WorldWideScience

Sample records for soil plant atmosphere

  1. Selenium Cycling Across Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Interfaces: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenny H.E. Winkel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se is an essential element for humans and animals, which occurs ubiquitously in the environment. It is present in trace amounts in both organic and inorganic forms in marine and freshwater systems, soils, biomass and in the atmosphere. Low Se levels in certain terrestrial environments have resulted in Se deficiency in humans, while elevated Se levels in waters and soils can be toxic and result in the death of aquatic wildlife and other animals. Human dietary Se intake is largely governed by Se concentrations in plants, which are controlled by root uptake of Se as a function of soil Se concentrations, speciation and bioavailability. In addition, plants and microorganisms can biomethylate Se, which can result in a loss of Se to the atmosphere. The mobilization of Se across soil-plant-atmosphere interfaces is thus of crucial importance for human Se status. This review gives an overview of current knowledge on Se cycling with a specific focus on soil-plant-atmosphere interfaces. Sources, speciation and mobility of Se in soils and plants will be discussed as well as Se hyperaccumulation by plants, biofortification and biomethylation. Future research on Se cycling in the environment is essential to minimize the adverse health effects associated with unsafe environmental Se levels.

  2. Development of an experimental approach to study coupled soil-plant-atmosphere processes using plant analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautz, Andrew C.; Illangasekare, Tissa H.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Heck, Katharina; Helmig, Rainer

    2017-04-01

    The atmosphere, soils, and vegetation near the land-atmosphere interface are in a state of continuous dynamic interaction via a myriad of complex interrelated feedback processes which collectively, remain poorly understood. Studying the fundamental nature and dynamics of such processes in atmospheric, ecological, and/or hydrological contexts in the field setting presents many challenges; current experimental approaches are an important factor given a general lack of control and high measurement uncertainty. In an effort to address these issues and reduce overall complexity, new experimental design considerations (two-dimensional intermediate-scale coupled wind tunnel-synthetic aquifer testing using synthetic plants) for studying soil-plant-atmosphere continuum soil moisture dynamics are introduced and tested in this study. Validation of these experimental considerations, particularly the adoption of synthetic plants, is required prior to their application in future research. A comparison of three experiments with bare soil surfaces or transplanted with a Stargazer lily/limestone block was used to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed approaches. Results demonstrate that coupled wind tunnel-porous media experimentation, used to simulate field conditions, reduces complexity, and enhances control while allowing fine spatial-temporal resolution measurements to be made using state-of-the-art technologies. Synthetic plants further help reduce system complexity (e.g., airflow) while preserving the basic hydrodynamic functions of plants (e.g., water uptake and transpiration). The trends and distributions of key measured atmospheric and subsurface spatial and temporal variables (e.g., soil moisture, relative humidity, temperature, air velocity) were comparable, showing that synthetic plants can be used as simple, idealized, nonbiological analogs for living vegetation in fundamental hydrodynamic studies.

  3. Soil physics with Python transport in the soil-plant-atmosphere system

    CERN Document Server

    Bittelli, Marco; Tomei, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents numerical methods to solve soil physics problems using computers. It starts with the theory and then shows how to use Python code to solve the problems. Most soil physics books focus on deriving rather than solving the differential equations for mass and energy transport in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. The focus of this book is on solutions. Agricultural and biological scientists usually have a good working knowledge of algebra and calculus, but not of differential equations. Here numerical procedures are used to solve differential equations.

  4. MAPSS: Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System Model, Version 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: MAPSS (Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System) is a landscape to global vegetation distribution model that was developed to simulate the potential biosphere...

  5. MAPSS: Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System Model, Version 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MAPSS (Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System) is a landscape to global vegetation distribution model that was developed to simulate the potential biosphere impacts and...

  6. Carbon allocation and carbon isotope fluxes in the plant-soil-atmosphere continuum: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Brüggemann

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial carbon (C cycle has received increasing interest over the past few decades, however, there is still a lack of understanding of the fate of newly assimilated C allocated within plants and to the soil, stored within ecosystems and lost to the atmosphere. Stable carbon isotope studies can give novel insights into these issues. In this review we provide an overview of an emerging picture of plant-soil-atmosphere C fluxes, as based on C isotope studies, and identify processes determining related C isotope signatures. The first part of the review focuses on isotopic fractionation processes within plants during and after photosynthesis. The second major part elaborates on plant-internal and plant-rhizosphere C allocation patterns at different time scales (diel, seasonal, interannual, including the speed of C transfer and time lags in the coupling of assimilation and respiration, as well as the magnitude and controls of plant-soil C allocation and respiratory fluxes. Plant responses to changing environmental conditions, the functional relationship between the physiological and phenological status of plants and C transfer, and interactions between C, water and nutrient dynamics are discussed. The role of the C counterflow from the rhizosphere to the aboveground parts of the plants, e.g. via CO2 dissolved in the xylem water or as xylem-transported sugars, is highlighted. The third part is centered around belowground C turnover, focusing especially on above- and belowground litter inputs, soil organic matter formation and turnover, production and loss of dissolved organic C, soil respiration and CO2 fixation by soil microbes. Furthermore, plant controls on microbial communities and activity via exudates and litter production as well as microbial community effects on C mineralization are reviewed. A further part of the paper is dedicated to physical interactions between soil CO2 and the soil matrix, such as

  7. Behavior of iodine in the atmosphere-soil-plant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Satoshi; Uchida, Shigeo

    1996-01-01

    Levels and behavior of radioactive and stable iodine in the environment have been studied to obtain parameter values for the assessment of 129 I released from nuclear facilities. The deposition velocity (V D ) of gaseous iodine from the atmosphere to rice grains (rough rice) was 0.00048 cm 3 g -1 s -1 for CH 3 I and 0.15 cm 3 g -1 s -1 for I 2 . The ratio of the iodine distribution in a grain exposed to CH 3 I was as follows, rough rice : brown rice (hulled rice) : polished rice = 1.0 : 0.49 : 0.38. The distribution ratio in polished rice for CH 3 I was about 20 times higher than that for I 2 . The soil-solution distribution coefficient (K d ) for both I - and IO 3 - varied very widely, i.e. -1 . High values were found in soils having high concentrations of total organic carbon, active-Al and active-Fe (Al and Fe extracted by a mixture of oxalic acid and ammonium oxalate). Andosol, one of the most typical Japanese soils derived from deposits of volcanic ash, showed specifically high K d values. The soil-to-plant transfer factors (or concentration ratio) in the edible parts of crops were in the range 0.0002-0.016. The transfer factors for tomato, sweet potato, carrot, soybeans and rice were significantly lower than their leaf values. The value for rice (polished) was 0.002. Iodine was found to be evaporated from the soil-plant system as CH 3 I. The emission of CH 3 I from rice plants grown on flooded soil was much higher than that from oat plants grown on unflooded soil. The 129 I levels in environmental samples collected in and around Tokai-mura, where a spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant is located, have been determined by neutron activation analysis. The concentrations of 129 I in surface soils ranged from -1 . The 129 I concentrations in forest soil tended to be higher than those in field soils. Most of the 129 I was retained in the first 10 cm of the surface soil collected from forests in Tokai-mura. (author)

  8. Using magnetic and chemical measurements to detect atmospherically-derived metal pollution in artificial soils and metal uptake in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapkota, B.; Cioppa, M.T.

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of potential effects of ambient atmospheric pollution on magnetic and chemical properties of soils and plants requires precise experimental studies. A controlled growth experiment assessing magnetic and chemical parameters was conducted within (controls) and outside (exposed) a greenhouse setting. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) measurements showed that while initial MS values were similar for the sample sets, the overall MS value of exposed soil was significantly greater than in controls, suggesting an additional input of Fe-containing particles. Scanning electron microscope images of the exposed soils revealed numerous angular magnetic particles and magnetic spherules typical of vehicular exhaust and combustion processes, respectively. Similarly, chemical analysis of plant roots showed that plants grown in the exposed soil had higher concentrations of Fe and heavy (toxic) metals than controls. This evidence suggests that atmospheric deposition contributed to the MS increase in exposed soils and increased metal uptake by plants grown in this soil. - Highlights: ► Magnetic susceptibility (MS) values increased in exposed soils during the growth. ► MS values in control soils decreased from their initial values during the growth. ► Decrease in MS values due to downwards migration of Fe particles, magnetic mineral transformations and Fe uptake by plants. ► Higher metal uptake in plants grown in exposed soils than those grown in controls. ► Atmospheric particulate deposition isolated as main contributor to these effects. - Variations in atmospheric particulate levels are measurable using magnetic and chemical techniques on soils and plant biomass, and suggest pollutant levels may be higher than previously recognized.

  9. The contributions of Lewis Fry Richardson to drainage theory, soil physics, and the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, John; Raats, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The EGU Division on Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics awards the Lewis Fry Richardson Medal. Richardson's significance is highlighted in http://www.egu.eu/awards-medals/portrait-lewis-fry-richardson/, but his contributions to soil physics and to numerical solutions of heat and diffusion equations are not mentioned. We would like to draw attention to those little known contributions. Lewis Fry Richardson (1881-1953) made important contributions to many fields including numerical weather prediction, finite difference solutions of partial differential equations, turbulent flow and diffusion, fractals, quantitative psychology and studies of conflict. He invented numerical weather prediction during World War I, although his methods were not successfully applied until 1950, after the invention of fast digital computers. In 1922 he published the book `Numerical weather prediction', of which few copies were sold and even fewer were read until the 1950s. To model heat and mass transfer in the atmosphere, he did much original work on turbulent flow and defined what is now known as the Richardson number. His technique for improving the convergence of a finite difference calculation is known as Richardson extrapolation, and was used by John Philip in his 1957 semi-analytical solution of the Richards equation for water movement in unsaturated soil. Richardson's first papers in 1908 concerned the numerical solution of the free surface problem of unconfined flow of water in saturated soil, arising in the design of drain spacing in peat. Later, for the lower boundary of his atmospheric model he needed to understand the movement of heat, liquid water and water vapor in what is now called the vadose zone and the soil plant atmosphere system, and to model coupled transfer of heat and flow of water in unsaturated soil. Finding little previous work, he formulated partial differential equations for transient, vertical flow of liquid water and for transfer of heat and water vapor. He

  10. Studying water in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum: a bibliographic guide to techniques

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholes, RJ

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available The parameters used to describe the flow of water, and energy to a lesser extent, through the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum are reviewed and the techniques used for estimating their values contrasted. The measurements which are necessary...

  11. Evapotranspiration: A process driving mass transport and energy exchange in the soil-plant-atmosphere-climate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katul, Gabriel G.; Oren, Ram; Manzoni, Stefano; Higgins, Chad; Parlange, Marc B.

    2012-09-01

    The role of evapotranspiration (ET) in the global, continental, regional, and local water cycles is reviewed. Elevated atmospheric CO2, air temperature, vapor pressure deficit (D), turbulent transport, radiative transfer, and reduced soil moisture all impact biotic and abiotic processes controlling ET that must be extrapolated to large scales. Suggesting a blueprint to achieve this link is the main compass of this review. Leaf-scale transpiration (fe) as governed by the plant biochemical demand for CO2 is first considered. When this biochemical demand is combined with mass transfer formulations, the problem remains mathematically intractable, requiring additional assumptions. A mathematical "closure" that assumes stomatal aperture is autonomously regulated so as to maximize the leaf carbon gain while minimizing water loss is proposed, which leads to analytical expressions for leaf-scale transpiration. This formulation predicts well the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and increases in D on fe. The case of soil moisture stress is then considered using extensive gas exchange measurements collected in drought studies. Upscaling the fe to the canopy is then discussed at multiple time scales. The impact of limited soil water availability within the rooting zone on the upscaled ET as well as some plant strategies to cope with prolonged soil moisture stress are briefly presented. Moving further up in direction and scale, the soil-plant system is then embedded within the atmospheric boundary layer, where the influence of soil moisture on rainfall is outlined. The review concludes by discussing outstanding challenges and how to tackle them by means of novel theoretical, numerical, and experimental approaches.

  12. Plant-soil distribution of potentially toxic elements in response to elevated atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Benjamin D; Dijkstra, Paul; Natali, Susan M; Megonigal, J Patrick; Ketterer, Michael E; Drake, Bert G; Lerdau, Manuel T; Gordon, Gwyneth; Anbar, Ariel D; Hungate, Bruce A

    2011-04-01

    The distribution of contaminant elements within ecosystems is an environmental concern because of these elements' potential toxicity to animals and plants and their ability to hinder microbial ecosystem services. As with nutrients, contaminants are cycled within and through ecosystems. Elevated atmospheric CO2 generally increases plant productivity and alters nutrient element cycling, but whether CO2 causes similar effects on the cycling of contaminant elements is unknown. Here we show that 11 years of experimental CO2 enrichment in a sandy soil with low organic matter content causes plants to accumulate contaminants in plant biomass, with declines in the extractable contaminant element pools in surface soils. These results indicate that CO2 alters the distribution of contaminant elements in ecosystems, with plant element accumulation and declining soil availability both likely explained by the CO2 stimulation of plant biomass. Our results highlight the interdependence of element cycles and the importance of taking a broad view of the periodic table when the effects of global environmental change on ecosystem biogeochemistry are considered.

  13. State-space approach for evaluating the soil-plant-atmosphere system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timm, L.C.; Reichardt, K.; Cassaro, F.A.M.; Tominaga, T.T.; Bacchi, O.O.S.; Oliveira, J.C.M.; Dourado-Neto, D.

    2004-01-01

    Using as examples one sugarcane and one forage oat experiment, both carried out in the State of Sao Paulo, Brazil, this chapter presents recent state-space approaches used to evaluate the relation between soil and plant properties. A contrast is made between classical statistics methodologies that do not take into account the sampling position coordinates, and the more recently used methodologies which include the position coordinates, and allow a better interpretation of the field-sampled data. Classical concepts are first introduced, followed by spatially referenced methodologies like the autocorrelation function, the cross correlation function, and the state-space approach. Two variations of the state-space approach are given: one emphasizes the evolution of the state system while the other based on the bayesian formulation emphasizes the evolution of the estimated observations. It is concluded that these state-space analyses using dynamic regression models improve data analyses and are therefore recommended for analyzing time and space data series related to the performance of a given soil-plant-atmosphere system. (author)

  14. Movement of iodine and rain water from the atmosphere to the plant - soil - water system by the activable tracer techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuita, Kouichi

    1996-01-01

    Iodine is one of the important elements in the environmental and agricultural sciences. It is requested to elucidate the long-term behavior of iodine in the atmosphere - soil·plant - soil water system. We developed the new tracer method, in which iodine released into the atmosphere from the stack of iodine manufacturing plant in Chiba prefecture was used as the activable tracer. Using this method, we traced the direct deposition of iodine in atmosphere onto the plant tops and the penetration of fallout iodine into soil in an open air over a long period. A quantitative evaluation of recharge function of water resources in agricultural and forest lands of Japan was eagerly requested from the nation. For it, we developed the new Br - tracer method combined with the soil water sampling system with the alumina porous ceramic cup. This tracer method was successfully applied to the agricultural and forest land in the catchment area of Sakawa river in Kanagawa prefecture. And the infiltration rate of the rain water and irrigation water, from the soil surface to the dept of 3m of the soil horizon in the forest land, tea garden and paddy field was quantitatively measured during two years. (J.P.N.)

  15. A versatile model for tritium transfer from atmosphere to plant and soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melintescu, A.; Galeriu, D.

    2004-01-01

    The need to increase the predictive power of risk assessment for large tritium releases implies a process level approach for model development. Tritium transfer for atmosphere to plant and the conversion in organically bound tritium depend strongly on plant characteristics, season, and meteorological conditions.In order to cope with this large variability and to avoid also, expensive calibration experiments, we developed a model using knowledge of plant physiology, agro-meteorology, soil sciences, hydrology, and climatology. The transfer of tritiated water to plant is modelled with resistance approach including sparse canopy. The canopy resistance is modelled using Jarvis-Calvet approach modified in order to directly use the canopy photosynthesis rate.The crop growth model WOFOST is used for photosynthesis rate both for canopy resistance and formation of organically bound tritium, also. Using this formalism, the tritium transfer parameters are directly linked to known processes and parameters from agricultural sciences. The model predictions for tritium in wheat are closed to a factor two to experimental data without any calibration. The model also is tested for rice and soya bean and can be applied for various plants and environmental conditions. For sparse canopy the model uses coupled equations between soil and plants. (author)

  16. 15N isotopic techniques to study nitrogen cycle in soil-plant-atmosphere system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Chandrakala, J.U.; Sachdev, M.S.; Sachdev, P.

    2009-01-01

    Intensification of agriculture to meet the increasing food demand has caused severe disruption in natural balance of global as well as regional nitrogen cycle, potentially threatening the future sustainability of agriculture and environment of the total fertilizer nitrogen used in agriculture globally, only less than half is recovered by crop plants, rest is lost to the environment, resulting in several environmental problems such as ground water pollution and global warming, besides huge economic loss of this costly input in agriculture. Improving fertilizer nitrogen use efficiency and minimising N loss to the environment is the key to regain the lost control of nitrogen cycle in agriculture. Fertilizer nitrogen use efficiency depends largely on N requirement of crops, N supply from soil and fertilizer through N transformations in soil, and N losses from the soil-water-plant system. 15 N isotopic techniques have the potential to provide accurate measurement quantification of different processes involved in N cycle such as fixation of atmospheric N 2 , transformations- mineralization and immobilization- of soil and fertilizer N which governs N supply to plants, and N losses to the environment through ammonia volatilization, denitrification and nitrate leaching. 15 N tracers can also give precise identification of ways and sources of N loss from agriculture. These information can be used to develop strategies for increasing fertilizer N use efficiency and minimizing the loss of this costly input from agriculture to environment, which in turn will help to achieve the tripartite goal of food security, agricultural profitability and environmental quality. (author)

  17. HTO deposition by vapor exchange between atmosphere and soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunnenberg, C.

    1989-01-01

    HTO deposition to soils occurs by vapor exchange between atmosphere and soil-air, when the concentration gradient is directed downwards, and it is principally independent from simultaneous transport of H 2 O. In relatively dry top soil, which is frequently the case, as it tries to attain equilibrium with the air humidity, HTO diffuses into deeper soil driven by the same mechanisms that caused the deposition process. The resulting HTO profile is depending on the atmospheric supply and the soil physical conditions, and it is the source for further tritium pathways, namely root uptake by plants and reemission from soil back into the ground-level air. Simulation experiments with soil columns exposed to HTO labeled atmospheres have proved the theoretical expectation that under certain boundary conditions the HTO profile can be described by an error function. The key parameter is the effective diffusion coefficient, which in turn is a function of the sorption characteristics of the particular soil. (orig.) [de

  18. Thermodynamic limits set relevant constraints to the soil-plant-atmosphere system and to optimality in terrestrial vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleidon, Axel; Renner, Maik

    2016-04-01

    The soil-plant-atmosphere system is a complex system that is strongly shaped by interactions between the physical environment and vegetation. This complexity appears to demand equally as complex models to fully capture the dynamics of the coupled system. What we describe here is an alternative approach that is based on thermodynamics and which allows for comparatively simple formulations free of empirical parameters by assuming that the system is so complex that its emergent dynamics are only constrained by the thermodynamics of the system. This approach specifically makes use of the second law of thermodynamics, a fundamental physical law that is typically not being considered in Earth system science. Its relevance to land surface processes is that it fundamentally sets a direction as well as limits to energy conversions and associated rates of mass exchange, but it requires us to formulate land surface processes as thermodynamic processes that are driven by energy conversions. We describe an application of this approach to the surface energy balance partitioning at the diurnal scale. In this application the turbulent heat fluxes of sensible and latent heat are described as the result of a convective heat engine that is driven by solar radiative heating of the surface and that operates at its thermodynamic limit. The predicted fluxes from this approach compare very well to observations at several sites. This suggests that the turbulent exchange fluxes between the surface and the atmosphere operate at their thermodynamic limit, so that thermodynamics imposes a relevant constraint to the land surface-atmosphere system. Yet, thermodynamic limits do not entirely determine the soil-plant-atmosphere system because vegetation affects these limits, for instance by affecting the magnitude of surface heating by absorption of solar radiation in the canopy layer. These effects are likely to make the conditions at the land surface more favorable for photosynthetic activity

  19. Sensitivity of a soil-plant-atmosphere model to changes in air temperature, dew point temperature, and solar radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luxmoore, R.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab.,TN); Stolzy, J.L.; Holdeman, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    Air temperature, dew point temperature and solar radiation were independently varied in an hourly soil-plant-atmosphere model in a sensitivity analysis of these parameters. Results suggested that evapotranspiration in eastern Tennessee is limited more by meteorological conditions that determine the vapor-pressure gradient than by the necessary energy to vaporize water within foliage. Transpiration and soil water drainage were very sensitive to changes in air and dew point temperature and to solar radiation under low atmospheric vapor-pressure deficit conditions associated with reduced air temperature. Leaf water potential and stomatal conductance were reduced under conditions having high evapotranspiration. Representative air and dew point temperature input data for a particular application are necessary for satisfactory results, whereas irradiation may be less well characterized for applications with high atmospheric vapor-pressure deficit. The effects of a general rise in atmospheric temperature on forest water budgets are discussed.

  20. The origin of lead in the organic horizon of tundra soils: Atmospheric deposition, plant translocation from the mineral soil or soil mineral mixing?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaminder, Jonatan; Farmer, John G.; MacKenzie, Angus B.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the anthropogenic contribution to lead (Pb) concentrations in surface soils in high latitude ecosystems is central to our understanding of the extent of atmospheric Pb contamination. In this study, we reconstructed fallout of Pb at a remote sub-arctic region by using two ombrotrophic peat cores and assessed the extent to which this airborne Pb is able to explain the isotopic composition ( 206 Pb/ 207 Pb ratio) in the O-horizon of tundra soils. In the peat cores, long-range atmospheric fallout appeared to be the main source of Pb as indicated by temporal trends that followed the known European pollution history, i.e. accelerated fallout at the onset of industrialization and peak fallout around the 1960s-70s. The Pb isotopic composition of the O-horizon of podzolic tundra soil ( 206 Pb/ 207 Pb = 1.170 ± 0.002; mean ± SD) overlapped with that of the peat ( 206 Pb/ 207 Pb = 1.16 ± 0.01) representing a proxy for atmospheric aerosols, but was clearly different from that of the parent soil material ( 206 Pb/ 207 Pb = 1.22-1.30). This finding indicated that long-range fallout of atmospheric Pb is the main driver of Pb accumulation in podzolic tundra soil. In O-horizons of tundra soil weakly affected by cryoturbation (cryosols) however, the input of Pb from the underlying mineral soil increased as indicated by 206 Pb/ 207 Pb ratios of up to 1.20, a value closer to that of local soil minerals. Nevertheless, atmospheric Pb appeared to be the dominant source in this soil compartment. We conclude that Pb concentrations in the O-horizon of studied tundra soils - despite being much lower than in boreal soils and representative for one of the least exposed sites to atmospheric Pb contaminants in Europe - are mainly controlled by atmospheric inputs from distant anthropogenic sources. - Highlights: → We used Pb isotopic composition to aid interpretation of Pb profiles in tundra soils. → Ombrotrophic peat cores were used as records of atmospheric inputs of Pb.

  1. The origin of lead in the organic horizon of tundra soils: Atmospheric deposition, plant translocation from the mineral soil or soil mineral mixing?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaminder, Jonatan, E-mail: jonatan.klaminder@emg.umu.se [Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umea University, 90187 Umea (Sweden); Farmer, John G. [School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JN, Scotland (United Kingdom); MacKenzie, Angus B. [Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre, East Kilbride, G75 0QF, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15

    Knowledge of the anthropogenic contribution to lead (Pb) concentrations in surface soils in high latitude ecosystems is central to our understanding of the extent of atmospheric Pb contamination. In this study, we reconstructed fallout of Pb at a remote sub-arctic region by using two ombrotrophic peat cores and assessed the extent to which this airborne Pb is able to explain the isotopic composition ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratio) in the O-horizon of tundra soils. In the peat cores, long-range atmospheric fallout appeared to be the main source of Pb as indicated by temporal trends that followed the known European pollution history, i.e. accelerated fallout at the onset of industrialization and peak fallout around the 1960s-70s. The Pb isotopic composition of the O-horizon of podzolic tundra soil ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb = 1.170 {+-} 0.002; mean {+-} SD) overlapped with that of the peat ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb = 1.16 {+-} 0.01) representing a proxy for atmospheric aerosols, but was clearly different from that of the parent soil material ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb = 1.22-1.30). This finding indicated that long-range fallout of atmospheric Pb is the main driver of Pb accumulation in podzolic tundra soil. In O-horizons of tundra soil weakly affected by cryoturbation (cryosols) however, the input of Pb from the underlying mineral soil increased as indicated by {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratios of up to 1.20, a value closer to that of local soil minerals. Nevertheless, atmospheric Pb appeared to be the dominant source in this soil compartment. We conclude that Pb concentrations in the O-horizon of studied tundra soils - despite being much lower than in boreal soils and representative for one of the least exposed sites to atmospheric Pb contaminants in Europe - are mainly controlled by atmospheric inputs from distant anthropogenic sources. - Highlights: {yields} We used Pb isotopic composition to aid interpretation of Pb profiles in tundra soils. {yields} Ombrotrophic peat

  2. Faster turnover of new soil carbon inputs under increased atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Groenigen, Kees Jan; Osenberg, Craig W; Terrer, César; Carrillo, Yolima; Dijkstra, Feike A; Heath, James; Nie, Ming; Pendall, Elise; Phillips, Richard P; Hungate, Bruce A

    2017-10-01

    Rising levels of atmospheric CO 2 frequently stimulate plant inputs to soil, but the consequences of these changes for soil carbon (C) dynamics are poorly understood. Plant-derived inputs can accumulate in the soil and become part of the soil C pool ("new soil C"), or accelerate losses of pre-existing ("old") soil C. The dynamics of the new and old pools will likely differ and alter the long-term fate of soil C, but these separate pools, which can be distinguished through isotopic labeling, have not been considered in past syntheses. Using meta-analysis, we found that while elevated CO 2 (ranging from 550 to 800 parts per million by volume) stimulates the accumulation of new soil C in the short term (soil C pool over either temporal scale. Our results are inconsistent with predictions of conventional soil C models and suggest that elevated CO 2 might increase turnover rates of new soil C. Because increased turnover rates of new soil C limit the potential for additional soil C sequestration, the capacity of land ecosystems to slow the rise in atmospheric CO 2 concentrations may be smaller than previously assumed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Effects of atmospheric CO2 enrichment on soil CO2 efflux in a young longleaf pine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) can affect the quantity and quality of plant tissues which will impact carbon (C) cycling and storage in plant/soil systems and the release of CO2 back to the atmosphere. Research is needed to quantify the effects of elevated CO2 on soil CO2 efflux to predi...

  4. Soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikonen, J P; Sucksdorff, Y [Finnish Environment Agency, Helsinki (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    In this study the soil/vegetation/atmosphere-model based on the formulation of Deardorff was refined to hour basis and applied to a field in Vihti. The effect of model parameters on model results (energy fluxes, temperatures) was also studied as well as the effect of atmospheric conditions. The estimation of atmospheric conditions on the soil-vegetation system as well as an estimation of the effect of vegetation parameters on the atmospheric climate was estimated. Areal surface fluxes, temperatures and moistures were also modelled for some river basins in southern Finland. Land-use and soil parameterisation was developed to include properties and yearly variation of all vegetation and soil types. One classification was selected to describe the hydrothermal properties of the soils. Evapotranspiration was verified against the water balance method

  5. Soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikonen, J.P.; Sucksdorff, Y. [Finnish Environment Agency, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In this study the soil/vegetation/atmosphere-model based on the formulation of Deardorff was refined to hour basis and applied to a field in Vihti. The effect of model parameters on model results (energy fluxes, temperatures) was also studied as well as the effect of atmospheric conditions. The estimation of atmospheric conditions on the soil-vegetation system as well as an estimation of the effect of vegetation parameters on the atmospheric climate was estimated. Areal surface fluxes, temperatures and moistures were also modelled for some river basins in southern Finland. Land-use and soil parameterisation was developed to include properties and yearly variation of all vegetation and soil types. One classification was selected to describe the hydrothermal properties of the soils. Evapotranspiration was verified against the water balance method

  6. Selenium cycling across soil-plant atmosphere interfaces: a critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenium (Se) is an essential element for humans and animals, which occurs ubiquitously in the environment. It is present in trace amounts in both organic and inorganic forms in marine and freshwater systems, soils, biomass, and in the atmosphere. Low Se levels in certain terrestrial environments ha...

  7. Unraveling the Plant-Soil Interactome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, M. S.; Hixson, K.; Ahkami, A. H.; HaHandkumbura, P. P.; Hess, N. J.; Fang, Y.; Fortin, D.; Stanfill, B.; Yabusaki, S.; Engbrecht, K. M.; Baker, E.; Renslow, R.; Jansson, C.

    2017-12-01

    Plant photosynthesis is the primary conduit of carbon fixation from the atmosphere to the terrestrial ecosystem. While more is known about plant physiology and biochemistry, the interplay between genetic and environmental factors that govern partitioning of carbon to above- and below ground plant biomass, to microbes, to the soil, and respired to the atmosphere is not well understood holistically. To address this knowledge gap there is a need to define, study, comprehend, and model the plant ecosystem as an integrated system of integrated biotic and abiotic processes and feedbacks. Local rhizosphere conditions are an important control on plant performance but are in turn affected by plant uptake and rhizodeposition processes. C3 and C4 plants have different CO2 fixation strategies and likely have differential metabolic profiles resulting in different carbon sources exuding to the rhizosphere. In this presentation, we report on an integrated capability to better understand plant-soil interactions, including modeling tools that address the spatiotemporal hydrobiogeochemistry in the rhizosphere. Comparing Brachypodium distachyon, (Brachypodium) as our C3 representative and Setaria viridis (Setaria) as our C4 representative, we designed, highly controlled single-plant experimental ecosystems based these model grasses to enable quantitative prediction of ecosystem traits and responses as a function of plant genotype and environmental variables. A metabolomics survey of 30 Brachypodium genotypes grown under control and drought conditions revealed specific metabolites that correlated with biomass production and drought tolerance. A comparison of Brachypodium and Setaria grown with control and a future predicted elevated CO2 level revealed changes in biomass accumulation and metabolite profiles between the C3 and C4 species in both leaves and roots. Finally, we are building an mechanistic modeling capability that will contribute to a better basis for modeling plant water

  8. Effects of tillage practice and atmospheric CO2 level on soil CO2 efflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) affects both the quantity and quality of plant tissues, which impacts the cycling and storage of carbon (C) within plant/soil systems and thus the rate of CO2 release back to the atmosphere. Research to accurately quantify the effects of elevated CO2 and as...

  9. Comparing the performance of coupled soil-vegetation-atmosphere models at two contrasting field sites in South-West Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayler, S.; Wöhling, T.; Priesack, E.; Wizemann, H.-D.; Wulfmeyer, V.; Ingwersen, J.; Streck, T.

    2012-04-01

    The soil moisture, the energy balance at the land surface and the state of the lower atmosphere are closely linked by complex feedback processes. The vegetation acts as the interface between soil and atmosphere and plays an important role in this coupled system. Consequently, a consistent description of the fluxes of water, energy and carbon is a prerequisite for analyzing many problems in soil-, plant- and atmospheric research. To better understand the complex interplay of the involved processes, many numerical and physics-based soil-plant-atmosphere simulation models were developed during the last decades. As these models have been developed for different purposes, the degree of complexity in describing individual feedback processes can vary considerably. In models designed to predict soil moisture, for example, plants are often sufficiently represented by a simple sink term. If these models are calibrated, sometimes only one state variable and the corresponding calibration data type is used, e.g. soil water contents or pressure heads. In this case, vegetation properties and feedbacks between soil moisture, plant growth and stomatal conductivity are neglected to a large extent. Some crop models, in turn, pay little attention to modeling soil water transport. In a coupled soil-vegetation-atmosphere model, however, the interface between soil and atmosphere has to be consistent in all directions. As different data types such as soil moisture, leaf area development and evapotranspiration may contain contrasting information about the system under consideration, the fitting of such a model to a single data type may result in a poor agreement to another data type. The trade-off between the fittings to different data types can thereby be caused by structural inadequacies in the model or by errors in input and calibration data. In our study, we compare the Community Land Model CLM (version 3.5, offline mode) with different agricultural crop models to analyze the adequacy

  10. The influence of CO2 proceding from plant residue decomposition in the soil on isotopic ratio 13C/12c and plant development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, D.

    1987-01-01

    To determine the effect of plant incorporated in the soil on the microclimate of plant growth, an experiment was carried out in greenhouse and then under field conditions. Plant residue of C-3 crops δ 13 C = - 27.6 0 /00, was incorporated in the soil. This altered the isotopic composition of the CO 2 in soil air and in atmospheric air of soil layers adjacent to the surface. The soil air CO 2 isotopic composition showed that approximately 79% carbon was from the incorporated organic matter and 50% to 3% in O to 30 cm layers, respectively, in the atmospheric air adjacent to the surface. The isotopic ratio 13 C/ 12 C of plants cultivated in soil with incorporated organic matter was determined and it was noted that the envolved CO 2 was photosynthetically absorved by the plants during growth. CO 2 contribution from organic matter to the isotopic composition of C-4 plants varied from 33% to 13% during growth. Plants cultivated in soil with organic matter had a better development than those cultivated in natural soil. Productivity was on average 50% greater than the control plants. (author) [pt

  11. Determination of symbiotic nitrogen fixation by labelling the soil atmosphere with sup(15)N sub(2) at low isotope enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivelin, P.C.O.

    1982-01-01

    A direct method to determine the total symbiotic nitrogen fixation during the leguminous plants cycles has been, developed, by labelling the soil atmosphere with sup(15)N sub(2) at low isotope enrichment, of about 1 atom % excess. The soil explored by the root system of leguminous plants was confined by means of a chamber in the field and by sealed pots in greenhouse experiments in order to maintain the soil air labelled with sup(15)N sub(2). The average sup(15)N concentration in the soil atmosphere, necessary to calculate dinitrogen fixation, was obtained by integration of the exponential functions of isotope dilution. Those functions were obtained by periodic sampling and analysis of the N sub(2) in the soil atmosphere. The field experiment with labelled atmosphere was carried out from the 22 sup(nd) to the 31 sup(st) day of the bean crop cycle and 5.5 mg N/plant (24% of total plant N) was derived from fixation. In pot experiments, under greenhouse conditions, integrated determination of fixation was made in Phaseolus beans (from the 19 sup(th) to the 67 sup(th) day from planting) and in soybeans (from the 24 sup(th) to the 70 sup(th) day from planting). The soil atmosphere was labelled with sup(15)N sub(2) in both cases. Average fixation obtained for Phaseolus beans was 80 mg N/plant (65% of total plant N) and for soybeans 265 mg N/plant (71% of total plant N). Evaluation of the basic concept of the isotope dilution method to determine nitrogen fixation in pots experiments, as proposed by Fried and Middelboe (1977) has also been made in the present paper. Simultaneous determinations of fixation in soybeans, using the isotope dilution method of Fried and Middelboe, natural variation of the sup(15)N/ sup(14)N ratios, and total-N differences, indicated the same results for pot experiments, harvested at the end of the plant cycle. (author)

  12. Magnetic Measurements of Atmospheric Dust Deposition in Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapička, Aleš; Petrovský, Eduard; Grison, Hana; Podrázský, Vilém; Křížek, Pavel

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric dust of anthropogenic origin contains significant portion of minerals characterized by ferrimagnetic properties [1,2]. These minerals, mostly iron oxides, can serve as tracers of industrial pollutants in soil layers. Moreover, recent results, e.g., [3,4] show significant correlation between concentration-dependent magnetic parameters (e.g., low-field magnetic susceptibility) and concentration of heavy metals (e.g., Pb, Zn, Cd). In our paper we have investigated magnetic properties of depth soil profiles from Krušné hory Mountains (Czech Republic), which belong to a highly contaminated, so-called Black Triangle in central Europe. Emissions are determined by considerable concentration of big sources of pollution (power plants burning fossil fuel, metallurgical and chemical industry). Increased values of magnetic susceptibility (25 - 200 × 10-5 SI) were clearly identified in the top-soil layers. Thermomagnetic analyses and SEM observation indicate that the accumulated anthropogenic ferrimagnetics dominate these layers. Magnetic enhancement is limited to depths of 4-7 cm below the soil surface, usually in F-H or top of Ah soil horizons; deeper soil horizons contain mainly magnetically weak materials and are characterized by much lower values of susceptibility (up to 30 × 10-5 SI). Significant magnetic parameters (e.g., Curie temperature Tc) and SEM results of contaminated topsoils are comparable with magnetic parameters of atmospheric dust, collected (using high-volume samplers) at the same localities.

  13. Inorganic carbon fluxes across the vadose zone of planted and unplanted soil mesocosms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Eike Marie; Jacques, D.; Jessen, S.

    2014-01-01

    The efflux of carbon dioxide (CO2) from soils influences atmospheric CO2 concentrations and thereby climate change. The partitioning of inorganic carbon (C) fluxes in the vadose zone between emission to the atmosphere and to the groundwater was investigated to reveal controlling underlying...... mechanisms. Carbon dioxide partial pressure in the soil gas (pCO(2)), alkalinity, soil moisture and temperature were measured over depth and time in unplanted and planted (barley) mesocosms. The dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) percolation flux was calculated from the pCO(2), alkalinity and the water flux...... to calculate the soil CO2 production. Carbon dioxide fluxes were modeled using the HP1 module of the Hydrus 1-D software. The average CO2 effluxes to the atmosphere from unplanted and planted mesocosm ecosystems during 78 days of experiment were 0.1 +/- 0.07 and 4.9 +/- 0.07 mu mol Cm-2 s(-1), respectively...

  14. Plants increase laccase activity in soil with long-term elevated CO2 legacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Partavian, Asrin; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Vestergård, Mette

    2015-01-01

    [CO2] stimulate laccase activity. We incubated soil exposed to seven years of elevated or ambient field [CO2] in ambient or elevated [CO2] chambers for six months either with or without plants (Deschampsia flexuosa). Elevated chamber [CO2] increased D. flexuosa production and belowground respiration....... Interestingly, plants also grew larger in soil with an elevated [CO2] legacy. Plants stimulated soil microbial biomass, belowground respiration and laccase activity, and the plant-induced laccase stimulation was particularly apparent in soil exposed to long-term elevated [CO2] in the field, whereas laccase......Actively growing plants can stimulate mineralization of recalcitrant soil organic matter (SOM), and increased atmospheric [CO2] can further enhance such plant-mediated SOM degradation. Laccases are central for recalcitrant SOM decomposition, and we therefore hypothesized that plants and elevated...

  15. Challenges in tracing the fate and effects of atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon deposition in vascular plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desalme, Dorine; Binet, Philippe; Chiapusio, Geneviève

    2013-05-07

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous organic pollutants that raise environmental concerns because of their toxicity. Their accumulation in vascular plants conditions harmful consequences to human health because of their position in the food chain. Consequently, understanding how atmospheric PAHs are taken up in plant tissues is crucial for risk assessment. In this review we synthesize current knowledge about PAH atmospheric deposition, accumulation in both gymnosperms and angiosperms, mechanisms of transfer, and ecological and physiological effects. PAHs emitted in the atmosphere partition between gas and particulate phases and undergo atmospheric deposition on shoots and soil. Most PAH concentration data from vascular plant leaves suggest that contamination occurs by both direct (air-leaf) and indirect (air-soil-root) pathways. Experimental studies demonstrate that PAHs affect plant growth, interfering with plant carbon allocation and root symbioses. Photosynthesis remains the most studied physiological process affected by PAHs. Among scientific challenges, identifying specific physiological transfer mechanisms and improving the understanding of plant-symbiont interactions in relation to PAH pollution remain pivotal for both fundamental and applied environmental sciences.

  16. On-line stable isotope measurements during plant and soil gas exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakir, D.

    2001-01-01

    Recent techniques for on-line stable isotope measurements during plant and soil exchange of CO 2 and/or water vapor are briefly reviewed. For CO 2 , these techniques provide means for on-line measurements of isotopic discrimination during CO 2 exchange by leaves in the laboratory and in the field, of isotopic discrimination during soil respiration and during soil-atmosphere CO 2 exchange, and of isotopic discrimination in O 2 during plant respiration. For water vapor, these techniques provide means to measure oxygen isotopic composition of water vapor during leaf transpiration and for the analysis of sub microliter condensed water vapor samples. Most of these techniques involve on-line sampling of CO 2 and water vapor from a dynamic, intact soil or plant system. In the laboratory, these systems also allow on-line isotopic analysis by continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The information obtained with these on-line techniques is becoming increasingly valuable, and often critical, for ecophysiologial research and in the study of biosphere-atmosphere interactions. (author)

  17. Agricultural soil fumigation as a source of atmospheric methyl bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, K; Williams, J; Wang, N Y; Cicerone, R J

    1993-09-15

    Methyl bromide (MeBr) is used increasingly as a biocidal fumigant, primarily in agricultural soils prior to planting of crops. This usage carries potential for stratospheric ozone reduction due to Br atom catalysis, depending on how much MeBr escapes from fumigated soils to the atmosphere and on details of atmospheric chemical reactions. We present direct field measurements of MeBr escape; 87% of the applied MeBr was emitted within 7 days after a commercial fumigation. Covering the field with plastic sheets retarded MeBr escape somewhat but first-day losses were still 40%; thicker sections of sheets were relatively more effective than thin sections. We also measured gaseous MeBr concentrations versus depth in the soil column; these profiles display diffusion-like evolution. In soil, MeBr is partitioned among gas, liquid, and adsorbed solid phases. Calculated soil inventories agreed only roughly with applied amounts, probably due to nonequilibrium partitioning (during the first 30 min) and to uncertainties in partitioning coefficients. Fumigated fields may release less MeBr if they are covered by more gas-tight plastic films, if injection techniques are improved and injection is deeper, and if soil moistures, organic amounts, and densities are greater than in the soil studied here.

  18. Elevated atmospheric CO2 increases microbial growth rates and enzymes activity in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Blagodatsky, Sergey; Dorodnikov, Maxim; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2010-05-01

    Increasing the belowground translocation of assimilated carbon by plants grown under elevated CO2 can cause a shift in the structure and activity of the microbial community responsible for the turnover of organic matter in soil. We investigated the long-term effect of elevated CO2 in the atmosphere on microbial biomass and specific growth rates in root-free and rhizosphere soil. The experiments were conducted under two free air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) systems: in Hohenheim and Braunschweig, as well as in the intensively managed forest mesocosm of the Biosphere 2 Laboratory (B2L) in Oracle, AZ. Specific microbial growth rates (μ) were determined using the substrate-induced respiration response after glucose and/or yeast extract addition to the soil. We evaluated the effect of elevated CO2 on b-glucosidase, chitinase, phosphatase, and sulfatase to estimate the potential enzyme activity after soil amendment with glucose and nutrients. For B2L and both FACE systems, up to 58% higher μ were observed under elevated vs. ambient CO2, depending on site, plant species and N fertilization. The μ-values increased linearly with atmospheric CO2 concentration at all three sites. The effect of elevated CO2 on rhizosphere microorganisms was plant dependent and increased for: Brassica napus=Triticum aestivumyeast extract then for those growing on glucose, i.e. the effect of elevated CO2 was smoothed on rich vs. simple substrate. So, the r/K strategies ratio can be better revealed by studying growth on simple (glucose) than on rich substrate mixtures (yeast extract). After adding glucose, enzyme activities under elevated CO2 were 1.2-1.9-fold higher than under ambient CO2. This indicates the increased activity of microorganisms, which leads to accelerated C turnover in soil under elevated CO2. Our results clearly showed that the functional characteristics of the soil microbial community (i.e. specific growth rates and enzymes activity) rather than total microbial biomass

  19. The propagation of a soil H218O labeling through the atmosphere-plant-soil system under drought using H218O and C18OO as two independent proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, Matthias; Sturm, Patrick; Hammerle, Albin; Siegwolf, Rolf; Gentsch, Lydia; Buchmann, Nina; Knohl, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Above- and belowground processes in plants are tightly coupled via carbon and water flows through the atmosphere-plant-soil system. While recent studies elucidated the influence of drought on the carbon flow through plant and soil using 13C, much less is known about the propagation of 18O. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the timing and intensity of 18O enrichment in soil and shoot CO2 and H2O vapor fluxes of European beech saplings (Fagus sylvatica L.) after applying 18O-labeled water to the soil. A custom-made chamber system, separating shoot from soil compartments, allowed independent measurements of shoot and soil related processes in a controlled climate chamber environment. Gas-exchange of oxygen stable isotopes in CO2 and H2O-vapor served as the main tool for investigation and was monitored in real-time using laser spectroscopy. This is the first study measuring concurrently and continuously the enrichment of 18O in CO2 and H2O in shoot- and soil gas-exchange after applying 18O-labeled water to the soil. Photosynthesis (A) and stomatal conductance (gs) of drought-stressed plants showed an immediate coinciding small increase to the H218O irrigation event after only ~30 min. This rapid information transfer, however, was not accompanied by the arrival of 18O labeled water molecules within the shoot. The actual label induced 18O enrichment in transpired water and CO2 occurred not until ~4h after labeling. Further, the timing of the enrichment of 18O in the transpirational flux was similar in both treatments, thus pointing to similar transport rates. However, drought reduced the 18O exchange rate between H2O and CO2at the shoot level, likely caused by a smaller leaf CO2retroflux. Moreover, 18O exchange between H2O and CO2 occurred also in the soil. However, the there was no difference observed between the treatments.

  20. The balance of distribution and conversion of pentachlorophenal 14C in rice plants and soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, U.; Scheunert, I.; Korte, F.

    1981-01-01

    Rice plants were cultivated in a climatic chamber in vessels with 7-8 kg soil which was contaminated with 14 C pentachlorophenol. The soil was flooded with water during the growth period. The test was carried out until the rice plants were ripe. All parts of the system (atmosphere, straw and ears, roots and stubble, infiltration water, soil and washing water from the roots) were then investigated for their 14 C content. It could be seen that pentachlorophenol does not belong to the so-called 'persistant' environmental chemicals. After a period of vegetation, only about 1% of the initial substance is found in the plant/soil system. Besides the volatility of the initial substance and/or decomposition products into the atmosphere, a stepwise reductive dechlorination takes place in the soil and plants and finally the residues are bonded in a specific form to soil and plants. Residues can occur in the rice grains after soil treatment of rice cultures which also are largely bonded and cannot be chemically characterized. Its toxicological significance has not been thoroughly investigated. The question of the long-term consequences of the bonded residues still needs extensive research despite the favourable conclusion that can be drawn from this study on environmental behaviour of pentachlorophenol. (orig.) [de

  1. Effects of metal pollutants on magnetic and chemical properties of soils and plant biomass: experimental studies in Environmental Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Birendra

    Understanding the interactions and effects of biotic and abiotic factors on magnetic parameter measurements used to assess levels of pollutants requires experimental analysis of potential individual parameters. Using magnetic and chemical measurements, three separate experimental studies were conducted in order to evaluate the separate and combined effects of soil composition, atmospheric exposure, and contaminant levels on soil magnetic susceptibility (MS) measurements, plant growth and metal uptake by plants. Experiment 1 examined the effects of incorporating an artificial Fe-rich contaminant into a synthetic soil on surficial soil magnetic properties and plant growth inside a greenhouse. Periodic measurements of surficial soil MS showed significant decreases in MS values in the three treatments (two levels of Fe-contamination and controls), with the greatest reduction in soils with the most contamination, and the least in controls. Three potential causes were suggested: Fe uptake by plants, magnetic minerals transformation, and downward migration of Fe-particles. Some arguments for the first two causes were discussed; however, the third possibility was separately evaluated in the second and third experiments. In the follow-up study (Experiment 2) conducted to examine the effects of ambient atmospheric pollution on magnetic and chemical properties of soils and plant biomass, the overall surficial soil MS was found to be significantly higher in synthetic soils exposed to a natural atmosphere in comparison to controls placed in a greenhouse. Root biomass samples taken from the exposed soils had much higher trace/heavy metal concentrations. Such increases in soil MS and bioavailability of metals in the exposed soils indicate that atmospheric pollution affected the soil and plants grown in there. Microscopic observations of Fe-rich particles from the post-harvest exposed soil revealed morphologies similar to Fe-containing particulates from power plants and

  2. Impacts of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on vegetation and soils in Joshua Tree National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.B. Allen; L. Rao; R.J. Steers; A. Bytnerowicz; M.E. Fenn

    2009-01-01

    The western Mojave Desert is downwind of nitrogen emissions from coastal and inland urban sources, especially automobiles. The objectives of this research were to measure reactive nitrogen (N) in the atmosphere and soils along a N-deposition gradient at Joshua Tree National Park and to examine its effects on invasive and native plant species. Atmospheric nitric acid (...

  3. Energy balance at the soil atmosphere interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi, M; Hepburn, B.D.P.; Thomas, HR; Vardon, P.J.

    2016-01-01

    Soil atmospheric interactions play an important role within the thermal energy balance and seasonal temperature variations of the ground. This paper presents a formulation for the surface boundary conditions related to interactions between soil and atmosphere. The boundary condition formulated

  4. Modeling stomatal conductance in the earth system: linking leaf water-use efficiency and water transport along the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonan, G. B.; Williams, M.; Fisher, R. A.; Oleson, K. W.

    2014-09-01

    The Ball-Berry stomatal conductance model is commonly used in earth system models to simulate biotic regulation of evapotranspiration. However, the dependence of stomatal conductance (gs) on vapor pressure deficit (Ds) and soil moisture must be empirically parameterized. We evaluated the Ball-Berry model used in the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) and an alternative stomatal conductance model that links leaf gas exchange, plant hydraulic constraints, and the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum (SPA). The SPA model simulates stomatal conductance numerically by (1) optimizing photosynthetic carbon gain per unit water loss while (2) constraining stomatal opening to prevent leaf water potential from dropping below a critical minimum. We evaluated two optimization algorithms: intrinsic water-use efficiency (ΔAn /Δgs, the marginal carbon gain of stomatal opening) and water-use efficiency (ΔAn /ΔEl, the marginal carbon gain of transpiration water loss). We implemented the stomatal models in a multi-layer plant canopy model to resolve profiles of gas exchange, leaf water potential, and plant hydraulics within the canopy, and evaluated the simulations using leaf analyses, eddy covariance fluxes at six forest sites, and parameter sensitivity analyses. The primary differences among stomatal models relate to soil moisture stress and vapor pressure deficit responses. Without soil moisture stress, the performance of the SPA stomatal model was comparable to or slightly better than the CLM Ball-Berry model in flux tower simulations, but was significantly better than the CLM Ball-Berry model when there was soil moisture stress. Functional dependence of gs on soil moisture emerged from water flow along the soil-to-leaf pathway rather than being imposed a priori, as in the CLM Ball-Berry model. Similar functional dependence of gs on Ds emerged from the ΔAn/ΔEl optimization, but not the ΔAn /gs optimization. Two parameters (stomatal efficiency and root hydraulic

  5. An analytical model for soil-atmosphere feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefli, B.; Van der Ent, R.J.; Woods, R.; Savenije, H.H.G.

    2012-01-01

    Soil-atmosphere feedback is a key for understanding the hydrological cycle and the direction of potential system changes. This paper presents an analytical framework to study the interplay between soil and atmospheric moisture, using as input only the boundary conditions at the upstream end of

  6. Model development for prediction of soil water dynamics in plant production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhengfeng; Jin, Huixia; Zhang, Kefeng

    2015-09-01

    Optimizing water use in agriculture and medicinal plants is crucially important worldwide. Soil sensor-controlled irrigation systems are increasingly becoming available. However it is questionable whether irrigation scheduling based on soil measurements in the top soil could make best use of water for deep-rooted crops. In this study a mechanistic model was employed to investigate water extraction by a deep-rooted cabbage crop from the soil profile throughout crop growth. The model accounts all key processes governing water dynamics in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Results show that the subsoil provides a significant proportion of the seasonal transpiration, about a third of water transpired over the whole growing season. This suggests that soil water in the entire root zone should be taken into consideration in irrigation scheduling, and for sensor-controlled irrigation systems sensors in the subsoil are essential for detecting soil water status for deep-rooted crops.

  7. Mycorrhiza-mediated competition between plants and decomposers drives soil carbon storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averill, Colin; Turner, Benjamin L; Finzi, Adrien C

    2014-01-23

    Soil contains more carbon than the atmosphere and vegetation combined. Understanding the mechanisms controlling the accumulation and stability of soil carbon is critical to predicting the Earth's future climate. Recent studies suggest that decomposition of soil organic matter is often limited by nitrogen availability to microbes and that plants, via their fungal symbionts, compete directly with free-living decomposers for nitrogen. Ectomycorrhizal and ericoid mycorrhizal (EEM) fungi produce nitrogen-degrading enzymes, allowing them greater access to organic nitrogen sources than arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. This leads to the theoretical prediction that soil carbon storage is greater in ecosystems dominated by EEM fungi than in those dominated by AM fungi. Using global data sets, we show that soil in ecosystems dominated by EEM-associated plants contains 70% more carbon per unit nitrogen than soil in ecosystems dominated by AM-associated plants. The effect of mycorrhizal type on soil carbon is independent of, and of far larger consequence than, the effects of net primary production, temperature, precipitation and soil clay content. Hence the effect of mycorrhizal type on soil carbon content holds at the global scale. This finding links the functional traits of mycorrhizal fungi to carbon storage at ecosystem-to-global scales, suggesting that plant-decomposer competition for nutrients exerts a fundamental control over the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  8. Mycorrhizal mediation of plant response to atmospheric change: Air quality concepts and research considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, S R; Schoeneberger, M M

    1991-01-01

    The term 'global climate change' encompasses many physical and chemical changes in the atmosphere that have been induced by anthropogenic pollutants. Increases in concentrations of CO2 and CH4 enhance the 'greenhouse effect' of the atmosphere and may contribute to changes in temperature and precipitation patterns at the earth's surface. Nitrogen oxides and SO2 are phytotoxic and also react with other pollutants to produce other phytotoxins in the troposphere such as O3 and acidic substances. However, release of chlorofluorocarbons into the atmosphere may cause depletion of stratospheric O3, increasing the transmittance of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation to the earth's surface. Increased intensities of UV-B could affect plants and enhance photochemical reactions that generate some phytotoxic pollutants. The role of mycorrhizae in plant responses to such stresses has received little attention. Although plans for several research programs have acknowledged the importance of drought tolerance and soil fertility in plant responses to atmospheric stresses, mycorrhizae are rarely targeted to receive specific investigation. Most vascular land plants form mycorrhizae, so the role of mycorrhizae in mediating plant responses to atmospheric change may be an important consideration in predicting effects of atmospheric changes on plants in managed and natural ecosystems.

  9. The Role of Plant Water Storage on Water Fluxes within the Coupled Soil-Plant-Atmosphere System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C. W.; Duman, T.; Parolari, A.; Katul, G. G.

    2015-12-01

    Plant water storage (PWS) contributes to whole-plant transpiration (up to 50%), especially in large trees and during severe drought conditions. PWS also can impact water-carbon economy as well as the degree of resistance to drought. A 1-D porous media model is employed to accommodate transient water flow through the plant hydraulic system. This model provides a mechanistic representation of biophysical processes constraining water transport, accounting for plant hydraulic architecture and the nonlinear relation between stomatal aperture and leaf water potential when limited by soil water availability. Water transport within the vascular system from the stem base to the leaf-lamina is modeled using Richards's equation, parameterized with the hydraulic properties of the plant tissues. For simplicity, the conducting flow in the radial direction is not considered here and the capacitance at the leaf-lamina is assumed to be independent of leaf water potential. The water mass balance in the leaf lamina sets the upper boundary condition for the flow system, which links the leaf-level transpiration to the leaf water potential. Thus, the leaf-level gas exchange can be impacted by soil water availability through the water potential gradient from the leaf lamina to the soil, and vice versa. The root water uptake is modeled by a multi-layered macroscopic scheme to account for possible hydraulic redistribution (HR) in certain conditions. The main findings from the model calculations are that (1) HR can be diminished by the residual water potential gradient from roots to leaves at night due to aboveground capacitance, tree height, nocturnal transpiration or the combination of the three. The degree of reduction depends on the magnitude of residual water potential gradient; (2) nocturnal refilling to PWS elevates the leaf water potential that subsequently delays the onset of drought stress at the leaf; (3) Lifting water into the PWS instead of HR can be an advantageous strategy

  10. Soil inoculation method determines the strength of plant-soil interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorde, van de T.F.J.; Ruijten, M.; Putten, van der W.H.; Bezemer, T.M.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that interactions between plants and biotic components of the soil influence plant productivity and plant community composition. Many plant–soil feedback experiments start from inoculating relatively small amounts of natural soil to sterilized bulk soil. These soil

  11. Advances of study on atmospheric methane oxidation (consumption) in forest soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chen-rui; SHI Yi; YANG Xiao-ming; WU Jie; YUE Jin

    2003-01-01

    Next to CO2, methane (CH4) is the second important contributor to global warming in the atmosphere and global atmospheric CH4 budget depends on both CH4 sources and sinks. Unsaturated soil is known as a unique sink for atmospheric CH4 in terrestrial ecosystem. Many comparison studies proved that forest soil had the biggest capacity of oxidizing atmospheric CH4 in various unsaturated soils. However, up to now, there is not an overall review in the aspect of atmospheric CH4 oxidation (consumption) in forest soil. This paper analyzed advances of studies on the mechanism of atmospheric CH4 oxidation, and related natural factors (Soil physical and chemical characters, temperature and moisture, ambient main greenhouse gases concentrations, tree species, and forest fire) and anthropogenic factors (forest clear-cutting and thinning, fertilization, exogenous aluminum salts and atmospheric deposition, adding biocides, and switch of forest land use) in forest soils. It was believed that CH4 consumption rate by forest soil was limited by diffusion and sensitive to changes in water status and temperature of soil. CH4 oxidation was also particularly sensitive to soil C/N, Ambient CO2, CH4 and N2O concentrations, tree species and forest fire. In most cases, anthropogenic disturbances will decrease atmospheric CH4 oxidation, thus resulting in the elevating of atmospheric CH4. Finally, the author pointed out that our knowledge of atmospheric CH4 oxidation (consumption) in forest soil was insufficient. In order to evaluate the contribution of forest soils to atmospheric CH4 oxidation and the role of forest played in the process of global environmental change, and to forecast the trends of global warming exactly, more researchers need to studies further on CH4 oxidation in various forest soils of different areas.

  12. Variability of atmospheric depositions of artificial radioelements and their transfer into soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourcelot, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    In this Habilitation thesis, I present the results and prospects of the main research topics that contribute to bettering our knowledge of the behaviour of artificial radioelements in the geosphere and biosphere. In the first chapter I present a summary of the research carried out for my thesis on the Oklo reactors. In the subsequent chapters I present my research work at the IRSN. The second chapter concerns the atmospheric depositions of radioactive contaminants. I have studied the principal environmental parameters involved in the empirical modelling of the transfer of artificial radioelements from the atmosphere to the soil. Here I essentially use measurements of artificial radioelements ( 137 Cs, plutonium, americium) in soils that reveal the variability of accidental depositions further to the Chernobyl disaster (paragraph 2.1) and chronic radioactive depositions coming from the atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons (paragraph 2.2). In the third chapter I address the problem of transfers of artificial radioelements into the soil. The interest of this lies in the fact that these transfers represent serious risks for man. Taken over the long term (in the months and years that follow the depositing of radioactive elements on the ground and plants), the transfers of radioactive pollutants into the soil are responsible for the contamination of both plants (transfer via the roots) and underground water and surface water (transfer after vertical migration). My research work into the transfers of radioactive pollutants in soils is centred on vertical migrations and root transfers, as both these processes can be studied through environmental samplings and measurements. More precisely, I have studied the migrations of radioactive pollutants and their geochemical analogues in different types of soils (paragraph 3.1) and the variability of the activities of radiostrontium and radiocesium in the compartments of permanent grassland zones (soil, grass, milk and cheese

  13. New estimates of oxygen isotope fractionation by plants and soils - Implications for the isotopic composition of the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angert, A.; Luz, B.

    2002-01-01

    Oxygen concentration and δ 18 O of O 2 have been monitored in light and heavy soils. Steep oxygen gradients were present at the heavy soil site (minimal O 2 concentration was 1% at 150cm depth) and δ 18 O values typically ranged from 0 per mille to -1.6 per mille relative to air O 2 . In the light-soil site, the O 2 concentration was 20.38% to 20.53% and δ 18 O values ranged from -0.06±0.015 per mille to 0.06±0.015 per mille relative to atmospheric O 2 . The fractionation in soil respiration was estimated from the observed [O 2 ] and δ 18 O profiles and their change with time by a five-box numerical model. Diffusion due to concentration and temperature gradients was taken into account. Good agreement was found between the model results and the measured values. The average discrimination against 18 O in the two study sites was 12±1 per mille. The current understanding of the composition of air O 2 attributes the magnitude of the fractionation in soil respiration to biochemical mechanisms alone. Thus the discrimination against 18 O is assumed to be 18 per mille in cyanide-sensitive dark respiration and 25 per mille to 30 per mille in cyanide-resistant respiration. The discrimination we report is significantly less than in dark respiration. This overall low discrimination is explained by slow diffusion in soil aggregates, and in root tissues that results in low O 2 concentration in the consumption site. Since about half of the terrestrial respiration occurs in soils, our new discrimination estimate lowers significantly the discrimination value for terrestrial uptake. Higher then currently assumed discrimination was found in experiments with illuminated plants. This high discrimination might compensate for the low discrimination found in soils. (author)

  14. Exploring the Role of Plant Genetics to Enhance Soil Carbon Sequestration in Hybrid Poplar Plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wullschleger, S. D.; Garten, C. T.; Classen, A. T.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentrations have increased in recent decades and are projected to increase even further during the coming century. These projections have prompted scientists and policy-makers to consider how plants and soils can be used to stabilize CO2 concentrations. Although storing carbon in terrestrial ecosystems represents an attractive near-term option for mitigating rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations, enhancing the sequestration potential of managed systems will require advancements in understanding the fundamental mechanisms that control rates of carbon transfer and turnover in plants and soils. To address this challenge, a mathematical model was constructed to evaluate how changes in particular plant traits and management practices could affect soil carbon storage beneath hybrid poplar (Populus) plantations. The model was built from four sub-models that describe aboveground biomass, root biomass, soil carbon dynamics, and soil nitrogen transformations for trees growing throughout a user-defined rotation. Simulations could be run over one or multiple rotations. A sensitivity analysis of the model indicated changes in soil carbon storage were affected by variables that could be linked to hybrid poplar traits like rates of aboveground production, partitioning of carbon to coarse and fine roots, and rates of root decomposition. A higher ratio of belowground to aboveground production was especially important and correlated directly with increased soil carbon storage. Faster decomposition rates for coarse and fine dead roots resulted in a greater loss of carbon to the atmosphere as CO2 and less residual organic carbon for transfer to the fast soil carbon pool. Hence, changes in root chemistry that prolonged dead root decomposition rates, a trait that is under potential genetic control, were predicted to increase soil carbon storage via higher soil carbon inputs. Nitrogen limitation of both aboveground biomass production and soil carbon sequestration was

  15. FAO/IAEA interregional training course on the use of isotope and radiation techniques in studies on soil/plant relationships with emphasis on soil water management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The document presents an outline and programme schedule for the FAO/IAEA Inter-regional Training Workshop on the Use of Isotope and Radiation Techniques in Studies on Soil-Plant Relationships held in Vienna, 1 June - 9 July 1993. The major topics include instrumentation and radiometric assay, liquid scintillation counting, isotope techniques in fertilizer use efficiency and nitrogen fixation, crop-soil-water-atmosphere relations. General topics such as plant growth, water requirement and soil erosion processes are also covered

  16. FAO/IAEA interregional training course on the use of isotope and radiation techniques in studies on soil/plant relationships with emphasis on soil water management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The document presents an outline and programme schedule for the FAO/IAEA Inter-regional Training Workshop on the Use of Isotope and Radiation Techniques in Studies on Soil-Plant Relationships held in Vienna, 1 June - 9 July 1993. The major topics include instrumentation and radiometric assay, liquid scintillation counting, isotope techniques in fertilizer use efficiency and nitrogen fixation, crop-soil-water-atmosphere relations. General topics such as plant growth, water requirement and soil erosion processes are also covered

  17. The exchange of acetaldehyde between plants and the atmosphere: Stable carbon isotope and flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Kolby Jeremiah

    The exchange of acetaldehyde between plant canopies and the atmosphere may significantly influence regional atmospheric chemistry and plant metabolism. While plants are known to both produce and consume acetaldehyde, the exchange of this compound with forested ecosystems is complicated by physical, biological, and chemical processes that range from being poorly understood to completely unknown. This precludes a quantitative understanding of acetaldehyde exchange rates between the atmosphere and the biosphere. In this study, the processes controlling the exchange of acetaldehyde with plant canopies was investigated using concentration, flux, and natural abundance 13C measurements of gas phase acetaldehyde from individual plants, soils, and entire ecosystems. Although previously only considered important in anoxic tissues, it was discovered that acetaldehyde is produced and consumed in leaves through ethanolic fermentation coupled to the pyruvate dehydrogenase bypass system under normal aerobic conditions. These coupled pathways determine the acetaldehyde compensation point, a major factor controlling its exchange with the atmosphere. Carbon isotope analysis suggests a new pathway for acetaldehyde production from plants under stress involving the peroxidation of membrane fatty acids. This pathway may be a major source of acetaldehyde to the atmosphere from plants under biotic and abiotic stresses. Plant stomata were found to be the dominant pathway for the exchange of acetaldehyde with the atmosphere with stomatal conductance influencing both emission and uptake fluxes. In addition, increasing temperature and solar radiation was found to increase the compensation point by increasing the rates of acetaldehyde production relative to consumption. Under ambient conditions, bare soil was neutral to the exchange of acetaldehyde while senescing and decaying leaves were found to be strong source of acetaldehyde to the atmosphere due to increased decomposition processes and

  18. Atmospheric CO2 and O3 alter competition for soil nitrogen in developing forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald R. Zak; Mark E. Kubiske; Kurt S. Pregitzer; Andrew J. Burton

    2012-01-01

    Plant growth responses to rising atmospheric CO2 and O3 vary among genotypes and between species, which could plausibly influence the strength of competitive interactions for soil N. Ascribable to the size-symmetric nature of belowground competition, we reasoned that differential growth responses to CO2...

