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Sample records for soil absorption systems

  1. The absorption and distribution of Cesium-134 in rice-soil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yinliang; Chen Chuanqun; Chen Bin; Sun Zhiming

    1991-01-01

    Dynamics of absorption of 134 Cs by rice shows that absorption rate is the fastest at boot stage; absorption capacities of 134 Cs in soils are different with the different physical-chemical properties of soils; absorption amounts vary with the time of irrigating 134 Cs; the closer the irrigation time to mature stage is, the more the absorption amount of 134 Cs in rice will be; the more the irrigating times are, and the higher the radioactivity of 134 Cs in irrigating water is, the more the absorption amount in rice will be. After brown rice is polished, contamination of 134 Cs can be decreased by 22.6-45.6%. The order of specific activity in rice is: bran > root > straw > husk > polished rice. Percentage activity of straw, brown rice, root and husk is 51.4%, 28.4%, 11.8% and 8.4% respectively. The migration of 134 Cs is very slow in soil and 95.1% of 134 Cs is concentrated in surface soil (0-2.5 cm). The distribution ratio of 134 Cs in the rice and soil is 6.1%:93.9%. Potassium ion can inhibit the absorption of 134 Cs by rice. There is an exponential function between the concentration of potassium ion and specific activity of 134 Cs in rice

  2. Heavy metal absorption by vegetables grown in different soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canova, F.; Riolfatti, M.; Ravazzolo, E.; Da Ros, D.; Brigato, L.

    1995-01-01

    The authors study the bibliographic and experimental data on absorption by vegetables of several heavy metals present in the soil or brought to it via fertilizations, especially with the use of compost coming from waste treatment plants. The presence of heavy metals in the soil causes increased levels of these toxic substances in the edible parts of the vegetables grown in that soil. Not to be neglected is also the absorption by the leaf apparatus of airborne particulate containing heavy metals which deposit on the parts of the vegetable exposed to the air. The available data lack homogeneity of investigation as they have been draw from studies which followed different methodologies. Therefore further studies are required in order to: eliminate some of the variables that might affect the absorption of metals from the soil and supply comparable data. Moreover, a greater number of vegetable species and their different edible parts will have to be taken into consideration

  3. STUDIES AND RESEARCHES ON TYPHA LATIFOLIA’S (BULRUSH ABSORPTION CAPACITY OF HEAVY METALS FROM THE SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEXANDRA-DANA CHIŢIMUŞ 1*, CRISTIAN RADU 1, 2, VALENTIN NEDEFF 1, EMILIAN MOŞNEGUŢU 1, NARCIS BÂRSAN 1

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The research aimed to determine Typha latifolia’s (bulrush absorption capacity of heavy metals from the soil in the industrial area of Piatra Neamt city, Romania. Heavy metals present in ecological systems are available to the absorption process only partially, depending on the type of pH of the environment, their chemical composition, and the quantity of heavy metals in the soil, plants, sediments, water, or air. The choice of sampling points (the industrial area of Piatra Neamt city took into consideration the areas where the pollution sources are located and where the sediment layer is thick and the granularity level is lower than 63 μm. The investigation of Typha latifolia’s absorption capacity showed that, in case of nickel, chromium, copper and arsenic, a very low capacity of heavy metals absorption was detected. Typha latifolia’s highest absorption capacity of heavy metals from the soil was recorded in case of cadmium.

  4. Determining photon energy absorption parameters for different soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucuk, Nil; Cakir, Merve; Tumsavas, Zeynal

    2013-01-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients (μ s ) for five different soil samples were measured at 661.6, 1173.2 and 1332.5 keV photon energies. The soil samples were separately irradiated with 137 Cs and 60 Co (370 kBq) radioactive point gamma sources. The measurements were made by performing transmission experiments with a 2″ x 2″ NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, which had an energy resolution of 7% at 0.662 MeV for the gamma-rays from the decay of 137 Cs. The effective atomic numbers (Z eff ) and the effective electron densities (N eff ) were determined experimentally and theoretically using the obtained μ s values for the soil samples. Furthermore, the Z eff and N eff values of the soil samples were computed for the total photon interaction cross-sections using theoretical data over a wide energy region ranging from 1 keV to 15 MeV. The experimental values of the soils were found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values. Sandy loam and sandy clay loam soils demonstrated poor photon energy absorption characteristics. However, clay loam and clay soils had good photon energy absorption characteristics. (author)

  5. Remote Sensing of CO2 Absorption by Saline-Alkali Soils: Potentials and Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available CO2 absorption by saline-alkali soils was recently demonstrated in the measurements of soil respiration fluxes in arid and semiarid ecosystems and hypothetically contributed to the long-thought “missing carbon sink.” This paper is aimed to develop the preliminary theory and methodology for the quantitative analysis of CO2 absorption by saline-alkali soils on regional and global scales. Both the technological progress of multispectral remote sensing over the past decades and the conjectures of mechanisms and controls of CO2 absorption by saline-alkali soils are advantageous for remote sensing of such absorption. At the end of this paper, the scheme for remote sensing is presented and some unresolved issues related to the scheme are also proposed for further investigations.

  6. Influence of soil and agricultural technique in metal absorption by vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, K. Dias da; Cazicava, J.; Coelho, M.; Dalia, K.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work is to verify the influence of soil and agricultural techniques in the metal absorption by the vegetables. Metal concentrations were evaluated in soil and vegetable samples from different regions and cultivated by different agricultural techniques. PIXE, 252 Cf-PDMS and Radiochemical techniques were applied. Si, Zr, Ce, Th and Pb, identified in soil samples, were not biologically available. Ga, Ge, As and Br, identified in tubercles, show that spray pesticides used on the vegetable leaves were absorbed by them. 232 Th and 238 U, presented in the soil, were not absorbed by the vegetables. Airborne particles from anthropogenic sources (CFn, VCn) were absorbed by the vegetables. Compounds from mineral sources, presented in soil, (V + , VCO 3 , HPO 4 , Cr + , CrOH + Mn + , FeH, Fe(OH) n ) and bioorganic compounds (N + , Ca(CN) n +, CnH + ) were identified in the vegetables. Metal absorbed by the vegetables is not dependent on metal concentration in soil. Different tubercles cultivated in the same soil show similar metal absorption. The exogenous contributions, such as the elements presented in water irrigation, pesticides, fertilizers and airborne particles deposited on leaves can be absorbed by the vegetables. Absorption by the roots depends on the chemical compound of the elements. Pesticide sprays and air pollution can cause more contamination in the vegetables than in the soil. The use of this methodology allows the identification of possible sources of metals in soils and in vegetables and metal speciation. (author)

  7. Effects of animal activity on the absorption rate of soils in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rates of absorption into various microsites in Karoo soils were compared. The absorption of water by hard, bare intershrub soils was significantly increased by the presence of emergence holes of adult cicadas and near nest-mounds of the harvester ant Messor capensis. Both these insects play an important role in ...

  8. Molecular characterization of copper in soils using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strawn, Daniel G.; Baker, Leslie L.

    2009-01-01

    Bioavailability of Cu in the soil is a function of its speciation. In this paper we investigated Cu speciation in six soils using X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and synchrotron-based micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF). The XANES and EXAFS spectra in all of the soils were the same. μ-XRF results indicated that the majority of the Cu particles in the soils were not associated with calcium carbonates, Fe oxides, or Cu sulfates. Principal component analysis and target transform of the XANES and EXAFS spectra suggested that Cu adsorbed on humic acid (HA) was an acceptable match. Thus it appears that Cu in all of the soils is primarily associated with soil organic matter (SOM). Theoretical fitting of the molecular structure in the soil EXAFS spectra revealed that the Cu in the soils existed as Cu atoms bound in a bidentate complex to O or N functional groups. - Copper speciation in six soils was investigated using XANES, EXAFS, and μ-XRF.

  9. Sound absorption coefficient in situ: an alternative for estimating soil loss factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Rosane; Meletti de Abreu, Marco Henrique; Okada, Rafael Yuri; Soares, Paulo Fernando; GranhenTavares, Célia Regina

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the sound absorption coefficient and factors of the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) was determined in a section of the Maringá Stream basin, Paraná State, by using erosion plots. In the field, four erosion plots were built on a reduced scale, with dimensions of 2.0×12.5m. With respect to plot coverage, one was kept with bare soil and the others contained forage grass (Brachiaria), corn and wheat crops, respectively. Planting was performed without any type of conservation practice in an area with a 9% slope. A sedimentation tank was placed at the end of each plot to collect the material transported. For the acoustic system, pink noise was used in the measurement of the proposed monitoring, for collecting information on incident and reflected sound pressure levels. In general, obtained values of soil loss confirmed that 94.3% of material exported to the basin water came from the bare soil plot, 2.8% from the corn plot, 1.8% from the wheat plot, and 1.1% from the forage grass plot. With respect to the acoustic monitoring, results indicated that at 16kHz erosion plot coverage type had a significant influence on the sound absorption coefficient. High correlation coefficients were found in estimations of the A and C factors of the USLE, confirming that the acoustic technique is feasible for the determination of soil loss directly in the field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of potassium behaviour in soils on crop absorption | Lin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potassium (K) is one of the three major elements that play important roles in plants, such as maintaining turgor of cells, promoting activation of enzymes, and improving efficiency of photosynthesis. The types of K in soil may affect the plant absorption of K. K in soils includes K minerals, K in layered silicates (clay minerals), ...

  11. Research on self-absorption corrections for laboratory γ spectral analysis of soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Zining; Jia Mingyan; Li Huibin; Cheng Ziwei; Ju Lingjun; Shen Maoquan; Yang Xiaoyan; Yan Ling; Fen Tiancheng

    2010-01-01

    Based on the calibration results of the point sources,dimensions of HPGe crystal were characterized.Linear attenuation coefficients and detection efficiencies of all kinds of samples were calculated,and the function F(μ) of φ75 mm x 25 mm sample was established. Standard surface source was used to simulate the source of different heights in the soil sample. And the function ε(h) which reflect the relationship between detection efficiencies and heights of the surface sources was determined. The detection efficiency of calibration source can be obtained by integration, F(μ) functions of soil samples established is consistent with the result of MCNP calculation code. Several φ75 mm x 25 mm soil samples were measured by the HPGe spectrometer,and the function F(μ) was used to correct the self absorption. F(μ) functions of soil samples of various dimensions can be calculated by MCNP calculation code established, and self absorption correction can be done. To verify the efficiency of calculation results, φ75 mm x 75 mm soil samples were measured. Several φ75 mm x 25 mm soil samples from aerosphere nuclear testing field was measured by the HPGe spectrometer,and the function F(μ) was used to correct the self absorption. The function F(m) was established, and the technical method which is used to correct the soil samples of unknown area is also given. The correction method of surface source greatly improves the gamma spectrum's metrical accuracy, and it will be widely applied to environmental radioactive investigation. (authors)

  12. Absorption and distribution of Zn by spring wheat in high zinc soil and effect of rhizosphere soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Lingyu; Wei Dongpu; Hua Luo; Chen Shibao

    1999-01-01

    The isotope tracer technique was used to study the absorption and distribution of 65 Zn by spring wheat in high zinc soil. The results showed that the distribution of 65 Zn in the organs of spring wheat was in the order as stem leaf>grain>root>wheat husk; the specific activity of 65 Zn and the transfer factor of 65 Zn in the organs of spring wheat were in the order as root>grain>wheat husk>stem leaf. With added 65 Zn increased, the absorption amount of 65 Zn by spring wheat and the distribution of 65 Zn in root increased. The 65 Zn applied was enriched by rhizosphere soil of spring wheat

  13. Plant-uptake of uranium: Hydroponic and soil system studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswami, A.; Carr, P.; Burkhardt, M.

    2001-01-01

    Limited information is available on screening and selection of terrestrial plants for uptake and translocation of uranium from soil. This article evaluates the removal of uranium from water and soil by selected plants, comparing plant performance in hydroponic systems with that in two soil systems (a sandy-loam soil and an organic-rich soil). Plants selected for this study were Sunflower (Helianthus giganteus), Spring Vetch (Vicia sativa), Hairy Vetch (Vicia villosa), Juniper (Juniperus monosperma), Indian Mustard (Brassica juncea), and Bush Bean (Phaseolus nanus). Plant performance was evaluated both in terms of the percent uranium extracted from the three systems, as well as the biological absorption coefficient (BAC) that normalized uranium uptake to plant biomass. Study results indicate that uranium extraction efficiency decreased sharply across hydroponic, sandy and organic soil systems, indicating that soil organic matter sequestered uranium, rendering it largely unavailable for plant uptake. These results indicate that site-specific soils must be used to screen plants for uranium extraction capability; plant behavior in hydroponic systems does not correlate well with that in soil systems. One plant species, Juniper, exhibited consistent uranium extraction efficiencies and BACs in both sandy and organic soils, suggesting unique uranium extraction capabilities.

  14. Organic fertilizer application increases the soil respiration and net ecosystem carbon dioxide absorption of paddy fields under water-saving irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shihong; Xiao, Ya Nan; Xu, Junzeng

    2018-04-01

    Quantifying carbon sequestration in paddy soil is necessary to understand the effect of agricultural practices on carbon cycles. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of organic fertilizer addition (MF) on the soil respiration and net ecosystem carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) absorption of paddy fields under water-saving irrigation (CI) in the Taihu Lake Region of China during the 2014 and 2015 rice-growing seasons. Compared with the traditional fertilizer and water management (FC), the joint regulation of CI and MF (CM) significantly increased the rice yields and irrigation water use efficiencies of paddy fields by 4.02~5.08 and 83.54~109.97% (p < 0.05). The effects of organic fertilizer addition on soil respiration and net ecosystem CO 2 absorption rates showed inter-annual differences. CM paddy fields showed a higher soil respiration and net CO 2 absorption rates during some periods of the rice growth stage in the first year and during most periods of the rice growth stage in the second year. These fields also had significantly higher total CO 2 emission through soil respiration (total R soil ) and total net CO 2 absorption compared with FC paddy fields (p < 0.05). The total R soil and net ecosystem CO 2 absorption of CM paddy fields were 67.39~91.55 and 129.41~113.75 mol m -2 , which were 27.66~135.52 and 12.96~31.66% higher than those of FC paddy fields. The interaction between water and fertilizer management had significant effects on total net ecosystem CO 2 absorption. The frequent alternate wet-dry cycles of CI paddy fields increased the soil respiration and reduced the net CO 2 absorption. Organic fertilizer promoted the soil respiration of paddy soil but also increased its net CO 2 absorption and organic carbon content. Therefore, the joint regulation of water-saving irrigation and organic fertilizer is an effective measure for maintaining yield, increasing irrigation water use efficiency, mitigating CO 2 emission, and promoting paddy

  15. Caesium absorption by barley - influence of its retention by the soil - competitive action of potassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferron-Trosseau, F.

    1964-06-01

    We have studied, in various culture media, how the absorption of caesium by barley varies with its concentration, and how this absorption can be in competition with a similar alkali cation-potassium. We have also considered the caesium distribution in the ground in particular radio-active caesium, between the soil and solution, as a function of the amount of caesium. From our work it is clear that barley behaves very differently according to whether the caesium is in a nutritive solution or is in the soil: for a nutritive solution, the fraction of caesium (radioactive and stable) absorbed by barley remains practically constant in the presence of increasing amounts (relatively small) of stable caesium; in soil, the fraction of the radio-active caesium absorbed increases as the stable caesium content (fairly low) of the soil increases, in relationship with a rapidly decreasing selectivity of the soil for Cs + . The difference between these results is thus explained by the very pronounced selectivity of the illitic soil studied for Cs + , as long as the proportion of Cs remains low, about as low as that of most natural soils. Furthermore, the K + ion is in competition with the Cs + ion, for absorption by barley in a culture medium in a nutritive solution or in soil, only when the potassium concentrations are relatively low, of the order of the nutritive maximum. This shows that the addition of potassium to a medium already rich in this element does not reduce the absorption of caesium by barley. The choice of experimental conditions close to natural conditions (nutritive media strong in calcium) and the examination of the distribution of radioactive caesium between the soil, the soil solution and the plant in the presence of very low doses of stable caesium make these results interesting from the 'atomic health' point of view; it should be expected that a definite contamination risk exists for plants cultivated on synthetic media and for plants such as rice and cress

  16. Atomic absorption determination of metals in soils using ultrasonic sample preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmilenko, F.A.; Smityuk, N.M.; Baklanov, A.N.

    2002-01-01

    It was shown that ultrasonic treatment accelerates sample preparation of soil extracts from chernozem into different solvents by a factor of 6 to 60. These extracts are used for the atomic absorption determination of soluble species of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn. The optimum ultrasound parameters (frequency, intensity, and treatment time) were found for preparing soil extracts containing analytes in concentrations required in agrochemical procedures. Different extractants used to extract soluble heavy metals from soils of an ordinary chernozem type in agrochemical procedures using ultrasonic treatment were classified in accordance with the element nature [ru

  17. Simulation of a combined heating, cooling and domestic hot water system based on ground source absorption heat pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Wei; You, Tian; Wang, Baolong; Shi, Wenxing; Li, Xianting

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A combined heating/cooling/DHW system based on GSAHP is proposed in cold regions. • The soil imbalance is effectively reduced and soil temperature can be kept stable. • 20% and 15% of condensation/absorption heat is recovered by GSAHP to produce DHW. • The combined system can improve the primary energy efficiency by 23.6% and 44.4%. - Abstract: The amount of energy used for heating and domestic hot water (DHW) is very high and will keep increasing. The conventional ground source electrical heat pump used in heating-dominated buildings has the problems of thermal imbalance, decrease of soil temperature, and deterioration of heating performance. Ground source absorption heat pump (GSAHP) is advantageous in both imbalance reduction and primary energy efficiency (PEE) improvement; however, the imbalance is still unacceptable in the warmer parts of cold regions. A combined heating/cooling/DHW (HCD) system based on GSAHP is proposed to overcome this problem. The GSAHPs using generator absorber heat exchange (GAX) and single-effect (SE) cycles are simulated to obtain the performance under various working conditions. Different HCD systems in Beijing and Shenyang are simulated comparatively in TRNSYS, based on which the thermal imbalance, soil temperature, heat recovery, and energy efficiency are analyzed. Results show that GSAHP–GAX–HCD is suitable for Beijing and GSAHP–SE–HCD is suitable for Shenyang. The imbalance ratio can be reduced to −14.8% in Beijing and to 6.0% in Shenyang with an annual soil temperature variation of only 0.5 °C and 0.1 °C. Furthermore, about 20% and 15% of the total condensation/absorption heat is recovered to produce DHW, and the PEE can reach 1.516 in Beijing and 1.163 in Shenyang. The combined HCD systems can achieve a PEE improvement of 23.6% and 44.4% compared with the normal heating/cooling systems

  18. Hydrogeologic implications of increased septic-tank-soil-absorption system density, Ogden Valley, Weber County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Mike; Miner, Michael L.; ,

    1990-01-01

    Ground water in Ogden Valley occurs in perched, confined, and unconfined aquifers in the valley fill to depths of 600 feet and more. The confined aquifer, which underlies only the western portion of the valley, is overlain by cleyey silt lacustrine sediments probably deposited during the Bonneville Basin's Little Valley lake cycle sometime between 90,000 and 150,000 years ago. The top of this cleyey silt confining layer is generally 25 to 60 feet below the ground surface. Unconfined conditions occur above and beyond the outer margin of the confining layer. The sediments overlying the confining layer are primarily Lake Bonneville deposits. Water samples from springs, streams, and wells around Pineview Reservoir, and from the reservoir itself, were collected and analyzed. These samples indicate that water quality in Ogden Valley is presently good. Average nitrate concentrations in the shallow unconfined aquifer increase toward the center of Ogden Valley. This trend was not observed in the confined aquifer. There is no evidence, however, of significant water-quality deterioration, even in the vicinity of Huntsville, a town that has been densely developed using septic-tank-soil-absorption systems for much of the time since it was founded in 1860.

  19. Combining Sequential Extractions and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Quantitative and Qualitative Zinc Speciation in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Tatiana; Minkina, Tatiana; Batukaev, Abdulmalik; Nevidomskaya, Dina; Burachevskaya, Marina; Tsitsuashvili, Viktoriya; Urazgildieva, Kamilya

    2017-04-01

    The combined use of X-ray absorption spectrometry and extractive fractionation is an effective approach for studying the interaction of metal ions with soil compounds and identifying the phases-carriers of metals in soil and their stable fixation. These studies were carried out using the technique of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and chemical extractive fractionation. In a model experiment the samples taken in Calcic Chernozem were artificially contaminated with higher portion of Zn(NO3)2 (2000 mg/kg). The metal were incubated in soil samples for 2 year. The samples of soil mineral and organic phases (calcite, kaolinite, bentonite, humic acids) were saturated with Zn2+ from a solution of nitrate salts of metal. The total content of Zn in soil and soil various phases was determined using the X-ray fluorescence method. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) Zn was measured at the Structural Materials Science beamline of the Kurchatov Center for Synchrotron Radiation. Sequential fractionation of Zn in soil conducted by Tessier method (Tessier et al., 1979) which determining 5 fractions of metals in soil: exchangeable, bound to Fe-Mn oxide, bound to carbonate, bound to the organic matter, and bound to silicate (residual). This methodology has so far more than 4000 citations (Web of Science), which demonstrates the popularity of this approach. Much Zn compounds are contained in uncontaminated soils in stable primary and secondary silicates inherited from the parental rocks (67% of the total concentrations in all fractions), which is a regional trait of soils in the fore-Caucasian plain. Extracted fractionation of metal compounds in soil samples, artificially contaminated with Zn salts, indicates the priority holding of Zn2+ ions by silicates, carbonates and Fe-Mn oxides. The Zn content significantly increases in the exchangeable fraction. Atomic structure study of the soil various phases saturated with Zn2+ ion by using (XANES) X-ray absorption spectroscopy

  20. Ex situ remediation of polluted soils by absorptive polymers, and a comparison of slurry and two-phase partitioning bioreactors for ultimate contaminant degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomei, M. Concetta, E-mail: tomei@irsa.cnr.it [Water Research Institute, C.N.R., Via Salaria km 29.300, Monterotondo Scalo, 00015 Rome (Italy); Mosca Angelucci, Domenica [Water Research Institute, C.N.R., Via Salaria km 29.300, Monterotondo Scalo, 00015 Rome (Italy); Annesini, M. Cristina [Department of Chemical Engineering Materials and Environment, Sapienza University of Rome, Via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Daugulis, Andrew J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • We investigate absorptive polymers for ex-situ soil bioremediation. • We compare the performance of the novel technology with a slurry bioreactor. • The polymer is very effective in decontaminating the soil (77% removal in 4 h). • The polymer is readily regenerated in a two phase partitioning bioreactor. -- Abstract: The present study has provided a comparison between a conventional ex situ method for the treatment of contaminated soil, a soil slurry bioreactor, with a novel technology in which a contaminant is rapidly and effectively removed from the soil by means of absorptive polymer beads, which are then added to a two-phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB) for biodegradation of the target molecule. 4-nitrophenol (4NP) was selected as a model contaminant, being representative of a large class of xenobiotics, and the DuPont thermoplastic Hytrel™ 8206 was utilized for its extraction from soil over ranges of soil contamination level, soil moisture content, and polymer:soil ratios. Since the polymers were able to rapidly (up to 77% and 85% in 4 and 24 h respectively) and selectively remove the contaminant, the soil retained its nutrient and microflora content, which is in contrast to soil washing which can remove these valuable soil resources. After 4 h of reaction time, the TPPB system demonstrated removal efficiency four times higher (77% vs 20%) than the slurry system, with expected concomitant savings in time and energy. A volumetric removal rate of 75 mg4NP h{sup −1} L{sup −1} was obtained in the TPPB, significantly greater than the value of 1.7 obtained in the slurry bioreactor. The polymers were readily regenerated for subsequent reuse, demonstrating the versatility of the polymer-based soil treatment technology.

  1. Determination of phosphorus absorption in function of the time in two soils from volcanic ashes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pino N, I; Casas G, L.

    1988-01-01

    A green house experiment was carried out with the aim to define the most appropiate period of harvest of plant materials, and also to define the absorption curve of P through the time. The absorption curve of P was also studied for the Osorno soil series using triple superphosphate P32 and phosphoric rock from Bahia Inglesa. The P rates were 500 mg and 1.000 mg respectively. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L) var. Perquenco, was used at ten plants per pot. of 1.000 cc. A gradual absorption of P through the time was detected, reaching its maximun value 65 days after the emergency. The P from the fertilizer and the total P follow the same tendency, while the P from the soil decreases through the time. For the period of the time considered in this research the triple superphosphate was 10 times more efficient than the phosphoric rocck. (author)

  2. Absorption of technetium by plants in relation to soil type contamination level and time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousny, J.M.; Myttenaere, C. (Louvain Univ. (Belgium). Lab. de Physiologie Vegetale)

    1981-01-01

    Plants of Pisum sativum (var. Merveille de Kelvedon) were grown on seven typical european soils contaminated with different levels of /sup 99/Tc(0.17; 1.7 and 17 ..mu..Ci/kg). Added initially as pertechnetate, the technetium absorption has been studied for three successive cultures. The translocation of technetium from soil to plant leaves is high, but its transfer is reduced in soils rich in organic matter (Fen) or poorly drained (Braunerde). Aging reduces the technetium transfer and modify its relative distribution in plant (relatively more technetium is found in fruits); these results let suppose some modification of the technetium chemical form in soils with time.

  3. Fertilizer balance in the soil-plant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichardt, K.; Libardi, P.L.; Victoria, R.L.; Ruschel, A.P.; Nascimento Filho, V.F. do; Saito, S.M.T.

    A report is presented on a beans culture project developed to study in detail processes on: (1)Nitrogen - fixation, mineralization, denetrification and absorption by the plant (effect of plant variety; selection of the efficient rhizobia; bacteria specificity for the plant; inocculation longevity; persistence and competition with bacteria found naturally in the soil, etc.) (2)Phosphorus and Potassium interactions with nitrogen absorption, residual effects of natural phosphates. The transformations suffered by nitrogen and the ways it follows after its application to the soil were also studied aiming at a rational handling of the fertilizer. The use of fertilizers by the plants was studied through stable and radioactive isotopes, information being sought on absorption efficiency, phosphorus - and potassium interactions with nitrogen absorption, and effects of natural phosphates. Three types of experiments were carried out: I-Nitrogen fixation experiments II-Nitrogen-and Potassium fertility experiments III-Laboratory experiments [pt

  4. Efficiency calibration and measurement of self-absorption correction of environmental gamma spectroscopy of soils samples using Marinelli beaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdi, M. R.; Mostajaboddavati, M.; Hassanzadeh, S.; Faghihian, H.; Rezaee, Kh.; Kamali, M.

    2006-01-01

    A nonlinear function in combination with the method of mixing activity calibrated is applied for fitting the experimental peak efficiency of HPGe spectrometers in 59-2614 keV energy range. The preparation of Marinelli beaker standards of mixed gamma and RG-set at secular equilibrium with its daughter radionuclides was studied. Standards were prepared by mixing of known amounts of 13B a, 241 Am, 152 Eu, 207 Bi, 24 Na, Al 2 O 3 powder and soil. The validity of these standards was checked by comparison with certified standard reference material RG-set and IAEA-Soil-6 Self-absorption was measured for the activity calculation of the gamma-ray lines about series of 238 U daughter, 232 Th series, 137 Cs and 40 K in soil samples. Self-absorption in the sample will depend on a number of factor including sample composition, density, sample size and gamma-ray energy. Seven Marinelli beaker standards were prepared in different degrees of compaction with bulk density ( ρ) of 1.000 to 1.600 g cm -3 . The detection efficiency versus density was obtained and the equation of self-absorption correction factors calculated for soil samples

  5. Absorption-heat-pump system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, G.; Perez-Blanco, H.

    1983-06-16

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  6. Organic radionuclide compounds in soil solutions and their role in elements absorption in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agapkin, G.I.; Tikhomirov, F.A.

    1991-01-01

    The results of reference experiments with introduction of radioactive labels ( 35 S, 45 Ca, 59 Fe, 85 , 125 I) into 5 types of climatophytic soils by the method of radiogel-chromatography allow to ascertain that in soil solutions 59 Fe and 125 I incorporate completely and 35 S, 45 Ca and 85 Sr incorporate by 60-90 % into the composition of one of three fractions of organic compounds with molecular masses of 4x10 2 -6x10 4 . It is shown that significant variations between soils in the absorption of such radionuclides as 4 5 Ca, 58 Fe, 85 Sr and 125 I are celated to a different degree of their transport into soil solutions as well as to differencies in their distribution by molecular-mass fractions of water-soluble organic compounds

  7. Effect of soil type and application method on nutrients absorption and utilization by grape plants 1-Absorption and utilization of manganese using Mn-54

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, F.A.; Sharaf, A.N.M.; Khamis, M.A.; Sharaf, M.M.

    2000-01-01

    This work was conducted to study effect of soil type and application method on absorption, translocation and utilization of Mn by grape plants. One year old rooted cuttings of grape (Cv. Ruby seedless) were transplanted in plastic containers filled with 15 kg of three different soils, i.e. clay loam soil, sandy soil and calcareous soil. Fertilization treatments were as follows: Tap water (control) (T1); soil application of N, P,K and Mg (T2); T2 plus soil application of Fe, Mn and Zn (T4). Also, pot experiment was carried out using Mn SO4 at 5ppm for soil application and at 0.5% for foliar application and Mn-54 was used for labelling both solutions. Manganese contents in different organs of grape plant were significantly increased by the three fertilization treatments as compared to those of control. Moreover, highest Mn level was obtained due to foliar application of micro elements and soil application of macro elements T 4 . followed by soil application of both macro-and micro elements T 3 , soil application of macro elements only T2 and control T1

  8. Simulation of absorption refrigeration system for automobile application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanathan Anand

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An automotive air-conditioning system based on absorption refrigeration cycle has been simulated. This waste heat driven vapor absorption refrigeration system is one alternate to the currently used vapour compression refrigeration system for automotive air-conditioning. Performance analysis of vapor absorption refrigeration system has been done by developing a steady-state simulation model to find the limitation of the proposed system. The water-lithium bromide pair is used as a working mixture for its favorable thermodynamic and transport properties compared to the conventional refrigerants utilized in vapor compression refrigeration applications. The pump power required for the proposed vapor absorption refrigeration system was found lesser than the power required to operate the compressor used in the conventional vapor compression refrigeration system. A possible arrangement of the absorption system for automobile application is proposed.

  9. Research concerning the influence of soil type and fertilization prescriptions on nitrogen and phosphorus absorption by grapevine from fertilizers using 15N and 32P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serdinescu, A.

    1994-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted with the aim to study the effect of two types of soils (reddish-brown and podzol) fertilized with different N, P, K rates and ratios, on nitrogen and phosphorus absorption by grapevine from fertilizers. The mineral fertilizers were applied in pots as binary and ternary combinations between N, P and K. In case of each combination there were applied different levels for each nutrient (two levels for nitrogen and three levels for phosphorus and potassium). Nitrogen was applied at 3 mg NO 3 /100 g soil (N 1 ) as 2.375% 15 N atom excess labelled ammonium nitrate, phosphorus at 5 mg P 2 O 5 /100 g soil (P 1 ) as monosodium phosphate labelled with 32 P (0.30 mCi/pot) and potassium at 10 mg K 2 0/100 g soil (K 1 ) as potassium sulphate. Nitrogen and phosphorus absorption was estimated by means of Ndff% and Pdff% values, established in grapevine at blooming and at the beginning of ripening. The experimental data indicated a higher nitrogen and phosphorus absorption from mineral fertilizers in the reddish-brown soil, as compared to podzol. In both soils the nitrogen absorption was positively influenced by the increase of the nitrogen rate and by the simultaneous administration of phosphorus and potassium. Phosphorus absorption was not thoroughly influenced by the use of nitrogen and potassium. (author)

  10. Absorption heat pump system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  11. The low-ion QSO absorption-line systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanzetta, K.M.

    1988-01-01

    Various techniques are used to investigate the class of QSO absorption-line systems that exhibit low-ion absorption lines. Four separate investigations are conducted as follows: Spectroscopy of 32 QSOs at red wavelengths is presented and used to investigate intermediate-redshift MgII absorption. A total of 22 Mg II doublets are detected, from which properties of the Mg II absorbers are derived. Marginal evidence for intrinsic evolution of the number density of the Mg II absorbers with redshift is found. The data are combined with previous observations of C IV and C II seen in the same QSOs at blue wavelengths, and the properties of Mg II- and C IV-selected systems are compared. A sample is constructed of 129 QSOs for which are available published data suitable for detecting absorption-line systems that are optically thick to Lyman continuum radiation. A total of 53 such Lyman-limit systems are found, from which properties of the Lyman-limit systems are derived. It is found that the rate of incidence of the systems does not strongly evolved with redshift. This result is contrasted with the evolution found previously for systems selected on the basis of Mg II absorption. Spectroscopy at red wavelengths of eight QSOs with known damped Lyα absorption systems is presented. Spectroscopic and spectrophotometric observations aimed at detecting molecular hydrogen and dust in the z = 2.796 damped Lyα absorber toward Q1337 + 113 are presented

  12. Dermal absorption of benzo[a]pyrene into human skin from soil: Effect of artificial weathering, concentration, and exposure duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, Trevor K; Shirai, Jeffry H; Bunge, Annette L; Lowney, Yvette W; Ruby, Michael V; Kissel, John C

    2017-11-01

    In vitro assessments of 14 C-benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) absorption through human epidermis were conducted with the sub-63-μm fraction of four test soils containing different amounts of organic and black carbon. Soils were artificially weathered for eight weeks and applied to epidermis at nominal BaP concentrations of 3 and 10 mg/kg for 8 or 24 h. Experiments were also conducted at 24 h with unweathered soils and with BaP deposited onto skin from acetone at a comparable chemical load. For the weathered soils, absorption was independent of the amount of organic or black carbon, the mass in the receptor fluid was proportional to exposure duration but independent of concentration, and the mass recovered in the skin after washing was proportional to concentration and independent of exposure time. Results from the weathered and unweathered soils were similar except for the mass recovered in the washed skin, which was lower for the weathered soil only at the higher concentration. We hypothesize that chemical concentrations exceeded the BaP sorption capacity accessible within the artificial weathering timeframe for all soils tested, and that BaP mass in the washed skin was dominated by particles that were not removed by washing. Fluxes into and through skin from soils were lower by an order of magnitude than from acetone-deposited BaP.

  13. Heavy metal dynamics in the soil-leaf-fruit system under intensive apple cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murtić Senad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major problems confronting agricultural production is heavy metal contamination of agricultural soils, which imposes considerable limitations on productivity and leads to great consumer health and safety concerns about the products obtained on these soils. The objective of this study was to evaluate heavy metal dynamics in the soil-leaf-fruit system in an intensive apple cv. 'Idared' planting located in the Municipality of Goražde. Heavy metal contents in the soil samples and plant material were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry using a Shimadzu 7000 AA device, according to the instructions specified in the ISO 11047 method. The dynamics of the heavy metals analyzed, excepting zinc, in the soil-leaf-fruit system was characterized by relatively high total levels of heavy metals in the soil and a very low degree of their accumulation in the leaves and in particular the fruits. No fruit sample was found to have toxic levels of any of the heavy metals analyzed. In terms of soil contamination, this suggests the suitability of the study location for safe apple fruit production.

  14. Caesium absorption by barley - influence of its retention by the soil - competitive action of potassium; Absorption du cesium par l'orge - influence de sa retention dans le sol - action competitive du potassium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferron-Trosseau, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-06-01

    We have studied, in various culture media, how the absorption of caesium by barley varies with its concentration, and how this absorption can be in competition with a similar alkali cation-potassium. We have also considered the caesium distribution in the ground in particular radio-active caesium, between the soil and solution, as a function of the amount of caesium. From our work it is clear that barley behaves very differently according to whether the caesium is in a nutritive solution or is in the soil: for a nutritive solution, the fraction of caesium (radioactive and stable) absorbed by barley remains practically constant in the presence of increasing amounts (relatively small) of stable caesium; in soil, the fraction of the radio-active caesium absorbed increases as the stable caesium content (fairly low) of the soil increases, in relationship with a rapidly decreasing selectivity of the soil for Cs{sup +}. The difference between these results is thus explained by the very pronounced selectivity of the illitic soil studied for Cs{sup +}, as long as the proportion of Cs remains low, about as low as that of most natural soils. Furthermore, the K{sup +} ion is in competition with the Cs{sup +} ion, for absorption by barley in a culture medium in a nutritive solution or in soil, only when the potassium concentrations are relatively low, of the order of the nutritive maximum. This shows that the addition of potassium to a medium already rich in this element does not reduce the absorption of caesium by barley. The choice of experimental conditions close to natural conditions (nutritive media strong in calcium) and the examination of the distribution of radioactive caesium between the soil, the soil solution and the plant in the presence of very low doses of stable caesium make these results interesting from the 'atomic health' point of view; it should be expected that a definite contamination risk exists for plants cultivated on synthetic media and for plants such

  15. MERCURY QUANTIFICATION IN SOILS USING THERMAL DESORPTION AND ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY: PROPOSAL FOR AN ALTERNATIVE METHOD OF ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Catone Soares

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the considerable environmental importance of mercury (Hg, given its high toxicity and ability to contaminate large areas via atmospheric deposition, little is known about its activity in soils, especially tropical soils, in comparison with other heavy metals. This lack of information about Hg arises because analytical methods for determination of Hg are more laborious and expensive compared to methods for other heavy metals. The situation is even more precarious regarding speciation of Hg in soils since sequential extraction methods are also inefficient for this metal. The aim of this paper is to present a technique of thermal desorption associated with atomic absorption spectrometry, TDAAS, as an efficient tool for quantitative determination of Hg in soils. The method consists of the release of Hg by heating, followed by its quantification by atomic absorption spectrometry. It was developed by constructing calibration curves in different soil samples based on increasing volumes of standard Hg2+ solutions. Performance, accuracy, precision, and quantification and detection limit parameters were evaluated. No matrix interference was detected. Certified reference samples and comparison with a Direct Mercury Analyzer, DMA (another highly recognized technique, were used in validation of the method, which proved to be accurate and precise.

  16. Ex situ remediation of polluted soils by absorptive polymers, and a comparison of slurry and two-phase partitioning bioreactors for ultimate contaminant degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomei, M Concetta; Mosca Angelucci, Domenica; Annesini, M Cristina; Daugulis, Andrew J

    2013-11-15

    The present study has provided a comparison between a conventional ex situ method for the treatment of contaminated soil, a soil slurry bioreactor, with a novel technology in which a contaminant is rapidly and effectively removed from the soil by means of absorptive polymer beads, which are then added to a two-phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB) for biodegradation of the target molecule. 4-nitrophenol (4NP) was selected as a model contaminant, being representative of a large class of xenobiotics, and the DuPont thermoplastic Hytrel™ 8206 was utilized for its extraction from soil over ranges of soil contamination level, soil moisture content, and polymer:soil ratios. Since the polymers were able to rapidly (up to 77% and 85% in 4 and 24h respectively) and selectively remove the contaminant, the soil retained its nutrient and microflora content, which is in contrast to soil washing which can remove these valuable soil resources. After 4h of reaction time, the TPPB system demonstrated removal efficiency four times higher (77% vs 20%) than the slurry system, with expected concomitant savings in time and energy. A volumetric removal rate of 75 mg4NPh(-1) L(-1) was obtained in the TPPB, significantly greater than the value of 1.7 obtained in the slurry bioreactor. The polymers were readily regenerated for subsequent reuse, demonstrating the versatility of the polymer-based soil treatment technology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Uniform semiclassical approximation for absorptive scattering systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.; Pato, M.P.

    1987-07-01

    The uniform semiclassical approximation of the elastic scattering amplitude is generalized to absorptive systems. An integral equation is derived which connects the absorption modified amplitude to the absorption free one. Division of the amplitude into a diffractive and refractive components is then made possible. (Author) [pt

  18. Absorption and utilization of fertilizer-N and soil-N with mixed application of straw and urea by rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xinwei; Liu Feng; Ye Shuya; Zhu Hongbin; Ye Chengxin

    1996-01-01

    The nitrogen absorption of mixed application of straw and urea by rice was studied by using 15 N isotope tracing technique. The results show that the sole application of straw would result in biological immobilization of available soil N. The insufficient N supply was the limiting factor for rice tiller and spikelets development. Mixed use of straw and urea obviously improved nitrogen supply from both fertilizer and soil, which in turn, promoted the yield of growing rice and increased the soil fertility and productivity of later crop

  19. Urban airborne lead: X-ray absorption spectroscopy establishes soil as dominant source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingitore, Nicholas E; Clague, Juan W; Amaya, Maria A; Maciejewska, Beata; Reynoso, Jesús J

    2009-01-01

    Despite the dramatic decrease in airborne lead over the past three decades, there are calls for regulatory limits on this potent pediatric neurotoxin lower even than the new (2008) US Environmental Protection Agency standard. To achieve further decreases in airborne lead, what sources would need to be decreased and what costs would ensue? Our aim was to identify and, if possible, quantify the major species (compounds) of lead in recent ambient airborne particulate matter collected in El Paso, TX, USA. We used synchrotron-based XAFS (x-ray absorption fine structure) to identify and quantify the major Pb species. XAFS provides molecular-level structural information about a specific element in a bulk sample. Pb-humate is the dominant form of lead in contemporary El Paso air. Pb-humate is a stable, sorbed complex produced exclusively in the humus fraction of Pb-contaminated soils; it also is the major lead species in El Paso soils. Thus such soil must be the dominant source, and its resuspension into the air, the transfer process, providing lead particles to the local air. Current industrial and commercial activity apparently is not a major source of airborne lead in El Paso, and presumably other locales that have eliminated such traditional sources as leaded gasoline. Instead, local contaminated soil, legacy of earlier anthropogenic Pb releases, serves as a long-term reservoir that gradually leaks particulate lead to the atmosphere. Given the difficulty and expense of large-scale soil remediation or removal, fugitive soil likely constrains a lower limit for airborne lead levels in many urban settings.

  20. Hotspots of soil N2O emission enhanced through water absorption by plant residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravchenko, A.N.; Toosi, E.R.; Guber, A.K.; Ostrom, N.E.; Yu, J.; Azeem, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Robertson , G.P. (UAF Pakistan); (UC); (Hubei); (MSU)

    2017-06-05

    N2O is a highly potent greenhouse gas and arable soils represent its major anthropogenic source. Field-scale assessments and predictions of soil N2O emission remain uncertain and imprecise due to the episodic and microscale nature of microbial N2O production, most of which occurs within very small discrete soil volumes. Such hotspots of N2O production are often associated with decomposing plant residue. Here we quantify physical and hydrological soil characteristics that lead to strikingly accelerated N2O emissions in plant residue-induced hotspots. Results reveal a mechanism for microscale N2O emissions: water absorption by plant residue that creates unique micro-environmental conditions, markedly different from those of the bulk soil. Moisture levels within plant residue exceeded those of bulk soil by 4–10-fold and led to accelerated N2O production via microbial denitrification. The presence of large (Ø >35 μm) pores was a prerequisite for maximized hotspot N2O production and for subsequent diffusion to the atmosphere. Understanding and modelling hotspot microscale physical and hydrologic characteristics is a promising route to predict N2O emissions and thus to develop effective mitigation strategies and estimate global fluxes in a changing environment.

  1. Lead determination in uranium mineralization soils by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite oven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, Gleber Tacio

    2001-01-01

    The contamination of soils by lead has a great environmental importance due to its toxicity to vegetables, animals and humans. In general, the mobility of the lead is small due to its low solubility and strong adsorption in the soil. However, its solubility can be altered by several conditions (pH, redox potential and ionic stronger). Consequently, lead can migrate through the soil and can contaminate superficial and underground waters. The objective of this work was to determine the concentration of total lead in soil samples with uranium mineralization, in an area at Ipora/GO, having been evaluated as economically insuitable the extraction of that mineral. The radiogenic lead appears as a product of natural radioactive elements decay. In the decay series of uranium-238 we found the isotope lead-214 (half-life of 26,8 min), lead-210 (half-life of 22,3 min), and lead-206 that is stable. The sampling was done in profiles around north, south, east and west directions, starting from a reference point (FT), chosen by presenting the largest radiation of that place (4800 cps). A mass of 1 Kg of superficial soil was collected to each 20 m, in each profile, until 150 m of FT. Approximately, 1 g of dry soil, fraction 2 mm, was digested with a mixture of acids HNO 3 /HClO 4 2:1 (v/v), and the resulting solution was analyzed by atomic absorption. An atomic absorption spectrometer was used with graphite furnace, with deuterium arc to background correction and pyrolytic coated tube. Phosphoric acid was used as chemical modifier. The obtained results, using the standard additions method, presented a decrease of the lead concentration, in all profiles, when the distance of FT was increased. It was also made a radiometric screening in each sampling point. The lead concentration variate from 115,1 μg.g -1 in FT, to less than 40 μg.g -1 at 150 m of distance of FT ( 3 ) 2 was used. The method was applied to a certified sample, showing a good agreement between certified and

  2. Nanodeserts: A Conjecture in Nanotechnology to Enhance Quasi-Photosynthetic CO2 Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper advances “nanodeserts” as a conjecture on the possibility of developing the hierarchical structured polymeric nanomaterials for enhancing abiotic CO2 fixation in the soil-groundwater system beneath deserts (termed as quasi-photosynthetic CO2 absorption. Arid and semiarid deserts ecosystems approximately characterize one-third of the Earth’s land surface but play an unsung role in the carbon cycling, considering the huge potentials of such CO2 absorption to expand insights to the long-sought missing CO2 sink and the naturally unneglectable turbulence in temperature sensitivities of soil respiration it produced. “Nanodeserts” as a reconciled concept not only indicate a conjecture in nanotechnology to enhance quasi-photosynthetic CO2 absorption, but also aim to present to the desert researchers a better understanding of the footprints of abiotic CO2 transport, conversion, and assignment in the soil-groundwater system beneath deserts. Meanwhile, nanodeserts allow a stable temperature sensitivity of soil respiration in deserts by largely reducing the CO2 release above the deserts surface and highlighting the abiotic CO2 fixation beneath deserts. This may be no longer a novelty in the future.

  3. The use of atomic absorption spectroscopy to measure arsenic, selenium, molybdenum, and vanadium in water and soil samples from uranium mill tailings sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenbach, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    The Technical Measurements Center (TMC) was established to support the environmental measurement needs of the various DOE remedial action programs. A laboratory intercomparison study conducted by the TMC, using soil and water samples from sites contaminated by uranium mill tailings, indicated large discrepancies in analytical results reported by participating laboratories for arsenic, selenium, molybdenum, and vanadium. The present study was undertaken to investigate the most commonly used analytical techniques for measuring these four elements, ascertain routine and reliable quantification, and assess problems and successes of analysts. Based on a survey of the technical literature, the analytical technique of atomic absorption spectroscopy was selected for detailed study. The application of flame atomic absorption, graphite furnace atomic absorption, and hydride generation atomic absorption to the analysis of tailings-contaminated samples is discussed. Additionally, laboratory sample preparation methods for atomic absorption spectroscopy are presented. The conclusion of this report is that atomic absorption can be used effectively for the determination of arsenic, selenium, molybdenum, and vanadium in water and soil samples if the analyst understands the measurement process and is aware of potential problems. The problem of accurate quantification of arsenic, selenium, molybdenum, and vanadium in water and soil contaminated by waste products from uranium milling operations affects all DOE remedial action programs [Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP), Formerly Utilized Site Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), and Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program (UMTRAP)], since all include sites where uranium was processed. 96 refs., 9 figs

  4. Urban airborne lead: X-ray absorption spectroscopy establishes soil as dominant source.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas E Pingitore

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the dramatic decrease in airborne lead over the past three decades, there are calls for regulatory limits on this potent pediatric neurotoxin lower even than the new (2008 US Environmental Protection Agency standard. To achieve further decreases in airborne lead, what sources would need to be decreased and what costs would ensue? Our aim was to identify and, if possible, quantify the major species (compounds of lead in recent ambient airborne particulate matter collected in El Paso, TX, USA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used synchrotron-based XAFS (x-ray absorption fine structure to identify and quantify the major Pb species. XAFS provides molecular-level structural information about a specific element in a bulk sample. Pb-humate is the dominant form of lead in contemporary El Paso air. Pb-humate is a stable, sorbed complex produced exclusively in the humus fraction of Pb-contaminated soils; it also is the major lead species in El Paso soils. Thus such soil must be the dominant source, and its resuspension into the air, the transfer process, providing lead particles to the local air. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Current industrial and commercial activity apparently is not a major source of airborne lead in El Paso, and presumably other locales that have eliminated such traditional sources as leaded gasoline. Instead, local contaminated soil, legacy of earlier anthropogenic Pb releases, serves as a long-term reservoir that gradually leaks particulate lead to the atmosphere. Given the difficulty and expense of large-scale soil remediation or removal, fugitive soil likely constrains a lower limit for airborne lead levels in many urban settings.

  5. Caesium absorption by barley - influence of its retention by the soil - competitive action of potassium; Absorption du cesium par l'orge - influence de sa retention dans le sol - action competitive du potassium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferron-Trosseau, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-06-01

    We have studied, in various culture media, how the absorption of caesium by barley varies with its concentration, and how this absorption can be in competition with a similar alkali cation-potassium. We have also considered the caesium distribution in the ground in particular radio-active caesium, between the soil and solution, as a function of the amount of caesium. From our work it is clear that barley behaves very differently according to whether the caesium is in a nutritive solution or is in the soil: for a nutritive solution, the fraction of caesium (radioactive and stable) absorbed by barley remains practically constant in the presence of increasing amounts (relatively small) of stable caesium; in soil, the fraction of the radio-active caesium absorbed increases as the stable caesium content (fairly low) of the soil increases, in relationship with a rapidly decreasing selectivity of the soil for Cs{sup +}. The difference between these results is thus explained by the very pronounced selectivity of the illitic soil studied for Cs{sup +}, as long as the proportion of Cs remains low, about as low as that of most natural soils. Furthermore, the K{sup +} ion is in competition with the Cs{sup +} ion, for absorption by barley in a culture medium in a nutritive solution or in soil, only when the potassium concentrations are relatively low, of the order of the nutritive maximum. This shows that the addition of potassium to a medium already rich in this element does not reduce the absorption of caesium by barley. The choice of experimental conditions close to natural conditions (nutritive media strong in calcium) and the examination of the distribution of radioactive caesium between the soil, the soil solution and the plant in the presence of very low doses of stable caesium make these results interesting from the 'atomic health' point of view; it should be expected that a definite contamination risk exists for plants cultivated on synthetic media and for

  6. Procedure for intercomparison study for trace elements determination in soil samples by absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez P, L.A.; Benavides M, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    In the environmental sampling analysis there is very important to establish an adequate methodologies on the laboratories for improvement the quality of the results obtained, so the establishment of a qualified laboratories network for environmental analysis. The objective of this work is to show the working plan for the analysis of eight elements on a Russian soil sample for an interlaboratory comparison with IAEA, by the Absorption spectroscopy technique using flame. (Author)

  7. Systemic Absorption of Nanomaterials by Oral Exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Mona-Lise; Bredsdorff, Lea; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    This report and accompanying database systematically evaluates the reliability and relevance of the existing scientific literature regarding systemic absorption of nanomaterials by oral exposure and makes specific recommendations for future testing approaches.......This report and accompanying database systematically evaluates the reliability and relevance of the existing scientific literature regarding systemic absorption of nanomaterials by oral exposure and makes specific recommendations for future testing approaches....

  8. Effects of different soil remediation methods on inhibition of lead absorption and growth and quality of Dianthus superbus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoyu; Ma, Siyue; Li, Jianheng

    2017-12-01

    Heavy metal pollution in soil poses a serious threat to the growth of plants used in traditional Chinese medicine. Therefore, a pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of various soil remediation methods on the performance of Herba Dianthi (Dianthus superbus L.) grown on Pb-contaminated soil. The results show that inoculation of Herba Dianthi with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) led to a significant reduction in Pb uptake (P< 0.05), and increased root development and root-to-shoot ratio compared to untreated control plants, along with the highest content of active components. When planting with Trifolium repens, the reduction effect of Pb absorption was insignificant. Herba Dianthi showed improved growth and active ingredients, and the lowest Pb content, with AMF inoculation. The addition of EDTA decreased the growth of Herba Dianthi, but promoted the absorption of Pb. The inhibition of tumor cells was highest in E2. In conclusion, inoculation with AMF can ensure that plant lead content meets testing standards, helping to improve the quality of medicinal herbs.

  9. The Role of Absorption Cooling for Reaching Sustainable Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindmark, Susanne

    2005-07-01

    This thesis focuses on the role and potential of absorption cooling in future energy systems. Two types of energy systems are investigated: a district energy system based on waste incineration and a distributed energy system with natural gas as fuel. In both cases, low temperature waste heat is used as driving energy for the absorption cooling. The main focus is to evaluate the absorption technology in an environmental perspective, in terms of reduced CO{sub 2} emissions. Economic evaluations are also performed. The reduced electricity when using absorption cooling instead of compression cooling is quantified and expressed as an increased net electrical yield. The results show that absorption cooling is an environmentally friendly way to produce cooling as it reduces the use of electrically driven cooling in the energy system and therefore also reduces global CO{sub 2} emissions. In the small-scale trigeneration system the electricity use is lowered with 84 % as compared to cooling production with compression chillers only. The CO{sub 2} emissions can be lowered to 45 CO{sub 2}/MWh{sub c} by using recoverable waste heat as driving heat for absorption chillers. However, the most cost effective cooling solution in a district energy system is a combination between absorption and compression cooling technologies according to the study. Absorption chillers have the potential to be suitable bottoming cycles for power production in distributed systems. Net electrical yields over 55 % may be reached in some cases with gas motors and absorption chillers. This small-scale system for cogeneration of power and cooling shows electrical efficiencies comparable to large-scale power plants and may contribute to reducing peak electricity demand associated with the cooling demand.

  10. A Thermomechanical Transport Approach and Application in Soil-Water System of Polluted Mining Areas considering the Three-Phase Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermomechanical transport approach includes the process of diffusing or the condition of being diffused, absorption/desorption, swell/shrink, equilibrium/nonequilibrium, and thermomechanical transport of contaminant in three phases of polluted mining soil which are discussed. The thermomechanical transport model of the contaminants transport in polluted soil is established, and its basic equations are given. Based on that, the distribution regularities of the contaminant seepage in water-soil system are discussed in detail and the sensitivities of parameters are analyzed. The study shows that the parameter has important influence on the contamination distribution and transportation in polluted soil-water system. The influence degree is also related to the action of seepage force directly.

  11. Simulation of solar-powered absorption cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atmaca, I.; Yigit, A. [Uludag Univ., Bursa (Turkey). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2003-07-01

    With developing technology and the rapid increase in world population, the demand for energy is ever increasing. Conventional energy will not be enough to meet the continuously increasing need for energy in the future. In this case, renewable energy sources will become important. Solar energy is a very important energy source because of its advantages. Instead of a compressor system, which uses electricity, an absorption cooling system, using renewable energy and kinds of waste heat energy, may be used for cooling. In this study, a solar-powered, single stage, absorption cooling system, using a water-lithium bromide solution, is simulated. A modular computer program has been developed for the absorption system to simulate various cycle configurations and solar energy parameters for Antalya, Turkey. So, the effects of hot water inlet temperatures on the coefficient of performance (COP) and the surface area of the absorption cooling components are studied. In addition, reference temperatures which are the minimum allowable hot water inlet temperatures are determined and their effect on the fraction of the total load met by non-purchased energy (FNP) and the coefficient of performance are researched. Also, the effects of the collector type and storage tank mass are investigated in detail. (author)

  12. Elucidating differences in metal absorption efficiencies between terrestrial soft-bodied and aquatic species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owsianiak, Mikolaj; Veltman, Karin; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2014-01-01

    species, with the covalent index being the best predictor. It is hypothesized that metal absorption by soft-bodied species in soil systems is influenced by the rate of metal supply to the membrane, while in aquatic systems accumulation is solely determined by metal affinity to membrane bound transport...... proteins. Our results imply that developing predictive terrestrial bioaccumulation and toxicity models for metals must consider metal interactions with soil solids. This may include desorption of a cation bound to soil solids through ion exchange, or metal release from soil surfaces involving breaking...

  13. Influence of soil composition in the determination of chromium by atomic absorption spectrometry with flame air / acetylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran Sosa, Ibis; Granda Valdes, Mayra; Pomares Alfonso, Mario Simeon

    2014-01-01

    The Air-acetylene Flame Atomic Absorption determination of chromium is a complex task, being strongly influenced by sample composition and instrumental conditions. The objective of this work was to study the influence of Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, and Na on the absorption of chromium in the air-acetylene flame, both separately and combined in solution, when acetylene flow and burner height vary. Dissolutions of the mixtures simulated the composition of four soils from the Quibu River Basin in Havana, Cuba. Chromium absorption first increased and then decreased with increment of acetylene flow for shorter burner heights (∼ 2-4 mm); while a continuous increase was observed for larger heights (> 4 mm). This behavior was the same in the presence and absence of interfering chemical element, mentioned above. On the other hand, the dependence of the magnitude of the interference with acetylene flow and burner height was complex and dependent on the interfering element, particularly at larger heights where the behavior of Al was remarkably different. The interference of the four mixtures of Al, Ca, K, Fe, Mg and Na decreased in comparison to individual interfering effects and was less dependent on acetylene flow and burner height. Finally, a significant reduction of interference on chromium determination in soil samples was achieved by an adequate selection of acetylene flow and burner height

  14. Phosphorus absorption (32P) by apple trees under drip irrigation as influenced by the physical properties of the soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, R.

    1983-01-01

    P absorption by apple tree roots (Golden delicious/M2) is studied using carrier-free 32 P. A qualitative model of the influence of some physical properties of the soil is proposed combining individual tree responses to 32 P injection. (orig.)

  15. Linking soil systems to societal value systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helming, Katharina; Daedlow, Katrin; Techen, Anja; Kaiser, David Brian

    2017-04-01

    Sustainable management of soils is needed to avoid soil degradation and to maintain soil functions. This requires the assessment of how human activities drive soil management, how soil management affect soil functions and soil degradation, which trade-offs occur and how they compromise sustainable development targets. In the frame of the German research programme "Soils as a sustainable resource for the bio-economy - BonaRes", we developed an enhanced approach of the DPSIR (driver-pressure-state-impact-response) cycle which helps to assess these interrelations. Because not all soil functions can be maximized simultaneously in space and time and trade-offs are inevitable, it depends on the societal value system to decide which management practices and respective soil functional performances are valued sustainably. We analysed the applicability of three valuation concepts being prominent in research about social-ecological systems, namely resource efficiency, ecosystem services, and ethics and equity. The concept of resource efficiency is based in the life-cycle thinking and is often applied at the level of the farming systems and in the context of bio-economy strategies. It covers the use of natural (water, energy, nutrients, land) and economic resources. At the landscape level, the concept of ecosystem services is prominent. Here, the contribution of soils to the provisioning, regulating and cultural services of the natural ecosystems is considered. Ethical considerations include the intrinsic values of nature as well as issues of local and global equity between different societal groups, generations, and localities. The three concepts cover different problem dimensions and complexity levels of soil management and decision making. Alone, none of them are capable to discover complex questions of sustainable soil management and development. Rather, the exact spatial and temporal framing of the sustainability problem at stake determines which combination of the value

  16. Cosmological Evolution of QSO Absorption Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengler-Larrea, Erik

    1995-08-01

    First, the evolution with cosmic time of the hydrogen clouds which produce the Lyman-alpha absorption lines is studied in dependence on the strength of these lines. From the analysis it is concluded that the results show no evidence of a dependence in the sense of stronger lines evolving faster, although for the resolution at which the used observations were done, it can not be ruled out. Within the same analysis, a distribution of the Doppler parameter of the lines was obtained, with large values and a wide spread. This parameter being an indicator of the gas temperature, this result is in accordance with high temperatures and, consequently, large ionised fractions and a large fraction of the baryonic matter of the universe being associated with these clouds. However, recent high resolution studies seem to reveal that much lower temperatures are characteristic of the clouds. The main content of this thesis, however, focuses on the redshift evolution of the absorbing systems producing absorption at the Lyman limit and of the amount of CIV producing CIV absorption lines. Regarding the CIV absorbers, previous predictions on the effects underlying their redshift distribution pointed to an increase with redshift of the absorbing column densities. In this thesis the first direct measurements of such column densities by profile fitting of a large number of absorption systems (73) are presented, confirming the predictions of a decrease of at least a factor of 3 between z=1.5 and z=3.0. The study on the evolution of Lyman limit absorption systems (LLSs) puts an end to previous discrepancies between the results of different groups. Both a smooth single power law dependence of the LLS number density on redshift indicating no evolution in number density for 0.4 Team of the HST Key Project on QSO absorption lines, and in particular to estimate the necessary exposure times, the magnitudes of several of these objects had to be re-measured. The acquisition of their images and the

  17. Computational Model of a Biomass Driven Absorption Refrigeration System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munyeowaji Mbikan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The impact of vapour compression refrigeration is the main push for scientists to find an alternative sustainable technology. Vapour absorption is an ideal technology which makes use of waste heat or renewable heat, such as biomass, to drive absorption chillers from medium to large applications. In this paper, the aim was to investigate the feasibility of a biomass driven aqua-ammonia absorption system. An estimation of the solid biomass fuel quantity required to provide heat for the operation of a vapour absorption refrigeration cycle (VARC is presented; the quantity of biomass required depends on the fuel density and the efficiency of the combustion and heat transfer systems. A single-stage aqua-ammonia refrigeration system analysis routine was developed to evaluate the system performance and ascertain the rate of energy transfer required to operate the system, and hence, the biomass quantity needed. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the results of the performance of a computational model of an aqua-ammonia system under a range of parameters. The model showed good agreement with published experimental data.

