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Sample records for soil iii investigating

  1. Radionuclide diffusion in soils. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cipakova, A.; Szabova, T.

    1988-01-01

    Samples were taken of five soil types for determining diffusion coefficients, namely chernozem, illimerized brown soil, degraded chernozem, gleizated brown soil and heavy loamy brown soil. 5 layers of soil having a thickness of 1 cm each were placed in diffusion columns. 20 ml of water with 0.45 MBq 85 Sr of distilled water was poured over the columns. 10 ml of distilled water was poured over the columns every 5 days for monitoring the effect of the amount of precipitation and its distribution - a similarity with rainfall in the driest month, 41 ml of distilled water was then poured over the column every 5 days or 82 ml of distilled water every 10 days - imitating the month with the highest rainfall level. The effect of salts and various concentrations of salt mixtures on the value of the diffusion coefficient were monitored in solutions of NaNO 3 , KNO 3 and Ca(NO 3 ) 2 with added activity 0.45 MGq of 85 SrCl 2 . Diffusion was monitored for 101 days. All measured values are tabulated. The smallest diffusion coefficient was found in chernozem in the presence of H 2 O and the highest value was found in illimerized brown soil in the presence of 0.15 M of KNO 3 . (E.S.). 2 tabs., 10 refs

  2. Mobility and retention of micronutrients in soil : Part III. Investigation on the influence of various external factors, NPK-fertilizers and soil amending agents on the mobility and retention of manganese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Santikari, A.K.; Banerji, K.C.

    1980-01-01

    Investigations on the mobility and retention of manganese through Sindri red sandy clay loam of pH 7.4 and Ranchi clay loam of pH 5.6 have been carried out using the radiotracer 54 Mn. The vertical distribution of manganese in these soils showed almost sharp fall upto a depth of 12 to 14 cm and thereafter it tended to attain the saturation. Variations have been marked in the degrees of manganese retention at the top surface layers of the concerned soils. Influence of various NPK fertilizers and soil amending agents, at various application levels, have been studied on the mobility, retention and leaching loss of manganese in the prementioned soils. Marked variations have been recorded and discussed. (author)

  3. Adsorption and desorption of Am(III) on calcareous soil and its parent material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Weijuan; Zhang Fuming; Tao Zuyi

    2005-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of Am(III) on a calcareous soil (sierozem) and its parent material (loess) were studied by batch technique. The molarities of the Am(III) aqueous solutions were less than 5 x 10 -9 mol/l. High adsorbability was found of Am(III) on the calcareous soil and its parent material. In order to decrease the adsorption and, hence, to investigate the adsorption characteristics properly, stable Eu 3+ as hold back carrier and analogue was added to the aqueous solution. The relative contributions of CaCO 3 , organic matter (OM) to the Am(III) adsorption on calcareous soil and its parent material were investigated. The adsorption and desorption isotherms of Am(III) on untreated soil and loess and the three kinds of treated soils and three kinds of treated loesses to remove CaCO 3 , OM and both CaCO 3 and OM were determined, respectively. It was found that all isotherms were linear, the average distribution coefficients (K d ) for the untreated soil and for the untreated loess were almost equal, while there was an obvious difference between the values of the average distribution coefficients (K d ) for the treated soil and the treated loess to remove CaCO 3 or OM. The adsorption-desorption hysteresis on the untreated and treated soils and loesses actually occurred and there was an obvious difference between the hysteresis coefficients on both the corresponding treated soil and loess. It can be concluded that the adsorbability of Am(III) on calcareous soil is similar to that on its parent material, and that the contributions of CaCO 3 and OM to the Am(III) adsorption by the untreated soil are different from those by the untreated parent material. (author)

  4. INFLUENCES OF SOIL PROPERTIES ON CHROMIUM (III SORPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Salmasi, F. Salmasi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil adsorbing properties reduce sorption ability of the metal, which in turn may influence decision for remediation at contaminated sites. The objective of this study is presentation of a model based on soil properties to estimate the sorption of Cr(III in chromium contaminated soils. Twenty uncontaminated soil samples, with properties similar to the contaminated soils were selected from around of city of Tabriz and treated with Cr as CrCl3. A multiple regression analysis with statgraph software was used to drive an expression that related Cr sorption to common soil properties. The results showed that four soil properties were important in determining the amount of Cr adsorbed by the soils including pH, cation exchange capacity, total inorganic carbon and clay content with nearly 80% variability in Cr sorption and a reasonable level of confidence by this model. The obtained model suggested that Cr(III sorption was enhanced by higher soil pH, more total inorganic carbon, more clay, and higher cation exchange capacity.

  5. Soil Properties Database of Spanish Soils Volume III.- Extremadura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueba, C; Millan, R.; Schmid, T.; Roquero, C; Magister, M.

    1998-01-01

    The soil vulnerability determines the sensitivity of the soil after an accidental radioactive contamination due to Cs-13 7 and Sr-90. The Departamento de Impacto Ambiental de la Energia of CIEMAT is carrying out an assessment of the radiological vulnerability of the different Spanish soils found on the Iberian Peninsula. This requires the knowledge of the soil properties for the various types of existing soils. In order to achieve this aim, a bibliographical compilation of soil profiles has been made to characterize the different soil types and create a database of their properties. Depending on the year of publication and the type of documentary source, the information compiled from the available bibliography is very heterogeneous. Therefore, an important effort has been made to normalize and process the information prior to its incorporation to the database. This volume presents the criteria applied to normalized and process the data as well as the soil properties of the various soil types belonging to the Comunidad Autonoma de Extremadura. (Author) 50 refs

  6. Soil stabilization field trial : interim report III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Shrinkage cracks in cement-stabilized bases/subbase can be alleviated by specifying the right cement dosage, or by other additives/procedures that suppress crack susceptibility. A field trial of six 1000 ft test sections to investigate several altern...

  7. The Use of Soil in Criminal Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Lorna; Fitzpatrick, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Forensic soil science, as a newly developed discipline of soil science, has matured to the extent that well-defined questions and successful crime scene investigations are being addressed in increasingly refined ways to assist law enforcement agencies. Soils, rocks, regolith, minerals and man-made mineral particles such as bricks (i.e. referred to "human-made" soil materials) are being used in specialised forensic investigations to associate/disassociate a sample taken from an item, such as shoes, clothing, shovel or vehicle, with a specific location. The majority of forensic cases involving soil materials are usually overwhelmingly complex, and the challenges of associating relevant information from one source with another, often requires the use and development of sophisticated field and laboratory methods. Through examples from case studies, this presentation will demonstrate how advanced field and laboratory approaches have been critical in developing coherent, predictive, soil models, from landscape to microscopic scales, to help contribute to soil-based criminal investigations in both Australia and Scotland. To demonstrate the critical importance of soil materials in forensic investigations, the following 2 case studies, which tackle difficult problems at a range of scales involving highly complex issues, will be presented: •The use of soil evidence to help solve a double murder case. This investigation used morphological, chemical, physical and mineralogical properties to identify similarities between soil-regolith found on a shovel taken from the suspect's vehicle and wetland soil-regolith subsequently located in the bottom of a quarry (Fitzpatrick and Raven, 2012). •The use of soil and related material to help search and to provide evidence in a murder case. This investigation used soil mineralogical and organic properties to identify similarities between sand found on a shovel and sand subsequently located at a beach. Results illustrate the benefit of

  8. An experimental investigation to characterise soil macroporosity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 119; Issue 5 ... quality monitoring and groundwater pollution assessment due to preferential leaching of solutes and pesticides,study of soil structural properties and infiltration behaviour of soils,investigation of flash floods in rivers, and hydrological ...

  9. Bioavailability of Fe(III) in Natural Soils and the Impact on Mobility of Inorganic Contaminants (Final Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosson, David S. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Cowan, Robert M. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States). Dept. of Environmental Science; Young, Lily Y. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States). Center for Agriculture and the Environment; Hatcherl, Eric L. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Scala, David J. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2005-08-02

    Inorganic contaminants, such as heavy metals and radionuclides, can adhere to insoluble Fe(III) minerals resulting in decreased mobility of these contaminants through subsurface environments. Dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (DIRB), by reducing insoluble Fe(III) to soluble Fe(II), may enhance contaminant mobility. The Savannah River Site, South Carolina (SRS), has been subjected to both heavy metal and radionuclide contamination. The overall objective of this project is to investigate the release of inorganic contaminants such as heavy metals and radionuclides that are bound to solid phase soil Fe complexes and to elucidate the mechanisms for mobilization of these contaminants that can be associated with microbial Fe(III) reduction. This is being accomplished by (i) using uncontaminated and contaminated soils from SRS as prototype systems, (ii) evaluating the diversity of DIRBs within the samples and isolating cultures for further study, (iii) using batch microcosms to evaluate the bioavailability of Fe(III) from pure minerals and SRS soils, (iv) developing kinetic and mass transfer models that reflect the system dynamics, and (v) carrying out soil column studies to elucidate the dynamics and interactions amongst Fe(III) reduction, remineralization and contaminant mobility.

  10. Microbial reduction of Fe(III) and turnover of acetate in Hawaiian soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küsel, Kirsten; Wagner, Christine; Trinkwalter, Tanja; Gössner, Anita S; Bäumler, Rupert; Drake, Harold L

    2002-04-01

    Soils contain anoxic microzones, and acetate is an intermediate during the turnover of soil organic carbon. Due to negligible methanogenic activities in well-drained soils, acetate accumulates under experimentally imposed short-term anoxic conditions. In contrast to forest, agricultural, and prairie soils, grassland soils from Hawaii rapidly consumed rather than formed acetate when incubated under anoxic conditions. Thus, alternative electron acceptors that might be linked to the anaerobic oxidation of soil organic carbon in Hawaiian soils were assessed. Under anoxic conditions, high amounts of Fe(II) were formed by Hawaiian soils as soon as soils were depleted of nitrate. Rates of Fe(II) formation for different soils ranged from 0.01 to 0.31 micromol (g dry weight soil)(-1) h(-1), but were not positively correlated to increasing amounts of poorly crystallized iron oxides. In general, sulfate-reducing and methanogenic activities were negligible. Supplemental acetate was rapidly oxidized to CO2 via the sequential reduction of nitrate and Fe(III) in grassland soil (obtained near Kaena State Park). Supplemental H2 stimulated the formation of Fe(II), but H2-utilizing acetogens appeared to also be involved in the consumption of H2. Approximately 270 micromol Fe(III) (g dry weight soil)(-1) was available for Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, and acetate became a stable end product when Fe(III) was depleted in long-term incubations. Most-probable-number estimates of H2- and acetate-utilizing Fe(III) reducers and of H2-utilizing acetogens were similar. These results indicate that (i) the microbial reduction of Fe(III) is an important electron-accepting process for the anaerobic oxidation of organic matter in Fe(III)-rich Hawaiian soils of volcanic origin, and (ii) acetate, formed by the combined activity of fermentative and acetogenic bacteria, is an important trophic link in anoxic microsites of these soils.

  11. Investigation of Clostridium botulinum group III's mobilome content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woudstra, Cédric; Le Maréchal, Caroline; Souillard, Rozenn; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Auricchio, Bruna; Bano, Luca; Bayon-Auboyer, Marie-Hélène; Koene, Miriam; Mermoud, Isabelle; Brito, Roseane B; Lobato, Francisco C F; Silva, Rodrigo O S; Dorner, Martin B; Fach, Patrick

    2018-02-01

    Clostridium botulinum group III is mainly responsible for botulism in animals. It could lead to high animal mortality rates and, therefore, represents a major environmental and economic concern. Strains of this group harbor the botulinum toxin locus on an unstable bacteriophage. Since the release of the first complete C. botulinum group III genome sequence (strain BKT015925), strains have been found to contain others mobile elements encoding for toxin components. In this study, seven assays targeting toxin genes present on the genetic mobile elements of C. botulinum group III were developed with the objective to better characterize C. botulinum group III strains. The investigation of 110 C. botulinum group III strains and 519 naturally contaminated samples collected during botulism outbreaks in Europe showed alpha-toxin and C2-I/C2-II markers to be systematically associated with type C/D bont-positive samples, which may indicate an important role of these elements in the pathogenicity mechanisms. On the contrary, bont type D/C strains and the related positive samples appeared to contain almost none of the markers tested. Interestingly, 31 bont-negative samples collected on farms after a botulism outbreak revealed to be positive for some of the genetic mobile elements tested. This suggests loss of the bont phage, either in farm environment after the outbreak or during laboratory handling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Kinetic modeling of antimony(III) oxidation and sorption in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yongbing; Mi, Yuting; Zhang, Hua

    2016-10-05

    Kinetic batch and saturated column experiments were performed to study the oxidation, adsorption and transport of Sb(III) in two soils with contrasting properties. Kinetic and column experiment results clearly demonstrated the extensive oxidation of Sb(III) in soils, and this can in return influence the adsorption and transport of Sb. Both sorption capacity and kinetic oxidation rate were much higher in calcareous Huanjiang soil than in acid red Yingtan soil. The results indicate that soil serve as a catalyst in promoting oxidation of Sb(III) even under anaerobic conditions. A PHREEQC model with kinetic formulations was developed to simulate the oxidation, sorption and transport of Sb(III) in soils. The model successfully described Sb(III) oxidation and sorption data in kinetic batch experiment. It was less successful in simulating the reactive transport of Sb(III) in soil columns. Additional processes such as colloid facilitated transport need to be quantified and considered in the model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Soil moisture mapping at Bubnow Wetland using L-band radiometer (ELBARA III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łukowski, Mateusz; Schwank, Mike; Szlązak, Radosław; Wiesmann, Andreas; Marczewski, Wojciech; Usowicz, Bogusław; Usowicz, Jerzy; Rojek, Edyta; Werner, Charles

    2016-04-01

    The study of soil moisture is a scientific challenge. Not only because of large diversity of soils and differences in their water content, but also due to the difficulty of measuring, especially in large scale. On this field of interest several methods to determine the content of water in soil exists. The basic and referential is gravimetric method, which is accurate, but suitable only for small spatial scales and time-consuming. Indirect methods are faster, but need to be validated, for example those based on dielectric properties of materials (e.g. time domain reflectometry - TDR) or made from distance (remote), like brightness temperature measurements. Remote sensing of soil moisture can be performed locally (from towers, drones, planes etc.) or globally (satellites). These techniques can complement and help to verify different models and assumptions. In our studies, we applied spatial statistics to local soil moisture mapping using ELBARA III (ESA L-band radiometer, 1.4 GHz) mounted on tower (6.5 meter height). Our measurements were carried out in natural Bubnow Wetland, near Polesie National Park (Eastern Poland), during spring time. This test-site had been selected because it is representative for one of the biggest wetlands in Europe (1400 km2), called "Western Polesie", localized in Ukraine, Poland and Belarus. We have investigated Bubnow for almost decade, using meteorological and soil moisture stations, conducting campaigns of hand-held measurements and collecting soil samples. Now, due to the possibility of rotation at different incidence angles (as in previous ELBARA systems) and the new azimuth tracking capabilities, we obtained brightness temperature data not only at different distances from the tower, but also around it, in footprints containing different vegetation and soil types. During experiment we collected data at area about 450 m2 by rotating ELBARA's antenna 5-175° in horizontal and 30-70° in vertical plane. This type of approach allows

  14. Magnetooptical investigations on ferromagnetic III-V-semiconductors; Magnetooptische Untersuchungen an ferromagnetischen III-V-Halbleitern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, Andreas

    2009-07-23

    Magnetooptical Kerr effect (MOKE) and Magnetic Circular Dichroism (MCD) have been used to investigate magnetic as well as bandstructure properties of diluted magnetic III-V-semiconductors containing Mn. In these ferromagnetic systems it has been found that the strength of the observed effects depends linearly on the magnetization of the samples with no influence of the external magnetic field. The magnetooptical effects allowed the recording of hysteresis loops of GaMnAs, GaMnSb, InMnAs and InMnSb samples for different temperatures and in the case of GaMnAs also for different alignments of the external magnetic field with respect to the easy axis of magnetization. The Stoner-Wohlfahrt-Model has been used to describe the resulting shapes of the loops yielding the magnetic anisotropy parameters of the samples. For magnetically saturated samples, spectra of MOKE and MCD have been recorded. Contrary to pure III-V-semiconductors, which exhibit lots of sharp resonances due to interband transitions between Landau levels, III-Mn-V-semi-conductors how only very few (or just one) considerably broad resonance(s). Their spectral position(s) do(es) neither depend upon the magnetic field as it would be the case for pure III-V-semiconductors nor the magnetization. Only the amplitude increases linearly with the magnetization. Utilizing a kp-theory it has been possible to describe the observed dependencies. Valence- and conduction-band are split into Landau levels by the external magnetic field and, in addition to the Zeeman-effect, the spin-levels are split by the exchange interaction between the localized electrons of the Mn ions and the free carriers which is proportional to the magnetization of the samples. This splitting is much bigger than the Landau level splitting. Due to an inhomogeneous distribution of the Mn ions and due to the high carrier density the Landau levels are strongly broadened and their structure is not observable. Owing to the high carrier-concentration in

  15. The Efficiency of Strontium-90 Desorption Using Iron (III) Solutions in the Decontamination Process of Radioactive Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Vladimirovna Cheremisina; Vasiliy Sergeev; Varvara Alabusheva; Alexander Fedorov; Alexandra Iliyna

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents the investigation on the estimated efficiency of iron (III) chloride solutions in the decontamination process of radioactive soils with 90 Sr, according to kinetic and thermodynamic characteristics of the desorption process. The specific 90 Sr radioactivity of soil samples was (3.9±0.3)·104 Bq·g. The adsorption isotherms of Sr 2+ and Fe 3+ are described with the Langmuir equation. The values of Gibbs energy G0298 = -4.65 kJ·mol -1 and equilibrium ion exchange constant ...

  16. The Efficiency of Strontium-90 Desorption Using Iron (III Solutions in the Decontamination Process of Radioactive Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Vladimirovna Cheremisina

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the investigation on the estimated efficiency of iron (III chloride solutions in the decontamination process of radioactive soils with 90 Sr, according to kinetic and thermodynamic characteristics of the desorption process. The specific 90 Sr radioactivity of soil samples was (3.9±0.3·104 Bq·g. The adsorption isotherms of Sr 2+ and Fe 3+ are described with the Langmuir equation. The values of Gibbs energy G0298 = -4.65 kJ·mol -1 and equilibrium ion exchange constant Keq = 6,5 confirm the hypothesis of strontium removal from soils with iron (III cations. The effectiveness of the method is substantiated by experimental and calculated results of this study samples of radioactive soils are deactivated in 90% after 9.5 hours, whereas the kinetic constant is 6.77·10 s -1 . The suggested method of soil cleanup with 0.2 M Fe 3+ solutions is optimal and complies with the environmental requirements.

  17. Investigation of iron(III) complex with crown-porphyrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankratov, Denis A., E-mail: pankratov@radio.chem.msu.ru; Dolzhenko, Vladimir D. [Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Stukan, Reonald A. [Semenov Institute of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Al Ansari, Yana F.; Savinkina, Elena V. [Lomonosov Moscow State Academy of Fine Chemical Technology (Russian Federation); Kiselev, Yury M. [Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15

    Iron complex of 5-(4-(((4 Prime -hydroxy-benzo-15-crown-5)-5 Prime -yl)diazo)phenyl)-10,15, 20-triphenylporphyrin was investigated by {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy and EPR. Two Fe sites were identified; they give two differing signals, doublet and wide absorption in a large velocity interval. EPR spectra of solutions of the complex in chloroform at room temperature also show two signals with g = 2.064, A{sub Fe} = 0.032 cm{sup - 1}; g = 2.015, A{sub Fe} = 0.0034 cm{sup - 1}. The doublet asymmetry is studied vs. temperature and normal angle to the sample plane and gamma-beam. The isomer shift {delta} in the doublet varies from 0.25 to 0.41 mm/s in the 360-5 K temperature range, whereas quadruple splitting value is constant, {Delta} {approx} 0.65 mm/s. The relax absorption may be described as a wide singlet ({delta} = 0.30- 0.44 mm/s and {Gamma} = 2.83-3.38 mm/s); its relative area strongly depends on temperature. According to {delta}, both signals are assigned to Fe(III)

  18. Smart system for safe and optimal soil investigation in urban areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Alqadad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the challenges and difficulties experienced during soil investigation in urban areas using drilling machines and soil sampling. The focus is on the consequences of a lack of data on the subsoil profile and presence of utilities, which could cause major accidents with severe economic and social losses, resulting in constriction activities being delayed and urban services being disrupted. This paper describes certain accidents related to soil investigation in Qatar and their consequences, as well as the lessons learned from these accidents. In order to meet the challenges of soil investigation in urban areas, this paper presents a solution based on smart technology, which includes: (i a geotechnical information system with update data concerning the soil profile, soil surface, utilities locations, and water table level; (ii tools for data management, analysis, and visualization; and (iii a user interface that allows authorities, companies, and citizens to access authorized data via a graphic interface, update data, and send messages and alerts in the case of any incident occurring. Finally, the paper presents a promising perspective for the development of smart drilling devices, which record data related to the functioning of a drilling machine and transmit data to the smart soil investigation system. Keywords: Soil investigation, Smart, Urban area, Drill borehole, GIS, Underground utility

  19. Investigation of Clostridium botulinum group III's mobilome content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudstra, Cédric; Maréchal, Le Caroline; Souillard, Rozenn; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Auricchio, Bruna; Bano, Luca; Bayon-Auboyer, Marie Hélène; Koene, Miriam; Mermoud, Isabelle; Brito, Roseane B.; Lobato, Francisco C.F.; Silva, Rodrigo O.S.; Dorner, Martin B.; Fach, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum group III is mainly responsible for botulism in animals. It could lead to high animal mortality rates and, therefore, represents a major environmental and economic concern. Strains of this group harbor the botulinum toxin locus on an unstable bacteriophage. Since the release of

  20. Investigation of natural radionuclide contents in soil in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Sanming; Liu Ruye

    1992-01-01

    The survey of natural radionuclide contents in soil in China (1983-1990) is a part of investigation of environmental natural radioactivity level on China. The results of the investigation area as follows: (1) The average content of natural radionuclides 238 U, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K(area weighted) and its standard deviation for single measurement is 39.5 and 34.4,36.5 and 22.0, 49.1 and 27.6, 580.0 and 202.0 Bq.kg -1 ,respectively.(2) The content of natural radionuclides is apparently correlated to the types of soil-forming rock. The analysis results from 1552 soil samples of soil-forming rock show that: the content of 238 U, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K for magmatic rock type is the highest, 238 U, 226 Ra and 232 Th of metamorphic rock type higher, sedimentary rock type the lowest. However, the content of 40 K of sedimentary rock type is more higher, magmatic rock type the lowest. In magmatic rock type, the content of 238 U, 226 Ra, 232 Th of granite and acidic magmatic rock type, and the content of 40 K of acidic and alkaline magmatic rock type are higher. (3) The analysis results from 9613 various types of soil samples show that for crimson soil of ferralsol wind soil of rock soil-forming order at northern part is lower. For frigid dessert soil of alpine soil order, alpine dessert soil, and the burozem, dark burozem and drab soil of alfisol order and semialfisol order, the content of 40 K is shown to be higher, and it is lower for latosol of ferralsol order, crimson soil, yellow soil and various lime soil. (4) The geographical distribution of the natural radionuclide content in soil appears apparently regional

  1. Using 137 Cs measurements to investigate the influence of erosion and soil redistribution on soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, P; Walling, D E

    2011-05-01

    Information on the interaction between soil erosion and soil properties is an important requirement for sustainable management of the soil resource. The relationship between soil properties and the soil redistribution rate, reflecting both erosion and deposition, is an important indicator of this interaction. This relationship is difficult to investigate using traditional approaches to documenting soil redistribution rates involving erosion plots and predictive models. However, the use of the fallout radionuclide (137)Cs to document medium-term soil redistribution rates offers a means of overcoming many of the limitations associated with traditional approaches. The study reported sought to demonstrate the potential for using (137)Cs measurements to assess the influence of soil erosion and redistribution on soil properties (particle size composition, total C, macronutrients N, P, K and Mg, micronutrients Mn, Mo, Fe, Cu and Zn and other elements, including Ti and As). (137)Cs measurements undertaken on 52 soil cores collected within a 7 ha cultivated field located near Colebrooke in Devon, UK were used to establish the magnitude and spatial pattern of medium-term soil redistribution rates within the field. The soil redistribution rates documented for the individual sampling points within the field ranged from an erosion rate of -12.9 t ha(-1) yr(-1) to a deposition rate of 19.2 t ha(-1) yr(-1). Composite samples of surface soil (0-5 cm) were collected immediately adjacent to each coring point and these samples were analysed for a range of soil properties. Individual soil properties associated with these samples showed significant variability, with CV values generally lying in the range 10-30%. The relationships between the surface soil properties and the soil redistribution rate were analysed. This analysis demonstrated statistically significant relationships between some soil properties (total phosphorus, % clay, Ti and As) and the soil redistribution rate, but for

  2. Using 137Cs measurements to investigate the influence of erosion and soil redistribution on soil properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, P.; Walling, D.E.

    2011-01-01

    Information on the interaction between soil erosion and soil properties is an important requirement for sustainable management of the soil resource. The relationship between soil properties and the soil redistribution rate, reflecting both erosion and deposition, is an important indicator of this interaction. This relationship is difficult to investigate using traditional approaches to documenting soil redistribution rates involving erosion plots and predictive models. However, the use of the fallout radionuclide 137 Cs to document medium-term soil redistribution rates offers a means of overcoming many of the limitations associated with traditional approaches. The study reported sought to demonstrate the potential for using 137 Cs measurements to assess the influence of soil erosion and redistribution on soil properties (particle size composition, total C, macronutrients N, P, K and Mg, micronutrients Mn, Mo, Fe, Cu and Zn and other elements, including Ti and As). 137 Cs measurements undertaken on 52 soil cores collected within a 7 ha cultivated field located near Colebrooke in Devon, UK were used to establish the magnitude and spatial pattern of medium-term soil redistribution rates within the field. The soil redistribution rates documented for the individual sampling points within the field ranged from an erosion rate of -12.9 t ha -1 yr -1 to a deposition rate of 19.2 t ha -1 yr -1 . Composite samples of surface soil (0-5 cm) were collected immediately adjacent to each coring point and these samples were analysed for a range of soil properties. Individual soil properties associated with these samples showed significant variability, with CV values generally lying in the range 10-30%. The relationships between the surface soil properties and the soil redistribution rate were analysed. This analysis demonstrated statistically significant relationships between some soil properties (total phosphorus, % clay, Ti and As) and the soil redistribution rate, but for most

  3. Investigation of the separation of americium(III) and europium(III) by high-speed countercurrent chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J.F.; Jin, Y.R.; Xu, Q.C.; Wang, S.L.; Zhang, L.X.

    2005-01-01

    The long-lived actinides are the important elements in the radioactive waste ;disposal. Because the ions semi diameter and chemical properties of trivalent actinides(III) and trivalent lanthanides(III) are very similar, the separation between them is very difficult. Yang Yu-Sheng put forward the actinides(III) are softer acid than the lanthanides(III), so the actinides(III) are more easily extracted by the soft extractant contain sulfur or nitrogen than the lanthanides(III). Some research have been done on the separation between actinides(III) and lanthanides(III) using the extractants contain sulfur or nitrogen. The results show that satisfactory separation efficiency was gained. Countercurrent Chromatography (CCC) have many specific advantages, such as free from solid support, permit large sample volume and high flow rate, which is useful in the preconcentration of inorganic solute and inorganic preparation. Some studies were done on the separation of lanthanides or-other inorganic elements by HSCCC, the high-purity reagents prepared by HSCCC or CPC turned out to be successful. In present paper, the investigation of separation between Americium (III) and Euricium (III) by High-Speed Countercurrent Chromatography (HSCCC) were made. The extractant used in the work was prepared by ourselves, which is of the soft extractant contrain sulfur. The effects of separation condition on the separation efficiency of Am and Eu by HSCCC were investigated using dichlorophenyl dithiophosphinic acid in xylene as the stationary phase and 0.1 mol/L NaClO4 as mobile phase, respectively. The results show that mutual separation between Am and Eu can be accomplished. The separation factor increases with the increasing of the concentration of extractant and the pH value of the mobile phase, further more, minishing the flow rate of the mobile phase can also improves the separation efficiency between Am and Eu. The nearly base separation was gained when the flow rate is 0.35 ml/min, the

  4. Investigation of Soil Salinity to Distinguish Boundary Line between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Investigation of Soil Salinity to Distinguish Boundary Line between Saline and ... Setting 4 dSm-1 as the limit between saline and non-saline soils in kriging algorithms resulted in a .... number of sample points within the search window,.

  5. Investigation Of The Microbial-Induced Corrosion Potential Of Soils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation of sulphate-reducing bacteria induced corrosion potential of soils along 18-inch 45km Tebidaba/Brass underground oil pipeline in Southern Ijaw LGA of Bayelsa State, Nigeria, is carried out experimentally. The analysis involves determination of some physico-chemical parameters of soils in the pipeline route, ...

  6. Comparative investigations of cesium and potassium in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaller, G.; Leising, C.; Krestel, R.; Wirth, E.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was the reliable estimation of the Cs-137 root uptake by agricultural crops using the ''observed ratio model'' (OR model) for the determination of transfer factors: Cs (plant)/K (plant)=OR x Cs (soil)/K (soil). For model validation representative soil (arable land, grass land, organic substrates from forest and peat) and plant samples from Bavaria were taken These 4 parameters varied within a sufficiently wide range. In addition some samples from forest sites were taken. Soil and plant samples were taken at the same locations within 1 m2. (orig.) [de

  7. Visible light photodegradation of phenanthrene catalyzed by Fe(III)-smectite: role of soil organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hanzhong; Li, Li; Fan, Xiaoyun; Liu, Mingdeng; Deng, Wenye; Wang, Chuanyi

    2013-07-15

    In the present study, phenanthrene is employed as a model to explore the roles played by three soil organic matter (SOM) fractions, i.e., dissolved organic matter (DOM), humic acid (HA), and fulvic acid (FA), in its photodegradation with assistance of Fe(III)-smectite under visible-light. Slight decrease in phenanthrene photodegradation rate was observed in the presence of DOM, which is explained in terms of oxidative-radical competition between DOM and target phenanthrene molecules due to the high electron-donor capacity of phenolic moieties in DOM. On the other hand, a critic content is observed with FA (0.70mg/g) and HA (0.65mg/g). Before reaching the critic content, the removal of phenanthrene is accelerated; while after that, the photodegradation rate is suppressed. The acceleration of phenanthrene degradation can be attributed to the photosensitization of FA and HA. Due to the strong interaction between phenanthrene and the phenyl rings, however, the retention of phenanthrene on SOM-Fe(III)-smectite in the presence of high content of HA or FA is enhanced, thus slowing down its photodegradation. Those observations provide valuable insights into the transformation and fate of PAHs in the natural soil environment and open a window for using clay-humic substances complexes for remediation of contaminated soil. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Visible light photodegradation of phenanthrene catalyzed by Fe(III)-smectite: Role of soil organic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Hanzhong, E-mail: jiahz0143@yahoo.com.cn [Laboratory of Eco-Materials and Sustainable Technology (LEMST), Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, Xinjiang 830011 (China); Li, Li [Laboratory of Eco-Materials and Sustainable Technology (LEMST), Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, Xinjiang 830011 (China); The Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100049 (China); Fan, Xiaoyun [Laboratory of Eco-Materials and Sustainable Technology (LEMST), Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, Xinjiang 830011 (China); Liu, Mingdeng [Laboratory of Eco-Materials and Sustainable Technology (LEMST), Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, Xinjiang 830011 (China); The Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100049 (China); Deng, Wenye [Laboratory of Eco-Materials and Sustainable Technology (LEMST), Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, Xinjiang 830011 (China); Wang, Chuanyi, E-mail: cywang@ms.xjb.ac.cn [Laboratory of Eco-Materials and Sustainable Technology (LEMST), Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, Xinjiang 830011 (China)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Soil organic matter (SOM) has significant influence on the transformation of PAHs. • Photodegradation rate is strongly dependent on the SOM fractions and their content. • Photolysis is determined by the interaction between phenanthrene, clay and SOM. -- Abstract: In the present study, phenanthrene is employed as a model to explore the roles played by three soil organic matter (SOM) fractions, i.e., dissolved organic matter (DOM), humic acid (HA), and fulvic acid (FA), in its photodegradation with assistance of Fe(III)-smectite under visible-light. Slight decrease in phenanthrene photodegradation rate was observed in the presence of DOM, which is explained in terms of oxidative-radical competition between DOM and target phenanthrene molecules due to the high electron–donor capacity of phenolic moieties in DOM. On the other hand, a critic content is observed with FA (0.70 mg/g) and HA (0.65 mg/g). Before reaching the critic content, the removal of phenanthrene is accelerated; while after that, the photodegradation rate is suppressed. The acceleration of phenanthrene degradation can be attributed to the photosensitization of FA and HA. Due to the strong interaction between phenanthrene and the phenyl rings, however, the retention of phenanthrene on SOM–Fe(III)-smectite in the presence of high content of HA or FA is enhanced, thus slowing down its photodegradation. Those observations provide valuable insights into the transformation and fate of PAHs in the natural soil environment and open a window for using clay–humic substances complexes for remediation of contaminated soil.

  9. Investigation and evaluation of orimulsion dispersion in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltrenas, P.; Idzelis, R.; Petraitis, E.

    1999-01-01

    To establish the hardening and penetration of orimulsion into 85 cm diameter plastic drums with different types of soil (light and middle loam, big sand and a fertile mixed soil), orimulsion was poured so that it would form layers with the thickness of 1 cm (56.7 cm 3 ), 3 cm (170.1 cm 3 ) and 5 cm (282.5 cm 3 ). Investigation of each layer was made three times, each time using five filled tankages. When orimulsion is poured on the soil surface, a vertical and horizontal dispersion occurs. A vertical dispersion is called penetration. The penetration of orimulsion (the soaking depth of a filtrate) into different types of soil is different. In a non-thickened dry soil the largest orimulsion penetration was in sand. During the first hour, depending on the amount of poured orimulsion, the filtrate was absorbed into the soil to 10-11 mm, and during twenty-four hours - to 42-45 mm. A vertical penetration of orimulsion into soil stabilized after 3 days and reached 100-115 mm. Orimulsion penetration into a fertile soil is smaller than that in sand. During the first hours the orimulsion was absorbed only 4-7 mm, and after twenty-four hours - 23-32 mm, after 3 days (when stabilized) - 60-78 mm. The penetration of orimulsion into a light loamy soil is the smallest: in the first hour - only I mm, and after 3 days - 2-5 mm. The penetration of orimulsion in all the types of the investigated thickened wet soils is smaller than that in non-thickened ones, and the filtrate penetration depth is twice as less. It is determined that air temperature has an influence on orimulsion penetration into soil. At a lower air temperature orimulsion freezes more quickly. On the other hand, at a higher temperature the orimulsion freezing period becomes longer. That is why the filtrate penetration time into soil is longer, later a pellicle is formed. With the help of experiments, it is found that the most intensive evaporation of drifting hydrocarbons is in the first 3 hours. Later the orimulsion

  10. Bonding of radioactive contamination. III. Auger electron spectroscopic investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.; Whitkop, P.G.

    1983-01-01

    The mechanisms by which radioactive contamination would be bonded to a DWPF canister surface are being investigated. Tests with low pressure water and air-injected water decontamination of radioactive specimens showed that bonding of contamination increases rapidly with postoxidation temperature. Even with the least severe temperature conditions expected on the waste glass canister, bonding is so great that decontamination cannot be affected by water-only techniques. A preoxidation film increased rather than decreased bonding. This memorandum describes detailed surface analyses of coupons simulating DWPF canister surfaces. Based on this examination we conclude: contamination will be dispersed throughout the oxide film on DWPF canisters. Contamination is concentrated at the surface, decreasing farther into the oxide film; some samples contain sludge contamination at the steel/oxide interface. This was not the case for semi-volatile (Cs 2 O) contamination; in samples with contamination at the steel/oxide interface, at least 80% of the contamination is usually in the oxide layer; no difference in contamination dispersion between preoxidized and non-preoxidized samples was found; and postoxidation atmosphere had no effect on the contamination dispersion within the oxide layer. 6 references, 9 figures

  11. Cd Mobility in Anoxic Fe-Mineral-Rich Environments - Potential Use of Fe(III)-Reducing Bacteria in Soil Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehe, E. M.; Adaktylou, I. J.; Obst, M.; Schröder, C.; Behrens, S.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Tylsizczak, T.; Michel, F. M.; Krämer, U.; Kappler, A.

    2014-12-01

    Agricultural soils are increasingly burdened with heavy metals such as Cd from industrial sources and impure fertilizers. Metal contaminants enter the food chain via plant uptake from soil and negatively affect human and environmental health. New remediation approaches are needed to lower soil metal contents. To apply these remediation techniques successfully, it is necessary to understand how soil microbes and minerals interact with toxic metals. Here we show that microbial Fe(III) reduction initially mobilizes Cd before its immobilization under anoxic conditions. To study how microbial Fe(III) reduction influences Cd mobility, we isolated a new Cd-tolerant, Fe(III)-reducing Geobacter sp. from a heavily Cd-contaminated soil. In lab experiments, this Geobacter strain first mobilized Cd from Cd-loaded Fe(III) hydroxides followed by precipitation of Cd-bearing mineral phases. Using Mössbauer spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, the original and newly formed Cd-containing Fe(II) and Fe(III) mineral phases, including Cd-Fe-carbonates, Fe-phosphates and Fe-(oxyhydr)oxides, were identified and characterized. Using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, Cd was mapped in the Fe(II) mineral aggregates formed during microbial Fe(III) reduction. Microbial Fe(III) reduction mobilizes Cd prior to its precipitation in Cd-bearing mineral phases. The mobilized Cd could be taken up by phytoremediating plants, resulting in a net removal of Cd from contaminated sites. Alternatively, Cd precipitation could reduce Cd bioavailability in the environment, causing less toxic effects to crops and soil microbiota. However, the stability and thus bioavailability of these newly formed Fe-Cd mineral phases needs to be assessed thoroughly. Whether phytoremediation or immobilization of Cd in a mineral with reduced Cd bioavailability are feasible mechanisms to reduce toxic effects of Cd in the environment remains to be

  12. Application of TAM III to study sensitivity of soil organic matter degradation to temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikegard, Peter; Barros, Nieves; Piñeiro, Verónica

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, studies of soil biodegradation are based on CO2 dissipation rates. CO2 is a product of aerobic degradation of labile organic substrates like carbohydrates. That limits the biodegradation concept to just one of the soil organic matter fractions. This feature is responsible for some problems to settle the concept of soil organic matter (SOM) recalcitrance and for controversial results defining sensitivity of SOM to temperature. SOM consists of highly complex macromolecules constituted by fractions with different chemical nature and redox state affecting the chemical nature of biodegradation processes. Biodegradation of fractions more reduced than carbohydrates take place through metabolic pathways that dissipate less CO2 than carbohydrate respiration, that may not dissipate CO2, or that even may uptake CO2. These compounds can be considered more recalcitrant and with lower turnover times than labile SOM just because they are degraded at lower CO2 rates that may be just a consequence of the metabolic path. Nevertheless, decomposition of every kind of organic substrate always releases heat. For this reason, the measurement of the heat rate by calorimetry yields a more realistic measurement of the biodegradation of the SOM continuum. TAM III is one of the most recent calorimeters designed for directly measuring in real time the heat rate associated with any degradation process. It is designed as a multichannel system allowing the concomitant measurement of to up 24 samples at isothermal conditions or through a temperature scanning mode from 18 to 100ºC, allowing the continous measure of any sample at controlled non-isothermal conditions. The temperature scanning mode was tested in several soil samples collected at different depths to study their sensitivity to temperature changes from 18 to 35 ºC calculating the Q10 and the activation energy (EA) by the Arrhenius equation. It was attempted to associate the obtained EA values with the soil thermal

  13. Ammonium citrate as enhancement for electrodialytic soil remediation and investigation of soil solution during the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Kirkelund, Gunvor M; Ottosen, Lisbeth M

    2015-01-01

    Seven electrodialytic experiments were conducted using ammonium citrate as enhancing agent to remediate copper and chromium-contaminated soil from a wood-preservation site. The purpose was to investigate the effect of current density (0.2, 1.0 and 1.5 mA cm(-2)), concentration of enhancing agent (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 M) and remediation times (21, 42 and 117 d) for the removal of Cu and Cr from a calcareous soil. To gain insight on metal behavior, soil solution was periodically collected using suction cups. It was seen that current densities higher than 1.0 mA cm(-2) did not increase removal and thus using too high current densities can be a waste of energy. Desorption rate is important and both remediation time and ammonium citrate concentration are relevant parameters. It was possible to collect soil solution samples following an adaptation of the experimental set-up to ensure continuous supply of ammonium citrate to the soil in order to keep it saturated during the remediation. Monitoring soil solution gives valuable information on the evolution of remediation and helps deciding when the soil is remediated. Final concentrations in the soil ranged from 220 to 360 mg Cu kg(-1) (removals: 78-86%) and 440-590 mg Cr kg(-1) (removals: 35-51%), being within the 500 mg kg(-1) limit for a clean soil only for Cu. While further optimization is still required for Cr, the removal percentages are the highest achieved so far, for a real Cu and Cr-contaminated, calcareous soil. The results highlight EDR potential to remediate metal polluted soils at neutral to alkaline pH by choosing a good enhancement solution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ammonium citrate as enhancement for electrodialytic soil remediation and investigation of soil solution during the process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Seven electrodialytic experiments were conducted using ammonium citrate as enhancing agent to remediate copper and chromium-contaminated soil from a wood-preservation site. The purpose was to investigate the effect of current density (0.2, 1.0 and 1.5 mA cm−2), concentration of enhancing agent (0...... to remediate metal polluted soils at neutral to alkaline pH by choosing a good enhancement solution....

  15. Spectroscopic investigation of complexation of Cm(III) und Eu(III) with partitioning-relevant N-donor ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremer, Antje

    2014-01-01

    The separation of trivalent actinides and lanthanides is an essential part of the development of improved nuclear fuel cycles. Liquid-liquid extraction is an applicable technique to achieve this separation. Due to the chemical similarity and the almost identical ionic radii of trivalent actinides and lanthanides this separation is, however, only feasible with highly selective extracting agents. It has been proven that molecules with soft sulphur or nitrogen donor atoms have a higher affinity for trivalent actinides. In the present work, the complexation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) with N-donor ligands relevant for partitioning has been studied by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). This work aims at a better understanding of the molecular reason of the selectivity of these ligands. In this context, enormous effort has been and is still put into detailed investigations on BTP and BTBP ligands, which are the most successful N-donor ligands for the selective extraction of trivalent actinides, to date. Additionally, the complexation and extraction behavior of molecules which are structurally related to these ligands is studied. The ligand C5-BPP (2,6-bis(5-(2,2-dimethylpropyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl)pyridine) where the triazine rings of the aromatic backbone of the BTP ligands have been replaced by pyrazole rings is one of these molecules. Laser fluorescence spectroscopic investigation of the complexation of Cm(III) with this ligand revealed stepwise formation of three (Cm(C5-BPP) n ) 3+ complexes (n = 1 - 3). The stability constant of the 1:3 complex was determined (log β 3 = 14.8 ± 0.4). Extraction experiments have shown that, in contrast to BTP and BTBP ligands, C5-BPP needs an additional lipophilic anion source such as a 2-bromocarboxylic acid to selectively extract trivalent actinides from nitric acid solutions. The comparison of the stability constant of the (Cm(C5-BPP) 3 ) 3+ complex with the stability constant of the (Cm(nPr-BTP) 3 ) 3+ complex

  16. Extraction of Eu (III) in monazite from soils containing amang collected from Kampung Gajah ex-mining area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaini Hamzah; Nor Monica Ahmad; Ahmad Saat

    2011-01-01

    Malaysia was once a major tin exporting country. One of the by-products of the tin-mining activities is tin-tailing which known as amang very rich in rare earth elements, especially the lanthanides which are present as a mixture of phosphate minerals, mainly as ilmenite, xenotime and monazite. In this study, Kg Gajah in Kinta Valley occupying the State of Perak was chosen as a study area, since this area used to be the largest mining area in the 60s and 70s. The soil samples were separated using wet separation technique followed by magnetic separation. The monazite was then digested using a mixture of HF/ HNO 3 acids. The digested sample was extracted for its cerium content. The extraction behaviour of cerium in those samples has been investigated as a function of Cyanex 302 concentration in diluents and the time taken to reach the equilibrium. Extractant of bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)-mono-thio phosphinic acid (Cyanex302) in n-heptane was used throughout the analysis. Aqueous phase from extraction was analyzed spectro metrically using Arsenazo (III) while organic phase was subjected to rotavapour followed by analysis by FTIR. The aim of this study is to have the best concentration for Cyanex302 in order to extract as much as possible of Europium and to confirm the transfer of Eu (III) to the Cyanex 302 as an extractant. Result from UV/ VIS shows that 0.7 M is the best concentration of Cyanex 302 for the Eu (III) extraction from samples. Result from FTIR confirmed the structure of Cyanex302 has been replaced by Ce (IV). (author)

  17. Distribution of chromium species in a Cr-polluted soil: presence of Cr(III) in glomalin related protein fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Cardeza, María L; Ferri, Alejandro; Cornejo, Pablo; Gomez, Elena

    2014-09-15

    The accumulation of Cr in soil could be highly toxic to human health; therefore Cr soil distribution was studied in rhizosphere soils from Ricinus communis and Conium maculatum and bare soil (BS) from an industrial and urban area in Argentina. Total Cr, Cr(VI) and Cr(III) concentrations were determined in 3 soil fractions: total, extractable and associated to total-glomalin-related protein (T-GRSP). BS had the highest total Cr and total Cr(VI) concentrations. Total Cr(VI) concentration from both rhizosphere soils did not differ from the allowed value for residential area in Argentina (8 μg Cr(VI) g(-1) soil), while total Cr(VI) in BS was 1.8 times higher. Total Cr concentration in all the soils was higher than the allowed value (250 μg Cr g(-1) soil). Extractable and associated to T-GRSP Cr(VI) concentrations were below the detection limit. Cr(III) bound to T-GRSP was the highest in the BS. These findings are in agreement with a long term effect of glomalin in sequestrating Cr. In both plant species, total Cr was higher in root than in shoot and both species presented arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). As far as we know, this is the first study that reports the presence of Cr in T-GRSP fraction of soil organic matter. These findings suggest that Cr mycorrhizostabilization could be a predominant mechanism used by R. communis and C. maculatum to diminish Cr soil concentration. Nevertheless, further research is needed to clarify the contribution of native AMF isolated from R. communis and C. maculatum rhizosphere to the Cr phytoremediation process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigation of plutonium behaviour in artificially contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luksiene, B.; Druteikiene, R.

    2006-01-01

    The vertical migration and transformation of plutonium chemical forms artificially supplied to sandy loam columns after its exposure to natural conditions for about one year was investigated. An analysis of artificially contaminated samples after one year had shown that 81% of 239 Pu 4+ and 44% of 239 Pu 3+ were accumulated in the 0-5 cm layer of sandy loam. The data of sequential analysis of the same type of soil at the adequate artificial contamination level after one month exposure under laboratory conditions are presented as well. Pu 239 binding to soil geochemical fractions was rather uneven. The largest amount of Pu 239 (60%) was determined in the residual fraction. Consequently, it can be assumed that organic substances and some inorganic compounds, which usually are the main components of a residual fraction, affects the retention and migration of plutonium in the soil. (authors)

  19. Investigation of plutonium behaviour in artificially contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukshiene, B.; Druteikiene, R.

    2006-01-01

    The vertical migration and transformation of plutonium chemical forms artificially supplied to sandy loam columns after its exposure to natural conditions for about one year was investigated. An analysis of artificially contaminated samples after one year had shown that 81% of 239 Pu 4+ and 44% of 239 Pu 3+ were accumulated in the 0-5 cm layer of sandy loam. The data of sequential analysis of the same type of soil at the adequate artificial contamination level after one month exposure under laboratory conditions are presented as well. Pu 239 binding to soil geochemical fractions was rather uneven. The largest amount of Pu 239 (60 %) was determined in the residual fraction. Consequently, it can be assumed that organic substances and some inorganic compounds, which usually are the main components of a residual fraction, affects the retention and migration of plutonium in the soil. (authors)

  20. Spectroscopic investigations on the complexation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) with organic model ligands and their binding mode in human urine (in vitro)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, Anne

    2011-01-01

    In case of incorporation, trivalent actinides (An(III)) and lanthanides (Ln(III)) pose a serious health risk to humans. An(III) are artificial, highly radioactive elements which are mainly produced during the nuclear fuel cycle in nuclear power plants. Via hazardous accidents or nonprofessional storage of radioactive waste, they can be released in the environment and enter the human food chain. In contrast, Ln(III) are nonradioactive, naturally occurring elements with multiple applications in technique and medicine. Consequently it is possible that humans get in contact and incorporate both, An(III) and Ln(III). Therefore, it is of particular importance to elucidate the behaviour of these elements in the human body. While macroscopic processes such as distribution, accumulation and excretion are studied quite well, knowledge about the chemical binding form (speciation) of An(III) and Ln(III) in various body fluids is still sparse. In the present work, for the first time, the speciation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) in natural human urine (in vitro) has been investigated spectroscopically and the formed complex identified. For this purpose, also basic investigations on the complex formation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) in synthetic model urine as well as with the urinary relevant, organic model ligands urea, alanine, phenylalanine, threonine and citrate have been performed and the previously unknown complex stability constants determined. Finally, all experimental results were compared to literature data and predictions calculated by thermodynamic modelling. Since both, Cm(III) and Eu(III), exhibit unique luminescence properties, particularly the suitability of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) could be demonstrated as a method to investigate these metal ions in untreated, complex biofluids. The results of this work provide new scientific findings on the biochemical reactions of An(III) and Ln(III) in human body fluids on a molecular scale and

  1. Laboratory investigation of TerraZyme as a soil stabilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Siti Aimi Nadia Mohd; Azmi, Mastura; Ramli, Harris; Bakar, Ismail; Wijeyesekera, D. C.; Zainorabidin, Adnan

    2017-10-01

    In this study, a laboratory investigation was conducted to examine the performance of TerraZyme on different soil types. Laterite and kaolin were treated with 2% and 5% TerraZyme to determine changes in the soils' geotechnical properties. The obtained results were analysed and investigated in terms of compaction, Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS) and California Bearing Ratio (CBR). The changes in geotechnical properties of the stabilised and unstabilised soils were monitored after curing periods of 0, 7, 15, 21 and 30 days. Changes in compaction properties, UCS and CBR were observed. It was found that laterite with 5% TerraZyme gave a higher maximum dry density (MDD) and decreased the optimum moisture content (OMC). For kaolin, a different TerraZyme percentage did not show any effect on both MDD and OMC. For strength properties, it was found that 2% TerraZyme showed the greatest change in UCS over a 30-day curing period. The CBR value of stabilised kaolin with 2% TerraZyme gave a higher CBR value than the kaolin treated with 5% TerraZyme. It was also found that laterite treated with TerraZyme gave a higher CBR value. Lastly, it can be concluded that TerraZyme is not suitable for stabilising kaolin; TerraZyme requires a cohesive soil to achieve a better performance.

  2. Mechanistic investigation on the oxidation of kinetin by Ag(III)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 122; Issue 6. Mechanistic investigation on the oxidation of kinetin by Ag(III) periodate complex in aqueous alkaline media: A kinetic approach. S D Lamani A M Tatagar S T Nandibewoor. Full Papers Volume 122 Issue 6 November 2010 pp 891-900 ...

  3. Speciation of As(III), As(V), MMA and DMA in contaminated soil extracts by HPLC-ICP/MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissen, M.; Frimmel, F.H. [Engler-Bunte-Institut, Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2000-05-01

    A method to separate and quantify two inorganic arsenic species As(III) and As(V) and two organic arsenic species, monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), by HPLC-ICP/MS has been developed. The separation of arsenic species was achieved on the anionic exchange column IonPac {sup trademark} AS11 (Dionex) with NaOH as mobile phase. The technique was successfully applied to analyze extracts of two contaminated soils, sampled at a former tannery site (soil 1) and a former paint production site (soil 2). The soils were extracted at pH values similar to the natural environment. Extractions were performed at different pH values with 0.3 M ammonium oxalate (pH = 3), milli-Q water (pH = 5.8), 0.3 M sodium carbonate (pH = 8) and 0.3 M sodium bicarbonate (pH = 11). No organically bound arsenic was found in the extracts. As(V) was the major component. Only up to 0.04% of the total arsenic contained in soil 1 were mobilized. The highest amount of extracted arsenic was found at the highest pH. In the milli-Q water extract of soil 1 As(III) and As(V) were found. High amounts of As(V) were found in the extracts of soil 2. Up to 20% of the total arsenic bound to soil 2 constituents were released. The results show that the mobilization of arsenic depended on the pH value of the extraction solution and the kind of extracted soil. Dramatic consequences have to be expected for pH changes in the environment especially in cases where soils contain high amounts of mobile arsenic. (orig.)

  4. Soil Properties Database of Spanish Soils Volume III.- Extremadura; Base de Datos de Propiedades Edafologicas de los Suelos Espanoles Volumen III.- Extremadura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba, C; Millam, R; Schmid, T; Roquero, C; Magister, M

    1998-12-01

    The soil vulnerability determines the sensitivity of the soil after an accidental radioactive contamination due to Cs-137 and Sr-90. The Departamento de Impacto Ambiental de la Energia of CIEMAT is carrying out an assessment of the radiological vulnerability of the different Spanish soils found on the Iberian Peninsula. This requires the knowledge of the soil properties for the various types of existing soils. In order to achieve this aim, a bibliographical compilation of soil profiles has been made to characterize the different soil types and create a database of their properties. Depending on the year of publication and the type of documentary source, the information compiled from the available bibliography is very heterogeneous. Therefore, an important effort has been made to normalize and process the information prior to its incorporation to the database. This volume presents the criteria applied to normalize and process the data as well as the soil properties of the various soil types belonging to the Comunidad Autonoma de Extremadura. (Author) 50 refs.

  5. Investigation of soil radioactivity of Alkhwai area central Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, R. H. A.

    2012-10-01

    The present study is the first of its type to be conducted in Alkhwai area aiming at thorough investigation of natural environmental radioactivity. Considerable variation in soil radioactivity with location is observed. Results show that the average concentrations of 2 38U , 2 32T h and 4 0K in soil were found to be 14.79± 2.43, 20.71± 3.59 and 162.09± 21.19 respectively and have the range 10.0-21.98, 13.89-28.55 and from 113.51 to 219.45 respectively. It is observed that there is strong correlation between Uranium-Thorium and fair correlation between Uranium-Potassium and Thorium-Potassium. The average value of calculated gamma radiation dose rate in Alkhwai district was estimated to be (26.10) n Gy h -1 comparable with the world average (59 n Gy/h). The average dose from gamma radiation dose rate to an individual assuming a tropical rural setting is estimated to be 32.03 μSv/year, which is considered to be within the normal range for doses from natural sources. Further measurements of ambient dose for more soil type at different geological features of Sudan are needed to establish a more comprehensive database on the relationship between gamma radiation dose and geological-soil information. (Author)

  6. An investigation of inorganic antimony species and antimony associated with soil humic acid molar mass fractions in contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steely, Sarah; Amarasiriwardena, Dulasiri; Xing Baoshan

    2007-01-01

    The presence of antimony compounds is often suspected in the soil of apple orchards contaminated with lead arsenate pesticide and in the soil of shooting ranges. Nitric acid (1 M) extractable Sb from the shooting range (8300 μg kg -1 ) and the apple orchard (69 μg kg -1 ) had considerably higher surface Sb levels than the control site ( -1 ), and Sb was confined to the top ∼30 cm soil layer. Sb(V) was the principal species in the shooting range and the apple orchard surface soils. Size exclusion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (SEC-ICP-MS) analysis of humic acids isolated from the two contaminated soils demonstrated that Sb has complexed to humic acid molar mass fractions. The results also indicate that humic acids have the ability to arrest the mobility of Sb through soils and would be beneficial in converting Sb(III) to a less toxic species, Sb(V), in contaminated areas. - The soil surface and depth distribution Sb(V) and Sb(III) species in a contaminated apple orchard and a shooting range, and the effect soil humic acids on inorganic antimony species is reported

  7. Role of an organic carbon-rich soil and Fe(III) reduction in reducing the toxicity and environmental mobility of chromium(VI) at a COPR disposal site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Weixuan; Stewart, Douglas I; Humphreys, Paul N; Rout, Simon P; Burke, Ian T

    2016-01-15

    Cr(VI) is an important contaminant found at sites where chromium ore processing residue (COPR) is deposited. No low cost treatment exists for Cr(VI) leaching from such sites. This study investigated the mechanism of interaction of alkaline Cr(VI)-containing leachate with an Fe(II)-containing organic matter rich soil beneath the waste. The soil currently contains 0.8% Cr, shown to be present as Cr(III)(OH)3 in EXAFS analysis. Lab tests confirmed that the reaction of Cr(VI) in site leachate with Fe(II) present in the soil was stoichiometrically correct for a reductive mechanism of Cr accumulation. However, the amount of Fe(II) present in the soil was insufficient to maintain long term Cr(VI) reduction at historic infiltration rates. The soil contains a population of bacteria dominated by a Mangroviflexus-like species, that is closely related to known fermentative bacteria, and a community capable of sustaining Fe(III) reduction in alkaline culture. It is therefore likely that in situ fermentative metabolism supported by organic matter in the soil produces more labile organic substrates (lactate was detected) that support microbial Fe(III) reduction. It is therefore suggested that addition of solid phase organic matter to soils adjacent to COPR may reduce the long term spread of Cr(VI) in the environment. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Meteoric 10Be as a tool to investigate human induced soil fluxes: a conceptual model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Govers, Gerard; Vanacker, Veerle; De Vente, Joris; Boix-Fayos, Carolina; Minella, Jean; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik

    2014-05-01

    Spanish farmlands and (iii) strongly weathered Brazilian soils, relatively recently taken into cultivation. Model results confirm the hypothesis that meteoric 10Be can be a useful tracer to investigate human induced soil fluxes. However, interpretation of meteoric 10Be inventories along the profile must be performed with sufficient care: it is of utmost importance to jointly interpret meteoric 10Be inventories and depth dependent concentration. Long periods of human disturbance are clearly recognizable in the modeled meteoric 10Be signatures whereas the recognition of shorter periods of human impact critically depends on the boundary conditions. A sensitivity analysis points towards the essential role of soil chemistry in controlling depth dependent meteoric 10Be concentrations and associated lateral meteoric 10Be movement. The Be2D model is a step forward in unraveling the dynamic interplay between vertical meteoric 10Be migration and horizontal soil fluxes and is therefore very suited to underpin empirical work. In a first phase the Be2D model can be used as an exploration tool to select sampling locations whereas in a later phase, the model may be used to extrapolate experimental observations to the broader landscape scale. Sadler, P., 1981. Sediment accumulation rates and the completeness of stratigraphic sections. J. Geol. 89, 569-584.

  9. Experimental Investigation of Phenanthrene Pollutant Removal Efficiency for Contaminated Sandy Soil by Enhanced Soil Washing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif salah Alquzweeni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are environmental concerns that must be removed to acceptable level. This research assesses two agents (Na2EDTA and SDS to remediate contaminated sandy soil, spiked with 500mg/kg phenanthrene. Five sets of experiments (batch are applied to investigate the optimal of five influencing factors on soil remediation: Na2EDTA-SDS concentration, liquid/Solid ratio, stirring speed, pH value of flushing solution and mixing time. The results of batch experiments showed that SDS has high phenanthrene removal efficiency (90%, while Na2EDTA shows no phenanthrene removal. pH has no effect on phenanthrene removal. To study the influence of flow rates on the removal efficiency of contaminants, two column tests with hydraulic gradient of 0.2 and 1.2 conducted by SDS solution. The results illustrate that high phenanthrene removal from soil obtained by 1.2 hydraulic gradient condition. The SDS flushing solution removed approximately 69% and 81% of phenanthrene from soil under low and high hydraulic gradients, respectively. It was concluded that phenanthrene removal depend on surfactant micelles formation. Overall, the study showed that soil flushing removal efficiency for contaminants depends on the flushing agents selectivity and affinity to the contaminants and the condition of hydraulic gradient.

  10. Wind tunnel investigations on tritium reemission from soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taeschner, M.; Bunnenberg, C.

    1993-01-01

    Future fusion plants and tritium handling facilities will contain large amounts of tritium. Following chronical or accidental releases to the atmosphere a secondary HTO source is established in the downwind sector of the tritium release point as a result of deposition processes. To investigate HTO reemission rates, experiments were performed with a special wind tunnel, in which the air flows across the surface of soil columns under controlled conditions. In order to measure the HTO content of an air sample that was experimentally contaminated by reemission of HTO from a labeled soil column, a fast method is used. The air sample is bubbled through a flask filled with a definite volume of low-tritium water. At the end of the sampling period, the volume and the specific activity of the flask water are measured. With the help of a simple mathematical formula, that is presented in this report, the HTO activity of the air sample can be calculated. (orig.) [de

  11. Using {sup 137}Cs measurements to investigate the influence of erosion and soil redistribution on soil properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, P. [School of Geography, Beijing Normal University, Beijing (China); Geography, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Amory Building, Rennes Drive, Exeter, EX4 4RJ, Devon (United Kingdom); Walling, D.E., E-mail: d.e.walling@exeter.ac.u [Geography, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Amory Building, Rennes Drive, Exeter, EX4 4RJ, Devon (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    Information on the interaction between soil erosion and soil properties is an important requirement for sustainable management of the soil resource. The relationship between soil properties and the soil redistribution rate, reflecting both erosion and deposition, is an important indicator of this interaction. This relationship is difficult to investigate using traditional approaches to documenting soil redistribution rates involving erosion plots and predictive models. However, the use of the fallout radionuclide {sup 137}Cs to document medium-term soil redistribution rates offers a means of overcoming many of the limitations associated with traditional approaches. The study reported sought to demonstrate the potential for using {sup 137}Cs measurements to assess the influence of soil erosion and redistribution on soil properties (particle size composition, total C, macronutrients N, P, K and Mg, micronutrients Mn, Mo, Fe, Cu and Zn and other elements, including Ti and As). {sup 137}Cs measurements undertaken on 52 soil cores collected within a 7 ha cultivated field located near Colebrooke in Devon, UK were used to establish the magnitude and spatial pattern of medium-term soil redistribution rates within the field. The soil redistribution rates documented for the individual sampling points within the field ranged from an erosion rate of -12.9 t ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} to a deposition rate of 19.2 t ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. Composite samples of surface soil (0-5 cm) were collected immediately adjacent to each coring point and these samples were analysed for a range of soil properties. Individual soil properties associated with these samples showed significant variability, with CV values generally lying in the range 10-30%. The relationships between the surface soil properties and the soil redistribution rate were analysed. This analysis demonstrated statistically significant relationships between some soil properties (total phosphorus, % clay, Ti and As) and the soil

  12. Investigation of transformation of radionuclides in soils oil polluted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbatov, F.Y.; Ahmedov, M.M.; Ibadov, N.A.; Balayev, V.S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Despite of constant improvement in view of last achievement of a science and technique the technological processes of oil production are accompanied by coming in environment a number of chemical substances - oil products, poly aromatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, salts of heavy metals, including soluble and insoluble compound of stable and radioactive isotopes of metals, various gases etc. Technological processes of production, transportation of crude oil and its complex processing is followed with essential pollution of soil by oil products, radioactive substances because of crude oil and grounds waters spillage. The problem of radioactive pollution of environment in oil-extracting sites and especially in old deposits of Apsheron peninsula, in particular, in oil fields of Surakhani and Balakhani by the various factors is rather urgent in Azerbaijan. On a whole, radioactive-ecological situation is defined by the quantitative contents of natural radionuclides, chemical structure of grounds waters and oil, and also accumulation of radioactive substances in pipelines and modular items as crystals radiobarits or calcium and magnesium salts. Systemic and complex research on this direction will allow creating the mechanism of radionuclides transformation in oil-contaminated soils. The condition of radioactive background of soil cover of oil field in Surakhani was studied in our researches. The soil samples taken from various depths of deposit are investigated. The quantities of total oil components, aliphatic and poly aromatic hydrocarbons, heavy metals and natural radionuclides are determined. The attempt is made to explain dependence of various meanings of carried out analyses on the depth of taken samples. In summary it is necessary to note, that the researches on more detailed study of influence of the factors on processes of accumulation and transformation natural radionuclides proceed. The systemic researches on this direction will allow securing of

  13. Neutron activation and radiometric investigation of Kazakhstan soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwozdz, R.; Popov, J.V.; Shishkov, I.A.; Poznyak, V.; Solodukhin, V.P.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Great diversity of radio-ecological problems requires measurement of materials with vastly differing chemical composition and density, and varying volume. In case of gamma spectrometry such variation in composition, density and volume changes the response of a measuring system quite drastically. A necessary correction is usually achieved by applying one of the four correction methods. The first one is applying a standard with composition as close to the measured sample as possible. The second method needs some previous knowledge about the chemical composition of the sample and a subsequent calculation of the mass absorption coefficient. The third method, an intensity ratio of two gamma lines, can only be applied when an isotope in the investigated sample has two measurable gamma lines. The fourth method consists in an additional gamma transmission measurement, using an isotopic source. Application of the first two methods to samples collected in Kazakhstan is evaluated and the results achieved are described. Instrumental neutron activation analysis by either long, or short irradiation was applied to three groups of samples. The first 15 samples were from the Semipalatinsk area, the next 15 from the area north for the Kara-Tau range. The third group of 5 samples was from the Syr-Darya valley. The Kara-Tau and Syr-Darya samples originate from the area adjacent to an uranium mining site. Only two samples are collected at cultivated soil, all the other are collected at the steppe or semi-desert areas, In the additional group measured there were ten sub-samples of the environmental soil standard, prepared at the Institute of Nuclear Physics. Activation analysis was applied as well to Soil-6 and Soil IAEA-375, two reference materials distributed by IAEA. Determination of concentration of about 40 elements in very sample enabled computation of mass absorption coefficients for all the investigated samples. Results of calculation and experimental testing prove

  14. The soil structure investigation for the interpreting radiocaesium behaviour in upper horizons of Chernobyl contaminated sandy soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazhinskij, A.G.

    2002-01-01

    The soil-composing particles in natural environment form aggregates of different stability. For soils (topsoil) of contrasting type from Chernobyl NPP area the particle size and microaggregate analyses have been performed and the distribution of Cs 137 in the obtained fractions has been studied. Results of long-term investigation of Cs 137 vertical migration in sandy soils of 50-km zone around Chernobyl NPP have been compared with data on radiocaesium distribution among water-stable aggregates and particles of various size in studied soils. On the basis of particle size analysis and aggregate soil composition the size of soil components with vertical migration potential, and the amount of Cs 137 potentially tending to migrate with the soil components along soil profile have been assessed. Based on findings showing Cs 137 partitioning among water-stable soil aggregates of diverse size and pattern of the radionuclide vertical distribution in top 0-10 cm soil layer, it was assumed that neither shift of peak radiocaesium level from upper soil layer downwards nor the so-called slow constituent of Cs 137 vertical migration (in terms of quasi diffusion description of Cs 137 profile in soil) could not be explained by self-motion of soil aggregates and particles with associated radiocaesium. Hypothesis of root intermixing as principal mechanism responsible for Cs 137 vertical transport in top 0-10 cm soil layer was postulated

  15. Mechanistic investigation of Fe(III) oxide reduction by low molecular weight organic sulfur species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitel, Eryn M.; Taillefert, Martial

    2017-10-01

    Low molecular weight organic sulfur species, often referred to as thiols, are known to be ubiquitous in aquatic environments and represent important chemical reductants of Fe(III) oxides. Thiols are excellent electron shuttles used during dissimilatory iron reduction, and in this capacity could indirectly affect the redox state of sediments, release adsorbed contaminants via reductive dissolution, and influence the carbon cycle through alteration of bacterial respiration processes. Interestingly, the reduction of Fe(III) oxides by thiols has not been previously investigated in environmentally relevant conditions, likely due to analytical limitations associated with the detection of thiols and their oxidized products. In this study, a novel electrochemical method was developed to simultaneously determine thiol/disulfide pair concentrations in situ during the reduction of ferrihydrite in batch reactors. First order rate laws with respect to initial thiol concentration were confirmed for Fe(III) oxyhydroxide reduction by four common thiols: cysteine, homocysteine, cysteamine, and glutathione. Zero order was determined for both Fe(III) oxyhydroxide and proton concentration at circumneutral pH. A kinetic model detailing the molecular mechanism of the reaction was optimized with proposed intermediate surface structures. Although metal oxide overall reduction rate constants were inversely proportional to the complexity of the thiol structure, the extent of metal reduction increased with structure complexity, indicating that surface complexes play a significant role in the ability of these thiols to reduce iron. Taken together, these results demonstrate the importance of considering the molecular reaction mechanism at the iron oxide surface when investigating the potential for thiols to act as electron shuttles during dissimilatory iron reduction in natural environments.