  19. Effect of different treatments on 85Sr plant uptake in various soil types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koblinger-Bokori, E.; Szerbin, P.

    2000-01-01

    In the recent years radioecological studies are concentrated on the investigation of restoration possibilities of contaminated ecosystems. These studies are aimed to develop methods for decreasing the bioavailability of the radionuclides released to the environment. Radionuclides of long half-lives, such as 90 Sr and 137 Cs, are of special importance from the point of human health, since these nuclides can enter the human body via the food-chain and increase the radiation burden for many years. 90 Sr and 137 Cs contamination of the environment may occur as a result of atmospheric releases during nuclear accidents. For instance, considerable amounts were released to the atmosphere during the Chernobyl reactor accident. In the presented study strontium plant uptake from different types of soil was investigated. To avoid the difficulties related to 90 Sr determination, the gamma-emitting strontium isotope 85 Sr is used at the experiments (no isotopic effect takes place). The plant selected is yellow leguminous bean. Most typical Hungarian soils (leached Ramann brown forest soil, alluvial soil, chernozem-light sandy soil and calcareous chernozem soil) were selected for the experiments carried out under laboratory conditions. Results are presented in relation to major soil characteristics. Effects of two different treatments: lime and organic matter fertilizations on plant uptake are given. The highest uptake was found in bean grown on leached Ramann brown forest soil, whereas the lowest value was measured in the plant grown in calcareous chernozem soil. Organic fertilization significantly reduced the uptake of radiostrontium in all investigated types of soil. The largest factor of reduction was found to be as high as 3.5. Lime fertilization was less effective. Our study clearly demonstrates that carefully selected post-accident treatments (e.g. organic fertilization following strontium contamination) can significantly reduce the environmental consequences of

  20. Diffusional limits to the consumption of atmospheric methane by soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striegl, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    Net transport of atmospheric gases into and out of soil systems is primarily controlled by diffusion along gas partial pressure gradients. Gas fluxes between soil and the atmosphere can therefore be estimated by a generalization of the equation for ordinary gaseous diffusion in porous unsaturated media. Consumption of CH4 by methylotrophic bacteria in the top several centimeters of soil causes the uptake of atmospheric CH4 by aerated soils. The capacity of the methylotrophs to consume CH4 commonly exceeds the potential of CH4 to diffuse from the atmosphere to the consumers. The maximum rate of uptake of atmospheric CH4 by soil is, therefore, limited by diffusion and can be calculated from soil physical properties and the CH4 concentration gradient. The CH4 concentration versus depth profile is theoretically described by the equation for gaseous diffusion with homogeneous chemical reaction in porous unsaturated media. This allows for calculation of the in situ rate of CH4 consumption within specified depth intervals.

  1. Deposition rates of atmospheric particulates determined from 210Pb measurements in soils and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likuku, A. S.; Branford, D.

    2011-01-01

    Deposition rates of atmospheric particles were determined using previously published 210P b data in soils and air. The dry deposition velocities for moorland and woodland soils were 2.2 ± 1.8 and 9 ± 2 mm · s - 1 , respectively. The 210P b concentration in rain was calculated to be 94 ± 10 mBq · L - 1. The large (∼ 4 times) deposition velocities in woodland relative to moorland soils is an indication of the degree of accumulation of particles, and most possibly contaminants within woodland soils, which is of practical importance in the mitigation of pollutant concentrations in urban areas by planting trees. (authors)

  2. Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and Drought Affect Soil Microbial Community and Functional Diversity Associated with Glycine max

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junfeng Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Under the background of climate change, the increase of atmospheric CO2 and drought frequency have been considered as significant influencers on the soil microbial communities and the yield and quality of crop. In this study, impacts of increased ambient CO2 and drought on soil microbial structure and functional diversity of a Stagnic Anthrosol were investigated in phytotron growth chambers, by testing two representative CO2 levels, three soil moisture levels, and two soil cover types (with or without Glycine max. The 16S rDNA and 18S rDNA fragments were amplified to analyze the functional diversity of fungi and bacteria. Results showed that rhizosphere microbial biomass and community structure were significantly affected by drought, but effects differed between fungi and bacteria. Drought adaptation of fungi was found to be easier than that of bacteria. The diversity of fungi was less affected by drought than that of bacteria, evidenced by their higher diversity. Severe drought reduced soil microbial functional diversity and restrained the metabolic activity. Elevated CO2 alone, in the absence of crops (bare soil, did not enhance the metabolic activity of soil microorganisms. Generally, due to the co-functioning of plant and soil microorganisms in water and nutrient use, plants have major impacts on the soil microbial community, leading to atmospheric CO2 enrichment, but cannot significantly reduce the impacts of drought on soil microorganisms.

  3. Carbon flux from plants to soil microbes is highly sensitive to nitrogen addition and biochar amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, C.; Solaiman, Z. M.; Kilburn, M. R.; Clode, P. L.; Fuchslueger, L.; Koranda, M.; Murphy, D. V.

    2012-04-01

    The release of carbon through plant roots to the soil has been recognized as a governing factor for soil microbial community composition and decomposition processes, constituting an important control for ecosystem biogeochemical cycles. Moreover, there is increasing awareness that the flux of recently assimilated carbon from plants to the soil may regulate ecosystem response to environmental change, as the rate of the plant-soil carbon transfer will likely be affected by increased plant C assimilation caused by increasing atmospheric CO2 levels. What has received less attention so far is how sensitive the plant-soil C transfer would be to possible regulations coming from belowground, such as soil N addition or microbial community changes resulting from anthropogenic inputs such as biochar amendments. In this study we investigated the size, rate and sensitivity of the transfer of recently assimilated plant C through the root-soil-mycorrhiza-microbial continuum. Wheat plants associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were grown in split-boxes which were filled either with soil or a soil-biochar mixture. Each split-box consisted of two compartments separated by a membrane which was penetrable for mycorrhizal hyphae but not for roots. Wheat plants were only grown in one compartment while the other compartment served as an extended soil volume which was only accessible by mycorrhizal hyphae associated with the plant roots. After plants were grown for four weeks we used a double-labeling approach with 13C and 15N in order to investigate interactions between C and N flows in the plant-soil-microorganism system. Plants were subjected to an enriched 13CO2 atmosphere for 8 hours during which 15NH4 was added to a subset of split-boxes to either the root-containing or the root-free compartment. Both, 13C and 15N fluxes through the plant-soil continuum were monitored over 24 hours by stable isotope methods (13C phospho-lipid fatty acids by GC-IRMS, 15N/13C in bulk plant

  4. Influence of the soil-atmosphere exchange on the hydric profile induced in soil-structure system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Al Qadad

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil-atmosphere exchange leads to a moisture change in the soil. This can cause major damage to engineering structures due to the soil expansion and shrinkage. The soil-atmosphere exchange is related to several parameters, in particular the soil characteristics and climate conditions. The presence of an engineering structure causes a variation of the hydraulic profile in the soil, which can lead to heterogeneous soil movement and consequently to structural damage. This paper presents a coupled numerical model based on the consideration of both water flow in unsaturated soils and soil-atmosphere exchange. After the validation of the model, the paper presents its use for the analysis of the influence of the presence of structures on moisture change induced under climatic conditions recorded in a semi-arid region. Analysis shows that the presence of the structure leads to important change in the moisture distribution, in particular in the vicinity of the structure.

  5. Old-field Community, Climate and Atmospheric Manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aimee Classen

    2009-11-01

    We are in the process of finishing a number of laboratory, growth chamber and greenhouse projects, analyzing data, and writing papers. The projects reported addressed these subjects: How do climate and atmospheric changes alter aboveground plant biomass and community structure; Effects of multiple climate changes factors on plant community composition and diversity: what did we learn from a 5-year open-top chamber experiment using constructed old-field communities; Do atmospheric and climatic change factors interact to alter woody seedling emergence, establishment and productivity; Soil moisture surpasses elevated CO{sub 2} and temperature in importance as a control on soil carbon dynamics; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter belowground root and fungal biomass; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter soil microarthropod and microbial communities; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter belowground microbial function; Linking root litter diversity and microbial functioning at a micro scale under current and projected CO{sub 2} concentrations; Multifactor climate change effects on soil ecosystem functioning depend on concurrent changes in plant community composition; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter aboveground insect populations; How do climate and atmospheric changes alter festuca endophyte infection; How do climate and atmospheric changes soil carbon stabilization.

  6. Plant-plant competition outcomes are modulated by plant effects on the soil bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortal, S; Lozano, Y M; Bastida, F; Armas, C; Moreno, J L; Garcia, C; Pugnaire, F I

    2017-12-19

    Competition is a key process that determines plant community structure and dynamics, often mediated by nutrients and water availability. However, the role of soil microorganisms on plant competition, and the links between above- and belowground processes, are not well understood. Here we show that the effects of interspecific plant competition on plant performance are mediated by feedbacks between plants and soil bacterial communities. Each plant species selects a singular community of soil microorganisms in its rhizosphere with a specific species composition, abundance and activity. When two plant species interact, the resulting soil bacterial community matches that of the most competitive plant species, suggesting strong competitive interactions between soil bacterial communities as well. We propose a novel mechanism by which changes in belowground bacterial communities promoted by the most competitive plant species influence plant performance and competition outcome. These findings emphasise the strong links between plant and soil communities, paving the way to a better understanding of plant community dynamics and the effects of soil bacterial communities on ecosystem functioning and services.

  7. Plant diversity and plant identity influence Fusarium communities in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Nicholas; Kinkel, Linda; Kistler, H Corby

    2017-01-01

    Fusarium communities play important functional roles in soil and in plants as pathogens, endophytes, and saprotrophs. This study tests how rhizosphere Fusarium communities may vary with plant species, changes in the diversity of the surrounding plant community, and soil physiochemical characteristics. Fusarium communities in soil associated with the roots of two perennial prairie plant species maintained as monocultures or growing within polyculture plant communities were characterized using targeted metagenomics. Amplicon libraries targeting the RPB2 locus were generated from rhizosphere soil DNAs and sequenced using pyrosequencing. Sequences were clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and assigned a taxonomy using the Evolutionary Placement Algorithm. Fusarium community composition was differentiated between monoculture and polyculture plant communities, and by plant species in monoculture, but not in polyculture. Taxonomic classification of the Fusarium OTUs showed a predominance of F. tricinctum and F. oxysporum as well of the presence of a clade previously only found in the Southern Hemisphere. Total Fusarium richness was not affected by changes in plant community richness or correlated with soil physiochemical characteristics. However, OTU richness within two predominant phylogenetic lineages within the genus was positively or negatively correlated with soil physiochemical characteristics among samples within each lineage. This work shows that plant species, plant community richness, and soil physiochemical characteristics may all influence the composition and richness of Fusarium communities in soil.

  8. Distribution pathways of hexachlorocyclohexane isomers in a soil-plant-air system. A case study with Cynara scolymus L. and Erica sp. plants grown in a contaminated site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, R Calvelo; Monterroso, C; Macías, F; Camps-Arbestain, M

    2008-09-01

    This study focuses on the main routes of distribution and accumulation of different hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers (mainly alpha-, beta-, gamma- and delta-HCH) in a soil-plant-air system. A field assay was carried out with two plant species, Cynara scolymus L. and Erica sp., which were planted either: (i) directly in the HCH-contaminated soil; or (ii) in pots filled with uncontaminated soil, which were placed in the HCH-contaminated soil. Both plant species accumulated HCH in their tissues, with relatively higher accumulation in above-ground biomass than in roots. The beta-HCH isomer was the main isomer in all plant tissues. Adsorption of HCH by the roots from contaminated soil (soil-->root pathway) and adsorption through the aerial biomass from either the surrounding air, following volatilization of the contaminant (soil-->air-->shoot pathway), and/or contact with air-suspended particles contaminated with HCH (soil particles-->shoot pathway) were the main mechanisms of accumulation. These results may have important implications for the use of plants for reducing the transfer of contaminants via the atmosphere.

  9. Methane transport and emissions from soil as affected by water table and vascular plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhullar, Gurbir S; Iravani, Majid; Edwards, Peter J; Olde Venterink, Harry

    2013-09-08

    The important greenhouse gas (GHG) methane is produced naturally in anaerobic wetland soils. By affecting the production, oxidation and transport of methane to the atmosphere, plants have a major influence upon the quantities emitted by wetlands. Different species and functional plant groups have been shown to affect these processes differently, but our knowledge about how these effects are influenced by abiotic factors such as water regime and temperature remains limited. Here we present a mesocosm experiment comparing eight plant species for their effects on internal transport and overall emissions of methane under contrasting hydrological conditions. To quantify how much methane was transported internally through plants (the chimney effect), we blocked diffusion from the soil surface with an agar seal. We found that graminoids caused higher methane emissions than forbs, although the emissions from mesocosms with different species were either lower than or comparable to those from control mesocosms with no plant (i.e. bare soil). Species with a relatively greater root volume and a larger biomass exhibited a larger chimney effect, though overall methane emissions were negatively related to plant biomass. Emissions were also reduced by lowering the water table. We conclude that plant species (and functional groups) vary in the degree to which they transport methane to the atmosphere. However, a plant with a high capacity to transport methane does not necessarily emit more methane, as it may also cause more rhizosphere oxidation of methane. A shift in plant species composition from graminoids to forbs and/or from low to high productive species may lead to reduction of methane emissions.

  10. Soil as an archive of coal-fired power plant mercury deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Martín, José Antonio; Nanos, Nikos

    2016-05-05

    Mercury pollution is a global environmental problem that has serious implications for human health. One of the most important sources of anthropogenic mercury emissions are coal-burning power plants. Hg accumulations in soil are associated with their atmospheric deposition. Our study provides the first assessment of soil Hg on the entire Spanish surface obtained from one sampling protocol. Hg spatial distribution was analysed with topsoil samples taken from 4000 locations in a regular sampling grid. The other aim was to use geostatistical techniques to verify the extent of soil contamination by Hg and to evaluate presumed Hg enrichment near the seven Spanish power plants with installed capacity above 1000 MW. The Hg concentration in Spanish soil fell within the range of 1-7564 μg kg(-1) (mean 67.2) and 50% of the samples had a concentration below 37 μg kg(-1). Evidence for human activity was found near all the coal-fired power plants, which reflects that metals have accumulated in the basin over many years. Values over 1000 μg kg(-1) have been found in soils in the vicinity of the Aboño, Soto de Ribera and Castellon power plants. However, soil Hg enrichment was detectable only close to the emission source, within an approximate range of only 15 km from the power plants. We associated this effect with airborne emissions and subsequent depositions as the potential distance through fly ash deposition. Hg associated with particles of ash tends to be deposited near coal combustion sources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Atmosphere-soil-vegetation model including CO2 exchange processes: SOLVEG2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Haruyasu

    2004-11-01

    A new atmosphere-soil-vegetation model named SOLVEG2 (SOLVEG version 2) was developed to study the heat, water, and CO 2 exchanges between the atmosphere and land-surface. The model consists of one-dimensional multilayer sub-models for the atmosphere, soil, and vegetation. It also includes sophisticated processes for solar and long-wave radiation transmission in vegetation canopy and CO 2 exchanges among the atmosphere, soil, and vegetation. Although the model usually simulates only vertical variation of variables in the surface-layer atmosphere, soil, and vegetation canopy by using meteorological data as top boundary conditions, it can be used by coupling with a three-dimensional atmosphere model. In this paper, details of SOLVEG2, which includes the function of coupling with atmosphere model MM5, are described. (author)

  12. Isotopes in soil-plant nutrition studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1962-01-01

    Radioisotopes have greatly facilitated investigating the characteristics of plant nutrients in the soil, in measuring soil moisture, in studying the uptake of nutrients by plants and in devising efficient methods of fertilizer application, and are now being widely used in soil-plant nutrition research. A recent international symposium on the use of radioisotopes in soil-plant nutrition studies showed the varied ways in which isotopes can contribute to agricultural production by helping to investigate soil characteristics and soil-plant relationships. The symposium, jointly sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, was held in Bombay from 26 February to 2 March 1962, at the invitation of the Government of India

  13. Simulation models: a current indispensable tool in studies of the continuous water-soil-plant - atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Seijas, Teresa; Gonzalez, Felicita; Cid, G.; Osorio, Maria de los A.; Ruiz, Maria Elena

    2008-01-01

    Full text: This work assesses the current use of simulation models as a tool useful and indispensable for the advancement in the research and study of the processes related to the continuous water-soil - plant-atmosphere. In recent years they have reported in the literature many jobs where these modeling tools are used as a support to the decision-making process of companies or organizations in the agricultural sphere and in Special for the design of optimal management of irrigation and fertilization strategies of the crops. Summarizes some of the latest applications reported with respect to the use of water transfers and solutes, such simulation models mainly to nitrate leaching and groundwater contamination problems. On the other hand also summarizes important applications of simulation models of growth of cultivation for the prediction of effects on the performance of different conditions of water stress, and finally some other applications on the management of the different irrigation technologies as kingpins, superfiail irrigation and drip irrigation. Refer also the main work carried out in Cuba. (author)

  14. Effect of top soil wettability on water evaporation and plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Bharat; Shah, D O; Mishra, Brijesh; Joshi, P A; Gandhi, Vimal G; Fougat, R S

    2015-07-01

    In general, agricultural soil surfaces being hydrophilic in nature get easily wetted by water. The water beneath the soil moves through capillary effect and comes to the surface of the soil and thereafter evaporates into the surrounding air due to atmospheric conditions such as sunlight, wind current, temperature and relative humidity. To lower the water loss from soil, an experiment was designed in which a layer of hydrophobic soil was laid on the surface of ordinary hydrophilic soil. This technique strikingly decreased loss of water from the soil. The results indicated that the evaporation rate significantly decreased and 90% of water was retained in the soil in 83 h by the hydrophobic layer of 2 cm thickness. A theoretical calculation based on diffusion of water vapour (gas phase) through hydrophobic capillaries provide a meaningful explanation of experimental results. A greater retention of water in the soil by this approach can promote the growth of plants, which was confirmed by growing chick pea (Cicer arietinum) plants and it was found that the length of roots, height of shoot, number of branches, number of leaves, number of secondary roots, biomass etc. were significantly increased upon covering the surface with hydrophobic soil in comparison to uncovered ordinary hydrophilic soil of identical depth. Such approach can also decrease the water consumption by the plants particularly grown indoors in residential premises, green houses and poly-houses etc. and also can be very useful to prevent water loss and enhance growth of vegetation in semi-arid regions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of different treatments on {sup 85}Sr plant uptake in various soil types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koblinger-Bokori, E.; Szerbin, P. [' Frederic Joliot-Curie' National Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, Budapest (Hungary)

    2000-05-01

    In the recent years radioecological studies are concentrated on the investigation of restoration possibilities of contaminated ecosystems. These studies are aimed to develop methods for decreasing the bioavailability of the radionuclides released to the environment. Radionuclides of long half-lives, such as {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs, are of special importance from the point of human health, since these nuclides can enter the human body via the food-chain and increase the radiation burden for many years. {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs contamination of the environment may occur as a result of atmospheric releases during nuclear accidents. For instance, considerable amounts were released to the atmosphere during the Chernobyl reactor accident. In the presented study strontium plant uptake from different types of soil was investigated. To avoid the difficulties related to {sup 90}Sr determination, the gamma-emitting strontium isotope {sup 85}Sr is used at the experiments (no isotopic effect takes place). The plant selected is yellow leguminous bean. Most typical Hungarian soils (leached Ramann brown forest soil, alluvial soil, chernozem-light sandy soil and calcareous chernozem soil) were selected for the experiments carried out under laboratory conditions. Results are presented in relation to major soil characteristics. Effects of two different treatments: lime and organic matter fertilizations on plant uptake are given. The highest uptake was found in bean grown on leached Ramann brown forest soil, whereas the lowest value was measured in the plant grown in calcareous chernozem soil. Organic fertilization significantly reduced the uptake of radiostrontium in all investigated types of soil. The largest factor of reduction was found to be as high as 3.5. Lime fertilization was less effective. Our study clearly demonstrates that carefully selected post-accident treatments (e.g. organic fertilization following strontium contamination) can significantly reduce the

  16. The photosynthetic response of tobacco plants overexpressing ice plant aquaporin McMIPB to a soil water deficit and high vapor pressure deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Miki; Hanba, Yuko T; Katsuhara, Maki

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the photosynthetic capacity and plant growth of tobacco plants overexpressing ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.) aquaporin McMIPB under (1) a well-watered growth condition, (2) a well-watered and temporal higher vapor pressure deficit (VPD) condition, and (3) a soil water deficit growth condition to investigate the effect of McMIPB on photosynthetic responses under moderate soil and atmospheric humidity and water deficit conditions. Transgenic plants showed a significantly higher photosynthesis rate (by 48 %), higher mesophyll conductance (by 52 %), and enhanced growth under the well-watered growth condition than those of control plants. Decreases in the photosynthesis rate and stomatal conductance from ambient to higher VPD were slightly higher in transgenic plants than those in control plants. When plants were grown under the soil water deficit condition, decreases in the photosynthesis rate and stomatal conductance were less significant in transgenic plants than those in control plants. McMIPB is likely to work as a CO2 transporter, as well as control the regulation of stomata to water deficits.

  17. Soil availability, plant uptake and soil to plant transfer of 99Tc-- A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, Roy; Willey, Neil

    2003-01-01

    The fission yield of 99 Tc from 239 Pu and 235 U is similar to that of 137 Cs or 90 Sr and it is therefore an important component of nuclear weapons fall-out, nuclear waste and releases from nuclear facilities. There is particular current interest in 99 Tc transfer from soil to plants for: (a) environmental impact assessments for terrestrial nuclear waste repositories, and (b) assessments of the potential for phytoextraction of radionuclides from contaminated effluent and soil. Vascular plants have high 99 Tc uptake capacity, a strong tendency to transport it to shoot material and accumulate it in vegetative rather than reproductive structures. The mechanisms that control 99 Tc entry to plants have not been identified and there has been little discussion of the potential for phytoextraction of 99 Tc contaminated effluents or soil. Here we review soil availability, plant uptake mechanisms and soil to plant transfer of 99 Tc in the light of recent advances in soil science, plant molecular biology and phytoextraction technologies. We conclude that 99 Tc might not be highly available in the long term from up to 50% of soils worldwide, and that no single mechanism that might be easily targeted by recombinant DNA technologies controls 99 Tc uptake by plants. Overall, we suggest that Tc might be less available in terrestrial ecosystems than is often assumed but that nevertheless the potential of phytoextraction as a decontamination strategy is probably greater for 99 Tc than for any other nuclide of radioecological interest

  18. Validation of a spatial–temporal soil water movement and plant water uptake model

    KAUST Repository

    HEPPELL, J.

    2014-06-01

    © 2014, (publisher). All rights reserved. Management and irrigation of plants increasingly relies on accurate mathematical models for the movement of water within unsaturated soils. Current models often use values for water content and soil parameters that are averaged over the soil profile. However, many applications require models to more accurately represent the soil–plant–atmosphere continuum, in particular, water movement and saturation within specific parts of the soil profile. In this paper a mathematical model for water uptake by a plant root system from unsaturated soil is presented. The model provides an estimate of the water content level within the soil at different depths, and the uptake of water by the root system. The model was validated using field data, which include hourly water content values at five different soil depths under a grass/herb cover over 1 year, to obtain a fully calibrated system for plant water uptake with respect to climate conditions. When compared quantitatively to a simple water balance model, the proposed model achieves a better fit to the experimental data due to its ability to vary water content with depth. To accurately model the water content in the soil profile, the soil water retention curve and saturated hydraulic conductivity needed to vary with depth.

  19. Competition overwhelms the positive plant-soil feedback generated by an invasive plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Kerri M; Knight, Tiffany M

    2017-01-01

    Invasive plant species can modify soils in a way that benefits their fitness more than the fitness of native species. However, it is unclear how competition among plant species alters the strength and direction of plant-soil feedbacks. We tested how community context altered plant-soil feedback between the non-native invasive forb Lespedeza cuneata and nine co-occurring native prairie species. In a series of greenhouse experiments, we grew plants individually and in communities with soils that differed in soil origin (invaded or uninvaded by L. cuneata) and in soils that were live vs. sterilized. In the absence of competition, L. cuneata produced over 60% more biomass in invaded than uninvaded soils, while native species performance was unaffected. The absence of a soil origin effect in sterile soil suggests that the positive plant-soil feedback was caused by differences in the soil biota. However, in the presence of competition, the positive effect of soil origin on L. cuneata growth disappeared. These results suggest that L. cuneata may benefit from positive plant-soil feedback when establishing populations in disturbed landscapes with few interspecific competitors, but does not support the hypothesis that plant-soil feedbacks influence competitive outcomes between L. cuneata and native plant species. These results highlight the importance of considering whether competition influences the outcome of interactions between plants and soils.

  20. Soil compaction and growth of woody plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, T.T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States). Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy and Management

    1999-07-01

    Although soil compaction in the field may benefit or inhibit the growth of plants, the harmful effects are much more common. This paper emphasizes the deleterious effects of predominantly high levels of soil compaction on plant growth and yield. High levels of soil compaction are common in heavily used recreation areas, construction sites, urban areas, timber harvesting sites, fruit orchards, agroforestry systems and tree nurseries. Compaction can occur naturally by settling or slumping of soil or may be induced by tillage tools, heavy machinery, pedestrian traffic, trampling by animals and fire. Compaction typically alters soil structure and hydrology by increasing soil bulk density; breaking down soil aggregates; decreasing soil porosity, aeration and infiltration capacity; and by increasing soil strength, water runoff and soil erosion. Appreciable compaction of soil leads to physiological dysfunctions in plants. Often, but not always, reduced water absorption and leaf water deficits develop. Soil compaction also induces changes in the amounts and balances of growth hormones in plants, especially increases in abscisic acid and ethylene. Absorption of the major mineral nutrients is reduced by compaction of both surface soils and subsoils. The rate of photosynthesis of plants growing in very compacted soil is decreased by both stomatal and non-stomatal inhibition. Total photosynthesis is reduced as a result of smaller leaf areas. As soils become increasingly compacted respiration of roots shifts toward an anaerobic state. Severe soil compaction adversely influences regeneration of forest stands by inhibiting seed germination and growth of seedlings, and by inducing seedling mortality. Growth of woody plants beyond the seedling stage and yields of harvestable plant products also are greatly decreased by soil compaction because of the combined effects of high soil strength, decreased infiltration of water and poor soil aeration, all of which lead to a decreased

  1. Soil compaction and growth of woody plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlowski, T.T.

    1999-01-01

    Although soil compaction in the field may benefit or inhibit the growth of plants, the harmful effects are much more common. This paper emphasizes the deleterious effects of predominantly high levels of soil compaction on plant growth and yield. High levels of soil compaction are common in heavily used recreation areas, construction sites, urban areas, timber harvesting sites, fruit orchards, agroforestry systems and tree nurseries. Compaction can occur naturally by settling or slumping of soil or may be induced by tillage tools, heavy machinery, pedestrian traffic, trampling by animals and fire. Compaction typically alters soil structure and hydrology by increasing soil bulk density; breaking down soil aggregates; decreasing soil porosity, aeration and infiltration capacity; and by increasing soil strength, water runoff and soil erosion. Appreciable compaction of soil leads to physiological dysfunctions in plants. Often, but not always, reduced water absorption and leaf water deficits develop. Soil compaction also induces changes in the amounts and balances of growth hormones in plants, especially increases in abscisic acid and ethylene. Absorption of the major mineral nutrients is reduced by compaction of both surface soils and subsoils. The rate of photosynthesis of plants growing in very compacted soil is decreased by both stomatal and non-stomatal inhibition. Total photosynthesis is reduced as a result of smaller leaf areas. As soils become increasingly compacted respiration of roots shifts toward an anaerobic state. Severe soil compaction adversely influences regeneration of forest stands by inhibiting seed germination and growth of seedlings, and by inducing seedling mortality. Growth of woody plants beyond the seedling stage and yields of harvestable plant products also are greatly decreased by soil compaction because of the combined effects of high soil strength, decreased infiltration of water and poor soil aeration, all of which lead to a decreased

  2. Distribution pathways of hexachlorocyclohexane isomers in a soil-plant-air system. A case study with Cynara scolymus L. and Erica sp. plants grown in a contaminated site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvelo Pereira, R.; Monterroso, C.; Macias, F.; Camps-Arbestain, M.

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on the main routes of distribution and accumulation of different hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers (mainly α-, β-, γ- and δ-HCH) in a soil-plant-air system. A field assay was carried out with two plant species, Cynara scolymus L. and Erica sp., which were planted either: (i) directly in the HCH-contaminated soil; or (ii) in pots filled with uncontaminated soil, which were placed in the HCH-contaminated soil. Both plant species accumulated HCH in their tissues, with relatively higher accumulation in above-ground biomass than in roots. The β-HCH isomer was the main isomer in all plant tissues. Adsorption of HCH by the roots from contaminated soil (soil → root pathway) and adsorption through the aerial biomass from either the surrounding air, following volatilization of the contaminant (soil → air → shoot pathway), and/or contact with air-suspended particles contaminated with HCH (soil particles → shoot pathway) were the main mechanisms of accumulation. These results may have important implications for the use of plants for reducing the transfer of contaminants via the atmosphere. - Hexachlorocyclohexane isomers are preferentially accumulated in above-ground tissues of plants grown in a heavily contaminated site

  3. Natural abundance N stable isotopes in plants and soils as an indicator of N deposition hotspots in urban environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trammell, T. L.

    2017-12-01

    The natural abundance of stable isotopes in plants and soils has been utilized to understand ecological phenomenon. Foliar δ15N is an integrator of soil δ15N, atmospheric N sources, and fractionation processes that occur during plant N uptake, plant N assimilation, and mycorrhizal associations. The amount of reactive N in the environment has greatly increased due to human activities, and urban ecosystems experience excess N deposition that can have cascading effects on plants and soils. Foliar δ15N has been shown to increase with increasing N deposition and nitrification rates suggesting increased foliar δ15N occurs with greater N inputs as a result of accelerated soil N cycling. Thus, foliar δ15N can be an indication of soil N availability for plant uptake and soil N cycling rates, since high N availability results in increased soil N cycling and subsequent loss of 14N. Limited research has utilized foliar and soil δ15N in urban forests to assess the importance of plant uptake of atmospheric N deposition and to gain insight about ecosystem processes. Previous investigations found foliar δ15N of mature trees in urban forests is not only related to elevated pollutant-derived N deposition, but also to soil N availability and soil N cycling rates. Similarly, enriched foliar δ15N of urban saplings was attributed to soil characteristics that indicated higher nitrification, thus, greater nitrate leaching and low N retention in the urban soils. These studies demonstrate the need for measuring the δ15N of various plant and soil N sources while simultaneously measuring soil N processes (e.g., net nitrification rates) in order to use natural abundance δ15N of plants and soils to assess N sources and cycling in urban forests. A conceptual framework that illustrates biogenic and anthropogenic controls on nitrogen isotope composition in urban plants and soils will be presented along with foliar and soil δ15N from urban forests across several cities as a proof of

  4. Soil and terrestrial biology studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Soil and terrestrial biology studies focused on developing an understanding of the uptake of gaseous substances from the atmosphere by plants, biodegradation of oil, and the movement of Pu in the terrestrial ecosystems of the southeastern United States. Mathematical models were developed for SO 2 and tritium uptake from the atmosphere by plants; the uptake of tritium by soil microorganisms was measured; and the relationships among the Pu content of soil, plants, and animals of the Savannah River Plant area were studied. Preliminary results are reported for studies on the biodegradation of waste oil on soil surfaces

  5. Parameterization of radiocaesium soil-plant transfer using soil characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konoplev, A. V.; Drissner, J.; Klemt, E.; Konopleva, I. V.; Zibold, G.

    1996-01-01

    A model of radionuclide soil-plant transfer is proposed to parameterize the transfer factor by soil and soil solution characteristics. The model is tested with experimental data on the aggregated transfer factor T ag and soil parameters for 8 forest sites in Baden-Wuerttemberg. It is shown that the integral soil-plant transfer factor can be parameterized through radiocaesium exchangeability, capacity of selective sorption sites and ion composition of the soil solution or the water extract. A modified technique of (FES) measurement for soils with interlayer collapse is proposed. (author)

  6. Simultaneous state-parameter estimation supports the evaluation of data assimilation performance and measurement design for soil-water-atmosphere-plant system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shun; Shi, Liangsheng; Zha, Yuanyuan; Williams, Mathew; Lin, Lin

    2017-12-01

    Improvements to agricultural water and crop managements require detailed information on crop and soil states, and their evolution. Data assimilation provides an attractive way of obtaining these information by integrating measurements with model in a sequential manner. However, data assimilation for soil-water-atmosphere-plant (SWAP) system is still lack of comprehensive exploration due to a large number of variables and parameters in the system. In this study, simultaneous state-parameter estimation using ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) was employed to evaluate the data assimilation performance and provide advice on measurement design for SWAP system. The results demonstrated that a proper selection of state vector is critical to effective data assimilation. Especially, updating the development stage was able to avoid the negative effect of ;phenological shift;, which was caused by the contrasted phenological stage in different ensemble members. Simultaneous state-parameter estimation (SSPE) assimilation strategy outperformed updating-state-only (USO) assimilation strategy because of its ability to alleviate the inconsistency between model variables and parameters. However, the performance of SSPE assimilation strategy could deteriorate with an increasing number of uncertain parameters as a result of soil stratification and limited knowledge on crop parameters. In addition to the most easily available surface soil moisture (SSM) and leaf area index (LAI) measurements, deep soil moisture, grain yield or other auxiliary data were required to provide sufficient constraints on parameter estimation and to assure the data assimilation performance. This study provides an insight into the response of soil moisture and grain yield to data assimilation in SWAP system and is helpful for soil moisture movement and crop growth modeling and measurement design in practice.

  7. Volatilization of iodine from soils and plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildung, R.E.; Cataldo, D.A.; Garland, T.R.

    1985-04-01

    Elevated levels of 129 I, a long-lived fission product, are present in the environment as a result of nuclear weapons testing and fuel reprocessing. To aid in understanding the anomalous behavior of this element, relative to natural I ( 127 I), in the vicinity of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, preliminary laboratory-growth chamber studies were undertaken to examine the possible formation of volatile inorganic and organic I species in soil and plant systems. Inorganic 129 I added to soil was volatilized from both the soil and plant during plant growth, at average ratios of 2 x 10 -3 %/day soil and 9 x 10 -3 %/day foliage, respectively. Volatilization rates from soil were an order of magnitude less in the absence of growing roots. Less than 2% of soil or plant volatiles was subsequently retained by plant canopies. Volatile I, chemically characterized by selective sorption methods, consisted principally of alkyl iodides formed by both soil and plant processes. However, plants and soils containing actively growing roots produced a larger fraction of volatile inorganic I than soil alone. 14 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  8. Atmospheric Deposition of Heavy Metals in Soil Affected by Different Soil Uses of Southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, J. A.; Faz, A.; Martínez-Martínez, S.; Bech, J.

    2009-04-01

    Heavy metals are a natural constituent of rocks, sediments and soils. However, the heavy metal content of top soils is also dependent on other sources than weathering of the indigenous minerals; input from atmospheric deposition seems to be an important pathway. Atmospheric deposition is defined as the process by which atmospheric pollutants are transferred to terrestrial and aquatic surfaces and is commonly classified as either dry or wet. The interest in atmospheric deposition has increased over the past decade due to concerns about the effects of deposited materials on the environment. Dry deposition provides a significant mechanism for the removal of particles from the atmosphere and is an important pathway for the loading of heavy metals into the soil ecosystem. Within the last decade, an intensive effort has been made to determine the atmospheric heavy metal deposition in both urban and rural areas. The main objective of this study was to identification of atmospheric heavy metals deposition in soil affected by different soil uses. Study area is located in Murcia Province (southeast of Spain), in the surroundings of Murcia City. The climate is typically semiarid Mediterranean with an annual average temperature of 18°C and precipitation of 350 mm. In order to determine heavy metals atmospheric deposition a sampling at different depths (0-1 cm, 1-5 cm, 5-15 cm and 15-30 cm) was carried out in 7 sites including agricultural soils, two industrial areas and natural sites. The samples were taken to the laboratory where, dried, passed through a 2 mm sieve, and grinded. For the determination of the moisture the samples were weighed and oven dried at 105 °C for 24 h. The total amounts of metals (Pb, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Mn, Ni and Cr) were determined by digesting the samples with nitric/perchoric acids and measuring with ICP-MS. Results showed that zinc contamination in some samples of industrial areas was detected, even this contamination reaches 30 cm depth; thus it is

  9. The effect of elevated CO2 and temperature on nutrient uptake by plants grown in basaltic soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasenor Iribe, E.; Dontsova, K.; Juarez, S.; Le Galliard, J. F.; Chollet, S.; Llavata, M.; Massol, F.; Barré, P.; Gelabert, A.; Daval, D.; Troch, P.; Barron-Gafford, G.; Van Haren, J. L. M.; Ferrière, R.

    2017-12-01

    Mineral weathering is an important process in soil formation. The interactions between the hydrologic, geologic and atmospheric cycles often determine the rate at which weathering occurs. Elements and nutrients weathered from the soil by water can be removed from soils in the runoff and seepage, but they can also remain in situ as newly precipitated secondary minerals or in biomass as a result of plant uptake. Here we present data from an experiment that was conducted at the controlled environment facility, Ecotron Ile-de-France (Saint-Pierre-les-Nemours, France) that studied mineral weathering and plant growth in granular basaltic material with high glass content that is being used to simulate soil in large scale Biosphere 2 Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO) project. The experiment used 3 plant types: velvet mesquite (Prosopis velutina), green spangletop (Leptochloa dubia), and alfalfa (Medicago sativa), which were grown under varying temperature and CO2 conditions. We hypothesized that plants grown under warmer, higher CO2 conditions would have larger nutrient concentrations as more mineral weathering would occur. Results of plant digestions and analysis showed that plant concentrations of lithogenic elements were significantly influenced by the plant type and were different between above- and below-ground parts of the plant. Temperature and CO2 treatment effects were less pronounced, but we observed significant temperature effect on plant uptake. A number of major and trace elements showed increase in concentration with increase in temperature at elevated atmospheric CO2. Effect was observed both in the shoots and in the roots, but more significant differences were observed in the shoots. Results presented here indicate that climate change would have strong effect on plant uptake and mobility of weathered elements during soil formation and give further evidence of interactions between abiotic and biological processes in terrestrial ecosystems.

  10. Radiocarbon of Respired CO2 Following Fire in Alaskan Boreal Forest: Can Disturbance Release Old Soil Carbon to the Atmosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuur, E. A.; Randerson, J. A.; Fessenden, J.; Trumbore, S. E.

    2002-12-01

    Fire in the boreal forest releases carbon stored in vegetation and soil to the atmosphere. Following fire, microbial decomposition is stimulated by inputs of plant detritus and changes in soil microclimate, which can result in large losses of carbon. Furthermore, warmer summer soil temperatures and deeper thaw depths in burned ecosystems may make carbon that was previously climatically protected by low soil temperatures susceptible to decomposition. We used radiocarbon measurements to estimate the age of carbon released by soil respiration following fire in two black spruce (Picea mariana) forests in interior Alaska that burned during the summer of 1999. To isolate soil respiration, we established manipulated plots where vegetation was prevented from recolonizing, and paired control plots in nearby unburned forest. Soil respiration radiocarbon signatures in the burned manipulation ranged from +112\\permil to +192\\permil and differed significantly from the unburned controls that ranged from +100\\permil to +130\\permil. Burned plots appear to respire older carbon than unburned forest, which could either be due to the stimulation of decomposition of intermediate age soil organic matter pools, to the lack of plant respiration that reflects the atmospheric radiocarbon signature of +92\\permil, or both. At least during the initial phase following fire, these data suggest that carbon fluxes from soil are dominated by soil organic matter pools with decadal scale turnover times.

  11. Transuranic element behavior in soils and plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildung, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The principal objective of this study is to define soil, plant, and foliar interaction processes that influence the availability of transuranic elements to agricultural plants and animals as a basis for improved modeling and dose-assessment. Major areas of emphasis are: (1) soil and soil-microbial processes that influence the concentration and form of transuranic elements in soil solutions and availability to the plant root with time; (2) deposition and plant interception of airborne submicronic particles containing transuranic elements and their susceptibility to leaching; (3) plant processes that influence transport across plant root membrane and foliar surfaces, as well as the form and sites of deposition of transuranic elements in mature plants; and (4) the integrated effect of soil and plant processes on transuranic element availability to, and form in, animals that consume plants

  12. Electro-chemistry of soil formation. VI. Atmospheric salts in relation to soil and peat formation and plant composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattson, S; Sandberg, G; Terning, P E

    1944-01-01

    The Ca/Mg ratios have been determined in the Ramna bog, in the Unden and Annerstad podzol profile series, and in the Dala brown earth series. A number of plant species from each locality have been included. The more ombrogenic the formation, the lower the Ca/Mg ratios. An application of the Donnan equilibrium leads to the conclusion that the saturation with bases may be considerable in ombrogenic peat, whereas the saturation of excessively leached mineral soils must be very small. The latter must, like all weak or unsaturated soil acidoids in general, contain a relatively high proportion of exchangeable alkali cations.

  13. Atmospheric heavy metal deposition accumulated in rural forest soils of southern Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovmand, Mads Frederik; Kemp, Kaare; Kystol, J.

    2008-01-01

    Thirty-three years of measurements of atmospheric heavy metal (HM) deposition (bulk precipitation) in Denmark combined with European emission inventories form the basis for calculating a 50-year accumulated atmospheric input to a remote forest plantation on the island of Laesoe. Soil samples taken...... in atmospheric deposition and in soils. The accumulated atmospheric deposition is of the same magnitude as the increase of these metals in the top soil....

  14. Behaviour of transuranic radionuclides in soils, plants and soil-plant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyas, B.N.; Mistry, K.B.

    1996-01-01

    The present paper reviews the investigations undertaken to elucidate the physicochemical, edaphic and physiological aspects of the behaviour of long-lived transuranic radionuclides 239 Pu and 241 Am in typical Indian soils and soil-plant systems. 23 refs

  15. Hotspots of soil N2O emission enhanced through water absorption by plant residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravchenko, A.N.; Toosi, E.R.; Guber, A.K.; Ostrom, N.E.; Yu, J.; Azeem, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Robertson , G.P. (UAF Pakistan); (UC); (Hubei); (MSU)

    2017-06-05

    N2O is a highly potent greenhouse gas and arable soils represent its major anthropogenic source. Field-scale assessments and predictions of soil N2O emission remain uncertain and imprecise due to the episodic and microscale nature of microbial N2O production, most of which occurs within very small discrete soil volumes. Such hotspots of N2O production are often associated with decomposing plant residue. Here we quantify physical and hydrological soil characteristics that lead to strikingly accelerated N2O emissions in plant residue-induced hotspots. Results reveal a mechanism for microscale N2O emissions: water absorption by plant residue that creates unique micro-environmental conditions, markedly different from those of the bulk soil. Moisture levels within plant residue exceeded those of bulk soil by 4–10-fold and led to accelerated N2O production via microbial denitrification. The presence of large (Ø >35 μm) pores was a prerequisite for maximized hotspot N2O production and for subsequent diffusion to the atmosphere. Understanding and modelling hotspot microscale physical and hydrologic characteristics is a promising route to predict N2O emissions and thus to develop effective mitigation strategies and estimate global fluxes in a changing environment.

  16. Microbial activities in forest soils exposed to chronic depositions from a lignite power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klose, S.; Wernecke, K.D.; Makeschin, F. [Technical University of Dresden, Tharandt (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    Atmospheric emissions of fly ash and SO{sub 2} from lignite-fired power plants strongly affect large forest areas in Germany. The impact of different deposition loads on the microbial biomass and enzyme activities was studied at three forest sites (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) along an emission gradient of 3, 6, and 15 km downwind of a coal-fired power plant, representing high, moderate and low emission rates. An additional site at a distance of 3 km from the power plant was chosen to study the influence of forest type on microbial parameters in coniferous forest soils under fly ash and SO{sub 2} emissions. Soil microbial biomass C and N, CO{sub 2} evolved and activities of L-asparaginase, L-glutaminase, beta-glucosidase, acid phosphatase and arylsulfatase (expressed on dry soil and organic C basis) were determined in the forest floor (L, Of and Oh horizon) and mineral top soil (0-10 cm). It is concluded that chronic fly ash depositions decrease litter decomposition by influencing specific microbial and enzymatic processes in forest soils.

  17. Investigating the origin of Pb pollution in a terrestrial soil-plant-snail food chain by means of Pb isotope ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notten, M.J.M. [Institute of Ecological Science, Department of System Ecology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV, Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: m.notten@nunhems.com; Walraven, N. [Faculty of Geosciences, Department of Earth Sciences/Geochemistry, University of Utrecht, Budapestlaan 4, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Beets, C.J. [Institute of Earth Sciences, Department of Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vroon, P. [Institute of Earth Sciences, Department of Petrology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rozema, J.; Aerts, R. [Institute of Ecological Science, Department of System Ecology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-06-15

    Lead isotope ratios were used to trace the origin of Pb in a soil-plant (Urtica dioica)-snail (Cepaea nemoralis) food chain in two polluted locations in the floodplains of the rivers Meuse and Rhine (Biesbosch National Park) and one reference location in the Netherlands. Lead isotope ratios and concentrations were determined in soil, litter, plant leaves, snails, rainwater and airborne particulate matter. Anthropogenic Pb in the soils of all locations was found to be derived from deposition of Pb polluted river sediments. Discharging rivers influenced the reference location before being reclaimed from the sea. The river sediment contains anthropogenic Pb from various sources related to industrial activities in the hinterland of the rivers Meuse and Rhine. Lead in the atmosphere contributed substantially to Pb pollution and Pb transfer in plant leaves and snails in all locations. Lead pollution in plant leaves and snails can be explained from a mixture of river sediment-Pb and atmospheric Pb from various transfer routes that involve low concentrations.

  18. Investigating the origin of Pb pollution in a terrestrial soil-plant-snail food chain by means of Pb isotope ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notten, M.J.M.; Walraven, N.; Beets, C.J.; Vroon, P.; Rozema, J.; Aerts, R.

    2008-01-01

    Lead isotope ratios were used to trace the origin of Pb in a soil-plant (Urtica dioica)-snail (Cepaea nemoralis) food chain in two polluted locations in the floodplains of the rivers Meuse and Rhine (Biesbosch National Park) and one reference location in the Netherlands. Lead isotope ratios and concentrations were determined in soil, litter, plant leaves, snails, rainwater and airborne particulate matter. Anthropogenic Pb in the soils of all locations was found to be derived from deposition of Pb polluted river sediments. Discharging rivers influenced the reference location before being reclaimed from the sea. The river sediment contains anthropogenic Pb from various sources related to industrial activities in the hinterland of the rivers Meuse and Rhine. Lead in the atmosphere contributed substantially to Pb pollution and Pb transfer in plant leaves and snails in all locations. Lead pollution in plant leaves and snails can be explained from a mixture of river sediment-Pb and atmospheric Pb from various transfer routes that involve low concentrations

  19. Interactive effects of preindustrial, current and future atmospheric CO2 concentrations and temperature on soil fungi associated with two Eucalyptus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ian C; Drigo, Barbara; Keniry, Kerry; Ghannoum, Oula; Chambers, Susan M; Tissue, David T; Cairney, John W G

    2013-02-01

    Soil microbial processes have a central role in global fluxes of the key biogenic greenhouse gases and are likely to respond rapidly to climate change. Whether climate change effects on microbial processes lead to a positive or negative feedback for terrestrial ecosystem resilience is unclear. In this study, we investigated the interactive effects of [CO(2)] and temperature on soil fungi associated with faster-growing Eucalyptus saligna and slower-growing Eucalyptus sideroxylon, and fungi that colonised hyphal in-growth bags. Plants were grown in native soil under controlled soil moisture conditions, while subjecting the above-ground compartment to defined atmospheric conditions differing in CO(2) concentrations (290, 400, 650 μL L(-1)) and temperature (26 and 30 °C). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequencing methods were used to examine effects on the structure of the soil fungal communities. There was no significant effect of host plant or [CO(2)]/temperature treatment on fungal species richness (α diversity); however, there was a significant effect on soil fungal community composition (β diversity) which was strongly influenced by eucalypt species. Interestingly, β diversity of soil fungi associated with both eucalypt species was significantly influenced by the elevated [CO(2) ]/high temperature treatment, suggesting that the combination of future predicted levels of atmospheric [CO(2)] and projected increases in global temperature will significantly alter soil fungal community composition in eucalypt forest ecosystems, independent of eucalypt species composition. These changes may arise through direct effects of changes in [CO(2)] and temperature on soil fungi or through indirect effects, which is likely the case in this study given the plant-dependent nature of our observations. This study highlights the role of plant species in moderating below-ground responses to future predicted changes to [CO(2)] and temperature and the

  20. Some plant extracts retarde nitrification in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul–Mehdi S. AL-ANSARI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An incubation experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of aqueous extracts of 17 plant materials on nitrification inhibition of urea- N in soil as compared with chemical inhibitor Dicyandiamide (DCD. Plant materials used in study were collected from different areas of Basrah province, south of Iraq. Aqueous extracts were prepared at ratio of 1:10 (plant material: water and added at conc. of 0.05, 0.10 and 0.20 ml g– 1 soil to loamy sand soil. DCD was added to soil at rate of 50 µg g-1 soil . Soil received urea at rate of 1000 µg N g-1 soil. Treated soils were incubated at 30 OC for 40 days. Results showed that application of all plant extracts, except those of casuarina, date palm and eucalyptus to soil retarded nitrification in soil. Caper, Sowthistle ,bladygrass and pomegranate extracts showed highest inhibition percentage (51, 42, 40 and 40 %, respectively and were found to be more effective than DCD (33 %. Highest inhibition was achieved by using those extracts at conc. of 0.1 ml g-1 soil after 10 days of incubation . Data also revealed that treated soil with these plant extracts significantly increased amount of NH4+–N and decreased amount of NO3-–N accumulation in soil compared with DCD and control treatments. Results of the study suggested a possibility of using aqueous extracts of some studied plants as potent nitrification inhibitor in soil.

  1. Plant Uptake of Atmospheric Carbonyl Sulfide in Coast Redwood Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. E.; Whelan, M. E.; Berry, J. A.; Hilton, T. W.; Zumkehr, A.; Stinecipher, J.; Lu, Y.; Kornfeld, A.; Seibt, U.; Dawson, T. E.; Montzka, S. A.; Baker, I. T.; Kulkarni, S.; Wang, Y.; Herndon, S. C.; Zahniser, M. S.; Commane, R.; Loik, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    The future resilience of coast redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens) is now of critical concern due to the detection of a 33% decline in California coastal fog over the 20th century. However, ecosystem-scale measurements of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance are challenging in coast redwood forests, making it difficult to anticipate the impacts of future changes in fog. To address this methodological problem, we explore coastal variations in atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS or OCS), which could potentially be used as a tracer of these ecosystem processes. We conducted atmospheric flask campaigns in coast redwood sites, sampling at surface heights and in the canopy ( 70 m), at the University of California Landels-Hill Big Creek Reserve and Big Basin State Park. We simulated COS atmosphere-biosphere exchange with a high-resolution 3-D model to interpret these data. Flask measurements indicated a persistent daytime drawdown between the coast and the downwind forest (45 ± 6 ppt COS) that is consistent with the expected relationship between COS plant uptake, stomatal conductance, and gross primary production. Other sources and sinks of COS that could introduce noise to the COS tracer technique (soils, anthropogenic activity, nocturnal plant uptake, and surface hydrolysis on leaves) are likely to be small relative to daytime COS plant uptake. These results suggest that COS measurements may be useful for making ecosystem-scale estimates of carbon, water, and energy exchange in coast redwood forests.

  2. Transuranic Behavior in Soils and Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildung, R.E.; Garland, T.R.; Cataldo, D.A.; Rogers, J.E.; McFadden, K.M.; McNair, V.M.; Schreckhise, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The principal objectives of these investigations are to determine (1) the potential for alteration of transuranic solubility through formation of transuranic complexes in soil and the role of the soil microflora in this process, (2) the extent of uptake nd translocation by plants and the sites of plant deposition of transuranics or their complexes, (3) the bond types and chemical forms of transuranics or their metabolites in microbes, plant tissues and soils, (4) the influence of soil properties, environmental conditions and cropping on these processes, and (5) the retention of airborne pollutants by plant foliage and their subsequent absorption by leaves and transport to seeds and roots

  3. Hazardous organic compounds in biogas plant end products-Soil burden and risk to food safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suominen, K.; Verta, M.; Marttinen, S.

    2014-01-01

    The end products (digestate, solid fraction of the digestate, liquid fraction of the digestate) of ten biogas production lines in Finland were analyzed for ten hazardous organic compounds or compound groups: polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB(7)), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH(16)), bis-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), perfluorinated alkyl compounds (PFCs), linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LASs), nonylphenols and nonylphenol ethoxylates (NP + NPEOs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA). Biogas plant feedstocks were divided into six groups: municipal sewage sludge, municipal biowaste, fat, food industry by-products, animal manure and others (consisting of milling by-products (husk) and raw former foodstuffs of animal origin from the retail trade). There was no clear connection between the origin of the feedstocks of a plant and the concentrations of hazardous organic compounds in the digestate. For PCDD/Fs and for DEHP, the median soil burden of the compound after a single addition of digestate was similar to the annual atmospheric deposition of the compound or compound group in Finland or other Nordic countries. For PFCs, the median soil burden was somewhat lower than the atmospheric deposition in Finland or Sweden. For NP + NPEOs, the soil burden was somewhat higher than the atmospheric deposition in Denmark. The median soil burden of PBDEs was 400 to 1000 times higher than the PBDE air deposition in Finland or in Sweden. With PBDEs, PFCs and HBCD, the impact of the use of end products should be a focus of further research. Highly persistent compounds, such as PBDE- and PFC-compounds may accumulate in agricultural soil after repeated use of organic fertilizers containing these compounds. For other compounds included in this study, agricultural use of biogas plant end products is unlikely to cause risk to food safety in Finland. - Highlights:

  4. Hazardous organic compounds in biogas plant end products-Soil burden and risk to food safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suominen, K., E-mail: kimmo.suominen@evira.fi [Finnish Food Safety Authority Evira, Risk Assessment Research Unit, Mustialankatu 3, 00790 Helsinki (Finland); Verta, M. [Finnish Environmental Institute (SYKE), Mechelininkatu 34a, P.O. Box 140, 00251 Helsinki (Finland); Marttinen, S. [MTT Agrifood Research Finland, 31600 Jokioinen (Finland)

    2014-09-01

    The end products (digestate, solid fraction of the digestate, liquid fraction of the digestate) of ten biogas production lines in Finland were analyzed for ten hazardous organic compounds or compound groups: polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB(7)), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH(16)), bis-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), perfluorinated alkyl compounds (PFCs), linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LASs), nonylphenols and nonylphenol ethoxylates (NP + NPEOs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA). Biogas plant feedstocks were divided into six groups: municipal sewage sludge, municipal biowaste, fat, food industry by-products, animal manure and others (consisting of milling by-products (husk) and raw former foodstuffs of animal origin from the retail trade). There was no clear connection between the origin of the feedstocks of a plant and the concentrations of hazardous organic compounds in the digestate. For PCDD/Fs and for DEHP, the median soil burden of the compound after a single addition of digestate was similar to the annual atmospheric deposition of the compound or compound group in Finland or other Nordic countries. For PFCs, the median soil burden was somewhat lower than the atmospheric deposition in Finland or Sweden. For NP + NPEOs, the soil burden was somewhat higher than the atmospheric deposition in Denmark. The median soil burden of PBDEs was 400 to 1000 times higher than the PBDE air deposition in Finland or in Sweden. With PBDEs, PFCs and HBCD, the impact of the use of end products should be a focus of further research. Highly persistent compounds, such as PBDE- and PFC-compounds may accumulate in agricultural soil after repeated use of organic fertilizers containing these compounds. For other compounds included in this study, agricultural use of biogas plant end products is unlikely to cause risk to food safety in Finland. - Highlights:

  5. Levels of tritium in soils and vegetation near Canadian nuclear facilities releasing tritium to the atmosphere: implications for environmental models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.A.; Kwamena, N.-O.A.; Ilin, M.; Wilk, M.; Clark, I.D.

    2015-01-01

    Concentrations of organically bound tritium (OBT) and tritiated water (HTO) were measured over two growing seasons in vegetation and soil samples obtained in the vicinity of four nuclear facilities and two background locations in Canada. At the background locations, with few exceptions, OBT concentrations were higher than HTO concentrations: OBT/HTO ratios in vegetation varied between 0.3 and 20 and values in soil varied between 2.7 and 15. In the vicinity of the four nuclear facilities OBT/HTO ratios in vegetation and soils deviated from the expected mean value of 0.7, which is used as a default value in environmental transfer models. Ratios of the OBT activity concentration in plants ([OBT] plant ) to the OBT activity concentration in soils ([OBT] soil ) appear to be a good indicator of the long-term behaviour of tritium in soil and vegetation. In general, OBT activity concentrations in soils were nearly equal to OBT activity concentrations in plants in the vicinity of the two nuclear power plants. [OBT] plant /[OBT] soil ratios considerably below unity observed at one nuclear processing facility represents historically higher levels of tritium in the environment. The results of our study reflect the dynamic nature of HTO retention and OBT formation in vegetation and soil during the growing season. Our data support the mounting evidence suggesting that some parameters used in environmental transfer models approved for regulatory assessments should be revisited to better account for the behavior of HTO and OBT in the environment and to ensure that modelled estimates (e.g., plant OBT) are appropriately conservative. - Highlights: • We measured tritium in soils and plants near four nuclear facilities in Canada. • OBT/HTO ratios in plants are higher than default value in environmental models. • OBT/HTO ratios in background soils reflect historically higher atmospheric tritium. • Implications for environmental transfer models are discussed

  6. Long-term decrease of atmospheric test 137Cs in the soil-prairie plant-milk pathway in southern Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuller, P.; Ellies, A.; Handl, J.

    1998-01-01

    The time dependency of nuclear test 137 Cs in soil, prairie plants, and milk was observed on pastures of seven dairy farms in the 10th Region, Chile, from 1982 to 1997, without any appreciable deposition of radioactive fallout after 1983. Whereas the 137 Cs concentration in the soil decreased at a rate close to that of the radionuclide's physical decay during the whole observation period, the rate of decrease of the 137 Cs concentration in the prairie plants and in the milk, having been very rapid between 1982--1990, became slower between 1991--1997. The effective half-lives of the concentration in plants were found to be 5.6 y and 12 y during the first and second observation periods, respectively. Similar half-lives of 5.5 y and 13 y were found for the concentration decline in milk during each period. These data clearly demonstrate a reduction in the long-term decrease of the 137 Cs plant uptake, and consequently in the decrease of the 137 Cs concentration in milk, resulting from a decline of 137 Cs availability for prairie plants in the Hapludand soils over the whole 15-y observation period

  7. Plant species and functional group effects on abiotic and microbial soil properties and plant-soil feedback responses in two grasslands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, T.M.; Lawson, C.S.; Hedlund, K.; Edwards, A.R.; Brooks, A.J.; Igual, J.M.; Mortimer, S.R.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2006-01-01

    1 Plant species differ in their capacity to influence soil organic matter, soil nutrient availability and the composition of soil microbial communities. Their influences on soil properties result in net positive or negative feedback effects, which influence plant performance and plant community

  8. Effect of different treatments on 110m Ag plant uptake in various soil types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szerbin, P.; Koblinger-Bokori, E.

    1996-01-01

    110m Ag contamination may occur as a result of atmospheric release either during normal operation of nuclear power plants or in accidental circumstances. The gamma peaks of 110m Ag and radiocaesium are very close, and not every laboratory could make distinction between them. Therefore very few references are available on 110m Ag environmental behaviour and plant uptake. In the present study plant uptake of 110m Ag from four different types of soil was investigated, and the results are presented in relation to major soil characteristics. In addition, effects of two different treatments (phosphate and organic matter fertilizations) are determined in each type of soil. Our study clearly demonstrates that a carefully selected post-accident treatment can significantly reduce the environmental consequences of radioactive releases. Methods to be developed on bases of such studies could be used for remedial actions of agricultural lands polluted with radioactive substances

  9. Soil-atmosphere interaction in unsaturated cut slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsiampousi Aikaterini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interaction between atmosphere and soil has only recently attracted significant interest. Soil-atmosphere interaction takes place under dynamic climatic conditions, which vary throughout the year and are expected to suffer considerable alterations due to climate change. However, Geotechnical Analysis has traditionally been limited to simplistic approaches, where winter and summer pore water pressure profiles are prescribed. Geotechnical Structures, such as cut slopes, are known to be prone to large irreversible displacements under the combined effect of water uptake by a complex vegetation root system and precipitation. If such processes take place in an unsaturated material the complexity of the problem renders the use of numerical analysis essential. In this paper soil-atmosphere interaction in cut slopes is studied using advanced, fully coupled partially saturated finite element analyses. The effect of rainfall and evapotranspiration is modelled through sophisticated boundary conditions, applying actual meteorological data on a monthly basis. Stages of low and high water demand vegetation are considered for a period of several years, before simulating the effect of vegetation removal. The analysis results are presented with regard to the serviceability and stability of the cut slope.