  18. Phosphorus in soil treatment systems: accumulation and mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eveborn, David; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Elmefors, Elin; Yu, Lin; Eriksson, Ann-Kristin; Ljung, Emelie; Renman, Gunno

    2014-11-01

    Septic tanks with subsequent soil treatment systems (STS) are a common treatment technique for domestic wastewater in rural areas. Phosphorus (P) leakage from such systems may pose a risk to water quality (especially if they are located relatively close to surface waters). In this study, six STS in Sweden (11-28 years old) were examined. Samples taken from the unsaturated subsoil beneath the distribution pipes were investigated by means of batch and column experiments, and accumulated phosphorus were characterized through X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis. At all sites the wastewater had clearly influenced the soil. This was observed through decreased pH, increased amounts of oxalate extractable metals and at some sites altered P sorption properties. The amount of accumulated P in the STS were found to be between 0.32 and 0.87 kg m(-3), which in most cases was just a fraction of the estimated P load (<30%). Column studies revealed that high P concentrations (up to 6 mg L(-1)) were leached from the material when deionized water was applied. However, the response to deionized water varied between the sites. As evidenced by XANES analysis, aluminium phosphates or P adsorbed to aluminium (hydr)oxides, as well as organically bound P, were important sinks for P. Generally soils with a high content of oxalate-extractable Al were also less vulnerable to P leakage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effluent Storage and Biomat Occurrence among Septic System Absorption Field Architectures in a Typic Fragiudult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, N J M; Brye, K R; Dunn, S; Soerens, T S; Sharpley, A N; Mason, E; Gbur, E E

    2013-07-01

    On-site wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs) are commonly used by households in areas of low population density to treat household wastewater and recycle it back to the environment. However, new absorption field products of differing architecture types have recently become available. A 3-yr field study was conducted in Bethel Heights, northwest Arkansas to assess several newer architecture types (i.e., chambers, polystyrene-aggregate, and gravel-less pipe) relative to the traditional pipe-and-gravel design under wet- and dry-soil conditions. Thirteen products of four different architecture types were installed in 46-cm-deep trenches in a Captina silt loam (fine-silty, siliceous, active, mesic Typic Fragiudult). Products were evaluated based on in-trench solution storage measured with an electronic water-level sensor approximately weekly from January 2009 through January 2012. Between May 2010 and January 2012, the thickness of any biomat formation was measured approximately weekly by insertion of a wooden dowel through in-trench monitoring ports. Architecture type alone did not affect ( > 0.05) in-trench solution storage. However, solution storage among individual products differed under wet- and dry-soil conditions ( storage but that several alternative products also had greater solution storage than that of the traditional pipe-and-gravel system. With no observed effluent surfacing, the soil morphology approach appears to be adequate and appropriately environmentally conservative for assigning typical single-family loading rates to alternative OWTS products and to the traditional pipe-and-gravel system. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  20. Chemical and structural characterization of soil humic substances under agroforestry and conventional systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gislane M. de Moraes

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies have proven that the agroforestry systems in the semi-arid region of the State of Ceará, Brazil, induce an increase in soil organic C levels. Notwithstanding, there is no information if this increase also results in qualitative changes in different pools of soil organic matter. The objective of this study was to verify the possible chemical and structural alterations in fulvic and humic acids of a Luvisol in areas adopting agroforestry, traditional intensive cultivation and native forest in a long-term experiment conducted in the semi-arid region of Ceará State, Brazil. The study was conducted in an experimental area of the National Goat Research Center (Embrapa in Sobral, CE. The following treatments were evaluated: agrosilvopasture (AGP, silvopasture (SILV, intensive cultivation under fallow (ICF, and areas with native forest (NF. Soil fulvic and humic acids fractions were extracted from the 0-6 and 6-12 cm layers and characterized by elemental composition, thermogravimetry and infrared spectroscopy analyses. The elemental composition analysis of humic acids confirmed the data found for fulvic acids, showing reduction in the C, H and N levels, followed by an increase in O contents in the AGP and ICF treatments over SILV and NF. In all treatments, except to SILV in the 0-6 cm layer, the percentage of mass loss was highest (300-600 °C for humic acids in the thermally most stable region. Despite the similarity between infrared spectra, soil fulvic acids in the SILV treatment extracted from 6-12 cm depth decrease the absorption bands at 1708 and 1408 cm-1 followed by an increase in the absorption band at 1608 cm-1 attributed to aromatic C=C groups. This behavior suggests an increase in the aromatic character of the structure. The AGP and ICF treatments, which increase the soil tilling, favored the maintenance of humic substances with a more aromatic character in the soil than SILV and NF. The less aromatic humic substances in the SILV

  1. Rapidly reconfigurable slow-light system based on off-resonant Raman absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vudyasetu, Praveen K.; Howell, John C.; Camacho, Ryan M.

    2010-01-01

    We present a slow-light system based on dual Raman absorption resonances in warm rubidium vapor. Each Raman absorption resonance is produced by a control beam in an off-resonant Λ system. This system combines all optical control of the Raman absorption and the low-dispersion broadening properties of the double Lorentzian absorption slow light. The bandwidth, group delay, and central frequency of the slow-light system can all be tuned dynamically by changing the properties of the control beam. We demonstrate multiple pulse delays with low distortion and show that such a system has fast switching dynamics and thus fast reconfiguration rates.

  2. Feasibility study on reducing lead and cadmium absorption by spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) in a contaminated soil using nanoporous activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sara Darvishi; Mohammad Reza Ardakani; Saeed Vazan; Farzad Paknejad; Amir Hossein Faregh; Hossein Ghafourian

    2012-01-01

    Activated carbons (AC) have been long recognized as prominent absorbents in industries and feature numerous applications in preventing or absorbing the harmful gases and liquids and could be employed for filtration and remediation or even reutilization of chemicals. In order to investigate the capacity of AC in reducing the absorption of heavy metals (HM) including lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) and dual complex (Pb x Cd) by spinach, a factorial experiment in a completely randomized design with three replications on a pot trial was conducted. Three factors including five levels of AC 0, 5000, 10000, 15000, 20000 mg/kg soil, one concentration level of Pb 4,000 mg/kg soil and one concentration level of cadmium Cd 8 mg/kg soil were tested. The index of heavy metal concentration was calculated in leaf, stem and root and their corresponding dry weights. Results illustrated that in contaminated soils, plants with AC exhibited a superior reduction of absorption of HM vis-a-vis the plants without AC. The foremost result regarding the impact of AC on reducing the concentration of Pb and Cd was observed in 20,000 level of AC. This reveals that AC declined the soil contamination and lessened the accumulation of HM into the shoots and roots. Results suggest that the application of AC may be an eligible solution for decreasing the translocation of HM into the plants. (author)

  3. Percutaneous absorption of [14C]DDT and [14C]benzo[a]pyrene from soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wester, R.C.; Maibach, H.I.; Bucks, D.A.; Sedik, L.; Melendres, J.; Liao, C.; DiZio, S.

    1990-01-01

    The objective was to determine percutaneous absorption of DDT and benzo[a]pyrene in vitro and in vivo from soil into and through skin. Soil (Yolo County 65-California-57-8; 26% sand, 26% clay, 48% silt) was passed through 10-, 20-, and 48-mesh sieves. Soil then retained by 80-mesh was mixed with [14C]-labeled chemical at 10 ppm. Acetone solutions at 10 ppm were prepared for comparative analysis. Human cadaver skin was dermatomed to 500 microns and used in glass diffusion cells with human plasma as the receptor fluid (3 ml/hr flow rate) for a 24-hr skin application time. With acetone vehicle, DDT (18.1 +/- 13.4%) readily penetrated into human skin. Significantly less DDT (1.0 +/- 0.7%) penetrated into human skin from soil. DDT would not partition from human skin into human plasma in the receptor phase (less than 0.1%). With acetone vehicle, benzo[a]pyrene (23.7 +/- 9.7%) readily penetrated into human skin. Significantly less benzo[a]pyrene (1.4 +/- 0.9%) penetrated into human skin from soil. Benzo[a]pyrene would not partition from human skin into human plasma in the receptor phase (less than 0.1%). Substantivity (skin retention) was investigated by applying 14C-labeled chemical to human skin in vitro for only 25 min. After soap and water wash, 16.7 +/- 13.2% of DDT applied in acetone remained absorbed to skin. With soil only 0.25 +/- 0.11% of DDT remained absorbed to skin. After soap and water wash 5.1 +/- 2.1% of benzo[a]pyrene applied in acetone remained absorbed to skin. With soil only 0.14 +/- 0.13% of benzo[a]pyrene remained absorbed to skin

  4. Analysis of soil reference materials for vanadium(+5) species by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandiwana, Khakhathi L.; Panichev, Nikolay

    2010-01-01

    Solid Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) with known vanadium(+5) content are currently not commercially available. Because of this, vanadium species have been determined in solid CRMs of soil, viz. CRM023-50, CRM024-50, CRM049-50, SQC001 and SQC0012. These CRMs are certified with only total vanadium content. Vanadium(+5) was extracted from soil reference materials with 0.1 M Na 2 CO 3 . The quantification of V(+5) was carried out by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS). The concentration of V(+5) in the analyzed CRMs was found to be ranging between 3.60 and 86.0 μg g -1 . It was also found that SQC001 contains approximately 88% of vanadium as V(+5) species. Statistical evaluation of the results of the two methods by paired t-test was in good agreement at 95% level of confidence.

  5. [Determination of soil exchangeable base cations by using atomic absorption spectrophotometer and extraction with ammonium acetate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-ge; Xiao, Min; Dong, Yi-hua; Jiang, Yong

    2012-08-01

    A method to determine soil exchangeable calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), and sodium (Na) by using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS) and extraction with ammonium acetate was developed. Results showed that the accuracy of exchangeable base cation data with AAS method fits well with the national standard referential soil data. The relative errors for parallel samples of exchangeable Ca and Mg with 66 pair samples ranged from 0.02%-3.14% and 0.06%-4.06%, and averaged to be 1.22% and 1.25%, respectively. The relative errors for exchangeable K and Na with AAS and flame photometer (FP) ranged from 0.06%-8.39% and 0.06-1.54, and averaged to be 3.72% and 0.56%, respectively. A case study showed that the determination method for exchangeable base cations by using AAS was proven to be reliable and trustable, which could reflect the real situation of soil cation exchange properties in farmlands.

  6. Optomechanically induced absorption in parity-time-symmetric optomechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. Y.; Guo, Y. Q.; Pei, P.; Yi, X. X.

    2017-06-01

    We explore the optomechanically induced absorption (OMIA) in a parity-time- (PT -) symmetric optomechanical system (OMS). By numerically calculating the Lyapunov exponents, we find out the stability border of the PT -symmetric OMS. The results show that in the PT -symmetric phase the system can be either stable or unstable depending on the coupling constant and the decay rate. In the PT -symmetric broken phase the system can have a stable state only for small gain rates. By calculating the transmission rate of the probe field, we find that there is an inverted optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT) at δ =-ωM and an OMIA at δ =ωM for the PT -symmetric optomechanical system. At each side of δ =-ωM there is an absorption window due to the resonance absorption of the two generated supermodes. Comparing with the case of optomechanics coupled to a passive cavity, we find that the active cavity can enhance the resonance absorption. The absorption rate at δ =ωM increases as the coupling strength between the two cavities increases. Our work provides us with a promising platform for controlling light propagation and light manipulation in terms of PT symmetry, which might have potential applications in quantum information processing and quantum optical devices.

  7. Lack of dust in quasar absorption line systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jura, M.

    1977-01-01

    It is stated that the origin of absorption line systems in quasars is still uncertain. Most such systems apparently have atomic hydrogen column densities of the order of 10 19 /cm 2 , but at least two quasars, 1331 + 170 and PHL957, have such strong Lyman α absorption lines that atomic hydrogen column densities of the order of 10 21 /cm 2 are indicated. It should be possible to observe the dust produced 2,200 A extinction feature as it is red shifted into the visible, and to determine whether absorption line systems are produced in spiral galaxies where the dust content is similar to that in the interstellar medium. It has been argued that the emission line regions of quasars generally lack dust and that towards PHL957 the 2,200 A feature is absent. The present author argues that dust similar to that found in the interstellar medium is not found towards the quasars 1331 + 170 and PHL957. This could explain why H 2 is not found towards PHL957, and it indicates that the absorption line systems in quasars are not produced in spiral galaxies similar to our own. It seems from the analysis presented that the dust-to-gas ratio towards 1331 + 170 is at least a factor of 20 less than in the interstellar medium, and there is no reason to suppose that this lack of dust results from a lack of metals It is concluded that there seems to be a lack of normal dust towards PHL957 by at least a factor of two; and that the absorption region towards 1331 + 170 and probably the region towards PHL957 are lacking dust similar to that in our own galaxy. This can explain the lack of H 2 in these systems. (U.K.)

  8. Absorption of gamma-emitting fission products and activation products by rice under flooded and unflooded conditions from two tropical soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Souza, T.J.; Mistry, K.B.

    1980-01-01

    The absorption of gamma-emitting fission products 106 Ru, 125 Sb, 137 Cs and 144 Ce and activation products 59 Fe, 58 Co, 54 Mn and 65 Zn by rice plants grown on two contrasting tropical soils, namely, a blak soil (pellustert) and a laterite (oxisol), and the effects of flooding were studied under controlled conditions. Results indicated greater uptake of 106 Ru and 125 Sb from the black soil than from the laterite. In contrast, the uptake of 144 Ce and 137 Cs was greater in the laterite than in the black soil. Flooding treatment enhanced the uptake of all these fission products by rice plants in the laterite soil whereas this effect was observed only for 125 Sb and 137 Cs in the black soil. The plant uptake of activation products from the two soil types showed maximum accumulation of 65 Zn followed by 54 Mn, 59 Fe and 58 Co in both soil types. Besides, uptake of these nuclides was greater from the laterite soil than from the black soil. Flooding treatment for rice while showing a reduction of 59 Fe uptake showed an increase in plant uptake of 58 Co, 54 Mn and 65 Zn in both soil types. (orig.)

  9. Second law analysis of double effect vapour absorption cooler system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomri, Rabah; Hakimi, Riad

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, exergy analysis of double effect lithium bromide/water absorption refrigeration system is presented. The system consists of a second effect generator between the generator and condenser of the single effect absorption refrigeration system, including two solution heat exchangers between the absorber and the two generators. In order to simulate the refrigeration system by using a computer, a new set of computationally efficient formulations of thermodynamic properties of lithium bromide/water solution developed is used. The exergy analysis is carried out for each component of the system. All exergy losses that exist in double effect lithium bromide/water absorption system are calculated. In addition to the coefficient of performance and the exergetic efficiency of the system, the number of exergy of each component of the system is also estimated. This study suggests the component of the absorption refrigeration system that should be developed. The results show that the performance of the system increases with increasing low pressure generator (LPG) temperature, but decreases with increasing high pressure generator (HPG) temperature. The highest exergy loss occurs in the absorber and in the HPG, which therefore makes the absorber and HPG the most important components of the double effect refrigeration system

  10. Effect of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the transformation and immobilization of arsenic in soils: New insights from X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Jian-Xin [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); School of River and Ocean Engineering, Chongqing Jiaotong University, Chongqing 400074 (China); Wang, Yu-Jun, E-mail: yjwang@issas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Liu, Cun [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Wang, Li-Hua; Yang, Ke [Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of sciences, Shanghai 201204 (China); Zhou, Dong-Mei, E-mail: dmzhou@issas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Li, Wei; Sparks, Donald L. [Environmental Soil Chemistry Group, Delaware Environmental Institute and Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19717-1303 United States (United States)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Immobility and transformation of As on different Eh soils were investigated. • μ-XRF, XANES, and XPS were used to gain As distribution and speciation in soil. • Sorption capacity of As on anaerobic soil was much higher than that on oxic soil. • Fe oxides reductive dissolution is a key factor for As sorption and transformation. - Abstract: The geochemical behavior and speciation of arsenic (As) in paddy soils is strongly controlled by soil redox conditions and the sequestration by soil iron oxyhydroxides. Hence, the effects of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the adsorption, transformation and precipitation of As(III) and As(V) in soils were investigated using batch experiments and synchrotron based techniques to gain a deeper understanding at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. The results of batch sorption experiments revealed that the sorption capacity of As(V) on anoxic soil was much higher than that on control soil. Synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) mapping studies indicated that As was heterogeneously distributed and was mainly associated with iron in the soil. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed that the primary speciation of As in the soil is As(V). These results further suggested that, when As(V) was introduced into the anoxic soil, the rapid coprecipitation of As(V) with ferric/ferrous ion prevented its reduction to As(III), and was the main mechanism controlling the immobilization of As. This research could improve the current understanding of soil As chemistry in paddy and wetland soils.

  11. Effect of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the transformation and immobilization of arsenic in soils: New insights from X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Jian-Xin; Wang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Cun; Wang, Li-Hua; Yang, Ke; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Li, Wei; Sparks, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Immobility and transformation of As on different Eh soils were investigated. • μ-XRF, XANES, and XPS were used to gain As distribution and speciation in soil. • Sorption capacity of As on anaerobic soil was much higher than that on oxic soil. • Fe oxides reductive dissolution is a key factor for As sorption and transformation. - Abstract: The geochemical behavior and speciation of arsenic (As) in paddy soils is strongly controlled by soil redox conditions and the sequestration by soil iron oxyhydroxides. Hence, the effects of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the adsorption, transformation and precipitation of As(III) and As(V) in soils were investigated using batch experiments and synchrotron based techniques to gain a deeper understanding at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. The results of batch sorption experiments revealed that the sorption capacity of As(V) on anoxic soil was much higher than that on control soil. Synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) mapping studies indicated that As was heterogeneously distributed and was mainly associated with iron in the soil. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed that the primary speciation of As in the soil is As(V). These results further suggested that, when As(V) was introduced into the anoxic soil, the rapid coprecipitation of As(V) with ferric/ferrous ion prevented its reduction to As(III), and was the main mechanism controlling the immobilization of As. This research could improve the current understanding of soil As chemistry in paddy and wetland soils

  12. Assessment of elemental pollution in soil of Islamabad city using instrumental neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectrometry techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daud, M.; Wasim, M.; Khalid, N.; Zaidi, J.H.; Iqbal, J.

    2009-01-01

    The soil samples of nine different sites in Islamabad were studied for their elemental composition. Instrumental neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectrometry were employed and 33 elements were determined. The acquired data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, principal component analysis, cluster analysis, pollution level index and enrichment factor. A perusal of results shows a distribution of elemental concentration in two major groups, one along the highway and the other in industrial area of Islamabad. The soil along the highway sites was found to be relatively less polluted than at the sites in the industrial area. The enrichment factor indicates the presence of As, Pb, Sb, Se and Sn at higher levels. The method validation was done by analyzing IAEA reference materials SL-1 (lake sediment) and S7 (soil). (orig.)

  13. Spectrophotometer-Integrating-Sphere System for Computing Solar Absorptance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, William G., Jr.; Slemp, Wayne S.; Perry, John E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A commercially available ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared spectrophotometer was modified to utilize an 8-inch-diameter modified Edwards-type integrated sphere. Software was written so that the reflectance spectra could be used to obtain solar absorptance values of 1-inch-diameter specimens. A descriptions of the system, spectral reflectance, and software for calculation of solar absorptance from reflectance data are presented.

  14. A low-cost vaporization-atomization system for atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhn F, C.G.; Ambiado V, F.; Woerner V, R.

    1990-01-01

    A low-cost vaporization-atomization system for atomic absorption spectrometry is developed as an alternative to the use of a graphite furnace in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. (Author)

  15. Absorption of gamma-emitting fission products and activation products by rice under flooded and unflooded conditions from two tropical soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Souza, T J; Mistry, K B [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Biology and Agriculture Div.

    1980-01-01

    The absorption of gamma-emitting fission products /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 137/Cs and /sup 144/Ce and activation products /sup 59/Fe, /sup 58/Co, /sup 54/Mn and /sup 65/Zn by rice plants grown on two contrasting tropical soils, namely, a blak soil (pellustert) and a laterite (oxisol), and the effects of flooding were studied under controlled conditions. Results indicated greater uptake of /sup 106/Ru and /sup 125/Sb from the black soil than from the laterite. In contrast, the uptake of /sup 144/Ce and /sup 137/Cs was greater in the laterite than in the black soil. Flooding treatment enhanced the uptake of all these fission products by rice plants in the laterite soil whereas this effect was observed only for /sup 125/Sb and /sup 137/Cs in the black soil. The plant uptake of activation products from the two soil types showed maximum accumulation of /sup 65/Zn followed by /sup 54/Mn, /sup 59/Fe and /sup 58/Co in both soil types. Besides, uptake of these nuclides was greater from the laterite soil than from the black soil. Flooding treatment for rice while showing a reduction of /sup 59/Fe uptake showed an increase in plant uptake of /sup 58/Co, /sup 54/Mn and /sup 65/Zn in both soil types.

  16. Artificial neural network analysis of triple effect absorption refrigeration systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajizadeh Aghdam, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Islamic Azad University (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], email: a.hajizadeh@iaukashan.ac.ir; Nazmara, H.; Farzaneh, B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], email: h.nazmara@nioec.org, email: b_farzaneh_ms@yahoo.com

    2011-07-01

    In this study, artificial neural networks are utilized to predict the performance of triple effect series and parallel flow absorption refrigeration systems, with lithium bromide/water as the working fluid. Important parameters such as high generator and evaporator temperatures were varied and their effects on the performance characteristics of the refrigeration unit were observed. Absorption refrigeration systems make energy savings possible because they can use heat energy to produce cooling, in place of the electricity used for conventional vapour compression chillers. In addition, non-conventional sources of energy (such as solar, waste heat, and geothermal) can be utilized as their primary energy input. Moreover, absorption units use environmentally friendly working fluid pairs instead of CFCs and HCFCs, which affect the ozone layer. Triple effect absorption cycles were analysed. Results apply for both series and parallel flow systems. A relative preference for parallel-flow over series-flow is also shown.

  17. [Chlorine speciation and concentration in cultivated soil in the northeastern China studied by X-ray absorption near edge structure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Lang, Chun-Yan; Ma, Ling-Ling; Xu, Dian-Dou; Zheng, Lei; Lu, Yu-Nanz; Cui Li-Rui; Zhang, Xiao-Meng

    2014-10-01

    A procedure has been proposed to determine chlorine speciation and concentration in soil with X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), and this method was applied to study the cultivated soil (bog, dark brown and black cultivated soil) in the Northeastern China. Qualitative analysis was carried out by least-squares fitting of sample spectra with standard spectra of three model compounds (NaCl, 3-chloropropionic acid, chlorophenol red). Linear correlation between the absolute fluorescence intensity of a series of NaCl standards and the Cl concentration was used as quantification standard for measuring the total Cl concentration in samples. The detection limits,relative standard deviation (RSD), recoveries were 2 mg · kg(-1), 0%-5% and 77%-133%, respectively. The average concentration of total Cl was 19 mg · kg(-1). The average relative content was as high as 61% of organochlorine with the concentration of 1-2 times as high as the concentration of inorganic chloride. The distribution trend of the total Cl, inorganic chloride and organic chlorine in different types of soil was: bog arable soil > dark brown soil > black soil. In conclusion, XANES is a reliable method to nondestructively characterize the speciation and concentration of chlorine in soil, which would provide some basic data for the future study of the chlorine's biogeochemical transformations.

  18. In vitro and in vivo percutaneous absorption of retinol from cosmetic formulations: Significance of the skin reservoir and prediction of systemic absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yourick, Jeffrey J.; Jung, Connie T.; Bronaugh, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    The percutaneous absorption of retinol (Vitamin A) from cosmetic formulations was studied to predict systemic absorption and to understand the significance of the skin reservoir in in vitro absorption studies. Viable skin from fuzzy rat or human subjects was assembled in flow-through diffusion cells for in vitro absorption studies. In vivo absorption studies using fuzzy rats were performed in glass metabolism cages for collection of urine, feces, and body content. Retinol (0.3%) formulations (hydroalcoholic gel and oil-in-water emulsion) containing 3 H-retinol were applied and absorption was measured at 24 or 72 h. All percentages reported are % of applied dose. In vitro studies using human skin and the gel and emulsion vehicles found 0.3 and 1.3% retinol, respectively, in receptor fluid at 24 h. Levels of absorption in the receptor fluid increased over 72 h with the gel and emulsion vehicles. Using the gel vehicle, in vitro rat skin studies found 23% in skin and 6% in receptor fluid at 24 h, while 72-h studies found 18% in skin and 13% in receptor fluid. Thus, significant amounts of retinol remained in rat skin at 24 h and decreased over 72 h, with proportional increases in receptor fluid. In vivo rat studies with the gel found 4% systemic absorption of retinol after 24 h and systemic absorption did not increase at 72 h. Retinol remaining in rat skin after in vivo application was 18% and 13% of the applied dermal dose after 24 and 72 h, respectively. Similar observations were made with the oil-in water emulsion vehicle in the rat. Retinol formed a reservoir in rat skin both in vivo and in vitro. Little additional retinol was bioavailable after 24 h. Comparison of these in vitro and in vivo results for absorption through rat skin indicates that the 24-h in vitro receptor fluid value accurately estimated 24-h in vivo systemic absorption. Therefore, the best single estimate of retinol systemic absorption from in vitro human skin studies is the 24-h receptor fluid

  19. [Effect of Long-Term Fertilization on Organic Nitrogen Functional Groups in Black Soil as Revealed by Synchrotron-Based X-Ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure Spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Gao, Qiang; Wang, Shuai; Zhu, Ping; Zhang, Jin-jing; Zhao, Yi-dong

    2015-07-01

    Nitrogen (N) is a common limiting nutrient in crop production. The N content of soil has been used as an important soil fertility index. Organic N is the major form of N in soil. In most agricultural surface soils, more than 90% of total N occurs in organic forms. Therefore, understanding the compositional characteristics of soil organic N functional groups can provide the scientific basis for formulating the reasonable farmland management strategies. Synchrotron radiation soft X-ray absorption near-edge structure (N K-edge XANES) spectroscopy is the most powerful tool to characterize in situ organic N functional groups compositions in soil. However, to our most knowledge, no studies have been conducted to examine the organic N functional groups compositions of soil using N K-edge XANES spectroscopy under long-term fertilization practices. Based on a long-term field experiment (started in 1990) in a black soil (Gongzhuling, Northeast China), we investigated the differences in organic N functional groups compositions in bulk soil and clay-size soil fraction among fertilization patterns using synchrotron-based N K- edge XANES spectroscopy. Composite soil samples (0-20 cm) were collected in 2008. The present study included six treatments: farmland fallow (FALL), no-fertilization control (CK), chemical nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium fertilization (NPK), NPK in combination with organic manure (NPKM), 1.5 times of NPKM (1.5 NPKM), and NPK in combination with maize straw (NPKS). The results showed that N K-edge XANES spectra of all the treatments under study exhibited characteristic absorption peaks in the ranges of 401.2-401.6 and 402.7-403.1 eV, which were assigned as amides/amine-N and pyrrole-N, respectively. These characteristic absorption peaks were more obvious in clay-size soil fraction than in bulk soil. The results obtained from the semi-quantitative analysis of N K-edge XANES spectra indicated that the relative proportion of amides/amine-N was the highest

  20. Performance of a compact solar absorption cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulyanef; Kamaruzzaman Sopian

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the performance of a compact solar absorption system. Purpose of compact solar is collector, generator and condenser in one unit. At present, two types of absorption cooling systems are marketed: the lithium bromide-water system and the ammonia-water system. In the lithium bromide-water system, water vapor is the refrigerant and ammonia water system where ammonia is the refrigerant. In addition, the ammonia-water system requires higher generator temperature 120 o C to 150 o C than a flat-plate solar collector can provide without special techniques. The lithium bromide-water system operates satisfactorily at a generator temperature of 75 o C to 100 o C, achievable by a flat-plate collector. The lithium bromide-water system also has a higher COP than the ammonia-water system. The disadvantage of the lithium bromide-water systems is that the evaporators cannot operate at temperature below 0 o C since the refrigerant is water. The Coefficient of Performance (COP) system is 0.62 and the concentration of LiBr-H 2 O is 50%

  1. Cosmological implications of the redshift distribution of QSO absorption systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khare-Joshi, P.; Perry, J.J.

    1982-01-01

    We have used the observational data on QSO absorption redshifts, as compiled by Perry, Burbidge and Burbidge (1978) (hereafter PB 2 ), Drew (1978) and Weyman et al. (1979) (hereafter W 2 PT), to study various selection effects likely to affect the distribution of absorption redshifts and, then to determine the probable number distribution of absorbers per redshift interval of 0.1, as a function of z. The distribution obtained, assuming all the observed absorption to be intervening, is found to be statistically incompatible with the redshift distribution of galaxies with constant cross-section for any Friedman cosmology with zero cosmological constant and q 0 >= 0. Therefore, in order to eliminate the absorption systems which are plausibly intrinsic, we have applied the criterion suggested by W 2 PT and by the analysis of the distribution of absorption systems as a function of the relative velocity between the emitting and the absorbing gas, for the PB 2 data set; to wit, we have analysed the distributions obtained by assuming that those systems with relative velocity greater than 0.02 c, 0.02 c but not equal to 0.1 c to 0.11 c and 0.06 c respectively, or those systems without O VI and N V lines, are produced by the intervening galaxies. The results are discussed. (author)

  2. Automotive exhaust gas flow control for an ammonia–water absorption refrigeration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rêgo, A.T.; Hanriot, S.M.; Oliveira, A.F.; Brito, P.; Rêgo, T.F.U.

    2014-01-01

    A considerable part of the energy generated by an automotive internal combustion engine is wasted as heat in the exhaust system. This wasted heat could be recovered and applied to power auxiliary systems in a vehicle, contributing to its overall energy efficiency. In the present work, the experimental analysis of an absorption refrigeration system was performed. The exhaust system of an automotive internal combustion engine was connected to the generator element of an absorption refrigeration system. The performance of the absorption refrigerator was evaluated as a function of the supplied heat. The use of a control strategy for the engine exhaust gas mass flow rate was implemented to optimize the system. Exhaust gas flow was controlled by step-motor actuated valves commanded by a microcontroller in which a proportional-integral control scheme was implemented. Information such as engine torque, speed, key temperatures in the absorption cycle, as well as internal temperatures of the refrigerator was measured in a transient regime. The results indicated that the refrigeration system exhibited better performance when the amount of input heat is controlled based on the temperature of the absorption cycle generator. It was possible to conclude that, by dynamically controlling the amount of input heat, the utilisation range of the absorption refrigeration system powered by exhaust gas heat could be expanded in order to incorporate high engine speed operating conditions. - Highlights: •An absorption refrigerator was driven by automotive exhaust gas heat. •A system for controlling the refrigeration system heat input was developed. •Excessive exhaust gas heat leads to ineffective operation of the refrigerator. •Control of refrigerator's generator temperature led to better performance. •The use of exhaust gas was possible for high engine speeds

  3. Determination of Heavy Metals and Radioactive Elements in Alluvial Soil using Atomic Absorption and Gamma Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamed, S.S.; Walley EI Dine, N.; Soliman, S.I.; Moussa, W.M.

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes some methods dealing with measurements of some heavy and radioactive elements (U, Th and K) in Egyptian cultivated soil samples. Samples were collected from Toshka area. Also, soil and plant samples were collected from Kalube and EI - Gabal EI - Asfar to compare the obtained results from both region. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS),Neutron activation analysis (INAA) and Natural radioactivity techniques were followed. FAAS and INAA techniques agreed fairly well for the compared elements Co,Zn and Fe which determined by the two techniques. Also for K which was determined by FAAS and natural radioactivity. It was found that the concentration range in soil samples for Co, Fe, K and Zn lies between 4.18 and 29.2 μg/g, 3.0 and 3.8 mg/g, 3.49 and 13.28 mg/g and 120 and 663 μg/g respectively while in plant samples the concentration of Co was from 3.02 to 4.02 μg/g, Fe from 1.18 to 1.35 mg/g and Zn from 29.63 to 73.02 μg/g

  4. Soil microorganisms determine the sorption of radionuclides within organic soil systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parekh, N.R.; Poskitt, J.M.; Dodd, B.A.; Potter, E.D.; Sanchez, A.

    2008-01-01

    The potential of soil microorganisms to enhance the retention of 137 Cs and 85 Sr in organic systems was assessed in a series of experiments. A biologically active, 'mineral-free', organic material, produced under laboratory conditions from leaves, was used as the uptake matrix in all experiments to minimise potential interference from competing clay minerals. Biological uptake and release were differentiated from abiotic processes by comparing the sorption of radionuclides in sterilised organic material with sterile material inoculated with soil extracts or single fungal strains. Our results show conclusively that living components of soil systems are of primary importance in the uptake of radionuclides in organic material. The presence of soil microorganisms significantly enhanced the retention of Cs in organic systems and ∼70% of the Cs spike was strongly (irreversibly) bound (remained non-extractable) in the presence of microorganisms compared to only ∼10% in abiotic systems. Sorption of 85 Sr was not significantly influenced by the presence of soil microorganisms. A non-linear temperature response was observed for the retention in biotic systems with increased uptake at between 10 and 30 deg. C and lower retention at temperatures above or below the optimum range. The optimum temperatures for biological uptake were between 15 and 20 deg. C for Cs, and 25 and 30 deg. C for Sr. Our results indicate that single strains of soil and saprotrophic fungi make an important contribution to the sorption of Cs and Sr in organic systems, but can only account for part of the strong, irreversible binding observed in biotic systems. Single strains of soil fungi increased the amount of non-extractable 137 Cs (by ∼30%) and 85 Sr (by ∼20%) in the organic systems as compared to abiotic systems, but the major fraction of 137 Cs and 85 Sr sorbed in systems inoculated with saprotrophic fungi remained extractable

  5. Green roof soil system affected by soil structural changes: A project initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínková, Vladimíra; Dohnal, Michal; Šácha, Jan; Šebestová, Jana; Sněhota, Michal

    2014-05-01

    Anthropogenic soil systems and structures such as green roofs, permeable or grassed pavements comprise appreciable part of the urban watersheds and are considered to be beneficial regarding to numerous aspects (e.g. carbon dioxide cycle, microclimate, reducing solar absorbance and storm water). Expected performance of these systems is significantly affected by water and heat regimes that are primarily defined by technology and materials used for system construction, local climate condition, amount of precipitation, the orientation and type of the vegetation cover. The benefits and potencies of anthropogenic soil systems could be considerably threatened in case when exposed to structural changes of thin top soil layer in time. Extensive green roof together with experimental green roof segment was established and advanced automated monitoring system of micrometeorological variables was set-up at the experimental site of University Centre for Energy Efficient Buildings as an interdisciplinary research facility of the Czech Technical University in Prague. The key objectives of the project are (i) to characterize hydraulic and thermal properties of soil substrate studied, (ii) to establish seasonal dynamics of water and heat in selected soil systems from continuous monitoring of relevant variables, (iii) to detect structural changes with the use of X-ray Computed Tomography, (iv) to identify with the help of numerical modeling and acquired datasets how water and heat dynamics in anthropogenic soil systems are affected by soil structural changes. Achievements of the objectives will advance understanding of the anthropogenic soil systems behavior in conurbations with the temperate climate.

  6. LiBr absorption systems integrated with high–efficiency IGSG plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud; Bellomare, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    vapor compression inverse cycles; waste heat from other systems can in fact be used as an efficient input instead of electrical energy. The opportunity to integrate Li-Br absorption systems with a high-efficiency energy plant was studied; rejected heat from a Municipal Solid Waste Gasification Plant......Over the last few years, the energy demand for cooling systems is increasing; different solutions in fact have been proposed in order to minimize the energetic and environmental impact of this trend. In this direction, absorption cooling systems are recognized as a valid alternative to traditional...

  7. Performance of Active Wave Absorption Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tue; Frigaard, Peter

    on a horisontal and vertical velocity are treated. All three systems are based on digital FIR-filters. For numerical comparison a performance function combining the frequency response of the set of filters for each system is derived enabling discussion on optimal filter design and system setup. Irregular wave......A comparison of wave gauge based on velocity meter based active absorption systems is presented discussing advantages and disadvantages of the systems. In detail one system based on two surface elevations, one system based on a surface elevation and a horisontal velocity and one system based...... tests with a highly reflective structure with the purely wave gauge based system and the wave gauge velocity meter based system are performed. The wave test depict the differences between the systems....

  8. Investigation of Pb species in soils, celery and duckweed by synchrotron radiation X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Liqiang; Shen, Yating; Liu, Jian; Zeng, Yuan

    2016-08-01

    The Pb species play a key role in its translocation in biogeochemical cycles. Soils, sediments and plants were collected from farmlands around Pb mines, and the Pb species in them was identified by X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectrometry. In soils, Pb5(PO4)3Cl and Pb3(PO4)2 were detected, and in sediments, Pb-fulvic acids (FAs) complex was identified. A Pb complex with FA fragments was also detected in celery samples. We found that (1) different Pb species were present in soils and sediments; (2) the Pb species in celery, which was grown in sediments, was different from the species present in duckweed, which grew in water; and (3) a Pb-FA-like compound was present in celery roots. The newly identified Pb species, the Pb-FA-like compound, may play a key role in Pb tolerance and translocation within plants.

  9. Endovascular vein harvest: systemic carbon dioxide absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Andrew M; Schwartz, Carl S; Bert, Arthur; Hurlburt, Peter; Gough, Jeffrey; Stearns, Gary; Singh, Arun K

    2006-06-01

    Endovascular vein harvest (EDVH) requires CO(2) insufflation to expand the subcutaneous space, allowing visualization and dissection of the saphenous vein. The purpose of this study was to assess the extent of CO(2) absorption during EDVH. Prospective observational study. Single tertiary care hospital. Sixty patients (30 EDVH and 30 open-vein harvest) undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Hemodynamic, procedural, and laboratory data were collected prior to (baseline), during, and at it the conclusion (final) of vein harvesting. Data were also collected during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Data were compared by using t tests, analysis of variance, and correlation statistics when needed. There were significant increases in arterial CO(2) (PaCO(2), 35%) and decreases in pH (1.35%) during EDVH. These were associated with increases in heart rate, mean blood pressure, and cardiac output. Within the EDVH group, greater elevations (>10 mmHg) in PaCO2 were more likely during difficult harvest procedures, and these patients exhibited greater increase in heart rate. Elevated CO(2) persisted during CPB, requiring higher systemic gas flows and greater use of phenylephrine to maintain desired hemodynamics. EDVH was associated with systemic absorption of CO(2). Greater absorption was more likely in difficult procedures and was associated with greater hemodynamic changes requiring medical therapy.

  10. Photoacoustic Experimental System to Confirm Infrared Absorption Due to Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Fumitoshi; Monjushiro, Hideaki; Nishiyama, Masayoshi; Kasai, Toshio; Harris, Harold H.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental system for detecting infrared absorption using the photoacoustic (PA) effect is described. It is aimed for use at high-school level to illustrate the difference in infrared (IR) absorption among the gases contained in the atmosphere in connection with the greenhouse effect. The experimental system can be built with readily…

  11. Model systems for understanding absorption tuning by opsin proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Brøndsted

    2009-01-01

    This tutorial review reports on model systems that have been synthesised and investigated for elucidating how opsin proteins tune the absorption of the protonated retinal Schiff base chromophore. In particular, the importance of the counteranion is highlighted. In addition, the review advocates...... is avoided, and it becomes clear that opsin proteins induce blueshifts in the chromophore absorption rather than redshifts....

  12. The distribution of absorptive power dissipation in irradiated nanoparticulate system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jiayu; Yang, Jian; Gu, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of local radiant absorption is important to the nanostructure optimization, it is beneficial to the applications in energy harvesting, optical heating, photocatalysis, etc. In this paper, FDTD model is constructed for the distribution of absorptive power dissipation in irradiated nanoparticulate system. The theoretical model extended from Mie theory is used to examine the FDTD model, the parameters and conditions set for FDTD simulation are confirmed based on the comparison. Then, the influence of Ag nanoparticle on the absorptive properties of nearby TiO_2 nanoparticle is investigated by FDTD simulation at the wavelength of 0.25 μm. It is indicated that suitable distance between TiO_2 and Ag particles is beneficial to the spectral radiant absorption of TiO_2 particle. Considering the agglomeration of nanoparticles and the oxidation at the TiO_2–Ag interface, the Ag core coated with Al_2O_3 shell is suggested, and the simulated results indicated that the shell thickness and the Ag core size need to be optimized for enhancing the radiant absorption of TiO_2 particle. - Highlights: • The absorptive power distribution in nanoparticulate system is simulated by FDTD. • FDTD simulation is compared with theoretical model extended from Mie theory. • The parameters and conditions are confirmed based on the comparison. • The influence of Ag nanoparticle on nearby TiO_2 particle's absorption is analyzed.

  13. Grey water treatment by the slanted soil system with unsorted soil media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushijima, Ken; Tanaka, Erina; Suzuki, Laís Yuko; Hijikata, Nowaki; Funamizu, Naoyuki; Ito, Ryusei

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the performance of unsorted soil media in the slanted soil treatment system, in terms of removal efficiency in suspended solids (SS), chemical oxygen demand (COD), linear alkylbenzene sulphonate (LAS) and Escherichia coli, and lifetime until clogging occurs. Unsorted soil performed longer lifetime until clogging than sorted fine soil. Removal of SS, COD, and LAS also performed same or better level in unsorted soil than fine soil. As reaction coefficients of COD and LAS were described as a function of the hydraulic loading rate, we can design a slanted soil system according to the expected hydraulic loading rate and the targeted level of COD or LAS in effluent. Regarding bacteria removal, unsorted soil performed sufficient reduction of E. coli for 5 weeks; however, the removal process occurred throughout all four chambers, while that of fine soil occurred in one to two chambers.

  14. Volume reduction system by soil classifying. Soil-washing system and problems to be solved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshino, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Radioactive contamination of ground surfaces, buildings and forests in a broad area was caused by the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan. The national government and municipalities have still been carrying out the decontamination works for livelihood areas after five years from the accident. The government estimated that the amounts of soils and wastes removed by the decontamination works would be about 28,000,000 cubic meters maximum including 20,000,000 cubic meters maximum of soils. The removed soils will be stored in “Interim Storage Facility” then will be finally disposed outside of Fukushima prefecture within 30 years. On the other hand, shortage of the soils as materials needed for the revitalization in Fukushima prefecture is expected. Technical Advisory Council on Remediation and Waste Management, which consists of about 90 companies, started a working group to investigate solutions to these problems. The working group focused on the investigation of the possibility to recycle the soils by washing and classification to use them as the materials for civil engineering works, and to reduce the volume of the interim storage. In the first part of this report, we have evaluated the applicability of various technologies for purification and volume reduction of the removed soils, and have researched usages, required quantities and specifications of the recycled soils. In the second part, we have made trial calculations of the volume reduction effects and costs using the washing and classification system. The calculated results showed the possibilities of reducing the storage capacity of the interim storage facility, as well as the construction and the operation costs by recycling the removed soils with the washing and classification system inside the interim storage facility. At the end of this report, we proposed problems to be solved in order to adopt the washing and classification system. (author)

  15. Validation of an analytical method based on the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast-sequential determination of several hazardous/priority hazardous metals in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frentiu, Tiberiu; Ponta, Michaela; Hategan, Raluca

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this paper was the validation of a new analytical method based on the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast-sequential determination of several hazardous/priority hazardous metals (Ag, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in soil after microwave assisted digestion in aqua regia. Determinations were performed on the ContrAA 300 (Analytik Jena) air-acetylene flame spectrometer equipped with xenon short-arc lamp as a continuum radiation source for all elements, double monochromator consisting of a prism pre-monocromator and an echelle grating monochromator, and charge coupled device as detector. For validation a method-performance study was conducted involving the establishment of the analytical performance of the new method (limits of detection and quantification, precision and accuracy). Moreover, the Bland and Altman statistical method was used in analyzing the agreement between the proposed assay and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry as standardized method for the multielemental determination in soil. The limits of detection in soil sample (3σ criterion) in the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry method were (mg/kg): 0.18 (Ag), 0.14 (Cd), 0.36 (Co), 0.25 (Cr), 0.09 (Cu), 1.0 (Ni), 1.4 (Pb) and 0.18 (Zn), close to those in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry: 0.12 (Ag), 0.05 (Cd), 0.15 (Co), 1.4 (Cr), 0.15 (Cu), 2.5 (Ni), 2.5 (Pb) and 0.04 (Zn). Accuracy was checked by analyzing 4 certified reference materials and a good agreement for 95% confidence interval was found in both methods, with recoveries in the range of 94-106% in atomic absorption and 97-103% in optical emission. Repeatability found by analyzing real soil samples was in the range 1.6-5.2% in atomic absorption, similar with that of 1.9-6.1% in optical emission spectrometry. The Bland and Altman method showed no statistical significant difference between the two spectrometric

  16. Optical absorption measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draggoo, V.G.; Morton, R.G.; Sawicki, R.H.; Bissinger, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature

  17. Soil, climate and the environment - an indissociable threesome. Soil carbon and global changes: reciprocal impacts; Carbon in all its forms; Echomicadas, a new tool to analyse carbon 14; Biotransformation of metallic trace elements by soil micro-organisms; Absorption and distribution of metallic elements in plants; Dynamics of metallic contaminants in agricultural systems; Is photo-remediation for tomorrow? Hyper-accumulator plants; Sediments, tell me the Seine history... The complex history of plant feeding by the soil; The environmental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatte, Christine; Tisnerat-Laborde, Nadine; Ayrault, Sophie; Balesdent, Jerome; Chapon, Virginie; Bourguignon, Jacques; Alban, Claude; Ravanel, Stephane; Denaix, Laurence; Nguyen, Christophe; Vavasseur, Alain; Sarrobert, Catherine; Gasperi, Johnny; Latrille, Christelle; Savoye, Sebastien; Augusto, Laurent; Conan Labbe, Annie; Bernard Michel, Bruno; Douysset, Guilhem; Toqnelli, Antoine; Vailhen, Dominique; Moulin, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The articles of this file on the relationships between soils, climate and the environment discuss the reciprocal impacts of soil carbon and global changes with the objective of reduction of greenhouse effect and of increase of carbon sequestration; the various forms of carbon are presented and their properties commented ; a compact radiocarbon system (ECHoMiCADAS) is presented, developed by the Laboratory of sciences of climate and environment (LSCE) and designed for the analysis of carbon 14; an article describes how micro-organisms can play a crucial role in the transformation of soil pollutants by modifying their chemical speciation and thus their toxicity; strategies based on the absorption of metallic trace elements present in the soil to control physiological processes in plants are discussed, with applications to agriculture, food supply and to the environment; researches related to the study of effects of metallic contaminants in agricultural systems are evoked, and the reasons for a slow development of phyto-technologies, notably phyto-remediation, for pollution control and decontamination of soils and liquid media, are explained. Other themes are presented : hyper-accumulator plants which present very high contents of non-essential (As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Se) or essential (Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni) elements, are slowly growing, and display a limited biomass, but could be used for a phyto-extraction of metals from contaminated soils; how analysis and dating of sediments can reveal the presence of contaminants, and therefore give an insight into human activities and regulations, and into their impact on the river; how plants are able to develop strategies in their search for nutrients in different types of soils, even poor ones, and presentation of the various disciplines, methods and techniques used for environmental analysis with their applications to installation and site control, or to the study of pollutant migration

  18. A systemic approach for modeling soil functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Hans-Jörg; Bartke, Stephan; Daedlow, Katrin; Helming, Katharina; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Lang, Birgit; Rabot, Eva; Russell, David; Stößel, Bastian; Weller, Ulrich; Wiesmeier, Martin; Wollschläger, Ute

    2018-03-01

    The central importance of soil for the functioning of terrestrial systems is increasingly recognized. Critically relevant for water quality, climate control, nutrient cycling and biodiversity, soil provides more functions than just the basis for agricultural production. Nowadays, soil is increasingly under pressure as a limited resource for the production of food, energy and raw materials. This has led to an increasing demand for concepts assessing soil functions so that they can be adequately considered in decision-making aimed at sustainable soil management. The various soil science disciplines have progressively developed highly sophisticated methods to explore the multitude of physical, chemical and biological processes in soil. It is not obvious, however, how the steadily improving insight into soil processes may contribute to the evaluation of soil functions. Here, we present to a new systemic modeling framework that allows for a consistent coupling between reductionist yet observable indicators for soil functions with detailed process understanding. It is based on the mechanistic relationships between soil functional attributes, each explained by a network of interacting processes as derived from scientific evidence. The non-linear character of these interactions produces stability and resilience of soil with respect to functional characteristics. We anticipate that this new conceptional framework will integrate the various soil science disciplines and help identify important future research questions at the interface between disciplines. It allows the overwhelming complexity of soil systems to be adequately coped with and paves the way for steadily improving our capability to assess soil functions based on scientific understanding.

  19. Developing the soil moisture sensor using optical fiber technique (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Mitsuru; Nishigaki, Makoto; Seno, Shoji; Toida, Masaru; Hirata, Yoichi; Takenobu, Kazuyoshi; Tagishi, Hirotaka; Nakano, Katsushi; Kunimaru, Takanori; Maekawa, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Yoichi

    2012-09-01

    This research focused on methods of estimating the amounts of groundwater recharge, which are normally required as upper boundary conditions in groundwater flow analyses, based on measurements of infiltrating water in the ground, to systematize the methods and establish systems which are stable and measurable on site over a long time. Regarding developing measurement systems, fiber-optic strain measurement methods that enable multiple-point and long-distance measurement were used for measuring three quantities: suction pressure, soil moisture and volumetric water content rate obtained by applying water absorption swelling material, and each measurement was discussed. The results showed that the fiber-optic soil aquameter has two types of practical application: one for measuring suction pressure (Type I), and the other for measuring volumetric water content rate obtained by applying water absorption swelling material (Type III). Furthermore, by using measurement instruments in actual fields, the validity of the two methods for estimating the rainfall infiltration capacities of shallow-layer soils, that is, estimating the capacities either directly by measurements of soil water or from unsaturated hydraulic conductivities, was confirmed. (author)

  20. Combining selective sequential extractions, X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy, and X-Ray Powder Diffraction for Cu (II speciation in soil and mineral phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Minkina

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of Cu (II ions with the matrix of soil and mineral phases of layered silicates was assessed by the Miller method of selective sequential fractionation and a set of synchrotron X-ray methods, including X-ray powder diffraction (XRD and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES. It was shown that the input of Cu into Calcic Chernozem in the form of monoxide (CuO and salt (Cu(NO32 affected the transformation of Cu compounds and their affinity for metal-bearing phases. It was found that the contamination of soil with a soluble Cu(II salt increased the bioavailability of the metal and the role of organic matter and Fe oxides in the fixation and retention of Cu. During the incubation of soil with Cu monoxide, the content of the metal in the residual fractions increased, which was related to the possible entry of Cu in the form of isomorphic impurities into silicates, as well as to the incomplete dissolution of exogenic compounds at the high level of their input into the soil. A mechanism for the structural transformation of minerals was revealed, which showed that ion exchange processes result in the sorption of Cu (II ions from the saturated solution by active sites on the internal surface of the lattice of dioctahedral aluminosilicates. Surface hydroxyls at the octahedral aluminum atom play the main role. X-ray diagnostics revealed that excess Cu(II ions are removed from the system due to the formation and precipitation of coarsely crystalline Cu(NO3(OH3.

  1. Plant absorption of trace elements in sludge amended soils and correlation with soil chemical speciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torri, Silvana, E-mail: torri@agro.uba.ar [Catedra de Fertilidad y Fertilizantes, Facultad de Agronomia, UBA, Avda San Martin 4453, Buenos Aires (C1417 DSE) (Argentina); Lavado, Raul [Catedra de Fertilidad y Fertilizantes, Facultad de Agronomia, UBA, Avda San Martin 4453, Buenos Aires (C1417 DSE) (Argentina)

    2009-07-30

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between Lolium perenne L. uptake of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in sludge amended soils and soil availability of these elements assessed by soil sequential extraction. A greenhouse experiment was set with three representative soils of the Pampas Region, Argentina, amended with sewage sludge and sewage sludge enriched with its own incinerated ash. After the stabilization period of 60 days, half of the pots were sampled for soil analysis; the rest of the pots were sown with L. perenne and harvested 8, 12, 16 and 20 weeks after sowing, by cutting just above the soil surface. Cadmium and Pb concentrations in aerial tissues of L. perenne were below detection limits, in good agreement with the soil fractionation study. Copper and Zn concentration in the first harvest were significantly higher in the coarse textured soil compared to the fine textured soil, in contrast with soil chemical speciation. In the third harvest, there was a positive correlation between Cu and Zn concentration in aerial biomass and soil fractions usually considered of low availability. We conclude that the most available fractions obtained by soil sequential extraction did not provide the best indicator of Cu and Zn availability to L. perenne.

  2. Plant absorption of trace elements in sludge amended soils and correlation with soil chemical speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torri, Silvana; Lavado, Raul

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between Lolium perenne L. uptake of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in sludge amended soils and soil availability of these elements assessed by soil sequential extraction. A greenhouse experiment was set with three representative soils of the Pampas Region, Argentina, amended with sewage sludge and sewage sludge enriched with its own incinerated ash. After the stabilization period of 60 days, half of the pots were sampled for soil analysis; the rest of the pots were sown with L. perenne and harvested 8, 12, 16 and 20 weeks after sowing, by cutting just above the soil surface. Cadmium and Pb concentrations in aerial tissues of L. perenne were below detection limits, in good agreement with the soil fractionation study. Copper and Zn concentration in the first harvest were significantly higher in the coarse textured soil compared to the fine textured soil, in contrast with soil chemical speciation. In the third harvest, there was a positive correlation between Cu and Zn concentration in aerial biomass and soil fractions usually considered of low availability. We conclude that the most available fractions obtained by soil sequential extraction did not provide the best indicator of Cu and Zn availability to L. perenne.

  3. Effect of organic and inorganic fertilizer applied together on N and P absorption and soil fertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Kuibo; Yu Meiyan; Shen Xiuzhen; Wang Tongyan; Chen Xueliu; Wang Zhifen

    1994-01-01

    15 N trace experiments show that organic and inorganic fertilizer applied together promotes organic N mineralization and absorption. Base fertilizer is mainly for nutrition organs and spring fertilizer for reproduction organs. Organic and inorganic fertilizer applied together obtained the highest production efficiency of total N. Total P amount in wheat plant is slightly higher than that of inorganic N applied only, but P distribution in nutrition organs was slightly lower than that of inorganic N applied only. Organic and inorganic fertilizer applied together, not only promoted the production but also increased fertility of soil, so it is an important measure for wheat to obtain high production continuously

  4. Determination of silver in soils, sediments, and rocks by organic-chelate extraction and atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, T.T.; Ball, J.W.; Nakagawa, H.M.

    1971-01-01

    A useful method for the determination of silver in soil, sediment, and rock samples in geochemical exploration has been developed. The sample is digested with concentrated nitric acid, and the silver extracted with triisooctyl thiophosphate (TOTP) in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) after dilution of the acid digest to approximately 6 M. The extraction of silver into the organic extractant is quantitative and not affected by the nitric acid concentration from 4 M to 8 M, or by different volumes of TOTP-MIBK. The extracted silver is stable and remains in the organic phase up to several days. The silver concentration is determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. ?? 1971.

  5. Soil Temperature and Moisture Profile (STAMP) System Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, David R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The soil temperature and moisture profile system (STAMP) provides vertical profiles of soil temperature, soil water content (soil-type specific and loam type), plant water availability, soil conductivity, and real dielectric permittivity as a function of depth below the ground surface at half-hourly intervals, and precipitation at one-minute intervals. The profiles are measured directly by in situ probes at all extended facilities of the SGP climate research site. The profiles are derived from measurements of soil energy conductivity. Atmospheric scientists use the data in climate models to determine boundary conditions and to estimate the surface energy flux. The data are also useful to hydrologists, soil scientists, and agricultural scientists for determining the state of the soil. The STAMP system replaced the SWATS system in early 2016.

  6. The effect of age on systemic absorption and systemic disposition of bupivacaine after subarachnoid administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veering, B.T.; Burm, A.G.; Vletter, A.A.; van den Hoeven, R.A.; Spierdijk, J. (Leiden Univ. Hospital (Netherlands))

    1991-02-01

    In order to evaluate the role of the pharmacokinetics of the age-related changes in the clinical profile of spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine, we studied the influence of age on the systemic absorption and systemic disposition of bupivacaine after subarachnoid administration in 20 male patients (22-81 yr), ASA Physical Status 1 or 2, by a stable isotope method. After subarachnoid administration of 3 ml 0.5% bupivacaine in 8% glucose, a deuterium-labeled analog (13.4 mg) was administered intravenously. Blood samples were collected for 24 h. Plasma concentrations of unlabeled and deuterium-labeled bupivacaine were determined with a combination of gas chromatography and mass fragmentography. Biexponential functions were fitted to the plasma concentration-time data of the deuterium-labeled bupivacaine. The systemic absorption was evaluated by means of deconvolution. Mono- and biexponential functions were fitted to the data of fraction absorbed versus time. The maximal height of analgesia and the duration of analgesia at T12 increased with age (r = 0.715, P less than 0.001; r = 0.640, P less than 0.01, respectively). In 18 patients the systemic absorption of bupivacaine was best described by a biexponential equation. The half-life of the slow systemic absorption process (r = -0.478; P less than 0.05) and the mean absorption time (r = -0.551; P less than 0.02) decreased with age. The total plasma clearance decreased with age (r = -0.650, P less than 0.002), whereas the mean residence time and terminal half-life increased with age (r = 0.597, P less than 0.01; r = 0.503, P less than 0.05).

  7. The effect of age on systemic absorption and systemic disposition of bupivacaine after subarachnoid administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veering, B.T.; Burm, A.G.; Vletter, A.A.; van den Hoeven, R.A.; Spierdijk, J.

    1991-01-01

    In order to evaluate the role of the pharmacokinetics of the age-related changes in the clinical profile of spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine, we studied the influence of age on the systemic absorption and systemic disposition of bupivacaine after subarachnoid administration in 20 male patients (22-81 yr), ASA Physical Status 1 or 2, by a stable isotope method. After subarachnoid administration of 3 ml 0.5% bupivacaine in 8% glucose, a deuterium-labeled analog (13.4 mg) was administered intravenously. Blood samples were collected for 24 h. Plasma concentrations of unlabeled and deuterium-labeled bupivacaine were determined with a combination of gas chromatography and mass fragmentography. Biexponential functions were fitted to the plasma concentration-time data of the deuterium-labeled bupivacaine. The systemic absorption was evaluated by means of deconvolution. Mono- and biexponential functions were fitted to the data of fraction absorbed versus time. The maximal height of analgesia and the duration of analgesia at T12 increased with age (r = 0.715, P less than 0.001; r = 0.640, P less than 0.01, respectively). In 18 patients the systemic absorption of bupivacaine was best described by a biexponential equation. The half-life of the slow systemic absorption process (r = -0.478; P less than 0.05) and the mean absorption time (r = -0.551; P less than 0.02) decreased with age. The total plasma clearance decreased with age (r = -0.650, P less than 0.002), whereas the mean residence time and terminal half-life increased with age (r = 0.597, P less than 0.01; r = 0.503, P less than 0.05)

  8. Soil chemical atributtes on brachiaria spp in integrated crop livestock system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdinei Tadeu Paulino

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Integrated crop-livestock systems have attracted more interest in the last few years due to their capacity of improving stability and sustainability of agricultural systems when compared to more specialized production ones. The crop-livestock integration is an effective technique, but complex to maintain pasture productivity and its recovery, whose efficiency depends on soil physical management and its chemical fertility. Regarding the soil fertility, the corrective practices generally begin with the liming due to the high acidity of most Brazilian soils and low levels of Ca and Mg in the exchange complex and high Al saturation. In areas of crop-livestock systems, liming corrects the surface acidity potential. However, this practice can leave the subsoil with excess aluminum and lack of calcium, which inhibit root growth and affect the absorption of water and nutrients. The application of gypsum allows the improvement of the subsoil, reducing Al saturation and increasing levels of calcium and sulfur. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the soil chemical properties of a Haplorthox soil in integrated crop-livestock system (ICL with Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu and Piatã, Brachiaria ruziziensis with gypsum and liming application. This study was conducted at the Instituto de Zootecnia, Nova Odessa/SP, a pasture established on a soil with medium texture (61.4% sand, silt 14.6% and 24.0% clay. The treatment plots consisted on integration crop-livestock (ICL cultivated - maize and B. Marandu,  ICL - maize and B. ruziziensis, ICL - maize and B. Piatã and an untreated control group (control - without liming and fertilization grazed pasture throughout the year, located immediately adjacent to the ICL evaluation, which was cultivated for 25 years with B. brizantha cv. Marandu. All pastures were desiccated in October with glyphosate-based herbicide (4 liters per hectare. Then gypsum (1.2 Mg ha-1 and liming (1.2 Mg ha-1 were applied

  9. From Process Understanding Via Soil Functions to Sustainable Soil Management - A Systemic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollschlaeger, U.; Bartke, S.; Bartkowski, B.; Daedlow, K.; Helming, K.; Kogel-Knabner, I.; Lang, B.; Rabot, E.; Russell, D.; Stößel, B.; Weller, U.; Wiesmeier, M.; Rabot, E.; Vogel, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    Fertile soils are central resources for the production of biomass and the provision of food and energy. A growing world population and latest climate targets lead to an increasing demand for both, food and bio-energy, which requires preserving and improving the long-term productivity of soils as a bio-economic resource. At the same time, other soil functions and ecosystem services need to be maintained: filter for clean water, carbon sequestration, provision and recycling of nutrients, and habitat for biological activity. All these soil functions result from the interaction of a multitude of physical, chemical and biological processes that are not yet sufficiently understood. In addition, we lack understanding about the interplay between the socio-economic system and the soil system and how soil functions benefit human wellbeing. Hence, a solid and integrated assessment of soil quality requires the consideration of the ensemble of soil functions and its relation to soil management to finally be able to develop site-specific options for sustainable soil management. We present an integrated modeling approach that investigates the influence of soil management on the ensemble of soil functions. It is based on the mechanistic relationships between soil functional attributes, each explained by a network of interacting processes as derived from scientific evidence. As the evidence base required for feeding the model is for the most part stored in the existing scientific literature, another central component of our work is to set up a public "knowledge-portal" providing the infrastructure for a community effort towards a comprehensive knowledge base on soil processes as a basis for model developments. The connection to the socio-economic system is established using the Drivers-Pressures-Impacts-States-Responses (DPSIR) framework where our improved understanding about soil ecosystem processes is linked to ecosystem services and resource efficiency via the soil functions.