  16. Soil Investigation Aspects of a Complex Metro Project in Amsterdam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbschleb, Jurgen

    The municipality of Amsterdam wishes to reduce the level of car traffic within the City Centre. As a consequence the public transport is to be extended by a new (bored) North/South Metro line. The excavation depths for the stations will exceed 30 m and will be constructed in difficult soft soil conditions. A further significant aspect is that the building pits are very near (3 to 5 m) to buildings of historical importance. The design philosophy of the station boxes was to determine an acceptable balance between the safety requirements and construction costs. The guidelines for the design, both for the building pits and the bored tunnel, are the predicted deformations of the adjacent building foundations. One of the more important geotechnical risks for this project is incorrect determination of the deformations arising from the building processes alongside the route of the metro. As such it should be realised that advanced finite element programs with second order material models require different geotechnical parameters than analytical models. The careful selection of calculation (soil) models, the level of safety (risk analysis), and site investigation is the start of the determination of the geotechnical parameters. This paper will focus on the interpretation of the site investigation for this complex project and will concentrate on the process followed, the problems encountered with the interpretation, the obtained results, and the used tools for geotechnical risk management.

  17. Optical and Temporal Carrier Dynamics Investigations of III-Nitrides for Semiconductor Lighting

    KAUST Repository

    Ajia, Idris A.

    2018-05-22

    III-nitride semiconductors suffer significant efficiency limitations; ‘efficiency’ being an umbrella term that covers an extensive list of challenges that must be overcome if they are to fulfil their vast potential. To this end, it is imperative to understand the underlying phenomena behind such limitations. In this dissertation, I combine powerful optical and structural characterization techniques to investigate the effect of different defects on the carrier dynamics in III-nitride materials for light emitting devices. The results presented herein will enhance the current understanding of the carrier mechanisms in such devices, which will lead to device efficiency improvements. In the first part of this dissertation, the effects of some important types of crystal defects present in III-nitride structures are investigated. Here, two types of defects are studied in two different III-nitride-based light emitting structures. The first defects of interest are V-pit defects in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) blue LEDs, where their contribution to the high-efficiency of such LEDs is discussed. In addition, the effect of these defects on the efficiency droop phenomenon in these LEDs is elucidated. Secondly, the optical effects of grain boundary defects in AlN-rich AlGaN/AlGaN MQWs is studied. In this study, it is shown that grain boundary defects may result in abnormal carrier localization behavior in these deep ultraviolet (UV) structures. While both defects are treated individually, it is evident from these studies that threading dislocation (TD) defects are an underlying contributor to the more undesirable outcomes of the said defects. In the second part, the dissertation reports on the carrier dynamics of III-nitride LED structures grown on emerging substrates—as possible efficiency enhancing techniques—aimed at mitigating the effects of TD defects. Thus, the carrier dynamics of GaN/AlGaN UV MQWs grown, for the first time, on (2̅01) – oriented β-Ga2O

  18. A spectrophotometric investigation of the complex formation between lanthanum (III) and eriochrome cyanine R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boodts, J.F.C.; Saffioti, W.

    1979-01-01

    The complex formation between La(III) and Eriochrome Cyanine R has been investigated. Three complexes have been detected. A first one (Complex I) in the pH range of 5.3-5.5 with lambda sub(max) = 460nm. a second one (Complex II) in the pH range of 6.2-6.5 with lambda sub(max) = 490nm and a third one (complex III) in the pH range of 8.2 - 9.0 with lambda sub(max) = 545nm and a shoulder between 570-580nm. The composition and stability constants of the complexes, respectively: complex I: La(ECR) 2 and 4.9 x 10 7 , complex II: La(ECR) 2 and 7.0 x 10 7 , complex III: La.ECR and 1.0 x 10 4 . All measurements were taken at 25.0 +- 0.1 0 C and μ = 0.2 (NaClO 4 ). (Author) [pt

  19. Spectroscopic investigation on the interaction of some surfactant-cobalt(III) complexes with serum albumins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignesh, Gopalaswamy; Nehru, Selvan; Manojkumar, Yesaiyan; Arunachalam, Sankaralingam, E-mail: arunasurf@yahoo.com

    2014-01-15

    The interaction of HSA/BSA with single and double chain surfactant-cobalt(III) complexes, cis-[Co(phen){sub 2}(UA)Cl](ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O (1), cis-[Co(phen){sub 2}(UA){sub 2}](ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}·2H{sub 2}O (2), cis-[Co(en){sub 2}(UA)Cl](ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O (3), cis-[Co(en){sub 2}(UA){sub 2}](ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}·2H{sub 2}O (4), were investigated by steady state fluorescence, UV–vis absorption, synchronous, three dimensional fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The results reveal that the quenching of HSA/BSA by all the four complexes takes place through static mechanism. The binding constant, binding sites and thermodymamic parameter were calculated. The results illustrate that the double chain surfactant-cobalt(III) complexes bind more strongly than the corresponding single chain complexes. The distance between donor (HSA/BSA) and acceptor (surfactant-cobalt(III) complexes) was obtained according to FRET. The results of synchronous, three dimensional and circular dichroism spectroscopy studies show that all the complexes caused considerable amount of conformational and some amount of environment changes in HSA/BSA. -- Highlights: • Binding of single and double chain surfactant-cobalt(III) complexes with serum albumins. • Hydrophobic attraction plays a major role in the binding process. • Binding induces considerable amount of conformational changes in the protein.

  20. OCCLUSION AND ARTICULATION IN BRUXISM AND BRUXOMANIA INVESTIGATED WITH THE SYSTEM T-SCAN III.

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana Dimova

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To be analyzed common features of occlusal relationships in patients with bruxism and bruxomania at maximum intercuspation (MIP) and eccentric jaw movements. Materials and Methods: 30 patients (22 women and 8 men, mean aged of 42,8 ± 13,3) with bruxism and/or bruxomania are examined with the system T-Scan III. Sequence of records is - at maximum intercuspation (MIP); in manual leading to central relation and in eccentric jaw movements. In the same sequence is investigated control ...

  1. Water retention of repellent and subcritical repellent soils: New insights from model and experimental investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czachor, H.; Doerr, S. H.; Lichner, L.

    2010-01-01

    SummarySoil organic matter can modify the surface properties of the soil mineral phase by changing the surface tension of the mineral surfaces. This modifies the soil's solid-water contact angle, which in turn would be expected to affect its water retention curve (SWRC). Here we model the impact of differences in the soil pore-water contact angle on capillarity in non-cylindrical pores by accounting for their complex pore geometry. Key outcomes from the model include that (i) available methods for measuring the Young's wetting angle on soil samples are insufficient in representing the wetting angle in the soil pore space, (ii) the wetting branch of water retention curves is strongly affected by the soil pore-water contact angle, as manifest in the wetting behavior of water repellent soils, (iii) effects for the drying branch are minimal, indicating that both wettable and water repellent soils should behave similarly, and (vi) water retention is a feature not of only wettable soils, but also soils that are in a water repellent state. These results are tested experimentally by determining drying and wetting branches for (a) 'model soil' (quartz sands with four hydrophobization levels) and (b) five field soil samples with contrasting wettability, which were used with and without the removal of the soil organic matter. The experimental results support the theoretical predictions and indicate that small changes in wetting angle can cause switches between wettable and water repellent soil behavior. This may explain the common observation that relatively small changes in soil water content can cause substantial changes in soil wettability.

  2. Investigating biochar as a tool for mine soil remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochar is a cost-effective, carbon negative soil amendment that can lead to improved soil quality. Research has also demonstrated the efficacy of biochar to sorb heavy metals and agricultural chemicals from contaminated soils, thus effectively reducing the potential for metal and chemical contamin...

  3. Optical and Temporal Carrier Dynamics Investigations of III-Nitrides for Semiconductor Lighting

    KAUST Repository

    Ajia, Idris A.

    2018-01-01

    In the first part of this dissertation, the effects of some important types of crystal defects present in III-nitride structures are investigated. Here, two types of defects are studied in two different III-nitride-based light emitting structures. The first defects of interest are V-pit defects in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) blue LEDs, where their contribution to the high-efficiency of such LEDs is discussed. In addition, the effect of these defects on the efficiency droop phenomenon in these LEDs is elucidated. Secondly, the optical effects of grain boundary defects in AlN-rich AlGaN/AlGaN MQWs is studied. In this study, it is shown that grain boundary defects may result in abnormal carrier localization behavior in these deep ultraviolet (UV) structures. While both defects are treated individually, it is evident from these studies that threading dislocation (TD) defects are an underlying contributor to the more undesirable outcomes of the said defects. In the second part, the dissertation reports on the carrier dynamics of III-nitride LED structures grown on emerging substrates—as possible efficiency enhancing techniques—aimed at mitigating the effects of TD defects. Thus, the carrier dynamics of GaN/AlGaN UV MQWs grown, for the first time, on (2̅01) – oriented β-Ga2O3 is studied. It is shown to be a candidate substrate for highly efficient vertical UV devices. Finally, results from the carrier dynamics investigation of an AlGaN/AlGaN MQW LED structure homoepitaxially grown on AlN substrate are discussed, where it is shown that its high-efficiency is sustained at high temperatures through the thermal redistribution of carriers to highly efficient recombination sites.

  4. Investigation of bacterial hopanoid inputs to soils from Western Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shunthirasingham, Chubashini [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, Scarborough College, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ont., M1C1A4 (Canada); Simpson, Myrna J. [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, Scarborough College, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ont., M1C1A4 (Canada)]. E-mail: myrna.simpson@utoronto.ca

    2006-06-15

    Hopanoids have been widely used as characteristic biomarkers to study inputs of bacterial biomass to sediments because they are preserved in the geologic record. A limited number of studies have been performed on hopanoid biomarkers in soils. The present study examined the distribution and potential preservation of hopanoids in soils that are developed under different climatic conditions and varying vegetative inputs. Solvent extraction and sequential chemical degradation methods were employed to extract both 'free' and 'bound' hopanoids, from three grassland soils, a grassland-forest transition soil, and a forest soil from Western Canada. Identification and quantification of hopanoids in the soil samples were carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Methylbishomohopanol, bishomohopanol and bishomohopanoic acid were detected in all solvent extracts. The base hydrolysis and ruthenium tetroxide extracts contained only bishomohopanoic acid at a concentration range of 0.8-8.8 {mu}g/gC and 2.2-28.3 {mu}g/gC, respectively. The acid hydrolysis procedure did not release detectable amounts of hopanoids. The solvent extraction yielded the greatest amounts of 'free' hopanoids in two of the grassland soils (Dark Brown and Black Chernozems) and in the forest soil (Gray Luvisol). In contrast, the chemical degradation methods resulted in higher amounts of 'bound' hopanoids in the third grassland soil (Brown Chernozem) and the transition soil (Dark Gray Chernozem), indicating that more hopanoids exist in the 'bound' form in these soils. Overall, the forest and the transition soils contained more hopanoids than the grassland soils. This is hypothesized to be due to the greater degradation of hopanoids in the grassland soils and or sorption to clay minerals, as compared to the forest and transition soils.

  5. Investigation of bacterial hopanoid inputs to soils from Western Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shunthirasingham, Chubashini; Simpson, Myrna J.

    2006-01-01

    Hopanoids have been widely used as characteristic biomarkers to study inputs of bacterial biomass to sediments because they are preserved in the geologic record. A limited number of studies have been performed on hopanoid biomarkers in soils. The present study examined the distribution and potential preservation of hopanoids in soils that are developed under different climatic conditions and varying vegetative inputs. Solvent extraction and sequential chemical degradation methods were employed to extract both 'free' and 'bound' hopanoids, from three grassland soils, a grassland-forest transition soil, and a forest soil from Western Canada. Identification and quantification of hopanoids in the soil samples were carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Methylbishomohopanol, bishomohopanol and bishomohopanoic acid were detected in all solvent extracts. The base hydrolysis and ruthenium tetroxide extracts contained only bishomohopanoic acid at a concentration range of 0.8-8.8 μg/gC and 2.2-28.3 μg/gC, respectively. The acid hydrolysis procedure did not release detectable amounts of hopanoids. The solvent extraction yielded the greatest amounts of 'free' hopanoids in two of the grassland soils (Dark Brown and Black Chernozems) and in the forest soil (Gray Luvisol). In contrast, the chemical degradation methods resulted in higher amounts of 'bound' hopanoids in the third grassland soil (Brown Chernozem) and the transition soil (Dark Gray Chernozem), indicating that more hopanoids exist in the 'bound' form in these soils. Overall, the forest and the transition soils contained more hopanoids than the grassland soils. This is hypothesized to be due to the greater degradation of hopanoids in the grassland soils and or sorption to clay minerals, as compared to the forest and transition soils

  6. Investigation of Emerging Materials for Optoelectronic Devices Based on III-Nitrides

    KAUST Repository

    Muhammed, Mufasila Mumthaz

    2018-03-11

    III-nitride direct bandgap semiconductors have attracted significant research interest due to their outstanding potential for modern optoelectronic and electronic applications. However, the high cost of III-nitride devices, along with low performance due to dislocation defects, remains an obstacle to their further improvement. In this dissertation, I present a significant enhancement of III-nitride devices based on emerging materials. A promising substrate, (-201)-oriented β-Ga2O3 with unique properties that combine high transparency and conductivity, is used for the first time in the development of high-quality vertical III-nitride devices, which can be cost-effective for large-scale production. In addition, hybridizing GaN with emerging materials, mainly perovskite, is shown to extend the functionality of III-nitride applications. As a part of this investigation, high-performance and high-responsivity fast perovskite/GaN-based UV-visible broadband photodetectors were developed. State-of-the-art GaN epilayers grown on (-201)-oriented β-Ga2O3 using AlN and GaN buffer layers are discussed, and their high optical quality without using growth enhancement techniques is demonstrated. In particular, a low lattice mismatch (⁓4.7%) between GaN and the substrate results in a low density of dislocations ~4.8Å~107 cm−2. To demonstrates the effect of (-201)-oriented β-Ga2O3 substrate on the quality of III-nitride alloys, high-quality ternary alloy InxGa1−xN film is studied, followed by the growth of high quality InxGa1−xN/GaN single and multiple quantum wells (QWs). The optical characterization and carrier dynamics by photoluminescence (PL) and time-resolved PL measurements were subsequently performed. Lastly, to investigate the performance of a vertical emitting device based on InGaN/GaN multiple QWs grown on (-201)-oriented β-Ga2O3 substrate, high-efficiency vertical-injection emitting device is developed and extensively investigated. The conductive nature of

  7. Improved Antileishmanial Activity of Dppz through Complexation with Antimony(III and Bismuth(III: Investigation of the Role of the Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Demicheli

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Two novel trivalent antimony(III and bismuth(III complexes with the nitrogen-donor heterocyclic ligand dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz were synthesized and characterized as [Sb(dppzCl3]∙H2O∙CH3OH and [Bi(dppzCl3]. The crystal structure of Sb(III complex was determined by X-ray crystallography. These complexes were evaluated for their activity against the promastigote form of Sb(III-sensitive and –resistant Leishmania infantum chagasi and Leishmania amazonensis strains. Both complexes were more effective than dppz alone in inhibiting the growth of Leishmania promastigotes and were at least 77 and 2,400 times more active than potassium antimonyl tartrate in Sb(III-sensitive and -resistant Leishmania, respectively. The cytotoxicity of dppz and its complexes against mouse peritoneal macrophages occurred at dppz concentrations at least 6-fold greater than those found to be active against Leishmania promastigotes.To investigate the role of the metal in the improved antileishmanial activity of dppz, the activity of the Sb(III complex was compared between the Sb-resistant mutants and their respective parental sensitive strains. The lack of cross-resistance to the Sb(III-dppz complex together with the much lower activity of antimonyl tartrate, SbCl3 and BiCl3 strongly support the model that the metal is not active by itself but improves the activity of dppz through complexation.

  8. Characterization of Soil Heterogeneity Across Scales in an Intensively Investigated Soil Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Matthew; Gimenez, Daniel; Nemes, Attila; Dathe, Annette; French, Helen; Bloem, Esther; Koestel, John; Jarvis, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous water flow in undisturbed soils is a natural occurrence that is complex to model due to potential changes in hydraulic properties in soils over changes in space. The use of geophysical methods, such as Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), can provide a minimally-invasive approximation of the spatial heterogeneity of the soil. This spatial distribution can then be combined with measured hydraulic properties to inform a model. An experiment was conducted on an Intensively Investigated Soil Volume (IISV), with dimensions of 2m x 1m x 0.8m, located in an agricultural field that is part of the Gryteland catchment in Ås, Norway. The location of the IISV was determined through surface ERT runs at two sequential resolutions. The first run was used to find an area of higher apparent electrical resistivity in a 23.5 x 11.5 m area with 0.5 m spacing. The second run measured apparent electrical resistivity in a 4.7 x 1 m area with 0.1 m spacing, from which the final IISV volume was derived. Distinct features found in the higher resolution run of the IISV, including a recent tire track from a harvester, were used as a spatial reference point for the installation of 20 pairs of TDR probes and tensiometers. The instruments measured water content, temperature and pressure potential at 10 minute intervals and ran continuously for a period of two weeks. After completion of the data collection the IISV was intensively sampled, with 30 samples taken for bulk density, 62 for hydraulic property measurements, and 20 to be used for both CT scanning and hydraulic property measurements. The measurement of hydraulic properties is ongoing and retention will be measured in the 0 - 100 cm range on a sand table, and from 100 - approx. 900 cm with an automated evaporation method. The formation of spatial clusters to represent the soil heterogeneity as relatively homogeneous units based on mesoscale properties like apparent electrical resistivity, bulk density, texture, in

  9. Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenschuss, A.; Huber, S.; Riss, A.; Schwarz, S.; Tulipan, M.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental soil surveys in each province of Austria have been performed, soils of about 5,000 sites were described and analyzed for nutrients and pollutants, the majority of these data are recorded in the soil information system of Austria (BORIS) soil database, http://www.ubavie.gv.at/umweltsituation/boden/boris), which also contains a soil map of Austria, data from 30 specific investigations mainly in areas with industry and results from the Austria - wide cesium investigation. With respect to the environmental state of soils a short discussion is given, including two geographical charts, one showing which sites have soil data (2001) and the other the cadmium distribution in top soils according land use (forest, grassland, arable land, others). Information related to the soil erosion, Corine land cover (Europe-wide land cover database), evaluation of pollutants in soils (reference values of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mo, Ni, Se, Pb, Tl, Va, Zn, AOX, PAH, PCB, PCDD/pcdf, dioxin), and relevant Austrian and European standards and regulations is provided. Figs. 2, Tables 4. (nevyjel)

  10. 1 INVESTIGATIONS ON THE EXPANSIVE SOILS OF ADDIS ABABA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to owners for repair, if the structure is to be salvaged at all. The object of this paper is to study the significant engineering properties of the expans- ive soils and assess the damages on structures as a result of heaving and shrinkage of the soil on which the foundations of the structures are erected. For this purpose samples ...

  11. Waste site grouping for 200 Areas soil investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to identify logical waste site groups for characterization based on criteria established in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy (DOE-RL 1996a). Specific objectives of the document include the following: finalize waste site groups based on the approach and preliminary groupings identified in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; prioritize the waste site groups based on criteria developed in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; select representative site(s) that best represents typical and worse-case conditions for each waste group; develop conceptual models for each waste group. This document will serve as a technical baseline for implementing the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy. The intent of the document is to provide a framework, based on waste site groups, for organizing soil characterization efforts in the 200 Areas and to present initial conceptual models

  12. Soil Investigation of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, Johnbull O [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Earles, Jennifer E [ORNL; Mehlhorn, Tonia L [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Pierce, Eric M [ORNL

    2017-03-01

    Mercury is regarded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management as a priority contaminant on the Oak Ridge Reservation because of the environmental risks associated with substantial losses from buildings, soils, and surface waters at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). As a result of historical releases of mercury from Y-12 primarily in the 1950s and early 1960s, the lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) stream channel and bank soil margins are contaminated with mercury (Brooks and Southworth 2011; Tennessee Valley Authority 1985b, a). A Mercury Remediation Technology Development project is underway to evaluate the nature of downstream mercury contamination and to develop targeted site-specific remedial technologies that can mitigate mercury release and biological uptake. It is known that mercury concentration varies longitudinally and with depth in LEFPC bank soils; however, soil types and soil physical properties are not well known, especially relative to the zones of mercury contamination. Moreover, there are no soil maps for the downstream reaches of LEFPC in Roane County (i.e. from the Chestnut Hill Road downstream) and this work represents the first ever soil mapping along this section of LEFPC.

  13. Transmission of vertical stress in a real soil profile. Part III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamandé, Mathieu; Schjønning, Per

    2011-01-01

    The transmission of stress in soils is extremely sensitive to changes in water content. According to the elasticity theory, for a given load applied to a given soil, an increase in soil water content yields a higher concentration of stresses under the centre of the load and a deeper propagation...... of stresses. We quantified the effect of soil water content of topsoil/subsoil layers (wet/wet, wet/dry, and dry/dry) on stress transmission. 3D measurements of vertical stresses under a towed wheel (800/50R34) were performed in situ in a Stagnic Luvisol. The tyre was loaded with 60 kN, and we used...... were measured in separate tests. Increase of water content in the topsoil by 114% increased the contact area by 149%, decreased the vertical stresses at the tyre–soil interface by 50%, and decreased the maximum vertical stress at 0.3 and 0.6 m depth by 46 and 63%, respectively. Stress attenuation...

  14. Chromate adsorption on selected soil minerals: Surface complexation modeling coupled with spectroscopic investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veselská, Veronika, E-mail: veselskav@fzp.czu.cz [Department of Environmental Geosciences, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcka 129, CZ-16521, Prague (Czech Republic); Fajgar, Radek [Department of Analytical and Material Chemistry, Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals of the CAS, v.v.i., Rozvojová 135/1, CZ-16502, Prague (Czech Republic); Číhalová, Sylva [Department of Environmental Geosciences, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcka 129, CZ-16521, Prague (Czech Republic); Bolanz, Ralph M. [Institute of Geosciences, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Carl-Zeiss-Promenade 10, DE-07745, Jena (Germany); Göttlicher, Jörg; Steininger, Ralph [ANKA Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, DE-76344, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Siddique, Jamal A.; Komárek, Michael [Department of Environmental Geosciences, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcka 129, CZ-16521, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Study of Cr(VI) adsorption on soil minerals over a large range of conditions. • Combined surface complexation modeling and spectroscopic techniques. • Diffuse-layer and triple-layer models used to obtain fits to experimental data. • Speciation of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) was assessed. - Abstract: This study investigates the mechanisms of Cr(VI) adsorption on natural clay (illite and kaolinite) and synthetic (birnessite and ferrihydrite) minerals, including its speciation changes, and combining quantitative thermodynamically based mechanistic surface complexation models (SCMs) with spectroscopic measurements. Series of adsorption experiments have been performed at different pH values (3–10), ionic strengths (0.001–0.1 M KNO{sub 3}), sorbate concentrations (10{sup −4}, 10{sup −5}, and 10{sup −6} M Cr(VI)), and sorbate/sorbent ratios (50–500). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to determine the surface complexes, including surface reactions. Adsorption of Cr(VI) is strongly ionic strength dependent. For ferrihydrite at pH <7, a simple diffuse-layer model provides a reasonable prediction of adsorption. For birnessite, bidentate inner-sphere complexes of chromate and dichromate resulted in a better diffuse-layer model fit. For kaolinite, outer-sphere complexation prevails mainly at lower Cr(VI) loadings. Dissolution of solid phases needs to be considered for better SCMs fits. The coupled SCM and spectroscopic approach is thus useful for investigating individual minerals responsible for Cr(VI) retention in soils, and improving the handling and remediation processes.

  15. Direct methods of soil-structure interaction analysis for earthquake loadings (III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, J. B.; Lee, S. R.; Kim, J. M.; Park, K. R.; Choi, J. S.; Oh, S. B. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-15

    In this study, direct methods for seismic analysis of soil-structure interaction system have been studied. A computer program 'KIESSI-QK' has been developed based on the finite element technique coupled with infinite element formulation. A substructuring method isolating the displacement solution of near field soil region was adopted. The computer program developed was verified using a free-field site response problem. The post-correlation analysis for the forced vibration tests after backfill of the Hualien LSST project has been carried out. The seismic analyses for the Hualien and Lotung LSST structures have been also performed utilizing the developed computer program 'KIESSI-QK'.

  16. Direct methods of soil-structure interaction analysis for earthquake loadings (III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, J B; Lee, S R; Kim, J M; Park, K R; Choi, J S; Oh, S B [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-15

    In this study, direct methods for seismic analysis of soil-structure interaction system have been studied. A computer program 'KIESSI-QK' has been developed based on the finite element technique coupled with infinite element formulation. A substructuring method isolating the displacement solution of near field soil region was adopted. The computer program developed was verified using a free-field site response problem. The post-correlation analysis for the forced vibration tests after backfill of the Hualien LSST project has been carried out. The seismic analyses for the Hualien and Lotung LSST structures have been also performed utilizing the developed computer program 'KIESSI-QK'.

  17. Investigations of the sorption characteristics of radiosilver on some natural and artificial soil particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, Gyula; Guczi, Judit [`FJC` National Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, Budapest (Hungary); Valyon, Jozef [Central Research Institute for Chemistry, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Bulman, Robert A. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton Didcot, England (United Kingdom)

    1995-09-05

    The likely distribution of {sup 110m}Ag(I), a radionuclide that may be produced in nuclear power stations and which has been known to contaminate the environment, between the components of particles of soil has been investigated by measuring its uptake from solutions of sodium nitrate, sodium EDTA and sodium citrate onto particles of chernozem soil and particles formed to simulate soils. The artificial soil particles were formed from: (1) silicas coated with manganese oxide, ferric oxide and hydrated ferric oxide, (2) silicas bearing chemically bound humic and fulvic acids and (3) alumina bearing anionically associated humic acid. These investigations have established that uptake of {sup 110m}Ag(I) by the humate coatings of soil particles will predominate under a wide range of pH. In the absence of humate coatings on the soil particles the radionuclide will be bound by the Fe/Mn oxide fractions of soils.

  18. Investigations of the sorption characteristics of radiosilver on some natural and artificial soil particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, Gyula; Guczi, Judit; Valyon, Jozef; Bulman, Robert A.

    1995-01-01

    The likely distribution of 110m Ag(I), a radionuclide that may be produced in nuclear power stations and which has been known to contaminate the environment, between the components of particles of soil has been investigated by measuring its uptake from solutions of sodium nitrate, sodium EDTA and sodium citrate onto particles of chernozem soil and particles formed to simulate soils. The artificial soil particles were formed from: (1) silicas coated with manganese oxide, ferric oxide and hydrated ferric oxide, (2) silicas bearing chemically bound humic and fulvic acids and (3) alumina bearing anionically associated humic acid. These investigations have established that uptake of 110m Ag(I) by the humate coatings of soil particles will predominate under a wide range of pH. In the absence of humate coatings on the soil particles the radionuclide will be bound by the Fe/Mn oxide fractions of soils

  19. STABILITY: AN INVESTIGATION OF AS(III)/AS(V) STABILITY IN IRON RICH DRINKING WATER MATRICES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic in drinking water is predominantly inorganic arsenic. The two oxidation states of inorganic arsenic are As(III)(pKa=9.3) and As(V)(pKa2=6.9). The distribution of As(III) and AS(V) in a water is dependent on the redox potential of the water. The actual distribution can ...

  20. Organic pollutants in Bavarian soils. Investigations in the framework of the 'Bavarian soil cadastre'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joneck, M.; Prinz, R.; Schmidt, R.

    1990-01-01

    Within the framework of the Bavarian soil cadastre, 260 soils from 90 sites throughout Bavaria were sampled for organic pollutants between 1986 and mid-1989. From the material class of the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), first results were introduced. The PCB total concentrations depend very strongly on soil utilization. Forest sites occupy a special position. The comparison of agricultural and forest soils with regard to pollutant concentrations is possible only with volume specific concentrations and/or a site-specific material balance. (orig.) [de

  1. OCCLUSION AND ARTICULATION IN BRUXISM AND BRUXOMANIA INVESTIGATED WITH THE SYSTEM T-SCAN III.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Dimova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To be analyzed common features of occlusal relationships in patients with bruxism and bruxomania at maximum intercuspation (MIP and eccentric jaw movements. Materials and Methods: 30 patients (22 women and 8 men, mean aged of 42,8 ± 13,3 with bruxism and/or bruxomania are examined with the system T-Scan III. Sequence of records is - at maximum intercuspation (MIP; in manual leading to central relation and in eccentric jaw movements. In the same sequence is investigated control group - 30 people (15 women and 15 men aged between 21 and 45 who didn’t have bruxism and/or bruxomania and dentition is preserved. Results: In the control group 85% of cases there is a balance of forces in both halves of the dental arch. In patients with bruxism is established uneven distribution of forces in MIP and articulation blockages (95%. There are three major reasons that impede spontaneous bilateral closing - force outliers (93% of cases; low force outliers (82% and presence of interceptive contacts and sliding occurring in the beginning of occlusion time until MIP (in all patients. Conclusions: In order to achieve a balanced occlusion in patients with bruxism and/or bruxomania required are correct diagnosis, registration and removal of preliminary contacts, articulation blockages and infraocclusion. Occlusal analysis is objective and an indicator of subsequent treatment only when it is a combination of clinical, instrumental and computerized occlusal analysis.

  2. Material dynamics in polluted soils with different structures - comparative investigations of general soil and aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taubner, H.

    1992-01-01

    In structured soils, a small-scale heterogeneity of physical and chemical properties will develop which results in a reduced availability of the reaction sites of the soil matrix. In view of the lack of knowledge on the conditions within the individual aggregates were carried out for characterizing the aggregates and comparing them with the soil in, general soil samples were taken from natural structure of a podzolic soil and a podazolic brown earth from two sites in the Fichtelgebirge mountains as well as a parabraun earth from East Holstein. The horizons differed with regard to their texture and structure; silty material tends to have a subpolyhedral structure and calyey material a polyhedral structure. The general soil samples and aggregate samples from the three B horizons were subjected, with comparable experimental conditions, to percolation experiments inducing a multiple acid load. The soil solution from the secondary pore system and aggregate pore system is more heterogeneus for the higher-structured subpolyhedral texture of the perdzolic soil than for the less strongly aggregated subpolyhedral structured of the podzolic brown earth. (orig.) [de

  3. An investigation on the fatigue behavior of DCB specimen bonded with aluminum foam at Mode III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Cho, J. U. [Kongju University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Zhao, G [School of Aerospace, Xian Jiaotong University, Xian (China); Cho, C. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Aluminum foam with its excellent physical and mechanical characteristics is a lightweight metallic material used with good quality in vehicle bumpers, internal shock absorbers on planes, as materials for vessel joints etc. On the contrary, when aluminum foam is used without sufficient investigation, there is the likelihood of damage or destruction of the machine or mechanical structure, and in extreme case it may cause to human casualties. This study aims to analyze the characteristics of adhesive structures with aluminum foam for the closed-type aluminum foam used primarily as shock absorbers. The fatigue analyses of the DCB test specimens at mode III with aluminum foam are verified through a fatigue experiment. As the analysis results, test specimen models with the thicknesses (t) of 35 mm, 45 mm and 55 mm showed the peak load occurrence approximately after the progress from 0 to 50 cycles. And afterwards the load gradually decreased as the cycles increased. The peak loads for each DCB test specimens were ±0.80 kN for the specimen thickness(t) of 35 mm, ±0.98 kN for the specimen thickness(t) of 45 mm and ±1.18 kN for the specimen thickness(t) of 55 mm. It is also shown that the peak load occurring on the specimen increased as specimen thickness increased. These study results are compared with the specimen thickness of 35 mm model as the basis. When the specimen thickness is increased as much as 10 mm, the peak load is increased approximately 1.25 times. When the specimen thickness is also increased as much as 20 mm, the peak load is increased 1.5 times. The analysis data and the real experiment data showed similar results each other. Therefore, it can be thought that the analysis data is applicable in real field. And it is estimated that the mechanical characteristics of the DCB test specimen at mode III during the fatigue load conditions can be systematically and efficiently analyzed.

  4. Investigation of Soil Erosion and Phosphorus Transport within an Agricultural Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klik, A.; Jester, W.; Muhar, A.; Peinsitt, A.; Rampazzo, N.; Mentler, A.; Staudinger, B.; Eder, M.

    2003-04-01

    In a 40 ha agricultural used watershed in Austria, surface runoff, soil erosion and nutrient losses are measured spatially distributed with 12 small erosion plots. Crops during growing season 2002 are canola, corn, sunflower, winter wheat, winter barley, rye, sugar beets, and pasture. Canopy height and canopy cover are observed in 14-day intervals. Four times per year soil water content, shear stress and random roughness of the surface are measured in a 25 x 25 m grid (140 points). The same raster is sampled for soil texture analyses and content of different phosphorus fractions in the 0-10 cm soil depth. Spatially distributed data are used for geostatistical analysis. Along three transects hydrologic conditions of the hillslope position (top, middle, foot) are investigated by measuring soil water content and soil matrix potential. After erosive events erosion features (rills, deposition, ...) are mapped using GPS. All measured data will be used as input parameters for the Limburg Soil Erosion Model (LISEM).

  5. Investigation of electro-kinetic methods for soil decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabanova, A.N.

    2000-01-01

    The choices of effective methods for ecological system decontamination, their perfection and introduction into practical use have been actual tasks for the Ural region. The objective of this work has been to study the potentials of electrical kinetics method of ISOTRON Corporation (US) for decontamination of the Urals soils. Results obtained have shown the method proposed to be usable for decontaminating some types of soils from strontium and plutonium; it is low effective for decontamination in the area of South-Urals radioactive plume. Thus, a low effectiveness can be expected in podsolic and leached laterite characterized by a high content of loamy sand and sandy soils, as well as for sobby-podsolic ones. The method can be promising for decontamination of soils and wastes from chemical contaminants, such as Zn, Ni, Cu, Pb, Hg, and others. Important advantages of this method compared to others have been its simplicity, small amount of wastes, and feasibility of decontamination in areas difficult to access. (authors)

  6. Investigation of the extraction equilibrium of ternary ionassociation complex of thallium(III) with iodo-nitro-tetrazolium chlorid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Dimitrov, A.

    1976-01-01

    The extraction equilibrium of the ternary ion-association complex of iodo-nitro-tetrazolium [3-(4-iodophenyl)2-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyltetrazolium chloride] with the chlorocomplex of thallium(III) is investigated radiochemically. The molar ratio of the ion-associate is found to be 1:1, the association constant has a value of 3.2x10 3 in aqueous solution and the distribution constant is 8.9. The extraction constant which gives a quantitative characterization of the equilibrium is 2.3x10 4 . From the investigation performed it can be concluded that a quite satisfactory extraction of thallium(III) by means of iodo-nitro-tetrazole in benzene can be carried out. The extraction constant has a relatively high value which allows to use this system conveniently for the extraction-photometric determination of thallium(III). (T.C.)

  7. Analytical investigation of the influence of soil on tanks for seismic analysis of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, M.; Wright, J.T.; Stevenson, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    When seismically designing equipment, such as ground supported tanks of nuclear power plants, the free field response spectra are normally applied to a model having a fixed base. The consideration of soil structure interaction, which routinely has been applied to nuclear power plant building structures constructed on the soil surface, has not normally been applied to equipment. In this study, the effect of soil structure interaction on seismic response of tanks will be evaluated as a function of soil surface stiffness and depth using the calculated soil stiffness equations developed by H. Tajimi. The authors investigated the influence of the soil properties and composition represented as soil springs which depend on the soil conditions (shear modulus, density, Poisson's ratio) and the depth of soil surface. The results of this study are presented in the form of graphs which may be used to identify the range of soil parameters which have a significant effect on the seismic response of typical nuclear power plant tanks. A typical example to express the influence of the soil surface for seismic response and vibrational characteristics is presented. (orig./HP)

  8. Investigation of radionuclide distribution in soil particles in different landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkinev, V. M.; Korobova, E. M.; Linnik, V. G.

    2012-04-01

    Russian and foreign publications have been analyzed for understanding the role of micro- and nano- particles in distribution and migration of technogenic elements in soils in different landscape conditions. A technique for application of various fractionation methods to separate and study -particles of different size down to micro- and nano-level has been developed. The dry sit method on the first stage of particle separation is recommend to be followed by the membrane filtration method. For obtaining more comprehensive information, combinations of fractionation technique should be chosen taking into account that (1) the efficiency of particles' separation using subsequent technique would be higher than using the preceding one; (2) separation methods should preferably be based on different principles (separation according size, density, charge etc.); (3) initial fractionation should separate particles according to their size, that makes possible to create an even scale for various samples. A study of distribution and balance of technogenic radionuclides' in soil particles of the size intervals 1.0—0.25, 0.25-0.1, 0.1-0.05, 0.05-0.01, 0.01-0.005, 0.005-0.001 and soil layers. Contribution of the silt particles (0,05-0,01 mm) to Cs-137 contamination ranged from 26 to 33,8%, 45% maximum due to "optimal" combination of both factors. Clay fraction was responsible for approximately 30% of Cs-137 contained in soil horizons due to higher sorption capacity. Relatively high correlation between the activity of 152,154Eu and 60 and the content of silt and clay allowed suggesting their incorporation mainly in clay fraction. Selected experimental plots near the Kola NPP (northern taiga) were used to compare soil particles (fractions 140-71; 71-40 and radioactivity found in soil litter appeared to be related to the Chernobyl contamination. Concentration of s-137 was higher in small size fractions. Obtained results were considered to be useful for understanding of radionuclide

  9. Structure and luminescent investigation of new Ln(III)-TTA complexes containing N-methyl-ε-caprolactam as ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alex Santos, E-mail: alexb@ifes.edu.br [Coordenadoria de Química e Biologia, IFES, Vitória, ES 29040-780 (Brazil); Caliman, Ewerton Valadares [Coordenadoria de Engenharia Metalúrgica, IFES, Vitória, ES 29040-780 (Brazil); Dutra, José Diogo L. [Departamento de Química Fundamental, UFPE, Recife, PE 50590-470 (Brazil); Da Silva, Jeferson G. [Departamento de Farmácia, UFJF, Governador Valadares, MG 35010-17 (Brazil); Araujo, Maria Helena, E-mail: maria.araujo@pq.cnpq.br [Departamento de Química, UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG 31270-901 (Brazil)

    2016-02-15

    The synthesis and photoluminescent properties of Ln(III)-TTA complexes (Ln=Eu(III) and Sm(III) ions; TTA=3-thenoyltrifluoroacetonate) with N-methyl-ε-caprolactam (NMC) are reported. The Ln complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, complexometric titration with EDTA and infrared spectroscopy. The molecular structures of the [Eu(TTA){sub 3}(NMC)(H{sub 2}O)] and [Sm(TTA){sub 3}(NMC)(H{sub 2}O)]·H{sub 2}O compounds were determined by single crystal X-ray crystallography. In these structures, the three TTA molecules are coordinated to the metal in anionic form as bidentate ligands, while the H{sub 2}O and NMC molecules are coordinated to the metal in neutral form as monodentated ligands. The coordination polyhedron around the Ln(III) atom can be described as square antiprismatic molecular geometry. The geometry of the [Eu(TTA){sub 3}(NMC)(H{sub 2}O)] complex was optimized with the Sparkle/RM1 model for Ln(III) complexes, allowing analysis of intramolecular energy transfer processes of the Eu(III) compound. The spectroscopic properties of the 4f{sup 6} intraconfigurational transitions of the Eu(III) complex were then studied experimentally and theoretically. The low value of emission quantum efficiency of {sup 5}D{sub 0} emitting level (η) of Eu(III) ion (ca. 36%) is due to the vibrational modes of the water molecule that act as luminescence quenching. In addition, the luminescence decay curves, the experimental intensity parameters (Ω{sub λ}), lifetimes (τ), radiative (A{sub rad}) and non-radiative (A{sub nrad}) decay rates, theoretical quantum yield (q{sub cal}) were also determined and discussed. - Highlights: • New Ln-TTA complexes with lactam were obtained and their luminescence investigated. • Jablonsky diagram for the Eu(III) complex shows the main channel for the IET process. • Data confirm the potentiality of the Eu(III) complex to produce red luminescence. • LUMPAC has provided useful information on the luminescence of the Eu(III

  10. Effects of iron(III)chelates on the solubility of heavy metals in calcareous soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ylivainio, Kari, E-mail: kari.ylivainio@mtt.f [Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-10-15

    In this study I evaluated the effects of complexing agents on the solubility of heavy metals in an incubation experiment up to 56 days when complexing agents were applied as Fe-chelates (Fe-EDDS(S,S), Fe-EDDS(mix), Fe-EDTA and Fe-EDDHA) on calcareous soils at a level sufficient to correct Fe chlorosis (0.1 mmol kg{sup -1}). Of these ligands, EDDHA was the most efficient in keeping Fe in water-soluble form, and EDDS increased the solubility of Cu and Zn most, and only EDTA increased the solubility of Cd and Pb. EDTA increased the solubility of Ni steadily during the incubation period, equalling about 5-8% of the added EDTA concentration. [S,S]-EDDS was biodegraded within 56 days, whereas EDDS(mix) was less biodegradable. Ni-chelates were the most recalcitrant against biodegradation. The study shows that even a moderate input of chelates to soil increases the solubility of toxic heavy metals and their risk of leaching. - When correcting Fe chlorosis Fe-EDDS causes lower environmental concern than Fe-EDTA.

  11. Effects of iron(III)chelates on the solubility of heavy metals in calcareous soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ylivainio, Kari

    2010-01-01

    In this study I evaluated the effects of complexing agents on the solubility of heavy metals in an incubation experiment up to 56 days when complexing agents were applied as Fe-chelates (Fe-EDDS(S,S), Fe-EDDS(mix), Fe-EDTA and Fe-EDDHA) on calcareous soils at a level sufficient to correct Fe chlorosis (0.1 mmol kg -1 ). Of these ligands, EDDHA was the most efficient in keeping Fe in water-soluble form, and EDDS increased the solubility of Cu and Zn most, and only EDTA increased the solubility of Cd and Pb. EDTA increased the solubility of Ni steadily during the incubation period, equalling about 5-8% of the added EDTA concentration. [S,S]-EDDS was biodegraded within 56 days, whereas EDDS(mix) was less biodegradable. Ni-chelates were the most recalcitrant against biodegradation. The study shows that even a moderate input of chelates to soil increases the solubility of toxic heavy metals and their risk of leaching. - When correcting Fe chlorosis Fe-EDDS causes lower environmental concern than Fe-EDTA.

  12. Effects of iron(III)chelates on the solubility of heavy metals in calcareous soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylivainio, Kari

    2010-10-01

    In this study I evaluated the effects of complexing agents on the solubility of heavy metals in an incubation experiment up to 56 days when complexing agents were applied as Fe-chelates (Fe-EDDS(S,S), Fe-EDDS(mix), Fe-EDTA and Fe-EDDHA) on calcareous soils at a level sufficient to correct Fe chlorosis (0.1 mmol kg(-1)). Of these ligands, EDDHA was the most efficient in keeping Fe in water-soluble form, and EDDS increased the solubility of Cu and Zn most, and only EDTA increased the solubility of Cd and Pb. EDTA increased the solubility of Ni steadily during the incubation period, equalling about 5-8% of the added EDTA concentration. [S,S]-EDDS was biodegraded within 56 days, whereas EDDS(mix) was less biodegradable. Ni-chelates were the most recalcitrant against biodegradation. The study shows that even a moderate input of chelates to soil increases the solubility of toxic heavy metals and their risk of leaching. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pore-scale investigation on the response of heterotrophic respiration to moisture conditions in heterogeneous soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Liu, Chongxuan; Todd-Brown, Katherine E.; Liu, Yuanyuan; Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2016-11-15

    The relationship between microbial respiration rate and soil moisture content is an important property for understanding and predicting soil organic carbon degradation, CO2 production and emission, and their subsequent effects on climate change. This paper reports a pore-scale modeling study to investigate the response of heterotrophic respiration to moisture conditions in soils and to evaluate various factors that affect this response. X-ray computed tomography was used to derive soil pore structures, which were then used for pore-scale model investigation. The pore-scale results were then averaged to calculate the effective respiration rates as a function of water content in soils. The calculated effective respiration rate first increases and then decreases with increasing soil water content, showing a maximum respiration rate at water saturation degree of 0.75 that is consistent with field and laboratory observations. The relationship between the respiration rate and moisture content is affected by various factors, including pore-scale organic carbon bioavailability, the rate of oxygen delivery, soil pore structure and physical heterogeneity, soil clay content, and microbial drought resistivity. Simulations also illustrates that a larger fraction of CO2 produced from microbial respiration can be accumulated inside soil cores under higher saturation conditions, implying that CO2 flux measured on the top of soil cores may underestimate or overestimate true soil respiration rates under dynamic moisture conditions. Overall, this study provides mechanistic insights into the soil respiration response to the change in moisture conditions, and reveals a complex relationship between heterotrophic microbial respiration rate and moisture content in soils that is affected by various hydrological, geochemical, and biophysical factors.

  14. Spectroscopic investigations on the complexation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) with organic model ligands and their binding mode in human urine (in vitro); Spektroskopische Untersuchungen zur Komplexbildung von Cm(III) und Eu(III) mit organischen Modellliganden sowie ihrer chemischen Bindungsform in menschlichem Urin (in vitro)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, Anne

    2011-10-26

    In case of incorporation, trivalent actinides (An(III)) and lanthanides (Ln(III)) pose a serious health risk to humans. An(III) are artificial, highly radioactive elements which are mainly produced during the nuclear fuel cycle in nuclear power plants. Via hazardous accidents or nonprofessional storage of radioactive waste, they can be released in the environment and enter the human food chain. In contrast, Ln(III) are nonradioactive, naturally occurring elements with multiple applications in technique and medicine. Consequently it is possible that humans get in contact and incorporate both, An(III) and Ln(III). Therefore, it is of particular importance to elucidate the behaviour of these elements in the human body. While macroscopic processes such as distribution, accumulation and excretion are studied quite well, knowledge about the chemical binding form (speciation) of An(III) and Ln(III) in various body fluids is still sparse. In the present work, for the first time, the speciation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) in natural human urine (in vitro) has been investigated spectroscopically and the formed complex identified. For this purpose, also basic investigations on the complex formation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) in synthetic model urine as well as with the urinary relevant, organic model ligands urea, alanine, phenylalanine, threonine and citrate have been performed and the previously unknown complex stability constants determined. Finally, all experimental results were compared to literature data and predictions calculated by thermodynamic modelling. Since both, Cm(III) and Eu(III), exhibit unique luminescence properties, particularly the suitability of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) could be demonstrated as a method to investigate these metal ions in untreated, complex biofluids. The results of this work provide new scientific findings on the biochemical reactions of An(III) and Ln(III) in human body fluids on a molecular scale and

  15. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 414: Clean Slate III Plutonium Dispersion (TTR) Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 414 is located on the Tonopah Test Range, which is approximately 130 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and approximately 40 miles southeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CAU 414 site consists of the release of radionuclides to the surface and shallow subsurface from the conduct of the Clean Slate III (CSIII) storage transportation test conducted on June 9, 1963. CAU 414 includes one corrective action site (CAS), TA-23-03CS (Pu Contaminated Soil). The known releases at CAU 414 are the result of the atmospheric dispersal of contamination from the 1963 CSIII test. The CSIII test was a nonnuclear detonation of a nuclear device located inside a reinforced concrete bunker covered with 8 feet of soil. This test dispersed radionuclides, primarily uranium and plutonium, on the ground surface. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 414 will be evaluated based on information collected from a corrective action investigation (CAI). The investigation is based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 7, 2016, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; the U.S. Air Force; and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective action alternatives for CAU 414.

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 414: Clean Slate III Plutonium Dispersion (TTR) Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick [Navarro, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 414 is located on the Tonopah Test Range, which is approximately 130 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and approximately 40 miles southeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CAU 414 site consists of the release of radionuclides to the surface and shallow subsurface from the conduct of the Clean Slate III (CSIII) storage–transportation test conducted on June 9, 1963. CAU 414 includes one corrective action site (CAS), TA-23-03CS (Pu Contaminated Soil). The known releases at CAU 414 are the result of the atmospheric dispersal of contamination from the 1963 CSIII test. The CSIII test was a nonnuclear detonation of a nuclear device located inside a reinforced concrete bunker covered with 8 feet of soil. This test dispersed radionuclides, primarily uranium and plutonium, on the ground surface. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 414 will be evaluated based on information collected from a corrective action investigation (CAI). The investigation is based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 7, 2016, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; the U.S. Air Force; and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective action alternatives for CAU 414.

  17. Investigation on the electrode process of the Mn(II)/Mn(III) couple in redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Fangqin; Wang Yongliang; Wang Wenhong; Wang Xindong

    2008-01-01

    The Mn(II)/Mn(III) couple has been recognized as a potential anode for redox flow batteries to take the place of the V(IV)/V(V) in all-vanadium redox battery (VRB) and the Br 2 /Br - in sodium polysulfide/bromine (PSB) because it has higher standard electrode potential. In this study, the electrochemical behavior of the Mn(II)/Mn(III) couple on carbon felt and spectral pure graphite were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, steady polarization curve, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, transient potential-step experiment, X-ray diffraction and charge-discharge experiments. Results show that the Mn(III) disproportionation reaction phenomena is obvious on the carbon felt electrode while it is weak on the graphite electrode owing to its fewer active sites. The reaction mechanism on carbon felt was discussed in detail. The reversibility of Mn(II)/Mn(III) is best when the sulfuric acid concentration is 5 M on the graphite electrode. Performance of a RFB employing Mn(II)/Mn(III) couple as anolyte active species and V(III)/V(II) as catholyte ones was evaluated with constant-current charge-discharge tests. The average columbic efficiency is 69.4% and the voltage efficiency is 90.4% at a current density of 20 mA cm -2 . The whole energy efficiency is 62.7% close to that of the all-vanadium battery and the average discharge voltage is about 14% higher than that of an all-vanadium battery. The preliminary exploration shows that the Mn(II)/Mn(III) couple is electrochemically promising for redox flow battery

  18. Investigation of features in radon soil dynamics and search for influencing factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, Grigorii; Cherepnev, Maxim; Nagorskiy, Petr; Yakovleva, Valentina

    2018-03-01

    The features in radon soil dynamics at two depths were investigated and the main influencing factors were revealed. The monitoring of radon volumetric activity in soil air was performed at experimental site of Tomsk Observatory of Radioactivity and Ionizing Radiation with using radon radiometers and scintillation detectors of alpha-radiation with 10 min sampling frequency. The detectors were installed into boreholes of 0.5 and 1 m depths. The analysis of the soil radon monitoring data has allowed revealing some dependencies at daily and annual scales and main influencing factors. In periods with clearly defined daily radon variations in the soil were revealed the next: 1) amplitude of the daily variations of the soil radon volumetric activity damps with the depth, that is related with the influence of convective fluxes in the soil; 2) temporal shift between times of occurrence of radon volumetric activity maximum (or minimum) values at 0.5 m and 1 m depths can reach 3 hours. In seasonal dynamics of the soil radon the following dependences were found: 1) maximal values are observed in winter, but minimal - in summer; 2) spring periods of snow melting are accompanied by anomaly increasing of radon volumetric activity in the soil up to about 3 times. The main influencing factors are atmospheric precipitations, temperature gradient in the soil and the state of upper soil layer.

  19. Investigation of global particulate nitrate from the AeroCom phase III experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bian

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available An assessment of global particulate nitrate and ammonium aerosol based on simulations from nine models participating in the Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom phase III study is presented. A budget analysis was conducted to understand the typical magnitude, distribution, and diversity of the aerosols and their precursors among the models. To gain confidence regarding model performance, the model results were evaluated with various observations globally, including ground station measurements over North America, Europe, and east Asia for tracer concentrations and dry and wet depositions, as well as with aircraft measurements in the Northern Hemisphere mid-to-high latitudes for tracer vertical distributions. Given the unique chemical and physical features of the nitrate occurrence, we further investigated the similarity and differentiation among the models by examining (1 the pH-dependent NH3 wet deposition; (2 the nitrate formation via heterogeneous chemistry on the surface of dust and sea salt particles or thermodynamic equilibrium calculation including dust and sea salt ions; and (3 the nitrate coarse-mode fraction (i.e., coarse/total. It is found that HNO3, which is simulated explicitly based on full O3-HOx-NOx-aerosol chemistry by all models, differs by up to a factor of 9 among the models in its global tropospheric burden. This partially contributes to a large difference in NO3−, whose atmospheric burden differs by up to a factor of 13. The atmospheric burdens of NH3 and NH4+ differ by 17 and 4, respectively. Analyses at the process level show that the large diversity in atmospheric burdens of NO3−, NH3, and NH4+ is also related to deposition processes. Wet deposition seems to be the dominant process in determining the diversity in NH3 and NH4+ lifetimes. It is critical to correctly account for contributions of heterogeneous chemical production of nitrate on dust and sea salt, because this process

  20. The taste of soil: chemical investigation of soil, grape and wine in the Sopron wine region (Hungary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Tomás; Horvàth, Imre; Bidló, András; Hofmann, Eszther

    2015-04-01

    The taste of soil: chemical investigation of soil, grape and wine in the Sopron wine region (Hungary) The Sopron wine region is one of the most significant and historical wine-producing regions of Hungary. 1800 hectares out of the total area of 4300 hectares of the wine region are used for grape cultivation. Kékfrankos (Blue Frankish) is the most frequent grape variety (60%) nevertheless other varieties are also grown here (including Zweigelt, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Portugieser and Sauvignon Blanc). In this study preliminary results of the chemical analyses involving soil, grape and wine are presented, which could provide a future basis for a comprehensive terroir research in the wine region. As soil is the premanent home of grapevine, its quality is highly influencing for the growth of the plants and grape berries, and also determines future organoleptic characteristics of the wines. The investigated basic soil parameters included humus content, transition, soil structure, compactness, roots, skeletal percent, color, physical assortment, concretion, soil defects. Laboratory measurements involved the determination of pH, carbonated lime content, humus content, ammonium lactate-acetic acid soluble P and K content, KCl soluble Ca and Mg content, EDTA and DTPA soluble Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn content. Soil samples were also investigated for heavy metal contents using ICP-OES method (Thermo Scientific iCAP 7000 Series). By the use of thermoanalytical measurements (Mettler Toledo TGA/DSC 1 type thermogravimeter, 5°C/min, air atmosphere, 25-1000°C) the mineral composition of the soils was evaluated. Regarding major aroma compounds in grape berries and wine, the concentrations of organic acids (tartaric-, acetic-, succinic-, malic-, lactic acid), methanol, ethanol, glycerine, glucose and fructose were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (Shimadzu LC-20 HPLC equipment with DAD and RID detection). The density, titratable acidity, pH and total extractive

  1. Probing the Natural World, Level III, Teacher's Edition: Investigating Variation. Intermediate Science Curriculum Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, John R., Ed.; Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is the teacher's edition of one of the eight units of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) for level III students (grade 9). This unit focuses on diversity in human populations, measurement, and data collection. Optional excursions are described for students who wish to study a topic in greater depth. An introduction describes…

  2. Probing the Natural World, Level III, Student Guide: Investigating Variation. Intermediate Science Curriculum Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, John R., Ed.; Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is the student's text of one unit of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) for level III students (grade 9). This unit focuses on diversity in human populations, measurement, and data collection. Numerous activities are given and optional excursions encourage students to pursue a topic in greater depth. Data tables within the…

  3. Spectroscopic and mechanistic investigations into oxidation of aspartame by diperiodatocuprate(III in aqueous alkaline medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayant I. Gowda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of aspartame (ASP by diperiodatocuprate(III (DPC in aqueous alkaline medium at 298 K and a constant ionic strength of 0.30 mol dm−3 was studied spectrophotometrically. The reaction between aspartame and diperiodatocuprate(III in alkaline medium exhibits 1:6 stoichiometry in the reaction. The order of the reaction with respect to [diperiodatocuprate(III] was unity, while the apparent order with respect to [aspartame] was less than unity over the concentration range studied. The rate of the reaction increased with increase in [OH−] whereas the rate decreased with increase in [$ {\\text{IO}}^-_4 $]. Increasing the ionic strength of the medium increased the rate. The main products were identified by FT-IR, NMR, and LC-MS spectral studies. The probable mechanism was proposed. The activation parameters with respect to slow step of the mechanism were computed and discussed. Thermodynamic quantities were also calculated. Kinetic studies suggest that [Cu(H2IO6(H2O2] is the reactive species of Cu(III.

  4. Investigation of Emerging Materials for Optoelectronic Devices Based on III-Nitrides

    KAUST Repository

    Mumthaz Muhammed, Mufasila

    2018-01-01

    performance due to dislocation defects, remains an obstacle to their further improvement. In this dissertation, I present a significant enhancement of III-nitride devices based on emerging materials. A promising substrate, (-201)-oriented β-Ga2O3 with unique

  5. An injected gamma-tracer method for soil-moisture movement investigations in arid zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, A.R.; Navada, S.V.; Rao, S.M.

    1980-01-01

    A method for the in-situ determination of soil-moisture transport rates using K 3 60 Co(CN) 6 is discussed. The tracer compares well with tritiated water in laboratory investigations and the results obtained in limited field studies are very encouraging. The method promises to be of specific interest in arid-zone investigations where the soil-moisture fluxes in liquid and vapour phases could cause complications for tritium tracer data interpretation. (author)

  6. Flashphotolysis investigations of the influence of the ionic strength on the kinetics of energy transfer reactions. Investigation of the reaction of Tb(III)- and Eu(III)-trisdipicolinate with different charged iron compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorle, A.

    1999-01-01

    Luminescent lanthanide complexes are especially important as labels for the investigation of biological substances. The rare earths are employed as probes and are often able to substitute more expensive radioactive labels. The kinetic investigations of the reactions of Tb(III)- and Eu(III)-trisdipicolinate (charge: 3**-) with different charged iron complexes as quenchers (charge: 3 - , 1 - , 2 + ) (solvent: H 2 O) at varying ionic strength give results that can help to find out more details about how the intermolecular energy transfer takes place. By creating a Stern-Volmer plot one can get the rate constant of the luminescent quenching: Plotting the rate constants of quenching taken from the timeresolved flashphotolysis measurement (y-axis) versus the concentration of the quencher (x-axis) the resulting slope equals a rate constant k 2 of 2 nd order. (author)

  7. Investigation of structure and characteristics of soil for foundation design of gamma irradiators capacity 2 MCi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukuh Prayogo; Hasriyasti Saptowati

    2016-01-01

    Soil investigation conducted before the work of irradiator building structural foundation design is initiated. Intake of sample was set at some point drill at Irradiator facility site to the disturbed soil layer or not disturbed. From the results of this soil investigation will be selected as alternative / types, the depth and dimensions of the foundation of the most economical but still safe. Soil investigation method used was Deep Boring, undisturbed and disturbed sampling, SPT ( Standard Penetration Test ), CPT ( Cone Penetration Test / Sondir ). Testing conducted in the field and in the laboratory of soil mechanics to determine the mechanical properties, soil layer thickness and other physical properties for calculation of the bearing capacity of the foundation. The results of the soil investigation at the three-point drill showed the average depth of the bedrock -19.33 m and adhesion 3163.88 kg / cm’. Test boring at point BH1 found the depth of the bedrock -19.33 m and adhesion 3163.88 kg / cm’. Test boring at point BH1 found the bedrock at a depth of 32 m with a maximum SPT value 16. from the data can be determined the appropriate type of foundation is bored pile. The foundation is the upper structure support which can lead to a reduction / settlement if its bearing capacity is not able to withstand the load on it. (author)

  8. Investigation and Evaluation of Heavy Metals Pollution of Agricultural Soils Near a Steel Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XIE Tuan-hui

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The pollution of heavy metals in farmland around a steel plant in the west of Fujian Province was investigated. The pollution index method, principal component analysis and factor analysis on the pollution of Cr, Pb, Cd, Ni, Cu, Zn and As in the soils were carried out to clarify the pollution status, the main source, the degree, and the distribution of the heavy metals pollution in the soil. The secondary standards for acidic agricultural soils of "soil environmental quality standard"(GB 15618-1995were used as the evaluation criterion. The single factor evaluation results showed that the pollution of soil by Cd and Zn in the investigated area was widespread and serious and the points over standard rate was 100% and 95.5% respectively, while the pollution by Pb, Cu and As was slight and the points over standard rate was 29.6%,15.9% and 6.8% respectively. The soils were not polluted by Cr and Ni. The principal component analysis and factor analysis showed that the correlation between Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn and As was significant and homologous. Therefore, the pollution of Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn and As of the soils should be mainly attributed to the pollutants emitted from the steel plant. The correlation between Cr and Ni was also significant and homologous. It was deduced that Cr and Ni in the soils were largely originated from the soils themselves. The comprehensive pollution degree of the heavy metals in the soils decreased as the distance between the steel plant and farmland increasing. The soils of the fields near the entrance of irrigation water from the waste water of the steel plant were more seriously polluted.

  9. Studies and further needed investigations on radioactive contaminants in soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belivermis, M.; Kilic, O.; Topcuoglu, S.; Cotuk, Y.; Kalayci, G.; Pestreli, D.

    2009-01-01

    Following the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident, the radionuclides were deposited on the marine and terrestrial environments of Turkey and other countries as wet and / or dry fallout. It is well known that, the soil is the main reservoir at the terrestrial environment. The geographic distribution of the Chernobyl radionuclides per unit area is significantly different. Many countries have drawn radiation maps using the radionuclide data of the soil samples. The radioecological monitoring study in the soil samples are also investigated in the our country. However, the exist data is limited for whole region of Turkey. In general, the type study, that make, in uncultivated soil sample use of different soil layers (0-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-30 cm). In our previous studies, the activity concentration of gamma emitting radionuclides were determined in soil samples (0-5 cm) from the Thrace (73 sites) and East and South Marmara (100 sites) regions. Moreover, the mean values of the annual effective dose equivalent were also calculated. In literature, numerous studies have been published concerning vertical migration of 1 37Cs in uncultivated soil samples use of different soil types. However, we have not enough data on this subject. On the other hand, we want to present a previously published data on the vertical distribution of 1 37Cs radionuclide in an uncultivated site in the eastern Black Sea region. It is well known that the determination of soil to plant transfer factors of radiocesium that take account all economically crops on the soil varieties is a need to support dose assessment or countermeasure studies. Previously published IAEA reports, we determined transfer factors for some crops of 1 37Cs radionuclides in cultivated soil samples (0-20 cm depth) in the eastern Black Sea region. At the same time, we have given a new project to IAEA for the determination of transfer factor of radiocesium from soil to some crops for Akkuyu Nuclear Power Plant site.

  10. Adsorption and desorption dynamics of citric acid anions in soil

    KAUST Repository

    Oburger, E.; Leitner, D.; Jones, D. L.; Zygalakis, K. C.; Schnepf, A.; Roose, T.

    2011-01-01

    The functional role of organic acid anions in soil has been intensively investigated, with special focus on (i) microbial respiration and soil carbon dynamics, (ii) nutrient solubilization or (iii) metal detoxification and reduction of plant metal

  11. Pulse-radiolytic investigation of the reduction of titanium(III) ions in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micic, O.I.; Nenadovic, M.T.

    1979-01-01

    The absorption spectrum and decay kinetics of intermediates formed by the reaction of titanium(III) ions with H atoms, hydrated electrons, and carboxyl radicals have been studied in aqueous solution using the pulse-radiolysis technique. The product of the reaction with H atoms in acid solution is a Ti 3+ -H hydride intermediate which decomposes by a first-order process with a half-life of ca. 3 s. Titanium(II) is formed by reaction with hydrated electrons and CO 2 H radicals. The absorption spectrum of titanium(II) and the kinetics of its reactions are reported and discussed. The formation of molecular hydrogen by reaction of Ti 2+ with water is suppressed by the other solutes in the solutions. Titanium(III) reacts with CO 2 H, CH 2 CO 2 H, and CH(CO 2 H) 2 radicals to give titanium-radical complexes. (author)

  12. Gas-phase infrared spectrum of phosphorus (III) oxycyanide, OPCN: experimental and theoretical investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaf, Abdul. W.; Kassem, M.; Alibrahim, M.; Boustani, Ihsan

    1999-03-01

    An attempt was made to observe the gas-phase infrared spectrum of Phosphorus (III) oxycyanide, OPCN for the first time. This molecule was produced by an on-line process using phosphorus (III) oxychloride, OPCl as precursor passed over heated AgCN. The products were characterised by the infrared spectra of their vapours. The low resolution gas-phase Fourier transform infrared spectrum shows two bands centered at 2165 and 1385 cm -1. These bands are assigned to, ν1 (CN stretch) and ν2 (OP stretch), respectively. Ab initio self-consistent-field (SCF) molecular orbital (MO) and Møller-Plesset second order perturbation theory (MP2) calculations were performed to determine the geometry, total energy and vibrational frequencies of OPCN.

  13. Gas-phase infrared spectrum of phosphorus (III) oxycyanide, OPCN: Experimental and theoretical and theoretical investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allaf, A.W.; Kassem, M.; Alibrahim, M.

    1999-01-01

    An attempt was made to observe the gas-phase infrared spectrum of phosphorus (III) oxycyanide, OPCN for the first time. This molecule was produced by on-line process using phosphorus (III) oxychloride, OPCI as precursor passed over heated Ag CN. The products were characterised by the infrared spectra of their vapours. The low resolution gas-phase Fourier transform infrared spectrum shows two bands at 2165 and 1385 cm -1 . These bands are assigned to ν 1 (C≡N stretch) and ν 2 (O=P stretch), respectively. Ab initio self-consistent-field (SCF) molecular orbital (MO) and Moeller - Plesset second order perturbation theory (MP2) calculations were performed to determine the geometry, total energy and vibrational frequencies of OPCN. (authors)

  14. Biotransformation of As (III to As (V and their stabilization in soil with Bacillus sp. XS2 isolated from gold mine tailing of Xinjiang, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kumar Karn

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Xinjiang province is one of the most polluted region in China, this region affected by multi-metal problem, especially arsenic (As affect very badly. Two major forms of As present in the environment As (III and As (V as compared to As (V, As (III is much more toxic. Our aim is to remediate As (III contaminated soil by using As (III resistant microbe, having the high transforming ability for As (III to As (V. An As (III oxidizing bacterium Bacillus sp. XS2, isolated and selected from gold mine tailing which have shown high resistance up to 6400 mg L−1 and efficiently transformed up to 4000 mg L−1 in sucrose low phosphate medium (SLP, higher than any of the previous reported Bacillus sp.. In soil, we found that XS2 successfully transformed up to 81% of soluble exchangeable fraction within 10 d in contaminated soil (with 500 mg kg−1, which makes it potential microbe for the removal of contaminated site with arsenic in the environment. Further XS2 was characterized for their molecular basis of resistance and we establish that XS2 having arsenic oxidase enzyme activity which is accountable for the detoxification of arsenic at high concentration and provide resistance to the bacterium. Gene encoding arsenic oxidase (aioA-gene was also amplified from this bacterium using polymerase chain reaction (PCR with degenerate primer. The aioA-gene is specific for the arsenite-oxidizing bacteria. The deduced amino acid sequence had shown 42% similarity with pseudomonas sp. arsenic oxidase. Further, the strain was characterized by 16s rRNA gene sequence analysis and shown maximum similarity with Bacillus sp.