  10. Do invasive plant species alter soil health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invasive species may alter soil characteristics or interact with the soil microbial community to yield a competitive advantage. Our objectives were to determine: if invasive plant species alter soil properties important to soil health; and the long-term effects of invasive plant species on soil pro...

  11. Can changes in soil biochemistry and plant stoichiometry explain loss of animal diversity of heathlands?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogels, J.J.; Verberk, W.C.E.P.; Lamers, L.P.M.; Siepel, H.

    2017-01-01

    Increased atmospheric deposition rates of nitrogen (N) and sulphur (S) are known to affect soil biogeochemistry and cause a decline in plant biodiversity of heathlands. Concomitant declines of heathland invertebrates are mainly attributed to changes in vegetation composition and altered habitat

  12. Plant-soil feedbacks and the coexistence of competing plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revilla Rimbach, Tomas; Veen, G. F. (Ciska); Eppinga, Maarten B.; Weissing, Franz J.

    Plant-soil feedbacks can have important implications for the interactions among plants. Understanding these effects is a major challenge since it is inherently difficult to measure and manipulate highly diverse soil communities. Mathematical models may advance this understanding by making the

  13. Plant species influence on soil C after afforestation of Mediterranean degraded soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Maria T.; García-Vargas, Carlos; Madejón, Engracia; Marañón, Teodoro

    2015-04-01

    Increasing C sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems is one of the main current environmental challenges to mitigate climate change. Afforestation of degraded and contaminated lands is one of the key strategies to achieve an increase in C sequestration in ecosystems. Plant species differ in their mechanisms of C-fixation, C allocation into different plant organs, and interaction with soil microorganisms, all these factors influencing the dynamics of soil C following the afforestation of degraded soils. In this work we examine the influence of different woody plant species on soil C dynamics in degraded and afforested Mediterranean soils. The soils were former agricultural lands that were polluted by a mining accident and later afforested with different native plant species. We analysed the effect of four of these species (Olea europaea var. sylvestris Brot., Populus alba L., Pistacia lentiscus L. and Retama sphaerocarpa (L.) Boiss.) on different soil C fractions, soil nutrient availability, microbial activity (soil enzyme activities) and soil CO2 fluxes 15 years after the establishment of the plantations. Results suggest that the influence of the planted trees and shrubs is still limited, being more pronounced in the more acidic and nutrient-poor soils. Litter accumulation varied among species, with the highest C accumulated in the litter under the deciduous species (Populus alba L.). No differences were observed in the amount of total soil organic C among the studied species, or in the concentrations of phenols and sugars in the dissolved organic C (DOC), which might have indicated differences in the biodegradability of the DOC. Microbial biomass and activity was highly influenced by soil pH, and plant species had a significant influence on soil pH in the more acidic site. Soil CO2 fluxes were more influenced by the plant species than total soil C content. Our results suggest that changes in total soil C stocks after the afforestation of degraded Mediterranean

  14. Soil frost-induced soil moisture precipitation feedback and effects on atmospheric states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Stefan; Blome, Tanja; Ekici, Altug; Beer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Permafrost or perennially frozen ground is an important part of the terrestrial cryosphere; roughly one quarter of Earth's land surface is underlain by permafrost. As it is a thermal phenomenon, its characteristics are highly dependent on climatic factors. The impact of the currently observed warming, which is projected to persist during the coming decades due to anthropogenic CO2 input, certainly has effects for the vast permafrost areas of the high northern latitudes. The quantification of these effects, however, is scientifically still an open question. This is partly due to the complexity of the system, where several feedbacks are interacting between land and atmosphere, sometimes counterbalancing each other. Moreover, until recently, many global circulation models (GCMs) and Earth system models (ESMs) lacked the sufficient representation of permafrost physics in their land surface schemes. Within the European Union FP7 project PAGE21, the land surface scheme JSBACH of the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology ESM (MPI-ESM) has been equipped with the representation of relevant physical processes for permafrost studies. These processes include the effects of freezing and thawing of soil water for both energy and water cycles, thermal properties depending on soil water and ice contents, and soil moisture movement being influenced by the presence of soil ice. In the present study, it will be analysed how these permafrost relevant processes impact large-scale hydrology and climate over northern hemisphere high latitude land areas. For this analysis, the atmosphere-land part of MPI-ESM, ECHAM6-JSBACH, is driven by prescribed observed SST and sea ice in an AMIP2-type setup with and without the newly implemented permafrost processes. Results show a large improvement in the simulated discharge. On one hand this is related to an improved snowmelt peak of runoff due to frozen soil in spring. On the other hand a subsequent reduction of soil moisture leads to a positive

  15. Relationship between Depth of Soil Moisture Assessment and Turgidity of Coffee Plant in Selected Agroclimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy Erwiyono

    2008-05-01

    rainfall type at elevation around 500 m asl. Robusta coffee clone with no name at Kaliwining experimental station showed wilting sign, reduction of its turgidity, and falling leaves during the dry season, and positively responding to soil moisture increase. An effort to maintain plant turgidity with increasing soil water stress could be done by managing atmospheric demand to be lower. Practical implications of the findings might be discussed a bit more deeply in this paper.

  16. Utilization of plants for stabilization and cleaning up of metal contaminated soil and water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Štofko

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Phytoremediation has been defined as the use of green plants and their associated rhizospheric microorganisms to remove, degrade, or contain contaminants located in soisl, sediments, groundwater, surface water, and even the atmosphere. Categories of phytoremediation include - phytoextraction or phytoaccumulation, phytotransformation, phytostimulation or plant-assisted bioremediation, phytovolatilization, rhizofiltration, pump and tree, phytostabilization, and hydraulic control. Phytoremediation of heavy metal contaminated soils basically includes phytostabilization, phytoextraction, rhizofiltration and phytovolatilization. Selection of plants for phytoremediation of metals depends on a particular application.

  17. Water vs. carbon: An evaluation of SMAP soil moisture and OCO-2 solar-induced fluorescence to characterize global plant stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, A. J.; Fisher, J.; Goulden, M.; Randerson, J. T.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2017-12-01

    Plants link the carbon and water cycles through photosynthesis and evapotranspiration (ET). When plants take in CO2 for photosynthesis, water evaporates to the atmosphere. This exchange of carbon and water is sensitive to a number of environmental variables including: soil water availability, temperature, atmospheric water vapor, and radiation. When the atmospheric demand for water is high, plants avoid hydraulic failure by regulating the amount of water exiting leaves at the expense of inhibiting carbon uptake. Over time, stress caused by this response limits plant growth and can even result in death by carbon starvation. With increasing atmospheric demand for water, impending expansion of arid regions, and more frequent droughts, understanding how vegetation responds to regulate photosynthesis and ET is important to quantify potential feedbacks between the carbon and water cycles. Despite its importance, to what extent plants respond to stressful conditions is an open science question. An important step forward is to characterize the dominant controls in these stress events and identify geographic areas that are vulnerable to climate change. The 2015-2016 El Nino and subsequent 2016-2017 La Nina transition provides an opportunity to quantify the extent and magnitude of vegetation regulation of these carbon and water variables in response to changes in environmental conditions. We present results from a space-based analysis using global observations of solar induced fluorescence (SIF) from the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2), soil moisture from Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP), and two widely used ET models (PT-JPL and MOD-16) to characterize the dominant controls on gross primary production and ET.

  18. Comparative estimation of soil and plant pollution in the impact area of air emissions from an aluminium plant after technogenic load reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evdokimova, Galina A; Mozgova, Natalya P

    2015-01-01

    The work provides a comparative analysis of changes in soil properties in the last 10-13 years along the pollution gradient of air emissions from Kandalaksha aluminium plant in connection with the reduction of their volume. The content of the priority pollutant fluorine (F) in atmospheric precipitation and in the organic horizon of soil in the plant impact zone significantly decreased in 2011-2013 compared to 2001. The aluminium concentrations reduced only in immediate proximity to the plant (2 km). The fluorine, calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) concentrations are higher in liquid phase compared to solid phase thus these elements can migrated to greater distances from the pollution source (up to 15-20 km). Silicon (Si), aluminium (Al), iron (Fe) and phosphorus (P) can be found only in solid phases and in fall-out within the 5 km. The acidity of soil litter reduced by 2 pH units in the proximity to the plot within the 2 km. The zone of maximum soil contamination decreased from 2.5 km to 1.5 km from the emission source, the zones of heavy and moderate pollution reduced by 5 km in connection with the reduction of pollutant emissions in the plant. A high correlation between the fluorine concentrations in vegetables and litter was found. Higher fluorine concentrations in the soil result in its accumulation in plants. Mosses accumulate fluorine most intensively.

  19. Soil water availability and microsite mediate fungal and bacterial phospholipid fatty acid biomarker abundances in Mojave Desert soils exposed to elevated atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, V. L.; Schaeffer, S. M.; Ziegler, S. E.; Evans, R. D.

    2011-06-01

    Changes in the rates of nitrogen (N) cycling, microbial carbon (C) substrate use, and extracellular enzyme activities in a Mojave Desert ecosystem exposed to elevated atmospheric CO2 suggest shifts in the size and/or functional characteristics of microbial assemblages in two dominant soil microsites: plant interspaces and under the dominant shrub Larrea tridentata. We used ester-linked phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) biomarkers as a proxy for microbial biomass to quantify spatial and temporal differences in soil microbial communities from February 2003 to May 2005. Further, we used the 13C signature of the fossil CO2 source for elevated CO2 plots to trace recent plant C inputs into soil organic matter (SOM) and broad microbial groups using δ13C (‰). Differences between individual δ13CPLFA and δ13CSOM for fungal biomarkers indicated active metabolism of newer C in elevated CO2 soils. Total PLFA-C was greater in shrub microsites compared to plant interspaces, and CO2 treatment differences within microsites increased under higher soil water availability. Total, fungal, and bacterial PLFA-C increased with decreasing soil volumetric water content (VWC) in both microsites, suggesting general adaptations to xeric desert conditions. Increases in fungal-to-bacterial PLFA-C ratio with decreasing VWC reflected functional group-specific responses to changing soil water availability. While temporal and spatial extremes in resource availability in desert ecosystems contribute to the difficulty in identifying common trends or mechanisms driving microbial responses in less extreme environments, we found that soil water availability and soil microsite interacted with elevated CO2 to shift fungal and bacterial biomarker abundances in Mojave Desert soils.

  20. Effects of soil's properties on transfer of 137Cs to rice plants through plant uptake after soil deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keum, Dong-Kwon; Lee, Hansoo; Kang, Hee-Seok; Jun, In; Choi, Yong-Ho; Lee, Chang-Woo

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a dynamic compartment model to appraise the concentration of 137 Cs in agricultural plants as a result of a soil deposition. The present model used the Absalom model as a module to account for the effects of a soil's properties (pH, soil clay content, organic matter content, and exchangeable potassium) on a plant uptake, and the leaching and fixation process of 137 Cs in a soil. The model was tested by comparing the model predictions of the 137 Cs aggregated transfer factors for rice plants with those obtained as results of simulated 137 Cs soil deposition experiments with seventeen paddy soils of different properties, all of which were performed before a transplanting of the rice. Predicted 137 Cs TF a values of the rice plants were found to be comparable with those observed. (author)

  1. Testing of multistep soil washing for radiocesium-contaminated soil containing plant matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funakawa, Masafumi; Tagawa, Akihiro; Okuda, Nobuyasu

    2012-01-01

    Decontamination work following radiocesium exposure requires a vast reduction in the amount of contaminated soil generated. The current study subjected 4 types of contaminated soil with different properties to multistep soil washing under the same conditions. This study also determined the effectiveness of radiocesium decontamination and the extent to which the amount of contaminated soil was reduced. In addition, the effectiveness of plant matter separation, adsorbent addition, and grinding as part of multistep soil washing was determined using the same contaminated soil. Results of testing indicated that the rate of radiocesium decontamination ranged from 73.6 to 89.2% and the recovery rate ranged from 51.5 to 84.2% for twice-treated soil, regardless of the soil properties or cesium level. Plant matter in soil had a high radiocesium level. However, there was little plant matter in our soil sample. Therefore, plant matter separation had little effect on the improvement in the percentage of radiocesium decontamination of twice-treated soil. Soil surface grinding improved the rate of radiocesium decontamination of twice-treated soil. However, radiocesium in soil tightly bound with minerals in the soil; thus, the addition of an adsorbent also failed to improve the rate of radiocesium decontamination. (author)

  2. Mosses Are Better than Leaves of Vascular Plants in Monitoring Atmospheric Heavy Metal Pollution in Urban Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanbin; Fan, Miao; Hu, Ronggui; Zhao, Jinsong; Wu, Yupeng

    2018-05-29

    Mosses and leaves of vascular plants have been used as bioindicators of environmental contamination by heavy metals originating from various sources. This study aims to compare the metal accumulation capabilities of mosses and vascular species in urban areas and quantify the suitability of different taxa for monitoring airborne heavy metals. One pleurocarpous feather moss species, Haplocladium angustifolium , and two evergreen tree species, Cinnamomum bodinieri Osmanthus fragrans , and substrate soil were sampled in the urban area of different land use types in Wuhan City in China. The concentrations of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ni, V, Pb, and Zn in these samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The differences of heavy metals concentration in the three species showed that the moss species was considerably more capable of accumulating heavy metals than tree leaves (3 times to 51 times). The accumulated concentration of heavy metals in the moss species depended on the metal species and land use type. The enrichment factors of metals for plants and the correlations of metals in plants with corresponding metals in soil reflected that the accumulated metals in plants stemmed mostly from atmospheric deposition, rather than the substrate soil. Anthropogenic factors, such as traffic emissions from automobile transportation and manufacturing industries, were primarily responsible for the variations in metal pollutants in the atmosphere and subsequently influenced the metal accumulation in the mosses. This study elucidated that the moss species H. angustifolium is relatively more suitable than tree leaves of C. bodinieri and O. fragrans in monitoring heavy metal pollution in urban areas, and currently Wuhan is at a lower contamination level of atmospheric heavy metals than some other cities in China.

  3. Multi-year assessment of soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) modeling uncertainties over a Mediterranean agricultural site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrigues, S.; Olioso, A.; Calvet, J.-C.; Lafont, S.; Martin, E.; Chanzy, A.; Marloie, O.; Bertrand, N.; Desfonds, V.; Renard, D.

    2012-04-01

    Vegetation productivity and water balance of Mediterranean regions will be particularly affected by climate and land-use changes. In order to analyze and predict these changes through land surface models, a critical step is to quantify the uncertainties associated with these models (processes, parameters) and their implementation over a long period of time. Besides, uncertainties attached to the data used to force these models (atmospheric forcing, vegetation and soil characteristics, crop management practices...) which are generally available at coarse spatial resolution (>1-10 km) and for a limited number of plant functional types, need to be evaluated. This paper aims at assessing the uncertainties in water (evapotranspiration) and energy fluxes estimated from a Soil Vegetation Atmosphere Transfer (SVAT) model over a Mediterranean agricultural site. While similar past studies focused on particular crop types and limited period of time, the originality of this paper consists in implementing the SVAT model and assessing its uncertainties over a long period of time (10 years), encompassing several cycles of distinct crops (wheat, sorghum, sunflower, peas). The impacts on the SVAT simulations of the following sources of uncertainties are characterized: - Uncertainties in atmospheric forcing are assessed comparing simulations forced with local meteorological measurements and simulations forced with re-analysis atmospheric dataset (SAFRAN database). - Uncertainties in key surface characteristics (soil, vegetation, crop management practises) are tested comparing simulations feeded with standard values from global database (e.g. ECOCLIMAP) and simulations based on in situ or site-calibrated values. - Uncertainties dues to the implementation of the SVAT model over a long period of time are analyzed with regards to crop rotation. The SVAT model being analyzed in this paper is ISBA in its a-gs version which simulates the photosynthesis and its coupling with the stomata

  4. Who's on first? Part I: Influence of plant growth on C association with fresh soil minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurath, R.; Whitman, T.; Nico, P. S.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Firestone, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral surfaces provide sites for carbon stabilization in soils, protecting soil organic matter (SOM) from microbial degradation. SOM distributed across mineral surfaces is expected to be patchy and certain minerals undergo re-mineralization under dynamic soil conditions, such that soil minerals surfaces can range from fresh to thickly-coated with SOM. Our research investigates the intersection of microbiology and geochemistry, and aims to build a mechanistic understanding of plant-derived carbon (C) association with mineral surfaces and the factors that determine SOM fate in soil. Plants are the primary source of C in soil, with roots exuding low-molecular weight compounds during growth and contributing more complex litter compounds at senescence. We grew the annual grass, Avena barbata, (wild oat) in a 99 atom% 13CO2 atmosphere in soil microcosms incubated with three mineral types representing a spectrum of reactivity and surface area: quartz, kaolinite, and ferrihydrite. These minerals, isolated in mesh bags to exclude roots but not microorganisms, were extracted and analyzed for total C and 13C at multiple plant growth stages. At plant senescence, the quartz had the least mineral-bound C (0.40 mg-g-1) and ferrihydrite the most (0.78 mg-g-1). Ferrihydrite and kaolinite also accumulated more plant-derived C (3.0 and 3.1% 13C, respectively). The experiment was repeated with partially digested 13C-labled root litter to simulate litter decomposition during plant senescence. Thus, we are able evaluate contributions derived from living and dead root materials on soil minerals using FTIR and 13C-NMR. We find that mineral-associated C bears a distinct microbial signature, with soil microbes not only transforming SOM prior to mineral association, but also populating mineral surfaces over time. Our research shows that both soil mineralogy and the chemical character of plant-derived compounds are important controls of mineral protection of SOM.

  5. Plant-uptake of uranium: Hydroponic and soil system studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswami, A.; Carr, P.; Burkhardt, M.

    2001-01-01

    Limited information is available on screening and selection of terrestrial plants for uptake and translocation of uranium from soil. This article evaluates the removal of uranium from water and soil by selected plants, comparing plant performance in hydroponic systems with that in two soil systems (a sandy-loam soil and an organic-rich soil). Plants selected for this study were Sunflower (Helianthus giganteus), Spring Vetch (Vicia sativa), Hairy Vetch (Vicia villosa), Juniper (Juniperus monosperma), Indian Mustard (Brassica juncea), and Bush Bean (Phaseolus nanus). Plant performance was evaluated both in terms of the percent uranium extracted from the three systems, as well as the biological absorption coefficient (BAC) that normalized uranium uptake to plant biomass. Study results indicate that uranium extraction efficiency decreased sharply across hydroponic, sandy and organic soil systems, indicating that soil organic matter sequestered uranium, rendering it largely unavailable for plant uptake. These results indicate that site-specific soils must be used to screen plants for uranium extraction capability; plant behavior in hydroponic systems does not correlate well with that in soil systems. One plant species, Juniper, exhibited consistent uranium extraction efficiencies and BACs in both sandy and organic soils, suggesting unique uranium extraction capabilities.

  6. Complex linkage between soil, soil water, atmosphere and Eucalyptus Plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, C.; Tiwari, K. N.

    2017-12-01

    Eucalyptus is most widely planted genus grown in waste land of eastern region of India to meet the pulp industry requirements. Sustainability of these plantations is of concern because in spite of higher demand water and nutrients of plantations, they are mostly planted on low-fertility soils. This study has been conducted to quantify effect of 25 years old, a fully established eucalyptus plantations on i.) Alteration in physico-chemical and hydrological properties of soil of eucalyptus plantation in comparison to soil of natural grassland and ii.) Spatio-temporal variation in soil moisture under eucalyptus plantations. Soil physico-chemical properties of two adjacent plots covered with eucatuptus and natural grasses were analyzed for three consecutive depths (i.e. 0-30 cm, 30-60 cm and 60-90 cm) with five replications in each plot. Soil infiltration rate and saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) were measured in-situ to incorporate the influence of macro porosity caused due to roots of plantations. Daily soil moisture at an interval of 10 cm upto 160 cm depth with 3 replications and Leaf Area Index (LAI) at an interval of 15 days with 5 replications were recorded over the year. Significant variations found at level of 0.05 between soil properties of eucalyptus and natural grass land confirm the effect of plantations on soil properties. Comparative results of soil properties show significant alteration in soil texture such as percent of sand, organic matter and Ks found more by 20%, 9% and 22% respectively in eucalyptus plot as compare to natural grass land. Available soil moisture (ASM) was found constantly minimum in top soil excluding rainy season indicate upward movement of water and nutrients during dry season. Seasonal variation in temperature (T), relative humidity (RH) and leaf area index (LAI) influenced the soil moisture extraction phenomenon. This study clearly stated the impact of long term establishment of eucalyptus plantations make considerable

  7. A new plant chamber facility PLUS coupled to the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohaus, T.; Kuhn, U.; Andres, S.; Kaminski, M.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Wegener, R.; Yu, Z.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-11-01

    A new PLant chamber Unit for Simulation (PLUS) for use with the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber) has been build and characterized at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Germany. The PLUS chamber is an environmentally controlled flow through plant chamber. Inside PLUS the natural blend of biogenic emissions of trees are mixed with synthetic air and are transferred to the SAPHIR chamber where the atmospheric chemistry and the impact of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) can be studied in detail. In PLUS all important enviromental parameters (e.g. temperature, PAR, soil RH etc.) are well-controlled. The gas exchange volume of 9.32 m3 which encloses the stem and the leafes of the plants is constructed such that gases are exposed to FEP Teflon film and other Teflon surfaces only to minimize any potential losses of BVOCs in the chamber. Solar radiation is simulated using 15 LED panels which have an emission strength up to 800 μmol m-2 s-1. Results of the initial characterization experiments are presented in detail. Background concentrations, mixing inside the gas exchange volume, and transfer rate of volatile organic compounds (VOC) through PLUS under different humidity conditions are explored. Typical plant characteristics such as light and temperature dependent BVOC emissions are studied using six Quercus Ilex trees and compared to previous studies. Results of an initial ozonolysis experiment of BVOC emissions from Quercus Ilex at typical atmospheric concentrations inside SAPHIR are presented to demonstrate a typical experimental set up and the utility of the newly added plant chamber.

  8. A new plant chamber facility, PLUS, coupled to the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohaus, T.; Kuhn, U.; Andres, S.; Kaminski, M.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Wegener, R.; Yu, Z.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2016-03-01

    A new PLant chamber Unit for Simulation (PLUS) for use with the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber) has been built and characterized at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Germany. The PLUS chamber is an environmentally controlled flow-through plant chamber. Inside PLUS the natural blend of biogenic emissions of trees is mixed with synthetic air and transferred to the SAPHIR chamber, where the atmospheric chemistry and the impact of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) can be studied in detail. In PLUS all important environmental parameters (e.g., temperature, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), soil relative humidity (RH)) are well controlled. The gas exchange volume of 9.32 m3 which encloses the stem and the leaves of the plants is constructed such that gases are exposed to only fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon film and other Teflon surfaces to minimize any potential losses of BVOCs in the chamber. Solar radiation is simulated using 15 light-emitting diode (LED) panels, which have an emission strength up to 800 µmol m-2 s-1. Results of the initial characterization experiments are presented in detail. Background concentrations, mixing inside the gas exchange volume, and transfer rate of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) through PLUS under different humidity conditions are explored. Typical plant characteristics such as light- and temperature- dependent BVOC emissions are studied using six Quercus ilex trees and compared to previous studies. Results of an initial ozonolysis experiment of BVOC emissions from Quercus ilex at typical atmospheric concentrations inside SAPHIR are presented to demonstrate a typical experimental setup and the utility of the newly added plant chamber.

  9. Bioelectric potentials in the soil-plant system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdnyakov, A. I.

    2013-07-01

    A detailed study of the electric potentials in the soil-plant system was performed. It was found that the electric potential depends on the plant species and the soil properties. A theoretical interpretation of the obtained data was given. All the plants, independently from their species and their state, always had a negative electric potential relative to the soil. The electric potential of the herbaceous plants largely depended on the leaf area. In some plants, such as burdock ( Arctium lappa) and hogweed ( Heracleum sosnowskyi), the absolute values of the negative electric potential exceeded 100 mV. The electric potential was clearly differentiated by the plant organs: in the flowers, it was lower than in the leaves; in the leaves, it was usually lower than in the leaf rosettes and stems. The electric potentials displayed seasonal dynamics. As a rule, the higher the soil water content, the lower the electric potential of the plants. However, an inverse relationship was observed for dandelions ( Taraxacum officinale). It can be supposed that the electric potential between the soil and the plant characterizes the vital energy of the plant.

  10. Methane transport and emissions from soil as affected by water table and vascular plants

    OpenAIRE

    Bhullar, Gurbir S; Iravani, Majid; Edwards, Peter J; Olde Venterink, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Background: The important greenhouse gas (GHG) methane is produced naturally in anaerobic wetland soils. By affecting the production, oxidation and transport of methane to the atmosphere, plants have a major influence upon the quantities emitted by wetlands. Different species and functional plant groups have been shown to affect these processes differently, but our knowledge about how these effects are influenced by abiotic factors such as water regime and temperature remains limited. Here...

  11. High-resolution stable isotope monitoring reveals differential vegetation-soil water feedbacks among plant functional types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkmann, T. H. M.; Haberer, K.; Troch, P. A. A.; Gessler, A.; Weiler, M.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the linked dynamics of rain water recharge to soils and its utilization by plants is critical for predicting the impact of climate and land use changes on the productivity of ecosystems and the hydrologic cycle. While plants require vast quantities of water from the soil to sustain growth and function, they exert important direct and indirect controls on the movement of water through the rooted soil horizons, thereby potentially affecting their own resource availability. However, the specific ecohydrological belowground processes associated with different plant types and their rooting systems have been difficult to quantify with traditional methods. Here, we report on the use of techniques for monitoring stable isotopes in soil and plant water pools that allow us to track water infiltration and root uptake dynamics non-destructively and in high resolution. The techniques were applied in controlled rain pulse experiments with distinct plant types (grass, deciduous trees, grapevine) that we let develop on an initially uniform soil for two years. Our results show that plant species and types differed widely in their plasticity and pattern of root uptake under variable water availability. Thereby, and through notably co-acting indirect effects related to differential root system traits and co-evolution of soil properties, the different plants induced contrasting hydrological dynamics in the soil they had inhabited for only a short period of time. Taken together, our data suggest that the studied soil-vegetation systems evolved a positive infiltration-uptake feedback in which hydrological flow pathways underlying different species diverged in a way that complemented their specific water utilization strategy. Such a feedback could present an indirect competitive mechanism by which plants improve their own water supply and modulate hydrological cycling at the land surface. The ability to directly measure this feedback using in situ isotope methodology

  12. Soil-plant transfer factors in forest ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strebl, F.; Gerzabek, M.H.

    1995-04-01

    Within scope of an extended study about 137 Cs behaviour in forest ecosystems several parameters were found to influence soil-plant transfer factors. TF-values of different plant species cover a range of two magnitudes. This is partly due to variations in rooting depth of plants and specific physiological adaptations of nutrient supply. Perrenial plants like trees (Picea abies) and dwarf shrubs (Vaccinium myrtillus) showed a distinct age - dependency of 137 Cs - transfer factors. In young plant parts caesium concentration is higher than in old, more signified twigs. A correlation analysis of physico-chemical soil parameters and TF-values to forest vegetation showed, that soil organic matter, especially the degree of humification and the ratio between extractable fulvic to humic acids are important influencing factors of 137 Cs transfer from forest soils to plants. (author)

  13. In vitro determination of oxidation of atmospheric tritium gas in vegetation and soil in Ibaraki and Gifu, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimasa, Michiko; Ichimasa, Yusuke; Suzuki, Masatomo; Obayashi, Haruo; Sakuma, Youichi

    1999-01-01

    To quantify the rate of oxidation of tritium gas (referred to as HT) to tritiated water in the environment, various woody and herbaceous plant leaves and roots, mosses and lichens taken from a forest and fields in Ibaraki prefecture, and a forest in Toki, Gifu prefecture, were investigated as to their ability to oxidize atmospheric HT in vitro experiments. The HT oxidation activity in vegetation was compared with that in the surrounding surface soil (0-5 cm in depth). The rate of oxidation of HT in woody plant leaves including pine needles was extremely low, only about 1/10000-1/1000 that in the surface soil, as well as in herbaceous plant leaves with some exceptions (Phalaris arundinacea and Vaccinium smallii), whereas the rate in mosses and lichens was 50-500 times that in pine needles. The HT oxidation activity in roots of several plants including Phalaris arundinacea, Pieris japonica and Lespedeza homoloba was quite high and comparable to that in the surrounding surface soil. These results suggest that mosses, lichens and the leaves or roots of particular plants with high HT oxidation activity can be used to monitor the accidental release of HT into the environment. (author)

  14. Enrichment planting without soil treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagner, Mats

    1998-12-31

    Where enrichment planting had been carried out with either of the two species Picea abies and Pinus contorta, the survival of the planted seedlings was at least as good as after planting in a normal clear cut area treated with soil scarification. This was in spite of the fact that the seedlings were placed shallow in the humus layer without any soil treatment. However, they were sheltered from insects by treatment before planting. Where enrichment planting was carried out with Pinus sylvestris the survival in dense forest was poor, but in open forest the survival was good. The growth of planted seedlings was enhanced by traditional clearing and soil treatment. However, this was for Pinus sylvestris not enough to compensate for the loss of time, 1-2 years, caused by arrangement of soil scarification. The growth of seedlings planted under crown cover was directly related to basal area of retained trees. However, the variation in height growth among individual seedlings was very big, which meant that some seedlings grow well also under a fairly dense forest cover. The pioneer species Pinus sylvestris reacted more strongly to basal area of retained trees than did the shade tolerant species Picea abies. Enrichment planting seems to be a necessary tool for preserving volume productivity, at places where fairly intensive harvest of mature trees has been carried out in stands of ordinary forest type in central Sweden. If double seedlings, with one Picea abies and one Pinus sylvestris, are used, the probability for long term establishment is enhanced 13 refs, 20 figs, 4 tabs

  15. Competition for light and water in a coupled soil-plant system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoli, Gabriele; Huang, Cheng-Wei; Bonetti, Sara; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Marani, Marco; Katul, Gabriel

    2017-10-01

    It is generally accepted that resource availability shapes the structure and function of many ecosystems. Within the soil-plant-atmosphere (SPA) system, resource availability fluctuates in space and time whereas access to resources by individuals is further impacted by plant-to-plant competition. Likewise, transport and transformation of resources within an individual plant is governed by numerous interacting biotic and abiotic processes. The work here explores the co-limitations on water losses and carbon uptake within the SPA arising from fluctuating resource availability and competition. In particular, the goal is to unfold the interplay between plant access and competition for water and light, as well as the impact of transport/redistribution processes on leaf-level carbon assimilation and water fluxes within forest stands. A framework is proposed that couples a three-dimensional representation of soil-root exchanges with a one-dimensional description of stem water flow and storage, canopy photosynthesis, and transpiration. The model links soil moisture redistribution, root water uptake, xylem water flow and storage, leaf potential and stomatal conductance as driven by supply and demand for water and carbon. The model is then used to investigate plant drought resilience of overstory-understory trees simultaneously competing for water and light. Simulation results reveal that understory-overstory interactions increase ecosystem resilience to drought (i.e. stand-level carbon assimilation rates and water fluxes can be sustained at lower root-zone soil water potentials). This resilience enhancement originates from reduced transpiration (due to shading) and hydraulic redistribution in soil supporting photosynthesis over prolonged periods of drought. In particular, the presence of different rooting systems generates localized hydraulic redistribution fluxes that sustain understory transpiration through overstory-understory interactions. Such complex SPA dynamics

  16. Negative plant-soil feedbacks increase with plant abundance, and are unchanged by competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, John L; Laney Smith, Alyssa; Ortega, Yvette K; Pearson, Dean E; Callaway, Ragan M

    2016-08-01

    Plant-soil feedbacks and interspecific competition are ubiquitous interactions that strongly influence the performance of plants. Yet few studies have examined whether the strength of these interactions corresponds with the abundance of plant species in the field, or whether feedbacks and competition interact in ways that either ameliorate or exacerbate their effects in isolation. We sampled soil from two intermountain grassland communities where we also measured the relative abundance of plant species. In greenhouse experiments, we quantified the direction and magnitude of plant-soil feedbacks for 10 target species that spanned a range of abundances in the field. In soil from both sites, plant-soil feedbacks were mostly negative, with more abundant species suffering greater negative feedbacks than rare species. In contrast, the average response to competition for each species was unrelated with its abundance in the field. We also determined how competitive response varied among our target species when plants competed in live vs. sterile soil. Interspecific competition reduced plant size, but the strength of this negative effect was unchanged by plant-soil feedbacks. Finally, when plants competed interspecifically, we asked how conspecific-trained, heterospecific-trained, and sterile soil influenced the competitive responses of our target species and how this varied depending on whether target species were abundant or rare in the field. Here, we found that both abundant and rare species were not as harmed by competition when they grew in heterospecific-trained soil compared to when they grew in conspecific-cultured soil. Abundant species were also not as harmed by competition when growing in sterile vs. conspecific-trained soil, but this was not the case for rare species. Our results suggest that abundant plants accrue species-specific soil pathogens to a greater extent than rare species. Thus, negative feedbacks may be critical for preventing abundant species from

  17. Ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon in a heathland under future climatic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selsted, Merete Bang

    understanding plant and soil responses to such changes are necessary, as ecosystems potentially can ameliorate or accelerate global change. To predict the feedback of ecosystems to the atmospheric CO2 concentrations experiments imitating global change effects are therefore an important tool. This work....... Fluxes of CO2 from soil to atmosphere depend on a physical equilibrium between those two medias, why it is important to keep the CO2 gradient between soil and atmosphere unchanged during measurement. Uptake to plants via photosynthesis depends on a physiological process, which depends strongly...... on the atmospheric CO2 concentration. Photosynthesis and respiration run in parallel during measurements of net ecosystem exchange, and these measurements should therefore be performed with care to both the atmospheric CO2 concentration and the CO2 soil-atmosphere gradient....

  18. Guidelines for the use of isotopes of sulfur in soil-plant studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Sulfur (S) is an essential element in plant, human and animal nutrition. This publication provides an overview of the sulfur cycle and how isotopic tracers can be used to obtain unique and precise information on the fluxes and movement of S between and within different compartments of the soil-plant system. It provides information on the theory and measurement of 35S and 34S, safety procedures using 35S, preparation of labelled S fertilizers and plant residues, estimation of the quantity of isotope required for different temporal and spatial scales, preparation digestion /extraction) and analysis of soil and plant samples and guidelines on comparative advantages with non-nuclear techniques and applications, including case studies and references. It is a timely publication in that greater attention is now being focused on S deficiencies in agriculture, which are becoming more common due to reduced atmospheric accretions from industrial sources and to the reduced use of fertilizer materials that contain sulfur as a secondary nutrient. The sub-programme in Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition is committed to the dissemination of information to Member States on the practical applications of nuclear techniques through the IAEA Training Course Series. The present publication is preceded by IAEA-TCS-14 (2001), Use of Isotope and Radiation Methods in Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition, and IAEA-TCS-16 (2002), Neutron and Gamma Probes: Their Use in Agronomy

  19. Guidelines for the use of isotopes of sulfur in soil-plant studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-08-01

    Sulfur (S) is an essential element in plant, human and animal nutrition. This publication provides an overview of the sulfur cycle and how isotopic tracers can be used to obtain unique and precise information on the fluxes and movement of S between and within different compartments of the soil-plant system. It provides information on the theory and measurement of 35S and 34S, safety procedures using 35S, preparation of labelled S fertilizers and plant residues, estimation of the quantity of isotope required for different temporal and spatial scales, preparation digestion /extraction and analysis of soil and plant samples and guidelines on comparative advantages with non-nuclear techniques and applications, including case studies and references. It is a timely publication in that greater attention is now being focused on S deficiencies in agriculture, which are becoming more common due to reduced atmospheric accretions from industrial sources and to the reduced use of fertilizer materials that contain sulfur as a secondary nutrient. The sub-programme in Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition is committed to the dissemination of information to Member States on the practical applications of nuclear techniques through the IAEA Training Course Series. The present publication is preceded by IAEA-TCS-14 (2001), Use of Isotope and Radiation Methods in Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition, and IAEA-TCS-16 (2002), Neutron and Gamma Probes: Their Use in Agronomy.

  20. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration: effects of increased carbon input in a Lolium perenne soil on microorganisms and decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van J.H.; Gorissen, A.; Polci, D.

    2000-01-01

    Effects of ambient and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (350 and 700 μl l-1) on net carbon input into soil, the production of root-derived material and the subsequent microbial transformation were investigated. Perennial ryegrass plants (L. perenne L.) were labelled in a continuously labelled

  1. Plant-soil feedbacks: role of plant functional group and plant traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortois, R.; Schröder-Georgi, T.; Weigelt, A.; van der Putten, W.H.; De Deyn, G.B.

    2016-01-01

    Plant-soil feedback (PSF), plant trait and functional group concepts advanced our understanding of plant community dynamics, but how they are interlinked is poorly known. To test how plant functional groups (FGs: graminoids, small herbs, tall herbs, legumes) and plant traits relate to PSF, we grew

  2. HTO deposition through gas exchange between soil and atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinhals, J.

    1988-06-01

    Theoretical considerations show that the ratio of HTO/H 2 O molecules, i.e. the specific activity, is not the same in atmospheric humidity and moisture absorption but differs by the so-called specific activity coefficient k. On this basis a computer model (ATHOS) was developed which allowed the calculation of both the surface contamination of the soil due to the gas exchange with a contaminated atmosphere and the depth-specific distribution of the soil acitvity. On the one hand the equations base on a modified Philip-de Vries theory, and on the other hand on a large number of soil column experiments which served the examination of the influence of parameters of microclimate and soil physics on the absorption and diffusion of tritiated water vapour under simulated conditions Above all the individual capability of each soil type to absorb moisture must be taken into consideration in connection with the HTO transfer. In this context theoretical and experimental examinations were carried out indicating a practice-related possibility to determine the soil-specific absorption capability. (orig./DG) [de

  3. Induction of systemic resistance in plants by biochar, a soil-applied carbon sequestering agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elad, Yigal; David, Dalia Rav; Harel, Yael Meller; Borenshtein, Menahem; Kalifa, Hananel Ben; Silber, Avner; Graber, Ellen R

    2010-09-01

    Biochar is the solid coproduct of biomass pyrolysis, a technique used for carbon-negative production of second-generation biofuels. The biochar can be applied as a soil amendment, where it permanently sequesters carbon from the atmosphere as well as improves soil tilth, nutrient retention, and crop productivity. In addition to its other benefits in soil, we found that soil-applied biochar induces systemic resistance to the foliar fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea (gray mold) and Leveillula taurica (powdery mildew) on pepper and tomato and to the broad mite pest (Polyphagotarsonemus latus Banks) on pepper. Levels of 1 to 5% biochar in a soil and a coconut fiber-tuff potting medium were found to be significantly effective at suppressing both diseases in leaves of different ages. In long-term tests (105 days), pepper powdery mildew was significantly less severe in the biochar-treated plants than in the plants from the unamended controls although, during the final 25 days, the rate of disease development in the treatments and controls was similar. Possible biochar-related elicitors of systemic induced resistance are discussed.

  4. Community-level plant-soil feedbacks explain landscape distribution of native and non-native plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulmatiski, Andrew

    2018-02-01

    Plant-soil feedbacks (PSFs) have gained attention for their potential role in explaining plant growth and invasion. While promising, most PSF research has measured plant monoculture growth on different soils in short-term, greenhouse experiments. Here, five soil types were conditioned by growing one native species, three non-native species, or a mixed plant community in different plots in a common-garden experiment. After 4 years, plants were removed and one native and one non-native plant community were planted into replicate plots of each soil type. After three additional years, the percentage cover of each of the three target species in each community was measured. These data were used to parameterize a plant community growth model. Model predictions were compared to native and non-native abundance on the landscape. Native community cover was lowest on soil conditioned by the dominant non-native, Centaurea diffusa , and non-native community cover was lowest on soil cultivated by the dominant native, Pseudoroegneria spicata . Consistent with plant growth on the landscape, the plant growth model predicted that the positive PSFs observed in the common-garden experiment would result in two distinct communities on the landscape: a native plant community on native soils and a non-native plant community on non-native soils. In contrast, when PSF effects were removed, the model predicted that non-native plants would dominate all soils, which was not consistent with plant growth on the landscape. Results provide an example where PSF effects were large enough to change the rank-order abundance of native and non-native plant communities and to explain plant distributions on the landscape. The positive PSFs that contributed to this effect reflected the ability of the two dominant plant species to suppress each other's growth. Results suggest that plant dominance, at least in this system, reflects the ability of a species to suppress the growth of dominant competitors

  5. Soil Management Plan for the Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Construction activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant have often required the excavation or other management of soil within the facility. Because some of this soil may be contaminated, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) adopted specific policies to ensure the proper management of contaminated or potentially contaminated soil at the plant. Five types of contaminated or potentially contaminated soil are likely to be present at the Y-12 Plant: Soil that is within the boundaries of a Comprehensive Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Area of Contamination (AOC) or Operable Unit (OU); Soil that contains listed hazardous wastes; Soil that is within the boundaries of a RCRA Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU); Soil that contains polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS); Soil that contains low-level radioactive materials. The regulatory requirements associated with the five types of contaminated soil listed above are complex and will vary according to site conditions. This Soil Management Plan provides a standardized method for managers to determine the options available for selecting soil management scenarios associated with construction activities at the Y-12 Plant

  6. Land-atmosphere coupling and soil moisture memory contribute to long-term agricultural drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Newman, M.; Lawrence, D. M.; Livneh, B.; Lombardozzi, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    We assessed the contribution of land-atmosphere coupling and soil moisture memory on long-term agricultural droughts in the US. We performed an ensemble of climate model simulations to study soil moisture dynamics under two atmospheric forcing scenarios: active and muted land-atmosphere coupling. Land-atmosphere coupling contributes to a 12% increase and 36% decrease in the decorrelation time scale of soil moisture anomalies in the US Great Plains and the Southwest, respectively. These differences in soil moisture memory affect the length and severity of modeled drought. Consequently, long-term droughts are 10% longer and 3% more severe in the Great Plains, and 15% shorter and 21% less severe in the Southwest. An analysis of Coupled Model Intercomparsion Project phase 5 data shows four fold uncertainty in soil moisture memory across models that strongly affects simulated long-term droughts and is potentially attributable to the differences in soil water storage capacity across models.

  7. Radioactive zinc in soil-plant relationship studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimian, N.

    1986-01-01

    Zinc is one of the elements whose essentiality for plant growth and development has been proved beyond any doubt. Plant life and consequently the crop yield is impossible without zinc. The results of chemical, greenhouse, and field experiments on soils of Shiraz show that their level of available zinc for some crops is inadequate, despite the fact that the total amount of zinc in these soils may be relatively high. Obtaining the maximum yield, therefore, requires that either supplemental zinc be applied as chemical fertilizers or make the endogenous zinc more available to plants through some management practices. One of the isotopes of zinc, i.e. 65 Zn, is radioactive and has a detectable radiation which makes it suitable for tracer studies of zinc in soil, water, plant and animal. These studies help in understanding the soil plant relationships of zinc which in turn help to determine the optimum conditions of obtaining maximum yield. This paper presents and analyzes the results of some selected experiments to show different techniques of using radioactive zinc in understanding the behavior of zinc in soil and plant. Suggestions are also made of using this radioisotope in understanding the reactions of zinc in soils of Iran

  8. Radioiodine uptake by plants from soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabova, T.

    1976-01-01

    The uptake and accumulation of radioiodine by wheat, maize and peas from various types of soil have been studied. The uptake depends on the type of soil, on its content of organic matter and on the amount of fertilizer. Radioiodine is mainly accumulated in the roots. Accumulation in above-ground plant parts decreases in the following order: wheat, maize, peas. Uptake was highest from humus and clay soils and lowest from black and meadow soils. Application of chloride fertilizer or carrier iodine lead to an increase of radioiodine uptake in the whole plant. (author)

  9. Spatial Variation of Soil Type and Soil Moisture in the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, R.

    2001-06-27

    Soil characteristics (texture and moisture) are typically assumed to be initially constant when performing simulations with the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Soil texture is spatially homogeneous and time-independent, while soil moisture is often spatially homogeneous initially, but time-dependent. This report discusses the conversion of a global data set of Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) soil types to RAMS soil texture and the subsequent modifications required in RAMS to ingest this information. Spatial variations in initial soil moisture obtained from the National Center for Environmental Predictions (NCEP) large-scale models are also introduced. Comparisons involving simulations over the southeastern United States for two different time periods, one during warmer, more humid summer conditions, and one during cooler, dryer winter conditions, reveals differences in surface conditions related to increases or decreases in near-surface atmospheric moisture con tent as a result of different soil properties. Three separate simulation types were considered. The base case assumed spatially homogeneous soil texture and initial soil moisture. The second case assumed variable soil texture and constant initial soil moisture, while the third case allowed for both variable soil texture and initial soil moisture. The simulation domain was further divided into four geographically distinct regions. It is concluded there is a more dramatic impact on thermodynamic variables (surface temperature and dewpoint) than on surface winds, and a more pronounced variability in results during the summer period. While no obvious trends in surface winds or dewpoint temperature were found relative to observations covering all regions and times, improvement in surface temperatures in most regions and time periods was generally seen with the incorporation of variable soil texture and initial soil moisture.

  10. Parameterization of a bucket model for soil-vegetation-atmosphere modeling under seasonal climatic regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Romano

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the potential impact of accounting for seasonal variations in the climatic forcing and using different methods to parameterize the soil water content at field capacity on the water balance components computed by a bucket model (BM. The single-layer BM of Guswa et al. (2002 is employed, whereas the Richards equation (RE based Soil Water Atmosphere Plant (SWAP model is used as a benchmark model. The results are analyzed for two differently-textured soils and for some synthetic runs under real-like seasonal weather conditions, using stochastically-generated daily rainfall data for a period of 100 years. Since transient soil-moisture dynamics and climatic seasonality play a key role in certain zones of the World, such as in Mediterranean land areas, a specific feature of this study is to test the prediction capability of the bucket model under a condition where seasonal variations in rainfall are not in phase with the variations in plant transpiration. Reference is made to a hydrologic year in which we have a rainy period (starting 1 November and lasting 151 days where vegetation is basically assumed in a dormant stage, followed by a drier and rainless period with a vegetation regrowth phase. Better agreement between BM and RE-SWAP intercomparison results are obtained when BM is parameterized by a field capacity value determined through the drainage method proposed by Romano and Santini (2002. Depending on the vegetation regrowth or dormant seasons, rainfall variability within a season results in transpiration regimes and soil moisture fluctuations with distinctive features. During the vegetation regrowth season, transpiration exerts a key control on soil water budget with respect to rainfall. During the dormant season of vegetation, the precipitation regime becomes an important climate forcing. Simulations also highlight the occurrence of bimodality in the probability distribution of soil moisture during the season when plants are

  11. Atmospheric transformation of plant volatiles disrupts host plant finding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Blande, James D.; Holopainen, Jarmo K.

    2016-09-01

    Plant-emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play important roles in plant-insect interactions. Atmospheric pollutants such as ozone (O3) can react with VOCs and affect the dynamics and fidelity of these interactions. However, the effects of atmospheric degradation of plant VOCs on plant-insect interactions remains understudied. We used a system comprising Brassica oleracea subsp. capitata (cabbage) and the specialist herbivore Plutella xylostella to test whether O3-triggered VOC degradation disturbs larval host orientation, and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Larvae oriented towards both constitutive and larva-induced cabbage VOC blends, the latter being the more attractive. Such behaviour was, however, dramatically reduced in O3-polluted environments. Mechanistically, O3 rapidly degraded VOCs with the magnitude of degradation increasing with O3 levels. Furthermore, we used Teflon filters to collect VOCs and their reaction products, which were used as odour sources in behavioural tests. Larvae avoided filters exposed to O3-transformed VOCs and spent less time searching on them compared to filters exposed to original VOCs, which suggests that some degradation products may have repellent properties. Our study clearly demonstrates that oxidizing pollutants in the atmosphere can interfere with insect host location, and highlights the need to address their broader impacts when evaluating the ecological significance of VOC-mediated interactions.

  12. Soil-plant-atmosphere conditions regulating convective cloud formation above southeastern US pine plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoli, Gabriele; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Novick, Kimberly; Oishi, Andrew Christopher; Noormets, Asko; Marani, Marco; Katul, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    Loblolly pine trees (Pinus taeda L.) occupy more than 20% of the forested area in the southern United States, represent more than 50% of the standing pine volume in this region, and remove from the atmosphere about 500 g C m-2 per year through net ecosystem exchange. Hence, their significance as a major regional carbon sink can hardly be disputed. What is disputed is whether the proliferation of young plantations replacing old forest in the southern United States will alter key aspects of the hydrologic cycle, including convective rainfall, which is the focus of the present work. Ecosystem fluxes of sensible (Hs) and latent heat (LE) and large-scale, slowly evolving free atmospheric temperature and water vapor content are known to be first-order controls on the formation of convective clouds in the atmospheric boundary layer. These controlling processes are here described by a zero-order analytical model aimed at assessing how plantations of different ages may regulate the persistence and transition of the atmospheric system between cloudy and cloudless conditions. Using the analytical model together with field observations, the roles of ecosystem Hs and LE on convective cloud formation are explored relative to the entrainment of heat and moisture from the free atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that cloudy-cloudless regimes at the land surface are regulated by a nonlinear relation between the Bowen ratio Bo=Hs/LE and root-zone soil water content, suggesting that young/mature pines ecosystems have the ability to recirculate available water (through rainfall predisposition mechanisms). Such nonlinearity was not detected in a much older pine stand, suggesting a higher tolerance to drought but a limited control on boundary layer dynamics. These results enable the generation of hypotheses about the impacts on convective cloud formation driven by afforestation/deforestation and groundwater depletion projected to increase following increased human population in the

  13. Plant selection and soil legacy enhance long-term biodiversity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuppinger-Dingley, Debra; Flynn, Dan F B; De Deyn, Gerlinde B; Petermann, Jana S; Schmid, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Plant-plant and plant-soil interactions can help maintain plant diversity and ecosystem functions. Changes in these interactions may underlie experimentally observed increases in biodiversity effects over time via the selection of genotypes adapted to low or high plant diversity. Little is known, however, about such community-history effects and particularly the role of plant-soil interactions in this process. Soil-legacy effects may occur if co-evolved interactions with soil communities either positively or negatively modify plant biodiversity effects. We tested how plant selection and soil legacy influence biodiversity effects on productivity, and whether such effects increase the resistance of the communities to invasion by weeds. We used two plant selection treatments: parental plants growing in monoculture or in mixture over 8 yr in a grassland biodiversity experiment in the field, which we term monoculture types and mixture types. The two soil-legacy treatments used in this study were neutral soil inoculated with live or sterilized soil inocula collected from the same plots in the biodiversity experiment. For each of the four factorial combinations, seedlings of eight species were grown in monocultures or four-species mixtures in pots in an experimental garden over 15 weeks. Soil legacy (live inoculum) strongly increased biodiversity complementarity effects for communities of mixture types, and to a significantly weaker extent for communities of monoculture types. This may be attributed to negative plant-soil feedbacks suffered by mixture types in monocultures, whereas monoculture types had positive plant-soil feedbacks, in both monocultures and mixtures. Monocultures of mixture types were most strongly invaded by weeds, presumably due to increased pathogen susceptibility, reduced biomass, and altered plant-soil interactions of mixture types. These results show that biodiversity effects in experimental grassland communities can be modified by the evolution of

  14. Atmospheric emissions from power plant cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micheletti, W.

    2006-01-01

    Power plant recirculated cooling systems (cooling towers) are not typically thought of as potential sources of air pollution. However, atmospheric emissions can be important considerations that may influence cooling tower design and operation. This paper discusses relevant U.S. environmental regulations for potential atmospheric pollutants from power plant cooling towers, and various methods for estimating and controlling these emissions. (orig.)

  15. Plant uptake of radiocaesium from artificially contaminated soil monoliths covering major European soil types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waegeneers, Nadia; Sauras-Yera, Teresa; Thiry, Yves; Vallejo, V. Ramon; Smolders, Erik; Madoz-Escande, Chantal; Brechignac, Francois

    2009-01-01

    Uptake of 137 Cs was measured in different agricultural plant species (beans, lettuce, barley and ryegrass) grown in 5 undisturbed soil monoliths covering major European soil types. The first cultivation was made three years after soil contamination and plants were grown during 3 successive years. The plant-soil 137 Cs transfer factors varied maximally 12-fold among soils and 35-fold among species when grown on the same soil. Single correlations between transfer factors and soil properties were found, but they varied widely with plant type and can hardly be used as a predictive tool because of the few soils used. The variation of 137 Cs concentrations in plants among soils was related to differences in soil solution 137 Cs and K concentrations, consistent with previous observations in hydroponics and pot trials. Absolute values of transfer factors could not be predicted based on a model validated for pot trials. The 137 Cs activity concentration in soil solution decreased significantly (11- to 250-fold) for most soils in the 1997-1999 period and is partly explained by decreasing K in soil solution. Transfer factors of lettuce showed both increasing and decreasing trends between 2 consecutive years depending on soil type. The trends could be explained by the variation in 137 Cs and K concentrations in soil solution. It is concluded that differences in 137 Cs transfer factors among soils and trends in transfer factors as a function of time can be explained from soil solution composition, as shown previously for pot trials, although absolute values of transfer factors could not be predicted.

  16. Effects of plant species identity, diversity and soil fertility on biodegradation of phenanthrene in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyelami, Ayodeji O.; Okere, Uchechukwu V.; Orwin, Kate H.; De Deyn, Gerlinde B.; Jones, Kevin C.; Semple, Kirk T.

    2013-01-01

    The work presented in this paper investigated the effects of plant species composition, species diversity and soil fertility on biodegradation of 14 C-phenanthrene in soil. The two soils used were of contrasting fertility, taken from long term unfertilised and fertilised grassland, showing differences in total nitrogen content (%N). Plant communities consisted of six different plant species: two grasses, two forbs, and two legume species, and ranged in species richness from 1 to 6. The degradation of 14 C-phenanthrene was evaluated by measuring indigenous catabolic activity following the addition of the contaminant to soil using respirometry. Soil fertility was a driving factor in all aspects of 14 C-phenanthrene degradation; lag phase, maximum rates and total extents of 14 C-phenanthrene mineralisation were higher in improved soils compared to unimproved soils. Plant identity had a significant effect on the lag phase and extents of mineralisation. Soil fertility was the major influence also on abundance of microbial communities. - Highlights: ► Two grassland soils of contrasting fertility showing differences in total nitrogen content (%N) were used in this study. ► The effects of individual plant species and plant diversity on mineralisation of 14 C-phenanthrene in soil were investigated. ► Soil fertility was the major influence on mineralisation of 14 C-phenanthrene, and abundance of microbial community. ► The presence of a specific plant plays a role in the extent of mineralisation of phenanthrene in soil. - Soil management was the main driver for the mineralisation of 14 C-phenanthrene in soil.

  17. Cesium and potassium uptake by plants from soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaller, G.; Leising, C.; Krestel, R.; Wirth, E.

    1990-11-01

    The aim of the investigation was the reliable estimation of the Cs-137 root uptake by agricultural crops using the 'observed ratio model' (OR model) for the determination of transfer factors: Cs (plant)/K (plant) = OR x Cs (soil)/K (soil). For model validation representative soil (arable land, grass land, organic substrates from forests and peat) and plant samples from Bavaria were taken. These 4 parameters varied within a sufficiently wide range. In addition some samples from forest sites were taken. Soil and plant samples were taken at the same locations within 1 m 2 . (orig./HP) [de

  18. Plant diversity surpasses plant functional groups and plant productivity as driver of soil biota in the long term.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Eisenhauer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most significant consequences of contemporary global change is the rapid decline of biodiversity in many ecosystems. Knowledge of the consequences of biodiversity loss in terrestrial ecosystems is largely restricted to single ecosystem functions. Impacts of key plant functional groups on soil biota are considered to be more important than those of plant diversity; however, current knowledge mainly relies on short-term experiments.We studied changes in the impacts of plant diversity and presence of key functional groups on soil biota by investigating the performance of soil microorganisms and soil fauna two, four and six years after the establishment of model grasslands. The results indicate that temporal changes of plant community effects depend on the trophic affiliation of soil animals: plant diversity effects on decomposers only occurred after six years, changed little in herbivores, but occurred in predators after two years. The results suggest that plant diversity, in terms of species and functional group richness, is the most important plant community property affecting soil biota, exceeding the relevance of plant above- and belowground productivity and the presence of key plant functional groups, i.e. grasses and legumes, with the relevance of the latter decreasing in time.Plant diversity effects on biota are not only due to the presence of key plant functional groups or plant productivity highlighting the importance of diverse and high-quality plant derived resources, and supporting the validity of the singular hypothesis for soil biota. Our results demonstrate that in the long term plant diversity essentially drives the performance of soil biota questioning the paradigm that belowground communities are not affected by plant diversity and reinforcing the importance of biodiversity for ecosystem functioning.

  19. Balance and forms of zinc in soil and its uptake by plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šárka Poláková

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, zinc flows in arable soils of the Czech Republic and zinc fractions in arable soils are studied. Furthermore, a zinc uptake by agricultural plants is focused. Based on a database of the programme The basal soil monitoring system (BSMS a static zinc balance for arable soils on the national level was assessed. This programme is carried out by The Central Institute for Supervising and Testing in Agriculture (CISTA in Brno. As a representative for the zinc balance calculation, 121 monitoring plots were chosen. The Czech Republic net zinc fluxes ranged from –1250 g.ha– 1.y– 1 to +5595 g.ha– 1.y– 1, median +453 g.ha– 1.y– 1. The maximum zinc fluxes are typical of plots with manure applications. An atmospheric deposition is the most important input of zinc into arable soils. It makes 96,6% of the whole inputs. Leaching and run-off are neglected in this zinc balance by reason of missing credible data. The project Examination of zinc availability in dependence on its form in soil was established to provide more information about behavior of zinc in soil. The first step was starting a greenhouse pot experiment, which was focused on comparison of several extraction agents (AR, 2M HNO3, 0.43M HNO3, Mehlich III, DTPA, CAT, 1M NH4NO3, 0.01M CaCl2. Four soils with increasing zinc content were picked out for this experiment (Domanínek, Chrlice, Kutná Hora, Hlízov. Total zinc contents in these selected soils ranged from 156.8 to 583.7 ppm in dry matter (Aqua regia extraction. Contents in plants were in wide range from 20.7 to 273 ppm in dry matter according to the plant variety and used soil. Strong correlations between 0.43M HNO3, Mehlich III, DTPA and CAT were proved. Using of weaker extraction agents enabled to distinguish geogenic and anthropogenic origin of the contamination.

  20. Enhanced priming of old, not new soil carbon at elevated atmospheric CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergard, Mette; Reinsch, Sabine; Bengtson, Per

    2016-01-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations accompanied by global warming and altered precipitation patterns calls for assessment of long-term effects of these global changes on carbon (C) dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems, as changes in net C exchange between soil and atmosphere will impact the atmos......Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations accompanied by global warming and altered precipitation patterns calls for assessment of long-term effects of these global changes on carbon (C) dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems, as changes in net C exchange between soil and atmosphere will impact...... accelerate the decomposition of soil organic C (SOC), a phenomenon termed ‘the priming effect’, and the priming effect is most pronounced at low soil N availability. Hence, we hypothesized that priming of SOC decomposition in response to labile C addition would increase in soil exposed to long-term elevated...... decomposition of relatively old SOC fractions, i.e. SOC assimilated more than 8 years before sampling....

  1. Decomposition of soil and plant carbon from pasture systems after 9 years of exposure to elevated CO2: impact on C cycling and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de M.A.; Six, J.; Harris, D.; Blums, H.; Kessel, van C.

    2004-01-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 may alter decomposition rates through changes in plant material quality and through its impact on soil microbial activity. This study examines whether plant material produced under elevated CO2 decomposes differently from plant material produced under ambient CO2. Moreover,

  2. The fate of arsenic in soil-plant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Jiménez, Eduardo; Esteban, Elvira; Peñalosa, Jesús M

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic is a natural trace element found in the environment. In some cases and places, human activities have increased the soil concentration of As to levels that exceed hazard thresholds. Amongst the main contributing sources of As contamination of soil and water are the following: geologic origin, pyriticmining, agriculture, and coal burning. Arsenic speciation in soils occurs and is relatively complex. Soils contain both organic and inorganic arsenic species. Inorganic As species include arsenite and arsenate, which are the most abundant forms found in the environment. The majority of As in aerated soils exists as H₂AsO₄- (acid soils) or HAsO₄²- (neutral species and basic). However, HA₃sO₃ is the predomiant anaerobic soils, where arsenic availability is higher and As(III) is more weakly retained in the soil matrix than is As(V). The availability of As in soils is usually driven by multiple factors. Among these factors is the presence of Fe-oxides and/or phosphorus, (co)precipitation in salts, pH, organic matter, clay content, rainfall amount, etc. The available and most labile As fraction can potentially be taken up by plant roots, although the concentration of this fraction is usually low. Arsenic has no known biological function in plants. Once inside root cells, As(V) is quickly reduced to As(III), and, in many plant species, becomes complexed. Phosphorus nutrition influences As(V) uptake and toxicity in plants, whilst silicon has similar influences on As(III). Plants cope with As contamination in their tissues by possessing detoxification mechanisms. Such mechanisms include complexation and compartmentalization. However, once these mechanisms are saturated, symptoms of phytotoxicity appear. Phytotoxic effects commonly observed from As exposure includes growth inhibition, chlorophyll degradation, nutrient depletion and oxidative stress. Plants vary in their ability to accumulate and tolerate As (from tolerant hyperaccumulators to sensitive

  3. Plant uptake of radiocaesium from artificially contaminated soil monoliths covering major European soil types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waegeneers, Nadia [Laboratory for Soil and Water Management, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 20, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium)], E-mail: nadia.waegeneers@agr.kuleuven.ac.be; Sauras-Yera, Teresa [Departament de Biologia Vegetal, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Thiry, Yves [SCK.CEN, Radioecology Laboratory, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Vallejo, V. Ramon [Departament de Biologia Vegetal, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CEAM, Parque Tecnologico, Charles Darwin 14, 46980 Parterna (Spain); Smolders, Erik [Laboratory for Soil and Water Management, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 20, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Madoz-Escande, Chantal; Brechignac, Francois [SERLAB, ISPN, Department for Environmental Protection, CE-Cadarache Batiment 159, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex 13108 (France)

    2009-06-15

    Uptake of {sup 137}Cs was measured in different agricultural plant species (beans, lettuce, barley and ryegrass) grown in 5 undisturbed soil monoliths covering major European soil types. The first cultivation was made three years after soil contamination and plants were grown during 3 successive years. The plant-soil {sup 137}Cs transfer factors varied maximally 12-fold among soils and 35-fold among species when grown on the same soil. Single correlations between transfer factors and soil properties were found, but they varied widely with plant type and can hardly be used as a predictive tool because of the few soils used. The variation of {sup 137}Cs concentrations in plants among soils was related to differences in soil solution {sup 137}Cs and K concentrations, consistent with previous observations in hydroponics and pot trials. Absolute values of transfer factors could not be predicted based on a model validated for pot trials. The {sup 137}Cs activity concentration in soil solution decreased significantly (11- to 250-fold) for most soils in the 1997-1999 period and is partly explained by decreasing K in soil solution. Transfer factors of lettuce showed both increasing and decreasing trends between 2 consecutive years depending on soil type. The trends could be explained by the variation in {sup 137}Cs and K concentrations in soil solution. It is concluded that differences in {sup 137}Cs transfer factors among soils and trends in transfer factors as a function of time can be explained from soil solution composition, as shown previously for pot trials, although absolute values of transfer factors could not be predicted.