  10. [Investigation and analysis of heavy metal pollution related to soil-Panax notoginseng system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Mi, Yan-Hua; Lin, Xin; Liu, Da-Hui; Zeng, Min; Chen, Xiao-Yan

    2014-07-01

    In this study, five heavy metals contamination of soil and different parts of Panax notoginseng in the plantation area was investigated. Analysis of heavy metals correlation between the planting soil and P. notoginseng; and the absorption and accumulation characteristics and translocation of soil heavy metals by P. notoginseng plants was revealed. Through field investigation and laboratory analytical methods, analysis of China's 30 different soil P. notoginseng origin and content of heavy metals in five different parts of the P. notoginseng plant content of heavy metals. The results revealed that the soil heavy metals should not be neglected in the plantation area Referring to the national soil quality standards (GB15608-1995), the excessive degree of soil heavy metals pollution showed Hg > As > Cd > Cr in the plantation area, and Pb content of soil was in the scope of the standard. Refer to 'Green Industry Standards for Import and Export of Medical Plants and Preparations', the excessive degree of heavy metals content of P. notoginseng plants showed As > Pb > Cr > Cd, and Hg content of plants was in the scope of the standard. Concentrations of five heavy metals of underground parts of P. notoginseng plants are higher than aboveground, and heavy metals elements are more concentrated in the root, followed by the rhizome of P. notoginseng plants. Heavy metal accumulation characteristics of the different parts of the P. notoginseng of the overall performance is the root > the rhizome > the root tuber > leaves > stems. From the point of view BCF value analysis of various parts of the P. notoginseng plants to absorb heavy metals in soil, BCF values of all samples were less than 1, description P. notoginseng not belong Hyperaccumulator. From the view of transportation and related analysis of the soil-P. notoginseng systems, the rhizome of P. notoginseng and the content of As and Cr in soil was significantly correlated, the root of P. notoginseng and the content of Cd in

  11. Soil compaction and growth of woody plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, T.T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States). Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy and Management

    1999-07-01

    Although soil compaction in the field may benefit or inhibit the growth of plants, the harmful effects are much more common. This paper emphasizes the deleterious effects of predominantly high levels of soil compaction on plant growth and yield. High levels of soil compaction are common in heavily used recreation areas, construction sites, urban areas, timber harvesting sites, fruit orchards, agroforestry systems and tree nurseries. Compaction can occur naturally by settling or slumping of soil or may be induced by tillage tools, heavy machinery, pedestrian traffic, trampling by animals and fire. Compaction typically alters soil structure and hydrology by increasing soil bulk density; breaking down soil aggregates; decreasing soil porosity, aeration and infiltration capacity; and by increasing soil strength, water runoff and soil erosion. Appreciable compaction of soil leads to physiological dysfunctions in plants. Often, but not always, reduced water absorption and leaf water deficits develop. Soil compaction also induces changes in the amounts and balances of growth hormones in plants, especially increases in abscisic acid and ethylene. Absorption of the major mineral nutrients is reduced by compaction of both surface soils and subsoils. The rate of photosynthesis of plants growing in very compacted soil is decreased by both stomatal and non-stomatal inhibition. Total photosynthesis is reduced as a result of smaller leaf areas. As soils become increasingly compacted respiration of roots shifts toward an anaerobic state. Severe soil compaction adversely influences regeneration of forest stands by inhibiting seed germination and growth of seedlings, and by inducing seedling mortality. Growth of woody plants beyond the seedling stage and yields of harvestable plant products also are greatly decreased by soil compaction because of the combined effects of high soil strength, decreased infiltration of water and poor soil aeration, all of which lead to a decreased

  12. Soil compaction and growth of woody plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlowski, T.T.

    1999-01-01

    Although soil compaction in the field may benefit or inhibit the growth of plants, the harmful effects are much more common. This paper emphasizes the deleterious effects of predominantly high levels of soil compaction on plant growth and yield. High levels of soil compaction are common in heavily used recreation areas, construction sites, urban areas, timber harvesting sites, fruit orchards, agroforestry systems and tree nurseries. Compaction can occur naturally by settling or slumping of soil or may be induced by tillage tools, heavy machinery, pedestrian traffic, trampling by animals and fire. Compaction typically alters soil structure and hydrology by increasing soil bulk density; breaking down soil aggregates; decreasing soil porosity, aeration and infiltration capacity; and by increasing soil strength, water runoff and soil erosion. Appreciable compaction of soil leads to physiological dysfunctions in plants. Often, but not always, reduced water absorption and leaf water deficits develop. Soil compaction also induces changes in the amounts and balances of growth hormones in plants, especially increases in abscisic acid and ethylene. Absorption of the major mineral nutrients is reduced by compaction of both surface soils and subsoils. The rate of photosynthesis of plants growing in very compacted soil is decreased by both stomatal and non-stomatal inhibition. Total photosynthesis is reduced as a result of smaller leaf areas. As soils become increasingly compacted respiration of roots shifts toward an anaerobic state. Severe soil compaction adversely influences regeneration of forest stands by inhibiting seed germination and growth of seedlings, and by inducing seedling mortality. Growth of woody plants beyond the seedling stage and yields of harvestable plant products also are greatly decreased by soil compaction because of the combined effects of high soil strength, decreased infiltration of water and poor soil aeration, all of which lead to a decreased

  13. New thermodynamical systems. Alternative of compression-absorption; Nouveaux systemes thermodynamiques. Alternative de la compression-absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feidt, M.; Brunin, O.; Lottin, O.; Vidal, J.F. [Universite Henri Poincare Nancy, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Hivet, B. [Electricite de France, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes a 5 years joint research work carried out by Electricite de France (EdF) and the ESPE group of the LEMTA on compression-absorption heat pumps. It shows how a thermodynamical model of machinery, completed with precise exchanger-reactor models, allows to simulate and dimension (and eventually optimize) the system. A small power prototype has been tested and the first results are analyzed with the help of the models. A real scale experiment in industrial sites is expected in the future. (J.S.) 20 refs.

  14. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi enhance both absorption and stabilization of Cd by Alfred stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance) and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) in a Cd-contaminated acidic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Junli; Wu, Shengchun; Wu, Fuyong; Leung, Ho Man; Lin, Xiangui; Wong, Ming Hung

    2013-10-01

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to compare the phytoextraction efficiencies of Cd by hyper-accumulating Alfred stonecrop (Sedum alfredii Hance) and fast-growing perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) from a Cd-contaminated (1.6 mg kg(-1)) acidic soil, and their responses to the inoculations of two arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal strains, Glomus caledonium 90036 (Gc) and Glomus mosseae M47V (Gm). Ryegrass and stonecrop were harvested after growing for 9 and 27 wk, respectively. Without AM fungal inoculation, the weekly Cd extraction by stonecrop (8.0 μg pot(-1)) was 4.3 times higher than that by ryegrass (1.5 μg pot(-1)). Both Gc and Gm significantly increased (P soil acid phosphatase activities, and available P concentrations, and thereby plant P absorptions (except for Gm-inoculated ryegrass), shoot biomasses, and Cd absorptions (except for Gm-inoculated stonecrop), while only Gc-inoculated stonecrop significantly accelerated (P soil pH. The results suggested the potential application of hyper-accumulating Alfred stonecrop associated with AM fungi (notably Gc) for both extraction and stabilization of Cd in the in situ treatment of Cd-contaminated acidic soil. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Health risk assessment of heavy metals in soil-plant system amended with biogas slurry in Taihu basin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Bo; Lin, Cheng; Lv, Lin

    2016-09-01

    Biogas slurry is a product of anaerobic digestion of manure that has been widely used as a soil fertilizer. Although the use for soil fertilizer is a cost-effective solution, it has been found that repeated use of biogas slurry that contains high heavy metal contents can cause pollution to the soil-plant system and risk to human health. The objective of this study was to investigate effects of biogas slurry on the soil-plant system and the human health. We analyzed the heavy metal concentrations (including As, Pb, Cu, Zn, Cr and Cd) in 106 soil samples and 58 plant samples in a farmland amended with biogas slurry in Taihu basin, China. Based on the test results, we assessed the potential human health risk when biogas slurry containing heavy metals was used as a soil fertilizer. The test results indicated that the Cd and Pb concentrations in soils exceeded the contamination limits and Cd exhibited the highest soil-to-root migration potential. Among the 11 plants analyzed, Kalimeris indica had the highest heavy metal absorption capacity. The leafy vegetables showed higher uptake of heavy metals than non-leafy vegetables. The non-carcinogenic risks mainly resulted from As, Pb, Cd, Cu and Zn through plant ingestion exposure. The integrated carcinogenic risks were associated with Cr, As and Cd in which Cr showed the highest risk while Cd showed the lowest risk. Among all the heavy metals analyzed, As and Cd appeared to have a lifetime health threat, which thus should be attenuated during production of biogas slurry to mitigate the heavy metal contamination.

  16. Thermodynamic performance optimization of the absorption-generation process in an absorption refrigeration cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yi; Han, Wei; Jin, Hongguang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper proposes a new thermal compressor model with boost pressure ratio. • The proposed model is an effective way to optimize the absorption-generation process. • Boost pressure ratio is a key parameter in the proposed thermal compressor model. • The optimum boost pressure ratios for two typical refrigeration systems are obtained. - Abstract: The absorption refrigeration cycle is a basic cycle that establishes the systems for utilizing mid-low temperature heat sources. A new thermal compressor model with a key parameter of boost pressure ratio is proposed to optimize the absorption-generation process. The ultimate generation pressure and boost pressure ratio are used to represent the potential and operating conditions of the thermal compressor, respectively. Using the proposed thermal compressor model, the operation mechanism and requirements of the absorption refrigeration system and absorption-compression refrigeration system are elucidated. Furthermore, the two typical heat conversion systems are optimized based on the thermal compressor model. The optimum boost pressure ratios of the absorption refrigeration system and the absorption-compression refrigeration system are 0.5 and 0.75, respectively. For the absorption refrigeration system, the optimum generation temperature is 125.31 °C at the cooling water temperature of 30 °C, which is obtained by simple thermodynamic calculation. The optimized thermodynamic performance of the absorption-compression refrigeration system is 16.7% higher than that of the conventional absorption refrigeration system when the generation temperature is 100 °C. The thermal compressor model proposed in this paper is an effective method for simplifying the optimization of the thermodynamic systems involving an absorption-generation process.

  17. Soil Microbial Activity in Conventional and Organic Agricultural Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero F.V. Carneiro

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate microbial activity in soils under conventional and organic agricultural system management regimes. Soil samples were collected from plots under conventional management (CNV, organic management (ORG and native vegetation (AVN. Soil microbial activity and biomass was significantly greater in ORG compared with CNV. Soil bulk density decreased three years after adoption of organic system. Soil organic carbon (SOC was higher in the ORG than in the CNV. The soil under organic agricultural system presents higher microbial activity and biomass and lower bulk density than the conventional agricultural system.

  18. Absorption, distribution, and fate of neptunium in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cataldo, D.A.; Garland, T.R.; Wildung, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    Soil-plant concentration ratios (CR) for neptunium (Np) in bushbean, measured over the range of 5.2 /times/ 10/sup /minus/7/ to 4.1 mg of Np/g of soil, are approximately 2 at soil concentrations below 4 /times/ 10/sup /minus/4/ mg/g and increase to 12 at higher soil levels. The CR values determined for soybean, bushbean, barley, and alfalfa range from 0.5 to 4 at a soil concentration of 2.6 /times/ 10/sup /minus/6/ mg/g. Root absorption by soybean seedlings of Np from solutions containing 7 /times/ 10/sup /minus/7/ to 473 mg of Np(V)/mL is generally proportional to concentration but exhibits some saturation in root absorption at higher concentrations. Seed concentrations in bushbean and wheat are a factor of 10 lower than vegetative tissues. Neptunium is transported within the plant in organic complexes containing one or more organic acid residues. Fractionation of plant tissues indicates that Np is substantially more soluble than plutonium, especially in seeds, with approximately 50% of the soluble Np in roots and leaves associated with plant ligands of less than 5000 molecular weight

  19. Application of Terahertz Radiation to Soil Measurements: Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworak, Volker; Augustin, Sven; Gebbers, Robin

    2011-01-01

    Developing soil sensors with the possibility of continuous online measurement is a major challenge in soil science. Terahertz (THz) electromagnetic radiation may provide the opportunity for the measurement of organic material density, water content and other soil parameters at different soil depths. Penetration depth and information content is important for a functional soil sensor. Therefore, we present initial research on the analysis of absorption coefficients of four different soil samples by means of THz transmission measurements. An optimized soil sample holder to determine absorption coefficients was used. This setup improves data acquisition because interface reflections can be neglected. Frequencies of 340 GHz to 360 GHz and 1.627 THz to 2.523 THz provided information about an existing frequency dependency. The results demonstrate the potential of this THz approach for both soil analysis and imaging of buried objects. Therefore, the THz approach allows different soil samples to be distinguished according to their different absorption properties so that relations among soil parameters may be established in future. PMID:22163737

  20. Increasing efficacy and reducing systemic absorption of brimonidine tartrate ophthalmic gels in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaochen; Li, Jiawei; Pi, Jiaxin; Qi, Dongli; Guo, Pan; Li, Nan; Wu, Yumei; Liu, Zhidong

    2018-03-01

    Systemic absorption of ocularly administered Brimonidine Tartrate has been reported to give rise to several side-effects. Hence, it has become crucial to develop a delivery system that could increase efficacy and reduce systemic absorption. Therefore, the present work aims to develop Brimonidine Tartrate gels with different concentrations (0.05%, 0.1%, and 0.2% w/v, respectively) using Carbopol 974 P and HPMC E4M, and compare the therapeutic efficacy and systemic absorption with that of eye drop (0.2%, w/v) by UPLC-MS/MS. The result of histological analysis did not show any morphological or structural changes after the administration of formulations. In vitro residence time studies demonstrated that the gels exhibited a better precorneal residence time as compared with the eye drop. The gels with lower concentrations of the drug (0.05% and 0.1%, w/v) could significantly decrease intraocular pressure (IOP) in both normal and water-loaded rabbits as compared to the eye drop. Finally, the values of the ratio of AUC (0→∞) in comparison to eye drop showed the gels with lower concentrations of Brimonidine Tartrate could decrease the systemic absorption. From the result, it can be concluded the 0.1% ophthalmic gel has a potential to improve therapeutic efficacy and reduce the potential toxicity caused by systemic absorption.

  1. Foliar Absorption, Translocation and Utilization of Zn-65 by Mango Seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, F.A.; Sharaf, A.N.M.; Awad, S.M.; Abu EL Azm, S.K.

    2001-01-01

    Greenhouse experiment was designed using ZnSO 4 at rates of 0.125,0.25 and 0.50%. Solutions were adjusted to ph 6.0 and Tween-20 was added as a surfactant. The prepared solutions were labelled with carrier-free Zn-65. Six-month old mango seedlings were arranged in a complete block design to study the foliar absorption,translocation and percentage use of Zn-65 as influenced by soil application of phosphorus. The total absorption of Zn-65 by mango leaves was affected by spraying treatment of Zn-65 and soil application of phosphorus. In this respect increasing the rates of labelled Zn solution resulted in a great increment in the total absorption of in total absorption of Zn-65 by mango leaves was observed due to increasing P rates as a soil application from 0.0 up to 100 ppm. Translocation of the absorbed Zn-65 either in upward or downward direction was positively related to the absorbed amount. The percentage use of Zn-65 by mango leaves was reduced by increasing foliar Zn rates. On the contrary, it was slightly increased as a result of increasing soil application rate of P. Generally, the percentage use of Zn-65 mango leaves was ranged between 8.7 and 16.87 under the conditions of this experiment. Therefore, foliar application of ZnSO 4 could be recommended as a good source of Zn for mango nutrition in particular with addition of high rates of phosphorus as a soil application

  2. Leaching of heavy metals from contaminated soils using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES) and atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Z.; Islam, M.

    2010-01-01

    The clean-up of soils contaminated with heavy metals is one of the most difficult tasks for environmental engineering. Heavy metals are highly persistent in soil and a number of techniques have been developed that aim to remove heavy metals from contaminated soil. A method has been adopted to evaluate dynamic leaching of metal contaminants from industrial soil samples obtained from textile industrial sites in Lahore, Pakistan. In the extraction procedures employed five different leaching liquors were used: 0.01 M CaCl/sub 2/, 1 M HNO/sub 3/, a 1:1 mixture of 0.1M HCl and 0.1M NaCl, 0.01 M EDTA and pH controlled 0.5 M acetic acid. The qualitative and quantitative analyses were carried out by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometer (ICP-OES). The results indicate that Cu, Zn, Cd, Ni, Pb, Fe and As were extracted in the soil samples in varying concentration when using the different leach liquors. The predominant metals which were leached were As 78.7 ng/ml in 0.01 M EDTA; Zn 1.81 mu g/ml and Fe 898.96 macro g/ml in HNO/sub 3/. (author)

  3. Phosphorus absorption in drip irrigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guennelon, R.; Habib, R.

    1979-01-01

    Introducing the use of solute phosphate with drip irrigation may be an unsatisfying practice on account of the very weak mobility of PO 4 anion. Nevertheless P can move down to 30-40 cm depth by following the saturated flux along earth-worms holes or crakes, or by displacement in very narrow structural porosity, even in heavy soils. In this case roots cannot easily absorb PO 4 from soil solution, as soon as the soil is quite saturated. On the other hand, it seems that P absorption occurs very quickly and easily when the implantation of 32 P tagged solution is carried out at the border of zone which is concerned by the irrigation effects [fr

  4. Reflecting on the structure of soil classification systems: insights from a proposal for integrating subsoil data into soil information systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondeyne, Stefaan; Juilleret, Jérôme; Vancampenhout, Karen; Deckers, Jozef; Hissler, Christophe

    2017-04-01

    Classification of soils in both World Reference Base for soil resources (WRB) and Soil Taxonomy hinges on the identification of diagnostic horizons and characteristics. However as these features often occur within the first 100 cm, these classification systems convey little information on subsoil characteristics. An integrated knowledge of the soil, soil-to-substratum and deeper substratum continuum is required when dealing with environmental issues such as vegetation ecology, water quality or the Critical Zone in general. Therefore, we recently proposed a classification system of the subsolum complementing current soil classification systems. By reflecting on the structure of the subsoil classification system which is inspired by WRB, we aim at fostering a discussion on some potential future developments of WRB. For classifying the subsolum we define Regolite, Saprolite, Saprock and Bedrock as four Subsolum Reference Groups each corresponding to different weathering stages of the subsoil. Principal qualifiers can be used to categorize intergrades of these Subsoil Reference Groups while morphologic and lithologic characteristics can be presented with supplementary qualifiers. We argue that adopting a low hierarchical structure - akin to WRB and in contrast to a strong hierarchical structure as in Soil Taxonomy - offers the advantage of having an open classification system avoiding the need for a priori knowledge of all possible combinations which may be encountered in the field. Just as in WRB we also propose to use principal and supplementary qualifiers as a second level of classification. However, in contrast to WRB we propose to reserve the principal qualifiers for intergrades and to regroup the supplementary qualifiers into thematic categories (morphologic or lithologic). Structuring the qualifiers in this manner should facilitate the integration and handling of both soil and subsoil classification units into soil information systems and calls for paying

  5. Thermionic detection of the ionic fragments of continiuum-state pair absorption systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotop, R.; Niemax, K.; Richter, J.; Weber, K.H.

    1981-01-01

    Using a thermionic diode we have detected the ionic fragments formed by associative ionization and dissociation after continuum-state pair absorption processes in Cs-Cs and Cs-K systems. Assuming an ionization probability of unity of the excited species and calibrating the pair absorption bands by taking into account the known photoionization cross section of the atoms we found excellent agreement with data from classical absorption measurements. (orig.)

  6. Behaviour of transuranic radionuclides in soils, plants and soil-plant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyas, B.N.; Mistry, K.B.

    1996-01-01

    The present paper reviews the investigations undertaken to elucidate the physicochemical, edaphic and physiological aspects of the behaviour of long-lived transuranic radionuclides 239 Pu and 241 Am in typical Indian soils and soil-plant systems. 23 refs

  7. Ab-sorption machines for heating and cooling in future energy systems - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tozer, R.; Gustafsson, M.

    2000-12-15

    After the Executive Summary and a brief introductory chapter, Chapter 2, Sorption Technologies for Heating and Cooling in Future Energy Systems, reviews the main types of sorption systems. Chapter 3, Market Segmentation, then considers the major segments of the market including residential, commercial/institutional and industrial, and the types of sorption hardware most suitable to each. The highly important residential and commercial/institutional markets are mostly concerned with air-conditioning of buildings. More applications are identified and discussed for the industrial market, including refrigeration, food-storage cooling, process cooling, and process heating at various temperature ranges from hot water for hand-washing to high-temperature (greater than 130C). Other interesting industrial applications are absorption cooling or heating combined with co-generation, desiccant cooling, gas turbine inlet air cooling, combining absorption chillers with district heating systems, direct-fired absorption heat pumps (AHPs), and a closed greenhouse concept being developed for that economically important sector in the Netherlands. Most of the sorption market at this time comprises direct-fired absorption chillers, or hot water or steam absorption chillers indirectly driven by direct-fired boilers. Throughout the report, this category of absorption chillers is referred to generically as 'direct-fired'. In addition, this report covers absorption (reversible) heat pumps, absorption heat transformers, compression-absorption heat pumps, and adsorption chillers and heat pumps. Adsorption systems together with desiccant systems are also addressed. Chapter 4, Factors Affecting the Market, considers economic, environmental and policy issues. The geographical make-up of the world sorption market is then reviewed, followed by a number of practical operating and control considerations. These include vacuum requirements, crystallisation, corrosion, maintenance, health and

  8. Heavy Metal Contaminated Soil Imitation Biological Treatment Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chang; Chen, Jun; Wu, Ke; Zhou, Zhongkai; Cheng, Tingting

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the treatment methods of heavy metal pollution in soils were analyzed, the existence and transformation of heavy metals in soil were explored, and the mechanism of heavy metal absorption by plants was studied. It was concluded that the main form of plants absorb heavy metals in the soil is exchangeable. The main mechanism was that the plant cell wall can form complex with heavy metals, so that heavy metals fixed on the cell wall, and through the selective absorption of plasma membrane into the plant body. In addition, the adsorption mechanism of the adsorbed material was analyzed. According to the results of some researchers, it was found that the mechanism of adsorption of heavy metals was similar to that of plants. According to this, using adsorbent material as the main material, Imitate the principle of plant absorption of heavy metals in the soil to removing heavy metals in the soil at one-time and can be separated from the soil after adsorption to achieve permanent removal of heavy metals in the soil was feasibility.

  9. Designing the lithium bromide air conditioning absorption system for a bus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusoff Ali; Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Hariadi

    2006-01-01

    A system of air-conditioning using Lithium Bromide absorption system is used as an alternative refrigerant that will not pollute the atmosphere. Lithium Bromide is a chemical salt soluble in water. There is a big difference between vapour compression system and LiBr 2 absorption system. The absorption air conditioning system is made of a generator, a condenser, an evaporator and an absorber with necessary pumps and piping. When LiBr 2 solution is heated under low pressure, water will evaporate first, while LiBr 2 will remain in the solution and will become more concentrated. The water is the refrigerant in this system. The generator, where the water is vapourised, is heated using an electric heater or solar energy. The LiBr 2 weak solution under low pressure in the generator is heated and the water evaporate into vapour. The vapour produced is then cooled in the condenser and then expanded into the evaporator. The refrigerant (water) in evaporator change phase from liquid to vapour by absorbing heat from cooling water, which flow in the coil in the evaporator. The chilled water obtained is then pumped into the fan coil, which will be used in conditioning the passenger area of the bus. The water vapour from the evaporator is absorbed into LiBr 2 solution in the absorber, forming a weak solution of LiBr 2 . the weak solution from the absorber is then pumped back to the generator to regenerate. The absorption system does not use compressor, but requires pumps that need lower input power compared to that of a compressor. The system is considered as a new application for the bus. This will have great potential and will be environmentally friendly. The model in this study will be used for calculation of the cooling load for the bus

  10. Simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption system using photodiode array detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, S.L.; Chin, K.S.

    1994-01-01

    A photodiode array (PDA) detector-multichannel analyser (MCA) system has been coupled to a flame and a graphite furnace atomiser and tested for simultaneous multielement atomic absorption analysis. Multielement hollow cathode lamps (HCL) are used as light source. Spectral lines are dispersed through a spectrograph with triple gratings and detected by a 25.4 mm PDA detector consisting of 1024 elements. The optical MCA system is capable of recording multiple spectra spanned by the spectrograph/PDA. The transmitted intensity spectra obtained for the standard and analyte solutions during flame or graphite furnace atomisation are converted to absorbance spectra using the MCA software provided. Results from the comparison studies show that the linear range and sensitivities for Ni-Co-Fe and Cu-Cr obtained from the simultaneous measurements are within the same order of magnitudes as those from conventional single element determinations using photomultiplier tube detection. The study also shows that non-atomic absorption can be readily corrected by a two-line method where non-atomic absorption lines can be chosen from the spectra recorded simultaneously. The proposed system has been evaluated for the determination of trace elements using NBS standard reference water SRM 1643b

  11. Patterns and possible mechanisms of soil CO2 uptake in sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, Ke-Yu; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Wu, Bin; Qin, Shu-Gao; Liu, Zhen; She, Wei-Wei

    2016-02-15

    It has been reported that soils in drylands can absorb CO2, although the patterns and mechanisms of such a process remain under debate. To address this, we investigated the relationships between soil CO2 flux and meteorological factors and soil properties in Northwest China to reveal the reasons for "anomalous" soil CO2 flux in a desert ecosystem. Soil CO2 flux increased significantly and exponentially with surficial turbulence at the diel scale under dry conditions (Psoil CO2 flux demonstrated remarkable negative correlation with soil air pressure (Psoil water content was insufficient to dissolve the absorbed CO2 in dry conditions, but was sufficient in wet conditions. The concentration of soil HCO3(-) in the morning was higher than in the evening in dry conditions, but this pattern was reversed in wet conditions. These results imply that CO2 outgassing induced by turbulence, expansion of soil air, CO2 effusion from soil water, and carbonate precipitation during daytime can explain the abiotic diurnal CO2 release. Moreover, CO2 pumping from the atmosphere into the soil, caused mainly by carbonate dissolution, can account for nocturnal CO2 absorption in dry conditions. The abiotic soil CO2 flux pattern (CO2 absorption throughout the diel cycle) in wet conditions can be attributed to downward mass flow of soil CO2 and intensified soil air shrinkage, CO2 dissolving in soil water, and carbonate dissolution. These results provide a basis for determining the location of abiotic fixed carbon within soils in desert ecosystems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Thermodynamic simulation of ammonia-water absorption refrigeration system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathyabhama A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The ammonia-water absorption refrigeration system is attracting increasing research interests, since the system can be powered by waste thermal energy, thus reducing demand on electricity supply. The development of this technology demands reliable and effective system simulations. In this work, a thermodynamic simulation of the cycle is carried out to investigate the effects of different operating variables on the performance of the cycle. A computer program in C language is written for the performance analysis of the cycle.

  13. Heavy Metals Levels in Soil and Vegetables in Different Growing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hura C.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The current project deals with an issue of actuality and scientific/technical necessity and aims to assess the factors contributing to the vulnerability of ecological systems and therefore endangering/compromising food safety. The goals of this ongoing study are to address the main risk factors on ecological system with particular regards to fresh growing vegetables and to establish technical monitoring system(s with a view to increase food safety. Herein, the authors present the research results obtained in 2011 in SIECOLEG Project regarding the assessment of some heavy metals (mainly lead, cadmium, cooper, and manganese of 80 samples soils and 25 samples vegetables from some ecological system. The concentrations of heavy metals were measured by Atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS Schimadzu 6300 - with graphite furnace atomizer and autosampler. In soil: lead and cadmium concentrations ranged from 4.51 to 6.58 mg/kg and from 0.14 to 0.4 mg/kg, respectively. Cooper and manganese concentrations ranged from 20.73 to 6.58 mg/kg and from 218.1 to 298.3 mg/kg, respectively. In vegetables (tomatoes, cucumber, peppers, eggplant, cabbage: lead concentrations ranged from 0.0 (tomatoes to 4.35 mg/kg (cabbage; cooper concentrations ranged from 0.2 mg/kg (cucumber to 0.80 mg/kg (eggplant; manganese concentrations ranged from 0.0 mg/kg (tomatoes to 0.60 mg/kg (eggplant. Cadmium was not detected in any of analysed vegetable samples. Under these circumstances, the project intends to demonstrate the extent of this vulnerability and to elaborate measures for controlling and diminishing the effects of the involved factors in order to increase food safety and security for ecological fresh vegetables

  14. Use of soil-like substrate for growing plant to enhance closedness of biological lie support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, J. B.; Lasseur, C.; Tikhomirov, A. A.; Manuskovsky, N. S.; Kovalev, V. S.; Ushakova, S. A.; Zolotukhin, I. G.; Tirranen, L. S.; Gribovskaya, I. V.

    Soil-like substrate (SLS) a potential candidate for use for growing plants in closed biological life support systems (BLSS) was studied. SLS was made by successive transformation of wheat straw by oyster mushrooms and Californian worms. Fertility of SLS of different degree of maturity has been tested. Mature SLS contained 9.5 % of humus acids and 4.9 % of fulvic acids. Wheat, bean and cucumber crops cultivated on mature SLS were comparable to crops obtained on a neutral substrate (expanded clay aggregate). In the wheat-SLS system, net CO2 absorption started on the sixth day after sowing and stopped 5 days prior to harvesting whereas in the wheat-neutral substrate system, net CO2 absorption was registered throughout vegetation. In the SLS, dominant bacteria included the spore-forming bacteria of the Bacillus genus and dominant fungi included the genus Trichoderma. In the hydroponic cultivation on neutral substrate dominant bacteria were of the Pseudomonas genus, while most commonly found fungi were species of the Fusarium genus. Consequence of SLS incorporation in artificial BLSS for increasing the closure degree of internal mass exchange in comparison with a neutral substrate is considered.

  15. Remediation of a radioactively contaminated soil using a mobile soil-washing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, D.C.; Lahoda, E.J.; Dietrich, A.J.; Weigle, D.H.; Keegan, C.P.; Sachse, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    In order to obtain free-release of a former uranium mining site in Texas, it was required that the surface soil meet specific radiological guidelines. The soil has been contaminated with uranium and radium as a result of the spillage of well-drilling material, process solutions, and ion exchange resins during mining. To meet the required guidelines, the contaminated soil had to be either removed and disposed of off-site or remediated. For economic and long-term liability reasons, remediation of the soil by soil washing was performed. The remediation of this site utilizing the Scientific Ecology Group's soil washing system is discussed in this paper

  16. Determination of Arsenic in Soil Alkali by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometery Using Modified Corn Silk Fiber as Adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, X.; Ju, S.; Liu, M.; Zhao, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A safe, rapid, simple and environmentally friendly method based modified corn silk fiber (MC), chemical modified with succinic anhydride (C/sub 4/H/sub 4/O/sub 3/), was developed for the extraction and preconcentration of As(III) in food additives soil alkali sample prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) analysis. The structure and properties of VC (unmodified corn silk fiber) and MC were analyzed and discussed by means of FTIR, SEM and TG, and the effect of adsorbent amount, pH, soil alkali solution concentration, adsorption time and adsorption temperature were carefully optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the relative standard deviations (RSD, n=6) were 1.27-3.05%, the calibration graph was linear in the range of 0-100 meu g/ L and the limits of detection (LOD) was 0.13 meu g/L. The surface of MC became loose and porous which increased the adsorption area. Comparing with VC, carboxy groups were measured in MC and the increase of negative electron group in fiber molecular made its coordination combining ability with As(III) enhanced; In comparison with the removal arsenic rate of VC, MC's significantly increased by 2.86 fold. The recovery rate of soil alkali, treated by VC and MC, reached to 96.85% and 94.32%, and it did not affected the function of soil alkali. (author)

  17. Soil Erodibility Parameters Under Various Cropping Systems of Maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, P. M.; van der Zijp, M.; Kwaad, F. J. P. M.

    1996-08-01

    For four years, runoff and soil loss from seven cropping systems of fodder maize have been measured on experimental plots under natural and simulated rainfall. Besides runoff and soil loss, several variables have also been measured, including rainfall kinetic energy, degree of slaking, surface roughness, aggregate stability, soil moisture content, crop cover, shear strength and topsoil porosity. These variables explain a large part of the variance in measured runoff, soil loss and splash erosion under the various cropping systems. The following conclusions were drawn from the erosion measurements on the experimental plots (these conclusions apply to the spatial level at which the measurements were carried out). (1) Soil tillage after maize harvest strongly reduced surface runoff and soil loss during the winter; sowing of winter rye further reduced winter erosion, though the difference with a merely tilled soil is small. (2) During spring and the growing season, soil loss is reduced strongly if the soil surface is partly covered by plant residues; the presence of plant residue on the surface appeared to be essential in achieving erosion reduction in summer. (3) Soil loss reductions were much higher than runoff reductions; significant runoff reduction is only achieved by the straw system having flat-lying, non-fixed plant residue on the soil surface; the other systems, though effective in reducing soil loss, were not effective in reducing runoff.

  18. Emergency membrane contactor based absorption system for ammonia leaks in water treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jiahui; Fang, Xuliang; He, Yiliang; Jin, Qiang

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Because of the suspected health risks of trihalomethanes (THMs), more and more water treatment plants have replaced traditional chlorine disinfection process with chloramines but often without the proper absorption system installed in the case of ammonia leaks in the storage room. A pilot plant membrane absorption system was developed and installed in a water treatment plant for this purpose. Experimentally determined contact angle, surface tension, and corrosion tests indicated that the sulfuric acid was the proper choice as the absorbent for leaking ammonia using polypropylene hollow fiber membrane contactor. Effects of several operating conditions on the mass transfer coefficient, ammonia absorption, and removal efficiency were examined, including the liquid concentration, liquid velocity, and feed gas concentration. Under the operation conditions investigated, the gas absorption efficiency over 99.9% was achieved. This indicated that the designed pilot plant membrane absorption system was effective to absorb the leaking ammonia in the model storage room. The removal rate of the ammonia in the model storage room was also experimentally and theoretically found to be primarily determined by the ammonia suction flow rate from the ammonia storage room to the membrane contactor. The ammonia removal rate of 99.9% was expected to be achieved within 1.3 h at the ammonia gas flow rate of 500 m3/h. The success of the pilot plant membrane absorption system developed in this study illustrated the potential of this technology for ammonia leaks in water treatment plant, also paved the way towards a larger scale application.

  19. Soil organic phosphorus in soils under different land use systems in northeast Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slazak, Anna; Freese, Dirk; Hüttl, Reinhard F.

    2010-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) is commonly known as a major plant nutrient, which can act as a limiting factor for plant growth in many ecosystems, including different land use systems. Organic P (Po), transformations in soil are important in determining the overall biological availability of P and additionally Po depletion is caused by land cultivation. It is expected that changes of land use modifies the distribution of soil P among the various P-pools (Ptotal, Plabile, Po), where the Plabile forms are considered to be readily available to plants and Po plays an important role with P nutrition supply for plants. The aim of the study was to measure the different soil P pools under different land use systems. The study was carried out in northeast of Brandenburg in Germany. Different land use systems were studied: i) different in age pine-oak mixed forest stands, ii) silvopastoral land, iii) arable lands. Samples were taken from two mineral soil layers: 0-10 and 10-20 cm. Recently, a variety of analytical methods are available to determine specific Po compounds in soils. The different P forms in the soil were obtained by a sequential P fractionation by using acid and alkaline extractants, which mean that single samples were subjected to increasingly stronger extractants, consequently separating the soil P into fractions based on P solubility. The soil Ptotal for the forest stands ranged from 100 to 183 mg kg -1 whereas Po from 77 to 148 mg kg -1. The Po and Plabile in both soil layers increased significantly with increase of age-old oak trees. The most available-P fraction was Plabile predominate in the oldest pine-oak forest stand, accounting for 29% of soil Ptotal. For the silvopasture and arable study sites the Ptotal content was comparable. However, the highest value of Ptotal was measured in the 30 years old silvopastoral system with 685 mg kg-1 and 728 mg kg-1 at 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm depth, respectively than in arable lands. The results have shown that the 30 years old

  20. Thermodynamic performance analysis of gas-fired air-cooled adiabatic absorption refrigeration systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.; Chen, G.M.; Wang, Q.; Zhong, M.

    2007-01-01

    In China, the application of small size gas-fired air-cooled absorption refrigeration systems as an alternative for electric compression air conditioning systems has shown broad prospects due to occurrence of electricity peak demand in Chinese big cities and lack of water resources. However, for conventional air-cooled absorption refrigeration systems, it is difficult to enhance the heat and mass transfer process in the falling film absorber, and may cause problems, for example, remarkable increase of pressure, temperature and concentration in the generators, risk of crystallization, acceleration of corrosion, degradation of performance, and so on. This paper presents a gas-fired air-cooled adiabatic absorption refrigeration system using lithium bromide-water solutions as its working fluid, which is designed with a cooling capacity of 16 kW under standard conditions. The system has two new features of waste heat recovery of condensed water from generator and an adiabatic absorber with an air cooler. Performance simulation and characteristic analysis are crucial for the optimal control and reliability of operation in extremely hot climates. A methodology is presented to simulate thermodynamic performance of the system. The influences of outdoor air temperature on operation performances of the system are investigated

  1. Parametric analysis of an irreversible proton exchange membrane fuel cell/absorption refrigerator hybrid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Puqing; Zhang, Houcheng

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid system mainly consisting of a PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cell) and an absorption refrigerator is proposed, where the PEMFC directly converts the chemical energy contained in the hydrogen into electrical and thermal energies, and the thermal energy is transferred to drive the bottoming absorption refrigerator for cooling purpose. By considering the existing irreversible losses in the hybrid system, the operating current density region of the PEMFC permits the absorption refrigerator to exert its function is determined and the analytical expressions for the equivalent power output and efficiency of the hybrid system under different operating conditions are specified. Numerical calculations show that the equivalent maximum power density and the corresponding efficiency of the hybrid system can be respectively increased by 5.3% and 6.8% compared to that of the stand-alone PEMFC. Comprehensive parametric analyses are conducted to reveal the effects of the internal irreversibility of the absorption refrigerator, operating current density, operating temperature and operating pressure of the PEMFC, and some integrated parameters related to the thermodynamic losses on the performance of the hybrid system. The model presented in the paper is more general than previous study, and the results for some special cases can be directly derived from this paper. - Highlights: • A CHP system composed of a PEMFC and an absorption refrigerator is proposed. • Current density region enables the absorption refrigerator to work is determined. • Multiple irreversible losses in the system are analytically characterized. • Maximum power density and corresponding efficiency can be increased by 5.3% and 6.8%. • Effects of some designing and operating parameters on the performance are discussed

  2. One year of continuous measurements of soil CH4 and CO2 fluxes in a Japanese cypress forest: Temporal and spatial variations associated with Asian monsoon rainfall

    OpenAIRE

    Sakabe, Ayaka; Kosugi, Yoshiko; Takahashi, Kenshi; Itoh, Masayuki; Kanazawa, Akito; Makita, Naoki; Ataka, Mioko

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of Asian monsoon rainfall on CH[4] absorption of water-unsaturated forest soil. We conducted a 1 year continuous measurement of soil CH[4] and CO[2] fluxes with automated chamber systems in three plots with different soil characteristics and water content to investigate how temporal variations in CH[4] fluxes vary with the soil environment. CH[4] absorption was reduced by the “Baiu” summer rainfall event and peaked during the subsequent hot, dry period. Although CH[4] ...

  3. Impact of Cropping Systems, Soil Inoculum, and Plant Species Identity on Soil Bacterial Community Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, Suzanne L; Johnson, Stephen P; Miller, Zach J; Lehnhoff, Erik A; Olivo, Sarah; Yeoman, Carl J; Menalled, Fabian D

    2017-02-01

    Farming practices affect the soil microbial community, which in turn impacts crop growth and crop-weed interactions. This study assessed the modification of soil bacterial community structure by organic or conventional cropping systems, weed species identity [Amaranthus retroflexus L. (redroot pigweed) or Avena fatua L. (wild oat)], and living or sterilized inoculum. Soil from eight paired USDA-certified organic and conventional farms in north-central Montana was used as living or autoclave-sterilized inoculant into steam-pasteurized potting soil, planted with Am. retroflexus or Av. fatua and grown for two consecutive 8-week periods to condition soil nutrients and biota. Subsequently, the V3-V4 regions of the microbial 16S rRNA gene were sequenced by Illumina MiSeq. Treatments clustered significantly, with living or sterilized inoculum being the strongest delineating factor, followed by organic or conventional cropping system, then individual farm. Living inoculum-treated soil had greater species richness and was more diverse than sterile inoculum-treated soil (observed OTUs, Chao, inverse Simpson, Shannon, P soil contained more Chloroflexi and Acidobacteria, while the sterile inoculum soil had more Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, and Verrucomicrobia. Organically farmed inoculum-treated soil had greater species richness, more diversity (observed OTUs, Chao, Shannon, P soil. Cyanobacteria were higher in pots growing Am. retroflexus, regardless of inoculum type, for three of the four organic farms. Results highlight the potential of cropping systems and species identity to modify soil bacterial communities, subsequently modifying plant growth and crop-weed competition.

  4. Soil carbon pools in different pasture systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco M. Cardozo, Jr.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the carbon pools of a tropical soil where the native forest was replaced with different pasture systems. We studied five pasture production systems, including four monoculture systems with forage grasses such as Andropogon, Brachiaria, Panicum, and Cynodon, and an agroforestry system as well as a native vegetation plot. Greater availability of fulvic acid was detected in the agroforestry system as compared with that in the other systems. Higher lability of C was detected in the Andropogon system during the dry and rainy seasons and during the dry season in Cynodon. During the dry season, all pastures systems showed deficits in the net removal of atmospheric CO2. The structure and practices of the agroforestry system enables more carbon to be sequestered in the soil as compared with the monoculture pasture, suggesting that it is an important practice to mitigate climatic change and to improve soil quality.

  5. Performance modelling and simulation of an absorption solar cooling system for Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assilzadeh, F.; Ali, Y.; Kamaruzzaman Sopian

    2006-01-01

    Solar radiation contains huge amounts of energy and is required for almost all the natural processes on earth. Solar-powered air-conditioning has many advantages when compared to normal electricity system. This paper presents a solar cooling system that has been designed for Malaysia and other tropical regions using evacuated tube solar collector and LiBr absorption system. A modelling and simulation of absorption solar cooling system is modeled in Transient System Simulation (TRNSYS) environment. The typical meteorological year file containing the weather parameters is used to simulate the system. Then a system optimization is carried out in order to select the appropriate type of collector, the optimum size of storage tank, the optimum collector slope and area and the optimum thermostat setting of the auxiliary boiler

  6. Residential solar air conditioning: Energy and exergy analyses of an ammonia–water absorption cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aman, J.; Ting, D.S.-K.; Henshaw, P.

    2014-01-01

    Large scale heat-driven absorption cooling systems are available in the marketplace for industrial applications but the concept of a solar driven absorption chiller for air-conditioning applications is relatively new. Absorption chillers have a lower efficiency than compression refrigeration systems, when used for small scale applications and this restrains the absorption cooling system from air conditioning applications in residential buildings. The potential of a solar driven ammonia–water absorption chiller for residential air conditioning application is discussed and analyzed in this paper. A thermodynamic model has been developed based on a 10 kW air cooled ammonia–water absorption chiller driven by solar thermal energy. Both energy and exergy analyses have been conducted to evaluate the performance of this residential scale cooling system. The analyses uncovered that the absorber is where the most exergy loss occurs (63%) followed by the generator (13%) and the condenser (11%). Furthermore, the exergy loss of the condenser and absorber greatly increase with temperature, the generator less so, and the exergy loss in the evaporator is the least sensitive to increasing temperature. -- Highlights: • 10 kW solar thermal driven ammonia–water air cooled absorption chiller is investigated. • Energy and exergy analyses have been done to enhance the thermal performance. • Low driving temperature heat sources have been optimized. • The efficiencies of the major components have been evaluated

  7. [Variation in soil Mn fractions as affected by long-term manure amendment using atomic absorption spectrophotometer in a typical grassland of inner Mongolia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ming-ming; Jiang, Yong; Bai, Yong-fei; Zhang, Yu-ge; Xu, Zhu-wen; Li, Bo

    2012-08-01

    The effect of sheep manure amendment on soil manganese fractions was conducted in a 11 year experiment at inner Mongolia grassland, using sequential extraction procedure in modified Community Bureau of Reference, and determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Five treatments with dry sheep manure addition rate 0, 50, 250, 750, and 1500 g x m(-2) x yr(-1), respectively, were carried out in this experiment. Results showed that the recovery rate for total Mn was 91.4%-105.9%, as the percentage recovered from the summation of the improved BCR results with aqua regia extractable contents, and it was 97.2%-102.9% from certified soil reference materials. Plant available exchangeable Mn could be enhanced by 47.89%, but reducible and total Mn contents decreased significantly under heavy application of manure at depth of 0-5 cm. The effect of manure amendment on Mn fractions was greater in 0-5 cm than in 5-10 cm soil layer. The results are benefit to micronutrient fractions determination and nutrient management in grassland soils.

  8. Backscatter absorption gas imaging systems and light sources therefore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulp, Thomas Jan [Livermore, CA; Kliner, Dahv A. V. [San Ramon, CA; Sommers, Ricky [Oakley, CA; Goers, Uta-Barbara [Campbell, NY; Armstrong, Karla M [Livermore, CA

    2006-12-19

    The location of gases that are not visible to the unaided human eye can be determined using tuned light sources that spectroscopically probe the gases and cameras that can provide images corresponding to the absorption of the gases. The present invention is a light source for a backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI) system, and a light source incorporating the light source, that can be used to remotely detect and produce images of "invisible" gases. The inventive light source has a light producing element, an optical amplifier, and an optical parametric oscillator to generate wavelength tunable light in the IR. By using a multi-mode light source and an amplifier that operates using 915 nm pump sources, the power consumption of the light source is reduced to a level that can be operated by batteries for long periods of time. In addition, the light source is tunable over the absorption bands of many hydrocarbons, making it useful for detecting hazardous gases.

  9. Hybrid compression/absorption type heat utilization system (eco-energy city project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimata, T.; Susami, S.; Ogawa, Y. [Research and Development Dept., EBARA Corp., Kanagawa pref. (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    This research is intended to develop a 'hybrid compression/absorption type heat utilization system' by combining an absorption process with a compression process in one circulation cycle. This system can produce chilling heat for ice thermal storage by utilizing low-temperature waste heat (lower than 100 C) which is impossible to treat with a conventional absorption chiller. It means that this system will be able to solve the problem of a timing mismatch between waste heat and heat demand. The working fluid used in this proposed system should be suitable for producing ice, be safe, and not damage the ozone layer. In this project, new working fluids were searched as substitutes for the existing H{sub 2}O/LiBr or NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O. The interim results of this project in 1997, a testing unit using NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O was built for demonstration of the system and evaluation of its characteristics, and R134a/E181 was found to be one of the good working fluid for this system. The COP (ratio of energy of ice produced to electric power provided) of this system using R134a/E181 is expected to achieve 5.5 by computer simulation. The testing unit with this working fluid was built recently and prepared for the tests to confirm the result of the simulation. (orig.)

  10. Microbial Indicators of Soil Quality under Different Land Use Systems in Subtropical Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharjan, M.

    2016-12-01

    Land-use change from native forest to intensive agricultural systems can negatively impact numerous soil parameters. Understanding the effects of forest ecosystem transformations on markers of long-term soil health is particularly important in rapidly developing regions such as Nepal, where unprecedented levels of agriculturally-driven deforestation have occurred in recent decades. However, the effects of widespread land use changes on soil quality in this region have yet to be properly characterized. Microbial indicators (soil microbial biomass, metabolic quotient and enzymes activities) are particularly suited to assessing the consequences of such ecosystem disturbances, as microbial communities are especially sensitive to environmental change. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of land use system; i.e. forest, organic and conventional farming, on soil quality in Chitwan, Nepal using markers of microbial community size and activity. Total organic C and N contents were higher in organic farming compared with conventional farming and forest, suggesting higher nutrient retention and soil preservation with organic farming practices compared to conventional. These differences in soil composition were reflected in the health of the soil microbial communities: Organic farm soil exhibited higher microbial biomass C, elevated β-glucosidase and chitinase activities, and a lower metabolic quotient relative to other soils, indicating a larger, more active, and less stressed microbial community, respectively. These results collectively demonstrate that application of organic fertilizers and organic residues positively influence nutrient availability, with subsequent improvements in soil quality and productivity. Furthermore, the sensitivity of microbial indicators to different management practices demonstrated in this study supports their use as effective markers of ecosystem disturbance in subtropical soils.

  11. Molecular speciation of phosphorus in organic amendments and amended soils using nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray absorption spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajibove, B.

    2007-01-01

    Characterization of phosphorus (P) in organic amendments is essential for environmentally sustainable fertilization of agricultural soils. The sequential chemical extraction (SCE) technique commonly used for P characterization does not provide any direct molecular information about P species. Studies were conducted to characterize P species in organic amendments and amended soils at a molecular level. The SCE was used to fractionate P in organic amendments including biosolids, hog, dairy and beef cattle manures, and poultry litter. The extracts were analyzed for total P and P species using inductively coupled plasma - optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and solution 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, respectively. The relative proportions of P species in intact organic amendments and residues after each extraction, and calcareous soils amended with organic amendments and monoammonium phosphate (MAP) were estimated using the synchrotron-based P 1s X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The solution 31 P NMR provided a detailed characterization of organic P in the non-labile NaOH and HCl fractions of organic amendments, but was limited in characterizing the labile fractions of most of these organic amendments due to their proneness to alkaline hydrolysis. The XANES analysis, however, identified the actual chemical species constituting the labile P that was only characterized as inorganic P or orthophosphates by sequential extraction and solution 31 P NMR. In the amended Vertisolic and Chernozemic soils, XANES analysis estimated 'soluble and adsorbed P' as the dominant P species. For the Vertisolic soil, both the unamended and soil amended with biosolids and MAP contained hydroxyapatite (HAP). In addition, soil amended with biosolids, hog and dairy manures contained β-tricalcium phosphate (TRICAL), a more soluble CaP than HAP. TRICAL was found in all amended soils except in that amended with hog manure, while HAP was present

  12. Economic performance optimization of an absorption cooling system under uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebreslassie, Berhane H.; Guillen-Gosalbez, Gonzalo; Jimenez, Laureano; Boer, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    Many of the strategies devised so far to address the optimization of energy systems are deterministic approaches that rely on estimated data. However, in real world applications there are many sources of uncertainty that introduce variability into the decision-making problem. Within this general context, we propose a novel approach to address the design of absorption cooling systems under uncertainty in the energy cost. As opposed to other approaches that optimize the expected performance of the system as a single objective, in our method the design task is formulated as a stochastic bi-criteria non-linear optimization problem that simultaneously accounts for the minimization of the expected total cost and the financial risk associated with the investment. The latter criterion is measured by the downside risk, which avoids the need to define binary variables thus improving the computational performance of the model. The capabilities of the proposed modeling framework and solution strategy are illustrated in a case study problem that addresses the design of a typical absorption cooling system. Numerical results demonstrate that the method presented allows to manage the risk level effectively by varying the area of the heat exchangers of the absorption cycle. Specifically, our strategy allows identifying the optimal values of the operating and design variables of the cycle that make it less sensitive to fluctuations in the energy price, thus improving its robustness in the face of uncertainty.

  13. Genesis Eco Systems, Inc. soil washing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cena, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Genesis soil washing system is an integrated system of modular design allowing for maximum material handling capabilities, with optimized use of space for site mobility. The Surfactant Activated Bio-enhanced Remediation Equipment-Generation 1 (SABRE-1, Patent Applied For) modification was developed specifically for removing petroleum byproducts from contaminated soils. Scientifically formulated surfactants, introduced by high pressure spray nozzles, displace the contaminant from the surface of the soil particles into the process solution. Once the contaminant is dispersed into the liquid fraction of the process, it is either mechanically removed, chemically oxidized, or biologically oxidized. The contaminated process water is pumped through the Genesis Biosep (Patent Applied For) filtration system where the fines portion is flocculated, and the contaminant-rich liquid portion is combined with an activated mixture of nutrients and carefully selected bacteria to decompose the hydrocarbon fraction. The treated soil and dewatered fines are transferred to a bermed stockpile where bioremediation continues during drying. The process water is reclaimed, filtered, and recycled within the system

  14. Use of Neutron Probe to Quantify the Soil Moisture Flux in Layers of Cultivated Soil by Chickpea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El- Gendy, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    This work aims to use the neutron moisture meter and the soil moisture retention curve to quantify the soil moisture flux in the soil profile of Nubarria soil in Egypt at 15, 30, 45, and 60-cm depths during the growth season of Chickpea. This method depends on the use of in situ θ measurements via neutron moisture meter and soil matric suction using model of the soil moisture retention curve at different soil depths, which can be determined in situ. Total hydraulic potential values at the different soil depths were calculated as a function (θ) using the derivative model. The gradient of hydraulic potential at any soil depth can be obtained by detecting of the hydraulic potential within the soil profile. The soil water fluxes at the different soil depths were calculated using In situ measured unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and the gradient of hydraulic potential, which correlated with soil moisture contents as measured by neutron probe. Values of hydraulic potentials after and before irrigation indicate that the direction of soil moisture movement was downward after irrigation and was different before next irrigation. Collecting active roots for water absorption of chickpea were defined from direction of soil water movement from up and down to a certain soil depth was 19 cm depth from the soil surface. Active rooting depth was 53 cm depth, which separates between evapotranspiration and gravity effects The soil water fluxes after and before the next irrigation of chickpea were 1.2453, 0.8613, 0.8197 and 0.6588 cm/hr and 0.0037, - 0.0270,- 0.1341, and 0.2545 cm/hr at 15, 30, 45 and 60 cm depths, respectively. The negative values at 30 and 45 cm depth before the next irrigation indicates there were up ward movement for soil water flux, where finding collecting active roots for water absorption of chickpea at 19 cm depth. Direction of soil water movement, soil water flux, collecting active roots for water absorption and active rooting depth can be determined using

  15. Determination of cadmium in soil by atomic absorption spectrophotometry after extraction with 4-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-phenyl-5-thiazoleacetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, N.; Chaudhri, S.A.; Saeed, M.M.; Ahmed, J.

    1997-01-01

    Toxic elements are generally present in soil at trace levels and their uptake through food materials may induced hazardous effects to human being. The determination of toxic metal at trace levels is very essential in order to assess the extent of pollution. In the present study an effective, simple and rapid analytical method has been studied for the determination of cadmium in soil using 4-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-phenyl-5-thiazoleacetic acid (HCPTA). The cadmium was extracted with HCPTA in n-butyl acetate and cadmium was determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometric technique using air-acetylene flame. The quantitative extraction was observed at pH 8.4. The stoichiometric composition of the complex was found to be Cd(CPTA)2. The extraction constant was determined to be log K/sub ex/ = -10.44 plus minus 0.11. Under the optimal experimental conditions the influence of high concentration of various anions and cations on the extraction of cadmium has also been studied, which shows that EDTA masked the extraction completely whereas the presence of palladium decreased the extraction by 24 %. The reliability of the method was cross checked by analyzing IAEA Standard reference Material, Soil-7, for its cadmium contents. (author)

  16. Absorption and accumulation of aluminum and barium in eight Sindh wheat (Triticum Aestivum L.) varieties and their availability in its soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shar, G.Q.; Kazi, T.G.; Sahito, S.; Shaikh, M.S.

    2003-01-01

    The determination of the aluminum and barium contents in eight wheat varieties and the soil have been carried out using wet acid digestion method by nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide for dissolution of two heavy metals, aluminum and barium. The certified and representative samples of eight wheat varieties and the soil of experimental plot of NIA, Tandojam Sindh, Pakistan was done by atomic absorption spectrometry. The experimental study was conducted using six samples for each eight wheat varieties of FSC and RD as stand reference materials and representative samples, its soil was collected from nuclear institute of agriculture (NIA), Tandojam. The characteristics mean of each element for six samples of each variety of representative samples found to be 30.14,15.06, 26.5, 19.05, 23.78, 38.77, 29.23 and 25.6 of the aluminum and 3.81, 6.73, 7.38, 7.17, 3.34, 5.99, 17.34 and 16.4 mg/kg of the barium for Anmol, TJ-83, albadgar-93, Mehran-89, Soughat-90, Sarsabaz, Kiran and SKD-10/9 varieties respectively and its soil contain 50607.1 mg/kg respectively in respectively in representative samples which are compared with certified samples which is at the 95% confidence limit. (author)

  17. A new active absorption system and its performance to linear and non-linear waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Clavero, M.; Frigaard, Peter Bak

    2016-01-01

    Highlights •An active absorption system for wavemakers has been developed. •The theory for flush mounted gauges has been extended to cover also small gaps. •The new system has been validated in a wave flume with wavemakers in both ends. •A generation and absorption procedure for highly non-linear...

  18. Experimental results of a direct air-cooled ammonia–lithium nitrate absorption refrigeration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llamas-Guillén, S.U.; Cuevas, R.; Best, R.; Gómez, V.H.

    2014-01-01

    Absorption thermal cooling systems driven by renewable energy are a viable option in order to reduce fossil fuel consumption and the associated emissions. This work shows the results of an air cooled absorption cooling prototype working with an ammonia–lithium nitrate mixture at high ambient temperatures. An absorption refrigeration system was designed and built. The prototype is a one stage ammonia–lithium nitrate air cooled chiller. The experimental system was instrumented to evaluate each component. This paper shows the operation conditions in the experimental unit as well as some of the heat loads encountered at different operating conditions. The system was operated successfully at ambient temperatures in the range of 25–35 °C. A series of test showed that even at ambient temperatures it can be operated at evaporator temperatures below 10 °C producing chilled water for air conditioning applications such as radiative cooling panels. The system proved to stabilize very quickly and no risk of crystallization was encountered so the first results are promising in order to continue with the development of a more advanced prototype. - Highlights: •Experimental results of a direct air-cooled ammonia–lithium nitrate system. •The prototype is a one stage ammonia–lithium nitrate air cooled chiller. •The absorption system was operated successfully at ambient temperatures. •Cooling loads of 4.5 kW were reached in the chilled water side

  19. Revised Soil Classification System for Coarse-Fine Mixtures

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Junghee; Santamarina, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Soil classification systems worldwide capture great physical insight and enable geotechnical engineers to anticipate the properties and behavior of soils by grouping them into similar response categories based on their index properties. Yet gravimetric analysis and data trends summarized from published papers reveal critical limitations in soil group boundaries adopted in current systems. In particular, current classification systems fail to capture the dominant role of fines on the mechanical and hydraulic properties of soils. A revised soil classification system (RSCS) for coarse-fine mixtures is proposed herein. Definitions of classification boundaries use low and high void ratios that gravel, sand, and fines may attain. This research adopts emax and emin for gravels and sands, and three distinctive void ratio values for fines: soft eF|10  kPa and stiff eF|1  MPa for mechanical response (at effective stress 10 kPa and 1 MPa, respectively), and viscous λ⋅eF|LL for fluid flow control, where λ=2log(LL−25) and eF|LL is the void ratio at the liquid limit. For classification purposes, these void ratios can be estimated from index properties such as particle shape, the coefficient of uniformity, and the liquid limit. Analytically computed and data-adjusted boundaries are soil-specific, in contrast with the Unified Soil Classification System (USCS). Threshold fractions for mechanical control and for flow control are quite distinct in the proposed system. Therefore, the RSCS uses a two-name nomenclature whereby the first letters identify the component(s) that controls mechanical properties, followed by a letter (shown in parenthesis) that identifies the component that controls fluid flow. Sample charts in this paper and a Microsoft Excel facilitate the implementation of this revised classification system.