  15. Childhood lead poisoning investigations: evaluating a portable instrument for testing soil lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reames, Ginger; Lance, Larrie L

    2002-04-01

    The Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Branch of the California Department of Health Services evaluated a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument for use as a soil lead-testing tool during environmental investigations of lead-poisoned children's homes. A Niton XRF was used to test soil at 119 sampling locations in the yards of 11 San Francisco Bay Area houses. Niton XRF readings were highly correlated with laboratory results and met the study criteria for an acceptable screening method. The data suggest that the most health-protective and time-efficient approach to testing for soil lead above regulatory levels is to take either surface readings or readings of a test cup of soil prepared by grinding with a mortar and pestle. The advantage of the test cup method is that the test cup with soil may be submitted to a laboratory for confirmatory analysis.

  16. Final Remedial Investigation Report Area of Contamination (AOC) 57. Volume III. Appendices E through Q

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination from parking lot runoff. Although some residual TPHC and PAH concentrations remained in Area 1 soils after the removal...formulations and has industrial uses in tanneries, as well as the glass and wine making industries. Toxicity depends on its chemical form. Arsenic is an...nature and is an essential element. Copper deficiency is characterized by anemia and is used for medicinal purposes as an emetic and an astringent . Acute

  17. Biochemical investigation of yttrium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline: DNA binding and antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Moodi, Asieh; Niroomand, Sona

    2013-03-05

    Characterization of the interaction between yttrium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline as ligand, [Y(phen)2Cl(OH2)3]Cl2⋅H2O, and DNA has been carried out by UV absorption, fluorescence spectra and viscosity measurements in order to investigate binding mode. The experimental results indicate that the yttrium(III) complex binds to DNA and absorption is decreasing in charge transfer band with the increase in amount of DNA. The binding constant (Kb) at different temperatures as well as thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°), were calculated according to relevant fluorescent data and Vant' Hoff equation. The results of interaction mechanism studies, suggested that groove binding plays a major role in the binding of the complex and DNA. The activity of yttrium(III) complex against some bacteria was tested and antimicrobial screening tests shown growth inhibitory activity in the presence of yttrium(III) complex. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The use of gamma ray computed tomography to investigate soil compaction due to core sampling devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, Luiz F.; Arthur, Robson C.J.; Correchel, Vladia; Bacchi, Osny O.S.; Reichardt, Klaus; Brasil, Rene P. Camponez do

    2004-01-01

    Compaction processes can influence soil physical properties such as soil density, porosity, pore size distribution, and processes like soil water and nutrient movements, root system distribution, and others. Soil porosity modification has important consequences like alterations in results of soil water retention curves. These alterations may cause differences in soil water storage calculations and matrix potential values, which are utilized in irrigation management systems. Because of this, soil-sampling techniques should avoid alterations of sample structure. In this work soil sample compaction caused by core sampling devices was investigated using the gamma ray computed tomography technique. A first generation tomograph with fixed source-detector arrangement and translation/rotational movements of the sample was utilized to obtain the images. The radioactive source is 241 Am, with an activity of 3.7 GBq, and the detector consists of a 3 in. x 3 in. NaI(Tl) scintillation crystal coupled to a photomultiplier tube. Soil samples were taken from an experimental field utilizing cylinders 4.0 cm high and 2.6 cm in diameter. Based on image analyses it was possible to detect compacted regions in all samples next to the cylinder wall due to the sampling system. Tomographic unit profiles of the sample permitted to identify higher values of soil density for deeper regions of the sample, and it was possible to determine the average densities and thickness of these layers. Tomographic analyses showed to be a very useful tool for soil compaction characterization and presented many advantages in relation to traditional methods. (author)

  19. DNA analysis of soil extracts can be used to investigate fine root depth distribution of trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bithell, Sean L.; Tran-Nguyen, Lucy T. T.; Hearnden, Mark N.; Hartley, Diana M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the root distribution of trees by soil coring is time-consuming as it requires the separation of roots from soil and classification of roots into particular size classes. This labour-intensive process can limit sample throughput and therefore sampling intensity. We investigated the use of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) on soil DNA extractions to determine live fine root DNA density (RDD, mg DNA m−2) for mango (Mangifera indica) trees. The specificity of the qPCR was tested against DNA extracted from 10 mango cultivars and 14 weed species. All mango cultivars and no weeds were detected. Mango DNA was successfully quantified from control soil spiked with mango roots and weed species. The DNA yield of mango root sections stored in moist soil at 23–28 °C declined after 15 days to low concentrations as roots decayed, indicating that dead root materials in moist soil would not cause false-positive results. To separate large roots from samples, a root separation method for field samples was used to target the root fragments remaining in sieved (minimum 2 mm aperture) soil for RDD comparisons. Using this method we compared the seasonal RDD values of fine roots for five mango rootstock cultivars in a field trial. The mean cultivar DNA yields by depth from root fragments in the sieved soil samples had the strongest relationship (adjusted multiple R2 = 0.9307, P < 0.001) with the dry matter (g m−2) of fine (diameter <0.64 mm) roots removed from the soil by sieving. This method provides a species-specific and rapid means of comparing the distribution and concentration of live fine roots of trees in orchards using soil samples up to 500 g. PMID:25552675

  20. Investigation of the kinetics of hydrolysis of mixed cyanothiocyanatochromates(III) by high voltage ionophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasius, E.; Augustin, H.; Ehrhardt, T.

    1975-01-01

    The hydrolysis of the mixed cyanothiocyanatochromates(III) is studied with respect to the influence of the light and of the darkness upon the reaction rate. As representatives the labelled complexes [Cr(N 14 CS) 6 ] 3- , [Cr( 14 CN)(NCS) 5 ] 3- and trans-[Cr( 14 CN) 2 (NCS) 4 ] 3- , being easy preparated, are used. After the high voltage ionophoresis, their zones on the pherogramms are located by means of the activity distribution curves. The activities of the stamped zones of the complexes are taken into account for the concentrations, in measuring the concentration-time dependence at various pH values and temperatures. The reaction rates, the half-times and the Arrhenius energy of activation are reported. The rate of hydrolysis is dependent on the structure of the complexes and 50-fold in the light

  1. Investigation of the transport of actinide-bearing soil colloids in the soil-aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, J.C.; Campbell, M.J.; Kittrick, J.; Cheng, T.

    1980-04-01

    Uranium-233 particle size dependent distribution ratios for the 10 to 60 range were determined for muscatine silt loam, Burbank loamy sand, Ritzville silt loam, Fuquay sand, and Idaho sandy clay. A mathematical method for the analysis of centrifuge data was developed to determine particle size dependent distribution ratio for the 10 to 60 nm range. Comparison of the distribution ratio data for the 0 to 60 nm particle size range strongly suggests that particles in the 1 to 10 nm (8000 to 50,000 MW) range play a dominate role. Since these particles are probably humic acid polymers, future research should be focused on humic acid complexing of radionuclides. A mathematical analysis is given to demonstrate the role of humic acid complexing in the transport of radionuclides in the soil-aquatic environment

  2. Neutron-activation analysis for investigation of biochemical manganese in soils cotton soweol zone of Uzbekistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhumamuratov, A.; Tillaev, T.; Khatamov, Sh.; Suvanov, M.; Osinskaya, N.S.; Rakhmanova, T.P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: For many years we neutron activation analysis of soils sampled from different areas of landscape-geochemical regions of Uzbekistan including zone of extreme ecological catastrophe of Aral. Content of manganese and some other elements in the 'soil-cotton' system was investigated. Neutron-activation method of manganese determining with productivity up to 400 samples on shift with detection limit of 1,1 10 -5 % and discrepancies not more than 10%. Was developed extremely uniform distribution of manganese in cotton sowed soils of the Republic (340-1800mg/kg) is determined. Practically all soils of cotton-sowed zone of Republic are with lack of manganese. Distribution of manganese on soil profile of separate organs of cotton (leaves seeds etc.) was studied. Correlation between gross concentration of manganese and its active part extracted by distilled water on the basis of quantity analysis was found. Successive comparison of gross content of manganese in the soil with crop capacity of cotton in different zones of Republic made it possible to find interconnection between these quantities, which proves necessity of using micro-additions of manganese in the soils where its low concentration is detected

  3. Numerical Investigations of Moisture Distribution in a Selected Anisotropic Soil Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanek, M.

    2018-01-01

    The moisture of soil profile changes both in time and space and depends on many factors. Changes of the quantity of water in soil can be determined on the basis of in situ measurements, but numerical methods are increasingly used for this purpose. The quality of the results obtained using pertinent software packages depends on appropriate description and parameterization of soil medium. Thus, the issue of providing for the soil anisotropy phenomenon gains a big importance. Although anisotropy can be taken into account in many numerical models, isotopic soil is often assumed in the research process. However, this assumption can be a reason for incorrect results in the simulations of water changes in soil medium. In this article, results of numerical simulations of moisture distribution in the selected soil profile were presented. The calculations were conducted assuming isotropic and anisotropic conditions. Empirical verification of the results obtained in the numerical investigations indicated statistical essential discrepancies for the both analyzed conditions. However, better fitting measured and calculated moisture values was obtained for the case of providing for anisotropy in the simulation model.

  4. Investigating soil moisture-climate interactions with prescribed soil moisture experiments: an assessment with the Community Earth System Model (version 1.2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Mathias; Orth, René; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2017-04-01

    Land surface hydrology is an important control of surface weather and climate. A valuable technique to investigate this link is the prescription of soil moisture in land surface models, which leads to a decoupling of the atmosphere and land processes. Diverse approaches to prescribe soil moisture, as well as different prescribed soil moisture conditions have been used in previous studies. Here, we compare and assess four methodologies to prescribe soil moisture and investigate the impact of two different estimates of the climatological seasonal cycle used to prescribe soil moisture. Our analysis shows that, though in appearance similar, the different approaches require substantially different long-term moisture inputs and lead to different temperature signals. The smallest influence on temperature and the water balance is found when prescribing the median seasonal cycle of deep soil liquid water, whereas the strongest signal is found when prescribing soil liquid and soil ice using the mean seasonal cycle. These results indicate that induced net water-balance perturbations in experiments investigating soil moisture-climate coupling are important contributors to the climate response, in addition to the intended impact of the decoupling. These results help to guide the set-up of future experiments prescribing soil moisture, as for instance planned within the Land Surface, Snow and Soil Moisture Model Intercomparison Project (LS3MIP).

  5. Experimental and theoretical investigations of soil-structure interaction effect at HDR-reactor-building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wassermann, K.

    1983-01-01

    Full-scale dynamic testing on intermediate and high levels was performed at the Heissdampfreaktor (HDR) in 1979. Various types of dynamic forces were applied and response of the reactor containment structure and internal components was measured. Precalculations of dynamic behaviour and response of the structure were made through different mathematical models for the structure and the underlying soil. Soil-Structure Interaction effects are investigated and different theoretical models are compared with experimental results. In each model, the soil is represented by springs attached to the structural model. Stiffnesses of springs are calculated by different finite-element idealizations and half-space approximations. Eigenfrequencies and damping values related to interaction effects (translation, rocking, torsion) are identified from test results. The comparisons of dynamic characteristic of the soil-structure system between precalculations and test results show good agreement in general. (orig.)

  6. Child's play : investigating the exposure potential of environmental contaminants in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, D.C.; Dowling, K.; Waldron, H.; Garnett, D.

    2005-01-01

    Arsenic and chromium have been identified as soil contaminants from smelting, industrial and mining activities. The potential for human uptake of these elements from soil has been established with highest concentrations found in children, who are particularly susceptible to environmental exposure. This study explores the exposure potential of selected soil trace elements in rural Victoria, Australia, by investigating the relationship between uptake, measured using toenail clippings as the biomarker of exposure, and soil concentrations in two communities: one near current and historic gold mining, the other an agricultural community. We report the preliminary findings of a cross-sectional survey, in which toenail clippings were obtained from 12 children in the former community, and 16 children in the latter. (author). 26 refs., 3 tabs

  7. Investigation of the State of Radionuclides in Ultramicroconcentrations by the Method of a Horizontal Zone Electrophoresis in a Free Electrolyte. Ions of In(III) in Aqueous Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Bontchev, G D; Priemyshev, A N; Bozhikov, G A; Filossofov, D V; Ivanov, P I; Maslov, O D; Milanov, M V; Dmitriev, S N

    2000-01-01

    Using the electromigration method in a free electrolyte the behaviour of In(III) in some water solutions has been investigated. Data on electrophoretic mobility of In(III) as well as its complexes with DTPA and EDTA in a wide range of pH and temperature have been collected. On the basis of experimental results the diffusion coefficient of In(III) and concentration stability constant of a complex [InDTPA]^2- have been estimated.

  8. Effect of dissolved organic matter derived from waste amendments on the mobility of inorganic arsenic (III) in the Egyptian alluvial soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashad, Mohamed [Land and Water Technologies Department, Arid Lands Cultivation Research Institute, City of Scientific Research and Technological Applications (SRTA-City), New Borg El-Arab, 21934 Alexandria (Egypt); Assaad, Faiz F. [Soils and Water Use Department, National Research Centre, Dokki, Cairo (Egypt); Shalaby, Elsayed A. [Environmental Studies Department, Institute of Graduate Studies and Research, Alexandria University (Egypt)

    2013-07-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is one of the decisive factors affecting pollutants mobility in soils receiving waste amendments. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of DOM1 derived from agricultural solid waste (ASW) and DOM2 derived from municipal solid waste (MSW) on the mobility of inorganic arsenic (As) in two alluvial soils from the Nile River Delta. In column experiments, addition of DOM solutions significantly increased As concentration in the effluents. There was no significant difference between the two soils, the obtained results from soil2 columns revealed that DOM2 has stronger capability than DOM1 to facilitate As mobility. The pH of the studied soils is alkaline (8.1) which promoted the dissociation as well as deprotonation of DOM and as a consequence, humic substances in DOM become negatively charged organic anions, leading to their substantial competition with As for the adsorption sites on both soil surfaces. The results emphasized that in alkaline soils there is a risk of groundwater pollution in the long run by arsenic either naturally found in soil or originated at high soil pH when dissolved organic carbon (DOC) released from various organic amendments ASW and/or MSW and leached through soil profile.

  9. Synthesis, Photoluminescence Behavior of Green Light Emitting Tb(III) Complexes and Mechanistic Investigation of Energy Transfer Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Manju; Kumar, Satish; Devi, Rekha; Khatkar, Avni; Taxak, V B; Boora, Priti; Khatkar, S P

    2018-06-04

    A series of five new terbium(III) ion complexes with 4,4-difluoro-1-phenylbutane-1,3-dione (HDPBD) and anciliary ligands was synthesized. The composition and properties of complexes were analyzed by elemental analysis, IR, NMR, powder X-ray diffaraction, TG-DTG and photoluminescence spectroscopy. These complexes exhibited ligand sensitized green emission at 546 nm associated with 5 D 4  →  7 F 5 transitions of terbium ion in the emission spectra. The photoluminescence study manifested that the organic ligands act as antenna and facilitate the absorbed energy to emitting levels of Tb(III) ion efficiently. The enhanced luminescence intensity and decay time of ternary C2-C5 complexes observed due to synergistic effect of anciliary ligands. The CIE color coordinates of complexes came under the green region of chromaticity diagram. The mechanistic investigation of intramolecular energy transfer in the complexes was discussed in detail. These terbium(III) complexes can be thrivingly used as one of the green component in light emitting material and in display devices. Graphical Abstract Illustrate the sensitization process of the Tb ion and intramolecular energy transfer process in the Tb 3+ complex.

  10. Investigating the Effect of Soil Texture and Fertility on Evapotranspiration and Crop Coefficient of Maize Forage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghorbanian Kerdabadi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Crop coefficient varies in different environmental conditions, such as deficit irrigation, salinity and intercropping. The effect of soil fertility and texture of crop coefficient and evapotranspiration of maize was investigated in this study. Low soil fertility and food shortages as a stressful environment for plants that makes it different evapotranspiration rates of evapotranspiration calculation is based on the FAO publication 56. Razzaghi et al. (2012 investigate the effect of soil type and soil-drying during the seed-filling phase on N-uptake, yield and water use, a Danish-bred cultivar (CV. Titicaca was grown in field lysimeters with sand, sandy loam and sandy clay loam soil. Zhang et al (2014 were investigated the Effect of adding different amounts of nitrogen during three years (from 2010 to 2012 on water use efficiency and crop evapotranspiration two varieties of winter wheat. The results of their study showed. The results indicated the following: (1 in this dry land farming system, increased N fertilization could raise wheat yield, and the drought-tolerant Changhan No. 58 showed a yield advantage in drought environments with high N fertilizer rates; (2 N application affected water consumption in different soil layers, and promoted wheat absorbing deeper soil water and so increased utilization of soil water; and (3 comprehensive consideration of yield and WUE of wheat indicated that the N rate of 270 kg/ha for Changhan No. 58 was better to avoid the risk of reduced production reduction due to lack of precipitation; however, under conditions of better soil moisture, the N rate of 180 kg/ha was more economic. Materials and Methods: The study was a factorial experiment in a completely randomized design with three soil texture treatment, including silty clay loam, loam and sandy-loam soil and three fertility treatment, including without fertilizer, one and two percent fertilizer( It was conducted at the experimental farm in

  11. [Investigation and analysis of heavy metal pollution related to soil-Panax notoginseng system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Mi, Yan-Hua; Lin, Xin; Liu, Da-Hui; Zeng, Min; Chen, Xiao-Yan

    2014-07-01

    In this study, five heavy metals contamination of soil and different parts of Panax notoginseng in the plantation area was investigated. Analysis of heavy metals correlation between the planting soil and P. notoginseng; and the absorption and accumulation characteristics and translocation of soil heavy metals by P. notoginseng plants was revealed. Through field investigation and laboratory analytical methods, analysis of China's 30 different soil P. notoginseng origin and content of heavy metals in five different parts of the P. notoginseng plant content of heavy metals. The results revealed that the soil heavy metals should not be neglected in the plantation area Referring to the national soil quality standards (GB15608-1995), the excessive degree of soil heavy metals pollution showed Hg > As > Cd > Cr in the plantation area, and Pb content of soil was in the scope of the standard. Refer to 'Green Industry Standards for Import and Export of Medical Plants and Preparations', the excessive degree of heavy metals content of P. notoginseng plants showed As > Pb > Cr > Cd, and Hg content of plants was in the scope of the standard. Concentrations of five heavy metals of underground parts of P. notoginseng plants are higher than aboveground, and heavy metals elements are more concentrated in the root, followed by the rhizome of P. notoginseng plants. Heavy metal accumulation characteristics of the different parts of the P. notoginseng of the overall performance is the root > the rhizome > the root tuber > leaves > stems. From the point of view BCF value analysis of various parts of the P. notoginseng plants to absorb heavy metals in soil, BCF values of all samples were less than 1, description P. notoginseng not belong Hyperaccumulator. From the view of transportation and related analysis of the soil-P. notoginseng systems, the rhizome of P. notoginseng and the content of As and Cr in soil was significantly correlated, the root of P. notoginseng and the content of Cd in

  12. Investigation of dielectric constant variations for Malaysians soil species towards its natural background dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafery, Khawarizmi Mohd; Embong, Zaidi; Khee, Yee See; Haimi Dahlan, Samsul; Tajudin, Saiful Azhar Ahmad; Ahmad, Salawati; Kudnie Sahari, Siti; Maxwell, Omeje

    2018-01-01

    The correlation of natural background gamma radiation and real part of the complex relative permittivity (dielectric constant) for various species Malaysian soils was investigated in this research. The sampling sites were chosen randomly according to soils groups that consist of sedentary, alluvial and miscellaneous soil which covered the area of Batu Pahat, Kluang and Johor Bahru, Johor state of Malaysia. There are 11 types of Malaysian soil species that have been studied; namely Peat, Linau-Sedu, Selangor-Kangkong, Kranji, Telemong-Akob-Local Alluvium, Holyrood-Lunas, Batu Anam-Melaka-Tavy, Harimau Tampoi, Kulai-Yong Peng, Rengam-Jerangau, and Steepland soils. In-situ exposure rates of each soil species were measured by using portable gamma survey meter and ex-situ analysis of real part of relative permittivity was performed by using DAK (Dielectric Assessment Kit assist by network analyser). Results revealed that the highest and the lowest background dose rate were 94 ± 26.28 μR hr-1 and 7 ± 0.67 μR hr-1 contributed by Rengam Jerangau and Peat soil species respectively. Meanwhile, dielectric constant measurement, it was performed in the range of frequency between 100 MHz to 3 GHz. The measurements of each soils species dielectric constant are in the range of 1 to 3. At the lower frequencies in the range of 100 MHz to 600 MHz, it was observed that the dielectric constant for each soil species fluctuated and inconsistent. But it remained consistent in plateau form of signal at higher frequency at range above 600 MHz. From the comparison of dielectric properties of each soil at above 600 MHz of frequency, it was found that Rengam-Jerangau soil species give the highest reading and followed by Selangor-Kangkong species. The average dielectric measurement for both Selangor-Kangkong and Rengam-Jerangau soil species are 2.34 and 2.35 respectively. Meanwhile, peat soil species exhibits the lowest dielectric measurement of 1.83. It can be clearly seen that the pattern

  13. Investigation of structure and function of mitochondrial alcohol dehydrogenase isozyme III from Komagataella phaffii GS115.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huaidong; Li, Qin; Wang, Lina; Chen, Yan

    2018-05-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) catalyze the reversible oxidation of alcohol using NAD + or NADP + as cofactor. Three ADH homologues have been identified in Komagataella phaffii GS115 (also named Pichia pastoris GS115), ADH1, ADH2 and ADH3, among which adh3 is the only gene responsible for consumption of ethanol in Komagataella phaffii GS115. However, the relationship between structure and function of mitochondrial alcohol dehydrogenase isozyme III from Komagataella phaffii GS115 (KpADH3) is still not clear yet. KpADH3 was purified, identified and characterized by multiple biophysical techniques (Nano LC-MS/MS, Enzymatic activity assay, X-ray crystallography). The crystal structure of KpADH3, which was the first ADH structure from Komagataella phaffii GS115, was solved at 1.745 Å resolution. Structural analysis indicated that KpADH3 was the sole dimeric ADH structure with face-to-face orientation quaternary structure from yeast. The major structural different conformations located on residues 100-114 (the structural zinc binding loop) and residues 337-344 (the loop between α12 and β15 which covered the catalytic domain). In addition, three channels were observed in KpADH3 crystal structure, channel 2 and channel 3 may be essential for substrate specific recognition, ingress and egress, channel 1 may be the pass-through for cofactor. KpADH3 plays an important role in the metabolism of alcohols in Komagataella phaffii GS115, and its crystal structure is the only dimeric medium-chain ADH from yeast described so far. Knowledge of the relationship between structure and function of KpADH3 is crucial for understanding the role of KpADH3 in Komagataella phaffii GS115 mitochondrial metabolism. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The use of classical and radionuclide methods to investigate soil erosion in the Beskidy Mts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehlich, W.

    1997-01-01

    Information concerning the spatial patterns of erosion and deposition on cultivated hillslopes is difficult to obtain using conventional soil loss monitoring techniques. The use of the fallout radionuclides 134 Cs and 137 Cs as a sediment tracers offers considerable potential for elucidating patterns of soil redistribution. This paper presents the results of an investigation of soil erosion on a cultivate hillslope within the Homerka drainage basin in the Polish Flysch Carpathians, based on 134 Cs and 137 Cs measurements. The 137 Cs inventories of soils in this region reflect inputs from both bomb and Chernobyl-derived fallout. The high degree of spatial variability associated with Chernobyl fallout deposition poses considerable limitations on the potential for using radiocesium measurements to elucidate detailed patterns of soil loss. With an application of cesium method it was stated that during the last 35 years sediment storage within the edge of agricultural terraces is ca. 4 mm year -1 on the average on agricultural experimental slope in the drainage basin of Homerka. This value reflects tillage and dispersed wash and is comparable with the intensity of erosion on agricultural plots. The results provided by the 137 Cs measurements are consistent with other process-based measurements undertaken on the slopes and with available evidence concerning the dominant sources of suspended sediment transported by the local streams. A general model of soil loss and sediment delivery from cultivated slopes in the Polish Flysch Carpathians is proposed. (author)

  15. Utilization of subsurface microbial electrochemical systems to elucidate the mechanisms of competition between methanogenesis and microbial iron(III)/humic acid reduction in Arctic peat soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E. S.; Miller, K.; Lipson, D.; Angenent, L. T.

    2012-12-01

    High-latitude peat soils are a major carbon reservoir, and there is growing concern that previously dormant carbon from this reservoir could be released to the atmosphere as a result of continued climate change. Microbial processes, such as methanogenesis and carbon dioxide production via iron(III) or humic acid reduction, are at the heart of the carbon cycle in Arctic peat soils [1]. A deeper understanding of the factors governing microbial dominance in these soils is crucial for predicting the effects of continued climate change. In previous years, we have demonstrated the viability of a potentiostatically-controlled subsurface microbial electrochemical system-based biosensor that measures microbial respiration via exocellular electron transfer [2]. This system utilizes a graphite working electrode poised at 0.1 V NHE to mimic ferric iron and humic acid compounds. Microbes that would normally utilize these compounds as electron acceptors donate electrons to the electrode instead. The resulting current is a measure of microbial respiration with the electrode and is recorded with respect to time. Here, we examine the mechanistic relationship between methanogenesis and iron(III)- or humic acid-reduction by using these same microbial-three electrode systems to provide an inexhaustible source of alternate electron acceptor to microbes in these soils. Chamber-based carbon dioxide and methane fluxes were measured from soil collars with and without microbial three-electrode systems over a period of four weeks. In addition, in some collars we simulated increased fermentation by applying acetate treatments to understand possible effects of continued climate change on microbial processes in these carbon-rich soils. The results from this work aim to increase our fundamental understanding of competition between electron acceptors, and will provide valuable data for climate modeling scenarios. 1. Lipson, D.A., et al., Reduction of iron (III) and humic substances plays a major

  16. Investigation of the impacts of ethyl lactate based Fenton treatment on soil quality for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Suyin; Yap, Chiew Lin; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Venny

    2013-11-15

    This study aims to investigate the impacts of ethyl lactate (EL) based Fenton treatment on soil quality for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)-contaminated soils. Accumulation of oxygenated-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (oxy-PAHs) was observed, but quantitative measurement on the most abundant compound 9,10-anthraquinone (ATQ) showed lower accumulation of the compound than that reported for ethanol (ET) based Fenton treatment. In general, as compared to conventional water (CW) based Fenton treatment, the EL based Fenton treatment exerted either a lower or higher negative impact on soil physicochemical properties depending on the property type and shared the main disadvantage of reduced soil pH. For revegetation, EL based Fenton treatment was most appropriately adopted for soil with native pH >/~ 6.2 in order to obtain a final soil pH >/~ 4.9 subject to the soil buffering capacity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily Moghaddas; Ken Hubbert

    2014-01-01

    When managing for resilient forests, each soil’s inherent capacity to resist and recover from changes in soil function should be evaluated relative to the anticipated extent and duration of soil disturbance. Application of several key principles will help ensure healthy, resilient soils: (1) minimize physical disturbance using guidelines tailored to specific soil types...

  18. Oskarshamn site investigation. Programme for further investigations of bedrock, soil, water and environment in Laxemar subarea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-03-15

    SKB (the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co), has been conducting a site investigation at Simpevarp and Laxemar in Oskarshamn for siting of a final repository for spent nuclear fuel. An equivalent investigation is being conducted in Forsmark in Ohmmeter's. The initial part of the site investigations had been completed for the both of the subareas Simpevarp and Laxemar in the autumn of 2004. Based on the results of these investigations, SKB preliminarily prioritized the Laxemar subarea for further investigations. A programme was presented for the first stage of the complete site investigation in the Laxemar subarea, along with the main features of the remainder of the site investigation. The programme included investigations up until the summer of 2005 and was particularly aimed at obtaining answers to several vital questions so that the subsequent investigations could be focused on the rock areas judged to be most suitable for a final repository. These investigations have now been completed. This report presents the programme for the remainder of the site investigation. The points of departure are the general goals for the Deep Repository Project during the site investigation phase, analyses and evaluations of data from completed investigations, and the needs for additional data to be able to evaluate the site as a siting alternative for the final repository. The account mainly covers the investigations on the site. All other work - analyses, site descriptive modelling, facility design, safety assessments and studies and assessments of consequences for the environment, human health and society - are only mentioned to the extent necessary in order to place the investigations in their context. The direction of the site investigation in Oskarshamn and the investigation programme presented in this report is based on SKB's preliminary decision to prioritize the Laxemar subarea for further investigations. A final decision on the direction of the site

  19. Oskarshamn site investigation. Programme for further investigations of bedrock, soil, water and environment in Laxemar subarea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-03-01

    SKB (the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co), has been conducting a site investigation at Simpevarp and Laxemar in Oskarshamn for siting of a final repository for spent nuclear fuel. An equivalent investigation is being conducted in Forsmark in Ohmmeter's. The initial part of the site investigations had been completed for the both of the subareas Simpevarp and Laxemar in the autumn of 2004. Based on the results of these investigations, SKB preliminarily prioritized the Laxemar subarea for further investigations. A programme was presented for the first stage of the complete site investigation in the Laxemar subarea, along with the main features of the remainder of the site investigation. The programme included investigations up until the summer of 2005 and was particularly aimed at obtaining answers to several vital questions so that the subsequent investigations could be focused on the rock areas judged to be most suitable for a final repository. These investigations have now been completed. This report presents the programme for the remainder of the site investigation. The points of departure are the general goals for the Deep Repository Project during the site investigation phase, analyses and evaluations of data from completed investigations, and the needs for additional data to be able to evaluate the site as a siting alternative for the final repository. The account mainly covers the investigations on the site. All other work - analyses, site descriptive modelling, facility design, safety assessments and studies and assessments of consequences for the environment, human health and society - are only mentioned to the extent necessary in order to place the investigations in their context. The direction of the site investigation in Oskarshamn and the investigation programme presented in this report is based on SKB's preliminary decision to prioritize the Laxemar subarea for further investigations. A final decision on the direction of the site

  20. Isotopic investigation of the colloidal mobility of depleted uranium in a podsolic soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harguindeguy, S.; Crancon, P.; Pointurier, F.; Potin-Gautier, M.; Lespes, G.

    2014-01-01

    The mobility and colloidal migration of uranium were investigated in a soil where limited amounts of anthropogenic uranium (depleted in the "2"3"5U isotope) were deposited, adding to the naturally occurring uranium. The colloidal fraction was assumed to correspond to the operational fraction between 10 kDa and 1.2 μm after (ultra)filtration. Experimental leaching tests indicate that approximately 8-15% of uranium is desorbed from the soil. Significant enrichment of the leachate in the depleted uranium (DU) content indicates that uranium from recent anthropogenic DU deposit is weakly bound to soil aggregates and more mobile than geologically occurring natural uranium (NU). Moreover, 80% of uranium in leachates was located in the colloidal fractions. Nevertheless, the percentage of DU in the colloidal and dissolved fractions suggests that NU is mainly associated with the non-mobile coarser fractions of the soil. A field investigation revealed that the calculated percentages of DU in soil and groundwater samples result in the enhanced mobility of uranium downstream from the deposit area. Colloidal uranium represents between 10% and 32% of uranium in surface water and between 68% and 90% of uranium in groundwater where physicochemical parameters are similar to those of the leachates. Finally, as observed in batch leaching tests, the colloidal fractions of groundwater contain slightly less DU than the dissolved fraction, indicating that DU is primarily associated with macromolecules in dissolved fraction. (authors)

  1. Bridge-in-a-Backpack(TM) task 3.1: investigating soil - structure interaction - experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report includes fulfillment of Task 3.1 of a multi-task contract to further enhance concrete filled FRP tubes, or : the Bridge in a Backpack. Task 3 is an investigation of soil-structure interaction for the FRP tubes. Task 3.1 is the : design of...

  2. Investigation of metastable immiscibility in nuclear-waste-glasses. I-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egnell, J.; Larsen, J.G.; Moeller, L.; Roed, G.

    1981-12-01

    Metastable liquid-liquid separation in glasses can often cause significant changes in physical and chemical properties of the original homogeneous glass. In some technical borosilicate glasses this phenomenon is used to change the chemical durability of the glass. For potential nuclear-waste-glasses the slow cooling through the temperature range 550 0 C - 700 0 C may lead to such a liquid-liquid phase separation. In order to investigate the susceptibility of phase separation of nuclear-waste-glasses, two KBS model glasses, ABS-39 and ABS-41, were investigated. Two of the subsequent reports are concerned with this problem. The third report also takes into consideration the effects of MoO 3 on the immiscibility gap. The maximum amount of MoO 3 that can be dissolved in ABS-39 and ABS 41 is also determined. (Auth.)

  3. Investigation of nonlinear dynamic soil property at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.C.

    2000-01-01

    This document summarizes laboratory dynamic soil testing investigations conducted by the University of Texas at Austin (UTA) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) (Stokoe et al., 1995a, Stokoe et al., 1995b, Sponseller and Stokoe, 1995). The purpose of the investigation is to provide an evaluation of past testing results in the context of new test data and the development of consistent site wide models of material strain dependencies based upon geologic formation, depth, and relevant index properties

  4. ''In situ'' investigations of the radioactive fissionable element infiltration and retention in different soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oncescu, M.; Danis, A.; Sahagia, M.; Negrescu, C.; Bobe, M.; Balanescu, P.; Burcescu, M.; Tautu, N.

    1980-01-01

    ''In situ'' investigations of the natural and forced infiltration and retention of the fissionable elements from a liquid residue in several natural compacted soils and compacted clays are presented. The velocities and flow rates for different stages of the residue infiltration are determined. The retention of the fissionable elements by variation of the fissionable element concentration with the distance from the place of the residue depot is investigated. (author)

  5. Radioecological investigations in the food-chain air-soil-vine-wine. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, A.; Hellmuth, K.H.; Fischer, E.

    1988-12-01

    In a field investigation (1983-1985) comprising 8 locations of the most important viticultural regions in Germany, the contents of H-3, C-14, Sr-90, and Cs-137 in air, soils, leaves of the vine, grapes and wine were measured and site-specific transfer factors were calculated. Data concerning soil parameters, climatic conditions, cultivation and vinification were collected. The T contents of all samples were 10 Bq/l water of combustion, independent of location and year. The specific activity of C-14 in the atmosphere and in biological material was 0.22 Bq/g C, independent of site and year. Sr-90 contents of soils fluctuated between 0.7 and 3.5 Bq/kg dry matter. The mean content of leaves was 2 Bq/kg fresh material, of grapes 0.035 Bq/kg and of wine 0.008 Bq/l. The Cs-137 level of soils fluctuated between 1.3 and 7.9 Bq/kg dry matter. The mean content of leaves was 0.098 Bq/kg fresh material, of grapes 0.021 Bq/kg and of wine 0.0085 Bq/l. A relation between transfer and soil parameters and between the contents of grapes and wine was not recognizeable. While cultivar-specific differences were not observed in grapes, red wines contained somewhat more Cs-137 than white wines. Transfer factors soil-grapes were 0.027 for Sr-90 and 0.0057 for Cs-137. Site-specific influences such as soil parameters, climate, cultivation, vinification and differences between years led to a small fluctuation of values. No influence of the Neckarwestheim reactor has been found in any of the radionuclides. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Development of atmosphere-soil-vegetation model for investigation of radioactive materials transport in terrestrial biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katata, Genki; Nagai, Haruyasu; Zhang, Leiming; Held, Andreas; Serca, Dominique; Klemm, Otto

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the transport of radionuclides in the terrestrial biosphere we have developed a one-dimensional numerical model named SOLVEG that predicts the transfer of water, heat, and gaseous and particulate matters in atmosphere-soil-vegetation system. The SOLVEG represents atmosphere, soil, and vegetation as an aggregation of several layers. Basic equations used in the model are solved using the finite difference method. Most of predicted variables are interrelated with the source/sink terms of momentum, water, heat, gases, and particles based on mathematically described biophysical processes in atmosphere, soil and vegetation. The SOLVEG can estimate dry, wet and fog deposition of gaseous and particulate matters at each canopy layer. Performance tests of the SOLVEG with several observational sites were carried out. The SOLVEG predicted the observed temporal changes in water vapor, CO 2 , and ozone fluxes over vegetated surfaces. The SOLVEG also reproduced measured fluxes of fog droplets and of fine aerosols over the forest. (author)

  7. Laboratory investigation of steam transmission in unsaturated clayey soil under osmotic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Jalili

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquids coming from different sources like wastewaters, agricultural and industrial activities and leakages of chemical substances often have high concentration of chemical compositions and the osmotic gradient generated around such sources causes a considerable transmission of the Contamination. The steam transmitted by non-polluted soils moves to polluted masses, causing an increase in the volume of pollution zone and movement of pollutants. Therefore, such physical and chemical processes should be taken into account in pollution transmission models. Using Crumb method, laboratory investigations were conducted on non-dispersive and dispersive clayey soil samples obtained from three areas in Zanjan Province of Iran. A simple experimental setup has been used and hereby introduced. The impact of osmotic force from salinities of 0.5, 1, and 1.5% on steam transmission in clayey soil was examined. Results indicate that for all samples between 5 to 15 days, the moisture content increased in the pollutant zone and decreased in the non-pollutant area. Also it was observed that for dispersive clayey soil, movement of steam among layers was observed to be orderly and its amount was higher than that of non-dispersive clayey soil.

  8. Investigation of elemental and radiological contamination of soils in two shipyards in Chittagong, Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uddin, M. Shuza; Shariff, M. Asad; Hasan, M. Mehedi

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of metallic elements and natural radioactivity in soils collected from two shipyards and their surroundings in Chittagong, Bangladesh is presented. The elemental concentrations of the metals Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Cu were obtained by PIXE analysis with a 3 MV Tandem Accelerator, and the radioactivity of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K was determined using HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry. From the mean specific activities of the three radionuclides in soil samples, the radium equivalent activity, the gamma absorbed dose rate, the annual effective dose rate and the external hazard index were calculated. The study was focused on investigation of soil contamination via shipbreaking activities, if any. The somewhat higher contents of Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Cu in soil samples of shipyards, as compared to other locations, seem to be caused by the shipbreaking activities. The specific radioactivities as well as radium equivalent activity in soils of shipyards are also higher and thus possibly an indirect result of shipbreaking activities.

  9. Investigation of elemental and radiological contamination of soils in two shipyards in Chittagong, Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uddin, M. Shuza; Shariff, M. Asad; Hasan, M. Mehedi [Tandem Accelerator Facility, Dhaka (Bangladesh). Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology, Atomic Energy Research Establishment; Barua, Bijoy Sonker [Tandem Accelerator Facility, Dhaka (Bangladesh). Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology, Atomic Energy Research Establishment; Chittagong Univ. of Engineering and Technology, Chittagong (Bangladesh). Dept. of Physics; Rashid, M. Abdur [Chittagong Univ. of Engineering and Technology, Chittagong (Bangladesh). Dept. of Physics; Kamal, Masud [Radioactivity Testing and Monitoring Lab. Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, Chittagong (Bangladesh)

    2014-10-01

    An analysis of metallic elements and natural radioactivity in soils collected from two shipyards and their surroundings in Chittagong, Bangladesh is presented. The elemental concentrations of the metals Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Cu were obtained by PIXE analysis with a 3 MV Tandem Accelerator, and the radioactivity of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K was determined using HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry. From the mean specific activities of the three radionuclides in soil samples, the radium equivalent activity, the gamma absorbed dose rate, the annual effective dose rate and the external hazard index were calculated. The study was focused on investigation of soil contamination via shipbreaking activities, if any. The somewhat higher contents of Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Cu in soil samples of shipyards, as compared to other locations, seem to be caused by the shipbreaking activities. The specific radioactivities as well as radium equivalent activity in soils of shipyards are also higher and thus possibly an indirect result of shipbreaking activities.

  10. Use of 137Cs and other fallout radionuclide in soil erosion investigations: progress, problems and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walling, D.E.

    1998-01-01

    Accelerated erosion and soil degradation currently represent serious problems for the global environment. Against this background there is a need to assemble reliable information on the rates of soil loss involved. Existing techniques for documenting rates of soil loss possess many limitations and there is increasing interest in the potential for using fallout radionuclides, particularly 137 Cs, to obtain such information. An example of the application of the 137 Cs approach to a cultivated field at Rufford Forest Farm, Nottinghamshire, UK, is presented to illustrate its value. The key advantages of the approach are that it provides a means of assembling retrospective estimates of medium-term (ca. 40 years) rates of soil loss and the spatial pattern of erosion and deposition involved, on the basis of a single site visit. There are, however, currently a number of problems and uncertainties associated with the use of 137 Cs in soil erosion investigations, and these are reviewed and needs for further research identified. Potential developments of the approach, including the use of other fallout radionuclides such as unsupported 210 Pb and 7 Be are also considered. (author)

  11. Monitoring of praseodymium(III) ions in aqueous solutions, soil and sediment samples by a PVC membrane sensor based on a furan-triazole derivative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourjavid, Mohammad Reza [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Medicinal Chemistry. Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute; Rezaee, Mohammad; Hosseini, Majid Haji [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Razavi, Taherehsadat, E-mail: pourjavid@gmail.com [Research Institute of Petroleum Industry, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Instrumental Analysis Dept.

    2012-07-01

    A furan-triazole derivative has been explored as an ionophore for preparation of a highly selective Pr(III) membrane sensor. The proposed sensor exhibits a Nernstian response for Pr(III) activity over a wide concentration range with a detection limit of 5.2 x 10{sup -8}M. Its response is independent of pH of the solution in the range 3.0-8.8 and offers the advantages of fast response time. To investigate the analytical applicability of the sensor, it was applied successfully as an indicator electrode in potentiometric titration of Pr(III) solution and also in the direct and indirect determination of trace Pr(III) ions in some samples. (author)

  12. Investigation of electric fields for low-temperature treatment of soils and liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, W.O.; Goheen, S.C.; Miller, M.C.; Richardson, R.L.

    1992-02-01

    Work was performed to assess the feasibility of an in situ technology for decomposing and removing hazardous organic waste compounds from soils. The technology is based on conductive soil heating and partial electrical discharges (corona) combined with soil-vapor extraction. A pilot-scale facility was developed and used to evaluate the ability to heat and dry soils using polyphase electricity applied through inserted pipes. Uniform heating (100 ± 2 degrees C) and drying to 1.2-wt % moisture were observed. Heating and resultant in situ steam formation have been demonstrated in previous studies to be effective in removing volatile and semivolatile compounds. Corona reactors were constructed to investigate decomposition of organic compounds by oxidants produced in a point-to-liquid corona discharge in ambient air at room temperature and pressure. Point-to-liquid corona was found to be capable of destroying a wide variety of organics, including three aromatics, two polyaromatics, a pcp, a pcb, an alkane, an alkene, an amide, a complexant, a chelator, and an organic dye. Tests with trichloroethylene demonstrated a decontamination factor of 2 x 10 5 (equal to a destruction efficiency of 99.999995%) and nearly complete (99.7%) mineralization, with the main byproduct being aqueous chloride ions. Real-time data on the decolorization kinetics of aqueous methylene blue were obtained using in situ probe colorimetry. Reaction rates were directly proportional to the amount of unreacted dye present and the square of electrode current. Other exploratory tests were performed to investigate concepts for generating ac corona discharges in soil and the ability of those discharges to decompose adsorbed organic compounds. All findings are discussed in relation to a conceptual soil-treatment scenario that includes a description of the basic hardware requirements

  13. Determination of neodymium(III) ions in soil and sediment samples by a novel neodymium(III) sensor based on benzyl bisthiosemicarbazone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behmadi, Hossein [Department of Applied Chemistry, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zamani, Hassan Ali [Department of Chemistry, Quchan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Quchan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: haszamani@yahoo.com; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Norouzi, Parviz [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Endocrine and Metabolism Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-12-31

    The PVC membrane, containing benzyl bisthiosemicarbazone (BTC) as a suitable ionophore, exhibited a Nernstian response for the Nd{sup 3+} ions over a wide concentration range between 1.0 x 10{sup -2} and 1 x 10{sup -6} M, with a detection limit of 6.2 x 10{sup -7} M in the pH range of 3.7-8.3. It demonstrated a fast response time (<10 s) and it could be used for at least 7 weeks without any major potential deviation. Furthermore, the electrode revealed high selectivity with respect to all the common alkali, alkaline earth, transition and heavy metal ions, including the members of the lanthanide family other than Nd{sup 3+}. Concerning its applications, it was effectively employed for the determination of neodymium ions in soil and sediment samples and its validation with CRM.

  14. Investigation of mixed mode - I/II fracture problems - Part 1: computational and experimental analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Demir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, to investigate and understand the nature of fracture behavior properly under in-plane mixed mode (Mode-I/II loading, three-dimensional fracture analyses and experiments of compact tension shear (CTS specimen are performed under different mixed mode loading conditions. Al 7075-T651 aluminum machined from rolled plates in the L-T rolling direction (crack plane is perpendicular to the rolling direction is used in this study. Results from finite element analyses and fracture loads, crack deflection angles obtained from the experiments are presented. To simulate the real conditions in the experiments, contacts are defined between the contact surfaces of the loading devices, specimen and loading pins. Modeling, meshing and the solution of the problem involving the whole assembly, i.e., loading devices, pins and the specimen, with contact mechanics are performed using ANSYSTM. Then, CTS specimen is analyzed separately using a submodeling approach, in which three-dimensional enriched finite elements are used in FRAC3D solver to calculate the resulting stress intensity factors along the crack front. Having performed the detailed computational and experimental studies on the CTS specimen, a new specimen type together with its loading device is also proposed that has smaller dimensions compared to the regular CTS specimen. Experimental results for the new specimen are also presented.

  15. Behaviour and fate radionuclides in soils. Mathematical modelling and experimental investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovdan, E.N.

    2003-01-01

    The uncontrolled release of radionuclides as result of Chernobyl accident has led to contamination of 23% of territory of Republic of Belarus. Soil has high capacity to adsorb radionuclides and their intensive sorption provides the creation of a long-lived radionuclide source in a terrestrial environment. In the management of the contaminated areas and application of a countermeasure strategy it is extremely important to know the environmental mechanisms governing the behaviour of radionuclides in soils. Basic attention in the work is paid to the study of 137 Cs and 90 Sr because they are the main radionuclides from the view point of radioactive danger in polluted areas. The main features and processes that control radionuclide behaviour in soil have been analysed. On the basis of natural researches, lab test and mathematical modelling the impact of physical-chemical factors and the soil component composition changes upon the radionuclides migration and sorption in natural dispersed systems (peat, sand, bentonite, kaolin, sapropel) has been investigated. The investigations done allowed to substantiate the mathematical models of the radionuclides migration in the regions of positive and negative temperatures, to develop methods of experimental identification of main transfer characteristics and to compile a data base for these models. (orig.)

  16. Investigating microbial transformations of soil organic matter: synthesizing knowledge from disparate fields to guide new experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, S. A.; Tiemann, L. K.; Ballantyne, F., IV; Lehmeier, C. A.; Min, K.

    2015-04-01

    Discerning why some soil organic matter (SOM) leaves soil profiles relatively quickly while other compounds, especially at depth, can be retained for decades to millennia is challenging for a multitude of reasons. Simultaneous with soil-specific advances, multiple other disciplines have enhanced their knowledge bases in ways potentially useful for future investigations of SOM decay. In this article, we highlight observations highly relevant for those investigating SOM decay and retention but often emanating from disparate fields and residing in literature seldom cited in SOM research. We focus on recent work in two key areas. First, we turn to experimental approaches using natural and artificial aquatic environments to investigate patterns of microbially mediated OM transformations as environmental conditions change, and highlight how aquatic microbial responses to environmental change can reveal processes likely important to OM decay and retention in soils. Second, we emphasize the importance of establishing intrinsic patterns of decay kinetics for purified substrates commonly found in soils to develop baseline rates. These decay kinetics - which represent the upper limit of the reaction rates - can then be compared to substrate decay kinetics observed in natural samples, which integrate intrinsic decay reaction rates and edaphic factors essential to the site under study but absent in purified systems. That comparison permits the site-specific factors to be parsed from the fundamental decay kinetics, an important advance in our understanding of SOM decay (and thus persistence) in natural systems. We then suggest ways in which empirical observations from aquatic systems and purified substrate-enzyme reaction kinetics can be used to advance recent theoretical efforts in SOM-focused research. Finally, we suggest how the observations in aquatic and purified substrate-enzyme systems could be used to help unravel the puzzles presented by oft-observed patterns of SOM

  17. Investigation of Current Induced Spin Polarization in III-V Semiconductor Epilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luengo-Kovac, Marta

    In the development of a semiconductor spintronics device, a thorough understanding of spin dynamics in semiconductors is necessary. In particular, electrical control of electron spins is advantageous for its compatibility with present day electronics. In this thesis, we will discuss the electrical modification of the electron g-factor, which characterizes the strength of the interaction between a spin and a magnetic field, as well as investigate electrically generated spin polarizations as a function of various material parameters. We report on the modification of the electron g-factor by an in-plane electric field in an InGaAs epilayer. We performed external magnetic field scans of the Kerr rotation of the InGaAs film in order to measure the g-factor independently of the spin-orbit fields. The g-factor increases from -0.4473(0.0001) at 0 V/cm to -0.4419( 0.0001) at 50 V/cm applied along the [110] crystal axis. A comparison of temperature and voltage dependent photoluminescence measurements indicate that minimal channel heating occurs at these voltages. Possible explanations for this g-factor modification are discussed, including an increase in the electron temperature that is independent of the lattice temperature and the modification of the donor-bound electron wave function by the electric field. The current-induced spin polarization and momentum-dependent spin-orbit field were measured in InGaAs epilayers with varying indium concentrations and silicon doping densities. Samples with higher indium concentrations and carrier concentrations and lower mobilities were found to have larger electrical spin generation efficiencies. Furthermore, current-induced spin polarization was detected in GaAs epilayers despite the absence of measurable spin-orbit fields, indicating that the spin polarization mechanism is extrinsic. Temperature-dependent measurements of the spin dephasing rates and mobilities were used to characterize the relative strengths of the intrinsic D

  18. Investigation of the interaction of iron(III) complexes with dAMP by ESI-MS, MALDI-MS and potentiometric titration: insights into synthetic nuclease behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Christiane; Oliveira Moreira, Rafaela; Lube, Leonardo M; Horn, Adolfo; Szpoganicz, Bruno; Sherrod, Stacy; Russell, David H

    2010-06-07

    We report herein the characterization by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS), matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI-MS) and potentiometric titration of three iron(III) compounds: [Fe(III)(HPClNOL)Cl2]·NO3 (1), [Cl(HPClNOL)Fe(III)-(μ-O)-Fe(III)(HPClNOL)Cl]·Cl2·H2O (2) and [(SO4)(HPClNOL)Fe(III)-(μ-O)-Fe(III)(HPClNOL)(SO4)]·6H2O (3), where HPClNOL= 1-(bis-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-amino)-3-chloropropan-2-ol). Despite the fact that the compounds have distinct structures in solid state and non-buffered solution, all compounds present similar ESI and MALDI mass spectra in a buffered medium (pH 7.0). At this pH, the species [(PClNOL)Fe(III)-(μ-O)-Fe(III)(PClNOL)](2+) (m/z 354) was observed for all the compounds under investigation. Potentiometric titration confirms a similar behavior for all compounds, indicating that the dihydroxo form [(OH)(HPClNOL)Fe(III)-(μ-O)-Fe(III)(HPClNOL)(OH)](2+) is the major species at pH 7.0, for all the compounds. The products of the interaction between compounds (1), (2) and (3) and dAMP (2'-deoxyadenosine-5'-monophosphate) in a buffered medium (pH 7.0) were identified by MALDI-MS/MS. The fragmentation data obtained by MS/MS allow one to identify the nature of the interaction between the iron(III) compounds and dAMP, revealing the direct interaction between the iron center and phosphate groups.

  19. POISSON project. III. Investigating the evolution of the mass accretion rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniucci, S.; García López, R.; Nisini, B.; Caratti o Garatti, A.; Giannini, T.; Lorenzetti, D.

    2014-12-01

    Context. As part of the Protostellar Optical-Infrared Spectral Survey On NTT (POISSON) project, we present the results of the analysis of low-resolution near-IR spectroscopic data (0.9-2.4 μm) of two samples of young stellar objects in the Lupus (52 objects) and Serpens (17 objects) star-forming clouds, with masses in the range of 0.1 to 2.0 M⊙ and ages spanning from 105 to a few 107 yr. Aims: After determining the accretion parameters of the targets by analysing their H i near-IR emission features, we added the results from the Lupus and Serpens clouds to those from previous regions (investigated in POISSON with the same methodology) to obtain a final catalogue (143 objects) of mass accretion rate values (Ṁacc) derived in a homogeneous and consistent fashion. Our final goal is to analyse how Ṁacc correlates with the stellar mass (M∗) and how it evolves in time in the whole POISSON sample. Methods: We derived the accretion luminosity (Lacc) and Ṁacc for Lupus and Serpens objects from the Brγ (Paβ in a few cases) line by using relevant empirical relationships available in the literature that connect the H i line luminosity and Lacc. To minimise the biases that arise from adopting literature data that are based on different evolutionary models and also for self-consistency, we re-derived mass and age for each source of the POISSON samples using the same set of evolutionary tracks. Results: We observe a correlation Ṁacc~M*2.2 between mass accretion rate and stellar mass, similarly to what has previously been observed in several star-forming regions. We find that the time variation of Ṁacc is roughly consistent with the expected evolution of the accretion rate in viscous disks, with an asymptotic decay that behaves as t-1.6. However, Ṁacc values are characterised by a large scatter at similar ages and are on average higher than the predictions of viscous models. Conclusions: Although part of the scattering may be related to systematics due to the

  20. Autointoxication mechanism ofOryza sativa : III. Effect of temperature on phytotoxin production during rice straw decomposition in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, C H; Chiang, Y C; Chfng, H H

    1981-07-01

    The phytotoxicity produced during decomposition of rice straw in soil was evaluated under both constant and changing temperature conditions. Bioassay tests showed that the aqueous extract from a soilstraw mixture after incubation at constant temperature was more than twice as phytotoxic as the extract from soil incubated alone. The phytotoxicity was highest at 20-25 ° C. Temperatures above 25 ° C enhanced rice straw decomposition and also degraded the phytotoxic substances more rapidly. After incubation of soil mixtures under changing temperature regimes in a phytotron, the phytotoxicy of the soil aqueous extracts increased in the following order: soil alone lettuce or rice seedlings was also at the highest at the temperature range of 25-30 ° C irrespective of the direction of temperature changes from either low to high or vice versa. Five phytotoxic phenolics,p-hydroxybenzoic, vanillic,p-coumaric, syringic, and ferulic acids, were obtained from both the aqueous extract and residue of the incubated soil samples and were quantitatively estimated by chromatography. The amount of phytotoxins found in various soil mixtures followed the same increasing order as that found by the seed bioassay test. Although no definite distribution pattern of the phenolics in the incubated soil samples can be attributed to temperature variations, the amount of the phenolics was likely higher in the samples incubated at 25 ° C than at either 15 ° C or 35 ° C. The quantity of toxins released during decomposition of rice straw in soil reached highest levels six weeks after incubation and gradually disappeared after twelve weeks.

  1. Investigation of PCBs biodegradation by soil bacteria using tritium-labeled PCBs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, A.A.; Djuraeva, G.T.; Takhtobin, K.S.; Kadirova, M.; Yadgarov, H.T.; Zinovev, P.V.; Abdukarimov, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    The method of tritium labeling of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) has been developed. It allows producing of uniformly labeled tritium PCBs. High specific activity permits the tracing all of the tritium labeled PCBs biodegradation products. Radiochemical approach of the investigation of PCBs microbial degradation has been developed and PCB-destructive activity of soil bacteria strains has been studied. It was found that 4 investigated bacteria strains of Bacillus sp. has the ability accumulate and destroy PCBs. Use of developed radiochemical methods in complex with other analytical methods in investigation of PCBs biodegradation provide useful additional information. The radiochemical methods developed can be successfully used for wide screening of microorganisms, destructors of PCBs. (author)

  2. Labile pools of Pb in vegetable-growing soils investigated by an isotope dilution method and its influence on soil pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong; Huang, Zhi-Yong; Cao, Ying-Lan; Cai, Chao; Zeng, Xiang-Cheng; Li, Jian

    2012-08-01

    Pollution of Pb in the surface of agricultural soils is of increasing concern due to its serious impact on the plant growth and the human health through the food chain. However, the mobility, activity and bioavailability of Pb rely mainly on its various chemical species in soils. In the present study, E and L values, the labile pools of isotopically exchangeable Pb, were estimated using the method of isotope dilution in three vegetable-growing soils. The experiments involved adding a stable enriched isotope ((206)Pb > 96%) to a soil suspension and to soils in which plants are subsequently grown, the labile pools of Pb were then estimated by measuring the isotopic composition of Pb in soil solutions and in the plant tissues, respectively. In addition, the correlation of E values and soil pH was investigated at the ranges of pH 4.5-7.0. The amount of labile Pb in soils was also estimated using different single chemical extractants and a modified BCR approach. The results showed that after spiking the enriched isotopes of (206)Pb (>96%) for 24 hours an equilibration of isotopic exchanges in soil suspensions was achieved, and the isotope ratios of (208)Pb/(206)Pb measured at that time was used for calculating the E(24 h) values. The labile pools of Pb by %E(24 h) values, ranging from 53.2% to 61.7% with an average 57%, were found to be significantly higher (p soil pH was found in the tested soil sample. The results indicate that the %E(24 h) value can more rapidly and easily predict the labile pools of Pb in soils compared with L values, but it might be readily overestimated because of the artificial soil acidity derived from the spiked isotopic tracer and the excess of spiked enriched isotopes. The results also suggest that the amounts of Pb extracted with EDTA and the Σ(BCR) values extracted with the modified BCR approach are helpful to detect the labile pools of Pb in soils. In addition, the negative correlation between soil pH and the labile pools of Pb in soils

  3. Decision Analysis on Survey and SOil Investigation Problem in Power Engineering Consultant

    OpenAIRE

    Setyaman, Amy Maulany; Sunitiyoso, Yos

    2013-01-01

    The study aims to gather and organize information for decision making against the problems arising in Power Engineering Consultant's survey and soil investigation product due to new policy in production cost efficiency that is implemented in 2012. The study conducted using Kepner and Tragoe's analytical process that consisted of four stages analytical process such as situation analysis, problem analysis, decision making analysis and potential problem analysis. As for the decision making analy...

  4. Investigation of Soil and Vegetation Characteristics in Discontinuous Permafrost Landscapes Near Fairbanks, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    ER D C TR -1 5- 7 ERDC Center-Directed Research Investigation of Soil and Vegetation Characteristics in Discontinuous Permafrost ...Characteristics in Discontinuous Permafrost Landscapes Near Fairbanks, Alaska Jacob F. Berkowitz U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC...Washington, DC 20314-1000 Under ERDC Center-Directed Research project “Integrated Technologies for Delineat- ing Permafrost and Ground-State

  5. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in soil extracts investigated by FT-ICR-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, D.; Steffen, D.; Jablonowski, N. D.; Burauel, P.

    2012-04-01

    Soil drying and rewetting usually increases the release of xenobiotics like pesticides present in agricultural soils. Besides the effect on the release of two aged 14C-labeled pesticide residues we focus on the characterisation of simultaneously remobilized dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to gain new insights into structure and stability aspects of soil organic carbon fractions. The test soil (gleyic cambisol; Corg 1.2%, pH 7.2) was obtained from the upper soil layer of two individual outdoor lysimeter studies containing either environmentally long-term aged 14C residues of the herbicide ethidimuron (0-10 cm depth; time of aging: 9 years) or methabenzthiazuron (0-30 cm depth; time of aging: 17 years). Soil samples (10 g dry soil equivalents) were (A=dry/wet) previously dried (45°C) or (B=wet/wet) directly mixed with pure water (1+2, w:w), shaken (150 rpm, 1 h), and centrifuged (2000 g). This extraction procedure was repeated several individual times, for both setups. The first three individual extractions, respectively were used for further investigations. Salt was removed from samples prior analysis because of a possible quench effect in the electrospray (ESI) source by solid phase extraction (SPE) with Chromabond C18 Hydra-cartridges (Macherey-Nagel) and methanol as backextraction solvent. The so preconcentrated and desalted samples were introduced by flow injection analysis (FIA) in a fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS), equipped with an ESI source and a 7 T supra-conducting magnet (LTQ-FT Ultra, ThermoFisher Scientific). This technique is the key technique for complex natural systems attributed by their outstanding mass resolution (used 400.000 at m/z 400 Da) and mass accuracy (≤ 1ppm) by simultaneously providing molecular level details of thousands of compounds and was successful applied for the investigations of natural organic matter (NOM) different sources like marine and surface water, soil, sediment, bog and crude oil

  6. Comparative investigations of the heavy-metal uptake of different culture plants from soils fertilized with sewage sludge and its forecasting by means of soil extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luebben, S.; Goettingen Univ.

    1993-01-01

    This report is part of a research programme sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Science and Technology entitled ''Impact of municipal wastes on soils, soil organisms and plants''. In field experiments or on samples from these fields (four partial projects), soil microbiological, soil zoological and other pedological investigations were carried through; furthermore, soil samples were taken in the areas of five other partial projects studying for many years the impact of municipal waste, in order to investigate heavy metal transfer from soil to plants in greater detail. As the evaluation of the rates of heavy metal elimination shows, the possibility of soil decontamination merely through heavy metal transfer to plants is practically excluded. In moderately contaminated areas those culture plants should be given priority whose useful parts take up relatively little heavy metal. By raising the pH-value the availability of cadmium, zinc and nickel can, moreover, be effectively reduced and the concentrations of these elements in the plants lowered. The conclusion from this study is that moderate recycling of low-heavy-metal sewage sludge in farming will be safe as long as, especially, cadmium concentrations are critically monitored and as long as the soils in question are mainly medium to heavy ones with pH values higher than 6.5. (orig./Vhe) [de

  7. Anaerobic transformation of DDT related to iron(III) reduction and microbial community structure in paddy soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Manjia; Cao, Fang; Li, Fangbai; Liu, Chengshuai; Tong, Hui; Wu, Weijian; Hu, Min

    2013-03-06

    We studied the mechanisms of microbial transformation in functional bacteria on 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) in two different field soils, Haiyan (HY) and Chenghai (CH). The results showed that microbial activities had a steady dechlorination effect on DDT and its metabolites (DDx). Adding lactate or glucose as carbon sources increased the amount of Desulfuromonas, Sedimentibacter, and Clostridium bacteria, which led to an increase in adsorbed Fe(II) and resulted in increased DDT transformation rates. The electron shuttle of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic disodium salt resulted in an increase in the negative potential of soil by mediating the electron transfer from the bacteria to the DDT. Moreover, the DDT-degrading bacteria in the CH soil were more abundant than those in the HY soil, which led to higher DDT transformation rates in the CH soil. The most stable compound of DDx was 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chloro-phenyl)ethane, which also was the major dechlorination metabolite of DDT, and 1-chloro-2,2-bis-(p-chlorophenyl)ethane and 4,4'-dichlorobenzo-phenone were found to be the terminal metabolites in the anaerobic soils.

  8. 100-FR-3 groundwater/soil gas supplemental limited field investigation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    In 1993, a Limited Field Investigation (LFI) was conducted for the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit which identified trichloroethylene (TCE) as a contaminant of potential concern (COPC) (DOE-RL 1994). In groundwater samples collected for the LFI, TCE was detected in well 199-177-1 at a concentration exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (5 μg/L) and Washington State groundwater criteria (3 μg/L). With the concurrence of the EPA and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), a supplemental LFI was conducted to determine the extent and potential source of TCE groundwater contamination associated with the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit. This report summarizes the activities and results of the groundwater/soil gas supplemental LFI for the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit. The primary objective of this investigation was to assess the lateral distribution of TCE in shallow (3 to 5 ft below the water table) groundwater associated with the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit. The second objective was to assess soil gas (3 to 5 concentrations in the study area in an attempt to identify potential sources of TCE and develop a correlation between soil gas and groundwater concentrations). Finally, the third objective of the investigation was to refine the site conceptual model

  9. Investigation on reusing water treatment residuals to remedy soil contaminated with multiple metals in Baiyin, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Changhui; Zhao, Yuanyuan [The Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Pei, Yuansheng, E-mail: yspei@bnu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2012-10-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe/Al water treatment residuals (FARs) can stabilize As, Pb, Ni, Zn, Cr and Cu. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FARs cannot stabilize Ba and Cd. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The properties of FARs and soil affect the FARs' ability of stabilizing metals. - Abstract: In this work, the remediation of soils contaminated with multiple metals using ferric and alum water treatment residuals (FARs) in Baiyin, China, was investigated. The results of metals fractionation indicated that after the soil was treated with FARs, arsenic (As), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) could be transformed into more stable forms, i.e., As bound in crystalline Fe/Al oxides and other metals in the oxidable and residual forms. However, the forms of chromium (Cr) and cadmium (Cd) were unaffected. Interestingly, due to the effect of FARs, barium (Ba) was predominantly transformed into more mobile forms. The bioaccessibility extraction test demonstrated that the FARs reduced the bioaccessibility of As by 25%, followed by Cu, Cr, Zn, Ni and Pb. The bioaccessibility of Cd and Ba were increased; in particular, there was an increase of 41% for Ba at the end of the test. In conclusion, the FARs can be used to remedy soil contaminated with multiple metals, but comprehensive studies are needed before practical applications of this work.

  10. Investigation on reusing water treatment residuals to remedy soil contaminated with multiple metals in Baiyin, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Changhui; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Pei, Yuansheng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fe/Al water treatment residuals (FARs) can stabilize As, Pb, Ni, Zn, Cr and Cu. ► FARs cannot stabilize Ba and Cd. ► The properties of FARs and soil affect the FARs’ ability of stabilizing metals. - Abstract: In this work, the remediation of soils contaminated with multiple metals using ferric and alum water treatment residuals (FARs) in Baiyin, China, was investigated. The results of metals fractionation indicated that after the soil was treated with FARs, arsenic (As), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) could be transformed into more stable forms, i.e., As bound in crystalline Fe/Al oxides and other metals in the oxidable and residual forms. However, the forms of chromium (Cr) and cadmium (Cd) were unaffected. Interestingly, due to the effect of FARs, barium (Ba) was predominantly transformed into more mobile forms. The bioaccessibility extraction test demonstrated that the FARs reduced the bioaccessibility of As by 25%, followed by Cu, Cr, Zn, Ni and Pb. The bioaccessibility of Cd and Ba were increased; in particular, there was an increase of 41% for Ba at the end of the test. In conclusion, the FARs can be used to remedy soil contaminated with multiple metals, but comprehensive studies are needed before practical applications of this work.

  11. Chemical elemental distribution and soil DNA fingerprints provide the critical evidence in murder case investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Concheri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The scientific contribution to the solution of crime cases, or throughout the consequent forensic trials, is a crucial aspect of the justice system. The possibility to extract meaningful information from trace amounts of samples, and to match and validate evidences with robust and unambiguous statistical tests, are the key points of such process. The present report is the authorized disclosure of an investigation, carried out by Attorney General appointment, on a murder case in northern Italy, which yielded the critical supporting evidence for the judicial trial. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The proportional distribution of 54 chemical elements and the bacterial community DNA fingerprints were used as signature markers to prove the similarity of two soil samples. The first soil was collected on the crime scene, along a corn field, while the second was found in trace amounts on the carpet of a car impounded from the main suspect in a distant location. The matching similarity of the two soils was proven by crossing the results of two independent techniques: a elemental analysis via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS and optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES approaches, and b amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis by gel electrophoresis (ARDRA. CONCLUSIONS: Besides introducing the novel application of these methods to forensic disciplines, the highly accurate level of resolution observed, opens new possibilities also in the fields of soil typing and tracking, historical analyses, geochemical surveys and global land mapping.

  12. Investigation the Kinetic Models of Biological Removal of Petroleum Contaminated Soil Around Oil Pipeline Using Ryegrass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Ghaheri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The industrial revolution of the past century has resulted in significant damage to environmental resources such as air, water and soil. Petroleum contamination of soil is a serious problem throughout the oil producer countries. Remediation of petroleum contamination of soils is generally a slow and expensive process. Phytoremediation is a potentially less-damaging, cost-effective, but needs longer-term for remediation of contaminated land compared to the alternative methods. In this study the kinetics of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils in Khozestan were investigated. For this paper Ryegrass (Lolium perenne plant selected and the decline of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH was analyzed after growth stage, every 10 days up to 90 days. The results of TPH concentration was fitted with zero-order kinetic, first-order kinetic and Higuchi model. The result indicated that degradation of TPH with presence of plants as a function of time was well fitted with the first-order kinetic model. The first-order rate constants (K and half-lives (T1/2 for TPH degradation were 0.0098 1/day and 71 day; respectively. The results of phytoremediation showed that there were 65% decreases in TPH concentration with Ryegrass during the 17 weeks.