  4. Effects of plant species identity, diversity and soil fertility on biodegradation of phenanthrene in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyelami, Ayodeji O; Okere, Uchechukwu V; Orwin, Kate H; De Deyn, Gerlinde B; Jones, Kevin C [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Semple, Kirk T., E-mail: k.semple@lancaster.ac.uk [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    The work presented in this paper investigated the effects of plant species composition, species diversity and soil fertility on biodegradation of {sup 14}C-phenanthrene in soil. The two soils used were of contrasting fertility, taken from long term unfertilised and fertilised grassland, showing differences in total nitrogen content (%N). Plant communities consisted of six different plant species: two grasses, two forbs, and two legume species, and ranged in species richness from 1 to 6. The degradation of {sup 14}C-phenanthrene was evaluated by measuring indigenous catabolic activity following the addition of the contaminant to soil using respirometry. Soil fertility was a driving factor in all aspects of {sup 14}C-phenanthrene degradation; lag phase, maximum rates and total extents of {sup 14}C-phenanthrene mineralisation were higher in improved soils compared to unimproved soils. Plant identity had a significant effect on the lag phase and extents of mineralisation. Soil fertility was the major influence also on abundance of microbial communities. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two grassland soils of contrasting fertility showing differences in total nitrogen content (%N) were used in this study. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of individual plant species and plant diversity on mineralisation of {sup 14}C-phenanthrene in soil were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soil fertility was the major influence on mineralisation of {sup 14}C-phenanthrene, and abundance of microbial community. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The presence of a specific plant plays a role in the extent of mineralisation of phenanthrene in soil. - Soil management was the main driver for the mineralisation of {sup 14}C-phenanthrene in soil.

  5. Plant uptake of radiocesium from contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipiska, M.; Lesny, J.; Hornik, M.; Augustin, J.

    2004-01-01

    Phytoextraction field experiments were conducted on soil contaminated with radiocesium to determine the capacity of autochthonous grasses and weeds to accumulate 137 Cs. The aim of the study was to evaluate the potential of spontaneously growing vegetation as a tool for decontamination of non-agricultural contaminated land. As a test field, the closed monitored area of the radioactive wastewater treatment plant of the Nuclear Power Plant in Jaslovskie Bohunice, Slovakia was used. contamination was irregularly distributed from the level of background to spots with maximal activity up to 900 Bq/g soil. Sequential extraction analysis of soil samples showed the following extractability of radiocesium (as percent of total): water 2 = 0.3-1.1%; 1M CH 3 COONa = 0.3-0.9%; 0.04 M NH 4 Cl (in 25% CH 3 COOH) = 0.9-1.4% and 30% H 2 O 2 - 0.02 M HNO 3 = 4.5-9.0%.Specific radioactivity of the most efficiently bioaccumulating plant species did not exceed 4.0 BqKg -1 (dry weight biomass). These correspond to the soil-to-plant transfer factor (TF) values up to 44.4x10 -4 BqKg -1 crop, d.w.)/(BqKg -1 soil d.w). Aggregated transfer factor (T ag ) of the average sample of the whole crop harvested from defined area was 0.5x10 -5 (Bqkg -1 d.w. crop)/(Bqm -2 soil). It can be concluded that low mobility of radiocesium in analysed soil type, confirmed by sequential extraction analyses, is the main hindrance for practical application for autochthonous plants as a phytoremediation tool for aged contaminated area of non-cultivated sites. Plant cover can efficiently serve only as a soil surface-stabilising layer, mitigating the migration of radiocesium into the surrounding environment. (author)

  6. CO2 deficit in temperate forest soils receiving high atmospheric N-deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Siegfried

    2003-02-01

    Evidence is provided for an internal CO2 sink in forest soils, that may have a potential impact on the global CO2-budget. Lowered CO2 fraction in the soil atmosphere, and thus lowered CO2 release to the aboveground atmosphere, is indicated in high N-deposition areas. Also at forest edges, especially of spruce forest, where additional N-deposition has occurred, the soil CO2 is lowered, and the gradient increases into the closed forest. Over the last three decades the capacity of the forest soil to maintain the internal sink process has been limited to a cumulative supply of approximately 1000 and 1500 kg N ha(-1). Beyond this limit the internal soil CO2 sink becomes an additional CO2 source, together with nitrogen leaching. This stage of "nitrogen saturation" is still uncommon in closed forests in southern Scandinavia, however, it occurs in exposed forest edges which receive high atmospheric N-deposition. The soil CO2 gradient, which originally increases from the edge towards the closed forest, becomes reversed.

  7. Study of solution speciation, soil retention and soil-plant transfer of zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrand, E.

    2005-12-01

    Within the framework of the risks prevention policy of Andra, the radioactive zirconium introduction ( 93 Zr and 95 Zr) into the environment could be carried out starting from the nuclear waste whose storage is envisaged in deep geological layers. Thus, the goal of this study was to evaluate the parameters and phenomena influencing speciation (various chemical forms) and the soil-plant transfer of zirconium. Experiments of adsorption/desorption of zirconium with different ligands likely to be present in soils (goethite and humic acid) and with two soils, with contrasted characteristics, close to the underground research laboratory of Andra (Meuse) were carried out. These results of adsorption were then confronted with those obtained by the MUSIC and NICA-DONNAN models carried out using the computer code ECOSAT. Zr presents a strong affinity for the two types of soils and the soils constituents. Specific interactions of internal sphere type with the goethite were highlighted using the model. Soil-solution partition coefficients, or K d , values increase with pH and contact time. Various types of edible plants, pea (Pisum sativum L.) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L cv. St Pierre) were cultivated in hydroponic conditions and in soils spiked with various sources of Zirconium. The maximum zirconium contents are mainly measured in the roots of the plants. The soil-plant transfer factors measured during these experiments show a weak bioavailability of zirconium. An influence of speciation on Zr bioavailability is however highlighted. Some chemical forms, such as oxychloride or acetate, are more easily mobilized than others by the plant. (author)

  8. Smart plants, smart models? On adaptive responses in vegetation-soil systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ploeg, Martine; Teuling, Ryan; van Dam, Nicole; de Rooij, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    Hydrological models that will be able to cope with future precipitation and evapotranspiration regimes need a solid base describing the essence of the processes involved [1]. The essence of emerging patterns at large scales often originates from micro-behaviour in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere system. A complicating factor in capturing this behaviour is the constant interaction between vegetation and geology in which water plays a key role. The resilience of the coupled vegetation-soil system critically depends on its sensitivity to environmental changes. To assess root water uptake by plants in a changing soil environment, a direct indication of the amount of energy required by plants to take up water can be obtained by measuring the soil water potential in the vicinity of roots with polymer tensiometers [2]. In a lysimeter experiment with various levels of imposed water stress the polymer tensiometer data suggest maize roots regulate their root water uptake on the derivative of the soil water retention curve, rather than the amount of moisture alone. As a result of environmental changes vegetation may wither and die, or these changes may instead trigger gene adaptation. Constant exposure to environmental stresses, biotic or abiotic, influences plant physiology, gene adaptations, and flexibility in gene adaptation [3-7]. To investigate a possible relation between plant genotype, the plant stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and the soil water potential, a proof of principle experiment was set up with Solanum Dulcamare plants. The results showed a significant difference in ABA response between genotypes from a dry and a wet environment, and this response was also reflected in the root water uptake. Adaptive responses may have consequences for the way species are currently being treated in models (single plant to global scale). In particular, model parameters that control root water uptake and plant transpiration are generally assumed to be a property of the plant

  9. Atmospheric mercury pollution around a chlor-alkali plant in Flix (NE Spain): an integrated analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbrí, José M; López-Berdonces, Miguel Angel; Fernández-Calderón, Sergio; Higueras, Pablo; Díez, Sergi

    2015-04-01

    An integrated analysis approach has been applied to a mercury (Hg) case study on a chlor-alkali plant located in the Ebro River basin, close to the town of Flix (NE Spain). The study focused on atmospheric Hg and its incorporation in soils and lichens close to a mercury cell chlor-alkali plant (CAP), which has been operating since the end of the 19th century. Atmospheric Hg present in the area was characterized by means of seven total gaseous mercury (TGM) surveys carried out from 2007 to 2012. Surveys were carried out by car, walking, and at fixed locations, and covered an area of some 12 km(2) (including the CAP area, the village in which workers live, Flix town, and the Sebes Wildlife Reserve). Finally, an atmospheric Hg dispersion model was developed with ISC-AERMOD software validated by a lichen survey of the area. The results for the atmospheric compartment seem to indicate that the Flix area currently has the highest levels of Hg pollution in Spain on the basis of the extremely high average concentrations in the vicinity of the CAP (229 ng m(-3)). Moreover, the Hg(0) plume affects Flix town center to some extent, with values well above the international thresholds for residential areas. Wet and dry Hg deposition reached its highest values on the banks of the Ebro River, and this contributes to increased soil contamination (range 44-12,900 ng g(-1), average 775 ng g(-1)). A good fit was obtained between anomalous areas indicated by lichens and the dispersion model for 1 year.

  10. Soil fertility and plant diversity enhance microbial performance in metal-polluted soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanowicz, Anna M; Kapusta, Paweł; Szarek-Łukaszewska, Grażyna; Grodzińska, Krystyna; Niklińska, Maria; Vogt, Rolf D

    2012-11-15

    This study examined the effects of soil physicochemical properties (including heavy metal pollution) and vegetation parameters on soil basal respiration, microbial biomass, and the activity and functional richness of culturable soil bacteria and fungi. In a zinc and lead mining area (S Poland), 49 sites were selected to represent all common plant communities and comprise the area's diverse soil types. Numerous variables describing habitat properties were reduced by PCA to 7 independent factors, mainly representing subsoil type (metal-rich mining waste vs. sand), soil fertility (exchangeable Ca, Mg and K, total C and N, organic C), plant species richness, phosphorus content, water-soluble heavy metals (Zn, Cd and Pb), clay content and plant functional diversity (based on graminoids, legumes and non-leguminous forbs). Multiple regression analysis including these factors explained much of the variation in most microbial parameters; in the case of microbial respiration and biomass, it was 86% and 71%, respectively. The activity of soil microbes was positively affected mainly by soil fertility and, apparently, by the presence of mining waste in the subsoil. The mining waste contained vast amounts of trace metals (total Zn, Cd and Pb), but it promoted microbial performance due to its inherently high content of macronutrients (total Ca, Mg, K and C). Plant species richness had a relatively strong positive effect on all microbial parameters, except for the fungal component. In contrast, plant functional diversity was practically negligible in its effect on microbes. Other explanatory variables had only a minor positive effect (clay content) or no significant influence (phosphorus content) on microbial communities. The main conclusion from this study is that high nutrient availability and plant species richness positively affected the soil microbes and that this apparently counteracted the toxic effects of metal contamination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  11. Soil Oxidation-Reduction in Wetlands and Its Impact on Plant Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezeshki, S. R.; DeLaune, R. D.

    2012-01-01

    Soil flooding in wetlands is accompanied by changes in soil physical and chemical characteristics. These changes include the lowering of soil redox potential (Eh) leading to increasing demand for oxygen within the soil profile as well as production of soil phytotoxins that are by-products of soil reduction and thus, imposing potentially severe stress on plant roots. Various methods are utilized for quantifying plant responses to reducing soil conditions that include measurement of radial oxygen transport, plant enzymatic responses, and assessment of anatomical/morphological changes. However, the chemical properties and reducing nature of soil environment in which plant roots are grown, including oxygen demand, and other associated processes that occur in wetland soils, pose a challenge to evaluation and comparison of plant responses that are reported in the literature. This review emphasizes soil-plant interactions in wetlands, drawing attention to the importance of quantifying the intensity and capacity of soil reduction for proper evaluation of wetland plant responses, particularly at the process and whole-plant levels. Furthermore, while root oxygen-deficiency may partially account for plant stress responses, the importance of soil phytotoxins, produced as by-products of low soil Eh conditions, is discussed and the need for development of methods to allow differentiation of plant responses to reduced or anaerobic soil conditions vs. soil phytotoxins is emphasized. PMID:24832223

  12. Suppression of soil nitrification by plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbarao, Guntur Venkata; Yoshihashi, Tadashi; Worthington, Margaret; Nakahara, Kazuhiko; Ando, Yasuo; Sahrawat, Kanwar Lal; Rao, Idupulapati Madhusudhana; Lata, Jean-Christophe; Kishii, Masahiro; Braun, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-01

    Nitrification, the biological oxidation of ammonium to nitrate, weakens the soil's ability to retain N and facilitates N-losses from production agriculture through nitrate-leaching and denitrification. This process has a profound influence on what form of mineral-N is absorbed, used by plants, and retained in the soil, or lost to the environment, which in turn affects N-cycling, N-use efficiency (NUE) and ecosystem health and services. As reactive-N is often the most limiting in natural ecosystems, plants have acquired a range of mechanisms that suppress soil-nitrifier activity to limit N-losses via N-leaching and denitrification. Plants' ability to produce and release nitrification inhibitors from roots and suppress soil-nitrifier activity is termed 'biological nitrification inhibition' (BNI). With recent developments in methodology for in-situ measurement of nitrification inhibition, it is now possible to characterize BNI function in plants. This review assesses the current status of our understanding of the production and release of biological nitrification inhibitors (BNIs) and their potential in improving NUE in agriculture. A suite of genetic, soil and environmental factors regulate BNI activity in plants. BNI-function can be genetically exploited to improve the BNI-capacity of major food- and feed-crops to develop next-generation production systems with reduced nitrification and N2O emission rates to benefit both agriculture and the environment. The feasibility of such an approach is discussed based on the progresses made. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation and development of soil values for the pathway 'soil to plant'. Significance of mercury evaporation for the burden of plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaeth, S.; Schlueter, K.

    1998-05-01

    In cooperation with the Ad-hoc working group 'Transfer of heavy metals from soil to plant' of the Laenderarbeitsgemeinschaft Bodenschutz (LABO) the significance of mercury evaporation for the deduction of threshold values in respect of the impact via the pathway soil to plant was investigated. Mercury contamination of food- and feeding stuff plants was examined with special emphasis. For these purposes a lab experiment including three different soils with varying initial mercury load (background level, geogenic and anthropogenic contamination) and two different plant species (parsely and spinach) was carried out under defined conditions in closed lysimeters. Mercury uptake via the roots was minimised since the plants grew in isolated customary substrate which showed a low concentration of mercury. Thus, only the surrounding soil evaporated mercury. The concentrations of mercury in the plants in the background level treatment (0.1 mg Hg/kg dry soil) were 0.15 mg/kg dry matter (spinach) and 0.44 mg/kg dry matter (parsely). The treatment with anthropogenic contaminated soil (111 mg Hg/kg dry soil) resulted in concentrations in the two plants of 2.0 and 2.6 mg/kg dry matter, respectively. A comparable order of magnitude was achieved in the geogenic contaminated treatment (34 mg Hg/kg dry soil) with 2.1 mg/kg dry matter. Experiments conducted with radioactive 203 Hg showed in each case recoveries of 20 to 34% in the leaves regarding the evaporated Hg-tracer. Also in the stem and in the roots Hg-tracer could be detected, indicating a translocation within the plant from leaf to root. By means of a comprehensive literature study the state of the art for Hg-evaporation and Hg-uptake of plants was compiled. Comparing the experimental results with data derived from literature, the Hg-concentrations found are confirmed by results of other authors. (orig.) [de

  14. Soil ecosystem functioning under climate change: plant species and community effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kardol, Paul [ORNL; Cregger, Melissa [ORNL; Campany, Courtney E [ORNL; Classen, Aimee T [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Feedbacks of terrestrial ecosystems to climate change depend on soil ecosystem dynamics. Soil ecosystems can directly and indirectly respond to climate change. For example, warming directly alters microbial communities by increasing their activity. Climate change may also alter plant community composition, thus indirectly altering the microbial communities that feed on their inputs. To better understand how climate change may directly and indirectly alter soil ecosystem functioning, we investigated old-field plant community and soil ecosystem responses to single and combined effects of elevated [CO2], warming, and water availability. Specifically, we collected soils at the plot level (plant community soils), and beneath dominant plant species (plant-specific soils). We used microbial enzyme activities and soil nematodes as indicators for soil ecosystem functioning. Our study resulted in two main findings: 1) Overall, while there were some interactions, water, relative to increases in [CO2] and warming, had the largest impact on plant community composition, soil enzyme activities, and soil nematodes. Multiple climate change factors can interact to shape ecosystems, but in this case, those interactions were largely driven by changes in water availability. 2) Indirect effects of climate change, via changes in plant communities, had a significant impact on soil ecosystem functioning and this impact was not obvious when looking at plant community soils. Climate change effects on enzyme activities and soil nematode abundance and community structure strongly differed between plant community soils and plant-specific soils, but also within plant-specific soils. In sum, these results indicate that accurate assessments of climate change impacts on soil ecosystem functioning require incorporating the concurrent changes in plant function and plant community composition. Climate change-induced shifts in plant community composition will likely modify or counteract the direct

  15. Hg transfer from contaminated soils to plants and animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, S.M.; Henriques, B.; Reis, A.T.; Duarte, A.C.; Pereira, E.; Romkens, P.F.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the transfer of mercury (Hg) from soil to crops is crucial due to Hg toxicity and Hg occurrence in terrestrial systems. Previous research has shown that available Hg in soils contributes to plant Hg levels. Plant Hg concentrations are related to soil conditions and plant

  16. Biogenic volatile emissions from the soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñuelas, J; Asensio, D; Tholl, D; Wenke, K; Rosenkranz, M; Piechulla, B; Schnitzler, J P

    2014-08-01

    Volatile compounds are usually associated with an appearance/presence in the atmosphere. Recent advances, however, indicated that the soil is a huge reservoir and source of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs), which are formed from decomposing litter and dead organic material or are synthesized by underground living organism or organs and tissues of plants. This review summarizes the scarce available data on the exchange of VOCs between soil and atmosphere and the features of the soil and particle structure allowing diffusion of volatiles in the soil, which is the prerequisite for biological VOC-based interactions. In fact, soil may function either as a sink or as a source of bVOCs. Soil VOC emissions to the atmosphere are often 1-2 (0-3) orders of magnitude lower than those from aboveground vegetation. Microorganisms and the plant root system are the major sources for bVOCs. The current methodology to detect belowground volatiles is described as well as the metabolic capabilities resulting in the wealth of microbial and root VOC emissions. Furthermore, VOC profiles are discussed as non-destructive fingerprints for the detection of organisms. In the last chapter, belowground volatile-based bi- and multi-trophic interactions between microorganisms, plants and invertebrates in the soil are discussed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. A soil washing pilot plant for removing petroleum hydrocarbons from contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toor, I.A.; Roehrig, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    A soil washing pilot plant was built and tested for its ability to remove petroleum hydrocarbons from certain soils. The ITEX soil washing pilot plant is a trailer mountable mobile unit which has a washing capacity of two tons per hour of contaminated soils. A benchscale study was carried out prior to the fabrication of the pilot plant. The first sample was contaminated with diesel fuel while the second sample was contaminated with crude oil. Various nonionic, cationic and anionic cleaning agents were evaluated for their ability to remove petroleum hydrocarbons from these materials. The nonionic cleaning agents were more successful in cleaning the soils in general. The ultimate surfactant choice was based on several factors including cost, biodegradability, cleaning efficiency and other technical considerations. The soil samples were characterized in terms of their particle size distributions. Commercial diesel fuel was carefully mixed in this sand to prepare a representative sample for the pilot plant study. Two pilot runs were made using this material. A multistage washing study was also conducted in the laboratory which indicates that the contamination level can be reduced to 100 ppm using only four stages. Because the pilot plant washing efficiency is twice as high, it is believed that ultimate contamination levels can be reduced to lower levels using the same number of stages. However, this hypothesis has not been demonstrated to date

  18. Effects of Long-Term CO2 Enrichment on Soil-Atmosphere CH4 Fluxes and the Spatial Micro-Distribution of Methanotrophic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbin, Saeed; Guillet, Cécile; Kammann, Claudia I; Niklaus, Pascal A

    2015-01-01

    Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on plant growth and associated C cycling have intensively been studied, but less is known about effects on the fluxes of radiatively active trace gases other than CO2. Net soil-atmosphere CH4 fluxes are determined by the balance of soil microbially-driven methane (CH4) oxidation and methanogenesis, and both might change under elevated CO2. Here, we studied CH4 dynamics in a permanent grassland exposed to elevated CO2 for 14 years. Soil-atmosphere fluxes of CH4 were measured using large static chambers, over a period of four years. The ecosystem was a net sink for atmospheric CH4 for most of the time except summer to fall when net CH4 emissions occurred. We did not detect any elevated CO2 effects on CH4 fluxes, but emissions were difficult to quantify due to their discontinuous nature, most likely because of ebullition from the saturated zone. Potential methanotrophic activity, determined by incubation of fresh sieved soil under standardized conditions, also did not reveal any effect of the CO2 treatment. Finally, we determined the spatial micro-distribution of methanotrophic activity at less than 5× atmospheric (10 ppm) and elevated (10000 ppm) CH4 concentrations, using a novel auto-radiographic technique. These analyses indicated that domains of net CH4 assimilation were distributed throughout the analyzed top 15 cm of soils, with no dependence on CH4 concentration or CO2 treatment. Our investigations suggest that elevated CO2 exerts no or only minor effects on CH4 fluxes in the type of ecosystem we studied, at least as long as soil moisture differences are small or absent as was the case here. The autoradiographic analyses further indicate that the spatial niche of CH4 oxidation does not shift in response to CO2 enrichment or CH4 concentration, and that the same type of methanotrophs may oxidize CH4 from atmospheric and soil-internal sources.

  19. Screening plant species native to Taiwan for remediation of 137Cs-contaminated soil and the effects of K addition and soil amendment on the transfer of 137Cs from soil to plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, F.-I.; Chung, H.-P.; Teng, S.-P.; Sheu, S.-T.

    2005-01-01

    This study aims to screen plant species native to Taiwan that could be used to eliminate 137 Cs radionuclides from contaminated soil. Four kinds of vegetables and two kinds of plants known as green manures were used for the screening. The test plants were cultivated in 137 Cs-contaminated soil and amended soil which is a mixture of the contaminated one with a horticultural soil. The plant with the highest 137 Cs transfer factor was used for further examination on the effects of K addition on the transfer of 137 Cs from the soils to the plant. Experimental results revealed that plants cultivated in the amended soil produced more biomass than those in the contaminated soil. Rape exhibited the highest production of aboveground parts, and had the highest 137 Cs transfer factor among all the tested plants. The transfer of 137 Cs to the rape grown in the soil to which 100 ppm KCl commonly used in local fertilizers had been added, were restrained. Results of this study indicated that rape, a popular green manure in Taiwan, could remedy 137 Cs-contaminated soil

  20. Nuclear techniques used in soil fertility and plant nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halitligil, M.B.; Kislal, H.; Sirin, H.; Sirin, C.; Kilicaslan, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear techniques, which include the usage of radioactive and stable isotopes, had been used in soil fertility, plant nutrition, plant breeding, plant protection and food preservation research works after 1950s. Ultimately these nuclear techniques contributed greatly in increased plant production. In general, it is possible to separate the nuclear techniques used in soil fertility and plant nutrition into two groups. The first group is the use of radioactive and stable isotopes as a tracer in order to find out the optimum fertilization rate of plants precisely. The second group is the use of neutron probe in determining the soil moisture at different periods of the growing season and at various soil depths precisely without any difficulty. In research works where conventional techniques are used, it is not possible to identify how much of the nutrient taken up by the plant came from applied fertilizer or soil. However, when tracer techniques are used in research works it is possible to identify precisely which amount of the nutrient taken from fertilizer or from soil. Therefore, the nuclear techniques are very important in finding out which variety of fertilizer and how much of it must be used. The determination of the soil moisture is very important in finding the water needs of the plants for a good growth. Soil moisture contents changes often during the growth period, so it must be determined very frequently in order to determine the amount of irrigation that has to be done. Conventional soil moisture determination (gravimetric method) is very laborious especially when it has to be done frequently. However, by using neutron probe soil moisture determinations can be done very easily any time during the plant growth period

  1. Nuclear techniques used in soil fertility and plant nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halitligil, M.B.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear techniques, which include the usage of radioactive and stable isotopes, had been used in soil fertility, plant nutrition, plant breeding, plant protection and food preservation research works after 1950s. Ultimately these nuclear techniques contributed greatly in increased plant production. In general, it is possible to separate the nuclear techniques used in soil fertility and plant nutrition into two groups. The first group is the use of radioactive and stable isotopes as a tracer in order to find out the optimum fertilization rate of plants precisely. The second group is the use of neutron probe in determining the soil moisture at different periods of the growing season and at various soil depths precisely without any difficulty. In research works where conventional techniques are used, it is not possible to identify how much of the nutrient taken up by the plant came from applied fertilizer or soil. However, when tracer techniques are used in research works it is possible to identify precisely which amount of the nutrient taken from fertilizer or from soil. Therefore, the nuclear techniques are very important in finding out which variety of fertilizer and how much of it must be used. The determination of the soil moisture is very important in finding the water needs of the plants for a good growth. Soil moisture contents changes often during the growth period, so it must be determined very frequently in order to determine the amount of irrigation that has to be done. Conventional soil moisture determination (gravimetric method) is very laborious especially when it has to be done frequently. However, by using neutron probe soil moisture determinations can be done very easily any time during the plant growth period. (author)

  2. Importance of biotic and abiotic components in feedback between plants and soil

    OpenAIRE

    Hanzelková, Věra

    2017-01-01

    The plant-soil feedback affects the forming of a plant community. Plants affect their own species as well as other species. The plant-soil feedback can be both positive and negative. Plants affect soil, change its properties, and the soil affects the plants reciprocally. Soil components can be divided into biotic and abiotic ones. The abiotic component is represented by physical and chemical properties of the soil. The main properties are the soil structure, the soil moisture, the soil temper...

  3. Effects of plant diversity, N fertilization, and elevated carbon dioxide on grassland soil N cycling in a long-term experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Kevin E; Hobbie, Sarah E; Tilman, David; Reich, Peter B

    2013-04-01

    The effects of global environmental changes on soil nitrogen (N) pools and fluxes have consequences for ecosystem functions such as plant productivity and N retention. In a 13-year grassland experiment, we evaluated how elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 ), N fertilization, and plant species richness alter soil N cycling. We focused on soil inorganic N pools, including ammonium and nitrate, and two N fluxes, net N mineralization and net nitrification. In contrast with existing hypotheses, such as progressive N limitation, and with observations from other, often shorter, studies, elevated CO2 had relatively static and small, or insignificant, effects on soil inorganic N pools and fluxes. Nitrogen fertilization had inconsistent effects on soil N transformations, but increased soil nitrate and ammonium concentrations. Plant species richness had increasingly positive effects on soil N transformations over time, likely because in diverse subplots the concentrations of N in roots increased over time. Species richness also had increasingly positive effects on concentrations of ammonium in soil, perhaps because more carbon accumulated in soils of diverse subplots, providing exchange sites for ammonium. By contrast, subplots planted with 16 species had lower soil nitrate concentrations than less diverse subplots, especially when fertilized, probably due to greater N uptake capacity of subplots with 16 species. Monocultures of different plant functional types had distinct effects on N transformations and nitrate concentrations, such that not all monocultures differed from diverse subplots in the same manner. The first few years of data would not have adequately forecast the effects of N fertilization and diversity on soil N cycling in later years; therefore, the dearth of long-term manipulations of plant species richness and N inputs is a hindrance to forecasting the state of the soil N cycle and ecosystem functions in extant plant communities. © 2012 Blackwell

  4. Local variation in conspecific plant density influences plant-soil feedback in a natural grassland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kos, M.; Veendrick, Johan; Bezemer, T.M.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have argued that under field conditions plant–soil feedback may be related to the local density of a plant species, but plant–soil feedback is often studied by comparing conspecific and heterospecific soils or by using mixed soil samples collected from different locations and plant

  5. Soil reclamation with turfing plant harvest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouve, A.; Maubert, H.; Bon, P.; Barthe, P.

    1992-01-01

    This work performed within the European RESSAC Programme aims at providing efficient countermeasures to decontaminate agricultural soils. The evaluation of the admissible concentration of radionuclides in the soil is an important question in this topic. Two considerations may help to answer this question: the health aspect approaches with ICRP recommendations and the economical aspects which can widely interfere with the other. If the cleaning technique is inexpensive, it will be possible to enlarge its use beyond the low intervention levels. According to the frequently low migration rate of radionuclides in the soil profile after deposition on the soil surface, a method removing a thin layer of the soil surface entrapped by turfing plants will allow to limit the waste production. The method being tried in summer 1991 is inexpensive because it uses the power of the plants to convert sunlight energy into biomass. The method consist in sowing turfing plants able to develop a very dense root network entrapping the soil surface contaminated particles allowing their mechanical removal by means of existing machines: sod harvesters. This promising method, according to lab-experiments, can use the green techniques as well for hydro-seeding: a very fast tool for sowing by helicopter at the rate of 0,3 km sup 2 per day, as sod harvester able to remove a sod-soil layer thinner than 2 cm. (author)

  6. Nitrogen cycling in the soil-plant system along a precipitation gradient in the Kalahari sands

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Aranibar, JN

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available ). This and the fact that the driest savannas of the Kalahari sands are dominated by Mimosoideae species lead us to hypothe- size that symbiotic N2 fixation is more prevalent in drier sites of the Kalahari transect. Cyanobacteria are also capable of fixing atmospheric... enrichment for soils and plants; lower soil organic C and N; increased symbiotic and non-symbiotic N2 fixation; and de- creased NO losses from the system. The processes and pools analyzed are compared with the isotopic signatures along the precipitation...

  7. Ar-37 in the Atmospheric and Sub-Soil Gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purtschert, R.; Raghoo, L.S.

    2015-01-01

    On-site inspection of the radioactive noble gas isotope 37Ar is a definitive and unambiguous indicator of an underground nuclear explosion. 37Ar is produced underground by neutron activation of calcium by the reaction 40Ca(n,α)37Ar. In the atmosphere, 37Ar is produced by the spallation reaction 40Ar(n,4n)37Ar. Periodic measurements over the last six years on air collected in Bern revealed a background level in the order of 1-5 mBq/m 3 air in agreement with former findings and theoretical calculations. Those calculations also indicated that the intrusion of stratospheric air masses may lead to elevated tropospheric 37Ar concentrations up to 8-10 mBq/m 3 air. Selected samples taken up to now in the vicinity of nuclear power plants revealed no significant deviation from the natural background. In order to distinguish between natural and artificially elevated 37Ar the location-specific 37Ar activity range in soils, rocks and the atmosphere were identified. From CARIBIC flights, a passenger aircraft with a special air freight container filled with scientific equipment in the cargo compartment, tropospheric air samples were analyzed for 37Ar and 85Kr. The natural 37Ar production in soils and the rock basement underlying the alluvium is investigated by means of in situ measurements of different isotopes, theoretical calculations and irradiation experiments on selected rock samples. This will help resolve the temporal evolution and/or constancy of the natural 37Ar background and allow for an interpretation in terms of the identification of clandestine nuclear explosions. (author)

  8. Density-dependency and plant-soil feedback: former plant abundance influences competitive interactions between two grassland plant species through plant-soil feedbacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xue, W.; Bezemer, T.M.; Berendse, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Backgrounds and aims Negative plant-soil feedbacks (PSFs) are thought to promote species coexistence, but most evidence is derived from theoretical models and data from plant monoculture experiments. Methods We grew Anthoxanthum odoratum and Centaurea jacea in field plots in monocultures and in

  9. Wet and Dry Atmospheric Depositions of Inorganic Nitrogen during Plant Growing Season in the Coastal Zone of Yellow River Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junbao Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ecological problems caused by dry and wet deposition of atmospheric nitrogen have been widespread concern in the world. In this study, wet and dry atmospheric depositions were monitored in plant growing season in the coastal zone of the Yellow River Delta (YRD using automatic sampling equipment. The results showed that SO42- and Na+ were the predominant anion and cation, respectively, in both wet and dry atmospheric depositions. The total atmospheric nitrogen deposition was ~2264.24 mg m−2, in which dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition was about 32.02%. The highest values of dry and wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition appeared in May and August, respectively. In the studied area, NO3-–N was the main nitrogen form in dry deposition, while the predominant nitrogen in wet atmospheric deposition was NH4+–N with ~56.51% of total wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition. The average monthly attribution rate of atmospheric deposition of NO3-–N and NH4+–N was ~31.38% and ~20.50% for the contents of NO3-–N and NH4+–N in 0–10 cm soil layer, respectively, suggested that the atmospheric nitrogen was one of main sources for soil nitrogen in coastal zone of the YRD.

  10. Wet and dry atmospheric depositions of inorganic nitrogen during plant growing season in the coastal zone of Yellow River Delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junbao; Ning, Kai; Li, Yunzhao; Du, Siyao; Han, Guangxuan; Xing, Qinghui; Wu, Huifeng; Wang, Guangmei; Gao, Yongjun

    2014-01-01

    The ecological problems caused by dry and wet deposition of atmospheric nitrogen have been widespread concern in the world. In this study, wet and dry atmospheric depositions were monitored in plant growing season in the coastal zone of the Yellow River Delta (YRD) using automatic sampling equipment. The results showed that SO4 (2-) and Na(+) were the predominant anion and cation, respectively, in both wet and dry atmospheric depositions. The total atmospheric nitrogen deposition was ~2264.24 mg m(-2), in which dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition was about 32.02%. The highest values of dry and wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition appeared in May and August, respectively. In the studied area, NO3 (-)-N was the main nitrogen form in dry deposition, while the predominant nitrogen in wet atmospheric deposition was NH4 (+)-N with ~56.51% of total wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition. The average monthly attribution rate of atmospheric deposition of NO3 (-)-N and NH4 (+)-N was ~31.38% and ~20.50% for the contents of NO3 (-)-N and NH4 (+)-N in 0-10 cm soil layer, respectively, suggested that the atmospheric nitrogen was one of main sources for soil nitrogen in coastal zone of the YRD.

  11. Soil-to-plant halogens transfer studies 2. Root uptake of radiochlorine by plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashparov, V.; Colle, C.; Zvarich, S.; Yoschenko, V.; Levchuk, S.; Lundin, S.

    2005-01-01

    Long-term field experiments have been carried out in the Chernobyl exclusion zone in order to determine the parameters governing radiochlorine ( 36 Cl) transfer to plants from four types of soil, namely, podzoluvisol, greyzem, and typical and meadow chernozem. Radiochlorine concentration ratios (CR) in radish roots (15 ± 10), lettuce leaves (30 ± 15), bean pods (15 ± 11) and wheat seed (23 ± 11) and straw (210 ± 110) for fresh weight of plants were obtained. These values correlate well with stable chlorine values for the same plants. One year after injection, 36 Cl reached a quasi-equilibrium with stable chlorine in the agricultural soils and its behavior in the soil-plant system mimicked the behavior of stable chlorine (this behavior was determined by soil moisture transport in the investigated soils). In the absence of intensive vertical migration, more than half of 36 Cl activity in arable layer of soil passes into the radish, lettuce and the aboveground parts of wheat during a single vegetation period

  12. Soil-to-plant halogens transfer studies 2. Root uptake of radiochlorine by plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashparov, V. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Str.7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Colle, C. [Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN/DEI/SECRE), Cadarache bat 159, BP 3, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)]. E-mail: claude.colle@irsn.fr; Zvarich, S. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Str.7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Yoschenko, V. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Str.7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Levchuk, S. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Str.7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Lundin, S. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Str.7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine)

    2005-07-01

    Long-term field experiments have been carried out in the Chernobyl exclusion zone in order to determine the parameters governing radiochlorine ({sup 36}Cl) transfer to plants from four types of soil, namely, podzoluvisol, greyzem, and typical and meadow chernozem. Radiochlorine concentration ratios (CR) in radish roots (15 {+-} 10), lettuce leaves (30 {+-} 15), bean pods (15 {+-} 11) and wheat seed (23 {+-} 11) and straw (210 {+-} 110) for fresh weight of plants were obtained. These values correlate well with stable chlorine values for the same plants. One year after injection, {sup 36}Cl reached a quasi-equilibrium with stable chlorine in the agricultural soils and its behavior in the soil-plant system mimicked the behavior of stable chlorine (this behavior was determined by soil moisture transport in the investigated soils). In the absence of intensive vertical migration, more than half of {sup 36}Cl activity in arable layer of soil passes into the radish, lettuce and the aboveground parts of wheat during a single vegetation period.

  13. Microbial Biomarkers for Native and Agricultural Soil Inputs to Atmospheric Particulate Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, J. M.; Herckes, P.; Fraser, M. P.; Collins, J.; Van Mooy, B. A.

    2017-12-01

    Intense dust storms (haboobs) erode desert soils and cause dramatic short-term increases in particulate matter (PM) concentration in the atmosphere. Background atmospheric PM levels in the southwestern United States also commonly exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standards, so episodic haboobs and normal weather patterns both contribute to aeolian transport. We analyzed fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM>2.5) dust fractions sampled in Tempe, Arizona for molecular biomarkers indicative of dust sourced from either native or agricultural soils. We focused on pigments and intact polar lipids (IPLs) that were also in soil crusts collected in the region. The PM samples were taken during two weeks (23 July to 5 August 2014) that included two haboobs during the first week and mostly calm weather with minor rainfall during the second week. We detected scytonemin, a diagnostic pigment biomarker for cyanobacteria, in all PM>2.5 samples, but its concentration was highest in haboob dust. Similarly, scytonemin was only abundant in PM2.5 samples taken during haboobs. Scytonemin is an important component of native biological soil crusts, protecting the crust community from UV radiation, and is ca. two orders of magnitude less abundant in disturbed agricultural soils. In biological soil crusts, scytonemin is associated with extracellular polysaccharides that are produced by cyanobacteria and bind soil into cohesive crusts. The association between scytonemin and haboobs suggests that native soil erosion is facilitated by high energy, episodic events that overcome crust cohesion. IPLs were abundant in agricultural soil crusts and included phosphatidylethanolamine from soil bacteria and a glucosylceramide from fungi. These compounds had similar concentration in haboob and background dust, suggesting agricultural or otherwise disturbed soils contribute more to ambient dust. In this study, we employed a new high resolution mass spectrometric method that produces molecular formulas and

  14. Effect of growing plants on denitrification at high soil nitrate concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haider, K.; Mosier, A.; Heinemeyer, O.

    1987-01-01

    The availability of plant rhizosphere C deposits and its influence on microbial denitrification is not clearly defined. Conflicting reports as to the influence of plants and root exudation on denitrification continue to appear in the literature. The results of the authors earlier phytotron study indicated that denitrification was not stimulated in soils planted with corn or wheat compared to unplanted soils. Lower nitrate concentrations in the planted soils, however, may have led to misinterpretation of this data. A second study was conducted, to evaluate the effect of actively growing plants on denitrification where the NO 3 7 content of planted soils was maintained similar to unplanted soils. Simultaneously the C fixed by corn (Zea mays) and the fate of fertilizer N applied to the soil during the growing season were quantified. The corn was grown in a phytotron under a continuous supply of 14 CO 2 in 15 N fertilized soils to which 15 N-NO 3 - was added periodically during the growing season. The results of these studies showed that denitrification was not stimulated in soils planted with corn during active plant growth phase even when soil NO 3 - was relatively high. Denitrification was, however, greater in corn planted than unplanted soil when the recoverable root biomass began to decrease. Less N was immobilized and net 15 N immobilization was lower in planted soils than in unplanted soils. As denitrification was lower in planted soils during the time of active plant growth, the study suggests that root exudates did not stimulate either process

  15. Do we know how plants sense a drying soil?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streck Nereu Augusto

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of crop growth and yield in dry areas is largely due to stomatal closure in response to dry soil, which decreases photosynthesis. However, the mechanism that causes stomatal closure in a drying soil is a controversial issue. Experienced and respected plant physiologists around the world have different views about the primary sensor of soil water shortage in plants. The goal of this review is to present a chronological synthesis about the evidence of the possible candidates for the mechanism by which plants sense a drying soil. Hydraulic signals in the leaves as the mechanism that causes stomatal closure dominated the view on how plants sense a drying soil during the 70?s and the early 80?s. In the middle 80?s, studies suggested that stomatal conductance is better correlated with soil and root water status than with leaf water status. Thus, chemical signals produced in the roots dominated the view on how plants sense a drying soil during the late 80?s and early 90?s. During the second half of the 90?s, however, studies provided evidence that hydraulic signals in the leaves are still better candidates for the mechanism by which plants sense a drying soil. After more than 60 years of studies in plant-water relations, the question raised in the title still has no unanimous answer. This controversial issue is a good research rationale for the current generation of plant physiologists.

  16. Atmospheric dust additions as a soil formation factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Hernandez, J. L.; Ruoss, J.

    2009-07-01

    The Mediterranean area is distinguished by a least four features that determine the nature of its soils. These are its climate, its mountains, the addition of exogenous dust and ongoing anthropogenic effects. We here present three cases in which the influence of atmospheric dust additions can be detected in the soils of representative circum-Saharan contexts the Canary Islands, Betic intramontane depressions, and the Sierra Bermeja peridotite massif (Malaga). The unique position of the Canary Islands determines important rates of dust deposit, largely depending on position on the relief. the nature of the dust contrasts with the rocky substratum of the islands, and the marine and volcanic context can also affect the nature of the deposits. The numerous, extensive intramontane basins of the Betic Cordilleras act as large captors of atmospheric dust, with rates similar to those found in the Canary archipelago. The carbonate content of these exogenous additions represents a significant components that should be taken into account when establishing the carbonate accumulation regime in these soils. (Author) 13 refs.

  17. Plant-soil feedbacks and the coexistence of competing plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revilla, T.A.; Veen, G.F.; Eppinga, M.B.; Weissing, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    Plant–soil feedbacks can have important implications for the interactions among plants. Understanding these effects is a major challenge since it is inherently difficult to measure and manipulate highly diverse soil communities. Mathematical models may advance this understanding by making the

  18. Plant-soil feedbacks and the coexistence of competing plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revilla, T.A.; Veen, G.F.; Eppinga, M.B.; Weissing, F.J.

    Plant–soil feedbacks can have important implications for the interactions among plants. Understanding these effects is a major challenge since it is inherently difficult to measure and manipulate highly diverse soil communities. Mathematical models may advance this understanding by making the

  19. Salinity controls on plant transpiration and soil water balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, S.; Molini, A.; Suweis, S. S.; Viola, F.; Entekhabi, D.

    2017-12-01

    Soil salinization and aridification represent a major threat for the food security and sustainable development of drylands. The two problems are deeply connected, and their interplay is expected to be further enhanced by climate change and projected population growth. Salt-affected land is currently estimated to cover around 1.1 Gha, and is particularly widespread in semi-arid to hyper-arid climates. Over 900 Mha of these saline/sodic soils are potentially available for crop or biomass production. Salt-tolerant plants have been recently proposed as valid solution to exploit or even remediate salinized soils. However the effects of salinity on evapotranspiration, soil water balance and the long-term salt mass balance in the soil, are still largely unexplored. In this contribution we analyze the feedback of evapotranspiration on soil salinization, with particular emphasis on the role of vegetation and plant salt-tolerance. The goal is to introduce a simple modeling framework able to shed some light on how (a) soil salinity controls plant transpiration, and (b) salinization itself is favored/impeded by different vegetation feedback. We introduce at this goal a spatially lumped stochastic model of soil moisture and salt mass dynamics averaged over the active soil depth, and accounting for the effect of salinity on evapotranspiration. Here, the limiting effect of salinity on ET is modeled through a simple plant response function depending on both salt concentration in the soil and plant salt-tolerance. The coupled soil moisture and salt mass balance is hence used to obtain the conditional steady-state probability density function (pdf) of soil moisture for given salt tolerance and salinization level, Our results show that salinity imposes a limit in the soil water balance and this limit depends on plant salt-tolerance mainly through the control of the leaching occurrence (tolerant plants exploit water more efficiently than the sensitive ones). We also analyzed the

  20. CAOS: the nested catchment soil-vegetation-atmosphere observation platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Markus; Blume, Theresa

    2016-04-01

    Most catchment based observations linking hydrometeorology, ecohydrology, soil hydrology and hydrogeology are typically not integrated with each other and lack a consistent and appropriate spatial-temporal resolution. Within the research network CAOS (Catchments As Organized Systems), we have initiated and developed a novel and integrated observation platform in several catchments in Luxembourg. In 20 nested catchments covering three distinct geologies the subscale processes at the bedrock-soil-vegetation-atmosphere interface are being monitored at 46 sensor cluster locations. Each sensor cluster is designed to observe a variety of different fluxes and state variables above and below ground, in the saturated and unsaturated zone. The numbers of sensors are chosen to capture the spatial variability as well the average dynamics. At each of these sensor clusters three soil moisture profiles with sensors at different depths, four soil temperature profiles as well as matric potential, air temperature, relative humidity, global radiation, rainfall/throughfall, sapflow and shallow groundwater and stream water levels are measured continuously. In addition, most sensors also measure temperature (water, soil, atmosphere) and electrical conductivity. This setup allows us to determine the local water and energy balance at each of these sites. The discharge gauging sites in the nested catchments are also equipped with automatic water samplers to monitor water quality and water stable isotopes continuously. Furthermore, water temperature and electrical conductivity observations are extended to over 120 locations distributed across the entire stream network to capture the energy exchange between the groundwater, stream water and atmosphere. The measurements at the sensor clusters are complemented by hydrometeorological observations (rain radar, network of distrometers and dense network of precipitation gauges) and linked with high resolution meteorological models. In this

  1. Interpretation of soil-to-plant transfer on the basis of soil solution chemical composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lembrechts, J.F.; Van Loon, L.R.; Van Ginkel, J.H.; Desmet, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    Soil-to-plant translocation of a radionuclide depends on its availability on the one hand and on the efficiency of the uptake process on the other. Criticism on the use of transfer coefficients for the description of translocation mainly concerns the fact that the complex variety of processes, a.o. dependent on plant characteristics and soil type and treatment, is integrated in a single ratio. For the interpretation of the effect of counter-measures the static transfer coefficient proved to be hard to handle and knowledge of the separate underlying processes and their time dependence showed to be indispensible. Based upon translocation experiments with technetium, cobalt, strontium and zinc transfer was shown to be primarily related to the concentration of the plant available fraction in the soil solution as well as to the soil solution chemistry in general. The transfer factor of the first three elements expressed in the basis of soil solution activity (ml/g), was observed to decrease when the nutrient content of the soil solution -- reflected by its conductivity -- increased. The characteristics of the soil matrix (solid phase) furthermore showed to be of secondary importance for the explanation of the observed accumulation. Since the interstitial soil liquid phase mediates between solid phase and plant root, reliable interpretations of soil-to-plant transfer might as a rule be based on a separate study of the effect of soil properties on availability on the one hand of the uptake from nutrient solutions on the other

  2. Soil Methanotrophy Model (MeMo v1.0): a process-based model to quantify global uptake of atmospheric methane by soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murguia-Flores, Fabiola; Arndt, Sandra; Ganesan, Anita L.; Murray-Tortarolo, Guillermo; Hornibrook, Edward R. C.

    2018-06-01

    Soil bacteria known as methanotrophs are the sole biological sink for atmospheric methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas that is responsible for ˜ 20 % of the human-driven increase in radiative forcing since pre-industrial times. Soil methanotrophy is controlled by a plethora of factors, including temperature, soil texture, moisture and nitrogen content, resulting in spatially and temporally heterogeneous rates of soil methanotrophy. As a consequence, the exact magnitude of the global soil sink, as well as its temporal and spatial variability, remains poorly constrained. We developed a process-based model (Methanotrophy Model; MeMo v1.0) to simulate and quantify the uptake of atmospheric CH4 by soils at the global scale. MeMo builds on previous models by Ridgwell et al. (1999) and Curry (2007) by introducing several advances, including (1) a general analytical solution of the one-dimensional diffusion-reaction equation in porous media, (2) a refined representation of nitrogen inhibition on soil methanotrophy, (3) updated factors governing the influence of soil moisture and temperature on CH4 oxidation rates and (4) the ability to evaluate the impact of autochthonous soil CH4 sources on uptake of atmospheric CH4. We show that the improved structural and parametric representation of key drivers of soil methanotrophy in MeMo results in a better fit to observational data. A global simulation of soil methanotrophy for the period 1990-2009 using MeMo yielded an average annual sink of 33.5 ± 0.6 Tg CH4 yr-1. Warm and semi-arid regions (tropical deciduous forest and open shrubland) had the highest CH4 uptake rates of 602 and 518 mg CH4 m-2 yr-1, respectively. In these regions, favourable annual soil moisture content ( ˜ 20 % saturation) and low seasonal temperature variations (variations < ˜ 6 °C) provided optimal conditions for soil methanotrophy and soil-atmosphere gas exchange. In contrast to previous model analyses, but in agreement with recent observational data

  3. Tritium dynamics in soils and plants at a tritium processing facility in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihok, S.; St-Amanat, N.; Kwamena, N.O. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (Canada); Clark, I.; Wilk, M.; Lapp, A. [University of Ottawa (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The dynamics of tritium released as tritiated water (HTO) have been studied extensively with results incorporated into environmental models such as CSA N288.1 used for regulatory purposes in Canada. The dispersion of tritiated gas (HT) and rates of oxidation to HTO have been studied under controlled conditions, but there are few studies under natural conditions. HT is a major component of the tritium released from a gaseous tritium light manufacturing facility in Canada (CNSC INFO-0798). To support the improvement of models, a garden was set up in one summer near this facility in a spot with tritium in air averaging ∼ 5 Bq/m{sup 3} HTO (passive diffusion monitors). Atmospheric stack releases (575 GBq/week) were recorded weekly. HT releases occur mainly during working hours with an HT:HTO ratio of 2.6 as measured at the stack. Soils and plants (leaves/stems and roots/tubers) were sampled for HTO and organically-bound tritium (OBT) weekly. Active day-night monitoring of air was conducted to interpret tritium dynamics relative to weather and solar radiation. The experimental design included a plot of natural grass/soil, contrasted with grass (sod) and Swiss chard, pole beans and potatoes grown in barrels under different irrigation regimes (in local topsoil at 29 Bq/L HTO, 105 Bq/L OBT). All treatments were exposed to rain (80 Bq/L) and atmospheric releases of tritium (weekdays), and reflux of tritium from soils (initial conditions of 284 Bq/L HTO, 3,644 Bq/L OBT) from 20 years of operations. Three irrigation regimes were used for barrel plants to mimic home garden management: rain only, low tritium tap water (5 Bq/L), and high tritium well water (mean 10,013 Bq/L). This design provided a range of plants and starting conditions with contrasts in initial HTO/OBT activity in soils, and major tritium inputs from air versus water. Controls were two home gardens far from any tritium sources. Active air monitoring indicated that the plume was only occasionally present for

  4. Arsenic-phosphorus interactions in the soil-plant-microbe system: Dynamics of uptake, suppression and toxicity to plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anawar, Hossain M; Rengel, Zed; Damon, Paul; Tibbett, Mark

    2018-02-01

    High arsenic (As) concentrations in the soil, water and plant systems can pose a direct health risk to humans and ecosystems. Phosphate (Pi) ions strongly influence As availability in soil, its uptake and toxicity to plants. Better understanding of As(V)-Pi interactions in soils and plants will facilitate a potential remediation strategy for As contaminated soils, reducing As uptake by crop plants and toxicity to human populations via manipulation of soil Pi content. However, the As(V)-Pi interactions in soil-plant systems are complex, leading to contradictory findings among different studies. Therefore, this review investigates the role of soil type, soil properties, minerals, Pi levels in soil and plant, Pi transporters, mycorrhizal association and microbial activities on As-Pi interactions in soils and hydroponics, and uptake by plants, elucidate the key mechanisms, identify key knowledge gaps and recommend new research directions. Although Pi suppresses As uptake by plants in hydroponic systems, in soils it could either increase or decrease As availability and toxicity to plants depending on the soil types, properties and charge characteristics. In soil, As(V) availability is typically increased by the addition of Pi. At the root surface, the Pi transport system has high affinity for Pi over As(V). However, Pi concentration in plant influences the As transport from roots to shoots. Mycorrhizal association may reduce As uptake via a physiological shift to the mycorrhizal uptake pathway, which has a greater affinity for Pi over As(V) than the root epidermal uptake pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Agriculture on Mars: Soils for Plant Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D. W.

    2016-01-01

    Robotic rovers and landers have enabled the mineralogical, chemical, and physical characterization of loose, unconsolidated materials on the surface of Mars. Planetary scientists refer to the regolith material as "soil." NASA is currently planning to send humans to Mars in the mid 2030s. Early missions may rely on the use of onsite resources to enable exploration and self-sufficient outposts on Mars. The martian "soil" and surface environment contain all essential plant growth elements. The study of martian surface materials and how they might react as agricultural soils opens a new frontier for researchers in the soil science community. Other potential applications for surface "soils" include (i) sources for extraction of essential plant-growth nutrients, (ii) sources of O2, H2, CO2, and H2O, (iii) substrates for microbial populations in the degradation of wastes, and (iv) shielding materials surrounding outpost structures to protect humans, plants, and microorganisms from radiation. There are many challenges that will have to be addressed by soil scientists prior to human exploration over the next two decades.

  6. Transfer of 137Cs from soil to plants in different types of soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorovic, D.; Radenkovic, M.; Popovic, D.; Djuric, G.

    1998-01-01

    The investigations were carried out in two mountainous regions in the West and South region of the country). Three main types of soils were examined: shale, limestone and the mixed type, and several plants: grass, meadow flora, pinewood, blueberries, an endemic species of Mt. Sara and the bioindicators: moss and lichen. The transfer factors lay in the range of 0.1 - 2.0 in dependence on the type of soil and plant (3.0 - 10.0 for the bioindicator plants). The vertical distribution of 13' 7Cs in the first 15 cm layer of the soil indicates a slow migration of Chernobyl cesium through soil, except on riversides where the wash-out effect plays a role. Generally, the concentration of 137 Cs in soils strongly depends on the configuration of the ground

  7. Methods to Quantify Nickel in Soils and Plant Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Wurr Rodak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In comparison with other micronutrients, the levels of nickel (Ni available in soils and plant tissues are very low, making quantification very difficult. The objective of this paper is to present optimized determination methods of Ni availability in soils by extractants and total content in plant tissues for routine commercial laboratory analyses. Samples of natural and agricultural soils were processed and analyzed by Mehlich-1 extraction and by DTPA. To quantify Ni in the plant tissues, samples were digested with nitric acid in a closed system in a microwave oven. The measurement was performed by inductively coupled plasma/optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES. There was a positive and significant correlation between the levels of available Ni in the soils subjected to Mehlich-1 and DTPA extraction, while for plant tissue samples the Ni levels recovered were high and similar to the reference materials. The availability of Ni in some of the natural soil and plant tissue samples were lower than the limits of quantification. Concentrations of this micronutrient were higher in the soil samples in which Ni had been applied. Nickel concentration differed in the plant parts analyzed, with highest levels in the grains of soybean. The grain, in comparison with the shoot and leaf concentrations, were better correlated with the soil available levels for both extractants. The methods described in this article were efficient in quantifying Ni and can be used for routine laboratory analysis of soils and plant tissues.

  8. A climate sensitive model of carbon transfer through atmosphere, vegetation and soil in managed forest ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loustau, D.; Moreaux, V.; Bosc, A.; Trichet, P.; Kumari, J.; Rabemanantsoa, T.; Balesdent, J.; Jolivet, C.; Medlyn, B. E.; Cavaignac, S.; Nguyen-The, N.

    2012-12-01

    For predicting the future of the forest carbon cycle in forest ecosystems, it is necessary to account for both the climate and management impacts. Climate effects are significant not only at a short time scale but also at the temporal horizon of a forest life cycle e.g. through shift in atmospheric CO2 concentration, temperature and precipitation regimes induced by the enhanced greenhouse effect. Intensification of forest management concerns an increasing fraction of temperate and tropical forests and untouched forests represents only one third of the present forest area. Predicting tools are therefore needed to project climate and management impacts over the forest life cycle and understand the consequence of management on the forest ecosystem carbon cycle. This communication summarizes the structure, main components and properties of a carbon transfer model that describes the processes controlling the carbon cycle of managed forest ecosystems. The model, GO+, links three main components, (i) a module describing the vegetation-atmosphere mass and energy exchanges in 3D, (ii) a plant growth module and a (iii) soil carbon dynamics module in a consistent carbon scheme of transfer from atmosphere back into the atmosphere. It was calibrated and evaluated using observed data collected on coniferous and broadleaved forest stands. The model predicts the soil, water and energy balance of entire rotations of managed stands from the plantation to the final cut and according to a range of management alternatives. It accounts for the main soil and vegetation management operations such as soil preparation, understorey removal, thinnings and clearcutting. Including the available knowledge on the climatic sensitivity of biophysical and biogeochemical processes involved in atmospheric exchanges and carbon cycle of forest ecosystems, GO+ can produce long-term backward or forward simulations of forest carbon and water cycles under a range of climate and management scenarios. This

  9. Development and validation of a dynamical atmosphere-vegetation-soil HTO transport and OBT formation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ota, Masakazu, E-mail: ohta.masakazu@jaea.go.jp [Research Group for Environmental Science, Division of Environment and Radiation, Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Nagai, Haruyasu [Research Group for Environmental Science, Division of Environment and Radiation, Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    A numerical model simulating transport of tritiated water (HTO) in atmosphere-soil-vegetation system, and, accumulation of organically bound tritium (OBT) in vegetative leaves was developed. Characteristic of the model is, for calculating tritium transport, it incorporates a dynamical atmosphere-soil-vegetation model (SOLVEG-II) that calculates transport of heat and water, and, exchange of CO{sub 2}. The processes included for calculating tissue free water tritium (TFWT) in leaves are HTO exchange between canopy air and leaf cellular water, root uptake of aqueous HTO in soil, photosynthetic assimilation of TFWT into OBT, and, TFWT formation from OBT through respiration. Tritium fluxes at the last two processes are input to a carbohydrate compartment model in leaves that calculates OBT translocation from leaves and allocation in them, by using photosynthesis and respiration rate in leaves. The developed model was then validated through a simulation of an existing experiment of acute exposure of grape plants to atmospheric HTO. Calculated TFWT concentration in leaves increased soon after the start of HTO exposure, reaching to equilibrium with the atmospheric HTO within a few hours, and then rapidly decreased after the end of the exposure. Calculated non-exchangeable OBT amount in leaves linearly increased during the exposure, and after the exposure, rapidly decreased in daytime, and, moderately nighttime. These variations in the calculated TFWT concentrations and OBT amounts, each mainly controlled by HTO exchange between canopy air and leaf cellular water and by carbohydrates translocation from leaves, fairly agreed with the observations within average errors of a factor of two. - Highlights: > TFWT retention and OBT formation in leaves were modeled > The model fairly well calculates TFWT concentration after an acute HTO exposure > The model well assesses OBT formation and attenuation of OBT amount in leaves.

  10. Heavy metal contamination and ecological risk of farmland soils adjoining steel plants in Tangshan, Hebei, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liyun; Yang, Maomao; Wang, Liping; Peng, Fei; Li, Yuan; Bai, Hao

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the heavy metal concentrations and ecological risks to farmland soils caused by atmospheric deposition adjoining five industrial steel districts in Tangshan, Hebei, China. A total of 39 topsoil samples from adjoining these plants were collected and analyzed for Pb, Zn, Cu, Cr, and As. The geo-accumulation index (Igeo) and potential ecological risk index (PERI) were calculated to assess the heavy metal pollution level in soils. The results showed that the levels of Pb and As in farmland soils adjoining all steel plants were more than the background value, with the As content being excessively high. The Cr and Cu contents of some samples were over the background values, but the Zn content was not. In all the research areas, the largest Igeo value of the heavy metals was for As, followed by Pb, and the largest monomial PERI ([Formula: see text]) was As, which showed that the pollution of As in farmland soils was significant and had considerable ecological risk. Additionally, the heavy metal sequential extraction experiments showed that Pb and Cr, which exceeded the background value, were present in about 20% of the exchangeable and carbonate-bound fractions in the soils surrounding some steel plants. This would imply the risk of these heavy metals being absorbed and accumulated by the crops. Therefore, the local government needs to control the pollution of heavy metals in the farmland soils adjoining the steel plant as soon as possible, in order to avoid possible ecological and food safety risks.

  11. Assessment of 210Po deposition in moss species and soil around coal-fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nita Salina Abu Bakar; Ahmad Saat

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the depositions of 210 Po were assessed in the surface soil and some mosses species found in the area around coal fired power plant using radiochemical deposition and alpha spectrometry counting system. The purposes of the study were to determine activity concentrations of 210 Po in mosses and surface soil collected around coal-fired power plant in relation to trace the potential source of 210 Po and to identify most suitable moss species as a bio-indicator for 210 Po deposition. In this study, different species of mosses, Orthodontium imfractum, Campylopus serratus and Leucobryum aduncum were collected in May 2011 at the area around 15 km radius from Tanjung Bin coal-fired power plant located in Pontian, Johor. The 210 Po activity concentrations in mosses and soil varied in the range 102 ± 4 to 174 ± 8 Bq/kg dry wt. and 37 ± 2 to 184 ± 8 Bq/kg dry wt., respectively. Corresponding highest activity concentration of 210 Po observed in L. aduncum, therefore, this finding can be concluded this species was the most suitable as a bio-indicator for 210 Po deposition. On the other hand, it is clear the accumulation of 210 Po in mosses might be supplied from various sources of atmospheric deposition such as coal-fired power plant operation, industrial, plantation, agriculture and fertilizer activities, burned fuel fossil and forest; and other potential sources. Meanwhile, the main source of 210 Po in surface soil is supplied from the in situ deposition of radon decay and its daughters in the soil itself. (author)

  12. Transfer of technetium in the soil-rice plant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, K.; Muramatsu, Y.

    1995-01-01

    In order to assess the behavior of Tc in flooded soil-plant systems, laboratory experiments have been done using 95m Tc as a tracer. Two common soil types in Japan, Andosol and Gray lowland soils, were used. Soil-plant transfer factors of Tc in rice grain were very low, i.e. 5 x 10 -5 for Andosol and 6 x 10 -4 for Gray lowland soil. It was found that the Tc concentrations in rice plants were influenced by those in soil solutions. Concentrations of 95m Tc in both soil solutions decreased rapidly in the early period of cultivation. It was observed that redox-potential (Eh) also decreased markedly following flooding. A relationship was found between the decrease of the 95m Tc concentrations in soil solutions and the drop of Eh in the soils. The Tc (VII) added to soil was transformed to insoluble Tc (IV) under the reduced conditions existing in flooded soil. (author). 10 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Plant species richness regulates soil respiration through changes in productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, André Tavares Corrêa; van Ruijven, Jasper; Berendse, Frank

    2010-07-01

    Soil respiration is an important pathway of the C cycle. However, it is still poorly understood how changes in plant community diversity can affect this ecosystem process. Here we used a long-term experiment consisting of a gradient of grassland plant species richness to test for effects of diversity on soil respiration. We hypothesized that plant diversity could affect soil respiration in two ways. On the one hand, more diverse plant communities have been shown to promote plant productivity, which could increase soil respiration. On the other hand, the nutrient concentration in the biomass produced has been shown to decrease with diversity, which could counteract the production-induced increase in soil respiration. Our results clearly show that soil respiration increased with species richness. Detailed analysis revealed that this effect was not due to differences in species composition. In general, soil respiration in mixtures was higher than would be expected from the monocultures. Path analysis revealed that species richness predominantly regulates soil respiration through changes in productivity. No evidence supporting the hypothesized negative effect of lower N concentration on soil respiration was found. We conclude that shifts in productivity are the main mechanism by which changes in plant diversity may affect soil respiration.

