y; Couto, L B; Hagstrom, J N; Elwell, D; Fields, P A; Burton, M; Bellinger, D A; Read, M S; Brinkhous, K M; Podsakoff, G M; Nichols, T C; Kurtzman, G J; High, K A

    1999-01-01

    Hemophilia B is a severe X-linked bleeding diathesis caused by the absence of functional blood coagulation factor IX, and is an excellent candidate for treatment of a genetic disease by gene therapy. Using an adeno-associated viral vector, we demonstrate sustained expression (>17 months) of factor IX in a large-animal model at levels that would have a therapeutic effect in humans (up to 70 ng/ml, adequate to achieve phenotypic correction, in an animal injected with 8.5x10(12) vector particles/kg). The five hemophilia B dogs treated showed stable, vector dose-dependent partial correction of the whole blood clotting time and, at higher doses, of the activated partial thromboplastin time. In contrast to other viral gene delivery systems, this minimally invasive procedure, consisting of a series of percutaneous intramuscular injections at a single timepoint, was not associated with local or systemic toxicity. Efficient gene transfer to muscle was shown by immunofluorescence staining and DNA analysis of biopsied tissue. Immune responses against factor IX were either absent or transient. These data provide strong support for the feasibility of the approach for therapy of human subjects.

  8. An adeno-associated virus-based intracellular sensor of pathological nuclear factor-κB activation for disease-inducible gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelwahed Chtarto

    Full Text Available Stimulation of resident cells by NF-κB activating cytokines is a central element of inflammatory and degenerative disorders of the central nervous system (CNS. This disease-mediated NF-κB activation could be used to drive transgene expression selectively in affected cells, using adeno-associated virus (AAV-mediated gene transfer. We have constructed a series of AAV vectors expressing GFP under the control of different promoters including NF-κB -responsive elements. As an initial screen, the vectors were tested in vitro in HEK-293T cells treated with TNF-α. The best profile of GFP induction was obtained with a promoter containing two blocks of four NF-κB -responsive sequences from the human JCV neurotropic polyoma virus promoter, fused to a new tight minimal CMV promoter, optimally distant from each other. A therapeutical gene, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF cDNA under the control of serotype 1-encapsidated NF-κB -responsive AAV vector (AAV-NF was protective in senescent cultures of mouse cortical neurons. AAV-NF was then evaluated in vivo in the kainic acid (KA-induced status epilepticus rat model for temporal lobe epilepsy, a major neurological disorder with a central pathophysiological role for NF-κB activation. We demonstrate that AAV-NF, injected in the hippocampus, responded to disease induction by mediating GFP expression, preferentially in CA1 and CA3 neurons and astrocytes, specifically in regions where inflammatory markers were also induced. Altogether, these data demonstrate the feasibility to use disease-activated transcription factor-responsive elements in order to drive transgene expression specifically in affected cells in inflammatory CNS disorders using AAV-mediated gene transfer.

  9. Enhancement of innate immune system in monocot rice by transferring the dicotyledonous elongation factor Tu receptor EFR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fen Lu; Huiqin Wang; Shanzhi Wang; Wendi Jiang; Changlin Shan; Bin Li; Jun Yang; Shiyong Zhang; Wenxian Sun

    2015-01-01

    The elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) receptor (EFR) in cruciferous plants specifical y recognizes the N-terminal acetylated elf18 region of bacterial EF-Tu and thereby activates plant immunity. It has been demonstrated that Arabidopsis EFR confers broad-spectrum bacterial resistance in the EFR transgenic solanaceous plants. Here, the transgenic rice plants (Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica cv. Zhonghua 17) and cel cultures with constitutive expression of AtEFR were developed to investigate whether AtEFR senses EF-Tu and thus enhances bacterial resistance in the monocot plants. We demonstrated that the Xanthomonas oryzae-derived elf18 peptide induced oxidative burst and mitogen-activated protein kinase activa-tion in the AtEFR transgenic rice cel s and plants, respectively. Pathogenesis-related genes, such as OsPBZ1, were upregulated dramatical y in transgenic rice plant and cel lines in response to elf18 stimulation. Importantly, pretreatment with elf18 trig-gered strong resistance to X. oryzae pv. oryzae in the transgenic plants, which was largely dependent on the AtEFR expression level. These plants also exhibited enhanced resistance to rice bacterial brown stripe, but not to rice fungal blast. Col ectively, the results indicate that the rice plants with heterologous expression of AtEFR recognize bacterial EF-Tu and exhibit enhanced broad-spectrum bacterial disease resistance and that pattern recognition receptor-mediated immunity may be manipulated across the two plant classes, dicots and monocots.

  10. Sub-Coulomb α Transfers on C12 and the C12(α, γ)O16 S Factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brune, C. R.; Geist, W. H.; Kavanagh, R. W.; Veal, K. D.

    1999-01-01

    The 12 C( α, γ) 16 O reaction is crucial for the understanding of He burning in massive stars, but the low-energy cross section is highly uncertain. To address this problem we have measured at sub-Coulomb energies total cross sections for the 12 C( 6 Li, d) 16 O and 12 C( 7 Li, t) 16 O reactions to the bound 2 + and 1 - states of 16 O . The data are analyzed to obtain the reduced α widths of these states. Together with capture and phase-shift data, these results provide for a more accurate determination of the low-energy 12C(α, γ) 16 O S factor: S E1 (0.3 MeV) =101±17 keV b and S E2 (0.3 MeV) =42 +16 -23 keV b for the E1 and E2 multipole components of the reaction. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society

  11. HARDWARE ENVIRONMENT FACTOR FOR CONTROL SIGNAL TRANSFER TO A PLANT IN THE SYNTHESIS PROBLEM OF DISCRETE SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Nuyya

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper attempts to revise certain provisions of the existing theory of discrete systems in the organization of hardware environment control signal transmission to a technical plant. It is known that the formation of a digital signal in discrete control problem of continuous plant is carried out by microcontroller or micro-computer and is represented by a parallel code, which dimension is determined by the hardware used. The parallel code for a digital clock cycle of the designed system is transmitted to the terminal device of a technical continuous plant, where the digital-to-analog conversion takes place. This kind of control signal transmission to the technical plant asserts its implementation by means of parallel buses. It is known that the length of a parallel bus is limited to an amount not exceeding half a meter due to the existing interference environment with modern standards of length. Thus, if the placement of the control signal and control plant is such that their connecting bus length exceeds more than half a meter, there is the inevitable transition from the parallel control signal to an allotted serial. The paper deals with the system factors arising in the transition from the parallel control signal to the serial by modern interfaces. Provisions of the paper are illustrated by an example. This paper is intended for system analytics and channel specialists. The resulting algorithm is applicable for control of plants (electric drive, in particular in the large industrial factories.