  13. Optimization of photometric determination of U with arsenazo III for direct determination of U in steels, soils and waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosturiak, A.; Talanova, A.; Rurikova, D.; Kalavska, D.

    1984-01-01

    Conditions were optimized for the reaction of U(VI) with arsenazo III. Recommended as the optimal medium for photometric determination of uranium in the concentration range 0.5 to 50 μg U/ml was the glycine buffer with pH 1.2 to 2.2. The results of the suggested method have better reproducibility than those of the mineral acid procedure used so far. Complexone III should be added to mask the other cations accompanying uranium in steels, waters and rocks. (author)

  14. Nuclear-physical methods of investigation of an element composition in samples of soils and plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hushmurodov, Sh.; Botaev, N.

    2002-01-01

    Soil (ground) and vegetative covers of the Earth are one of the most responsive and specific parts of the biosphere with respect to pollution. A proper control after them is of fundamental importance in creating and protecting optical surrounding. Analysis of soils and plants is a necessary and important stage in the process of investigation of microelements' migration in biogeochemical cycles. For this purpose we studied some reserved terrains of Uzbekistan to reveal a level of their contamination by heavy metals, as well as to find out typical and territorial singularities in accumulation of a number of elements by soils and plants. In order to decrease an influence of systematic errors, and to obtain more precise and reliable data, we carried out the element analysis of the samples by different methods, such as gamma-activation analysis, neutron-activation analysis, X-ray spectral analysis, and X-ray fluorescent analysis. As a result of our investigations we have obtained rather great information, which can be used in future to estimate the conditions of the surrounding nature. The investigations allowed us to determine the content of about 40 elements, as well as to show that the data, obtained by different nuclear-physical methods, are in rather good agreement. A reproducibility of the results of the methods, determined in control measurements, depends on the concentration of the analyzed elements, and is equal to 10-35 %. A comparison of the obtained data allowed us to reveal some singularities in element composition of the investigated samples depending on their type and territorial factor. It has been revealed that the data, obtained by different methods, are in rather good agreement. Our investigations allowed us to find out a series of regularities and singularities in accumulation of elements in plants, as well as to show the possibility of using nuclear-physical methods in such investigations

  15. From bulk soil to intracrystalline investigation of plant-mineral interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemarchand, D.; Voinot, A.; Chabaux, F.; Turpault, M.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the controls and feedbacks regulating the flux of matter between bio-geochemical reservoirs in forest ecosystems receives a fast growing interest for the last decades. A complex question is to understand how minerals and vegetation interact in soils to sustain life and, to a broader scope, how forest ecosystems may respond to human activity (acid rain, harvesting,...) and climate perturbations (temperature, precipitation,...). Many mineralogical and biogeochemical approaches have longtime been developed, and occasionally coupled, in order to investigate the mechanisms by which chemical elements either are exchanged between soil particles and solutions, or are transferred to plants or to deeper soil layers and finally leave the system. But the characterization of particular processes like the contribution of minor reactive minerals to plant nutrition and global fluxes or the mechanisms by which biology can modify reaction rates and balance the bioavailability of nutrients in response to environmental perturbation sometimes fails because of the lack of suitable tracers. Recent analytical and conceptual advances have opened new perspectives for the use of light "non traditional" stable isotopes. Showing a wild range of concentrations and isotopic compositions between biogeochemical reservoirs in forest ecosystem, boron has physico-chemical properties particularly relevant to the investigation of water/rock interactions even when evolving biologically-mediated reactions. In this study, we focused on the distribution of boron isotopes from intracrystalline to bulk soil scales. An overview of the boron distribution and annual fluxes in the soil-plant system clearly indicates that the vegetation cycling largely controls the mobility of boron. We also observe that the mineral and biological B pools have drastically different isotopic signature that makes the transfer of B between them very easy to follow. In particular, the podzol soil we analyzed shows a

  16. X-ray absorption spectroscopy as a tool investigating arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) sorption by an aluminum-based drinking-water treatment residual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Konstantinos C; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Parsons, Jason G; Datta, Rupali; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2009-11-15

    Historic applications of arsenical pesticides to agricultural land have resulted in accumulation of residual arsenic (As) in such soils. In situ immobilization represents a cost-effective and least ecological disrupting treatment technology for soil As. Earlier work in our laboratory showed that drinking-water treatment residuals (WTRs), a low-cost, waste by-product of the drinking-water treatment process exhibit a high affinity for As. Wet chemical experiments (sorption kinetics and desorption) were coupled with X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements to elucidate the bonding strength and type of As(V) and As(III) sorption by an aluminum-based WTR. A fast (1h), followed by a slower sorption stage resulted in As(V) and As(III) sorption capacities of 96% and 77%, respectively. Arsenic desorption with a 5mM oxalate from the WTR was minimal, being always absorption spectroscopy data showed inner-sphere complexation between As and surface hydroxyls. Reaction time (up to 48h) had no effect on the initial As oxidation state for sorbed As(V) and As(III). A combination of inner-sphere bonding types occurred between As and Al on the WTR surface because mixed surface geometries and interatomic distances were observed.

  17. Electrical and dielectric investigation of intercalated polypyrrole montmorillonite nanocomposite prepared by spontaneous polymerization of pyrrole into Fe(III)-montmorillonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zidi, Rabii, E-mail: rabiizidi@gmail.com [Physical Chemistry Laboratory for Mineral Materials and their Applications, National Center for Research in Materials Sciences (CNRSM), B.P.73, 8020 Soliman (Tunisia); Bekri-Abbes, Imene; Sdiri, Nasr [Physical Chemistry Laboratory for Mineral Materials and their Applications, National Center for Research in Materials Sciences (CNRSM), B.P.73, 8020 Soliman (Tunisia); Vimalanandan, Ashokanand; Rohwerder, Michael [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Düsseldorf (Germany); Srasra, Ezzeddine [Physical Chemistry Laboratory for Mineral Materials and their Applications, National Center for Research in Materials Sciences (CNRSM), B.P.73, 8020 Soliman (Tunisia)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • We have prepared and characterized a Fe-MMT/PPy nanocomposites. • Investigate electrical conductivity and dielectric properties of the nanocomposite. • Investigate the temperature and frequency dependencies of alternating current conductivity of nanocomposites. - Abstract: Pyrrole was introduced into Fe(III)-exchanged montmorillonite to spontaneously polymerize within the interlayer resulting in the formation of intercalated polypyrrole-montmorillonite nanocomposite. The molar proportion of pyrrole to interlayer Fe{sup 3+} (R) has been varied from 0.5 to 5. The nanocomposite has been characterized by X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electronic Microscope, FTIR spectroscopy and impedance spectroscopy. It has been shown that intercalated polypyrrole montmorillonite nanocomposite was obtained. The results showed that the dc conductivity and dielectric properties of polypyrrole depend on R. The alternating current (ac) conductivity of the polymer obeys the power law, i.e., σ{sub ac}(ω) = Aω{sup s}. The alternating conductivity of nanocomposite was controlled by the correlated barrier hopping model. The activation energy for alternating current mechanism decreases with increasing frequency which confirms the hopping conduction to the dominant mechanism as compared with the dc activation energy. The dielectric relaxation mechanism was explained on the basis of complex dielectric modulus.

  18. “Doing the Wrong Things Right” Site Investigations in Soft Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilus, M. H.; Lim, A. J. M. S.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Azmi, M. A. M.

    2016-11-01

    Site investigation is a very important process by which geotechnical, geological and other relevant information which might affect the construction or performance of a civil engineering or building project is acquired. However, common practice in site investigations is not always in accordance to the standard that has been defined. Reliability on the information obtained depends upon several factors that involves correct procedures and competent workers and also supervision. Several examples on site investigation methods are discussed in this paper. Explanation on the difference between the site investigation methods used for real practices in the field and how it should be done are discussed in detail. Therefore, it is hoped that site investigation should always be uniquely planned and should be an interactive and flexible process of discovery and changes according to the condition of the soil.

  19. Soil Organic Carbon Stocks in Arctic Deltaic Sediments: Investigations in the Lena River Delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrzycki, S.; Kutzbach, L.; Desyatkin, A.; Pfeiffer, E.-M.

    2012-04-01

    The soil organic carbon stock (SSOC) of deltaic sediments in arctic permafrost regions is known to be significant but is insufficiently investigated so far. Previous SSOC studies were conducted mainly in the comparatively well studied Mackenzie River Delta (area: 13,000 km2) in Canada. The few studies from other arctic delta regions report only the gravimetric carbon (C) contents and are limited to the active layer depth at the time of sampling. Since C deposits in permafrost regions are likely to become a future C source, more detailed investigations of the presently frozen likely carbon-rich sediment and soil layers in other arctic delta regions are of importance. Our investigations were performed on Samoylov Island in the southern-central part of the Lena River Delta (32,000 km2) which is the largest arctic delta and the fifth largest delta worldwide. Samoylov Island is representative for the Lena River Delta's first terrace and the active floodplains. Within this study a new portable Snow-Ice-Permafrost-Research-Establishment (SIPRE) auger was used during a spring field session to obtain 1 m deep frozen soil cores (n = 37) distributed over all known soil and vegetation units. These cores are analyzed for bulk contents of nitrogen (N) and C, ice content and bulk density (BD) and to determine the SSOC including the rarely investigated currently permanently frozen layers up to 1 m depth on Samoylov Island. Our study provides evidence for high SSOC for a depth of 1 m for the investigated area ranging between 6 kg m2 and 54 kg m2. Considering the spatial extent of different soil units on the two geomorphological units of Samoylov Island, the area-weighted average SSOC were 31 kg m2 (n = 31) for the first terrace and 15 kg m2 (n = 6) for the active floodplain. For the correspondent soil units of Turbels and Orthels in circumpolar permafrost regions, Tarnocai et al. 2009 reported a mean SSOC of 27 kg m2 (min: 0.1 kg m2, max: 126 kg m2) for a depth of 1 m. For up

  20. Investigation of soil structure in Uzungöl settlement area by Shallow Seismic Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Karslı

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to relase the soil structure of Uzungöl district of Trabzon city, a vocational area, where had been formed by a historical landslide and lake deposits and to evaluate its geotechnical characters by using seismic methods which are noninvasive, rapidly applicable and provide substantial information about the structure of investigated ground in a short time. For this purpose, seismic refraction, active-passive surface waves and seismic reflections in 16 profiles were gathered on four sub-areas and and evaluated by current favorable numerical methods. Although it considerably varies between profiles, the depth of basement, depositional base of deposits, was averagely obtained as 13.5-15m at upper elevation and 25-50m at lower elevation of the study area. Dynamic elastic parameters and average shear wave velocity of the upper 30m (VS30 of soil in the area were calculated. The soil classification of study area was interpreted as locally Z1 and Z2 class for TEC, B and C class for EC-8 code, C and D class for NERHP. According to VS30 (394-530m/s, ground amplification and predominant vibration period of the study area are respectively obtained as 1.5-2.1 and 0.23-0.30sec. On the other hand, all deposits are characterized by stiffness-solid soil, excluding arable soil from surface to a few meters depth. In addition, the first meters of bedrock shows weathered character, but deeper parts are very compact and hard. Therefore, a scientific infrastructure has been formed to carry out the engineering projects to be planned for Uzungöl settletment safely and without damaging the environment.

  1. Investigating substrate use efficiency across different microbial physiologies in soil-extracted, solubilized organic matter (SESOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyle, K. T.; Martinez, C. E.

    2017-12-01

    Recent experimental work has elevated the importance of microbial processing for the stabilization of fresh carbon inputs within the soil mineral matrix. Enhancing our understanding of soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics therefore requires a better understanding of how efficiently microbial metabolism can process low molecular weight carbon substrates (carbon use efficiency, CUE) under environmentally relevant conditions. One approach to better understanding microbial uptake rates and CUE is the ecophysiological study of soil isolates in liquid media culture consisting of soil-extracted solubilized organic matter (SESOM). We are using SESOM from an Oa horizon under hemlock hardwood vegetation in upstate New York as liquid media for the growth of 12 isolates from the Oa and B horizon of the same site. Here we seek to test the uptake rates as well as CUE of 5 different low molecular weight substrates spanning compound class and nominal oxidation state (glucose, acetate, formate, glycine, valine) by isolates differing in phylogeny and physiology. The use of a spike of each of the 13C-labeled substrates into SESOM, along with a 0.2 μm filtration step, allows accurate partitioning of labeled carbon between biomass, gaseous CO2 as well as the exometabolome. Coupled UHPLC-MS measurements are being used to identify and determine uptake rates of over 80 potential C substrates present in the extract as well as our labeled substrate of interest along the course of the isolate growth curve. This work seeks to utilize a gradient in substrate class as well as microbial physiologies to inform our understanding of C and N cycling under relevant soil solution conditions. Future experiments may also use labeled biomass from stationary phase to investigate the stabilization potential of anabolic products formed from each substrate with a clay fraction isolated from the same site.

  2. Field investigations of soils at TA-19, TA-26, TA-73 and TA-0, SWMU aggregate 0-D and 016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFadden, L.D.

    1995-01-01

    Field based investigations of the general soil-geomorphic characteristics were carried out at TA-19, -26, -73, -0, Aggregate 0-D and -016 in order to provide information for utilization in ongoing and anticipated LANL ERP (Environmental Restoration Project) activities at these sites. These investigations show that soils exhibiting diverse morphologic character, varying ages, and relations to landforms characterize these sites. A review of recent and ongoing soils studies also shows that soil textural, chemical, and mineralogical characteristics may profoundly influence the migration and/or retardation of a variety of potential contaminants initially placed in direct contact with soils, or that encounter soils during subsurface percolation or discharge. Soil-geomorphic relations also provide important insights into recent site erosion, deposition or other surficial processes that must, be considered as part of environmental assessment of a given site and remediation; and, the planned geomorphic mapping activities at each site, as well as other associated activities (e.g, geophysical survey, site sampling) are accordingly appropriate and necessary with respect to identification of significant soil relations at each site. Specific and general recommendations in consideration of important findings regarding the possible impacts of soil development of the nature of contaminant behavior at various sites are provided to help guide sampling and analysis activities during ERP investigations outlined in the RFI Work Plan for Operational Unit-1071

  3. Upscaling the Use of Fallout Radionuclides in Soil Erosion and Sediment Budget Investigations: Addressing the Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.E. Walling

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of fallout radionuclides in soil erosion investigations and related sediment budget studies has provided a widely used tool for improving understanding of soil erosion and sediment transfer processes. However, most studies using fallout radionuclides undertaken to date have focussed on small areas. This focus on small areas reflects both the issues addressed and practical constraints associated with sample collection and analysis. Increasing acceptance of the important role of fine sediment in degrading aquatic habitats and in the transfer and fate of nutrients and contaminants within terrestrial and fluvial systems has emphasised the need to consider larger areas and the catchment or regional scale. The need to upscale existing approaches to the use of fallout radionuclides to larger areas represents an important challenge. This contribution provides a brief review of existing and potential approaches to upscaling the use of fallout radionuclides and presents two examples where such approaches have been successfully applied. These involve a national scale assessment of soil erosion rates in England and Wales based on 137Cs measurements and an investigation of the sediment budgets of three small/intermediate-size catchments in southern Italy.

  4. Efficiency of a new strategy involving a new class of natural hetero-ligand iron(III) chelates (Fe(III)-NHL) to improve fruit tree growth in alkaline/calcareous soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Marta; Ortuño, María F; Pérez-Sarmiento, Francisco; Bacaicoa, Eva; Baigorri, Roberto; Conejero, Wenceslao; Torrecillas, Arturo; García-Mina, José M

    2012-12-01

    Iron (Fe) chlorosis is a serious problem affecting the yield and quality of numerous crops and fruit trees cultivated in alkaline/calcareous soils. This paper describes the efficiency of a new class of natural hetero-ligand Fe(III) chelates (Fe-NHL) to provide available Fe for chlorotic lemon trees grown in alkaline/calcareous soils. These chelates involve the participation in the reaction system of a partially humified lignin-based natural polymer and citric acid. First results showed that Fe-NHL was adsorbed on the soil matrix while maintaining available Fe for plants in alkaline/calcareous solution. The effects of using three different sources as Fe fertilisers were also compared: two Fe-NHL formulations (NHL1, containing 100% of Fe as Fe-NHL, and NHL2, containing 80% of Fe as Fe-NHL and 20% of Fe as Fe-ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis-(o-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid (Fe-EDDHA)) and Fe-EDDHA. Both Fe-NHL formulations increased fruit yield without negative effects on fruit quality in comparison with Fe-EDDHA. In the absence of the Fe-starter fraction (NHL1), trees seemed to optimise Fe assimilation and translocation from Fe-NHL, directing it to those parts of the plant more involved in development. The field assays confirmed that Fe-NHL-based fertilisers are able to provide Fe to chlorotic trees, with results comparable to Fe-EDDHA. Besides, this would imply a more sustainable and less expensive remediation than synthetic chelates. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. An overview of the MIZ-1 borehole investigations during phase I/II. MIZ-1 progress report 03-01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Kunio; Takeuchi, Shinji; Ikeda, Koki

    2004-05-01

    Surface-based investigations have now been carried out, in a step-by-step fashion, with the main aims of the development of conceptual models of the geological environment and the enhancement of the understanding of the undisturbed deep geological environment before excavation of the shafts and experimental drifts. The MIZ-1 borehole investigation programme was launched in December 2002, as a step of the field investigations at the MIU Construction Site. The overall goals of the MIZ-1 borehole investigations are to characterise the geological environment from the surface to over 1,000 m depth in the crystalline basement, to establish baseline conditions before excavation of the shafts and experimental drifts, and to provide a deep borehole for observing hydraulic responses during the shaft and drift excavation and experiments in the drifts during the Construction and the Operation Phases. The borehole is planned to be drilled in an overall south-westerly direction from the north-eastern area of the MIU Site. The planned inclination varies from vertical at shallower depths to 12deg from vertical at greater depths down to 1,350 m along the borehole length, which will be achieved by controlled directional drilling. In MIZ-1 Phase I/II (from March to May 2003), the borehole was drilled vertically, through the entire sedimentary formations, down to 123.00 m in the uppermost part of the Toki granite at the MIU Construction Site. The new method of wireline core drilling with a downhole motor was introduced for the drilling. Planned geological, geophysical and hydrochemical investigations and complementary hydraulic and hydrochemical monitoring were performed. In addition, as a complete loss of drilling fluid was encountered at 115.85 m along the borehole length, modified work procedures resulted in the execution of hydraulic tests with groundwater sampling, from necessity, in that section and of further drilling work. The local QC system was applied to all the

  6. Microbiological investigation of soil samples of the caprock above the Gorleben salt dome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutzner, H.J.; Sonnen, H.; Bachmann, F.

    1993-01-01

    Microorganisms constitute an essential part of the soil structure. Through their activities a large number of processes in the soil are caused: decomposition (mineralization) and conversion (humate formation) of organic substances; formation of biomass (reproduction); oxidation and reduction of various elements or compounds, and thus generation of a geomicrobiological cycle of nitrogen, sulphur, iron, manganese and other elements; and, at the same time, by means of oxidation/reduction processes they cause modifications of the solubility of metals (precipitation or mobility increase). Therefore, an influence exerted by microorganisms, as an integral part of the caprock, on radionuclide migration cannot be excluded. The investigations performed served to look into the question to which extent microorganisms occur in the profile of the caprock above the Gorleben salt dome; which geomicrobiological activities are to be expected there due to their physiological properties, and whether their influence on radionuclide migration seems to be realistic. (orig./DG) [de

  7. Investigation of soil properties for identifying recharge characteristics in the Lake Chad Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, M. L.; Ndunguru, G. G.; Adisa, S. J.; Lee, J.; Adegoke, J. O.; Goni, I. B.; Grindley, J.; Mulugeta, V.

    2009-12-01

    Lake Chad was once labeled as one of the largest fresh water lakes in the world, providing water and livelihood to over 20 million people. The lake is shared by six different countries; Chad Nigeria, Niger, Cameroon, Central African Republic, and Sudan. Since the 1970 to date, a significant decrease in the size of the lake has been observed with the use of satellite imagery. This shrinking of the lake has been blamed on global warming, population increase and poor water management by the agriculture industry for farming purpose for both plants and animals. While these can be all valid reasons for the decrease of Lake Chad, we see the need to examine environmental and hydrological evidence around the Lake Chad basin. This study was carried out from upper stream to lower stream leading from Kano to the Damatru region which is one of several water bodies that supply Lake Chad. Over seventy six sites were sampled for soil texture, bulk density and other physical properties to investigate recharge capacity of the basin especially along the stream. Soils were collected using a soil core and properly stored at 4 degrees Celsius. Soils were weighed and put to dry at 105 degrees for twenty four hours. Dry weight was recorded and bulk density was calculated. The wet sieve method was used to determine the particle size analysis. Soils were weighed to 10 grams and hydrogen peroxide added to separate particles. Samples were washed with water and put to dry overnight. Soils were reweighed and sieved to separate as course sand, fine sand and silt and clay. The data revealed that in the upstream, coarse sand continuously decreased while silt and clay continuously increased down toward the lake. At mid stream silt and clay had significantly higher values when compared to coarse sand and fine sand. In the lower stream, bulk density clearly decreased compared to the upper and mid streams. Correlations will be carried out to investigate the particle size analysis and bulk density with

  8. Alternative methods and radionuclides for use in soil-erosion and sedimentation investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Q.; Walling, D.E.; Wallbrink, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    The use of 137 Cs for documenting rates and patterns of soil redistribution and sediment deposition represents an important advance that overcomes many of the limitations of existing techniques. Thus, the 137 Cs approach presents several key advantages but a number of potential limitations must also be recognized and addressed in any application. For example, traditional procedures for applying 137 Cs measurements in soil-erosion and sedimentation investigations involve the collection of soil or sediment cores from a study site and their subsequent transfer to the laboratory for preparation and analysis of 137 Cs activity by gamma spectrometry. The resulting measurements of 137 Cs activity (Bq g -1 ) are used to calculate the 137 Cs inventories (Bq m -2 ) for the individual cores and, thus the sampling points. In cases where a large number of cores are collected and require analysis, their processing and laboratory measurement will involve substantial effort. Furthermore, an extended period of time will generally be required for the measurements, because long count times are required for environmental samples containing relatively low levels of 137 Cs activity. Appreciable delays in obtaining results may, therefore, arise and it is not generally possible to obtain immediate data for use in planning and developing an ongoing sampling programme for detailed investigations. In view of these limitations, there is clearly a need to explore the potential for enhancing and extending the 137 Cs technique by using other methods to obtain the 137 Cs measurements within a shorter period of time and by using other fallout radionuclides with behaviour similar to that of 137 Cs but with a continuous input or a half-life extending to days rather than years, that could be used to document either the short-term contemporary rates of soil redistribution and sediment deposition or address issues of variability. This chapter discusses the procedures involved in employing field

  9. Ethanol mediated As(III) adsorption onto Zn-loaded pinecone biochar: Experimental investigation, modeling, and optimization using hybrid artificial neural network-genetic algorithm approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Mohd; Van Vinh, N; Behera, Shishir Kumar; Park, Hung-Suck

    2017-04-01

    Organic matters (OMs) and their oxidization products often influence the fate and transport of heavy metals in the subsurface aqueous systems through interaction with the mineral surfaces. This study investigates the ethanol (EtOH)-mediated As(III) adsorption onto Zn-loaded pinecone (PC) biochar through batch experiments conducted under Box-Behnken design. The effect of EtOH on As(III) adsorption mechanism was quantitatively elucidated by fitting the experimental data using artificial neural network and quadratic modeling approaches. The quadratic model could describe the limiting nature of EtOH and pH on As(III) adsorption, whereas neural network revealed the stronger influence of EtOH (64.5%) followed by pH (20.75%) and As(III) concentration (14.75%) on the adsorption phenomena. Besides, the interaction among process variables indicated that EtOH enhances As(III) adsorption over a pH range of 2 to 7, possibly due to facilitation of ligand-metal(Zn) binding complexation mechanism. Eventually, hybrid response surface model-genetic algorithm (RSM-GA) approach predicted a better optimal solution than RSM, i.e., the adsorptive removal of As(III) (10.47μg/g) is facilitated at 30.22mg C/L of EtOH with initial As(III) concentration of 196.77μg/L at pH5.8. The implication of this investigation might help in understanding the application of biochar for removal of various As(III) species in the presence of OM. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Response of soil bacterial communities to lead and zinc pollution revealed by Illumina MiSeq sequencing investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xihui; Zhang, Zhou; Hu, Shunli; Ruan, Zhepu; Jiang, Jiandong; Chen, Chen; Shen, Zhenguo

    2017-01-01

    Soil provides a critical environment for microbial community development. However, microorganisms may be sensitive to substances such as heavy metals (HMs), which are common soil contaminants. This study investigated bacterial communities using 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene fragment sequencing in geographic regions with and without HM pollution to elucidate the effects of soil properties and HMs on bacterial communities. No obvious changes in the richness or diversity of bacterial communities were observed between samples from mining and control areas. Significant differences in bacterial richness and diversity were detected between samples from different geographic regions, indicating that the basic soil characteristics were the most important factors affecting bacterial communities other than HMs. However, the abundances of several phyla and genera differed significantly between mining and control samples, suggesting that Zn and Pb pollution may impact the soil bacterial community composition. Moreover, regression analyses showed that the relative abundances of these phyla and genera were correlated significantly with the soil-available Zn and Pb contents. Redundancy analysis indicated that the soil K, ammoniacal nitrogen (NH 4 + -N), total Cu, and available Zn and Cu contents were the most important factors. Our results not only suggested that the soil bacteria were sensitive to HM stresses but also indicated that other soil properties may affect soil microorganisms to a greater extent.

  11. An investigation of radionuclide uptake into food crops grown in soils treated with bauxite mining residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.B.; Clarke, P.C.; Robertson, W.; McPharlin, I.R.; Jeffrey, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    Sandy soils of the coastal plain area of Western Australia have poor phosphorous retention capacity which leads to pollution of surface water bodies in the region. Application of bauxite mining residues (termed 'red mud') to vegetable and crops has been proposed as a solution to increase the phosphorous and water retention and thereby reduce the leaching of nutrients. The thorium and radium-226 concentrations in the 'red mud' residues are in excess of 1 kBq/kg, and 300 Bq/kg respectively. Potentially, the use of these residues on agricultural land could result in increased levels of radionuclides in food grown in amended soils. The transfer of long-lived radionuclides of both the natural thorium and uranium series to a variety of vegetable crops grown under controlled conditions is investigated. The effects of varying the rates of application of 'red mud' and phosphate fertilizers on radionuclide uptake are studied. It has been shown previously that fallout caesium-137 is sandy soils of the region transfers readily to food and grazing crops. Some of the parameters which influence that transfer are also examined. (author). 14 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs

  12. Preliminary investigation of stereotactic body radiation therapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Jindong; Lu Changxing; Wang Jiaming; Liu Jun; Li Hongxuan; Wang Changlu; Gao Lanting; Zhao Lei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and treatment-related toxicity of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: SBRT was applied to 30 patients, including clinically staged T 1 , T 2 (≤5 cm) or T 3 (chest wall primary tumors only), N 0 , M 0 ,biopsy-confirmed NSCLC. All patients were precluded from lobotomy because of physical condition or comorbidity. No patients developed tumors of any T-stage in the proximal zone. SBRT was performed with the total dose of 50 Gy to 70 Gy in 10 - 11 fractions during 12 - 15 days. prescription line was set onthe edge of the PTV. Results: The follow-up rate was 100%. The number of patients who completed the 1-, and 2-year follow-up were 15, and 10, respectively. All 30 patients completed therapy as planned. The complete response (CR), partial response (PR) and stable disease (SD) rates were 37%, 53% and 3%, respectively. With a median follow-up of 16 months (range, 4-36 months), Kaplan-Meier local control at 2 years was 94%. The 2-year overall survival was 84% and the 2-year cancer specific survival was 90%. Seven patients(23%) developed Grade 2 pneumonitis, no grade > 2 acute or late lung toxicity was observed. No one developed chest wall pain. Conclusions: It is feasible to deliver 50 Gy to 70 Gy of SBRT in 10 - 11 fractions for medically inoperable patients with stage I / II NSCLC. It was associated with low incidence of toxicities and provided sustained local tumor control.The preliminary investigation indicated the cancer specific survival probability of SBRT was high. It is necessary to perform similar investigation in a larger number of patients with long-term follow-up. (authors)

  13. Interactions between leaf macro, micronutrients and soil properties in pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) orchards

    OpenAIRE

    Koukoulakis, Prodromos; Chatzissavvidis, Christos; Papadopoulos, Aristotelis; Pontikis, Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    The interactions between: (i) leaf dry matter macronutrients, micronutrients and soil chemical properties, (ii) leaf macro- and micronutrients, (iii) soil macro- and micronutrients and (iv) soil chemical properties, and soil micro- and macronutrients in 50 pistachio orchards were investigated in leaves and soils by means of regression analysis. Most of the soils were deficient in plant-available P, Zn, Mn, Fe, and B, while they were excessively supplied with Cu. Leaf analysis showed that most...

  14. Investigations of soil-plant transfer of radiocesium after deposition from the Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilo, M.

    1991-11-01

    Due to the low deposition of radiocaesium in NRW after the Chernobyl accident of about 2500 Bq 137 Cs/m 2 and 720 Bq 134 Cs/m 2 , radiocaesium was not detectable in cereals from NRW. A deposition of about 44,100 Bq 137 Cs/m 2 and 13,500 Bq 134 Cs/m 2 was calculated for the vicinity of Tannheim, a village in Upper Swabia. Nevertheless, the content of radiocaesium in grain from Upper Swabia was found to be more than one hundred times lower than that of natural 40 K. Transferfactors (TF/SP) for radiocaesium were determined for cereals from the three investigated soil types: Kalkvega (FAO classification: Calcaric Fluvisol), Braunerde (Cambisol) and Parabraunerde-Pseudogley (Luvisol-Planosol). The total variation in TF(SP) from 54 sampling sites was a factor of 43 (grain) and 18 (straw). However, the values did not reach the calculation basis of the German Regulatory Guide of 0.05 (Allgemeine Berechnungsgrundlage). The maximum TF(SP) for 134/137 Cs in grain of 0.026 is clearly below that limit. A drastic increase of radioactivity in sewage sludge was observed in Upper Swabia. In the Tannheim sewage plant a radiocaesium content of about 12,500 Bq/kg dry matter was measured. In order to obtain further information on the possible radioecological consequences of using this sewage sludge as fertilizer a lysimeter study was carried out with application of the contaminated sewage sludge. Radioactivity in soil and several crops was measured for the growing periods 1989 and 1990. Although the soil type ('worst-case model') could have led one to expect high TF(SP) the increase of radiocaesium in plants was quite small. A higher uptake of radiocaesium by plants is caused by varying the potassium contents of the soil rather than by the application of the contaminated sewage sludge. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Lab-scale impact test to investigate the pipe-soil interaction and comparative study to evaluate structural responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Man Ryu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the dynamic response of a subsea pipeline under an impact load to determine the effect of the seabed soil. A laboratory-scale soil-based pipeline impact test was carried out to investigate the pipeline deformation/strain as well as the interaction with the soil-pipeline. In addition, an impact test was simulated using the finite element technique, and the calculated strain was compared with the experimental results. During the simulation, the pipeline was described based on an elasto-plastic analysis, and the soil was modeled using the Mohr-Coulomb fail-ure criterion. The results obtained were compared with ASME D31.8, and the differences between the analysis results and the rules were specifically investigated. Modified ASME formulae were proposed to calculate the precise structural behavior of a subsea pipeline under an impact load when considering sand- and clay-based seabed soils.

  16. Geochemical Investigations In Soils And Waters Of Ischia Island (southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avino, R.; Capaldi, G.; Di Matteo, V.; Pece, R.

    The island of Ischia is localized in the Gulf of Naples and is a volcanic field belonging to the volcanic district of the Phlegraean Fields. It covers an area of about 42 Km2 and is characterized by a complex system of faults and fractures of tectonic and volcano- tectonic origin. The highest peak of the island is Mt Epomeo (787 m), situated in the central part of Ischia. The last eruption on this island took place in 1302 (Arso) and from that time the volcanic activity has reduced only to hydrothermal manifestations (fumaroles and thermal springs) localized especially along the faults that border Mt Epomeo. So the area around the Epomeo is an area of great interest for geochemical investigations, and in fact in this place high concentration of mercury, carbon dioxide and radon have been measured. In this work are presented the data of a study on the concentration of CO2 and mercury and of the activity of radon in the soils and in the waters of the island of Ischia. For these investigations 184 samples of soils have been collected and analyzed in laboratory to calculate the concentration of mercury using the Jerome 511 Mercury Vapor Analyzer. In the same sampling sites measurements of CO2 and of the activity of radon-222 in the soils have also been made using the Track- etch@ method. As regards the waters, a sampling of 50 wells localized all around the coast of the island has been carried out. In these waters measures of mercury and of the activity of some radioactive elements have been done. The measures of radioactivity has been carried out by gamma spectrometry with a HPE Ge detector. All the investigations (in soils and in waters) allow to have preliminary information about the concentrations of these investigated elements and will be a starting-point for a more detailed sampling in those place where anomalies have been found. This set of data can also help to better understand the degassing process of these elements through the principal structures of the

  17. Investigating the spatial anisotropy of soil radioactivity in the region of Vinaninkarena, Antsirabe-Madagascar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabesiranana, N.; Rasolonirina, M.; Solonjara, A.F.; Raoelina Andriambololona

    2009-01-01

    A study was conducted in the region of Vinaninkarena-Antsirabe, to investigate the spatial distrubition of the environmental radioactivity. Forty-two (42) top soil samples were collected from two different sampling points. They were analyzed for uranium and thorium series by gamma spectrometry. In order to determine radioactivity spatial structure, semi-variance analysis was used. From 82 samples and 840 paired data, semi-variances were computed, variograms charted and modelled. Results showed that spatial dependance ranges vary from 100 m to 300m. Moreover, spatial anisotropy is also detected. Such result allows optimizing sampling design for future mapping of the environmental radioactivity of the region.

  18. Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenschuss, A.; Huber, S.; Riss, A.; Schwarz, S.; Tulipan, M.

    2001-01-01

    For Austria there exists a comprehensive soil data collection, integrated in a GIS (geographical information system). The content values of pollutants (cadmium, mercury, lead, copper, mercury, radio-cesium) are given in geographical charts and in tables by regions and by type of soil (forests, agriculture, greenland, others) for the whole area of Austria. Erosion effects are studied for the Austrian region. Legal regulations and measures for an effective soil protection, reduction of soil degradation and sustainable development in Austria and the European Union are discussed. (a.n.)

  19. Investigating the Effect of Biological Crusts on Some Biological Properties of Soil (Case Study: Qare Qir Rangelands of Golestan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kakeh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Physical and biological soil crusts are the principal types of soil crusts. Physical and biological soil crusts are distributed in arid, semi-arid and sub-humid regions which constitute over 40% of the earth terrestrial surface. Biological soil crusts (BSCs result from an intimate association between soil particles and cyanobacteria, algae, fungi, lichens and mosses in different proportions which live on the surface, or in the immediately uppermost millimeters of soil. Some of the functions that BSCs influences include: water absorption and retention, nutrient retention, Carbon and nitrogen fixation, biological activate and hydrologic Status. BSCs are important from the ecological view point and their effects on the environment, especially in rangeland, and desert ecosystems and this caused which researchers have a special attention to this component of the ecosystems more than before. Materials and Methods: This study carried out in the Qara Qir rangelands of Golestan province, northeast of Iran (37º15′ - 37º23′ N &54º33′ -54º39′ E, to investigate the effects of BSCs on some of soil biological properties. Four sites including with and without BSCs cover were selected. Soil biological properties such as microbial populations, soil respiration, microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen, as well as, other effective properties such asorganic carbon percent, total nitrogen, electrical conductivity, and available water content were measured in depths of 0-5 and 5-15 cm of soil with four replications. The gathered data were analyzed by nested plot, and the mean values were compared by Duncan test. Results and Discussion: The results showed that organic carbon and water content were higher at the surface under BSCs, followed by 5-15 cm soils under BSCs. Both soil depths of uncrusted soils showed substantially lower organic carbon and water content than the BSC-covered soils. Total nitrogen was far higher in BSC-encrusted surface

  20. Synergistic solvent extraction investigation of Am (III), Eu (III), Zn(II), and Cs(I), using 2-heptyl-2-methyl-nonanoic acid mixed with different organophosphorus compounds from nitrate media. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, H.A.; Ramadan, A.; Abdel-Fattah, A.

    1996-01-01

    Extraction studies for investigating the effect of mixing 2-heptyl-2-methyl nonanoic acid (HA) with a number of organophosphorus compounds; namely tributyl phosphate (TBP), terphenyl phosphate oxide (TPPO); tri octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) or bis-2-(ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP) in benzene on the extraction of trace elements Am(III), Eu(III), Zn(II), and Cs(I) from nitrate media of ionic strength, I=0.1 M were carried out. The effect of adding different organophosphorus compounds to HA was tested to account for the presence or absence of the phenomenon of synergism. It was found that TBP, TPPO, and TOPO causing some antagonistic effects for the elements studied. Extraction enhancement was only observed with bis- (2-ethyl-hexyl) -phosphoric acid (HDEHP) for all the elements investigated. The extraction mechanisms as well as the thermodynamic parameters for the mixed extracted species are discussed. 19 figs

  1. Synergistic solvent extraction investigation of Am (III), Eu (III), Zn(II), and Cs(I), using 2-heptyl-2-methyl-nonanoic acid mixed with different organophosphorus compounds from nitrate media. Vol. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Naggar, H A; Ramadan, A; Abdel-Fattah, A [Nuclear Chemistry Department, Hot Laboratories Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Extraction studies for investigating the effect of mixing 2-heptyl-2-methyl nonanoic acid (HA) with a number of organophosphorus compounds; namely tributyl phosphate (TBP), terphenyl phosphate oxide (TPPO); tri octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) or bis-2-(ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP) in benzene on the extraction of trace elements Am(III), Eu(III), Zn(II), and Cs(I) from nitrate media of ionic strength, I=0.1 M were carried out. The effect of adding different organophosphorus compounds to HA was tested to account for the presence or absence of the phenomenon of synergism. It was found that TBP, TPPO, and TOPO causing some antagonistic effects for the elements studied. Extraction enhancement was only observed with bis- (2-ethyl-hexyl) -phosphoric acid (HDEHP) for all the elements investigated. The extraction mechanisms as well as the thermodynamic parameters for the mixed extracted species are discussed. 19 figs.

  2. Managed aquifer recharge: the fate of pharmaceuticals from infiltrated treated wastewater investigated through soil column experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Matthew; Selke, Stephanie; Balsaa, Peter; Wefer-Roehl, Annette; Kübeck, Christine; Schüth, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    The EU FP7 project MARSOL addresses water scarcity challenges in arid regions, where managed aquifer recharge (MAR) is an upcoming technology to recharge depleted aquifers using alternative water sources. Within this framework, column experiments were conducted to investigate the fate of pharmaceuticals when secondary treated wastewater (TWW) is infiltrated through a natural soil (organic matter content 6.8%) being considered for MAR. Three parallel experiments were run under conditions of continuous infiltration (one column) and wetting-drying cycles (two columns, with different analytes) over a 16 month time period. The pharmaceuticals diclofenac, ibuprofen, carbamazepine, naproxen, gemfibrozil, and fenoprofen, as well as the antibiotics doxycycline, sulfadimidine, and sulfamethoxazole, are commonly present in treated wastewater in varying concentrations. For the experiments, concentration variability was reduced by spiking the column inflow water with these compounds. Concentrations were periodically analyzed at different depths in each column and the mass passing each depth over the duration of the experiment was calculated. At the end of the experiments, sorbed pharmaceuticals were extracted from soil samples collected from different depths. A pressurized liquid extraction method was developed and resulted in recoveries from spiked post-experiment soil samples ranging from 64% (gemfibrozil) to 82% (carbamazepine) for the six non-antibiotic compounds. Scaling results by these recovery rates, the total mass of pharmaceuticals sorbed to the soil in the columns was calculated and compared to the calculated attenuated mass (i.e. mass that left the water phase). The difference between the attenuated mass and the sorbed mass is considered to be mass that degraded. Results for continuous infiltration conditions indicate that for carbamazepine and diclofenac, sorption is the primary attenuation mechanism, with missing (i.e. degraded) mass lying within the propagated

  3. Investigation of Stabilised Batu Pahat Soft Soil Pertaining on its CBR and Permeability Properties for Road Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Idrus, M. M.; Singh, J. S. M.; Musbah, A. L. A.; Wijeyesekera, D. C.

    2016-07-01

    Soil stabilization by adding materials such as cement, lime and bitumen is one of the effective methods for improving the geotechnical properties of soils [11] Nano-particle is one of the newest additives and many studies about using nano-particle in soil improvement has been done but it was given less attention when soft clay soils stabilization is concerned. To evaluate the strength characteristics of stabilized Batu Pahat soft clay, laboratory investigation on early strength gained by the stabilized soil must be conducted to formulate a suitable and economical mix design [10]. To achieve such purpose, the study examined the effect of NanoClay on the California Bearing Ratio and the Permeability of soft clay. The results gained shows that the Nano-Clay is able to increase the strength of the soft clay [9]. The California Bearing Ratio of the soil is increase significantly where the results for the highest percentage of admixture is 14.4% while the permeability of the soil decreases significantly with increasing Nano-Clay whereby the results of the highest percentage of admixture is 2.0187x10-11 m/s. After doing this research, it is proven that Nano-clay can contribute towards better soil stabilization and enhance the quality of soil as subgrade and foundation at large.

  4. An attempt to prepare and characterize a soil reference material for Cr(VI) and Cr(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solano, G.; Katz, S.A.; Holzbecher, J.; Chatt, A.

    1994-01-01

    Reference materials for the speciation and quantification of chromium in contaminated soils were prepared by impregnating diatomaceous earth with BaCrO 4 and Cr 2 O 3 . The chromium concentrations of these materials were confirmed to be 200 mg/kg both by atomic absorption spectrometry and by instrumental neutron activation analysis, but monthly assays over two calendar quarters of the reference material impregnated with BaCrO 4 revealed the hexavalent chromium was not stable in this matrix. (author) 6 refs,; 2 tabs

  5. Systematic theoretical investigation of the zero-field splitting in Gd(III) complexes: Wave function and density functional approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Shehryar, E-mail: sherkhan@fysik.su.se; Odelius, Michael, E-mail: odelius@fysik.su.se [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Center, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kubica-Misztal, Aleksandra [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Reymonta 4, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland); Kruk, Danuta [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Sloneczna 54, Olsztyn PL-10710 (Poland); Kowalewski, Jozef [Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-01-21

    The zero-field splitting (ZFS) of the electronic ground state in paramagnetic ions is a sensitive probe of the variations in the electronic and molecular structure with an impact on fields ranging from fundamental physical chemistry to medical applications. A detailed analysis of the ZFS in a series of symmetric Gd(III) complexes is presented in order to establish the applicability and accuracy of computational methods using multiconfigurational complete-active-space self-consistent field wave functions and of density functional theory calculations. The various computational schemes are then applied to larger complexes Gd(III)DOTA(H{sub 2}O){sup −}, Gd(III)DTPA(H{sub 2}O){sup 2−}, and Gd(III)(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}{sup 3+} in order to analyze how the theoretical results compare to experimentally derived parameters. In contrast to approximations based on density functional theory, the multiconfigurational methods produce results for the ZFS of Gd(III) complexes on the correct order of magnitude.

  6. Investigation and Identification of Types and Amounts of Heavy Metals in Soil of an Industrial Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Mohammadhosseini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was mainly designed to investigate and identify the amounts and types of heavy metals in the soils of National Iranian Oil Refining & Distribution Company in Shahrood region and tried to establish a logical relation between the presence of heavy metals and their damage on vegetation. In addition, considering the power of drained soil and due to the proximity of ground water in Shahrood region, conducting this study provides a better insight into recognition of the possible contamination centers of drinking waters. The gridding and selective method was used for sampling step. Accordingly, five sub-samples were taken from each grid and finally after mixing all of the sub-samples, the final samples were obtained with an average weight of 400 grams prior to sending to the laboratory. To determine the total concentration of heavy metals in soil, extraction was done using concentrated solutions of HCl and HNO3. The total concentration of the heavy metals of chromium, cobalt and nickel were measured using an ICP-MS instrument, and the rest of the elements using an XRF device. The results explicitly indicated that the quantities of nickel, lead, zinc and strontium in patient samples exceeded the standard, and the other elements were lower than their standard limits. More specifically, the contents of lead and strontium in both normal and patient samples were higher than their standard contents. Moreover, the majority of the vegetation loss across the affected areas was caused by heavy metal accumulation, particularly nickel, lead, zinc, and strontium.

  7. Rates of leaching of radium from contaminated soils: an experimental investigation of radium bearing soils from Port Hope, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathwani, J.S.; Phillips, C.R.

    1978-01-01

    The leachability of Ra-226 from soil at Port Hope, Ontario contaminated by waste from a long established U refinery is described here. A small-scale static leach test was devised to provide information to permit an assessment of hazard due to leaching in the environment. Two different leaching solutions were prepared to simulate a range of infiltrating water quality in disposal environments: one by bubbling CO 2 into distilled water to pH 5.5, and another by bubbling SO 2 into water to pH 3.5. Narrow-range size fractions of the soils (i.e. 0.250 to 0.105 mm) were leached for 30 to 45 days (equivalent rainfall of 2 to 3 yr). It was found that leaching is significantly affected by soil texture, total amounts leached and the maximum concentrations reached being much greater for coarser, and intermediate size fractions than for fine soil fractions. Also, leachant acidity significantly increased leaching rates and resulted in enhanced mobility in soils. A straight line for the plot of Q/Q 0 (cumulative fraction released) vs. Tsup(1/2) (T is leaching time in days) indicated that leaching could be considered to be a diffusion phenomenon in accordance with Fick's law. Diffusion coefficients ranging from 5 X 10 -11 to 2 X 10 -13 cm 2 day -1 were found. These coefficients provide a basis for estimating the fraction that would be leached over longer periods. (Auth.)

  8. Investigate the influence of halloysite and activated carbon mixtures in phytostabilization of Pb-contaminated soil with Lolium perenne L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radziemska Maja

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of halloysite and activated carbon mixtures on the biomass and distribution of macronutrients (Mg, K, Ca, Na, P in ryegrass grown in Pb-contaminated soil. The soil was spiked with four different levels of lead contamination, i.e. 0 (control, 200, 400, 800 mg·kg−1 were applied in an analytical grade Pb(NO32 solution mixed thoroughly with the soil. Raw halloysite (3% and activated carbon (1% relative to soil mass mixtures were used to reduce the effect of soil lead contamination. Ryegrass of the Bokser variety was harvested after 42 days, and soil samples were collected for laboratory tests. The mixture of sorbents applied in the experiment which turned out to be most effective at doses of lead amounting to 400 and 800 mg·kg−1 of soil, with the increase in the yield of ryegrass being the highest. Increasing contamination of soil with lead in the series without the mixture of sorbents increased the contents of phosphorus, sodium, calcium and magnesium in ryegrass. The applied mixture of halloysite and activated carbon changed the macronutrient concentration in ryegrass, with the greatest changes found in that of potassium and sodium.

  9. Investigation of iron(III) reduction and trace metal interferences in the determination of dissolved iron in seawater using flow injection with luminol chemiluminescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ussher, Simon J. [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences (SEOES), University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Milne, Angela [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences (SEOES), University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Department of Oceanography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4320 (United States); Landing, William M. [Department of Oceanography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4320 (United States); Attiq-ur-Rehman, Kakar [Department of Chemistry, University of Balochistan, Quetta (Pakistan); Seguret, Marie J.M.; Holland, Toby [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences (SEOES), University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Achterberg, Eric P. [National Oceanography Centre, University of Southampton, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH (United Kingdom); Nabi, Abdul [Department of Chemistry, University of Balochistan, Quetta (Pakistan); Worsfold, Paul J., E-mail: pworsfold@plymouth.ac.uk [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences (SEOES), University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-12

    A detailed investigation into the performance of two flow injection-chemiluminescence (FI-CL) manifolds (with and without a preconcentration column) for the determination of sub-nanomolar dissolved iron (Fe(II) + Fe(III)), following the reduction of Fe(III) by sulphite, in seawater is described. Kinetic experiments were conducted to examine the efficiency of reduction of inorganic Fe(III) with sulphite under different conditions and a rigorous study of the potential interference caused by other transition metals present in seawater was conducted. Using 100 {mu}M concentrations of sulphite a reduction time of 4 h was sufficient to quantitatively reduce Fe(III) in seawater. Under optimal conditions, cobalt(II) and vanadium(IV)/(III) were the major positive interferences and strategies for their removal are reported. Specifically, cobalt(II) was masked by the addition of dimethylglyoxime to the luminol solution and vanadium(IV) was removed by passing the sample through an 8-hydroxyquinoline column in a low pH carrier stream. Manganese(II) also interfered by suppression of the CL response but this was not significant at typical open ocean concentrations.

  10. Investigations of effective porosity of till by means of a combined soil-moisture/density gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordberg, L.; Modig, S.

    1974-01-01

    Effective porosity and processes of saturation and dewatering in till have been investigated. The study was performed in undisturbed till columns, surrounded by ring-shaped excavations filled with sand. The procedure allowed for a raising and lowering of an artificial groundwater level in the till under controlled conditions, which in turn made possible controlled processes of saturation and dewatering. A combined gamma-neutron soil moisture /density gauge was used. The water content was recorded during a period in which water was added to a specially prepared, undisturbed in-situ soil column until a state of saturation was reached. This was followed by a period of induced dewatering by gravity drainage. The drainage was recorded until a steady state> approximately equalling field capacity, was approached (5-16 d). Water contents at saturation are assumed approximately to equal total porosity, having a range of 17.9-32.0% in the investigated till. The intensity of drainage was highest on the first day of dewatering and then diminished with time. A perfectly steady state was never reached. Therefore field capacity is used with indices, indicating the length of time of drainage. Consequently, effective porosity is qualified by the corresponding indices. After 15-16 days of gravity drainage, effective porosity was calculated to be on the average 7.4% at one test plot and 3.4% at another. The difference has been attributed to a corresponding difference in depth to the natural groundwater level; because of the method used a higher groundwater level and capillary fringe may have hampered the complete drainage, resulting in a relatively low value of effective porosity. The investigation is most likely to be applicable in water balance studies, groundwater discharge predictions and various construction and waste-water projects in moraine terrain. (author)

  11. Multidisciplinary Investigations Regarding the Wear of Machine Tools Operating Into the Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardei, P.; Vladutoiu, L. C.; Gheorghe, G.; Fechete, T. L. V.; Chisiu, G.

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents the results obtained by the authors in investigating the problem of wear of work organs of machines working in continuous interaction with the soil. The phenomenon of the interaction of the tools of agricultural machinery for ploughing, and the soil, is a complex of phenomena, one of the most difficult to model. Among the phenomena involved in this interaction, friction and wear (of many types) are the most important. We did not take into account the chemical wear, and by the wear caused by weather conditions. Research has focused on formulating a theory that has more than a descriptive character, for it be used for application purposes. For this we used classical theoretical models, mathematical models based on the theory of continuous bodies, theory of flow of fluids around the profiles, as well as other theories, approached or not, in an attempt to solve as satisfactorily the issue of the wear, for the tools of the agricultural machines for the tillage. We also sought to highlight the fact that wear is a phenomenon on a micro and macro-scale scale, and its generating causes must ultimately be related to observable effects, on the macro-structural scale.

  12. Investigation of the WISC-III and WASI in Clinical Child Populations: A Framework for Further Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Wayne C.; Austin, David W.; Reid, David S.

    2007-01-01

    To promote efficient clinical practice, interest has been growing in brief assessment scales to replace full-scale versions in some circumstances. In nonclinical populations, the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) has substituted for the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children--Third Edition (WISC-III). Agreement between these…

  13. Degradation of 14C-ETU in a soil profile investigated by means of incubation in two different incubation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bech, A.; Johannesen, H.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of the paper is to elucidate the mechanism of biodegradation of ethylenethiourea (ETU) in arable soils, both on the surface and in the deeper layers. The effect of incubation system upon the ETU biodegradation was studied by incubation of undisturbed and mixed soil cores in tubes or flasks respectively. The total mineralization of ETU to CO2 in the ploughed layer and in the deeper layers is investigated by means of biodegradation tests with 14 C-ETU in soil samples collected from 15, 60 and 100 cm depth. ETU microbial biodegradation was studied in a series of tests covering conversion and isolation of ETU degrading microorganisms. (EG) 86 refs

  14. Investigation of Tin and Molybdenum concentrations in the Soils in the southern part of the Silesian Upland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bureć-Drewniak W.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Majority of soils from the southern part of the Silesian Upland (Poland are highly degraded and contain elevated levels of heavy metals. Detailed studies, including dissemination, mobility and bioavailability have been conducted for most heavy metals, except tin and molybdenum. Therefore, the purpose of presented studies was evaluation of molybdenum and tin pollution and determination of their mobility and bioavailability in all soil types derived from the investigated area. A total of 9920 soil samples, including 5256 topsoil samples and 4664 subsoil samples were analyzed. Comparison of elements concentration between topsoil and subsoil allows identification of the source of pollution (natural or anthropogenic of tested elements.

  15. Molecular investigations into a globally important carbon pool: permafrost-protected carbon in Alaskan soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.P. Waldrop; K.P. Wickland; R. White; A.A. Berhe; J.W. Harden; V.E. Romanovsky

    2010-01-01

    The fate of carbon (C) contained within permafrost in boreal forest environments is an important consideration for the current and future carbon cycle as soils warm in northern latitudes. Currently, little is known about the microbiology or chemistry of permafrost soils that may affect its decomposition once soils thaw. We tested the hypothesis that low microbial...

  16. Investigation of some Macro and Micro Elements in Soil and Sugarcane Plant in Elguneid Scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassona, R K [Sudan Atomic Energy Commission, Khartoum (Sudan)

    1996-09-01

    The contents of some macro nutrients(N,Mg,P,K and Ca), micro nutrients(Mn,Fe,Cu,Zn and Mo) and other elements in sugarcane plant and soil samples in Elguneid scheme were evaluated in this study.During this study soil and plant samples were taken from different depths and different sites.Plant samples were collected from the same sites at 6 and 10 months age.The objectives of this work were to determine the nutrient contents of soil and sugarcane plant, to relate the nutrient contents of soil with that of plant and to compare the average elemental content of soil and plant with the available literature.To achieve the above mentioned goals,atomic absorption spectrometry(AAS), X-ray fluorescence,flame photometry,kjeldahl method and colorimetry were used for the elemental analysis of soil and plant samples. It was found that the elemental concentration decreases with soil depth increase.There were no seasonal variations in the elemental in soil and plant samples.The data obtained in this work for soil and plant samples were comparable to those reported in litreature in other areas.Using the elemental concentration ratios in soil and plant samples referred to the concentration of iron which is an indicator of soil as a source. The enrichment factor for some nutrients was calculated that N, P, and K have some sources other than soil, such as fertilizers and pesticides. (Author). 85 refs., 27 tabs., 20 figs.

  17. Investigation of some Macro and Micro Elements in Soil and Sugarcane Plant in Elguneid Scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassona, R.K.

    1996-09-01

    The contents of some macro nutrients(N,Mg,P,K and Ca), micro nutrients(Mn,Fe,Cu,Zn and Mo) and other elements in sugarcane plant and soil samples in Elguneid scheme were evaluated in this study.During this study soil and plant samples were taken from different depths and different sites.Plant samples were collected from the same sites at 6 and 10 months age.The objectives of this work were to determine the nutrient contents of soil and sugarcane plant, to relate the nutrient contents of soil with that of plant and to compare the average elemental content of soil and plant with the available literature.To achieve the above mentioned goals,atomic absorption spectrometry(AAS), X-ray fluorescence,flame photometry,kjeldahl method and colorimetry were used for the elemental analysis of soil and plant samples. It was found that the elemental concentration decreases with soil depth increase.There were no seasonal variations in the elemental in soil and plant samples.The data obtained in this work for soil and plant samples were comparable to those reported in litreature in other areas.Using the elemental concentration ratios in soil and plant samples referred to the concentration of iron which is an indicator of soil as a source. The enrichment factor for some nutrients was calculated that N, P, and K have some sources other than soil, such as fertilizers and pesticides. (Author)

  18. U.S. Geological Survey programs and investigations related to soil and water conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterkamp, W.R.; Gray, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has a rich tradition of collecting hydrologic data, especially for fluxes of water and suspended sediment, that provide a foundation for studies of soil and water conservation. Applied and basic research has included investigations of the effects of land use on rangelands, croplands, and forests; hazards mapping; derivation of flood and drought frequency, and other statistics related to streamflow and reservoir storage; development and application of models of rainfall-runoff relations, chemical quality, and sediment movement; and studies of the interactive processes of overland and channel flow with vegetation. Networks of streamgaging stations and (or) sampling sites within numerous drainage basins are yielding information that extends databases and enhances the ability to use those data for interpretive studies.

  19. Multidecadal persistence of organic matter in soils: insights from spatially resolved investigations at the submicrometer scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfalla, Suzanne; Barré, Pierre; Bernard, Sylvain; Le Guillou, Corentin; Alléon, Julien; Chenu, Claire

    2016-04-01

    Better understanding the mechanisms responsible for the pluri-decadal persistence of carbon in soils requires well constraining the dynamics, the distribution and the chemical nature of both the soil organic carbon (SOC) and the associated mineral phases. The question we address in this work is whether different mineral species lead to different organo-mineral interactions and stabilize different quantities of SOM and different types of SOC. Here, benefiting from the unique opportunity offered by an INRA long term bare fallow (LTBF) experiment having started in 1928 in Versailles (France), we report the in-situ characterization of SOC dynamics in four clay fractions of this silty loam soil (total clays [TC, clays [CC, 0.2-2μm], intermediate clays [IC, 0.05-0.2μm] and fine clays [FC, 0-0.05μm]). The IC and FC fractions only contain smectite and illite/smectite mixed-layered clay minerals while the CC fraction also contains illite and kaolinite. In the absence of any carbon input, the plant-free LTBF clay fractions from Versailles progressively lost SOC during the first 50 years of the experiment, until they reached a seemingly stable concentration. Of note, the investigated clay fractions did not lose the same amount of SOC and do not exhibit the same final carbon concentrations. The decrease of the organic C:N ratios with LTBF duration corresponds to a progressive enrichment in N-rich SOC for all fractions which can be attributed to microbial material. Even though the speciation of SOC appears to only slightly evolve with LTBF duration, an enrichment in carboxyl and carbonyl groups is revealed by bulk-scale C-NEXAFS data for SOC from all clay fractions. In addition, STXM-based NEXAFS investigations at the submicrometer scale reveal three types of SOC-clay assemblages in addition to clay-free SOC and organic-free clays. While SOC appears mostly adsorbed onto clay surfaces within the IC and FC fractions, other protection mechanisms occur within the CC fraction

  20. Experimental investigation of aluminum complexing with sodium ion and of gallium and iron (III) speciation in natural solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diakonov, Igor

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this work is to acquire thermodynamic data on the aqueous complexes forming between sodium and aluminum, gallium and hydroxide, and iron (III) and hydroxide. These data will provide for a better understanding of the transport and distribution of these elements in surface and hydrothermal fluids. Stability constants of the sodium-aluminate complex (Na Al(OH) 4 deg.) were obtained from boehmite solubility measurements at temperatures from 125 to 350 deg. C in alkaline solutions containing from 0.1 to 1 mol/L sodium. Complementary potentiometric measurements were performed with a sodium selective electrode, between 75 and 200 deg C (the potentiometric study was carried out by Gleb Pokrovski). Analyses of these data within the framework of the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) model allowed determination of the HKF parameters for Na Al(OH) 4 deg. and calculation of its thermodynamic properties to 800 deg. C and 5 kb. The results of this work show that Na Al(OH) 4 deg. complex formation increases significantly the solubility of aluminum-bearing minerals and consequently aluminum mobility in hydrothermal fluids. Gallium speciation in surface and hydrothermal fluids is dominated by the negatively charged species, Ga(OH) 4 - . The thermodynamic properties of this species were determined from of OEGaOOH solubility measurements as a function of pH and temperature from 25 to 250 deg. C. In general, the variation of gallium aqueous speciation with pH is similar to that of aluminum other than at temperatures less than 200 deg. C over the pH range 3 - 6. This difference can account for the independent behavior of gallium versus aluminum in numerous low temperature natural systems. The thermodynamic properties of Fe(OH) 3 deg. which dominates the speciation of Fe(III) in surface waters and Fe(OH) 4 - were determined from hematite solubility measurements as a function of pH, oxygen pressure and temperature from 110 to 300 deg. C. The available thermodynamic data on

  1. iSOIL: Interactions between soil related sciences - Linking geophysics, soil science and digital soil mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Peter; Werban, Ulrike; Sauer, Uta

    2010-05-01

    High-resolution soil property maps are one major prerequisite for the specific protection of soil functions and restoration of degraded soils as well as sustainable land use, water and environmental management. To generate such maps the combination of digital soil mapping approaches and remote as well as proximal soil sensing techniques is most promising. However, a feasible and reliable combination of these technologies for the investigation of large areas (e.g. catchments and landscapes) and the assessment of soil degradation threats is missing. Furthermore, there is insufficient dissemination of knowledge on digital soil mapping and proximal soil sensing in the scientific community, to relevant authorities as well as prospective users. As one consequence there is inadequate standardization of techniques. At the poster we present the EU collaborative project iSOIL within the 7th framework program of the European Commission. iSOIL focuses on improving fast and reliable mapping methods of soil properties, soil functions and soil degradation risks. This requires the improvement and integration of advanced soil sampling approaches, geophysical and spectroscopic measuring techniques, as well as pedometric and pedophysical approaches. The focus of the iSOIL project is to develop new and to improve existing strategies and innovative methods for generating accurate, high resolution soil property maps. At the same time the developments will reduce costs compared to traditional soil mapping. ISOIL tackles the challenges by the integration of three major components: (i)high resolution, non-destructive geophysical (e.g. Electromagnetic Induction EMI; Ground Penetrating Radar, GPR; magnetics, seismics) and spectroscopic (e.g., Near Surface Infrared, NIR) methods, (ii)Concepts of Digital Soil Mapping (DSM) and pedometrics as well as (iii)optimized soil sampling with respect to profound soil scientific and (geo)statistical strategies. A special focus of iSOIL lies on the

  2. Investigation of soil erosion in arable land in Hungary using radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezsoe, Z.; Szabo, Sz.

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative data on long-term soil erosion rates on agricultural land are an essential requirement for the development of effective soil management and conservation strategies. Although several methods to estimate soil erosion exist, the use of 137 Cs and/or 210 Pb as fallout radionuclides for tracing soil movement overcomes many of the limitations of the traditional methods. Recently, the 137 Cs-technique has been widely accepted and is now commonly used for estimating the magnitude of soil loss. Long-term migration of 137 Cs in the Buekkzserc-Cserepfalu-Bogacs triangle area, at the foot of Buekk mountain (NE Hungary) was studied. The samples were analysed for 137 Cs by gamma spectrometry, using a calibrated high-resolution, low background HPGe coaxial detector. Migration of fallout nuclides in an undisturbed stable soil reflects the influence of a range of physico-chemical and biological processes operating in the soil system. (N.T.)

  3. Mechanistic investigation of food effect on disintegration and dissolution of BCS class III compound solid formulations: the importance of viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Asma; Amidon, Gordon L; Langguth, Peter

    2012-10-01

    A negative food effect, i.e. a decrease in bioavailability upon the co-administration of compounds together with food, has been attributed particularly with high solubility/low permeability compounds (BCS class III). Different mechanisms have been proposed including intestinal dilution leading to a lower concentration gradient across the intestinal wall as well as binding of the active pharmaceutical ingredient to food components in the intestine and thereby decreasing the fraction of the dose available for absorption. These mechanisms refer primarily to the compound and not to the dosage form. An increase in viscosity of the dissolution fluid will in particular affect the absorption of BCS type III compounds with preferential absorption in the upper small intestine if the API release is delayed from the dosage form. The present study demonstrated that the increase in viscosity of the dissolution medium, following ingestion of a solid meal, may drastically reduce disintegration and dissolution. For that purpose the viscosity of the standard FDA meal was determined and simulated by solutions of HPMC in buffer. As model formulations, three commercially available tablets containing trospium chloride, a BCS class III m-cholinoreceptor antagonist was used. Trospium chloride drug products have been described to undergo a negative food effect of more than 80% following ingestion with food. The tablets showed prolonged disintegration times and reduced dissolution rates in viscous media, which could be attributed to changes in the liquid penetration rates. The effect was particularly significant for film-coated tablets relative to uncoated dosage forms. The results show the necessity of considering media viscosity when designing in vitro models of drug release for BCS type III drug formulations. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Investigating relations between environmental toxins in Northern Irish soils and streams and Chronic Kidney Disease prevalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Chloe E.; McKinley, Jennifer M.; Ofterdinger, Ulrich; Fogarty, Damian; Atkinson, Peter M.; Palmer, Sherry

    2016-01-01

    The unknown aetiology of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) has attracted recent attention as a result of the increasing global prevalence and recent reviews of occupational and environmental exposure to nephrotoxins. The main focus of this research is to examine the potential relationship between environmental exposure to known nephrotoxins including arsenic, cadmium and lead and the potential health risk associated with the progressive dysfunction of the kidneys in renal impaired patients with CKD across Northern Ireland. In addition to these known nephrotoxins, co-abundance with several essential elements has been found to play a role as protecting mechanisms while others increase the uptake of nephrotoxic elements as a result of similar absorption mechanisms within the body. Key elements protecting the body from toxicity include selenium and zinc, whereas those which have been attributed to enhance the uptake of arsenic, cadmium and lead include iron and calcium. The compositional nature of the soil and stream geochemical data is explored to aid in the analysis of interactions between elements. Two approaches, one data-driven and the other knowledge-driven, are explored to investigate the associations between co-abundant elements. The bioaccessibility of these elements, which is the portion of the relevant toxin absorbed within the body, is also investigated to identify areas across Northern Ireland with an increased environmental hazard and potential health risk. The study uses a combination of datasets from the United Kingdom Renal Registry (UKRR) unknown aetiology subset, the soil and stream geochemical dataset from the Tellus Survey (GSNI) with the addition of a bioaccessibility subset. Findings suggest a relationship between the presence of elevated arsenic in stream waters and impaired renal function of the kidneys. Interactions between essential elements and potentially toxic elements could explain the regional variation of CKD of uncertain aetiology across

  5. INVESTIGATION OF STRAIN STATE OF BASE OF THE FRAGMENT’S MODEL OF THE PILE FOUNDATION DURING STAGED LOADING OF ITS ELEMENTS IN THE SOIL TANK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEDIN V. L.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Purpose. Changes of stress strain state of the fragment’s model of the pile foundation’s base depending on load sequence change should be investigated. Methodology. There are laboratory three test runs of the fragment’s model of the pile foundation carried out at the soil tank, unlike staged of loading and square of weight square on the soil under the plate raft with the including of pile. Results. There are laboratory confirmations of change of strain-stress state of pile foundation base depending on its elements’ load sequence change and confirmations of the influence of piles preloading on their settlement reduction. Originality. Carried out series of tests under the spatial invert with step-by-step loading of model elements of pile foundation fragments (the II and III test runs showed that such sequence of foundation load allows it to take heavier loads under the condition of the same values of settlement. The model of pile foundation’s fragment with additional loading of pile (III test run showed that such sequence of foundation load allows it to take heavier loads in comparison to the I test run. Practical value. Upon condition of staged including of all elements of the pile foundation, prestressed strain state (additional skin frictions, around the model of the pile, at some point, which facilitates the movement of the pile’s model, not connected with the plate. There are laboratory confirmations of dependencies that the more the weight square under the plate is, the greater the displacement of pile’s fragment. This effect can be useful for preloading piles in the real building, and to help align the piles' settling within the limits of the pile field, before the transfer of operational loads.