  20. Revised Soil Classification System for Coarse-Fine Mixtures

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Junghee

    2017-04-17

    Soil classification systems worldwide capture great physical insight and enable geotechnical engineers to anticipate the properties and behavior of soils by grouping them into similar response categories based on their index properties. Yet gravimetric analysis and data trends summarized from published papers reveal critical limitations in soil group boundaries adopted in current systems. In particular, current classification systems fail to capture the dominant role of fines on the mechanical and hydraulic properties of soils. A revised soil classification system (RSCS) for coarse-fine mixtures is proposed herein. Definitions of classification boundaries use low and high void ratios that gravel, sand, and fines may attain. This research adopts emax and emin for gravels and sands, and three distinctive void ratio values for fines: soft eF|10  kPa and stiff eF|1  MPa for mechanical response (at effective stress 10 kPa and 1 MPa, respectively), and viscous λ⋅eF|LL for fluid flow control, where λ=2log(LL−25) and eF|LL is the void ratio at the liquid limit. For classification purposes, these void ratios can be estimated from index properties such as particle shape, the coefficient of uniformity, and the liquid limit. Analytically computed and data-adjusted boundaries are soil-specific, in contrast with the Unified Soil Classification System (USCS). Threshold fractions for mechanical control and for flow control are quite distinct in the proposed system. Therefore, the RSCS uses a two-name nomenclature whereby the first letters identify the component(s) that controls mechanical properties, followed by a letter (shown in parenthesis) that identifies the component that controls fluid flow. Sample charts in this paper and a Microsoft Excel facilitate the implementation of this revised classification system.

  1. Fly ash dynamics in soil-water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.; Fulekar, M.H.; Jayalakshmi, C.P.

    1989-01-01

    Studies regarding the effluents and coal ashes (or fly ash) resulting from coal burning are numerous, but their disposal and interactions with the soil and water systems and their detailed environmental impact assessment with concrete status reports on a global scale are scanty. Fly ash dynamics in soil and water systems are reviewed. After detailing the physical composition of fly ash, physicochemical changes in soil properties due to fly ash amendment are summarized. Areas covered include texture and bulk density, moisture retention, change in chemical equilibria, and effects of fly ash on soil microorganisms. Plant growth in amended soils is discussed, as well as plant uptake and accumulation of trace elements. In order to analyze the effect of fly ash on the physicochemical properties of water, several factors must be considered, including surface morphology of fly ash, pH of the ash sluice water, pH adjustments, leachability and solubility, and suspended ash and settling. The dynamics of fly ash in water systems is important due to pollution of groundwater resources from toxic components such as trace metals. Other factors summarized are bioaccumulation and biomagnification, human health effects of contaminants, and the impact of radionuclides in fly ash. Future research needs should focus on reduction of the environmental impact of fly ash and increasing utilization of fly ash as a soil amendment. 110 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs

  2. Performance of chromatographic systems to model soil-water sorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Rodríguez, Marta; Fuguet, Elisabet; Ràfols, Clara; Rosés, Martí

    2012-08-24

    A systematic approach for evaluating the goodness of chromatographic systems to model the sorption of neutral organic compounds by soil from water is presented in this work. It is based on the examination of the three sources of error that determine the overall variance obtained when soil-water partition coefficients are correlated against chromatographic retention factors: the variance of the soil-water sorption data, the variance of the chromatographic data, and the variance attributed to the dissimilarity between the two systems. These contributions of variance are easily predicted through the characterization of the systems by the solvation parameter model. According to this method, several chromatographic systems besides the reference octanol-water partition system have been selected to test their performance in the emulation of soil-water sorption. The results from the experimental correlations agree with the predicted variances. The high-performance liquid chromatography system based on an immobilized artificial membrane and the micellar electrokinetic chromatography systems of sodium dodecylsulfate and sodium taurocholate provide the most precise correlation models. They have shown to predict well soil-water sorption coefficients of several tested herbicides. Octanol-water partitions and high-performance liquid chromatography measurements using C18 columns are less suited for the estimation of soil-water partition coefficients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Is the soil quality monitoring an effective tool in consumers' protection of agricultural crops from cadmium soil contamination?-a case of the Silesia region (Poland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekut, Agata; Baranowska, Renata; Marchwińska-Wyrwał, Ewa; Ćwieląg-Drabek, Małgorzata; Hajok, Ilona; Dziubanek, Grzegorz; Grochowska-Niedworok, Elżbieta

    2017-12-16

    The monitoring of soil quality should be a control tool used to reduce the adverse health effects arising from exposure to toxic chemicals in soil through cultivated crop absorption. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the monitoring and control system of soil quality in Poland, in terms of consumer safety, for agricultural plants cultivated in areas with known serious cadmium contamination, such as Silesia Province. To achieve the objective, the contents of cadmium in soils and vegetables in the Silesia administrative area were examined. The obtained results were compared with the results of soil contamination from the quality monitoring of arable soil in Poland. The studies show a significant exceedance of the permissible values of cadmium in soil samples and the vegetables cultivated on that soil. The threat to consumer health is a valid concern, although this threat was not indicated by the results of the national monitoring of soil quality. The results indicated an unequal distribution of risk to consumers resulting from contaminated soil. Moreover, the monitoring systems should be designed at the local or regional scale to guarantee the safety of consumers of edible plants cultivated in the areas contaminated with cadmium.

  4. HTO deposition through gas exchange between soil and atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinhals, J.

    1988-06-01

    Theoretical considerations show that the ratio of HTO/H 2 O molecules, i.e. the specific activity, is not the same in atmospheric humidity and moisture absorption but differs by the so-called specific activity coefficient k. On this basis a computer model (ATHOS) was developed which allowed the calculation of both the surface contamination of the soil due to the gas exchange with a contaminated atmosphere and the depth-specific distribution of the soil acitvity. On the one hand the equations base on a modified Philip-de Vries theory, and on the other hand on a large number of soil column experiments which served the examination of the influence of parameters of microclimate and soil physics on the absorption and diffusion of tritiated water vapour under simulated conditions Above all the individual capability of each soil type to absorb moisture must be taken into consideration in connection with the HTO transfer. In this context theoretical and experimental examinations were carried out indicating a practice-related possibility to determine the soil-specific absorption capability. (orig./DG) [de

  5. Effects of aluminum on root growth and absorption of nutrients by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aluminum (Al) is a biotoxic which often influences the absorption of nutrients by plants in strongly acidic soils. In this experiment, the effect of Al on root growth, absorption of macronutrients; phosphorus (P), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg) and micronutrients; iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu) and zinc ...

  6. Review on absorption technology with emphasis on small capacity absorption machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labus Jerko M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to review the past achievements in the field of absorption systems, their potential and possible directions for future development. Various types of absorption systems and research on working fluids are discussed in detail. Among various applications, solar cooling and combined cooling, heating and power (CCHP are identified as two most promising applications for further development of absorption machines. Under the same framework, special attention is given to the small capacity absorption machines and their current status at the market. Although this technology looks promising, it is still in development and many issues are open. With respect to that fact, this paper covers all the relevant aspects for further development of small capacity absorption machines.

  7. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Arlen F.; Allen, Robert J.; Mayo, M. Neale; Butler, Carolyn F.; Grossman, Benoist E.; Ismail, Syed; Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.; Higdon, Noah S.; Mayor, Shane D.; hide

    1994-01-01

    An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurements of atmospheric water vapor (H2O) and aerosols. A solid-state alexandrite laser with a 1-pm linewidth and greater than 99.85% spectral purity was used as the on-line transmitter. Solid-state avalanche photodiode detector technology has replaced photomultiplier tubes in the receiver system, providing an average increase by a factor of 1.5-2.5 in the signal-to-noise ratio of the H2O measurement. By incorporating advanced diagnostic and data-acquisition instrumentation into other subsystems, we achieved additional improvements in system operational reliability and measurement accuracy. Laboratory spectroscopic measurements of H2O absorption-line parameters were performed to reduce the uncertainties in our knowledge of the absorption cross sections. Line-center H2O absorption cross sections were determined, with errors of 3-6%, for more than 120 lines in the 720-nm region. Flight tests of the system were conducted during 1989-1991 on the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Electra aircraft, and extensive intercomparison measurements were performed with dew-point hygrometers and H2O radiosondes. The H2O distributions measured with the DIAL system differed by less than 10% from the profiles determined with the in situ probes in a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  8. CONCEPT OF AUTOMATIC CONTROL SYSTEM FOR IMPROVING THE EFFICIENCY OF THE ABSORPTION REFRIGERATING UNITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Titlova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The general concept of the automatic control systems constructing for increasing the efficiency of the artificial cold production process in the absorption refrigerating units is substantiated. The described automatic control systems provides necessary degree of the ammonia vapor purification from the water in all absorption refrigerating units modes and minimizes heat loss from the dephlegmator surface.

  9. An integrated GIS application system for soil moisture data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Di; Shen, Runping; Huang, Xiaolong; Shi, Chunxiang

    2014-11-01

    The gaps in knowledge and existing challenges in precisely describing the land surface process make it critical to represent the massive soil moisture data visually and mine the data for further research.This article introduces a comprehensive soil moisture assimilation data analysis system, which is instructed by tools of C#, IDL, ArcSDE, Visual Studio 2008 and SQL Server 2005. The system provides integrated service, management of efficient graphics visualization and analysis of land surface data assimilation. The system is not only able to improve the efficiency of data assimilation management, but also comprehensively integrate the data processing and analysis tools into GIS development environment. So analyzing the soil moisture assimilation data and accomplishing GIS spatial analysis can be realized in the same system. This system provides basic GIS map functions, massive data process and soil moisture products analysis etc. Besides,it takes full advantage of a spatial data engine called ArcSDE to effeciently manage, retrieve and store all kinds of data. In the system, characteristics of temporal and spatial pattern of soil moiture will be plotted. By analyzing the soil moisture impact factors, it is possible to acquire the correlation coefficients between soil moisture value and its every single impact factor. Daily and monthly comparative analysis of soil moisture products among observations, simulation results and assimilations can be made in this system to display the different trends of these products. Furthermore, soil moisture map production function is realized for business application.

  10. Triple-effect absorption refrigeration system with double-condenser coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1993-01-01

    A triple effect absorption refrigeration system is provided with a double-condenser coupling and a parallel or series circuit for feeding the refrigerant-containing absorbent solution through the high, medium, and low temperature generators utilized in the triple-effect system. The high temperature condenser receiving vaporous refrigerant from the high temperature generator is double coupled to both the medium temperature generator and the low temperature generator to enhance the internal recovery of heat within the system and thereby increase the thermal efficiency thereof.

  11. Understanding Absorptive Capacities is an "Innovation Systems" Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narula, Rajneesh

    2004-01-01

    This paper seeks to broaden our understanding of the concept underlying absorptive capacity atthe macro -level, paying particular attention to the growth and development perspectives. Weprovide definitions of absorptive and technological capacity, external technology flows,productivity growth....... We also undertake to explain how the nature ofabsorptive capacity changes with stages of economic development, and the importance of thedifferent aspects of absorptive capability at different stages. The relationship is not a linear one:the benefits that accrue from marginal increases in absorptive...... capability change over time.Finally, we provide a tentative and preliminary conceptual argument of how the different stagesof absorptive capacity are related to productivity growth, economic growth and employmentcreation.Key words: New economy, absorptive capacity, knowledge...

  12. Soil classification basing on the spectral characteristics of topsoil samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huanjun; Zhang, Xiaokang; Zhang, Xinle

    2016-04-01

    Soil taxonomy plays an important role in soil utility and management, but China has only course soil map created based on 1980s data. New technology, e.g. spectroscopy, could simplify soil classification. The study try to classify soils basing on the spectral characteristics of topsoil samples. 148 topsoil samples of typical soils, including Black soil, Chernozem, Blown soil and Meadow soil, were collected from Songnen plain, Northeast China, and the room spectral reflectance in the visible and near infrared region (400-2500 nm) were processed with weighted moving average, resampling technique, and continuum removal. Spectral indices were extracted from soil spectral characteristics, including the second absorption positions of spectral curve, the first absorption vale's area, and slope of spectral curve at 500-600 nm and 1340-1360 nm. Then K-means clustering and decision tree were used respectively to build soil classification model. The results indicated that 1) the second absorption positions of Black soil and Chernozem were located at 610 nm and 650 nm respectively; 2) the spectral curve of the meadow is similar to its adjacent soil, which could be due to soil erosion; 3) decision tree model showed higher classification accuracy, and accuracy of Black soil, Chernozem, Blown soil and Meadow are 100%, 88%, 97%, 50% respectively, and the accuracy of Blown soil could be increased to 100% by adding one more spectral index (the first two vole's area) to the model, which showed that the model could be used for soil classification and soil map in near future.

  13. ORIGINS OF ABSORPTION SYSTEMS OF CLASSICAL NOVA V2659 CYG (NOVA CYG 2014)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, A.; Kawakita, H. [Koyama Astronomical Observatory, Kyoto Sangyo University, Motoyama, Kamigamo, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Shinnaka, Y. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Tajitsu, A., E-mail: arai6a@cc.kyoto-su.ac.jp [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A’ohoku Place, Hilo, Hawaii 96720 (United States)

    2016-10-10

    We report on high-dispersion spectroscopy results of a classical nova V2659 Cyg (Nova Cyg 2014) that are taken 33.05 days after the V -band maximum. The spectrum shows two distinct blueshifted absorption systems originating from H i, Fe ii, Ca ii, etc. The radial velocities of the absorption systems are −620 km s{sup −1}, and −1100 to −1500 km s{sup −1}. The higher velocity component corresponds to the P-Cygni absorption features frequently observed in low-resolution spectra. Much larger numbers of absorption lines are identified at the lower velocity. These mainly originate from neutral or singly ionized Fe-peak elements (Fe i, Ti ii, Cr ii, etc.). Based on the results of our spectroscopic observations, we discuss the structure of the ejecta of V2659 Cyg. We conclude that the low- and high-velocity components are likely to be produced by the outflow wind and the ballistic nova ejecta, respectively.

  14. [Changes of soil physical properties during the conversion of cropland to agroforestry system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lai; Gao, Peng Xiang; Liu, Bin; Zhong, Chong Gao; Hou, Lin; Zhang, Shuo Xin

    2017-01-01

    To provide theoretical basis for modeling and managing agroforestry systems, the influence of conversion of cropland to agroforestry system on soil physical properties was investigated via a walnut (Juglans regia)-wheat (Triticum aestivum) intercropping system, a wide spreading local agroforestry model in northern Weihe River of loess area, with the walnut and wheat monoculture systems as the control. The results showed that the improvement of the intercropping system on soil physical properties mainly appeared in the 0-40 cm soil layer. The intercropping system could prevent soil bulk density rising in the surface soil (0-20 cm), and the plow pan in the 20-40 cm soil layer could be significantly alleviated. The intercropping system had conti-nuous improvement on soil field capacity in each soil layer with the planting age increase, and the soil field capacity was higher than that of each monoculture system in each soil layer (except 20-40 cm soil layer) since the 5th year after planting. The intercropping system had continuous improvement on soil porosity in each soil layer, but mainly in the 0-20 and 20-40 cm soil layer, and the ratio of capillary porosity was also improved. The soil bulk density, field capacity and soil porosity obtained continuous improvement during the conversion of cropland to agroforestry system, and the improvement on soil physical properties was stronger in shallow soil layer than in deep soil.

  15. Soil fauna and its relation with environmental variables in soil management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilmar Baretta

    Full Text Available The present study aims to generate knowledge about the soil fauna, its relation to other explanatory environmental variables, and, besides it, to select edaphic indicators that more contribute to separate the land use systems (LUS. Five different LUS were chosen: conventional tillage with crop rotation (CTCR; no-tillage with crop rotation (NTCR; conventional tillage with crop succession (CTCS; no-tillage with crop succession (NTCS and minimum tillage with crop succession (MTCS. The samples were made in the counties Chapecó, Xanxerê and Ouro Verde located in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, and were considered the true replicates of the LUS. In each site, nine points were sampled in a sampling grid of 3 x 3. At the same points, soil was sampled for the physical, chemical and biological attributes (environmental variables. Pitfall traps were used to evaluate the soil fauna. Data were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA and canonical discriminant analysis (CDA. The soil fauna presented potential to be used as indictors of soil quality, since some groups proved to be sensible to changes of the environmental variables and to soil management and tillage. The soil management using crop rotation (NTCR and CTCR presented higher diversity, compared to the systems using crop succession (NTCS, MTCS and NTCS, evidencing the importance of the soil tillage, independent of the season (summer or winter. The variable that better contributed to explain these changes were the chemical variables (potassium, pH, calcium, organic matter, available phosphorus, potential acidity, and biological variables (Shannon diversity index, Collembola, Pielou equitability index and microbial biomass carbon, respectively.

  16. Speciation of heavy metals in paddy soils from selected areas in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-12

    Oct 12, 2011 ... regarding their origin and distribution in soils. Five sampling ... elements that originate in the phosphate rock. ... these areas to improve rice productivity and control pests. ... acid digest were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry ..... paddy soil using X-ray fluorescence, absorption and diffraction.

  17. Biological detoxification of a hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabbri, F.; Lucchese, G.; Nardella, A.

    2005-01-01

    The soil quality of an industrial site chronically contaminated by 39000 mg/kg of oil was detrimentally affected. Soil treatments by bio-pile and land-farming resulted in a reduction of the level of contamination exceeding 90% of the original values, but without reaching regulatory limits. However, the bio-remediation treatments dramatically reduced the mobility of the contaminants and, accordingly, microbial tests clearly indicate that the soil quality improved to acceptable levels, similar to those typically observed in unaltered soils. Hydrocarbon mobility was estimated by the use of water and mild extractants (methanol and sodium dodecyl sulphate) to leach the contaminants from the soil; soil quality was evaluated by comparing the values of selected microbial and enzymatic parameters of the treated soil samples to reference values determined for natural soils. Microbial assessments included: measurement of the nitrification potential, dehydrogenase activity, measures of respiration and lipase activity, microbial counts (MPN on rich media) and Microtox TM assays of the water elutriate. Dermal absorption potential was evaluated using absorption on C 18 disks

  18. A noncontact laser system for measuring soil surface topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C.; White, I.; Thwaite, E.G.; Bendeli, A.

    1988-01-01

    Soil surface topography profoundly influences runoff hydrodynamics, soil erosion, and surface retention of water. Here we describe an optical noncontact system for measuring soil surface topography. Soil elevation is measured by projecting a laser beam onto the surface and detecting the position of the interception point. The optical axis of the detection system is oriented at a small angle to the incident beam. A low-power HeNe (Helium-Neon) laser is used as the laser source, a photodiode array is used as the laser image detector and an ordinary 35-mm single lens reflex camera provides the optical system to focus the laser image onto the diode array. A wide spectrum of measurement ranges (R) and resolutions are selectable, from 1 mm to 1 m. These are determined by the laser-camera distance and angle, the focal length of the lens, and the sensing length of the diode array and the number of elements (N) contained in the array. The resolution of the system is approximately R/2N. We show for the system used here that this resolution is approximately 0.2%. In the configuration selected, elevation changes of 0.16 mm could be detected over a surface elevation range of 87 mm. The sampling rate of the system is 1000 Hz, which permits soil surfaces to be measured at speeds of up to 1 m s −1 with measurements taken at 1-mm spacing. Measurements of individual raindrop impacts on the soil and of soil surfaces before and after rain show the versatility of the laser surface profiler, which has applications in studies of erosion processes, surface storage and soil trafficability

  19. A Neutron Radiology Application to Natural Absorption (Imbibition) of Water into Porous Rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, M.F.; de Beer, Frikkie

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Dynamic neutron radiology provides a method of evaluating the concentration of water in porous media. A study of water imbibition (absorption of a wetting liquid into a porous medium with a non-wetting fluid, air), which is imaged by dynamic neutron radiology , provides an excellent method of determining the fluid diffusivity parameter, D. This parameter enables one to model water-air regimes in surface hydrological systems and aquifers; analogies can also be made for deeper petroleum systems. A methodology of pixel-by-pixel analysis for the estimation of water concentration, as a function of time under natural absorption conditions, is proposed which provides a good mapping of D within a rock sample. The proposed method entails the discrete mapping of the differential equation for horizontal flow of a partial water concentration, c, in an air-filled rock/soil. (authors)

  20. Comparing organic versus conventional soil management on soil respiration [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bence Mátyás

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil management has great potential to affect soil respiration. In this study, we investigated the effects of organic versus conventional soil management on soil respiration.  We measured the main soil physical-chemical properties from conventional and organic managed soil in Ecuador. Soil respiration was determined using alkaline absorption according to Witkamp.  Soil properties such as organic matter, nitrogen, and humidity, were comparable between conventional and organic soils in the present study, and in a further analysis there was no statically significant correlation with soil respiration. Therefore, even though organic farmers tend to apply more organic material to their fields, but this did not result in a significantly higher CO2 production in their soils in the present study.

  1. Absorptive capacity, technological innovation, and product life cycle: a system dynamics model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Bo; Guo, Feng; Guo, Jinyu

    2016-01-01

    While past research has recognized the importance of the dynamic nature of absorptive capacity, there is limited knowledge on how to generate a fair and comprehensive analytical framework. Based on interviews with 24 Chinese firms, this study develops a system-dynamics model that incorporates an important feedback loop among absorptive capacity, technological innovation, and product life cycle (PLC). The simulation results reveal that (1) PLC affects the dynamic process of absorptive capacity; (2) the absorptive capacity of a firm peaks in the growth stage of PLC, and (3) the market demand at different PLC stages is the main driving force in firms' technological innovations. This study also explores a sensitivity simulation using the variables of (1) time spent in founding an external knowledge network, (2) research and development period, and (3) knowledge diversity. The sensitivity simulation results show that the changes of these three variables have a greater impact on absorptive capacity and technological innovation during growth and maturity stages than in the introduction and declining stages of PLC. We provide suggestions on how firms can adjust management policies to improve their absorptive capacity and technological innovation performance during different PLC stages.

  2. Venezuelan Soils Bibliography with AGRIS System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, Julia; Marquez, Orfila; Ramos V, Dilia; Graterol, Orlando; Rivero, Aida

    1997-01-01

    The adoption of the AGRIS system to develop the soils bibliographical database, implies: 1) To adopt a bibliographical information system, specially designed for the agricultural area. 2) To use with precision the methodological rules and the computer platform offered by the system. 3) The possibility to be flowingly inserted in the bigger agricultural information network of in the Hispanic World. 4) The interinstitucional cooperation for the gathering and exchange of the Venezuelan documental information, related to the soils area. 5) To contribute to the enrichment of the documental information contained in the Venezuelan Agricultural Bibliographic Database, managered by the AGRIS/CARIS National Center, CENIAP headquarters (considered as the main agricultural investigation center, with a higher trajectory in the FONAIAP). The document briefly presents: the AGRIS (Agricultural Information System), the projects AGRIS/CARIS and VARIBEV (Valuation of Venezuelan Edaphology Bibliographic Information Files), the tematic contain characteristics and other bibliometric elements, the searching aided process, and the development of an agricultural vocabulary (AGROVOC), that became a Dictionary. Finally, the labor of the Venezuelan Edaphologists is recognized for the maintenance of the Venezuelan Edaphologic Bibliography, specialized in soils and related areas [es

  3. Partitioning of hydrophobic pesticides within a soil-water-anionic surfactant system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Keller, Arturo A

    2009-02-01

    Surfactants can be added to pesticide-contaminated soils to enhance the treatment efficiency of soil washing. Our results showed that pesticide (atrazine and diuron) partitioning and desorbability within a soil-water-anionic surfactant system is soil particle-size dependent and is significantly influenced by the presence of anionic surfactant. Anionic surfactant (linear alkylbenzene sulphonate, LAS) sorption was influenced by its complexation with both the soluble and exchangeable divalent cations in soils (e.g. Ca2+, Mg2+). In this study, we propose a new concept: soil system hardness which defines the total amount of soluble and exchangeable divalent cations associated with a soil. Our results showed that anionic surfactant works better with soils having lower soil system hardness. It was also found that the hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) sorbed onto the LAS-divalent cation precipitate, resulting in a significant decrease in the aqueous concentration of HOC. Our results showed that the effect of exchangeable cations and sorption of HOC onto the surfactant precipitates needs to be considered to accurately predict HOC behavior within soil-water-anionic surfactant systems.

  4. Soil Water and Temperature System (SWATS) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, David R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The soil water and temperature system (SWATS) provides vertical profiles of soil temperature, soil-water potential, and soil moisture as a function of depth below the ground surface at hourly intervals. The temperature profiles are measured directly by in situ sensors at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The soil-water potential and soil moisture profiles are derived from measurements of soil temperature rise in response to small inputs of heat. Atmospheric scientists use the data in climate models to determine boundary conditions and to estimate the surface energy flux. The data are also useful to hydrologists, soil scientists, and agricultural scientists for determining the state of the soil.

  5. Soil heterogeneity and soil fertility gradients in smallholder agricultural systems of the east african highlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tittonell, P.A.; Muriuki, A.; Klapwijk, C.J.; Shepherd, K.D.; Coe, R.; Vanlauwe, B.

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity in soil fertility in these smallholder systems is caused by both inherent soil-landscape and human-induced variability across farms differing in resources and practices. Interventions to address the problem of poor soil fertility in Africa must be designed to target such diversity and

  6. NOAA Soil Moisture Products System (SMOPS) Daily Blended Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Soil Moisture Operational Products System (SMOPS) combines soil moisture retrievals from multiple satellite sensors to provide a global soil moisture map with...

  7. Tunable Absorption System based on magnetorheological elastomers and Halbach array: design and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocian, Mirosław; Kaleta, Jerzy; Lewandowski, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.lewandowski@pwr.edu.pl; Przybylski, Michał

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Construction of a Tunable Absorption System incorporating MRE has been done. • For system control by magnetic field a double circular Halbach array has been used. • Significant changes of the TSAs natural frequency and damping has been obtained. - Abstract: In this paper, the systematic design, construction and testing of a Tunable Absorption System (TAS) incorporating magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) has been investigated. The TAS has been designed for energy absorption and mitigation of vibratory motions from an impact excitation. The main advantage of the designed TAS is that it has the ability to change and adapt to working conditions. Tunability can be realised through a change in the magnetic field caused by the change of an internal arrangement of permanent magnets within a double dipolar circular Halbach array. To show the capabilities of the tested system, experiments based on an impulse excitation have been performed. Significant changes of the TASs natural frequency and damping characteristics have been obtained. By incorporating magnetic tunability within the TAS a significant qualitative and quantitative change in the devices mechanical properties and performance were obtained.

  8. Developing SASSA: a Soil Analysis Support System for Archaeologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Wilson

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available There is constant pressure on field archaeologists to be familiar with the core concepts of a diverse range of specialist disciplines. Soils and sediments are an integral part of archaeological sites, and soil and sedimentary analyses applied to archaeological questions are now recognised as an important branch of geoarchaeology. However, the teaching of soils in archaeology degrees is variable and many archaeologists complain they lack the confidence and skills to describe and interpret properly the deposits they excavate. SASSA (Soil Analysis Support System for Archaeologists is a free-to-use, internet-based system designed to familiarise archaeologists with the concepts and possibilities offered by the scientific study of soils and sediments associated with archaeological sites. The aims of SASSA are: ◦To provide soils training specifically for archaeologists, suitable for either a university or workplace setting. ◦To provide a freely accessible soils and archaeology knowledge base for archaeologists working in either the office or the field. ◦To support archaeologists describing and interpreting soils in the field. ◦To enhance understanding of the types of archaeological questions that soil analysis can help to address. ◦To initiate dialogue between archaeologists, geoarchaeologists, and soil scientists in order to encourage the thoughtful application of soil analyses to archaeological questions. SASSA consists of two core components: a knowledge base and a field tool. The 'front-end' of the website is the knowledge base; this uses wiki technology to allow users to add their own content and encourage dialogue between archaeologists and geoarchaeologists. The field tool uses an XML data structure and decision-tree support system to guide the user through the process of describing and interpreting soils and sediments. SASSA is designed for use on both 'static' (PC and 'mobile' (PDA and laptop hardware in order to provide in situ

  9. Simultaneous determination of Cd and Fe in beans and soil of different regions of Brazil using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and direct solid sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Lisia M G; Welz, Bernhard; Araujo, Rennan G O; Jacob, Silvana do C; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Martens, Andreas; Gonzaga Martens, Irland B; Becker-Ross, Helmut

    2009-11-11

    A fast routine screening method for the simultaneous determination of cadmium and iron in bean and soil samples is proposed, using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and direct solid sampling. The primary absorption line at 228.802 nm has been used for the determination of cadmium, and an adjacent secondary line, at 228.726 nm, for iron. Fourteen bean samples and 10 soil samples from nine states all over Brazil have been analyzed. The limits of detection (3 sigma, n = 10) were 2.0 microg kg(-1) for Cd and 4.5 mg kg(-1) for Fe. The relative standard deviation ranged from 4 to 7% for Cd and from 5 to 28% for Fe, which is usually acceptable for a screening method. The accuracy of the method has been confirmed by the analysis of two certified reference materials; the results were in agreement with the certified values at a 95% confidence interval.

  10. Analysis of a solar powered absorption system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Said, S.A.M.; El-Shaarawi, M.A.I.; Siddiqui, M.U.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Conventional absorption system modified to increase COP. • Results indicated increase of 10% in COP due to dephlegmator heat recovery. • Results indicated increase of 8% in COP due to refrigerant storage unit. • Results indicated increase of 18% in COP due to combined effect of modifications. • Simulation results indicated a very good agreement with the measured results. - Abstract: Today, fossil fuel is the primary extensively used source of energy. However, its negative impact on the environment have forced the energy research continuity to seriously consider renewable sources of energy. Solar energy, in particular, has been the main focus in this regard because it is a source of clean energy and naturally available. This study presents the design and analysis of a solar powered absorption refrigeration system modified to increase its coefficient of performance (COP). The modifications include recovering of waste heat from a dephlegmator and utilization of a refrigerant storage unit. The simulation results indicate an increase of 10% in the COP of the conventional design using dephlegmator heat recovery and an increase of 8% in the COP of the conventional design due to the use of a refrigerant storage. The analysis for the combined effect of modifications indicates an increase of 18% in the COP compared to conventional design. Calculated values of coefficient of performance indicate a very good agreement with the ones obtained based on measurement

  11. Industrial trigeneration using ammonia-water absorption refrigeration systems (AAR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colonna, Piero; Gabrielli, Sandro

    2003-01-01

    In many industrial processes there is a simultaneous need for electric power and refrigeration at low temperatures. Examples are in the food and chemical industries. Nowadays the increase in fuel prices and the ecological implications are giving an impulse to energy technologies that better exploit the primary energy source and integrated production of utilities should be considered when designing a new production plant. The number of so-called trigeneration systems installations (electric generator and absorption refrigeration plant) is increasing. If low temperature refrigeration is needed (from 0 to -40 deg. C), ammonia-water absorption refrigeration plants can be coupled to internal combustion engines or turbogenerators. A thermodynamic system study of trigeneration configurations using a commercial software integrated with specifically designed modules is presented. The study analyzes and compares heat recovery from the primary mover at different temperature levels. In the last section a simplified economic assessment that takes into account disparate prices in European countries compares conventional electric energy supply from the grid and optimized trigeneration plants in one test case (10 MW electric power, 7000 h/year)

  12. Effect of organic matter, irrigation and soil mulching on the nutritional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The elevation of soil organic matter level until 5.08% in conjunction with the implementation of 100% of Evapotranspiration (ETc) water depth and the use of mulch on the soil favored the greatest absorption of nutrients and increased the productivity of okra plant. Keywords: Cattle manure, nutrient absorption, management of ...

  13. Influence of Soil Tillage Systems on Soil Respiration and Production on Wheat, Maize and Soybean Crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraru, P. I.; Rusu, T.

    2012-04-01

    Soil respiration leads to CO2 emissions from soil to the atmosphere, in significant amounts for the global carbon cycle. Soil capacity to produce CO2 varies depending on soil, season, intensity and quality of agrotechnical tillage, soil water, cultivated plant, fertilizer etc. The data presented in this paper were obtained on argic-stagnic Faeoziom (SRTS, 2003). These areas were was our research, presents a medium multiannual temperature of 8.20C, medium of multiannual rain drowns: 613 mm. The experimental variants chosen were: A. Conventional system (CS): V1-reversible plough (22-25 cm)+rotary grape (8-10 cm); B. Minimum tillage system (MT): V2 - paraplow (18-22 cm) + rotary grape (8-10 cm); V3 - chisel (18-22 cm) + rotary grape (8-10 cm);V4 - rotary grape (10-12 cm); C. No-Tillage systems (NT): V5 - direct sowing. The experimental design was a split-plot design with three replications. In one variant the area of a plot was 300 m2. The experimental variants were studied in the 3 years crop rotation: maize - soy-bean - autumn wheat. To soil respiration under different tillage practices, determinations were made for each crop in four vegetative stages (spring, 5-6 leaves, bean forming, harvest) using ACE Automated Soil CO2 Exchange System. Soil respiration varies throughout the year for all three crops of rotation, with a maximum in late spring (1383 to 2480 mmoli m-2s-1) and another in fall (2141 to 2350 mmoli m-2s-1). The determinations confirm the effect of soil tillage system on soil respiration, the daily average is lower at NT (315-1914 mmoli m-2s-1), followed by MT (318-2395 mmoli m-2s-1) and is higher in the CS (321-2480 mmol m-2s-1). Productions obtained at MT and NT don't have significant differences at wheat and are higher at soybean. The differences in crop yields are recorded at maize and can be a direct consequence of loosening, mineralization and intensive mobilization of soil fertility. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by CNCSIS

  14. Lasting effects of soil health improvements with management changes in cotton-based cropping systems in a sandy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    The soil microbial component is essential for sustainable agricultural systems and soil health. This study evaluated the lasting impacts of 5 years of soil health improvements from alternative cropping systems compared to intensively tilled continuous cotton (Cont. Ctn) in a low organic matter sandy...

  15. Cenotic and physiological control of the radionuclides migration into system soil-plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravets, A.P.

    1998-01-01

    Some biological - cenotic and physiological - factors which determine the availability of radionuclides for a plant and the general capacity for the accumulation of pollutants were investigated and analysed. Metabolites of soil microorganisms and especially root excretion of higher plants increase the rate of destruction of solid forms of pollution and enhance the leaching of radionuclides from the solid matrix. The following facts were demonstrated in the conditions of contamination heterogeneity of Chernobyl fallout: (i) During the period of vegetation the plants of different species of f. Poacea, 1 .5 to 2.7-fold increase in the chemical mobility and biological availability of radionuclides; (ii) Additional increase in the concentration of soil microorganisms (micromycetes) leads to enhanced contents of the mobile form of the pollutant in soil and increases the level of accumulation of the radionuclides by higher plants; (iii) Increase in the density of sowing (and competition, respectively) of the different species of the plants also leads to an enhanced availability of the radionuclides and 1 .7 to 2.4- fold increase in the level of accumulation of the radionuclides by the plants. Other aspect of formation of the level of plant pollution include the peculiarities of radionuclide absorption and accumulation by the plant biomass. The effects of a high density of sowing, high level of the watering and gamma irradiation on the changes in the level of radionuclide accumulation and, at the same time, the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the plant biomass were investigated in the laboratory and in a greenhouse experiment. In parallel, increased CEC and radionuclide accumulation by a factor of 1.5 to 2.7 was demonstrated. These facts suggest that the biological factors are a powerful tool of control of the pollutants availability and accumulation and may be take into account under development of the modern agricultural technology for clear products formation

  16. LiCl Dehumidifier LiBr absorption chiller hybrid air conditioning system with energy recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Suk M.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a hybrid air conditioning system that combines a solar powered LiCl dehumidifier with a LiBr absorption chiller. The desiccant dehumidifier removes the latent load by absorbing moisture from the air, and the sensible load is removed by the absorption chiller. The desiccant dehumidifier is coupled to a regenerator and the desiccant in the regenerator is heated by solar heated hot water to drive the moisture therefrom before being fed back to the dehumidifier. The heat of vaporization expended in the desiccant regenerator is recovered and used to partially preheat the driving fluid of the absorption chiller, thus substantially improving the overall COP of the hybrid system.

  17. Soil solution interactions may limit Pb remediation using P amendments in an urban soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrycki, John F; Scheckel, Kirk G; Basta, Nicholas T

    2017-01-01

    Lead (Pb) contaminated soils are a potential exposure hazard to the public. Amending soils with phosphorus (P) may reduce Pb soil hazards. Soil from Cleveland, OH containing 726 ± 14 mg Pb kg -1 was amended in a laboratory study with bone meal and triple super phosphate (TSP) at 5:1 P:Pb molar ratios. Soil was acidified, neturalized and re-acidified to encourage Pb phosphate formation. PRSTM-probes were used to evaluate changes in soil solution chemistry. Soil acidification did not decrease in vitro bioaccessible (IVBA) Pb using either a pH 1.5, 0.4 M glycine solution or a pH 2.5 solution with organic acids. PRSTM-probe data found soluble Pb increased 10-fold in acidic conditions compared to circumnetural pH conditions. In acidic conditions (p = 3-4), TSP treated soils increased detected P 10-fold over untreated soils. Bone meal application did not increase PRSTM-probe detected P, indicating there may have been insufficient P to react with Pb. X-ray absorption spectroscopy suggested a 10% increase in pyromorphite formation for the TSP treated soil only. Treatments increased soil electrical conductivity above 16 mS cm -1 , potentially causing a new salinity hazard. This study used a novel approach by combining the human ingestion endpoint, PRSTM-probes, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy to evaluate treatment efficacy. PRSTM-probe data indicated potentially excess Ca relative to P across incubation steps that could have competed with Pb for soluble P. More research is needed to characterize soil solutions in Pb contaminated urban soils to identify where P treatments might be effective and when competing cations, such as Ca, Fe, and Zn may limit low rate P applications for treating Pb soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A thermodynamic evaluation on high pressure condenser of double effect absorption refrigeration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yılmaz, İbrahim Halil; Saka, Kenan; Kaynakli, Omer

    2016-01-01

    One of the parameters affecting the COP of the absorption system can be considered as the thermal balance between the high pressure condenser (HPC) and the low pressure generator (LPG) since heat rejected from the HPC is utilized as an energy source by the LPG. Condensation of the water vapor in the HPC depends on the heat removal via the LPG. This circumstance is significant for making an appropriate design and a controllable system with high performance in practical applications. For this reason, a thermodynamic analysis for the HPC of a double effect series flow water/lithium bromide absorption refrigeration system was emphasized in this study. A simulation was developed to investigate the energy transfer between the HPC and LPG. The results show that the proper designation of the HPC temperature improves the COP and ECOP due its significant impact, and its value necessarily has to be higher than the outlet temperature of the LPG based on the operating scheme. Furthermore, the COP and ECOP of the absorption system can be raised in the range of 9.72–35.09% in case of 2 °C-temperature increment in the HPC under the described conditions to be applied. - Highlights: • Thermal balance in HPC/LPG unit of a double effect absorption system was studied. • A simulation program was developed and its outputs were validated. • A parametric study was conducted for a wide range of component temperatures. • Proper designation of the HPC temperature improves the COP and ECOP. • The system performance raised 9.72–35.09% by controlling the HPC temperature.

  19. Absorption of electromagnetic field energy by superfluid system of atoms with electric dipole moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poluektov, Yu.M.

    2014-01-01

    The modified Gross-Pitaevskii equation which takes into account relaxation and interaction with alternating electromagnetic field is used to consider the absorption of electromagnetic field energy by a superfluid system on the assumption that the atoms has intrinsic dipole moment. It is shown that the absorption may be of a resonant behavior only if the dispersion curves of the electromagnetic wave and the excitations of the superfluid system intersect. It is remarkable that such a situation is possible if the superfluid system has a branch of excitations with the energy gap at low momenta. The experiments on absorption of microwaves in superfluid helium are interpreted as evidence of existence of such gap excitations. A possible modification of the excitation spectrum of superfluid helium in the presence of excitation branch with energy gap is dis-cussed qualitatively

  20. Monitoring and analysis of an absorption air-conditioning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez de Vinaspre, M.; Bourouis, M.; Coronas, A. [Centro de Innovacion Tecnologica en Revalorizacion Energetica y Refrigeracion, Tarragona (Spain); Garcia, A.; Soto, V.; Pinazo, J.M. [E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales, Valencia (Spain)

    2004-09-01

    In the last few years, high-energy consumption due to air-conditioning has led to a growing interest in the efficient use of energy in buildings. Although simulation programs have always been the main tools for analyzing energy in buildings, the reliability of their results is often compromised by a lack of certainty to reflect real conditions. The aim of this work is to monitorize and analyze the thermal behavior of an absorption-based air-conditioning installation of a university building in Tarragona, Spain. The existing monitoring system of the installation has been improved by implementing additional sensors and flow meters. The data has been stored during summer 2002 and used to assess the energy balance of the air-conditioning installation and the operational regime of the absorption chiller. [Author].

  1. Tillage System and Cover Crop Effects on Soil Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdollahi, Lotfollah; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2014-01-01

    ), and moldboard plowing (MP) with and without a cover crop were evaluated in a long-term experiment on a sandy loam soil in Denmark. Chemical, physical, and biological soil properties were measured in the spring of 2012. The field measurements included mean weight diameter (MWD) after the drop-shatter test......, penetration resistance, and visual evaluation of soil structure (VESS). In the laboratory, aggregate strength, water-stable aggregates (WSA), and clay dispersibility were measured. The analyzed chemical and biological properties included soil organic C (SOC), total N, microbial biomass C, labile P and K......Optimal use of management systems including tillage and winter cover crops is recommended to improve soil quality and sustain agricultural production. The effects on soil properties of three tillage systems (as main plot) including direct drilling (D), harrowing to a depth of 8 to 10 cm (H...

  2. Nutrient Release from Disturbance of Infiltration System Soils during Construction

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel P. Treese; Shirley E. Clark; Katherine H. Baker

    2012-01-01

    Subsurface infiltration and surface bioretention systems composed of engineered and/or native soils are preferred tools for stormwater management. However, the disturbance of native soils, especially during the process of adding amendments to improve infiltration rates and pollutant removal, may result in releases of nutrients in the early life of these systems. This project investigated the nutrient release from two soils, one disturbed and one undisturbed. The disturbed soil was collected i...

  3. Nonlinear absorption of fullerene- and nanotubes-doped liquid crystal systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kamanina, N.; Reshak, Ali H; Vasiliev, P.Y.; Vangonen, A. I.; Studeonov, V. I.; Usanov, Y. E.; Ebothe, J.; Gondek, E.; Wojcik, W.; Danel, A.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 3 (2009), s. 391-394 ISSN 1386-9477 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : nonlinear absorption properties * organic electrooptical systems * liquid crystal * fullerene s * nanotubes * PVK-derivatives Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.177, year: 2009

  4. Solar system for soil drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocic, Z.R.; Stojanovic, J.B.; Antic, M.A.; Pavlovic, T.M.

    1999-01-01

    The paper reviews solar system for drainage of the cultivable agricultural surfaces which can be situated near the rivers in plains. These are usually very fertile surfaces which cannot be cultivated die to constant presence of the water. Using such solar systems should increase the percentage of cultivable surfaces. These systems can also be installed on the cultivable agricultural surfaces, where the water surfaces or so called still waters appear, which make impossible the application of agritechnical measures on these surfaces, significantly decreasing crops and creating conditions for the growth of pond plants and animals. Increasing the percentage of cultivable agricultural surfaces would increase national agricultural income. At the same time, increasing the percentage of cultivable agricultural surfaces decreases the surfaces of unhealthy bog, swamp and marshland soils, where many insect breed. They are the cause for soil spraying from the air, which causes the pollution of environment. Solar systems do not pollute the environment because they use solar energy as the purest source of energy. Their usage has special significance in the places where there is no electricity distribution network

  5. Probabilistic frequency variations of structure-soil systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, C.W.; Hadjian, A.H.

    1976-01-01

    During earthquakes, structure-soil systems act as filters greatly amplifying the response of equipment whose frequencies are at or near their natural frequencies. Thus, the estimation of these structure-soil system frequencies assumes significant importance both for safety and cost. Actual in-situ frequencies of structures differ from calculated frequencies due both to variations in mathematical modelling techniques and to variations of material properties. This paper studies the second source only. This variability is usually gauged by the 'worst case' analyses technique in which extreme high- and low- parameter values are assumed and the associated frequencies are used as upper and lower bounds. This approach is not entirely satisfactory because it does not provide any indication of the probability of these limits being exceeded, of the distribution between these limits, or of the level of conservation introduced into the design process. The present approach provides this additional information. The emphasis in this part is both on developing the methodology and on the results obtained. It covers both the fixed-base structure and the effects of soil-structure interaction. Empirical data on concrete proerties were obtained from previously published results. Much less is known about variability of soil properties, so the soil structure interaction coefficients are assumed to be normally distributed. As data on the variation of soil properties become available, they can be readily incorporated via the methodology developed here. (Auth.)

  6. Prototype explosives detection system based on nuclear resonance absorption in nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgado, R.E.; Arnone, G.J.; Cappiello, C.C.

    1996-01-01

    A laboratory prototype system has been developed for the experimental evaluation of an explosives detection technique based on nuclear resonance absorption of gamma rays in nitrogen. Major subsystems include a radiofrequency quadrupole proton accelerator and associated beam transport system, a high-power gamma-ray production target, an airline-luggage tomographic inspection system, and an image- processing/detection-alarm subsystem. The detection system performance, based on a limited experimental test, is reported

  7. USDA soil classification system dictates site surface management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowmer, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Success or failure of site surface management practices greatly affects long-term site stability. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) soil classification system best documents those parameters which control the success of installed practices for managing both erosion and surface drainage. The USDA system concentrates on soil characteristics in the upper three meters of the surface that support the associated flora both physically and physiologically. The USDA soil survey first identifies soil series based on detailed characteristics that are related to production potential. Using the production potential, land use capability classes are developed. Capability classes reveal the highest and best agronomic use for the site. Lower number classes are considered arable while higher number classes are best suited for grazing agriculture. Application of ecological principles based on the USDA soil survey reveals the current state of the site relative to its ecological potential. To assure success, site management practices must be chosen that are compatible with both production capability and current state of the site

  8. Study on adsorption of 60Co in soils and minerals and transportation of 60Co in bean-soil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yonghong; Chen Chuanqun; Wang Shouxiang; Zhang Yongxi; Sun Zhiming

    1998-02-01

    The adsorption and desorption of 60 Co in soils and minerals, and the transportation, accumulation, distribution in bean-soil system are studied. The results are as follows: (1) 60 Co was adsorbed rapidly and desorbed difficultly by soils and minerals. The order of the saturated adsorption rate and K d (distribution coefficient) of 60 Co at the balance value was: kieselguhr>paddy soil (loamy clay)>yellowish red soil>kaoline>perlite>silt-loamy soil. The order of D f (desorption factor) value was: yellowish red soil>silt-loamy soil>kaoline>perlite>paddy soil (loamy clay)>kieselguhr. The dynamic behavior of 60 Co in the soils and minerals could be described as a closed two--compartment model. (2) After 60 Co was introduced to the bean-soil system, the concentration of 60 Co in the root is about 10.4∼23.3 times of that in the stalk, and 30 times of that in the bean pod. The negative correlation between the concentration of 60 Co in the soil and depth was detected, over 90 per cent of 60 Co was retained within 6 centimeters of the surface layer, the half residual depth was 2 centimeters. An opened two-compartment model was applied to describe the behavior of 60 Co in the bean-soil system

  9. Nitrogen dynamics in a soil-sugar cane system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Julio Cesar Martins de; Reichardt, Klaus; Bacchi, Osny O.S.; Timm, Luis Carlos; Tominaga, Tania Toyomi; Castro Navarro, Roberta de; Cassaro, Fabio Augusto Meira; Dourado-Neto, Durval; Trivelin, Paulo Cesar Ocheuse; Piccolo, Marisa de Cassia

    2000-01-01

    Results of an organic matter management experiment of a sugar cane crop are reported for the first cropping year. Sugar cane was planted in October 1997, and labeled with a 15 N fertilizer pulse to study the fate of organic matter in the soil-plant system. A nitrogen balance is presented, partitioning the system in plant components (stalk, tip and straw), soil components (five soil organic matter fractions) and evaluating leaching losses. The 15 N label permitted to determine, at the end of the growing season, amounts of nitrogen derived from the fertilizer, present in the above mentioned compartments. (author)

  10. Swelling Behaviour of Superabsorbent Polymers for Soil Amendment under Different Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Lejcuś

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important among the numerous applications of superabsorbent polymers (SAPs, also known as hydrogels, is soil improvement and supporting plant vegetation in agriculture and environmental engineering. Currently, when water scarcity involves water stress, they are becoming still more commonly used for water retention in soil. As it turns out, one of the major factors influencing the superabsorbent polymers water retention capacity (WRC is the load of soil. The study presents test results of absorbency under load (AUL of SAPs. The object of the analysis was cross-linked copolymer of acrylamide and potassium acrylate, of a granulation of 0.50–3.15 mm. The authors analysed the water absorption capacity of the superabsorbent polymers under loads characteristic for 3 different densities of soil (1.3 g∙cm−3, 0.9 g∙cm−3, 0.5 g∙cm−3 and three different depths of application (10 cm, 20 cm, and 30 cm. Soil load and bulk densities were simulated by using weights. The experiments were conducted with a Mecmesin Multitest 2.5-xt apparatus. The obtained results demonstrate a very significant reduction in water absorption capacity by SAP under load. For a 30 cm deep layer of soil of bulk density of 1.3 g∙cm−3, after 1 h, this value amounted to 5.0 g∙g−1, and for the control sample without load, this value amounted to more than 200 g∙g−1. For the lowest load in the experiment, which was 0.49 kPa (10 cm deep layer of soil of a bulk density of 0.5 g∙cm−3, this value was 33.0 g∙g−1 after 60 min. Loads do not only limit the volume of the swelling superabsorbent polymer but they also prolong the swelling time. The soil load caused a decrease in the absorption capacity from 338.5 g∙g−1 to 19.3 g∙g−1, as well as a prolongation of the swelling time. The rate parameter (time required to reach 63% of maximum absorption capacity increased from 63 min for the control sample to more than 300 min for the largest analysed

  11. Study of an absorption machine for an ammonia-water system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper deals with Study of an absorption machine for an ammonia-water system decentralized trigeneration. The effects of evaporator, absorber and boiler temperature on the coefficient of performance of this cycle investigate. Simulation results show that with increasing the evaporator and absorber temperature the ...

  12. Analysis Of Non-Volatile Toxic Heavy Metals (Cd, Pb, Cu,Cr And Zn) In ALLIUM SATIVUM (Garlic) And Soil Samples ,Collected From Different Locations Of Punjab, Pakistan By Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Ata S.; Tayyab S.; Rasool A.

    2013-01-01

    Garlic is one of the most widely used medicinal plants. The monitoring of toxic metals such as lead, Cadmium, Chromium, Copper and Zinc in garlic and the soil of garlic fields collected from ten different cities of Punjab is critical for preventing public health against the hazards of metal toxicity. The levels of toxic heavy metals in garlic and soil samples were investigated using Atomic absorption spectrometer. The metal content in garlic samples was found to be in increasing order as Cr> ...

  13. [Signal analysis and spectrum distortion correction for tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Wei-Yi; Zhu, Yong; Chen, Jun; Chen, Jun-Qing; Liang, Bo

    2011-04-01

    In the present paper, the signal of a tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) trace gas sensing system, which has a wavelength modulation with a wide range of modulation amplitudes, is studied based on Fourier analysis method. Theory explanation of spectrum distortion induced by laser intensity amplitude modulation is given. In order to rectify the spectrum distortion, a method of synchronous amplitude modulation suppression by a variable optical attenuator is proposed. To validate the method, an experimental setup is designed. Absorption spectrum measurement experiments on CO2 gas were carried out. The results show that the residual laser intensity modulation amplitude of the experimental system is reduced to -0.1% of its original value and the spectrum distortion improvement is 92% with the synchronous amplitude modulation suppression. The modulation amplitude of laser intensity can be effectively reduced and the spectrum distortion can be well corrected by using the given correction method and system. By using a variable optical attenuator in the TDLAS (tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy) system, the dynamic range requirements of photoelectric detector, digital to analog converter, filters and other aspects of the TDLAS system are reduced. This spectrum distortion correction method can be used for online trace gas analyzing in process industry.

  14. Numerical solution for heave of expansive soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadrnezhad, S. A.

    1999-01-01

    A numerical solution for heave prediction is developed within the context theories for both saturated and unsaturated soil behaviors. Basically, lowering the potential level of compressing on a saturated layer will cause heaving due to water absorption. This water absorption is in an opposite way, similar to water dissipation as what happens during unloading in consolidation process. However, in unsaturated layers any change of the stability of potential energy level will cause the tendency of change in particle interconnection forces. So, any change by either distressing or the variation of moisture ratio will lead to soil heave. In this paper a finite element solution is employed for predicting the heave in saturated soil similar to unloading in consolidation. Also, in the case of unsaturated soil, equivalent soil suction as negative pore water pressures in applied to soil elements as equivalent nodal forces. To show the potential of this method, test results were com pated with those obtained from computations. These comparisons show that the presented method is capable of predicting the heave phenomenon quite well

  15. X-ray Microspectroscopy and Chemical Reactions in Soil Microsites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Hesterberg; M Duff; J Dixon; M Vepraskas

    2011-12-31

    Soils provide long-term storage of environmental contaminants, which helps to protect water and air quality and diminishes negative impacts of contaminants on human and ecosystem health. Characterizing solid-phase chemical species in highly complex matrices is essential for developing principles that can be broadly applied to the wide range of notoriously heterogeneous soils occurring at the earth's surface. In the context of historical developments in soil analytical techniques, we describe applications of bulk-sample and spatially resolved synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) for characterizing chemical species of contaminants in soils, and for determining the uniqueness of trace-element reactivity in different soil microsites. Spatially resolved X-ray techniques provide opportunities for following chemical changes within soil microsites that serve as highly localized chemical micro- (or nano-)reactors of unique composition. An example of this microreactor concept is shown for micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis of metal sulfide oxidation in a contaminated soil. One research challenge is to use information and principles developed from microscale soil chemistry for predicting macroscale and field-scale behavior of soil contaminants.

  16. Determination of solute organic concentration in contaminated soils using a chemical-equilibrium soil column system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamst, Jesper; Kjeldsen, Peter; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2007-01-01

    using two soils with different content of organic carbon (f(oc) of 1.5 and 6.5%, respectively). A quadruple blind test of the ER-V system using glass beads in stead of soil showed an acceptable recovery (65-85%) of all of the 11 VOCs tested. Only for the most volatile compound (heptane, K-H similar...... to 80) an unacceptable recovery was found (9%). The contact time needed for obtaining chemical equilibrium was tested in the ER-H system by performing five test with different duration (1, 2, 4, 7 and 19 days) using the low organic carbon soil. Seven days of contact time appeared sufficient...... for determination of solute concentration in a contaminated soil were developed; (1) a chemical Equilibrium and Recirculation column test for Volatile organic chemicals (ER-V) and (2) a chemical Equilibrium and Recirculation column test for Hydrophobic organic chemicals (ER-H). The two test systems were evaluated...

  17. Behaviour of radioactive and stable isotopes of calcium in the soil-solution-plant system at different soil humidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karavaeva, E.N.; Molchanova, I.V.

    1976-01-01

    The results of experiments performed to study the behaviour of radioactive and stable isotopes of Ca in soil - solution - plant system at different soil moistening are given. The experiments have been conducted in culture pans with two soils: soddy-meadow and soddy-podzolic differing in a number of physico-chemical properties. The solution of radioactive Ca( 45 CaCl 2 ) has been applied to soddy-meadow soil at the rate of 0.2 μcurie/kg, and to soddy-podzolic soil - at the rate of 0.1 μcurie/kg. The distribution and accumulation coefficients are estimated by the ratio to the total content of stable Ca and 45 Ca in soil. A direct relationship between distribution coefficients and the rate of soil moistening is observed. It has been established that 45 Ca and the natural stable isotopes of Ca applied to the soil differ in the type of distribution in soil - soil solution system and in accumulation by plants. However, a great similarity has been observed in behaviour of radioactive and stable isotopes of Ca depending on soil moistening

  18. Absorption of arsenic from soil and water by two chard (Beta vulgaris L.) varieties: A potential risk to human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yañez, L M; Alfaro, J A; Bovi Mitre, G

    2018-04-14

    The accumulation of arsenic (As) in vegetables poses a risk of contamination to humans via the food chain. Two chard (var. cicla and var. d'ampuis) crops were grown for 60 days in greenhouses on Aridisol soil, and irrigated with water from Pastos Chicos, Jujuy (Argentina). The soil and water used in the trial presented 49 and 1.44 mg/L As concentration levels, respectively. Total dry biomass (TDB) and total As were determined in soils, roots and leaves. The latter was quantified by atomic absorption spectrometry with hydride generation, and bioconcentration and translocation factors were determined. TDB in var. cicla showed statistically significant differences when the plant was cultivated in control soil and watered with the toxicant (2.04 g), as compared with the treatment without exposure (2.8 g). TDB in var. d'ampuis presented statistically significant differences with respect to that of the control when the plants were grown in soils with As and watered with the toxicant (3.3 g). This variety increased its biomass in the presence of As. In the two Swiss chard varieties evaluated, the largest As accumulation in root and leaves was found when they were cultivated in contaminated soil and watered with distilled water. The presence of the toxicant in the leaves exceeded the limits established by Código Alimentario Argentino, i.e. 0.30 mg/kg. Total target hazard quotient (THQ) values for As were higher than 1, suggesting that consumers would run significant risks when consuming these chard varieties. Furthermore, it was determined that the carcinogenic risk (CR) posed by this type of exposure to As exceeded the acceptable risk level of 1 × 10 -6 . Based on this evidence, we may conclude that consuming chard cultivated on the evaluated site brings about considerable risks to local residents' health. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Soil microbial biomass in an agroforestry system of Northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane C. Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Agroforestry systems (AFS are considered alternative land use options to help prevent soil degradation and improve soil microbial biomass and organic C status. However, it is unclear how different densities of babassu palm [Attalea speciosa (syn. Orbignya phalerata], which is an important tree in Northeast Brazil, affect the soil microbial biomass. We investigated the soil microbial biomass C and activity under AFS with different densities of babassu palm associated with Brachiaria brizantha grass. Soil microbial biomass C (MBC, soil microbial biomass N (MBN, MBC:total organic C ratio, fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis and dehydrogenase activity showed highest values in plots with high density of babassu palm. On the other hand, the respiratory quotient (qCO2 was significantly greater in plots without babassu palm. Brachiaria brizantha in monoculture may promote C losses from the soil, but AFS with high density of babassu palm may increase the potential of soils to accumulate C.Keywords: Enzyme activity, tropical soil, babassu palm, silvopastoral system, soil quality.DOI: 10.17138/TGFT(341-48

  20. Environmental behavior of soils and mixtures of soil-whitewash mud

    OpenAIRE

    Machado,Carlos Cardoso; Pires,José Maurício Machado; Fontes,Maurício Paulo F.; Pereira,Reginaldo Sérgio; Portugal,Carla Ribeiro Machado e

    2004-01-01

    The present study sought to observe the behavior of soils in natural state and in mixtures, in different ratios, with the industrial solid residue called whitewash mud. The work was conducted with samples of typical soils from the region of Alagoinhas, Bahia-Brazil. Wet chemical analysis and atomic absorption spectrophotometry were used in order to obtain the classification of the industrial solid residue. Solubilization and leaching tests were performed and X-ray diffraction and electron mic...

  1. Acidity field of soils as ion-exchange systems and the diagnostics of genetic soil horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotov, Yu. A.; Sukhacheva, E. Yu.; Aparin, B. F.

    2014-12-01

    For the comprehensive description of the acidity of a two-phase ion-exchange system, we should analyze two curves of the ionite titration by a strong base in water and salt solutions and find the quantitative relationships between the corresponding pH characteristics. An idea of the three-dimensional field of acidity of ion-exchange systems (the phase space of the soil acidity characteristics) and its three two-dimensional projections is suggested. For soils, three interrelated characteristics—the pH values of the salt and water extracts and the degree of base saturation—can serve as spatial coordinates for the acidity field. Representation of factual data in this field makes it possible to compare and analyze the acidity characteristics of different soils and soil horizons and to determine their specific features. Differentiation of the field into separate volumes allows one to present the data in a discrete form. We have studied the distribution patterns of the groups of soil horizons from Leningrad oblast and other regions of northwestern Russia in the acidity field. The studied samples are grouped in different partially overlapping areas of the projections of the acidity field. The results of this grouping attest to the correctness of the modern classification of Russian soils. A notion of the characteristic soil area in the acidity field is suggested; it can be applied to all the soils with a leaching soil water regime.