  14. Effects of plant cover on soil N mineralization during the growing season in a sandy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Y.; Shao, M.; Wei, X.; Fu, X.

    2017-12-01

    Soil nitrogen (N) mineralization and its availability plays a vital role in regulating ecosystem productivity and C cycling, particularly in semiarid and desertified ecosystems. To determine the effect of plant cover on N turnover in a sandy soil ecosystem, we measured soil N mineralization and inorganic N pools in soil solution during growing season in a sandy soil covered with various plant species (Artemisia desertorum, Salix psammophila, and Caragana korshinskii). A bare sandy soil without any plant was selected as control. Inorganic N pools and N mineralization rates decreased overtime during the growing season, and were not affected by soil depth in bare land soils, but were significantly higher at the 0-10 cm layer than those at the 10-20 cm soil layer under any plant species. Soil inorganic N pool was dominated by ammonium, and N mineralization was dominated by nitrification regardless of soil depth and plant cover. Soils under C. korshinskii have significant higher inorganic N pools and N mineralization rate than soils under bare land and A. desertorum and S. psammophila, and the effects of plant cover were greater at the 0-10 cm soil layer than at the 10-20 cm layer. The effects of C. korshinskii on soil inorganic N pools and mineralization rate varied with the stage of growing season, with greater effects on N pools in the middle growing season, and greater effects on mineralization rate at the last half of the growing season. The results from this study indicate that introduction of C. korshinskii has the potential to increase soil N turnover and availability in sandy soils, and thus to decrease N limitation. Caragana korshinskii is therefore recommend for the remediation of the desertified land.

  15. Global Change Effects on Plant-Soil Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Marie

    of this dissertation has been to determine how soil food web structure and function is affected when the quantity and quality of plant input is altered under global change. By studying the abundance and composition of soil organisms, particularly those in the rhizosphere, closely associated with living plants, we...... (Paper III). Furthermore, by way of meta-analysis, the role of organisms in global change effects on ecosystem function is modelled (Paper IV). Among CO2, warming and summer drought, CO2 is the factor most consistently impacting soil organisms. CO2 increases abundance of microorganisms and nematodes...... suggest that not only the global change effects on established ecosystems, but also the global change effects on plant community composition as well as land use management may determine the composition and function of soil food webs in the future....

  16. Transuranic behavior in soils and plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildung, R.E.; Garland, T.R.; Cataldo, D.A.; Rogers, J.E.; McFadden, K.M.; Jenne, E.A.; Schreckhise, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    The principal objective of this study is to gather information about soil, plant, and foliar interaction factors that influence the availability of transuranics to agricultural plants and animals. This paper discusses plant processes which influence transport across the plant root membrane and foliar surfaces, and the form and sites of deposition of transuranic elements in mature plants

  17. Distribution of 14C in soil and rice plants following application of 14C - parathion to soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrea, M.M. de; Ruegg, E.F.

    1983-01-01

    Amount of residues of 14 C-parathion in soil rice plants after application of the insecticide to soil were determined in four systems studied during five weeks: pots of soil with and without plants and open or enclosed by a transparent cover. Measurements of amounts volatilized and 14 CO 2 evolution from the pesticide were made in closed system without plants. The bound residues in soil and plants were also determined. Results indicated that parathion half life in a Gley Humic soil was about two weeks. Very little radiocarbon was taken up by rice plants; of this, more was found in shoots of plants enclosed, probably by collection of the volatilized material by plants. About 6% and 4% of the 14 C-parathion were found as volatilized material and 14 CO 2 , respectively after five weeks. Bound residues varied very little and reached a maximum of 22% in soil and in plants amounted to less than 2% at the final of the experiment. (Author) [pt

  18. Phytoremediation of radiocesium in different soils using cultivated plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yasukazu; Saito, Takashi; Tsukada, Hirofumi

    2012-01-01

    A huge amount of radionuclides were released into the environment after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident. Radiocesium, which is one of the more prevalent radionuclides, was deposited in the soil. It is well known that radiocesium is adsorbed into the soil and binds strongly to clay. As a result, it is difficult to reduce the contamination level in the soil. We examine the possibility of decontamination by means of phytoremediation. Four species of plants (sunflower, sorghum, amaranth, and buckwheat) were sown in light-colored Andosol and gray lowland soil. When the plants matured, they were harvested and separated into their different parts, i.e., flower, leaf, stem, and root. The removal percentage of 137 Cs for the aboveground parts, which is defined as the ratio of the total content of 137 Cs in the aboveground biomass of plants to that in the cultivated soil of 0-15 cm depth, was 0.013-0.93% for the light-colored Andosol and 0.0072-0.038% for the gray lowland soil. The plants exhibiting the highest value cultivated in the light-colored Andosol and gray lowland soil were amaranth (0.093%) and sunflower (0.038%), respectively. This indicates that it is difficult to remove radiocesium from contaminated soil by means of phytoremediation. (author)

  19. Soil Methanotrophy Model (MeMo v1.0: a process-based model to quantify global uptake of atmospheric methane by soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Murguia-Flores

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil bacteria known as methanotrophs are the sole biological sink for atmospheric methane (CH4, a potent greenhouse gas that is responsible for  ∼  20 % of the human-driven increase in radiative forcing since pre-industrial times. Soil methanotrophy is controlled by a plethora of factors, including temperature, soil texture, moisture and nitrogen content, resulting in spatially and temporally heterogeneous rates of soil methanotrophy. As a consequence, the exact magnitude of the global soil sink, as well as its temporal and spatial variability, remains poorly constrained. We developed a process-based model (Methanotrophy Model; MeMo v1.0 to simulate and quantify the uptake of atmospheric CH4 by soils at the global scale. MeMo builds on previous models by Ridgwell et al. (1999 and Curry (2007 by introducing several advances, including (1 a general analytical solution of the one-dimensional diffusion–reaction equation in porous media, (2 a refined representation of nitrogen inhibition on soil methanotrophy, (3 updated factors governing the influence of soil moisture and temperature on CH4 oxidation rates and (4 the ability to evaluate the impact of autochthonous soil CH4 sources on uptake of atmospheric CH4. We show that the improved structural and parametric representation of key drivers of soil methanotrophy in MeMo results in a better fit to observational data. A global simulation of soil methanotrophy for the period 1990–2009 using MeMo yielded an average annual sink of 33.5 ± 0.6 Tg CH4 yr−1. Warm and semi-arid regions (tropical deciduous forest and open shrubland had the highest CH4 uptake rates of 602 and 518 mg CH4 m−2 yr−1, respectively. In these regions, favourable annual soil moisture content ( ∼  20 % saturation and low seasonal temperature variations (variations  <   ∼  6 °C provided optimal conditions for soil methanotrophy and soil–atmosphere gas exchange

  20. Soil moisture effects on the carbon isotopic composition of soil respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    The carbon isotopic composition ( 13C) of recently assimilated plant carbon is known to depend on water-stress, caused either by low soil moisture or by low atmospheric humidity. Air humidity has also been shown to correlate with the 13C of soil respiration, which suggests indir...

  1. Heavy Metal Polluted Soils: Effect on Plants and Bioremediation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. U. Chibuike

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Soils polluted with heavy metals have become common across the globe due to increase in geologic and anthropogenic activities. Plants growing on these soils show a reduction in growth, performance, and yield. Bioremediation is an effective method of treating heavy metal polluted soils. It is a widely accepted method that is mostly carried out in situ; hence it is suitable for the establishment/reestablishment of crops on treated soils. Microorganisms and plants employ different mechanisms for the bioremediation of polluted soils. Using plants for the treatment of polluted soils is a more common approach in the bioremediation of heavy metal polluted soils. Combining both microorganisms and plants is an approach to bioremediation that ensures a more efficient clean-up of heavy metal polluted soils. However, success of this approach largely depends on the species of organisms involved in the process.

  2. A new approach for soil-plant transfer calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorp, F. van; Eleveld, R.; Frissel, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    Models to calculate radiation doses to man caused by normal or accidental release of radionuclides from nuclear industries often include the transfer of these nuclides from soil to plant. This soil-plant transfer is mostly described with a black box approach by using concentration factors. This approach has several disadvantages, the most important being the lack of physical meaning of a concentration factor. We propose to describe the soil-plant transfer of radionuclides as a function of plant and soil parameters all having a physical meaning. The separate parameters are open to experimental determination but a realistic estimation of the parameters is also possible, or the use of a combination of both. Depending on the purpose of the calculation, realistic or conservative values of the parameters can be used and the degree of conservatism can be indicated. (author)

  3. Plant nutrition and soil fertility manual

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, J. Benton

    2012-01-01

    .... With over 70 percent new material, the second edition of the Plant Nutrition and Soil Fertility Manual discusses the principles determining how plants grow and the elements essential for successful...

  4. Atmospheric nitrogen dioxide and northern plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurela, A; Punkkinen, R

    1981-01-01

    Convincing quantitative data have recently been published about the uptake of atmospheric NO/sub 2/ by certain plants. Several qualitative pieces of evidence were found suggesting similar ability in northern plants. The volume fraction of NO/sub 2/ in the air, Phi, was measured at Kevo (70/sup 0/N, 27/sup 0/E). The Saltzman method was used, with a continuously recording detector, especially developed for measurements below the usual analytical limit of this method (0.005 ppm). The systematic error of Phi was estimated to be less than 50%. In general, Phi did not vary much with time. However, when the recorder of the atmospheric electric field at the adjacent Meteorological Station of Kevo once rose up to 4 times the normal value, the Phi-curve simultaneously rose momentarily. By using the measured value of anti-Phi, the annual uptake of NO/sub 2/-nitrogen by plants in the region of Kevo was estimated to be about 0.1 g(N)m/sup -2/ for a canopy of pines and lichens, and about 0.001 g(N)m/sup -2/ for plants at the tops of low mountains. In terms of dry weight of lichens, the uptake rate would be of the order of 0.1 ..mu..g(N)h/sup -1/ (g dry weight)/sup -1/, based on independent measurements. These amount are of the same order of magnitude as the yields of biological nitrogen fixation by lichens in corresponding conditions. A direct experimental study of the uptake of atmospheric NO/sub 2/ by northern plants seems very desirable and readily feasible.

  5. A Coupled Soil-Atmosphere Model of H2O2 on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Mark A.; Stoker, Carol R.; Mckay, Christopher P.; Zent, Aaron P.

    1994-01-01

    The Viking Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer failed to detect organic compounds on Mars, and both the Viking Labeled Release and the Viking Gas Exchange experiments indicated a reactive soil surface. These results have led to the widespread belief that there are oxidants in the martian soil. Since H2O2 is produced by photochemical processes in the atmosphere of Mars, and has been shown in the laboratory to reproduce closely the Viking LR results, it is a likely candidate for a martian soil oxidant. Here, we report on the results of a coupled soil/atmosphere transport model for H202 on Mars. Upon diffusing into the soil, its concentration is determined by the extent to which it is adsorbed and by the rate at which it is catalytically destroyed. An analytical model for calculating the distribution of H202 in the martian atmosphere and soil is developed. The concentration of H202 in the soil is shown to go to zero at a finite depth, a consequence of the nonlinear soil diffusion equation. The model is parameterized in terms of an unknown quantity, the lifetime of H202 against heterogeneous catalytic destruction in the soil. Calculated concentrations are compared with a H202 concentration of 30 nmoles/cu cm, inferred from the Viking Labeled Release experiment. A significant result of this model is that for a wide range of H202 lifetimes (up to 105 years), the extinction depth was found to be less than 3 m. The maximum possible concentration in the top 4 cm is calculated to be approx. 240 nmoles/cu cm, achieved with lifetimes of greater than 1000 years. Concentrations higher than 30 nmoles/cu cm require lifetimes of greater than 4.3 terrestrial years. For a wide range of H202 lifetimes, it was found that the atmospheric concentration is only weakly coupled with soil loss processes. Losses to the soil become significant only when lifetimes are less than a few hours. If there are depths below which H202 is not transported, it is plausible that organic compounds

  6. Uptake of C-14 tagged acetate by rice in a paddy soil-to-rice plant system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo [Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    rice plants in the control group. Similar phenomena should also be found for spiked group so that it was difficult to estimate root uptake rate from soil. The highest activity was 1.3 x 10{sup 3} ± 2.3 x 10{sup 2} Bq/g of the rice husk sample in the spiked group, and the C-14 activities in each plant part of the spiked group decreased in the same order as those of the control group. The average soil-to-plant transfer factor for C-14 in white rice (TF: Bq/g-dry of C-14 in white rice/ Bq/g-dry of C-14 in the soil) was 6.8. This TF includes the C-14 uptake by rice plants from the atmosphere. Therefore, new environmental parameter, which considers the transfer of C-14 from atmosphere, is desired. This work has been partially supported by the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy, the Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry (METI) Japan. (authors)

  7. Atmospheric deposition of mercury in Atlantic Forest and ecological risk to soil fauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristhy Buch, Andressa; Cabral Teixeira, Daniel; Fernandes Correia, Maria Elizabeth; Vieira Silva-Filho, Emmanoel

    2014-05-01

    The increasing levels of mercury (Hg) found in the atmosphere nowadays has a great contribution from anthropogenic sources and has been a great concern in the past two decades in industrialized countries. Brazil is the seventh country with the highest rate of mercury in the atmosphere. Certainly, the petroleum refineries have significant contribution, seen that 100 million m3 of crude oil are annually processed. These refineries contribute with low generation of solid waste; however, a large fraction of Hg can be emitted to the atmosphere. There are sixteen refineries in Brazil, three of them located in the state of Rio de Janeiro. The Hg is a toxic and hazardous trace element, naturally found in the earth crust. The major input of Hg to ecosystems is through atmospheric deposition (wet and dry), being transported in the atmosphere over large distances. The forest biomes are of great importance in the atmosphere/soil cycling of elemental Hg through foliar uptake and subsequent transfer to the soil through litterfall, which play an important role as Hg sink. The Atlantic Forest of Brazil is the greater contributor of fauna and flora biodiversity in the world and, according to recent studies, this biome has the highest concentrations of mercury in litter in the world, as well as in China, at Subtropical Forest. Ecotoxicological assessments can predict the potential ecological risk of Hg toxicity in the soil can lead to impact the soil fauna and indirectly other trophic levels of the food chain within one or more ecosystems. This study aims to determine mercury levels that represent risks to diversity and functioning of soil fauna in tropical forest soils. The study is conducted in two forest areas inserted into conservation units of Rio de Janeiro state. One area is located next to an important petroleum refinery in activity since fifty-two years ago, whereas the other one is located next to other refinery under construction (beginning activities in 2015), which will

  8. Soil-Plant-Microbe Interactions in Stressed Agriculture Management: A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shobhit Raj VIMAL; Jay Shankar SINGH; Naveen Kumar ARORA; Surendra SINGH

    2017-01-01

    The expected rise in temperature and decreased precipitation owing to climate change and unabated anthropogenic activities add complexity and uncertainty to agro-industry.The impact of soil nutrient imbalance,mismanaged use of chemicals,high temperature,flood or drought,soil salinity,and heavy metal pollutions,with regard to food security,is increasingly being explored worldwide.This review describes the role of soil-plant-microbe interactions along with organic manure in solving stressed agriculture problems.Beneficial microbes associated with plants are known to stimulate plant growth and enhance plant resistance to biotic (diseases) and abiotic (salinity,drought,pollutions,etc.) stresses.The plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) and mycorrhizae,a key component of soil microbiota,could play vital roles in the maintenance of plant fitness and soil health under stressed environments.The application of organic manure as a soil conditioner to stressed soils along with suitable microbial strains could further enhance the plant-microbe associations and increase the crop yield.A combination of plant,stress-tolerant microbe,and organic amendment represents the tripartite association to offer a favourable environment to the proliferation of beneficial rhizosphere microbes that in turn enhance the plant growth performance in disturbed agro-ecosystem.Agriculture land use patterns with the proper exploitation of plant-microbe associations,with compatible beneficial microbial agents,could be one of the most effective strategies in the management of the concerned agriculture lands owing to climate change resilience.However,the association of such microbes with plants for stressed agriculture management still needs to be explored in greater depth.

  9. Phytoremediation of radiocesium in different soils using cultivated plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yasukazu; Saito, Takashi; Tsukada, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    A huge amount of radionuclides were released into the environment after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident. Radiocesium, which is one of the more prevalent radionuclides, was deposited in the soil. It is well known that radiocesium is adsorbed into the soil and binds strongly to clay. As a result, it is difficult to reduce the contamination level in the soil. We examine the possibility of decontamination by means of phytoremediation. Four species of plants (sunflower, sorghum, amaranth, and buckwheat) were sown in light-colored Andosol and gray lowland soil. When the plants matured, they were harvested and separated into their different parts, i.e., flower, leaf, stem, and root. The removal percentage of "1"3"7Cs for the aboveground parts, which is defined as the ratio of the total content of "1"3"7Cs in the aboveground biomass of plants to that in the cultivated soil of 0-15 cm depth, was 0.013- 0.93% for the light-colored Andosol and 0.0072-0.038% for the gray lowland soil. The plants exhibiting the highest value cultivated in the light-colored Andosol and gray lowland soil were amaranth (0.093%) and sunflower (0.038%), respectively. This indicates that it is difficult to remove radiocesium from contaminated soil by means of phytoremediation. (author)

  10. An experimental study on mass loading of soil particles on plant surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J. G.; Gerzabek, M. H.; Mueck, K.

    1994-01-01

    Radionuclide contaminated soil adhered to plant surfaces can contribute to human ingestion dose. To determine this contribution, a method of 46 Sc neutron activation analysis was established and tested, by which a detection limit of 0.05 mg soil per g dry plant biomass can be obtained. In the field and greenhouse experiment the mass loading of soil on ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and broadbean (Vicia faba L.) was investigated and the contribution from rainsplash and wind erosion were evaluated separately. Soil retained on plant surfaces in field conditions in Seibersdorf/Austria was 5.77 ± 1.44 mg soil per g dry plant for ryegrass and 9.51 ± 0.73 mg soil per g dry plant for broadbean. Estimates of contribution from rainsplash and wind erosion to soil contamination of plants during the experimental period are 68 % and 32 % for broadbean 47 % and 53 % for ryegrass respectively. Mass loading results from field studies indicate that soil adhesion on plant surfaces can contribute up to 23 % of plant 137 Cs contamination, the transfer factors modified by mass loading decline differently, depending on 137 Cs concentration of the soil and the soil mass adhered to plant surfaces. (author)

  11. Interannual variability of plant phenology in tussock tundra: modelling interactions of plant productivity, plant phenology, snowmelt and soil thaw

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, van M.T.; Williams, M.; Laundre, J.A.; Shaver, G.R.

    2003-01-01

    We present a linked model of plant productivity, plant phenology, snowmelt and soil thaw in order to estimate interannual variability of arctic plant phenology and its effects on plant productivity. The model is tested using 8 years of soil temperature data, and three years of bud break data of

  12. 134Cs uptake by four plant species and Cs-K relations in the soil-plant system as affected by Ca(OH)2 application to an acid soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massas, I.; Skarlou, V.; Haidouti, C.; Giannakopoulou, F.

    2010-01-01

    Three rates of Ca(OH) 2 were applied to an acid soil and the 134 Cs uptake by radish, cucumber, soybean and sunflower plants was studied. The 134 Cs concentration in all plant species was reduced from 1.6-fold in the sunflower seeds to 6-fold in the soybean vegetative parts at the higher Ca(OH) 2 rate. Potassium (K) concentration in plants was also reduced, but less effectively. The significantly decreased 134 Cs-K soil to plant distribution factors (D.F.) clearly suggest a stronger effect of soil liming on 134 Cs than on K plant uptake. This observation was discussed in terms of ionic interactions in the soil matrix and within the plants. The results also indicated that the increased Ca 2+ concentration in the exchange phase and in the soil solution along with the improved root activity, due to the soil liming, enhanced the immobilization of 134 Cs in the soil matrix and consequently lowered the 134 Cs availability for plant uptake.

  13. Screening of plants for phytoremediation of oil-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeura, Hiromi; Kawasaki, Yu; Kaimi, Etsuko; Nishiwaki, Junko; Noborio, Kosuke; Tamaki, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Several species of ornamental flowering plants were evaluated regarding their phytoremediation ability for the cleanup of oil-contaminated soil in Japanese environmental conditions. Thirty-three species of plants were grown in oil-contaminated soil, and Mimosa, Zinnia, Gazania, and cypress vine were selected for further assessment on the basis of their favorable initial growth. No significant difference was observed in the above-ground and under-ground dry matter weight of Gazania 180 days after sowing between contaminated and non-contaminated plots. However, the other 3 species of plants died by the 180th day, indicating that Gazania has an especially strong tolerance for oil-contaminated soil. The total petroleum hydrocarbon concentration of the soils in which the 4 species of plants were grown decreased by 45-49% by the 180th day. Compared to an irrigated plot, the dehydrogenase activity of the contaminated soil also increased significantly, indicating a phytoremediation effect by the 4 tested plants. Mimosa, Zinnia, and cypress vine all died by the 180th day after seeding, but the roots themselves became a source of nutrients for the soil microorganisms, which led to a phytoremediation effect by increase in the oil degradation activity. It has been indicated that Gazania is most appropriate for phytoremediation of oil-contaminated soil.

  14. Modeling long-term uptake and re-volatilization of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) across the soil-atmosphere interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zhongwen; Haberer, Christina; Maier, Uli; Beckingham, Barbara; Amos, Richard T; Grathwohl, Peter

    2015-12-15

    Soil-atmosphere exchange is important for the environmental fate and atmospheric transport of many semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs). This study focuses on modeling the vapor phase exchange of semi-volatile hydrophobic organic pollutants between soil and the atmosphere using the multicomponent reactive transport code MIN3P. MIN3P is typically applied to simulate aqueous and vapor phase transport and reaction processes in the subsurface. We extended the code to also include an atmospheric boundary layer where eddy diffusion takes place. The relevant processes and parameters affecting soil-atmosphere exchange were investigated in several 1-D model scenarios and at various time scales (from years to centuries). Phenanthrene was chosen as a model compound, but results apply for other hydrophobic organic compounds as well. Gaseous phenanthrene was assumed to be constantly supplied to the system during a pollution period and a subsequent regulation period (with a 50% decline in the emission rate). Our results indicate that long-term soil-atmosphere exchange of phenanthrene is controlled by the soil compartment - re-volatilization thus depends on soil properties. A sensitivity analysis showed that accumulation and transport in soils in the short term is dominated by diffusion, whereas in the long term groundwater recharge and biodegradation become relevant. As expected, sorption causes retardation and slows down transport and biodegradation. If atmospheric concentration is reduced (e.g. after environmental regulations), re-volatilization from soil to the atmosphere occurs only for a relatively short time period. Therefore, the model results demonstrate that soils generally are sinks for atmospheric pollutants. The atmospheric boundary layer is only relevant for time scales of less than one month. The extended MIN3P code can also be applied to simulate fluctuating concentrations in the atmosphere, for instance due to temperature changes in the topsoil. Copyright

  15. Impact of soil texture and water availability on the hydraulic control of plant and grape-berry development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara Tramontini; Cornelis van Leeuwen; Jean-Christophe Domec; Agnès Destrac-Irvine; Cyril Basteau; Marco Vitali; Olaf Mosbach-Schulz; Claudio Lovisolo

    2013-01-01

    All components of the soil-plant-atmosphere (s-p-a) continuum are known to control berry quality in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) via ecophysiological interactions between water uptake by roots and water loss by leaves. The scope of the present work was to explore how the main hydraulic components of grapevine influence fruit quality through changes...

  16. Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition and the Properties of Soils in Forests of Vologda Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrevatykh, I. Yu.; Ivashchenko, K. V.; Ananyeva, N. D.; Ivanishcheva, E. A.

    2018-02-01

    Twenty plots (20 m2 each) were selected in coniferous and mixed forests of the industrial Vologda district and the Vytegra district without developed industries in Vologda region. In March, snow cores corresponding to the snow cover depth were taken on these plots. In August, soil samples from the 0- to 20-cm layer of litter-free soddy-podzolic soil (Albic Retisol (Ochric)) were taken on the same plots in August. The content of mineral nitrogen (Nmin), including its ammonium (NH+ 4) and nitrate (NO- 3) forms, was determined in the snow (meltwater) and soil. The contents of total organic carbon, total nitrogen, and elements (Al, Ca); pH; particle size distribution; and microbiological parameters―carbon of microbial biomass (Cmic) and microbial respiration (MR)―were determined in the soil. The ratio MR/Cmic = qCO2 (specific respiration of microbial biomass, or soil microbial metabolic quotient) was calculated. The content of Nmic in meltwater of two districts was 1.7 mg/L on the average (1.5 and 0.3 mg/L for the NH+ 4 and NO- 3 forms, respectively). The annual atmospheric deposition was 0.6-8.9 kg Nmin/ha, the value of which in the Vologda district was higher than in the Vytegra district by 40%. Reliable correlations were found between atmospheric NH+ 4 depositions and Cmic (-0.45), between NH+ 4 and qCO2 (0.56), between atmospheric NO- 3 depositions and the soil NO- 3 (-0.45), and between NO- 3 and qCO2 (-0.58). The content of atmospheric Nmin depositions correlated with the ratios C/N (-0.46) and Al/Ca (-0.52) in the soil. In forests with the high input of atmospheric nitrogen (>2.0 kg NH+ 4/(ha yr) and >6.4 kg Nmin/(ha yr)), a tendency of decreasing Cmic, C/N, and Al/Ca, as well as increasing qCO2, was revealed, which could be indicative of deterioration in the functioning of microbial community and the chemical properties of the soil.

  17. Caesium Radionuclide Uptake from Wet Soil to Kangkung Plant (Ipomoea sp)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putu Sukmabuana; Poppy Intan Tjahaja

    2009-01-01

    Caesium radionuclide transfer from soil to kangkung plant (Ipomoea sp) generally consumed by people had been examined to obtain transfer factor value for internal radiation dose assessment via soil-plant-human pathway. The kangkung plants were cultivated on watered soil medium containing 134 Cs with concentration of about 80 Bq/g, and the 134 Cs uptake by plants, i.e root, stem, and leaves, were measured using gamma spectrometer. The 134 Cs plant uptake was expressed as transfer factor, i.e. ratio of plant 134 Cs concentration to 134 Cs concentration on soil medium. From this research it was obtained transfer factor value of 134 C from soil to plant is 0.07, and the transfer factor for root, stem, and leaves are 0.34 ; 0.05 ; 0,03 respectively, after 45 days cultivation. The transfer factor values are less than one, indicate that kangkung plant do not accumulate Cs radionuclide from soil. (author)

  18. Linking plants, fungi and soil mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Anil; Graf, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Plants provide important functions in respect soil strength and are increasingly considered for slope stabilisation within eco-engineering methods, particularly to prevent superficial soil failure. The protective functions include hydrological regulation through interception and evapo-transpiration as well as mechanical stabilisation through root reinforcement and, to a certain extent, chemical stabilisation through sticky metabolites. The ever-growing application of plants in slope stabilisation demanded more precise information of the vegetation effects and, concomitant, led the models for quantifying the reinforcement shoot up like mushrooms. However, so far, the framework and interrelationships for both the role of plants and the quantification concepts have not been thoroughly analysed and comprehensively considered, respectively, often resulting in unsatisfactory results. Although it seems obvious and is implicitly presupposed that the plant specific functions related to slope stability require growth and development, this is anything but given, particularly under the often hostile conditions dominating on bare and steep slopes. There, the superficial soil layer is often characterised by a lack of fines and missing medium-sized and fine pores due to an unstable soil matrix, predominantly formed by coarse grains. Low water retention capacity and substantial leaching of nutrients are the adverse consequences. Given this general set-up, sustainable plant growth and, particularly, root development is virtually unachievable. At exactly this point mycorrhizal fungi, the symbiotic partners of almost all plants used in eco-engineering, come into play. Though, they are probably well-known within the eco-engineering community, mycorrhizal fungi lead a humble existence. This is in spite of the fact that they supply their hosts with water and nutrients, improving the plant's ability to master otherwise unbridgeable environmental conditions. However, in order to support

  19. UNDERSTANDING PLANT-SOIL RELATIONSHIPS USING CONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT FACILITIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although soil is a component of terrestrial ecosystems, it is comprised of a complex web of interacting organisms, and therefore, can be considered itself as an ecosystem. Soil microflora and fauna derive energy from plants and plant residues and serve important functions in mai...

  20. The Effect of Thermal Convection on Earth-Atmosphere CO2 Gas Exchange in Aggregated Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganot, Y.; Weisbrod, N.; Dragila, M. I.

    2011-12-01

    Gas transport in soils and surface-atmosphere gas exchange are important processes that affect different aspects of soil science such as soil aeration, nutrient bio-availability, sorption kinetics, soil and groundwater pollution and soil remediation. Diffusion and convection are the two main mechanisms that affect gas transport, fate and emissions in the soils and in the upper vadose zone. In this work we studied CO2 soil-atmosphere gas exchange under both day-time and night-time conditions, focusing on the impact of thermal convection (TCV) during the night. Experiments were performed in a climate-controlled laboratory. One meter long columns were packed with matrix of different grain size (sand, gravel and soil aggregates). Air with 2000 ppm CO2 was injected into the bottom of the columns and CO2 concentration within the columns was continuously monitored by an Infra Red Gas Analyzer. Two scenarios were compared for each soil: (1) isothermal conditions, representing day time conditions; and (2) thermal gradient conditions, i.e., atmosphere colder than the soil, representing night time conditions. Our results show that under isothermal conditions, diffusion is the major mechanism for surface-atmosphere gas exchange for all grain sizes; while under night time conditions the prevailing mechanism is dependent on the air permeability of the matrix: for sand and gravel it is diffusion, and for soil aggregates it is TCV. Calculated CO2 flux for the soil aggregates column shows that the TCV flux was three orders of magnitude higher than the diffusive flux.

  1. Soil-plant transfer models for metals to improve soil screening value guidelines valid for São Paulo, Brazil.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dos Santos-Araujo, Sabrina N; Swartjes, Frank A; Versluijs, Kees W; Moreno, Fabio Netto; Alleoni, Luís R F

    2017-01-01

    In Brazil, there is a lack of combined soil-plant data attempting to explain the influence of specific climate, soil conditions, and crop management on heavy metal uptake and accumulation by plants. As a consequence, soil-plant relationships to be used in risk assessments or for derivation of soil

  2. Review of effect of soil on radionuclide uptake by plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, S.C.; Evenden, W.G.

    1987-03-01

    This review was undertaken to improve the understanding of, and to compile the available data concerning, the transfer of uranium (U), thorium (Th) and lead (Pb) from soils to plants. The emphasis of the review was on the absorption of these elements from the soil by plant roots, and the mechanisms underlying this process were outlined. The behaviour of U, Th and Pb in soils and plants was discussed with illustration by data from the literature. An extensive compilation of plant/soil concentration ratios (CR) was completed and the most relevant data for Canadian nuclear facilities were selected. Very few data were found for edible plants and these did not represent the range of soil types found near Canadian nuclear facilities. Recommendations of the most fruitful research directions were made. 69 refs

  3. Spatial heterogeneity of plant-soil feedback affects root interactions and interspecific competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Marloes; Ravenek, Janneke M; Smit-Tiekstra, Annemiek E; van der Paauw, Jan Willem; de Caluwe, Hannie; van der Putten, Wim H; de Kroon, Hans; Mommer, Liesje

    2015-08-01

    Plant-soil feedback is receiving increasing interest as a factor influencing plant competition and species coexistence in grasslands. However, we do not know how spatial distribution of plant-soil feedback affects plant below-ground interactions. We investigated the way in which spatial heterogeneity of soil biota affects competitive interactions in grassland plant species. We performed a pairwise competition experiment combined with heterogeneous distribution of soil biota using four grassland plant species and their soil biota. Patches were applied as quadrants of 'own' and 'foreign' soils from all plant species in all pairwise combinations. To evaluate interspecific root responses, species-specific root biomass was quantified using real-time PCR. All plant species suffered negative soil feedback, but strength was species-specific, reflected by a decrease in root growth in own compared with foreign soil. Reduction in root growth in own patches by the superior plant competitor provided opportunities for inferior competitors to increase root biomass in these patches. These patterns did not cascade into above-ground effects during our experiment. We show that root distributions can be determined by spatial heterogeneity of soil biota, affecting plant below-ground competitive interactions. Thus, spatial heterogeneity of soil biota may contribute to plant species coexistence in species-rich grasslands. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. [Characteristics of mercury pollution in soil and atmosphere in Songhua River upstream Jia-pi-gou gold mining area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gang; Wang, Ning; Wang, Yuan; Liu, Te; Ai, Jian-Chao

    2012-09-01

    In the studied area of Jia-pi-gou at the upstream area of Songhua River, algamation process has been applied as a dominant method to extract gold for more than one hundred and eighty years, resulting in severe mercury environmental pollution. The total mercury contents in the atmosphere and soil have been determined by mercury analyzer (Zeeman RA915+) and cold atomic absorption spectrophotometry (GB/T 17136-1997), respectively. To study the pollution characteristics of mercury in the soil and atmosphere, the mercury flux at the interface between the soil and the atmosphere of 4 sampling sites Lao-jin-chang, Er-dao-gou, Er-dao-cha and community of Jia-pi-gou have been determined with the method of dynamic flux chamber. Furthermore, linear regression analyses on the total mercury contents between soil and atmosphere have been carried out and the correlation coefficient of mercury exchange flux between soil and atmosphere and meteorological factors has been studied. The results are as follows: (1) The mean value of mercury content in the atmosphere is (71.08 +/- 38.22) ng x m(-3). (2) The mean value of mercury content in the soil is (0.913 1 +/- 0.040 8) mg x kg(-1); it shows remarkably positive correlation between the mercury contents in soil and in the atmosphere. (3) The mercury exchange flux between soil and atmosphere in different locations are Lao-jin-chang [(129.13 +/- 496.07) ng (m2 x h)(-1)], Er-dao-gou [(98.64 +/- 43.96) ng x (m2 x h)(-1)], Er-dao-cha [(23.17 +/- 171.23) ng x (m2 x h)(-1)], and community of Jia-pi-gou [(7.12 +/- 46.33) ng x (m2 x h)(-1)]. (4) Solar radiation is the major influential factor in the mercury exchange flux between the soil and atmosphere in Lao-jin-chang, Er-dao-cha and community of Jia-pi-gou. Solar radiation, air temperature and soil temperature jointly influence the process of the mercury exchange flux between the soil and atmosphere in Er-dao-gou. Under the disturbance of terrain, three noticeably distinctive trend features

  5. Radiochlorine concentration ratios for agricultural plants in various soil conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashparov, V.; Colle, C.; Levchuk, S.; Yoschenko, V.; Zvarich, S.

    2007-01-01

    Long-term field experiments have been carried out in the Chernobyl exclusion zone in order to determine the parameters governing radiochlorine ( 36 Cl) transfer to plants from four types of soil, namely, Podzoluvisol, Greyzem, Phaeozem and Chernozem. Radiochlorine concentration ratios (CR = concentration of 36 Cl in the fresh plant material divided by its concentration in the dried soil in the upper 20 cm layer) were obtained in green peas (2.6 ± 0.4), onions (1.5 ± 0.5), potatoes (8 ± 1), clover (90 ± 26) and ryegrass (158 ± 88) hay, oat seeds (36 ± 23) and straw (305 ± 159), wheat seeds (35 ± 10) and straw (222 ± 82). These values correlate with the stable chlorine values for the same plants. It was shown that 36 Cl plant/soil CR in radish roots (CR = 9.7 ± 1.4) does not depend on the stable chlorine content in the soil (up to 150 mg kg -1 ), soil type and thus, that stable chlorine CR values (9.4 ± 1.2) can also be used for 36 Cl. Injection of additional quantities of stable chlorine into the soil (100 mg kg -1 of dry soil) with fertilizer does not change the soil-to-plant transfer of 36 Cl. The results from a batch experiment showed that chlorine is retained in the investigated soils only by live biota and transfers quickly (in just a few hours) into the soil solution from dry vegetation even without decomposition of dead plants and is integrated in the migration processes in soil

  6. Radiochlorine concentration ratios for agricultural plants in various soil conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashparov, V. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Strasse 7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Colle, C. [Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN/DEI/SECRE), Cadarache bat 159, BP 3, 13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France)]. E-mail: claude.colle@irsn.fr; Levchuk, S. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Strasse 7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Yoschenko, V. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Strasse 7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Zvarich, S. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Strasse 7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine)

    2007-06-15

    Long-term field experiments have been carried out in the Chernobyl exclusion zone in order to determine the parameters governing radiochlorine ({sup 36}Cl) transfer to plants from four types of soil, namely, Podzoluvisol, Greyzem, Phaeozem and Chernozem. Radiochlorine concentration ratios (CR = concentration of {sup 36}Cl in the fresh plant material divided by its concentration in the dried soil in the upper 20 cm layer) were obtained in green peas (2.6 {+-} 0.4), onions (1.5 {+-} 0.5), potatoes (8 {+-} 1), clover (90 {+-} 26) and ryegrass (158 {+-} 88) hay, oat seeds (36 {+-} 23) and straw (305 {+-} 159), wheat seeds (35 {+-} 10) and straw (222 {+-} 82). These values correlate with the stable chlorine values for the same plants. It was shown that {sup 36}Cl plant/soil CR in radish roots (CR = 9.7 {+-} 1.4) does not depend on the stable chlorine content in the soil (up to 150 mg kg{sup -1}), soil type and thus, that stable chlorine CR values (9.4 {+-} 1.2) can also be used for {sup 36}Cl. Injection of additional quantities of stable chlorine into the soil (100 mg kg{sup -1} of dry soil) with fertilizer does not change the soil-to-plant transfer of {sup 36}Cl. The results from a batch experiment showed that chlorine is retained in the investigated soils only by live biota and transfers quickly (in just a few hours) into the soil solution from dry vegetation even without decomposition of dead plants and is integrated in the migration processes in soil.

  7. Phytolacca americana from contaminated and noncontaminated soils of South Korea: Effects of elevated temperature, CO2 and simulated acid rain on plant growth response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.-O.; Rodriguez, R.J.; Lee, E.J.; Redman, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    Chemical analyses performed on the invasive weed Phytolacca americana (pokeweed) growing in industrially contaminated (Ulsan) and noncontaminated (Suwon) sites in South Korea indicated that the levels of phenolic compounds and various elements that include some heavy metals (Al, As, B, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) were statistically higher in Ulsan soils compared to Suwon soils with Al being the highest (>1,116 mg/l compared to 432 mg/l). Analysis of metals and nutrients (K, Na, Ca, Mg, Cl, NH4, N, P, S) in plant tissues indicated that accumulation occurred dominantly in plant leaves with Al levels being 33.8 times higher in Ulsan plants (PaU) compared to Suwon plants (PaS). The ability of PaU and PaS to tolerate stress was evaluated under controlled conditions by varying atmospheric CO2 and temperature and soil pH. When grown in pH 6.4 soils, the highest growth rate of PaU and PaS plants occurred at elevated (30??C) and non-elevated (25??C) temperatures, respectively. Both PaU and PaS plants showed the highest and lowest growth rates when exposed to atmospheric CO2 levels of 360 and 650 ppm, respectively. The impact of soil pH (2-6.4) on seed germination rates, plant growth, chlorophyll content, and the accumulation of phenolics were measured to assess the effects of industrial pollution and global-warming-related stresses on plants. The highest seed germination rate and chlorophyll content occurred at pH 2.0 for both PaU and PaS plants. Increased pH from 2-5 correlated to increased phenolic compounds and decreased chlorophyll content. However, at pH 6.4, a marked decrease in phenolic compounds, was observed and chlorophyll content increased. These results suggest that although plants from Ulsan and Suwon sites are the same species, they differ in the ability to deal with various stresses. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  8. Interspecific competition of early successional plant species in ex-arable fields as influenced by plant-soil feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Jing, Jingying; Bezemer, T. Martijn; Van der Putten, Wim H.

    2015-01-01

    Plant–soil feedback can affect plants that belong to the same (intraspecific feedback) or different species (interspecific feedback). However, little is known about how intra- and interspecific plant–soil feedbacks influence interspecific plant competition. Here, we used plants and soil from early-stage ex-arable fields to examine how intra- and interspecific plant–soil feedbacks affect the performance of 10 conditioning species and the focal species, Jacobaea vulgaris. Plants were grown alon...

  9. Effect of soil type on radionuclides in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    The research was undertaken to provide plant/soil concentration ratio (CR) data for uranium (U), thorium (Th) and lead (Pb) using crops and soils typical of Canada. A clay, a silt, a sand and an organic soil were used and spinach, potatoes, corn, blueberries, wild rice, barley and radish were grown. CR values decreased among the soils in the order sand > silt = clay > organic. CR values were lower in potato flesh than in potato peels, and usually lower in grains than in the associated stems. the geometric mean CR values for U, Th and Pb on a dry plant/dry soil basis were 0.013, 0.0022, and 0.0050, respectively

  10. Interspecific competition of early successional plant species in ex-arable fields as influenced by plant-soil feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jing, Jingying; Bezemer, T. Martijn; Van der Putten, Wim H.

    2015-01-01

    Plant–soil feedback can affect plants that belong to the same (intraspecific feedback) or different species (interspecific feedback). However, little is known about how intra- and interspecific plant–soil feedbacks influence interspecific plant competition. Here, we used plants and soil from

  11. Effects of Soil Quality Enhancement on Pollinator-Plant Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin J. Cardoza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Both biotic and abiotic factors can affect soil quality, which can significantly impact plant growth, productivity, and resistance to pests. However, the effects of soil quality on the interactions of plants with beneficial arthropods, such as pollinators, have not been extensively examined. We studied the effects of vermicompost (earthworm compost, VC soil amendment on behavioral and physiological responses of pollinators to flowers and floral resources, using cucumbers, Cucumis sativus, as our model system. Results from experiments conducted over three field seasons demonstrated that, in at least two out of three years, VC amendment significantly increased visit length, while reducing the time to first discovery. Bumblebee (Bombus impatiens workers that fed on flowers from VC-amended plants had significantly larger and more active ovaries, a measure of nutritional quality. Pollen fractions of flowers from VC-grown plants had higher protein compared to those of plants grown in chemically fertilized potting soil. Nectar sugar content also tended to be higher in flowers from VC-grown plants, but differences were not statistically significant. In conclusion, soil quality enhancement, as achieved with VC amendment in this study, can significantly affect plant-pollinator interactions and directly influences pollinator nutrition and overall performance.

  12. Predicting molybdenum toxicity to higher plants: Influence of soil properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, S.P.; Mico, C.; Curdy, R.; Zhao, F.J.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of soil properties on the toxicity of molybdenum (Mo) to four plant species was investigated. Soil organic carbon or ammonium-oxalate extractable Fe oxides were found to be the best predictors of the 50% effective dose (ED 50 ) of Mo in different soils, explaining > 65% of the variance in ED 50 for four species except for ryegrass (26-38%). Molybdenum concentrations in soil solution and consequently plant uptake were increased when soil pH was artificially raised because sorption of Mo to amorphous oxides is greatly reduced at high pH. The addition of sulphate significantly decreased Mo uptake by oilseed rape. For risk assessment, we suggest that Mo toxicity values for plants should be normalised using soil amorphous iron oxide concentrations. - Amorphous iron oxides or organic carbon were found to be the best predictors of the toxicity threshold values of Mo to higher plants on different soils.

  13. Plant uptake of pentachlorophenol from sludge-amended soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellin, C.A.; O'Connor, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    A greenhouse study was conducted to determine the effects of sludge on plant uptake of 14 C-pentachlorophenol (PCP). Plants included tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.), lettuce (Latuca sativa L.), carrot (Daucus carota L.), and chile pepper (Capsicum annum L.). Minimal intact PCP was detected in the fescue and lettuce by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. No intact PCP was detected in the carrot tissue extracts. Chile pepper was not analyzed for intact PCP because methylene chloride extracts contained minimal 14 C. The GC/MS analysis of soil extracts at harvest suggests a half-life of PCP of about 10 d independent of sludge rate or PCP loading rate. Rapid degradation of PCP in the soil apparently limited PCP availability to the plant. Bioconcentration factors (dry plant wt./initial soil PCP concentration) based on intact PCP were < 0.01 for all crops, suggesting little PCP uptake. Thus, food-chain crop PCP uptake in these alkaline soils should not limit land application of sludge

  14. Soil-plant transfer models for metals to improve soil screening value guidelines valid for São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos-Araujo, Sabrina N; Swartjes, Frank A; Versluijs, Kees W; Moreno, Fabio Netto; Alleoni, Luís R F

    2017-11-07

    In Brazil, there is a lack of combined soil-plant data attempting to explain the influence of specific climate, soil conditions, and crop management on heavy metal uptake and accumulation by plants. As a consequence, soil-plant relationships to be used in risk assessments or for derivation of soil screening values are not available. Our objective in this study was to develop empirical soil-plant models for Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Zn, in order to derive appropriate soil screening values representative of humid tropical regions such as the state of São Paulo (SP), Brazil. Soil and plant samples from 25 vegetable species in the production areas of SP were collected. The concentrations of metals found in these soil samples were relatively low. Therefore, data from temperate regions were included in our study. The soil-plant relations derived had a good performance for SP conditions for 8 out of 10 combinations of metal and vegetable species. The bioconcentration factor (BCF) values for Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in lettuce and for Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in carrot were determined under three exposure scenarios at pH 5 and 6. The application of soil-plant models and the BCFs proposed in this study can be an important tool to derive national soil quality criteria. However, this methodological approach includes data assessed under different climatic conditions and soil types and need to be carefully considered.

  15. An experimental study on mass loading of soil particles on plant surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Gerzabek, M.H.; Mueck, K.

    1994-03-01

    Radionuclide contaminated soil adhered to plant surfaces can contribute to human ingestion dose. To determine this contribution, a method of 46 Sc neutron activation analysis was established and tested, by which a detection limit of 0.05 mg soil per g dry plant biomass can be obtained. In the field and greenhouse experiment the mass loading of soil on ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and broad bean (Vicia faba L.) was investigated and the contribution from rainsplash and wind erosion were evaluated separately. Soil retained on plant surfaces in field conditions in Seibersdorf/Austria was 5.77 ± 1.44 mg soil per g dry plant for ryegrass and 9.51 ± 0.73 mg soil per g dry plant for broad bean. Estimates of contribution from rainsplash and wind erosion to soil contamination of plant during the experimental period are 68 % and 32 % for broadbean, 47 % and 53 % for ryegrass, respectively. Mass loading results from field studies indicate that soil adhesion on plant surfaces can contribute up to 23 % of plant 137 Cs contamination, the transfer factors modified by mass loading decline differently, depending on 137 Cs concentration of the soil and the soil mass adhered to plant surfaces. (authors)

  16. Soil HONO Emissions and Its Potential Impact on the Atmospheric Chemistry and Nitrogen Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, H.; Chen, C.; Zhang, Q.; Poeschl, U.; Cheng, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Hydroxyl radicals (OH) are a key species in atmospheric photochemistry. In the lower atmosphere, up to ~30% of the primary OH radical production is attributed to the photolysis of nitrous acid (HONO), and field observations suggest a large missing source of HONO. The dominant sources of N(III) in soil, however, are biological nitrification and denitrification processes, which produce nitrite ions from ammonium (by nitrifying microbes) as well as from nitrate (by denitrifying microbes). We show that soil nitrite can release HONO and explain the reported strength and diurnal variation of the missing source. The HONO emissions rates are estimated to be comparable to that of nitric oxide (NO) and could be an important source of atmospheric reactive nitrogen. Fertilized soils appear to be particularly strong sources of HONO. Thus, agricultural activities and land-use changes may strongly influence the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. A new HONO-DNDC model was developed to simulate the evolution of HONO emissions in agriculture ecosystems. Because of the widespread occurrence of nitrite-producing microbes and increasing N and acid deposition, the release of HONO from soil may also be important in natural environments, including forests and boreal regions. Reference: Su, H. et al., Soil Nitrite as a Source of Atmospheric HONO and OH Radicals, Science, 333, 1616-1618, 10.1126/science.1207687, 2011.

  17. In vitro antagonistic activity, plant growth promoting traits and phylogenetic affiliation of rhizobacteria associated with wild plants grown in arid soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Wael S; Akhkha, Abdellah; El-Naggar, Moustafa Y; Elbadry, Medhat

    2014-01-01

    The role of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) in adaptation of plants in extreme environments is not yet completely understood. For this study native bacteria were isolated from rhizospeheric arid soils and evaluated for both growth-promoting abilities and antagonistic potential against phytopathogenic fungi and nematodes. The phylogentic affiliation of these representative isolates was also characterized. Rhizobacteria associated with 11 wild plant species from the arid soil of Almadinah Almunawarah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) were investigated. From a total of 531 isolates, only 66 bacterial isolates were selected based on their ability to inhibit Fusarium oxysporum, and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. The selected isolates were screened in vitro for activities related to plant nutrition and plant growth regulation as well as for antifungal and nematicidal traits. Isolated bacteria were found to exhibit capabilities in fix atmospheric nitrogen, produce ammonia, indoleacetic acid (IAA), siderophores, solubilize phosphate and zinc, and showed an antagonistic potential against some phytopathogenic fungi and one nematode species (Meloidogyne incognita) to various extent. Isolates were ranked by their potential ability to function as PGPR. The 66 isolates were genotyped using amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The taxonomic composition of the representative genotypes from both rhizosphere and rhizoplane comprised Bacillus, Enterobacter and Pseudomonas. Out of the 10 genotypes, three strains designated as PHP03, CCP05, and TAP02 might be regarded as novel strains based on their low similarity percentages and high bootstrap values. The present study clearly identified specific traits in the isolated rhizobacteria, which make them good candidates as PGPR and might contribute to plant adaption to arid environments. Application of such results in agricultural fields may improve and enhance plant growth in arid soils.

  18. In vitro Antagonistic Activity, Plant Growth Promoting Traits and Phylogenetic Affiliation of Rhizobacteria Associated with Wild Plants Grown in Arid Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael Samir El-Sayed

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR in adaptation of plants in extreme environments is not yet completely understood. For this study native bacteria were isolated from rhizospeheric arid soils and evaluated for both growth-promoting abilities and antagonistic potential against phytopathogenic fungi and nematodes. The phylogentic affiliation of these representative isolates was also characterized. Rhizobacteria associated with eleven wild plant species from the arid soil of Almadinah Almunawarah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA were investigated. From a total of 531 isolates, only 66 bacterial isolates were selected based on their ability to inhibit Fusarium oxysporum, and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. The selected isolates were screened in vitro for activities related to plant nutrition and plant growth regulation as well as for antifungal and nematicidal traits. Isolated bacteria were found to exhibit capabilities in fix atmospheric nitrogen, produce ammonia, indoleacetic acid (IAA, siderophores, solubilize phosphate and zinc, and showed an antagonistic potential against some phytopathogenic fungi and one nematode species (Meloidogyne incognita to various extent. Isolates were ranked by their potential ability to function as PGPR. The 66 isolates were genotyped using amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The taxonomic composition of the representative genotypes from both rhizosphere and rhizoplane comprised Bacillus, Enterobacter and Pseudomonas. Out of the ten genotypes, three strains designated as PHP03, CCP05, and TAP02 might be regarded as novel strains based on their low similarity percentages and high bootstrap values. The present study clearly identified specific traits in the isolated rhizobacteria, which make them good candidates as PGPR and might contribute to plant adaption to arid environments. Application of such results in agricultural fields may improve and enhance plant

  19. Radium - 226 levels in some sudanese plants and soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sam, A.K.

    1993-01-01

    The natural levels of 226 Ra in plant and soil samples have been studied. The field study was mainly conducted in western Sudan (Darfur and Kurdofan) where areas of high natural background radiation have been identified and Khartoum area was taken as a control to (i) assess in natural setting the soil-to-plant concentration ratios (concentration in dry sample / concentration in dry soil) of the naturally occurring radionuclide 226 Ra, (ii) establish base-line data on Radium activity concentration levels in environmental materials and (iii) explore the area of high natural radiation background in western Sudan.Low level gamma spectrometry, employing high purity germanium detector (HPGe) of relative efficiency 12%, has been used for the determination of 226 Ra activity concentrations in plant and soil samples. The mean Radium activity concentration found in soil ranged from 14.41 Bq/Kg to 79.08 Bq/Kg, the values correspond to the reported normal background levels of 226 Ra in soils worldwide. Radium activity concentrations found in Sudanese plants were significantly higher compared to those related to plants from normal background regions and significantly lower than those reported for plants from high background regions in other countries. The mean soil/plant concentration ratios (CRs) found in this study were 0.12, 0.15, 0.17 and 0.08 for whole plants, fruits and leafy vegetables, root vegetables and grains, respectively. These ranges of CR values are comparable with overall range of CR where environmental conditions are normal. The estimated daily intakes by individuals consuming foods of local origin were 1.00, 10.4 and 7.91 Bq/Day of radium Khour Abu Habil, Arkuri and Dumpir, respectively. Since the dietary habits were different, as it was noticed, these results have been much lower in comparison with those obtained from some European countries and United States. (author), 44 refs., 18 tabs., 13 figs

  20. Fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in plant-soil systems: Plant responses to a chemical stress in the root zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoylman, Anne M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Under laboratory conditions selected to maximize root uptake, plant tissue distribution of PAH-derived 14C was largely limited to root tissue of Malilotus alba. These results suggest that plant uptake of PAHs from contaminated soil via roots, and translocation to aboveground plant tissues (stems and leaves), is a limited mechanism for transport into terrestrial food chains. However, these data also indicate that root surface sorption of PAHs may be important for plants grown in soils containing elevated concentration PAHs. Root surface sorption of PAHs may be an important route of exposure for plants in soils containing elevated concentrations of PAHS. Consequently, the root-soil interface may be the site of plant-microbial interactions in response to a chemical stress. In this study, evidence of a shift in carbon allocation to the root zone of plants exposed to phenanthrene and corresponding increases in soil respiration and heterotrophic plate counts provide evidence of a plant-microbial response to a chemical stress. The results of this study establish the importance of the root-soil interface for plants growing in PAH contaminated soil and indicate the existence of plant-microbial interactions in response to a chemical stress. These results may provide new avenues of inquiry for studies of plant toxicology, plant-microbial interactions in the rhizosphere, and environmental fates of soil contaminants. In addition, the utilization of plants to enhance the biodegradation of soil contaminants may require evaluation of plant physiological changes and plant shifts in resource allocation.

  1. Plant-soil interactions promote co-occurrence of three nonnative woody shrubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuebbing, Sara E; Classen, Aimée T; Call, Jaime J; Henning, Jeremiah A; Simberloff, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Ecosystems containing multiple nonnative plant species are common, but mechanisms promoting their co-occurrence are understudied. Plant-soil interactions contribute to the dominance of singleton species in nonnative ranges because many nonnatives experience stronger positive feedbacks relative to co-occurring natives. Plant-soil interactions could impede other nonnatives if an individual nonnative benefits from its soil community to a greater extent than its neighboring nonnatives, as is seen with natives. However, plant-soil interactions could promote nonnative co-occurrence if a nonnative accumulates beneficial soil mutualists that also assist other nonnatives. Here, we use greenhouse and field experiments to ask whether plant-soil interactions (1) promote the codominance of two common nonnative shrubs (Ligustrum sinense and Lonicera maackii) and (2) facilitate the invasion of a less-common nonnative shrub (Rhamnus davurica) in deciduous forests of the southeastern United States. In the greenhouse, we found that two of the nonnatives, L. maackii and R. davurica, performed better in soils conditioned by nonnative shrubs compared to uninvaded forest soils, which. suggests that positive feedbacks among co-occurring nonnative shrubs can promote continued invasion of a site. In both greenhouse and field experiments, we found consistent signals that the codominance of the nonnatives L. sinense and L. maackii may be at least partially explained by the increased growth of L. sinense in L. maackii soils. Overall, significant effects of plant-soil interactions on shrub performance indicate that plant-soil interactions can potentially structure the co-occurrence patterns of these nonnatives.

  2. Interlaboratory Comparetive Studies of Soil/Plant Analysis Methods ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The information on analytical techniques that are used for soil and plant analyses in different agricultural laboratories of Kenya was gathered and compiled in table forms. Performance of six laboratories was compaired for different elements and parameters of soil and plant samples. Chemical analysis of identical samples ...

  3. Effects of soil depth and plant-soil interaction on microbial community in temperate grasslands of northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiaodong; Zhang, Naili; Zeng, Hui; Wang, Wei

    2018-07-15

    Although the patterns and drivers of soil microbial community composition are well studied, little is known about the effects of plant-soil interactions and soil depth on soil microbial distribution at a regional scale. We examined 195 soil samples from 13 sites along a climatic transect in the temperate grasslands of northern China to measure the composition of and factors influencing soil microbial communities within a 1-m soil profile. Soil microbial community composition was measured using phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) analysis. Fungi predominated in topsoil (0-10 cm) and bacteria and actinomycetes in deep soils (40-100 cm), independent of steppe types. This variation was explained by contemporary environmental factors (including above- and below-ground plant biomass, soil physicochemical and climatic factors) >58% in the 0-40 cm of soil depth, but soils. Interestingly, when we considered the interactive effects between plant traits (above ground biomass and root biomass) and soil factors (pH, clay content, and soil total carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous), we observed a significant interaction effect occurring at depths of 10-20 cm soil layer, due to different internal and external factors of the plant-soil system along the soil profile. These results improve understanding of the drivers of soil microbial community composition at regional scales. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Reduction of Cadmium Uptake of Rice Plants Using Soil Amendments in High Cadmium Contaminated Soil: A Pot Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian Siswanto

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of agricultural residues on reducing cadmium uptake in rice plants. The rice plants growing on no cadmium/free cadmium soils (N, Cd soils (Cds, and Cd soils each amended with 1% w/w of coir pith (CP, coir pith modified with sodium hydroxide (CPm and corncob (CC under high cadmium contaminated soil with an average 145 mg Cd kg-1 soil were investigated. The results showed that the cumulative transpiration of rice grown in various treatments under high cadmium contaminated soil followed the order: Cds > CPm ≥ CP ≥ CC. These transpirations directly influenced cadmium accumulation in shoots and husks of rice plants. The CC and CP seemed to work to reduce the cadmium uptake by rice plants indicated by accumulated cadmium in the husk that were 2.47 and 7.38 mg Cd kg-1 dry weight, respectively. Overall, transpiration tended to drive cadmium accumulation in plants for rice grown in high cadmium contaminated soil. The more that plants uptake cadmium, the lower cadmium that remains in the soil.

  5. Plant effects on soil denitrification - a review of potential mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malique, Francois; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Dannenmann, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Denitrification is a microbial process occurring in soils, both producing and consuming the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (NO), competing for nitrate with plants and hydrological leaching pathways, removing nutrients and reactive nitrogen from the biosphere, and closing the global nitrogen cycle. Despite its obvious importance, denitrification remained among the least well quantified biogeochemical processes in soils. This is due to enormous methodological difficulties involved in the direct quantification of soil microbial denitrification rates (mainly with regard to the terminal product N2) and the denitrification nitrogen gas product ratios (NO:N2O:N2), Plants may affect denitrification through a myriad of mechanisms such as e.g., competition for nitrate and water, through oxygen consumption, by regulating litter quality and changing soil pH, and via the exudation of labile carbon or secondary plant compounds involved in shaping the rhizospheric microbial community. However, plant effects on denitrification so far hardly were quantified so that the actual extent of plant control on denitrification is largely unknown. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on mechanisms how plants can affect denitrification rates and N gas product ratios in soils at temporal scales from hours to days and years. We review earlier research to quantify plant effects on denitrification as well as critically discuss the limited methods currently available to quantify plant-soil-denitrifier interactions. Finally, we provide pointers to use plants as tools to manage denitrification, e.g. to improve N use efficiency in agricultural ecosystems and to minimize soil nitrous oxide emissions.

  6. Divergent composition but similar function of soil food webs of individual plants: plant species and community effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, T.M.; Fountain, T.; Barea, J.M.; Christensen, S.; Dekker, S.C.; Duyts, H.; Hal, van R.; Harvey, J.A.; Hedlund, K.; Maraun, M.; Mikola, J.; Mladenov, A.G.; Robin, C.; Ruiter, de P.C.; Scheu, H.; Setälä, S.; šmilauer, P.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2010-01-01

    Soils are extremely rich in biodiversity, and soil organisms play pivotal roles in supporting terrestrial life, but the role that individual plants and plant communities play in influencing the diversity and functioning of soil food webs remains highly debated. Plants, as primary producers and

  7. Divergent composition but similar function of soil food webs beneath individual plants: plant species and community effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, T.M.; Fountain, M.T.; Barea, J.M.; Christensen, S.; Dekker, S.C.; Duyts, H.; van Hal, R.; Harvey, J.A.; Hedlund, K.; Maraun, M.; Mikola, J.; Mladenov, A.G.; Robin, C.; de Ruiter, P.C.; Scheu, S.; Setälä, H.; Milauer, P.; Van der Putten, W.H.

    2010-01-01

    Soils are extremely rich in biodiversity, and soil organisms play pivotal roles in supporting terrestrial life, but the role that individual plants and plant communities play in influencing the diversity and functioning of soil food webs remains highly debated. Plants, as primary producers and

  8. Mobility and contamination assessment of mercury in coal fly ash, atmospheric deposition, and soil collected from Tianjin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zheng; Wu, Guanghong; Su, Ruixian; Li, Congwei; Liang, Peiyu

    2011-09-01

    Samples of class F coal fly ash (levels I, II, and III), slag, coal, atmospheric deposition, and soils collected from Tianjin, China, were analyzed using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) Method 3052 and a sequential extraction procedure, to investigate the pollution status and mobility of Hg. The results showed that total mercury (HgT) concentrations were higher in level I fly ash (0.304 µg/g) than in level II and level III fly ash and slag (0.142, 0.147, and 0.052 µg/g, respectively). Total Hg in the atmospheric deposition was higher during the heating season (0.264 µg/g) than the nonheating season (0.135 µg/g). Total Hg contents were higher in suburban area soils than in rural and agricultural areas. High HgT concentrations in suburban area soils may be a result of the deposition of Hg associated with particles emitted from coal-fired power plants. Mercury in fly ash primarily existed as elemental Hg, which accounted for 90.1, 85.3, and 90.6% of HgT in levels I, II, and III fly ash, respectively. Mercury in the deposition existed primarily as sulfide Hg, which accounted for 73.8% (heating season) and 74.1% (nonheating season) of HgT. However, Hg in soils existed primarily as sulfide Hg, organo-chelated Hg and elemental Hg, which accounted for 37.8 to 50.0%, 31.7 to 41.8%, and 13.0 to 23.9% of HgT, respectively. The percentage of elemental Hg in HgT occurred in the order fly ash > atmospheric deposition > soils, whereas organo-chelated Hg and sulfide Hg occurred in the opposite order. The present approach can provide a window for understanding and tracing the source of Hg in the environment in Tianjin and the risk associated with Hg bioaccessibility. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  9. Soil [N] modulates soil C cycling in CO2-fumigated tree stands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieleman, W. I. J.; Luyssaert, S.; Rey, A.