  6. An Investigation into the Effects of Temperature Gradient on the Soil Water–Salt Transfer with Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Ren

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Temperature gradients exist in the field under brackish water irrigation conditions, especially in northern semi–arid areas of China. Although there are many investigators dedicated to studying the mechanism of brackish water irrigation and the effect of brackish water irrigation on crops, there are fewer investigations of the effects of temperature gradient on the water–salt transport. Based on the combination of a physical experiment and a mathematical model, this study was conducted to: (a build a physical model and observe the redistribution of soil water–heat–salt transfer; (b develop a mathematical model focused on the influence of a temperature gradient on soil water and salt redistribution based on the physical model and validate the proposed model using the measured data; and (c analyze the effects of the temperature gradient on the soil water–salt transport by comparing the proposed model with the traditional water–salt model in which the effects of temperature gradient on the soil water–salt transfer are neglected. Results show that the soil temperature gradient has a definite influence on the soil water–salt migration. Moreover, the effect of temperature gradient on salt migration was greater than that of water movement.

  7. Investigation of the binding of tiron to uranium(IV) and uranium(VI) found in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birnbaum, E.R.; Iams, H.D.; del Rio Garcia, M.; Ford, D.K.; Smith, P.H.; Strietelmeier, B.; Brainard, J.

    1993-01-01

    The authors are investigating the utility of a chelate-reductant system to extract uranium from 2 million yards of contaminated soil at the Fernald uranium reprocessing plant near Cincinnati, Ohio. It has been found that reduction of the uranyl contaminants using Tiron as the ligand. Of concern is whether the increased mobilization is simply a result of the higher affinity of Tiron to U(IV), or whether reduction of amorphous iron oxides contained in the soil is exposing greater amounts of uranyl ions to the ligand. It is important to establish if the latter mechanism is occurring, since a removal process which does not damage the soil is desired. Potentiometric and spectrophotometric studies of Tiron binding to soluble uranyl and U(V) salts will be presented as models to help understand the soil studies. Extraction behavior of UO 2 (OH) 2 will also be presented

  8. Remote sensing investigations of fugitive soil arsenic and its effects on vegetation reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonecker, E. Terrence

    2007-12-01

    Three different remote sensing technologies were evaluated in support of the remediation of fugitive arsenic and other hazardous waste-related risks to human and ecological health at the Spring Valley Formerly Used Defense Site in northwest Washington D.C., an area of widespread soil arsenic contamination as a result of World War I research and development of chemical weapons. The first evaluation involved the value of information derived from the interpretation of historical aerial photographs. Historical aerial photographs dating back as far as 1918 provided a wealth of information about chemical weapons testing, storage, handling and disposal of these hazardous materials. When analyzed by a trained photo-analyst, the 1918 aerial photographs resulted in 42 features of potential interest. When compared with current remedial activities and known areas of contamination, 33 of 42 or 78.5 % of the features were spatially correlated with current areas of contamination or remedial activity. The second investigation involved the phytoremediation of arsenic through the use of Pteris ferns and the evaluation of the spectral properties of these ferns. Three hundred ferns were grown in controlled laboratory conditions in soils amended with five levels (0, 20, 50, 100 and 200 parts per million) of sodium arsenate. After 20 weeks, the Pteris ferns were shown to have an average uptake concentration of over 4,000 parts per million each. Additionally, statistical analysis of the spectral signature from each fern showed that the frond arsenic concentration could be reasonably predicted with a linear model when the concentration was equal or greater than 500 parts per million. Third, hyperspectral imagery of Spring Valley was obtained and analyzed with a suite of spectral analysis software tools. Results showed the grasses growing in areas of known high soil arsenic could be identified and mapped at an approximate 85% level of accuracy when the hyperspectral image was processed

  9. Investigation of Cd Adsorption and Accumulation from Contaminated Soil in Different Parts of Root Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Yargholi

    2010-01-01

        Environmental pollution with heavy metals and their absorption by plants form a universal problem around the world. Numerous investigations have been conducted to put wastewaters containing heavy metals to agricultural reuse. Little is known, however, about the absorption of cadmium in the root zone and its accumulation in the different organs of crops, particularly in root crops. This study was carried out to investigate the influence of different levels of Cd concentration in the root zone on the accumulation rate in various parts of four different types of common root crops in karaj Iran. The experiment was performed in a factorial testing plan in random blocks and in four treatments with three replicates. The treatments included four levels of Cd concentration in soil (50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg, 50 mg/kg, control without Cd addition and water with 0.5 molar of EDTA. The soil used in this study was prepared by passing through a sieve with a 2mm mesh and adding Nitrate Cadmium (Cd(NO32. Cylinder plastic vases 40 Cm in diameter and 60 cm high were employed to cultivate vegetables. Water demandwas estimated via the Penman-Mantith method, in which Kc was calculated by means of recorded data at Meshgin-Abad synoptic station in Karaj. At the end of the growing season, samples were taken from different organs of the plants to measure Cadmium accumulation. The SPSS software was used for the variance analysis of the collected data. The Dunkan test (at 0.01 and 0.05 levels was then used to evaluate averages of the specifications in the factorial testing levels. The results indicate a direct relationship between Cd concentration in the root zone and Cd accumulation in plant organs. Adding 0.5 molar of EDTA to the irrigation water caused Cd accumulation in plant organs to exceed 60 percent. The results also show that Cd concentration, except for the control, was in excess of the limit for human consumption and that its accumulation levels in the different species tested

  10. The investigation of the possibility for using some wild and cultivated plants as hyperaccumulators of heavy metals from contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maric, Miroslava; Antonijevic, Milan; Alagic, Sladjana

    2013-02-01

    The copper production in Bor (East Serbia) during the last 100 years presents an important source of the pollution of environment. Dust, waste waters, tailing, and air pollutants influence the quality of soil, water, and air. Over 2,000 ha of fertile soil have been damaged by the flotation tailing from Bor's facilities. The goal of the present work has been to determine the content of Pb, Cu, and Fe in wild plants (17 species) naturally growing in the damaged soil and in fodder crops (nine species) planted at the same place. The content of Pb, Cu, and Fe has been analyzed in damaged soil as well. This study has also searched for native (wild) and cultivated plants which are able to grow in contaminated soil in the area of the intense industrial activity of copper production in Bor, which means that they can accumulate and tolerate heavy metals in their above-ground tissues. It has been found out that the content of all metals in contaminated soil decreases considerably at the end of the experiment. As it has been expected, all plant species could accumulate investigated metals. All tested plants, both wild-growing and cultivated plants, seem to be quite healthy on the substrate which contained extremely high concentrations of copper.

  11. Investigation of Influence Zones Induced by Shallow Tunnelling in Soft Soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vu Minh, N.; Broere, W.; Bosch, J.W.

    2017-01-01

    The extent of the influence zone affected by shallow tunnelling depends on the value of volume loss which normally represents the amount of over-excavation and stress changes induced in the soil. This paper combines upper and lower estimates of volume loss for different soft soils and

  12. Advancing investigation and physical modeling of first-order fire effects on soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    William J. Massman; John M. Frank; Sacha J. Mooney

    2010-01-01

    Heating soil during intense wildland fires or slash-pile burns can alter the soil irreversibly, resulting in many significant long-term biological, chemical, physical, and hydrological effects. To better understand these long-term effects, it is necessary to improve modeling capability and prediction of the more immediate, or first-order, effects that fire can have on...

  13. Use of Carbon Isotopic Tracers in Investigating Soil Carbon Sequestration and Stabilization in Agroecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-09-01

    The global surface temperatures have been reported to increase at an average rate of 0.06 C (0.11 F) per decade. This observed climate change known as the greenhouse effect is attributed to the emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs), including carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere, resulting in trapping the heat near the earth’s surface causing global warming. World soils are the largest reservoir of terrestrial carbon and that soils are a source or sink of GHGs depending on land use management. Recognizing the urgent need to address the soil organic matter constraints for a sustainable agricultural production to ensure food security, this publication provides an integrated view on conventional and isotopic methods of measuring and modelling soil carbon dynamics, and the use nuclear and radioisotope tracer techniques in in-situ glasshouse and field labelling techniques to assess soil organic matter turnover and sequestration.

  14. On the origin of some red soils from Sardinia (Italy). A neutron activation analysis investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genova, N.; Meloni, S.; Oddone, M.; Pavia Univ.; Melis, P.

    2001-01-01

    In Sardinia, the Italian island in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, there are many red soils developed on limestone or dolomite. Soil and underlying bedrock samples from 5 different sites have been submitted to chemical and mineralogical characterization, by using standard X-ray diffraction analysis, spectrochemical methods and instrumental neutron activation analysis. Obtained results are presented and discussed in terms of precision and accuracy. Trace element concentration variation with depth is discussed as well as the enrichment/depletion ratios between soils and rocks, and the rare-earth element distribution. Data analysis suggests for some soils a formation process based on the evolution of the underlying bedrock, and for the other soils a formation process partly based on the evolution of the local rock but with meaningful contributions of external sources, both eolian and/or alluvial. (author)

  15. Synthesis, Crystal Structures, Magnetic Properties, and Theoretical Investigation of a New Series of NiII-LnIII-WV Heterotrimetallics: Understanding the SMM Behavior of Mixed Polynuclear Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieru, Veacheslav; Pasatoiu, Traian D; Ungur, Liviu; Suturina, Elizaveta; Madalan, Augustin M; Duhayon, Carine; Sutter, Jean-Pascal; Andruh, Marius; Chibotaru, Liviu F

    2016-12-05

    The polynuclear compounds containing anisotropic metal ions often exhibit efficient barriers for blocking of magnetization at fairly arbitrary geometries. However, at variance with mononuclear complexes, which usually become single-molecule magnets (SMM) under the sole requirement of a highly axial crystal field at the metal ion, the factors influencing the SMM behavior in polynuclear complexes, especially, with weakly axial magnetic ions, still remain largely unrevealed. As an attempt to clarify these conditions, we present here the synthesis, crystal structures, magnetic behavior, and ab initio calculations for a new series of Ni II -Ln III -W V trimetallics, [(CN) 7 W(CN)Ni(H 2 O)(valpn)Ln(H 2 O) 4 ]·H 2 O (Ln = Y 1, Eu 2, Gd 3, Tb 4, Dy 5, Lu 6). The surprising finding is the absence of the magnetic blockage even for compounds involving strongly anisotropic Dy III and Tb III metal ions. This is well explained by ab initio calculations showing relatively large transversal components of the g-tensor in the ground exchange Kramers doublets of 1 and 4 and large intrinsic tunneling gaps in the ground exchange doublets of 3 and 5. In order to get more insight into this behavior, another series of earlier reported compounds with the same trinuclear [W V Ni II Ln III ] core structure, [(CN) 7 W(CN)Ni(dmf)(valdmpn)Ln(dmf) 4 ]·H 2 O (Ln = Gd III 7, Tb III 8a, Dy III 9, Ho III 10), [(CN) 7 W(CN)Ni(H 2 O)(valdmpn)Tb(dmf) 2.5 (H 2 O) 1.5 ]·H 2 O·0.5dmf 8b, and [(CN) 7 W(CN)Ni(H 2 O)(valdmpn)Er(dmf) 3 (H 2 O) 1 ]·H 2 O·0.5dmf 11, has been also investigated theoretically. In this series, only 8b exhibits SMM behavior which is confirmed by the present ab initio calculations. An important feature for the entire series is the strong ferromagnetic coupling between Ni(II) and W(V), which is due to an almost perfect trigonal dodecahedron geometry of the octacyano wolframate fragment. The reason why only 8b is an SMM is explained by positive zero-field splitting on the nickel

  16. Synchrotron-based micro and nanotomographic investigations of soil aggregate microbial and pore structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemner, K. M.; O'Brien, S.; Whiteside, M. D.; Sholto-Douglas, D.; Antipova, O.; Bailey, V.; Boyanov, M.; Dohnalkova, A.; Gursoy, D.; Kovarik, L.; Lai, B.; Roehrig, C.; Vogt, S.

    2017-12-01

    Soil is a highly complex network of pore spaces, minerals, and organic matter (e.g., roots, fungi, and bacteria), making it physically heterogeneous over nano- to macro-scales. Such complexity arises from feedbacks between physical processes and biological activity that generate a dynamic, self-organizing 3D complex. Since we first demonstrated the utility of synchrotron-based transmission tomography to image internal soil aggregate structure [Kemner et al., 1998], we and many other researchers have made use of and have advanced the application of this technique. However, our understanding of how microbes and microbial metabolism are distributed throughout soil aggregates is limited, because no technique is available to image the soil pore network and the life that inhabits it. X-ray transmission microtomography can provide highly detailed 3D renderings of soil structure but cannot distinguish cells from other electron-light material such as air or water. However, the use of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) as a reporter of bacterial presence enables us to overcome this constraint, instilling bacterial cells with enough contrast to detect them and their metabolic functions in their opaque soil habitat, with hard x-rays capable of penetrating 3D soil structures at high resolution. Previous transmission tomographic imaging of soil aggregates with high energy synchrotron x-rays has demonstrated 700 nm3 voxel spatial resolution. These and recent results from nanotomographic x-ray transmission imaging of soil aggregates with 30 nm3 voxel resolution will be presented. In addition, results of submicron voxel-sized x-ray fluorescence 3D imaging to determine microbial distributions within soil aggregates and the critical role to be played by the upgrade of the Advanced Photon Source for 100-1000X increases in hard x-ray brilliance will also be presented. *Kemner, et al., SPIE 3449, 45-53, 1998

  17. A lysimeter experiment to investigate the leaching of veterinary antibiotics through a clay soil and comparison with field data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Paul [Cranfield Centre for EcoChemistry, Cranfield University, Shardlow Hall, Shardlow, Derby DE72 2GN (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: paul.kay@adas.co.uk; Blackwell, Paul A. [Cranfield Centre for EcoChemistry, Cranfield University, Shardlow Hall, Shardlow, Derby DE72 2GN (United Kingdom); Boxall, Alistair B.A. [Cranfield Centre for EcoChemistry, Cranfield University, Shardlow Hall, Shardlow, Derby DE72 2GN (United Kingdom)

    2005-03-01

    Pharmaceuticals used in livestock production may be present in manure and slurry as the parent compound and/or metabolites. The environment may therefore be exposed to these substances due to the application of organic fertilisers to agricultural land or deposition by grazing livestock. For other groups of substances that are applied to land (e.g. pesticides), preferential flow in clay soils has been identified as an extremely important mechanism by which surface water pollution can occur. This lysimeter study was therefore performed to investigate the fate of three antibiotics from the sulphonamide, tetracycline and macrolide groups in a clay soil. Only sulphachloropyridazine was detected in leachate and soil analysis at the end of the experiment showed that almost no antibiotic residues remained. These data were analysed alongside field data for the same compounds to show that soil tillage which breaks the connectivity of macropores formed over the summer months, prior to slurry application, significantly reduces chemical mobility. - This paper describes one of the first studies to investigate the fate of veterinary medicines in cracking clay soils.

  18. A lysimeter experiment to investigate the leaching of veterinary antibiotics through a clay soil and comparison with field data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, Paul; Blackwell, Paul A.; Boxall, Alistair B.A.

    2005-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals used in livestock production may be present in manure and slurry as the parent compound and/or metabolites. The environment may therefore be exposed to these substances due to the application of organic fertilisers to agricultural land or deposition by grazing livestock. For other groups of substances that are applied to land (e.g. pesticides), preferential flow in clay soils has been identified as an extremely important mechanism by which surface water pollution can occur. This lysimeter study was therefore performed to investigate the fate of three antibiotics from the sulphonamide, tetracycline and macrolide groups in a clay soil. Only sulphachloropyridazine was detected in leachate and soil analysis at the end of the experiment showed that almost no antibiotic residues remained. These data were analysed alongside field data for the same compounds to show that soil tillage which breaks the connectivity of macropores formed over the summer months, prior to slurry application, significantly reduces chemical mobility. - This paper describes one of the first studies to investigate the fate of veterinary medicines in cracking clay soils

  19. An investigation of the speciation of radionuclides in sediments and soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.B.; Stanney, K.A.; Williams, G.A.

    1981-08-01

    A sequential chemical extraction procedure has been used to investigate the speciation of the radionuclides 210 Pb and 226 Ra in three soil and sediment samples from the Mt. Brockman area in the Northern Territory. The analyses, by γ-ray spectrometry, are in terms of those species that are exchangeable, bound to carbonates, bound to iron or manganese oxides, bound to organic matter, and tightly bound in the crystal lattices of various minerals. The results for the radionuclides indicate significant differences between 210 Pb and 226 Ra in their distribution among the fractions, with very little 226 Ra present in all residual fractions. Very low concentrations of both radionuclides were present in the fractions representing species bound to carbonates, with 226 Ra concentrations greater that 210 Pb. Where the iron content of the sample is high, and in the form of iron oxides, both radionuclides are associated largely with the iron oxide phase. The fraction representing species bound to organic matter contained relatively high concentrations of both radionuclides in all samples

  20. Magnetic anisotropy of dysprosium(III) in a low-symmetry environment: a theoretical and experimental investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernot, Kevin; Luzon, Javier; Bogani, Lapo; Etienne, Mael; Sangregorio, Claudio; Shanmugam, Muralidharan; Caneschi, Andrea; Sessoli, Roberta; Gatteschi, Dante

    2009-04-22

    A mixed theoretical and experimental approach was used to determine the local magnetic anisotropy of the dysprosium(III) ion in a low-symmetry environment. The susceptibility tensor of the monomeric species having the formula [Dy(hfac)(3)(NIT-C(6)H(4)-OEt)(2)], which contains nitronyl nitroxide (NIT-R) radicals, was determined at various temperatures through angle-resolved magnetometry. These results are in agreement with ab initio calculations performed using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method, validating the predictive power of this theoretical approach for complex systems containing rare-earth ions, even in low-symmetry environments. Susceptibility measurements performed with the applied field along the easy axis eventually permitted a detailed analysis of the temperature and field dependence of the magnetization, providing evidence that the Dy ion transmits an antiferromagnetic interaction between radicals but that the Dy-radical interaction is ferromagnetic.

  1. Determinants of risk factor control in subjects with coronary heart disease : a report from the EUROASPIRE III investigators.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooney, Marie Therese

    2012-04-18

    The EUROASPIRE audits of risk factor control have indicated that, even in those with established coronary heart disease, risk factor control remains poor. We therefore analysed the EUROASPRE III data set to establish the factors associated with success or failure in risk factor control in order to inform future risk factor management strategies. University education, attendance at a specialist cardiology clinic, and participation in a cardiac rehabilitation programme were associated with improved risk factor control. Risk factor control was poorer in women, those with diabetes, and those undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery as opposed to medical therapy or percutaneous coronary intervention. Increasing age, depression, and anxiety were not associated with poorer risk factor control.

  2. Investigation of synthesized new vanadium(III) complexes of ditolyldithiophosphate ligands by spectroscopic, cyclic voltammetric, DFT, antimicrobial and cytotoxic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Syed, Atiya; Andotra, Savit; Kaur, Ramanpreet; Vikas; Pandey, Sushil K.

    2018-02-01

    Vanadium(III) complexes with sulfur donor dithiophosphate ligands corresponding to [{(ArO)2PS2}3V] and [{(ArO)2PS2}2VCl.L] (Ar = o-, m-, p-CH3C6H4 and p-Cl-m-CH3C6H3; L = NC5H5, P(C6H5)3, have been synthesized and characterized by various physico-chemical techniques like elemental analyses, magnetic studies, ESI-Mass, IR, UV and heteronuclear NMR (1H, 13C and 31P) spectral studies. These analyses have contributed to the prediction of structure: by exhibiting significant v(P-S) and v(Pdbnd S) band shifting in comparative IR spectra; shifting of resonance signal in comparative 31P NMR spectra of ligands and complexes and stability of V(III) ion in the complexed state is confirmed by magnetic and UV studies. Therefore, the six coordinated geometry stabilizing the trivalent vanadium atom in the complexes and adducts, respectively has been confirmed. The cyclic voltammetric analyses presented the redox aptitude of the complex under analysis which can be utilized as catalyst in organic synthesis. The geometry of ligands and complexes has been optimized using density functional theory (DFT). The structural parameters, vibrational bands and energy gaps of frontier orbitals (HOMO-LUMO) have also been calculated. The calculated geometric and spectral results reproduced the experimental data with well agreement. The DFT computed frontier molecular orbitals (HOMO-LUMO) and their energies suggest charge transfer occurs within the complexes. Antimicrobial screening of the complexes against two bacterial strains: Gram-positive, Enterrococcus faecalis and Gram-negative, Eischerichia coli and fungus Fusarium oxysporum have shown potential bioactivity. A preliminary cytotoxic analysis has been carried out using the cultivated human cell lines: lung adeno carcinoma cell line A-549, leukemia cell line THP-1, prostate cancer cell line PC3 and colorectal cancer cell line HCT-116.

  3. Investigating the impact of temporal and spatial variation in spring snow melt on summer soil respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, G. P.; Papuga, S. A.; Wright, C. L.; Nelson, K.; Barron-Gafford, G. A.

    2010-12-01

    While soil respiration - the flux of carbon dioxide from the soil surface to the atmosphere - is the second largest terrestrial carbon flux, it is the least well constrained component of the terrestrial carbon cycle. This is in part because of its high variability in space and time that can become amplified under certain environmental conditions. Under current climate change scenarios, both summer and winter precipitation are expected to be altered in terrestrial ecosystems of the southwestern US. Precipitation magnitude and intensity influence soil moisture, which is a key control on ecosystem-scale respiration rates. Therefore understanding how changes in snow and rainfall translate to changes in soil moisture is critical to understanding climate change impacts on soil respiration processes. Our study took place within the footprint of a semiarid mixed-conifer flux measurement system on Mount Bigelow just north of Tucson, AZ. We analyzed images from three understory phenology cameras (pheno-cams) to identify areas that represented early and late snowmelt. Within the field of view of each of the three pheno-cams we established three early-melt and three late-melt soil respiration measurement “sites”. To understand the persistence of snowmelt conditions on summer soil respiration, we measured soil respiration, soil moisture, and soil temperature at all six sites on four days representing different summer periods (i.e. pre-monsoon, early monsoon, mid-monsoon, and late monsoon). Throughout the entire study period, at both early- and late-melt sites soil respiration was strongly correlated with amount of soil moisture, and was less responsive to temperature. Soil respiration generally increased throughout the rainy season, peaking by mid-monsoon at both early- and late-melt sites. Interestingly, early-melt sites were wetter than late-melt sites following rainfall occurring in the pre- and early monsoon. However, following rainfall occurring in the mid- to late

  4. Investigation about the efficiency of the bioaugmentation technique when applied to diesel oil contaminated soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Pinto Mariano

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This work investigated the efficiency of the bioaugmentation technique when applied to diesel oil contaminated soils collected at three service stations. Batch biodegradation experiments were carried out in Bartha biometer flasks (250 mL used to measure the microbial CO2 production. Biodegradation efficiency was also measured by quantifying the concentration of hydrocarbons. In addition to the biodegradation experiments, the capability of the studied cultures and the native microorganisms to biodegrade the diesel oil purchased from a local service station, was verified using a technique based on the redox indicator 2,6 -dichlorophenol indophenol (DCPIP. Results obtained with this test showed that the inocula used in the biodegradation experiments were able to degrade the diesel oil and the tests carried out with the native microorganisms indicated that these soils had a microbiota adapted to degrade the hydrocarbons. In general, no gain was obtained with the addition of microorganisms or even negative effects were observed in the biodegradation experiments.Este trabalho investigou a eficiência da técnica do bioaumento quando aplicada a solos contaminados com óleo diesel coletados em três postos de combustíveis. Experimentos de biodegradação foram realizados em frascos de Bartha (250 mL, usados para medir a produção microbiana de CO2. A eficiência de biodegradação também foi quantificada pela concentração de hidrocarbonetos. Conjuntamente aos experimentos de biodegradação, a capacidade das culturas estudadas e dos microrganismos nativos em biodegradar óleo diesel comprado de um posto de combustíveis local, foi verificada utilizando-se a técnica baseada no indicador redox 2,6 - diclorofenol indofenol (DCPIP. Resultados obtidos com esse teste mostraram que os inóculos empregados nos experimentos de biodegradação foram capazes de biodegradar óleo diesel e os testes com os microrganismos nativos indicaram que estes solos

  5. Numerical investigation of soil and buried structures using finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Shirzad Shahrivar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Today the important of studying soil effect on behavior of soil  contacted structures such as foundations, piles,  retaining wall and other similar structures is so much that neglecting of soil-structure interaction effect can cause to untrue results. In this paper soil-structure interaction simulation was done by using Finite element method analysis with ABAQUS version 6.13-14.The results has been presented based on pile function in contact with soil, vertical stresses in soil and structures, pore pressure in drained and undrained condition and underground water level.Final conclusions revealed that pore pressure effect is not uniform on all parts of pile and amount of pore pressure increment in top elements is lower than down elements of  pile.Further it was proven that average amount of vertical stress on end of pile is    of this stress on top of the pile. thus it was concluded that 70% of pile bearing capacity is depend on friction of soil and pile contact surface.

  6. Investigation of biological destruction of benzo[a]pyrene andpolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of biochar in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunev, R. V.; Smirnova, E. V.; Sharipova, A. R.; Gilmutdinova, I. M.; Giniyatullin, K. G.

    2018-01-01

    The biological decomposition of benzo[a]pyrene in the concentrations exceeding the MAC (maximum permissible concentration) level in soils by 2, 5 and 10 times was studied in laboratory conditions. The gray forest soil samples were contaminated with benzo[a]pyrene and incubated in optimum for bacterial growth soil moisture for 30 and 60 days. The residual amount of contaminant was monitored by HPLC after extraction with acetone-cyclohexane (2:1). Soil microbial activity was evaluated by measuring basal respiration (BR) and substrate-induced respiration (SID) rates of the soil by gas chromatography. The results of the experiment showed that in 60 days the amount of benzo[a]pyrene in contaminated soils decreased; however, this time was not enough for complete decomposition of pollutant. In this case, benzo[a]pyrene has a negative effect on the BR and SIR rates. Soil contamination affected the BR rate only at high doses (10 MPC), whereas the SIR was a more sensitive indicator of the toxic effect of the pollutant and significantly reacts already at concentrations at the level of 2 MPC. The combination of PAHs isolated from biochar has a strong negative effect on the values of BR and SIR.

  7. Theoretical investigation of inclusion complex formation of Gold (III – Dimethyldithiocarbamate anticancer agents with cucurbit[n = 5,6]urils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabiollah Mahdavifar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gold (III-N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamate [DMDT(AuX2] complexes have recently gained increasing attention as potential anticancer agents because of their strong tumor cell growth–inhibitory effects, generally achieved by exploiting non-cisplatin-like mechanisms of action. The goal of our research work is to encapsulate the gold(III dimethyldithiocarbamate complexes as anticancer with cucurbit[n]urils (CB[n = 5, 6] by accurate calculations, to predict the inclusion complex formation of gold(III species with cucurbiturils (CB[n = 5, 6]. The calculations were carried out just for the 1:1 stoichiometric complexes. Upon encapsulation, binding energy, thermodynamic parameters, structural parameters and electronic structures of complexes are investigated. The results of the thermodynamic calculations and the binding energy show that the inclusion process is exothermic and the CB[6]/[DMDT(AuBr2] complex is more stable than other complexes. The final geometry of CB[n]/drugs indicates that the drugs were expelled from the cavity of CB[n]. NBO calculations reveal that the hydrogen bonding between CB[n] and drugs and electrostatic interactions are the major factors contributing to the overall stabilities of the complexes.

  8. Investigation of the Stress Intensity Limits of ASME Section III Div.5 for Structure Design Criteria of SFR Fuel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Jin-Yup; Kim, Hyung-Kyu; Cheon, Jin-Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    These affect the mechanical design of the fuel assembly components. And thus, appropriate structural design criteria should also be chosen to incorporate the specific design conditions of the SFR fuel assemblies. Among them, the temperature is one of the most crucial conditions to be concerned because the sodium coolant temperature is normally more than 500ºC which is much higher than that of the LWR (< 350ºC). This implies that a thermal creep should be significantly considered in the SFR fuel assembly mechanical design. In addition to the high temperature condition, an irradiation swelling is also an important behavior that the SFR fuel assembly material should accommodate. To incorporate the temperature and irradiation impacts, the material of the fuel assembly components is presently determined to be made of HT-9, the ferriticmartensitic steel. In this paper, the ASME Sec. III Div. 5 (referred to as ‘Div. 5’ hereinafter), which was developed for a ‘high temperature reactor’, is considered as one of the structural design criteria for the mechanical design of SFR fuel assemblies. In this paper, the stress intensity limits, S{sub m} and S{sub t} of HT-9 were built for the structural criteria of an SFR fuel assembly. S{sub m} is obtained from the ultimate strength. As for S{sub t}, it is more complicated because of its dependency of time duration in addition to temperature. Following the definition of S{sub mt}, the method in the ASME Sec. III Div. 1, Subsec. NH was consulted. We found that the Sm is adopted as S{sub mt} under the temperature about 470ºC which is relatively low temperature range and over 470ºC with relatively short time duration as 1000 hours. And the S{sub t} is adopted as Smt at over 470ºC and long time duration over 34800 hours, and over 520ºC and 10{sup 4} hours too. And at over 570ºC and 1000 hours, and at over 630ºC and 100 hours, S{sub t} is also adopted for S{sub mt}.

  9. Using 13C-labeled benzene and Raman gas spectroscopy to investigate respiration and biodegradation kinetics following soil contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochum, Tobias; Popp, Juergen; Frosch, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    Soil and groundwater contamination with benzene can cause serious environmental damages. However, many soil microorganisms are capable to adapt and known to strongly control the fate of organic contamination. Cavity enhanced Raman gas spectroscopy (CERS) was applied to investigate the short-term response of indigenous soil bacteria to a sudden surface contamination with benzene regarding the temporal variations of gas products and their exchange rates with the adjacent atmosphere. 13C-labeled benzene was spiked on a silty-loamy soil column (sampled from Hainich National Park, Germany) in order to track and separate the changes in heterotrophic soil respiration - involving 12CO2 and O2 - from the microbial process of benzene degradation, which ultimately forms 13CO2.1 The respiratory quotient (RQ) of 0.98 decreased significantly after the spiking and increased again within 33 hours to a value of 0.72. This coincided with maximum 13CO2 concentration rates (0.63 μ mol m-2 s-1), indicating highest benzene degradation at 33 hours after the spiking event. The diffusion of benzene in the headspace and the biodegradation into 13CO2 were simultaneously monitored and 12 days after the benzene spiking no measurable degradation was detected anymore.1 The RQ finally returned to a value of 0.96 demonstrating the reestablished aerobic respiration. In summary, this study shows the potential of combining Raman gas spectroscopy and stable isotopes to follow soil microbial biodegradation dynamics while simultaneously monitoring the underlying respiration behavior. Support by the Collaborative Research Center 1076 Aqua Diva is kindly acknowledged. We thank Beate Michalzik for soil analysis and discussion. 1. T. Jochum, B. Michalzik, A. Bachmann, J. Popp and T. Frosch, Analyst, 2015, 140, 3143-3149.

  10. Chromate Adsorption on Selected Soil Minerals: Surface Complexation Modeling Coupled with Spectroscopic Investigation.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veselská, V.; Fajgar, Radek; Číhalová, S.; Bolanz, R.M.; Göttlicher, J.; Steininger, R.; Siddique, J.A.; Komárek, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 318, NOV 15 (2016), s. 433-442 ISSN 0304-3894 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : surface complexation modeling * chromate * soil minerals Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.065, year: 2016

  11. 300-FF-1 operable unit remedial investigation phase II report: Physical separation of soils treatability study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    This report describes the approach and results of physical separations treatability tests conducted at the Hanford Site in the North Process Pond of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. Physical separation of soils was identified as a remediation alternative due to the potential to significantly reduce the amount of contaminated soils prior to disposal. Tests were conducted using a system developed at Hanford consisting of modified EPA equipment integrated with screens, hoppers, conveyors, tanks, and pumps from the Hanford Site. The treatability tests discussed in this report consisted of four parts, in which an estimated 84 tons of soil was processed: (1) a pre-test run to set up the system and adjust system parameters for soils to be processed; (2) a baseline run to establish the performance of the system - Test No. 1; (3) a final run in which the system was modified as a result of findings from the baseline run - Test No. 2; and (4) water treatment.

  12. Cold war legacy: sub-surface investigation of unsaturated prairie soil radiologically contaminated in 1951

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, D.J.; Andrews, W.S.; Wang, Z.; Creber, K.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    An unintentional release of fission products (FPs) from a buried storage tank in 1951 resulted in 6.7 L of liquid, bearing radioactive material, being spilled into unsaturated prairie soil at a depth of 3.7 m. Since then, the site has been undisturbed. In October 2001, boreholes were drilled and soil samples were recovered for analysis. Gamma well logging showed higher than background radiation readings at a depth of 3.5 m (corresponding to the storage container location) and a peak reading at 4.7 m (attributed to the breakthrough curve). The soil was determined to be predominantly lean clay with a silty sand layer between 4.4 and 5.1 m. Future work includes radiochemical analysis, soil column simulation, determination of distribution coefficients and transport modelling. (author)

  13. 300-FF-1 operable unit remedial investigation phase II report: Physical separation of soils treatability study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    This report describes the approach and results of physical separations treatability tests conducted at the Hanford Site in the North Process Pond of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. Physical separation of soils was identified as a remediation alternative due to the potential to significantly reduce the amount of contaminated soils prior to disposal. Tests were conducted using a system developed at Hanford consisting of modified EPA equipment integrated with screens, hoppers, conveyors, tanks, and pumps from the Hanford Site. The treatability tests discussed in this report consisted of four parts, in which an estimated 84 tons of soil was processed: (1) a pre-test run to set up the system and adjust system parameters for soils to be processed; (2) a baseline run to establish the performance of the system - Test No. 1; (3) a final run in which the system was modified as a result of findings from the baseline run - Test No. 2; and (4) water treatment

  14. Comparative resilience of soil and natural zeolite against adverse features of a municipal sewage. A preliminary investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buondonno, A.; Coppola, E.; Capra, G.F.; De Riso, S.; Duras, M.G.; Selis, G.; Vacca, S.; Colella, C.

    2008-01-01

    A research was started aiming at evaluating the possible use of natural zeolites as exchange conditioners to improve and make durable the soil resilience against the adverse effects of the use of anomalous waters for irrigation purposes. This paper deals with a preliminary investigation on the comparative resilience of an Entisol with poor exchange properties and of a Neapolitan yellow tuff (NYT) sample against the adverse features of a dirty municipal sewage (DSW). Results showed that NYT treatment largely and significantly improved the poor soil exchange activity. In particular. NYT exchange sites selectively took up ammonium from DSW. As a consequence, ammonium was trapped, then protected against losses in the environment and, concurrently, exchangeable cations, such as K and Ca, were made free as plant nutrients. The results highlight the possible positive role of zeolitized tuff in restoring and sustaining soil resilience.

  15. Investigation of the mobilizability of persistent pollutants in the system groundwater/soil/plant of a former fen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hein, D.; Goertz, W.; Leisner-Saaber, J.; Rathje, M.

    1993-01-01

    For a former fen situated at the eastern border of the Lower terraces of the river Rhine in the close neighbourhood of densely populated urban districts a biotope-managementplan suggests the rewetting and restauration of typical landscape forms. High concentrations of heavy metals and low pH-values of the soil imply a potential danger especially for the groundwater. In order to solve this conflict between the aims of protecting rare biotopes and of saving groundwater-resources investigations were carried out considering all environmental compartments concerned: groundwater, surfacewater, soil and plants. The results demonstate that a step-by-step rewetting of the area is possible without a previous exchange of soil. In addition, careful groundwater control has to be carried out. (orig.) [de

  16. Chemical stabilisation of lead in shooting range soils with phosphate and magnesium oxide: Synchrotron investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderson, Peter; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi; Lim, Jung Eun; Ok, Yong Sik

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Quantitative speciation of Pb by XAS as a result of Phosphate and MgO treatment revealed Pb converted to pyromorphite was limited. • Subsequent MgO addition increased pyromorphite formation. • Pb was precipitated on the surface of MgO as PbO. • Bioaccessibility of Pb decreased with P treatments, but not with MgO only. - Abstract: Three Australian shooting range soils were treated with phosphate and magnesium oxide, or a combination of both to chemically stabilize Pb. Lead speciation was determined after 1 month ageing by X-ray absorption spectroscopy combined with linear combination fitting in control and treated soils. The predominant Pb species in untreated soils were iron oxide bound Pb, humic acid bound Pb and the mineral litharge. Treatment with phosphate resulted in substantial pyromorphite formation in two of the soils (TV and PE), accounting for up to 38% of Pb species present, despite the addition of excess phosphate. In MgO treated soils only, up to 43% of Pb was associated with MgO. Litharge and Pb hydroxide also formed as a result of MgO addition in the soils. Application of MgO after P treatment increased hydroxypyromorphite/pyromorphite formation relative to soils teated with phosphate only. X-ray diffraction and Scanning electron microscopy revealed PbO precipitate on the surface of MgO. Soil pH, (5.3–9.3) was an important parameter, as was the solubility of existing Pb species. The use of direct means of determination of the stabilisation of metals such as by X-ray absorption spectroscopy is desirable, particularly in relation to understanding long term stability of the immobilised contaminants.

  17. Chemical stabilisation of lead in shooting range soils with phosphate and magnesium oxide: Synchrotron investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanderson, Peter [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation and CRC for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), University of South Australia, University Parade, 5095 Mawson Lakes (Australia); Naidu, Ravi, E-mail: ravi.naidu@crccare.com [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation and CRC for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), University of South Australia, University Parade, 5095 Mawson Lakes (Australia); Bolan, Nanthi [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation and CRC for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), University of South Australia, University Parade, 5095 Mawson Lakes (Australia); Lim, Jung Eun; Ok, Yong Sik [Korea Biochar Research Center & Department of Biological Environment, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Quantitative speciation of Pb by XAS as a result of Phosphate and MgO treatment revealed Pb converted to pyromorphite was limited. • Subsequent MgO addition increased pyromorphite formation. • Pb was precipitated on the surface of MgO as PbO. • Bioaccessibility of Pb decreased with P treatments, but not with MgO only. - Abstract: Three Australian shooting range soils were treated with phosphate and magnesium oxide, or a combination of both to chemically stabilize Pb. Lead speciation was determined after 1 month ageing by X-ray absorption spectroscopy combined with linear combination fitting in control and treated soils. The predominant Pb species in untreated soils were iron oxide bound Pb, humic acid bound Pb and the mineral litharge. Treatment with phosphate resulted in substantial pyromorphite formation in two of the soils (TV and PE), accounting for up to 38% of Pb species present, despite the addition of excess phosphate. In MgO treated soils only, up to 43% of Pb was associated with MgO. Litharge and Pb hydroxide also formed as a result of MgO addition in the soils. Application of MgO after P treatment increased hydroxypyromorphite/pyromorphite formation relative to soils teated with phosphate only. X-ray diffraction and Scanning electron microscopy revealed PbO precipitate on the surface of MgO. Soil pH, (5.3–9.3) was an important parameter, as was the solubility of existing Pb species. The use of direct means of determination of the stabilisation of metals such as by X-ray absorption spectroscopy is desirable, particularly in relation to understanding long term stability of the immobilised contaminants.

  18. Development of a Computerized Penetrometer System for Hazardous Waste Site Soils Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-30

    soil to prevent contaminant movement . o To preserve the standard electric cone geometry, i.e., 600 point, 1.4-in. (3.56-cm) OD, 1.54-in. 2 (9.9-cm2...considerable soil movements without cracking or rupturing. The second objective was to preserve the ASTM standard electric cone exterior geometry so as to...electrokinesis, and telluric current phenomena. Of these, the electrochemical and electrokinesis phenomena typically produce the largest voltage magnitude (on

  19. Investigation of the Stress Intensity Limits of ASME Section III Div.5 for Structure Design Criteria of SFR Fuel Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Jin-Yup; Kim, Hyung-Kyu; Cheon, Jin-Sik

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the stress intensity limits, Sm and St of HT-9 were built for the structural criteria of an SFR fuel assembly. Sm is obtained from the ultimate strength. As for St, it is more complicated because of its dependency of time duration in addition to temperature. Following the definition of Smt, the method in the ASME Sec. III Div. 1, Subsec. NH was consulted. We found that the Sm is adopted as Smt under the temperature about 470 .deg. C which is relatively low temperature range and over 470 .deg. C with relatively short time duration as 1000 hours. And the St is adopted as Smt at over 470 .deg. C and long time duration over 34800 hours, and over 520 .deg. C and 104 hours too. And at over 570 .deg. C and 1000 hours, and at over 630 .deg. C and 100 hours, St is also adopted for Smt. To use the present result as design criteria, a stringent examination needs to be carried out, because those are calculated from the formulae of HT-9 without an experimental validation. Therefore, an experimental work on the mechanical properties of HT-9 will be necessary.

  20. Molecular-level spectroscopic investigations of the complexation and photodegradation of catechol to/by iron(III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abadleh, Hind; Tofan-Lazar, Julia; Situm, Arthur; Slikboer, Samantha

    2014-05-01

    Surface water plays a crucial role in facilitating or inhibiting surface reactions in atmospheric aerosols. Little is known about the role of surface water in the complexation of organic molecules to transition metals in multicomponent aerosol systems. We will show results from real time diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) experiments for the in situ complexation of catechol to Fe(III) and its photosensitized degradation under dry and humid conditions. Catechol was chosen as a simple model for humic-like substances (HULIS) in aerosols and aged polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). It has also been detected in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed from the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with benzene. Given the importance of the iron content in aerosols and its biogeochemistry, our studies were conducted using FeCl3. For comparison, these surface-sensitive studies were complemented with bulk aqueous ATR-FTIR, UV-vis, and HPLC measurements for structural, quantitative and qualitative information about complexes in the bulk, and potential degradation products. The implications of our studies on understanding interfacial and condensed phase chemistry relevant to multicomponent aerosols, water thin islands on buildings, and ocean surfaces containing transition metals will be discussed.

  1. Experimental and numerical investigations of soil water balance at the hinterland of the Badain Jaran Desert for groundwater recharge estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lizhu; Wang, Xu-Sheng; Hu, Bill X.; Shang, Jie; Wan, Li

    2016-09-01

    Quantification of groundwater recharge from precipitation in the huge sand dunes is an issue in accounting for regional water balance in the Badain Jaran Desert (BJD) where about 100 lakes exist between dunes. In this study, field observations were conducted on a sand dune near a large saline lake in the BJD to investigate soil water movement through a thick vadose zone for groundwater estimation. The hydraulic properties of the soils at the site were determined using in situ experiments and laboratory measurements. A HYDRUS-1D model was built up for simulating the coupling processes of vertical water-vapor movement and heat transport in the desert soil. The model was well calibrated and validated using the site measurements of the soil water and temperature at various depths. Then, the model was applied to simulate the vertical flow across a 3-m-depth soil during a 53-year period under variable climate conditions. The simulated flow rate at the depth is an approximate estimation of groundwater recharge from the precipitation in the desert. It was found that the annual groundwater recharge would be 11-30 mm during 1983-2012, while the annual precipitation varied from 68 to 172 mm in the same period. The recharge rates are significantly higher than those estimated from the previous studies using chemical information. The modeling results highlight the role of the local precipitation as an essential source of groundwater in the BJD.

  2. An investigation of sulfur concentrations in soils and pine needles in Bandelier National Monument, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladney, E.S.; Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Jones, E.A.; Bell, M.G.; Morgan, J.D.; Stallings, E.A.; Nelson, L.A.; Lundstrom, C.; Bowker, R.G.

    1993-03-01

    Sulfur measurements in different age groups of pinon pine needles and adjacent soil samples from ten sampling sites at Bandelier National Monument were determined using combustion elemental analysis and chromatographic techniques. The primary goal was to establish base-line levels for elemental sulfur in the Monument. Sulfur levels in foliage and soils were evaluated using analysis of variance techniques. Foliage sulfur concentrations differed significantly among the 10 sampling sites and among trees within sites; however, needles of different ages did not differ significantly in sulfur content. Average soil concentrations were very low, approximately 12% of the average needle concentrations. Soil sulfur concentrations also differed significantly among the 10 sampling sites and at different depths in the soil. No statistical differences were evident in soils sampled at the four compass points (N,S,E,W) around each tree. These differences imply that large numbers of samples are needed to identify small effects from anthropogenic inputs of sulfur into the system or that the effects must be large relative to the differences among sampling sites and individual trees in order to be detected

  3. An investigation of sulfur concentrations in soils and pine needles in Canyonlands National Park, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladney, E.S.; Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Jones, E.A.; Bell, M.G.; Morgan, J.D.; Nelson, L.A.; Lundstrom, C.; Bowker, R.G.

    1993-03-01

    Sulfur measurements in different age groups of pinon pine needles and adjacent soil samples from ten sampling sites at Canyonlands National Park were determined using combustion elemental analysis and chromatographic techniques. The primary goal was to establish base-line levels for elemental sulfur in the Park. Sulfur levels in foliage and soils were evaluated using analysis of variance techniques. No significant differences were found in foliage sulfur concentrations among the 10 sampling sites; however, trees within sites were significantly different. Needles of different ages did not differ significantly in sulfur content. Average soil concentrations were very low, approximately 4% of the average needle concentrations. Soil sulfur concentrations also differed significantly among the 10 sampling sites and at different depths in the soil. No statistical differences were evident in soils sampled at the four compass points (N,S,E,W) around each tree. These differences imply that large numbers of samples are needed to identify small effects from anthropogenic inputs of sulfur into the system, or that the effects must be large relative to the differences among sampling sites and individual trees in order to be detected

  4. Experimental investigation of the seismic control of a nonlinear soil-structure system using MR dampers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hui; Wang, Jian

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental study conducted to demonstrate the feasibility and capability of magnetorheological (MR) dampers commanded by a decentralized control algorithm for seismic control of nonlinear civil structures considering soil-structure interaction (SSI). A two-story reinforced concrete (RC) frame resting in a laminar soil container is employed as the test specimen, and two MR dampers equipped in the first story are used to mitigate the response of this frame subjected to various intensity seismic excitations. A hyperbolic tangent function is used to represent the hysteretic behavior of the MR damper and a decentralized control approach for commanding MR dampers is proposed and implemented in the shaking table tests. Only the response of the first story is feedback for control command calculation of the MR dampers. The results indicate that the MR damper can effectively reduce the response of the soil-structure system, even when the soil-structure system presents complex nonlinear hysteretic behavior. The robustness of the proposed decentralized control algorithm is validated through the shaking table tests on the soil-structure system with large uncertainty. The most interesting findings in this paper are that MR dampers not only mitigate the superstructure response, but also reduce the soil response, pile response and earth pressure on the pile foundation

  5. Use of Cesium-137 Fallout in Soil Erosion Investigations in Protected Areas in Cienfuegos Province, Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibello Hernandez, Rita Y.

    2011-01-01

    The large-scale nuclear explosions that had taken place due to the nuclear weapons tests or as a result of nuclear accidents are the main causes of the great dispersion of artificial radionuclides around the world. One of these radionuclides is Cesium-137, which is strongly fixed to the fine soils particles. This fact, together with its half-life of 30 years and its easy detection by gamma spectrometry have converted Cesium-137, in a good radiotracer of the soils movement. This technique has been widely used and validated in different landscapes throughout the world. Its effectiveness was also previously validated and proved in Cienfuegos province too. This research was aimed at using the Cesium-137 technique to study soil redistribution and quantify erosion in the called Protected Areas in Cienfuegos province, where soil loss and sediment transport are the main causes of deterioration of these ecosystems with the consequent economic and / or environmental losses. The results were represented in a map using the software SURFER 8.0, achieving greater visibility of the soil redistribution in the plot studied. The methodology used in this study can be used in other places wherever it is necessary to know the magnitude of the erosion problems and to know the soil redistribution pattern in the landscape which can be very useful to draw the plans for reorganization of land use. (Author)

  6. Rehabilitation materials from surface- coal mines in western U.S.A. III. Relations between elements in mine soil and uptake by plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severson, R.C.; Gough, L.P.

    1984-01-01

    Plant uptake of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn from mine soils was assessed using alfalfa Medicago sativa, sainfoin Onobrychis viciaefolia, smooth brome Bromus inermis, crested wheatgrass Agropyron cristatum, slender wheatgrass A. trachycaulum and intermediate wheatgrass A. intermedium; mine soil (cover-soil and spoil material) samples were collected from rehabilitated areas of 11 western US surface-coal mines in North Dakota, Montana, Wyoming and Colorado. Correlations between metals in plants and DTPA-extractable metals from mine soils were generally not statistically significant and showed no consistent patterns for a single metal or for a single plant species. Metal uptake by plants, relative to amounts in DTPA extracts of mine soil, was positively related to mine soil organic matter content or negatively related to mine soil pH. DTPA-extractable metal levels were significantly correlated with mine soil pH and organic-matter content.-from Authors

  7. An isotopic investigation of the temperature response of young and old soil organic matter respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Nancy; Cloy, Joanna; Garnett, Mark; Reay, David; Smith, Keith; Otten, Wilfred

    2010-05-01

    The effect of temperature on rates of soil respiration is critical to our understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle and potential feedbacks to climate change. The relative temperature sensitivity of labile and recalcitrant soil organic matter (SOM) is still controversial; different studies have produced contrasting results, indicating limited understanding of the underlying relationships between stabilisation processes and temperature. Current global carbon cycle models still rely on the assumption that SOM pools with different decay rates have the same temperature response, yet small differences in temperature response between pools could lead to very different climate feedbacks. This study examined the temperature response of soil respiration and the age of soil carbon respired from radiocarbon dated fractions of SOM (free, intra-aggregate and mineral-bound) and whole soils (organic and mineral layers). Samples were collected from a peaty gley soil from Harwood Forest, Northumberland, UK. SOM fractions were isolated from organic layer (5 - 17 cm) material using high density flotation and ultrasonic disaggregation - designated as free (aggregate (aggregates > 1.8 g cm-3) and mineral-bound (> 1.8 g cm-3) SOM. Fractions were analysed for chemical composition (FTIR, CHN analysis, ICP-OES), 14C (AMS), δ13C and δ15N (MS) and thermal properties (DSC). SOM fractions and bulk soil from the organic layer and the mineral layer (20 - 30 cm) were incubated in sealed vessels at 30 ° C and 10 ° C for 3 or 9 months to allow accumulation of CO2 sufficient for sampling. Accumulated respired CO2 samples were collected on zeolite molecular sieve cartridges and used for AMS radiocarbon dating. In parallel, material from the same fractions and layers were incubated at 10 ° C, 15 ° C, 25 ° C and 30 ° C for 6 months and sampled weekly for CO2 flux measurements using GC chromatography. Initial data have shown radiocarbon ages ranging from modern to 219 y BP in bulk soil from

  8. A pedological investigation of soils associated with rocks of the Ventersdorp supergroup in the western Transvaal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viljoen, J.N.J.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this study was the collecting of information pertaining to soils overlying the rocks of the Ventersdorp Supergroup and an evaluation of the influence of these rocks on soil formation. The area studied was divided into six sub-areas, and one or two sample areas were allocated to each of these sub-areas. In each sample area the soil was studied in catenary sequence. Profile pits were described and samples taken for physical and chemical analyses. The sand fraction was separated into light and heavy mineral fractions. The surface of quartz grains were studied with a petrographic microscope and the aid of an electron microscope. X-ray diffraction was used to determine the mineralogy of the silt and light mineral fractions and a number of selected clay mineral samples. The following characteristics were observed despite the universal presence of wind transported material: epidote, angular quartz grains with undulatory extinction as well as a high percentage silt, coarse and medium sand and fragments of amygdaloids. Aeolian sand in variable amounts is present in all the profiles, and is an important factor affecting the genesis of the soil. Aeolian sand of different ages was possibly distributed and deposited during dry phases in the Quaternary. The influence of aeolian sand on soil formation was evaluated on the basis of mineralogy, grain size distribution, surface characteristics and undulatory extinction of quartz grains as well as soil morphology. The weathering products of different origin were subsequently mixed in situ by bioturbation. The present soil mantle is a product of a number of processes associated with climatic changes in the past, the present climate and mixtures of parent materials of different origin

  9. Telephone survey to investigate relationships between onychectomy or onychectomy technique and house soiling in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerard, Amanda F; Larson, Mandy; Baldwin, Claudia J; Petersen, Christine

    2016-09-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether associations existed between onychectomy or onychectomy technique and house soiling in cats. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SAMPLE 281 owners of 455 cats in Polk County, Iowa, identified via a list of randomly selected residential phone numbers of cat owners in that region. PROCEDURES A telephone survey was conducted to collect information from cat owners on factors hypothesized a priori to be associated with house soiling, including cat sex, reproductive status, medical history, and onychectomy history. When cats that had undergone onychectomy were identified, data were collected regarding the cat's age at the time of the procedure and whether a carbon dioxide laser (CDL) had been used. Information on history of house soiling behavior (urinating or defecating outside the litter box) was also collected. RESULTS Onychectomy technique was identified as a risk factor for house soiling. Cats for which a non-CDL technique was used had a higher risk of house soiling than cats for which the CDL technique was used. Cats that had undergone onychectomy and that lived in a multicat (3 to 5 cats) household were more than 3 times as likely to have house soiled as were single-housed cats with intact claws. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results of this cross-sectional study suggested that use of the CDL technique for onychectomy could decrease the risk of house soiling by cats relative to the risk associated with other techniques. This and other findings can be used to inform the decisions of owners and veterinarians when considering elective onychectomy for cats.

  10. Investigation of potential for occurrence of molten soil displacement events during in situ vitrification of combustible wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.S.; Strachan, C.W.; Luey, J.

    1993-02-01

    Computer simulations are used to investigate the application of in situ vitrification (ISV) for processing contaminated soil containing high loadings of solid, compressible waste material, typical of landfills and solid waste trenches. Specifically, these simulations predict whether significant displacement of molten soil, due to large, 1 to 2 m diameter, gas bubbles rising up through the ISV melt, are likely to occur during processing of combustible waste-loaded sites. These bubbles are believed to originate from high-pressure regions below the melt caused by vaporization of water and gases generated by the combustion, volatilization, or pyrolyzation of combustible materials in the waste. Simulations were run using the TOUGH2 computer code to predict pressures underneath the ISV melt TOUGH2 is an unsaturated groundwater modeling code capable of treating non-isothermal problems. These simulations include moving melt front and simple pyrolysis models and investigate how the gas pressure in the soil below the melt is affected by melt progression rate, soil permeability, combustible and impermeable material loading. The following, conclusions have been drawn based on the TOUGH2 simulations

  11. Use of soil moisture dynamics and patterns at different spatio-temporal scales for the investigation of subsurface flow processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Blume

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatial patterns as well as temporal dynamics of soil moisture have a major influence on runoff generation. The investigation of these dynamics and patterns can thus yield valuable information on hydrological processes, especially in data scarce or previously ungauged catchments. The combination of spatially scarce but temporally high resolution soil moisture profiles with episodic and thus temporally scarce moisture profiles at additional locations provides information on spatial as well as temporal patterns of soil moisture at the hillslope transect scale. This approach is better suited to difficult terrain (dense forest, steep slopes than geophysical techniques and at the same time less cost-intensive than a high resolution grid of continuously measuring sensors. Rainfall simulation experiments with dye tracers while continuously monitoring soil moisture response allows for visualization of flow processes in the unsaturated zone at these locations. Data was analyzed at different spacio-temporal scales using various graphical methods, such as space-time colour maps (for the event and plot scale and binary indicator maps (for the long-term and hillslope scale. Annual dynamics of soil moisture and decimeter-scale variability were also investigated. The proposed approach proved to be successful in the investigation of flow processes in the unsaturated zone and showed the importance of preferential flow in the Malalcahuello Catchment, a data-scarce catchment in the Andes of Southern Chile. Fast response times of stream flow indicate that preferential flow observed at the plot scale might also be of importance at the hillslope or catchment scale. Flow patterns were highly variable in space but persistent in time. The most likely explanation for preferential flow in this catchment is a combination of hydrophobicity, small scale heterogeneity in rainfall due to redistribution in the canopy and strong gradients in unsaturated conductivities leading to

  12. Comparación de los métodos de Bray & Kurtz N° i y Mehlich III en la determinación de la disponibilidad de fósforo en suelos con fertilizaciones continuas Comparison of Bray & Kurtz N°1 and Mehlich III methods in the determination of phosphorus availability in soils with continuous fertilizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Mirta

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo propone comparar dos métodos de evaluación de fósforo extractable, Bray & Kurtz I, de uso habitual en la zona pampeana y Mehlich III, de uso internacional en suelos que han recibido fertilizaciones fosfatadas continuas. Los suelos estudiados recibieron dosis crecientes de fertilizante fosfatado, aplicadas al inicio de una rotación de maíz, trigo y soja. Sobre parcelas de campo, se tomaron muestras de suelo, se analizaron y se compararon los datos de fósforo extractable (P por Mehlich III y Bray & Kurtz I. Para determinar la bondad de ambos métodos, se ajustaron los datos con la prueba de Peto-Wilcoxon de determinación de curvas de concordancia y análisis de regresión para evaluar la sensibilidad de ambos métodos. Los resultados mostraron que a valores bajos, ambos métodos no se diferencian sustancialmente, pero a partir de los 15 (mg kg-1 de P en el suelo, el método de Mehlich III sobreestima el valor con respecto a Bray & Kurtz I.También fue Bray & Kurtz I el que detectó la mejor variación de las dosis agregadas de P, mostrando mayor sensibilidad entre los tratamientos efectuados. Se concluye que de los estudios realizados el método de Bray & Kurtz I es el que mejor se adapta a las prácticas de diagnóstico y recomendaciones regionales de uso de fertilizante.In this work, we compared two methods of available phosphorus evaluation, Bray & Kurtz I, (the most common in the pampean zone, and Mehlich III, (commonly used in other countries in soils with contionuous P applications. The studied soils received increasing doses of phosphate fertilizer, applied to the beginning of a maize, wheat and soybean rotation. Soil samples were taken in the field, and extractable phosphorus (P by Mehlich III and Bray & Kurtz I methods were compared. The data were adjusted with the Peto-Wilcoxon test of determination and regression analysis to evaluate the sensitivity of both methods. The results indicated that to low values, these are

  13. Geophysical techniques for reconnaissance investigations of soils and surficial deposits in mountainous terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, C.G.; Doolittle, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Two techniques were assessed for their capabilities in reconnaissance studies of soil characteristics: depth to the water table and depth to bedrock beneath surficial deposits in mountainous terrain. Ground-penetrating radar had the best near-surface resolution in the upper 2 m of the profile and provided continuous interpretable imagery of soil profiles and bedrock surfaces. Where thick colluvium blankets side slopes, the GPR could not consistently define the bedrock interface. In areas with clayey or shaley sediments, the GPR is also more limited in defining depth and is less reliable. Seismic refraction proved useful in determining the elevation of the water table and depth to bedrock, regardless of thickness of overlying material, but could not distinguish soil-profile characteristics.-from Authors

  14. INVESTIGATION OF HEAVY METAL CONTAMINATION IN THE ROADSIDE SOIL AT MORENA DISTRICT IN INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Laxmi Kant Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Pollution of natural environment due to release of heavy metals from various sources is a widespread problem throughout the world. This study explains the effect of heavy metal contaminants in Roadside soil of Morena district. Twelve air dried surface soil samples were collected from 50cm – 1m (point A) and twelve from 30m (point B) away from the roadside along a road with a distance of 50 km. Heavy metals were found in both points with highest concentration at 50cm – 1m (point A). Roadside s...

  15. Application of instrument neutron-activation analysis in a comparative investigation of soil samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrov, D. (Institute po Kriminalistika i Kriminologiya, Sofia (Bulgaria))

    1983-01-01

    A quantitative measurement of the contents of 17 chemical elements in soil samples, collected using the existing network from the surface of five cultivated areas in Bulgaria has been carried out. The values obtained have been used to calculate the evaluations psub(i) of the dispersions and for the ordering of the chemical elements according to their importance in criminology. The possibility for criminological comparison of single soil samples using the contents of the five most important elements - Th, Fe, Sc, Ce and Mn has been shown.

  16. Application of instrument neutron-activation analysis in a comparative investigation of soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, D.

    1983-01-01

    A quantitative measurement of the contents of 17 chemical elements in soil samples, collected using the existing network from the surface of five cultivated areas in Bulgaria has been carried out. The values obtained have been used to calculate the evaluations psub(i) of the dispersions and for the ordering of the chemical elements according to their importance in criminology. The possibility for criminological comparison of single soil samples using the contents of the five most important elements - Th, Fe, Sc, Ce and Mn has been shown. (author)

  17. A Molecular Investigation of Soil Organic Carbon Composition, Variability, and Spatial Distribution Across an Alpine Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, H. T.; Lawrence, C. R.; Winnick, M.; Druhan, J. L.; Williams, K. H.; Maher, K.; Rainaldi, G. R.; McCormick, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    The cycling of carbon through soils is one of the least understood aspects of the global carbon cycle and represents a key uncertainty in the prediction of land-surface response to global warming. Thus, there is an urgent need for advanced characterization of soil organic carbon (SOC) to develop and evaluate a new generation of soil carbon models. We hypothesize that shifts in SOC composition and spatial distribution as a function of soil depth can be used to constrain rates of transformation between the litter layer and the deeper subsoil (extending to a depth of approximately 1 m). To evaluate the composition and distribution of SOC, we collected soil samples from East River, a shale-dominated watershed near Crested Butte, CO, and characterized relative changes in SOC species as a function of depth using elemental analysis (EA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and bulk C X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Our results show that total organic carbon (TOC) decreases with depth, and high total inorganic carbon (TIC) content was found in deeper soils (after 75 cm), a characteristic of the bedrock (shale). The distribution of aliphatic C relative to the parent material generally decreases with depth and that polysaccharide can be a substantial component of SOC at various depths. On the other hand, the relative distribution of aromatic C, traditionally viewed as recalcitrant, only makes up a very small part of SOC regardless of depth. These observations confirm that molecular structure is not the only determinant of SOC turnover rate. To study other contributors to SOC decomposition, we studied changes in the spatial correlation of SOC and minerals using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). We found that aromatics mostly locate on the surface of small soil aggregates (1-10 μm). Polysaccharides and proteins, both viewed as labile traditionally, are more evenly distributed over the interior of the

  18. Investigation of Hg uptake and transport between paddy soil and rice seeds combining Hg isotopic composition and speciation

    OpenAIRE

    C. Feng; Z. Pedrero; P. Li; B. Du; X. Feng; M. Monperrus; E. Tessier; S. Berail; D. Amouroux

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Human consumption of rice constitutes a potential toxicological risk in mercury (Hg) polluted areas such as Hg mining regions in China. It is recognized to be an important source of Hg for the local human diet considering the efficient bioaccumulation of methylmercury (MeHg) in rice seed. To assess Hg sources and uptake pathways to the rice plants, Hg speciation and isotopic composition were investigated in rice seeds and their corresponding paddy soils from different locations withi...

  19. Electronic structure of some adenosine receptor antagonists. III. Quantitative investigation of the electronic absorption spectra of alkyl xanthines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, H.; Shalaby, Samia H.; El-sawy, K. M.; Hilal, Rifaat

    2002-07-01

    Quantitative and comparative investigation of the electronic absorption spectra of theophylline, caffeine and their derivatives is reported. The spectra of theophylline, caffeine and theobromine were compared to establish the predominant tautomeric species in solution. This comparison, analysis of solvent effects and assignments of the observed transitions via MO computations indicate the exits of only one tautomeric species in solution that is the N7 form. A low-lying triplet state was identified which corresponds to a HOMO-LUMO transition. This relatively long-lived T 1 state is always less polar than the ground state and may very well underlie the photochemical reactivity of alkyl xanthines. Substituents of different electron donating or withdrawing strengths and solvent effects are investigated and analyzed. The present analysis is facilitated via computer deconvolution of the observed spectra and MO computation.

  20. Investigation of vegetation history of buried chernozem soils using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vysloužilová, B.; Ertlen, D.; Šefrna, L.; Novák, T.; Virágh, K.; Rué, M.; Campaner, A.; Dreslerová, Dagmar; Schwartz, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 365, 16 April (2015), s. 203-211 ISSN 1040-6182 Institutional support: RVO:67985912 Keywords : Holocene * paleopedology * paleoecology * near-infrared spectroscopy * chernozem * buried paleosol Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science Impact factor: 2.067, year: 2015

  1. Soil investigations for jack-ups, pile design, and fixed platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, E R

    1977-05-01

    With the exception of dynamically positioned vessels, all stationary structures used by the petroleum industry in the sea are, in one way or another, connected to the seabed to ensure their immobility or stability. Consequently, the ability of the marine soils to support the imposed loads must be determined to allow a safe and economic foundation design and method of structure installation. Two main types of tests are being carried out offshore more or less on a routine basis: the cone penetration and the in-situ vane. The standard cone penetrometer testing method consists essentially of an electric penetrometer which is pushed into the seabed at a constant speed by an hydraulic piston. Remotely operated from the sea surface, the cone penetrates into the ground and the resistance that the soil exerts against the tip and sides of the cone are separately and continuously measured and recorded. The resulting continuous graph provides a detailed picture of the soil profile. In addition, soils data currently required for foundation design and installation can be derived from the test results based on existing correlations.

  2. Microbial Chlorination of Organic Matter in Forest Soil: Investigation Using Cl-36-Chloride and Its Methodology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rohlenová, Jana; Gryndler, Milan; Forczek, Sándor; Fuksová, Květoslava; Handová, V.; Matucha, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 10 (2009), s. 3652-3655 ISSN 0013-936X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/05/0636 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : BOUND CHLORINE * CHLOROACETIC ACIDS * HUMIC SUBSTANCES Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science Impact factor: 4.630, year: 2009

  3. Investigation of soil potentially contaminated by monazite processing by-products: case study and suggestion for protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briquet, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    This work describes a characterization of soil potentially contaminated by monazite chemical processing residues. For case study it was selected a country area of Sao Paulo State, containing a monazite processing by-product depository. The main objective was to evaluate the soil contamination in an area of approximately 18,000 m 2 and esteem the total effective dose equivalent. During the development of this work, it was verified necessity of an investigation protocol, in order to standardize actions of regulatory authorities. A survey of the applicable legislation was carried out, as a tool to support decision making process. The methodology was based on the 'Manual de Gerenciamento de Areas Contaminadas' of CETESB (2001 a), a national document to guide studies of contaminated areas. It was also considered the 'Multi Agency Radiation Survey and Site Manual Investigation - MARSSIM' (2000), a U.S. government document that provides a nationally consensus approach to conduct investigations at potentially contaminated sites. The developed activities had been divided in three general stages: data-collecting and information on the place, identification of soil contamination and its distribution until the depth of 3 meters and evaluation of the associated dose. The evaluation of the radiological impact was carried out considering the worst-case use scenario (most restrictive future use), standing out that the final decision fits to the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission - CNEN. CNEN's scope of responsibility includes determining the site release criteria and the cleanup necessity. (author)

  4. Investigations involving oxidation-reduction (REDOX) pretreatment in conjunction with biological remediation of contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montemagno, C.D.; Peters, R.W.; Tyree, A.