  12. Transfer coefficients to terrestrial food products in equilibrium assessment models for nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zach, R.

    1980-09-01

    Transfer coefficients have become virtually indispensible in the study of the fate of radioisotopes released from nuclear installations. These coefficients are used in equilibrium assessment models where they specify the degree of transfer in food chains of individual radioisotopes from soil to plant products and from feed or forage and drinking water to animal products and ultimately to man. Information on transfer coefficients for terrestrial food chain models is very piecemeal and occurs in a wide variety of journals and reports. To enable us to choose or determine suitable values for assessments, we have addressed the following aspects of transfer coefficients on a very broad scale: (1) definitions, (2) equilibrium assumption, which stipulates that transfer coefficients be restricted to equilibrium or steady rate conditions, (3) assumption of linearity, that is the idea that radioisotope concentrations in food products increase linearly with contamination levels in the soil or animal feed, (4) methods of determination, (5) variability, (6) generic versus site-specific values, (7) statistical aspects, (8) use, (9) sources of currently used values, (10) criteria for revising values, (11) establishment and maintenance of files on transfer coefficients, and (12) future developments. (auth)

  13. Measurement of the magnetic neutron form factor at a four-momentum transfer of Q2 = 0.255 (GeV/c)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reike, H.

    1993-12-01

    The Electron Stretcher Accelerator ELSA of Bonn University delivers an external electron beam with a duty factor of up to 55%. Thus nonmagnetic detectors can be used to perform electron nucleon coincidence experiments with high precision. The magnetic form factor of the neutron G m n is determined by the so-called ratio method, i.e. G m n is extracted from the measured ratio of the cross sections of the d(e,e'n) and d(e,e'p) reactions in a region of quasi-free kinematics. Protons and neutrons are detected simultaneously in the same scintillation counter, so many systematic errors cancel out. The neutron detection efficiency is measured in situ by the associated particle method using the p(γ,π + n) reaction. For this reaction the high energy part of the photons produced by the electron beam in the target is used. The value of G m n found at a four momentum transfer of Q 2 = 0.255 (GeV/c) 2 is (10.1 ± 3.8)% higher than the dipole value. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of passively transferred antibodies in bighorn and domestic lambs reveals one factor in differential susceptibility of these species to Mannheimia haemolytica-induced pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Caroline N; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Knowles, Donald P; Call, Douglas R; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2011-07-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica consistently causes fatal bronchopneumonia in bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis) under natural and experimental conditions. Leukotoxin is the primary virulence factor of this organism. BHS are more susceptible to developing fatal pneumonia than the related species Ovis aries (domestic sheep [DS]). In BHS herds affected by pneumonia, lamb recruitment is severely impaired for years subsequent to an outbreak. We hypothesized that a lack of maternally derived antibodies (Abs) against M. haemolytica provides an immunologic basis for enhanced susceptibility of BH lambs to population-limiting pneumonia. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the titers of Abs directed against M. haemolytica in the sera of BH and domestic lambs at birth through 12 weeks of age. Results revealed that BH lambs had approximately 18-fold lower titers of Ab against surface antigens of M. haemolytica and approximately 20-fold lower titers of leukotoxin-neutralizing Abs than domestic lambs. The titers of leukotoxin-neutralizing Abs in the serum and colostrum samples of BH ewes were approximately 157- and 50-fold lower than those for domestic ewes, respectively. Comparatively, the higher titers of parainfluenza 3 virus-neutralizing Abs in the BH lambs ruled out the possibility that these BHS had an impaired ability to passively transfer Abs to their lambs. These results suggest that lower levels of leukotoxin-neutralizing Abs in the sera of BH ewes, and resultant low Ab titers in their lambs, may be a critical factor in the poor lamb recruitment in herds affected by pneumonia.

  15. Sites involved in intra- and interdomain allostery associated with the activation of factor VIIa pinpointed by hydrogen-deuterium exchange and electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongjian; Olsen, Ole H; Persson, Egon; Rand, Kasper D

    2014-12-19

    Factor VIIa (FVIIa) is a trypsin-like protease that plays an important role in initiating blood coagulation. Very limited structural information is available for the free, inactive form of FVIIa that circulates in the blood prior to vascular injury and the molecular details of its activity enhancement remain elusive. Here we have applied hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry coupled to electron transfer dissociation to pinpoint individual residues in the heavy chain of FVIIa whose conformation and/or local interaction pattern changes when the enzyme transitions to the active form, as induced either by its cofactor tissue factor or a covalent active site inhibitor. Identified regulatory residues are situated at key sites across one continuous surface of the protease domain spanning the TF-binding helix across the activation pocket to the calcium binding site and are embedded in elements of secondary structure and at the base of flexible loops. Thus these residues are optimally positioned to mediate crosstalk between functional sites in FVIIa, particularly the cofactor binding site and the active site. Our results unambiguously show that the conformational allosteric activation signal extends to the EGF1 domain in the light chain of FVIIa, underscoring a remarkable intra- and interdomain allosteric regulation of this trypsin-like protease. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of hepatocyte growth factor gene to human dental pulp stem cells under good manufacturing practice improves their potential for periodontal regeneration in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yu; Liu, Zhenhai; Xie, Yilin; Hu, Jingchao; Wang, Hua; Fan, Zhipeng; Zhang, Chunmei; Wang, Jingsong; Wu, Chu-Tse; Wang, Songlin