    2010-01-01

    Under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations, soil carbon (C) inputs are typically enhanced, suggesting larger soil C sequestration potential. However, soil C losses also increase and progressive nitrogen (N) limitation to plant growth may reduce the CO2 effect on soil C inputs with time. We...... compiled a data set from 131 manipulation experiments, and used meta-analysis to test the hypotheses that: (1) elevated atmospheric CO2 stimulates soil C inputs more than C losses, resulting in increasing soil C stocks; and (2) that these responses are modulated by N. Our results confirm that elevated CO2...... induces a C allocation shift towards below-ground biomass compartments. However, the increased soil C inputs were offset by increased heterotrophic respiration (Rh), such that soil C content was not affected by elevated CO2. Soil N concentration strongly interacted with CO2 fumigation: the effect...

  10. Influence of copper high-tension lines on plants and soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraal, H.; Ernst, W.

    1976-09-01

    The copper contents of plants and soils were determined in relation to the distance from copper high-tension lines. In the vicinity of the cables clayey and fenny soils had demonstrably higher copper contents, due to corrosion of the cables, than regions 20 m and more outside the high-tension lines. On these soils, however, copper accumulation in the plants was low in comparison with those from a sandy soil, although this soil itself showed no copper increase in relation to the cables. The contaminated plants may present a risk of poisoning for sheep within a 20 m distance on both sides of the cables. No changes in plant species composition and in the copper tolerance of Agrostis tenuis were observed.

  11. Predicting molybdenum toxicity to higher plants: Influence of soil properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, S.P., E-mail: steve.mcgrath@bbsrc.ac.u [Soil Science Department, Centre for Soils and Ecosystems Functions, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ (United Kingdom); Mico, C. [Soil Science Department, Centre for Soils and Ecosystems Functions, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ (United Kingdom); Curdy, R. [Laboratory for Environmental Biotechnology (LBE), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL) Station 6 CH, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Zhao, F.J. [Soil Science Department, Centre for Soils and Ecosystems Functions, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    The effect of soil properties on the toxicity of molybdenum (Mo) to four plant species was investigated. Soil organic carbon or ammonium-oxalate extractable Fe oxides were found to be the best predictors of the 50% effective dose (ED{sub 50}) of Mo in different soils, explaining > 65% of the variance in ED{sub 50} for four species except for ryegrass (26-38%). Molybdenum concentrations in soil solution and consequently plant uptake were increased when soil pH was artificially raised because sorption of Mo to amorphous oxides is greatly reduced at high pH. The addition of sulphate significantly decreased Mo uptake by oilseed rape. For risk assessment, we suggest that Mo toxicity values for plants should be normalised using soil amorphous iron oxide concentrations. - Amorphous iron oxides or organic carbon were found to be the best predictors of the toxicity threshold values of Mo to higher plants on different soils.

  12. Atmospheric emission of 137Cs82 from Beloyarsk nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolotkov, G. A.

    2018-01-01

    Citing Beloyarsk nuclear power plant (Russia) as an example, the problem of remote detection of radioactivity in the atmospheric pollution is examined. The comparative analysis of injected radionuclides into the atmosphere from the nuclear power plant with advanced fast neutron reactor is carried out. The main radionuclides throw out into the atmosphere from the nuclear power plant are beta-radionuclides. The secondary and tertiary spectra of beta-electrons decay for artificial radionuclide 137Cs82 is calculated, using Spencer-Fano’s equation. The averaged parameters of initial beta - electrons generated by 137Cs82 decay in the atmosphere is calculated.

  13. Relationship of sulfur content of soils and plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengl, F; Reckendorfer, P

    1928-01-01

    Crops were fertilized with fertilizers which contained chloride and sulfate in order to examine how the sulfur content of a plant may be affected by that of the soil. At the time of flowering the respective chlorine or sulfate content of the plants was considerably above that of the controls; differences were less, however, when the plants were fully mature. Sulfate, in particular, was little different. In field observations, little correlation was noted between sulfate content of plants and soils. Natural variations in the sulfur content of plants were greater than the increases attributable to smoke air pollution. 2 tables.

  14. A soil-based model to predict radionuclide transfer in a soil-plant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roig, M.; Vidal, M.; Tent, J.; Rauret, G.; Roca, M.C.; Vallejo, V.R.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work was to check if the main soil parameters predefined as ruling soil-plant transfer were sufficient to predict a relative scale of radionuclide mobility in mineral soils. Two agricultural soils, two radionuclides ( 85 Sr and 134 Cs), and two crops (lettuce and pea) were used in these experiments following radioactive aerosol deposition simulating the conditions of a site some distance far away from the center of a nuclear accident, for which condensed deposition would be the more significant contribution. The available fraction of these radionuclides was estimated in these soils from experiments in which various reagents were tested and several experimental conditions were compared. As a general conclusion, the soil parameters seemed to be sufficient for prediction purposes, although the model should be improved through the consideration of physiological aspects, especially those depending of the plant selectivity according to the composition of the soil solution

  15. Implementation of Controlled Traffic in the Canadian Prairies: Soil and Plant Dynamics under Simulated and Field Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenette, Kris; Hernandez-Ramirez, Guillermo

    2017-04-01

    Achieving resiliency in agroecosystems may be accomplished through the incorporation of contemporary management systems and the diversification of crop rotations with pulse crops, such as controlled traffic farming (CTF) and faba beans (Vicia faba L.). As these practices become more common in the Canadian Prairies, it is imperative to have a well-rounded understanding of how faba beans interact with the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum in conditions found in contemporary management systems. Simulated field conditions emulated soil compaction found in both the trafficked and un-trafficked areas of a CTF system, in which the presence of high water availability was shown to offset the negative results of large applications of compactive effort. Furthermore, low water availability exacerbated differences in plant responses between compaction treatments. The simulated treatment of 1.2 gcm-3 coupled with high water content yielded the most optimal results for most measured parameters, with a contrasting detrimental treatment of 1.4 gcm-3 at low water availability. The simulated field conditions were further bridged through an analysis of two commercial sites in Alberta, Canada that compared both trafficked and un-trafficked soil properties. Soil properties such as available nitrogen (AN), pH, soil total nitrogen (STN), soil organic carbon (SOC), bulk density, macroporosity, soil quality S-Index, plant available water capacity (PAWC) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (Km) were analysed and compared among trafficked and un-trafficked areas. The measured soil physical and hydraulic properties of bulk density, macroporosity, S-Index, PAWC and Km were shown to be heavily influenced by the CTF traffic regime, while soil nutrient properties of AN, pH, STN SOC were determined to be dependent on both management and landscape features.

  16. Rapid atmospheric transport and large-scale deposition of recently synthesized plant waxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Daniel B.; Ladd, S. Nemiah; Schubert, Carsten J.; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2018-02-01

    Sedimentary plant wax 2H/1H ratios are important tools for understanding hydroclimate and environmental changes, but large spatial and temporal uncertainties exist about transport mechanisms from ecosystem to sediments. To assess atmospheric pathways, we collected aerosol samples for two years at four locations within a ∼60 km radius in northern Switzerland. We measured n-alkane distributions and 2H/1H ratios in these samples, and from local plants, leaf litter, and soil, as well as surface sediment from six nearby lakes. Increased concentrations and 2H depletion of long odd chain n-alkanes in early summer aerosols indicate that most wax aerosol production occurred shortly after leaf unfolding, when plants synthesize waxes in large quantities. During autumn and winter, aerosols were characterized by degraded n-alkanes lacking chain length preferences diagnostic of recent biosynthesis, and 2H/1H values that were in some cases more than 100‰ higher than growing season values. Despite these seasonal shifts, modeled deposition-weighted average 2H/1H values of long odd chain n-alkanes primarily reflected summer values. This was corroborated by n-alkane 2H/1H values in lake sediments, which were similar to deposition-weighted aerosol values at five of six sites. Atmospheric deposition rates for plant n-alkanes on land were ∼20% of accumulation rates in lakes, suggesting a role for direct deposition to lakes or coastal oceans near similar production sources, and likely a larger role for deposition on land and transport in river systems. This mechanism allows mobilization and transport of large quantities of recently produced waxes as fine-grained material to low energy sedimentation sites over short timescales, even in areas with limited topography. Widespread atmospheric transfer well before leaf senescence also highlights the importance of the isotopic composition of early season source water used to synthesize waxes for the geologic record.

  17. Greater soil carbon accumulation in deeper soils in native- than in exotic-dominated grassland plantings in the southern Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsey, B. J.; Xu, X.; Polley, H. W.; Hofmockel, K. S.

    2017-12-01

    Global change includes invasion by non-native plant species, and invasion may affect carbon cycling and storage. We tested predictions in central Texas in an experiment that compares mixtures of all exotic or all native species under two summer irrigation treatments (128 or 0 mm) that varies the amount of summer drought stress. At the end of the eighth growing season after establishment, soils were sampled in 10 cm increments to 100 cm depth to determine if soil C differed among treatments, and if treatments differentially affected soil C in deeper soils. Soil C content was significantly (5%) higher under native plantings than under exotic species plantings (P plantings increased with depth, and native plantings had higher soil C in deeper soil layers than in surface layers (native-exotic x depth, P plantings had decreasing soil C with depth. Soil C:N ratio and δ13C/12C were also significantly affected by native-exotic status, with soils in exotic plots having a significantly greater C4 contribution than native soils. Soil C was unaffected by summer irrigation treatments. Our results suggest that a significant amount of carbon could be sequestered by replacing exotic plant species with native species in the southern Plains, and that more work should be conducted at deeper soil depths. If we had restricted our analyses to surface soil layers (e.g. top 30 cm), we would have failed to detect depth differences between natives and exotics.

  18. Evaluation of 14C abundance in soil respiration using accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koarashi, Jun; Iida, Takao; Moriizumi, Jun; Asano, Tomohiro

    2004-01-01

    To clarify the behavior of 14 C in terrestrial ecosystems, 14 C abundance in soil respiration was evaluated in an urban forest with a new method involving a closed chamber technique and 14 C measurement by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Soil respiration had a higher Δ 14 C than the contemporary atmosphere. This indicates that a significant portion of soil respiration is derived from the decomposition of soil organic matter enriched in 14 C by atmospheric nuclear weapons tests, with a notable time lag between atmospheric 14 C addition and re-emission from soil. On the other hand, δ 14 C in soil respiration demonstrated that 14 C abundance ratio itself in soil-respired CO 2 is not always high compared with that in atmospheric CO 2 because of the isotope fractionation during plant photosynthesis and microbial decomposition of soil organic matter. The Δ 14 C in soil respiration was slightly lower in August than in March, suggesting a relatively high contribution of plant root respiration and decomposition of newly accumulated and/or 14 C-depleted soil organic matter to the total soil respiration in August

  19. Atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides released by a nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barboza, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed to simulate the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides released by a nuclear plant operating under normal conditions. The model, based on gaussian plume representation, accouts for and evaluates several factors which affect the concentraction of effluents in the atmosphere, such as: ressuspension, deposition, radioactive decay, energy and type of the radiation emitted, among others. The concentraction of effluents in the atmosphere is calculated for a uniform mesh of points around the plant, allowing the equivalent doses to be then evaluated. Simulations of the atmosphere dispersion of radioactive plumes of Cs 137 and Ar 41 have been performed assuming a constant rate of release, as expected from the normal operation of a nuclear plant. Finally, this work analyzes the equivalent doses at ground level due to the dispersion of Cs 137 and Ar 41 , accumulated over one year and determines the isodose curves for a hypothetical site. (author) [pt

  20. Soil-to-plant concentration factors for radiological assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Y.C.; Thompson, S.E.; Colsher, C.S.

    1982-09-01

    This report presents the results of a literature review to derive soil-to-plant concentration factors to predict the concentration of a radionuclide in plants from that in soil. The concentration factor, B/sub v/ is defined as the ratio of the concentration of a nuclide in the edible plant part to that in dry soil. CR (the concentration ratio) is similarly defined to denote the concentration factor for dry feed consumed by livestock. B/sub v/ and CR values are used to assess the dose from radionuclides deposited onto soil and transferred into crop plants via roots. Approaches for deriving B/sub v/ and CR values are described, and values for food and feed are tabulated for individual elements. The sources of uncertainty are described, and the factors that contribute to the inherent variability of the B/sub v/ and CR values are discussed. Summary tables of elemental B/sub v/ and CR values and statistical parameters that characterize their distributions provide a basis for a systematic updating of many of the B/sub v/ values in Regulatory Guide 1.109. They also provide a basis for selecting B/sub v/ and CR values for other applications that involve the use of equilibrium models to predict the concentration of radionuclides in plants from that in soil

  1. Estimating CO2 gas exchange in mixed age vegetable plant communities grown on soil-like substrates for life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velichko, V. V.; Tikhomirov, A. A.; Ushakova, S. A.

    2018-02-01

    If soil-like substrate (SLS) is to be used in human life support systems with a high degree of mass closure, the rate of its gas exchange as a compartment for mineralization of plant biomass should be understood. The purpose of this study was to compare variations in CO2 gas exchange of vegetable plant communities grown on the soil-like substrate using a number of plant age groups, which determined the so-called conveyor interval. Two experimental plant communities were grown as plant conveyors with different conveyor intervals. The first plant community consisted of conveyors with intervals of 7 days for carrot and beet and 14 days for chufa sedge. The conveyor intervals in the second plant community were 14 days for carrot and beet and 28 days for chufa sedge. This study showed that increasing the number of age groups in the conveyor and, thus, increasing the frequency of adding plant waste to the SLS, decreased the range of variations in CO2 concentration in the "plant-soil-like substrate" system. However, the resultant CO2 gas exchange was shifted towards CO2 release to the atmosphere of the plant community with short conveyor intervals. The duration of the conveyor interval did not significantly affect productivity and mineral composition of plants grown on the SLS.

  2. A potential new proxy for paleo-atmospheric pO2 from soil carbonate-hosted fluid inclusions applied to pristine Chinle soils from the Petrified Forest 1A core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, M. F.; Pettitt, E.; Knobbe, T.

    2017-12-01

    Proxies for the concentration of O2 in the ancient atmosphere are scarce. We have developed a potential new proxy for ancient atmospheric O2 content based on soil carbonate-hosted fluid inclusions. Soils are in continuous atmospheric communication, and relatively static equilibration between soil gas and atmospheric gas during formation, such that a predictable amount of atmosphere infiltrates a soil. This atmosphere is trapped by inclusions during carbonate precipitation. Here we show that carbonate hosted fluid inclusions are faithful recorders of soil gas concentrations and isotope ratios, and specifically that soil O2 partial pressures can be derived from the total gas contents of these inclusions. Using carbonate nodules from a span of depths in a modern vertisol near Dallas, TX, as a test case, we employ an online crushing technique to liberate gases from soil carbonates into a small custom-built quadrupole mass spectrometer where all gases are measured in real time. We quantify the total oxygen content of the gas using a matrix-matched calibration, and define each species as a partial pressure of the total gas released from the nodule. Atmospheric pO2 is very simply derived from the soil-nodule partial pressures by accounting for the static productivity of the soil (using a small correction based on the CO2 concentration). When corrected for aqueous solubility using Henry's Law, these soil-carbonate hosted gas results reveal soil O2 concentrations that are comparable to modern-day dry atmosphere. Armed with this achievement in modern soils, and as a test on the applicability of the approach to ancient samples, we successfully apply the new proxy to nodules from the Late Triassic Chinle formation from the Petrified Forest National Park Core, taken as part of the Colorado Plateau Coring Project. Analysis of soil O2 from soil gas monitoring wells paired with measurements from contemporaneous soil carbonate nodules is needed to precisely calibrate the new proxy.

  3. Plant tolerance to diesel minimizes its impact on soil microbial characteristics during rhizoremediation of diesel-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrutia, O.; Garbisu, C.; Epelde, L.; Sampedro, M.C.; Goicolea, M.A.; Becerril, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Soil contamination due to petroleum-derived products is an important environmental problem. We assessed the impacts of diesel oil on plants (Trifolium repens and Lolium perenne) and soil microbial community characteristics within the context of the rhizoremediation of contaminated soils. For this purpose, a diesel fuel spill on a grassland soil was simulated under pot conditions at a dose of 12,000 mg diesel kg -1 DW soil. Thirty days after diesel addition, T. repens (white clover) and L. perenne (perennial ryegrass) were sown in the pots and grown under greenhouse conditions (temperature 25/18 o C day/night, relative humidity 60/80% day/night and a photosynthetic photon flux density of 400 μmol photon m -2 s -1 ) for 5 months. A parallel set of unplanted pots was also included. Concentrations of n-alkanes in soil were determined as an indicator of diesel degradation. Seedling germination, plant growth, maximal photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (F v /F m ), pigment composition and lipophylic antioxidant content were determined to assess the impacts of diesel on the studied plants. Soil microbial community characteristics, such as enzyme and community-level physiological profiles, were also determined and used to calculate the soil quality index (SQI). The presence of plants had a stimulatory effect on soil microbial activity. L. perenne was far more tolerant to diesel contamination than T. repens. Diesel contamination affected soil microbial characteristics, although its impact was less pronounced in the rhizosphere of L. perenne. Rhizoremediation with T. repens and L. perenne resulted in a similar reduction of total n-alkanes concentration. However, values of the soil microbial parameters and the SQI showed that the more tolerant species (L. perenne) was able to better maintain its rhizosphere characteristics when growing in diesel-contaminated soil, suggesting a better soil health. We concluded that plant tolerance is of crucial importance for the

  4. Vanadium bioavailability and toxicity to soil microorganisms and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Maja A; Baken, Stijn; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Hadialhejazi, Golshid; Smolders, Erik

    2013-10-01

    Vanadium, V, is a redox-sensitive metal that in solution, under aerobic conditions, prevails as the oxyanion vanadate(V). There is little known regarding vanadium toxicity to soil biota, and the present study was set up to determine the toxicity of added vanadate to soil organisms and to investigate the relationship between toxicity and vanadium sorption in soils. Five soils with contrasting properties were spiked with 7 different doses (3.2-3200 mg V kg(-1)) of dissolved vanadate, and toxicity was measured with 2 microbial and 3 plant assays. The median effective concentration (EC50) thresholds of the microbial assays ranged from 28 mg added V kg(-1) to 690 mg added V kg(-1), and the EC50s in the plant assays ranged from 18 mg added V kg(-1) to 510 mg added V kg(-1). The lower thresholds were in the concentration range of the background vanadium in the untreated control soils (15-58 mg V kg(-1)). The vanadium toxicity to plants decreased with a stronger soil vanadium sorption strength. The EC50 values for plants expressed on a soil solution basis ranged from 0.8 mg V L(-1) to 15 mg V L(-1) and were less variable among soils than corresponding values based on total vanadium in soil. It is concluded that sorption decreases the toxicity of added vanadate and that soil solution vanadium is a more robust measure to determine critical vanadium concentrations across soils. © 2013 SETAC.

  5. Accumulation of Pb, Cd and Zn from contaminated soil to various plants and evaluation of soil remediation with indicator plant (Plantago lanceolata L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zupan, M.; Lobnik, F.; Kadunc, V. [Ljubljana Univ. (Slovenia). Agronomy Dept., Center for Soil and Environmental Science; Hudnik, V. [National Institute of Chemistry Hajdrihova 19, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    1997-12-31

    The accumulation of cadmium, lead, and zinc by different major cultivated plants from soils contaminated with heavy metals, is presented. The vegetables, crops, and the indicator plant narrow leaf plantain (Plantago lanceolata L.) were used in a field experiment including 3 areas with different levels of pollution. The highest concentrations of heavy metals were observed in edible green parts of vegetables (endive, spinach, lettuce) and roots (carrot, red beet, radish). The heavy metal content in leguminous plants (pods and seeds) was very low compared to high soil concentrations. Wheat and maize showed lower concentrations in grains and kernels than in green parts. Lime and vermiculite were used for reduction of Cd availability to plants in polluted soil. The Cd concentration decreased in the narrow leaf plantain in the presence of both lime and vermiculite in acid soil. In the higher-pH soil the Cd availability to spinach was greatly reduced in the presence of vermiculite

  6. Using a plant hormone and a thioligand to improve phytoremediation of Hg-contaminated soil from a petrochemical plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassina, L; Tassi, E; Pedron, F; Petruzzelli, G; Ambrosini, P; Barbafieri, M

    2012-09-15

    Mercury-contaminated soils from a petrochemical plant in southern Italy were investigated to assess the phytoextraction efficiency of crop plants treated with the phytohormone, cytokinine (CK foliar treatment), and with the thioligand, ammonium thiosulfate (TS, soil application). Plant biomass, evapotranspiration, Hg uptake and distribution in plant tissues following treatment were compared. Results indicate the effectiveness of CK in increasing plant biomass and the evapotranspiration rate while TS treatment promoted soil Hg solubility and availability. The simultaneous addition of CK and TS treatments increased Hg uptake and translocation in both tested plants with up to 248 and 232% in Brassica juncea (Indian mustard) and Helianthus annuus (sunflower) respectively. B. juncea was more effective in Hg uptake, whereas H. annuus gave better response regarding plant biomass production. The effectiveness of the treatments was confirmed by the calculation of Hg phytoextraction and evaluation of labile-Hg residue in the soil after plant growth. In one growing cycle the plants subject to simultaneous CK and TS treatment significantly reduced labile-Hg pools that were characterized by the soil sequential extraction, but did not significantly affect the pseudototal metal content in the soil. Results support the use of plant growth regulators in the assisted phytoextraction process for Hg-contaminated soils. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Soil Penetration by Earthworms and Plant Roots--Mechanical Energetics of Bioturbation of Compacted Soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siul Ruiz

    Full Text Available We quantify mechanical processes common to soil penetration by earthworms and growing plant roots, including the energetic requirements for soil plastic displacement. The basic mechanical model considers cavity expansion into a plastic wet soil involving wedging by root tips or earthworms via cone-like penetration followed by cavity expansion due to pressurized earthworm hydroskeleton or root radial growth. The mechanical stresses and resulting soil strains determine the mechanical energy required for bioturbation under different soil hydro-mechanical conditions for a realistic range of root/earthworm geometries. Modeling results suggest that higher soil water content and reduced clay content reduce the strain energy required for soil penetration. The critical earthworm or root pressure increases with increased diameter of root or earthworm, however, results are insensitive to the cone apex (shape of the tip. The invested mechanical energy per unit length increase with increasing earthworm and plant root diameters, whereas mechanical energy per unit of displaced soil volume decreases with larger diameters. The study provides a quantitative framework for estimating energy requirements for soil penetration work done by earthworms and plant roots, and delineates intrinsic and external mechanical limits for bioturbation processes. Estimated energy requirements for earthworm biopore networks are linked to consumption of soil organic matter and suggest that earthworm populations are likely to consume a significant fraction of ecosystem net primary production to sustain their subterranean activities.

  8. Impact of acid atmospheric deposition on soils : quantification of chemical and hydrologic processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grinsven, van J.J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition of SO x , NOx and NHx will cause major changes in the chemical composition of solutions in acid soils, which may affect the biological functions of the soil. This thesis deals with quantification of soil acidification by means of chemical

  9. Soil moisture effects on the carbon isotope composition of soil respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claire L. Phillips; Nick Nickerson; David Risk; Zachary E. Kayler; Chris Andersen; Alan Mix; Barbara J. Bond

    2010-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of recently assimilated plant carbon is known to depend on water-stress, caused either by low soil moisture or by low atmospheric humidity. Air humidity has also been shown to correlate with the δ13C of soil respiration, which suggests indirectly that recently fixed photosynthates...

  10. Soil-plant transfer of Cs-137 and Sr-90 in digestate amended agricultural soils- a lysimeter scale experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, Khalid; Berns, Anne E.; Pütz, Thomas; Burauel, Peter; Vereecken, Harry; Zoriy, Myroslav; Flucht, Reinhold; Opitz, Thorsten; Hofmann, Diana

    2014-05-01

    Radiocesium and radiostrontium are among the most problematic soil contaminants following nuclear fallout due to their long half-lives and high fission yields. Their chemical resemblance to potassium, ammonium and calcium facilitates their plant uptake and thus enhances their chance to reach humans through the food-chain dramatically. The plant uptake of both radionuclides is affected by the type of soil, the amount of organic matter and the concentration of competitive ions. In the present lysimeter scale experiment, soil-plant transfer of Cs-137 and Sr-90 was investigated in an agricultural silty soil amended with digestate, a residue from a biogas plant. The liquid fraction of the digestate, liquor, was used to have higher nutrient competition. Digestate application was done in accordance with the field practice with an application rate of 34 Mg/ha and mixing it in top 5 cm soil, yielding a final concentration of 38 g digestate/Kg soil. The top 5 cm soil of the non-amended reference soil was also submitted to the same mixing procedure to account for the physical disturbance of the top soil layer. Six months after the amendment of the soil, the soil contamination was done with water-soluble chloride salts of both radionuclides, resulting in a contamination density of 66 MBq/m2 for Cs-137 and 18 MBq/m2 for Sr-90 in separate experiments. Our results show that digestate application led to a detectable difference in soil-plant transfer of the investigated radionuclides, effect was more pronounced for Cs-137. A clear difference was observed in plant uptake of different plants. Pest plants displayed higher uptake of both radionuclides compared to wheat. Furthermore, lower activity values were recorded in ears compared to stems for both radionuclides.

  11. On the application of models for simulating soil water dynamics and plant growth. Einsatz von Wasserhaushalts- und Photosynthesemodellen in der Oekosystemanalyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessolek, G.

    1989-01-01

    Firstly, theoretical considerations of two simplified water models and two crop yield models are presented. The respecting models are used to calculate the actual evapotranspiration, groundwater recharge, capillary rise and plant growth (gross, potential and actual biomass - production). By comparing calculated model results with field data, it is shown that for a satisfying simulation the models have to be calibrated carefully. A sensitivity analysis of the model input parameters shows the accuracy with which field measurements have to be carried out. Secondly, the application of the models for a number of ecological case studies has been demonstrated. Questions concerning the dependence of soil physical properties, climatical conditions, vegetation and groundwater depth on soil water dynamics and plant growth have been discussed. Furthermore, attention has been given to the consequences of human activity (irrigation, fertilisation, groundwater lowering and sealing up) on the atmosphere - soil - plant - system. (orig./RB).

  12. Plant uptake of 134Cs in relation to soil properties and time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massas, I.; Skarlou, V.; Haidouti, C.

    2002-01-01

    134 Cs uptake by sunflower and soybean plants grown on seven different soils and its relation to soil properties were studied in a greenhouse pot experiment. Soil in each pot was contaminated by dripping the 134 Cs in layers, and sunflower and soybean plants were grown for three and two successive periods, respectively. 134 Cs plant uptake was expressed as the transfer factor (TF) (Bq kg -1 plant/Bq kg -1 soil) and as the daily plant uptake (flux) (Bq pot -1 day -1 ) taking into account biomass production and growth time. For the studied soils and for both plants, no consistent trend of TFs with time was observed. The use of fluxes, in general, provided less variable results than TFs and stronger functional relationships. A negative power functional relationship between exchangeable potassium plus ammonium cations expressed as a percentage of cation exchange capacity of each soil and 134 Cs fluxes was found for the sunflower plants. A similar but weaker relationship was observed for soybean plants. The significant correlation between sunflower and soybean TFs and fluxes, as well as the almost identical highest/lowest 134 Cs flux ratios, in the studied soils, indicated a similar effect of soil characteristics on 134 Cs uptake by both plants. In all the studied soils, sunflower 134 Cs TFs and fluxes were significantly higher than the respective soybean values, while no significant difference was observed in potassium content and daily potassium plant uptake (flux) of the two plants

  13. The effect of plant water storage on water fluxes within the coupled soil-plant system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng-Wei; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Ward, Eric J; Duman, Tomer; Manoli, Gabriele; Parolari, Anthony J; Katul, Gabriel G

    2017-02-01

    In addition to buffering plants from water stress during severe droughts, plant water storage (PWS) alters many features of the spatio-temporal dynamics of water movement in the soil-plant system. How PWS impacts water dynamics and drought resilience is explored using a multi-layer porous media model. The model numerically resolves soil-plant hydrodynamics by coupling them to leaf-level gas exchange and soil-root interfacial layers. Novel features of the model are the considerations of a coordinated relationship between stomatal aperture variation and whole-system hydraulics and of the effects of PWS and nocturnal transpiration (Fe,night) on hydraulic redistribution (HR) in the soil. The model results suggest that daytime PWS usage and Fe,night generate a residual water potential gradient (Δψp,night) along the plant vascular system overnight. This Δψp,night represents a non-negligible competing sink strength that diminishes the significance of HR. Considering the co-occurrence of PWS usage and HR during a single extended dry-down, a wide range of plant attributes and environmental/soil conditions selected to enhance or suppress plant drought resilience is discussed. When compared with HR, model calculations suggest that increased root water influx into plant conducting-tissues overnight maintains a more favorable water status at the leaf, thereby delaying the onset of drought stress. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. Ecosystem-scale plant hydraulic strategies inferred from remotely-sensed soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassiouni, M.; Good, S. P.; Higgins, C. W.

    2017-12-01

    Characterizing plant hydraulic strategies at the ecosystem scale is important to improve estimates of evapotranspiration and to understand ecosystem productivity and resilience. However, quantifying plant hydraulic traits beyond the species level is a challenge. The probability density function of soil moisture observations provides key information about the soil moisture states at which evapotranspiration is reduced by water stress. Here, an inverse Bayesian approach is applied to a standard bucket model of soil column hydrology forced with stochastic precipitation inputs. Through this approach, we are able to determine the soil moisture thresholds at which stomata are open or closed that are most consistent with observed soil moisture probability density functions. This research utilizes remotely-sensed soil moisture data to explore global patterns of ecosystem-scale plant hydraulic strategies. Results are complementary to literature values of measured hydraulic traits of various species in different climates and previous estimates of ecosystem-scale plant isohydricity. The presented approach provides a novel relation between plant physiological behavior and soil-water dynamics.

  15. Soil to plant transfer of radionuclides: predicting the fate of multiple radioisotopes in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willey, Neil J.

    2014-01-01

    Predicting soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides is restricted by the range of species for which concentration ratios (CRs) have been measured. Here the radioecological utility of meta-analyses of phylogenetic effects on alkali earth metals will be explored for applications such as ‘gap-filling’ of CRs, the identification of sentinel biomonitor plants and the selection of taxa for phytoremediation of radionuclide contaminated soils. REML modelling of extensive CR/concentration datasets shows that the concentrations in plants of Ca, Mg and Sr are significantly influenced by phylogeny. Phylogenetic effects of these elements are shown here to be similar. Ratios of Ca/Mg and Ca/Sr are known to be quite stable in plants so, assuming that Sr/Ra ratios are stable, phylogenetic effects and estimated mean CRs are used to predict Ra CRs for groups of plants with few measured data. Overall, there are well quantified plant variables that could contribute significantly to improving predictions of the fate radioisotopes in the soil-plant system

  16. Soil-plant transfer factors of Co-60 for alfalfa lettuce and spinach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitru, Radu Octavian

    1997-01-01

    The transfer of Co-60 from soil into plants is a less studied problem. Soil-plant transfer factors for Co-60 known from literature vary by about four orders of magnitude for each kind of plants. We have calculated the average values and have determined the field of variability of the known transfer factors. These indicated us that alfalfa, lettuce and spinach have in this order the greatest absorption capacity of Co-60 from soil. We have determined the physical, chemical and mineralogical properties of the utilized soil. This is a brown reddish forest type soil. The plants have been cultivated in pots by plantlet method of Neubauer and Schneider. The results of our measurements of soil-to-plant transfer factors of 60-Co are the followings: 0.0612 ± 0.0047 for alfalfa, 0.0960 ± 0.0072 for lettuce and 0.1446 ± 0.0107 for spinach. These values prove the strong dependence of the type of soil and plant of the soil-plant transfer factors for Co-60. (author)

  17. Heavy metal toxicity in rice and soybean plants cultivated in contaminated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lígia de Souza Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals can accumulate in soil and cause phytotoxicity in plants with some specific symptoms. The present study evaluated the specific symptoms on rice and soybeans plants caused by excess of heavy metals in soil. Rice and soybean were grown in pots containing soil with different levels of heavy metals. A completely randomized design was used, with four replications, using two crop species and seven sample soils with different contamination levels. Rice and soybean exhibited different responses to the high concentrations of heavy metals in the soil. Rice plants accumulated higher Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn concentrations and were more sensitive to high concentrations of these elements in the soil, absorbing them more easily compared to the soybean plants. However, high available Zn concentrations in the soil caused phytotoxicity symptoms in rice and soybean, mainly chlorosis and inhibited plant growth. Further, high Zn concentrations in the soil reduced the Fe concentration in the shoots of soybean and rice plants to levels considered deficient.

  18. Biodiversity of Soil Microbial Communities Following Woody Plant Invasion of Grassland: An Assessment Using Molecular Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantola, I. B.; Gentry, T. J.; Filley, T. R.; Boutton, T. W.

    2012-12-01

    Woody plants have encroached into grasslands, savannas, and other grass-dominated ecosystems throughout the world during the last century. This dramatic vegetation change is likely driven by livestock grazing, altered fire frequencies, elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and/or changes in atmospheric deposition patterns. Woody invasion often results in significant changes in ecosystem function, including alterations in above- and belowground primary productivity, soil C, N, and P storage and turnover, and the size and activity of the soil microbial biomass pool. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships and interactions between plant communities and soil microbial communities in the Rio Grande Plains region of southern Texas where grasslands have been largely replaced by woodlands. Research was conducted along a successional chronosequence representing the stages of woody plant encroachment from open grassland to closed-canopy woodland. To characterize soil microbial community composition, soil samples (0-7.5 cm) were collected in remnant grasslands (representing time 0) and near the centers of woody plant clusters, groves, and drainage woodlands ranging in age from 10 to 130 yrs. Ages of woody plant stands were determined by dendrochronology. Community DNA was extracted from each soil sample with a MoBio PowerMax Soil DNA isolation kit. The DNA concentrations were quantified on a NanoDrop ND-1000 spectrophotometer and diluted to a standard concentration. Pyrosequencing was performed by the Research and Testing Laboratory (Lubbock, TX) according to Roche 454 Titanium chemistry protocols. Samples were amplified with primers 27F and 519R for bacteria, and primers ITS1F and ITS4 for fungi. Sequences were aligned using BioEdit and the RDP Pipeline and analyzed in MOTHUR. Non-metric multidimensional scaling of the operational taxonomic units identified by pyrosequencing revealed that both bacterial and fungal community composition were

  19. Study of radioactive sr and Cs in soil and soil /plant system at Inshas region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eissa, H.S.M.

    2008-01-01

    The radioactive fallout is considered one of the most major environmental problems that threats public health. The work presented in this thesis is carried out to investigate the level of radioactivity in different environmental samples of soils and vegetations collected from different locations around the NRC at Inshas area and the area nearby (about 30 km radius). Six different locations: Inshas, Shebeen, Abu-Zaabal, Al-Oboor in addition to two sites in the nuclear research center (old reactor and protection department sites) were chosen for the collection of the soil and plant samples. Most typical egyptian soils (sandy, sandyloam, clayey)from three different places (Al-Oboor, Abu-Zaabal, and Shebeen El-Kanatter) were selected for the experiments carried out under laboratory conditions. The plants investigated were grass, old trees and wheat. Cs 137 and Sr 90 were chosen to represent the most important long-lived radionuclides considering the human health, since these nuclides can enter human body via food chain and increase the radiation burden for many years. The following points are considered in this work: 1- Natural radionuclides concentration in different environmental samples of soil and plant especially (grasses and leaves of old trees) were determined using high resolution gamma-spectroscopic system (hyper-pure germanium detector). 2-Two groups of elements have been determined directly in two plant samples from each location (one grass, and the other old trees) together with their corresponding soils.3- Transfer factors (often used to describe the uptake of the radioisotope from soil to plant)of the log-lived radionuclides 137 Cs and 90 from soil to the wheat plant have been studied by radiotracer experiments .4- The sorption behavior of Cs and Sr radionuclides by the different soil types was investigated kinetically using batch techniques.

  20. Response of plant species to coal-mine soil materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, A.D.; Tucker, T.C.; Thames, J.L.

    1983-03-01

    The two-year Black Mesa Coal Mine Research Study on the area near Kayenta, Arizona investigating the growth and establishment of seven plant species in unmined soil and coal-mined soils found that plant species grew better in unmined soil and that irrigation is essential during seedling establishment for the effective stabilization of coal-mined soils in a semi-arid environment. Differences among the species included variations in germination, response to irrigation, seedling establishment, and stem growth. 12 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Iron Availability in Tropical Soils and Iron Uptake by Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Furlan Mielki

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Given the increase in crop yields and the expansion of agriculture in low fertility soils, deficiency of micronutrients, such as iron, in plants grown in tropical soils has been observed. The aim of this study was to evaluate Fe availability and Fe uptake by corn (Zea mays L. plants in 13 different soils, at two depths. Iron was extracted by Mehlich-1, Mehlich-3, and CaCl2 (Fe-CC and was fractionated in forms related to low (Feo and high (Fed crystallinity pedogenic oxyhydroxides, and organic matter (Fep using ammonium oxalate, dithionite-citrate, and sodium pyrophosphate, respectively. In order to relate Fe availability to soil properties and plant growth, an experiment was carried out in a semi-hydroponic system in which part of the roots developed in a nutrient solution (without Fe and part in the soil (the only source of Fe. Forty-five days after seeding, we quantified shoot dry matter and leaf Fe concentration and content. Fed levels were high, from 5 to 132 g kg-1, and Feo and Fe-CC levels were low, indicating the predominance of Fe as crystalline oxyhydroxides and a low content of Fe readily available to plants. The extraction solutions showed significant correlations with various soil properties, many common to both, indicating that they act similarly. The correlation between the Mehlich-1 and Mehlich-3 extraction solutions was highly significant. However, these two extraction methods were inefficient in predicting Fe availability to plants. There was a positive correlation between dry matter and Fe levels in plant shoots, even within the ranges considered adequate in the soil and in the plant. Dry matter production and leaf Fe concentration and content were positively correlated with Fep concentration, indicating that the Fe fraction related to soil organic matter most contributes to Fe availability to plants.

  2. Dependence of soil-to-plant transfer factors of elements on their concentrations in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Hirofumi; Watabe, Teruhisa.

    1996-01-01

    Transfer factors (TFs) of 31 stable elements from soil to plant were determined by neutron activation analysis. Soil and plant samples were collected from 112 farm fields in Aomori prefecture, Japan. The elements described are those that could be detected by this method, which include essential elements for plant growth and nonessential elements. Several of these elements were divided into two groups, each having different TF characteristics. In the first group of elements there was an inverse correlation between the TFs and the soil concentrations of the elements, especially for Cl, K and Ca. The concentrations of these elements in plants were independent of their soil concentrations. However, in the second group, especially Sc and Co, the TFs were independent of the soil concentrations of the elements. The fluctuation of TFs observed in this study was smaller than that previously reported. This may be attributed to the relatively narrow geographic area of the present study. In addition, the TFs for the stable elements in this study were generally one to three orders of magnitude lower than those compiled for radioactive isotopes in previous publications. (author)

  3. Do plant-based amendments improve soil physiochemical and microbiological properties and plant growth in dryland ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneller, Tayla; Harris, Richard; Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam

    2017-04-01

    Background Land intensive practices including mining have contributed to the degradation of landscapes globally. Current challenges in post-mine restoration revolve around the use of substrates poor in organic materials (e.g. overburden and waste rock) and lack of original topsoil which may result in poor seedling recruitment and in later stages in soil nutrient deficiency, metal toxicity, decreased microbial activity and high salinity (Bateman et al., 2016; Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2016). Despite continuous efforts and advances we have not proportionally advanced our capability to successfully restore these landscapes following mining. Recent attempts to improve plant establishment in arid zone restoration programs have included the application of plant based amendments to soil profiles. This approach usually aims to accelerate soil reconstruction via improvement of soil aggregate stability and increase of soil organic carbon, and water holding capacity. Whilst a significant amount of recent research has focused on the application of such amendments, studies on the potential application of plant based materials to recover soil functionality and re-establish plant communities in post-mined landscapes in arid regions are limited. Here we will discuss our work investigating the application of a plant based amendment on soil substrates commonly used in post mining restoration in the Pilbara region, Western Australia. Methodology The study was conducted in a glasshouse facility where environmental conditions were continuously monitored. Using two growth materials (topsoil and waste rock) and a plant based amendment (dry biomass of the most common grass in the Pilbara, Triodia wiseana) five different treatments were tested. Treatments consisted of control soil treatments (topsoil, waste and a mixture of the former soil types (mixture)) and two amended soil treatments (waste amended and mixture amended). Additionally, three different vegetation communities were studies

  4. Heavy metal concentrations in plants and different harvestable parts: A soil-plant equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guala, Sebastian D.; Vega, Flora A.; Covelo, Emma F.

    2010-01-01

    A mathematical interaction model, validated by experimental results, was developed to modeling the metal uptake by plants and induced growth decrease, by knowing metal in soils. The model relates the dynamics of the uptake of metals from soil to plants. Also, two types of relationships are tested: total and available metal content. The model successfully fitted the experimental data and made it possible to predict the threshold values of total mortality with a satisfactory approach. Data are taken from soils treated with Cd and Ni for ryegrass (Lolium perenne, L.) and oats (Avena sativa L.), respectively. Concentrations are measured in the aboveground biomass of plants. In the latter case, the concentration of metals in different parts of the plants (tillering, shooting and earing) is also modeled. At low concentrations, the effects of metals are moderate, and the dynamics appear to be linear. However, increasing concentrations show nonlinear behaviors. - The model proposed in this study makes possible to characterize the nonlinear behavior of the soil-plant interaction with metal pollution.

  5. Heavy metal concentrations in plants and different harvestable parts: A soil-plant equilibrium model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guala, Sebastian D. [Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de General Sarmiento, Gutierrez 1150, Los Polvorines, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Vega, Flora A. [Departamento de Bioloxia Vexetal e Ciencia do Solo, Facultade de Bioloxia, Universidade de Vigo, Lagoas, Marcosende, 36310 Vigo, Pontevedra (Spain); Covelo, Emma F., E-mail: emmaf@uvigo.e [Departamento de Bioloxia Vexetal e Ciencia do Solo, Facultade de Bioloxia, Universidade de Vigo, Lagoas, Marcosende, 36310 Vigo, Pontevedra (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    A mathematical interaction model, validated by experimental results, was developed to modeling the metal uptake by plants and induced growth decrease, by knowing metal in soils. The model relates the dynamics of the uptake of metals from soil to plants. Also, two types of relationships are tested: total and available metal content. The model successfully fitted the experimental data and made it possible to predict the threshold values of total mortality with a satisfactory approach. Data are taken from soils treated with Cd and Ni for ryegrass (Lolium perenne, L.) and oats (Avena sativa L.), respectively. Concentrations are measured in the aboveground biomass of plants. In the latter case, the concentration of metals in different parts of the plants (tillering, shooting and earing) is also modeled. At low concentrations, the effects of metals are moderate, and the dynamics appear to be linear. However, increasing concentrations show nonlinear behaviors. - The model proposed in this study makes possible to characterize the nonlinear behavior of the soil-plant interaction with metal pollution.

  6. Soil - plant experimental radionuclide transfer factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrin, R.I.; Dulama, C.N.; Toma, Al.

    2006-01-01

    Some experimental research was performed in our institute to assess site specific soil-plant transfer factors. A full characterization of an experimental site was done both from pedo-chemical and radiological point of view. Afterwards, a certain number of culture plants were grown on this site and the evolution of their radionuclide burden was then recorded. Using some soil amendments one performed a parallel experiment and the radionuclide root uptake was evaluated and recorded. Hence, transfer parameters were calculated and some conclusions were drawn concerning the influence of site specific conditions on the root uptake of radionuclides. (authors)

  7. Importance of soil-water relation in assessment endpoint in bioremediated soils: Plant growth and soil physical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.; Sawatsky, N.

    1995-01-01

    Much effort has been focused on defining the end-point of bioremediated soils by chemical analysis (Alberta Tier 1 or CCME Guideline for Contaminated Soils) or toxicity tests. However, these tests do not completely assess the soil quality, or the capability of soil to support plant growth after bioremediation. This study compared barley (Hordeum vulgare) growth on: (i) non-contaminated, agricultural topsoil, (2) oil-contaminated soil (4% total extractable hydrocarbons, or TEH), and (3) oil-contaminated soil treated by bioremediation (< 2% TEH). Soil physical properties including water retention, water uptake, and water repellence were measured. The results indicated that the growth of barley was significantly reduced by oil-contamination of agricultural topsoil. Furthermore, bioremediation did not improve the barley yield. The lack of effects from bioremediation was attributed to development of water repellence in hydrocarbon contaminated soils. There seemed to be a critical water content around 18% to 20% in contaminated soils. Above this value the water uptake by contaminated soil was near that of the agricultural topsoil. For lower water contents, there was a strong divergence in sorptivity between contaminated and agricultural topsoil. For these soils, water availability was likely the single most important parameter controlling plant growth. This parameter should be considered in assessing endpoint of bioremediation for hydrocarbon contaminated soils

  8. Observing plants dealing with soil water stress: Daily soil moisture fluctuations derived from polymer tensiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ploeg, Martine; de Rooij, Gerrit

    2014-05-01

    Periods of soil water deficit often occur within a plant's life cycle, even in temperate deciduous and rain forests (Wilson et al. 2001, Grace 1999). Various experiments have shown that roots are able to sense the distribution of water in the soil, and produce signals that trigger changes in leaf expansion rate and stomatal conductance (Blackman and Davies 1985, Gollan et al. 1986, Gowing et al. 1990 Davies and Zhang 1991, Mansfield and De Silva 1994, Sadras and Milroy 1996). Partitioning of water and air in the soil, solute distribution in soil water, water flow through the soil, and water availability for plants can be determined according to the distribution of the soil water potential (e.g. Schröder et al. 2013, Kool et al. 2014). Understanding plant water uptake under dry conditions has been compromised by hydrological instrumentation with low accuracy in dry soils due to signal attenuation, or a compromised measurement range (Whalley et al. 2013). Development of polymer tensiometers makes it possible to study the soil water potential over a range meaningful for studying plant responses to water stress (Bakker et al. 2007, Van der Ploeg et al. 2008, 2010). Polymer tensiometer data obtained from a lysimeter experiment (Van der Ploeg et al. 2008) were used to analyse day-night fluctuations of soil moisture in the vicinity of maize roots. To do so, three polymer tensiometers placed in the middle of the lysimeter from a control, dry and very dry treatment (one lysimeter per treatment) were used to calculate water content changes over 12 hours. These 12 hours corresponded with the operation of the growing light. Soil water potential measurements in the hour before the growing light was turned on or off were averaged. The averaged value was used as input for the van Genuchten (1980) model. Parameters for the model were obtained from laboratory determination of water retention, with a separate model parameterization for each lysimeter setup. Results show daily

  9. Cadmium and zinc in plants and soil solutions from contaminated soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, S.E.; Hamon, R.E.; Holm, P.E.

    1997-01-01

    In an experiment using ten heavy metal-contaminated soils from six European countries, soil solution was sampled by water displacement before and after the growth of radish. Concentrations of Cd, Zn and other elements in solution (K, Ca, Mg, Mn) generally decreased during plant growth, probably...

  10. A preliminary study on the uptake of radioiodine by rice plants from soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shigeo; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Sumiya, Misako; Ohmomo, Yoichiro; Yamaguchi, Shuho.

    1989-01-01

    In an atmospheric discharge of radioiodines, direct deposition of the nuclides onto leaf surface must be the most significant pathway from the environment to man. However, 129 I reaches man through several pathways because of its long half life of 1.6 x 10 7 years. Root uptake of 129 I is one of the most important pathways of this nuclide. In Japan, rice is thought to be the most critical crop on the pathway. In this paper, uptake of radioiodine from irrigation water by rice plant was investigated. Rice plants, Oryza sativa cv. Nihonbare, were grown under flooded condition in Wagner pots containing soil collected in Tokai-mura. Iodine-131 was added as a tracer into the surface water in the pots at three different growing stages, heading, dough-ripe and yellow-ripe stages, respectively, and the plants were cultivated until the harvest time in a plant growth chamber. At the harvest time, concentration of 131 I in each organ of rice plant was measured with a NaI scintillation counter. The profile of 131 I in the soil was also investigated. The results obtained are as follows; (1) Activities of 131 I in leaf blade and sheath of lower part were generally higher than those of upper part. Compared to the 131 I activity of the flag leaf, the ratios of the activity in rachis-branch, hull and brown rice were 1.0-0.5, 0.1 and 1-5 x 10 -3 , respectively. These may suggest that iodine taken up by the roots scarcely re-translocated into rice. (2) Ratio of 131 I in brown rice and hull was about 1 : 4. (3) Activity ratio ('concentration of 131 I in brown rice'/'average concentration of that in the soil' during 6 days uptake experiment.) was 4-5 x 10 -4 . (author)

  11. Molybdenum and technetium cycle in the environment. Physical chemical evolution and mobility in soils and plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saas, A.; Denardi, J.L.; Colle, C.; Quinault, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    Molybdenum 99 and technetium 99 from liquid discharges of base nuclear installations (reactors, reprocessing plants, UF 6 treatment, etc.) can reach the environment via irrigation waters and atmospheric deposits. The contribution to the soil by irrigation results in a physical-chemical transformation, the results of which, in the case of technetium 99, could be volatilization via microbes. The changes in the physical-chemical forms of technetium in different soils reveals the preponderant effect of the initial amount deposited. The determination of the rate of technetium and molybdenum assimilation shows a certain similarity in behaviour; yet the localization of these isotopes is not the same. The transfer of molybdenum and technetium via the root system is different in its intensity; this is mainly due to different physical-chemical forms. Finally, each isotope has an optimum assimilation threshold and a toxicity threshold. The study of the physical-chemical evolution and the mobility in the soil-plant-water table system of these two isotopes shows a new aspect with respect to certain transfer channels to the human being [fr

  12. Study of atmospheric tritium transfers in lettuce: kinetic study, equilibrium and organic incorporation during a continuous atmospheric exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis has explored the mechanisms of tritium 'absorption and incorporation in a human-consumed plant, lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), due to atmospheric exposure. Foliar uptake appears to play a key role in absorption of tritium as tissue free water tritium. Whatever the development stage and the light conditions, the specific activity in tissue free water reaches that of water vapour in air in several hours. The specific activity ratio is then about 0, 4. The time to reach equilibrium in soil is over 24 hours in most cases: the specific activity ratio ranges then 0, 01 to 0, 26. Incorporation rate of tissue free water tritium as organically-bound tritium has been estimated to 0, 13 to 0, 16 % h-l in average over the growing period of the plant, but marked variations are observed during growth. In particular, a significant increase appeared at the exponential growth stage. Deposition and diffusion of tritium in soil lead to significant OBT activities in soil. Results globally indicate equilibrium between the different environmental compartments (air, soil, plant). However, some experiments have revealed high OBT concentrations regarding atmospheric level exposure and ask for a possible phenomenon of local tritium accumulation in OBT for particular conditions of exposure. (author) [fr

  13. Future Applications in Quantitative Isotopic Tracing using Homogeneously Carbon-13 Labelled Plant Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaets, Johanna I.F.; Chen, Janet; Resch, Christian; Mayr, Leopold; Weltin, Georg; Heiling, Maria; Gruber, Roman; Dercon, Gerd

    2017-01-01

    Carbon-13 ("1"3C) and nitrogen-15 ("1"5N) labelled plant material is increasingly being used to trace the fate of plant-derived C and N into the atmosphere, soil, water and organisms in many studies, including those investigating the potential of soils to store greenhouse gases belowground. Storage of C in soils can offset and even reduce atmospheric levels of the greenhouse gas, CO_2, and interest in such studies is growing due to problems associated with anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions impacting climate change. Reduction of N loss in soils is also of great interest, as it reduces release of the greenhouse gas, N_2O, into the atmosphere. However, accurate quantitative tracing of plant-derived C and N in such research is only possible if plant material is labelled both homogeneously and in sufficient quantities.

  14. Uptake by Plants of Radiostrontium from Contaminated Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A. J.

    1965-01-01

    In a recent report from this department it was shown that the extractability of radiostrontium from contaminated soil samples was effectively reduced by heat treatment and by the addition of phosphate to the soil. It was pointed out that, under emergency conditions, heat-treatment of the contamin......In a recent report from this department it was shown that the extractability of radiostrontium from contaminated soil samples was effectively reduced by heat treatment and by the addition of phosphate to the soil. It was pointed out that, under emergency conditions, heat......-treatment of the contaminated soil surface and heavy phosphate application might thus reduce the uptake by plants of radiostrontium more efficiently than liming, which is only effective in soils of low calcium status. In the investigation reviewed here the influence of heat treatment and superphosphate application on the plant...... uptake of radiostrontium was examined in pot experiments. For comparison the effect of applying calcium carbonate to the contaminated soil surface was also determined....

  15. Elevated atmospheric CO2 in a semi-natural grassland: Root dynamics, decomposition and soil C balances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindhoej, Erik

    2001-01-01

    This thesis focuses on how elevated atmospheric CO 2 affects a semi-natural grassland, with emphasis on root growth, decomposition and the subsequent long-term effects on soil C balances. Parts of a semi-natural grassland in Central Sweden were enclosed in open-top chambers and exposed to ambient and elevated levels of CO 2 (+350 μmol mol -1 ) from 1995 to 2000, while chamberless rings were used for controls. Root dynamics were observed with minirhizotrons while root biomass and production were studied with soil cores and ingrowth cores. Roots collected from ingrowth cores were incubated under controlled conditions for 160 days to measure root decomposition rates. Treatment-induced differences in microclimate, C input and root decomposability were entered into the ICBM soil C balance model for 30-year projections of soil C balances for the three treatments. Elevated CO 2 chambers had higher biomass production both above and below ground compared to ambient, however the root response increased over the years while the shoot response decreased. Plants grown under elevated CO 2 had greater water-use efficiency compared to ambient, which was shown in higher soil moisture and greater biomass production during slightly dry years. Elevated CO 2 chambers showed higher root appearance rates in spring and higher disappearance rates during autumn and winter. Roots from plants grown under elevated CO 2 decomposed more rapidly. The decreased input and the drier conditions in the ambient chambers were projected to lead to a 1.7% decrease in soil C over 30 years. Under elevated CO 2 , however, the increased input compensated for the higher root decomposability and moister soil conditions and lead only to a projected 1.3% decrease in soil C. This work shows that six years of elevated CO 2 exposure had extensive effects on this semi-natural grassland. The CO 2 response of the grassland was dependent on weather conditions and production increased most when under slight water stress

  16. Spatial and vertical distribution and risk assessment of natural radionuclides in soils surrounding the lignite-fired power plants in Megalopolis basin, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaefthymiou, H V; Manousakas, M; Fouskas, A; Siavalas, G

    2013-01-01

    Twenty soil profile samples and fourteen surface soil samples collected from the vicinity of the lignite-fired power plants in the Megalopolis basin (Greece) were analysed for their natural radionuclide concentration and (137)Cs, since fossil fuels are associated with naturally occurring radioactive materials and hence with radiological impact. No significant enhancement of surface soil radioactivity levels in the vicinity of lignite-fired plants was observed. A downcore decreasing trend of (137)Cs was observed in a number of cores reflecting its atmospheric origin, whereas the uniform distribution observed in a number of other cores gave information on the mechanical alteration of the soil. The average dose rate value was found to be 63 ± 22 nGy h(-1), while the annual average effective dose from the terrestrial gamma radiation was found to be 0.08 ± 0.03 mSv.

  17. Soil carbon content and relative abundance of high affinity H2-oxidizing bacteria predict atmospheric H2 soil uptake activity better than soil microbial community composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khdhiri, Mondher; Hesse, Laura; Popa, Maria Elena; Quiza, Liliana; Lalonde, Isabelle; Meredith, Laura K.; Röckmann, Thomas; Constant, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Soil-atmosphere exchange of H2 is controlled by gas diffusion and the microbial production and oxidation activities in soil. Among these parameters, the H2 oxidation activity catalyzed by soil microorganisms harboring high affinity hydrogenase is the most difficult variable to parameterize because

  18. [Coordination effect between vapor water loss through plant stomata and liquid water supply in soil-plant-atmosphere continuum (SPAC): a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Min; Qi, Hua; Luo, Xin-Lan; Zhang, Xuan

    2008-09-01

    Some important phenomena and behaviors concerned with the coordination effect between vapor water loss through plant stomata and liquid water supply in SPAC were discussed in this paper. A large amount of research results showed that plants show isohydric behavior when the plant hydraulic and chemical signals cooperate to promote the stomatal regulation of leaf water potential. The feedback response of stomata to the change of environmental humidity could be used to explain the midday depression of stomatal conductance and photosynthesis under drought condition, and also, to interpret the correlation between stomatal conductance and hydraulic conductance. The feed-forward response of stomata to the change of environmental humidity could be used to explain the hysteresis response of stomatal conductance to leaf-atmosphere vapor pressure deficit. The strategy for getting the most of xylem transport requires the rapid stomatal responses to avoid excess cavitation and the corresponding mechanisms for reversal of cavitation in short time.

  19. Gas Transport and Exchange through Wetland Plant Aerenchyma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorrell, Brian Keith; Brix, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Aerenchyma, the large airspaces in aquatic plants, is a rapid gas transport pathway between atmosphere and soil in wetlands. Oxygen transport aerates belowground tissue and oxidizes rhizosphere soil, an important process in wetland biogeochemistry. Most plant O2 transport occurs by diffusion...

  20. Impact of rice-straw biochars amended soil on the biological Si cycle in soil-plant ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zimin; Delvaux, Bruno; Struyf, Eric; Unzué-Belmonte, Dácil; Ronsse, Frederik; Cornelis, Jean-Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Biochar used as soil amendment can enhance soil fertility and plant growth. It may also contribute to increase the plant mineralomass of silicon (Si). However, very little studies have focused on the plant Si cycling in biochar amended soils. Here, we study the impact of two contrasting biochars derived from rice straws on soil Si availability and plant Si uptake. Rice plants were grown in a hydroponic device using Yoshida nutrient solution, respectively devoid of H4SiO4 (0 ppm Si: Si-) and enriched with it (40 ppm Si: Si+). After 12 weeks, the plants were harvested for further pyrolysis, conducted with holding time of 1h at 500˚ C. The respective rice-biochars are Si-/biochar and Si+/biochar. They exhibit contrasting phytolith contents (0.3 g Si kg-1 vs. 51.3 g Si kg-1), but identical physico-chemical properties. They were applied in two soils differing in weathering stage: a weathered Cambisol (CA) and a highly weathered Nitisol (NI). We then studied the effects of the amended biochar on CaCl2 extractable Si using a 64-days kinetic approach, on the content of soil biogenic Si, and on the uptake of Si by wheat plants grown for 5 weeks. We also quantified Si mineralomass in plants. We compared the effects of biochars to that of wollastonite (Wo)-(CaSiO3), a common Si-fertilizer. Our results show that Si+/biochar significantly increase the content of BSi in both soils. In CA, the cumulative content of CaCl2 extractable Si amounts to 85 mg kg-1 after Si+/biochar amendment, which is below the amount extracted after Wo application (100 mg kg-1). In contrast, in NI, the cumulative content of CaCl2 extractable Si is 198 mg kg-1 in the Si+/biochar amended treatment, which is far above the one measured after Wo application (93 mg kg-1). The Si-/biochar has no effect on the cumulative content of CaCl2 extractable Si in either soil type. Biochars and wollastonite increase the biomass of wheat on both soils. The increase is, however, larger in NI than in CA. In terms of Si

  1. Nutrient leaching when soil is part of plant growth media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soils can serve as sorbents for phosphorus (P) within plant growth media, negating the need for artificial sorbents. The purpose of this study was to compare soils with different properties, as part of plant growth media, for their effect on nutrient levels in effluent. Four soils were mixed with sa...

  2. Radiocesium storage in soil microbial biomass of undisturbed alpine meadow soils and its relation to 137Cs soil-plant transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stemmer, Michael; Hromatka, Angelika; Lettner, Herbert; Strebl, Friederike

    2005-01-01

    This study focuses on radiocesium storage in soil microbial biomass of undisturbed alpine meadow sites and its relation to the soil-to-plant transfer. Soil and plant samples were taken in August 1999 from an altitude transect (800-1600 m.a.s.l.) at Gastein valley, Austria. Soil samples were subdivided into 3-cm layers for analyses of total, K 2 SO 4 -extractable and microbially stored 137 Cs. Microbial biomass was measured by the fumigation extraction method, and fungal biomass was quantified using ergosterol as biomarker molecule. In general, the quantity of 137 Cs stored in the living soil microbial biomass was relatively small. At the high-altitude meadows, showing high amounts of fungal biomass, microbially stored 137 Cs amounted to 0.64 ± 0.14 kBq m -2 which corresponds to about 1.2-2.7% of the total 137 Cs soil inventory. At lower altitudes, microbial 137 Cs content was distinctly smaller and in most cases not measurable at all using the fumigation extraction method. However, a positive correlation between the observed soil-to-plant aggregated transfer factor, microbially stored 137 Cs and fungal biomass was found, which indicates a possible role of fungal biomass in the storage and turnover of 137 Cs in soils and in the 137 Cs uptake by plants

  3. Impact of acid atmosphere deposition on soils : field monitoring and aluminum chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, J.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of acid atmospheric deposition on concentrations and transfer of major solutes in acid, sandy soils was studied. Emphasis was given to mobilization and transport of potentially toxic aluminum. Data on solute concentrations and fluxes in meteoric water as well as soil solutions

  4. Interrelationships between soil cover and plant cover depending on land use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiina Köster

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Interrelationships between soil cover and plant cover of normally developed (or postlithogenic mineral soils are analysed on the basis of four sampling soil groups. The four-link pedo-ecological sequence of analysed soils, rendzinas → brown soils → pseudopodzolic soils → gley-podzols, forms a representative cross section in relation to the normal mineral soils of Estonia. All groups differ substantially from each other in terms of soil properties (calcareousness, acidity, nutrition conditions, profile fabric and humus cover. The primary tasks of the research were (1 to elucidate the main pedo-ecological characteristics of the four soil groups and their suitability for plant cover, (2 to evaluate comparatively soils in terms of productivity, sustainability, biodiversity and environmental protection ability and (3 to analyse possibilities for ecologically sound matching of soil cover with suitable plant cover. On the basis of the same material, the influence of land-use change on humus cover (epipedon fabric, properties of the entire soil cover and soil–plant interrelationship were also analysed. An ecosystem approach enables us to observe particularities caused by specific properties of a soil type (species, variety in biological turnover and in the formation of biodiversity.