    1991-01-01

    Oxidation-reduction (REDOX) reactions are among the most important reactions involved in the environmental engineering field. Oxidation is a reaction in which the oxidation state of the treated compound is increased, i.e., the material loses electrons. Reduction involves the addition of a chemical (reducing) agent which lowers the oxidation state of a substance, i.e., the material gains electrons. Both processes of oxidation and reduction occur together. All REDOX reactions are thermodynamically based. There are a number of oxidizing agents which have been reported in the technical literature for treatment of refractory organic compounds. Common oxidizing agents include: hydrogen peroxide, ozone, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, and combinations thereof, such as UV/ozone and UV/peroxide. A gradient of REDOX reactions is possible, depending on such factors as the oxidation-reduction reaction conditions, the availability of electron donors and acceptors, and the nature of the organic compounds involved. A review of the technical literature revealed that the majority of the oxidation-reduction applications have been in the areas of wastewater treatment and groundwater remediation, with very little attention devoted to the potential of using REDOX technologies for remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils. In this particular study, feasibility studies were performed on gasoline- contaminated soil. These studies focused on three major phases: 1) containment of the contamination by addition of tailoring agents to the soil, 2) biological remediation either performed in situ or on-site (using a slurry reactor system), and 3) pretreatment of the contaminated soils using REDOX systems, prior to biological remediation. This particular paper focuses on the third phase of the project, aimed at ''softening'' the refractory organics resulting in the formation of organic compounds which are more amenable to biological degradation. This paper focuses its attention on the use of

  5. Further investigations on the resilience capacity of Taraxacum officinale Weber growing on mine soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleci, Laura; Bini, Claudio; Spiandorello, Massimo; Wahsha, Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    Heavy metal accumulation produces significant physiological and biochemical responses in vascular plants. Plants growing on abandoned mine sites are of particular interest, since they are genetically tolerant to high metal concentrations. In this work we examined the effect of heavy metals (HM) on the morphology of T. officinale growing on mine soils, with the following objectives: - to determine the fate of HM within the soil-plant system; - to highlight possible damage at anatomical and cytological level; - to assess the resilience capacity of Taraxacum officinale after three years of pot cultivation. Wild specimens of Taraxacum officinale Web, with their soil clod, were gathered from four sites with different contamination levels by heavy metals (Cu, Fe, Pb, Zn) in the abandoned Imperina Valley mine (Northeast Italy). Plants were cultivated in pots at the botanical garden of the University of Florence (HBF), and appeared macroscopically not affected by toxic signals (e.g. reduced growth, leaf necrosis) possibly induced by soil HM concentration. Leaves and roots taken at the same growing season were observed by light microscopy (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Light microscopy observations show a clear difference in the cell organization of not-contaminated and contaminated samples. The unpolluted samples present a well organized palisade tissue and spongy photosynthetic parenchyma. Samples from contaminated sites, instead, present a palisade parenchyma less organized, and a reduction of leaf thickness proportional to HM concentration. The poor structural organisations, and the reduced foliar thickness of the contaminated plants, are related to soil contamination. Differences in roots micromorphology concern the cortical parenchyma. Moreover, all the samples examined present mycorrhiza. Ultrastructure observations of the parenchyma cells show mitochondrial structure alteration, with lacking or reduced cristae of the internal membrane at increasing

  6. Investigations involving oxidation-reduction (REDOX) pretreatment in conjunction with biological remediation of contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montemagno, C. D. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Peters, R. W.; Tyree, A.

    1991-07-01

    Oxidation-reduction (REDOX) reactions are among the most important reactions involved in the environmental engineering field. Oxidation is a reaction in which the oxidation state of the treated compound is increased, i.e., the material loses electrons. Reduction involves the addition of a chemical (reducing) agent which lowers the oxidation state of a substance, i.e., the material gains electrons. Both processes of oxidation and reduction occur together. All REDOX reactions are thermodynamically based. There are a number of oxidizing agents which have been reported in the technical literature for treatment of refractory organic compounds. Common oxidizing agents include: hydrogen peroxide, ozone, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, and combinations thereof, such as UV/ozone and UV/peroxide. A gradient of REDOX reactions is possible, depending on such factors as the oxidation-reduction reaction conditions, the availability of electron donors and acceptors, and the nature of the organic compounds involved. A review of the technical literature revealed that the majority of the oxidation-reduction applications have been in the areas of wastewater treatment and groundwater remediation, with very little attention devoted to the potential of using REDOX technologies for remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils. In this particular study, feasibility studies were performed on gasoline- contaminated soil. These studies focused on three major phases: 1) containment of the contamination by addition of tailoring agents to the soil, 2) biological remediation either performed in situ or on-site (using a slurry reactor system), and 3) pretreatment of the contaminated soils using REDOX systems, prior to biological remediation. This particular paper focuses on the third phase of the project, aimed at ''softening'' the refractory organics resulting in the formation of organic compounds which are more amenable to biological degradation. This paper focuses its attention on the use of

  7. Investigations of dynamic interactions coupled by soil between neighbouring nuclear power plants of high mass in case of seismic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthees, W.; Magiera, G.

    1980-01-01

    A sensitivity study for the interaction effects for adjacent structures of nuclear power plants i.e. for main buildings and auxiliary buildings has been performed due to horizontal seismic excitation. An interaction measuring rule for response spectra has been defined as the ratio of amplitude of response calculated inclusive the auxiliary building to the amplitude calculated without the auxiliary building in respect to the proper eigen-frequencies. The calculations of the three-dimensional effects are approximated with the program FLUSH. The accuracy of the achievable response herewith calculated is proven in comparison with other suitable methods. The interaction measuring rule is determined by a parameter investigation including the mathematical model consisting of the soil, the main building, and the auxiliary building. The following assumptions are asserted: 1. the soil characteristics are temporarily constant. Ignorance of the accuracy of the realistic i.e. stress depending soil values is encountered by variation of the decisive characteristics within their applicable band-width. 2. The fineness of the mathematical-mechanical modelling for the structural systems i.e. the number of the degrees of freedom is limited to a minimum. Attention is hereby paid that the eigen-frequencies of the main building as well as the eigen-frequencies of the layered soil system in the range of 0 to 10 Hz are computed with sufficient accuracy. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Preliminary Investigations of Some Engineering Properties for the Use of Different Soils in Waste Disposal Cover System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Rahman, R.O.

    2008-01-01

    Near surface disposal facilities are designed to provide long term isolation for low and intermediate level radioactive wastes from the human environment by means of multi-barriers system, which consists of a combination of natural and engineering barriers that act passively to isolate the waste. Adequate and reliable multi-layer engineered cover system is required by the long-term safety concept for waste disposal to control moisture and percolation, promote surface water runoff, minimize erosion, and prevent direct exposure to the waste. In this work, investigations of some engineering properties that are utilized in hydrological and geotechnical design of capillary barrier have been estimated for different local soil textures. Measurements of the physical properties of the studied soil textures have been conducted to determine their suitability for the utilization in engineered cover system for near surface disposal facility. The soil water characteristics have been estimated from the measured physical properties using Vereeckens pedotransfer functions. The critical pressure head for different combinations of soils have been evaluated and the thickness of the finer layer has been calculated. Also some mechanical properties, angle of internal friction and the cohesion, have been estimated using pedotransfer function. The pre-compression stresses have been evaluated and the slope stability of the designed barriers has been quantified by comparing the factor of safety for each studied case for different slope values

  9. Use of tritium-labeled PCBs for investigation of PCBs biodegradation by soil bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, A.A.; Djuraeva, G.T.; Takhtobiri, K.S.; Yadgarov, H.T.; Zinovev, P. V.; Abdukarimov, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    The method for tritium labelling of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was developed. The strains of soil bacteria - destructors of chloro organic compounds was studied with the help of test-system based on the using of tritium-labeled PCBs. The strains of bacteria were grown on the agar synthetic medium and then were introduced into the synthetic medium containing tritium-labeled mixture of PCBs (commercial mark - SOVOL) as alone source of carbon. The samples were analysed after one and two months period of incubation. PCBs were extracted by hexane from fraction of bacteria and fraction of cultural medium and radioactivity was measured. The samples were analyzed by thin layer chromatography (TLC) with following radioautography. Additionally samples were analyzed by gas chromatography. It was found that all selected strains survived in the medium with PCBs as alone source of carbon and bacteria accumulated PCBs from cultural medium. Accumulation of PCBs by strains of bacteria was different. The TLC analysis detected additional compounds labeled by tritium, that prove the degradation of PCBs in presence of bacteria. The gas chromatography analysis of cultural medium and bacteria detected redistribution in the system and qualitative changes of PCBs in bacteria. The strains of bacteria also were grown in model condition on the soil with tritium labeled PCBs. We found that some strains effectively destroy PCBs with decreasing level of tritium label in the soil. The using of tritium labeled PCBs' allows to introduce precise quantitative characteristics for study of accumulation and biodegradation PCBs by soil bacteria strains. Developed test-system is very useful tool for selection of new strains of soil bacteria - destructors of PCBs

  10. Radioecological investigations in the food-chain air-soil-vine-wine. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, A.

    1989-10-01

    This Part 2 presents all of the results, including the harvest of 1986 and 1987; it thus describes the consequences of the Chernobyl accident. H-3, C-14, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were determined in soil, vine leaves, grapes and wine at different locations. In some of the samples Cs-134, K-40 and Ra-226 were also measured. Site-specific transfer factors were calculated for Sr-90 and for the Cs radionuclides. The mean content of Cs-137 before Chernobyl (after Chernogyl) was about 4 (9) Bq/kg dry matter in soil (top 30 cm), 0.07 (3) Bq/kg fresh matter in leaves, 0.02 (0.4) Bq/kg FM in grapes, and 0.008 (0.9) Bq/l in wine. As comapred to 1986 distinctly lower levels were found in leaves, grapes and wine from 1987. The content of Cs-134 was about half that of Cs-137 in 1986. Due to its shorter half-life Cs-134 had fallen below detection limit in many of the 1987 samples. Mean Sr-90 levels were 1-2 Bq/kg in soil and in leaves (dry matter and fresh matter, respectively), 19-56 mBq/kg in grapes, and 3-11 mBq/l in wine. Samples obtained in the fall of 1986 showed no increase of Sr-90 in soil and leaves, whereas a slight increase was found in grapes and wine as a consequence of Chernobyl. Site-specific influences such als soil parameters, climate, cultivation, vinification and differences between years had no pronounced effects on transfer factors. No influence of the nuclear power station Neckarwestheim has been found in any of the radionuclides. (orig./HP) [de

  11. Radioecological investigations in the food-chain air-soil-vine-wine. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, A.

    1989-01-01

    This Part 2 presents all of the results, including the harvest of 1986 and 1987; it thus describes the consequences of the Chernobyl accident. H-3, C-14, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were determined in soil, vine leaves, grapes and wine at different locations. In some of the samples Cs-134, K-40 and Ra-226 were also measured. Site-specific transfer factors were calculated for Sr-90 and for the Cs radionuclides. The mean content of Cs-137 before Chernobyl (after Chernobyl) was about 4 (9) Bq/kg dry matter in soil (top 30 cm), 0.07 (3) Bq/kg fresh matter in leaves, 0.02 (0.4) Bq/kg FM in grapes, and 0.008 (0.9) Bq/l in wine. As compared to 1986 distinctly lower levels were found in leaves, grapes and wine from 1987. The content of Cs-134 was about half that of Cs-137 in 1986. Due to its shorter half-life Cs-134 had fallen below detection limit in many of the 1987 samples. Mean Sr-90 levels were 1-2 Bq/kg in soil and in leaves (dry matter and fresh matter, respectively), 19-56 mBq/kg in grapes, and 3-11 mBq/l in wine. Samples obtained in the fall of 1986 showed no increase of Sr-90 in soil and leaves, whereas a slight increase was found in grapes and wine as a consequence of Chernobyl. Site-specific influences such als soil parameters, climate, cultivation, vinification and differences between years had no pronounced effects on transfer factors. No influence of the nuclear power station Neckarwestheim has been found in any of the radionuclides. (orig./HP) [de

  12. An econometric investigation of impacts of sustainable land management practices on soil carbon and yield risk: A potential for climate change mitigation

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Edward; Nkonya, Ephraim; Place, Frank; Mwanjalolo, Majaliwa

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the impacts of sustainable land management practices on soil carbon stocks and also impacts of soil carbon on the mean and variance of crop production using econometric tools. Using a cross-sectional plot-level dataset collected from three agroecological zones of Uganda with soil carbon measured at a depth of 0 to 15 centimeters, our results have robustly shown that irrigation, fertilizers, improved fallow, crop residues, mulching, and trash lines are positively and significant...

  13. Modeling soil CO2 production and transport to investigate the intra-day variability of surface efflux and soil CO2 concentration measurements in a scots pine forest (Pinus Sylvestris, L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Goffin, Stéphanie; Wylock, Christophe; Haut, Benoît; Maier, Martin; Longdoz, Bernard; Aubinet, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Aimed:The main aim of this study is to improve the mechanistic understanding of soil CO2 efflux (Fs), especially its temporal variation at short-time scales, by investigating, through modeling, which underlying process among CO2 production and its transport up to the atmosphere is responsible for observed intra-day variation of Fs and soil CO2 concentration [CO2].Methods:In this study, a measurement campaign of Fs and vertical soil [CO2] profiles was conducted in a Scots Pine Forest soil in H...

  14. Experimental and Numerical Investigations of Soil Desiccation for Vadose Zone Remediation: Report for Fiscal Year 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Andy L.; Oostrom, Mart; Bacon, Diana H.

    2008-02-04

    Apart from source excavation, the options available for the remediation of vadose zone metal and radionuclide contaminants beyond the practical excavation depth (0 to 15 m) are quite limited. Of the available technologies, very few are applicable to the deep vadose zone with the top-ranked candidate being soil desiccation. An expert panel review of the work on infiltration control and supplemental technologies identified a number of knowledge gaps that would need to be overcome before soil desiccation could be deployed. The report documents some of the research conducted in the last year to fill these knowledge gaps. This work included 1) performing intermediate-scale laboratory flow cell experiments to demonstrate the desiccation process, 2) implementing a scalable version of Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases–Water-Air-Energy (STOMP-WAE), and 3) performing numerical experiments to identify the factors controlling the performance of a desiccation system.

  15. Investigation of the radioactive and heavy metal pollution of the danube Delta lacustrine sediments and soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinescu, L.C.; Ciortea, C.; Fluerasu, D.; Stoica, P.; Duliu, O.G.; Stoica, P.

    2005-01-01

    Results obtained for five lacustrine sediment cores and three soil samples, collected in 1996 from Danube Delta, by using INAA, ICP-MS, and TTPIXE analytical methods, are presented. The measured vertical profiles identified as possible pollutants the following elements: Al, Cu, Zn, As, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Hg, Tl, Pb, and Bi. In the sediment cores, the determined elements, except V and Ni, show near-surface enrichment relative to the lower part (1.3-3 enrichment factor, except 5 - 7 for Cd and Hg). In some few cases, As, Cd, Cu, Cr, Mn, and Pb exceeded the minimum threshold of safety defined by the Romanian legislation. For soil samples, increased (1.5-3 times) values at surface in comparison with the 30 cm depth was also found, but values much lower compared to lacustrine sediments, indicating the riverine transport as the main source of heavy-metal near-surface contamination of the lacustrine sediments

  16. Investigation on the photocatalytic degradation of pyrene on soil surfaces using nanometer anatase TiO2 under UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Dianbo; Li Peijun; Li Xiaojun; Zhao Qing; Zhang Yinqiu; Jia Chunyun; Li Peng

    2010-01-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of pyrene on soil surfaces was investigated in the presence of nanometer anatase TiO 2 under a variety of conditions. After being spiked with pyrene, soil samples loaded with different amounts of TiO 2 (0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, and 4%, w/w) were exposed to UV irradiation for 25 h. The results indicated that the photocatalytic degradation of pyrene followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. TiO 2 accelerated the degradation of pyrene generally as indicated by the half-life reduction from 45.90 to 31.36 h, corresponding to the TiO 2 amounts from 0% to 4%, respectively. The effects of H 2 O 2 , light intensity and humic acids on the degradation of pyrene were also investigated. The degradation of pyrene increased along with increasing the concentration of H 2 O 2 , light intensity and the concentration of humic acids. All results indicated that the photocatalytic method in the presence of nanometer anatase TiO 2 was an advisable choice for the treatments of PAHs polluted soil in the future.

  17. Investigation of Pore Scale Processes That Affect Soil Vapor Extraction. Final Technical Report EMSP 70045

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valocchi, Albert J.; Werth, Charles W.; Webb, Andrew W.

    2004-01-01

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contamination in the vadose zone is a significant problem at Department of Energy sites. Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is commonly used to remediate DNAPLs from the vadose zone. In most cases, a period of high recovery has been followed by a sustained period of low recovery. This behavior has been attributed to multiple processes including slow interphase mass transfer, retarded vapor phase transport, and diffusion from unswept zones of low permeability. This research project used a combination of laboratory experimentation and mathematical modeling to determine how these various processes interact to limit the removal of DNAPL components in heterogeneous porous media during SVE. Our results were applied to scenarios typical of the carbon tetrachloride spill zone at the Hanford Site. Our results indicate that: (a) the initial distribution of the spilled DNAPL (i.e., the spill-zone architecture) has a major influence upon the performance of any subsequent SVE operations; (b) while the pattern of higher and lower conductivity soil zones has an important impact upon spill zone architecture, soil moisture distribution plays an even larger role when there are large quantities of co-disposed waste-water (as in the Hanford scenario); (c) depending upon soil moisture dynamics, liquid DNAPL that is trapped by surrounding water is extremely difficult to remove by SVE; (d) natural barometric pumping can remove a large amount of the initial DNAPL mass for spills occurring close to the land surface, and hence the initial spilled inventory will be over-estimated if this process is neglected

  18. Land characterisation for soil-based constructed wetlands: Adapting investigation methods to design objectives

    OpenAIRE

    Petitjean, A.; Forquet, N.; Choubert, J.M.; Coquery, M; Bouyer, M.; Boutin, C.

    2015-01-01

    Buffer zones between wastewater treatment plants and receiving water bodies have recently gained interest in France. These soil-based constructed wetland (SBCW) systems receive treated wastewater and may have various designs aiming to mimic 'natural' wetlands. Research is needed to assess the treatment efficiency of such systems. To this aim, a comprehensive study is carried out to understand the fate of water, conventional pollutants (suspended solids, organic carbon, ammonium, and phosph...

  19. INVESTIGATION OF GEOTECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS OF SAND DUNE SOIL: A CASE STUDY AROUND BAIJI IN IRAQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas J. Al-Taie

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: While more than half the land surface of Iraq consists of deserts covered mainly with sand dunes, little research has taken place to study the characteristics and the behavior of dune soils. This paper directed toward studying the geotechnical properties of dune sands taken from Baiji city (northwest of Iraq. A vast laboratory testing program was carried out to achieve the purpose of this paper. The physical tests, chemical tests, X-ray diffraction analysis, permeability test, compaction characteristics, compressibility and collapsibility tests; and shear strength tests were included in this program. The results indicate that soil of Baiji sand dune exhibits prefer engineering properties according to their state. As such, this soil is considered suitable for use in geotechnical constructions. ABSTRAK: Walaupun lebih separuh daripada bumi Iraq terdiri daripada gurun yang dipenuhi dengan bukit-bukit pasir, tidak banyak penyelidikan dijalankan untuk mengkaji sifat-sifat dan ciri-ciri tanah pasir  tersebut. Kertas kerja ini menyelidik sifat geoteknikal bukit pasir yang diambil dari pekan Baiji (di bahagian barat utara Iraq.  Program penyelidikan makmal yang menyeluruh telah  dijalankan bagi mencapai objektif kajian ini. Ujian fizikal, ujian kimia, analisis belauan sinar-x, ujian kebolehtelapan, ciri pemadatan, faktor ketermampatan, ujian keruntuhan dan ujian kekuatan ricih diambilkira dalam program ini. Keputusan menunjukkan bahawa tanih bukit pasir Baiji mengutamakan ciri kejuruteraan berdasarkan keadaannya. Oleh itu, tanah ini dianggap sesuai untuk kegunaan pembinaan geoteknikal.

  20. An investigation of soil-structure interaction effects observed at the MIT Green Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taciroglu, Ertugrul; Çelebi, Mehmet; Ghahari, S. Farid; Abazarsa, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    The soil-foundation impedance function of the MIT Green Building is identified from its response signals recorded during an earthquake. Estimation of foundation impedance functions from seismic response signals is a challenging task, because: (1) the foundation input motions (FIMs) are not directly measurable, (2) the as-built properties of the super-structure are only approximately known, and (3) the soil-foundation impedance functions are inherently frequency-dependent. In the present study, aforementioned difficulties are circumvented by using, in succession, a blind modal identification (BMID) method, a simplified Timoshenko beam model (TBM), and a parametric updating of transfer functions (TFs). First, the flexible-base modal properties of the building are identified from response signals using the BMID method. Then, a flexible-base TBM is updated using the identified modal data. Finally, the frequency-dependent soil-foundation impedance function is estimated by minimizing the discrepancy between TFs (of pairs instrumented floors) that are (1) obtained experimentally from earthquake data and (2) analytically from the updated TBM. Using the fully identified flexible-base TBM, the FIMs as well as building responses at locations without instruments can be predicted, as demonstrated in the present study.

  1. Investigation of soils affected by burnt hospital wastes in Nigeria using PIXE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ephraim P, Inyang; Ita, Akpan; Eusebius I, Obiajunwa

    2013-12-01

    Improper management of hospital waste has been reported to be responsible for several acute outbreaks like the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). In spite of these challenges, hospital wastes are sometimes not properly handled in Nigeria. To date, there has not been an adequate study on the effect and fate of burnt hospital waste on agricultural soil. The effect of burnt hospital wastes on the agricultural soil was conducted on soils sampled around farm settlement near Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife, South West Nigeria. PIXE technique was employed with a 1.7 MV 5SDH Tandem Pelletron accelerator available at Centre for Energy Research and Development O.A.U Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Eleven elements- Si, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Zr and Pb were detected and their concentrations and enrichment factors determined. The presence of Pb and Cl at the elevated concentrations range of (77.8 ± 3.5 - 279.6 ± 97.6 and 102.2 ± 37.4 -167.2±17.43) ppm respectively in this study, is of serious health concern because of the agricultural practices in the neighborhoods of the study sites. There is a need for proper handling of hospital and other related hazardous wastes because of the possibility of such posing serious environmental pollution problems.

  2. Development of a GIS-based failure investigation system for highway soil slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Raghav; Aydilek, Ahmet H.; Tanyu, Burak F.

    2015-06-01

    A framework for preparation of an early warning system was developed for Maryland, using a GIS database and a collective overlay of maps that highlight highway slopes susceptible to soil slides or slope failures in advance through spatial and statistical analysis. Data for existing soil slope failures was collected from geotechnical reports and field visits. A total of 48 slope failures were recorded and analyzed. Six factors, including event precipitation, geological formation, land cover, slope history, slope angle, and elevation were considered to affect highway soil slope stability. The observed trends indicate that precipitation and poor surface or subsurface drainage conditions are principal factors causing slope failures. 96% of the failed slopes have an open drainage section. A majority of the failed slopes lie in regions with relatively high event precipitation ( P>200 mm). 90% of the existing failures are surficial erosion type failures, and only 1 out of the 42 slope failures is deep rotational type failure. More than half of the analyzed slope failures have occurred in regions having low density land cover. 46% of failures are on slopes with slope angles between 20° and 30°. Influx of more data relating to failed slopes should give rise to more trends, and thus the developed slope management system will aid the state highway engineers in prudential budget allocation and prioritizing different remediation projects based on the literature reviewed on the principles, concepts, techniques, and methodology for slope instability evaluation (Leshchinsky et al., 2015).

  3. Ecological investigations on plant associations in differently disturbed heavy-metal contaminated soils of Great Britain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, W

    1968-01-01

    In different areas of Great Britain comparing ecological studies have been made on disturbed and undisturbed heavy metal contaminated soils. In Grizedale (Pennine), sampling of an undisturbed transect having high levels of major nutrients showed marked differentiation within a small area, only related to the plant available levels of zinc, copper, and lead. However, studies on disturbed heavy metal soils and spoil-heaps revealed a low water capacity and a low supply of major nutrients, particularly of N and P. These suggest that here both the enrichment of heavy metals and the considerable decrease of other nutrients are important in determining the heavy metal vegetation, and in maintaining it against other species. The quantity of zinc in plants is not related to the total or plant-available amount of zinc in soil, but confirmed physiological experiments on the influence of phosphorus and different zinc compounds (complexed or inorganic) on the uptake and distribution of zinc in Thlaspi alpestre and Minnartia rerum. Also an antagonism between lead and copper was revealed. 24 references.

  4. A molecular investigation of soil organic carbon composition across a subalpine catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Tieh; Lawrence, Corey R.; Winnick, Matthew J.; Bargar, John R.; Maher, Katharine

    2018-01-01

    The dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) storage and turnover are a critical component of the global carbon cycle. Mechanistic models seeking to represent these complex dynamics require detailed SOC compositions, which are currently difficult to characterize quantitatively. Here, we address this challenge by using a novel approach that combines Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and bulk carbon X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to determine the abundance of SOC functional groups, using elemental analysis (EA) to constrain the total amount of SOC. We used this SOC functional group abundance (SOC-fga) method to compare variability in SOC compositions as a function of depth across a subalpine watershed (East River, Colorado, USA) and found a large degree of variability in SOC functional group abundances between sites at different elevations. Soils at a lower elevation are predominantly composed of polysaccharides, while soils at a higher elevation have more substantial portions of carbonyl, phenolic, or aromatic carbon. We discuss the potential drivers of differences in SOC composition between these sites, including vegetation inputs, internal processing and losses, and elevation-driven environmental factors. Although numerical models would facilitate the understanding and evaluation of the observed SOC distributions, quantitative and meaningful measurements of SOC molecular compositions are required to guide such models. Comparison among commonly used characterization techniques on shared reference materials is a critical next step for advancing our understanding of the complex processes controlling SOC compositions.

  5. Earthquake simulation, actual earthquake monitoring and analytical methods for soil-structure interaction investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, H T [Seismic Center, Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1988-07-01

    Approaches for conducting in-situ soil-structure interaction experiments are discussed. High explosives detonated under the ground can generate strong ground motion to induce soil-structure interaction (SSI). The explosive induced data are useful in studying the dynamic characteristics of the soil-structure system associated with the inertial aspect of the SSI problem. The plane waves generated by the explosives cannot adequately address the kinematic interaction associated with actual earthquakes because of he difference in wave fields and their effects. Earthquake monitoring is ideal for obtaining SSI data that can address all aspects of the SSI problem. The only limitation is the level of excitation that can be obtained. Neither the simulated earthquake experiments nor the earthquake monitoring experiments can have exact similitude if reduced scale test structures are used. If gravity effects are small, reasonable correlations between the scaled model and the prototype can be obtained provided that input motion can be scaled appropriately. The key product of the in-situ experiments is the data base that can be used to qualify analytical methods for prototypical applications. (author)

  6. Wine from the Netherlands: investigating the effect of soil-type on taste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vis, Geert-Jan; Maljers, Denise; Beurskens, Stan

    2016-04-01

    During the last decade professional viticulture has seen a strong increase in the Netherlands, reaching 270 ha in 2015. Although on a European scale this is a small area, the number of prize-winning quality wines is steadily growing. This growth can largely be ascribed to new grape varieties from Germany and Switzerland, that are better adapted to the cooler and moister climate at the northern fringe of the viticultural zone, as well as to increasing viticultural expertise. The distribution of vineyards across the Netherlands shows that they occur on a plethora of substrates. Dutch substrate is dominated by typical lowland deposits such as fluvial and marine sands and clays and aeolian sands. Unlike many European countries, bedrock is scarce. Only in the south-eastern extremity and in the east of the country, carbonate bedrock is present at or near the surface. This wide variety of substrate triggered our interest in the effect of the various soil-types on the smell and taste characteristics of wines. An effect which is often mentioned concerning well-known foreign wines. We wondered whether an Auxerrois wine from carbonate rocks tastes significantly different from a wine from the same grape variety from loess. And how about a Johanniter wine from fluvial deposits versus windblown sands? And what happens if you make wine in exactly the same way with the same grape variety and from the same vineyard, but with three different yeast types? To answer our questions, we selected ten Dutch vineyards with varying soil-types and the grape varieties Auxerrois and Johanniter. In October 2014 we harvested the grapes and wine was made under controlled identical conditions (in a double setup). The wines were scientifically tested at the institute of Viticulture and Oenology in Neustadt, Germany. The results show no significant effect of soil-type on the smell and taste of Dutch wines in our experiment. Varying yeast types (Cryarome, 3079, VL2) used on Souvignier Gris grapes from

  7. Electronic properties of III-nitride semiconductors: A first-principles investigation using the Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Rafael B.; Almeida, J. S. de; Ferreira da Silva, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we use density functional theory to investigate the influence of semilocal exchange and correlation effects on the electronic properties of III-nitride semiconductors considering zinc-blende and wurtzite crystal structures. We find that the inclusion of such effects through the use of the Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson potential yields an excellent description of the electronic structures of these materials giving energy band gaps which are systematically larger than the ones obtained with standard functionals such as the generalized gradient approximation. The discrepancy between the experimental and theoretical band gaps is then significantly reduced with semilocal exchange and correlation effects. However, the effective masses are overestimated in the zinc-blende nitrides, but no systematic trend is found in the wurtzite compounds. New results for energy band gaps and effective masses of zinc-blende and wurtzite indium nitrides are presented

  8. Sorption of PAHs to humic acid- and iron(III)carbon ate particles by using passive dosing vials for investigating the transport of organic contamination in stormwater runoff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Katrine; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen; Baun, Anders

    2013-01-01

    ) has been foun d to facilitate transport of organic contaminants and metals in stormwater runoff system s, but little is known about the role of the colloidal fraction including nano-sized particl es (0.001-1 μm). Based on the large specific surface area of colloids and nanosized particles, t heir...... abundance, and knowledge about their facilitated transport of persistent organic polluti on in natural waters, they are likely to diminish the efficiency of engineered treatment sys tems unless appropriately accounted for. In this work organic and inorganic nanosized partic les were investigated......(III)carbo nate particles (22 nm) sorption experiments are ongoing. Based on these results and a literature review, the importance of including particulate fractions for surface water q uality assessment in relation to the WFD will be discussed....

  9. Impact of Fe(III)-OM complexes and Fe(III) polymerization on SOM pools reactivity under different land uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannetta, B.; Plaza, C.; Zaccone, C.; Siebecker, M. G.; Rovira, P.; Vischetti, C.; Sparks, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) protection and long-term accumulation are controlled by adsorption to mineral surfaces in different ways, depending on its molecular structure and pedo-climatic conditions. Iron (Fe) oxides are known to be key regulators of the soil carbon (C) cycle, and Fe speciation in soils is highly dependent on environmental conditions and chemical interactions with SOM. However, the molecular structure and hydrolysis of Fe species formed in association with SOM is still poorly described. We hypothesize the existence of two pools of Fe which interact with SOM: mononuclear Fe(III)-SOM complexes and precipitated Fe(III) hydroxides. To verify our hypothesis, we investigated the interactions between Fe(III) and physically isolated soil fractions by means of batch experiments at pH 7. Specifically, we examined the fine silt plus clay (FSi+C) fraction, obtained by ultrasonic dispersion and wet sieving. The soil samples spanned several land uses, including coniferous forest (CFS), grassland (GS), technosols (TS) and agricultural (AS) soils. Solid phase products and supernatants were analyzed for C and Fe content. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis were also performed. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to assess the main C functional groups involved in C complexation and desorption experiments. Preliminary linear combination fitting (LCF) of Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra suggested the formation of ferrihydrite-like polymeric Fe(III) oxides in reacted CFS and GS samples, with higher C and Fe concentration. Conversely, mononuclear Fe(III) OM complexes dominated the speciation for TS and AS samples, characterized by lower C and Fe concentration, inhibiting the hydrolysis and polymerization of Fe (III). This approach will help revealing the mechanisms by which SOM pools can control Fe(III) speciation, and will elucidate how both Fe(III

  10. Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: Part III. Investigation of European standard methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Jhy-Charm; Lee, Eun Gyung; Lee, Larry A; Kashon, Michael L; Harper, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Lee et al. (Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: part I. Pulsation measurements. Ann Occup Hyg 2014a;58:60-73) introduced an approach to measure pump pulsation (PP) using a real-world sampling train, while the European Standards (EN) (EN 1232-1997 and EN 12919-1999) suggest measuring PP using a resistor in place of the sampler. The goal of this study is to characterize PP according to both EN methods and to determine the relationship of PP between the published method (Lee et al., 2014a) and the EN methods. Additional test parameters were investigated to determine whether the test conditions suggested by the EN methods were appropriate for measuring pulsations. Experiments were conducted using a factorial combination of personal sampling pumps (six medium- and two high-volumetric flow rate pumps), back pressures (six medium- and seven high-flow rate pumps), resistors (two types), tubing lengths between a pump and resistor (60 and 90 cm), and different flow rates (2 and 2.5 l min(-1) for the medium- and 4.4, 10, and 11.2 l min(-1) for the high-flow rate pumps). The selection of sampling pumps and the ranges of back pressure were based on measurements obtained in the previous study (Lee et al., 2014a). Among six medium-flow rate pumps, only the Gilian5000 and the Apex IS conformed to the 10% criterion specified in EN 1232-1997. Although the AirChek XR5000 exceeded the 10% limit, the average PP (10.9%) was close to the criterion. One high-flow rate pump, the Legacy (PP=8.1%), conformed to the 10% criterion in EN 12919-1999, while the Elite12 did not (PP=18.3%). Conducting supplemental tests with additional test parameters beyond those used in the two subject EN standards did not strengthen the characterization of PPs. For the selected test conditions, a linear regression model [PPEN=0.014+0.375×PPNIOSH (adjusted R2=0.871)] was developed to determine the PP relationship between the published method (Lee et al., 2014a) and the EN methods

  11. Investigation of ratio 'strontium-calcium' in the plants and in the corresponding soil solution for 90Sr and for natural total strontium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prorok, V.V.; Makarenko, T.Yi.; Mel'nichenko, L.Yu.; Mason, K.F.V.; Ganushevich, A.P.; Ostashko, V.V.

    2005-01-01

    Ratios Sr/Ca for natural total strontium and 90 Sr/Ca in the plants and in the corresponding soil solutions for three experimental lands with 'fuel' type of pollution for several plants at natural conditions are determined. The lands with tree different types of soil are at the Exclusive Zone of the Chernobyl Power Station. The obtained experimental results shown that ratio Sr/Ca in plant is equal to this ratio in the corresponding soil solution for all investigated lands and plants. Ratio 90 Sr/Ca in plant exceeds this ratio at the corresponding soil solution

  12. On-site investigations of hydrocarbon contaminated soil by the Pollut-Eval methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoit, Y.; Prigent, S.; Haeseler, F.

    2005-01-01

    The Pollut-Eval method is based on the Rock-Eval pyrolysis method, founded on an IFP patent that has been used for decades for oil prospecting in sedimentary basins all over the world. This equipment provides data on the quantity and the quality of organic matter in sedimentary rocks. With the increasing demand for cost effective and rapid contaminated site diagnosis, it became obvious that the field of application of the Rock-Eval technology should be enlarged to environmental problematic. The Pollut-Eval methodology was developed since 1996 and firstly qualified through the design of a laboratory version. Compared to the previous apparatus dedicated to the geochemistry, innovations allow acquisition of data for accurate quantification of complex organic pollutants and mineral carbon distribution. New methods were developed especially for the characterisation of hydrocarbon pollutants in soil. Compared to kerogen analysis, the characterisation of light petroleum cuts entrapped in soil as pollutants was available by the design of an adapted refrigerated auto-sampler. The prevention of the loss of the high vapour tension pollutants couldn't be avoided for the new environmental field of applications. Site after site, the various experiments involving the 'laboratory' version of the Pollut-Eval analyser extended the application field of the methodology. The efficiency of the thermal extraction applied directly on the soil showed useful advantages compared to conventional solvent extraction techniques, especially for pollutants originating from former gas plants. The method was especially suitable for the determination of the complete carbon mass balance in the case of non-extractable organic pollutant such as coal tar or for heavy petroleum cut such as heavy fuel, vacuum distillation residue and bitumen. By the way, the Pollut-Eval method became rapidly complementary to more conventional GC quantification dedicated to complex organic pollution characterisation. By the

  13. Investigation of soil fertility at a remote site in karachi, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirin, K.; Shafiq, S.; Imad, S.; Alvi, S.K.; Khan, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    This study reveals chemical and physical properties of soils collected from a remote site at Karachi, Pakistan. Altogether 23 parameters were determined. Out of 12 soil samples 11 were categorised as sand or sandy barns, p1-I varied between 7.35-8.49, density ranged between 1.61-2.39 gm/cm3, the conductivity of 1:2 water extracts varied up to a great extent i.e., between 0.437-16.47 MS/M3. Sodium (Na) contents were higher in ammonium acetate extract when compared with 1:2 water extract. The bicarbonate (HCO/sub 3/) contents were ranged between 0. 17-1.73 ppm. The organic matter contents were low (0.81 -2,21%), these soils were also deficient in their macronutrient contents. Specifically, the ranges of nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg) and sulphur (S) were 0.04-i. 16%, 0.25-15.99 ppm, 4.40-135.89 ppm, 0.001-0.199%, 0.001-0.019% and 0.01-0.143%, respectively. Heavy metals were determined in diethylene--triamine-pentaacctic acid (DTPA) extracts and the levels of iron (Fe), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn). and zinc (Zn) in these samples were I.86-3280 ppm, 1.68-7.69 ppm, 16.51-75.28 and 0.25-20.75 ppm, respectively. Toxic heavy metals, lead (Pb) and nickel (Ni) contents were also estimated and their concentration was found low ranging between 0.91-563 ppm and 0.32-1.26 ppm, respectively. (author)

  14. Chemical and microbiological investigations on mineral-oil contaminated soils following on-site regeneration measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollerbach, A.; Teschner, M.; Bosecker, K.; Wehner, H.; Kassner, H.

    1992-01-01

    In the site of a former petroleum refinery, where bombing during the second World War has caused in part deep-down contamination of the ground with petroleum and its products, a pilot study with five on-site biological treatment beds was carried through by different firms with the aim to reduce the hydrocarbon content of the soil to 1 gramme per kilogramme of dry weight. Thus, good comparability of the different regeneration measures was given. Sampling was done at the end of the regeneration experiments by obtaining an average sample. (orig.) [de

  15. Remedial investigation/feasibility study Work Plan and addenda for Operable Unit 4-12: Central Facilities Area Landfills II and III at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keck, K.N.; Stormberg, G.J.; Porro, I.; Sondrup, A.J.; McCormick, S.H.

    1993-07-01

    This document is divided into two main sections -- the Work Plan and the addenda. The Work Plan describes the regulatory history and physical setting of Operable Unit 4-12, previous sampling activities, and data. It also identifies a preliminary conceptual model, preliminary remedial action alternatives, and preliminary applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. In addition, the Work Plan discusses data gaps and data quality objectives for proposed remedial investigation activities. Also included are tasks identified for the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) and a schedule of RI/FS activities. The addenda include details of the proposed field activities (Field Sampling Plan), anticipated quality assurance activities (Quality Assurance Project Plan), policies and procedures to protect RI/FS workers and the environment during field investigations (Health and Safety Plan), and policies, procedures, and activities that the Department of Energy will use to involve the public in the decision-making process concerning CFA Landfills II and III RI/FS activities (Community Relations Plan)

  16. Remedial investigation/feasibility study Work Plan and addenda for Operable Unit 4-12: Central Facilities Area Landfills II and III at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, K.N.; Stormberg, G.J.; Porro, I.; Sondrup, A.J.; McCormick, S.H.

    1993-07-01

    This document is divided into two main sections -- the Work Plan and the addenda. The Work Plan describes the regulatory history and physical setting of Operable Unit 4-12, previous sampling activities, and data. It also identifies a preliminary conceptual model, preliminary remedial action alternatives, and preliminary applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. In addition, the Work Plan discusses data gaps and data quality objectives for proposed remedial investigation activities. Also included are tasks identified for the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) and a schedule of RI/FS activities. The addenda include details of the proposed field activities (Field Sampling Plan), anticipated quality assurance activities (Quality Assurance Project Plan), policies and procedures to protect RI/FS workers and the environment during field investigations (Health and Safety Plan), and policies, procedures, and activities that the Department of Energy will use to involve the public in the decision-making process concerning CFA Landfills II and III RI/FS activities (Community Relations Plan).

  17. A Laboratory Investigation on Shear Strength Behavior of Sandy Soil: Effect of Glass Fiber and Clinker Residue Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouaricha Leyla

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A study was undertaken to investigate the shear strength parameters of treated sands reinforced with randomly distributed glass fibers by carrying out direct shear test after seven days curing periods. Firstly, we studied the fiber content and fiber length effect on the peak shear strength on samples. The second part gives a parametric analysis on the effect of glass fiber and clinker residue content on the shear strength parameters for two types of uniform Algerian sands having different particle sizes (Chlef sand and Rass sand with an average relative density Dr = 50%. Finally, the test results show that the combination of glass fiber and clinker residue content can effectively improve the shear strength parameters of soil in comparison with unreinforced soil. For instance, there is a significant gain for the cohesion and friction angle of reinforced sand of Chlef. Compared to unreinforced sand, the cohesion for sand reinforced with different ratios of clinker residue increased by 4.36 to 43.08 kPa for Chlef sand and by 3.1 to 28.64 kPa for Rass sand. The feature friction angles increased from 38.73° to 43.01° (+4.28°, and after the treatment, clinker residue content of soil evaluated to 5% (WRC = 5%.

  18. A Laboratory Investigation on Shear Strength Behavior of Sandy Soil: Effect of Glass Fiber and Clinker Residue Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaricha, Leyla; Henni, Ahmed Djafar; Lancelot, Laurent

    2017-12-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate the shear strength parameters of treated sands reinforced with randomly distributed glass fibers by carrying out direct shear test after seven days curing periods. Firstly, we studied the fiber content and fiber length effect on the peak shear strength on samples. The second part gives a parametric analysis on the effect of glass fiber and clinker residue content on the shear strength parameters for two types of uniform Algerian sands having different particle sizes (Chlef sand and Rass sand) with an average relative density Dr = 50%. Finally, the test results show that the combination of glass fiber and clinker residue content can effectively improve the shear strength parameters of soil in comparison with unreinforced soil. For instance, there is a significant gain for the cohesion and friction angle of reinforced sand of Chlef. Compared to unreinforced sand, the cohesion for sand reinforced with different ratios of clinker residue increased by 4.36 to 43.08 kPa for Chlef sand and by 3.1 to 28.64 kPa for Rass sand. The feature friction angles increased from 38.73° to 43.01° (+4.28°), and after the treatment, clinker residue content of soil evaluated to 5% (WRC = 5%).

  19. Heavy metal contamination of surface soil in electronic waste dismantling area: site investigation and source-apportionment analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinhui Li; Huabo Duan; Pixing Shi

    2011-07-01

    The dismantling and disposal of electronic waste (e-waste) in developing countries is causing increasing concern because of its impacts on the environment and risks to human health. Heavy-metal concentrations in the surface soils of Guiyu (Guangdong Province, China) were monitored to determine the status of heavy-metal contamination on e-waste dismantling area with a more than 20 years history. Two metalloids and nine metals were selected for investigation. This paper also attempts to compare the data among a variety of e-waste dismantling areas, after reviewing a number of heavy-metal contamination-related studies in such areas in China over the past decade. In addition, source apportionment of heavy metal in the surface soil of these areas has been analysed. Both the MSW open-burning sites probably contained invaluable e-waste and abandoned sites formerly involved in informal recycling activities are the new sources of soil-based environmental pollution in Guiyu. Although printed circuit board waste is thought to be the main source of heavy-metal emissions during e-waste processing, requirement is necessary to soundly manage the plastic separated from e-waste, which mostly contains heavy metals and other toxic substances.

  20. Investigation of the radioactivity in air, water and soil in the Estado de Chihuahua

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montero C, M.E.; Renteria V, M.; Herrera P, E.F.; Villalba, M.L.; Colmenero S, L.H.

    2004-01-01

    The results of the determinations of activities of the series of U-238, Th-232 and the K-40 in soils, of the Rn-222 in the air of the domiciles, and in underground water are presented, as well as the total uranium activity in underground water, product of an extensive sampling in the state of Chihuahua. In two of the aquifers a positive correlation was obtained among the concentration of total uranium and the Rn-222 dissolved in the water of each well. Also it was finds a positive tendency among the averages of the concentration of U-238 in the soil and of the concentration of Rn-222 in the air of the domiciles in different towns, and among the averages of the concentration of U-238 in the floor and of the concentration of the Rn-222 dissolved in the well water in different aquifer. It is suggested that the constitution for rocks more or less uraniferous of the alluvial valleys gives explanation to the observed correlations. (Author)

  1. Application of PIXE analysis to investigation of plants cultivated with contaminated soil of Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, K., E-mail: keizo.ishii@qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Research Center for Remediation Engineering of Living Environments Contaminated with Radioisotopes, Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Terakawa, A.; Matsuyama, S.; Ishizaki, A.; Arai, H.; Osada, N.; Sugai, H.; Takahashi, H. [Research Center for Remediation Engineering of Living Environments Contaminated with Radioisotopes, Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Sera, K. [Cyclotron Research Center, Iwate Medical University, 348-58 Tomegamori, Takizawa, Iwate 020-0173 (Japan); Sasaki, H.; Sasaki, K.; Sawamura, T. [Sasaki Taro memorial PIXE Center, Asano-cho 5, Hakodate 040-0076 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    We present a method to research low radioactive cesium contaminated plants by the use of PIXE analysis. Highly contaminated regions still remain in the Fukushima prefecture. We collected wild plants growing in this area, that is, Butterbur, Welsh onion, Alpine leek and White clover and measured their specific activities of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 40}K. We also measured {sup 137}Cs and {sup 40}K specific activities of soil under these plants. Soil-to-plant transfer factors of {sup 137}Cs were ∼0.02 for 4 wild plants and those of {sup 40}K were ∼0.5 except for White clover. Using PIXE analysis, we measured the concentration of mineral elements in these plants. Among mineral elements, we noted the concentrations of additional alkali metal elements such as Na, K and Rb. The experimental results showed that the concentration of Rb was proportional to the specific activities of {sup 137}Cs except for Welsh onion and other elements had no strong correlation with {sup 137}Cs. These results indicate that there may be correlations between the adsorption of Cs and Rb.

  2. Analysis of plant soil seed banks and seed dispersal vectors: Its potential and limits for forensic investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šumberová, Kateřina; Ducháček, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Plant seeds exhibit many species-specific traits, thus potentially being especially helpful for forensic investigations. Seeds of a broad range of plant species occur in soil seed banks of various habitats and may become attached in large quantities to moving objects. Although plant seeds are now routinely used as trace evidence in forensic practice, only scant information has been published on this topic in the scientific literature. Thus, the standard methods remain unknown to specialists in such botanical subjects as plant ecology and plant geography. These specialists, if made aware of the forensic uses of seeds, could help in development of new, more sophisticated approaches. We aim to bridge the gap between forensic analysts and botanists. Therefore, we explore the available literature and compare it with our own experiences to reveal both the potential and limits of soil seed bank and seed dispersal analysis in forensic investigations. We demonstrate that habitat-specific and thus relatively rare species are of the greatest forensic value. Overall species composition, in terms of species presence/absence and relative abundance can also provide important information. In particular, the ecological profiles of seeds found on any moving object can help us identify the types of environments through which the object had travelled. We discuss the applicability of this approach to various European environments, with the ability to compare seed samples with georeferenced vegetation databases being particularly promising for forensic investigations. We also explore the forensic limitations of soil seed bank and seed dispersal vector analyses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterisation of agricultural waste-derived biochars and their sorption potential for sulfamethoxazole in pasture soil: A spectroscopic investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, Prakash; Sarmah, Ajit K.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of feedstock type and pyrolysis temperatures on the sorptive potential of a model pastoral soil amended with biochars for sulfamethoxazole (SMO), using laboratory batch sorption studies. The results indicated that high temperature chars exhibited enhanced adsorptive potential, compared to low temperature chars. Pine sawdust (PSD) biochar produced at 700 °C using the steam gasification process exhibited the highest sorptive capacity (2-fold greater than the control treatment) for SMO among the three biochars used. Soils amended with green waste (GW) biochars produced at three different pyrolysis temperatures showed a small increase in SMO sorption with the increases in temperature. The NMR spectra, the elemental molar ratios (H/C, O/C) and polarity index (O + N)/C of the biochars revealed that PSD biochar possessed the highest degree of aromatic condensation compared to CC and GW chars. These results correlated well with the sorption affinity of each biochar, with effective distribution coefficient (K d eff ) being highest for PSD and lowest for GW biochars. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results for the biochars showed a relatively large difference in oxygen containing surface functional groups amongst the GW biochars. However, they exhibited nearly identical sorption affinity to SMO, indicating negligible role of oxygen containing surface functional groups on SMO sorption. These observations provide important information on the use of biochars as engineered sorbents for environmental applications, such as reducing the bioavailability of antibiotics and/or predicting the fate of sulfonamides in biochar-amended soils. - Highlights: • High temperature chars showed enhanced adsorptive potential, compared to low temperature chars. • Oxygen containing acidic functional groups of biochar play negligible role in sorption. • Biochar properties like specific surface area and aromaticity enhanced its sorption capacity. • Amendment of

  4. Characterisation of agricultural waste-derived biochars and their sorption potential for sulfamethoxazole in pasture soil: A spectroscopic investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, Prakash; Sarmah, Ajit K., E-mail: a.sarmah@auckland.ac.nz

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of feedstock type and pyrolysis temperatures on the sorptive potential of a model pastoral soil amended with biochars for sulfamethoxazole (SMO), using laboratory batch sorption studies. The results indicated that high temperature chars exhibited enhanced adsorptive potential, compared to low temperature chars. Pine sawdust (PSD) biochar produced at 700 °C using the steam gasification process exhibited the highest sorptive capacity (2-fold greater than the control treatment) for SMO among the three biochars used. Soils amended with green waste (GW) biochars produced at three different pyrolysis temperatures showed a small increase in SMO sorption with the increases in temperature. The NMR spectra, the elemental molar ratios (H/C, O/C) and polarity index (O + N)/C of the biochars revealed that PSD biochar possessed the highest degree of aromatic condensation compared to CC and GW chars. These results correlated well with the sorption affinity of each biochar, with effective distribution coefficient (K{sub d}{sup eff}) being highest for PSD and lowest for GW biochars. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results for the biochars showed a relatively large difference in oxygen containing surface functional groups amongst the GW biochars. However, they exhibited nearly identical sorption affinity to SMO, indicating negligible role of oxygen containing surface functional groups on SMO sorption. These observations provide important information on the use of biochars as engineered sorbents for environmental applications, such as reducing the bioavailability of antibiotics and/or predicting the fate of sulfonamides in biochar-amended soils. - Highlights: • High temperature chars showed enhanced adsorptive potential, compared to low temperature chars. • Oxygen containing acidic functional groups of biochar play negligible role in sorption. • Biochar properties like specific surface area and aromaticity enhanced its sorption capacity.

  5. Investigation of break location effects on thermal-hydraulics during intermediate break loss-of-coolant accident experiments at ROSA-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Yasuo; Tasaka, Kanji

    1986-01-01

    The rig of safety assessment (ROSA)-III facility is a volumetrically scaled (1/424) boiling water reactor (BWR/6) system with an electrically heated core designed for integral loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) and emergency core cooling system (ECCS) tests. Break location effects on thermal-hydraulics during intermediate LOCAs were investigated by using four experiments at the ROSA-III, the 15 and 25 % main recirculation pump suction line break (MRPS-B) experiments, the 21 % single-ended jet pump drive line break (JPD-B) experiment and the 15 % main steam line break (MSL-B) experiment. Water injection from the high pressure core spray (HPCS) was not used in any of the experiments. Failure of ECCS actuation by the high containment pressure was also assumed in the tests. In the MRPS-B experiments, the discharge flow turned from low quality fluid to high quality fluid when the downcomer water level dropped to the main recirculation line outlet elevation, which suppressed coolant loss from the vessel and the core. In the JPD-B experiment, the jet pump drive nozzle was covered with low quality fluid and low quality fluid discharge continued even after the downcomer water level reached the jet pump suction elevation. Low quality fluid discharge ceased after the ADS actuation. It suggestes that the JPD-B LOCA has the possibility of causing larger and more severe core dryout and cladding temperature excursion than the MRPS-B LOCA. The MSL-B LOCA was characterized by mixture level swell in the downcomer and the core. The core mixture level swell resulted in the much later core dryout initiation than that in the MRPS-B LOCA, however, ECCS actuation was also delayed because of slow downcomer water level drop. (author)

  6. Investigation of the Possibility of Phytoremediating a Soil Contaminated with Anthracene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ahmadi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs are one of the most important organic pollutants frequently found in the environment. In this experiment, the effect of phytoremediation as a cost effective method was studied on the concentration of anthracene (C14H10 which is one of PAHs. The effect of sorghum (V1, hairy vetch (V2 and oat (V3 was studied under four concentrations of anthracene (S1, S2, S3 and S4 in soil. In S1 level which pollution was the lowest, the three plants had the highest reduction rate. The reduction rate was decreased by increasing the pollution level (S2 and S3,; the lowest reduction rate was observed in S4 level which had the highest pollution level. There was significant difference between the three plants and the fallow. Generally, hairy vetch had the highest phytoremediating capacity and resistance compared with the other plants.

  7. Optimising the use of marine tephrochronology in the North Atlantic: a detailed investigation of the Faroe Marine Ash Zones II, III and IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Adam J.; Davies, Siwan M.; Abbott, Peter M.; Rasmussen, Tine L.; Palmer, Adrian P.

    2014-12-01

    Tephrochronology is central to the INTIMATE goals for testing the degree of climatic synchroneity during abrupt climatic events that punctuated the last glacial period. Since their identification in North Atlantic marine sequences, the Faroe Marine Ash Zone II (FMAZ II), FMAZ III and FMAZ IV have received considerable attention due to their potential for high-precision synchronisation with the Greenland ice-cores. In order to optimise the use of these horizons as isochronous markers, a detailed re-investigation of their geochemical composition, sedimentology and the processes that deposited each ash zone is presented. Shard concentration profiles, geochemical homogeneity and micro-sedimentological structures are investigated for each ash zone preserved within core JM11-19PC, retrieved from the southeastern Norwegian Sea on the central North Faroe Slope. This approach allows a thorough assessment of primary ash-fall preservation and secondary depositional features and demonstrates its value for assessing depositional integrity in the marine environment. Results indicate that the FMAZ II and IV are well-resolved primary deposits that can be used as isochrons for high-precision correlation studies. We outline key recommendations for future marine tephra studies and provide a protocol for optimising the application of tephrochronology to meet the INTIMATE synchronisation goals.

  8. GS Soil - Assessment and strategic development of INSPIRE compliant Geodata-Services for European Soil Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Paul Henning; Münier, Bernd

    facilities and long term observations as part of the Annex III theme "Environmental Monitoring Facilities", • Information about the soil related aspects of Annex III theme "Natural Risk Zones" as e.g. landslides, soil erosion, soil compaction, soil organic carbon decline, salinization, acidification and soil...

  9. Preliminary study on the use of the 137Cs method for soil erosion investigation in the pampean region of Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujan, A.; Yanez, M.S.; Santanatoglia, O.J.; Chagas, C.; Massobrio, M.; Castiglioni, M.; Ciallella, H.; Fernandez, J.

    2000-01-01

    Soil erosion is the most important degradation process in Argentine. According to the estimation of 4.9 million ha in Pampa Ondulada Region, 1.600.000 ha (36% of agricultural soils) are affected by the erosion. Field measurements of soil erosion and sediment deposition using classical techniques are difficult, time consuming, and expensive but indispensable to feed the prediction models for conservation practices design and farm planning. Many authors have reported that the measurement of fallout nuclides is useful tool to characterize geomorphical processes. Walling and He proposes models for converting 137 Cs depletion/enrichment amounts to net soil loss/deposition. These models are based in the comparison between a reference 137 Cs profile in a long term undisturbed site (control site) and the 137 Cs profiles in the suspected eroded or deposited sites in the landscape. The aim of this study is to provide a complete and well representative set of data on the erosion intensity in topographical conditions for the Pampa Ondulada Region in Argentine by using a tracer technique. The study area is a small watershed (about 300 ha), located in Arroyo del Tala medium basin, within Partido of San Pedro in Buenos Aires Province, Argentine. This paper presents a group of results from a detailed investigation of erosion and sediment delivery, within a 49 ha cultivated field study site in this watershed. The base of sampling strategy is the grid approach. A reference inventory, representing the local fallout input, was searched for at a site experiencing neither erosion nor deposition. Radiocaesium analyses were made at the Nuclear Regulatory Authority Laboratory by a GE Hp detector. To make an interpretation of 137 Cs distribution of soil losses and sedimentation, the Mass Balance Model 2 was used (Walling and He 1997). The erosion/deposition rates from Mass Balance Model 2 are in the range of 0 to -30 t·ha -1 ·y -1 for erosion, and 0 to 19 t·ha -1 ·y -1 for deposition

  10. Quantum Chemical Investigation of the Transition States and Intermediates for the Reaction of the Nitrosonium Ion with the Pentaammineazidocobalt(III) Ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotzinger, François P

    2016-12-19

    The water exchange reaction on Co(NH 3 ) 5 OH 2 3+ was investigated with various density functionals and basis sets. A Gibbs activation energy (ΔG ⧧ ) agreeing with experiment was obtained with the long-range-corrected functionals ωB97X-D3 and LC-BOP-LRD, SMD hydration, and modified Karlsruhe def2-TZVP basis sets. This computational technique was then applied to the reaction of NO + with Co(NH 3 ) 5 N 3 2+ . All of the possible pathways were investigated, NO + attack at the terminal N of Co(NH 3 ) 5 N 3 2+ via the E and the Z isomers of the transition states, and NO + attack at the bound N of azide, also via both isomers. The most favorable pathway proceeds via the attack at the bound N via the Z isomer. This leads to the intermediate with an oxatetrazole ligand bound to Co(III) at the N in the 3-position, Co(NH 3 ) 5 (cycl-N 4 O) 3+ , which undergoes N 2 elimination to yield the Co(NH 3 ) 5 N 2 O 3+ intermediate. The subsequent substitution of N 2 O by water follows the I d mechanism with retention of the configuration. No evidence for the existence of the square-pyramidal pentacoordinated intermediate Co(NH 3 ) 5 3+ was found. All of the investigated intermediates, Co(NH 3 ) 5 N 2 3+ , Co(NH 3 ) 5 [E-N(N 2 )(NO)] 3+ , Co(NH 3 ) 5 (E-ON 4 ) 3+ , Co(NH 3 ) 5 ON 2 3+ , Co(NH 3 ) 5 (cycl-N 4 O) 3+ , and Co(NH 3 ) 5 N 2 O 3+ , exhibit short lifetimes of less than ∼60 μs and react via the I d mechanism.

  11. Phonon and free-charge carrier properties in group-III nitride heterostructures investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry and optical Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeche, Stefan

    The material class of group-III nitrides gained tremendous technological importance for optoelectronic and high-power/high-frequency amplification devices. Tunability of the direct band gap from 0.65 eV (InN) to 6.2 eV (AlN) by alloying, high breakthrough voltages and intrinsic mobilities, as well as the formation of highly mobile 2d electron gases (2DEG) at heterointerfaces make these compounds ideal for many applications. GaN and Ga-rich alloys are well studied and current research is mainly device-oriented. For example, choice and quality of the gate dielectric significantly influence device performance in high-electron mobility transistors (HEMT) which utilize highly mobile 2DEGs at heterointerfaces. Experimental access to the 2DEG channel properties without influence from parasitic currents or contact properties are desirable. In- and Al-rich ternary alloys are less explored than Ga-rich compounds. For InN and In-rich alloys, while many material parameters such as stiffness constants or effective mass values are largely unknown, reliable p-type doping is a major challenge, also because p-type conducting channels are buried within highly conductive n-type material formed at the surface and interfaces preventing electrical characterization. For AlN and high-Al content alloys, doping mechanisms are not understood and reliable fabrication of material with high free-charge carrier (FCC) concentrations was achieved just recently. Difficulties to form ohmic contacts impair electrical measurements and optical characterization is impeded by lack of high-energy excitation sources. In this work, spectroscopic ellipsometry over the wide spectral range from the THz to VUV in combination with optical Hall effect (generalized ellipsometry with applied magnetic field) from THz to MIR are applied in order to investigate the phonon modes and FCC properties in group-III nitride heterostructures. Adequate model descriptions and analysis strategies are introduced which allow

  12. Investigation of antioxidative and anticancer potentials of Streptomyces sp. MUM256 isolated from Malaysia mangrove soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Loh eTeng Hern

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A Streptomyces strain, MUM256 was isolated from Tanjung Lumpur mangrove soil in Malaysia. Characterization of the strain showed that it has properties consistent with those of the members of the genus Streptomyces. In order to explore the potential bioactivities, extract of the fermented broth culture of MUM256 was prepared with organic solvent extraction method. DPPH and SOD activity were utilized to examine the antioxidant capacity and the results have revealed the potency of MUM256 in superoxide anion scavenging activity in dose-dependent manner. The cytotoxicity of MUM256 extract was determined using cell viability assay against 8 different panels of human cancer cell lines. Among all the tested cancer cells, HCT116 was the most sensitive toward the extract treatment. At the highest concentration of tested extract, the result showed 2.3, 2.0 and 1.8 folds higher inhibitory effect against HCT116, HT29 and Caco-2 respectively when compared to normal cell line. This result has demonstrated that MUM256 extract was selectively cytotoxic towards colon cancer cell lines. In order to determine the constituents responsible for its bioactivities, the extract was then subjected to chemical analysis using GC-MS. The analysis resulted in the identification of chemical constituents including phenolic and pyrrolopyrazine compounds which may responsible for antioxidant and anticancer activities observed. Based on the findings of this study, the presence of bioactive constituents in MUM256 extract could be a potential source for the development of antioxidative and chemopreventive agents.

  13. A Range-Wide Experiment to Investigate Nutrient and Soil Moisture Interactions in Loblolly Pine Plantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney E. Will

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The future climate of the southeastern USA is predicted to be warmer, drier and more variable in rainfall, which may increase drought frequency and intensity. Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda is the most important commercial tree species in the world and is planted on ~11 million ha within its native range in the southeastern USA. A regional study was installed to evaluate effects of decreased rainfall and nutrient additions on loblolly pine plantation productivity and physiology. Four locations were established to capture the range-wide variability of soil and climate. Treatments were initiated in 2012 and consisted of a factorial combination of throughfall reduction (approximate 30% reduction and fertilization (complete suite of nutrients. Tree and stand growth were measured at each site. Results after two growing seasons indicate a positive but variable response of fertilization on stand volume increment at all four sites and a negative effect of throughfall reduction at two sites. Data will be used to produce robust process model parameterizations useful for simulating loblolly pine growth and function under future, novel climate and management scenarios. The resulting improved models will provide support for developing management strategies to increase pine plantation productivity and carbon sequestration under a changing climate.

  14. Investigation on the Binding of Polycyclic AromaticHydrocarbons with Soil Organic Matter: A Theoretical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patchreenart Saparpakorn

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are ubiquitous contaminants of the terrestrial environment that have been designated as Environmental Protection Agency (EPA Priority Pollutants. In this study, molecular modeling was used to examine the physical and chemical characteristics of soil organic matter (SOM, fulvic acid (FA and humic acid (HA, as well as their binding interactions with PAHs. The molecular structures of 18 PAHs were built by using the SYBYL 7.0 program and then fully optimized by a semiempirical (AM1 method. A molecular docking program, AutoDock 3.05, was used to calculate the binding interactions between the PAHs, and three molecular structure models including FA (Buffle’s model, HA (Stevenson’s model and SOM (Schulten and Schnitzer’s model. The π-π interactions and H-bonding interactions were found to play an important role in the intermolecular bonding of the SOM/PAHs complexes. In addition, significant correlations between two chemical properties, boiling point (bp and octanol/water partition coefficient (Log Kow and final docking energies were observed. The preliminary docking results provided knowledge of the important binding modes to FA, HA and SOM, and thereby to predict the sorption behavior of PAHs and other pollutants.

  15. Synthesis, spectroscopy and biological investigations of manganese(III) Schiff base complexes derived from heterocyclic β-diketone with various primary amine and 2,2'-bipyridyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surati, Kiran R.

    2011-06-01

    The mixed ligand mononuclear complex [Mn(bipy)(HPMFP)(OAc)]ClO 4 was synthesized by reaction of Mn(OAc) 3·2H 2O with HPMFP and 2,2'-bipyridyl. The corresponding Schiff base complexes were prepared by condensation of [Mn(bipy)(HPMFP)(OAc)]ClO 4 with ethylenediamine, ethanolamine and glycine (where HPMFP = 1-phenyl-3methyl-4-formyl-2-pyrazolin-5one, bipy = 2,2'-bipyridyl). All the compounds have been characterized by elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, conductometry measurements and 1H and 13C NMR, FT-IR, mass spectrometry. Electronic spectral and magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate square pyramidal geometry around manganese(III) ion. The thermal stabilities, activation energy E*, entropy change Δ S*, enthalpy change Δ H* and heat capacity of thermal degradation for these complexes were determined by TGA and DSC. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity of four coordination compounds and ligand HPMFP were investigated. In vitro activates of Bacillus subtillis (MTCC-619), Staphylococcus aureus (MTCC-96), Escherichia coli (MTCC-722) and Klebsiella pneumonia (MTCC-109) bacteria and the fungus Candida albicans (ATCC-90028) were determined. All the compounds showed good antimicrobial activity. The antimicrobial activities increased as formation of Schiff base.

  16. USDA-ARS and US EPA scientific investigations concerning biochars impact on soil health characteristics, microbial transport, and environmental restoration of mine-impacted soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochar is being evaluated by scientists from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS) for its potential to sequester soil C, to improve soil health, and to increase crop yields. ARS scientists from multiple locations (Florence SC, K...

  17. Laboratory test investigations on soil water characteristic curve and air permeability of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianyong; Wu, Xun; Ai, Yingbo; Zhang, Zhen

    2018-05-01

    The air permeability coefficient has a high correlation with the water content of municipal solid waste. In this study, continuous drying methodology using a tension meter was employed to construct the soil water characteristic curve of municipal solid waste (M-SWCC). The municipal solid waste air permeability test was conducted by a newly designed apparatus. The measured M-SWCC was well reproduced by the van Genuchten (V-G) model and was used to predict the parameters of typical points in M-SWCC, including saturated water content, field capacity, residual water content and water content at the inflection point. It was found that the M-SWCC was significantly influenced by void ratio. The final evaporation and test period of M-SWCC increase with the increase in void ratio of municipal solid waste. The evolution of air permeability coefficient with water content of municipal solid waste depicted three distinct characteristic stages. It was observed that the water contents that corresponded to the two cut-off points of the three stages were residual water content and water content at the inflection point, respectively. The air permeability coefficient of municipal solid waste decreased with the increase of the water content from zero to the residual water content. The air permeability coefficient was almost invariable when the water content increased from residual water content to the water content at the inflection point. When the water content of municipal solid waste exceeded the water content at the inflection point, the air permeability coefficient sharply decreased with the increase of water content.

  18. Investigation of the variation of the specific heat capacity of local soil samples from the Niger delta, Nigeria with moisture content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ofoegbu, C.O.; Adjepong, S.K.

    1987-11-01

    Results of an investigation of the variation, with moisture content, of the specific heat capacity of samples of three texturally different types of soil (clayey, sandy and sandy loam) obtained from the Niger delta area of Nigeria, are presented. The results show that the specific heat capacities of the soils studied, increase with moisture content. This increase is found to be linear for the entire range of moisture contents considered (0-25%), in the case of the sandy loam soil while for the clayey and sandy soils the specific heat capacity is found to increase linearly with moisture content up to about 15% after which the increase becomes parabolic. The rate of increase of specific heat capacity with moisture content appears to be highest in the clayey soil and lowest in the sandy soil. It is thought that the differences in the rates of increase of specific heat capacity with moisture content, observed for the soils, reflect the soils' water-retention capacities. (author) 3 refs, 5 figs

  19. Investigation of Different Forms of Potassium as a Function of Clay Mineralogy and Soil Evolution in Some Soils of Fars Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sadri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The optimum and sustainable use of soil is only possible with a correct and complete understanding of its properties. Potassium (K+ is an essential element for plant growth and is a dynamic ion in the soil system and its importance in agriculture is well recognized. According to increasing order of plant availability, soil K exists in four forms: mineral (5000-25000 ppm, nonexchangeable (50-750 ppm, exchangeable (40-600 ppm, and solution (1-10 ppm. K cycling or transformations among the K forms in soils are dynamic. The objectives of the present research were to study the relationship between different forms of potassium and clay mineralogy as well as soil evolution of 14 surface soil samples from some selected locations of Fars Province. Materials and methods: Fars provinces, with an area of 122000 km2 located in southern Iran. The elevation varies from 500 m to 4400 m above mean sea level. Mean annual precipitation ranges from about 350 mm to 850 mm. Mean annual temperature ranges from 10°C to 24°C. According to Soil Moisture and Temperature Regime Map of Iran, the soils comprise xeric, and ustic moisture regimes along with mesic, thermic and hyperthemic temperature regimes. Based on the previous soil survey maps of Fars province, 14 surface soil samples were collected. Routine physicochemical analyses and clay mineralogy were performed on soil samples. Soil reaction, texture, electrical conductivity, calcium carbonate, and gypsum were identified. Soluble potassium, exchangeable potassium, non exchangeable potassium, and mineral potassium were measured. The amounts of K forms in each sample were determined. Total K was determined following digestion (110°C of soil with 48 % HF and 6 M HCl. Water soluble K was measured in the saturated extract. Exchangeable K was extracted with 20 ml 1.0 M NH4OAc (pH 7.0 for 5 min. Nitric acid-extractable K was measured by extraction of a soil sample with boiling 1.0 M HNO3 for 1 h. Potassium

  20. The use of radioisotopes in the study of soil fertility III. Comparison between different formula used for the calculation of the available nutrient contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, F. de A.F.