  2. National Soil Information System in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrah Erdogan, Hakki; Sahin, Mehmet; Sahin, Yuksel

    2013-04-01

    Land consolidation (LC) represents complexity if management, legal, economic and technical procedures realized in order to adjust the land structure according to actual human preferences and needs. It includes changes in ownership rights to land and other real estate property, exchange of parcels among owners, changes in parcel borders, parcel size and shape, joining and dividing of parcels, changes in land use, construction works as roads, bridges, water changes etc.. Since the subject of LC is agricultural lands, the quality of consolidation depends on the quality of soil data. General Directorate of Agrarian Reform (GDAR) is the responsible institution on land consolidation whole of Turkey. Under GDAR, National Soil Information System (NSIS) has been build up with base soil data in relevant scale (1:5000). NSIS contain detailed information on soil chemical and physical properties, current land use, parent material, land capability class, Storie Index Values. SI were used on land consolidation, land use planning and farm development services. LCC was used for land distribution, rental land; define of village settlement, consolidation, expropriation, reconstruction, reclamation, non-agricultural usage. LCC were also specified to subclasses in four different limited factors as i) flow and erosion risk ii) requirement of drainage and soil moisture iii) Limits of soil tillage and root (shallow soils, low water retention capacity, stony, salty .etc) iv) climatic limits. In this study, digital soil survey and mapping project located in Yumurtalik, Adana is presented as an example of NSIS data structure. The project cover an area of 45709 ha that include crop lands as an area of 28528 ha and other land use (urban, roads..etc) as an area of 17181 ha. Soil profiles were described in 45 different points and totally 1279 soil samples were collected in field study and the check bore hole were made in 3170 points.

  3. A experimental system for the checking of the absorption of E.C.A.G. graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raievski, V.; Vidal, R.

    1958-01-01

    A system is described for measuring the mean absorption cross section in thermal neutrons of graphite. This system consists of a graphite stack containing a Ra-Be source and a BF3 counter. A cavity in the stack receives the graphite to be studied or the graphite standard. By comparing the counting rates their absorption ratio can be deduced. The measurement is performed on graphite rods which have been machined before being placed in the pile. It provides the possibility of detecting over a batch of 1 ton of graphite, in a single measurement, a difference in absorption of 0.1 milli barn. (author) [fr

  4. Absorption heat pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formigoni, C.

    1998-01-01

    A brief description of the difference between a compression and an absorption heat pump is made, and the reasons why absorption systems have spread lately are given. Studies and projects recently started in the field of absorption heat pumps, as well as criteria usually followed in project development are described. An outline (performance targets, basic components) of a project on a water/air absorption heat pump, running on natural gas or LPG, is given. The project was developed by the Robur Group as an evolution of a water absorption refrigerator operating with a water/ammonia solution, which has been on the market for a long time and recently innovated. Finally, a list of the main energy and cost advantages deriving from the use of absorption heat pumps is made [it

  5. Moisture movement in cement-based repair systems monitored by X-ray absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukovic, M.; Ye, G.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.; van Breugel, K.

    2017-01-01

    In concrete repair systems, material properties in the repair material and interface are greatly influenced by the initial moisture content of the concrete (or mortar) substrate. In order to quantify moisture profiles inside the repair system, X-ray absorption was used. Preliminary studies are

  6. Simulation of large-scale soil water systems using groundwater data and satellite based soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreye, Phillip; Meon, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Complex concepts for the physically correct depiction of dominant processes in the hydrosphere are increasingly at the forefront of hydrological modelling. Many scientific issues in hydrological modelling demand for additional system variables besides a simulation of runoff only, such as groundwater recharge or soil moisture conditions. Models that include soil water simulations are either very simplified or require a high number of parameters. Against this backdrop there is a heightened demand of observations to be used to calibrate the model. A reasonable integration of groundwater data or remote sensing data in calibration procedures as well as the identifiability of physically plausible sets of parameters is subject to research in the field of hydrology. Since this data is often combined with conceptual models, the given interfaces are not suitable for such demands. Furthermore, the application of automated optimisation procedures is generally associated with conceptual models, whose (fast) computing times allow many iterations of the optimisation in an acceptable time frame. One of the main aims of this study is to reduce the discrepancy between scientific and practical applications in the field of hydrological modelling. Therefore, the soil model DYVESOM (DYnamic VEgetation SOil Model) was developed as one of the primary components of the hydrological modelling system PANTA RHEI. DYVESOMs structure provides the required interfaces for the calibrations made at runoff, satellite based soil moisture and groundwater level. The model considers spatial and temporal differentiated feedback of the development of the vegetation on the soil system. In addition, small scale heterogeneities of soil properties (subgrid-variability) are parameterized by variation of van Genuchten parameters depending on distribution functions. Different sets of parameters are operated simultaneously while interacting with each other. The developed soil model is innovative regarding concept

  7. The integration of innovative technologies into a physical-separation-based soil washing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstich, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    An innovative system's approach to the treatment of soils at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) has been proposed to effectively and cost competitively treat a significant mass of soil. The use of an integrated soil treatment system to decontaminate FEMP soils is a unique application of the soil washing technology. Due to the unfavorable soil particle size distribution and the ubiquitous distribution of uranium among these particle size fractions, conventional soil washing processes commonly used on predominantly sandy soils alone may not achieve the desirable waste minimization level without the inclusion of innovative technologies. This objective of this paper is to briefly describe the physical separation and chemical extraction process commonly used in soil washing operation and to present the baseline soil washing approach used on FEMP soils. Noting the successful and not-so-successful processes within the soil washing operation at the FEMP, a proposed innovative system's approach to treating FEMP soils will be described. This system's approach will integrate a conventional soil washing operation with proposed innovative technologies

  8. Ethnopedology and soil quality of bamboo (Bambusa sp.) based agroforestry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun Jyoti, Nath; Lal, Rattan; Das, Ashesh Kumar

    2015-07-15

    It is widely recognized that farmers' hold important knowledge of folk soil classification for agricultural land for its uses, yet little has been studied for traditional agroforestry systems. This article explores the ethnopedology of bamboo (Bambusa sp.) based agroforestry system in North East India, and establishes the relationship of soil quality index (SQI) with bamboo productivity. The study revealed four basic folk soil (mati) types: kalo (black soil), lal (red soil), pathal (stony soil) and balu (sandy soil). Of these, lal mati soil was the most predominant soil type (~ 40%) in bamboo-based agroforestry system. Soil physio-chemical parameters were studied to validate the farmers' soil hierarchal classification and also to correlate with productivity of the bamboo stand. Farmers' hierarchal folk soil classification was consistent with the laboratory scientific analysis. Culm production (i.e. measure of productivity of bamboo) was the highest (27culmsclump(-1)) in kalo mati (black soil) and the lowest (19culmsclump(-1)) in balu mati (sandy soil). Linear correlation of individual soil quality parameter with bamboo productivity explained 16 to 49% of the variability. A multiple correlation of the best fitted linear soil quality parameter (soil organic carbon or SOC, water holding capacity or WHC, total nitrogen) with productivity improved explanatory power to 53%. Development of SQI from ten relevant soil quality parameters and its correlation with bamboo productivity explained the 64% of the variation and therefore, suggest SQI as the best determinant of bamboo yield. Data presented indicate that the kalo mati (black soil) is sustainable or sustainable with high input. However, the other three folk soil types (red, stony and sandy soil) are also sustainable but for other land uses. Therefore, ethnopedological studies may move beyond routine laboratory analysis and incorporate SQI for assessing the sustainability of land uses managed by the farmers'. Additional

  9. Short Communication: Soil carbon pools in different pasture systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardozo, F.M. Jr.; Carneiro, R.F.V.; Leite, L.F.C.; Araujo, A.S.F.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the carbon pools of a tropical soil where the native forest was replaced with different pasture systems. We studied five pasture production systems, including four monoculture systems with forage grasses such as Andropogon, Brachiaria, Panicum, and Cynodon, and an agroforestry system as well as a native vegetation plot. Greater availability of fulvic acid was detected in the agroforestry system as compared with that in the other systems. Higher lability of C was detected in the Andropogon system during the dry and rainy seasons and during the dry season in Cynodon. During the dry season, all pastures systems showed deficits in the net removal of atmospheric CO2. The structure and practices of the agroforestry system enables more carbon to be sequestered in the soil as compared with the monoculture pasture, suggesting that it is an important practice to mitigate climatic change and to improve soil quality. (Author)

  10. Analysis of a multicomponent gas absorption system with carrier gas coabsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merriman, J.R.

    1975-03-01

    Conventional integrated versions of the packed gas absorber design equations do not account for significant coabsorption of the carrier gas along with the dilute transferring species. These equations, as a result, also neglect the relationship between dilute component transfer and carrier gas coabsorption. In the absorption of Kr and Xe from various carrier gases, using CCl 2 F 2 as the process solvent, carrier coabsorption is substantial. Consequently, a design package was developed to deal with multicomponent gas absorption in systems characterized by carrier gas coabsorption. Developed within the general film theory framework, the basic feature of this design approach is a view of dilute component mass-transfer as a conventional diffusive transfer superimposed on a net flux caused by carrier absorption. Other supporting elements of the design package include predictive techniques for various fluid properties, estimating procedures for carrier gas equilibrium constants, and correlations for carrier gas and dilute gas mass-transfer coefficients. When applied to systems using CCl 2 F 2 as the solvent; He, N 2 , air, or Ar as the carrier gas; and Kr or Xe as the dilute gas; the design approach gave good results, even when extended to conditions well beyond those of its development. (U.S.)

  11. Nutrient Release from Disturbance of Infiltration System Soils during Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Treese

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Subsurface infiltration and surface bioretention systems composed of engineered and/or native soils are preferred tools for stormwater management. However, the disturbance of native soils, especially during the process of adding amendments to improve infiltration rates and pollutant removal, may result in releases of nutrients in the early life of these systems. This project investigated the nutrient release from two soils, one disturbed and one undisturbed. The disturbed soil was collected intact, but had to be air-dried, and the columns repacked when soil shrinkage caused bypassing of water along the walls of the column. The undisturbed soil was collected and used intact, with no repacking. The disturbed soil showed elevated releases of nitrogen and phosphorus compared to the undisturbed soil for approximately 0.4 and 0.8 m of runoff loading, respectively. For the undisturbed soil, the nitrogen release was delayed, indicating that the soil disturbance accelerated the release of nitrogen into a very short time period. Leaving the soil undisturbed resulted in lower but still elevated effluent nitrogen concentrations over a longer period of time. For phosphorus, these results confirm prior research which demonstrated that the soil, if shown to be phosphorus-deficient during fertility testing, can remove phosphorus from runoff even when disturbed.

  12. Application of UV-visible absorption spectroscopy combined with two-dimensional correlation for insight into DOM fractions from native halophyte soils in a larger estuarine delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Huaibin; Yu, Huibin; Pan, Hongwei; Gao, Hongjie

    2018-05-01

    UV-visible absorption spectroscopy combined with principal component analysis (PCA) and two-dimensional correlation (2D correlation) is used to trace components of dissolved organic matter (DOM) extracted from soils in a larger estuarine delta and to investigate spatial variations of DOM fractions. Soil samples of different depths were collected from native halophyte soils along a saline gradient, i.e., Suaeda salsa Comm. (SSC), Chenopodium album Comm. (CAC), Phragmites australis Comm. (PAC), and Artemisia selengensis Comm. (ASC). Molecular weights of DOM within the SSC soil profile were the lowest, followed by the CAC, PAC, and ASC soil profiles. Humification degree of DOM within the ASC soil profile was the highest, followed by the PAC, SSC, and CAC soil profiles. DOM within the soil profiles mainly contained phenolic, carboxylic, microbial products, and aromatic and alkyl groups through the PCA, which presented the significant differentiation among the four native halophyte soil profiles. The 2D UV correlation spectra of DOM within the SSC soil profile indicated that the variations of the phenolic groups were the largest, followed by the carboxylic groups, microbial products, and humified organic materials according to the band changing order of 285 → 365 → 425 → 520 nm. The 2D UV correlation spectra of DOM within the CAC soil profiles determined that the decreasing order of the variations was phenolic groups > carboxylic groups > microbial products according the band changing order of 285 → 365 → 425 nm. The 2D UV correlation spectra of DOM within the PAC soil profile proved that the variations of the phenolic groups were larger than those of the carboxylic groups according to the band changing order of 285 → 365 nm. The 2D UV correlation spectra of DOM within the ASC soil profile demonstrated that the variations of the phenolic groups were larger than those of the other DOM fractions according to the broad cross-peak at

  13. Microbiological parameters as indicators of soil quality under various soil management and crop rotation systems in southern Brazil.

    OpenAIRE

    FRANCHINI, J. C.; CRISPINO, C. C.; SOUZA, R. A.; TORRES, E.; HUNGRIA, M.

    2006-01-01

    Metadata only record This article attempts to recognize soil parameters that can be used to monitor soil quality under different crop and soil management systems. The rates of CO2 emissions (soil respiration) were affected by variations in the sampling period, as well as in soil management and crop rotation. Considering all samples, CO2 emissions were 21% greater in conventional tillage. Soil microbial biomass was also influenced by sampling period and soil management, but not by crop rota...

  14. Integrated vacuum extraction/pneumatic soil fracturing system for remediation of low permeability soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaines, A.L.; Piniewski, R.J.; Yarbrough, G.D.

    1994-01-01

    There is wide use of vacuum extraction to remove volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from unsaturated soil. At sites with soil of low permeability, VOC extraction rates may not be sufficient to meet soil clean-up objectives within the desired time frame. During vacuum extraction in low permeability soil, the diffusion rates of VOCs through the soil matrix may limit VOC removal rates. An increase in the number of subsurface paths for advective flow through the contaminated zone results in a larger mass of contaminant being removed in a shorter time frame, accelerating site remediation. One technique for increasing the number of subsurface flow paths is Terra Vac's process of pneumatic soil fracturing (PSF). In this process, pressurized air is injected into the subsurface, creating micro-fractures for the vacuum extraction system to withdraw contaminants. Similar to hydraulic fracturing techniques long used in the petroleum industry for increasing yield from oil and gas production wells, this technique has applications for soil remediation in low permeability conditions. Two case studies, one in Louisiana at a gasoline service station and one at a manufacturing plant in New York, are presented

  15. Soil properties mapping with the DIGISOIL multi-sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, G.

    2012-04-01

    The multidisciplinary DIGISOIL project aimed to integrate and improve in situ and proximal measurement technologies for the assessment of soil properties and soil degradation indicators, going from the sensing technologies to their integration and their application in (digital) soil mapping (DSM). In order to assess and prevent soil degradation and to benefit from the different ecological, economical and historical functions of the soil in a sustainable way, high resolution and quantitative maps of soil properties are needed. The core objective of the project is to explore and exploit new capabilities of advanced geophysical technologies for answering this societal demand. To this aim, DIGISOIL addresses four issues covering technological, soil science and economic aspects: (i) the validation of geophysical (in situ, proximal and airborne) technologies and integrated pedo-geophysical inversion techniques (mechanistic data fusion) (ii) the relation between the geophysical parameters and the soil properties, (iii) the integration of the derived soil properties for mapping soil functions and soil threats, (iv) the pre-evaluation, standardisation and sub-industrialization of the proposed methodologies, including technical and economical studies related to the societal demand. With respect to these issues, the DIGISOIL project allows to develop, test and validate the most relevant geophysical technologies for mapping soil properties. The system was tested on different field tests, and validated the proposed technologies and solutions for each of the identified methods: geoelectric, GPR, EMI, seismics, magnetic and hyperspectral. After data acquisition systems, sensor geometry, and advanced data processing techniques have been developed and validated, we present now the solutions for going from geophysical data to soil properties maps. For two test sites, located respectively in Luxembourg (LU) and Mugello (IT) a set of soil properties maps have been produced. They give

  16. Preliminary aseismic analysis on bolts of driving mechanism in absorption sphere shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Feng; Li Tianjin; Zhang Zhengming; Huang Zhiyong; Bo Hanliang

    2012-01-01

    The absorption sphere shutdown system performs an important role in reactivity regulating and control. Driving mechanism is a set of key mechanical moving parts which is used to control falling of absorption spheres in absorption sphere shutdown system. It is about 5 m for driving mechanism with the slim structure, which is connected with the upper supported plate of metal reactor internals through storage vessel with bolts. Both the storage vessel and driving mechanism are equipment of seismic classification I. It is significant to calculate and check the bolts strength of driving mechanism. In this paper, complicate structure of driving mechanism was simplified to three variable cross sections and statically indeterminate problem was solved. The bolts at the bottom and on the top of the storage vessel were calculated and checked. The preliminary results indicate that the bolts strength is reliable and safe, and the supporting force at the most weak point of driving mechanism is as well obtained. (authors)

  17. Microbial Diversity in Soil Treatment Systems for Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cuyk, S.; Spear, J.; Siegrist, R.; Pace, N.

    2002-05-01

    There is an increasing awareness and concern over land based wastewater system performance with respect to the removal of bacteria and virus. The goal of this work is to describe and identify the organismal composition of the microbiota in the applied wastewater effluent, the rich biomat that develops at the infiltrative surface, and in the soil percolate in order to aid in the understanding of bacterial and virus purification in soil treatment systems. The traditional reliance on pure culture techniques to describe microbiota is circumvented by the employment of a molecular approach. Microbial community characterization is underway based on cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes for phylogenetic analyses, to determine the nature and quantity of microbiota that constitute these ecosystems. Knowledge of the organisms naturally present can influence the design and treatment capacity of these widely used land based systems. Laboratory, intermediate and field scale systems are currently under study. Since human pathogens are known to exist in sewage effluents, their removal in wastewater infiltration systems and within the underlying soil are in need of a more fundamental understanding. The relationship between design parameters and environmental conditions, including a microbial characterization, is essential for the prevention of contamination in groundwater sources. Preliminary results indicate the presence of uncultured organisms and phylogenetic kinds that had not been detected in these systems using other methods. Acinetobacter johnsonii and Acrobacter cryaerophilus were the two dominant species found in septic tank effluent, comprising 20% and 11% of the library respectively. In soil samples collected from the infiltrative surface of a column dosed with STE, there was no dominant bacterial species present. Percolate samples collected from the outflow of the column showed that a tuber borchii symbiont, a common soil microorganism, dominated the bacterial

  18. Intervening O vi Quasar Absorption Systems at Low Redshift: A Significant Baryon Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp; Savage; Jenkins

    2000-05-01

    Far-UV echelle spectroscopy of the radio-quiet QSO H1821+643 (zem=0.297), obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) at approximately 7 km s-1 resolution, reveals four definite O vi absorption-line systems and one probable O vi absorber at 0.15quasar in redshift; these are likely intervening systems unrelated to the background QSO. In the case of the strong O vi system at zabs=0.22497, multiple components are detected in Si iii and O vi as well as H i Lyman series lines, and the differing component velocity centroids and b-values firmly establish that this is a multiphase absorption system. A weak O vi absorber is detected at zabs=0.22637, i.e., offset by approximately 340 km s-1 from the zabs=0.22497 system. Lyalpha absorption is detected at zabs=0.22613, but no Lyalpha absorption is significantly detected at 0.22637. Other weak O vi absorbers at zabs=0.24531 and 0.26659 and the probable O vi system at 0.21326 have widely diverse O vi/H i column density ratios with N(O vi)/N(H i) ranging from systems is Omegab(Ovi&parr0; greater, similar0.0008 h-175. With an assumed metallicity of 1/10 solar and a conservative assumption that the fraction of oxygen in the O vi ionization stage is 0.2, we obtain Omegab(Ovi&parr0; greater, similar0.004 h-175. This is comparable to the combined cosmological mass density of stars and cool gas in galaxies and X-ray-emitting gas in galaxy clusters at low redshift.

  19. Remediation of lead and cadmium-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Ahmed K; Osman, Khaled A; Gouda, Neama Abdel-Razeek

    2016-01-01

    The research was designated to study the ability of plants to bio-accumulate, translocate and remove the heavy metals, lead and cadmium from contaminated soil. The herbal plant ryegrass, Lolium multiflorum was investigated as a bio-accumulator plant for these metals. The translocation of these heavy metals in the herbal plant was compared considering root to shoot transport and redistribution of metals in the root and shoot system. The trace metal contents from root and shoot parts were determined using atomic absorption spectrometer. The results showed that the percent of lead and cadmium transferred to ryegrass plant were averaged as 51.39, and 74.57%, respectively, while those remained in the soil were averaged as 48.61 and 25.43% following 60 days of treatment. The soil-plant transfer index in root and shoot system of ryegrass was found to be 0.32 and 0.20 for lead, and 0.50 and 0.25 for cadmium. These findings indicated that the herbal plant ryegrass, Lolium multiflorum is a good accumulator for cadmium than lead. The soil-plant transfer factor (the conc. of heavy metal in plant to the conc. in soil) indicated that the mechanism of soil remedy using the investigated plant is phytoextraction where the amounts of heavy metals transferred by plant roots into the above ground portions were higher than that remained in the soil. The method offers green technology solution for the contamination problem since it is effective technology with minimal impact on the environment and can be easily used for soil remedy.

  20. Transfer of technetium in the soil-rice plant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, K.; Muramatsu, Y.

    1995-01-01

    In order to assess the behavior of Tc in flooded soil-plant systems, laboratory experiments have been done using 95m Tc as a tracer. Two common soil types in Japan, Andosol and Gray lowland soils, were used. Soil-plant transfer factors of Tc in rice grain were very low, i.e. 5 x 10 -5 for Andosol and 6 x 10 -4 for Gray lowland soil. It was found that the Tc concentrations in rice plants were influenced by those in soil solutions. Concentrations of 95m Tc in both soil solutions decreased rapidly in the early period of cultivation. It was observed that redox-potential (Eh) also decreased markedly following flooding. A relationship was found between the decrease of the 95m Tc concentrations in soil solutions and the drop of Eh in the soils. The Tc (VII) added to soil was transformed to insoluble Tc (IV) under the reduced conditions existing in flooded soil. (author). 10 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colburn, Jr., John W.

    1991-01-01

    A real time soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system includes a plurality of ground-engaging tools in association with individual soil sensors which measure soil chemical levels. The system includes the addition of a solvent which rapidly saturates the soil/tool interface to form a conductive solution of chemicals leached from the soil. A multivalent electrode, positioned within a multivalent frame of the ground-engaging tool, applies a voltage or impresses a current between the electrode and the tool frame. A real-time soil chemical sensor and controller senses the electrochemical reaction resulting from the application of the voltage or current to the leachate, measures it by resistivity methods, and compares it against pre-set resistivity levels for substances leached by the solvent. Still greater precision is obtained by calibrating for the secondary current impressed through solvent-less soil. The appropriate concentration is then found and the servo-controlled delivery system applies the appropriate amount of fertilizer or agricultural chemicals substantially in the location from which the soil measurement was taken.

  2. Monitoring soil carbon will prepare growers for a carbon trading system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma C. Suddick

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available California growers could reap financial benefits from the low-carbon economy and cap-and-trade system envisioned by the state's AB 32 law, which seeks to lower greenhouse gas emissions statewide. Growers could gain carbon credits by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and sequestering carbon through reduced tillage and increased biomass residue incorporation. First, however, baseline stocks of soil carbon need to be assessed for various cropping systems and management practices. We designed and set up a pilot soil carbon and land-use monitoring network at several perennial cropping systems in Northern California. We compared soil carbon content in two vineyards and two orchards (walnut and almond, looking at conventional and conservation management practices, as well as in native grassland and oak woodland. We then calculated baseline estimates of the total carbon in almond, wine grape and walnut acreages statewide. The organic walnut orchard had the highest total soil carbon, and no-till vineyards had 27% more carbon in the surface soil than tilled vineyards. We estimated wine grape vineyards are storing significantly more soil carbon per acre than almond and walnut orchards. The data can be used to provide accurate information about soil carbon stocks in perennial cropping systems for a future carbon trading system.

  3. Determination of sedimentation rates and absorption coefficient of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MIKE HORSFALL

    particles have pores that can absorb radiation. Gamma rays have been used to study the absorption coefficients of cobalt(II) insoluble compounds (Essien and Ekpe, 1998), densities of marine sediments. (Gerland and Villinger, 1995) and soil particle-size distribution (Vaz et al., 1992). In this study, sedimentation rates of ...

  4. Visible-NIR Spectroscopic Evidence for the Composition of Low-Albedo Altered Soils on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, S.; Merenyi, E.; Singer, R.; Kirkland, L.

    1996-03-01

    Spectroscopic studies of altered Martian soils at visible and at NIR wavelengths have generally supported the canonical model of the surface layer as consisting mostly of 2 components, bright red hematite-containing dust and dark gray pyroxene-containing sand. However several of the studies have also provided tantalizing evidence for distinct 1 micrometer Fe absorptions in discrete areas, particularly dark red soils which are hypothesized to consist of duricrust. These distinct absorptions have been proposed to originate from one or more non-hematitic ferric phases. We have tested this hypothesis by merging high spatial resolution visible- and NIR-wavelength data to synthesize composite 0.44-3.14 1lm spectra for regions of western Arabia and Margaritifer Terra. The extended wavelength coverage allows more complete assessment of ferric, ferrous, and H2O absorptions in both wavelength ranges. The composite data show that, compared to nearby bright red soil in Arabia, dark red soil in Oxia has a lower albedo, a more negative continuum slope, and a stronger 3 micrometer H2O absorption . However Fe absorptions are closely similar in position and depth. These results suggest that at least some dark red soils may differ from "normal" dust and mafic sand more in texture than in Fe mineralogy, although there appears to be enrichment in a water-containing phase and/or a dark, spectrally neutral phase. In contrast, there is clear evidence for enrichment of a low-albedo ferric mineral in dark gray soils composing Sinus Meridiani. These have visible- and NIR-wavelength absorptions consistent with crystalline hematite with relatively little pyroxene, plus a very weak 3 micrometer H2O absorption. These properties suggest a Ethology richer in crystalline hematite and less hydrated than both dust and mafic-rich sand.

  5. Spatial Variation of Soil Type and Soil Moisture in the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, R.

    2001-06-27

    Soil characteristics (texture and moisture) are typically assumed to be initially constant when performing simulations with the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Soil texture is spatially homogeneous and time-independent, while soil moisture is often spatially homogeneous initially, but time-dependent. This report discusses the conversion of a global data set of Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) soil types to RAMS soil texture and the subsequent modifications required in RAMS to ingest this information. Spatial variations in initial soil moisture obtained from the National Center for Environmental Predictions (NCEP) large-scale models are also introduced. Comparisons involving simulations over the southeastern United States for two different time periods, one during warmer, more humid summer conditions, and one during cooler, dryer winter conditions, reveals differences in surface conditions related to increases or decreases in near-surface atmospheric moisture con tent as a result of different soil properties. Three separate simulation types were considered. The base case assumed spatially homogeneous soil texture and initial soil moisture. The second case assumed variable soil texture and constant initial soil moisture, while the third case allowed for both variable soil texture and initial soil moisture. The simulation domain was further divided into four geographically distinct regions. It is concluded there is a more dramatic impact on thermodynamic variables (surface temperature and dewpoint) than on surface winds, and a more pronounced variability in results during the summer period. While no obvious trends in surface winds or dewpoint temperature were found relative to observations covering all regions and times, improvement in surface temperatures in most regions and time periods was generally seen with the incorporation of variable soil texture and initial soil moisture.

  6. Soil quality assessment of rice production systems in South of Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues de Lima, A.C.; Hoogmoed, W.B.; Brussaard, L.

    2007-01-01

    Soil quality, as a measure of the soil capacity to function, can be quantified by indicators based on physical, chemical and biological properties. Maintaining soil quality at a desirable level in the rice cropping system is a very complex issue due to the nature of the production systems used. In

  7. Mapping Quantitatively Regional Drug Absorption in Canines with IntelliCap System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, D.; Schütz, H.; Beyerbach, A.; Zou, H.; Shimizu, J.; Iordanov, V.P.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative regional absorption of a drug under development was studied by using the novel IntelliCap system. IntelliCap is an orally swallowable programmable drug delivery capsule and capable of real-time monitoring of physiological conditions (pH, temperature), consequently allowing localization

  8. The pharmacokinetic profile of tamsulosin oral controlled absorption system (OCAS((R)))

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, M. C.; Korstanje, C.; Krauwinkel, W.; Kuipers, M.

    2005-01-01

    Context: A new formulation of tamsulosin for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia (LUTS/BPH) has been developed. This formulation uses the proprietary oral controlled absorption system (OCAS(R)) technology which has the potential to better control

  9. The Research on Programmable Control System of Lithium-Bromide Absorption Refrigerating Air Conditioner Based on the Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Lunan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article regard the solar lithium-bromide absorption refrigerating air conditioning system as the research object, and it was conducting adequate research of the working principle of lithium bromide absorption refrigerating machine, also it was analyzing the requirements of control system about solar energy air conditioning. Then the solar energy air conditioning control system was designed based on PLC, this system was given priority to field bus control system, and the remote monitoring is complementary, which was combining the network remote monitoring technology. So that it realized the automatic control and intelligent control of new lithium bromide absorption refrigerating air conditioning system with solar energy, also, it ensured the control system can automatically detect and adjust when the external conditions was random changing, to make air conditioning work effectively and steadily, ultimately ,it has great research significance to research the air conditioning control system with solar energy.

  10. NLP model based thermoeconomic optimization of vapor compression–absorption cascaded refrigeration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Vaibhav; Sachdeva, Gulshan; Kachhwaha, S.S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • It addresses the size and cost estimation of cascaded refrigeration system. • Cascaded system is a promising decarburizing and energy efficient technology. • Second law analysis is carried out with modified Gouy-Stodola equation. • The total annual cost of plant operation is optimized in present work. - Abstract: This paper addresses the size and cost estimation of vapor compression–absorption cascaded refrigeration system (VCACRS) for water chilling application taking R410a and water–LiBr as refrigerants in compression and absorption section respectively which can help the design engineers in manufacturing and experimenting on such kind of systems. The main limitation in the practical implementation of VCACRS is its size and cost which are optimized in the present work by implementing Direct Search Method in non-linear programming (NLP) mathematical model of VCACRS. The main objective of optimization is to minimize the total annual cost of system which comprises of costs of exergy input and capital costs in monetary units. The appropriate set of decision variables (temperature of evaporator, condenser, generator, absorber, cascade condenser, degree of overlap and effectiveness of solution heat exchanger) minimizes the total annual cost of VCACRS by 11.9% with 22.4% reduction in investment cost at the base case whereas the same is reduced by 7.5% with 11.7% reduction in investment cost with reduced rate of interest and increased life span and period of operation. Optimization results show that the more investment cost in later case is well compensated through the performance and operational cost of the system. In the present analysis, optimum cascade condensing temperature is a strong function of period of operation and capital recovery factor. The cascading of compression and absorption systems becomes attractive for lower rate of interest and increase life span and operational period

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of an absorption refrigeration system with ionic-liquid/refrigerant mixture as a working fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yoon Jo; Kim, Sarah; Joshi, Yogendra K.; Fedorov, Andrei G.; Kohl, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Thermodynamics of an ionic-liquid (IL) based absorption refrigeration system has been numerically analyzed. It provides an alternative to the normally toxic working fluids, such as the ammonia in conventional absorption systems. The use of ILs also eliminates crystallization and metal-compatibility problems of the water/LiBr system. Mixtures of refrigerants and imidazolium-based ILs are theoretically explored as the working fluid pairs in a miniature absorption refrigeration system, so as to utilize waste-heat to power a refrigeration/heat pump system for electronics cooling. A non-random two-liquid (NRTL) model was built and used to predict the solubility of the mixtures. Saturation temperatures at the evaporator and condenser were set at 25 °C and 50 °C, respectively, with the power dissipation of 100 W. Water in combination with [emim][BF 4 ] (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate) gave the highest coefficient of performance (COP) around 0.9. The refrigerant/IL compatibility indicated by the circulation ratio, alkyl chain length of the IL, and thermodynamic properties of the refrigerants, such as latent heat of evaporation were proven to be important factors in determining the performance of the absorption system. The negative effect of high viscosity was mitigated by dilution of the IL with the refrigerant and the use of slightly larger microfluidic channel heat exchangers. -- Highlights: ► Mixtures of refrigerant/ionic-liquid are studied for absorption system. ► We carry out comprehensive theoretical thermodynamic analysis. ► The essential factors of refrigerant/IL affecting the performance are identified. ► Water/[emim][BF 4 ] showed the best performance of COP. ► The effects of high viscosity ILs on the system performance are not significant.

  12. Benchmarking a Soil Moisture Data Assimilation System for Agricultural Drought Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hun, Eunjin; Crow, Wade T.; Holmes, Thomas; Bolten, John

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable interest in the application of land surface data assimilation systems (LDAS) for agricultural drought applications, relatively little is known about the large-scale performance of such systems and, thus, the optimal methodological approach for implementing them. To address this need, this paper evaluates an LDAS for agricultural drought monitoring by benchmarking individual components of the system (i.e., a satellite soil moisture retrieval algorithm, a soil water balance model and a sequential data assimilation filter) against a series of linear models which perform the same function (i.e., have the same basic inputoutput structure) as the full system component. Benchmarking is based on the calculation of the lagged rank cross-correlation between the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and soil moisture estimates acquired for various components of the system. Lagged soil moistureNDVI correlations obtained using individual LDAS components versus their linear analogs reveal the degree to which non-linearities andor complexities contained within each component actually contribute to the performance of the LDAS system as a whole. Here, a particular system based on surface soil moisture retrievals from the Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM), a two-layer Palmer soil water balance model and an Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is benchmarked. Results suggest significant room for improvement in each component of the system.

  13. Soil aggregation and organic carbon of Oxisols under coffee in agroforestry systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Pinto Guimarães

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Intensive land use can lead to a loss of soil physical quality with negative impacts on soil aggregates, resistance to root penetration, porosity, and bulk density. Organic and agroforestry management systems can represent sustainable, well-balanced alternatives in the agroecosystem for promoting a greater input of organic matter than the conventional system. Based on the hypothesis that an increased input of organic matter improves soil physical quality, this study aimed to evaluate the impact of coffee production systems on soil physical properties in two Red-Yellow Oxisols (Latossolos Vermelho-Amarelos in the region of Caparaó, Espirito Santo, Brazil. On Farm 1, we evaluated the following systems: primary forest (Pf1, organic coffee (Org1 and conventional coffee (Con1. On Farm 2, we evaluated: secondary forest (Sf2, organic coffee intercropped with inga (Org/In2, organic coffee intercropped with leucaena and inga (Org/In/Le2, organic coffee intercropped with cedar (Org/Ced2 and unshaded conventional coffee (Con2. Soil samples were collected under the tree canopy from the 0-10, 10-20 and 20-40 cm soil layers. Under organic and agroforestry coffee management, soil aggregation was higher than under conventional coffee. In the agroforestry system, the degree of soil flocculation was 24 % higher, soil moisture was 80 % higher, and soil resistance to penetration was lower than in soil under conventional coffee management. The macroaggregates in the organic systems, Org/In2, Org/In/Le2, and Org/Ced2 contained, on average, 29.1, 40.1 and 34.7 g kg-1 organic carbon, respectively. These levels are higher than those found in the unshaded conventional system (Con2, with 20.2 g kg-1.

  14. Arsenic content of soils from three regions of Santa Catarina State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Cristina de Souza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The determination of trace elements is necessary in order to monitor their entry into the soil system and to remediate contaminated areas. The purpose of this study was to determine the natural content of arsenic (As in soils of three regions of Santa Catarina State (SC: the Southern Plateau, the Metropolitan area and the Southern Coast. Arsenic content was obtained after digestion in a microwave oven, following the USEPA 3051 A protocol and quantification was made by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization. The results were analyzed by the Scott-Knott test at a 5% significance level. Soil attributes that best correlated with arsenic content were clay, organic carbon, cation exchange capacity and Al and Fe oxides. The arsenic levels are related to the source material and the slope of regional soils.

  15. Biomimetic Hydrogel Composites for Soil Stabilization and Contaminant Mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi; Hamdan, Nasser; Shen, Li; Nan, Hanqing; Almajed, Abdullah; Kavazanjian, Edward; He, Ximin

    2016-11-15

    We have developed a novel method to synthesize a hyper-branched biomimetic hydrogel network across a soil matrix to improve the mechanical strength of the loose soil and simultaneously mitigate potential contamination due to excessive ammonium. This method successfully yielded a hierarchical structure that possesses the water retention, ion absorption, and soil aggregation capabilities of plant root systems in a chemically controllable manner. Inspired by the robust organic-inorganic composites found in many living organisms, we have combined this hydrogel network with a calcite biomineralization process to stabilize soil. Our experiments demonstrate that poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) can work synergistically with enzyme-induced carbonate precipitation (EICP) to render a versatile, high-performance soil stabilization method. PAA-enhanced EICP provides multiple benefits including lengthening of water supply time, localization of cementation reactions, reduction of harmful byproduct ammonium, and achievement of ultrahigh soil strength. Soil crusts we have obtained can sustain up to 4.8 × 10 3 kPa pressure, a level comparable to cementitious materials. An ammonium removal rate of 96% has also been achieved. These results demonstrate the potential for hydrogel-assisted EICP to provide effective soil improvement and ammonium mitigation for wind erosion control and other applications.

  16. Determination Of Activity Of Radionuclides In Moss-Soil Sample With Self-Absorption Correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Thien Thanh; Chau Van Tao; Truong Thi Hong Loan; Hoang Duc Tam

    2011-01-01

    Hyper Pure Germanium (HPGe) spectrometer system is a very powerful tool for radioactivity measurements. The systematic uncertainty in the full energy peak efficiency is due to the differences between the matrix (density and chemical composition) of the reference and the other bulk samples. For getting precision from the gamma spectrum analysis, the absorbed correction in the sample should be considered. For gamma spectral analysis, a correction for absorption effects in sample should be considered, especially for bulk samples. The results were presented and discussed in this paper. (author)

  17. Technical Basis for the Use of Alpha Absorption Corrections on RCF Gross Alpha Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceffalo, G.M.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides the supporting data and rationale for making absorption corrections to gross alpha data to correct alpha data for loss due to absorption in the sample matrix. For some time there has been concern that the gross alpha data produced by the Environmental Restoration Contractor Radiological Counting Facility, particularly gross alpha analysis on soils, has been biased toward low results, as no correction for self-absorption was applied to the counting data. The process was investigated, and a new methodology for alpha self-absorption has been developed

  18. Thermodynamic performance analysis of a vapor compression–absorption cascaded refrigeration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Vaibhav; Kachhwaha, S.S.; Sachdeva, Gulshan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Study includes first and second law analysis with alternatives refrigerants. • Power consumption in cascaded system is 61% less than vapor compression system. • COP of compression system is improved by 155% with cascaded absorption system. • Condenser is more sensitive to external fluid temperature as compare to evaporator. - Abstract: In the present study, a thermodynamic model for cascaded vapor compression–absorption system (CVCAS) has been developed which consists of a vapor compression refrigeration system (VCRS) coupled with single effect vapor absorption refrigeration system (VARS). Based on first and second laws, a comparative performance analysis of CVCAS and an independent VCRS has been carried out for a design capacity of 66.67 kW. The results show that the electric power consumption in CVCAS is reduced by 61% and COP of compression section is improved by 155% with respect to the corresponding values pertaining to a conventional VCRS. However there is a trade-off between these parameters and the rational efficiency which is found to decrease to half of that for a VCRS. The effect of various operating parameters, i.e., superheating, subcooling, cooling capacity, inlet temperature and the product of effectiveness and heat capacitance of external fluids are extensively studied on the COP, total irreversibility and rational efficiency of the CVCAS. Besides, the performance of environment friendly refrigerants such as R410A, R407C and R134A is found to be almost at par with that of R22. Hence, all the alternative refrigerants selected herein can serve as potential substitutes for R22. Furthermore, it has been found that reducing the irreversibility rate of the condenser by one unit due to decrease in condenser temperature depicted approximately 3.8 times greater reduction in the total irreversibility rate of the CVCAS, whereas unit reduction in the evaporator’s irreversibility rate due to increase in evaporator temperature reduced

  19. Influence of limestone doses in the Manganese absorption by Brachiaria decumbens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armelin, Maria Jose A.; Fulas, Paulo M.M.; Saiki, Mitiko; Primavesi, Odo; Primavesi, Ana C.

    2005-01-01

    To restore a degraded pasture of Brachiaria decumbens, located in Sao Carlos - SP, Southeastern Brazil, under tropical climate, an experiment was carried out to study the influence of different methods of the limestone doses application on manganese absorption by the aboveground part of the forage, during 3 years of treatment. The experimental design was randomized block, with 6 replications and 8 treatments. The 100m 2 blocks were established in the pasture. Each block received a sequence of limestone doses (0, 1, 2, 4, and 8 t/ha) applied on soil surface with NK and, 2 t/ha applied on soil surface with plus one annual application of 1t/ha and NK, 4t/ha buried in the soil with NK, 4t/ha applied on soil surface without NK. Forages samples were collected 14 cm above soil surface. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) followed by gamma-ray spectrometry was the analytical method used to determine manganese content. The statistical analysis showed some significant variations of this element absorption by the plant with regard to the treatments, but anything that could compromise the mineral nutrition of forage. Moreover, the quality of forage for the animal feeding showed suitable agreement to manganese requirement. INAA showed that it can be an alternative option for agronomical researches that require the knowledge of the manganese concentration. (author)

  20. Simulating soil greenhouse emissions from Swiss long-term cropping system trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necpalova, Magdalena; Lee, Juhwan; Skinner, Colin; Büchi, Lucie; Berner, Alfred; Mäder, Paul; Mayer, Jochen; Charles, Raphael; van der Heijden, Marcel; Wittwer, Raphael; Gattinger, Andreas; Six, Johan

    2017-04-01

    There is an urgent need to identify and evaluate management practices for their bio-physical potential to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from agriculture. The cost and time required for direct management-specific GHG measurements limit the spatial and temporal resolution and the extent of data that can be collected. Biogeochemical process-based models such as DayCent can be used to bridge data gaps over space and time and estimate soil GHG emissions relevant to various climate change mitigation strategies. Objectives of this study were (a) to parameterize DayCent for common Swiss crops and crop-specific management practices using the Swiss long-term experimental data collected at four sites (Therwil, Frick, Changins, and Reckenholz); (b) to evaluate the model's ability to predict crop productivity, long-term soil carbon dynamics and N2O emissions from Swiss cropping systems; (c) to calculate a net soil GHG balance for all treatments (except for bio-dynamic) studied in long-term field experiments in Switzerland; and (d) to study the management effects and their interactions on soil GHG emissions at each experimental site. Model evaluation indicated that DayCent predicted crop productivity (rRMSE=0.29 r2=0.81, n=2614), change in soil carbon stock (rRMSE=0.14, r2=0.72, n=1289) and cumulative N2O emissions (rRMSE=0.25, r2=0.89, n=8) satisfactorily across all treatments and sites. Net soil GHG emissions were derived from changes in soil carbon, N2O emissions and CH4 oxidation on an annual basis using IPCC (2014) global warming potentials. Modelled net soil GHG emissions calculated for individual treatments over 30 years ranged from -594 to 1654 kg CO2 eq ha-1 yr-1. The highest net soil GHG emissions were predicted for conventional tillage and slurry application treatment at Frick, while soils under organic and reduced tillage management at Reckenholz acted as a net GHG sink. The statistical analyses using linear MIXED models indicated that net soil GHG

  1. COSMOS: the COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zreda

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The newly-developed cosmic-ray method for measuring area-average soil moisture at the hectometer horizontal scale is being implemented in the COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (or the COSMOS. The stationary cosmic-ray soil moisture probe measures the neutrons that are generated by cosmic rays within air and soil and other materials, moderated by mainly hydrogen atoms located primarily in soil water, and emitted to the atmosphere where they mix instantaneously at a scale of hundreds of meters and whose density is inversely correlated with soil moisture. The COSMOS has already deployed more than 50 of the eventual 500 cosmic-ray probes, distributed mainly in the USA, each generating a time series of average soil moisture over its horizontal footprint, with similar networks coming into existence around the world. This paper is written to serve a community need to better understand this novel method and the COSMOS project. We describe the cosmic-ray soil moisture measurement method, the instrument and its calibration, the design, data processing and dissemination used in the COSMOS project, and give example time series of soil moisture obtained from COSMOS probes.

  2. Energy and exergy analyses of the diffusion absorption refrigeration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yıldız, Abdullah; Ersöz, Mustafa Ali

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the thermodynamic analyses of a DAR (diffusion absorption refrigeration) cycle. The experimental apparatus is set up to an ammonia–water DAR cycle with helium as the auxiliary inert gas. A thermodynamic model including mass, energy and exergy balance equations are presented for each component of the DAR cycle and this model is then validated by comparison with experimental data. In the thermodynamic analyses, energy and exergy losses for each component of the system are quantified and illustrated. The systems' energy and exergy losses and efficiencies are investigated. The highest energy and exergy losses occur in the solution heat exchanger. The highest energy losses in the experimental and theoretical analyses are found 25.7090 W and 25.4788 W respectively, whereas those losses as to exergy are calculated 13.7933 W and 13.9976 W. Although the values of energy efficiencies obtained from both the model and experimental studies are calculated as 0.1858, those values, in terms of exergy efficiencies are found 0.0260 and 0.0356. - Highlights: • The diffusion absorption refrigerator system is designed manufactured and tested. • The energy and exergy analyses of the system are presented theoretically and experimentally. • The energy and exergy losses are investigated for each component of the system. • The highest energy and exergy losses occur in the solution heat exchanger. • The energy and the exergy performances are also calculated

  3. A fully continuous supercritical fluid extraction system for contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, M.; Stiver, W.H.

    2007-01-01

    Brownfield sites are contaminated sites in an urban setting. There are hundreds of thousands of such sites, where contaminants migrate to the atmosphere, seep into groundwater, runoff into surface water and enter the food chain through plant uptake and soil ingestion. The Sydney Tar Ponds alone contain more than a million tonnes of contaminated soils and sediments. Soil vapour extraction, incineration, bioremediation, solvent extraction and land filling are among the remediation techniques that have been developed for brownfield sites over the years. However, no single technology is ideally suited to all cases because of the diversity of contaminants and diversity of site characterization. This paper focused on supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) which is well suited to sites contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and heavy metal. A fully continuous laboratory-scale SFE process for a slurry-based system was designed and constructed to handle the supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO 2 ) and the soil slurry. The system continuously pumps carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions and soil slurry into a counter-current contacting column. The testing soil was Delhi loamy sand, spiked with 10 mg/g of naphthalene. The soil slurry ranged from 0.0028 g dry soil per g slurry to 0.072 g/g. The operating temperature was 43 degrees C and the operating pressure was 7.7 MPa. Near steady state, fully continuous flow was achieved with runs lasting up to 2 hours. The quantifiable recoveries of naphthalene from the soil slurry was demonstrated and the mass transfer coefficients for the system were quantified in order to provide the foundation to advance to a full-scale system and costing analysis. 14 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  4. A fully continuous supercritical fluid extraction system for contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, M.; Stiver, W.H. [Guelph Univ., ON (Canada). School of Engineering

    2007-04-15

    Brownfield sites are contaminated sites in an urban setting. There are hundreds of thousands of such sites, where contaminants migrate to the atmosphere, seep into groundwater, runoff into surface water and enter the food chain through plant uptake and soil ingestion. The Sydney Tar Ponds alone contain more than a million tonnes of contaminated soils and sediments. Soil vapour extraction, incineration, bioremediation, solvent extraction and land filling are among the remediation techniques that have been developed for brownfield sites over the years. However, no single technology is ideally suited to all cases because of the diversity of contaminants and diversity of site characterization. This paper focused on supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) which is well suited to sites contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and heavy metal. A fully continuous laboratory-scale SFE process for a slurry-based system was designed and constructed to handle the supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO{sub 2}) and the soil slurry. The system continuously pumps carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions and soil slurry into a counter-current contacting column. The testing soil was Delhi loamy sand, spiked with 10 mg/g of naphthalene. The soil slurry ranged from 0.0028 g dry soil per g slurry to 0.072 g/g. The operating temperature was 43 degrees C and the operating pressure was 7.7 MPa. Near steady state, fully continuous flow was achieved with runs lasting up to 2 hours. The quantifiable recoveries of naphthalene from the soil slurry was demonstrated and the mass transfer coefficients for the system were quantified in order to provide the foundation to advance to a full-scale system and costing analysis. 14 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  5. Determining CDOM Absorption Spectra in Diverse Coastal Environments Using a Multiple Pathlength, Liquid Core Waveguide System. Measuring the Absorption of CDOM in the Field Using a Multiple Pathlength Liquid Waveguide System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Richard L.; Belz, Mathias; DelCastillo, Carlos; Trzaska, Rick

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the accuracy, sensitivity and precision of a multiple pathlength, liquid core waveguide (MPLCW) system for measuring colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) absorption in the UV-visible spectral range (370-700 nm). The MPLCW has four optical paths (2.0, 9.8, 49.3, and 204 cm) coupled to a single Teflon AF sample cell. Water samples were obtained from inland, coastal and ocean waters ranging in salinity from 0 to 36 PSU. Reference solutions for the MPLCW were made having a refractive index of the sample. CDOM absorption coefficients, a(sub CDOM), and the slope of the log-linearized absorption spectra, S, were compared with values obtained using a dual-beam spectrophotometer. Absorption of phenol red secondary standards measured by the MPLCW at 558 nm were highly correlated with spectrophotometer values (r > 0.99) and showed a linear response across all four pathlengths. Values of a(sub CDOM) measured using the MPLCW were virtually identical to spectrophotometer values over a wide range of concentrations. The dynamic range of a(sub CDOM) for MPLCW measurements was 0.002 - 231.5/m. At low CDOM concentrations (a(sub 370) CDOM) were slightly greater than MPLCW values and showed larger fluctuations at longer wavelengths due to limitations in instrument precision. In contrast, MPLCW spectra followed an exponential to 600 nm for all samples. The maximum deviation in replicate MPLCW spectra was less than 0.001 absorbance units. The portability, sampling, and optical characteristics of a MPLCW system provide significant enhancements for routine CDOM absorption measurements in a broad range of natural waters.

  6. Absorption behavior of technetium and rhenium through plant roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagami, K.; Uchida, S.

    2004-01-01

    The absorption behavior of technetium (Tc) and rhenium (Re) through plant roots was studied using nutrient solution culture. Radish samples, grown in culture solutions for 20-30 days in a green house, were transferred into plastic vessels containing nutrient solutions contaminated with multi-tracer solutions including Tc-95m and Re-183. The plant samples were grown individually for 1-7 days under laboratory conditions. The activities of radionuclides in nutrient solutions and oven-dried plant parts (roots, fleshy roots and leaves) were measured with Ge detecting systems. The concentrations of Tc-95m and Re-183 in the nutrient solutions after harvesting the plants were almost the same as those in the initial solution. Possibly, the radionuclides were taken up with water through plant roots. The distributions of Tc and Re in the plants showed no differences, thus, soluble Tc and Re absorption by plant samples were the same. It is suggested that Re could be used as a geochemical tracer of Tc in the soil environment. (author)

  7. NEW TRENDS IN AGRICULTURE - CROP SYSTEMS WITHOUT SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan GRAD

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper studied new system of agriculture - crop systems without soil. The culture systems without soil can be called also the hydroponic systems and now in Romania are not used only sporadically. In other countries (USA, Japan, the Netherlands, France, UK, Denmark, Israel, Australia, etc.. they represent the modern crop technology, widely applied to vegetables, fruits, fodder, medicinal plants and flowers by the experts in this area. In the world, today there are millions of hectares hydroponics, most of the vegetables, herbs, fruits of hypermarkets are coming from the culture systems without soil. The process consists of growing plants in nutrient solutions (not in the ground, resorting to an complex equipment, depending on the specifics of each crop, so that the system can be applied only in the large farms, in the greenhouses, and not in the individual households. These types of culture systems have a number of advantages and disadvantages also. Even if today's culture systems without soil seem to be the most modern and surprising technology applied in plant growth, the principle is very old. Based on him were built The Suspended Gardens of the Semiramis from Babylon, in the seventh century BC, thanks to him, the population from the Peru”s highlands cultivates vegetables on surfaces covered with water or mud. The peasant households in China, even today use the millenary techniques of the crops on gravel. .This hydroponic agriculture system is a way of followed for Romanian agriculture too, despite its high cost, because it is very productive, ecological, can cover, by products, all market demands and it answer, increasingly, constraints of urban life. The concept of hydroponics agriculture is known and appreciated in Romania also, but more at the theory level.

  8. Observations of nickel, chromium, and zinc in QSO absorption-line systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, D.M.; Roth, K.C.

    1990-01-01

    New observations of Ni II, Cr II, and Zn II in several damped Ly-alpha QSO absorption-line systems at z about 2 are presented. Using the N(Zn II)/N(H I) ratio as a probe of the metallicity and N(Cr II)/N(Zn II) as a measure of the dust content, it is found that the heavy-element abundances in the z = 1.921 system toward the QSO 2206-199N are 20 percent solar and that the dust-to-gas ratio is 11 percent of the Galactic disk value. The observations of these species in the z = 2.309 system toward PHL 957 yield a more extreme metallicity (4 percent solar) and dust-to-gas ratio (3 percent Galactic). In addition, a depletion of Ni in the z = 2.039 absorber toward PKS 0458 - 020 and an absence of C I absorption in the z about 2 damped systems toward 1215 + 333 and 2359 - 022 are found which are consistent with a lack of dust. Among the four damped systems whose Ni, Cr, and Zn abundances have been examined quantitatively to date, all show convincing evidence of much lower metallicities and dust content than the Galactic disk. The implications of these results with regard to the interpretation of the high-redshift damped Ly-alpha systems as an evolving population of young galaxies are discussed. 41 refs

  9. Enhancing productivity of salt affected soils through crops and cropping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.S.; Khan, A.R.

    2002-05-01

    The reclamation of salt affected soils needs the addition of soil amendment and enough water to leach down the soluble salts. The operations may also include other simple agronomic techniques to reclaim soils and to know the crops and varieties that may be grown and other management practices which may be followed on such soils (Khan, 2001). The choice of crops to be grown during reclamation of salt affected soils is very important to obtain acceptable yields. This also decides cropping systems as well as favorable diversification for early reclamation, desirable yield and to meet the other requirements of farm families. In any salt affected soils, the following three measures are adopted for reclamation and sustaining the higher productivity of reclaimed soils. 1. Suitable choice of crops, forestry and tree species; 2. Suitable choice of cropping and agroforestry system; 3. Other measures to sustain the productivity of reclaimed soils. (author)

  10. Design of absorption system water-ammonia by using solar radiation as thermal source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcanti, Eduardo J. Cidade; Souza, Luiz Guilherme Meira [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Centro de Tecnlogia. Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica], E-mails: educanti@gmail.com, lguilherme@dem.ufrn.br

    2010-07-01

    An absorption refrigeration system with the single effect of par ammonia water with 1.758 kW (1 / 2 RT) cooling capacity was designed. The system was operating under conditions of 5 degree C evaporation and 45 degree C condensation temperature. The absorption system has a heat exchanger to improve performance. The heat source is the cylinder parabolic solar concentrator (CPC). The design of the concentrator was estimated based on experimental data of the pilot plant built in the Solar Energy Laboratory, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte. The thermodynamic model with heat and mass transfer was made to the project areas of heat exchange (absorber) and consequent construction of the system. The rectifying column was modeling assuming that liquid is in equilibrium with the vapor state in all plate. The results should show the dimensions of the compact and allows a future assessment of the operational cost. (author)

  11. Graphical expression of thermodynamic characteristics of absorption process in ammonia-water system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fortelný Zdeněk

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The adiabatic sorption is very interesting phenomenon that occurs when vapor of refrigerant is in contact with unsaturated liquid absorbent-refrigerant mixture and exchange of heat is forbid between the system and an environment. This contribution introduces new auxiliary lines that enable correct position determination of the adiabatic sorption process in the p-T-x diagram of ammoniawater system. The presented auxiliary lines were obtained from common functions for fast calculation of water-ammonia system properties. Absorption cycles designers often utilize p-t-x diagrams of working mixtures for first suggestion of new absorption cycles. The p-t-x diagrams enable fast correct determination of saturate states of liquid (and gaseous mixtures of refrigerants and absorbents. The working mixture isn’t only at saturated state during a real working cycle. If we know pressure and temperature of an unsaturated mixture, exact position determination is possible in the p-t-x diagrams too.

  12. Absorption solar cooling systems using optimal driving temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecuona, Antonio; Ventas, Rubén; Vereda, Ciro; López, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    The optimum instantaneous driving temperature of a solar cooling facility is determined along a day. The chillers compared use single effect cycles working with NH 3 /LiNO 3 , either conventional or hybridised by incorporating a low pressure booster compressor. Their performances are compared with a H 2 O/LiBr single effect absorption chiller as part of the same solar system. The results of a detailed thermodynamic cycle for the absorption chillers allow synthesizing them in a modified characteristic temperature difference model. The day accumulated solar cold production is determined using this optimum temperature during two sunny days in mid-July and mid-September, located in Madrid, Spain. The work shows the influences of operational variables and a striking result: selection of a time-constant temperature during all the day does not necessarily imply a substantial loss, being the temperature chosen a key parameter. The results indicate that the NH 3 /LiNO 3 option with no boosting offers a smaller production above-zero Celsius degrees temperatures, but does not require higher hot water driving temperatures than H 2 O/LiBr. The boosted cycle offers superior performance. Some operational details are discussed. - Highlights: • Instantaneous optimum driving temperature t g,op for solar cooling in Madrid. • 3 absorption cycles tested: H 2 O/LiBr and NH 3 /LiNO 3 single effect and hybrid. • The t g,op of the hybrid cycle is 16 °C lower than both single effect cycles. • The best fixed driving temperature can reach almost the same behaviour than t g,op

  13. Remote Multi-layer Soil Temperature Monitoring System Based on GPRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Kuo CHEN

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available There is the temperature difference between the upper and lower layer of the shallow soil in the forest. It is a potential energy that can be harvested by thermoelectric generator for the electronic device in the forest. The temperature distribution at different depths of the soil is the first step for thermoelectric generation. A remote multi-layer soil temperature monitoring system based on GPRS is proposed in this paper. The MSP430F149 MCU is used as the main controller of multi-layer soil temperature monitoring system. A temperature acquisition module is designed with DS18B20 and 4 core shielded twisted-pair cable. The GPRS module sends the measured data to remote server through wireless communication network. From the experiments in the campus of Beijing Forestry University, the maximum error of measured temperature in this system is 0.2°C by comparing with professional equipment in the same condition. The results of the experiments show that the system can accurately realize real-time monitoring of multi-layer soil temperature, and the data transmission is stable and reliable.

  14. Inhibition of two-photon absorption in a three-level system with a pair of bichromatic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Jinhua; Hu Xiangming; Cheng Guangling; Li Xing; Du Dan

    2005-01-01

    We study two-photon absorption in a three-level ladder atomic system driven by a pair of bichromatic fields of equal frequency differences. The high-frequency component of one bichromatic field and the low-frequency component of the other are on two-photon resonance. The transition probability is calculated by employing the method of harmonic expansion and matrix inversion. Unexpectedly, when the sums of the phases of the different pairs of field components on the two-photon resonance are equal to each other, two-photon absorption is dramatically suppressed and the atomic system becomes transparent against two-photon absorption. Physically, due to dynamical Stark splitting, the two-photon transitions induced by the different pairs of field components experience different dressed states with phase difference of π. As a result, destructive interference occurs between the two pathways and leads to the inhibition of two-photon absorption

  15. Carbon storage of different soil-size fractions in Florida silvopastoral systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haile, Solomon G; Nair, P K Ramachandran; Nair, Vimala D

    2008-01-01

    Compared with open (treeless) pasture systems, silvopastoral agroforestry systems that integrate trees into pasture production systems are likely to enhance soil carbon (C) sequestration in deeper soil layers. To test this hypothesis, total soil C contents at six soil depths (0-5, 5-15, 15-30, 30-50, 50-75, and 75-125 cm) were determined in silvopastoral systems with slash pine (Pinus elliottii) + bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) and an adjacent open pasture (OP) with bahiagrass at four sites, representing Spodosols and Ultisols, in Florida. Soil samples from each layer were fractionated into three classes (250-2000, 53-250, and <53 microm), and the C contents in each were determined. Averaged across four sites and all depths, the total soil organic carbon (SOC) content was higher by 33% in silvopastures near trees (SP-T) and by 28% in the alleys between tree rows (SP-A) than in adjacent open pastures. It was higher by 39% in SP-A and 20% in SP-T than in open pastures in the largest fraction size (250-2000 microm) and by 12.3 and 18.8%, respectively, in the intermediate size fraction (53-250 microm). The highest SOC increase (up to 45 kg m(-2)) in whole soil of silvopasture compared with OP was at the 75- to 125-cm depth at the Spodosol sites. The results support the hypothesis that, compared with open pastures, silvopastures contain more C in deeper soil layers under similar ecological settings, possibly as a consequence of a major input to soil organic matter from decomposition of dead tree-roots.