    2015-12-15

    Periodontitis is one of the most widespread infectious diseases in humans. We previously promoted significant periodontal tissue regeneration in swine models with the transplantation of autologous periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and PDLSC sheet. We also promoted periodontal tissue regeneration in a rat model with a local injection of allogeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the roles of the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in periodontal tissue regeneration in swine. In the present study, we transferred an adenovirus that carried HGF gene into human DPSCs (HGF-hDPSCs) under good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions. These cells were then transplanted into a swine model for periodontal regeneration. Twenty miniature pigs were used to generate periodontitis with bone defect of 5 mm in width, 7 mm in length, and 3 mm in depth. After 12 weeks, clinical, radiological, quantitative and histological assessment of regenerated periodontal tissues was performed to compare periodontal regeneration in swine treated with cell implantation. Our study showed that injecting HGF-hDPSCs into this large animal model could significantly improve periodontal bone regeneration and soft tissue healing. A hDPSC or HGF-hDPSC sheet showed superior periodontal tissue regeneration compared to the injection of dissociated cells. However, the sheets required surgical placement; thus, they were suitable for surgically-managed periodontitis treatments. The adenovirus-mediated transfer of the HGF gene markedly decreased hDPSC apoptosis in a hypoxic environment or in serum-free medium, and it increased blood vessel regeneration. This study indicated that HGF-hDPSCs produced under GMP conditions significantly improved periodontal bone regeneration in swine; thus, this method represents a potential clinical application for periodontal regeneration.

  17. Heat transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Heat transfer. Heat conduction in solid slab. Convective heat transfer. Non-linear temperature. variation due to flow. HEAT FLUX AT SURFACE. conduction/diffusion.

  18. Heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Heat transfer takes place between material systems as a result of a temperature difference. The transmission process involves energy conversions governed by the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The heat transfer proceeds from a high-temperature region to a low-temperature region, and because of the finite thermal potential, there is an increase in entropy. Thermodynamics, however, is concerned with equilibrium states, which includes thermal equilibrium, irrespective of the time necessary to attain these equilibrium states. But heat transfer is a result of thermal nonequilibrium conditions, therefore, the laws of thermodynamics alone cannot describe completely the heat transfer process. In practice, most engineering problems are concerned with the rate of heat transfer rather than the quantity of heat being transferred. Resort then is directed to the particular laws governing the transfer of heat. There are three distinct modes of heat transfer: conduction, convection, and radiation. Although these modes are discussed separately, all three types may occur simultaneously

  19. Transfer Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Bo

    2014-01-01

    Against a background of rather mixed evidence about transfer pricing practices in multinational enterprises (MNEs) and varying attitudes on the part of tax authorities, this paper explores how multiple aims in transfer pricing can be pursued across four different transfer pricing regimes. A MNE h...

  20. Bioaccumulation of short chain chlorinated paraffins in a typical freshwater food web contaminated by e-waste in south china: Bioaccumulation factors, tissue distribution, and trophic transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Runxia; Luo, Xiaojun; Tang, Bin; Chen, Laiguo; Liu, Yu; Mai, Bixian

    2017-03-01

    Short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are under review for inclusion into the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants. However, limited information is available on their bioaccumulation and biomagnification in ecosystems, which is hindering evaluation of their ecological and health risks. In the present study, wild aquatic organisms (fish and invertebrates), water, and sediment collected from an enclosed freshwater pond contaminated by electronic waste (e-waste) were analyzed to investigate the bioaccumulation, distribution, and trophic transfer of SCCPs in the aquatic ecosystem. SCCPs were detected in all of the investigated aquatic species at concentrations of 1700-95,000 ng/g lipid weight. The calculated bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) varied from 2.46 to 3.49. The relationship between log BAF and the octanol/water partition coefficient (log K OW ) for benthopelagic omnivorous fish species followed the empirical model of bioconcentration, indicating that bioconcentration plays an important role in accumulation of SCCPs. In contrast, the relationship for the benthic carnivorous fish and invertebrates was not consistent with the empirical model of bioconcentration, implying that the bioaccumulation of SCCPs in these species could be more influenced by other complex factors (e.g., habitat and feeding habit). Preferential distribution in the liver rather than in other tissues (e.g., muscle, gills, skin, and kidneys) was noted for the SCCP congeners with higher log K OW , and bioaccumulation pathway (i.e. water or sediment) can affect the tissue distribution of SCCP congeners. SCCPs underwent trophic dilution in the aquatic food web, and the trophic magnification factor (TMF) values of SCCP congener groups significantly correlated with their corresponding log K OW values (p < 0.0001). The present study results improved our understanding on the environmental behavior and fate of SCCPs in aquatic ecosystem. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  1. A chimeric peptide of intestinal trefoil factor containing cholesteryl ester transfer protein B cell epitope significantly inhibits atherosclerosis in rabbits after oral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Gaofu; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Shengying; Xin, Shanshan; Du, Peng; Zhang, Qingye; Zhao, Xiuyun

    2011-04-01

    Vaccination against cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is proven to be effective for inhibiting atherosclerosis in animal models. In this study, the proteases-resistant intestinal trefoil factor (TFF3) was used as a molecular vehicle to construct chimeric TFF3 (cTFF3) containing CETP B cell epitope and tetanus toxin helper T cell epitope. It was found that cTFF3 still preserved a trefoil structure, and can resist proteases digestion in vitro. After oral immunization with cTFF3, the CETP-specific IgA and IgG could be found in intestine lavage fluid and serum, and the anti-CETP antibodies could inhibit partial CETP activity to increase high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, decrease low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and inhibit atherosclerosis in animals. Therefore, TFF3 is a potential molecular vehicle for developing oral peptide vaccines. Our research highlights a novel strategy for developing oral peptide vaccines in the future. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of transfer factors of uranium, thorium, radium and lead from soil to agricultural product in Japan for estimating internal radiation dose through ingestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tomozo; Tashiro, Yoshikazu; Fujinaga, Hideshi; Ishii, Tomoaki; Gunji, Yasuyoshi