    1976-01-01

    Data on available phosphorus in soils published by Neptune et Campanelli (1961) and Campanelli (1962) were used by the author to show the identity of the formulas used by fried et Dean (1952), Larsen (1952), Barbier, Lesaint et Tyszkeiwicz (1954) and Mello (1967-1969) [pt

  1. Investigation of the copper contents in vineyard soil, grape must and wine and the relationship among them in the Huaizhuo Basin Region, China: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangyu; Ma, Tingting; Yu, Jing; Huang, Weidong; Fang, Yulin; Zhan, Jicheng

    2018-02-15

    The copper contents in vineyard soil, grape must and wine and the relationship among them in the Huaizhuo Basin Region, China, were investigated. The results showed that the copper pollution status in vineyard soils, grapes and wines in the investigated area in China is under control, with only 4 surface soil (0-20cm) samples over maximum residue limits (MRL) and no grape or wine samples over MRL. Different vineyards, grape varieties, vine ages, and training systems all significantly influenced the copper contents in the vineyard soils, grape and wines. Additionally, the copper levels in the vineyard soils, grapes and wines all had some correlation. In wine samples, the copper contents ranged from 0.52 to 663μg/L, which is only approximately one percent the level found in grapes and one ten-thousandth that found in soils. Of the wine samples, red wines showed a significantly higher copper content than white wines, while in the red/white grape and soil samples, no significant differences were observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Thallium speciation in plant tissues-Tl(III) found in Sinapis alba L. grown in soil polluted with tailing sediment containing thallium minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnodębska-Ostręga, Beata; Sadowska, Monika; Ostrowska, Sylwia

    2012-05-15

    Besides the dominant species in plants-Tl(I), noticeable amounts of Tl(III) (about 10% of total Tl content) were found in extracts of plants cultivated in the presence of tailing sediments, which are the main source of anthropogenic thallium already present in the environment. It is an important step of gaining knowledge about the detoxification mechanisms developed by Sinapis alba. This plant species is highly tolerant to Tl and it is able to cumulate high amounts of Tl and transport it into the above-ground organs. For more adequate estimation of accumulating abilities of S. alba, the elements' bioavailability was taken into consideration. The obtained bioconcentration factors of Cd (AF=0.6) and Zn (AF=1-2) were significantly lower than of Tl (AF=100-200). The biomass production was similar to the biomass of control cultivation. The results were based on ICP MS measurements of total elements' content and HPLC ICP MS for speciation analysis. The quality of obtained results was evaluated based on the intermethod comparison with voltammetry as a reference method. Comparison of data obtained using ICP MS and electrochemical methods (after a proper chemical treatment) was also used for indication of Tl(III) presence and for proving that Tl(I) was not transferred into Tl(III) during analytical procedures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. An in situ investigation of the influence of a controlled burn on the thermophysical properties of a dry soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. J. Massman; J. M. Frank

    2004-01-01

    High soil temperatures associated with fire influence forests and their ability to regenerate after a fire by altering soil properties and soil chemistry and by killing microbes, plant roots, and seeds. Because intense wild fires are an increasingly common component of the landscape (Graham 2003) and because fire is frequently used by land managers to reduce surface...

  4. Investigation into macroscopic and microscopic behaviors of wet granular soils using discrete element method and X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, Vinh-Du; Tang, Anh-Minh; Roux, Jean-Noël; Pereira, Jean-Michel; Aimedieu, Patrick; Bornert, Michel

    2017-06-01

    We present an investigation into macroscopic and microscopic behaviors of wet granular soils using the discrete element method (DEM) and the X-ray Computed Tomography (XRCT) observations. The specimens are first prepared in very loose states, with frictional spherical grains in the presence of a small amount of an interstitial liquid. Experimental oedometric tests are carried out with small glass beads, while DEM simulations implement a model of spherical grains joined by menisci. Both in experiments and in simulations, loose configurations with solid fraction as low as 0.30 are prepared under low stress, and undergo a gradual collapse in compression, until the solid fraction of cohesionless bead packs (0.58 to 0.6) is obtained. In the XRCT tests, four 3D tomography images corresponding to different typical stages of the compression curve are used to characterize the microstructure.

  5. Preliminary investigations to assess the usefulness of Be-7 as a radiotracer in soil covered by vegetation [Activities of the Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Laboratory, Seibersdorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iurian, Andra-Rada; Dercon, Gerd; Adu-Gyamfi, Joseph; Mabit, Lionel; Kis-Benedek, Gyula; Ceccatelli, Alessia; Tarjan, Sandor; Blake, William

    2014-01-01

    Different factors may affect the extent of radionuclides’ interception by plants and therewith their inventories in soil covered areas. In particular, there is interest in assessing the impact of the vegetation factor for different soil coverage conditions, when using 7 Be as radiotracer of soil redistribution in cropped farmland. Our results suggest that 7 Be foliar interception of bean plants is likely to affect the radionuclide inventories and their spatial uniformity in covered soil. Reliable results on short-term erosion using 7 Be can be obtained in cropped farmland with limited cover, but only when taking into account the interception factor. The impact of the interception factor is highly dependent on rainfall intensity and duration, crop species and the growing stage of the plants. Further investigations into these variables are required

  6. Preliminary investigations to assess the usefulness of Be-7 as a radiotracer in soil covered by vegetation [Activities of the Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Laboratory, Seibersdorf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iurian, Andra-Rada [Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Dercon, Gerd; Adu-Gyamfi, Joseph; Mabit, Lionel [Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Laboratory, Joint FAO/IAEA Division for Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Seibersdorf (Austria); Kis-Benedek, Gyula; Ceccatelli, Alessia; Tarjan, Sandor [3Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, IAEA Environment Laboratories, Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, International Atomic Energy Agency, Seibersdorf (Austria); Blake, William [School of Geography, University of Plymouth, Plymouth (United Kingdom); others, and

    2014-07-15

    Different factors may affect the extent of radionuclides’ interception by plants and therewith their inventories in soil covered areas. In particular, there is interest in assessing the impact of the vegetation factor for different soil coverage conditions, when using {sup 7}Be as radiotracer of soil redistribution in cropped farmland. Our results suggest that {sup 7}Be foliar interception of bean plants is likely to affect the radionuclide inventories and their spatial uniformity in covered soil. Reliable results on short-term erosion using {sup 7}Be can be obtained in cropped farmland with limited cover, but only when taking into account the interception factor. The impact of the interception factor is highly dependent on rainfall intensity and duration, crop species and the growing stage of the plants. Further investigations into these variables are required.

  7. Systematically biological prioritizing remediation sites based on datasets of biological investigations and heavy metals in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Chih; Lin, Yu-Pin; Anthony, Johnathen

    2015-04-01

    Heavy metal pollution has adverse effects on not only the focal invertebrate species of this study, such as reduction in pupa weight and increased larval mortality, but also on the higher trophic level organisms which feed on them, either directly or indirectly, through the process of biomagnification. Despite this, few studies regarding remediation prioritization take species distribution or biological conservation priorities into consideration. This study develops a novel approach for delineating sites which are both contaminated by any of 5 readily bioaccumulated heavy metal soil contaminants and are of high ecological importance for the highly mobile, low trophic level focal species. The conservation priority of each site was based on the projected distributions of 6 moth species simulated via the presence-only maximum entropy species distribution model followed by the subsequent application of a systematic conservation tool. In order to increase the number of available samples, we also integrated crowd-sourced data with professionally-collected data via a novel optimization procedure based on a simulated annealing algorithm. This integration procedure was important since while crowd-sourced data can drastically increase the number of data samples available to ecologists, still the quality or reliability of crowd-sourced data can be called into question, adding yet another source of uncertainty in projecting species distributions. The optimization method screens crowd-sourced data in terms of the environmental variables which correspond to professionally-collected data. The sample distribution data was derived from two different sources, including the EnjoyMoths project in Taiwan (crowd-sourced data) and the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) ?eld data (professional data). The distributions of heavy metal concentrations were generated via 1000 iterations of a geostatistical co-simulation approach. The uncertainties in distributions of the heavy

  8. Richard III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Palle Schantz

    2017-01-01

    Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"......Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"...

  9. Quadrivalent meningococcal vaccination of adults: phase III comparison of an investigational conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM, with the licensed vaccine, Menactra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisinger, Keith S; Baxter, Roger; Block, Stanley L; Shah, Jina; Bedell, Lisa; Dull, Peter M

    2009-12-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis in the United States, with the highest case fatality rates reported for individuals > or = 15 years of age. This study compares the safety and immunogenicity of the Novartis Vaccines investigational quadrivalent meningococcal CRM(197) conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM, to those of the licensed meningococcal conjugate vaccine, Menactra, when administered to healthy adults. In this phase III multicenter study, 1,359 adults 19 to 55 years of age were randomly assigned to one of four groups (1:1:1:1 ratio) to receive a single dose of one of three lots of MenACWY-CRM or a single dose of Menactra. Serum samples obtained at baseline and 1 month postvaccination were tested for serogroup-specific serum bactericidal activity using human complement (hSBA). The hSBA titers following vaccination with MenACWY-CRM and Menactra were compared in noninferiority and prespecified superiority analyses. Reactogenicity was similar in the MenACWY-CRM and Menactra groups, and neither vaccine was associated with a serious adverse event. When compared with Menactra, MenACWY-CRM met the superiority criteria for the proportions of recipients achieving a seroresponse against serogroups C, W-135, and Y and the proportion of subjects achieving postvaccination titers of > or = 1:8 for serogroups C and Y. MenACWY-CRM's immunogenicity was statistically noninferior (the lower limit of the two-sided 95% confidence interval was more than -10%) to that of Menactra for all four serogroups, with the postvaccination hSBA geometric mean titers being consistently higher for MenACWY-CRM than for Menactra. MenACWY-CRM is well tolerated in adults 19 to 55 years of age, with immune responses to each of the serogroups noninferior and, in some cases, statistically superior to those to Menactra.

  10. Experimental investigation of the dielectric properties of soil under hydraulic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner, Tilman; Bore, Thierry; Karlovšek, Jurij; Scheuermann, Alexander; Wagner, Norman

    2017-01-01

    An experimental set-up was developed in order to determine the coupled hydraulic, dielectric and mechanical properties of granular media under hydraulic loading. The set-up consisted of a modified column for permeability tests involving a flow meter and pressure transducers along the sample to quantify the hydraulic gradient. A newly developed open-ended coaxial probe allowed the measurement of the frequency dependent dielectric permittivity of the material under test. The shear strength of the sample within the column was measured using a conventional vane shear device. In this paper, the overall set-up is introduced with focus on the open-ended coaxial probe. The design and calibration of the probe are introduced in detail. A numerical study showed that the sensitive cylindrical volume of the probe was approximately 150 mm in diameter with a depth of 65 mm. An investigation with glass beads showed that the set-up allowed the parameterization of the hydraulic, mechanic and dielectric parameters of granular materials under the influence of vertical flow. A satisfactorily good correlation between porosity and the real part of the dielectric permittivity was detected. The critical hydraulic gradient defining the transition of a fixed bed of particles to fluidization was characterized by a sharp peak in the evolution of the hydraulic conductivity and could easily be determined from the measurements. The shear strength of the material under test reduces linearly with increasing hydraulic gradient. Future investigations will be carried out to provide the required parameterizations for experimental and numerical investigations of the internal erosion of granular media. (paper)

  11. PARDISEKO III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, H.; Sack, C.

    1975-05-01

    This report gives a detailed description of the latest version of the PARDISEKO code, PARDISEKO III, with particular emphasis on the numerical and programming methods employed. The physical model and its relation to nuclear safety as well as a description and the results of confirming experiments are treated in detail in the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre report KFK-1989. (orig.) [de

  12. DFT/TDDFT investigation on the electronic structures and photophysical properties of phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes with 2-(pyridin-2-yl)-benzo[d]imidazole ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, Xiaohong, E-mail: shangxiaohong58@aliyun.com [College of Chemistry and Life Science, Changchun University of Technology, Changchun 130012 (China); Han, Deming [School of Life Science and Technology, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China); Li, Dongfeng [College of Chemistry and Life Science, Changchun University of Technology, Changchun 130012 (China); Zhang, Gang [State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)

    2014-03-15

    We have reported a theoretical analysis of a series of heteroleptic iridium(III) complexes (mpmi){sub 2}Ir(pybi) [mpmi=1-(4-tolyl)-3-methyl-imidazole, pybi=2-(pyridin-2-yl)-benzo[d]imidazole] (1a), (fpmi){sub 2}Ir(pybi) [fpmi=1-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-3-methyl-imidazole] (1b), (tfpmi){sub 2}Ir(pybi) [tfpmi=1-methyl-3-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-imidazole] (1c), (pypmi){sub 2}Ir(pybi) [pypmi=3-(3-methyl-imidazol)-pyrazole] (2a), (phpymi){sub 2}Ir(pybi) [phpymi=3-(3-methyl-imidazol)-5-phenyl-pyrazole] (2b), and (inpymi){sub 2}Ir(pybi) [inpymi=3-(3-methyl-imidazol)-indeno[1,2-c]pyrazole] (2c) by using the density functional theory (DFT) method to investigate their electronic structures and photophysical properties and obtain further insights into the phosphorescent efficiency mechanism. By changing cyclometalated ligands, the conjugation length, and substituents of the cyclometalated ligands, one can tune the emission color from green (λ{sub em}=520 nm) to orange (λ{sub em}=592 nm). Complexes 1a, 1b, 2a, and 2b have the almost identical emission wavelength about 550 nm, while 592 nm for 1c and 520 nm for 2c are red shifted and blue shifted, respectively, relative to 1a. The calculated results indicate that, for 1b and 1c, the substituents of −F and −CF{sub 3} at the phenyl moiety cause a poor hole-injection ability compared with that of 1a. For all these complexes studied, the hole-transporting performances are better than the electron-transporting ones. The difference between reorganization energies for hole transport (λ{sub ih}) and reorganization energies for electron transport (λ{sub ie}) for complex 1c are relatively smaller, indicating that the hole and electron transfer balance could be achieved more easily in the emitting layer. The alteration of cyclometalated ligands with different conjugation lengths and substituents has an impact on the optoelectronic properties of these complexes. It is believed that the larger metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT

  13. The effect of soil type on the bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghollahi, Ali; Fazaelipoor, Mohammad Hassan; Schaffie, Mahin

    2016-09-15

    In this research the bioremediation of four different types of contaminated soils was monitored as a function of time and moisture content. The soils were categorized as sandy soil containing 100% sand (type I), clay soil containing more than 95% clay (type II), coarse grained soil containing 68% gravel and 32% sand (type III), and coarse grained with high clay content containing 40% gravel, 20% sand, and 40% clay (type IV). The initially clean soils were contaminated with gasoil to the concentration of 100 g/kg, and left on the floor for the evaporation of light hydrocarbons. A full factorial experimental design with soil type (four levels), and moisture content (10 and 20%) as the factors was employed. The soils were inoculated with petroleum degrading microorganisms. Soil samples were taken on days 90, 180, and 270, and the residual total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) was extracted using soxhlet apparatus. The moisture content of the soils was kept almost constant during the process by intermittent addition of water. The results showed that the efficiency of bioremediation was affected significantly by the soil type (Pvalue soil with the initial TPH content of 69.62 g/kg, and the lowest for the clay soil (23.5%) with the initial TPH content of 69.70 g/kg. The effect of moisture content on bioremediation was not statistically significant for the investigated levels. The removal percentage in the clay soil was improved to 57% (within a month) in a separate experiment by more frequent mixing of the soil, indicating low availability of oxygen as a reason for low degradation of hydrocarbons in the clay soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Annual report on the Background Soil Characterization Project on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Results of Phase 1 investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, D.R.; Goddard, P.L.; Hatmaker, T.L.; Hook, L.A.; Jackson, B.L.; Kimbrough, C.W.; Lee, S.Y.; Lietzke, D.A.; McGin, C.W.; Nourse, B.D.; Schmoyer, R.L.; Shaw, R.A.; Stinnette, S.E.; Switek, J.; Wright, J.C.; Ammons, J.T.; Branson, J.L.; Burgoa, B.B.

    1993-05-01

    Many constituents of potential concern for human health occur naturally at low concentrations in undisturbed soils. The Background soil Characterization Project (BSCP) was undertaken to provide background concentration data on potential contaminants in natural soils on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The objectives of the BSCP are to provide baseline data for contaminated site assessment and estimates of potential human health risk associated with background concentrations of hazardous and other constituents in native soils. This report presents, evaluates, and documents data and results obtained in Phase I of the project. It is intended to be a stand-alone document for application and use in structuring and conducting remedial investigation and remedial action projects in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program

  15. Annual report on the Background Soil Characterization Project on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Results of Phase 1 investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, D.R.; Goddard, P.L.; Hatmaker, T.L.; Hook, L.A.; Jackson, B.L.; Kimbrough, C.W.; Lee, S.Y.; Lietzke, D.A.; McGin, C.W.; Nourse, B.D.; Schmoyer, R.L.; Shaw, R.A.; Stinnette, S.E.; Switek, J.; Wright, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ammons, J.T.; Branson, J.L.; Burgoa, B.B. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Plant and Soil Science; Lietzke, D.A. [Lietzke (David A.), Rutledge, TN (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Many constituents of potential concern for human health occur naturally at low concentrations in undisturbed soils. The Background soil Characterization Project (BSCP) was undertaken to provide background concentration data on potential contaminants in natural soils on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The objectives of the BSCP are to provide baseline data for contaminated site assessment and estimates of potential human health risk associated with background concentrations of hazardous and other constituents in native soils. This report presents, evaluates, and documents data and results obtained in Phase I of the project. It is intended to be a stand-alone document for application and use in structuring and conducting remedial investigation and remedial action projects in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program.

  16. Investigation of biochar effects as a non-structural BMP on soil erosional properties using a rainfall simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khademalrasoul, Ataalah; Kuhn, Nikolaus J; Hu, Yaxian

    Recent studies have shown the potential of biochar for improving overall soil quality including soil aggregation and structure. Erodibility is an inherent soil property that amongst others is highly dependent on soil organic matter content which affects aggregate stability and crusting during...... runoff events. We hypothesized that erodibility is reduced in biochar-amended soils and tested this in controlled rainfall-runoff simulations. The specific objectives of our study were (1) to compare runoff and sediment generation between a biochar and an unamended control treatment on an arable sandy...... loam soil and (2) to determine the effect of the biochar treatment on SOC erodibility. A field experiment with eight plots was established at Risø, Denmark, in 2011; four biochar-amended and four unamended control plots. Biochar produced from birch wood at 500 ºC was applied at a rate of 2 kg m-2...

  17. Radon gas. A review with emphasis on site investigations and measurements of soil gas and indoor house levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, Seamus.

    1992-09-01

    A review of radon gas, with particular reference to its source and transport through soils and into buildings is examined. The principal parameters affecting the movement of radon has been discussed. The levels of radon gas in soils and in dwelling houses has been examined. Radon levels in the soil gas were highest in mineral soils with pear soils giving low readings but there was no significant differences between the results. Houses situated over granite and limestone bedrock gave similar results for indoor radon concentrations, with no significant differences being recorded. Results were expected to be much higher in houses over granite areas, in view of the higher uranium series activity in granites. It is concluded that high radon gas levels in soils under and in he vicinity of houses is the probable explanation for the indoor radon levels found. The influence of the underlying bedrock is not the most important parameter as was surmised before the study. (author)

  18. Ambient Vibrations Measurements and 1D Site Response Modelling as a Tool for Soil and Building Properties Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiano Imposa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The safety of historic buildings heritage is an important task that becomes more substantial when the buildings are directed to educational purposes. The present study aims at evaluating the dynamic features of the Benedettini complex, an historic monastery located in downtown Catania, which is at present the headquarters of the humanistic studies department of the University of Catania. Both the building’s complex response to a seismic input and the soil-to-structure interaction were investigated using ambient noise recordings. The results point out a multiple dynamic behaviour of the monastery structure that shows several oscillation modes, whereas the identification of a single natural frequency can be observed in some sites where the structure can more freely oscillate. This observation is also confirmed by the variability of computed damping values that appear linked to the different rigidity of the structure, as a function of the either the longitudinal or transversal orientation of the investigated structural elements. Moreover, the comparison between the building’s fundamental period and spectral ratios frequencies, which were obtained from free field ambient noise measurements located outside the monastery, outline the presence of potential resonance effects between the site and structure during a seismic event. Numerical modelling of the local seismic response confirms the obtained experimental site frequencies, setting into evidence that higher amplification factors are reached in the same frequency range characterizing the building.

  19. Use of the food-chain model FOOD III and the soil model SCEMR to assess irrigation as a biosphere pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, S.C.

    1985-02-01

    Irrigation of contaminated water onto crop land is a relatively direct pathway for radionuclides to deliver a radiation dose to man. Irrigation was not originally included in the SYVAC assessment model for the Precambrian Shield because no irrigation is currently practised in the region. This report re-evaluates this decision. An analysis of meteorological data shows that crop yield in northern Ontario would benefit from irrigation. Thus, incentives are present for subsistence-scale, and perhaps commercial-scale, irrigation of surface or well water. A food-chain analysis indicated that irrigation with contaminated water could deliver a dose comparable to direct consumption (drinking) of the same water, for some radionuclides. Long-term contamination of soil through irrigation was predicted to be a substantial hazard, even when soil leaching was incorporated into the food-chain model. This report presents parameter estimates that could be used to incorporate irrigation as a pathway in the SYVAC code and will constitute the basis for further decisions concerning this pathway

  20. Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on soil and its components. III. Influence of clay acidity, humic acid coating and herbicide structure on acetanilide herbicide adsorption on homoionic clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-ping; Fang, Zhuo; Liu, Hui-jun; Yang, Wei-chun

    2002-04-01

    Adsorption of chloroacetanilide herbicides on homoionic montmorillonite, soil humic acid, and their mixtures was studied by coupling batch equilibration and FT-IR analysis. Adsorption isotherms of acetochlor, alachlor, metolachlor and propachlor on Ca(2+)-, Mg(2+)-, Al(3+)- and Fe(3+)-saturated clays were well described by the Freundlich equation. Regardless of the type of exchange cations, Kf decreased in the order of metolachlor > acetolachlor > alachlor > propachlor on the same clay. FT-IR spectra showed that the carbonyl group of the herbicide molecule was involved in binding, probably via H-bond with water molecules in the clay interlayer. The type and position of substitutions around the carbonyl group may have affected the electronegativity of oxygen, thus influencing the relative adsorption of these herbicides. For the same herbicide, adsorption on clay increased in the order of Mg2+ < Ca2+ < Al3+ < or = Fe3+ which coincided with the increasing acidity of homoionic clays. Acidity of cations may have affected the protonation of water, and thus the strength of H-bond between the clay water and herbicide. Complexation of clay and humic acid resulted in less adsorption than that expected from independent adsorption by the individual constituents. The effect varied with herbicides, but the greatest decrease in adsorption occurred at a 60:40 clay-to-humic acid ratio for all the herbicides. Causes for the decreased adsorption need to be characterized to better understand adsorption mechanisms and predict adsorption from soil compositions.

  1. Investigations into the application of a combination of bioventing and biotrickling filter technologies for soil decontamination processes--a transition regime between bioventing and soil vapour extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, S M C; Ferreira Jorge, R M; Castro, P M L

    2009-10-30

    Bioventing has emerged as one of the most cost-effective in situ technologies available to address petroleum light-hydrocarbon spills, one of the most common sources of soil pollution. However, the major drawback associated with this technology is the extended treatment time often required. The present study aimed to illustrate how an intended air-injection bioventing technology can be transformed into a soil vapour extraction effort when the air flow rates are pushed to a stripping mode, thus leading to the treatment of the off-gas resulting from volatilisation. As such, a combination of an air-injection bioventing system and a biotrickling filter was applied for the treatment of contaminated soil, the latter aiming at the treatment of the emissions resulting from the bioventing process. With a moisture content of 10%, soil contaminated with toluene at two different concentrations, namely 2 and 14 mg g soil(-1), were treated successfully using an air-injection bioventing system at a constant air flow rate of ca. 0.13 dm(3) min(-1), which led to the removal of ca. 99% toluene, after a period of ca. 5 days of treatment. A biotrickling filter was simultaneously used to treat the outlet gas emissions, which presented average removal efficiencies of ca. 86%. The proposed combination of biotechnologies proved to be an efficient solution for the decontamination process, when an excessive air flow rate was applied, reducing both the soil contamination and the outlet gas emissions, whilst being able to reduce the treatment time required by bioventing only.

  2. Investigation on the electronic structures and photophysical properties of a series of cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes based on DFT/TDDFT calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, Chunyu, E-mail: shang.chun.yu@163.com; Xu, Jie; Du, Yanqiu; Zhao, Jie

    2016-07-15

    The electronic structures and photophysical properties of a series of cyclometalated iridium (III) complexes Ir(C{sup ∧}N){sub 2}(H{sub 2}NNHCOO), including 1 [C{sup ∧}N=2-phenyl-pyridine], 2 [C{sup ∧}N=5-fluoro-2-phenylpyridine], 3 [C{sup ∧}N=2-phenyl-5-trifluoromethylpyridine], 4 [C{sup ∧}N=6-phenyl-[2, 3] bipyridinyl], 5 [C{sup ∧}N=7-phenyl-cyclopenta [4] dipyridine] and 6 [C{sup ∧}N=8-phenyl-[1, 9] phenanthroline], have been theoretically investigated based on density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT. The characteristics in phosphorescent performances have been outlined for each of the complexes in the applications in OLED. On the basis of the two simplifications presented in this paper and the available experimental data, the magnitudes of phosphorescent radiative rates for complexes 1–6 were approximately calculated to be: 5.56×10{sup 5} s{sup −1}, 2.68×10{sup 5} s{sup −1}, 1.17×10{sup 6} s{sup −1}, 9.78×10{sup 4} s{sup −1}, 5.30×10{sup 6} s{sup −1} and 6.71×10{sup 6} s{sup −1}, respectively. Meanwhile, the sequence of phosphorescent quantum efficiencies was obtained to be: Φ{sub PL}(4)<Φ{sub PL}(2)<Φ{sub PL}(1)<Φ{sub PL}(3)<Φ{sub PL}(5)<Φ{sub PL}(6), in which Φ{sub PL}(4) is by far the lowest, Φ{sub PL}(5) is much larger and Φ{sub PL}(6) is by far the largest. In contrast to complex 1, the emission wavelengths are slightly red-shifted for 2 and 3 and significantly red-shifted for 4 and 5, while the emission wavelength of 6 is slightly blue-shifted. In comparison, complexes 6 and 5 may be singled out to be the most efficient phosphorescence emitters for the applications in OLED.

  3. Neoadjuvant letrozole in postmenopausal estrogen and/or progesterone receptor positive breast cancer: A phase IIb/III trial to investigate optimal duration of preoperative endocrine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krainick-Strobel, Ute E; Lichtenegger, Werner; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Tulusan, Augustinus H; Jänicke, Fritz; Bastert, Gunther; Kiesel, Ludwig; Wackwitz, Birgit; Paepke, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, preoperative volume reduction of locally advanced breast cancers, resulting in higher rates of breast-conserving surgery (BCS), has become increasingly important also in postmenopausal women. Clinical interest has come to center on the third-generation nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors (AIs), including letrozole, for such neoadjuvant endocrine treatment. This usually lasts 3–4 months and has been extended to up to 12 months, but optimal treatment duration has not been fully established. This study was designed as a multicenter, open-label, single-arm, exploratory phase IIb/III clinical trial of letrozole 2.5 mg, one tablet daily, for 4–8 months. The primary objective was to investigate the effect of neoadjuvant treatment duration on tumor regression and BCS eligibility to identify optimal treatment duration. Tumor regression (by clinical examination, mammography, and ultrasound), shift towards BCS eligibility, and safety assessments were the main outcome measures. Standard parametric and nonparametric descriptive statistics were performed. Letrozole treatment was received by 32 of the enrolled 33 postmenopausal women (median (range): 67.0 (56–85) years) with unilateral, initially BCS-ineligible primary breast cancer (clinical stage ≥ T2, N0, M0). Letrozole treatment duration in the modified intent-to-treat (ITT; required 4 months' letrozole treatment) analysis population (29 patients) was 4 months in 14 patients and > 4 months in 15 patients. The respective per-protocol (PP) subgroup sizes were 14 and 11. The majority of partial or complete responses were observed at 4 months, though some beneficial responses occurred during prolonged letrozole treatment. Compared with baseline, median tumor size in the ITT population was reduced by 62.5% at Month 4 and by 70.0% at final study visit (Individual End). Similarly, in the PP population, respective reductions were 64.0% and 67.0%. Whereas initially all patients were mastectomy candidates

  4. Fermilab III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding

  5. Fermilab III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-09-15

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding.

  6. Microscale Syntheses, Reactions, and 1H NMR Spectroscopic Investigations of Square Planar Macrocyclic Tetraamido-N Cu(III) Complexes Relevant to Green Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uffelman, Erich S.; Doherty, Jonathan R.; Schulze, Carl; Burke, Amy L.; Bonnema, Kristen R.; Watson, Tanya T.; Lee, Daniel W., III

    2004-01-01

    Microscale fusions, description, and spectroscopic analysis of the reactivity of a square planar Cu(III) complex significant to green chemistry, are presented. The experiment also includes nine focal points on which pre-lab and post-lab questions are based, and the final exams reflect the students' comprehension of these and other features of…

  7. Microscale Synthesis, Reactions, and (Super 1)H NMR Spectroscopic Investigations of Square Planar Macrocyclic, Tetramido-N Co(III) Complexes Relevant to Green Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Tanya T.; Uffelman, Erich S.; Lee, Daniel W., III; Doherty, Jonathan R.; Schulze, Carl; Burke, Amy L.; Bonnema, Kristen, R.

    2004-01-01

    The microscale preparation, characterization, and reactivity of a square planar Co(III) complex that has grown out of a program to introduce experiments of relevance to green chemistry into the undergraduate curriculum is presented. The given experiments illustrate the remarkable redox and aqueous acid-base stability that make the macrocycles very…

  8. An Investigation of the Utility of the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination III in the Early Detection of Dementia in Memory Clinic Patients Aged over 75 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubb, Michael T; Evans, Jonathan J

    2015-01-01

    To examine the validity of Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination III (ACE-III) in detecting early dementia in UK memory clinic patients aged 75-85 years. The ACE-III was administered to 59 patients prior to diagnosis. The extent to which scores predicted the membership of the dementia or no-dementia group was explored using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and other parameters of diagnostic performance. Thirty-three participants (55.9%) were diagnosed with dementia (Alzheimer's disease = 56.3%, Alzheimer's disease with cerebrovascular disease = 31.3%, and vascular dementia = 12.5%). The optimal cut-off for detecting dementia was 81/100 (scores <81 indicating dementia with a sensitivity of 0.79, a specificity of 0.96, and a positive predictive value of 0.96), with superiority over published cut-offs (88/100 and 82/100) at medium and lower prevalence rates. The number of years of full-time education had a significant positive relationship to total ACE-III scores (r = 0.697, p < 0.001) for the no-dementia group. Exploratory analysis indicated that optimal cut-offs were different for higher versus lower education groups. The ACE-III has excellent accuracy for the detection of dementia in day-to-day clinical practice. Lower cut-offs than those specified in the index paper, and the consideration of the patients' years of full-time education may be necessary for optimal diagnostic performance. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Electrochemical investigations of Pu(IV)/Pu(III) redox reaction using graphene modified glassy carbon electrodes and a comparison to the performance of SWCNTs modified glassy carbon electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Ruma; Gamare, Jayashree; Sharma, Manoj K.; Kamat, J.V.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • First report of aqueous electrochemistry of Plutonium on graphene modified electrode. • Graphene is best electrocatalytic material for Pu(IV)/Pu(III) redox couple among the reported modifiers viz. reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and SWCNT’s. • The electrochemical reversibility of Pu(IV)/Pu(III) redox couple improves significantly on graphene modified electrode compared to previously reported rGO & SWCNTs modified electrodes • Donnan interaction between plutonium species and graphene surface offers a possibility for designing a highly sensitive sensor for plutonium • Graphene modified electrode shows higher sensitivity for the determination of plutonium compared to glassy carbon and single walled carbon nanotube modified electrode - Abstract: The work reported in this paper demonstrates for the first time that graphene modified glassy carbon electrode (Gr/GC) show remarkable electrocatalysis towards Pu(IV)/Pu(III) redox reaction and the results were compared with that of single-walled carbon nanotubes modified GC (SWCNTs/GC) and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. Graphene catalyzes the exchange of current of the Pu(IV)/Pu(III) couple by reducing both the anodic and cathodic overpotentials. The Gr/GC electrode shows higher peak currents (i p ) and smaller peak potential separation (ΔE p ) values than the SWCNTs/GC and GC electrodes. The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants (k s ), charge transfer coefficients (α) and the diffusion coefficients (D) involved in the electrocatalytic redox reaction were determined. Our observations show that graphene is best electrocatalytic material among both the SWCNTs and GC to study Pu(IV)/Pu(III) redox reaction.

  10. Sensitive determination of adenosine disodium triphosphate in soil, milk, and pharmaceutical formulation by enoxacin–europium (III) fluorescence complex in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, Al-Mahmnur; Kamruzzaman, Mohammad; Hak Lee, Sang; Ho Kim, Young; Jin Jo, Hae; Hong Kim, Sung; Park, Sang-Ryoul

    2012-01-01

    A new spectroflurometric method for the determination of adenosine disodium triphosphate (ATP) is developed. Fluorometric interaction between ATP and enoxacin (ENX)–Eu 3+ complex was studied using UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. Weak luminescence spectra of Eu 3+ were enhanced after complexation with ENX at 589 nm and 614 nm upon excitation at 395 nm due to energy transfer from the ligand to the lanthanide ion. It was observed that luminescence spectrum of Eu 3+ was strongly enhanced further at 614 nm after incorporation of ATP into the ENX–Eu 3+ complex. Under optimal conditions, the enhancement of luminescence at 614 nm was responded linearly with the concentration of ATP. The linearity was maintained in the range of 1.5×10 −10 –1.15×10 −8 M (R=0.9973) with the limit of detection (3σ) of 4.71×10 −11 M. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 9 repeated measurements of 1×10 −9 M ATP was 1.25%. Successful determinations of ATP in soil, milk, and a pharmaceutical formulation with the proposed method were demonstrated. - Highlights: ► Weak luminescence of Eu 3+ was enhanced at 614 nm after formation of complex with ENX. ► Energy transfer occurs through FRET from ENX to Eu 3+ upon excitation. ► Luminescence signal was further enhanced when ATP conjugates with ENX–Eu 3+ complex. ► Luminescence intensity of Eu 3+ at 614 nm was correlated with concentration of ATP. ► The method was applied to determine ATP in soil, milk, and pharmaceutical samples.

  11. Fire effects on soils in Lake States forests: A compilation of published research to facilitate long-term investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessica Miesel; P. Goebel; R. Corace; David Hix; Randall Kolka; Brian Palik; David. Mladenoff

    2012-01-01

    Fire-adapted forests of the Lake States region are poorly studied relative to those of the western and southeastern United States and our knowledge base of regional short- and long-term fire effects on soils is limited. We compiled and assessed the body of literature addressing fire effects on soils in Lake States forests to facilitate the re-measurement of previous...

  12. The impact of corn stover removal on N2O emission and soil respiration: An investigation with automated chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn stover removal, whether for silage, bedding, or bioenergy production, could have a variety of environmental consequences through its effect on soil processes, particularly N2O production and soil respiration. Because these effects may be episodic in nature, weekly snapshots with static chambers...

  13. Geochemical and mineralogical investigation of domestic archaeological soil features at the Tiel-Passewaaij site, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, S.; Slomp, C.P.; Huisman, D.J.; Vriend, S.P.

    2008-01-01

    Archaeological soil features can be defined as areas of staining in ancient cultural soil horizons and are frequently used in surveys to locate sites and activity areas. Visual observation of these features, however, provides only limited information on their origin and the processes leading to

  14. Geochemical and mineralogical investigation of domestic archaeological soil features at the Tiel-Passewaaij sit, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, S.; Slomp, C.P.; Huisman, D.J.; Vriend, S.P.

    2009-01-01

    Archaeological soil features can be defined as areas of staining in ancient cultural soil horizons and are frequently used in surveys to locate sites and activity areas. Visual observation of these features, however, provides only limited information on their origin and the processes leading to

  15. Geochemical and mineralogical investigation of domestic archaeological soil features at the Tiel-Passewaaij site, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, S.; Slomp, C.P.; Huisman, D.J.; Vriend, S.P.

    2009-01-01

    Archaeological soil features can be defined as areas of staining in ancient cultural soil horizons and are frequently used in surveys to locate sites and activity areas. Visual observation of these features, however, provides only limited information on their origin and the processes leading to

  16. Microbial chlorination of organic matter in forest soil: investigation using 36Cl-chloride and its methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlenová, J; Gryndler, M; Forczek, S T; Fuksová, K; Handova, V; Matucha, M

    2009-05-15

    Chloride, which comes into the forest ecosystem largely from the sea as aerosol (and has been in the past assumed to be inert), causes chlorination of soil organic matter. Studies of the chlorination showed that the content of organically bound chlorine in temperate forest soils is higher than that of chloride, and various chlorinated compounds are produced. Our study of chlorination of organic matter in the fermentation horizon of forest soil using radioisotope 36Cl and tracer techniques shows that microbial chlorination clearly prevails over abiotic, chlorination of soil organic matter being enzymatically mediated and proportional to chloride content and time. Long-term (>100 days) chlorination leads to more stable chlorinated substances contained in the organic layer of forest soil (overtime; chlorine is bound progressively more firmly in humic acids) and volatile organochlorines are formed. Penetration of chloride into microorganisms can be documented by the freezing/thawing technique. Chloride absorption in microorganisms in soil and in litter residues in the fermentation horizon complicates the analysis of 36Cl-chlorinated soil. The results show that the analytical procedure used should be tested for every soil type under study.

  17. Crime Scene Soil Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, Cynthia; Simms, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Mobile learning is an incredible way to engage students in activities that encourage exploration and critical thinking. This type of learning is defined by the use of portable technology, such as laptops, tablets, and smart phones, to support learning in various environments and in various ways. Depending on the technologies and resources already…

  18. Development of experimental concepts for investigating the strength behavior of fine-grained cohesive soil in the Spacelab/space shuttle zero-g environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaparte, R.; Mitchell, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    Three different sets of tests are proposed for the NASA Spacelab experimental program. The first of tests, designed to measure the true cohesion of several different soils, would be carried out in space through use of a specially prepared direct shear apparatus. As part of this first series of tests, it is recommended that a set of drained unconfined compression tests be performed terrestrially on the same soils as tested in space. A form of the direct tension test is planned to measure the true tensile strength of the same types of soils used in the first series of tests. The direct tension tests could be performed terrestrially. The combined results of the direct shear tests, direct tension tests, and unconfined compression tests can be used to construct approximate failure envelopes for the soils tested in the region of the stress origin. Relationships between true cohesion and true tensile strength can also be investigated. In addition, the role of physio-chemical variables should be studied. The third set of tests involves using a multiaxial cubical or true triaxial test apparatus to investigate the influence of gravity induced fabric anisotropy and stress nonhomogeneities on the stress strain behavior of cohesive soils at low effective stress levels. These tests would involve both in space and terrestrial laboratory testing.

  19. Bridge-in-a-backpack(TM) : task 3.2: investigating soil - structure interaction - modeling and experimental results of steel arches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report includes fulfillment of Task 3.2 of a multi-task contract to further enhance concrete filled FRP tubes, or : the Bridge in a Backpack. Task 3 is an investigation of soil-structure interaction for the FRP tubes. Task 3.2 is the : modeling ...

  20. Bridge-in-a-backpack(TM) task 3.3 : investigate soil-structure interaction-modeling and experimental results of concrete filled FRP tube arches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This report includes fulfillment of Task 3.3 of a multi-task contract to further enhance concrete filled FRP tubes, or : the Bridge in a Backpack. Task 3 is an investigation of soil-structure interaction for the FRP tubes. Task 3.3 is the : modeling ...

  1. Tuning of Magnetic Anisotropy in Hexairon(III) Rings by Host-Guest Interactions: An Investigation by High-Field Torque Magnetometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornia; Affronte; Jansen; Abbati; Gatteschi

    1999-08-01

    Full chemical control of magnetic anisotropy in hexairon(III) rings can be achieved by varying the size of the guest alkali metal ion. Dramatically different anisotropies characterize the Li(I) and Na(I) complexes of [Fe(6)(OMe)(12)(L)(6)] (L=1,3-propanedione derivatives; a schematic representation of the Li(I) complex is shown), as revealed by high-field torque magnetometry-Iron: (g), oxygen: o, carbon: o, Li(+): plus sign in circle.

  2. Investigation on the self-association of an inorganic coordination compound with biological activity (Casiope?na III-ia) in aqueous solution

    OpenAIRE

    Mar?n-Medina, Alejandro; Garc?a-Ramos, Juan Carlos; Ru?z-Azuara, Lena; Carrillo-Nava, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    From studies using different experimental techniques employed to determine the presence of aggregates e.g. isothermal titration calorimetry, surface tension, electrical conductivity, UV?Vis spectrophotometry, dynamic and static light scattering, it is clearly demonstrated that the compound [Cu(4, 4?-dimethyl-2, 2?-bipyridine)(acetylacetonato)H2O]NO3 (Casiope?na III-ia), promising member of a family of new generation compounds for cancer treatment, is able to auto associate in aqueous media. P...

  3. Organic carbon and reducing conditions lead to cadmium immobilization by secondary Fe mineral formation in a pH-neutral soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehe, E Marie; Adaktylou, Irini J; Obst, Martin; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Behrens, Sebastian; Planer-Friedrich, Britta; Kraemer, Ute; Kappler, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is of environmental relevance as it enters soils via Cd-containing phosphate fertilizers and endangers human health when taken up by crops. Cd is known to associate with Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides in pH-neutral to slightly acidic soils, though it is not well understood how the interrelation of Fe and Cd changes under Fe(III)-reducing conditions. Therefore, we investigated how the mobility of Cd changes when a Cd-bearing soil is faced with organic carbon input and reducing conditions. Using fatty acid profiles and quantitative PCR, we found that both fermenting and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria were stimulated by organic carbon-rich conditions, leading to significant Fe(III) reduction. The reduction of Fe(III) minerals was accompanied by increasing soil pH, increasing dissolved inorganic carbon, and decreasing Cd mobility. SEM-EDX mapping of soil particles showed that a minor fraction of Cd was transferred to Ca- and S-bearing minerals, probably carbonates and sulfides. Most of the Cd, however, correlated with a secondary iron mineral phase that was formed during microbial Fe(III) mineral reduction and contained mostly Fe, suggesting an iron oxide mineral such as magnetite (Fe3O4). Our data thus provide evidence that secondary Fe(II) and Fe(II)/Fe(III) mixed minerals could be a sink for Cd in soils under reducing conditions, thus decreasing the mobility of Cd in the soil.

  4. ARSENIC ADSORPTION AND REDUCTION IN IRON-RICH SOILS NEARBY LANDFILLS IN NORTHWEST FLORIDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongqin Xue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Florida, soils are mainly composed of Myakka, an acid soil characterized by a subsurface accumulation of humus and Al(III and Fe(III oxides. Downgradient of the landfills in Northwest Florida, elevated levels of iron and arsenic observations had been made in the groundwater from monitoring wells, which was attributed to the geomicrobial iron and arsenic reduction. There is thus an immediate research need for a better understanding of the reduction reactions that are responsible for the mobilization of iron and arsenic in the subsurface soil nearby landfills. Owing to the high Fe(III oxide content, As(V adsorption reactions with Fe(III oxide surfaces are particularly important, which may control As(V reduction. This research focused on the investigation of the biogeochemical processes of the subsurface soil nearby landfills of Northwest Florida. Arsenic and iron reduction was studied in batch reactors and quantified based on Monod-type microbial kinetic growth simulations. As(V adsorption in iron-rich Northwest Floridian soils was further investigated to explain the reduction observations. It was demonstrated in this research that solubilization of arsenic in the subsurface soil nearby landfills in Northwest Florida would likely occur under conditions favoring Fe(III dissimilatory reduction.

  5. Investigation of the soil-to-plant transfer of Np-237, Pu-238, Am-241 and Cm-244

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimpl, M.

    1988-08-01

    Inside a greenhouse for radioecological studies the root uptake of Np, Pu, Am, and Cm from 5 different soils into 19 crop plants have been measured. The soils have been artificially contaminated with the 4 nuclides in range from 1-20 Bq/g dry soil. Within 7 vegetation periods about 380 transfer measurements have been performed. The obtained results show that the soil-to-plant transfer is mainly influenced by the following parameters: physical and chemical properties of the different radionuclides, plant species and variety, soil type, time of soil utilization and soil management. The transfer factors measured are compared with those data which are proposed for the calculation of the long term radiation burden of the population by ingestion of contaminated food inside the Federal Republic of Germany. The experiments have been performed from the beginning of 1983 to the end of 1986. The results summarized within this report have already been published in annual reports or as contributions to scientific meetings. (orig.) [de

  6. Investigation of Sensitivity of Some Pulses and Agronomic Crops to Soil Residue of Idosulfuron-mesosulfurun Herbicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Izadi-Darbandi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available To study the sensitivity of chick pea, bean, lentil, rapeseed, sugarbeet and tomato to soil residual concentration of Idosulfuron-mesosulfurun herbicide, an experiment was carried out under controlled conditions at the College of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran, in 2010. The studied factors were the 6 mentioned crops, and 7 levels of soil residual concentration of Idosulfuron-mesosulfurun herbicide (0, 0.0015, 0.0037, 0.0079, 0.015, 0.031 and 0.047 mg per kg of soil. The factorial experiment was carried out as a completely randomized design with three replications. Crops' emergence percentage was determined one week after their emergence. Plants' survival percentage and shoot and root biomass production were measured 30 days after their emergence. Results showed that all mentioned characteristics decreased significantly (P<0.01 in the presence of soil residue of the herbicide. Increasing Idosulfuron-mesosulfurun residual concentration in soil decreased emergence and shoot and root biomass production. Bean had the lowest shoot (44% and root (66.78% biomass loss and tomato had the highest shoot (96.38% and root (89.64% biomass loss. Based on ED50 index, pea (0.0079 mg/kg soil was the most tolerant and tomato (0.0003 mg/kg soil was the most susceptible crop to soil residues of Idosulfuron-mesosulfurun, and other crops ranked in between as: tomato< sugarbeet< rapeseed< lentil< bean< pea. In general, these results showed that soil residue of Idosulfuron-mesosulfurun can injure rotation crops and it is important to consider their sensitivity in rotation programming.

  7. Investigation of contaminated soil and water samples and their affirmativeness. Untersuchungen kontaminierter Boden- und Wasserproben und deren Aussagekraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauch, H J; Eisenmann, R [Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany, F.R.). DVGW-Forschungsstelle am Engler-Bunte-Institut

    1989-09-01

    Contaminations in gas utility premises are a potential pollution hazard; hence, ground water, soil air and soil need to be tested. The authors describe major requirements for such analyses. Soil samples are a specific problem due to the heterogeneity of the material which can be solved only by performing a very great number of individual measurements. This is demonstrated by examples from practice. The existing limits are not suitable for a hazard assessment of gasworks-typical contaminations. Schematic application of standard value recommendations like the 'Dutch List' and their abuse as a compilation of limits should be rejected. (orig.).

  8. Biogeochemical investigation in south eastern Andhra Pradesh: the distribution of rare earths, thorium and uranium in plants and soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, K.K.; Raju, A.N.

    2000-01-01

    The concentration of rare earth elements (REE), thorium and uranium were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in the plant species, Pterocarpus santalinus, P. marsupium and P. dalbergioides, and the soils on which they were growing. Higher concentrations of lanthanum (La), cerium (Ce) were observed in both plants and soils. Large amounts of thorium and uranium were found in the soil. In all tree species, the concentration of REEs were higher in the heartwood than the leaves. The heartwood of P. santalinus accumulated larger quantities of uranium (average concentration of 1.22 ppm) and thorium (mean value of 2.57 ppm) than the other two species. (orig.)

  9. Using multi-approaches to investigate the effects of land cover on runoff and soil erosion in the Loess Plateau of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, G.; Fu, B.; Liu, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    This study used the in-situ measurement, model simulation and radioisotope tracing methods to investigate the effects of land cover on runoff and soil erosion at plot and hillslope scales in the Loess Plateau of China. Three runoff plot groups covered by sparse young trees (Group 1), native shrubs (Group 2) and dense tussock (Group 3) with different revegetation time were established in the Yangjuangou catchment of Loess Plateau. Greater runoff was produced in plot groups (Group 2 and Group 3) with higher vegetation cover and longer restoration time as a result of soil compaction processes. Both of the runoff coefficient and soil loss rate decreased with increasing plot length in Group 2 and Group 3 plots. The runoff coefficient increased with plot length in Group 1 plots located at the early stage of revegetation, and the soil loss rates increased over an area threshold. Therefore, the effect of scale on runoff and soil erosion was dependent on restoration extent. The antecedent moisture condition (AMC) was explicitly incorporated in runoff production and initial abstraction of the SCS-CN model, and the direct effect of runoff on event soil loss was considered in the RUSLE model by adopting a rainfall-runoff erosivity factor. The modified SCS-CN and RUSLE models were coupled to link rainfall-runoff-erosion modeling. The modified SCS-CN model was accurate in predicting event runoff from the three plot groups with Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency (EF) over 0.85, and the prediction accuracy of the modified RUSLE model was satisfactory with EF values being over 0.70. The 137Cs tracing technique was used to examine soil erosion under different land uses and land-use combinations. The results show that the order of erosion rate in different land uses increases sequentially from mature forest to grass to young forest to orchard to terrace crop. The land-use combinations of 'grass (6 years old) + mature forest (25 years old) + grass (25 years old)' and 'grass (6 years old

  10. Nano-scale investigation of the association of microbial nitrogen residues with iron (hydr)oxides in a forest soil O-horizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiluweit, Marco; Bougoure, Jeremy J.; Zeglin, Lydia H.; Myrold, David D.; Weber, Peter K.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Kleber, Markus; Nico, Peter S.

    2012-10-01

    Amino sugars in fungal cell walls (such as chitin) represent an important source of nitrogen (N) in many forest soil ecosystems. Despite the importance of this material in soil nitrogen cycling, comparatively little is known about abiotic and biotic controls on and the timescale of its turnover. Part of the reason for this lack of information is the inaccessibility of these materials to classic bulk extraction methods. To address this issue, we used advanced visualization tools to examine transformation pathways of chitin-rich fungal cell wall residues as they interact with microorganisms, soil organic matter and mineral surfaces. Our goal was to document initial micro-scale dynamics of the incorporation of 13C- and 15N-labeled chitin into fungi-dominated microenvironments in O-horizons of old-growth forest soils. At the end of a 3-week incubation experiment, high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging of hyphae-associated soil microstructures revealed a preferential association of 15N with Fe-rich particles. Synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray spectromicroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) of the same samples showed that thin organic coatings on these soil microstructures are enriched in aliphatic C and amide N on Fe (hydr)oxides, suggesting a concentration of microbial lipids and proteins on these surfaces. A possible explanation for the results of our micro-scale investigation of chemical and spatial patterns is that amide N from chitinous fungal cell walls was assimilated by hyphae-associated bacteria, resynthesized into proteinaceous amide N, and subsequently concentrated onto Fe (hydr)oxide surfaces. If confirmed in other soil ecosystems, such rapid association of microbial N with hydroxylated Fe oxide surfaces may have important implications for mechanistic models of microbial cycling of C and N.

  11. Investigation of vertical transportation of Cs-137 in the different soil types and for the different raining regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varinlioglu, Ahmet; Tugrul, A. Beril

    2018-02-01

    Cs-137 is an important fission product that is produced in the nuclear reactors. Therefore it can create risk for the environment during the accident condition of the nuclear plants. In this study, vertical transportation of Cs-137 in the soil searched for three different soil types and three different raining regimes. The experiments observed in lyzimetric conditions in the laboratory. The results of the experiments show that in every raining regime the activities of different types of soils (sand, loam and clay) were related with descending activity order. When the results of the experiments were evaluated according to the raining regime it can be seen that the relative activity for every type of soil is always towards higher to lower raining conditions.

  12. [Investigation on prevalence of soil-transmitted nematode infections and influencing factors for children in southwest areas of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Bing; Wang, Guo-Fei; Zhang, Lin-Xiu; Luo, Ren-Fu; Tian, Hong-Chun; Tang, Li-Na; Wang, Ju-Jun; Medina, Alexis; Wise, Paul; Rozelle, Scott

    2012-06-01

    To understand the infection status and main risk factors of soil-transmitted nematodes in southwest China so as to provide the evidence for making the control programs for soil-transmitted nematodiasis. The prevalence of soil-transmitted nematode infections was determined by Kato-Katz technique and influencing factors were surveyed by using a standardized questionnaire, and in part of the children, the examination of Enterobius vermicularis eggs was performed by using the cellophane swab method. The relationship between soil-transmitted nematode infections and influencing factors was analyzed by the multiple probit estimated method. A total of 1 707 children were examined, with a soil-transmitted nematode infection rate of 22.2%, the crowd infection rates ofAscaris lumbricoides, hookworm, and Trichuris trichiura were 16.0%, 3.8% and 6.6% respectively and 495 children were examined on Enterobius vermicularis eggs, with the infection rate of 5.1%. The results of probit estimated analysis suggested that the effects of 4 factors on soil-transmitted nematode infections were significant (all P values were less than 0.05), namely the number of sib, educational level of mother, drinking unboiled water and raising livestock and poultry. Among the factors above, the educational level of mother could reduce the probability of infection (ME = -0.074), while the number of sib, drinking unboiled water and raising livestock and poultry could increase the probability of the infections (with ME of 0.028, -0.112 and 0.080, respectively). Soil-transmitted nematode infection rates are still in a high level for children in southwest poor areas of China, with Ascaris lumbricoides as a priority. The changes of children's bad health habits, raising livestock and poultry habits, and implementing the health education about parasitic diseases in mothers would be of great significance for the prevention and control of soil-transmitted nematodiasis.

  13. An investigation of sulfur concentrations in soils and pine needles in Chaco Culture National Historical Park, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladney, E.S.; Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Jones, E.A.; Bell, M.G.; Morgan, J.D.; Nelson, L.A.; Bowker, R.G.

    1993-03-01

    Sulfur measurements in different age groups of pinon pine needles and adjacent soil samples from ten sampling sites at Chaco Culture National Historical Park were determined using combustion elemental analysis and chromatographic techniques. The primary goal was to establish base-line levels for elemental sulfur in the Park. Sulfur levels in foliage and soils were evaluated using analysis of variance techniques. No significant differences were found in foliage sulfur concentrations among the 10 sampling sites; however, trees within sites were significantly different. Needles of different ages did not differ significantly in sulfur content. Average soil concentrations were low, approximately 30% of the average needle concentrations. Soil sulfur concentrations did not differ significantly among the 10 sampling sites; however, different depths in the soil had statistically different concentrations of sulfur. No statistical differences were evident in soils sampled at the four compass points (N,S,E,W) around each tree. These differences imply that large numbers of samples are needed to identify small effects from anthropogenic inputs of sulfur into the system or that the effects must be large relative to the differences among sampling sites and individual trees in order to be detected

  14. Influence of organic substrates on the kinetics of bacterial As(III) oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescure, T.; Joulian, C.; Bauda, P.; Hénault, C.; Battaglia-Brunet, F.

    2012-04-01

    on the bacterial speciation of arsenic in contaminated soils. Moreover, the biogeochemical consequences of this phenomenon on the mobility and ecotoxicity of this metalloid will be studied. The first task of this program is the precise and systematic investigation of the influence of different types and concentrations of organic matters on the activity of As(III)-oxidizing pure strains. Influence of aspartate, succinate (simple substrates) and yeast extract (complex substrate) on As(III)-oxidation kinetics has been studied. For each experiment, the bacterial growth and the expression of genes involved in the speciation of arsenic, i.e. aio and ars genes, has been monitored. A direct perspective of this work will be to perform experiments with humic and fulvic acids (complex organic matter commonly found in soils), and with water-extracted organic matter from polluted soils. Then the As(III)-oxidation activity of bacterial communities extracted from contaminated soils will be followed. These assays should allow the screening of conditions which will be applied in subsequent experiments with several real contaminated soils, including a former mining site, impacted industrial sites, and a forest soil heavily contaminated after arsenical ammunitions storage. This work is co-funded by BRGM and ADEME (convention TEZ 11-16).

  15. Impact of future climatic conditions on the potential for soil organic matter priming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinsch, Sabine; Ambus, Per; Thornton, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial carbon (C) storage and turnover are of major interest under changing climatic conditions. We present a laboratory microcosm study investigating the effects of anticipated climatic conditions on the soil microbial community and related changes in soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition....... Soil samples were taken from a heath-land after six years of exposure to elevated carbon dioxide (eCO2) in combination with summer drought (D) and increased temperature (T). Soil C-dynamics were investigated in soils from: (i) ambient, (ii) eCO2, and (iii) plots exposed to the combination of factors...... simulating future climatic conditions (TDeCO2) that simulate conditions predicted for Denmark in 2075. 13C enriched glucose (3 atom% excess) was added to soil microcosms, soil CO2 efflux was measured over a period of two weeks and separated into glucose- and SOM-derived C. Microbial biomass was measured...

  16. Soil respiration patterns and rates at three Taiwanese forest plantations: dependence on elevation, temperature, precipitation, and litterfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Hung, Chih-Yu; Lin, I-Rhy; Kume, Tomonori; Menyailo, Oleg V; Cheng, Chih-Hsin

    2017-11-15

    Soil respiration contributes to a large quantity of carbon emissions in the forest ecosystem. In this study, the soil respiration rates at three Taiwanese forest plantations (two lowland and one mid-elevation) were investigated. We aimed to determine how soil respiration varies between lowland and mid-elevation forest plantations and identify the relative importance of biotic and abiotic factors affecting soil respiration. The results showed that the temporal patterns of soil respiration rates were mainly influenced by soil temperature and soil water content, and a combined soil temperature and soil water content model explained 54-80% of the variation. However, these two factors affected soil respiration differently. Soil temperature positively contributed to soil respiration, but a bidirectional relationship between soil respiration and soil water content was revealed. Higher soil moisture content resulted in higher soil respiration rates at the lowland plantations but led to adverse effects at the mid-elevation plantation. The annual soil respiration rates were estimated as 14.3-20.0 Mg C ha -1  year -1 at the lowland plantations and 7.0-12.2 Mg C ha -1  year -1 at the mid-elevation plantation. When assembled with the findings of previous studies, the annual soil respiration rates increased with the mean annual temperature and litterfall but decreased with elevation and the mean annual precipitation. A conceptual model of the biotic and abiotic factors affecting the spatial and temporal patterns of the soil respiration rate was developed. Three determinant factors were proposed: (i) elevation, (ii) stand characteristics, and (iii) soil temperature and soil moisture. The results indicated that changes in temperature and precipitation significantly affect soil respiration. Because of the high variability of soil respiration, more studies and data syntheses are required to accurately predict soil respiration in Taiwanese forests.

  17. Investigating CH4 production in an oxic plant-soil system -a new approach combining isotopic labelling (13C) and inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Katharina; Keppler, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Typically, aerated soil are net sinks of atmospheric methane (CH4), being highest in native ecosystems (pristine forests > managed forests > grasslands > crop fields). However, this does not exclude a simultaneous endogenic CH4 production in the plant-soil system, which cannot be detected simply via CH4 flux measurements. Methanogenic archaea producing CH4 under anoxic conditions were thought to be the only biotic source of CH4 in the soil. However, until recently a non-archaeal pathway of CH4 formation is known where CH4 is produced under oxic conditions in plants (Keppler et al. 2006) and fungi (Lenhart et al. 2012). Additionally, abiotic formation of CH4 from soil organic matter was reported (Jugold et al. 2012) and may be ubiquitous in terrestrial ecosystems. The major goal of this project was to determine soil endogenic CH4 sources and to estimate their contribution to the endogenic CH4 production. Especially the effect of plants and fungi on soil CH4 production was investigated. Therefore, a series of experiments was carried out on field fresh soil collected in a grassland and a forest ecosystem under controlled laboratory conditions. By combining selective inhibitors and 13C labelling, CH4 production rates of several CH4 sources were quantified. The major difficulty was to detect the comparatively small flux of CH4 production against the background of the high CH4 consumption rates due to methanotrophic bacteria. Therefore, we supplemented bare soil and soil with vegetation with selective inhibitors and 13C labelled substrates in a closed chamber system. In a first step, CH4 production was determined by the inhibition of CH4 oxidizing bacteria with Difluoromethane (DFM, 2ml l-1). In the following, a 13C labelled substrate (either CO2, Acetate, or Methionine -S-CH3 labelled) was added in combination with a specific inhibitor -either for archaeal methanogenesis (Bromoethanesulfonate), bacteria (Streptomycin), or fungi (Captan, Cycloheximide). Gas samples were

  18. Geochemical Investigation of Selected Elements in an Agricultural Soil: Case Study in Sumani Watershed West Sumatera in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aflizar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the geochemical study of agricultural soil and river sediments along Sumani watershed, West Sumatra in Indonesia. We examined the distribution and abundances of 16 elements (Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni, Cr,V, Sr, Rb, Ce, Th, Zr, Si, Ti, Fe Ca, and P in vegetable soil, sawah soil =and river sediment sample, to evaluate the factors controlling their abundances, possible sources, and environmental implications. Average concentrations of Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni, Cr,V, Sr, Rb, Ce, Th, Zr at vegetable (1 soil were 38, 88.3, 38.7, 3, 8, 101, 96, 98, 87, 31 and 218 mg kg-1 , 26, 39.05, 8.8, 13.5, 31, 231.5, 37, 19, 78, 16 and 303.5 mg kg-1 at sawah soil (3, 4 and 30, 61.6, 35.7, 9, 22, 294, 65, 12, 78, 14 and 232 mg kg-1 at river sediment (2, respectively. The concentration of Pb, Rb, Th and Zr at upland vegetables, V and Zr at sawah soil and river sediment were mostly two time Sumatra BCSCST or BCC in several samples. Enrichment factor values showed low to moderate enrichment of Pb, Zn, Cu, Rb, Ce and Zr, whereas Th showed significant contamination at vegetables soil, suggesting contributions from anthropogenic sources. Anthropogenic contributions of most metals mainly originate from natural processes. However, Pb, Ce, Th and Zr ranges of 527–108, 41-89, 66-117 and 35-100%, respectively, at Vegetable and sawah soil and river sediment confirm their anthropogenic contribution. Factor analysis and correlation matrices suggested that elevated metal concentrations at agricultural soil in Sumani watershed might be controlled by pH, CEC, Fe-oxy-hydroxides. Deposition of metals at vegetable and sawah soil and river sediment might be controlled by non-ferrous metal (i.e., aluminosilicates, sediment grain size, or source rock composition (andesite, alluvial fan, undifferentiated volcanic material, granite and gneiss.

  19. Investigating local controls on temporal stability of soil water content using sensor network data and an inverse modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, W.; Bogena, H. R.; Huisman, J. A.; Martinez, G.; Pachepsky, Y. A.; Vereecken, H.

    2013-12-01

    Soil water content is a key variable in the soil, vegetation and atmosphere continuum with high spatial and temporal variability. Temporal stability of soil water content (SWC) has been observed in multiple monitoring studies and the quantification of controls on soil moisture variability and temporal stability presents substantial interest. The objective of this work was to assess the effect of soil hydraulic parameters on the temporal stability. The inverse modeling based on large observed time series SWC with in-situ sensor network was used to estimate the van Genuchten-Mualem (VGM) soil hydraulic parameters in a small grassland catchment located in western Germany. For the inverse modeling, the shuffled complex evaluation (SCE) optimization algorithm was coupled with the HYDRUS 1D code. We considered two cases: without and with prior information about the correlation between VGM parameters. The temporal stability of observed SWC was well pronounced at all observation depths. Both the spatial variability of SWC and the robustness of temporal stability increased with depth. Calibrated models both with and without prior information provided reasonable correspondence between simulated and measured time series of SWC. Furthermore, we found a linear relationship between the mean relative difference (MRD) of SWC and the saturated SWC (θs). Also, the logarithm of saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), the VGM parameter n and logarithm of α were strongly correlated with the MRD of saturation degree for the prior information case, but no correlation was found for the non-prior information case except at the 50cm depth. Based on these results we propose that establishing relationships between temporal stability and spatial variability of soil properties presents a promising research avenue for a better understanding of the controls on soil moisture variability. Correlation between Mean Relative Difference of soil water content (or saturation degree) and inversely

  20. Distribution of soil arsenic species, lead and arsenic bound to humic acid molar mass fractions in a contaminated apple orchard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, Kimberly; Amarasiriwardena, Dulasiri; Xing, Baoshan

    2006-01-01

    Excessive application of lead arsenate pesticides in apple orchards during the early 1900s has led to the accumulation of lead and arsenic in these soils. Lead and arsenic bound to soil humic acids (HA) and soil arsenic species in a western Massachusetts apple orchard was investigated. The metal-humate binding profiles of Pb and As were analyzed with size exclusion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SEC-ICP-MS). It was observed that both Pb and As bind 'tightly' to soil HA molar mass fractions. The surface soils of the apple orchard contained a ratio of about 14:1 of water soluble As (V) to As (III), while mono-methyl (MMA) and di-methyl arsenic (DMA) were not detectable. The control soil contained comparatively very low levels of As (III) and As (V). The analysis of soil core samples demonstrated that As (III) and As (V) species are confined to the top 20 cm of the soil. - The distribution of arsenic species [i.e., As (III), As (V), and methylated arsenic species (DMA, MMA)] on the soil surface and in a depth profile as well as those associated with humic acids is discussed

  1. Influence of the supramolecular architecture on the magnetic properties of a DyIII single-molecule magnet: an ab initio investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Jung

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Single-crystal angular-resolved magnetometry and wavefunction-based calculations have been used to reconsider the magnetic properties of a recently reported DyIII-based single-molecule magnet, namely [Dy(hfac3(L1] with hfac− = 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoroacetylacetonate and L1 = 2-(4,5-bis(propylthio-1,3-dithiol-2-ylidene-6-(pyridin-2-yl-5H-[1,3]dithiolo[4',5':4,5]benzo[1,2-d]imidazole. The magnetic susceptibility and magnetization at low temperature are found to be strongly influenced by supramolecular interactions. Moreover, taking into account the hydrogen-bond networks in the calculations allows to explain the orientation of the magnetic axes. This strongly suggests that hydrogen bonds play an important role in the modulation of the electrostatic environment around the DyIII center that governs the nature of its magnetic ground-state and the orientation of its anisotropy axes. We thus show here that SMM properties that rely on supramolecular organization may not be transferable into single-molecule devices.