  16. Non-invasive localization of organic matter in soil aggregates using SR-μCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peth, Stephan; Mordhorst, Anneka; Chenu, Claire; Uteau Puschmann, Daniel; Garnier, Patricia; Nunan, Naoise; Pot, Valerie; Beckmann, Felix; Ogurreck, Malte

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of the location of soil organic matter (SOM) and its spatial association to soil structure is an important step in improving modeling approaches for simulating organic matter turnover processes. Advanced models for carbon mineralization are able to account for the 3D distribution of SOM which is assumed to influence mineralisation. However, their application is still limited by the fact that no method exists to non-invasively determine the 3D spatial distribution of SOM in structured soils. SR-based X-ray microtomography (SR-µCT) is an advanced and promising tool in gaining knowledge on the 3-dimensional organization of soil phases (minerals, organic matter, water, air) which on a voxel level could be implemented into spatially explicit models. However, since the contrast of linear attenuation coefficients of soil organic matter on the one hand and mineral components and water on the other hand are relatively low, especially when materials are finely dispersed, organic matter within the soil pore space is often not resolved in ordinary X-ray absorption contrast imaging. To circumvent this problem we have developed a staining procedure for organic matter using Osmium-tetroxide since Osmium is an element with an absorption edge at a higher X-ray energy level. Osmium is known from transmission electron microscopy analysis (TEM) to stain organic matter specifically and irreversibly while having an absorption edge at approximately 74 keV. We report on the application of a novel Osmium vapor staining method to analyze differences in organic matter content and identify small scale spatial distribution of SOM in soil aggregates. To achieve this we have taken soil aggregate samples (6-8 mm across) obtained from arable soils differing in soil management. Aggregate samples were investigated by synchrotron-based X-ray microtomography (SR-µCT) after staining the sample with Osmium-tetroxide (OsO4) vapor. We utilized the monochromatic X-ray beam to locate osmium

  17. Effect of Bio char on Plant Growth and Aluminium Form of Soil under Aluminium Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Lianwen; Li, Qingbiao; Sun, Jingwei; Feng, Ying

    2018-01-01

    Aluminium-enriched acid red soils in South China easily cause aluminium toxicity to plants, but biochip can improve soils and eliminate soil contaminations. In this project, biochip was used in potted plant control test to study the effect of biochip on plant growth in soil under acid aluminium stress and the migration and conversion of aluminium in plant-soil system. The fin dings show that the application of biochip increases the pH value of soil under aluminium stress significantly, changes the existing form of aluminium ion in soil, reduces the plants’ absorption of aluminium, and alleviates the aluminium toxicity to plants, but too much biochip may inhibit the growth of plants. In this case, further study should be carried out as regards the volume and way of biochip input in practical applications as well as the timeliness of aluminium toxicity removal.

  18. Relationship Between Soil Characteristics and Rate of Soil Loss on Coffee Base-Farming System at Sumberjaya, West Lampung

    OpenAIRE

    DARIAH, AI; AGUS, F; ARSYAD, S; SUDARSONO,; MASWAR,

    2003-01-01

    The current public perception concerning land use change is, whenever forest is converted to agricultural land, the forest functions would drasticaly decrease. Studies have shown that soil loss in coffee based systems varied widely and it could be much lower than the tolerable soil loss level, depending on soil properties. This research was conducted to determine the dominant factors of soil properties in influencing soil loss. This analysis was based on data collected from a 3-site (Laksana,...

  19. The Frequency and Damping of Soil-Structure Systems with Embedded Foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghannad, M. Ali; Rahmani, Mohammad T.; Jahankhah, Hossein

    2008-01-01

    The effect of foundation embedment on fundamental period and damping of buildings has been the title of several researches in three past decades. A review of the literature reveals some discrepancies between proposed formulations for dynamic characteristics of soil-embedded foundation-structure systems that raise the necessity of more investigation on this issue. Here, first a set of approximate polynomial equations for soil impedances, based on numerical data calculated from well known cone models, are presented. Then a simplified approach is suggested to calculate period and damping of the whole system considering soil medium as a viscoelastic half space. The procedure includes both material and radiation damping while frequency dependency of soil impedance functions is not ignored. Results show that soil-structure interaction can highly affect dynamic properties of system. Finally the results are compared with one of the commonly referred researches

  20. Water table fluctuations and soil biogeochemistry: An experimental approach using an automated soil column system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezanezhad, F.; Couture, R.-M.; Kovac, R.; O'Connell, D.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2014-02-01

    Water table fluctuations significantly affect the biological and geochemical functioning of soils. Here, we introduce an automated soil column system in which the water table regime is imposed using a computer-controlled, multi-channel pump connected to a hydrostatic equilibrium reservoir and a water storage reservoir. The potential of this new system is illustrated by comparing results from two columns filled with 45 cm of the same homogenized riparian soil. In one soil column the water table remained constant at -20 cm below the soil surface, while in the other the water table oscillated between the soil surface and the bottom of the column, at a rate of 4.8 cm d-1. The experiment ran for 75 days at room temperature (25 ± 2 °C). Micro-sensors installed at -10 and -30 cm below the soil surface in the stable water table column recorded constant redox potentials on the order of 600 and -200 mV, respectively. In the fluctuating water table column, redox potentials at the same depths oscillated between oxidizing (∼700 mV) and reducing (∼-100 mV) conditions. Pore waters collected periodically and solid-phase analyses on core material obtained at the end of the experiment highlighted striking geochemical differences between the two columns, especially in the time series and depth distributions of Fe, Mn, K, P and S. Soil CO2 emissions derived from headspace gas analysis exhibited periodic variations in the fluctuating water table column, with peak values during water table drawdown. Transient redox conditions caused by the water table fluctuations enhanced microbial oxidation of soil organic matter, resulting in a pronounced depletion of particulate organic carbon in the midsection of the fluctuating water table column. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed the onset of differentiation of the bacterial communities in the upper (oxidizing) and lower (reducing) soil sections, although no systematic differences in microbial community structure

  1. Earthquake response analyses of soil-structure system considering kinematic interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, H.; Yokono, K.; Miura, S.; Ishii, K.

    1985-01-01

    Improvement of soil-structure interaction analysis has been one of major concerns in earthquake engineering field, especially in nuclear industries, to evaluate the safety of structure accurately under earthquake events. This research aims to develop a rational analytical tool which considers effect of the 'kinematic interaction' satisfactory with a proposed simple low-pass filter. In this paper, first the effect of the kinematic interaction is investigated based on earthquake response analysis of a reactor building using the practical design models: the spring-mass-dashpot system and the 'lattice model', in which a building and soil medium are modeled by a system of lumped masses. Next, the filter is developed based on parametrical studies with various sizes of depth and width of foundations embedded in two-layers soil, which represents more general soil condition in practical designs compared with a homogeneous soil medium. (orig.)

  2. [Bare Soil Moisture Inversion Model Based on Visible-Shortwave Infrared Reflectance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao-po; Sun, Yue-jun; Qin, Qi-ming; Ren, Hua-zhong; Gao, Zhong-ling; Wu, Ling; Meng, Qing-ye; Wang, Jin-liang; Wang, Jian-hua

    2015-08-01

    Soil is the loose solum of land surface that can support plants. It consists of minerals, organics, atmosphere, moisture, microbes, et al. Among its complex compositions, soil moisture varies greatly. Therefore, the fast and accurate inversion of soil moisture by using remote sensing is very crucial. In order to reduce the influence of soil type on the retrieval of soil moisture, this paper proposed a normalized spectral slope and absorption index named NSSAI to estimate soil moisture. The modeling of the new index contains several key steps: Firstly, soil samples with different moisture level were artificially prepared, and soil reflectance spectra was consequently measured using spectroradiometer produced by ASD Company. Secondly, the moisture absorption spectral feature located at shortwave wavelengths and the spectral slope of visible wavelengths were calculated after analyzing the regular spectral feature change patterns of different soil at different moisture conditions. Then advantages of the two features at reducing soil types' effects was synthesized to build the NSSAI. Thirdly, a linear relationship between NSSAI and soil moisture was established. The result showed that NSSAI worked better (correlation coefficient is 0.93) than most of other traditional methods in soil moisture extraction. It can weaken the influences caused by soil types at different moisture levels and improve the bare soil moisture inversion accuracy.

  3. An In Silico Knockout Model for Gastrointestinal Absorption Using a Systems Pharmacology Approach - Development and Application for Ketones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittal Shivva

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal absorption and disposition of ketones is complex. Recent work describing the pharmacokinetics (PK of d-β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB following oral ingestion of a ketone monoester ((R-3-hydroxybutyl (R-3-hydroxybutyrate found multiple input sites, nonlinear disposition and feedback on endogenous production. In the current work, a human systems pharmacology model for gastrointestinal absorption and subsequent disposition of small molecules (monocarboxylic acids with molecular weight < 200 Da was developed with an application to a ketone monoester. The systems model was developed by collating the information from the literature and knowledge gained from empirical population modelling of the clinical data. In silico knockout variants of this systems model were used to explore the mechanism of gastrointestinal absorption of ketones. The knockouts included active absorption across different regions in the gut and also a passive diffusion knockout, giving 10 gut knockouts in total. Exploration of knockout variants has suggested that there are at least three distinct regions in the gut that contribute to absorption of ketones. Passive diffusion predominates in the proximal gut and active processes contribute to the absorption of ketones in the distal gut. Low doses are predominantly absorbed from the proximal gut by passive diffusion whereas high doses are absorbed across all sites in the gut. This work has provided mechanistic insight into the absorption process of ketones, in the form of unique in silico knockouts that have potential for application with other therapeutics. Future studies on absorption process of ketones are suggested to substantiate findings in this study.

  4. Absorption of plant-incorporated nuclear fuel cycle elements from the gastro-intestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, M.F.; Garland, T.R.; Cataldo, D.A.; Schreckhise, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    Soybean plants (Glycine max cv Williams) grown hydroponically on solutions containing ammonium pertechnetate ( 95 Tcsup(m)O - 4 ) were fed to rats (omnivores) and guinea pigs (herbivores). Absorption of plant-incorporated technetium was compared with absorption of inorganic 95 Tcsup(m) from a gavaged solution or with absorption of 95 Tcsup(m) added to non-radioactive soybean tissues. In a second study absorption of plutonium from alfalfa (Medicago sativa cv Ladak) grown on soil amended with either 238 Pu nitrate or 238 Pu-DTPA was compared with absorption of gavaged 238 Pu solutions and 238 Pu mixed with non-radioactive alfalfa. Incorporation of 95 Tcsup(m) into soybean tissues resulted in decreased absorption by both animal species. In contrast, incorporation of 238 Pu in alfalfa resulted in an increased absorption when compared with controls that were administered inorganic 238 Pu. These results suggest that organic binding may alter, in either direction, absorption of nuclear fuel cycle elements. (author)

  5. Soil physico-hydrical properties resulting from the management in Integrated Production Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Carlos Auler

    Full Text Available Anthropic action, such as the soil use and management systems, promote changes in the soil structure. These changes might hamper the development of plants in soil management practices that involve its mobilization, and the negative effects might be increased due to intensive use. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physico-hydrical properties of a Haplohumox in integrated production systems under different soil managements. The soil superficial (0.0-0.10 m and sub-superficial (0.10-0.20 m layers were evaluated in the different systems: conventional tillage (CT, minimum tillage (MT, no-tillage (NT and chiseled no-tillage (CNT, taking into consideration the annual ryegrass cropped for different uses [cover crop (C, grazing (G and silage (S] during the winter. Soil bulk density (Db, total porosity (TP, macro (Ma and microporosity (Mi, water retention curves (SWRC and water retention due to pore size (r were determined. The annual ryegrass used as C produced lower Db and Mi and higher TP and Ma in CT, MT and CNT systems. No difference was verified between G and S in any of the management systems or soil layers. The superficial layer SWRC presented similar behavior regarding CT, MT and CNT. Under NT, C resulted in higher water retention. However, G and S provided higher water retention due to the pore size in this system.

  6. β Absorption dust concentration monitor system based on the PLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian Dexing; Zhou Xiuliang; Liu Liyan; Li Zonglun; Cao Guanghui; Mao Wanchong

    2011-01-01

    To provide an on-line automatic system for dust concentration monitor is the purpose of this design.The system based on β-ray-absorption-method,employing PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) control technology, is presented. The user input parameter setup,the data acquisition and processing, and the communication with computer can be effectively regulated using the advanced PLC control technology. It has the features of high reliability, easy operation and easy maintenance, and the ability to monitor remotely. Measurement range: 0.1-1500 mg/m 3 , Accuracy: ±9%. The structure,working principle, electric circuit and software development of the system are introduced in detail. (authors)

  7. Mulching as a strategy to improve soil properties and reduce soil erodibility in coffee farming systems of Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nzeyimana, I.; Hartemink, A.E.; Ritsema, C.J.; Stroosnijder, L.; Huerta Lwanga, Esperanza; Geissen, V.

    2017-01-01

    In Rwanda, mulch is applied in coffee fields to control soil erosion. The objective of this paper is to quantify the effects of different types of mulch on soil properties and soil erodibility in coffee farming systems in three different agro-ecological zones of the highlands of Rwanda. The

  8. Soil-atmosphere greenhouse-gas exchange in a bioretention system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, E.; Chan, H.; Beringer, J.; Livesley, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Bioretention systems are a popular green-technology for the management of urban stormwater runoff in many countries. They typically consist of a trench filled with a highly permeable soil medium that supports vegetation; runoff is diverted to bioretention systems and, by percolating through the filter medium, is subjected to a number of treatment processes. Nitrogen (N) is one of the key pollutants targeted by bioretention systems, which are able to reduce N concentrations considerably from inflow to outflow. To increase N removal, a saturated zone at the bottom of the filter medium is often artificially generated, to both enhance the denitrification process and increase the water available to the vegetation between inflow events. Although studies on the N-removal performance of bioretention systems are widely available in the literature, less is known about the exchange of greenhouse gases (GHG), especially nitrous oxide (N2O), between the bioretention systems and the atmosphere. Here, we present an experimental pilot study to measure N2O and CO2 soil emissions in a bioretention system installed on the Clayton Campus of Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. The bioretention system is divided into three cells, each 15 m2; the system as a whole receives water run-off from 4500 m2 of impervious car park. We monitored two cells with mostly sandy-loam vegetated with native sedges (mainly Carex Appressa and Lomandra Longifolia), one with and one without a saturated zone. Three manual flux chambers were installed in both cells. Gas flux samples were taken twice a week at about 11 am between the 2nd of March and the 18th of May 2011 (late summer and fall). Since October 2010, air-phase soil CO2 concentration profiles were measured continuously using solid-state infrared CO2 transmitters (GMT-221 model, Vaisala, Finland), along with soil moisture and soil temperature. Preliminary analysis of the chamber data (March only) showed that N2O fluxes were in general below 50

  9. Space Launch System Base Heating Test: Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Ron; Carr, Zak; MacLean, Mathew; Dufrene, Aaron; Mehta, Manish

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) measurement of several water transitions that were interrogated during a hot-fire testing of the Space Launch Systems (SLS) sub-scale vehicle installed in LENS II. The temperature of the recirculating gas flow over the base plate was found to increase with altitude and is consistent with CFD results. It was also observed that the gas above the base plate has significant velocity along the optical path of the sensor at the higher altitudes. The line-by-line analysis of the H2O absorption features must include the effects of the Doppler shift phenomena particularly at high altitude. The TDLAS experimental measurements and the analysis procedure which incorporates the velocity dependent flow will be described.

  10. Bright soil units on Mars determined from ISM imaging spectrometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, Scott; Mustard, John

    1993-01-01

    The lithology of bright Martian soil provides evidence for chemical and physical processes that have modified the planet's surface. Data from the ISM imaging spectrometer, which observed much of the equatorial region at a spatial resolution of approximately 22 km, cover the NIR wavelength range critical to ascertaining the presence and abundance of Fe-containing phases, hydroxylated silicates, and H2O in the bright soil. ISM data previously have revealed spatial variations in depth of the 3.0-microns H2O absorption suggesting differences in water content, a weak absorption at 2.2 microns indicative of metal-OH in phyllosilicate, and variations in the 1-micron Fe absorption indicative of differences in Fe mineralogy. This paper summarizes first results of a systematic investigation of spectral heterogeneity in bright soils observed by ISM. At least seven 'units' with distinctive properties were discriminated. Comparison of their spatial distributions with Viking data shows that they generally correspond with previously recognized morphologic, color, and thermal features. These correspondences and the units' spectral attributes provide evidence for lithologic differences between the soils in different geologic settings.

  11. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for water vapor investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browell, E. V.; Carter, A. F.; Wilkerson, T. D.

    1981-01-01

    Range-resolved water vapor measurements using the differential-absorption lidar (DIAL) technique is described in detail. The system uses two independently tunable optically pumped lasers operating in the near infrared with laser pulses of less than 100 microseconds separation, to minimize concentration errors caused by atmospheric scattering. Water vapor concentration profiles are calculated for each measurement by a minicomputer, in real time. The work is needed in the study of atmospheric motion and thermodynamics as well as in forestry and agriculture problems.

  12. Stability performance and interface shear strength of geocomposite drain/soil systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Maidiana; Frost, Matthew; Dixon, Neil

    2018-02-01

    Landfill covers are designed as impermeable caps on top of waste containment facilities after the completion of landfill operations. Geocomposite drain (GD) materials consist of a geonet or geospacer (as a drainage core) sandwiched between non-woven geotextiles that act as separators and filters. GD provides a drainage function as part of the cover system. The stability performance of landfill cover system is largely controlled by the interface shear strength mobilized between the elements of the cover. If a GD is used, the interface shear strength properties between the upper surface of the GD and the overlying soil may govern stability of the system. It is not uncommon for fine grained materials to be used as cover soils. In these cases, understanding soil softening issues at the soil interface with the non-woven geotextile is important. Such softening can be caused by capillary break behaviour and build-up of water pressures from the toe of the drain upwards into the cover soil. The interaction processes to allow water flow into a GD core through the soil-geotextile interface is very complex. This paper reports the main behaviour of in-situ interface shear strength of soil-GD using field measurements on the trial landfill cover at Bletchley, UK. The soil softening at the interface due to soaked behaviour show a reduction in interface shear strength and this aspect should be emphasized in design specifications and construction control. The results also help to increase confidence in the understanding of the implications for design of cover systems.

  13. Simulation of Tillage Systems Impact on Soil Biophysical Properties Using the SALUS Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Sartori

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A sustainable land management has been defined as the management system that allows for production, while minimizing risk, maintaining quality of soil and water. Tillage systems can significantly decrease soil carbon storage and influence the soil environment of a crop. Crop growth models can be useful tools in evaluating the impact of different tillage systems on soil biophysical properties and on the growth and final yield of the crops. The objectives of this paper were i to illustrate the SALUS model and its tillage component; ii to evaluate the effects of different tillage systems on water infiltration and time to ponding, iii to simulate the effect of tillage systems on some soil biophysical properties. The SALUS (System Approach to Land Use Sustainability model is designed to simulate continuous crop, soil, water and nutrient conditions under different tillage and crop residues management strategies for multiple years. Predictions of changes in surface residue, bulk density, runoff, drainage and evaporation were consistent with expected behaviours of these parameters as described in the literature. The experiment to estimate the time to ponding curve under different tillage system confirmed the theory and showed the beneficial effects of the residue on soil surface with respect to water infiltration. It also showed that the no-tillage system is a more appropriate system to adopt in areas characterized by high intensity rainfall.

  14. Simulation of Tillage Systems Impact on Soil Biophysical Properties Using the SALUS Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Basso

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A sustainable land management has been defined as the management system that allows for production, while minimizing risk, maintaining quality of soil and water. Tillage systems can significantly decrease soil carbon storage and influence the soil environment of a crop. Crop growth models can be useful tools in evaluating the impact of different tillage systems on soil biophysical properties and on the growth and final yield of the crops. The objectives of this paper were i to illustrate the SALUS model and its tillage component; ii to evaluate the effects of different tillage systems on water infiltration and time to ponding, iii to simulate the effect of tillage systems on some soil biophysical properties. The SALUS (System Approach to Land Use Sustainability model is designed to simulate continuous crop, soil, water and nutrient conditions under different tillage and crop residues management strategies for multiple years. Predictions of changes in surface residue, bulk density, runoff, drainage and evaporation were consistent with expected behaviours of these parameters as described in the literature. The experiment to estimate the time to ponding curve under different tillage system confirmed the theory and showed the beneficial effects of the residue on soil surface with respect to water infiltration. It also showed that the no-tillage system is a more appropriate system to adopt in areas characterized by high intensity rainfall.

  15. Soils in Lower Saxony. Pt. 1. Soil properties, soil use and soil protection. NIBIS - Lower Saxony Soil Information System. Information system on soil science; Boeden in Niedersachsen. T. 1. Bodeneigenschaften, Bodennutzung und Bodenschutz. Niedersaechsiches Bodeninformationssystem NIBIS. Fachinformationssystem Bodenkunde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benzler, J.H.; Boess, J.; Capelle, A.; Gehrt, E.; Heineke, H.J.; Kues, J.; Mueller, U.; Oelkers, K.H.; Roeschmann, G.; Schneider, J.; Sponagel, H. [Niedersaechsisches Landesamt fuer Bodenforschung, Hannover (Germany). Abt. Bodenkunde

    1997-12-31

    In the first part the multitude of activities in Lower Saxony on soil information are described, in particular the structure of the NIBIS (Niedersaechsisches Bodeninformationssystem - Lower Saxony Soil Information System) and the wide range of possibilities for its usage. The second part is meant to enhance the interest in and the knowledge about soils. The history of land use and the great structural variety of soils in Lower Saxony, the complex associations and their distribution are presented in cross sections, profiles and maps. A detailed bibliography provides information about the relevant literature. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im ersten Teil werden die vielfaeltigen Aktivitaeten in Niedersachsen auf dem Gebiet der Bodeninformation verdeutlicht. Insbesondere werden der Aufbau des Niedersaechsischen Informationssystems NIBIS und seine Nutzungsmoeglichkeiten dargestellt. Im zweiten Kapitel soll das Verstaendnis fuer das Medium Boden geweckt werden. Die Geschichte der Bodennutzung sowie die Vielfalt des Aufbaues der Boeden Niedersachsens, die Komplexibilitaet ihrer Vergesellschaftung und die Vorstellungen zur Bodenverbreitung werden mit Gelaendeschnitten, Profilaufnahmen und Karten vorgestellt. Ein ausfuehrliches Literaturverzeichnis verweist auf weiterfuehrende Schriften. (orig.)

  16. Aspects of neptunium behavior in plants; absorption, distribution, and fate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cataldo, D.A.; Garland, T.R.; Wildung, R.E.

    1984-03-01

    The availability of Np(V) for absorption by plants and its subsequent transport and fate are described. Plant uptake of Np from solutions containing 7 x 10 -7 to 473 μg Np/ml is proportional to concentration, exhibiting some saturation at higher concentrations. Soil studies using Np concentrations of 5.2 x 10 -7 to 4.1 μg/g soil show CR values to be constant at approx. 2 at soil concentrations below 4 x 10 -4 μg/g, and increase to 12 at higher soil levels. Soil/plant CR values vary with plant species and range from 0.5 to 4; seed concentrations are a factor of 10 lower than vegetative tissues. Fractionation of plant tissues show Np to be substantially more soluble than Pu, with approx. 50% of the soluble Np being associated with plant ligands of < 5000 MW. 6 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  17. Efficient atom localization via probe absorption in an inverted-Y atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianchun; Wu, Bo; Mao, Jiejian

    2018-06-01

    The behaviour of atom localization in an inverted-Y atomic system is theoretically investigated. For the atoms interacting with a weak probe field and several orthogonal standing-wave fields, their position information can be obtained by measuring the probe absorption. Compared with the traditional scheme, we couple the probe field to the transition between the middle and top levels. It is found that the probe absorption sensitively depends on the detuning and strength of the relevant light fields. Remarkably, the atom can be localized at a particular position in the standing-wave fields by coupling a microwave field to the transition between the two ground levels.

  18. The importance of the ammonia purification process in ammonia-water absorption systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Seara, Jose; Sieres, Jaime

    2006-01-01

    Practical experience in working with ammonia-water absorption systems shows that the ammonia purification process is a crucial issue in order to obtain an efficient and reliable system. In this paper, the detrimental effects of the residual water content in the vapour refrigerant are described and quantified based on the system design variables that determine the effectiveness of the purification process. The study has been performed considering a single stage system with a distillation column with complete condensation. The ammonia purification effectiveness of the column is analysed in terms of the efficiencies in the stripping and rectifying sections and the reflux ratio. By varying the efficiencies from 0 to 1, systems with neither the rectifying nor stripping section, with either the rectifying or stripping section, or with both sections can be considered. The impact of the ammonia purification process on the absorption system performance is studied based on the column efficiencies and reflux ratio; and its effects on refrigerant concentration, system COP, system pressures and main system mass flow rates and concentrations are analysed. When the highest efficiency rectifying sections are used a combination of generation temperature and reflux ratio which leads to optimum COP values is found. The analysis covers different operating conditions with air and water cooled systems from refrigeration to air conditioning applications by changing the evaporation temperature. The importance of rectification in each kind of application is evaluated

  19. How to take absorptive surfaces into account when designing outdoor sound reinforcement systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten bo

    1996-01-01

    When sound reinforcement systems are used outdoors, absorptive surfaces are usually present along the propagation path of the sound. This may lead to a very significant colouration of the spectrum received by the audience. The colouration depends on the location and directivity of the loudspeaker......, the nature of the absorptive surface (eg grass) and the location of the audience. It is discussed how this effect may be calculated and numerical examples are shown. The results show a significant colouration and attenuation of the sound due to grass-covered surfaces....

  20. Soil food web properties explain ecosystem services across European land use systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Franciska T; Thébault, Elisa; Liiri, Mira; Birkhofer, Klaus; Tsiafouli, Maria A; Bjørnlund, Lisa; Bracht Jørgensen, Helene; Brady, Mark Vincent; Christensen, Søren; de Ruiter, Peter C; d'Hertefeldt, Tina; Frouz, Jan; Hedlund, Katarina; Hemerik, Lia; Hol, W H Gera; Hotes, Stefan; Mortimer, Simon R; Setälä, Heikki; Sgardelis, Stefanos P; Uteseny, Karoline; van der Putten, Wim H; Wolters, Volkmar; Bardgett, Richard D

    2013-08-27

    Intensive land use reduces the diversity and abundance of many soil biota, with consequences for the processes that they govern and the ecosystem services that these processes underpin. Relationships between soil biota and ecosystem processes have mostly been found in laboratory experiments and rarely are found in the field. Here, we quantified, across four countries of contrasting climatic and soil conditions in Europe, how differences in soil food web composition resulting from land use systems (intensive wheat rotation, extensive rotation, and permanent grassland) influence the functioning of soils and the ecosystem services that they deliver. Intensive wheat rotation consistently reduced the biomass of all components of the soil food web across all countries. Soil food web properties strongly and consistently predicted processes of C and N cycling across land use systems and geographic locations, and they were a better predictor of these processes than land use. Processes of carbon loss increased with soil food web properties that correlated with soil C content, such as earthworm biomass and fungal/bacterial energy channel ratio, and were greatest in permanent grassland. In contrast, processes of N cycling were explained by soil food web properties independent of land use, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and bacterial channel biomass. Our quantification of the contribution of soil organisms to processes of C and N cycling across land use systems and geographic locations shows that soil biota need to be included in C and N cycling models and highlights the need to map and conserve soil biodiversity across the world.

  1. Atomic absorption instrument functional description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystroff, R.I.; Boyle, W.G. Jr.; Barton, G.W. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This report describes a proposed system for automating atomic absorption analysis. The system consists of two atomic absorption instruments and an automatic sampler that can be attached to either instrument. A computer program controls the sampling and gathers data. The program then uses the data to perform bookkeeping, data processing, and report writing

  2. Thermodynamic limits set relevant constraints to the soil-plant-atmosphere system and to optimality in terrestrial vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleidon, Axel; Renner, Maik

    2016-04-01

    The soil-plant-atmosphere system is a complex system that is strongly shaped by interactions between the physical environment and vegetation. This complexity appears to demand equally as complex models to fully capture the dynamics of the coupled system. What we describe here is an alternative approach that is based on thermodynamics and which allows for comparatively simple formulations free of empirical parameters by assuming that the system is so complex that its emergent dynamics are only constrained by the thermodynamics of the system. This approach specifically makes use of the second law of thermodynamics, a fundamental physical law that is typically not being considered in Earth system science. Its relevance to land surface processes is that it fundamentally sets a direction as well as limits to energy conversions and associated rates of mass exchange, but it requires us to formulate land surface processes as thermodynamic processes that are driven by energy conversions. We describe an application of this approach to the surface energy balance partitioning at the diurnal scale. In this application the turbulent heat fluxes of sensible and latent heat are described as the result of a convective heat engine that is driven by solar radiative heating of the surface and that operates at its thermodynamic limit. The predicted fluxes from this approach compare very well to observations at several sites. This suggests that the turbulent exchange fluxes between the surface and the atmosphere operate at their thermodynamic limit, so that thermodynamics imposes a relevant constraint to the land surface-atmosphere system. Yet, thermodynamic limits do not entirely determine the soil-plant-atmosphere system because vegetation affects these limits, for instance by affecting the magnitude of surface heating by absorption of solar radiation in the canopy layer. These effects are likely to make the conditions at the land surface more favorable for photosynthetic activity

  3. Dynamics of water absorption through superabsorbent polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sooyoung; Kim, Wonjung

    2017-11-01

    Superabsorbent polymers (SAPs) consist of hydrophilic cross-linked polymer networks that can absorb and retain a great amount of water relative to their own mass, so that they are widely used for disposable diapers and holding soil moisture in agriculture. SAPs are typically available in the form of submillimeter-sized particles, and the water absorption is driven by capillary flows between particles as well as diffusion that entail swelling. Although the control of water absorption of SAPs is important in engineering applications, but the dynamics of water absorption in SAP particles has not been fully understood. We examine the dynamics of the water absorption of sodium polyacrylate, one of the most common SAP. We experimentally measured the water absorption of sodium polyacrylate particles in one-dimensional confined channel. The water flows through the particles were analyzed by capillarity dominant at the early stage and by diffusion involving volume expansion critical at a later stage. The results provide a quantitative basis of the hydrodynamic analysis of the water flow through SAP particles from a macroscopic point of view, facilitating the prediction of water uptake of SAPs in hygienic and agricultural applications. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Grant funded by the Korea government (MSIP) (No.2015R1A2A2A04006181).

  4. Bioelectric potentials in the soil-plant system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdnyakov, A. I.

    2013-07-01

    A detailed study of the electric potentials in the soil-plant system was performed. It was found that the electric potential depends on the plant species and the soil properties. A theoretical interpretation of the obtained data was given. All the plants, independently from their species and their state, always had a negative electric potential relative to the soil. The electric potential of the herbaceous plants largely depended on the leaf area. In some plants, such as burdock ( Arctium lappa) and hogweed ( Heracleum sosnowskyi), the absolute values of the negative electric potential exceeded 100 mV. The electric potential was clearly differentiated by the plant organs: in the flowers, it was lower than in the leaves; in the leaves, it was usually lower than in the leaf rosettes and stems. The electric potentials displayed seasonal dynamics. As a rule, the higher the soil water content, the lower the electric potential of the plants. However, an inverse relationship was observed for dandelions ( Taraxacum officinale). It can be supposed that the electric potential between the soil and the plant characterizes the vital energy of the plant.

  5. The effect of sewage sludge application on the growth and absorption rates of Pb and As in water spinach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the effect of the application of sewage sludge on the growth rates and absorption rates of Pb and As in potted water spinach. Our results indicated that application of sewage sludge promoted vegetable growth, and the dry weight of water spinach reached a maximal value (4.38 ± 0.82 g upon 8% sludge application. We also found that the dry weights of water spinach after treatment were all greater than those of the control systems (CK. Treatment with sludge promoted the absorption of Pb and As in water spinach, with a significant (p < 0.05 increase of absorbed Pb following treatment concentrations above 10%, and a peak absorption of As at 8%. Finally, we found that concentrations of Pb and As were higher in rhizosphere-attached soil than in free pot.

  6. The effect of environmental conditions and soil physicochemistry on phosphate stabilisation of Pb in shooting range soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Peter; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi

    2016-04-01

    The stabilisation of Pb in the soil by phosphate is influenced by environmental conditions and physicochemical properties of the soils to which it is applied. Stabilisation of Pb by phosphate was examined in four soils under different environmental conditions. The effect of soil moisture and temperature on stabilisation of Pb by phosphate was examined by measurement of water extractable and bioaccessible Pb, sequential fractionation and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The addition of humic acid, ammonium nitrate and chloride was also examined for inhibition or improvement of Pb stability with phosphate treatment. The effect of moisture level varied between soils. In soil MB and DA a soil moisture level of 50% water holding capacity was sufficient to maximise stabilisation of Pb, but in soil TV and PE reduction in bioaccessible Pb was inhibited at this moisture level. Providing moisture at twice the soil water holding capacity did not enhance the effect of phosphate on Pb stabilisation. The difference of Pb stability as a result of incubating phosphate treated soils at 18 °C and 37 °C was relatively small. However wet-dry cycles decreased the effectiveness of phosphate treatment. The reduction in bioaccessible Pb obtained was between 20 and 40% with the most optimal treatment conditions. The reduction in water extractable Pb by phosphate was substantial regardless of incubation conditions and the effect of different temperature and soil moisture regimes was not significant. Selective sequential extraction showed phosphate treatment converted Pb in fraction 1 (exchangeable, acid and water soluble) to fraction 2 (reducible). There were small difference in fraction 4 (residual) Pb and fraction 1 as a result of treatment conditions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of stabilised PE soil revealed small differences in Pb speciation under varying soil moisture and temperature treatments. The addition of humic acid and chloride produced the greatest effect on Pb speciation in

  7. Assessment of natural radioactivity and heavy metals in water and soil around seismically active area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oktay Baykara; Mahmut Dogru; Firat University, Elazig

    2010-01-01

    The natural radioactivity concentration and some heavy metals in various water and soil samples collected from seismically active area have been determined. Gross-alpha and beta concentrations of different 33 water samples and some heavy metal (Fe, Pb, Cu, K, Mn, Cr and Zn) concentration in 72 soil samples collected from two major fault systems (North and East Anatolian Active Fault Systems) in Turkey have been studied. This survey regarding gross-alpha and beta radioactivity and some heavy metals concentrations was carried out by means of Krieger method using a gross-alpha and beta-counting system and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), respectively. Also, gross annual effective dose from the average gross-alpha activity in waters were calculated. (author)

  8. Energy and exergy analysis of a double effect absorption refrigeration system based on different heat sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaynakli, Omer; Saka, Kenan; Kaynakli, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy and exergy analysis was performed on double effect series flow absorption refrigeration system. • The refrigeration system runs on various heat sources such as hot water, hot air and steam. • A comparative analysis was carried out on these heat sources in terms of exergy destruction and mass flow rate of heat source. • The effect of heat sources on the exergy destruction of high pressure generator was investigated. - Abstract: Absorption refrigeration systems are environmental friendly since they can utilize industrial waste heat and/or solar energy. In terms of heat source of the systems, researchers prefer one type heat source usually such as hot water or steam. Some studies can be free from environment. In this study, energy and exergy analysis is performed on a double effect series flow absorption refrigeration system with water/lithium bromide as working fluid pair. The refrigeration system runs on various heat sources such as hot water, hot air and steam via High Pressure Generator (HPG) because of hot water/steam and hot air are the most common available heat source for absorption applications but the first law of thermodynamics may not be sufficient analyze the absorption refrigeration system and to show the difference of utilize for different type heat source. On the other hand operation temperatures of the overall system and its components have a major effect on their performance and functionality. In this regard, a parametric study conducted here to investigate this effect on heat capacity and exergy destruction of the HPG, coefficient of performance (COP) of the system, and mass flow rate of heat sources. Also, a comparative analysis is carried out on several heat sources (e.g. hot water, hot air and steam) in terms of exergy destruction and mass flow rate of heat source. From the analyses it is observed that exergy destruction of the HPG increases at higher temperature of the heat sources, condenser and absorber, and lower

  9. EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT SOIL TILLAGE SYSTEMS ON NODULATION AND YIELD OF SOYBEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jug

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary soil tillage for different crops in Croatia is generally based on mouldboard ploughing which is the most expensive for crops production. Negative effects due to frequent passes by equipment and machines (deterioration of soil structure, soil compaction, lower biogenity and soil tilth, together with negative economical and energetical costs, can be lowered and avoided by introduction of reduced soil tillage or direct drilling (No-tillage. Accordingly, the main goal of this research was to determine effects of conventional and reduced soil tillage systems on yield components and nodulation ability of nitrogen fixing bacteria in soybean crop. The research was established at chernozem soil type of northern Baranja as monofactorial completely randomized block design in four repetitions. The soil tillage variants were as follows: CT Conventional Tillage (primary soil tillage by moldboard ploughing at 25-30 cm depth, DH Multiple Diskharrowing at 10-15 cm as primary tillage, and NT No-tillage system. Results show significantly lower plant density, mass of 1000 grains and grain yield at variants with reduced soil tillage in both investigation years. However, reduced tillage systems had positive trend on nitrogen-fixing bacteria nodulation, since the highest values of number and mass of nodules per plant were recorded. This research was run during the years 2002 and 2003, the last one extremely droughty, thus it requires continuation.

  10. Use of the neutron activation technique: soil-plant transfer factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Wellington Ferrari da; Menezes, Maria Ângela de B.C.; Marques, Douglas José

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of the soil-plant transfer factor in the absorption and translocation of chemical elements, thus, it is possible to evaluate a better decision-making in the consecutive plantations. To determine these values, the content of a chemical element present in the plant or part of it with the total content present in the same soil where it is grown is considered. The objective of this study was to determine the concentrations of the chemical elements present in soil, leaf and grains corn, by neutron activation analysis and to compare the different soil-plant transfer factors. The samples were collected in a property located in the region of Biquinhas, MG, and irradiated in the TRIGA MARK I IPR-R1 CDTN / CNEN nuclear reactor. Thus, the concentrations of Br, Ce Fe, K, La, Na, Rb, Zn were determined. The soil-plant transfer factors for the elements found were varied, indicating a greater potassium absorption capacity (K). (author)

  11. Use of the neutron activation technique: soil-plant transfer factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Wellington Ferrari da, E-mail: wferrari250@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências e Técnicas Nucleares; Menezes, Maria Ângela de B.C., E-mail: menezes@cdtn.br [Centro Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (SERTA/CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Serviço de Técnicas Analíticas. Laboratório de Ativação Neutrônica; Marques, Douglas José, E-mail: douglasjmarques81@yahoo.com.br [Universidade José do Rosário Vellano, Alfenas, MG (Brazil). Setor de Olericultura e Experimentação em Agricultura Orgânica

    2017-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of the soil-plant transfer factor in the absorption and translocation of chemical elements, thus, it is possible to evaluate a better decision-making in the consecutive plantations. To determine these values, the content of a chemical element present in the plant or part of it with the total content present in the same soil where it is grown is considered. The objective of this study was to determine the concentrations of the chemical elements present in soil, leaf and grains corn, by neutron activation analysis and to compare the different soil-plant transfer factors. The samples were collected in a property located in the region of Biquinhas, MG, and irradiated in the TRIGA MARK I IPR-R1 CDTN / CNEN nuclear reactor. Thus, the concentrations of Br, Ce Fe, K, La, Na, Rb, Zn were determined. The soil-plant transfer factors for the elements found were varied, indicating a greater potassium absorption capacity (K). (author)

  12. Validation of radiological efficiency model applied for the crops/soils contaminated by radiocaesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montero, M.; Vazquez, C.; Moraleda, M.; Claver, F.

    2000-01-01

    The differences shown in the radiological efficiency applying the same agrochemical interventions on a range of contaminated agricultural scenarios by long-live radionuclides have conducted the radioecological studies to quantify the influence of local characteristics on the soil-to-plant transference. In the framework of the Decision Support Systems for post-accidental environmental restoration, a semi-mechanistic approach has been developed to estimate the soil-to-plant transfer factor from the major properties underlying the bioavailability of radiocaesium in soils and the absorption capacity by the crop. The model describes, for each soil texture class, the effects of time and K status on the transference of radiocaesium to plants. The approach lets to estimate the actual and the available minimum transference and to calculate the optimum amendment warranting the maximum radiological efficiency on an specific soil-crop combination. The parameterization and validation of the model from a database providing information about experimental transference studies for a collection of soil-crop combinations are shown. (Author) 4 refs

  13. Soil reaction and absorption of silicon by rice Reação do solo e absorção de silício pelo arroz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Sartori de Camargo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The solubility and availability of silicon can be influenced by soil reaction. A pot experiment with a clayey textured Rhodic Acrustox was conducted under greenhouse conditions to evaluate the effect of soil reaction on silicon availability to rice plants. The experiment was set up in a completely randomized design, using a factorial scheme (4 x 4 with four materials (calcitic lime, calcium and magnesium silicate, pure silicic acid, and wollastonite, four rates (0, 2500, 5000 and 7500 mg per 5 kg-pot and four replicates. After 60 days, dry matter yield and silicon absorption by the rice shoot plants, pH CaCl2, and soluble silicon (0.5 mol L-1 acetic acid and 0.01 mol L-1CaCl2 in the soil were evaluated. The materials increased soil pH as the applied rates increased, except silicic acid. Soluble silicon extracted by 0.5 mol L-1 acetic acid also increased with applied rates. For calcium chloride, soluble silicon increased in the soil only with wollastonite and calcium and magnesium silicate, agreeing with its total content. Silicon absorption by the above-ground part of the rice plants was linearly correlated with rates of wollastonite, followed by calcium and magnesium silicate, silicic acid and calcitic lime. Soil pH increase with lime was not sufficient to provide silicon to the rice. The 0.01 mol L-1 CaCl2 soluble silicon had the best correlation with silicon absorption by plants. More studies are necessary under field conditions and other soils to corroborate the presented results.A solubilidade e disponibilidade de silício podem ser influenciadas pela reação do solo. Com o objetivo de estudar o efeito da reação do solo sobre a disponibilidade de silício para a cultura do arroz, foi conduzido experimento em Latossolo Vermelho álico textura argilosa em casa-de-vegetação. O experimento foi conduzido em fatorial 4 x 4, delineamento em blocos inteiramente casualizados e quatro repetições. Quatro materiais (calcário, silicato de c

  14. Application of soil washing system to the volume reduction of radioactively contaminated soils and automated treatment of sludge cake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouri, Mitsuo; Tsuchida, Mitsuru; Baba, Naoki; Nakajima, Takuma

    2013-01-01

    The pilot plant study was intended to evaluate; a) the removal efficiency of radioactive Cs, b) the volume reduction rate of feed soils, c) the volumetric rate and concentration rate of discharged sludge cake, and d) the effect of radiation exposure reduction by automated filter press unit and automated packing unit of sludge cake. As a result of this study, following observations were made; 1) the radioactive Cs content of clean sands ranged 882∼2,940 Bq/kg as compared to the feed soils of 8,790 to 26,270 Bq/kg, 2) the removal efficiency of radioactive Cs ranged 84∼92% of feed soils, 3) the volume reduction rate of feed soils ranged 70∼86% (ave. 82%), and 4) the automated filter press unit and the automated packing system of sludge cake were helpful for workers in reducing radiation exposure. It is concluded that soil washing system can effectively reduce volume of radioactively contaminated soils and can be practically used in Fukushima for remediation of soils. (author)

  15. Soil Labile Organic Matter under Long-term Crop Rotation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saljnikov, E.

    2009-04-01

    Temperate grassland soils, typically Mollisols, have remained agriculturally productive with limited inputs for many years, despite the mining of energy and nutrients reserves contained within the soil organic fraction (Janzen, 1987; Tiessen et al., 1994). Such system can be considered resilient, at least initially, but one must question for how long such systems can be sustained. Effect of long-term land-use on biologically active fractions of soil organic matter is not well understood. Investigations were conducted in more than 40-year static experiments in northern Kazakhstan. We examined five fallow-wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cropping systems with different frequencies of the fallow phase: continuous wheat (CW), 6-y rotation (6R), 4-y rotation (4R), 2-y rotation (2R) and continuous fallow (CF). A unique sample from nationally protected virgin steppe near the experimental field was sampled for comparison with long-term cultivated soils. Soil samples were collected from the two phases of each rotation, pre- and post-fallow, and analyzed for biological soil properties that are potentially mineralizable C (PMC), potentially mineralizable N (PMN), microbial biomass C (MBC) and N (MBN) and "light fraction" C (LFC) and N (LFN). Potentially mineralizable C was inversely proportional to the frequency of fallow and was highest in CW. Potentially mineralizable N was more responsive to rotation phase than other indices of SOM. Light fraction OM was negatively correlated to the frequency of fallow and was higher in pre-fallow than in post-fallow phases. All studied biological characteristics were drastically greater in the soil from the natural steppe. The results suggested that the yearly input of plant residues in a less frequently fallowed system built up more PMC, whereas PMN was closely correlated to recent inputs of substrate added as plant residue. We concluded that a frequent fallowing for long period may deplete SOM via accelerated mineralization. The results may

  16. Soil solution interactions may limit Pb remediation using P ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lead (Pb) contaminated soils are a potential exposure hazard to the public. Amending soils with phosphorus (P) may reduce Pb soil hazards. Soil from Cleveland, OH containing 726 ± 14 mg Pb kg-1 was amended in a laboratory study with bone meal and triple super phosphate (TSP) at 5:1 P:Pb molar ratios. Soil was acidified, neturalized and re-acidified to encourage Pb phosphate formation. PRSTM-probes were used to evaluate changes in soil solution chemistry. Soil acidification did not decrease in vitro bioaccessible (IVBA) Pb using either a pH 1.5, 0.4 M glycine solution or a pH 2.5 solution with organic acids. PRSTM-probe data found soluble Pb increased 10-fold in acidic conditions compared to circumnetural pH conditions. In acidic conditions (p = 3-4), TSP treated soils increased detected P 10-fold over untreated soils. Bone meal application did not increase PRSTM-probe detected P, indicating there may have been insufficient P to react with Pb. X-ray absorption spectroscopy suggested a 10% increase in pyromorphite formation for the TSP treated soil only. Treatments increased soil electrical conductivity above 16 mS cm-1, potentially causing a new salinity hazard. This study used a novel approach by combining the human ingestion endpoint, PRSTM-probes, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy to evaluate treatment efficacy. PRSTM-probe data indicated potentially excess Ca relative to P across incubation steps that could have competed with Pb for soluble P. Mor

  17. Interactions in Natural Colloid Systems "Biosolids" - Soil and Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinichenko, Kira V.; Nikovskaya, Galina N.; Ulberg, Zoya R.

    2016-04-01

    The "biosolids" are complex biocolloid system arising in huge amounts (mln tons per year) from biological municipal wastewater treatment. These contain clusters of nanoparticles of heavy metal compounds (in slightly soluble or unsoluble forms, such as phosphates, sulphates, carbonates, hydroxides, and etc.), cells, humic substances and so on, involved in exopolysaccharides (EPS) net matrix. One may consider that biosolids are the natural nanocomposite. Due to the presence of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and other macro- and microelements (heavy metals), vitamins, aminoacids, etc., the biosolids are a depot of bioelements for plant nutrition. Thus, it is generally recognized that most rationally to utilize them for land application. For this purpose the biocolloid process was developed in biosolids system by initiation of microbial vital ability followed by the synthesis of EPS, propagation of ecologically important microorganisms, loosening of the structure and weakening of the coagulation contacts between biosolids colloids, but the structure integrity maintaining [1,2]. It was demonstrated that the applying of biosolids with metabolizing microorganisms to soil provided the improving soil structure, namely the increasing of waterstable aggregates content (70% vs. 20%). It occurs due to flocculation ability of biosolids EPS. The experimental modelling of mutual interactions in systems of soils - biosolids (with metabolizing microorganisms) were realized and their colloid and chemical mechanisms were formulated [3]. As it is known, the most harmonious plant growth comes at a prolonged entering of nutrients under the action of plant roots exudates which include pool of organic acids and polysaccharides [4]. Special investigations showed that under the influence of exudates excreted by growing plants, the biosolids microelements can release gradually from immobilized state into environment and are able to absorb by plants. Thus, the biosolids can serve as an active

  18. Simultaneous Measurements of Soil CO2 and CH4 Fluxes Using Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachhpal S. Jassal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a method of simultaneously measuring soil CO and CH fluxes using a laser-based cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS coupled to an automated non-steady-state chamber system. The differential equation describing the change in the greenhouse gas (GHG mixing ratio in the chamber headspace following lid closure is solved for the condition when a small flow rate of chamber headspace air is pulled through the CRDS by an external pump and exhausted to the atmosphere. The small flow rate allows calculation of fluxes assuming linear relationships between the GHG mixing ratios and chamber lid closure times of a few minutes. We also calibrated the chambers for effective volume ( and show that adsorption of the GHGs on the walls of the chamber caused to be 7% higher than the geometric volume, with the near-surface soil porosity causing another 4% increase in .

  19. Cs phytoremediation by Sorghum bicolor cultivated in soil and in hydroponic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Chen, Can; Wang, Jianlong

    2017-04-03

    Cs accumulation characteristics by Sorghum bicolor were investigated in hydroponic system (Cs level at 50-1000 μmol/L) and in soil (Cs-spiked concentration was 100 and 400 mg/kg soil). Two varieties of S. bicolor Cowly and Nengsi 2# grown on pot soil during the entire growth period (100 days) did not show significant differences on the height, dry weight (DW), and Cs accumulation. S. bicolor showed the potential phytoextraction ability for Cs-contaminated soil with the bioaccumulation factor (BCF) and the translocation factor (TF) values usually higher than 1 in soil system and in hydroponic system. The aerial parts of S. bicolor contributed to 86-92% of the total removed amounts of Cs from soil. Cs level in solution at 100 μmol/L gave the highest BCF and TF values of S. bicolor. Cs at low level tended to transfer to the aerial parts, whereas Cs at high level decreased the transfer ratio from root to shoot. In soil, the plant grew well when Cs spiked level was 100 mg/kg soil, but was inhibited by Cs at 400 mg/kg soil with Cs content in sorghum reaching 1147 mg/kg (roots), 2473 mg/kg (stems), and 2939 mg/kg (leaves). In hydroponic system, average Cs level in sorghum reached 5270 mg/kg (roots) and 4513 mg/kg (aerial parts), without significant damages to its biomass at 30 days after starting Cs treatment. Cs accumulation in sorghum tissues was positively correlated with the metal concentration in medium.

  20. Soil physical properties and grape yield influenced by cover crops and management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Dalla Rosa

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of cover crops in vineyards is a conservation practice with the purpose of reducing soil erosion and improving the soil physical quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate cover crop species and management systems on soil physical properties and grape yield. The experiment was carried out in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Southern Brazil, on a Haplic Cambisol, in a vineyard established in 1989, using White and Rose Niagara grape (Vitis labrusca L. in a horizontal, overhead trellis system. The treatments were established in 2002, consisting of three cover crops: spontaneous species (SS, black oat (Avena strigosa Schreb (BO, and a mixture of white clover (Trifolium repens L., red clover (Trifolium pratense L. and annual rye-grass (Lolium multiflorum L. (MC. Two management systems were applied: desiccation with herbicide (D and mechanical mowing (M. Soil under a native forest (NF area was collected as a reference. The experimental design consisted of completely randomized blocks, with three replications. The soil physical properties in the vine rows were not influenced by cover crops and were similar to the native forest, with good quality of the soil structure. In the inter-rows, however, there was a reduction in biopores, macroporosity, total porosity and an increase in soil density, related to the compaction of the surface soil layer. The M system increased soil aggregate stability compared to the D system. The treatments affected grapevine yield only in years with excess or irregular rainfall.

  1. Soil organic carbon sequestration and tillage systems in Mediterranean environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francaviglia, Rosa; Di Bene, Claudia; Marchetti, Alessandro; Farina, Roberta

    2016-04-01

    Soil carbon sequestration is of special interest in Mediterranean areas, where rainfed cropping systems are prevalent, inputs of organic matter to soils are low and mostly rely on crop residues, while losses are high due to climatic and anthropic factors such as intensive and non-conservative farming practices. The adoption of reduced or no tillage systems, characterized by a lower soil disturbance in comparison with conventional tillage, has proved to be positively effective on soil organic carbon (SOC) conservation and other physical and chemical processes, parameters or functions, e.g. erosion, compaction, ion retention and exchange, buffering capacity, water retention and aggregate stability. Moreover, soil biological and biochemical processes are usually improved by the reduction of tillage intensity. The work deals with some results available in the scientific literature, and related to field experiment on arable crops performed in Italy, Greece, Morocco and Spain. Data were organized in a dataset containing the main environmental parameters (altitude, temperature, rainfall), soil tillage system information (conventional, minimum and no-tillage), soil parameters (bulk density, pH, particle size distribution and texture), crop type, rotation, management and length of the experiment in years, initial SOCi and final SOCf stocks. Sampling sites are located between 33° 00' and 43° 32' latitude N, 2-860 m a.s.l., with mean annual temperature and rainfall in the range 10.9-19.6° C and 355-900 mm. SOC data, expressed in t C ha-1, have been evaluated both in terms of Carbon Sequestration Rate, given by [(SOCf-SOCi)/length in years], and as percentage change in comparison with the initial value [(SOCf-SOCi)/SOCi*100]. Data variability due to the different environmental, soil and crop management conditions that influence SOC sequestration and losses will be examined.

  2. Urban gray vs. urban green vs. soil protection — Development of a systemic solution to soil sealing management on the example of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artmann, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Managing urban soil sealing is a difficult venture due to its spatial heterogeneity and embedding in a socio-ecological system. A systemic solution is needed to tackle its spatial, ecological and social sub-systems. This study develops a guideline for urban actors to find a systemic solution to soil sealing management based on two case studies in Germany: Munich and Leipzig. Legal-planning, informal-planning, economic-fiscal, co-operative and informational responses were evaluated by indicators to proof which strategy considers the spatial complexity of urban soil sealing (systemic spatial efficiency) and, while considering spatial complexity, to assess what the key management areas for action are to reduce the ecological impacts by urban soil sealing (ecological impact efficiency) and to support an efficient implementation by urban actors (social implementation efficiency). Results suggest framing the systemic solution to soil sealing management through a cross-scale, legal-planning development strategy embedded in higher European policies. Within the socio-ecological system, the key management area for action should focus on the protection of green infrastructure being of high value for actors from the European to local scales. Further efforts are necessary to establish a systemic monitoring concept to optimize socio-ecological benefits and avoid trade-offs such as between urban infill development and urban green protection. This place-based study can be regarded as a stepping stone on how to develop systemic strategies by considering different spatial sub-targets and socio-ecological systems. - Highlights: • Urban soil sealing management is spatially complex. • The legal-planning strategy supports a systemic sealing management. • Urban green infrastructure protection should be in the management focus. • Soil protection requires policies from higher levels of government. • A systemic urban soil sealing monitoring concept is needed.

  3. Urban gray vs. urban green vs. soil protection — Development of a systemic solution to soil sealing management on the example of Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artmann, Martina, E-mail: m.artmann@ioer.de

    2016-07-15

    Managing urban soil sealing is a difficult venture due to its spatial heterogeneity and embedding in a socio-ecological system. A systemic solution is needed to tackle its spatial, ecological and social sub-systems. This study develops a guideline for urban actors to find a systemic solution to soil sealing management based on two case studies in Germany: Munich and Leipzig. Legal-planning, informal-planning, economic-fiscal, co-operative and informational responses were evaluated by indicators to proof which strategy considers the spatial complexity of urban soil sealing (systemic spatial efficiency) and, while considering spatial complexity, to assess what the key management areas for action are to reduce the ecological impacts by urban soil sealing (ecological impact efficiency) and to support an efficient implementation by urban actors (social implementation efficiency). Results suggest framing the systemic solution to soil sealing management through a cross-scale, legal-planning development strategy embedded in higher European policies. Within the socio-ecological system, the key management area for action should focus on the protection of green infrastructure being of high value for actors from the European to local scales. Further efforts are necessary to establish a systemic monitoring concept to optimize socio-ecological benefits and avoid trade-offs such as between urban infill development and urban green protection. This place-based study can be regarded as a stepping stone on how to develop systemic strategies by considering different spatial sub-targets and socio-ecological systems. - Highlights: • Urban soil sealing management is spatially complex. • The legal-planning strategy supports a systemic sealing management. • Urban green infrastructure protection should be in the management focus. • Soil protection requires policies from higher levels of government. • A systemic urban soil sealing monitoring concept is needed.

  4. Soil attributes of a silvopastoral system in Pernambuco Forest Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo N.B. Lima

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This research evaluated soil properties in a silvopastoral system using double rows of tree legumes. Treatments were signalgrass (Brachiaria decumbens in monoculture or in consortium with sabiá (Mimosa caesalpiniifolia or gliricidia (Gliricidia sepium. Treatments were arranged in a complete randomized block design, with 4 replications. Response variables included chemical characteristics and physical attributes of the soil. Silvopastoral systems had greater (P<0.001 soil exchangeable Ca (gliricidia = 3.2 and sabiá = 3.0 mmolc/dm3 than signalgrass monoculture (2.0 mmolc/dm3. Water infiltration rate was greater within the tree legume double rows (366 mm/h than in signalgrass (162 mm/h (P = 0.02. However, soil moisture was greater in signalgrass pastures (15.9% (P = 0.0020 than in silvopastures (14.9 and 14.8%, where soil moisture levels increased as distance from the tree rows increased. Conversely, the light fraction of soil organic matter was greater within the tree legume double rows than in the grassed area (P = 0.0019. Long-term studies are needed to determine if these benefits accumulate further and the productivity benefits which result.

  5. Soil quality assessment of rice production systems in South of Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues de Lima, A.C.; Hoogmoed, W.B.; Brussaard, L.

    2006-01-01

    Soil quality, as a measure of the soil capacity to function, can be quantified by indicators based on physical, chemical and biological properties. Maintaining soil quality at a desirable level in the rice cropping system is a very complex issue due to the nature of the production systems used. In the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, rice production is one of the most important agricultural activities in the region. The study presented here was conducted with the following objectives: (i) ...

  6. In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, John C.; Kaback, Dawn S.; Looney, Brian B.

    1993-01-01

    A method and system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil where the contaminants, such as toxic metals, are carried in a subsurface plume. The method comprises selection and injection into the soil of a fluid that will cause the contaminants to form stable, non-toxic compounds either directly by combining with the contaminants or indirectly by creating conditions in the soil or changing the conditions of the soil so that the formation of stable, non-toxic compounds between the contaminants and existing substances in the soil are more favorable. In the case of non-toxic metal contaminants, sulfides or sulfates are injected so that metal sulfides or sulfates are formed. Alternatively, an inert gas may be injected to stimulate microorganisms in the soil to produce sulfides which, in turn, react with the metal contaminants. Preferably, two wells are used, one to inject the fluid and one to extract the unused portion of the fluid. The two wells work in combination to create a flow of the fluid across the plume to achieve better, more rapid mixing of the fluid and the contaminants.

  7. Gintonin absorption in intestinal model systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Hwan Lee

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: The present study shows that gintonin could be absorbed in the intestine through transcellular and paracellular diffusion, and active transport. In addition, the lipid component of gintonin might play a key role in its intestinal absorption.

  8. Transuranic Behavior in Soils and Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildung, R.E.; Garland, T.R.; Cataldo, D.A.; Rogers, J.E.; McFadden, K.M.; McNair, V.M.; Schreckhise, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The principal objectives of these investigations are to determine (1) the potential for alteration of transuranic solubility through formation of transuranic complexes in soil and the role of the soil microflora in this process, (2) the extent of uptake nd translocation by plants and the sites of plant deposition of transuranics or their complexes, (3) the bond types and chemical forms of transuranics or their metabolites in microbes, plant tissues and soils, (4) the influence of soil properties, environmental conditions and cropping on these processes, and (5) the retention of airborne pollutants by plant foliage and their subsequent absorption by leaves and transport to seeds and roots

  9. Can we manipulate root system architecture to control soil erosion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ola, A.; Dodd, I. C.; Quinton, J. N.

    2015-09-01

    Soil erosion is a major threat to soil functioning. The use of vegetation to control erosion has long been a topic for research. Much of this research has focused on the above-ground properties of plants, demonstrating the important role that canopy structure and cover plays in the reduction of water erosion processes. Less attention has been paid to plant roots. Plant roots are a crucial yet under-researched factor for reducing water erosion through their ability to alter soil properties, such as aggregate stability, hydraulic function and shear strength. However, there have been few attempts to specifically manipulate plant root system properties to reduce soil erosion. Therefore, this review aims to explore the effects that plant roots have on soil erosion and hydrological processes, and how plant root architecture might be manipulated to enhance its erosion control properties. We demonstrate the importance of root system architecture for the control of soil erosion. We also show that some plant species respond to nutrient-enriched patches by increasing lateral root proliferation. The erosional response to root proliferation will depend upon its location: at the soil surface dense mats of roots may reduce soil erodibility but block soil pores thereby limiting infiltration, enhancing runoff. Additionally, in nutrient-deprived regions, root hair development may be stimulated and larger amounts of root exudates released, thereby improving aggregate stability and decreasing erodibility. Utilizing nutrient placement at specific depths may represent a potentially new, easily implemented, management strategy on nutrient-poor agricultural land or constructed slopes to control erosion, and further research in this area is needed.