  5. Ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon in a heathland under future climatic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang Selsted, M

    2010-07-15

    Global change is a reality. Atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels are rising as well as mean global temperature and precipitation patterns are changing. These three environmental factors have separately and in combination effect on ecosystem processes. Terrestrial ecosystems hold large amounts of carbon, why understanding plant and soil responses to such changes are necessary, as ecosystems potentially can ameliorate or accelerate global change. To predict the feedback of ecosystems to the atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations experiments imitating global change effects are therefore an important tool. This work on ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon in a heathland under future climatic conditions, shows that extended summer drought in combination with elevated temperature will ensure permanent dryer soil conditions, which decreases carbon turnover, while elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations will increase carbon turnover. In the full future climate scenario, carbon turnover is over all expected to increase and the heathland to become a source of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The methodology of static chamber CO{sub 2} flux measurements and applying the technology in a FACE (free air CO{sub 2} enrichment) facility is a challenge. Fluxes of CO{sub 2} from soil to atmosphere depend on a physical equilibrium between those two medias, why it is important to keep the CO{sub 2} gradient between soil and atmosphere unchanged during measurement. Uptake to plants via photosynthesis depends on a physiological process, which depends strongly on the atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration. Photosynthesis and respiration run in parallel during measurements of net ecosystem exchange, and these measurements should therefore be performed with care to both the atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration and the CO{sub 2} soil-atmosphere gradient. (author)

  6. Differential responses of soil bacteria, fungi, archaea and protists to plant species richness and plant functional group identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassen, Sigrid; Cortois, Roeland; Martens, Henk; de Hollander, Mattias; Kowalchuk, George A; van der Putten, Wim H; De Deyn, Gerlinde B

    2017-08-01

    Plants are known to influence belowground microbial community structure along their roots, but the impacts of plant species richness and plant functional group (FG) identity on microbial communities in the bulk soil are still not well understood. Here, we used 454-pyrosequencing to analyse the soil microbial community composition in a long-term biodiversity experiment at Jena, Germany. We examined responses of bacteria, fungi, archaea, and protists to plant species richness (communities varying from 1 to 60 sown species) and plant FG identity (grasses, legumes, small herbs, tall herbs) in bulk soil. We hypothesized that plant species richness and FG identity would alter microbial community composition and have a positive impact on microbial species richness. Plant species richness had a marginal positive effect on the richness of fungi, but we observed no such effect on bacteria, archaea and protists. Plant species richness also did not have a large impact on microbial community composition. Rather, abiotic soil properties partially explained the community composition of bacteria, fungi, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), archaea and protists. Plant FG richness did not impact microbial community composition; however, plant FG identity was more effective. Bacterial richness was highest in legume plots and lowest in small herb plots, and AMF and archaeal community composition in legume plant communities was distinct from that in communities composed of other plant FGs. We conclude that soil microbial community composition in bulk soil is influenced more by changes in plant FG composition and abiotic soil properties, than by changes in plant species richness per se. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The role of plant-soil feedbacks in driving native-species recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelenik, Stephanie G; Levine, Jonathan M

    2011-01-01

    The impacts of exotic plants on soil nutrient cycling are often hypothesized to reinforce their dominance, but this mechanism is rarely tested, especially in relation to other ecological factors. In this manuscript we evaluate the influence of biogeochemically mediated plant-soil feedbacks on native shrub recovery in an invaded island ecosystem. The introduction of exotic grasses and grazing to Santa Cruz Island, California, USA, converted native shrublands (dominated by Artemisia californica and Eriogonum arborescens) into exotic-dominated grasslands (dominated by Avena barbata) over a century ago, altering nutrient-cycling regimes. To test the hypothesis that exotic grass impacts on soils alter reestablishment of native plants, we implemented a field-based soil transplant experiment in three years that varied widely in rainfall. Our results showed that growth of Avena and Artemisia seedlings was greater on soils influenced by their heterospecific competitor. Theory suggests that the resulting plant-soil feedback should facilitate the recovery of Artemisia in grasslands, although four years of monitoring showed no such recovery, despite ample seed rain. By contrast, we found that species effects on soils lead to weak to negligible feedbacks for Eriogonum arborescens, yet this shrub readily colonized the grasslands. Thus, plant-soil feedbacks quantified under natural climate and competitive conditions did not match native-plant recovery patterns. We also found that feedbacks changed with climate and competition regimes, and that these latter factors generally had stronger effects on seedling growth than species effects on soils. We conclude that even when plant-soil feedbacks influence the balance between native and exotic species, their influence may be small relative to other ecological processes.

  8. The transport of natural radionuclides from soil to plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bikit, I.; Conkic, Lj.; Slivka, J.; Krmar, M.

    1995-01-01

    The transport and accumulation processes of Ra-226, U-238, Th-232 and K-40 from soil to plants have been studied. Plant samples with consumable parts grown below surface have been bred in natural conditions on soil with enhanced levels of natural radioactivity (barren soil of the uranium mine Gabrovnica-Kalna). An intensive transport of heavy natural radionuclides from soil to the roots was established. The transfer factors for U-238 and Ra-226 have been much bigger than for Th-232. The most intensive uptake was registered for beet root. (author)

  9. {sup 134}Cs uptake by four plant species and Cs-K relations in the soil-plant system as affected by Ca(OH){sub 2} application to an acid soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massas, I., E-mail: massas@aua.g [Soil Science Laboratory, Department of Natural Resources Management and Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural University of Athens, Iera Odos 75, 11855 Athens (Greece); Skarlou, V.; Haidouti, C.; Giannakopoulou, F. [Soil Science Laboratory, Department of Natural Resources Management and Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural University of Athens, Iera Odos 75, 11855 Athens (Greece)

    2010-03-15

    Three rates of Ca(OH){sub 2} were applied to an acid soil and the {sup 134}Cs uptake by radish, cucumber, soybean and sunflower plants was studied. The {sup 134}Cs concentration in all plant species was reduced from 1.6-fold in the sunflower seeds to 6-fold in the soybean vegetative parts at the higher Ca(OH){sub 2} rate. Potassium (K) concentration in plants was also reduced, but less effectively. The significantly decreased {sup 134}Cs-K soil to plant distribution factors (D.F.) clearly suggest a stronger effect of soil liming on {sup 134}Cs than on K plant uptake. This observation was discussed in terms of ionic interactions in the soil matrix and within the plants. The results also indicated that the increased Ca{sup 2+} concentration in the exchange phase and in the soil solution along with the improved root activity, due to the soil liming, enhanced the immobilization of {sup 134}Cs in the soil matrix and consequently lowered the {sup 134}Cs availability for plant uptake.

  10. Cesium-137 in soils and its soil-to-plant transfer rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papastefanou, C.; Manolopoulou, M.; Charalambous, S.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of fallout-derived 137 Cs in soils were made in the Valley of Ptolemais, North Greece after the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. The 137 Cs concentrations ranged between 290 Bq kg -1 and 7670 Bq kg -1 . It was found that the 137 Cs concentration is inversely proportional to 40 K concentration or potassium content of soils. Cesium-137 transfer coefficients from soil to plants (grass) ranged from 0.02 to 0.2

  11. Recent progress in plant nutrition research: cross-talk between nutrients, plant physiology and soil microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkama-Ohtsu, Naoko; Wasaki, Jun

    2010-08-01

    Mineral nutrients taken up from the soil become incorporated into a variety of important compounds with structural and physiological roles in plants. We summarize how plant nutrients are linked to many metabolic pathways, plant hormones and other biological processes. We also focus on nutrient uptake, describing plant-microbe interactions, plant exudates, root architecture, transporters and their applications. Plants need to survive in soils with mineral concentrations that vary widely. Describing the relationships between nutrients and biological processes will enable us to understand the molecular basis for signaling, physiological damage and responses to mineral stresses.

  12. Phosphorus cycling in natural and low input soil/plant systems: the role of soil microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, F.; Bünemann, E. K.; Oberson, A.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Frossard, E.

    2011-12-01

    Availability of phosphorus (as orthophosphate, Pi) limits biological production in many terrestrial ecosystems. During the first phase of soil development, weathering of minerals and leaching of Pi are the processes controlling Pi concentrations in the soil solution, while in mature soils, Pi is made available by desorption of mineral Pi and mineralization of organic compounds. In agricultural soils additional Pi is supplied by fertilization, either with mineral P and/or organic inputs (animal manure or plant residues). Soil microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) mediate several processes, which are central to the availability of Pi to plants. They play a role in the initial release of Pi from the mineral phase, and through extracellular phosphatase enzymes, they decompose and mineralize organic compounds, releasing Pi. On the other hand, microbial immobilization and internal turnover of Pi can decrease the soil available Pi pool, competing in this way with plants. Using radio- and stable isotopic approaches, we show evidence from different soil/plant systems which points to the central role of the microbial activity. In the presented case studies, P contained in the soil microbial biomass is a larger pool than available Pi. In a soil chronosequence after deglaciation, stable isotopes of oxygen associated to phosphate showed that even in the youngest soils microbial activity highly impacted the isotopic signature of available Pi. These results suggested that microorganisms were rapidly taking up and cycling Pi, using it to sustain their community. Microbial P turnover time was faster in the young (about 20 days) than in older soils (about 120 days), reflecting a different functioning of the microbial community. Microbial community crashes, caused by drying/rewetting and freezing/thawing cycles, were most likely responsible for microbial P release to the available P pool. In grassland fertilization experiments with mineral NK and NPK amendments, microbial P turnover

  13. Plants and fluorine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garber, K

    1962-01-01

    A report is given about the contents of fluorine in soil and different plants. It is stated that spinach and several spice herbages are rich in fluorine (0.98 - 21.8 ppm) while in other plants are not more than 5 ppm maximum. An exception is found in Thea sinensis with 178 ppm and more. Tea is, therefore, a source of fluorine for contamination of the human body. An increase of the fluorine contents of plants by manuring with F-salts or mineral manure is possible but of long duration. Damage to plants by uptake of fluorine from soil as well as in a gaseous condition from the atmosphere are described. The rate of damage is related to the type of soil in which the plant is grown.

  14. Straw gasification biochar increases plant available water capacity and plant growth in coarse sandy soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Veronika; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Petersen, Carsten Tilbæk

    Gasification biochar (GB) contains recalcitrant carbon that can contribute to soil carbon sequestration and soil quality improvement. However, the impact of GB on plant available water capacity (AWC) and plant growth in diverse soil types needs further reserach. A pot experiment with spring barley...... the characteristic low compressibility and high friction giving much better conditions for root penetration increasing yield potentials. Furthermore, risk of drought in dry periods, and nutrient losses in wet periods in coarser soil types is also reduced...

  15. Variability of the soil-to-plant radiocaesium transfer factor for Japanese soils predicted with soil and plant properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Shinichiro; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Sweeck, Lieve; Van Hees, May; Wannijn, Jean; Smolders, Erik

    2016-03-01

    Food chain contamination with radiocaesium (RCs) in the aftermath of the Fukushima accident calls for an analysis of the specific factors that control the RCs transfer. Here, soil-to-plant transfer factors (TF) of RCs for grass were predicted from the potassium concentration in soil solution (mK) and the Radiocaesium Interception Potential (RIP) of the soil using existing mechanistic models. The mK and RIP were (a) either measured for 37 topsoils collected from the Fukushima accident affected area or (b) predicted from the soil clay content and the soil exchangeable potassium content using the models that had been calibrated for European soils. An average ammonium concentration was used throughout in the prediction. The measured RIP ranged 14-fold and measured mK varied 37-fold among the soils. The measured RIP was lower than the RIP predicted from the soil clay content likely due to the lower content of weathered micas in the clay fraction of Japanese soils. Also the measured mK was lower than that predicted. As a result, the predicted TFs relying on the measured RIP and mK were, on average, about 22-fold larger than the TFs predicted using the European calibrated models. The geometric mean of the measured TFs for grass in the affected area (N = 82) was in the middle of both. The TFs were poorly related to soil classification classes, likely because soil fertility (mK) was obscuring the effects of the soil classification related to the soil mineralogy (RIP). This study suggests that, on average, Japanese soils are more vulnerable than European soils at equal soil clay and exchangeable K content. The affected regions will be targeted for refined model validation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Diverse effects of arsenic on selected enzyme activities in soil-plant-microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubun, Yelena V; Pleshakova, Ekaterina V; Mkandawire, Martin; Turkovskaya, Olga V

    2013-11-15

    Under the influence of pollutants, enzyme activities in plant-microbe-soil systems undergo changes of great importance in predicting soil-plant-microbe interactions, regulation of metal and nutrient uptake, and, ultimately, improvement of soil health and fertility. We evaluated the influence of As on soil enzyme activities and the effectiveness of five field crops for As phytoextraction. The initial As concentration in soil was 50mg As kg(-1) soil; planted clean soil, unplanted polluted soil, and unplanted clean soil served as controls. After 10 weeks, the growth of the plants elevated soil dehydrogenase activity relative to polluted but unplanted control soils by 2.4- and 2.5-fold for sorghum and sunflower (respectively), by 3-fold for ryegrass and sudangrass, and by 5.2-fold for spring rape. Soil peroxidase activity increased by 33% with ryegrass and rape, while soil phosphatase activity was directly correlated with residual As (correlation coefficient R(2)=0.7045). We conclude that soil enzyme activities should be taken into account when selecting plants for phytoremediation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Phytostabilization potential of ornamental plants grown in soil contaminated with cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Peng; Guo, Zhaohui; Cao, Xia; Xiao, Xiyuan; Liu, Yanan; Shi, Lei

    2018-03-21

    In a greenhouse experiment, five ornamental plants, Osmanthus fragrans (OF), Ligustrum vicaryi L. (LV), Cinnamomum camphora (CC), Loropetalum chinense var. rubrum (LC), and Euonymus japonicas cv. Aureo-mar (EJ), were studied for the ability to phytostabilization for Cd-contaminated soil. The results showed that these five ornamental plants can grow normally when the soil Cd content is less than 24.6 mg·kg -1 . Cd was mainly deposited in the roots of OF, LV, LC and EJ which have grown in Cd-contaminated soils, and the maximum Cd contents reached 15.76, 19.09, 20.59 and 32.91 mg·kg -1 , respectively. For CC, Cd was mainly distributed in the shoots and the maximum Cd content in stems and leaves were 12.5 and 10.71 mg·kg -1 , however, the total amount of Cd in stems and leaves was similar with the other ornamental plants. The enzymatic activities in Cd-contaminated soil were benefited from the five tested ornamental plants remediation. Soil urease and sucrase activities were improved, while dehydrogenase activity was depressed. Meanwhile, the soil microbial community was slightly influenced when soil Cd content is less than 24.6 mg·kg -1 under five ornamental plants remediation. The results further suggested that ornamental plants could be promising candidates for phytostabilization of Cd-contaminated soil.

  18. Using DTPA-extractable soil fraction to assess the bioconcentration factor of plants in phytoremediation of urban soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Bocanegra, Javier; Roca, Núria; Tume, Pedro; Bech, Jaume

    2017-04-01

    Urban soils may be highly contaminated with potentially toxic metals, as a result of intensive anthropogenic activities. Developing cities are increasing the number of lands where is practiced the urban agriculture. In this way, it is necessary to assess the part of heavy metals that is transferred to plants in order to a) know the potential health risk that represent soils and b) know the relation soil-plant to assess the ability of these plants to remove heavy metals from soil. Nowadays, to assess the bioconcentration factor (BF) of plants in phytoremediation, the pseudototal o total concentration has been used by many authors. Two different urban soils with similar pH and carbonates content but with different pollution degree were phytoremediated with different plant species. Urban soil from one Barcelona district (Spain), the most contaminated soil, showed an extractability of Cu, Pb and Zn of 9.6, 6.7 and 5.8% of the total fraction respectively. The soil from Talcahuano city (Chile), with contents of heavy metals slightly above the background upper limit, present values of 15.5, 13.5 and 12% of the total fraction of studied heavy metals. Furthermore, a peri-urban analysed soil from Azul (Argentina) also showed an elevated extractability with values of 24, 13.5 and 14% of the Cu, Pb and Zn contents respectively. These soils presented more extractability than other disturbed soils, like for example, soils from mine areas. The urban soils present more developed soil with an interaction between solution and solid phase in polluted systems. The most important soil surface functional groups include the basal plane of phyllosilicates and metal hydroxyls at edge sites of clay minerals, iron oxyhydroxides, manganese oxyhydroxides and organic matter. The interaction between solution and solid phase in polluted urban systems tends to form labile associations and pollutants are more readily mobilized because their bonds with soil particles are weaker. Clay and organic

  19. Uptake of radionuclides by plants growing on Brazilian soil: the effect of soil ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, Maria A.; Rochedo, Elaine R.R.; Ferreira, Ana C.M.; Vidal Perez, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The behaviour of radionuclides in soil is governed by several mechanisms that can vary significantly according to the specific reactivity of each element and soil properties. The 137 Cs is one of radionuclides that generally reduces with time its mobility and phytoavailability due to irreversible fixation in high activity clay mineral such as illite, vermiculite and montmorilonite. A long-term experimental essay using Brazilian soils was done in order to determine the effect of ageing of contamination on 137 Cs mobility in soils and transfer to plants. To perform this study, 4 different soils with different properties were contaminated with 137 Cs at different period: The older contamination refers to an urban soil contaminated at the Goiania accident (1987). A similar type of Goiania's soil (Ferralsol rich in Gibbsite) was artificially contaminated with 137 Cs in 1993. A subtropical class of soil (Nitisol) was contaminated in 1996 and two other tropical soils were contaminated in 2000 (Acrisol and Ferralsol rich in Goethite). The time's effect was studied by characterizing the evolution of soil properties and the changes in the distribution of radionuclides between phases till 2006. In addition, the phytoavailability was evaluated by carrying out experiments in lysimeters where radish was sowed at different periods:1996, 2000 and 2004. These results showed that the phytoavailability changed with time only in 2 situations: after changes in some soil properties such as pH or due to Cs fixation in high activity clay mineral when it was present in the soils even as trace mineral. The 137 Cs distribution in soil showed that Fe oxides are the main sink for this element in all type of soil and 14 years after contamination, the 137 Cs was still available for plants in the Ferralsol Gbbiste rich. In the Nitisol, 5 years after contamination, the 137 Cs was not detected as in the slightly acidic phase of sequential extraction neither detectable in radish roots or leaves

  20. Functional diversity of microbial decomposers facilitates plant coexistence in a plant-microbe-soil feedback model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Takeshi; Ushio, Masayuki; Fukui, Shin; Kondoh, Michio

    2010-08-10

    Theory and empirical evidence suggest that plant-soil feedback (PSF) determines the structure of a plant community and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. The plant community alters the nutrient pool size in soil by affecting litter decomposition processes, which in turn shapes the plant community, forming a PSF system. However, the role of microbial decomposers in PSF function is often overlooked, and it remains unclear whether decomposers reinforce or weaken litter-mediated plant control over nutrient cycling. Here, we present a theoretical model incorporating the functional diversity of both plants and microbial decomposers. Two fundamental microbial processes are included that control nutrient mineralization from plant litter: (i) assimilation of mineralized nutrient into the microbial biomass (microbial immobilization), and (ii) release of the microbial nutrients into the inorganic nutrient pool (net mineralization). With this model, we show that microbial diversity may act as a buffer that weakens plant control over the soil nutrient pool, reversing the sign of PSF from positive to negative and facilitating plant coexistence. This is explained by the decoupling of litter decomposability and nutrient pool size arising from a flexible change in the microbial community composition and decomposition processes in response to variations in plant litter decomposability. Our results suggest that the microbial community plays a central role in PSF function and the plant community structure. Furthermore, the results strongly imply that the plant-centered view of nutrient cycling should be changed to a plant-microbe-soil feedback system, by incorporating the community ecology of microbial decomposers and their functional diversity.

  1. Division S-4-soil fertility and plant nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, R.J.; Gilmour, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    A portion of anhydrous NH 3 fertilizer applied to soil can be rendered nonexchangeable through fixation by clay minerals and soil organic matter. The plant availability of anhydrous NH 3 fixed by these two soil fractions can be important agronomically if such fixation limits plant uptake of the fertilizer N. In this study, three soils with clay and organic C contents ranging from 120 to 310 and 7.8 to 30.1 g kg -1 , respectively, were injected with 15 N-labeled (2 atom % 15 N) liquid anhydrous NH 3 at a rate equivalent to 245 kg N ha -1 . Soluble and exchangeable N were removed by leaching and the soil was cropped to rye grass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) in pots. Soils were analyzed before and after cropping for clay fixed N and organic matter fixed N. Four cuttings (harvests) were made at 3- to 4-week intervals and roots were collected at the termination of the experiment. Above ground dry matter, total N uptake, and fertilizer-derived fixed N uptake (mg N pot -1 ) increased from the first to the second harvest and declined thereafter. Nitrogen recovered in the roots accounted for <11% of the total N and <7% of the fixed N utilized, and root dry matter accounted for 13 to 14% of the total dry matter produced. The ratio of fertilizer-derived fixed N uptake to total N uptake declined with harvest suggesting that the fixed N became less available to the rye grass with time. Fertilizer-derived fixed N recovered in the rye grass ranged from 19 to 26% of that originally fixed by the soil. The percentages of fertilizer-derived clay fixed N removed from the soils during cropping (35-72%) were much larger than those of the fertilizer-derived organic matter fixed N (<12%) suggesting that a majority of the plant uptake of fixed N originated in the clay fraction. Overall, fertilizer-derived fixed N removal from the soils (21-30%) agreed well with plant uptake data

  2. Remediation aspect of microbial changes of plant rhizosphere in mercury contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sas-Nowosielska, Aleksandra; Galimska-Stypa, Regina; Kucharski, Rafał; Zielonka, Urszula; Małkowski, Eugeniusz; Gray, Laymon

    2008-02-01

    Phytoremediation, an approach that uses plants to remediate contaminated soil through degradation, stabilization or accumulation, may provide an efficient solution to some mercury contamination problems. This paper presents growth chamber experiments that tested the ability of plant species to stabilize mercury in soil. Several indigenous herbaceous species and Salix viminalis were grown in soil collected from a mercury-contaminated site in southern Poland. The uptake and distribution of mercury by these plants were investigated, and the growth and vitality of the plants through a part of one vegetative cycle were assessed. The highest concentrations of mercury were found at the roots, but translocation to the aerial part also occurred. Most of the plant species tested displayed good growth on mercury contaminated soil and sustained a rich microbial population in the rhizosphere. The microbial populations of root-free soil and rhizosphere soil from all species were also examined. An inverse correlation between the number of sulfur amino acid decomposing bacteria and root mercury content was observed. These results indicate the potential for using some species of plants to treat mercury contaminated soil through stabilization rather than extraction. The present investigation proposes a practical cost-effective temporary solution for phytostabilization of soil with moderate mercury contamination as well as the basis for plant selection.

  3. Soil ecotoxicity assessment using cadmium sensitive plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Youn-Joo

    2004-01-01

    The crop plants, sorghum and cucumber, can be used as indicator species to assess ecotoxicity of soils contaminated by cadmium. - Four crop plant species (sweet corn, Zea may; wheat, Triticum aestivum; cucumber, Cucumis sativus; and sorghum, Sorghum bicolor) were tested to assess an ecotoxicity in cadmium-amended soils. The measurement endpoints used were seed germination and seedling growth (shoot and root). The presence of cadmium decreased the seedling growth. The medium effective concentration values (EC50) for shoot or root growth were calculated by the Trimmed Spearman-Karber method. Due to the greater accumulation of Cd to the roots, root growth was a more sensitive endpoint than shoot growth. Bioavailability and transport of Cd within plant were related to concentration and species. The ratio of bioaccumulation factor (BAF) in the shoots to the roots indicated high immobilization of Cd in the roots. Seed germination was insensitive to Cd toxicity, and is not recommended for a suitable assay. Among the test plants and test endpoints, root growth of sorghum and cucumber appears to be a good protocol to assess ecotoxicity of soils contaminated by Cd.

  4. Soil ecotoxicity assessment using cadmium sensitive plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Youn-Joo

    2004-01-01

    The crop plants, sorghum and cucumber, can be used as indicator species to assess ecotoxicity of soils contaminated by cadmium. - Four crop plant species (sweet corn, Zea may; wheat, Triticum aestivum; cucumber, Cucumis sativus; and sorghum, Sorghum bicolor) were tested to assess an ecotoxicity in cadmium-amended soils. The measurement endpoints used were seed germination and seedling growth (shoot and root). The presence of cadmium decreased the seedling growth. The medium effective concentration values (EC50) for shoot or root growth were calculated by the Trimmed Spearman-Karber method. Due to the greater accumulation of Cd to the roots, root growth was a more sensitive endpoint than shoot growth. Bioavailability and transport of Cd within plant were related to concentration and species. The ratio of bioaccumulation factor (BAF) in the shoots to the roots indicated high immobilization of Cd in the roots. Seed germination was insensitive to Cd toxicity, and is not recommended for a suitable assay. Among the test plants and test endpoints, root growth of sorghum and cucumber appears to be a good protocol to assess ecotoxicity of soils contaminated by Cd

  5. Using Plants for the Bioremediation (Phyto-remediation) of Chromium-Contaminated Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Sabour, M.F.; Al-Salama, Y.J.

    2003-01-01

    A trial was made to study the use of hyper accumulator plant species to extract Cr out of contaminated soils. Three soils (A,B, and C) were selected in this experiment, Soil A: Polluted soil from El-Gabal El-Asfer farm. (subjected to sewage effluent irrigation for more than 75 years). Soil B: Polluted soil from Bahtem area (subjected to sewage effluent irrigation for more than 30 years). Soil C: Polluted soil from Mostorud area (irrigated with contaminated water for more than 30 years due to direct discharge of industrial wastewater to irrigation water canals). Four Kg of each air-dried surface soil sample (0-20 cm) were packed in plastic containers in three replicates. Four plant species tested in this study namely, Sorghum (Sorghum Vulgar L.), Clover (Trifolium Pretense L.), Panikum (Panicum antidotal) and Canola (Brassica Napous.); were grown on each tested soil in a complete randomized block experimental design. Plant shoots were harvested every 60 days (three cuts) for sorghum, clover and panikum. In case of canola plants, the shoots were harvested after 60 days (vegetative stage) and 85 days(fruiting stage). The roots of all species were collected after the final cut. Initial and final soil samples were taken for Cr analyses using neutron activation analyses technique (NAA)

  6. Post-fire interactions between soil water repellency, soil fertility and plant growth in soil collected from a burned piñon-juniper woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernelius, Kaitlynn J.; Madsen, Matthew D.; Hopkins, Bryan G.; Bansal, Sheel; Anderson, Val J.; Eggett, Dennis L.; Roundy, Bruce A.

    2017-01-01

    Woody plant encroachment can increase nutrient resources in the plant-mound zone. After a fire, this zone is often found to be water repellent. This study aimed to understand the effects of post-fire water repellency on soil water and inorganic nitrogen and their effects on plant growth of the introduced annual Bromus tectorum and native bunchgrass Pseudoroegneria spicata. Plots centered on burned Juniperus osteosperma trees were either left untreated or treated with surfactant to ameliorate water repellency. After two years, we excavated soil from the untreated and treated plots and placed it in zerotension lysimeter pots. In the greenhouse, half of the pots received an additional surfactant treatment. Pots were seeded separately with B. tectorum or P. spicata. Untreated soils had high runoff, decreased soilwater content, and elevated NO3eN in comparison to surfactant treated soils. The two plant species typically responded similar to the treatments. Above-ground biomass and microbial activity (estimated through soil CO2 gas emissions) was 16.8-fold and 9.5-fold higher in the surfactant-treated soils than repellent soils, respectably. This study demonstrates that water repellency can influence site recovery by decreasing soil water content, promoting inorganic N retention, and impairing plant growth and microbial activity.

  7. Use of the neutron activation technique: soil-plant transfer factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Wellington Ferrari da; Menezes, Maria Ângela de B.C.; Marques, Douglas José

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of the soil-plant transfer factor in the absorption and translocation of chemical elements, thus, it is possible to evaluate a better decision-making in the consecutive plantations. To determine these values, the content of a chemical element present in the plant or part of it with the total content present in the same soil where it is grown is considered. The objective of this study was to determine the concentrations of the chemical elements present in soil, leaf and grains corn, by neutron activation analysis and to compare the different soil-plant transfer factors. The samples were collected in a property located in the region of Biquinhas, MG, and irradiated in the TRIGA MARK I IPR-R1 CDTN / CNEN nuclear reactor. Thus, the concentrations of Br, Ce Fe, K, La, Na, Rb, Zn were determined. The soil-plant transfer factors for the elements found were varied, indicating a greater potassium absorption capacity (K). (author)

  8. Use of the neutron activation technique: soil-plant transfer factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Wellington Ferrari da, E-mail: wferrari250@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências e Técnicas Nucleares; Menezes, Maria Ângela de B.C., E-mail: menezes@cdtn.br [Centro Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (SERTA/CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Serviço de Técnicas Analíticas. Laboratório de Ativação Neutrônica; Marques, Douglas José, E-mail: douglasjmarques81@yahoo.com.br [Universidade José do Rosário Vellano, Alfenas, MG (Brazil). Setor de Olericultura e Experimentação em Agricultura Orgânica

    2017-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of the soil-plant transfer factor in the absorption and translocation of chemical elements, thus, it is possible to evaluate a better decision-making in the consecutive plantations. To determine these values, the content of a chemical element present in the plant or part of it with the total content present in the same soil where it is grown is considered. The objective of this study was to determine the concentrations of the chemical elements present in soil, leaf and grains corn, by neutron activation analysis and to compare the different soil-plant transfer factors. The samples were collected in a property located in the region of Biquinhas, MG, and irradiated in the TRIGA MARK I IPR-R1 CDTN / CNEN nuclear reactor. Thus, the concentrations of Br, Ce Fe, K, La, Na, Rb, Zn were determined. The soil-plant transfer factors for the elements found were varied, indicating a greater potassium absorption capacity (K). (author)

  9. Soil to plant transfer values of 137 Cs in soils of tropical agro-ecological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, Maria Angelica; Ferreira, Ana Cristina Melo; Conti, Claudio Carvalho; Rochedo, Elaine Rua Rodriguez; Bartoly, Flavia; Viana, Aline Gonzalez; Moura, Glaucio Pereira; Poquet, Isabel; Perez, Daniel Vidal

    2002-01-01

    Recent radioecological studies have showed that some ecosystems present more suitable conditions for soil to plant transfer of some radionuclides, while others present lower transfer when compared with average values. Due to the difficulty to generate, experimentally, soil to plant transfer factors enough to cover the totality of existing soil and vegetation types, an alternative way has been the use of soil to reference plant transfer factor determined in various ecosystems. Trough the use of conversion factors, the reference transfer factor can be converted in values of transfer factor specific for a specific type of crop. These values can be used regionally to improve dose calculation and models for radiological risk assessments. This work presents experimental data for 137 Cs for reference crops grown up in Oxisol, Ultisol and Alfisol. These results allow the assessment of sensibility of main Brazilian soils regarding a radiological contamination with 137 Cs and provide regional parameters values. The results obtained in soils of tropical climate validate the international methodology aiming to derive generic transfer factor values for 137 Cs in reference crops based on a few soil properties such as fertility, pH and organic matter content. (author)

  10. Defoliation and Soil Compaction Jointly Drive Large-Herbivore Grazing Effects on Plants and Soil Arthropods on Clay Soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Klink, R.; Schrama, M.; Nolte, S.; Bakker, J. P.; WallisDeVries, M. F.; Berg, M. P.

    In addition to the well-studied impacts of defecation and defoliation, large herbivores also affect plant and arthropod communities through trampling, and the associated soil compaction. Soil compaction can be expected to be particularly important on wet, fine-textured soils. Therefore, we

  11. Defoliation and Soil Compaction Jointly Drive Large-Herbivore Grazing Effects on Plants and Soil Arthropods on Clay Soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Klink, R.; Schrama, M.; Nolte, S.; Bakker, Jan P.; WallisDeVries, M.F.; Berg, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the well-studied impacts of defecation and defoliation, large herbivores also affect plant and arthropod communities through trampling, and the associated soil compaction. Soil compaction can be expected to be particularly important on wet, fine-textured soils. Therefore, we

  12. Phytoextraction of arsenic-contaminated soil with Pteris vittata in Henan Province, China: comprehensive evaluation of remediation efficiency correcting for atmospheric depositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Mei; Wan, Xiaoming; Guo, Guanghui; Yang, Junxing; Chen, Tongbin

    2018-01-01

    Research on the appropriate method for evaluating phytoremediation efficiency is limited. A 2-year field experiment was conducted to investigate phytoremediation efficiency using the hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata on an arsenic (As)-contaminated site. The remediation efficiency was evaluated through the removal rate of As in soils and extraction rate of heavy metals in plants. After 2 years of remediation, the concentration of total As in soils decreased from 16.27 mg kg -1 in 2012 to 14.58 mg kg -1 in 2014. The total remediation efficiency of As was 10.39% in terms of the removal rate of heavy metals calculated for soils, whereas the remediation efficiency calculated from As uptake by P. vittata was 16.09%. Such a discrepancy aroused further consideration on the potential input of As. A large amount of As was brought in by atmospheric emissions, which possibly biased the calculation of remediation efficiency. In fact, considering also the atmospheric depositions of As, the corrected removal rate of As from soil was 16.57%. Therefore, the results of this work suggest that (i) when evaluating the phytoextraction efficiency, the whole input and output cycle of the element of interest in the targeted ecosystem must be considered, and (ii) P. vittata has the potential to be used to remediate As-contaminated soils in Henan Province, China.

  13. The 14C as tracer in the carbon flow assimilated by the plants (maize, sugar cane, bean) and it liberation to the soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paula Eduardo, B.J.F. de.

    1987-01-01

    The flow of carbon in three different crops, maize, beans and sugar cane was studied by use of 14 V. The plants were exposed to an atmosphere with a constant concentration of the tracer for 12 hours in a biosynthesis chamber. The detection of the isotope permitted the distribution and concentration of the photosynthetates in the various organs of the plants and the losses by liberation to the soil whether by root respiration or rhizodeposition to be followed. The technique of marking metabolites through photosynthesis and their detection in the various plant organs is well known and is employed despite the requirement for hight sophisticated apparatus. On the other hand the quantification of the plant-soil-microorganism interchanges presents great difficulties being dynamic processes, showing the necessity of more detailed studies. (author) [pt

  14. Persistence of endosulfan and its metabolites in tomato plants and soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carazo, E.; Barquero, M.; Valverde, B.

    1999-01-01

    Tests were conducted to study the persistence of 14 C-labelled α and β -endosulfan in tomato plants and soil under the greenhouse conditions when applied at the rate and number of applications used by tomato growers in Costa Rica. Two applications, at 30 and 55 days after planting were made. Plant and soil samples were extracted 37, 49, 71 and 125 days after planting and analyzed by LSC, TLC and GC-ECD. At 37 days after planting the compounds identified were α-endosulfan, β-endosulfan and endosulfan sulphate with a combined concentration of 3.6 mg/kg in plant and 0.6 mg/kg in the soil. At 49 days after planting the same three compounds were found at the combined concentration of 1.51 mg/kg in the plant and at 0.34 mg/kg in the soil. After 71 days low levels of α-endosulfan, β-endosulfan, endosulfan sulphate and endosulfan lactone were found in plants and soil. Similarly, at 125 days low levels of these compounds as well as low levels of two other metabolites, endosulfan alcohol and endosulfan ether were detected. Under the conditions of the experiment endosulfan residues do not seem to be significant or persistant. (author)

  15. The role of soil pH on soil carbonic anhydrase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauze, Joana; Jones, Sam P.; Wingate, Lisa; Wohl, Steven; Ogée, Jérôme

    2018-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are metalloenzymes present in plants and microorganisms that catalyse the interconversion of CO2 and water to bicarbonate and protons. Because oxygen isotopes are also exchanged during this reaction, the presence of CA also modifies the contribution of soil and plant CO18O fluxes to the global budget of atmospheric CO18O. The oxygen isotope signatures (δ18O) of these fluxes differ as leaf water pools are usually more enriched than soil water pools, and this difference is used to partition the net CO2 flux over land into soil respiration and plant photosynthesis. Nonetheless, the use of atmospheric CO18O as a tracer of land surface CO2 fluxes requires a good knowledge of soil CA activity. Previous studies have shown that significant differences in soil CA activity are found in different biomes and seasons, but our understanding of the environmental and ecological drivers responsible for the spatial and temporal patterns observed in soil CA activity is still limited. One factor that has been overlooked so far is pH. Soil pH is known to strongly influence microbial community composition, richness and diversity in addition to governing the speciation of CO2 between the different carbonate forms. In this study we investigated the CO2-H2O isotopic exchange rate (kiso) in six soils with pH varying from 4.5 to 8.5. We also artificially increased the soil CA concentration to test how pH and other soil properties (texture and phosphate content) affected the relationship between kiso and CA concentration. We found that soil pH was the primary driver of kiso after CA addition and that the chemical composition (i.e. phosphate content) played only a secondary role. We also found an offset between the δ18O of the water pool with which CO2 equilibrates and total soil water (i.e. water extracted by vacuum distillation) that varied with soil texture. The reasons for this offset are still unknown.

  16. The role of soil pH on soil carbonic anhydrase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sauze

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrases (CAs are metalloenzymes present in plants and microorganisms that catalyse the interconversion of CO2 and water to bicarbonate and protons. Because oxygen isotopes are also exchanged during this reaction, the presence of CA also modifies the contribution of soil and plant CO18O fluxes to the global budget of atmospheric CO18O. The oxygen isotope signatures (δ18O of these fluxes differ as leaf water pools are usually more enriched than soil water pools, and this difference is used to partition the net CO2 flux over land into soil respiration and plant photosynthesis. Nonetheless, the use of atmospheric CO18O as a tracer of land surface CO2 fluxes requires a good knowledge of soil CA activity. Previous studies have shown that significant differences in soil CA activity are found in different biomes and seasons, but our understanding of the environmental and ecological drivers responsible for the spatial and temporal patterns observed in soil CA activity is still limited. One factor that has been overlooked so far is pH. Soil pH is known to strongly influence microbial community composition, richness and diversity in addition to governing the speciation of CO2 between the different carbonate forms. In this study we investigated the CO2–H2O isotopic exchange rate (kiso in six soils with pH varying from 4.5 to 8.5. We also artificially increased the soil CA concentration to test how pH and other soil properties (texture and phosphate content affected the relationship between kiso and CA concentration. We found that soil pH was the primary driver of kiso after CA addition and that the chemical composition (i.e. phosphate content played only a secondary role. We also found an offset between the δ18O of the water pool with which CO2 equilibrates and total soil water (i.e. water extracted by vacuum distillation that varied with soil texture. The reasons for this offset are still unknown.

  17. Effects of gasification biochar on plant-available water capacity and plant growth in two contrasting soil types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Veronika; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Petersen, Carsten Tilbæk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gasification biochar (GB) contains recalcitrant carbon that can contribute to soil carbon sequestration and soil quality improvement. However, the impact of GB on plant-available water capacity (AWC) and plant growth in diverse soil types still needs to be explored. A pot experiment......, the reduced water regime significantly affected plant growth and water consumption, whereas the effect was less pronounced in the coarse sand. Irrespective of the soil type, both GBs increased AWC by 17–42%, with the highest absolute effect in the coarse sand. The addition of SGB to coarse sand led...

  18. Alleviating soil acidity through plant organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson R. Meda

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of water soluble plant extracts on soil acidity. The plant materials were: black oat, oil seed radish, white and blue lupin, gray and dwarf mucuna, Crotalaria spectabilis and C. breviflora, millet, pigeon pea, star grass, mato grosso grass, coffee leaves, sugar cane leaves, rice straw, and wheat straw. Plant extracts were added on soil surface in a PVC soil column at a rate of 1.0 ml min-1. Both soil and drainage water were analyzed for pH, Ca, Al, and K. Plant extracts applied on the soil surface increased soil pH, exchangeable Ca ex and Kex and decreased Al ex. Oil seed radish, black oat, and blue lupin were the best and millet the worst materials to alleviate soil acidity. Oil seed radish markedly increased Al in the drainage water. Chemical changes were associated with the concentrations of basic cations in the plant extract: the higher the concentration the greater the effects in alleviating soil acidity.Foram conduzidos experimentos de laboratórios para avaliar os efeitos de extratos de plantas solúveis em água na acidez do solo. Os materiais de plantas foram: aveia preta, nabo, tremoço branco e azul, mucuna cinza e anã, Crotalaria spectabilis e C. breviflora, milheto, guandu, grama estrela, grama mato grosso, folhas de café, folhas de cana-de-açúcar, palhada de arroz e palhada de trigo. Foi utilizado o seguinte procedimento para o extrato da planta solúvel em água: pesar 3g de material de planta, adicionar 150 ml de água, agitar por 8h e filtrar. Os extratos de plantas foram adicionados na superfície do solo em uma coluna de PVC (1 ml min-1. Após, adicionou-se água deionizada em quantidade equivalente a três volumes de poros. Os extratos de plantas aumentaram o pH, Ca e K trocável e diminuíram Al. Nabo, aveia preta e tremoço azul foram os melhores e milheto o pior material para amenizar a acidez do solo. Nabo aumentou Al na água de drenagem. As altera

  19. Characterization of soil fauna under the influence of mercury atmospheric deposition in Atlantic Forest, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Andressa Cristhy; Correia, Maria Elizabeth Fernandes; Teixeira, Daniel Cabral; Silva-Filho, Emmanoel Vieira

    2015-06-01

    The increasing levels of mercury (Hg) found in the atmosphere arising from anthropogenic sources, have been the object of great concern in the past two decades in industrialized countries. Brazil is the seventh country with the highest rate of mercury in the atmosphere. The major input of Hg to ecosystems is through atmospheric deposition (wet and dry), being transported in the atmosphere over large distances. The forest biomes are of strong importance in the atmosphere/soil cycling of elemental Hg through foliar uptake and subsequent transference to the soil through litter, playing an important role as sink of this element. Soil microarthropods are keys to understanding the soil ecosystem, and for such purpose were characterized by the soil fauna of two Units of Forest Conservation of the state of the Rio de Janeiro, inwhich one of the areas suffer quite interference from petrochemicals and industrial anthropogenic activities and other area almost exempts of these perturbations. The results showed that soil and litter of the Atlantic Forest in Brazil tend to stock high mercury concentrations, which could affect the abundance and richness of soil fauna, endangering its biodiversity and thereby the functioning of ecosystems. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Heavy Metal Polluted Soils: Effect on Plants and Bioremediation Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Chibuike, G. U.; Obiora, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    Soils polluted with heavy metals have become common across the globe due to increase in geologic and anthropogenic activities. Plants growing on these soils show a reduction in growth, performance, and yield. Bioremediation is an effective method of treating heavy metal polluted soils. It is a widely accepted method that is mostly carried out in situ; hence it is suitable for the establishment/reestablishment of crops on treated soils. Microorganisms and plants employ different mechanisms for...

  1. Transfer of 226Ra to plants from two types of soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosiak, L.; Pietrzak-Flis, Z.

    1998-01-01

    The transfer of 226 Ra to plants used as food (carrot, parsley, wheat) and as fodder (grass, maize) was studied. The plants were grown on two types of soil: sandy soil (l) and sandy loam soil (II) in an open field (exposure to dry and wet deposition, resuspension and soil adhesion) and in polyethylene tent with an underground irrigation system (isolation from wet deposition and from water splash on soil). The plants were grown simultaneously on the open and sheltered fields. The average concentrations of total 226 Ra and of exchangeable 226 Ra were 8.48 ± 0.50 Bq/kg dw was 0.62 ± 0.07 Bq/kg dw , respectively, in Soil I and 12.2 ± 0.56 Bq/kg dw and 0.66 ± 0.05 Bq/kg dw , respectively, in Soil II. 226 Ra was determined in the above-ground parts of the plants after washing in distilled water, in the rinse obtained from washing, in the insoluble residue separated from the rinse, and in the roots. The data obtained allowed us to determine the incorporated radionuclide in the plants and on their surface. Statistical analysis of the data indicates that there is no difference in the incorporated 226 Ra for plants grown on the open field and in the tent. This indicates that Ra enter the plants mainly through the root system, while the pathway via leaves and stems is negligible

  2. Martian Soil Plant Growth Experiment: The Effects of Adding Nitrogen, Bacteria, and Fungi to Enhance Plant Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliman, D. M.; Cooper, J. B.; Anderson, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    Plant growth is enhanced by the presence of symbiotic soil microbes. In order to better understand how plants might prosper on Mars, we set up an experiment to test whether symbiotic microbes function to enhance plant growth in a Martian soil simulant.

  3. Evaporational losses under different soil moisture regimes and atmospheric evaporativities using tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, P.; Chaudhary, T.N.; Mookerji, P.

    1991-01-01

    Tritium as tracer was used in a laboratory study to estimate the contribution of moisture from different soil depths towards actual soil water evaporation. Results indicated that for comparable amounts of free water evaporation (5 cm), contribution of moisture from 70-80 cm soil layer towards total soil moisture loss through evaporation increased nearly 1.5 to 3 folds for soils with water table at 90 cm than without water table. Identical initial soil moistures were exposed to different atmospheric evaporativities. Similarly, for a given initial soil moisture status, upward movement of moisture from 70-80 cm soil layer under low evaporativity was nearly 8 to 12 times that of under high evaporativity at 5 cm free water evaporation value. (author). 6 refs., 4 tabs., 2 figs

  4. Bioremediation of industrially contaminated soil using compost and plant technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taiwo, A M; Gbadebo, A M; Oyedepo, J A; Ojekunle, Z O; Alo, O M; Oyeniran, A A; Onalaja, O J; Ogunjimi, D; Taiwo, O T

    2016-03-05

    Compost technology can be utilized for bioremediation of contaminated soil using the active microorganisms present in the matrix of contaminants. This study examined bioremediation of industrially polluted soil using the compost and plant technology. Soil samples were collected at the vicinity of three industrial locations in Ogun State and a goldmine site in Iperindo, Osun State in March, 2014. The compost used was made from cow dung, water hyacinth and sawdust for a period of twelve weeks. The matured compost was mixed with contaminated soil samples in a five-ratio pot experimental design. The compost and contaminated soil samples were analyzed using the standard procedures for pH, electrical conductivity (EC), organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN), phosphorus, exchangeable cations (Na, K, Ca and Mg) and heavy metals (Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn and Cr). Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) seeds were also planted for co-remediation of metals. The growth parameters of Kenaf plants were observed weekly for a period of one month. Results showed that during the one-month remediation experiment, treatments with 'compost-only' removed 49 ± 8% Mn, 32 ± 7% Fe, 29 ± 11% Zn, 27 ± 6% Cu and 11 ± 5% Cr from the contaminated soil. On the other hand, treatments with 'compost+plant' remediated 71 ± 8% Mn, 63 ± 3% Fe, 59 ± 11% Zn, 40 ± 6% Cu and 5 ± 4% Cr. Enrichment factor (EF) of metals in the compost was low while that of Cu (EF=7.3) and Zn (EF=8.6) were high in the contaminated soils. Bioaccumulation factor (BF) revealed low metal uptake by Kenaf plant. The growth parameters of Kenaf plant showed steady increments from week 1 to week 4 of planting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Soil-to-plant halogens transfer studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashparov, V. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Str.7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Colle, C. [Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN/DEI/SECRE), Cadarache bat 159, BP 3, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)]. E-mail: claude.colle@irsn.fr; Zvarich, S. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Str.7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Yoschenko, V. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Str.7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Levchuk, S. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Str.7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Lundin, S. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Str.7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine)

    2005-07-01

    Long-term controlled experiments under natural conditions in the field have been carried out in the Chernobyl Exclusion zone in order to determine the parameters governing radioiodine transfer to plants from four types of soils (podzoluvisol, greyzem and typical and meadow chernozem) homogeneously contaminated in the 20-cm upper layer with an addition of {sup 125}I. An absence of {sup 125}I depletion in arable soil layers due to volatilization was noted up to one year after contamination. During one year, depletion due to the vertical migration of radioiodine from the arable layer of each of the soils did not exceed 4% of the total {sup 125}I content. Radioiodine concentration ratios (CR) were obtained in radish roots, lettuce leaves, bean pods, and wheat grain and straw. The highest CR values were observed in podzoluvisol: 0.01-0.03 for radish roots and lettuce leaves, 0.003-0.004 for bean pods and 0.001 for wheat grains. In the other three soils, these values were one order of magnitude lower. The parameters relating to changes in radioiodine bioavailability were determined, based on the contamination dynamics of plants in field conditions.

  6. Variation of the rare earth element concentrations in the soil, soil extract and in individual plants from the same site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyttenbach, A.; Tobler, L.; Furrer, V.; Schleppi, P.

    1998-01-01

    Samples of various types (spruce needles, blackberry leaves, soils, and soil extracts) have each been taken at 6 places from the same site. In addition, 4 whirls each from 2 spruce trees were sampled. Rare earth elements (REEs) were determined in these samples by neutron activation analysis with a chemical group separation. Variations between places were found to be small with soils and soil extracts, but large with plants. Variations between whirls were small. Plants neither reflected the soil nor the soil extract. Both plant species were dissimilar, but the logarithm of their ratio was a linear function of the atomic number of the REE. A negative Ce anomaly (with respect to soil) was found in both plant species. (author)

  7. Soil-plant relation in Cuban sugar cane by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Riso, O.; Griffith Martinez, J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper shows the result of soil-plant relation in samples from Cuban sugar canes of different soil types and cane varieties, using the INAA from thermal reactor. The behaviour of minor and trace elements in sugar cane leaves is uniform and independent of sugar cane variety or type of soil. The soil-plant relation shows four principal groups of micro elements, according to their absorption by the plant

  8. Soil stabilization linked to plant diversity and environmental context in coastal wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Hilary; Garbutt, Angus; Ladd, Cai; Malarkey, Jonathan; Skov, Martin W

    2016-03-01

    Plants play a pivotal role in soil stabilization, with above-ground vegetation and roots combining to physically protect soil against erosion. It is possible that diverse plant communities boost root biomass, with knock-on positive effects for soil stability, but these relationships are yet to be disentangled. We hypothesize that soil erosion rates fall with increased plant species richness, and test explicitly how closely root biomass is associated with plant diversity. We tested this hypothesis in salt marsh grasslands, dynamic ecosystems with a key role in flood protection. Using step-wise regression, the influences of biotic (e.g. plant diversity) and abiotic variables on root biomass and soil stability were determined for salt marshes with two contrasting soil types: erosion-resistant clay (Essex, southeast UK) and erosion-prone sand (Morecambe Bay, northwest UK). A total of 132 (30-cm depth) cores of natural marsh were extracted and exposed to lateral erosion by water in a re-circulating flume. Soil erosion rates fell with increased plant species richness ( R 2  = 0.55), when richness was modelled as a single explanatory variable, but was more important in erosion-prone ( R 2  = 0.44) than erosion-resistant ( R 2  = 0.18) regions. As plant species richness increased from two to nine species·m -2 , the coefficient of variation in soil erosion rate decreased significantly ( R 2  = 0.92). Plant species richness was a significant predictor of root biomass ( R 2  = 0.22). Step-wise regression showed that five key variables accounted for 80% of variation in soil erosion rate across regions. Clay-silt fraction and soil carbon stock were linked to lower rates, contributing 24% and 31%, respectively, to variation in erosion rate. In regional analysis, abiotic factors declined in importance, with root biomass explaining 25% of variation. Plant diversity explained 12% of variation in the erosion-prone sandy region. Our study indicates that soil stabilization

  9. The effect of partial soil sterilization on plant parasitic nematodes and plant growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eissa, M.F.M.

    1971-01-01

    Research was carried out on the possible yield increase of crops in The Netherlands by the use of PSS (partial soil sterilization) on the soil, on the basis of published as well as unpublished data and by experimentation with different disinfectants, soils and plants.

    Following review of the

  10. Sewage sludge fertiliser use: implications for soil and plant copper evolution in forest and agronomic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro-Domínguez, Nuria; Rigueiro-Rodríguez, Antonio; Mosquera-Losada, M Rosa

    2012-05-01

    Fertilisation with sewage sludge may lead to crop toxicity and environmental degradation. This study aims to evaluate the effects of two types of soils (forest and agronomic), two types of vegetation (unsown (coming from soil seed bank) and sown), and two types of fertilisation (sludge fertilisation and mineral fertilisation, with a no fertiliser control) in afforested and treeless swards and in sown and unsown forestlands on the total and available Cu concentration in soil, the leaching of this element and the Cu levels in plant. The experimental design was completely randomised with nine treatments and three replicates. Fertilisation with sewage sludge increased the concentration of Cu in soil and plant, but the soil values never exceeded the maximum set by Spanish regulations. Sewage sludge inputs increased both the total and Mehlich 3 Cu concentrations in agronomic soils and the Cu levels in plant developed in agronomic and forest soils, with this effect pronounced in the unsown swards of forest soils. Therefore, the use of high quality sewage sludge as fertiliser may improve the global productivity of forest, agronomic and silvopastoral systems without creating environmental hazards. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Soil microbial species loss affects plant biomass and survival of an introduced bacterial strain, but not inducible plant defences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurm, Viola; van der Putten, Wim H; Pineda, Ana; Hol, W H Gera

    2018-02-12

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strains can influence plant-insect interactions. However, little is known about the effect of changes in the soil bacterial community in general and especially the loss of rare soil microbes on these interactions. Here, the influence of rare soil microbe reduction on induced systemic resistance (ISR) in a wild ecotype of Arabidopsis thaliana against the aphid Myzus persicae was investigated. To create a gradient of microbial abundances, soil was inoculated with a serial dilution of a microbial community and responses of Arabidopsis plants that originated from the same site as the soil microbes were tested. Plant biomass, transcription of genes involved in plant defences, and insect performance were measured. In addition, the effects of the PGPR strain Pseudomonas fluorescens SS101 on plant and insect performance were tested under the influence of the various soil dilution treatments. Plant biomass showed a hump-shaped relationship with soil microbial community dilution, independent of aphid or Pseudomonas treatments. Both aphid infestation and inoculation with Pseudomonas reduced plant biomass, and led to downregulation of PR1 (salicylic acid-responsive gene) and CYP79B3 (involved in synthesis of glucosinolates). Aphid performance and gene transcription were unaffected by soil dilution. Neither the loss of rare microbial species, as caused by soil dilution, nor Pseudomonas affect the resistance of A. thaliana against M. persicae. However, both Pseudomonas survival and plant biomass respond to rare species loss. Thus, loss of rare soil microbial species can have a significant impact on both above- and below-ground organisms. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Plant remediation of soil contaminated with 137Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Juncheng; Zhang Jianfeng; Zhu Yongyi; Chen Jingjie; Mei Yong; Jiang Huimin

    2005-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the bio-remediation of soils contaminated with 137 Cs. The selected plants are Cucurbita moschata Duchesne, Brassica chinensis L, Chloris virgata, Beta oulgaris L. Hongye, Beta oulgaris L. Dongshengye and Beta oulgaris L. The soils samples were taken from the paddy field, 2 km from the Dayawan nuclear power plant and Qinshan nuclear power plant, respectively, and cinnamon soil from the cultivated land in Beijing. The results show that all the employed species of plant have a higher accumulation to 137 Cs with the increased grade of the radioactivity of 137 Cs. A good correlation exist with the coefficient (r 2 ) of 0.9989. When the contaminated radioactivity of 137 Cs is in the same level the uptake of Cucurbita moschata Duchesne, Brassica chinensis L. and Chloris virgata increased with the decrease of pH value ranged 5.22-7.69. The ability of bioremediation in the orders were Chloris virgata, Brassica chinensis L., Beta oulgaris L. Hongye, Cucurbita moschata Duchesne, Beta oulgaris L. and Beta oulgaris L. Dongshengye, according to the comprehensive evaluation of transfer factor, specific activity of plant in dry weight of biomass and total absorption of 137 Cs by the individual plant in the same area. (authors)

  13. Base-line data on everglades soil-plant systems: elemental composition, biomass, and soil depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volk, B.G.; Schemnitz, S.D.; Gamble, J.F.; Sartain, J.B.

    1975-01-01

    Plants and soils from plots in the Everglades Wildlife Management Area, Conservation Area 3, were examined. Chemical composition (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn, Co, Sr, Pb, Ni, Cr, Al, and Si) of most plant and soil digests was determined. Cladium jamaicense was the predominant plant species contributing to biomass in all plots except the wet prairie, where Rhynchospora sp. and Panicum hemitomon were most common. The biomass of dead C. jamaicense was greater than that of the living plants in unburned saw-grass plots. The burned saw grass, muck burn, and wet prairie were characterized by a large number of plant species per square meter but smaller average biomass production than the unburned saw-grass locations. Levels of Cu, Mn, Ca, Mg, K, and N in C. jamaicense differed significantly across locations. Highly significant differences in elemental composition existed between plant species. Concentrations of several elements (particularly Zn, Ca, Mg, P, and N) were low in live C. jamaicense compared with other plant species. Cesium-137 levels ranged from 670 to 3100 pCi/kg in sandy and in organic soils, respectively. Polygonum had a 137 Cs level of 11,600 pCi/kg. Dead C. jamaicense indicated a rapid leaching loss of 137 Cs from dead tissue

  14. Plant species effects on soil nutrients and chemistry in arid ecological zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brittany G; Verburg, Paul S J; Arnone, John A

    2016-09-01

    The presence of vegetation strongly influences ecosystem function by controlling the distribution and transformation of nutrients across the landscape. The magnitude of vegetation effects on soil chemistry is largely dependent on the plant species and the background soil chemical properties of the site, but has not been well quantified along vegetation transects in the Great Basin. We studied the effects of plant canopy cover on soil chemistry within five different ecological zones, subalpine, montane, pinyon-juniper, sage/Mojave transition, and desert shrub, in the Great Basin of Nevada all with similar underlying geology. Although plant species differed in their effects on soil chemistry, the desert shrubs Sarcobatus vermiculatus, Atriplex spp., Coleogyne ramosissima, and Larrea tridentata typically exerted the most influence on soil chemistry, especially amounts of K(+) and total nitrogen, beneath their canopies. However, the extent to which vegetation affected soil nutrient status in any given location was not only highly dependent on the species present, and presumably the nutrient requirements and cycling patterns of the plant species, but also on the background soil characteristics (e.g., parent material, weathering rates, leaching) where plant species occurred. The results of this study indicate that the presence or absence of a plant species, especially desert shrubs, could significantly alter soil chemistry and subsequently ecosystem biogeochemistry and function.

  15. Soil Respiration and Student Inquiry: A Perfect Match

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Catherine Marie; Wallenstein, Matthew David

    2011-01-01

    This activity explores the cycling of carbon between the atmosphere (primarily as CO[subscript 2]) and biomass in plants, animals, and microscopic organisms. Students design soil respiration experiments using a protocol that resembles current practice in soil ecology. Three methods for measuring soil respiration are presented. Student-derived…

  16. Peat soil composition as indicator of plants growth environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noormets, M.; Tonutare, T.; Kauer, K.; Szajdak, L.; Kolli, R.

    2009-04-01

    Exhausted milled peat areas have been left behind as a result of decades-lasting intensive peat production in Estonia and Europe. According to different data there in Estonia is 10 000 - 15 000 ha of exhausted milled peat areas that should be vegetated. Restoration using Sphagnum species is most advantageous, as it creates ecological conditions closest to the natural succession towards a natural bog area. It is also thought that the large scale translocation of vegetation from intact bogs, as used in some Canadian restoration trials, is not applicable in most of European sites due to limited availability of suitable donor areas. Another possibility to reduce the CO2 emission in these areas is their use for cultivation of species that requires minimum agrotechnical measures exploitation. It is found by experiments that it is possible to establish on Vaccinium species for revegetation of exhausted milled peat areas. Several physiological activity of the plant is regulated by the number of phytohormones. These substances in low quantities move within the plant from a site of production to a site of action. Phytohormone, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is formed in soils from tryptophane by enzymatic conversion. This compound seems to play an important function in nature as result to its influence in regulation of plant growth and development. A principal feature of IAA is its ability to affect growth, development and health of plants. This compound activates root morphology and metabolic changes in the host plant. The physiological impact of this substance is involved in cell elongation, apical dominance, root initiation, parthenocarpy, abscission, callus formation and the respiration. The investigation areas are located in the county of Tartu (58˚ 22' N, 26˚ 43' E), in the southern part of Estonia. The soil of the experimental fields belongs according to the WRB soil classification, to the soils subgroups of Fibri-Dystric Histosols. The investigation areas were

  17. Modelling 137Cs uptake in plants from undisturbed soil monoliths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waegeneers, Nadia; Smolders, Erik; Merckx, Roel

    2005-01-01

    A model predicting 137 Cs uptake in plants was applied on data from artificially contaminated lysimeters. The lysimeter data involve three different crops (beans, ryegrass and lettuce) grown on five different soils between 3 and 5 years after contamination and where soil solution composition was monitored. The mechanistic model predicts plant uptake of 137 Cs from soil solution composition. Predicted K concentrations in the rhizosphere were up to 50-fold below that in the bulk soil solution whereas corresponding 137 Cs concentration gradients were always less pronounced. Predictions of crop 137 Cs content based on rhizosphere soil solution compositions were generally closer to observations than those based on bulk soil solution composition. The model explained 17% (beans) to 91% (lettuce) of the variation in 137 Cs activity concentrations in the plants. The model failed to predict the 137 Cs activity concentration in ryegrass where uptake of the 5-year-old 137 Cs from 3 soils was about 40-fold larger than predicted. The model generally underpredicted crop 137 Cs concentrations at soil solution K concentration below about 1.0 mM. It is concluded that 137 Cs uptake can be predicted from the soil solution composition at adequate K nutrition but that significant uncertainties remain when soil solution K is below 1 mM

  18. Analysis of Soil Parameters in Almadenejos. Behavior of Mercury in Soil-Plant System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, R.; Sierra, M. J.; Villadoniga, M.; Millan, R.

    2010-01-01

    This scientific-technical report is the result of the stay of Rocio Fernandez Flores practices in the Research Unit soil degradation of the Department of Environment CIEMAT. The aim of this study is to determine the behaviour of mercury in soil of Almadenejos (Almaden, Ciudad Real, Espana) by using a six-step sequential extraction procedure and evaluate the transfer of this pollutant to Marrubium vulgare L., predominant in the area and studied for years due to its ability to accumulate large amounts of mercury without visual symptoms of toxicity. Furthermore, the results will be useful in order to determine if this plant specie could be used as phyto extractor in the recovery mercury contaminated soils. The results show that total mercury concentrations in soil ranged from 709 mg kg-1 to 22,616 mg kg-1. Regarding mercury distribution among different soil fractions, this heavy metal is mainly found in the fraction assigned in the fi nal insoluble residues, the oxidizable fraction and in the crystalline Fe-Mn oxydroxides, on the other hand, barely 1% or lower is readily available to plants However, Marrubium vulgare is able to accumulate high amount of mercury (3.5 - 373.5 mg kg-1). Regarding the mercury distribution inside the plant, mercury concentration in the root was higher than in the aerial part. Within the aerial part the maximum mercury concentration was generally found in leaves. According to the obtained results, Marrubium vulgare L. could be considered as a (hyper)accumulator plant. (Author) 57 refs.

  19. Effects of plant-soil feedback on tree seedling growth under arid conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, S.S.; Holmgren, M.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: Plants are able to influence their growing environment by changing biotic and abiotic soil conditions. These soil conditions in turn can influence plant growth conditions, which is called plant–soil feedback. Plant–soil feedback is known to be operative in a wide variety of ecosystems ranging

  20. Assessing soil and plant parameters affecting uranium availability and plant uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenhove, H.

    2009-01-01

    In the assessment of the potential impact of contaminants in soils and the requirement for the implementation of corrective actions, it is important to determine the contaminant's mobility and bioavailability and to identify the processes and parameters ruling it. Mobility and bioavailability of contaminants are among others affected by the physicochemical characteristics of the environment itself and plant properties. This is also the case for uranium (U), reported to be the most frequent radionuclide contaminant in ground and surface water and soils. The actual failure of the available transfer factor (TF) data and their broad relation to soil type to be an appropriate measure for food chain transfer in assessment models, calls for a more mechanistic understanding of the individual processes affecting bioavailability. The objectives of this study were (1) to test if Diffusive Gradient in Thin film (DGT) measured concentrations adequately assess U bioavailability and (2) to evaluate if differences in U uptake by plants can be explained by variation in root-mediated changes in selected soil properties and assess the role of organic acids in this process

  1. Air pollution effects on forest vegetation: Effects of Vado Ligure (Italy) power plant on soil acidification (evaluation method validation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naviglio, L.; Angelone, M.; Velletti, A.R.