    2002-01-01

    The transfer factors (TFs) of uranium (U), thorium (Th), radium (Ra) and lead (Pb) from soil to agricultural products were determined in order to estimate the internal radiation dose to the human body through ingestion. Samples of rice, potato, onion, cabbage, mandarin orange, spinach, apple and soil were collected from various districts in Japan. After appropriate pretreatment of the samples, concentrations in the sample solutions were measured by Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) (for U, Th and Pb) and liquid scintillation counter (for Ra). It was recognized that TFs were 4.9 x 10 -6 (apple) and 3.6 x 10 -4 (spinach) for U, 2.8 x 10 -6 (apple) and 2.3 x 10 -4 (spinach) for Th, and 4.0 x 10 -3 (hulled rice), 7.0 x 10 -5 (onion) and 5.0 x 10 -3 (hulled rice) for Pb. The TF of Ra, however, was not determined due to detection limitations. TF values obtained in the present study range from the same order of magnitude to 1/100 compared to the data in Technical Report Series No.364 (TRS364) as reported by IAEA. It was revealed that the internal radiation dose caused by the intake of uranium series radioactive nuclides through agricultural food ingestion was 16 μSv/y, where Pb was the most contributory nuclide. (author)

  3. Real-time monitoring of respiratory absorption factors of volatile organic compounds in ambient air by proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhonghui [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resources Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Yanli [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resources Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Center for Excellence in Urban Atmospheric Environment, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); Yan, Qiong [Department of Respiratory Diseases, Guangzhou No. 12 People' s Hospital, Guangzhou 510620 (China); Zhang, Zhou [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resources Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wang, Xinming, E-mail: wangxm@gig.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resources Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Center for Excellence in Urban Atmospheric Environment, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Respiratory absorption factors (AFs) are essential parameters in the evaluation of human health risks from toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ambient air. A method for the real time monitoring of VOCs in inhaled and exhaled air by proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) has been developed to permit the calculation of respiratory AFs of VOCs. Isoprene was found to be a better breath tracer than O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, humidity, or acetone for distinguishing between the expiratory and inspiratory phases, and a homemade online breath sampling device with a buffer tube was used to optimize signal peak shapes. Preliminary tests with seven subjects exposed to aromatic hydrocarbons in an indoor environment revealed mean respiratory AFs of 55.0%, 55.9%, and 66.9% for benzene, toluene, and C8-aromatics (ethylbenzene and xylenes), respectively. These AFs were lower than the values of 90% or 100% used in previous studies when assessing the health risks of inhalation exposure to hazardous VOCs. The mean respiratory AFs of benzene, toluene and C8-aromatics were 66.5%, 70.2% and 82.3% for the three female subjects; they were noticeably much higher than that of 46.4%, 45.2% and 55.3%, respectively, for the four male subjects.

  4. Comparison of Passively Transferred Antibodies in Bighorn and Domestic Lambs Reveals One Factor in Differential Susceptibility of These Species to Mannheimia haemolytica-Induced Pneumonia ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Caroline N.; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Knowles, Donald P.; Call, Douglas R.; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2011-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica consistently causes fatal bronchopneumonia in bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis) under natural and experimental conditions. Leukotoxin is the primary virulence factor of this organism. BHS are more susceptible to developing fatal pneumonia than the related species Ovis aries (domestic sheep [DS]). In BHS herds affected by pneumonia, lamb recruitment is severely impaired for years subsequent to an outbreak. We hypothesized that a lack of maternally derived antibodies (Abs) against M. haemolytica provides an immunologic basis for enhanced susceptibility of BH lambs to population-limiting pneumonia. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the titers of Abs directed against M. haemolytica in the sera of BH and domestic lambs at birth through 12 weeks of age. Results revealed that BH lambs had approximately 18-fold lower titers of Ab against surface antigens of M. haemolytica and approximately 20-fold lower titers of leukotoxin-neutralizing Abs than domestic lambs. The titers of leukotoxin-neutralizing Abs in the serum and colostrum samples of BH ewes were approximately 157- and 50-fold lower than those for domestic ewes, respectively. Comparatively, the higher titers of parainfluenza 3 virus-neutralizing Abs in the BH lambs ruled out the possibility that these BHS had an impaired ability to passively transfer Abs to their lambs. These results suggest that lower levels of leukotoxin-neutralizing Abs in the sera of BH ewes, and resultant low Ab titers in their lambs, may be a critical factor in the poor lamb recruitment in herds affected by pneumonia. PMID:21613459

  5. Evaluation of the CPU time for solving the radiative transfer equation with high-order resolution schemes applying the normalized weighting-factor method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xamán, J.; Zavala-Guillén, I.; Hernández-López, I.; Uriarte-Flores, J.; Hernández-Pérez, I.; Macías-Melo, E. V.; Aguilar-Castro, K. M.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we evaluated the convergence rate (CPU time) of a new mathematical formulation for the numerical solution of the radiative transfer equation (RTE) with several High-Order (HO) and High-Resolution (HR) schemes. In computational fluid dynamics, this procedure is known as the Normalized Weighting-Factor (NWF) method and it is adopted here. The NWF method is used to incorporate the high-order resolution schemes in the discretized RTE. The NWF method is compared, in terms of computer time needed to obtain a converged solution, with the widely used deferred-correction (DC) technique for the calculations of a two-dimensional cavity with emitting-absorbing-scattering gray media using the discrete ordinates method. Six parameters, viz. the grid size, the order of quadrature, the absorption coefficient, the emissivity of the boundary surface, the under-relaxation factor, and the scattering albedo are considered to evaluate ten schemes. The results showed that using the DC method, in general, the scheme that had the lowest CPU time is the SOU. In contrast, with the results of theDC procedure the CPU time for DIAMOND and QUICK schemes using the NWF method is shown to be, between the 3.8 and 23.1% faster and 12.6 and 56.1% faster, respectively. However, the other schemes are more time consuming when theNWFis used instead of the DC method. Additionally, a second test case was presented and the results showed that depending on the problem under consideration, the NWF procedure may be computationally faster or slower that the DC method. As an example, the CPU time for QUICK and SMART schemes are 61.8 and 203.7%, respectively, slower when the NWF formulation is used for the second test case. Finally, future researches to explore the computational cost of the NWF method in more complex problems are required.