  10. Identification of MgII Absorption Line Systems from SDSS Quasar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Motivation. The quasar absorption lines are crucial to our understanding of the Universe since the absorption lines provide a wealth of information on the gaseous Universe from high redshift to present day. The absorption lines can also allow us to probe the metallicity and ionization state of the gas (Wild et al. 2008).

  11. Lead contamination of environment in Meza Valley, Yugoslavia: some considerations on lead content in soil and plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djuric, D; Kerin, Z

    1970-01-01

    As part of a broad ecological study of lead contamination, soil samples and underground parts of some vegetables were analyzed for lead by the dithizone method. Vegetables fell into three groups: those with a relatively high Pb content (over 30 mg/kg); those with a medium Pb content (over 10 mg/kg); and those with a low Pb content (under 5 mg/kg). Variations in Pb content in the same kind of vegetables represented variations in soil Pb content and absorption. Variations between different kinds of vegetables were due to differences in plant physiology and capacity of absorption, shape and size of root, and depth of root in soil. Lead content was higher in vegetables grown in summer and fall than for the same vegetables grown in spring. Lead absorption coefficients were calculated for underground parts of vegetables according to the relation between the Pb content of the plant and total Pb content of soil and according to the relation between the Pb content of the plant and the AL-soluble Pb in soil (AL is the ammonium lactate acetic acid mixture). The latter method gave much less dispersed coefficients, indicating that AL-soluble Pb represents much more authoritative data for determining absorption coefficients than total soil Pb.

  12. BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES IN CHERNOZEM SOIL UNDER DIFFERENT FERTILIZATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecaterina Emnova

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the evaluation of the intensity of certain soil biochemical processes (e.g. soil organic C mineralization at Organic and mixed Mineral+Organic fertilization of typical chernozem in crop rotation dynamics (for 6 years by use of eco-physiological indicators of biological soil quality: microbial biomass carbon, basal soil respiration, as well as, microbial and metabolic quotients. Soil sampling was performed from a long-term field crop experiment, which has been established in 1971 at the Balti steppe (Northern Moldova. The crop types had a more considerable impact on the soil microbial biomass accumulation and community biochemical activity compared to long-term Organic or mixed Mineral + Organic fertilizers amendments. The Org fertilization system doesn’t make it possible to avoid the loss of organic C in arable typical chernozem. The organic fertilizer (cattle manure is able to mitigate the negative consequences of long-term mineral fertilization.

  13. Accumulation of 90Sr, Ca, Mg, K and Na in crane's-bill plants cultavated on soil and hydroponics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analyan, V.L.; Sarkisyan, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Accumulation of 90 Sr in plants under the conditions of soil and hydroponic cultures from the viewpoint of the possibility of obtaining ''pure'' vegetable production has been studied. Predominant absorption of 90 Sr by soil plants as compared with calcium is shown. In the course of using the hydroponic cultivation method redominant radiostrontium absorption has been manifested to all investigated nuclides including potassium. The accumulation coefficients analysis has shown that among soil plants the fisarst place is occupied by potassium, while the 90 Sr coefficients are greater than Ca on hydroponics, where the true, not distorted by soil sorption processes absorptive plant capacity has been manifested, the first places in the series are occupied by 90 Sr and K, then come Ca and Mg

  14. Experimental assessment of an absorption cooling system operating with the ammonia/lithium nitrate mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernández-Magallanes, J.A.; Domínguez-Inzunza, L.A.; Gutiérrez-Urueta, G.; Soto, P.; Jiménez, C.; Rivera, W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the experimental results of a single effect absorption cooling system of 3 kW of nominal cooling capacity operating with ammonia–lithium nitrate solution. The system was designed and built in the Instituto de Energías Renovables of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and can be used for food conservation or air conditioning. The absorber and generator are falling film heat exchangers. The condenser, evaporator and solution heat exchanger are compact plate heat exchangers. The heat was supplied to the generator at temperatures between 85 °C and 105 °C, while the cooling water temperatures to remove the heat produced during the condensation and absorption varied between 18 °C and 36 °C. The results showed that the system can produce up to 2.7 kW of cooling capacity at heating water temperatures of 95 °C and can achieve evaporator temperatures as low as 1 °C. The experimental coefficients of performance varied between 0.45 and 0.70. Because of the developed system do not need a rectifier and reasonable good coefficients of performance were achieved, the developed system seems to be a good alternative to be used for food conservation or air conditioning. - Highlights: • An absorption cooling system was developed using NH 3 –LiNO 3 . • The achieved COP (coefficients of performance) are the highest reported for a system using NH 3 –LiNO 3 . • Evaporator temperatures as low as 1 °C were achieved. • COP varied between 0.45 and 0.7. • The developed system seems to be a good alternative for food conservation and air conditioning

  15. Effects of Iron Concentration Level in Extracting Solutions from Contaminated Soils on the Determination of Zinc by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry with Two Background Correctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Waterlot

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc and iron concentrations were determined after digestion, water, and three-step sequential extractions of contaminated soils. Analyses were carried out using flame absorption spectrometry with two background correctors: a deuterium lamp used as the continuum light source (D2 method and the high-speed self-reversal method (HSSR method. Regarding the preliminary results obtained with synthetic solutions, the D2 method often emerged as an unsuitable configuration for compensating iron spectral interferences. In contrast, the HSSR method appeared as a convenient and powerful configuration and was tested for the determination of zinc in contaminated soils containing high amounts of iron. Simple, fast, and interference-free method, the HSSR method allows zinc determination at the ppb level in the presence of large amounts of iron with high stability, sensitivity, and reproducibility of results. Therefore, the HSSR method is described here as a promising approach for monitoring zinc concentrations in various iron-containing samples without any pretreatment.

  16. Determining uranium speciation in Fernald soils by molecular spectroscopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, P.G.; Berg, J.M.; Crisholm-Brause, C.J.; Conradson, S.D.; Donohoe, R.J.; Morris, D.E.; Musgrave, J.A.; Tait, C.D.

    1994-07-01

    This progress report describes new experimental results and interpretations for data collected from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993, as part of the Characterization Task of the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration of the Office of Technology Development, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management of the US Department of Energy. X-ray absorption, optical luminescence, and Raman vibrational spectroscopies were used to determine uranium speciation in contaminated soils from the US DOE's former uranium production facility at Fernald, Ohio. These analyses were carried out both before and after application of one of the various decontamination technologies being developed within the Integrated Demonstration. This year the program focused on characterization of the uranium speciation remaining in the soils after decontamination treatment. X-ray absorption and optical luminescence spectroscopic data were collected for approximately 40 Fernald soil samples, which were treated by one or more of the decontamination technologies

  17. Multi criteria evaluation for universal soil loss equation based on geographic information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwaamijaya, I. M.

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this research were to produce(l) a conceptual, functional model designed and implementation for universal soil loss equation (usle), (2) standard operational procedure for multi criteria evaluation of universal soil loss equation (usle) using geographic information system, (3) overlay land cover, slope, soil and rain fall layers to gain universal soil loss equation (usle) using multi criteria evaluation, (4) thematic map of universal soil loss equation (usle) in watershed, (5) attribute table of universal soil loss equation (usle) in watershed. Descriptive and formal correlation methods are used for this research. Cikapundung Watershed, Bandung, West Java, Indonesia was study location. This research was conducted on January 2016 to May 2016. A spatial analysis is used to superimposed land cover, slope, soil and rain layers become universal soil loss equation (usle). Multi criteria evaluation for universal soil loss equation (usle) using geographic information system could be used for conservation program.

  18. A Study of Iodine aerial deposition on crops, grass and soil and it's subsequent uptake and translocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, Zhaorong

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In order to further the knowledge of radioiodine mobility in the Asian biosphere system, a closed experimental system was established to study gaseous iodine deposition and uptake in a simulated agricultural system using 125 I. Pot experiments were carried out to study airborne 125 I deposition on crops and soil, the results show that: 1) 125 I aerosol deposited on plants in a dry deposition mode; 2) 125 I aerial deposition on leaves can be transferred to other tissues through foliar absorption; and 3) Corn and navy bean have the largest observed translocation factor of the selected crops. The 125 I soil-to-crops uptake test shows that 125 I deposited in soil can be transferred to plants via root uptake, and that the transfer factors in millet and broomcorn are significantly higher than other crops. (author)

  19. A study of iodine aerial deposition on crops, grass and soil and it's subsequent uptake and translocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Zhaorong

    2006-03-01

    In order to further the knowledge of radioiodine mobility in the Asian biosphere system, a closed experimental system was established to study gaseous iodine deposition and uptake in a simulated agricultural system using 125 I. Pot experiments were carried out to study airborne 125 I deposition on crops and soil, the results show that (1) 125 I aerosol deposited on plants in a dry deposition mode; (2) 125 I aerial deposition on leaves can be transferred to other tissues through foliar absorption; (3) corn and navy bean have the largest observed translocation factor of the selected crops. The 125 I soil-to-crops uptake test shows that 125 I deposited in soil can be transfered to plants via root uptake, and that the transfer factors in millet and broomcorn are significantly higher than that in other crops. (authors)

  20. Absorption in multiple scattering systems of coated spheres: design applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, Brian; Andraud, Christine; Stout, Sophie; Lafait, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    We illustrate the utility of some recently derived transfer matrix methods for electromagnetic scattering calculations in systems composed of coated spherical scatterers. Any of the spherical coatings, cores, or host media may be composed of absorbing materials. Our formulae permit the calculation of local absorption in either orientation fixed or orientation averaged situations. We introduce methods for estimating the macroscopic transport properties of such media, and show how our scattering calculations can permit 'design' optimization of macroscopic properties

  1. Open absorption system for cooling and air conditioning using membrane contactors - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conde-Petit, M. [M. Conde Engineering, Zuerich (Switzerland); Weber, R.; Dorer, V. [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (EMPA), Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    Air conditioning systems based upon the open absorption principle, essentially an absorption device operating at atmospheric pressure, have been proposed and investigated at many instances in the past eighty years. Their potential for improving energy efficiency is clearly recognized in the earliest research reports. By the mid 1950ies, solar thermal energy was being applied to drive open absorption-based air conditioning systems. For several reasons, however, the open absorption technology was not mature enough to take place in the mainstream. In the past two decades, vigorous efforts have been undertaken to reverse this situation, but success continued to elude, despite the fact that the main problems, such as corrosion, aerosols in the supply air, etc., have been identified. This report details the work and the main results from the MemProDEC Project. In this project innovative solutions were proposed, and successfully investigated, for the corrosion problem and the improvement of efficiency of the absorption process, in particular a new method to cool a very compact absorber. The practically uniform flow distribution for all three streams in the absorber (air, water and desiccant) warrants the contact of the air to be dehumidified with the desiccant over the whole surface of exchange (across a porous membrane). This, together with the cooling with water in counter flow to the air, are the key factors for the excellent effectiveness of the absorber. As the results show, the dehydration effectiveness of the prototype absorber is up to 150 % higher than that previously obtained by others. The solutions developed for compactness and modularity represent an important step in the way to flexible manufacturing, i.e. using a single element size to assemble autonomous air handling units of various nominal capacities. And although the manufacturing methods of the individual elements require improvement, namely by avoiding adhesive bonding, the choice of materials and the

  2. Invited Review Terahertz Transmission, Scattering, Reflection, and Absorption—the Interaction of THz Radiation with Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, R. A.

    2017-07-01

    Terahertz radiation has been proposed as a useful tool in the study of soils and related materials from such diverse perspectives as detection of non-metallic landmines to improving soil fertility by agricultural charcoals produced by pyrolysis of organic material. The main barrier to such applications is that soils are rather opaque at terahertz frequencies. In this article, the main findings to date on the interaction of terahertz radiation with soils are reviewed, organized around the four phenomena of terahertz: transmission, scattering, reflection, and absorption. Terahertz transmission through soils is generally low and decreases with frequency. Terahertz scattering is evident in many THz-soil interactions, as the wavelength of the radiation is of the order of the particle size. Terahertz reflection is important to communications as these develop from the GHz into the THz band. Terahertz absorption on diluted soil samples has been demonstrated to be effective in identifying soil constituents, such as aromatic compounds, and soil contaminants, such as pesticides.

  3. Application of vacuum membrane distillation to lithium bromide absorption refrigeration system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zanshe; Feng, Shiyu; Li, Yun [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Gu, Zhaolin [School of Human Settlement and Civil Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2009-11-15

    Conventional generator in lithium bromide absorption refrigeration system is too bulky and heavy to be fitted into small scale device, and the temperature of the driving heater in the generator seems much higher than low grade energy such as regenerative energy or waste heat energy. In this paper, desorption of aqueous lithium bromide solution by vacuum membrane distillation process was presented. Hollow fiber membrane module made by polyvinylidene fluoride was used as desorption device of aqueous lithium bromide solution. Influencing factors of feed flux, feed temperature in lumen side and vacuum pressure in shell side were tested and analyzed with orthogonal test. The results showed that permeation flux of water vapor increased with the feed temperature increasing and the feed flux increasing in lumen side, and the permeation flux also went up along with absolute pressure drop in shell side. Feasibility and potential application analysis shows that the temperature of the driving heat was low and the volume and weight of the desorption device was light. In this study, vacuum membrane distillation to the lithium bromide absorption refrigeration system has proved to be an efficient and cheap desorption mode. (author)

  4. Particulate Organic Matter Affects Soil Nitrogen Mineralization under Two Crop Rotation Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongyan Bu

    Full Text Available Changes in the quantity and/or quality of soil labile organic matter between and after different types of cultivation system could play a dominant role in soil nitrogen (N mineralization. The quantity and quality of particulate organic matter (POM and potentially mineralizable-N (PMN contents were measured in soils from 16 paired rice-rapeseed (RR/cotton-rapeseed (CR rotations sites in Hubei province, central China. Then four paired soils encompassing low (10th percentile, intermediate (25th and 75th percentiles, and high (90th percentile levels of soil PMN were selected to further study the effects of POM on soil N mineralization by quantifying the net N mineralization in original soils and soils from which POM was removed. Both soil POM carbon (POM-C and N (POM-N contents were 45.8% and 55.8% higher under the RR rotation compared to the CR rotation, respectively. The PMN contents were highly correlated with the POM contents. The PMN and microbial biomass N (MBN contents concurrently and significantly decreased when POM was removed. The reduction rate of PMN was positively correlated with changes in MBN after the removal of POM. The reduction rates of PMN and MBN after POM removal are lower under RR rotations (38.0% and 16.3%, respectively than CR rotations (45.6% and 19.5%, respectively. Furthermore, infrared spectroscopy indicated that compounds with low-bioavailability accumulated (e.g., aromatic recalcitrant materials in the soil POM fraction under the RR rotation but not under the CR rotation. The results of the present study demonstrated that POM plays a vital role in soil N mineralization under different rotation systems. The discrepancy between POM content and composition resulting from different crop rotation systems caused differences in N mineralization in soils.

  5. On site experiments of the slanted soil treatment systems for domestic gray water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itayama, Tomoaki; Kiji, Masato; Suetsugu, Aya; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Saito, Takeshi; Iwami, Norio; Mizuochi, Motoyuki; Inamori, Yuhei

    2006-01-01

    In order to make a breakthrough for the acute problem of water shortage in the world, the key words "decentralization and re-use" are very important for new sustainable sanitation systems that will be developed. Therefore, we focused on a new treatments system called "a slanted soil treatment system" which combines a biotoilet system with a domestic grey water treatment system. Because this system is a low cost and compact system, the system can be easily introduced to homes in urban areas or in the suburbs of cities in many developing countries. In this study, we performed on site experiments carried out on Shikoku Island, Japan, for several years. We obtained the following results. The slanted soil treatment system could remove organic pollutants and total nitrogen and total phosphorus in grey water effectively. Furthermore, the system performance became high in the case of the high concentration of the influent water. The nitrification reaction and denitrification reaction were speculated to exist due to aerobic zones and anaerobic zones present in the slanted soil treatment system. The slanted soil treatment system could perform for approximately 3 years with zero maintenance. The plug flow model of 1st order reaction kinetics could describe the reaction in the slanted soil treatment system. However, it is necessary to improve the system to maintain the performance in all seasons.

  6. Rice production in relation to soil quality under different rice-based cropping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Ba, Linh; Sleutel, Steven; Nguyen Van, Qui; Thi, Guong Vo; Le Van, Khoa; Cornelis, Wim

    2016-04-01

    Soil quality of shallow paddy soils may be improved by introducing upland crops and thus a more diverse crop cultivation pattern. Yet, the causal relationship between crop performance and enhanced soil traits in rice-upland crop rotations remains elusive. The objectives of this study were to (i) find correlations among soil properties under different rice-upland crop systems and link selected soil properties to rice growth and yield, (ii) present appropriate values of soil parameters for sustainable rice productivity in heavy clay soil, (iii) evaluate the effect of rotating rice with upland crops on rice yield and economic benefit in a long-term experiment. A rice-upland crop rotational field experiment in the Vietnamese Mekong delta was conducted for 10 years using a randomized complete block design with four treatments and four replications. Treatments were: (i) rice-rice-rice (control - conventional system as farmers' practice), (ii) rice-maize-rice, (iii) rice-mung bean-rice, and (iv) rice-mung bean-maize. Soil and plant sampling were performed after harvest of the rice crop at the end of the final winter-spring cropping season (i.e. year 10). Results show differences in rice growth and yield, and economic benefit as an effect of the crop rotation system. These differences were linked with changes in bulk density, soil porosity, soil aggregate stability index, soil penetration resistance, soil macro-porosity, soil organic carbon, acid hydrolysable soil C and soil nutrient elements, especially at soil depth of 20-30 cm. This is evidenced by the strong correlation (P < 0.01) between rice plant parameters, rice yield and soil properties such as bulk density, porosity, penetration resistance, soil organic carbon and Chydrolysable. It turned out that good rice root growth and rice yield corresponded to bulk density values lower than 1.3 Mg m-3, soil porosity higher than 50%, penetration resistance below 1.0 MPa, and soil organic carbon above 25 g kg-1. The optimal

  7. Integrating soil physical and biological properties in contrasting tillage systems in organic and conventional farming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crittenden, S.J.; Goede, de R.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    Though soil physical and soil biological properties are intrinsically linked in the soil environment they are often studied separately. This work adds value to analyses of soil biophysical quality of tillage systems under organic and conventional farming systems by correlating physical and

  8. Cooling performance and energy saving of a compression-absorption refrigeration system assisted by geothermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kairouani, L.; Nehdi, E.

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are to develop a novel combined refrigeration system, and to discuss the thermodynamic analysis of the cycle and the feasibility of its practical development. The aim of this work was to study the possibility of using geothermal energy to supply vapour absorption system cascaded with conventional compression system. Three working fluids (R717, R22, and R134a) are selected for the conventional compression system and the ammonia-water pair for the absorption system. The geothermal temperature source in the range 343-349 K supplies a generator operating at 335 K. Results show that the COP of a combined system is significantly higher than that of a single stage refrigeration system. It is found that the COP can be improved by 37-54%, compared with the conventional cycle, under the same operating conditions, that is an evaporation temperature at 263 K and a condensation temperature of 308 K. For industrial refrigeration, the proposed system constitutes an alternative solution for reducing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions

  9. A multiple soil ecosystem services approach to evaluate the sustainability of reduced tillage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérès, Guénola; Menasseri, Safya; Hallaire, Vincent; Cluzeau, Daniel; Heddadj, Djilali; Cotinet, Patrice; Manceau, Olivier; Pulleman, Mirjam

    2017-04-01

    In the current context of soil degradation, reduced tillage systems (including reduced soil disturbance, use of cover crops and crop rotation, and improved organic matter management) are expected to be good alternatives to conventional system which have led to a decrease of soil multi-functionality. Many studies worldwide have analysed the impact of tillage systems on different soil functions, but overran integrated view of the impact of these systems is still lacking. The SUSTAIN project (European SNOWMAN programme), performed in France and the Netherlands, proposes an interdisciplinary collaboration. The goals of SUSTAIN are to assess the multi-functionality of soil and to study how reduced-tillage systems impact on multiple ecosystem services such as soil biodiversity regulation (earthworms, nematodes, microorganisms), soil structure maintenance (aggregate stability, compaction, soil erosion), water regulation (run-off, transfer of pesticides) and food production. Moreover, a socio-economic study on farmer networks has been carried out to identify the drivers of adoption of reduced-tillage systems. Data have been collected in long-term experimental fields (5 - 13 years), representing conventional and organic farming strategies, and were complemented with data from farmer networks. The impact of different reduced tillage systems (direct seeding, minimum tillage, non-inverse tillage, superficial ploughing) were analysed and compared to conventional ploughing. Measurements (biological, chemical, physical, agronomical, water and element transfer) have been done at several dates which allow an overview of the evolution of the soil properties according to climate variation and crop rotation. A sociological approach was performed on several farms covering different production types, different courses (engagement in reduced tillage systems) and different geographical locations. Focusing on French trials, this multiple ecosystem services approach clearly showed that

  10. The kinetic model of 137Cs behavior in the system 'soil - plant' accounting of agrochemical soil properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prister, B.S.; Vinogradskaya, V.D.

    2011-01-01

    From data of the long-term radiological monitoring contaminated after Chernobyl accident lands of Ukraine investigated the dynamics of 137 Cs accumulation by plants in a wide range of environmental conditions. On the basis of modern concepts about the transformation of radionuclides forms in the soil created kinetic model the 137 Cs behavior in the system 'soil - plant', which uses as an argument to a complex estimation of agrochemical properties of soil, calculated according to the triad - the reaction of the soil solution, organic matter content and the amount of absorbed bases. Establish the high accuracy of the model and estimate the possibility of its use for other territories.

  11. Connecting the Interstellar Gas and Dust Properties in Distant Galaxies Using Quasar Absorption Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Monique C.; Dwek, Eliahu; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E.; Vladilo, Giovanni; Som, Debopam; Lackey, Kyle; Dwek, Eli; Beiranvand, Nassim; hide

    2016-01-01

    Gas and dust grains are fundamental components of the interstellar medium and significantly impact many of the physical processes driving galaxy evolution, such as star-formation, and the heating, cooling, and ionization of the interstellar material. Quasar absorption systems (QASs), which trace intervening galaxies along the sightlines to luminous quasars, provide a valuable tool to directly study the properties of the interstellar gas and dust in distant, normal galaxies. We have established the presence of silicate dust grains in at least some gas-rich QASs, and find that they exist at higher optical depths than expected for diffuse gas in the Milky Way. Differences in the absorption feature shapes additionally suggest variations in the silicate dust grain properties, such as in the level of grain crystallinity, from system-to-system. We present results from a study of the gas and dust properties of QASs with adequate archival IR data to probe the silicate dust grain properties. We discuss our measurements of the strengths of the 10 and 18 micron silicate dust absorption features in the QASs, and constraints on the grain properties (e.g., composition, shape, crystallinity) based on fitted silicate profile templates. We investigate correlations between silicate dust abundance, reddening, and gas metallicity, which will yield valuable insights into the history of star formation and chemical enrichment in galaxies.

  12. Portable Instrument to Measure CDOM Light Absorption in Aquatic Systems: WPI Success Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    World Precision Instruments, Inc. (WPI), of Sarasota, FL, in collaboration with NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center, has developed an innovative instrument to accurately measure Colored Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) absorption in the field. This successful collaboration has culminated in an exciting new device, called the UltraPath, now commercially available through WPI. Traditional methods of measuring absorption of dissolved materials require special handling and storage prior to measurement. Use of laboratory spectrophotometers as the measuring devices have proven time consuming, cumbersome, and delicate to handle. The UltraPath provides a low-cost, highly sensitive, rugged, portable system that is capable of high sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters.

  13. A review of the distribution coefficients of trace elements in soils: influence of sorption system, element characteristics, and soil colloidal properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Sabry M; Tsadilas, Christos D; Rinklebe, Jörg

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge about the behavior and reactions of separate soil components with trace elements (TEs) and their distribution coefficients (Kds) in soils is a key issue in assessing the mobility and retention of TEs. Thus, the fate of TEs and the toxic risk they pose depend crucially on their Kd in soil. This article reviews the Kd of TEs in soils as affected by the sorption system, element characteristics, and soil colloidal properties. The sorption mechanism, determining factors, favorable conditions, and competitive ions on the sorption and Kd of TEs are also discussed here. This review demonstrates that the Kd value of TEs does not only depend on inorganic and organic soil constituents, but also on the nature and characteristics of the elements involved as well as on their competition for sorption sites. The Kd value of TEs is mainly affected by individual or competitive sorption systems. Generally, the sorption in competitive systems is lower than in mono-metal sorption systems. More strongly sorbed elements, such as Pb and Cu, are less affected by competition than mobile elements, such as Cd, Ni, and Zn. The sorption preference exhibited by soils for elements over others may be due to: (i) the hydrolysis constant, (ii) the atomic weight, (iii) the ionic radius, and subsequently the hydrated radius, and (iv) its Misono softness value. Moreover, element concentrations in the test solution mainly affect the Kd values. Mostly, values of Kd decrease as the concentration of the included cation increases in the test solution. Additionally, the Kd of TEs is controlled by the sorption characteristics of soils, such as pH, clay minerals, soil organic matter, Fe and Mn oxides, and calcium carbonate. However, more research is required to verify the practical utilization of studying Kd of TEs in soils as a reliable indicator for assessing the remediation process of toxic metals in soils and waters. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Soil quality improvement under an ecologically based farming system in northwest Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecologically based farming conserves and improves the soil resource and protects environmental quality by using organic or natural resources without application of synthetic chemicals. Soil quality assessment indicates the ability of management systems to optimize soil productivity and to maintain i...

  15. Fitting maize into sustainable cropping systems on acid soils of the tropics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horst, W.J.

    2000-01-01

    One of the key elements of sustainable cropping systems is the integration of crops and/or crop cultivars with high tolerance of soil acidity and which make most efficient use of the nutrients supplied by soil and fertilizer. This paper is based mainly on on-going work within an EU-funded project combining basic research on plant adaptation mechanisms by plant physiologists, and field experimentation on acid soils in Brazil, Cameroon, Colombia and Guadeloupe by breeders, soil scientists and a agronomists. The results suggest that large genetic variability exists in adaptation of plants to acid soils. A range of morphological and physiological plant characteristics contribute to tolerance of acid soils, elucidation of which has contributed to the development of rapid techniques for screening for tolerance. Incorporation of acid-soil-tolerant species and cultivars into cropping systems contributes to improved nutrient efficiency overall, and thus reduces fertilizer needs. This may help to minimize maintenance applications of fertiliser through various pathways: (i) deeper root growth resulting in more-efficient uptake of nutrients from the sub-soil and less leaching, (ii) more biomass production resulting in less seepage and less leaching, with more intensive nutrient cycling, maintenance of higher soil organic-matter content, and, consequently, less erosion owing to better soil protection by vegetation and mulch. (author)

  16. A sensor array system for monitoring moisture dynamics inunsaturated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salve, R.; Cook, P.J.

    2007-05-15

    To facilitate investigations of moisture dynamics inunsaturated soil, we have developed a technique to qualitatively monitorpatterns of saturation changes. Field results suggest that this device,the sensor array system (SAS), is suitable for determining changes inrelative wetness along vertical soil profiles. The performance of theseprobes was compared with that of the time domain reflectometry (TDR)technique under controlled and field conditions. Measurements from bothtechniques suggest that by obtaining data at high spatial and temporalresolution, the SAS technique was effective in determining patterns ofsaturation changes along a soil profile. In addition, hardware used inthe SAS technique was significantly cheaper than the TDR system, and thesensor arrays were much easier to install along a soilprofile.

  17. Isotopic studies of Yucca Mountain soil fluids and carbonate pedogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnaughey, T.A.; Whelan, J.F.; Wickland, K.P.; Moscati, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    Secondary carbonates occurring within the soils, faults, and subsurface fractures of Yucca Mountain contain some of the best available records of paleoclimate and palehydrology for the potential radioactive waste repository site. This article discusses conceptual and analytical advances being made with regard to the interpretation of stable isotope data from pedogenic carbonates, specifically related to the 13 C content of soil CO 2 , CaCO 3 , precipitation mechanisms, and isotopic fractionations between parent fluids and precipitating carbonates. The 13 C content of soil carbon dioxide from Yucca Mountain and vicinity shows most of the usual patterns expected in such contexts: Decreasing 13 C content with depth decreasing 13 C with altitude and reduced 13 C during spring. These patterns exist within the domain of a noisy data set; soil and vegetational heterogeneities, weather, and other factors apparently contribute to isotopic variability in the system. Several soil calcification mechanisms appear to be important, involving characteristic physical and chemical environments and isotopic fractionations. When CO 2 loss from thin soil solutions is an important driving factor, carbonates may contain excess heavy isotopes, compared to equilibrium precipitation with soil fluids. When root calcification serves as a proton generator for plant absorption of soil nutrients, heavy isotope deficiencies are likely. Successive cycles of dissolution and reprecipitation mix and redistribute pedogenic carbonates, and tend to isotopically homogenize and equilibrate pedogenic carbonates with soil fluids

  18. Exploitation of geographic information system at mapping and modelling of selected soil parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palka, B.; Makovnikova, J.; Siran, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this presentation authors describe using of computers and geographic information systems (GIS) at effective use of soil fund, rational exploitation and organization of agricultural soil fund on the territory of the Slovak Republic, its monitoring and modelling. Using and creating of some geographically oriented information systems and databases about soils as well as present trends are discussed

  19. Soil Biochemical Changes Induced by Poultry Litter Application and Conservation Tillage under Cotton Production Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seshadri Sajjala

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Problems arising from conventional tillage (CT systems (such as soil erosion, decrease of organic matter, environmental damage etc. have led many farmers to the adoption of no-till (NT systems that are more effective in improving soil physical, chemical and microbial properties. Results from this study clearly indicated that NT, mulch tillage (MT, and winter rye cover cropping systems increased the activity of phosphatase, β-glucosidase and arylsulfatase at a 0–10 cm soil depth but decreased the activity of these enzymes at 10–20 cm. The increase in enzyme activity was a good indicator of intensive soil microbial activity in different soil management practices. Poultry litter (PL application under NT, MT, and rye cropping system could be considered as effective management practices due to the improvement in carbon (C content and the biochemical quality at the soil surface. The activities of the studied enzymes were highly correlated with soil total nitrogen (STN soil organic carbon (SOC at the 0–10 cm soil depth, except for acid phosphatase where no correlation was observed. This study revealed that agricultural practices such as tillage, PL, and cover crop cropping system have a noticeable positive effect on soil biochemical activities under cotton production.

  20. Effects of plastic mulches and high tunnel raspberry production systems on soil physicochemical quality indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagała-Świątkiewicz, Iwona; Siwek, Piotr

    2018-01-01

    In horticulture, degradable materials are desirable alternatives to plastic films. Our aim was to study the impact of soil plastic mulching on the soil properties in the high tunnel and open field production systems of raspberry. The raised beds were mulched with a polypropylene non-woven and two degradable mulches: polypropylene with a photodegradant and non-woven polylactide. The results indicated that the system of raspberry production, as well as the type of mulching had significant impact on soil organic carbon stock, moisture content and water stable aggregate amount. Soils taken from the open field system had a lower bulk density and water stability aggregation index, but higher organic carbon and capillary water content as compared to soils collected from high tunnel conditions. In comparison with the open field system, soil salinity was also found to be higher in high tunnel, as well as with higher P, Mg, Ca, S, Na and B content. Furthermore, mulch covered soils had more organic carbon amount than the bare soils. Soil mulching also enhanced the water capacity expressed as a volume of capillary water content. In addition, mulching improved the soil structure in relation to the bare soil, in particular, in open field conditions. The impact of the compared mulches on soil quality indicators was similar.

  1. Effects of 24 Years of Conservation Tillage Systems on Soil Organic Carbon and Soil Productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R. Olson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The 24-year study was conducted in southern Illinois (USA on land similar to that being removed from Conservation Reserve Program (CRP to evaluate the effects of conservation tillage systems on: (1 amount and rates of soil organic carbon (SOC storage and retention, (2 the long-term corn and soybean yields, and (3 maintenance and restoration of soil productivity of previously eroded soils. The no-till (NT plots did store and retain 7.8 Mg C ha−1 more and chisel plow (CP −1.6 Mg C ha−1 less SOC in the soil than moldboard plow (MP during the 24 years. However, no SOC sequestration occurred in the sloping and eroding NT, CP, and MP plots since the SOC level of the plot area was greater at the start of the experiment than at the end. The NT plots actually lost a total of −1.2 Mg C ha−1, the CP lost −9.9 Mg C ha−1, and the MP lost −8.2 Mg C ha−1 during the 24-year study. The long-term productivity of NT compared favorably with that of MP and CP systems.

  2. Thermodynamic modelling and parametric study of a low temperature vapour compression-absorption system based on modified Gouy-Stodola equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Vaibhav; Sachdeva, Gulshan; Kachhwaha, S.S.

    2015-01-01

    Present paper thermodynamically analyses a VCAS (vapour compression-absorption system) with carbon dioxide (compression section) and ammonia-water (absorption section) as refrigerants and determines the optimal condensing temperature of cascade condenser using modified Gouy-Stodola equation. The optimum cascade condenser temperature is found to be −13 °C for 175 kW refrigeration capacity at an evaporator temperature of −45 °C and condenser temperature of 35 °C. The optimum cascade condenser temperature maximises the overall COP, rational efficiency and minimises the total irreversibility rate of the VCAS system. The value of optimum condensing temperature and its corresponding maximum COP, and minimum irreversibility rate are discussed for a wide range of operating conditions. Further, a comparative study of TSVCS (two stage vapour compression system) used for low temperature refrigeration applications with VCAS shows that at design point, primary energy consumption is reduced by 60.6% and electrical COP is improved by 153.6% in VCAS as compared to conventional TSVCS. But the total irreversibility rate of VCAS is 38.4% higher than the TSVCS due to the use of low grade energy in vapour absorption system and hence the rational efficiency of VCAS is 14% low. - Highlights: • Optimum cascade condenser temperature with modified Gouy-Stodola law is analysed. • It maximises COP, rational efficiency and minimises total irreversibility. • 60.6% of primary energy is saved by cascaded absorption system. • Electrical COP is improved by 153.6% with cascaded absorption system

  3. Atrazine and Diuron partitioning within a soil-water-surfactant system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P.; Keller, A.

    2006-12-01

    The interaction between pesticide and soil and water is even more complex in the presence of surfactants. In this study, batch equilibrium was employed to study the sorption of surfactants and the partitioning behaviors of Atrazine and Diuron within a soil-water-surfactant system. Five soils and four surfactants (nonionic Triton- 100, cationic Benzalkonium Chloride (BC), anionic Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS), and anionic Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS)) were used. All surfactant sorption isotherms exhibited an initial linear increase at low surfactant concentrations but reached an asymptotic value as the surfactant concentrations increased. Among the surfactants, BC had the highest sorption onto all soils, followed by Triton-100 and then by LAS and SDS, implying that the nature of the charge significantly influences surfactant sorption. Sorption of either Triton-100 or BC was highly correlated with soil Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) while that of LAS and SDS was complicated by the presence of Ca2+ and Mg2+ in the aqueous phase and the CEC sites. Both LAS and SDS formed complexes with Ca2+ and Mg2+, resulting in a significant decrease in the detergency of the surfactants. At high surfactant concentrations and with micelles present in the aqueous phase, the micelles formed a more competitive partitioning site for the pesticides, resulting in less pesticide sorbed to the soil. At low Triton-100 and BC concentration, the sorption of the surfactants first resulted in less Atrazine sorption but more Diuron sorption, implying competition between the surfactants and Atrazine, which serves as an indirect evidence that there is a different sorption mechanism for Atrazine. Atrazine is a weak base and it protonates and becomes positively charged near particle surfaces where the pH is much lower than in the bulk solution. The protonated Atrazine may then be held on the CEC sites via electrostatic attraction. Triton-100, LAS and SDS sorbed on the soil showed similar

  4. Soil remediation process and system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monlux, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a process for remediation of soil containing up to about 30,000 ppm hydrocarbon contaminants. It comprises: providing hydrocarbon-contaminated soil in a divided condition of minus 1 1/2 double-prime to a first confined zone where it is exposed to an open flame; heating while agitating the contaminated soil in an oxidizing atmosphere in the first zone to a temperature below soil ignition within a range of from about 375 degrees F. to about 750 degrees F. for a time sufficient to drive off as vapors a substantial percentage of the hydrocarbon contaminates from the soil; passing hot gases containing the hydrocarbon contaminates from the soil; passing hot gases containing the hydrocarbon vapors from the first zone to a second zone; recovering heat from the hot gases in the second zone to condense a substantial percentage of the hydrocarbon vapors as liquid hydrocarbons; recovering the liquid hydrocarbons; and removing the soil from the first zone as remediated soil having below about 1000 ppm hydrocarbon contaminants

  5. Treatment of septic tank effluents by a full-scale capillary seepage soil biofiltration system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chihhao; Chang, Fang-Chih; Ko, Chun-Han; Teng, Chia-Ji; Chang, Tzi-Chin; Sheu, Yiong-Shing

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of septic tank effluent treatment by an underground capillary seepage soil biofiltration system in a suburban area of Taipei, Taiwan. In contrast to traditional subsurface wastewater infiltration systems, capillary seepage soil biofiltration systems initially draw incoming influent upwards from the distribution pipe by capillary and siphonage actions, then spread influent throughout the soil biofiltration bed. The underground capillary seepage soil biofiltration system consists of a train of underground treatment units, including one wastewater distribution tank, two capillary seepage soil biofiltration units in series, and a discharge tank. Each capillary seepage soil biofiltration unit contains one facultative digestion tank and one set of biofiltration beds. At the flow rate of 50 m3/day, average influent concentrations of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), suspended solid (SS), ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N), and total phosphates (TP), were 36.15 mg/L, 29.14 mg/L, 16.05 mg/L, and 1.75 mg/L, respectively. After 1.5 years of system operation, the measured influent and effluent results show that the treatment efficiencies of the soil biofiltration system for BOD, SS, NH3-N, TP, and total coliforms are 82.96%, 60.95%, 67.17%, 74.86%, and 99.99%, respectively.

  6. A framework of connections between soil and people can help improve sustainability of the food system and soil functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Bruce C; Hargreaves, Paul R; Watson, Christine A

    2018-04-01

    Globally soil quality and food security continue to decrease indicating that agriculture and the food system need to adapt. Improving connection to the soil by knowledge exchange can help achieve this. We propose a framework of three types of connections that allow the targeting of appropriate messages to different groups of people. Direct connection by, for example, handling soil develops soil awareness for management that can be fostered by farmers joining groups on soil-focused farming such as organic farming or no-till. Indirect connections between soil, food and ecosystem services can inform food choices and environmental awareness in the public and can be promoted by, for example, gardening, education and art. Temporal connection revealed from past usage of soil helps to bring awareness to policy workers of the need for the long-term preservation of soil quality for environmental conservation. The understanding of indirect and temporal connections can be helped by comparing them with the operations of the networks of soil organisms and porosity that sustain soil fertility and soil functions.

  7. Optimization of operation of energy supply systems with co-generation and absorption refrigeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojiljković Mirko M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Co-generation systems, together with absorption refrigeration and thermal storage, can result in substantial benefits from the economic, energy and environmental point of view. Optimization of operation of such systems is important as a component of the entire optimization process in pre-construction phases, but also for short-term energy production planning and system control. This paper proposes an approach for operational optimization of energy supply systems with small or medium scale co-generation, additional boilers and heat pumps, absorption and compression refrigeration, thermal energy storage and interconnection to the electric utility grid. In this case, the objective is to minimize annual costs related to the plant operation. The optimization problem is defined as mixed integer nonlinear and solved combining modern stochastic techniques: genetic algorithms and simulated annealing with linear programming using the object oriented “ESO-MS” software solution for simulation and optimization of energy supply systems, developed as a part of this research. This approach is applied to optimize a hypothetical plant that might be used to supply a real residential settlement in Niš, Serbia. Results are compared to the ones obtained after transforming the problem to mixed 0-1 linear and applying the branch and bound method.

  8. Phosphorus cycling in natural and low input soil/plant systems: the role of soil microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, F.; Bünemann, E. K.; Oberson, A.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Frossard, E.

    2011-12-01

    Availability of phosphorus (as orthophosphate, Pi) limits biological production in many terrestrial ecosystems. During the first phase of soil development, weathering of minerals and leaching of Pi are the processes controlling Pi concentrations in the soil solution, while in mature soils, Pi is made available by desorption of mineral Pi and mineralization of organic compounds. In agricultural soils additional Pi is supplied by fertilization, either with mineral P and/or organic inputs (animal manure or plant residues). Soil microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) mediate several processes, which are central to the availability of Pi to plants. They play a role in the initial release of Pi from the mineral phase, and through extracellular phosphatase enzymes, they decompose and mineralize organic compounds, releasing Pi. On the other hand, microbial immobilization and internal turnover of Pi can decrease the soil available Pi pool, competing in this way with plants. Using radio- and stable isotopic approaches, we show evidence from different soil/plant systems which points to the central role of the microbial activity. In the presented case studies, P contained in the soil microbial biomass is a larger pool than available Pi. In a soil chronosequence after deglaciation, stable isotopes of oxygen associated to phosphate showed that even in the youngest soils microbial activity highly impacted the isotopic signature of available Pi. These results suggested that microorganisms were rapidly taking up and cycling Pi, using it to sustain their community. Microbial P turnover time was faster in the young (about 20 days) than in older soils (about 120 days), reflecting a different functioning of the microbial community. Microbial community crashes, caused by drying/rewetting and freezing/thawing cycles, were most likely responsible for microbial P release to the available P pool. In grassland fertilization experiments with mineral NK and NPK amendments, microbial P turnover

  9. The relationship between ancient trees health and soil properties

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2011-12-07

    Dec 7, 2011 ... and dissolution of mineral elements, as well as help plant rooting and moisture ... analyzed the absorption of plants soil for phosphorus and indicated that .... coefficient of variation for soil pH, organic matter, total N, total P, total K, ..... profiles and X-ray density charts of different wood species. Holzforschung.

  10. Soil organic carbon assessments in cropping systems using isotopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín De Dios Herrero, Juan; Cruz Colazo, Juan; Guzman, María Laura; Saenz, Claudio; Sager, Ricardo; Sakadevan, Karuppan

    2016-04-01

    Introduction of improved farming practices are important to address the challenges of agricultural production, food security, climate change and resource use efficiency. The integration of livestock with crops provides many benefits including: (1) resource conservation, (2) ecosystem services, (3) soil quality improvements, and (4) risk reduction through diversification of enterprises. Integrated crop livestock systems (ICLS) with the combination of no-tillage and pastures are useful practices to enhance soil organic carbon (SOC) compared with continuous cropping systems (CCS). In this study, the SOC and its fractions in two cropping systems namely (1) ICLS, and (2) CCS were evaluated in Southern Santa Fe Province in Argentina, and the use of delta carbon-13 technique and soil physical fractionation were evaluated to identify sources of SOC in these systems. Two farms inside the same soil cartographic unit and landscape position in the region were compared. The ICLS farm produces lucerne (Medicago sativa Merrill) and oat (Avena sativa L.) grazed by cattle alternatively with grain summer crops sequence of soybean (Glicine max L.) and corn (Zea mays L.), and the farm under continuous cropping system (CCS) produces soybean and corn in a continuous sequence. The soil in the area is predominantly a Typic Hapludoll. Soil samples from 0-5 and 0-20 cm depths (n=4) after the harvest of grain crops were collected in each system and analyzed for total organic carbon (SOC, 0-2000 μm), particulate organic carbon (POC, 50-100 μm) and mineral organic carbon (MOC, is probably due to the presence of deep roots under pastures in ICLS. Delta carbon-13 values for 0-5 cm were -22.9, -21.2 and -19.9 per mil for REF, ICLS and CCS, respectively (Pis explained by the presence of tree species with high lignin content in natural vegetation. Lignin has lower delta carbon-13 compared to cellulose (dominating in crops and pastures), which is present in greater proportion in plant residues of

  11. Study on movement, accumulation and distribution of 137Cs in rice and soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Zixian; Xu Shiming

    1992-11-01

    The experiment of growing rice contaminated by 137 Cs solution shows that from the seedling stage to booting stage the absorption rate of 137 Cs is the highest, in the heading stage it is steady and in the milk stage goes to high again. The 137 Cs transfers from root to straw and ear, and from vegetative organs to reproductive organs. The relationship between specific activity (SA) and the amount of 137 Cs in soil is proportional. Only when the amount of 137 Cs in soil reaches to 370 Bq/g the SA of 137 Cs in rice rises remarkably. The different soil growing rice has different absorption rate of 137 Cs. Only in Shenzhen it is much higher than in other areas. The absorption of 137 Cs is also depending on different stage, in the milk stage it is considerably higher than other stages

  12. Contributions of Precipitation and Soil Moisture Observations to the Skill of Soil Moisture Estimates in a Land Data Assimilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; Liu, Qing; Bindlish, Rajat; Cosh, Michael H.; Crow, Wade T.; deJeu, Richard; DeLannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Huffman, George J.; Jackson, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    The contributions of precipitation and soil moisture observations to the skill of soil moisture estimates from a land data assimilation system are assessed. Relative to baseline estimates from the Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), the study investigates soil moisture skill derived from (i) model forcing corrections based on large-scale, gauge- and satellite-based precipitation observations and (ii) assimilation of surface soil moisture retrievals from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E). Soil moisture skill is measured against in situ observations in the continental United States at 44 single-profile sites within the Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) for which skillful AMSR-E retrievals are available and at four CalVal watersheds with high-quality distributed sensor networks that measure soil moisture at the scale of land model and satellite estimates. The average skill (in terms of the anomaly time series correlation coefficient R) of AMSR-E retrievals is R=0.39 versus SCAN and R=0.53 versus CalVal measurements. The skill of MERRA surface and root-zone soil moisture is R=0.42 and R=0.46, respectively, versus SCAN measurements, and MERRA surface moisture skill is R=0.56 versus CalVal measurements. Adding information from either precipitation observations or soil moisture retrievals increases surface soil moisture skill levels by IDDeltaR=0.06-0.08, and root zone soil moisture skill levels by DeltaR=0.05-0.07. Adding information from both sources increases surface soil moisture skill levels by DeltaR=0.13, and root zone soil moisture skill by DeltaR=0.11, demonstrating that precipitation corrections and assimilation of satellite soil moisture retrievals contribute similar and largely independent amounts of information.

  13. Smart system for safe and optimal soil investigation in urban areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Alqadad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the challenges and difficulties experienced during soil investigation in urban areas using drilling machines and soil sampling. The focus is on the consequences of a lack of data on the subsoil profile and presence of utilities, which could cause major accidents with severe economic and social losses, resulting in constriction activities being delayed and urban services being disrupted. This paper describes certain accidents related to soil investigation in Qatar and their consequences, as well as the lessons learned from these accidents. In order to meet the challenges of soil investigation in urban areas, this paper presents a solution based on smart technology, which includes: (i a geotechnical information system with update data concerning the soil profile, soil surface, utilities locations, and water table level; (ii tools for data management, analysis, and visualization; and (iii a user interface that allows authorities, companies, and citizens to access authorized data via a graphic interface, update data, and send messages and alerts in the case of any incident occurring. Finally, the paper presents a promising perspective for the development of smart drilling devices, which record data related to the functioning of a drilling machine and transmit data to the smart soil investigation system. Keywords: Soil investigation, Smart, Urban area, Drill borehole, GIS, Underground utility

  14. Variation in root activity with season and soil moisture in coconut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venugopal, Vandana; Balachandran, P.V.

    2007-01-01

    An experiment was conducted at the College of Horticulture, Vellanikkara to study the effect of season and soil moisture regime on the physiological activity of roots in coconut. The experiment has been laid out in CRD with two replications at two different depths (20 and 75 cm) and moisture regimes (irrigated and rain fed) round the year. The 32 P uptake was higher during wet season as compared to dry season in monocrop of coconut. The absorption was more from the surface layers during wet season and roots explored deeper soil layers during dry season. Irrigation in general improved absorption of 32 P in coconut and resulted in higher uptake from the surface soil compared to that under rainfed condition. (author)

  15. Second law comparison of single effect and double effect vapour absorption refrigeration systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomri, Rabah

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a comparative study between single effect and double effect absorption refrigeration systems with identical cold output is carried out. Simulation results were used to study the influence of the various operating parameters on the performance coefficient, the thermal loads of the components, exergetic efficiency (rational efficiency) and the total change in exergy of the two systems. It is concluded that the COP of double effect system is approximately twice the COP of single effect system but the exergetic efficiency of double effect system increase slightly compared to the exergetic efficiency of single effect system. It is found that for each condenser and evaporator temperature, there is an optimum generator temperature where the total change in exergy of the single effect and double effect absorption refrigeration systems is minimum. At this point the COP and exergetic efficiency of the systems become maximum. In this study and when the evaporation temperature is varied from 4 deg. C to 10 deg. C, condenser and absorber temperatures are varied from 33 deg. C to 39 deg. C and generator (HPG) temperature is varied from 60 deg. C to 190 deg. C the maximum COP values of the single effect refrigeration systems are in the range of 0.73-0.79 and for double effect refrigeration systems are in the range of 1.22-1.42. The maximum exergetic efficiency values of the single effect refrigeration systems are in the range of 12.5-23.2% and for double effect refrigeration systems are in the range of 14.3-25.1%.

  16. Soil phosphatase and urease activities impacted by cropping systems and water management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil enzymes can play an important role in nutrient availability to plants. Consequently, soil enzyme measurements can provide useful information on soil fertility for crop production. We examined the impact of cropping system and water management on phosphatase, urease, and microbial biomass C in s...

  17. Water erosion and soil water infiltration in different stages of corn development and tillage systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. de Carvalho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThis study evaluated soil and water losses, soil water infiltration and infiltration rate models in soil tillage systems and corn (Zea mays, L. development stages under simulated rainfall. The treatments were: cultivation along contour lines, cultivation down the slope and exposed soil. Soil losses and infiltration in each treatment were quantified for rains applied using a portable simulator, at 0, 30, 60 and 75 days after planting. Infiltration rates were estimated using the models of Kostiakov-Lewis, Horton and Philip. Based on the obtained results, the combination of effects between soil tillage system and corn development stages reduces soil and water losses. The contour tillage system promoted improvements in soil physical properties, favoring the reduction of erosion in 59.7% (water loss and 86.6% (soil loss at 75 days after planting, and the increase in the stable infiltration rate in 223.3%, compared with the exposed soil. Associated to soil cover, contour cultivation reduces soil and water losses, and the former is more influenced by management. Horton model is the most adequate to represent soil water infiltration rate under the evaluated conditions.

  18. A drill-soil system modelization for future Mars exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finzi, A. E.; Lavagna, M.; Rocchitelli, G.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a first approach to the problem of modeling a drilling process to be carried on in the space environment by a dedicated payload. Systems devoted to work in space present very strict requirements in many different fields such as thermal response, electric power demand, reliability and so on. Thus, models devoted to the operational behaviour simulation represent a fundamental help in the design phase and give a great improvement in the final product quality. As the required power is the crucial constraint within drilling devices, the tool-soil interaction modelization and simulation are finalized to the computation of the power demand as a function of both the drill and the soil parameters. An accurate study of the tool and the soil separately has been firstly carried on and, secondly their interaction has been analyzed. The Dee-Dri system, designed by Tecnospazio and to be part of the lander components in the NASA's Mars Sample Return Mission, has been taken as the tool reference. The Deep-Drill system is a complex rotary tool devoted to the soil perforation and sample collection; it has to operate in a Martian zone made of rocks similar to the terrestrial basalt, then the modelization is restricted to the interaction analysis between the tool and materials belonging to the rock set. The tool geometric modelization has been faced by a finite element approach with a Langrangian formulation: for the static analysis a refined model is assumed considering both the actual geometry of the head and the rod screws; a simplified model has been used to deal with the dynamic analysis. The soil representation is based on the Mohr-Coulomb crack criterion and an Eulerian approach has been selected to model it. However, software limitations in dealing with the tool-soil interface definition required assuming a Langrangian formulation for the soil too. The interaction between the soil and the tool has been modeled by extending the two-dimensional Nishimatsu

  19. Evaluation of a Soil Moisture Data Assimilation System Over West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolten, J. D.; Crow, W.; Zhan, X.; Jackson, T.; Reynolds, C.

    2009-05-01

    A crucial requirement of global crop yield forecasts by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) International Production Assessment Division (IPAD) is the regional characterization of surface and sub-surface soil moisture. However, due to the spatial heterogeneity and dynamic nature of precipitation events and resulting soil moisture, accurate estimation of regional land surface-atmosphere interactions based sparse ground measurements is difficult. IPAD estimates global soil moisture using daily estimates of minimum and maximum temperature and precipitation applied to a modified Palmer two-layer soil moisture model which calculates the daily amount of soil moisture withdrawn by evapotranspiration and replenished by precipitation. We attempt to improve upon the existing system by applying an Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation system to integrate surface soil moisture retrievals from the NASA Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) into the USDA soil moisture model. This work aims at evaluating the utility of merging satellite-retrieved soil moisture estimates with the IPAD two-layer soil moisture model used within the DBMS. We present a quantitative analysis of the assimilated soil moisture product over West Africa (9°N- 20°N; 20°W-20°E). This region contains many key agricultural areas and has a high agro- meteorological gradient from desert and semi-arid vegetation in the North, to grassland, trees and crops in the South, thus providing an ideal location for evaluating the assimilated soil moisture product over multiple land cover types and conditions. A data denial experimental approach is utilized to isolate the added utility of integrating remotely-sensed soil moisture by comparing assimilated soil moisture results obtained using (relatively) low-quality precipitation products obtained from real-time satellite imagery to baseline model runs forced with higher quality rainfall. An analysis of root-zone anomalies for each model

  20. Root systems and soil microbial biomass under no-tillage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venzke Filho Solismar de Paiva

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Some root parameters such as distribution, length, diameter and dry matter are inherent to plant species. Roots can influence microbial population during vegetative cycle through the rhizodeposits and, after senescence, integrating the soil organic matter pool. Since they represent labile substrates, especially regarding nitrogen, they can determine the rate of nutrient availability to the next crop cultivated under no-tillage (NT. The root systems of two crop species: maize (Zea mays L. cultivar Cargill 909 and soybean [Glycine max (L. Merr.] cultivar Embrapa 59, were compared in the field, and their influence on spatial distribution of the microbial C and N in a clayey-textured Typic Hapludox cultivated for 22 years under NT, at Tibagi, State of Paraná (PR, Brazil, was determined. Digital image processing and nail-plate techniques were used to evaluate 40 plots of a 80 ´ 50 ´ 3 cm soil profile. It was observed that 36% and 30% of the maize and soybeans roots, respectively, are concentrated in the 0 to 10 cm soil layer. The percent distribution of root dry matter was similar for both crops. The maize roots presented a total of 1,324 kg C ha-1 and 58 kg N ha-1, with higher root dry matter density and more roots in decomposition in the upper soil layer, decreasing with depth. The soybean roots (392 kg C ha-1 and 21 kg N ha-1 showed higher number of thinner roots and higher density per length unity compared to the maize. The maize roots enhanced microbial-C down to deeper soil layers than did the soybean roots. The microbial N presented a better correlation with the concentration of thin active roots and with roots in decomposition or in indefinite shape, possibly because of higher concentration of C and N easily assimilated by soil microorganisms.

  1. Effects of gastric pH on oral drug absorption: In vitro assessment using a dissolution/permeation system reflecting the gastric dissolution process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Makoto; Fukahori, Miho; Ikemura, Atsumi; Kubota, Ayaka; Higashino, Haruki; Sakuma, Shinji; Yamashita, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of gastric pH on the oral absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs using an in vitro system. A dissolution/permeation system (D/P system) equipped with a Caco-2 cell monolayer was used as the in vitro system to evaluate oral drug absorption, while a small vessel filled with simulated gastric fluid (SGF) was used to reflect the gastric dissolution phase. After applying drugs in their solid forms to SGF, SGF solution containing a 1/100 clinical dose of each drug was mixed with the apical solution of the D/P system, which was changed to fasted state-simulated intestinal fluid. Dissolved and permeated amounts on applied amount of drugs were then monitored for 2h. Similar experiments were performed using the same drugs, but without the gastric phase. Oral absorption with or without the gastric phase was predicted in humans based on the amount of the drug that permeated in the D/P system, assuming that the system without the gastric phase reflected human absorption with an elevated gastric pH. The dissolved amounts of basic drugs with poor water solubility, namely albendazole, dipyridamole, and ketoconazole, in the apical solution and their permeation across a Caco-2 cell monolayer were significantly enhanced when the gastric dissolution process was reflected due to the physicochemical properties of basic drugs. These amounts resulted in the prediction of higher oral absorption with normal gastric pH than with high gastric pH. On the other hand, when diclofenac sodium, the salt form of an acidic drug, was applied to the D/P system with the gastric phase, its dissolved and permeated amounts were significantly lower than those without the gastric phase. However, the oral absorption of diclofenac was predicted to be complete (96-98%) irrespective of gastric pH because the permeated amounts of diclofenac under both conditions were sufficiently high to achieve complete absorption. These estimations of the effects of

  2. Using waste heat of ship as energy source for an absorption refrigeration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmi, Waltteri; Vanttola, Juha; Elg, Mia; Kuosa, Maunu; Lahdelma, Risto

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A steady-state thermodynamic model is developed for absorption refrigeration in a ship. • Operation profile of B.Delta37 bulk carrier is used as an initial data. • Suitability of water-LiBr and ammonia-water working pairs were validated. • Coefficient of performance (COP) was studied in ISO and tropical conditions. • Estimated energy savings were 47 and 95 tons of fuel every year. - Abstract: This work presents a steady-state thermodynamic model for absorption refrigeration cycles with water-LiBr and ammonia-water working pairs for purpose of application on a ship. The coefficient of performance was studied with different generator and evaporator temperatures in ISO and tropical conditions. Absorption refrigeration systems were examined using exhaust gases, jacket water, and scavenge air as energy sources. Optimal generator temperatures for different refrigerant temperatures were found using different waste heat sources and for the absorption cycle itself. Critical temperature values (where the refrigeration power drops to zero) were defined. All of these values were used in order to evaluate the cooling power and energy production possibilities in a bulk carrier. The process data of exhaust gases and cooling water flows in two different climate conditions (ISO and tropical) and operation profiles of a B. Delta37 bulk carrier were used as initial data in the study. With the case ship data, a theoretical potential of saving of 70% of the electricity used in accommodation (AC use) compressor in ISO conditions and 61% in tropical conditions was recognized. Those estimates enable between 47 and 95 tons of annual fuel savings, respectively. Moreover, jacket water heat recovery with a water-LiBr system has the potential to provide 2.2–4.0 times more cooling power than required during sea-time operations in ISO conditions, depending on the main engine load.

  3. Estimation of water absorption coefficient using the TDR method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchorab, Zbigniew; Majerek, Dariusz; Brzyski, Przemysław; Sobczuk, Henryk; Raczkowski, Andrzej

    2017-07-01

    Moisture accumulation and transport in the building barriers is an important feature that influences building performance, causing serious exploitation problems as increased energy use, mold and bacteria growth, decrease of indoor air parameters that may lead to sick building syndrome (SBS). One of the parameters that is used to describe moisture characteristic of the material is water absorption coefficient being the measure of capillary behavior of the material as a function of time and the surface area of the specimen. As usual it is determined using gravimetric methods according to EN 1925:1999 standard. In this article we demonstrate the possibility of determination of water absorption coefficient of autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) using the Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) method. TDR is an electric technique that had been adopted from soil science and can be successfully used for real-time monitoring of moisture transport in building materials and envelopes. Data achieved using TDR readouts show high correlation with standard method of moisture absorptivity coefficient determination.

  4. Toward Soil Spatial Information Systems (SSIS) for global modeling and ecosystem management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgardner, Marion F.

    1995-01-01

    The general objective is to conduct research to contribute toward the realization of a world soils and terrain (SOTER) database, which can stand alone or be incorporated into a more complete and comprehensive natural resources digital information system. The following specific objectives are focussed on: (1) to conduct research related to (a) translation and correlation of different soil classification systems to the SOTER database legend and (b) the inferfacing of disparate data sets in support of the SOTER Project; (2) to examine the potential use of AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) data for delineating meaningful soils and terrain boundaries for small scale soil survey (range of scale: 1:250,000 to 1:1,000,000) and terrestrial ecosystem assessment and monitoring; and (3) to determine the potential use of high dimensional spectral data (220 reflectance bands with 10 m spatial resolution) for delineating meaningful soils boundaries and conditions for the purpose of detailed soil survey and land management.