  2. Microbiome and ecotypic adaption of Holcus lanatus (L.) to extremes of its soil pH range, investigated through transcriptome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ellen; Carey, Manus; Meharg, Andrew A; Meharg, Caroline

    2018-03-20

    Plants can adapt to edaphic stress, such as nutrient deficiency, toxicity and biotic challenges, by controlled transcriptomic responses, including microbiome interactions. Traditionally studied in model plant species with controlled microbiota inoculation treatments, molecular plant-microbiome interactions can be functionally investigated via RNA-Seq. Complex, natural plant-microbiome studies are limited, typically focusing on microbial rRNA and omitting functional microbiome investigations, presenting a fundamental knowledge gap. Here, root and shoot meta-transcriptome analyses, in tandem with shoot elemental content and root staining, were employed to investigate transcriptome responses in the wild grass Holcus lanatus and its associated natural multi-species eukaryotic microbiome. A full factorial reciprocal soil transplant experiment was employed, using plant ecotypes from two widely contrasting natural habitats, acid bog and limestone quarry soil, to investigate naturally occurring, and ecologically meaningful, edaphically driven molecular plant-microbiome interactions. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and non-AM fungal colonization was detected in roots in both soils. Staining showed greater levels of non-AM fungi, and transcriptomics indicated a predominance of Ascomycota-annotated genes. Roots in acid bog soil were dominated by Phialocephala-annotated transcripts, a putative growth-promoting endophyte, potentially involved in N nutrition and ion homeostasis. Limestone roots in acid bog soil had greater expression of other Ascomycete genera and Oomycetes and lower expression of Phialocephala-annotated transcripts compared to acid ecotype roots, which corresponded with reduced induction of pathogen defense processes, particularly lignin biosynthesis in limestone ecotypes. Ascomycota dominated in shoots and limestone soil roots, but Phialocephala-annotated transcripts were insignificant, and no single Ascomycete genus dominated. Fusarium-annotated transcripts were

  3. Arsenic bioavailability in soils before and after soil washing: the use of Escherichia coli whole-cell bioreporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Youngdae; Kang, Yerin; Chae, Yooeun; Kim, Sunghoon; Lee, Youngshim; Jeong, Seung-Woo; An, Youn-Joo

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the quantification of bioavailable arsenic in contaminated soils and evaluation of soil-washing processes in the aspect of bioavailability using a novel bacterial bioreporter developed in present study. The whole-cell bioreporter (WCB) was genetically engineered by fusing the promoter of nik operon from Escherichia coli and green fluorescent protein as a sensing domain and reporter domain. Among eight well-known hazardous heavy metals and metalloid, this system responded specifically to arsenic, thereby inferring association of As(III) with NikR inhibits the repression. Moreover, the response was proportional to the concentration of As(III), thereby it was capable to determine the amount of bioavailable arsenic quantitatively in contaminated soils. The bioavailable portion of arsenic was 5.9 (3.46-10.96) and 0.9 (0.27-1.74) % of total from amended and site soils, respectively, suggesting the bioavailability of arsenic in soils was related to the soil properties and duration of aging. On the other hand, only 1.37 (0.21-2.97) % of total arsenic was extracted into soil solutions and 19.88 (11.86-28.27) % of arsenic in soil solution was bioavailable. This result showed that the soluble arsenic is not all bioavailable and most of bioavailable arsenic in soils is water non-extractable. In addition, the bioavailable arsenic was increased after soil-washing while total amount was decreased, thereby suggesting the soil-washing processes release arsenic associated with soil materials to be bioavailable. Therefore, it would be valuable to have a tool to assess bioavailability and the bioavailability should be taken into consideration for soil remediation plans.

  4. Investigations into adverse effects on soil organisms at the concentration level of trigger values according to German Federal Soil Protection Act; Ermittlung der Wirkungen auf Bodenorganismen (Lebensraumfunktion) im Bereich der Pruefwerte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koerdel, W.; Dreher, P.; Hund, K.; Ruedel, H.

    1999-09-01

    The objective of the research project was to achieve clarification on whether the trigger values according to the Federal Soil Protection Act, which originally had been established for the protection of human health, are also suitable to ensure the protection of ecological soil functions, e.g. habitat functions for soil organisms. For this purpose ecotoxicological tests were carried out with soils for which contaminations were adjusted to the trigger values (recreation areas or fields and kitchen garden). Investigations were conducted with arsenic, cadmium and benzo(a)pyren. The contamination of the soils with the contaminants was achieved by preparing samples containing mixtures of two uncontaminated soils of different characteristics with strongly contaminated soil samples. The contaminated soil samples were obtained from sites characterized by showing only one major contaminant. The test organisms selected for the ecotoxicological tests cover different trophic levels: microorganisms (original population), nitrification, basal respiration, substrate-induced respiration; nematodes (added organisms), reproduction rate; earthworms (added organisms), reproduction rate; plants, germ inhibition and biomass production. For cadmium and arsenic comparable test results for contaminated and control soils were obtained in the concentration range of the trigger values for recreation areas or fields and kitchen with repect to the experiments with plants, nematodes and microorganisms. In sandy soils the habitat function for earthworms may be affected. Due to the high portion of contaminated soil in the soil mixtures with benzo(a)pyren the interpretation of the test results is in some cases uncertain. A further check considering effects to the microflora and Eisenia fetida would be desirable. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel des Forschungsvorhabens bestand darin, festzustellen, ob die im wesentlichen auf der Grundlage des Schutzes der menschlichen Gesundheit abgeleiteten Pruefwerte

  5. Contaminant transport in the sub-surface soil of an uncontrolled landfill site in China: site investigation and two-dimensional numerical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Haijian; Chen, Yunmin; Thomas, Hywel R; Sedighi, Majid; Masum, Shakil A; Ran, Qihua

    2016-02-01

    A field investigation of contaminant transport beneath and around an uncontrolled landfill site in Huainan in China is presented in this paper. The research aimed at studying the migration of some chemicals present in the landfill leachate into the surrounding clayey soils after 17 years of landfill operation. The concentrations of chloride and sodium ions in the pore water of soil samples collected at depths up to 15 m were obtained through an extensive site investigation. The contents of organic matter in the soil samples were also determined. A two-dimensional numerical study of the reactive transport of sodium and chloride ion in the soil strata beneath and outside the landfill is also presented. The numerical modelling approach adopted is based on finite element/finite difference techniques. The domain size of approximately 300 × 30 m has been analysed and major chemical transport parameters/mechanisms are established via a series of calibration exercises. Numerical simulations were then performed to predict the long-term behaviour of the landfill in relation to the chemicals studied. The lateral migration distance of the chloride ions was more than 40 m which indicates that the advection and mechanical dispersion are the dominant mechanism controlling the contaminant transport at this site. The results obtained from the analysis of chloride and sodium migration also indicated a non-uniform advective flow regime of ions with depth, which were localised in the first few metres of the soil beneath the disposal site. The results of long-term simulations of contaminant transport indicated that the concentrations of ions can be 10 to 30 times larger than that related to the allowable limit of concentration values. The results of this study may be of application and interest in the assessment of potential groundwater and soil contamination at this site with a late Pleistocene clayey soil. The obtained transport properties of the soils and the contaminant transport

  6. An investigation into the use of a mixture model for simulating the electrical properties of soil with varying effective saturation levels for sub-soil imaging using ECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, R R; Newill, P A; Podd, F J W; York, T A; Grieve, B D; Dorn, O

    2010-01-01

    A new visualisation tool is being developed for seed breeders, providing on-line data for each individual plant in a screening programme. It will be used to indicate how efficiently each plant utilises the water and nutrients available in the surrounding soil. This will facilitate early detection of desirable genetic traits with the aim of increased efficiency in identification and delivery of tomorrow's drought tolerant food crops. Visualisation takes the form of Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT), a non-destructive and non-intrusive imaging technique. Measurements are to be obtained for an individual plant thus allowing water and nutrient absorption levels for an individual specimen to be inferred. This paper presents the inverse problem, discusses the inherent challenges and presents the early experimental results. Two mixture models are evaluated for the prediction of electrical capacitance measurement data for varying effective soil saturation levels using a finite element model implemented in COMSOL Multiphysics. These early studies have given the research team an understanding of the technical challenges that must now be addressed to take the current research into the world of agri-science and food supply.

  7. Investigation of the uranium content in sediment and soil samples from the Santos and Sao Vicente estuary region, SP, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serafim, Ricardo A.M.; Correa, Bianca A.M.; Primi, M.C.; Geraldo, Luiz P.; Yamazaki, Yone M.

    2009-01-01

    In this work the uranium (U) content in sediment and soil samples collected near the Santos and Sao Vicente estuary was determined using the fission track registration technique (SSNTD). The sediment and soil samples after oven-dried and pulverized were prepared in the solution form. Around 10 μL of this solution was deposited on the plastic detector (PCLIGHT) and irradiated at the IEA-R1 (3.5 MW) nuclear reactor. After the irradiation and chemical etching of the plastic foils, the fission tracks were counted with a system consisting of an optical microscope together with a video camera and a PC computer. The U content in the analyzed samples ranged from 3.12 ± 0.55 to 18.3 ± 1.2 ppm for sediments and from 3.21 ± 0.63 to 11.5 ± 1.1 ppm for soils. These results were compared to other values reported in the literature for sediments and soils collected in environments similar to the ones studied in this work The average values for the U content obtained in this work are significant higher (above twice) than the world mean and are in reasonable agreement with results found by other authors for sediments and soils from regions considered as polluted or with a high level of radioactivity. (author)

  8. Investigation of ethyl lactate as a green solvent for desorption of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) from contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian Ahmadkalaei, Seyedeh Pegah; Gan, Suyin; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Abdul Talib, Suhaimi

    2016-11-01

    Treatment of oil-contaminated soil is a major environmental concern worldwide. The aim of this study is to examine the applicability of a green solvent, ethyl lactate (EL), in desorption of diesel aliphatic fraction within total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in contaminated soil and to determine the associated desorption kinetics. Batch desorption experiments were carried out on artificially contaminated soil at different EL solvent percentages (%). In analysing the diesel range of TPH, TPH was divided into three fractions and the effect of solvent extraction on each fraction was examined. The experimental results demonstrated that EL has a high and fast desorbing power. Pseudo-second order rate equation described the experimental desorption kinetics data well with correlation coefficient values, R 2 , between 0.9219 and 0.9999. The effects of EL percentage, initial contamination level of soil and liquid to solid ratio (L/S (v/w)) on initial desorption rate have also been evaluated. The effective desorption performance of ethyl lactate shows its potential as a removal agent for remediation of TPH-contaminated soil worldwide.

  9. The C-simulator as a tool to investigate the potential of household waste compost to increase soil organic matter in Flanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tits, Mia; Hermans, Inge; Elsen, Annemie; Vandendriessche, Hilde

    2010-05-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is an important parameter of the quality of arable land. At the global scale, agricultural soils are considered to be a major sink of carbon dioxide. Results of thousands of soil analyses carried out annually by the Soil Service of Belgium have shown that carbon stocks in Flemish agricultural land have dwindled in the past decades, and this in spite of the increased use of animal manure from intensive livestock holdings. In the framework of the improvement of the SOM content and at the same time the idea of organic waste recycling ("cradle to cradle"-principle), a long-term field experiment with household waste compost (HWC) was set up in 1997 by the Soil Service of Belgium. In this trial different HWC application rates and timings were realized yearly, in order to investigate its nutritive value for arable crops, its effect on crop yield and its long-term effect on soil fertility, pH and soil organic matter content. Yearly data on crop rotation, crop development and yield as well as soil and HWC analyses were obtained for each trial treatment. Climatic data were obtained from nearby weather stations. Also in the context of the SOM-problem, the Soil Service of Belgium and the University of Ghent have developed, at the request of the Flemish government, the C-simulator, a simple but efficient interactive tool to assist farmers with the carbon stock management on their arable land. By providing input on the current carbon status of a particular field, the crop rotation and the (organic) fertiliser plan, the program calculates the expected evolution of the soil organic carbon over a thirty year period. By consulting comparative lists of characteristics of different crops and organic manures the farmer can adjust his strategy for a more efficient organic matter management. The calculations of the C-simulator are based on the RothC model, which was calibrated for Flemish conditions through an extensive literature study. Specific data on the

  10. Use of a 137Cs re-sampling technique to investigate temporal changes in soil erosion and sediment mobilisation for a small forested catchment in southern Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porto, Paolo; Walling, Des E.; Alewell, Christine; Callegari, Giovanni; Mabit, Lionel; Mallimo, Nicola; Meusburger, Katrin; Zehringer, Markus

    2014-01-01

    for such calculations, key factors influencing the uncertainty of the estimates were identified and a procedure developed. The results of the study demonstrated that there had been no significant change in mean annual soil loss in recent years and this was consistent with the information provided by the estimates of sediment yield from the catchment for the same periods. The study demonstrates the potential for using a re-sampling technique to document recent changes in soil redistribution rates. - Highlights: • The study uses 137 Cs measurements to document changes in soil erosion rates. • A small forested catchment in southern Italy is selected for a case study. • A re-sampling technique is employed to investigate changes in soil erosion rates. • The results are validated by comparison with catchment sediment yield data

  11. Effects of low-alkalinity binders on stabilization/solidification of geogenic As-containing soils: Spectroscopic investigation and leaching tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang-Shan; Wang, Lei; Cui, Jin-Li; Poon, Chi Sun; Beiyuan, Jingzi; Tsang, Daniel C W; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2018-08-01

    The low-alkalinity stabilization/solidification (S/S) treatment of the soil containing high concentrations of geogenic As by physical encapsulation is considered as a proper management before land development; however, the choice of an effective binder and the leaching potential of As remain uncertain. In this study, the influence of S/S binders (cement blended with fuel ash (FA), furnace bottom ash (FBA), or ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS)) on the speciation and leaching characteristics of geogenic As was studied. The results of X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed the reduced amount of calcium silicate hydrate phase and the decrease in oxidation state of As(V)-O on the surface of Fe(III) oxides/hydroxides in the low-alkalinity S/S treated soils. This might be due to the binder incorporation and change in pH conditions, which slightly affected the As-Fe interaction and increased the non-specifically sorbed species of As. Therefore, the S/S treatment increased the leachability and bioaccessibility of geogenic As to varying degree but decreased the phyto-extractable As. The S/S treatment by cement incorporating 25% of class C fly ash (O4C1) could achieve comparable or better performance, while reducing the risk assessment code (RAC) to a greater extent compared to that of using cement only. This study illustrates the effectiveness and limitations of low-alkalinity binders (e.g., O4C1) for geogenic As immobilization and encapsulation, which provides a new insight for determining the appropriate S/S binder in soil remediation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Synthesis, spectral, crystallography and thermal investigations of novel Schiff base complexes of manganese (III) derived from heterocyclic β-diketone with aromatic and aliphatic diamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surati, Kiran R.; Thaker, B. T.

    2010-01-01

    The Schiff base tetradentate ligands N,N-bis-(3,5-dimethyl-1-p-tolyl-1H-pyrazol-4-ylmethylene)-ethane-1,2-diamine (H 2L 1), N,N-bis-(3,5-dimethyl-1-p-sulfonyl-1H-pyrazol-4-ylmethylene)-ethane-1,2-diamine (H 2L 2), N,N-bis-(3,5-dimethyl-1-p-tolyl-1H-pyrazol-4-ylmethylene)-benzene-1,2-diamine (H 2L 3) and N,N-bis-(3,5-dimethyl-1-p-sulfonyl-1H-pyrazol-4-ylmethylene)-benzene-1,2-diamine (H 2L 4) were prepared from the reaction between 5-oxo-3-methyl-1-p-tolyl-1H-pyrazole-4-carbaldehyde or 4-(4-formyl-5-oxo-3-methyl-pyrazol-1-yl)-benzenesulfonic acid and o-phenylenediamine or ethylenediamine. And these are characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H NMR and GC-MS. The corresponding Schiff base complexes of Mn(III) were prepared by condensation of [Mn 3(μ 3-O)(OAc) 6(H 2O) 3]·3H 2O with ligands H 2L 1, H 2L 2, H 2L 3 and H 2L 4. All these complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, X-ray crystallography, conductometry measurement, FT-IR, electronic spectra and mass (FAB) spectrometry. Thermal behaviour of the complexes has been studied by TGA, DTA and DSC. Electronic spectra and magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate octahedral stereochemistry of manganese (III) complexes, while non-electrolytic behaviour complexes indicate the absence of counter ion.

  13. Synthesis, spectral, crystallography and thermal investigations of novel Schiff base complexes of manganese (III) derived from heterocyclic beta-diketone with aromatic and aliphatic diamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surati, Kiran R; Thaker, B T

    2010-01-01

    The Schiff base tetradentate ligands N,N-bis-(3,5-dimethyl-1-p-tolyl-1H-pyrazol-4-ylmethylene)-ethane-1,2-diamine (H(2)L(1)), N,N-bis-(3,5-dimethyl-1-p-sulfonyl-1H-pyrazol-4-ylmethylene)-ethane-1,2-diamine (H(2)L(2)), N,N-bis-(3,5-dimethyl-1-p-tolyl-1H-pyrazol-4-ylmethylene)-benzene-1,2-diamine (H(2)L(3)) and N,N-bis-(3,5-dimethyl-1-p-sulfonyl-1H-pyrazol-4-ylmethylene)-benzene-1,2-diamine (H(2)L(4)) were prepared from the reaction between 5-oxo-3-methyl-1-p-tolyl-1H-pyrazole-4-carbaldehyde or 4-(4-formyl-5-oxo-3-methyl-pyrazol-1-yl)-benzenesulfonic acid and o-phenylenediamine or ethylenediamine. And these are characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, (1)H NMR and GC-MS. The corresponding Schiff base complexes of Mn(III) were prepared by condensation of [Mn(3)(mu(3)-O)(OAc)(6)(H(2)O)(3)].3H(2)O with ligands H(2)L(1), H(2)L(2), H(2)L(3) and H(2)L(4). All these complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, X-ray crystallography, conductometry measurement, FT-IR, electronic spectra and mass (FAB) spectrometry. Thermal behaviour of the complexes has been studied by TGA, DTA and DSC. Electronic spectra and magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate octahedral stereochemistry of manganese (III) complexes, while non-electrolytic behaviour complexes indicate the absence of counter ion. Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. AGRO-BIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION OF POTATO VARIETIES ON LIGHT-BROWN SOILS ASTRAKHAN REGION AT WATERING SPRINKLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Tyutyuma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a study of varieties collection of different ecological-geographic origin on light-brown soils in the summer planting and watering irrigation. The promising, high-yielding varieties for cultivation in the Astrakhan region were selected.

  15. Investigation of counter-measures in the case of radioactive materials penetration in soils and ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachse, G.; Anders, G.; Puehrer, H.; Stohn, W.

    1975-03-01

    Proceeding from the methods known from hydraulic engineering for the protection of ground waters from penetrating noxious substances, suitable measures for preventing the contamination of ground waters and soils are discussed. Since preventive measures are always of priority, a facility using concrete containers with double walls is considered to be an appropriate method for temporary storage of low and medium activity waste waters. (author)

  16. Simulation of boundary layer trajectory dispersion sensitivity to soil moisture conditions: MM5 and noah-based investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sensitivity of trajectories from experiments in which volumetric values of soil moisture were changed with respect to control values were analyzed during three different synoptic episodes in June 2006. The MM5 and Noah land surface models were used to simulate the response of the planetary boun...

  17. Study protocol of the B-CAST study: a multicenter, prospective cohort study investigating the tumor biomarkers in adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Megumi; Mori, Masaki; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Kanazawa, Akiyoshi; Kobayashi, Michiya; Okajima, Masazumi; Hyodo, Ichinosuke; Miyakoda, Keiko; Sugihara, Kenichi; Kotake, Kenjiro; Nishimura, Genichi; Tomita, Naohiro; Ichikawa, Wataru; Takahashi, Keiichi; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Furuhata, Tomohisa; Kondo, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III colon cancer is internationally accepted as standard treatment with established efficacy. Several oral fluorouracil (5-FU) derivatives with different properties are available in Japan, but which drug is the most appropriate for each patient has not been established. Although efficacy prediction of 5-FU derivatives using expression of 5-FU activation/metabolism enzymes in tumors has been studied, it has not been clinically applied. The B-CAST study is a multicenter, prospective cohort study aimed to identify the patients who benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy with each 5-FU regimen, through evaluating the relationship between tumor biomarker expression and treatment outcome. The frozen tumor specimens of patients with stage III colon cancer who receives postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy are examined. Protein expression of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). mRNA expression of TP, DPD, thymidylate synthase (TS) and orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRT) are evaluated using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The patients’ clinical data reviewed are as follow: demographic and pathological characteristics, regimen, drug doses and treatment duration of adjuvant therapy, types and severity of adverse events, disease free survival, relapse free survival and overall survival. Then, relationships among the protein/mRNA expression, clinicopathological characteristics and the treatment outcomes are analyzed for each 5-FU derivative. A total of 2,128 patients from the 217 institutions were enrolled between April 2009 and March 2012. The B-CAST study demonstrated that large-scale, multicenter translational research using frozen samples was feasible when the sample shipment and Web-based data collection were well organized. The results

  18. Novel solid phase extraction procedure for gold(III) on Dowex M 4195 prior to its flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuzen, Mustafa; Saygi, Kadriye O.; Soylak, Mustafa

    2008-01-01

    A method for solid phase extraction (SPE) of gold(III) using Dowex M 4195 chelating resin has been developed. The optimum experimental conditions for the quantitative sorption of gold(III), pH, effect of flow rates, eluent types, sorption capacity and the effect of diverse ions on the sorption of gold(III) have been investigated. The chelating resin can be reused for more than 100 cycles of sorption-desorption without any significant change in sorption of gold(III) ions. The recovery values for gold(III) and detection limit (LOD) of gold were greater than 95% and 1.61 μg L -1 , respectively. The preconcentration factor was 31. The relative standard deviation of the method was -1 . The proposed method has been applied for the determination of gold(III) in some real samples including water, soil and sediment samples

  19. Investigation of the nonlinear effects of Wiggler and undulator fields on the beam dynamics of particle storage rings in the case of DORIS III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decking, W.

    1995-11-01

    In this thesis I analyze the effects of wiggler and undulator magnetic fields on the beam dynamics of electron/positron storage rings. DORIS III, DESY's synchrotron radiation source is taken as an example. Wigglers and undulators are used for the production of synchrotron radiation or to control beam sizes in storage rings. Their introduction in the lattices of storage rings causes some problems due to the strong nonlinearities of the magnetic fields. Therefore a detailed analysis of the particle dynamics under the influence of wiggler magnetic fields and their field errors is necessary. This thesis provides such an analysis. The problem will be attacked analytically, numerically and experimentally. The analytic approach is based on the treatment of the appropriate Hamiltonian with perturbation theory. The magnetic fields are described with a Fourier series, which covers the main characteristics of wiggler and undulator fields. The main effect of wigglers and undulators is the excitation of fourth order synchro-betatron resonances. The description of field errors and other details of the magnetic fields is achieved by integrating over appropriately distributed current sheets. This allows the modeling of different parameters such as magnet pole width, periodicity errors and errors in the field gradients. (orig./WL)ons of motion in the fields calculated with this method can only be integrated numerically. This would be much too slow to be used in particle tracking codes. Therefore a transfer map b

  20. Application of polyacrylamide to reduce phosphorus losses from a Chinese purple soil: a laboratory and field investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Teng, Lingling; Wei, Shiqiang; Deng, Lili; Luo, Zaibo; Chen, Yupeng; Flanagan, Dennis C

    2010-07-01

    Use of anionic polyacrylamide (PAM) to control phosphorus (P) losses from a Chinese purple soil was studied in both a laboratory soil column experiment and a field plot experiment on a steep slope (27%). Treatments in the column study were a control, and PAM mixed uniformly into the soil at rates of 0.02, 0.05, 0.08, 0.10, and 0.20%. We found that PAM had an important inhibitory effect on vertical P transport in the soil columns, with the 0.20% PAM treatment having the greatest significant reduction in leachate soluble P concentrations and losses resulting from nine leaching periods. Field experiments were conducted on 5m wide by 21m long natural rainfall plots, that allowed collection of both surface runoff and subsurface drainage water. Wheat was planted and grown on all plots with typical fertilizer applied. Treatments included a control, dry PAM at 3.9 kg ha(-1), dry PAM at 3.9 kg ha(-1) applied together with lime (CaCO(3) at 4.9 t ha(-1)), and dry PAM at 3.9 kg ha(-1) applied together with gypsum (CaSO(4).2H(2)O at 4 t ha(-1)). Results from the field plot experiment in which 5 rainfall events resulted in measurable runoff and leachate showed that all PAM treatments significantly reduced runoff volume and total P losses in surface runoff compared to the control. The PAM treatments also all significantly reduced water volume leached to the tile drain. However, total P losses in the leachate water were not significantly different due to the treatments, perhaps due to the low PAM soil surface application rate and/or high experimental variability. The PAM alone treatment resulted in the greatest wheat growth as indicated by the plant growth indexes of wheat plant height, leaf length, leaf width, grain number per head, and dried grain mass. Growth indexes of the PAM with Calcium treatments were significantly lesser. These results indicate that the selection and use of soil amendments need to be carefully determined based upon the most important management goal at a

  1. Use of the reference organism Eisenia foetida to investigate bioaccumulation and biological effects following contamination of soil by uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovanetti, A.; Cozzella, M.L.; Basso, E.; Ninova, P.; Fesenko, S.; Sansone, U.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The use of reference organisms for radiological assessments on non -human species is an integral part of the current systemic approach for the management of radiation effects in the environment. The reference organisms approach allows the evaluation of radiological impact on the environment taking into account relationships among ambient radionuclide activity concentrations, dose and expected adverse biological effects. Four broad categories of biological damages are included: mortality, morbidity, DNA damage and reproductive failure. Earthworms are one of the most important biotic components in the soil, they are commonly used in studies of toxicity and they are included in the list of the reference organisms suggested by International (ICRP) and national organisations. However, up to now, no adequate results have been obtained for earthworms allowing the identification of the dose-response relationship, essentially for the contamination scenarios where radionuclide can provide both radiation and chemical impact. Uranium (U) is a naturally occurring heavy metal. Recently there has been public concern on the presence in the environment of depleted uranium (DU), a by-product of the process used to enrich natural uranium ore for use in nuclear reactors and in nuclear weapons. The presence of uranium in soil could lead to both toxic and radiation impact and it is difficult to distinguish the different impacts and their contribution to possible biological effects. European Union, OECD and FAO have selected the earthworms Eisenia for testing soil toxicity because it is an organism that can be easily cultured in the laboratory, an extensive database is available, and it feeds at the soil surface level. The prime objective of the present study was to evaluate the possible use of Eisenia foetida as a bio-marker of U environmental impact. Four groups of six sexually mature Eisenia foetida were maintained in the dark at 21 deg. C in Petri

  2. Land management on soil physical properties and maize (Zea mays L. var. BIMA) growth (An adaptation strategy of climate change)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, M. K.; Komariah; Pujiasmanto, B.; Noda, K.

    2018-03-01

    Water deficit is a problem on rainfed maize production but can be solved by proper land management. The objective of the study to determine the soil physical properties and maize yield affected by land management to adapt to drought. The experimental design was a randomized complete block using 5 treatments with 4 repetitions, including: (i) Control (KO), (ii) Rice Straw Mulched (MC), (iii) Compost Fertilizer (CF), (iv) In-Organic Fertilizer (AF), (v) Legume Cover crop (CC). Soil physical and maize growth properties namely soil moisture, soil texture, soil bulk density, plant height, biomass, and yield were investigated. The results showed that composting land increased soil water availability and provided nutrient to crops and thus increase soil physical properties, maize growth and yield. Although inorganic fertilizer also increased plant growth and yield, but it did not improve soil physical properties.

  3. IIIST1\\NTI-i\\III.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    guests in September 1914. (1) Major-General Sir Lothian Nicholson. KCB, CMG, and Major H 1. MacMullen, MC, History of the East Lancashire Regiment in the Great. War 1914-1918, Littlebury. Bros, Ltd. Liverpool,. 1936. p 114. Ti\\.~TI(~S-1\\ IIIST ••III. ~SI Til VI~V. I..•f :01 i\\. f~•• 10III.SOIl ~IIII~ 1~lt. The study of military tactics ...

  4. Use of transgenic GFP reporter strains of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the patterns of stress responses induced by pesticides and by organic extracts from agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbalagan, Charumathi; Lafayette, Ivan; Antoniou-Kourounioti, Melissa; Gutierrez, Carmen; Martin, Jose Rodriguez; Chowdhuri, Debapratim K; De Pomerai, David I

    2013-01-01

    As a free-living nematode, C. elegans is exposed to various pesticides used in agriculture, as well as to persistent organic residues which may contaminate the soil for long periods. Following on from our previous study of metal effects on 24 GFP-reporter strains representing four different stress-response pathways in C. elegans (Anbalagan et al. Ecotoxicology 21:439-455, 2012), we now present parallel data on the responses of these same strains to several commonly used pesticides. Some of these, like dichlorvos, induced multiple stress genes in a concentration-dependent manner. Unusually, endosulfan induced only one gene (cyp-34A9) to very high levels (8-10-fold) even at the lowest test concentration, with a clear plateau at higher doses. Other pesticides, like diuron, did not alter reporter gene expression detectably even at the highest test concentration attainable, while others (such as glyphosate) did so only at very high concentrations. We have also used five responsive GFP reporters to investigate the toxicity of soil pore water from two agricultural sites in south-east Spain, designated P74 (used for cauliflower production, but significantly metal contaminated) and P73 (used for growing lettuce, but with only background levels of metals). Both soil pore water samples induced all five test genes to varying extents, yet artificial mixtures containing all major metals present had essentially no effect on these same transgenes. Soluble organic contaminants present in the pore water were extracted with acetone and dichloromethane, then after evaporation of the solvents, the organic residues were redissolved in ultrapure water to reconstitute the soluble organic components of the original soil pore water. These organic extracts induced transgene expression at similar or higher levels than the original pore water. Addition of the corresponding metal mixtures had either no effect, or reduced transgene expression towards the levels seen with soil pore water only. We

  5. Investigation of Rainfall-Runoff Processes and Soil Moisture Dynamics in Grassland Plots under Simulated Rainfall Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Zhao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of rainfall-runoff are important aspects of hydrological processes. In this study, rainfall-runoff processes and soil moisture dynamics at different soil depths and slope positions of grassland with two different row spacings (5 cm and 10 cm, respectively, referred to as R5 and R10 were analyzed, by means of a solution of rainfall simulation experiments. Bare land was also considered as a comparison. The results showed that the mechanism of runoff generation was mainly excess infiltration overland flow. The surface runoff amount of R5 plot was greater than that of R10, while the interflow amount of R10 was larger than that of R5 plot, although the differences of the subsurface runoff processes between plots R5 and R10 were little. The effects of rainfall intensity on the surface runoff were significant, but not obvious on the interflow and recession curve, which can be described as a simple exponential equation, with a fitting degree of up to 0.854–0.996. The response of soil moisture to rainfall and evapotranspiration was mainly in the 0–20 cm layer, and the response at the 40 cm layer to rainfall was slower and generally occurred after the rainfall stopped. The upper slope generally responded fastest to rainfall, and the foot of the slope was the slowest. The results presented here could provide insights into understanding the surface and subsurface runoff processes and soil moisture dynamics for grasslands in semi-arid regions.

  6. Investigation of changes in {delta}{sup 13}C of PAHs during phytoremediation of coal tar-contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mick Cooper; Cheng-Gong Sun; Margaret Smith; Harry Duncan; Colin Snape [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom). School of Chemical Environmental and Mining Engineering

    2007-07-01

    It has been shown that phytoremediation of polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated land is a useful, low cost, low maintenance method of cleaning up land at former gas and coking works. However, PAH degradation in the soil and sediment is slow, but PAHs may be degraded through properly stimulated soil micro-organisms. Here we describe a laboratory trial, employing the clover Trifolium pretense (L.)(TP), which was grown in samples of soil contaminated by fresh coal tar, and in soil heavily contaminated by PAHs, obtained from a former coking works. As the latter substrate was 'naturally' contaminated, it contained both pure PAHs and their derivatives, and was thus considered fully 'weathered', and contained recalcitrant PAH species. Conventional analytical techniques (for example, GC-MS) generally provide little information on the source of pollutants such as PAHs. Previous work has established, however, that significant differences existed in the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C isotopic ratios between PAHs from various sources. Source apportionment of PAH contamination by stable isotope analysis is a powerful technique, but one which assumes that isotopic fractionation is not a significant factor in aged or bioaltered matrices. Phytoremediation trials described here have been utilised in order to determine whether or not any such fractionation of {sup 13}C occurs during the process. Although PAH distributions can be markedly altered by biodegradation, it has been demonstrated that, for low temperature coal tar, the carbon stable isotopic values of the parent PAHs remain fairly constant. 22 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. FRAGMATIC: A randomised phase III clinical trial investigating the effect of fragmin® added to standard therapy in patients with lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macbeth Fergus R

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE occurs when blood clots in the leg, pelvic or other deep vein (deep vein thrombosis with or without transport of the thrombus into the pulmonary arterial circulation (pulmonary embolus. VTE is common in patients with cancer and is increased by surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and disease progression. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH is routinely used to treat VTE and some evidence suggests that LMWH may also have an anticancer effect, by reduction in the incidence of metastases. The FRAGMATIC trial will assess the effect of adding dalteparin (FRAGMIN, a type of LMWH, to standard treatment for patients with lung cancer. Methods/Design The study design is a randomised multicentre phase III trial comparing standard treatment and standard treatment plus daily LMWH for 24 weeks in patients with lung cancer. Patients eligible for this study must have histopathological or cytological diagnosis of primary bronchial carcinoma (small cell or non-small cell within 6 weeks of randomisation, be 18 or older, and must be willing and able to self-administer 5000 IU dalteparin by daily subcutaneous injection or have it administered to themselves or by a carer for 24 weeks. A total of 2200 patients will be recruited from all over the UK over a 3 year period and followed up for a minimum of 1 year after randomisation. Patients will be randomised to one of the two treatment groups in a 1:1 ratio, standard treatment or standard treatment plus dalteparin. The primary outcome measure of the trial is overall survival. The secondary outcome measures include venous thrombotic event (VTE free survival, serious adverse events (SAEs, metastasis-free survival, toxicity, quality of life (QoL, levels of breathlessness, anxiety and depression, cost effectiveness and cost utility. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN80812769

  8. FRAGMATIC: A randomised phase III clinical trial investigating the effect of fragmin® added to standard therapy in patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, Gareth O; Burns, Sarah; Noble, Simon I; Macbeth, Fergus R; Cohen, David; Maughan, Timothy S

    2009-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs when blood clots in the leg, pelvic or other deep vein (deep vein thrombosis) with or without transport of the thrombus into the pulmonary arterial circulation (pulmonary embolus). VTE is common in patients with cancer and is increased by surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and disease progression. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is routinely used to treat VTE and some evidence suggests that LMWH may also have an anticancer effect, by reduction in the incidence of metastases. The FRAGMATIC trial will assess the effect of adding dalteparin (FRAGMIN), a type of LMWH, to standard treatment for patients with lung cancer. The study design is a randomised multicentre phase III trial comparing standard treatment and standard treatment plus daily LMWH for 24 weeks in patients with lung cancer. Patients eligible for this study must have histopathological or cytological diagnosis of primary bronchial carcinoma (small cell or non-small cell) within 6 weeks of randomisation, be 18 or older, and must be willing and able to self-administer 5000 IU dalteparin by daily subcutaneous injection or have it administered to themselves or by a carer for 24 weeks. A total of 2200 patients will be recruited from all over the UK over a 3 year period and followed up for a minimum of 1 year after randomisation. Patients will be randomised to one of the two treatment groups in a 1:1 ratio, standard treatment or standard treatment plus dalteparin. The primary outcome measure of the trial is overall survival. The secondary outcome measures include venous thrombotic event (VTE) free survival, serious adverse events (SAEs), metastasis-free survival, toxicity, quality of life (QoL), levels of breathlessness, anxiety and depression, cost effectiveness and cost utility. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN80812769

  9. Characterization of carotenoids in soil bacteria and investigation of their photodegradation by UVA radiation via resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar B N, Vinay; Kampe, Bernd; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-07-07

    A soil habitat consists of an enormous number of pigmented bacteria with the pigments mainly composed of diverse carotenoids. Most of the pigmented bacteria in the top layer of the soil are photoprotected from exposure to huge amounts of UVA radiation on a daily basis by these carotenoids. The photostability of these carotenoids depends heavily on the presence of specific features like a carbonyl group or an ionone ring system on its overall structure. Resonance Raman spectroscopy is one of the most sensitive and powerful techniques to detect and characterize these carotenoids and also monitor processes associated with them in their native system at a single cell resolution. However, most of the resonance Raman profiles of carotenoids have very minute differences, thereby making it extremely difficult to confirm if these differences are attributed to the presence of different carotenoids or if it is a consequence of their interaction with other cellular components. In this study, we devised a method to overcome this problem by monitoring also the photodegradation of the carotenoids in question by UVA radiation wherein a differential photodegradation response will confirm the presence of different carotenoids irrespective of the proximities in their resonance Raman profiles. Using this method, the detection and characterization of carotenoids in pure cultures of five species of pigmented coccoid soil bacteria is achieved. We also shed light on the influence of the structure of the carotenoid on its photodegradation which can be exploited for use in the characterization of carotenoids via resonance Raman spectroscopy.

  10. 15N NMR investigation of the covalent binding of reduced TNT amines to soil humic acid, model compounds, and lignocellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, K.A.; Kennedy, K.R.

    2002-01-01

    The five major reductive degradation products of TNT-4ADNT (4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene), 2ADNT (2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene), 2,4DANT (2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene), 2,6DANT (2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene), and TAT (2,4,6-triaminotoluene)-labeled with 15N in the amine positions, were reacted with the IHSS soil humic acid and analyzed by 15N NMR spectrometry. In the absence of catalysts, all five amines underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with quinone and other carbonyl groups in the soil humic acid to form both heterocyclic and nonheterocyclic condensation products. Imine formation via 1,2-addition of the amines to quinone groups in the soil humic acid was significant with the diamines and TAT but not the monoamines. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzed an increase in the incorporation of all five amines into the humic acid. In the case of the diamines and TAT, HRP also shifted the binding away from heterocyclic condensation product toward imine formation. A comparison of quantitative liquid phase with solid-state CP/MAS 15N NMR indicated that the CP experiment underestimated imine and heterocyclic nitrogens in humic acid, even with contact times optimal for observation of these nitrogens. Covalent binding of the mono- and diamines to 4-methylcatechol, the HRP catalyzed condensation of 4ADNT and 2,4DANT to coniferyl alcohol, and the binding of 2,4DANT to lignocellulose with and without birnessite were also examined.

  11. Investigation of Methane and Soil Carbon Dynamics Using Near Surface Geophysical Methods at the Tanoma Educational Wetland Site, Tanoma, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, A. D.; Mount, G.

    2017-12-01

    Studies to constrain methane budgets of Pennsylvania have sought to quantify the amount and rate of fugitive methane released during industrial natural gas development. However, contributions from other environmental systems such as artificial wetlands used to treat part of the 300 million gallons per day of acid mine drainage (AMD) are often not understated or not considered. The artificial wetlands are sources of both biogenic and thermogenic methane and are used to treat AMD which would otherwise flow untreated into Pennsylvania surface waters. Our research utilizes a combination of indirect non-invasive geophysical methods (ground penetrating radar, GPR) and the complex refractive index model, aerial imagery, and direct measurements (coring and gas traps) to estimate the contribution of biogenic methane from wetlands and legacy thermogenic methane from acid mine drainage from a flooded coal mine at an artificial wetland designed to treat these polluted waters at Tanoma, Pennsylvania. Our approach uses (3D) GPR surveys to define the thickness of the soil from the surface to the regolith-bedrock interface to create a volume model of potential biogenic gas stores. Velocity data derived from the GPR is then used to calculate the dielectric permittivity of the soil and then modeled for gas content when considering the saturation, porosity and amount of soil present. Depth-profile cores are extracted to confirm soil column interfaces and determine changes in soil carbon content. Comparisons of gas content are made with gas traps placed across the wetlands that measure the variability of gaseous methane released. In addition, methane dissolved in the waters from biogenic processes in the wetland and thermogenic processes underground are analyzed by a gas chromatograph to quantify those additions. In sum, these values can then be extrapolated to estimate carbon stocks in AMD areas such as those with similar water quality and vegetation types in the Appalachian region

  12. Predicting arsenic bioavailability to hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata in arsenic-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzaga, Maria Isidória Silva; Ma, Lena Q; Pacheco, Edson Patto; dos Santos, Wallace Melo

    2012-12-01

    Using chemical extraction to evaluate plant arsenic availability in contaminated soils is important to estimate the time frame for site cleanup during phytoremediation. It is also of great value to assess As mobility in soil and its risk in environmental contamination. In this study, four conventional chemical extraction methods (water, ammonium sulfate, ammonium phosphate, and Mehlich III) and a new root-exudate based method were used to evaluate As extractability and to correlate it with As accumulation in P. vittata growing in five As-contaminated soils under greenhouse condition. The relationship between different soil properties, and As extractability and plant As accumulation was also investigated. Arsenic extractability was 4.6%, 7.0%, 18%, 21%, and 46% for water, ammonium sulfate, organic acids, ammonium phosphate, and Mehlich III, respectively. Root exudate (organic acids) solution was suitable for assessing As bioavailability (81%) in the soils while Mehlich III (31%) overestimated the amount of As taken up by plants. Soil organic matter, P and Mg concentrations were positively correlated to plant As accumulation whereas Ca concentration was negatively correlated. Further investigation is needed on the effect of Ca and Mg on As uptake by P. vittata. Moreover, additional As contaminated soils with different properties should be tested.

  13. Effects of compost and phosphate amendments on arsenic mobility in soils and arsenic uptake by the hyperaccumulator, Pteris vittata L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Xinde; Ma, Lena Q.; Shiralipour, Aziz

    2003-01-01

    Chinese brake fern (Pteris vittata L.), an arsenic (As) hyperaccumulator, has shown the potential to remediate As-contaminated soils. This study investigated the effects of soil amendments on the leachability of As from soils and As uptake by Chinese brake fern. The ferns were grown for 12 weeks in a chromated-copper-arsenate (CCA) contaminated soil or in As spiked contaminated (ASC) soil. Soils were treated with phosphate rock, municipal solid waste, or biosolid compost. Phosphate amendments significantly enhanced plant As uptake from the two tested soils with frond As concentrations increasing up to 265% relative to the control. After 12 weeks, plants grown in phosphate-amended soil removed >8% of soil As. Replacement of As by P from the soil binding sites was responsible for the enhanced mobility of As and subsequent increased plant uptake. Compost additions facilitated As uptake from the CCA soil, but decreased As uptake from the ASC soil. Elevated As uptake in the compost-treated CCA soil was related to the increase of soil water-soluble As and As(V) transformation into As(III). Reduced As uptake in the ASC soil may be attributed to As adsorption to the compost. Chinese brake fern took up As mainly from the iron-bound fraction in the CCA soil and from the water-soluble/exchangeable As in the ASC soil. Without ferns for As adsorption, compost and phosphate amendments increased As leaching from the CCA soil, but had decreased leaching with ferns when compared to the control. For the ASC soil, treatments reduced As leaching regardless of fern presence. This study suggest that growing Chinese brake fern in conjunction with phosphate amendments increases the effectiveness of remediating As-contaminated soils, by increasing As uptake and decreasing As leaching. - Phosphate amendment increases the effectiveness of Chinese brake fern to remediate As-contaminated soils, by increasing As uptake and decreasing As leaching

  14. Investigation on the Assimilation of Nitrogen by Maize Roots and the Transport of Some Major Nitrogen Compounds by Xylem Sap. III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanko, S.; Ingversen, J.

    1971-01-01

    Xylem sap was collected from nitrogen-starved maize plants and investigations were made on the nitrogen transported. It appears from the results that several pools for different amino acids exist, which have different relations to the transport of nitrogen taken up. While in maize roots Glu, Glu...

  15. An investigation of groundwater organics, soil minerals, and activated carbon on the complexation, adsorption, and separation of technetium-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, B.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes studies on the interactions of technetium-99 (Tc) with different organic compounds and soil minerals under both oxidizing and reducing conditions. The report is divided into four parts and includes (1) effect of natural organic matter (NOM) on the complexation and solubility of Tc, (2) complexation between Tc and trichloroethylene (TCE) in aqueous solutions, (3) adsorption of Tc on soil samples from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), and (4) adsorption and separation of Tc on activated carbon. Various experimental techniques were applied to characterize and identify Tc complexation with organic compounds and TCE, including liquid-liquid extraction, membrane filtration, size exclusion, and gel chromatography. Results indicate, within the experimental error, Tc (as pertechnetate, TcO 4 ) did not appear to form complexes with groundwater or natural organic matter under both atmospheric and reducing conditions. However, Tc can form complexes with certain organic compounds or specific functional groups such as salicylate. Tc did not appear to form complexes with TCE in aqueous solution.Both liquid-liquid extraction and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) gave no indication Tc was complexed with TCE. The correlations between Tc and TCE concentrations in monitoring wells at PGDP may be a coincidence because TCE was commonly used as a decontamination reagent. Once TCE and Tc entered the groundwater, they behaved similarly because both TcO 4 - and TCE are poorly adsorbed by soils. An effective remediation technique to remove TcO 4 - from PGDP contaminated groundwater is needed. One possibility is the use of an activated carbon adsorption technique developed in this study

  16. Soil physics and agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dourado Neto, Durval; Reichardt, K.; Sparovek, G.

    2004-01-01

    The approach that integrates knowledge is very important in Agriculture, including farmers, extensionists, researchers and professors. The specialists, including the soil physicists, must have a global view of the crop production system. Therefore, their expertise can be useful for the society. The Essence of scientific knowledge is its practical application. The soil physics is a sub area of Agronomy. There are many examples of this specific subject related to Agriculture. This paper will focus, in general, the following cases: (i) erosion, environmental pollution and human health, (ii) plant population and distribution, soil fertility, evapo-transpiration and soil water flux density, and (iii) productivity, effective root depth, water deficit and yield

  17. The investigation formation of complexes of Fe(III) and Fe(II) in the water solution of imidazole at 298 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radjabov, U.R.; Yusupov, Z.N.; Sharipov, I.Kh.

    2001-01-01

    C H lm=0.1 mol/l, C F e(II)=1·10 - 4 m ol/l and iron sterns: 0.10, 0.25, 0.50 and 1.00 mol/l. It is established that in the investigated systems form at different on composition mono-, polynuclear, homo-- and heterovalent coordination compounds. In aids of the oxidation function accurate the composition, defined the constants formation and domination sphere of complex forms

  18. NRL transmittance measurements at DIRT-III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, J. A.; Haught, K. M.; Woytko, M. A.; Gott, C.

    1981-06-01

    This is a final report on NRL experiments at the DIRT-III tests at Fort Polk, Louisiana in April - May 1980. Spectral transmission data at 3 wavelengths 0.55 microns, 1.06 microns and 10.4 microns is reported for 27 events in natural soil and various prepared soils. Spectral transmittance of smoke and dust clouds generated by explosive charges was found to be independent of wavelengths in about 50% of the events where useful data was obtained. When the charge was buried in wet natural soil transmittance at 10.4 microns was transmittance at 0.55 microns .

  19. Microbial investigations in city soils of different use and heavy metal contamination with a view to characterizing its functional capability. Mikrobielle Untersuchungen in Stadtboeden unterschiedlicher Nutzung und Schwermetallbelastung zur Charakterisierung der Bodenfunktionalitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weritz, N

    1990-11-20

    This work investigates the microbiological situation of city soils as an indicator of the soils' functional capability, and their impairment due to heavy metal pollution. It gives a survey of the literature (biological activities, influences on biological activities from heavy metals, microorganisms, bacteria, fungi, enzyme activities, CO{sub 2} respiration, mechanisms of resistance, simulation effects), points out the area of investigation and the investigated plots, and describes the method adapted. The latter includes sampling and sample storage, soil-chemical and soil-biological methods, laboratory experiments and statistical evaluation. The investigation results, which are reported in detail, cover, inter alia, the following: pH value, CaCO{sub 3} contents, cation exchange capacity, carbon content, catalase activity, urease activity and the relative comparison of microbial activity between the types of use. Results relating to heavy metal contents cover the total content and the effect of heavy metal pollutions on substrate-induced respiration, catalase activity and xylanase activity. (HWJ).

  20. Field tracer investigation of unsaturated zone flow paths and mechanisms in agricultural soils of northwestern Mississippi, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, K.S.; Nimmo, J.R.; Rose, C.E.; Coupe, R.H.

    2011-01-01

    In many farmed areas, intensive application of agricultural chemicals and withdrawal of groundwater for irrigation have led to water quality and supply issues. Unsaturated-zone processes, including preferential flow, play a major role in these effects but are not well understood. In the Bogue Phalia basin, an intensely agricultural area in the Delta region of northwestern Mississippi, the fine-textured soils often exhibit surface ponding and runoff after irrigation and rainfall as well as extensive surface cracking during prolonged dry periods. Fields are typically land-formed to promote surface flow into drainage ditches and streams that feed into larger river ecosystems. Downward flow of water below the root zone is considered minimal; regional groundwater models predict only 5% or less of precipitation recharges the heavily used alluvial aquifer. In this study transport mechanisms within and below the root zone of a fallow soybean field were assessed by performing a 2-m ring infiltration test with tracers and subsurface monitoring instruments. Seven months after tracer application, 48 continuous cores were collected for tracer extraction to define the extent of water movement and quantify preferential flow using a mass-balance approach. Vertical water movement was rapid below the pond indicating the importance of vertical preferential flow paths in the shallow unsaturated zone, especially to depths where agricultural disturbance occurs. Lateral flow of water at shallow depths was extensive and spatially non-uniform, reaching up to 10. m from the pond within 2. months. Within 1. month, the wetting front reached a textural boundary at 4-5. m between the fine-textured soil and sandy alluvium, now a potential capillary barrier which, prior to extensive irrigation withdrawals, was below the water table. Within 10. weeks, tracer was detectable at the water table which is presently about 12. m below land surface. Results indicate that 43% of percolation may be through

  1. Soil water management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, D.R.; Cassel, D.K.

    1984-01-01

    The use of radiation and tracer techniques in investigations into soil water management in agriculture, hydrology etc. is described. These techniques include 1) neutron moisture gauges to monitor soil water content and soil water properties, 2) gamma radiation attenuation for measuring the total density of soil and soil water content, 3) beta radiation attenuation for measuring changes in the water status of crop plants and 4) radioactive and stable tracers for identifying pathways, reactions and retention times of the constituents in soils and groundwater aquifers. The number and spacing of soil observations that should be taken to represent the management unit are also considered. (U.K.)

  2. Mixed artificial grasslands with more roots improved mine soil infiltration capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gao-Lin; Yang, Zheng; Cui, Zeng; Liu, Yu; Fang, Nu-Fang; Shi, Zhi-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Soil water is one of the critical limiting factors in achieving sustainable revegetation. Soil infiltration capacity plays a vital role in determining the inputs from precipitation and enhancing water storage, which are important for the maintenance and survival of vegetation patches in arid and semi-arid areas. Our study investigated the effects of different artificial grasslands on soil physical properties and soil infiltration capacity. The artificial grasslands were Medicago sativa, Astragalus adsurgens, Agropyron mongolicum, Lespedeza davurica, Bromus inermis, Hedysarum scoparium, A. mongolicum + Artemisia desertorum, A. adsurgens + A. desertorum and M. sativa + B. inermis. The soil infiltration capacity index (SICI), which was based on the average infiltration rate of stage I (AIRSI) and the average infiltration rate of stage III (AIRS III), was higher (indicating that the infiltration capacity was greater) under the artificial grasslands than that of the bare soil. The SICI of the A. adsurgens + A. desertorum grassland had the highest value (1.48) and bare soil (-0.59) had the lowest value. It was evident that artificial grassland could improve soil infiltration capacity. We also used principal component analysis (PCA) to determine that the main factors that affected SICI were the soil water content at a depth of 20 cm (SWC20), the below-ground root biomasses at depths of 10 and 30 cm (BGB10, BGB30), the capillary porosity at a depth of 10 cm (CP10) and the non-capillary porosity at a depth of 20 cm (NCP20). Our study suggests that the use of Legume-poaceae mixtures and Legume-shrub mixtures to create grasslands provided an effective ecological restoration approach to improve soil infiltration properties due to their greater root biomasses. Furthermore, soil water content, below-ground root biomass, soil capillary porosity and soil non-capillary porosity were the main factors that affect the soil infiltration capacity.

  3. WAG 2 remedial investigation and site investigation site-specific work plan/health and safety checklist for the soil and sediment task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, V.L.; Burgoa, B.B.

    1993-12-01

    This document is a site-specific work plan/health and safety checklist (WP/HSC) for a task of the Waste Area Grouping 2 Remedial Investigation and Site Investigation (WAG 2 RI ampersand SI). Title 29 CFR Part 1910.120 requires that a health and safety program plan that includes site- and task-specific information be completed to ensure conformance with health- and safety-related requirements. To meet this requirement, the health and safety program plan for each WAG 2 RI ampersand SI field task must include (1) the general health and safety program plan for all WAG 2 RI ampersand SI field activities and (2) a WP/HSC for that particular field task. These two components, along with all applicable referenced procedures, must be kept together at the work site and distributed to field personnel as required. The general health and safety program plan is the Health and Safety Plan for the Remedial Investigation and Site Investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (ORNL/ER-169). The WP/HSCs are being issued as supplements to ORNL/ER-169

  4. Evaluation of soil structure in the framework of an overall soil quality rating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller, L; Shepherd, T G; Schindler, U

    2013-01-01

    Soil structure is an important aspect of agricultural soil quality, and its preservation and improvement are key to sustaining soil functions. Methods of overall soil quality assessment which include visual soil structure information can be useful tools for monitoring and managing the global soil...... resource. The aim of the paper is: (i) to demonstrate the role of visual quantification of soil structure within the procedure of the overall soil quality assessment by the Muencheberg Soil Quality Rating (M-SQR), (ii) to quantify the magnitude and variability of soil structure and overall M......-SQR on a number of agricultural research sites and (iii) to analyse the correlations of soil quality rating results with crop yields. We analysed visual soil structure and overall soil quality on a range of 20 experimental sites in seven countries. To assess visual soil structure we utilised the Visual Soil...

  5. Overall Survival in Patients With Advanced Melanoma Who Received Nivolumab Versus Investigator's Choice Chemotherapy in CheckMate 037: A Randomized, Controlled, Open-Label Phase III Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, James; Minor, David; D'Angelo, Sandra; Neyns, Bart; Smylie, Michael; Miller, Wilson H; Gutzmer, Ralf; Linette, Gerald; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Lao, Christopher D; Lorigan, Paul; Grossmann, Kenneth; Hassel, Jessica C; Sznol, Mario; Daud, Adil; Sosman, Jeffrey; Khushalani, Nikhil; Schadendorf, Dirk; Hoeller, Christoph; Walker, Dana; Kong, George; Horak, Christine; Weber, Jeffrey

    2018-02-01

    Purpose Until recently, limited options existed for patients with advanced melanoma who experienced disease progression while receiving treatment with ipilimumab. Here, we report the coprimary overall survival (OS) end point of CheckMate 037, which has previously shown that nivolumab resulted in more patients achieving an objective response compared with chemotherapy regimens in ipilimumab-refractory patients with advanced melanoma. Patients and Methods Patients were stratified by programmed death-ligand 1 expression, BRAF status, and best prior cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 therapy response, then randomly assigned 2:1 to nivolumab 3 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks or investigator's choice chemotherapy (ICC; dacarbazine 1,000 mg/m 2 every 3 weeks or carboplatin area under the curve 6 plus paclitaxel 175 mg/m 2 every 3 weeks). Patients were treated until they experienced progression or unacceptable toxicity, with follow-up of approximately 2 years. Results Two hundred seventy-two patients were randomly assigned to nivolumab (99% treated) and 133 to ICC (77% treated). More nivolumab-treated patients had brain metastases (20% v 14%) and increased lactate dehydrogenase levels (52% v 38%) at baseline; 41% of patients treated with ICC versus 11% of patients treated with nivolumab received anti-programmed death 1 agents after randomly assigned therapy. Median OS was 16 months for nivolumab versus 14 months for ICC (hazard ratio, 0.95; 95.54% CI, 0.73 to 1.24); median progression-free survival was 3.1 months versus 3.7 months, respectively (hazard ratio, 1.0; 95.1% CI, 0.78 to 1.436). Overall response rate (27% v 10%) and median duration of response (32 months v 13 months) were notably higher for nivolumab versus ICC. Fewer grade 3 and 4 treatment-related adverse events were observed in patients on nivolumab (14% v 34%). Conclusion Nivolumab demonstrated higher, more durable responses but no difference in survival compared with ICC. OS should be interpreted with

  6. Sequential extraction combined with isotope analysis as a tool for the investigation of lead mobilisation in soils: Application to organic-rich soils in an upland catchment in Scotland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacon, Jeffrey R.; Farmer, John G.; Dunn, Sarah M.; Graham, Margaret C.; Vinogradoff, Susan I.

    2006-01-01

    Sequential extraction (modified BCR procedure) combined with isotope analysis has been investigated as a tool for assessing mobilisation of lead into streams at an upland catchment in NE Scotland. The maximum lead concentrations (up to 110 mg kg -1 in air-dried soil) occurred not at the surface but at about 10 cm depth. The lowest 206 Pb/ 207 Pb ratios in any profile occurred, with one exception, at 2.5-5 cm depth. In the one exception, closest to the only road in the area, significantly lower 206 Pb/ 207 Pb ratios in the surface soil together with much increased chloride concentrations (in comparison to other surface waters) indicated the possible mobilisation of roadside lead and transfer to the stream. The 206 Pb/ 207 Pb ratios in extractable fractions tended at depth towards the ratio measured in the residual phase but the ratios in the oxidizable fraction increased to a value higher than that of the residual phase. - Sequential extraction combined with isotope analysis was used as a tool to assess mobilisation of lead into streams

  7. Arsenic mobilization and immobilization in paddy soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappler, A.; Hohmann, C.; Zhu, Y. G.; Morin, G.

    2010-05-01

    Arsenic is oftentimes of geogenic origin and in many cases bound to iron(III) minerals. Iron(III)-reducing bacteria can harvest energy by coupling the oxidation of organic or inorganic electron donors to the reduction of Fe(III). This process leads either to dissolution of Fe(III)-containing minerals and thus to a release of the arsenic into the environment or to secondary Fe-mineral formation and immobilisation of arsenic. Additionally, aerobic and anaerobic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria have the potential to co-precipitate or sorb arsenic during iron(II) oxidation at neutral pH that is usually followed by iron(III) mineral precipitation. We are currently investigating arsenic immobilization by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria and arsenic co-precipitation and immobilization by anaerobic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria in batch, microcosm and rice pot experiments. Co-precipitation batch experiments with pure cultures of nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria are used to quantify the amount of arsenic that can be immobilized during microbial iron mineral precipitation, to identify the minerals formed and to analyze the arsenic binding environment in the precipitates. Microcosm and rice pot experiments are set-up with arsenic-contaminated rice paddy soil. The microorganisms (either the native microbial population or the soil amended with the nitrate-dependent iron(II)-oxidizing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1) are stimulated either with iron(II), nitrate, or oxygen. Dissolved and solid-phase arsenic and iron are quantified. Iron and arsenic speciation and redox state in batch and microcosm experiments are determined by LC-ICP-MS and synchrotron-based methods (EXAFS, XANES).

  8. Potentiometric studies on some ternary complexes of Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III) and Ho(III) with cyclohexanediaminetetraacetic acid as primary ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marathe, D.G.; Munshi, K.N.

    1983-01-01

    The formation constants of the ternary complexes of neodymium(III), samarium(III), gadlonium(III) and holmium(III) with cyclohexanediaminetetraacetic acid (CyDTA) as primary ligand and dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN), dihydroxynaphthalene-6-sulphonic acid (DHNSA) and cateechol-3,5-disulphonic acid (CDSA) as secondary ligands have been investigated by potentiometric titration technique. The secondary ligands have been investigated by potentiometric titration technique. The values of formation constants of 1:1:1 ternary chelates are reported at three different temperatures, and at a fixed ionic strength, μ = 0.1 M (NaClO 4 ). (author)

  9. R Reactor seepage basins soil moisture and resistivity field investigation using cone penetrometer technology, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, M.K.

    2000-01-01

    The focus of this report is the summer 1999 investigation of the shallow groundwater system using cone penetrometer technology characterization methods to determine if the water table is perched beneath the R Reactor Seepage Basins (RRSBs)

  10. Experimental Investigation of Space Radiation Processing in Lunar Soil Ilmenite: Combining Perspectives from Surface Science and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, R.; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Baragiola, R.

    2010-01-01

    Energetic ions mostly from the solar wind play a major role in lunar space weathering because they contribute structural and chemical changes to the space-exposed surfaces of lunar regolith grains. In mature mare soils, ilmenite (FeTiO3) grains in the finest size fraction have been shown in transmission electron microscope (TEM) studies to exhibit key differences in their response to space radiation processing relative to silicates [1,2,3]. In ilmenite, solar ion radiation alters host grain outer margins to produce 10-100 nm thick layers that are microstructurally complex, but dominantly crystalline compared to the amorphous radiation-processed rims on silicates [1,2,3]. Spatially well-resolved analytical TEM measurements also show nm-scale compositional and chemical state changes in these layers [1,3]. These include shifts in Fe/Ti ratio from strong surface Fe-enrichment (Fe/Ti >> 1), to Fe depletion (Fe/Ti < 1) at 40-50 nm below the grain surface [1,3]. These compositional changes are not observed in the radiation-processed rims on silicates [4]. Several mechanism(s) to explain the overall relations in the ilmenite grain rims by radiation processing and/or additional space weathering processes were proposed by [1], and remain under current consideration [3]. A key issue has concerned the ability of ion radiation processing alone to produce some of the deeper- penetrating compositional changes. In order to provide some experimental constraints on these questions, we have performed a combined X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and field-emission scanning transmission electron (FE-STEM) study of experimentally ion-irradiated ilmenite. A key feature of this work is the combination of analytical techniques sensitive to changes in the irradiated samples at depth scales going from the immediate surface (approx.5 nm; XPS), to deeper in the grain interior (5-100 nm; FE-STEM).

  11. Decontamination of soil from the research reactor site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, H. Z.; Kim, K. N.; Choi, W. K.; Jeong, J. H.; Oh, W. J.

    2002-01-01

    The two research reactors (TRIGA MARK II and III) in Korea are to be decommissioned in the near future. When the reactors are completely dismantled, the site may remain contaminated due to the long period of operation. We assume that the site is radioactively contaminated by Co-60. Soils gathered from the research reactor site were artificially contaminated with Co 2+ ion. The desorption characteristics of Co 2+ ion from the soil surface by citric acid solution were investigated. Decontamination performances of citric acid and EDTA on soil stored in the radioactive waste drums was examined. The feasibility test of recycling the citric acid was also performed. We concluded that the radioactive waste volume could be reduced significantly by soil washing with a citric acid solution

  12. Antithrombin III blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003661.htm Antithrombin III blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... a protein that helps control blood clotting. A blood test can determine the amount of AT III present ...

  13. Application of multivariate analysis to investigate the trace element contamination in top soil of coal mining district in Jorong, South Kalimantan, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujiwati, Arie; Nakamura, K.; Watanabe, N.; Komai, T.

    2018-02-01

    Multivariate analysis is applied to investigate geochemistry of several trace elements in top soils and their relation with the contamination source as the influence of coal mines in Jorong, South Kalimantan. Total concentration of Cd, V, Co, Ni, Cr, Zn, As, Pb, Sb, Cu and Ba was determined in 20 soil samples by the bulk analysis. Pearson correlation is applied to specify the linear correlation among the elements. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Cluster Analysis (CA) were applied to observe the classification of trace elements and contamination sources. The results suggest that contamination loading is contributed by Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, As, and Pb. The elemental loading mostly affects the non-coal mining area, for instances the area near settlement and agricultural land use. Moreover, the contamination source is classified into the areas that are influenced by the coal mining activity, the agricultural types, and the river mixing zone. Multivariate analysis could elucidate the elemental loading and the contamination sources of trace elements in the vicinity of coal mine area.

  14. A numerical investigation into the performance of the soil nail wall and pile foundation at the Swift Delta I-5 Interchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Finite Difference Methods (FDM) and Finite Element Methods (FEM) studies are reported studying the soil nail wall construction at the Swift Delta I-5 Interchange bridge reconstruction in North Portland, Oregon. Five layers of soil nails were installe...

  15. Numerical and experimental investigation of DNAPL removal mechanisms in a layered porous medium by means of soil vapor extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Oostrom, Mart; Wietsma, Thomas W; Werth, Charles J; Valocchi, Albert J

    2009-10-13

    The purpose of this work is to identify the mechanisms that govern the removal of carbon tetrachloride (CT) during soil vapor extraction (SVE) by comparing numerical and analytical model simulations with a detailed data set from a well-defined intermediate-scale flow cell experiment. The flow cell was packed with a fine-grained sand layer embedded in a coarse-grained sand matrix. A total of 499 mL CT was injected at the top of the flow cell and allowed to redistribute in the variably saturated system. A dual-energy gamma radiation system was used to determine the initial NAPL saturation profile in the fine-grained sand layer. Gas concentrations at the outlet of the flow cell and 15 sampling ports inside the flow cell were measured during subsequent CT removal using SVE. Results show that CT mass was removed quickly in coarse-grained sand, followed by a slow removal from the fine-grained sand layer. Consequently, effluent gas concentrations decreased quickly at first, and then started to decrease gradually, resulting in long-term tailing. The long-term tailing was mainly due to diffusion from the fine-grained sand layer to the coarse-grained sand zone. An analytical solution for a one-dimensional advection and a first-order mass transfer model matched the tailing well with two fitting parameters. Given detailed knowledge of the permeability field and initial CT distribution, we were also able to predict the effluent concentration tailing and gas concentration profiles at sampling ports using a numerical simulator assuming equilibrium CT evaporation. The numerical model predictions were accurate within the uncertainty of independently measured or literature derived parameters. This study demonstrates that proper numerical modeling of CT removal through SVE can be achieved using equilibrium evaporation of NAPL if detailed fine-scale knowledge of the CT distribution and physical heterogeneity is incorporated into the model. However, CT removal could also be fit by a

  16. Arsenic Fate, Transport And Stability Study: Groundwater, Surface Water, Soil And Sediment Investigation At Fort Devens Superfund Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    A field investigation was conducted to examine the distribution of arsenic in groundwater, surface water, and sediments at the Fort Devens Superfund Site. The study area encompassed a portion of plow Shop Pond (Red Cove), which receives groundwater discharge from the aquifer und...

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 567: Miscellaneous Soil Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, with ROTC 1 Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick K.

    2013-07-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 567 is located in Areas 1, 3, 5, 20, and 25 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 567 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 567, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 01-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-1 • 03-23-25, Seaweed E Contamination Area • 05-23-07, A5b RMA • 20-23-08, Colby Mud Spill • 25-23-23, J-11 Soil RMA These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the investigation report. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on May 6, 2013, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 567. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with CAU 567 releases are nuclear test operations and other NNSS operations. The DQO process resulted in an assumption that total effective dose (TED) within a default contamination boundary

  18. Investigations on the remains of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated soils after the addition of micro-organisms active in decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahro, B.; Kaestner, M.; Breuer-Jammali, M.; Schaefer, G.; Kasche, V.

    1993-01-01

    The microbial decomposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) by bacteria and fungi was previously mainly examined in liquid cultures. In examining the microbial decomposition of PAH's in the soil, analytical problems arise. The disappearance of the PAH's or other xenobiotica in soil cultures cannot be regarded as equivalent to biological decomposition, as absorption phenomena in the soil also have to be regarded. (orig.) [de

  19. Project investigation and analysis of soil-structure interaction effects in seismic response of NPPs EBO, EMO, Slovakia. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhasova, E.

    1999-01-01

    The work described in this report was devoted to investigation of expected seismic response of the structures of WWER-440/213 type NPPs, namely Mochovce and Bohunice. Special attention was devoted to the properties of subsoil materials and the transfer of seismic waves from the bedrock to the foundation structures. Theoretical background was elaborated and discussed for wave propagation of surface waves. Alternative procedure was derived for non-linear media accounting for complex modulus theory. Material characteristics of subsoils were investigated for both NPPs. The obtained results were used as a basis for forecasting and calculation of expected seismic response when the time history records from Paks explosion were used an input. It was pointed out that the used procedure, together with previous calculation of subsoil transfer characteristics completed well the comparison with experimental results

  20. Soil life under stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tobor-Kaplon, Maria Agnieszka

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis I studied how long-term soil contamination affects microbial populations and processes, ecosystem properties and functional stability. I also investigated which parameters are suitable as indicators of soil quality in long-term contaminated soils. I found that contamination had a