  6. Electron transfer in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    Electron migration between and within proteins is one of the most prevalent forms of biological energy conversion processes. Electron transfer reactions take place between active centers such as transition metal ions or organic cofactors over considerable distances at fast rates and with remarkable...... specificity. The electron transfer is attained through weak electronic interaction between the active sites, so that considerable research efforts are centered on resolving the factors that control the rates of long-distance electron transfer reactions in proteins. These factors include (in addition......-containing proteins. These proteins serve almost exclusively in electron transfer reactions, and as it turns out, their metal coordination sites are endowed with properties uniquely optimized for their function....

  7. Retrospective determination of {sup 137}Cs specific activity distribution in spruce bark and bark aggregated transfer factor in forests on the scale of the Czech Republic ten years after the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suchara, I., E-mail: suchara@vukoz.cz [Silva Tarouca Research Institute for Landscape and Ornamental Gardening, Kvetnove namesti 391, CZ 252 43 Pruhonice (Czech Republic); Rulik, P., E-mail: petr.rulik@suro.cz [National Radiation Protection Institute, Bartoskova 28, CZ 140 00 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Hulka, J., E-mail: jiri.hulka@suro.cz [National Radiation Protection Institute, Bartoskova 28, CZ 140 00 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Pilatova, H., E-mail: helena.pilatova@suro.cz [National Radiation Protection Institute, Bartoskova 28, CZ 140 00 Prague 4 (Czech Republic)

    2011-04-15

    The {sup 137}Cs specific activities (mean 32 Bq kg{sup -1}) were determined in spruce bark samples that had been collected at 192 sampling plots throughout the Czech Republic in 1995, and were related to the sampling year. The {sup 137}Cs specific activities in spruce bark correlated significantly with the {sup 137}Cs depositions in areas affected by different precipitation sums operating at the time of the Chernobyl fallout in 1986. The ratio of the {sup 137}Cs specific activities in bark and of the {sup 137}Cs deposition levels yielded bark aggregated transfer factor T{sub ag} about 10.5 x 10{sup -3} m{sup -2} kg{sup -1}. Taking into account the residual specific activities of {sup 137}Cs in bark 20 Bq kg{sup -1} and the available pre-Chernobyl data on the {sup 137}Cs deposition loads on the soil surface in the Czech Republic, the real aggregated transfer factor after and before the Chernobyl fallout proved to be T*{sub ag} = 3.3 x 10{sup -3} m{sup -2} kg{sup -1} and T**{sub ag} = 4.0 x 10{sup -3} m{sup -2} kg{sup -1}, respectively. The aggregated transfer factors T*{sub ag} for {sup 137}Cs and spruce bark did not differ significantly in areas unequally affected by the {sup 137}Cs fallout in the Czech Republic in 1986, and the figures for these aggregated transfer factors were very similar to the mean bark T{sub ag} values published from the extensively affected areas near Chernobyl. The magnitude of the {sup 137}Cs aggregated transfer factors for spruce bark for the pre-Chernobyl and post-Chernobyl period in the Czech Republic was also very similar. The variability in spruce bark acidity caused by the operation of local anthropogenic air pollution sources did not significantly influence the accumulation and retention of {sup 137}Cs in spruce bark. Increasing elevation of the bark sampling plots had a significant effect on raising the remaining {sup 137}Cs specific activities in bark in areas affected by precipitation at the time when the plumes crossed, because

  8. Credit risk transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Bank for International Settlements

    2003-01-01

    Executive summary Techniques for transferring credit risk, such as financial guarantees and credit insurance, have been a long-standing feature of financial markets. In the past few years, however, the range of credit risk transfer (CRT) instruments and the circumstances in which they are used have widened considerably. A number of factors have contributed to this growth, including: greater focus by banks and other financial institutions on risk management; a more rigorous approach to risk/re...

  9. Transfer Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Carsten; Rossing, Christian Plesner

    trade internally as the units have to decide what prices should be paid for such inter-unit transfers. One important challenge is to uncover the consequences that different transfer prices have on the willingness in the organizational units to coordinate activities and trade internally. At the same time...... the determination of transfer price will affect the size of the profit or loss in the organizational units and thus have an impact on the evaluation of managers‟ performance. In some instances the determination of transfer prices may lead to a disagreement between coordination of the organizational units...