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to verify possible soil acidification due to atmospheric pollution caused by the emission of a thermoelectric power plant (coal and fuel oil fired) at Vado Ligure (Savona, Liguria) with a method used in many European stations by Prof. R. Wittig and other authors. The obtained data did not show high differences between the more and lesser exposed stations. This can be due to many reasons: no real difference of air quality between the two localities, the stations are still too close to the power plants and emissions have no sufficient time to be chemically transformed to produce acid effects; the method is not available in those soil types. More experiments in other localities will be carried out to better understand the observed data

  2. Responses of northern forest plants to atmospheric changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laine, K; Huttunen, S; Kauppi, M; Ohtonen, R; Laehdesmaeki, P [Oulu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Biology

    1997-12-31

    This research programme has been under way since 1990 to study the long-term synergistic effects of air pollutants and changing climatic conditions on the northern forest ecosystem and to increase the knowledge of climatic change and its consequences for the fragile northern nature. Ecological, physiological, morphological and biochemical methods have been used to study the responses of forest trees, dwarf shrubs, lichens and soil biology to environmental changes. The research programme is divided into four subprojects concentrating on different ecosystem levels. The subprojects are: (1) life, growth and survival strategies of northern dwarf shrubs under the pressure of a changing environment, (2) forest trees under the impact of air pollutants, increasing CO{sub 2} and UV-B, (3) susceptibility of lichens to air pollution and climatic change and (4) impact of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} on soil biology with special reference to carbon allocation and N fixation in symbiotic systems. This report summarizes the results of short-term experiments which showed many ecological and physiological changes in almost all elements of the northern boreal forests. These species-level measurements focused on the key species of the northern boreal forest, which have been thought to be useful in large-scale ecosystem experiments and modelling. The results will also facilitate the further studies on the patterns of plant species distribution and northern ecosystem function with respect to the environmental parameters that are expected to change along with global change (e.g. temperature, airchemistry, UV-B, snow condition)

  3. Responses of northern forest plants to atmospheric changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laine, K.; Huttunen, S.; Kauppi, M.; Ohtonen, R.; Laehdesmaeki, P. [Oulu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Biology

    1996-12-31

    This research programme has been under way since 1990 to study the long-term synergistic effects of air pollutants and changing climatic conditions on the northern forest ecosystem and to increase the knowledge of climatic change and its consequences for the fragile northern nature. Ecological, physiological, morphological and biochemical methods have been used to study the responses of forest trees, dwarf shrubs, lichens and soil biology to environmental changes. The research programme is divided into four subprojects concentrating on different ecosystem levels. The subprojects are: (1) life, growth and survival strategies of northern dwarf shrubs under the pressure of a changing environment, (2) forest trees under the impact of air pollutants, increasing CO{sub 2} and UV-B, (3) susceptibility of lichens to air pollution and climatic change and (4) impact of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} on soil biology with special reference to carbon allocation and N fixation in symbiotic systems. This report summarizes the results of short-term experiments which showed many ecological and physiological changes in almost all elements of the northern boreal forests. These species-level measurements focused on the key species of the northern boreal forest, which have been thought to be useful in large-scale ecosystem experiments and modelling. The results will also facilitate the further studies on the patterns of plant species distribution and northern ecosystem function with respect to the environmental parameters that are expected to change along with global change (e.g. temperature, airchemistry, UV-B, snow condition)

  4. Fertilizer balance in the soil-plant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichardt, K.; Libardi, P.L.; Victoria, R.L.; Ruschel, A.P.; Nascimento Filho, V.F. do; Saito, S.M.T.

    A report is presented on a beans culture project developed to study in detail processes on: (1)Nitrogen - fixation, mineralization, denetrification and absorption by the plant (effect of plant variety; selection of the efficient rhizobia; bacteria specificity for the plant; inocculation longevity; persistence and competition with bacteria found naturally in the soil, etc.) (2)Phosphorus and Potassium interactions with nitrogen absorption, residual effects of natural phosphates. The transformations suffered by nitrogen and the ways it follows after its application to the soil were also studied aiming at a rational handling of the fertilizer. The use of fertilizers by the plants was studied through stable and radioactive isotopes, information being sought on absorption efficiency, phosphorus - and potassium interactions with nitrogen absorption, and effects of natural phosphates. Three types of experiments were carried out: I-Nitrogen fixation experiments II-Nitrogen-and Potassium fertility experiments III-Laboratory experiments [pt

  5. Soil-atmosphere trace gas exchange in semiarid and arid zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbally, Ian E; Kirstine, Wayne V; Meyer, C P Mick; Wang, Ying Ping

    2008-01-01

    A review is presented on trace gas exchange of CH4, CO, N2O, and NOx arising from agriculture and natural sources in the world's semiarid and arid zones due to soil processes. These gases are important contributors to the radiative forcing and the chemistry of the atmosphere. Quantitative information is summarized from the available studies. Between 5 and 40% of the global soil-atmosphere exchange for these gases (CH4, CO, N2O, and NOx) may occur in semiarid and arid zones, but for each of these gases there are fewer than a dozen studies to support the individual estimates, and these are from a limited number of locations. Significant differences in the biophysical and chemical processes controlling these trace gas exchanges are identified through the comparison of semiarid and arid zones with the moist temperate or wet/dry savanna land regions. Therefore, there is a poorly quantified understanding of the contribution of these regions to the global trace gas cycles and atmospheric chemistry. More importantly, there is a poor understanding of the feedback between these exchanges, global change, and regional land use and air pollution issues. A set of research issues is presented.

  6. Soil to plant transfer factor of radiocesium by pot experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalil, A.; Rahman, M.M.; Koddus, A.; Chand, M.M.; Zaman, M.A.; Ahmad, G.U.

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with the soil to plant transfer factor (TF) of radiocesium (Cs 137 ) considered to be an important parameter while calculating radiological doses due to the potential release of radionuclides into the environment. In the present work, TF values were measured for the main foodstuffs in Bangladesh such as leafy vegetables (Lalshak, Palangshak), Ladyfinger, Radish, Potato, Potato Plant, Paddy, Paddy plant, Grass, Ginger, Ginger plant, Turmeric, and Turmeric plant by pot experiments grown in the AERE soil. Soil characteristics have also been investigated to assist the measured values of the corresponding radionuclide. TF values of the leafy parts and products of the corresponding plants were found in the range of 2.02x10 -1 to 1.8x10 -2 , which are reasonably comparable with the value found in the literature. It has been observed that the TF values in the leafy part of the plants are higher than the products. (author)

  7. Soil and plant response to used potassium silicate drilling fluid application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Linjun; Anne Naeth, M

    2015-10-01

    Use of drilling waste generated from the oil and gas industry for land reclamation has potential to be a practical and economical means to improve soil fertility and to decrease landfills. A four month greenhouse experiment with common barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) on three different textured soils was conducted to determine soil and plant response to incorporated or sprayed potassium silicate drilling fluid (PSDF). Two PSDF types (used once, used twice) were applied at six rates (10, 20, 30, 40, 60, 120m(3)ha(-1)) as twelve PSDF amendments plus a control (non PSDF). Effects of PSDF amendment on plant properties were significant, and varied through physiological growth stages. Barley emergence and below ground biomass were greater with used once than used twice PSDF at the same application rate in clay loam soil. Used twice PSDF at highest rates significantly increased barley above ground biomass relative to the control in loam and sand soil. All PSDF treatments significantly increased available potassium relative to the control in all three soils. Soil electrical conductivity and sodium adsorption ratio increased with PSDF addition, but not to levels detrimental to barley. Soil quality rated fair to poor with PSDF amendments in clay loam, and reduced plant performance at the highest rate, suggesting a threshold beyond which conditions are compromised with PSDF utilization. PSDF application method did not significantly affect plant and soil responses. This initial greenhouse research demonstrates that PSDF has potential as a soil amendment for reclamation, with consideration of soil properties and plant species tolerances to determine PSDF types and rates to be used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Detecting climate-change responses of plants and soil organic matter using isotopomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleucher, Jürgen; Ehlers, Ina; Segura, Javier; Haei, Mahsa; Augusti, Angela; Köhler, Iris; Zuidema, Pieter; Nilsson, Mats; Öquist, Mats

    2015-04-01

    Responses of vegetation and soils to environmental changes will strongly influence future climate, and responses on century time scales are most important for feedbacks on the carbon cycle, climate models, prediction of crop productivity, and for adaptation to climate change. That plants respond to increasing CO2 on century time scales has been proven by changes in stomatal index, but very little is known beyond this. In soil, the complexity of soil organic matter (SOM) has hampered a sufficient understanding of the temperature sensitivity of SOM turnover. Here we present new stable isotope methodology that allows detecting shifts in metabolism on long time scales, and elucidating SOM turnover on the molecular level. Compound-specific isotope analysis measures isotope ratios of defined metabolites, but as average of the entire molecule. Here we demonstrate how much more detailed information can be obtained from analyses of intramolecular distributions of stable isotopes, so-called isotopomer abundances. As key tool, we use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which allows detecting isotope abundance with intramolecular resolution and without risk for isotope fractionation during analysis. Enzyme isotope fractionations create non-random isotopomer patterns in biochemical metabolites. At natural isotope abundance, these patterns continuously store metabolic information. We present a strategy how these patterns can be used as to extract signals on plant physiology, climate variables, and their interactions. Applied in retrospective analyses to herbarium samples and tree-ring series, we detect century-time-scale metabolic changes in response to increasing atmospheric CO2, with no evidence for acclimatory reactions by the plants. In trees, the increase in photosynthesis expected from increasing CO2 ("CO2 fertilization) was diminished by increasing temperatures, which resolves the discrepancy between expected increases in photosynthesis and commonly observed

  9. Sensitivity of stomatal conductance to soil moisture: implications for tropospheric ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Anav

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture and water stress play a pivotal role in regulating stomatal behaviour of plants; however, in the last decade, the role of water availability has often been neglected in atmospheric chemistry modelling studies as well as in integrated risk assessments, despite the fact that plants remove a large amount of atmospheric compounds from the lower troposphere through stomata. The main aim of this study is to evaluate, within the chemistry transport model CHIMERE, the effect of soil water limitation on stomatal conductance and assess the resulting changes in atmospheric chemistry testing various hypotheses of water uptake by plants in the rooting zone. Results highlight how dry deposition significantly declines when soil moisture is used to regulate the stomatal opening, mainly in the semi-arid environments: in particular, over Europe the amount of ozone removed by dry deposition in one year without considering any soil water limitation to stomatal conductance is about 8.5 TgO3, while using a dynamic layer that ensures that plants maximize the water uptake from soil, we found a reduction of about 10 % in the amount of ozone removed by dry deposition ( ∼  7.7 TgO3. Although dry deposition occurs from the top of canopy to ground level, it affects the concentration of gases remaining in the lower atmosphere, with a significant impact on ozone concentration (up to 4 ppb extending from the surface to the upper troposphere (up to 650 hPa. Our results shed light on the importance of improving the parameterizations of processes occurring at plant level (i.e. from the soil to the canopy as they have significant implications for concentration of gases in the lower troposphere and resulting risk assessments for vegetation or human health.

  10. Sensitivity of stomatal conductance to soil moisture: implications for tropospheric ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anav, Alessandro; Proietti, Chiara; Menut, Laurent; Carnicelli, Stefano; De Marco, Alessandra; Paoletti, Elena

    2018-04-01

    Soil moisture and water stress play a pivotal role in regulating stomatal behaviour of plants; however, in the last decade, the role of water availability has often been neglected in atmospheric chemistry modelling studies as well as in integrated risk assessments, despite the fact that plants remove a large amount of atmospheric compounds from the lower troposphere through stomata. The main aim of this study is to evaluate, within the chemistry transport model CHIMERE, the effect of soil water limitation on stomatal conductance and assess the resulting changes in atmospheric chemistry testing various hypotheses of water uptake by plants in the rooting zone. Results highlight how dry deposition significantly declines when soil moisture is used to regulate the stomatal opening, mainly in the semi-arid environments: in particular, over Europe the amount of ozone removed by dry deposition in one year without considering any soil water limitation to stomatal conductance is about 8.5 TgO3, while using a dynamic layer that ensures that plants maximize the water uptake from soil, we found a reduction of about 10 % in the amount of ozone removed by dry deposition ( ˜ 7.7 TgO3). Although dry deposition occurs from the top of canopy to ground level, it affects the concentration of gases remaining in the lower atmosphere, with a significant impact on ozone concentration (up to 4 ppb) extending from the surface to the upper troposphere (up to 650 hPa). Our results shed light on the importance of improving the parameterizations of processes occurring at plant level (i.e. from the soil to the canopy) as they have significant implications for concentration of gases in the lower troposphere and resulting risk assessments for vegetation or human health.

  11. Air-tough: A fully 3-dimensional linking of atmosphere with soil using eddy diffusivity concept and V-TOUGH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montazer, P. [Multimedia Environmental Technology, Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    In arid climates, evapotranspiration is a strongly-coupled thermodynamic process that is controlled by the interaction of the atmospheric boundary layer and the upper soil surface. Simulation of this process requires a fully-coupled thermodynamic multi-phase fluid-flow and energy-transport code. Such a code was developed in a previous investigation using V-TOUGH. The resulting efficient computer code, A-TOUGH, simulates the effect of dynamic atmospheric fluctuations on vapor movement between the soil and the atmosphere and the resulting moisture movement in the soil. However, the coupling between the atmosphere and soil employed eddy diffusivity which was only a function of time and not a function of space. In the present study the code is extended to allow spatial as well as temporal variation of eddy diffusivity.

  12. Study of soil-plant transfer of 226Ra under greenhouse conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soudek, Petr; Petrova, Sarka; Benesova, Dagmar; Kotyza, Jan; Vagner, Martin; Vankova, Radomira; Vanek, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    A soil-plant transfer study was performed using soil from a former uranium ore processing factory in South Bohemia. We present the results from greenhouse experiments which include estimates of the time required for phytoremediation. The accumulation of 226 Ra by different plant species from a mixture of garden soil and contaminated substrate was extremely variable, ranging from 0.03 to 2.20 Bq 226 Ra/g DW. We found differences in accumulation of 226 Ra between plants from the same genus and between cultivars of the same plant species. The results of 226 Ra accumulation showed a linear relation between concentration of 226 Ra in plants and concentration of 226 Ra in soil mixtures. On the basis of these results we estimated the time required for phytoremediation, but this appears to be too long for practical purposes.

  13. High plant uptake of radiocesium from organic soils due to Cs mobility and low soil K content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, A.L.; Wright, S.M.; Naylor, C.; Kennedy, V.H.; Dodd, B.A.; Singleton, D.L.; Barnett, C.L.; Stevens, P.A.

    1999-01-01

    Post-Chernobyl experience has demonstrated that persistently high plant transfer of 137 Cs occurs from organic soils in upland and seminatural ecosystems. The soil properties influencing this transfer have been known for some time but have not been quantified. A pot experiment was conducted using 23 soils collected from selected areas of Great Britain, which were spiked with 134 Cs, and Agrostis capillaris grown for 19--45 days. The plant-to-soil 134 Cs concentration ratio (CR) varied from 0.06 to 44; log CR positively correlated to soil organic matter content (R 2 = 0.84), and CR values were highest for soils with low distribution coefficients (K d ) of 134 Cs. Soils with high organic matter contents and high concentrations of NH 4 + in solution showed high 134 Cs mobility (low K d ). The plant-to-soil solution 134 Cs ratio decreased sharply with increasing soil solution K + . A two parameter linear model, used to predict log CR from soil solution K + and K d , explained 94% of the variability in CR values. In conclusion, the high transfer of 134 Cs in organic soils is related to both the high 134 Cs mobility (low clay content and high NH 4 + concentrations) and low K availability

  14. Influence of conventional biochar and ageing biochar application to arable soil on soil fertility and plant yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvořáčková, Helena; Záhora, Jaroslav; Elbl, Jakub; Kynický, Jindřich; Hladký, Jan; Brtnický, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Biochar represents very controversial material which is product of pyrolysis. According to many studies biochar has positive effect on physical and chemical properties such as pH, conductivity, aggregates stability etc. Unfortunately biochar is product of combustion, so it can content toxic substance as are aromatic compound. These substances may have a negative effect on yield and microbial activities in soil. Our aim was eliminated concentration of toxic compound but preserved positive effect of biochar on soil properties. We was ageing/ activating of biochar in water environment and for soil inoculum we used native soil from landscape. Moreover two types of biochar was tested by pot experiment with seven variants, where conventional biochar from residual biomass and ageing biochar were applied in different doses: 10 t/ha, 20t/ha and 50 t/ha. Pots were placed in green house for 90 days and after the end of experiment the following parameters of soil fertility, health and quality were evaluated: content of soil organic matter, arbuscular mycorrhizal colonisation of Lactuca sativa L. roots, leaching of mineral nitrogen, changes in plant available nutrient content, EC and pH. Above all the total yield of indicator plant was observed. The significant (P plant yield and soil properties were found. The application of conventional biochar didn't have positive effect on plant yield in comparison with ageing biochar. The positive effect of ageing biochar addition on soil fertility was directly proportional to the dose which were applied - increasing in dose of ageing biochar resulted in increase of plant yield. Moreover the special experimental containers were used, where we was able to monitor the development of root in soil with and without addition of biochar (conventional or ageing). The positive influence of ageing biochar addition into soil on development of Lactuca sativa L. roots was observed.

  15. Multitracer study on absorption of radionuclides in atmosphere-plant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambe, Shizuko; Shinonaga, Taeko; Watanabe, Tadakazu; Yamaguchi, Isamu

    1996-01-01

    Direct absorption of atmospheric radionuclides by soybean plants was studied using a radioactive multitracer consisting of radionuclides of Sc, Mn, Co, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Eu, Gd, Yb, Hf, Re, and Ir. Soybean seedlings were cultivated at 23degC in a box where multitracer-adsorbed cellulose powders were floating in air. After 28-49 day-cultivation, the plants were harvested and divided into beans (seeds and pods), leaves, stems (inside and outside), and roots. Beans or leaves originating from the same node were collected together. After washing with dilute HCl solution and distilled water, they were dried and then subjected to γ-ray measurement. It was estimated that about 0.2 % of the multitracer was absorbed by the soybean plant, of which 80 % was found in the leaves, and 10 % each in beans and stems. The relative amounts of elements in the beans, leaves, and stems markedly differed depending on the element. Among the elements, Se * was greatly accumulated in the beans, leaves, and stems. Cobalt * , Se * , and Rb * were dominant in the beans, especially in the edible part of seeds. Relative amounts of Mn * , As * , Sr * , and Re * in the seeds were very small. It is noticeable that these nuclides were found in the seeds, though they were not physically exposed to the multitracer-adsorbed cellulose powders during growth. The radioactivities of Sc * , Mn * , Co * , As * , Se * , Rb * , Sr * , Y * , Eu * , Gd * , Yb * , Hf * , Re * , and Ir * were observed for the leaves. Brown leaves accumulated greater amounts of radionuclides than green ones. Main nuclides found in the stem were Sc * , Co * , Se * , Y * , Eu * , Gd * , Yb * , Hf * , and Ir * , a larger part of them on the outside. Trace amounts of Co * , Se * , and Rb * were detected in the roots. Little leakage of the multitracer into the soil was observed. These results indicate that various radionuclides in the atmosphere were directly absorbed through soybean leaves and then transported to the edible part

  16. Exchange of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) between plants and the atmosphere under laboratory and field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuninger, C.; Meixner, F. X.; Thielmann, A.; Kuhn, U.; Dindorf, T.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2012-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), often denoted as nitrogen oxides (NOx), and ozone (O3) are considered as most important compounds in atmospheric chemistry. In remote areas NOx concentration is related to biological activities of soils and vegetation. The emitted NOx will not entirely be subject of long range transport through the atmosphere. Aside oxidation of NO2 by the OH radical (forming HNO3), a considerable part of it is removed from the atmosphere through the uptake of NO2 by plants. The exchange depends on stomatal activity and on NO2 concentrations in ambient air. It is known that NO2 uptake by plants represents a large NO2 sink, but the magnitude and the NO2 compensation point concentration are still under discussion. Our dynamic chamber system allows exchange measurements of NO2 under field conditions (uncontrolled) as well as studies under controlled laboratory conditions including fumigation experiments. For NO2 detection we used a highly NO2 specific blue light converter (photolytic converter) with subsequent chemiluminescence analysis of the generated NO. Furthermore, as the exchange of NO2 is a complex interaction of transport, chemistry and plant physiology, in our field experiments we determined fluxes of NO, NO2, O3, CO2 and H2O. For a better knowledge of compensation point values for the bi-directional NO2 exchange we investigated a primary representative of conifers, Picea abies, under field and laboratory conditions, and re-analyzed older field data of the deciduous tree Quercus robur.

  17. Plant functional traits and soil carbon sequestration in contrasting biomes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Deyn, G.B.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.; Bardgett, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    Plant functional traits control a variety of terrestrial ecosystem processes, including soil carbon storage which is a key component of the global carbon cycle. Plant traits regulate net soil carbon storage by controlling carbon assimilation, its transfer and storage in belowground biomass, and its

  18. The behaviour of iodine in the compartments soil, plant and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pel, E.

    1993-02-01

    Within the framework of this study, several investigations were carried out into the behaviour of iodine in the soil-plant-air system. Particular attention was given to the mechanisms determining iodine transfer from soil to plant. Measurements of iodine contents in the soil, plants and individual parts of plants were as important an aim of this study as was the identification of factors possibly contributing to an abundant iodine uptake into plants. In view of iodine's role as an element essential to the health of both humans and animals, widely cultured forage crops and useful plants were investigated in this connection. As the relevant literature quotes unusually high contents of the substance for a number of foodstuffs based on plants, these were included in the studies for iodine contents. (orig.) [de

  19. The removal of plutonium contaminants from Rocky Flats Plant soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunderland, N.R.

    1987-01-01

    This research was undertaken to determine if the TRUclean process could effectively remove radioactive elements from soils other than derived coral. This is an interim report prior to the project report and discusses the outcome of the tests of the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) soil. The soil tested contained plutonium particulates in the micron and submicron range. Volume reduction and activity removal were accomplished with an overall efficiency of greater than 90%. The TRUclean process is a very practical and economical solution to soil contamination problems at the Rocky Flats Plant

  20. Chromium speciation, bioavailability, uptake, toxicity and detoxification in soil-plant system: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Muhammad; Shamshad, Saliha; Rafiq, Marina; Khalid, Sana; Bibi, Irshad; Niazi, Nabeel Khan; Dumat, Camille; Rashid, Muhammad Imtiaz

    2017-07-01

    Chromium (Cr) is a potentially toxic heavy metal which does not have any essential metabolic function in plants. Various past and recent studies highlight the biogeochemistry of Cr in the soil-plant system. This review traces a plausible link among Cr speciation, bioavailability, phytouptake, phytotoxicity and detoxification based on available data, especially published from 2010 to 2016. Chromium occurs in different chemical forms (primarily as chromite (Cr(III)) and chromate (Cr(VI)) in soil which vary markedly in term of their biogeochemical behavior. Chromium behavior in soil, its soil-plant transfer and accumulation in different plant parts vary with its chemical form, plant type and soil physico-chemical properties. Soil microbial community plays a key role in governing Cr speciation and behavior in soil. Chromium does not have any specific transporter for its uptake by plants and it primarily enters the plants through specific and non-specific channels of essential ions. Chromium accumulates predominantly in plant root tissues with very limited translocation to shoots. Inside plants, Cr provokes numerous deleterious effects to several physiological, morphological, and biochemical processes. Chromium induces phytotoxicity by interfering plant growth, nutrient uptake and photosynthesis, inducing enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species, causing lipid peroxidation and altering the antioxidant activities. Plants tolerate Cr toxicity via various defense mechanisms such as complexation by organic ligands, compartmentation into the vacuole, and scavenging ROS via antioxidative enzymes. Consumption of Cr-contaminated-food can cause human health risks by inducing severe clinical conditions. Therefore, there is a dire need to monitor biogeochemical behavior of Cr in soil-plant system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Predicting plant distribution in an heterogeneous Alpine landscape: does soil matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buri, Aline; Cianfrani, Carmen; Pradervand, Jean-Nicolas; Guisan, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    Topographic and climatic factors are usually used to predict plant distribution because they are known to explain their presence or absence. Soil properties have been widely shown to influence plant growth and distributions. However, they are rarely taken into account as predictors of plant species distribution models (SDM) in an edaphically heterogeneous landscape. Or, when it happens, interpolation techniques are used to project soil factors in space. In heterogeneous landscape, such as in the Alps region, where soil properties change abruptly as a function of environmental conditions over short distances, interpolation techniques require a huge quantities of samples to be efficient. This is costly and time consuming, and bring more errors than predictive approach for an equivalent number of samples. In this study we aimed to assess whether soil proprieties may be generalized over entire mountainous geographic extents and can improve predictions of plant distributions over traditional topo-climatic predictors. First, we used a predictive approach to map two soil proprieties based on field measurements in the western Swiss Alps region; the soil pH and the ratio of stable isotopes 13C/12C (called δ13CSOM). We used ensemble forecasting techniques combining together several predictive algorithms to build models of the geographic variation in the values of both soil proprieties and projected them in the entire study area. As predictive factors, we employed very high resolution topo-climatic data. In a second step, output maps from the previous task were used as an input for vegetation regional models. We integrated the predicted soil proprieties to a set of basic topo-climatic predictors known to be important to model plants species. Then we modelled the distribution of 156 plant species inhabiting the study area. Finally, we compared the quality of the models having or not soil proprieties as predictors to evaluate their effect on the predictive power of our models

  2. Long term effects on petrochemical activated sludge on plants and soil. Plant growth and metal absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedesco, M J; Gianello, C [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Solos; Ribas, P I.F.; Carvalho, E B [CORSAN-SITEL, Triunfo, RS (Brazil). Polo Petroquimico do Sul. Dept. de Operacao e Manutencao

    1994-12-31

    An experiment to study the effects of several application rates of excess activated sludge on plants, soil and leached water was started in 1985. Sludge was applied for six years and increased plant growth due to its nitrogen and phosphorous contribution, even though the decomposition rate in soil is low. Plant zinc, cadmium and nickel content increased with sludge application, while liming decreased the amounts of these metals taken up by plants. 9 refs., 8 tabs.

  3. Long term effects on petrochemical activated sludge on plants and soil. Plant growth and metal absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedesco, M.J.; Gianello, C. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Solos; Ribas, P.I.F.; Carvalho, E.B. [CORSAN-SITEL, Triunfo, RS (Brazil). Polo Petroquimico do Sul. Dept. de Operacao e Manutencao

    1993-12-31

    An experiment to study the effects of several application rates of excess activated sludge on plants, soil and leached water was started in 1985. Sludge was applied for six years and increased plant growth due to its nitrogen and phosphorous contribution, even though the decomposition rate in soil is low. Plant zinc, cadmium and nickel content increased with sludge application, while liming decreased the amounts of these metals taken up by plants. 9 refs., 8 tabs.

  4. Determination of microelement distribution in different components of soil-plant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luu Viet Hung; Maslov, O.D.; Gustova, M.V.; Trinh Thi Thu My; Phung Khac Nam Ho

    2011-01-01

    Leaves, stem, and roots of two shrub types: tea (Camellia sinensis), sweet leaf (Sauropus androgynus) and two herb types: vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides L.Nash), maize (Zea mays L) and Thucuc soil where the plants grow, were collected to be studied. Contents of 22 elements in the samples were determined by three methods: XRFA (X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis), GAA (Gamma Activation Analysis), and tracking method to study distribution of these elements in plants and soil-plant relationship. The study was carried out at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR, Dubna. Distribution of the elements in the soil-plant system was studied

  5. Radionuclide soil-to-plant transfer - experiences from the Chernobyl accident in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerzabek, M.H.

    1994-03-01

    In field studies after the Chernobyl fallout in Austria distinct differences in soil-to-plant transfer of 137 Cs and 90 Sr between crops were observed. However, within single plant species transfer values varied over one to three orders of magnitude. The main influencing factors are the soil properties, the soil adhesion phenomenon and probably the unhomogeneous vertical distribution of the radionuclides after plowing. On the basis of the presented results we should be aware of the uncertainties of the simple soil-to-plant transfer model, which partly mask the influence of soil parameters on root uptake and translocation. (author)

  6. Effects of plant species identity, diversity and soil fertility on biodegradation of phenanthrene in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oyelami, A.O.; Okere, U.V.; Orwin, K.; Deyn, de G.B.; Jones, K.C.; Semple, K.T.

    2013-01-01

    The work presented in this paper investigated the effects of plant species composition, species diversity and soil fertility on biodegradation of 14C-phenanthrene in soil. The two soils used were of contrasting fertility, taken from long term unfertilised and fertilised grassland, showing

  7. Observed Local Soil Moisture-Atmosphere Feedbacks within the Context of Remote SST Anomalies: Lessons From Recent Droughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, A. B.; Dirmeyer, P.; Lawrence, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    The existence and possible transition from positive to negative soil moisture-atmosphere feedbacks is explored in this presentation using collocated flux tower measurements (Ameriflux) and atmospheric profiles from reanalysis. The focus is on the series of physical processes that lead to these local feedbacks connecting remote sea surface temperature changes (SST anomalies) to local soil moisture and boundary layer responses. Seasonal and Agricultural droughts are particularly useful test beds for examining these feedback processes because they are typically characterized by prolonged stretches of rain-free days followed by some termination condition. To quantify the full process-chain across these distinct spatial scales, complimentary information from several well-established land-atmosphere coupling metrics are used including, but not limited to, Mixing Diagram approaches, Soil Moisture Memory, and the Heated Condensation Framework. Preliminary analysis shows that there may be transitions from negative and positive soil moisture-atmosphere feedbacks as droughts develop. This is largely instigated by persistent atmospheric forcing that initially promotes increased surface latent heat flux, which limits boundary layer depth and dry air entrainment. However, if stagnant synoptic conditions continue eventually soil moisture is depleted to the point of shutting off surface latent heat flux producing deep boundary layers and increased dry air entrainment thus deepening drought stress. A package of standardized Fortran 90 modules called the Coupling Metrics Toolkit (CoMeT; https://github.com/abtawfik/coupling-metrics) used to calculate these land-atmosphere coupling metrics is also briefly presented.

  8. Ecosystem development in roadside grasslands: Biotic control, plant-soil interactions, and dispersal limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Palacios, P.; Bowker, M.A.; Maestre, F.T.; Soliveres, S.; Valladares, F.; Papadopoulos, J.; Escudero, A.

    2011-01-01

    Roadside grasslands undergoing secondary succession are abundant, and represent ecologically meaningful examples of novel, human-created ecosystems. Interactions between plant and soil communities (hereafter plant-soil interactions) are of major importance in understanding the role of biotic control in ecosystem functioning, but little is known about these links in the context of ecosystem restoration and succession. The assessment of the key biotic communities and interactions driving ecosystem development will help practitioners to better allocate the limited resources devoted to roadside grassland restoration. We surveyed roadside grasslands from three successional stages (0-2, 7-9, and > 20 years) in two Mediterranean regions of Spain. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate how interactions between plants, biological soil crusts (BSCs), and soil microbial functional diversity (soil microorganisms) affect indicators of ecosystem development and restoration: plant similarity to the reference ecosystem, erosion control, and soil C storage and N accumulation. Changes in plant community composition along the successional gradient exerted the strongest influence on these indicators. High BSC cover was associated with high soil stability, and high soil microbial functional diversity from late-successional stages was associated with high soil fertility. Contrary to our expectations, the indirect effects of plants, mediated by either BSCs or soil microorganisms, were very weak in both regions, suggesting a minor role for plant-soil interactions upon ecosystem development indicators over long periods. Our results suggest that natural vegetation dynamics effectively improved ecosystem development within a time frame of 20 years in the grasslands evaluated. They also indicate that this time could be shortened if management actions focus on: (1) maintaining wellconserved natural areas close to roadsides to enhance plant compositional changes towards late

  9. Direct determination of tellurium in soil and plant samples by sector-field ICP-MS for the study of soil-plant transfer of radioactive tellurium subsequent to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Guosheng; Zheng, Jian; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2013-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident caused the release of large amounts of radioactive Te into the environment. Stable Te, as an analogue, is considered to be useful for the estimation of the soil-plant transfer of radioactive Te. It is necessary to estimate the radiation dose of Te that would result from food ingestion. However, due to the extremely low concentrations of Te in the environment, reported transfer factor values for Te are considerably limited. We report a sensitive analytical method for direct determination of trace Te in soil and plant samples using a sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS). The developed analytical method is characterized by a very low detection limit at the sub-parts per billion (ng g"-"1) level in soil and plant samples, and it has been applied to the study of soil-plant transfer to collect transfer factor data in Japan. (author)

  10. CO2, Temperature, and Soil Moisture Interactions Affect NDVI and Reproductive Phenology in Old-Field Plant Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, C.; Weltzin, J.; Norby, R.

    2004-12-01

    Plant community composition and ecosystem function may be altered by global atmospheric and climate change, including increased atmospheric [CO2], temperature, and varying precipitation regimes. We are conducting an experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) utilizing open-top chambers to administer experimental treatments of elevated CO2 (+300 ppm), warming (+ 3 degrees Celsius), and varying soil moisture availability to experimental plant communities constructed of seven common old-field species, including C3 and C4 grasses, forbs, and legumes. During 2004 we monitored plant community phenology (NDVI) and plant reproductive phenology. Early in the year, NDVI was greater in wet treatment plots, and was unaffected by main effects of temperature or CO2. This result suggests that early in the season warming is insufficient to affect early canopy development. Differences in soil moisture sustained throughout the winter and into early spring may constitute an important control on early canopy greenup. Elevated CO2 alleviated detrimental effects of warming on NDVI, but only early in the season. As ambient temperatures increased, elevated temperatures negatively impacted NDVI only in the dry plots. Wetter conditions ameliorate the effects of warming on canopy greenness during the warmer seasons of the year. Warming increased rates of bolting, number of inflorescences, and time to reproductive maturity for Andropogon virginicus (a C4 bunchgrass). Solidago Canadensis (a C3 late-season forb) also produced flowers earlier in elevated temperatures. Conversely, none of the C3 grasses and forbs that bolt or flower in late spring or early summer responded to temperature or CO2. Results indicate that warming and drought may impact plant community phenology, and plant species reproductive phenology. Clearly community phenology is driven by complex interactions among temperature, water, and CO2 that change throughout the season. Our data stresses the importance of

  11. Effect Of Bird Manure On Cotton Plants Grown On Soils Sampled ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cotton plant had a better development and growth when bird manure was only applied to soil or combined with mineral fertilizer and when cotton was grown on a soil where the previous crops were cereals (maize or sorghum). Planting cotton on a soil where the previous crop grown was maize or sorghum had no significant ...

  12. Soil Carbon in North American, Arctic, and Boreal Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajtha, K.; Bailey, V. L.; Schuur, E.; McGuire, D.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2017-12-01

    Globally, soils contain more than 3 times as much as C as the atmosphere and >4 times more C than the world's biota, therefore even small changes in soil C stocks could lead to large changes in the atmospheric concentration of CO2. Since SOCCR-1, improvements have been made in quantifying stocks and uncertainties in stocks of soil C to a depth of 1 m across North America. Estimates for soil carbon stocks in the US (CONUS + Alaska) range from 151 - 162 Pg C, based on extensive sampling and analysis. Estimates for Canada average about 262 Pg C, but sampling is not as extensive. Soil C for Mexico is calculated as 18 Pg C, but there is a great deal of uncertainty surrounding this value. These soil carbon stocks are sensitive to agricultural management, land use and land cover change, and development and loss of C-rich soils such as wetlands. Climate change is a significant threat although may be partially mitigated by increased plant production. Carbon stored in permafrost zone circumpolar soils is equal to 1330-1580 Pg C, almost twice that contained in the atmosphere and about order of magnitude greater than carbon contained in plant biomass, woody debris, and litter in the boreal and tundra biomes combined. Surface air temperature change is amplified in high latitude regions such that Arctic temperature rise is about 2.5 times faster than for the globe as a whole, and thus 5 - 15% of this carbon is considered vulnerable to release to the atmosphere by the year 2100 following the current trajectory of global and Arctic warming. This amount is likely to be up to an order of magnitude larger loss than the increase in carbon stored in plant biomass under the same changing conditions. Models of soil organic matter dynamics have been greatly improved in the last decade by including greater process-level understanding of factors that affect soil C stabilization and destabilization, yet structural features of many models are still limited in representing Arctic and boreal

  13. Biotransfer of Cd along a soil-plant- mealybug-ladybird food chain: A comparison with host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingmin; Zhang, Can; Qiu, Baoli; Ashraf, Umair; Azad, Rashid; Wu, Jianhui; Ali, Shaukat

    2017-02-01

    Agro-ecosystem contamination by the heavy metals present in different agricultural products is a serious challenge faced by the living organisms. This study explains the cadmium (Cd) transfer from soils contaminated with different cadmium concentrations through a plant (eggplant and tomato) - mealybug (Dysmicoccus neobrevipes) - predator (Cryptolaemus-montrouzieri) food chain. The soils were amended with Cd at the rates of 0, 12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg (w/w). Our findings showed that considerably higher Cd transfer through tomato plant. Cadmium was biomagnified during soil-root transfer while bio-minimization of Cd was observed for shoot-mealybug - ladybird transfer. Our results further showed sequestration of Cd during the metamorphosis of ladybird beetle whilst transfer of Cd through soil-plant-mealybug-ladybird multi-trophic food chain increased in a dose dependent manner. Our results emphasize the need of further studies to elaborate possible mechanisms of Cd bio-minimization by plants, mealybugs and ladybirds observed during this study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fungal Community Responses to Past and Future Atmospheric CO2 Differ by Soil Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, J. Christopher; Fay, Philip A.; Polley, H. Wayne; Jackson, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    Soils sequester and release substantial atmospheric carbon, but the contribution of fungal communities to soil carbon balance under rising CO2 is not well understood. Soil properties likely mediate these fungal responses but are rarely explored in CO2 experiments. We studied soil fungal communities in a grassland ecosystem exposed to a preindustrial-to-future CO2 gradient (250 to 500 ppm) in a black clay soil and a sandy loam soil. Sanger sequencing and pyrosequencing of the rRNA gene cluster revealed that fungal community composition and its response to CO2 differed significantly between soils. Fungal species richness and relative abundance of Chytridiomycota (chytrids) increased linearly with CO2 in the black clay (P 0.7), whereas the relative abundance of Glomeromycota (arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi) increased linearly with elevated CO2 in the sandy loam (P = 0.02, R2 = 0.63). Across both soils, decomposition rate was positively correlated with chytrid relative abundance (r = 0.57) and, in the black clay soil, fungal species richness. Decomposition rate was more strongly correlated with microbial biomass (r = 0.88) than with fungal variables. Increased labile carbon availability with elevated CO2 may explain the greater fungal species richness and Chytridiomycota abundance in the black clay soil, whereas increased phosphorus limitation may explain the increase in Glomeromycota at elevated CO2 in the sandy loam. Our results demonstrate that soil type plays a key role in soil fungal responses to rising atmospheric CO2. PMID:25239904

  15. Investigation of some Macro and Micro Elements in Soil and Sugarcane Plant in Elguneid Scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassona, R.K.

    1996-09-01

    The contents of some macro nutrients(N,Mg,P,K and Ca), micro nutrients(Mn,Fe,Cu,Zn and Mo) and other elements in sugarcane plant and soil samples in Elguneid scheme were evaluated in this study.During this study soil and plant samples were taken from different depths and different sites.Plant samples were collected from the same sites at 6 and 10 months age.The objectives of this work were to determine the nutrient contents of soil and sugarcane plant, to relate the nutrient contents of soil with that of plant and to compare the average elemental content of soil and plant with the available literature.To achieve the above mentioned goals,atomic absorption spectrometry(AAS), X-ray fluorescence,flame photometry,kjeldahl method and colorimetry were used for the elemental analysis of soil and plant samples. It was found that the elemental concentration decreases with soil depth increase.There were no seasonal variations in the elemental in soil and plant samples.The data obtained in this work for soil and plant samples were comparable to those reported in litreature in other areas.Using the elemental concentration ratios in soil and plant samples referred to the concentration of iron which is an indicator of soil as a source. The enrichment factor for some nutrients was calculated that N, P, and K have some sources other than soil, such as fertilizers and pesticides. (Author)

  16. Investigation of some Macro and Micro Elements in Soil and Sugarcane Plant in Elguneid Scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassona, R K [Sudan Atomic Energy Commission, Khartoum (Sudan)

    1996-09-01

    The contents of some macro nutrients(N,Mg,P,K and Ca), micro nutrients(Mn,Fe,Cu,Zn and Mo) and other elements in sugarcane plant and soil samples in Elguneid scheme were evaluated in this study.During this study soil and plant samples were taken from different depths and different sites.Plant samples were collected from the same sites at 6 and 10 months age.The objectives of this work were to determine the nutrient contents of soil and sugarcane plant, to relate the nutrient contents of soil with that of plant and to compare the average elemental content of soil and plant with the available literature.To achieve the above mentioned goals,atomic absorption spectrometry(AAS), X-ray fluorescence,flame photometry,kjeldahl method and colorimetry were used for the elemental analysis of soil and plant samples. It was found that the elemental concentration decreases with soil depth increase.There were no seasonal variations in the elemental in soil and plant samples.The data obtained in this work for soil and plant samples were comparable to those reported in litreature in other areas.Using the elemental concentration ratios in soil and plant samples referred to the concentration of iron which is an indicator of soil as a source. The enrichment factor for some nutrients was calculated that N, P, and K have some sources other than soil, such as fertilizers and pesticides. (Author). 85 refs., 27 tabs., 20 figs.

  17. A New and Improved Carbon Dioxide Isotope Analyzer for Understanding Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y. W.; Berman, E. S.; Owano, T. G.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Oikawa, P. Y.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Still, C. J.; Gardner, A.; Baer, D. S.; Rastogi, B.

    2015-12-01

    Stable CO2 isotopes provide information on biogeochemical processes that occur at the soil-plant-atmosphere interface. While δ13C measurement can provide information on the sources of the CO2, be it photosynthesis, natural gas combustion, other fossil fuel sources, landfills or other sources, δ18O, and δ17O are thought to be determined by the hydrological cycling of the CO2. Though researchers have called for analytical tools for CO2 isotope measurements that are reliable and field-deployable, developing such instrument remains a challenge. The carbon dioxide isotope analyzer developed by Los Gatos Research (LGR) uses LGR's patented Off-Axis ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy) technology and incorporates proprietary internal thermal control for high sensitivity and optimal instrument stability. This new and improved analyzer measures CO2 concentration as well as δ13C, δ18O, and δ17O from CO2 at natural abundance (150-2500 ppm). The laboratory precision is ±200 ppb (1σ) in CO2 at 1 s, with a long-term (2 min) precision of ±20 ppb. The 1-second precision for both δ13C and δ18O is 0.7 ‰, and for δ17O is 1.8 ‰. The long-term (2 min) precision for both δ13C and δ18O is 0.08 ‰, and for δ17O is 0.18 ‰. The instrument has improved precision, stability and user interface over previous LGR CO2 isotope instruments and can be easily programmed for periodic referencing and sampling from different sources when coupled with LGR's multiport inlet unit (MIU). We have deployed two of these instruments at two different field sites, one at Twitchell Island in Sacramento County, CA to monitor the CO2 isotopic fluxes from an alfalfa field from 6/29/2015-7/13/2015, and the other at the Wind River Experimental Forest in Washington to monitor primarily the oxygen isotopes of CO2 within the canopy from 8/4/2015 through mid-November 2015. Methodology, laboratory development and testing and field performance are presented.

  18. Biological Invasion Influences the Outcome of Plant-Soil Feedback in the Invasive Plant Species from the Brazilian Semi-arid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Tancredo Augusto Feitosa; de Andrade, Leonaldo Alves; Freitas, Helena; da Silva Sandim, Aline

    2017-05-30

    Plant-soil feedback is recognized as the mutual interaction between plants and soil microorganisms, but its role on the biological invasion of the Brazilian tropical seasonal dry forest by invasive plants still remains unclear. Here, we analyzed and compared the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) communities and soil characteristics from the root zone of invasive and native plants, and tested how these AMF communities affect the development of four invasive plant species (Cryptostegia madagascariensis, Parkinsonia aculeata, Prosopis juliflora, and Sesbania virgata). Our field sampling revealed that AMF diversity and frequency of the Order Diversisporales were positively correlated with the root zone of the native plants, whereas AMF dominance and frequency of the Order Glomerales were positively correlated with the root zone of invasive plants. We grew the invasive plants in soil inoculated with AMF species from the root zone of invasive (I changed ) and native (I unaltered ) plant species. We also performed a third treatment with sterilized soil inoculum (control). We examined the effects of these three AMF inoculums on plant dry biomass, root colonization, plant phosphorous concentration, and plant responsiveness to mycorrhizas. We found that I unaltered and I changed promoted the growth of all invasive plants and led to a higher plant dry biomass, mycorrhizal colonization, and P uptake than control, but I changed showed better results on these variables than I unaltered . For plant responsiveness to mycorrhizas and fungal inoculum effect on plant P concentration, we found positive feedback between changed-AMF community (I changed ) and three of the studied invasive plants: C. madagascariensis, P. aculeata, and S. virgata.

  19. Natural radioactivity in soil around Baoji coal-fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lingqing; Lu Xinwei; Jia Xiaodan; Wang Fengling

    2007-01-01

    Based on systematic sampling of soil around the Baoji coal-fired power plant, the activity concentrations of the natural radionuclides 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K were determined using γ-ray spectrometry. Each eight soil samples were collected within the range of 1 km of the plant, and at a distance of 1 and 3 km from the plant, respectively. Two layers of soil sample [0-25cm(layer A), 25cm-50cm(layer B)] were collected at each location. The concentrations of these radionuclides are different horizontally and vertically. The measured specific activity of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K were compared with the average activity of other cities in Shaanxi soil. The results show that 226 Ra concentrations in layer A were higher than those in layer B and concentrations of 232 Th and 40 K in layer B were greater than those in layer A in soil samples collected at 1 km. (authors)

  20. Contamination of Soil, Water, Plant and Dust by Zinc, Lead and Cadmium in Southwest Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastaran Esmaeilpourfard

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Due to mining, considerable amounts of heavy metal bearing mineralsare scattered in the atmosphere in the form of dust and make the surrounding air, water and soils polluted.Runoff water movingfrom the mountainstowardsplains may also transport heavy metals from mines to the soils.One type ofpollutions is contamination withheavy metals.The purpose of the present research has been to investigate the effect of heavy metals of mine on soil, water, plant and dust pollution. Materials and Methods: Gushfil mine is located 3 kilometers southwest of Sepahanshahr, Isfahan. Soil profiles were dug 500 meters apart along three parallel transects, between east of Sepahanshahr and Gushfil mine. The profiles were described and samples were collected from their horizons. Ore, wells, plant and dust were sampled as well. Total concentrations of lead, zinc and cadmium were measured in the samples. To find the origin of polluted dust and soil, lead isotopes contents in the samples were measured and regressional relationships between the ratios of these contents were investigated. Results and Discussion Sepahanshahr soils are not contaminated by zinc, lead and cadmium, but within a distance of one to two kilometers from the Gushfil mine, the soils are polluted by zinc and lead. Cadmium contamination was not observed in the studied soils. In all of the soils, the heavy metals content varies downwards irregularly. The reason for this variation trend is that the studied soils are alluvial. In different periods of time, alluvium parent materials have been transported by runoff water from the lead and zinc mines towards the alluvial piedmont plain. The studied heavy metals have been distributed irregularly in different horizons of the soils that have been formed in these parent materials. Lead and cadmium concentrations of drinking water in the studied area are much higher than the maximum amount allowed by the World Health Organization. Cadmium content in

  1. Reducing plant uptake of PAHs by cationic surfactant-enhanced soil retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Li, E-mail: ll19840106@zju.edu.c [Department of Environmental Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310028 (China); Zhu Lizhong, E-mail: zlz@zju.edu.c [Department of Environmental Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310028 (China); Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecological Health, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310029 (China)

    2009-06-15

    Reducing the transfer of contaminants from soils to plants is a promising approach to produce safe agricultural products grown on contaminated soils. In this study, 0-400 mg/kg cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB) and dodecylpyridinium bromide (DDPB) were separately utilized to enhance the sorption of PAHs onto soils, thereby reducing the transfer of PAHs from soil to soil solution and subsequently to plants. Concentrations of phenanthrene and pyrene in vegetables grown in contaminated soils treated with the cationic surfactants were lower than those grown in the surfactant-free control. The maximum reductions of phenanthrene and pyrene were 66% and 51% for chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum coronarium L.), 62% and 71% for cabbage (Brassica campestris L.), and 34% and 53% for lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), respectively. Considering the impacts of cationic surfactants on plant growth and soil microbial activity, CTMAB was more appropriate to employ, and the most effective dose was 100-200 mg/kg. - Cationic surfactants could enhance the retention of PAHs in soil, and reduce PAH transfer to and accumulation in vegetables.

  2. Reducing plant uptake of PAHs by cationic surfactant-enhanced soil retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Li; Zhu Lizhong

    2009-01-01

    Reducing the transfer of contaminants from soils to plants is a promising approach to produce safe agricultural products grown on contaminated soils. In this study, 0-400 mg/kg cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB) and dodecylpyridinium bromide (DDPB) were separately utilized to enhance the sorption of PAHs onto soils, thereby reducing the transfer of PAHs from soil to soil solution and subsequently to plants. Concentrations of phenanthrene and pyrene in vegetables grown in contaminated soils treated with the cationic surfactants were lower than those grown in the surfactant-free control. The maximum reductions of phenanthrene and pyrene were 66% and 51% for chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum coronarium L.), 62% and 71% for cabbage (Brassica campestris L.), and 34% and 53% for lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), respectively. Considering the impacts of cationic surfactants on plant growth and soil microbial activity, CTMAB was more appropriate to employ, and the most effective dose was 100-200 mg/kg. - Cationic surfactants could enhance the retention of PAHs in soil, and reduce PAH transfer to and accumulation in vegetables.

  3. Interactions in Natural Colloid Systems "Biosolids" - Soil and Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinichenko, Kira V.; Nikovskaya, Galina N.; Ulberg, Zoya R.

    2016-04-01

    The "biosolids" are complex biocolloid system arising in huge amounts (mln tons per year) from biological municipal wastewater treatment. These contain clusters of nanoparticles of heavy metal compounds (in slightly soluble or unsoluble forms, such as phosphates, sulphates, carbonates, hydroxides, and etc.), cells, humic substances and so on, involved in exopolysaccharides (EPS) net matrix. One may consider that biosolids are the natural nanocomposite. Due to the presence of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and other macro- and microelements (heavy metals), vitamins, aminoacids, etc., the biosolids are a depot of bioelements for plant nutrition. Thus, it is generally recognized that most rationally to utilize them for land application. For this purpose the biocolloid process was developed in biosolids system by initiation of microbial vital ability followed by the synthesis of EPS, propagation of ecologically important microorganisms, loosening of the structure and weakening of the coagulation contacts between biosolids colloids, but the structure integrity maintaining [1,2]. It was demonstrated that the applying of biosolids with metabolizing microorganisms to soil provided the improving soil structure, namely the increasing of waterstable aggregates content (70% vs. 20%). It occurs due to flocculation ability of biosolids EPS. The experimental modelling of mutual interactions in systems of soils - biosolids (with metabolizing microorganisms) were realized and their colloid and chemical mechanisms were formulated [3]. As it is known, the most harmonious plant growth comes at a prolonged entering of nutrients under the action of plant roots exudates which include pool of organic acids and polysaccharides [4]. Special investigations showed that under the influence of exudates excreted by growing plants, the biosolids microelements can release gradually from immobilized state into environment and are able to absorb by plants. Thus, the biosolids can serve as an active

  4. Sr isotope characterization of atmospheric inputs to soils along a climate gradient of the Chilean Coastal Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeser, Ralf; Schuessler, Jan A.; Floor, Geerke H.; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm

    2017-04-01

    mobile soil layer to 0.70571 (n = 25). We find that atmospheric sources (87Sr/86Srseawater = 0.709234; [2]) contribute about 13 % of Sr to the soil and are a minor but not negligible fraction in comparison to weathering supply from saprolite. Furthermore, the 87Sr/86Sr ratios determined for saprolite samples are in good agreement with the values reported for the local Illapel Plutonic Complex [3]. Hence, the top-soil atmospheric inputs are potentially influencing the plant's strategies of nutrient uplift, ultimately controlled by the plants' nutrient demand as a function of climate. [1] Capo, R. C., Stewart, B. W., and Chadwick, O. A., 1998, Strontium isotopes as tracers of ecosystem processes: theory and methods: Geoderma, v. 82, no. 1-3, p. 197-225. [2] DePaolo, D. J., and Ingram, B. L., 1985, High-resolution stratigraphy with strontium isotopes: Science, v. 227, no. 4689, p. 938-941. [3] Parada, M. A., Nyström, J. O., and Levi, B., 1999, Multiple sources for the Coastal Batholith of central Chile (31-34˚ S): geochemical and Sr-Nd isotopic evidence and tectonic implications: Lithos, v. 46, no. 3, p. 505-521.

  5. Effects of plant urease inhibitor on crop nutrition and soil characters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhengyin; Xu Weihong; Huang Yun; Yuan Lujiang; Jia Zhongyuan; Zhou Jun; Ding Shuying

    2002-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of 15 N-urea and 4 kinds of plant materials (P 1 , P 2 , P 3 and P 4 ) as urease inhibitor on sorghum and rice nutrition and soil characters. The results indicated that the growth, above-ground parts and roots weight of rice and sorghum were respectively promoted by 4 plant urease inhibitors and P 1 with little change of chl.a/chl.b ratios in these treatments. The content of amino acid in rice leaf and utilization rate of nitrogen by rice were enhanced by 12.9%-25.1% and 5.2%-7.7% respectively, and the utilization rate of nitrogen by sorghum was improved by urease inhibitor treatments (except P 1 ). Plant urease inhibitor could obviously increase the apparent utilization rate of nitrogen by 4.3%-19.2% for two crops and improve phosphorus and potassium uptake by rice plant but decrease phosphorus and potassium uptake by sorghum plant. The contents of soil alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen were increased by plant urease inhibitor under two cultivated condition. The inhibition time of plant urease inhibitor to soil urease was short and it disappeared as 36 days of rice growth under flooded condition, while the activities of soil urease were decreased by 10.6%-18.3% at 48 days of sorghum growth in upland soil

  6. Differential responses of soil bacteria, fungi, archaea and protists to plant species richness and plant functional group identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dassen, S.; Cortois, R.; Martens, Henk; De Hollander, M.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; van der Putten, W.H.; De Deyn, G.B.

    2017-01-01

    Plants are known to influence belowground microbial community structure along their roots, but the impacts of plant species richness and plant functional group (FG) identity on microbial communities in the bulk soil are still not well understood. Here, we used 454-pyrosequencing to analyse the soil

  7. Exchange of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) between soils and atmosphere under various CO2 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunk, Rüdiger; Behrendt, Thomas; Yi, Zhigang; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2017-06-01

    A new continuous integrated cavity output spectroscopy analyzer and an automated soil chamber system were used to investigate the exchange processes of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) between soils and the atmosphere under laboratory conditions. The exchange patterns of OCS between soils and the atmosphere were found to be highly dependent on soil moisture and ambient CO2 concentration. With increasing soil moisture, OCS exchange ranged from emission under dry conditions to an uptake within an optimum moisture range, followed again by emission at high soil moisture. Elevated CO2 was found to have a significant impact on the exchange rate and direction as tested with several soils. There is a clear tendency toward a release of OCS at higher CO2 levels (up to 7600 ppm), which are typical for the upper few centimeters within soils. At high soil moisture, the release of OCS increased sharply. Measurements after chloroform vapor application show that there is a biotic component to the observed OCS exchange. Furthermore, soil treatment with the fungi inhibitor nystatin showed that fungi might be the dominant OCS consumers in the soils we examined. We discuss the influence of soil moisture and elevated CO2 on the OCS exchange as a change in the activity of microbial communities. Physical factors such as diffusivity that are governed by soil moisture also play a role. Comparing KM values of the enzymes to projected soil water CO2 concentrations showed that competitive inhibition is unlikely for carbonic anhydrase and PEPCO but might occur for RubisCO at higher CO2 concentrations.

  8. Competition increases sensitivity of wheat (Triticum aestivum) to biotic plant-soil feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hol, W H Gera; de Boer, Wietse; ten Hooven, Freddy; van der Putten, Wim H

    2013-01-01

    Plant-soil feedback (PSF) and plant competition play an important role in structuring vegetation composition, but their interaction remains unclear. Recent studies suggest that competing plants could dilute pathogenic effects, whereas the standing view is that competition may increase the sensitivity of the focal plant to PSF. In agro-ecosystems each of these two options would yield contrasting outcomes: reduced versus enhanced effects of weeds on crop biomass production. To test the effect of competition on sensitivity to PSF, we grew Triticum aestivum (Common wheat) with and without competition from a weed community composed of Vicia villosa, Chenopodium album and Myosotis arvensis. Plants were grown in sterilized soil, with or without living field inoculum from 4 farms in the UK. In the conditioning phase, field inocula had both positive and negative effects on T. aestivum shoot biomass, depending on farm. In the feedback phase the differences between shoot biomass in T. aestivum monoculture on non-inoculated and inoculated soils had mostly disappeared. However, T. aestivum plants growing in mixtures in the feedback phase were larger on non-inoculated soil than on inoculated soil. Hence, T. aestivum was more sensitive to competition when the field soil biota was present. This was supported by the statistically significant negative correlation between shoot biomass of weeds and T. aestivum, which was absent on sterilized soil. In conclusion, competition in cereal crop-weed systems appears to increase cereal crop sensitivity to soil biota.

  9. Major controlling factors and predictions for cadmium transfer from the soil into spinach plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhenfei; Ding, Qiong; Wei, Dongpu; Li, Jumei; Chen, Shibao; Ma, Yibing

    2013-07-01

    Predicting the mobility, bioavailability and transfer of cadmium (Cd) in the soil-plant system is of great importance with regards to food safety and environmental management. In this study, the transfer characteristics of Cd (exogenous salts) from a wide range of Chinese soils to spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) were investigated. The major controlling factors and prediction equations for Cd transfer in the soil-plant system were also investigated. The results showed that plant Cd concentration was positively correlated with soil Cd concentration. The maximum transfer factor (ratio of the Cd concentration in the plant to that in the soil) was found in acid soils. The extended Freundlich-type function was able to describe the Cd transfer from soil to spinach plants. Combining soil total Cd, pH and organic carbon (OC) content in the prediction equation greatly improved the correlation performance compared with predictions based on total Cd only. A slight protection effect of OC on Cd uptake was observed at low soil Cd concentrations. The results are a useful tool that can be used to predict Cd transfer from soil to plant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mercury in plants and soils of the French-speaking part of Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinche, J P; Dvorak, V

    1975-01-01

    Samples of plants and soils from an agricultural (Changins/Nyon), industrial (Monthey) and urban (Le Vallon/Lausanne) area as well as samples from regions remote from the sources of atmospheric pollution have been analyzed for mercury. A contamination by the mercury of samples from the Monthey area could be ascertained. However, the average mercury content of 37 samples of leaves of trees and shrubs collected during fall 1974 in the Monthey area was lower by 53.2% as compared to the average value obtained in 1973;, this fact can be explained by the improved anti-pollution action taken by the chemical industry. No methyl mercury was found in the few samples from Monthey area analyzed for methyl mercury (4 samples of vegetables and one sample of tobacco leaves). On the other hand, all mushrooms, were they gathered in an area close or remote from the sources of mercury pollution, contained traces of methyl mercury (ranging between 1.9 and 28% of the total mercury content). Likewise, 4 samples of lichens gathered in Arolla (Valais) and La Fretaz/Bullet (Jura vaudois), both being remote mountain regions, did contain traces of methyl mercury (between 4.8 and 6.5% of total mercury content). Soils from Changins into which every other year, since 11 years, wheat treated with organomercury fungicides was sown, did not contain more mercury than soil from forests or mountain meadows. Samples of foliage of trees and shrubs from the vicinity of the municipal garbage combustion plant at Vallon (Lausanne) were clearly polluted by mercury. 18 references, 9 tables.

  11. Soil Moisture and Turgidity of Selected Robusta Coffee Clones on Alluvial Plain with Seasonal Rainfall Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy Erwiyono

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Observation on the seasonal variations of hydrological condition and turgidity of selected Robusta coffee clones has been carried out in Kaliwining Experimental Station, Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute in Jember. The aim was to evaluate the effect of hydrological variation on the coffee plants and the degree of soil moisture effect on plant performance. Experimental site overlays on alluvial plain, + 45 m a.s.l., 8o 15’ South with D rainfall type. Observation was conducted by survey method at the experimental plots of organic fertilizer and nitogen treatments on selected Robusta coffee clones derived from rooted cuttings, i.e. BP 436, BP 42, BP 936 and BP 358. Observation was only conducted at the experimental blocks of organic matter trials of 20 l/tree/year at nitrogen (Urea application of locally recommanded rate during the subsequent years of 1999 to 2001. Parameters observed included plant turgidity and soil moisture content of three different depths, i.e. 0—20, 20—40 and 40—60 cm and the weather. Observation was carried out in five replicates designed as blocks of barn manure treatment and N-fertilizer of recommended rate as basal fertilizer. The results showed that meteorological condition and soil moisture of experimental site through the years have seasonal patterns following the seasonal pattern of rainfall. Compared to other meteorological characteristics, relative humidity dominantly determined evaporation and plant turgidity. Plant turgi-dity was not only determined by soil moisture condition, but also atmospheric demand. When relative humidity (RH was relatively high, plant turgidity was relatively stable although soil moisture of surface layers was very low, and the reversal when soil moisture content was high plant turgidity was controlled by atmospheric demand (relative humidity. With a 3—4 dry month period, relative turgidity of the coffee plants was relatively stable above 82%, except when soil

  12. Searching for plant root traits to improve soil cohesion and resist soil erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Baets, Sarah; Smyth, Kevin; Denbigh, Tom; Weldon, Laura; Higgins, Ben; Matyjaszkiewicz, Antoni; Meersmans, Jeroen; Chenchiah, Isaac; Liverpool, Tannie; Quine, Tim; Grierson, Claire

    2017-04-01

    Soil erosion poses a serious threat to future food and environmental security. Soil erosion protection measures are therefore of great importance for soil conservation and food security. Plant roots have proven to be very effective in stabilizing the soil and protecting the soil against erosion. However, no clear insights are yet obtained into the root traits that are responsible for root-soil cohesion. This is important in order to better select the best species for soil protection. Research using Arabidopsis mutants has made great progress towards explaining how root systems are generated by growth, branching, and responses to gravity, producing mutants that affect root traits. In this study, the performance of selected Arabidopsis mutants is analyzed in three root-soil cohesion assays. Measurements of detachment, uprooting force and soil detachment are here combined with the microscopic analysis of root properties, such as the presence, length and density of root hairs in this case. We found that Arabidopsis seedlings with root hairs (wild type, wer myb23, rsl4) were more difficult to detach from gel media than hairless (cpc try) or short haired (rsl4, rhd2) roots. Hairy roots (wild type, wer myb23) on mature, non-reproductive rosettes were more difficult to uproot from compost or clay soil than hairless roots (cpc try). At high root densities, erosion rates from soils with hairless roots (cpc try) were as much as 10 times those seen from soils occupied by roots with hairs (wer myb23, wild type). We find t