  10. The effect of soil pH and the fungicide 'Captan' on 134Cs transfer factors for cucumber and radish plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skarlou, V.; Massas, I.; Anoussis, J.; Haidouti, C.; Arapis, G.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of soil pH and the fungicide 'Captan' on 134 Cs transfer factors (TFs) was studied in a greenhouse pot experiment with cucumber and radish plants. A soil with a low pH (4.2) was selected and its pH value has increased to 5.7, 6.5 and 7.6 by the addition of different amounts of Ca(OH) 2 . Liming of the soil and the subsequent increase in pH values resulted in a reduction of 134 Cs TFs which was not always significant. TFs were the highest in the very acid soil (pH 4.2) and were practically the same above the pH 5.7 although they were the lowest in the calcareous soil. The ratio highest / lowest TF of each crop or plant part ranged between ∼ 2.0 for radish and 4.5 for cucumber plants and it was much lower than that previously reported and attributed to pH differences. Edible to other plant material TF ratio indicates that cucumber plant accumulates considerably more of the totally absorbed 134 CS in the edible part than radish crops. When biomass production was used for excluding dilution effects, 134 CS total activity (Bq/pot) was higher for both plants when grown in the intermediate soil pH (5.7 - 6.5), due to the higher yield at these pH values. The application of the fungicide 'Captan' gave no significant differences in 134 Cs TFs for both plant species and in all studied soil pH. Refs. 4 (author)

  11. The Transfer and diffusion of Cesium 137 within forest ecosystem in Fukushima after the nuclear power plant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Takahiro; Murakami, Masashi [Community Ecology Lab., Biology Course, Faculty of Science, Chiba University, Chiba, 263-8522 (Japan); Ishii, Nobuyoshi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Tanoi, Keitaro; Hirose, Atsushi; Ohte, Nobuhito [Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, 113-8657 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    A large amount of radionuclides was released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident after the disastrous earthquake and subsequent tsunami of March 2011. Among the variety of radionuclides released from FDNPP, cesium 137 ({sup 137}Cs) is the most worrying radionuclide in the environment, with a half-life of 30 years. Since most of the Japanese land area is covered by forest, the distribution and transportation of radioactive materials within forest ecosystems should be conscientiously monitored. In Europe, many studies reported that the {sup 137}Cs deposition caused by the Chernobyl accident has still been distributed in the litter and soil layers and has become a source for the soil-to-plant transfer. Most of these studies emphasize the 'stability' of {sup 137}Cs within forest ecosystems, because {sup 137}Cs are considered to be strongly and immediately fixed in clay minerals. Even though there are many studies of the soil-to-plant transfer of {sup 137}Cs in forest after several years of Chernobyl accident, very initial distribution and transfer of {sup 137}Cs in food web within one to two years after the deposition in forest ecosystems have never been examined. The evaluation of the initial dynamics of {sup 137}Cs in forest ecosystems should be quite important because of the increasing stability of {sup 137}Cs after the deposition. The accumulation and transfer of {sup 137}Cs through food web within forest ecosystems were examined by collecting various organisms at forests in Fukushima. The {sup 137}Cs concentrations, natural Cs and K concentrations, and delta {sup 15}N of the specimens were measured to evaluate the occurrence of bioaccumulation or bio-diffusion of {sup 137}Cs through tropic interaction within forest ecosystem. {sup 137}Cs was highly concentrated on leaf litters which had been deposited in autumn 2010, before the accident. This accumulated {sup 137}Cs had transferred to higher trophic organisms mainly through

  12. Demand-side financing for maternal and newborn health: what do we know about factors that affect implementation of cash transfers and voucher programmes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Benjamin M; Murray, Susan F

    2017-08-31

    Demand-side financing (DSF) interventions, including cash transfers and vouchers, have been introduced to promote maternal and newborn health in a range of low- and middle-income countries. These interventions vary in design but have typically been used to increase health service utilisation by offsetting some financial costs for users, or increasing household income and incentivising 'healthy behaviours'. This article documents experiences and implementation factors associated with use of DSF in maternal and newborn health. A secondary analysis (using an adapted Supporting the Use of Research Evidence framework - SURE) was performed on studies that had previously been identified in a systematic review of evidence on DSF interventions in maternal and newborn health. The article draws on findings from 49 quantitative and 49 qualitative studies. The studies give insights on difficulties with exclusion of migrants, young and multiparous women, with demands for informal fees at facilities, and with challenges maintaining quality of care under increasing demand. Schemes experienced difficulties if communities faced long distances to reach participating facilities and poor access to transport, and where there was inadequate health infrastructure and human resources, shortages of medicines and problems with corruption. Studies that documented improved care-seeking indicated the importance of adequate programme scope (in terms of programme eligibility, size and timing of payments and voucher entitlements) to address the issue of concern, concurrent investments in supply-side capacity to sustain and/or improve quality of care, and awareness generation using community-based workers, leaders and women's groups. Evaluations spanning more than 15 years of implementation of DSF programmes reveal a complex picture of experiences that reflect the importance of financial and other social, geographical and health systems factors as barriers to accessing care. Careful design of DSF

  13. Research product transfer for local calibration factors of the Highway Safety Manual (HSM) and integrated surrogate safety assessment framework : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This technology transfer workshop presented transportation planners in the public and private sectors with two successful and closely related studies, conducted respectively by Morgan State University and the University of Virginia. The first module ...

  14. "Transfer Shock" or "Transfer Ecstasy?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickens, John M.

    The alleged characteristic drop in grade point average (GPA) of transfer students and the subsequent rise in GPA was investigated in this study. No statistically significant difference was found in first term junior year GPA between junior college transfers and native Florida State University students after the variance accounted for by the…

  15. Alpha-tocopherol transfer factor (aTTF) from rat liver mediates the transfer of d-alpha-[3H]-tocopherol from liposomes to human erythrocyte ghosts and exhibits saturation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdon, C.P.; Blumberg, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    aTTF was observed to transfer d-alpha-[ 3 H]-tocopherol ( 3 HaT) from egg lecithin liposomes to human erythrocyte ghosts (EG). aTTF may be associated with the 32,000-35,000 MW alpha-Tocopherol Binding Protein previously described to transfer 3 HaT from liposomes to rat liver microsomes and mitochondria prepared by ammonium sulfate precipitation of rat liver cytosol followed by dialysis against 50 mM TRIS-HCl/1 mM EDTA buffer, pH 7.4. Assay for aTTF activity consisted of incubating liposomal 3 HaT and EG in the presence of aTTF or buffer blank for various time periods at 37 0 C, then counting the resulting radioactivity in washed EG after pelleting by centrifugation. Liposomes were prelabeled-with non-exchangable glycerol-[ 14 C]-trioleate to correct for liposomes adhering to pelleted EG. Greater than 50% of the tritium found with the EG pellet was recovered by HPLC as 3 HaT. aTTF activity increased with increasing liposomal 3 HaT concentration before reaching a plateau. aTTF activity was similarly saturated by increasing EG concentrations. The same assay conditions with buffer blank along resulted in negligible transfer activity

  16. Community ultrasound. A study of the factors influencing transfer into primary care in the context of a shift in service provision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, V.

    1999-01-01

    Background: An ultrasound service has properties, which make it an attractive proposition as a community service in line with Government strategy. This transfer is a unique opportunity to study the change in the light of Government reforms to the National Health Service. Objectives: To identify the issues that are important when the transfer of ultrasound into a community setting is considered. To develop knowledge about the views of the users and providers of ultrasound services in relation to a community-based ultrasound service. To enhance understanding of the forces acting upon the decision process about the transfer of ultrasound into a community setting. Design: The study began by addressing qualitatively the views of eight focus groups from the major providers and users involved in the transfer of ultrasound into the community. Two of the key issues addressed in the focus groups were the criteria for successful transfer of the service and the perceived problems. Having identified the relevant areas via theme analysis, a questionnaire was developed and 1167 users and providers of ultrasound were approached to obtain a regional view. Results: There was good response with 353 health professionals and 495 patients completing the questionnaire. A suitable service suggested by the sample was either a low risk obstetric or gynaecology service, located at a Health Centre or a GP Surgery and staffed by radiographers. Three issues identified as important to the transfer of ultrasound were the maintenance of 'good communication links', 'provision of a high quality service' and making sure 'staff were appropriately trained'. Guidelines have been developed to assist in the transfer of decision-making process. Conclusion: Overall the health professionals rated ultrasound as suitable for community service, and the patients were happy to use such a service. However, there were concerns held by hospital clinicians that should be heeded. (author)

  17. Station Transfers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — ixed rail transit external system transfers for systems within the Continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The modes of...

  18. Technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    On the base of technological opportunities and of the environmental target of the various sectors of energy system this paper intend to conjugate the opportunity/objective with economic and social development through technology transfer and information dissemination [it

  19. Transfer factor of "9"0Sr and "1"3"7Cs to lettuce and winter wheat at different growth stage applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Attar, Lina; Al-Oudat, Mohammad; Safia, Bassam; Ghani, Basem Abdul

    2015-01-01

    The effect of clay soil contamination time on the transfer factors (F_vs) of "1"3"7Cs and "9"0Sr was investigated in four different growth stages of winter wheat and lettuce crops. The experiment was performed in an open field using lysimeters. The F_vs were the ratio of the activity concentrations of the radionuclides in crops to those in soil, both as dry weight (Bq kg"−"1). Significant difference of log-F_vs was evaluated using one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Basically, F_vs of "9"0Sr were higher than those of "1"3"7Cs, despite of the application stage or crop' variety. Higher F_vs for both radionuclides were observed for lettuce in comparison to winter wheat. F_vs of "9"0Sr showed comparable trends for both crops with enhanced F_vs obtained when contamination occurred in early stages, i.e. 1.20 for lettuce and 0.88 and 0.02 for winter wheat, straw and grains, respectively. Despite the fluctuation noted in the pattern of F_vs for "1"3"7Cs, soil contaminated at the second stage gave the highest F_vs for lettuce and grains, with geometric means of 0.21 and 0.01, respectively. However, wheat-straw showed remarkable increase in F_v for the latest contamination (ripening stage), about 0.06. It could be concluded that soil contamination at early growth stages would represent high radiological risk for the scenarios studied with an exception to "1"3"7Cs in winter wheat-straw which reflected greater hazard at the latest application. - Highlights: • Higher TFs for both radionuclides were observed for leafy plant in comparison to cereals. • Despite the growth stages & plants' variety, TFs of "9"0Sr were always higher than those of "1"3"7Cs. • TFs of "9"0Sr showed comparable trends in both crops and were higher at earlier growth stages. • Fluctuation noted in TFs for "1"3"7Cs in lettuce with higher TFs at second contamination-stage. • High TFs for "1"3"7Cs when contamination occurred at the latest growth stage of wheat vegetative.

  20. Long term reduction of Caesium and Strontium transfer factors from soil in foodstuff and dynamics of internal doses for a russian population after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shutov, V.N.; Bruk, J.Ja.; Travnikova, I.G.; Balonov, M.I.

    2002-01-01

    The model of the formation of the internal doses for the population living on the territory contaminated after the Chernobyl accident is described. Model parameters were obtained on the base of natural measurements results implemented in the different terms after the accident. The data on the caesium radionuclides content in the bodies of the inhabitants measurements were priority for the internal exposure dose estimation. In the case of the absence of such information, the results of the radionuclides content in the food products analysis or the data on the soil types prevailing in the areas of settlements, were used for the calculations. The data were obtained during 1986-2001 as a result of monitoring of contaminated areas in Russia that considerably differ in their soil and climate conditions, the levels of 1 37C s and 9 0S r surface activity on soil and types of countermeasures applied. A summary of effective half-lives (T 1/2 ) of 1 37C s and 9 0S r aggregated transfer factors (Tag) from soil into agricultural and natural products observed after the Chernobyl fallout is given. The short term decrease of 1 37C s Tag from soil into milk and beef during two months after fallout were observed - T 1/2 varied from 13 d to 36 d in depend on the part of dry and wet fallout. The studies between autumn 1986 and 1991 suggest a decrease in the 1 37C s Tag with T 1/2 /2 =1-2 years. From 5-6 years after deposition onwards T 1/2 /2 of 1 37 Cs and 9 0S r Tag's in the range of 8 to 21 years were observed. Effective half-lives of 1 37C s Tag's for foods from semi-natural ecosystems (mushrooms, berries, game, fish) are longer (up to tens years). On at least for some natural products the decrease seems to be only to radioactive decay. Comparison of the data on the dynamics of 1 37C s content in agricultural and natural food products indicates that the contribution of the latter in the internal dose of population grows with each year after fallout, and can reach in the remote

  1. Modification of the 137Cs, 90Sr, and 60Co transfer to wheat plantlets by NH4+ fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén, J; Muñoz-Muñoz, G; Baeza, A; Salas, A; Mocanu, N

    2017-03-01

    Inorganic fertilizers are used as agricultural countermeasures intended to inhibit the soil to plant transfer of radionuclides after a radioactive fallout. Two NH 4 + fertilizers, diammonium phosphate (DAP) and NPK, were applied to soil contaminated with a mixture of radionuclides to analyze whether they modify the transfer of 137 Cs, 90 Sr, and 60 Co and stable elements (K, Na, Ca, and Mg) to wheat plantlets grown under controlled laboratory conditions. DAP introduced NH 4 + in the soil, which can increase 137 Cs transfer, while NPK also introduced K + , which can decrease it. The application of DAP increased the accumulation of 137 Cs in wheat plantlets with increasing application rate, so did the 137 Cs/K in plantlets. Regarding the NPK application, the 137 Cs increased in all treatments, but at maximum rate, the available K introduced by the fertilizer was probably able to partially satisfy the nutritional requirements of the wheat plantlet and the 137 Cs decreased relative to the recommended rate. The 137 Cs/K ratio in plantlet decreased with increasing NPK rates. The transfer of 90 Sr increased with increasing DAP rate and only at the maximum NPK rate. The 60 Co transfer only increased at the maximum application rates for DAP and NPK. These modifications should be considered when using these fertilizers as agricultural countermeasures.

  2. Determination of uranium transfer factors from soils contaminated with natural uranium along the Vereinigten Mulde in Zwickau; Bestimmung von Transferfaktoren von Uran aus natuerlich belasteten Boeden entlang der Zwickauer und Vereinigten Mulde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brand, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    According to IAEA the food chain soil-plants-human is the predominant radionuclide ingestion path. The consumption of contaminated vegetarian food causes a continuous radiation exposure. In this context the problem of contaminated meadows in the Zwickauer and Vereinigten Mulde that is used for agriculture is of predominant interest. In this area intensive uranium mining has caused severe environmental contamination. The agricultural crop land and the grass land were studied with respect to the radionuclides U-238 and U-234. Following the radiochemical separation using ion chromatography the samples were analyzed by alpha-spectrometry. Compared to non-contaminated areas significant specific activities were measured. The transfer factors of the radionuclides U-238 and U-234 were determined for different plant parts. The transfer factors decrease with increasing radioactive contamination of the soils.

  3. Study on transfer of cadmium in soil-plant systems with the isotopic dilution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qitang; Morel, J.L.; Guckert, A.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the transfer rate from endogenous and exogenous cadmium in soil to plants. Soils were labelled with 109 Cd and amended with soluble cadmium salt or Cd containing sewage sludge. Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) were grown in pots and the effective transfer of cadmium from different sources to shoot of the plant were measured. The soils were also extracted with 0.1 M CaCl 2 , DTPA and 0.1 N HCl. The results showed that the addition of soluble cadmium salt substantially increased the plant cadmium content. Plant absorbed mainly the cadmium from exogenous sources in the soils treated with cadmium. The effective transfer rate of exogenous cadmium was higher than that of endogenous ones, and the soluble salt form was 2 to 3 times higher than that in the sewage sludge. 0.1 M CaCl 2 extracted Cd was significantly correlated with the plant cadmium content. The specific radioactivity of cadmium extracted by this reagent was nearer to the plant cadmium than that extracted by others. 0.1 N HCl extracted cadmium could not be absorbed by plants

  4. Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nanette R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this summer's work was to attempt to enhance Technology Application Group (TAG) ability to measure the outcomes of its efforts to transfer NASA technology. By reviewing existing literature, by explaining the economic principles involved in evaluating the economic impact of technology transfer, and by investigating the LaRC processes our William & Mary team has been able to lead this important discussion. In reviewing the existing literature, we identified many of the metrics that are currently being used in the area of technology transfer. Learning about the LaRC technology transfer processes and the metrics currently used to track the transfer process enabled us to compare other R&D facilities to LaRC. We discuss and diagram impacts of technology transfer in the short run and the long run. Significantly, it serves as the basis for analysis and provides guidance in thinking about what the measurement objectives ought to be. By focusing on the SBIR Program, valuable information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of this LaRC program are to be gained. A survey was developed to ask probing questions regarding SBIR contractors' experience with the program. Specifically we are interested in finding out whether the SBIR Program is accomplishing its mission, if the SBIR companies are providing the needed innovations specified by NASA and to what extent those innovations have led to commercial success. We also developed a survey to ask COTR's, who are NASA employees acting as technical advisors to the SBIR contractors, the same type of questions, evaluating the successes and problems with the SBIR Program as they see it. This survey was developed to be implemented interactively on computer. It is our hope that the statistical and econometric studies that can be done on the data collected from all of these sources will provide insight regarding the direction to take in developing systematic evaluations of programs like the SBIR Program so that they can

  5. Retrospective determination of 137Cs specific activity distribution in spruce bark and bark aggregated transfer factor in forests on the scale of the Czech Republic ten years after the Chernobyl accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchara, I; Rulík, P; Hůlka, J; Pilátová, H

    2011-04-15

    The (137)Cs specific activities (mean 32Bq kg(-1)) were determined in spruce bark samples that had been collected at 192 sampling plots throughout the Czech Republic in 1995, and were related to the sampling year. The (137)Cs specific activities in spruce bark correlated significantly with the (137)Cs depositions in areas affected by different precipitation sums operating at the time of the Chernobyl fallout in 1986. The ratio of the (137)Cs specific activities in bark a