  5. Thermodynamic and economic studies of two new high efficient power-cooling cogeneration systems based on Kalina and absorption refrigeration cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashidi, Jouan; Ifaei, Pouya; Esfahani, Iman Janghorban; Ataei, Abtin; Yoo, Chang Kyoo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Proposing two new power and cooling cogeneration systems based on absorption chillers and Kalina cycles. • Model-based comparison through thermodynamic and economic standpoints. • Investigating sensitivity of system performance and costs to the key parameters. • Reducing total annual costs of the base system up to 8% by cogeneration. • Increasing thermal efficiency up to 4.9% despite of cooling generation. - Abstract: Two new power and cooling cogeneration systems based on Kalina cycle (KC) and absorption refrigeration cycle (AC) are proposed and studied from thermodynamic and economic viewpoints. The first proposed system, Kalina power-cooling cycle (KPCC), combines the refrigerant loop of the water-ammonia absorption chiller, consisting of an evaporator and two throttling valves with the KC. A portion of the KC mass flow enters the evaporator to generate cooling after being condensed in the KPCC system. KPCC is a flexible system adapting power and cooling cogeneration to the demand. The second proposed system, Kalina lithium bromide absorption chiller cycle (KLACC), consists of the KC and a single effect lithium bromide-water absorption chiller (AC_L_i_B_r_-_w_a_t_e_r). The KC subsystem discharges heat to the AC_L_i_B_r_-_w_a_t_e_r desorber before condensing in the condenser. The performance and economic aspects of both proposed systems are analyzed and compared with the stand alone KC. A parametric analysis is conducted to evaluate the sensitivity of efficiencies and the generated power and cooling quantities to the key operating variables. The results showed that, thermal efficiency and total annual costs decreased by 5.6% and 8% for KPCC system but increased 4.9% and 58% for KLACC system, respectively. Since the power-cooling efficiency of KLACC is 42% higher than KPCC it can be applied where the aim is cooling generation without considering economic aspects.

  6. Carbon storage in soil size fractions under two cacao agroforestry systems in Bahia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama-Rodrigues, Emanuela F; Ramachandran Nair, P K; Nair, Vimala D; Gama-Rodrigues, Antonio C; Baligar, Virupax C; Machado, Regina C R

    2010-02-01

    Shaded perennial agroforestry systems contain relatively high quantities of soil carbon (C) resulting from continuous deposition of plant residues; however, the extent to which the C is sequestered in soil will depend on the extent of physical protection of soil organic C (SOC). The main objective of this study was to characterize SOC storage in relation to soil fraction-size classes in cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) agroforestry systems (AFSs). Two shaded cacao systems and an adjacent natural forest in reddish-yellow Oxisols in Bahia, Brazil were selected. Soil samples were collected from four depth classes to 1 m depth and separated by wet-sieving into three fraction-size classes (>250 microm, 250-53 microm, and <53 microm)-corresponding to macroaggregate, microaggregate, and silt-and-clay size fractions-and analyzed for C content. The total SOC stock did not vary among systems (mean: 302 Mg/ha). On average, 72% of SOC was in macroaggregate-size, 20% in microaggregate-size, and 8% in silt-and-clay size fractions in soil. Sonication of aggregates showed that occlusion of C in soil aggregates could be a major mechanism of C protection in these soils. Considering the low level of soil disturbances in cacao AFSs, the C contained in the macroaggregate fraction might become stabilized in the soil. The study shows the role of cacao AFSs in mitigating greenhouse gas (GHG) emission through accumulation and retention of high amounts of organic C in the soils and suggests the potential benefit of this environmental service to the nearly 6 million cacao farmers worldwide.

  7. Accumulation of /sup 90/Sr, Ca, Mg, K and Na in crane's-bill plants cultivated on soil and hydroponics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Analyan, V L; Sarkisyan, G A [AN Armyanskoj SSR, Erevan. Inst. Agrokhimicheskikh Problem i Gidroponiki

    1981-01-01

    Accumulation of /sup 90/Sr in plants under the conditions of soil and hydroponic cultures from the viewpoint of the possibility of obtaining ''pure'' vegetable production has been studied. Predominant absorption of /sup 90/Sr by soil plants as compared with calcium is shown. In the course of using the hydroponic cultivation method predominant radiostrontium absorption has been manifested to all investigated nuclides including potassium. The accumulation coefficients analysis has shown that among soil plants the first place is occupied by potassium, while the /sup 90/Sr coefficients are greater than Ca on hydroponics, where the true, not distorted by soil sorption processes absorptive plant capacity has been manifested, the first places in the series are occupied by /sup 90/Sr and K, then come Ca and Mg.

  8. Safety, tolerability, and systemic absorption of dapivirine vaginal microbicide gel in healthy, HIV-negative women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nel, Annalene M.; Coplan, Paul; van de Wijgert, Janneke H.; Kapiga, Saidi H.; von Mollendorf, Claire; Geubbels, Eveline; Vyankandondera, Joseph; Rees, Helen V.; Masenga, Gileard; Kiwelu, Ireen; Moyes, Jocelyn; Smythe, Shanique C.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the local and systemic safety of dapivirine vaginal gel vs. placebo gel as well as the systemic absorption of dapivirine in healthy, HIV-negative women. Two prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase I/II studies were conducted at five research centers, four in Africa

  9. Soil-Water Characteristic Curves of Red Clay treated by Ionic Soil Stabilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, D.; Xiang, W.

    2009-12-01

    The relationship of red clay particle with water is an important factor to produce geological disaster and environmental damage. In order to reduce the role of adsorbed water of red clay in WuHan, Ionic Soil Stabilizer (ISS) was used to treat the red clay. Soil Moisture Equipment made in U.S.A was used to measure soil-water characteristic curve of red clay both in natural and stabilized conditions in the suction range of 0-500kPa. The SWCC results were used to interpret the red clay behavior due to stabilizer treatment. In addition, relationship were compared between the basic soil and stabilizer properties such as water content, dry density, liquid limit, plastic limit, moisture absorption rate and stabilizer dosages. The analysis showed that the particle density and specific surface area increase, the dehydration rate slows and the thickness of water film thins after treatment with Ionic Soil Stabilizer. After treatment with the ISS, the geological disasters caused by the adsorbed water of red clay can be effectively inhibited.

  10. Modeling soil organic carbon stocks and changes in Spain using the GEFSOC system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvaro-Fuentes, Jorge; Easter, Mark; Cantero-Martínez, Carlos; Paustian, Keith

    2010-05-01

    Currently, there is little information about soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks in Spain. To date the effects of land-use and soil management on SOC stocks in Spain have been evaluated in experimental fields under certain soil and climate conditions. However, these field experiments do not account for the spatial variability in management, cropping systems and soil and climate characteristics that exist in the whole territory. More realistic approaches like ecosystem-level dynamic simulation systems linked to geographic information systems (GIS) allow better assessments of SOC stocks at a regional or national level. The Global Environmental Facility Soil Organic Carbon (GEFSOC) system was recently built for this purpose (Milne et al., 2007) and it incorporates three widely used models for estimating SOC dynamics: (a) the Century ecosystem model; (b) the RothC soil C decomposition model; and (c) the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) method for assessing soil C at regional scales. We modeled 9.5 Mha in northeast Spain using the GEFSOC system to predict SOC stocks and changes comprising: pasture, forest, cereal-fallow, cereal monoculture, orchards, rice, irrigated land and grapes and olives. The spatial distribution of the different land use categories and their change over time was obtained from the European Corine database and from Spanish census data on land use from 1926 to 2007. At the same time, current and historical management information was collected from different sources in order to have a fairly well picture of changes in land use and management for this area. Soil parameters needed by the system were obtained from the European soil map (1 km x 1 km) and climate data was produced by the Meteorology State Agency (Ministry of the Environment and Rural and Marine Environs of Spain). The SOC stocks simulated were validated with SOC values from the European SOC map and from other national studies. Modeled SOC results suggested that spatial

  11. Soil surface roughness decay in contrasting climates, tillage types and management systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal Vázquez, Eva; Bertol, Ildegardis; Tondello Barbosa, Fabricio; Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    Soil surface roughness describes the variations in the elevation of the soil surface. Such variations define the soil surface microrelief, which is characterized by a high spatial variability. Soil surface roughness is a property affecting many processes such as depression storage, infiltration, sediment generation, storage and transport and runoff routing. Therefore the soil surface microrelief is a key element in hydrology and soil erosion processes at different spatial scales as for example at the plot, field or catchment scale. In agricultural land soil surface roughness is mainly created by tillage operations, which promote to different extent the formation of microdepressions and microelevations and increase infiltration and temporal retention of water. The decay of soil surface roughness has been demonstrated to be mainly driven by rain height and rain intensity, and to depend also on runoff, aggregate stability, soil reface porosity and soil surface density. Soil roughness formation and decay may be also influenced by antecedent soil moisture (either before tillage or rain), quantity and type of plant residues over the soil surface and soil composition. Characterization of the rate and intensity of soil surface roughness decay provides valuable information about the degradation of the upper most soil surface layer before soil erosion has been initiated or at the very beginning of soil runoff and erosion processes. We analyzed the rate of decay of soil surface roughness from several experiments conducted in two regions under temperate and subtropical climate and with contrasting land use systems. The data sets studied were obtained both under natural and simulated rainfall for various soil tillage and management types. Soil surface roughness decay was characterized bay several parameters, including classic and single parameters such as the random roughness or the tortuosity and parameters based on advanced geostatistical methods or on the fractal theory. Our

  12. Optimal design of solid oxide fuel cell, ammonia-water single effect absorption cycle and Rankine steam cycle hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrpooya, Mehdi; Dehghani, Hossein; Ali Moosavian, S. M.

    2016-02-01

    A combined system containing solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine power plant, Rankine steam cycle and ammonia-water absorption refrigeration system is introduced and analyzed. In this process, power, heat and cooling are produced. Energy and exergy analyses along with the economic factors are used to distinguish optimum operating point of the system. The developed electrochemical model of the fuel cell is validated with experimental results. Thermodynamic package and main parameters of the absorption refrigeration system are validated. The power output of the system is 500 kW. An optimization problem is defined in order to finding the optimal operating point. Decision variables are current density, temperature of the exhaust gases from the boiler, steam turbine pressure (high and medium), generator temperature and consumed cooling water. Results indicate that electrical efficiency of the combined system is 62.4% (LHV). Produced refrigeration (at -10 °C) and heat recovery are 101 kW and 22.1 kW respectively. Investment cost for the combined system (without absorption cycle) is about 2917 kW-1.

  13. Effect of tillage systems and permanent groundcover intercropped with orange trees on soil enzyme activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elcio Liborio Balota

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different soil tillage systems and groundcover crops intercropped with orange trees on soil enzyme activities. The experiment was performed in an Ultisol soil in northwestern Paraná State. Two soil tillage systems were evaluated [conventional tillage (CT across the entire area and strip tillage (ST with a 2-m strip width] in combination with various groundcover vegetation management systems. Soil samples were collected after five years of experimental management at a depth of 0-15 cm under the tree canopy and in the inter-row space in the following treatments: (1 CT-Calopogonium mucunoides; (2 CT-Arachis pintoi; (3 CT-Bahiagrass; (4 CT-Brachiaria humidicola; and (5 ST-B. humidicola. The soil tillage systems and groundcover crops influenced the soil enzyme activities both under the tree canopy and in the inter-row space. The cultivation of B. humidicola provided higher amylase, arylsulfatase, acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase than other groundcover species. Strip tillage increased enzyme activities compared to the conventional tillage system.

  14. Soil quality assessment in rice production systems: establishing a minimum data set.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues de Lima, A.C.; Hoogmoed, W.B.; Brussaard, L.

    2008-01-01

    Soil quality, as a measure of the soil's capacity to function, can be assessed by indicators based on physical, chemical, and biological properties. Here we report on the assessment of soil quality in 21 rice (Oryza sativa) fields under three rice production systems (semi-direct, pre-germinated, and

  15. Neutron activation and radiometric investigation of Kazakhstan soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwozdz, R.; Popov, J.V.; Shishkov, I.A.; Poznyak, V.; Solodukhin, V.P.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Great diversity of radio-ecological problems requires measurement of materials with vastly differing chemical composition and density, and varying volume. In case of gamma spectrometry such variation in composition, density and volume changes the response of a measuring system quite drastically. A necessary correction is usually achieved by applying one of the four correction methods. The first one is applying a standard with composition as close to the measured sample as possible. The second method needs some previous knowledge about the chemical composition of the sample and a subsequent calculation of the mass absorption coefficient. The third method, an intensity ratio of two gamma lines, can only be applied when an isotope in the investigated sample has two measurable gamma lines. The fourth method consists in an additional gamma transmission measurement, using an isotopic source. Application of the first two methods to samples collected in Kazakhstan is evaluated and the results achieved are described. Instrumental neutron activation analysis by either long, or short irradiation was applied to three groups of samples. The first 15 samples were from the Semipalatinsk area, the next 15 from the area north for the Kara-Tau range. The third group of 5 samples was from the Syr-Darya valley. The Kara-Tau and Syr-Darya samples originate from the area adjacent to an uranium mining site. Only two samples are collected at cultivated soil, all the other are collected at the steppe or semi-desert areas, In the additional group measured there were ten sub-samples of the environmental soil standard, prepared at the Institute of Nuclear Physics. Activation analysis was applied as well to Soil-6 and Soil IAEA-375, two reference materials distributed by IAEA. Determination of concentration of about 40 elements in very sample enabled computation of mass absorption coefficients for all the investigated samples. Results of calculation and experimental testing prove

  16. Soil Properties and Plant Biomass Production in Natural Rangeland Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeu de Souza Werner

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Improper management of rangelands can cause land degradation and reduce the economic efficiency of livestock activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate soil properties and quantify plant biomass production in four natural rangeland management systems in the Santa Catarina Plateau (Planalto Catarinense of Brazil. The treatments, which included mowed natural rangeland (NR, burned natural rangeland (BR, natural rangeland improved through the introduction of plant species after harrowing (IH, and natural rangeland improved through the introduction of plant species after chisel plowing (IC, were evaluated in a Nitossolo Bruno (Nitisol. In the improved treatments, soil acidity was corrected, phosphate fertilizer was applied, and intercropped annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum, velvet grass (Holcus lanatus, and white clover (Trifolium repens were sown. Management systems with harrowed or chisel plowed soil showed improved soil physical properties; however, the effect decreased over time and values approached those of burned and mowed natural rangelands. Natural rangeland systems in the establishment phase had little influence on soil organic C. The mowed natural rangeland and improved natural rangeland exhibited greater production of grazing material, while burning the field decreased production and increased the proportion of weeds. Improvement of the natural rangelands increased leguminous biomass for pasture.

  17. Simply obtained global radiation, soil temperature and soil moisture in an alley cropping system in semi-arid Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mungai, D.N.; Stigter, C.J.; Coulson, C.L.; Ng'ang'a, J.K.

    2000-01-01

    Global radiation, soil temperature and soil moisture data were obtained from a 4-6 year old Cassia siamea/maize (CM) alley cropping (or hedgerow intercropping) system, at a semi-arid site at Machakos, Kenya, in the late eighties. With the growing need to explore and manage variations in

  18. Aggregates morphometry in a Latosol (Oxisol under different soil management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Eloize Carducci

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Changes in soil physical properties are inherent in land use, mainly in superficial layers. Structural alterations can directly influence distribution, stability and especially morphometry of soil aggregates, which hence will affect pore system and the dynamic process of water and air in soil. Among the methods used to measure these changes, morphometry is a complementary tool to the classic methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate structural quality of a Latosol (Oxisol, under different management systems, using morphometric techniques. Treatments consisted of soil under no-tillage (NT; pasture (P, in which both had been cultivated for ten years, and an area under native vegetation (NV – Savannah like vegetation. Aggregates were sampled at depths of 0-0.10 and 0.10-0.20 m, retained on sieves with 9.52 – 4.76 mm, 4.76 – 1.0mm, 1.0 – 0.5mm diameter ranges. Aggregate morphometry was assessed by 2D images from scanner via QUANTPORO software. The analyzed variables were: area, perimeter, aspect, roughness, Ferret diameter and compactness. Moreover, disturbed samples were collected at the same depths to determine particle size, aggregate stability in water, water-dispersible clay, clay flocculation index and organic matter content. It was observed that different soil management systems have modified soil aggregate morphology as well as physical attributes; and management effects’ magnitude increased from NT to P.

  19. A comprehensive, multi-objective optimization of solar-powered absorption chiller systems for air-conditioning applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirazi, Ali; Taylor, Robert A.; Morrison, Graham L.; White, Stephen D.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Multi-objective optimization of solar single/multi-effect absorption chillers was conducted. • Primary energy consumption and total annual cost were considered as the objectives. • Optimized designs of the alternative configurations were compared. • A detailed sensitivity analysis of the Pareto optimal solutions was investigated. - Abstract: Solar heating and cooling (SHC) systems are currently under rapid development and deployment due to their potential to reduce the use of fossil fuel resources and to alleviate greenhouse gas emissions in the building sector – a sector which is responsible for ∼40% of the world energy use. Absorption chiller technology (traditionally powered by natural gas in large buildings), can easily be retrofitted to run on solar energy. However, numerous non-intuitive design choices must be analyzed to achieve the best techno-economic performance of these systems. To date, there has been little research into the optimal configurations among the long list of potential solar-driven absorption chiller systems. To address this lack of knowledge, this paper presents a systematic simulation-based, multi-objective optimization of three common, commercially available lithium bromide-water absorption chillers – single-effect, double-effect and triple-effect – powered by evacuated tube collectors (ETCs), evacuated flat plate collectors (EFPCs), and concentrating parabolic trough collectors (PTCs), respectively. To the best of authors’ knowledge, this is the first study of its kind that compares the optimized designs of the most promising configurations of solar-assisted absorption chillers against a common set of energy, economic, and environmental metrics from a holistic perspective. A simulation model of these three configurations is developed using TRNSYS 17. A combined energy, economic, and environmental analysis of the modeled systems is conducted to calculate the primary energy use as well as the levelized total

  20. Sustainable Soil Water Management Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Basch, G.; Kassam, A.; Friedrich, T.; Santos, F.L.; Gubiani, P.I.; Calegari, A.; Reichert, J.M.; dos Santos, D.R.

    2012-01-01

    Soil quality and its management must be considered as key elements for an effective management of water resources, given that the hydrological cycle and land management are intimately linked (Bossio et al. 2007). Soil degradation has been described by Bossio et al. (2010) as the starting point of a negative cycle of soil-water relationships, creating a positive, self-accelerating feedback loop with important negative impacts on water cycling and water productivity. Therefore, sustainable soil...

  1. Mass balance of pent achloroni trobenzene-14c and metabolites in a closed aerated soil plant or soil-system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, M.

    1984-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out with pentachloronitrobenzene- 14 C and soils with and without plants in a closed aerated laboratory system. In both experiments, degradation to 14 CO 2 within 16 or 53 days, respectively, was very low (=0,01% of initially applied 14 C). Volatilization loses were about 15% in the system with plants (16 days) and were negligible in the soil without plants (53 days). The uptake into plants within 16 days was 5.26% of initially applied 14 C(0.86% unchanged parent compound, 3.35% soluble metabolites, and 1.05% unextractable residues); the major portion of soluble metabolites was highly polar conjugates which were not characterized further. The radioactivity left in both soils after 16 or 53 days, respectively, considered of 57 or 37% unchanged parent compound, 10 or 42% soluble metabolites, and 13 or 25% soil-bound residues. In the soil without plants, the following conversion products were identified after 53 days: pentachloroaniline (18.7% of initially applied 14 C), pentachlorthioanisole (17.3%), pentachlorobenzene, and pentachlorophenylmethylsulphoxide (2.6% each). (author)

  2. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system for measuring atmospheric mercury using differential absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, A.; Obrist, D.; Moosmuller, H.; Moore, C.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric elemental mercury (Hg0) is a globally pervasive element that can be transported and deposited to remote ecosystems where it poses — particularly in its methylated form — harm to many organisms including humans. Current techniques for measurement of atmospheric Hg0 require several liters of sample air and several minutes for each analysis. Fast-response (i.e., 1 second or faster) measurements would improve our ability to understand and track chemical cycling of mercury in the atmosphere, including high frequency Hg0 fluctuations, sources and sinks, and chemical transformation processes. We present theory, design, challenges, and current results of our new prototype sensor based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) for fast-response measurement of Hg0 mass concentrations. CRDS is a direct absorption technique that implements path-lengths of multiple kilometers in a compact absorption cell using high-reflectivity mirrors, thereby improving sensitivity and reducing sample volume compared to conventional absorption spectroscopy. Our sensor includes a frequency-doubled, dye-laser emitting laser pulses tunable from 215 to 280 nm, pumped by a Q-switched, frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser with a pulse repetition rate of 50 Hz. We present how we successfully perform automated wavelength locking and stabilization of the laser to the peak Hg0 absorption line at 253.65 nm using an external isotopically-enriched mercury (202Hg0) cell. An emphasis of this presentation will be on the implementation of differential absorption measurement whereby measurements are alternated between the peak Hg0 absorption wavelength and a nearby wavelength "off" the absorption line. This can be achieved using a piezo electric tuning element that allows for pulse-by-pulse tuning and detuning of the laser "online" and "offline" of the Hg absorption line, and thereby allows for continuous correction of baseline extinction losses. Unexpected challenges with this approach included

  3. Enhancement of absorption and hepatoprotective potential through soya-phosphatidylcholine-andrographolide vesicular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Pushpendra Kumar; Khurana, Navneet; Pounikar, Yogesh; Gajbhiye, Asmita; Kharya, Murli Dhar

    2013-06-01

    Andrographis paniculata is a medicinal herb used extensively for various ailments and contains therapeutically active phytoconstituent, andrographolide (AN). Although hepatoprotective activity of AN is established, but their bioavailability is restricted due to its rapid clearance. The aim of this study, therefore, was to formulate AN herbosomes (ANH) through complexation with naturally occurring soya-phosphatidylcholine (SPC), in order to enhance absorption. Prepared andrographolide-soy phosphatidylcholine (AN-SPC) complex prepared was subjected for characterisation of complex and formation of vesicular system known as ANH using rotary evaporation techniques. This complex was subjected to in vitro study using everted small intestine sac technique which showed significantly increased absorption of AN from the ANH as compared to the plain AN. The hepatoprotective potential of ANH and plain AN was evaluated using carbon tetrachloride inducing hepatotoxicity rat model and compared, in which ANH equivalent to 50 mg/kg of plain AN significantly restore serum glutamate oxalacetate transaminase (112.4 ± 9.67 for AN whereas 90.2 ± 4.23 for ANH) and serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (109.3 ± 7.89 for AN whereas 90.6 ± 4.34 for ANH) level as compared to control group. The ANH showed significantly better absorption than plain AN and this effect of ANH was also comparable to the standard drug (Silymarin). The findings of present study reveal that ANH has better bioavailability as shown by in vitro absorption study and hence improved hepatoprotection as compared to plain AN at equivalent dose.

  4. Use of neutron scattering meter to detect soil moisture distribution under trickle irrigation system in sandy soil of inshas, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-moniem, M.; El-gendy, R.W.; Gadalla, A.M.; Hamdy, A.; Zeedan, A.

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the soil moisture distribution under different quantities of irrigation water in cultivated sandy soil with squash, using drip irrigation system. This study was carried out in Inshas sandy soil at the farm of Soil and Water Research Department, Nuclear Research Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Egypt. Three rates of applied irrigation water (100, 75 and 50 % ETc) were used. Three sites (0, 12.5 and 25 cm distances from the emitter between drippers and laterals lines) were chosen to measure soil moisture contents (horizontal and vertical directions within the soil depths). The obtained data pointed out that the maximum width, in onion shape of water distribution under drip irrigation system, was at 45 cm depth at 0 site. From the study of soil moisture distribution, the overlapping between each two neighbor drippers played a good role in increasing soil moisture content at the 25 site rather than the rest sites. Water distribution was affected with plant location within the wet area as well as the used irrigation water quantities. Water distribution between drippers and laterals did not differ much approximately. The highest soil moisture depletion was at 12.5 site (between drippers) for 100 and 75 % ETc rather than the rest treatments. 100 % ETc treatment introduced the highest soil moisture depletion in the first stage of plant growth season for the three sites (between drippers and laterals). In the last stage of plant growth season, water re-distribution phenomena resulted from the changeable total hydraulic potential, which played important role for interpretation of results

  5. Differential Optical-absorption Spectroscopy (doas) System For Urban Atmospheric-pollution Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Edner, H; Ragnarson, P; Spannare, S; Svanberg, Sune

    1993-01-01

    We describe a fully computer-controlled differential optical absorption spectroscopy system for atmospheric air pollution monitoring. A receiving optical telescope can sequentially tune in to light beams from a number of distant high-pressure Xe lamp light sources to cover the area of a medium-sized city. A beam-finding servosystem and automatic gain control permit unattended long-time monitoring. Using an astronomical code, we can also search and track celestial sources. Selected wavelength ...

  6. Soil-plant relation in Cuban sugar cane by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Riso, O.; Griffith Martinez, J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper shows the result of soil-plant relation in samples from Cuban sugar canes of different soil types and cane varieties, using the INAA from thermal reactor. The behaviour of minor and trace elements in sugar cane leaves is uniform and independent of sugar cane variety or type of soil. The soil-plant relation shows four principal groups of micro elements, according to their absorption by the plant

  7. Analysis of a gas absorption system with soluble carrier gas and volatile solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanak, B.E.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of column diameter, carrier gas coabsorption, and solvent vaporization on the performance of a packed gas absorption column are examined. The system investigated employs dichlorodifluoromethane as a solvent to remove krypton from a nitrogen stream and is characterized by substantial nitrogen coabsorption. Three columns with diameters of 2, 3, and 4 inches were constructed and packed with 34.5 inches of Goodloe packing. In addition to the more conventional data, the experimental evaluation of these columns included the use of a radioisotope and a gamma scanning technique which provided direct measurement of the columns' molar krypton profiles. A multicomponent gas absorption model was developed, based on the two-film mass transfer theory, that allows the fluxes of all species to interact. Verification of this model was achieved through comparison of the calculated results with experimental data. With the feed gas flow rate between 6 and 36 lb moles/hr-ft 2 and the solvent feed rate between 40 and 400 lb moles/hr-ft 2 , column diameter was found to have no significant impact on the mass transfer efficiency of this system when carried out in columns with diameters of 2 inches or greater. The absorption of krypton was found to be enhanced and inhibited, respectively, by carrier gas coabsorption and solvent vaporization. An injector system to add gaseous solvent to the feed gas stream prior to its introduction into the packed bed was proposed to eliminate the detrimental effects of solvent vaporization.Using this injector to supersaturate the feed gas stream with solvent enhanced absorber performance in the same manner as carrier gas coabsorption

  8. Building an End-to-end System for Long Term Soil Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlavecz, K.; Terzis, A.; Musaloiu-E., R.; Cogan, J.; Szalay, A.; Gray, J.

    2006-05-01

    We have developed and deployed an experimental soil monitoring system in an urban forest. Wireless sensor nodes collect data on soil temperature, soil moisture, air temperature, and light. Data are uploaded into a SQL Server database, where they are calibrated and reorganized into an OLAP data cube. The data are accessible on-line using a web services interface with various visual tools. Our prototype system of ten nodes has been live since Sep 2005, and in 5 months of operation over 6 million measurements have been collected. At a high level, our experiment was a success: we detected variations in soil condition corresponding to topography and external environmental parameters as expected. However, we encountered a number of challenging technical problems: need for low-level programming at multiple levels, calibration across space and time, and cross- reference of measurements with external sources. Based upon the experience with this system we are now deploying 200 mode nodes with close to a thousand sensors spread over multiple sites in the context of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study LTER. www

  9. Three-objective optimization of a novel triple-effect absorption heat transformer combined with a water desalination system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoudi, S.M.S.; Salehi, S.; Yari, M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A new type of triple-effect absorption heat transformers is proposed. • A temperature lift of 180 °C is obtained by the proposed system. • The proposed system is observed to be the most effective. • The highest distilled water mass flow rate is obtained by the proposed system. - Abstract: A novel triple-effect absorption heat transformer is proposed and compared with a most studied configuration of triple-effect absorption heat transformer and a modified form of it from the viewpoint of exergoeconomics. All systems are integrated with water desalination system to produced distilled water. Sensitivity analyses are performed to identify the influence on the systems’ performance of such decision parameters as the temperatures of evaporator, condenser, absorber and absorbing evaporators for all the configurations. Then a three-objective optimization is accomplished to specify the optimal design points for the purpose of minimizing the product unit cost and maximizing the exergy coefficient of performance as well as the distilled water mass flow rate. In this regard, the Pareto frontiers are plotted for all the systems. The results show that, under the optimized conditions, the exergy coefficient of performance and distilled water mass flow rate for the proposed configuration can be higher by 16% and 38% with respect to the corresponding values in the other two systems. In addition, it is observed that the maximum gross temperature lift in the proposed system is about 20–40% higher than those in the other systems.

  10. Nitrogen Effects on Organic Dynamics and Soil Communities in Forest and Agricultural Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandy, S.; Neff, J.; Sinsabaugh, B.; Wickings, K.

    2008-12-01

    Human activities have doubled the global flux of biologically available N to terrestrial ecosystems but the effects of N on soil organic matter dynamics and soil communities remain difficult to predict. We examined soil organic matter chemistry and enzyme kinetics in three soil fractions (>250, 63-250, and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy, we found striking, ecosystem-specific effects of N deposition on carbohydrate abundance. Furfural, the dominant pyrolysis product of polysaccharides, was significantly decreased by simulated N deposition in the sugar maple/basswood system (15.87 versus 4.99%) but increased by N in the black oak/white oak system (8.83 versus 24.01%). There were ca. 3-fold increases in the ratio of total lignin derivatives to total polysaccharides in the >250 μm fraction of the sugar maple/basswood system but there were no changes in other size classes or in the black oak/white oak system. We also measured significant increases in the ratio of lignin derivatives to N-bearing compounds in the 63-250 and >250 μm fractions in both ecosystems but not in the corn-based cropping system. Our results demonstrate that changes in soil organic matter chemistry resulting from atmospheric N deposition or fertilization are directly linked to variation in enzyme responses to increased N availability across ecosystems and soil size fractions.

  11. Electrochemical characterization of corrosion in materials of grounding systems, simulating conditions of synthetic soils with characteristics of local soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Y.; Guerrero, L.; Vera-Monroy, S. P.; Blanco, J.; Jimenez, C.

    2017-12-01

    The integrity of structures buried in earthing becomes relevant when analysing maintenance and replacement costs of these systems, as the deterioration is mainly due to two factors, namely: the failures caused in the electrical systems, which are due to the system. Failure in earthing due to corrosion at the interface cause an alteration in the structure of the component material and generates an undesirable resistivity that cause malfunction in this type of protection systems. Two local soils were chosen that were categorized as sandy loam and clay loam type, whose chemical characteristics were simulated by means of an electrolyte corresponding to the amount of ions present determined by a soil characterization based on the CICE (effective cation exchange coefficient), which allows us to deduce the percentage of chloride and sulphate ions present for the different levels established in the experimental matrix. The interaction of these soils with grounding electrodes is a complex problem involving many factors to consider. In this study, the rates and corrosion currents of the different soils on two types of electrodes, one copper and the other AISI 304 stainless steel, were approximated by electrochemical techniques such as potentiodynamic curves and electrochemical impedance spectra. Considerably higher speeds were determined for copper-type electrodes when compared to those based on steel. However, from the Nyquist diagrams, it was noted that copper electrodes have better electrical performance than steel ones. The soil with the highest ionic activity turned out to be the sandy loam. The clay loam soil presents a tendency to water retention and this may be the reason for the different behaviour with respect to ionic mobility. The diffusion control in the steel seems to alter the ionic mobility because its corrosion rates proved to be very similar regardless of the type of soil chemistry. In general, corrosion rates fell since tenths of a millimetre every year to

  12. Optimization study of a single-effect water–lithium bromide absorption refrigeration system powered by flat-plate collector in hot regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, A.; Mosa, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A comprehensive analysis for optimizing solar absorption system in hot region. • The most important parameter to be controlled is hot source temperature. • Ensuring appropriate choice of parameters, COP of absorption unit exceeds 0.8. • Results show that solar cooling systems are promising in hot regions. • The research aims to play a vital role to promote the use of renewable energy. - Abstract: This investigation has been carried out to present a comprehensive analysis for optimizing the operation of solar absorption system in hot regions. To optimize performance of the system, the hot source temperature should be controlled in function of incident solar radiation, chilled and cooling water temperatures. With an appropriate control, these external conditions can be monitored to detect and implement the actual optimization conditions. Adopting typical values encountered in hot regions, the overall system performance takes its optimal value at temperatures between 75 and 80 °C. It was found that in designing or selecting solar collector, selective coating type is necessary to produce hot water with potential around 80–90 °C needed to optimize operation of absorption unit. By ensuring an appropriate choice of components temperatures, COP of absorption unit can exceed the value 0.8. Cooling water temperature above 40 °C reduces significantly the performance of the unit which requires, under conditions of extremely high external temperatures, dimensioning and selection of condensers and absorbers that guarantee values less than this limit

  13. Reducing conditions on barium absorption in rice plants cultured in BaSO4-enriched soil doi: 10.4025/actasciagron.v36i1.17539

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Osvaldo Lima Magalhães

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the possible solubilization of barium sulfate in soils under reducing conditions and its effects on barium bioavailability, an Oryza sativa pot trial was established. Increasing barium doses and two redox potential conditions were evaluated. The geochemical fractionation data demonstrated that reducing conditions led to an increase in the levels of more labile forms of barium and a reduction in more stable forms. Furthermore, higher doses of barium were found to have a negative impact on grain production. The highest levels of barium accumulation in the leaves, roots, and grains were observed with the highest barium dose under reducing conditions. These results demonstrate that reducing conditions increased barium bioavailability and absorption by rice plants.

  14. Role of soil micro-organisms in the sorption of radionuclides in organic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parekh, N.R.; Potter, E.D.; Poskitt, J.M.; Dodd, B.A.; Sanchez, A.

    2004-01-01

    Although the fraction of radionuclides linked to soil organic matter and soil microorganisms may be relatively small when compared to the amount bound to the mineral constituents, (mostly irreversibly bound), this fraction is of great importance as it remains readily exchangeable and is thus available for plant uptake. Many studies have measured the uptake of radionuclides by organic soils but the role of soil micro-organisms may have been masked by the presence of even small amounts of clay minerals occurring in these soils. We have carried out a series of experiments using a biologically active, 'mineral-free' organic soil produced under laboratory conditions, to determine the potential of soil micro-organisms to accumulate radionuclides Cs-134 and Sr-85. Biological uptake and release was differentiated from abiotic processes by comparing experimental results with inoculated and non-inoculated sterile organic material. We have investigated the role of different clay minerals, competing potassium and calcium ions, and changes in temperature on the sorption of Cs and Sr isotopes. The results from studies so far show conclusively that living components of soil systems are of primary importance in the uptake of radionuclides in organic material, microorganisms also influence the importance of chemical factors (e.g. adsorption to clay minerals) which may play a secondary role in these highly organic systems. In further experiments we hope to define the precise role of specific soil micro-organisms in these organic systems. (author)

  15. Soil carbon storage in silvopasture and related land-use systems in the brazilian cerrado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonucci, Rafael G; Nair, P K Ramachandran; Nair, Vimala D; Garcia, Rasmo; Bernardino, Fernando S

    2011-01-01

    Silvopastoral management of fast-growing tree plantations is becoming popular in the Brazilian Cerrado (savanna). To understand the influence of such systems on soil carbon (C) storage, we studied C content in three aggregate size classes in six land-use systems (LUS) on Oxisols in Minas Gerais, Brazil. The systems were a native forest, a treeless pasture, 24- and 4-yr-old eucalyptus ( sp.) plantations, and 15- and 4-yr-old silvopastures of fodder grass plus animals under eucalyptus. From each system, replicated soil samples were collected from four depths (0-10, 10-20, 20-50, and 50-100 cm), fractionated into 2000- to 250-, 250- to 53-, and <53-μm size classes representing macroaggregates, microaggregates, and silt + clay, respectively, and their C contents determined. Macroaggregate was the predominant size fraction under all LUS, especially in the surface soil layers of tree-based systems. In general, C concentrations (g kg soil) in the different aggregate size fractions did not vary within the same depth. The soil organic carbon (SOC) stock (Mg C ha) to 1-m depth was highest under pasture compared with other LUS owing to its higher soil bulk density. The soils under all LUS had higher C stock compared with other reported values for managed tropical ecosystems: down to 1 m, total SOC stock values ranged from 461 Mg ha under pasture to 393 Mg ha under old eucalyptus. Considering the possibility for formation and retention of microaggregates within macroggregates in low management-intensive systems such as silvopasture, the macroaggregate dynamics in the soil seem to be a good indicator of its C storage potential. American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America.

  16. Simulation of solar lithium bromide-water absorption cooling system with parabolic trough collector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazloumi, M.; Naghashzadegan, M.; Javaherdeh, K.

    2008-01-01

    Ahwaz is one of the sweltering cities in Iran where an enormous amount of energy is being consumed to cool residential places in a year. The aim of this research is to simulate a solar single effect lithium bromide-water absorption cooling system in Ahwaz. The solar energy is absorbed by a horizontal N-S parabolic trough collector and stored in an insulated thermal storage tank. The system has been designed to supply the cooling load of a typical house where the cooling load peak is about 17.5 kW (5 tons of refrigeration), which occurs in July. A thermodynamic model has been used to simulate the absorption cycle. The working fluid is water, which is pumped directly to the collector. The results showed that the collector mass flow rate has a negligible effect on the minimum required collector area, but it has a significant effect on the optimum capacity of the storage tank. The minimum required collector area was about 57.6 m 2 , which could supply the cooling loads for the sunshine hours of the design day for July. The operation of the system has also been considered after sunset by saving solar energy

  17. Mathematical Model of a Lithium-Bromide/Water Absorption Refrigeration System Equipped with an Adiabatic Absorber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem M. Osta-Omar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to develop a mathematical model for thermodynamic analysis of an absorption refrigeration system equipped with an adiabatic absorber using a lithium-bromide/water (LiBr/water pair as the working fluid. The working temperature of the generator, adiabatic absorber, condenser, evaporator, the cooling capacity of the system, and the ratio of the solution mass flow rate at the circulation pump to that at the solution pump are used as input data. The model evaluates the thermodynamic properties of all state points, the heat transfer in each component, the various mass flow rates, and the coefficient of performance (COP of the cycle. The results are used to investigate the effect of key parameters on the overall performance of the system. For instance, increasing the generator temperatures and decreasing the adiabatic absorber temperatures can increase the COP of the cycle. The results of this mathematical model can be used for designing and sizing new LiBr/water absorption refrigeration systems equipped with an adiabatic absorber or for optimizing existing aforementioned systems.

  18. Experimental analysis of CO2 emissions from agricultural soils subjected to five different tillage systems in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buragienė, Sidona; Šarauskis, Egidijus; Romaneckas, Kęstutis; Sasnauskienė, Jurgita; Masilionytė, Laura; Kriaučiūnienė, Zita

    2015-01-01

    Intensive agricultural production strongly influences the global processes that determine climate change. Thus, tillage can play a very important role in climate change. The intensity of soil carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions, which contribute to the greenhouse effect, can vary depending on the following factors: the tillage system used, meteorological conditions (which vary in different regions of the world), soil properties, plant residue characteristics and other factors. The main purpose of this research was to analyse and assess the effects of autumn tillage systems with different intensities on CO 2 emissions from soils during different seasons and under the climatic conditions of Central Lithuania. The research was conducted at the Experimental Station of Aleksandras Stulginskis University from 2009 to2012; and in 2014. The soils at the experimental site were classified as Eutric Endogleyic Planosol (Drainic). The investigations were conducted using five tillage systems with different intensities, typical of the Baltic Region. Deep conventional ploughing was performed at a depth of 230–250 mm, shallow ploughing was conducted at a depth of 120–150 mm, deep loosening was conducted at depths of 250–270 mm, and shallow loosening was conducted at depths of 120–150 mm. The fifth system was a no-tillage system. Overall, autumn tillage resulted in greater CO 2 emissions from the soil over both short- and long-term periods under the climatic conditions of Central Lithuania, regardless of the tillage system applied. The highest soil CO 2 emissions were observed for the conventional deep ploughing tillage system, and the lowest emissions were observed for the no-tillage system. The meteorological conditions greatly influenced the CO 2 emissions from the soil during the spring. Soil CO 2 emissions were enhanced as precipitation and the air and soil temperatures increased. Long-term investigations regarding the dynamics of CO 2 emissions from soils during the

  19. Estimating soil zinc concentrations using reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weichao; Zhang, Xia

    2017-06-01

    Soil contamination by heavy metals has been an increasingly severe threat to nature environment and human health. Efficiently investigation of contamination status is essential to soil protection and remediation. Visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (VNIRS) has been regarded as an alternative for monitoring soil contamination by heavy metals. Generally, the entire VNIR spectral bands are employed to estimate heavy metal concentration, which lacks interpretability and requires much calculation. In this study, 74 soil samples were collected from Hunan Province, China and their reflectance spectra were used to estimate zinc (Zn) concentration in soil. Organic matter and clay minerals have strong adsorption for Zn in soil. Spectral bands associated with organic matter and clay minerals were used for estimation with genetic algorithm based partial least square regression (GA-PLSR). The entire VNIR spectral bands, the bands associated with organic matter and the bands associated with clay minerals were incorporated as comparisons. Root mean square error of prediction, residual prediction deviation, and coefficient of determination (R2) for the model developed using combined bands of organic matter and clay minerals were 329.65 mg kg-1, 1.96 and 0.73, which is better than 341.88 mg kg-1, 1.89 and 0.71 for the entire VNIR spectral bands, 492.65 mg kg-1, 1.31 and 0.40 for the organic matter, and 430.26 mg kg-1, 1.50 and 0.54 for the clay minerals. Additionally, in consideration of atmospheric water vapor absorption in field spectra measurement, combined bands of organic matter and absorption around 2200 nm were used for estimation and achieved high prediction accuracy with R2 reached 0.640. The results indicate huge potential of soil reflectance spectroscopy in estimating Zn concentrations in soil.

  20. Two-dimensional atom localization via probe absorption in a four-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhi-Ping; Ge Qiang; Ruan Yu-Hua; Yu Ben-Li

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the two-dimensional (2D) atom localization via probe absorption in a coherently driven four-level atomic system by means of a radio-frequency field driving a hyperfine transition. It is found that the detecting probability and precision of 2D atom localization can be significantly improved via adjusting the system parameters. As a result, our scheme may be helpful in laser cooling or the atom nano-lithography via atom localization

  1. Development of methods for remediation of artificial polluted soils and improvement of soils for ecologically clean agricultural production systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogachev, V.; Adrianova, G.; Zaitzev, V.; Kalinin, V.; Kovalenko, E.; Makeev, A.; Malikova, L.; Popov, Yu.; Savenkov, A.; Shnyakina, V.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the research: Development of methods for the remediation of artificial polluted soils and the improvement of polluted lands to ecologically clean agricultural production.The following tasks will be implemented in this project to achieve viable practical solutions: - To determine the priority pollutants, their ecological pathways, and sources of origin. - To form a supervised environmental monitoring data bank throughout the various geo system conditions. - To evaluate the degree of the bio geo system pollution and the influence on the health of the local human populations. - To establish agricultural plant tolerance levels to the priority pollutants. - To calculate the standard concentrations of the priority pollutants for main agricultural plant groups. - To develop a soil remediation methodology incorporating the structural, functional geo system features. - To establish a territory zone division methodology in consideration of the degree of component pollution, plant tolerance to pollutants, plant production conditions, and human health. - Scientific grounding of the soil remediation proposals and agricultural plant material introductions with soil pollution levels and relative plant tolerances to pollutants. Technological Means, Methods, and Approaches Final proposed solutions will be based upon geo system and ecosystem approaches and methodologies. The complex ecological valuation methods of the polluted territories will be used in this investigation. Also, laboratory culture in vitro, application work, and multi-factor field experiments will be conducted. The results will be statistically analyzed using appropriate methods. Expected Results Complex biogeochemical artificial province assessment according to primary pollutant concentrations. Development of agricultural plant tolerance levels relative to the priority pollutants. Assessment of newly introduced plant materials that may possess variable levels of pollution tolerance. Remediation

  2. Cropping system impact on soil quality determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. VESTBERG

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide interest in soil quality evaluation has increased rapidly throughout the past decade, prompting us to evaluate the long-term impact of four cropping systems on several biological, chemical and physical determinants of soil quality. We hypothesized that after 17 years several of the determinants would show significant differences between conventional cereal and low input/organic rotations. Four crop rotations were imposed on a silt soil from 1982 through 1999. Rotation A was a conventionally managed cereal rotation that received 100% of the recommended mineral fertilizer each year. Rotation B was also managed conventionally from 1982 until 1993, although it received only 50% of the recommended mineral fertilizer. From 1994 through 1999, rotation B was managed as an organic rotation. Rotations C and D were low-input rotations with plant residues returned either untreated (Cor composted (Dfrom 1982 until 1994.From 1994 through 1999,they were also anaged organically. Significant decreases in extractable phosphorus (Pand potassium were observed in rotations C and D compared with rotation A, presumably because their yearly nutrient inputs were somewhat lower. The amount of soil organic carbon (Corg, soil water holding capacity, the numbers and biomass of earthworms and the microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen were or tended to be higher in low input/organic than in conventionally managed plots. These effects may be in connection with the slightly increased levels of Corg in soil of the organic rotations. Activities of twelve enzymes were strongly affected by sampling time (early-versus late-summer, but much less by long-term management. Litter decomposition, numbers of soil nematodes, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AMfungal diversity,AM spore density and AM functioning were little affected by rotation. However,AM spore density correlated positively with the high amounts of extractable calcium and P which were a result from excessive liming applied

  3. Physical separations soil washing system cold test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, J.P.

    1993-07-28

    This test summary describes the objectives, methodology, and results of a physical separations soil-washing system setup and shakedown test using uncontaminated soil. The test is being conducted in preparation for a treatability test to be conducted in the North Pond of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. It will be used to assess the feasibility of using a physical separations process to reduce the volume of contaminated soils in the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. The test is described in DOE-RL (1993). The setup test was conducted at an uncontrolled area located approximately 3.2 km northwest of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. The material processed was free of contamination. The physical separation equipment to be used in the test was transferred to the US Department of Energy (DOE) by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory. On May 13, 1993, soil-washing equipment was moved to the cold test location. Design assistance and recommendation for operation was provided by the EPA.

  4. Soil loss estimation using geographic information system in enfraz watershed for soil conservation planning in highlands of Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizachew Tiruneh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Accelerated soil erosion is a worldwide problem because of its economic and environmental impacts. Enfraz watershed is one of the most erosion-prone watersheds in the highlands of Ethiopia, which received little attention. This study was, therefore, carried out to spatially predict the soil loss rate of the watershed with a Geographic Information System (GIS and Remote Sensing (RS. Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE adapted to Ethiopian conditions was used to estimate potential soil losses by utilizing information on rainfall erosivity (R using interpolation of rainfall data, soil erodibility (K using soil map, vegetation cover (C using satellite images, topography (LS using Digital Elevation Model (DEM and conservation practices (P using satellite images. Based on the analysis, about 92.31% (5914.34 ha of the watershed was categorized none to slight class which under soil loss tolerance (SLT values ranging from 5 to 11 tons ha-1 year-1. The remaining 7.68% (492.21 ha of land was classified under moderate to high class about several times the maximum tolerable soil loss. The total and an average amount of soil loss estimated by RUSLE from the watershed was 30,836.41 ton year-1 and 4.81 tons ha-1year-1, respectively.

  5. Impact of mine tailings on surrounding soils: Case

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    H. ABDURAHMAN

    metals concentration was done by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). ... its effects causing a progressive pollution of soil with heavy metal emissions in ... MATERIALS AND METHODS ..... Validation of avoidance assays for the screening.

  6. The redshift number density evolution of Mg II absorption systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhi-Fu

    2013-01-01

    We make use of the recent large sample of 17 042 Mg II absorption systems from Quider et al. to analyze the evolution of the redshift number density. Regardless of the strength of the absorption line, we find that the evolution of the redshift number density can be clearly distinguished into three different phases. In the intermediate redshift epoch (0.6 ≲ z ≲ 1.6), the evolution of the redshift number density is consistent with the non-evolution curve, however, the non-evolution curve over-predicts the values of the redshift number density in the early (z ≲ 0.6) and late (z ≳ 1.6) epochs. Based on the invariant cross-section of the absorber, the lack of evolution in the redshift number density compared to the non-evolution curve implies the galaxy number density does not evolve during the middle epoch. The flat evolution of the redshift number density tends to correspond to a shallow evolution in the galaxy merger rate during the late epoch, and the steep decrease of the redshift number density might be ascribed to the small mass of halos during the early epoch.

  7. Soil cover by natural trees in agroforestry systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Ambrona, C. G. H.; Almoguera Millán, C.; Tarquis Alfonso, A.

    2009-04-01

    The dehesa is common agroforestry system in the Iberian Peninsula. These open oak parklands with silvo-pastoral use cover about two million hectares. Traditionally annual pastures have been grazed by cows, sheep and also goats while acorns feed Iberian pig diet. Evergreen oak (Quercus ilex L.) has other uses as fuelwood collection and folder after tree pruning. The hypothesis of this work is that tree density and canopy depend on soil types. We using the spanish GIS called SIGPAC to download the images of dehesa in areas with different soil types. True colour images were restoring to a binary code, previously canopy colour range was selected. Soil cover by tree canopy was calculated and number of trees. Processing result was comparable to real data. With these data we have applied a dynamic simulation model Dehesa to determine evergreen oak acorn and annual pasture production. The model Dehesa is divided into five submodels: Climate, Soil, Evergreen oak, Pasture and Grazing. The first three require the inputs: (i) daily weather data (maximum and minimum temperatures, precipitation and solar radiation); (ii) the soil input parameters for three horizons (thickness, field capacity, permanent wilting point, and bulk density); and (iii) the tree characterization of the dehesa (tree density, canopy diameter and height, and diameter of the trunk). The influence of tree on pasture potential production is inversely proportional to the canopy cover. Acorn production increase with tree canopy cover until stabilizing itself, and will decrease if density becomes too high (more than 80% soil tree cover) at that point there is competition between the trees. Main driving force for dehesa productivity is soil type for pasture, and tree cover for acorn production. Highest pasture productivity was obtained on soil Dystric Planosol (Alfisol), Dystric Cambisol and Chromo-calcic-luvisol, these soils only cover 22.4% of southwest of the Iberian peninssula. Lowest productivity was

  8. Soil characterization in contrasting cropping systems under the fast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The contrasting production systems under study were communal area, A2 (large scale resettlement) and A1 (small scale resettlement).All these systems are in Manicaland province, Zimbabwe. The A1 and A2 production systems were brought about during the 2000 land reform programme. The soil samples were collected ...

  9. New waste heat district heating system with combined heat and power based on absorption heat exchange cycle in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Fangtian; Fu Lin; Zhang Shigang; Sun Jian

    2012-01-01

    A new waste heat district heating system with combined heat and power based on absorption heat exchange cycle (DHAC) was developed to increase the heating capacity of combined heat and power (CHP) through waste heat recovery, and enhance heat transmission capacity of the existing primary side district heating network through decreasing return water temperature by new type absorption heat exchanger (AHE). The DHAC system and a conventional district heating system based on CHP (CDH) were analyzed in terms of both thermodynamics and economics. Compared to CDH, the DHAC increased heating capacity by 31% and increased heat transmission capacity of the existing primary side district heating network by 75%. The results showed that the exergetic efficiency of DHAC was 10.41% higher and the product exergy monetary cost was 36.6¥/GJ less than a CHD. DHAC is an effective way to increase thermal utilization factor of CHP, and to reduce district heating cost. - Highlights: ► Absorption heat pumps are used to recover waste heat in CHP. ► Absorption heat exchanger can reduce exergy loss in the heat transfer process. ► New waste heat heating system (DHAC) can increase heating capacity of CHP by 31%. ► DHAC can enhance heat transmission capacity of the primary pipe network by 75%. ► DHAC system has the higher exergetic efficiency and the better economic benefit.

  10. Carbon Storage in Soil Size Fractions Under Two Cacao Agroforestry Systems in Bahia, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama-Rodrigues, Emanuela F.; Ramachandran Nair, P. K.; Nair, Vimala D.; Gama-Rodrigues, Antonio C.; Baligar, Virupax C.; Machado, Regina C. R.

    2010-02-01

    Shaded perennial agroforestry systems contain relatively high quantities of soil carbon (C) resulting from continuous deposition of plant residues; however, the extent to which the C is sequestered in soil will depend on the extent of physical protection of soil organic C (SOC). The main objective of this study was to characterize SOC storage in relation to soil fraction-size classes in cacao ( Theobroma cacao L.) agroforestry systems (AFSs). Two shaded cacao systems and an adjacent natural forest in reddish-yellow Oxisols in Bahia, Brazil were selected. Soil samples were collected from four depth classes to 1 m depth and separated by wet-sieving into three fraction-size classes (>250 μm, 250-53 μm, and cacao AFSs, the C contained in the macroaggregate fraction might become stabilized in the soil. The study shows the role of cacao AFSs in mitigating greenhouse gas (GHG) emission through accumulation and retention of high amounts of organic C in the soils and suggests the potential benefit of this environmental service to the nearly 6 million cacao farmers worldwide.

  11. Integrated water-crop-soil-management system for evaluating the quality of irrigation water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pla-Sentis, I.

    1983-01-01

    The authors make use of an independent balance of the salts and ions present in the water available for irrigation, based on the residence times in the soil solution that are allowed by solubility limits and drainage conditions, to develop an efficient system for evaluating the quality of such water which combines the factors: water, crop, soil and management. The system is based on the principle that such quality depends not only on the concentration and composition of the salts dissolved in the water, but also on existing possibilities and limitations in using and managing it in respect of the soil and crops, with allowance for the crop's tolerance of salinity, drainage conditions and hydrological properties of the soils, climate and current or potential practices for the management of the irrigation. If this system is used to quantify approximately the time behaviour of the concentration and composition of the salts in the soil solution, it is possible not only to predict the effects on soil, crops and drainage water, but also to evaluate the various combinations of irrigation water, soil, crops and management and to select the most suitable. It is also useful for fairly accurately diagnosing current problems of salinity and for identifying alternatives and possibilities for reclamation. Examples of its use for these purposes in Venezuela are presented with particular reference to the diagnosis of the present and future development of ''salino-sodic'' and ''sodic'' soils by means of low-salt irrigation water spread over agricultural soils with very poor drainage in a sub-humid or semi-arid tropical climate. The authors also describe the use of radiation techniques for gaining an understanding of the relations between the factors making up the system and for improving the quantitative evaluations required to diagnose problems and to select the best management methods for the available irrigation water. (author)

  12. Experimental investigation on an ammonia-water-lithium bromide absorption refrigeration system without solution pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Tiehui; Wu Yuyuan; Yu Zhiqiang; Zhao Haichen; Wu Honglin

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → An absorption refrigeration system with ternary solution of NH 3 -H 2 O-LiBr was set up. → Performance of the NH 3 -H 2 O-LiBr system without solution pump was firstly tested. → Generator pressure in NH 3 -H 2 O-LiBr system was lower than the one in NH 3 -H 2 O system. → The COP of the NH 3 -H 2 O-LiBr system was 51.89% larger than the NH 3 -H 2 O binary system. → The optimum mass fraction of LiBr of about 23% led to the largest COP of 0.401. -- Abstract: Experimental researches were carried out on a novel ammonia-water-lithium bromide ternary solution absorption refrigeration and air-conditioning system without solution pump and distillation equipments. The experiments were conducted by using three kinds of NH 3 -H 2 O binary solution and 17 kinds of ternary solution with difference in mass fraction of NH 3 and LiBr. The experimental results showed that the vapor pressure of the generator in the system would be lower than that of the generator in an ammonia-water absorption system. In above two situations the same ammonia mass fraction and the same solution temperature were kept. The amplitude of vapor pressure decrease of the system generator would be larger with the increase of the mass fraction of LiBr. The maximum amplitude of decrease would be of 50%. With the increase of the mass fraction of LiBr, the coefficient of performance (COP) of the system would be increased initially, and then decreased later when the mass fraction of LiBr exceeded a certain value. This value was about 23% for the solution with ammonia mass fraction of 50% and 55%, and about 30% for the solution with ammonia mass fraction of 60%. Compared with the ammonia-water system, the COP of the ternary solution system with the same mass fraction of ammonia would increase up to 30%. With the ammonia mass fraction of 60% and LiBr mass fraction of 30% applied, the COP of the ternary solution system was increased up to 0.401. It was 51.89% higher than that when binary

  13. Studies estimating the dermal bioavailability of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons from manufactured plant tar-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, T.A.; Krueger, A.J.; Taylor, B.B.; Mauro, D.M.; Goldstein, L.S.

    1998-01-01

    In vitro percutaneous absorption studies were performed with contaminated soils or organic extracts of contaminated soils collected at manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. The MGP tar contaminated soils were found to contain a group of targeted polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) at levels ranging from 10 to 2400 mg/kg. The soil extracts contained target PAH at levels ranging from 12 000 - 34 000 mg/kg. Dermal penetration rates of target PAH from the MGP tar-contaminated soils/soil extracts were determined experimentally through human skin using 3 H-benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) as a surrogate. Results from three MGP sites showed reductions of 2-3 orders of magnitude in PAH absorption through human skin from the most contaminated soils in comparison to the soil extracts. Reduction in PAH penetration can be attributed to PAH concentration and (soil) matrix properties. PAH dermal flux values are used to determine site-specific dermally absorbed dose (DAD) and chronic daily intake (CDI) which are essential terms required to estimate risk associated with human exposure to MGP tar and MGP tar-contaminated soils. 21 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Practical improvements in soil redox potential (Eh) measurement for characterisation of soil properties. Application for comparison of conventional and conservation agriculture cropping systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husson, Olivier, E-mail: Olivier.husson@cirad.fr [CIRAD/PERSYST/UPR 115 AIDA and AfricaRice Centre, 01 BP 2031 Cotonou (Benin); Husson, Benoit, E-mail: bhusson@ideeaquaculture.com [IDEEAQUACULTURE, Parc Euromédecine 2, 39 Rue Jean Giroux, 34080 Montpellier (France); Brunet, Alexandre, E-mail: brunet.alexandre@outlook.com [CIRAD/US 49 Analyse, Avenue Agropolis, TA B-49/01, 34398 Montpellier Cedex (France); Babre, Daniel, E-mail: Daniel.babre@cirad.fr [CIRAD/US 49 Analyse, Avenue Agropolis, TA B-49/01, 34398 Montpellier Cedex (France); Alary, Karine, E-mail: Karine.alary@cirad.fr [CIRAD/US 49 Analyse, Avenue Agropolis, TA B-49/01, 34398 Montpellier Cedex (France); Sarthou, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: sarthou@ensat.fr [ENSAT/INRA/INP UMR AGIR. BP 52627, Chemin de Borde Rouge, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan Cedex (France); Charpentier, Hubert, E-mail: Charpentier.hub@wanadoo.fr [La Boisfarderie, Brives 36100 (France); Durand, Michel, E-mail: earldeslacs@orange.fr [Le Cazals, Castanet 81 150 (France); Benada, Jaroslav, E-mail: benada@vukrom.cz [Agrotest fyto, Kromeriz Institute, Havlíckova 2787, 76701 Kromeriz (Czech Republic); Henry, Marc, E-mail: henry@unistra.fr [UMR CNRS/UdS 7140, Université de Strasbourg, Institut Le Bel, 4, rue Blaise Pascal, CS 90032, Strasbourg 67081 (France)

    2016-02-04

    The soil redox potential (Eh) can provide essential information to characterise soil conditions. In practice, however, numerous problems may arise regarding: (i) Eh determination in soils, especially aerobic soils, e.g. variations in the instrumentation and methodology for Eh measurement, high spatial and temporal Eh variability in soils, irreversibility of the redox reaction at the surface electrode, chemical disequilibrium; and (ii) measurement interpretation. This study aimed at developing a standardised method for redox potential measurement in soils, in order to use Eh as a soil quality indicator. This paper presents practical improvements in soil Eh measurement, especially regarding the control of electromagnetic perturbations, electrode choice and preparation, soil sample preparation (drying procedure) and soil:water extraction rate. The repeatability and reproducibility of the measurement method developed are highlighted. The use of Eh corrected at pH7, pe+pH or rH{sub 2}, which are equivalent notions, is proposed to facilitate interpretation of the results. The application of this Eh measurement method allows characterisation of soil conditions with sufficient repeatability, reproducibility and accuracy to demonstrate that conservation agriculture systems positively alter the protonic and electronic balance of soil as compared to conventional systems. - Highlights: • Electromagnetic fields can dramatically perturb soil Eh measurement. • Our method overcomes the main difficulties in soil Eh measurement. • Accurate and reproducible measurement of mean soil Eh are achieved. • Eh{sub pH7}, pe+pH and rH{sub 2} are equivalent notions characterising electron activity. • Agricultural practices alter soil protonic and electronic characteristics.

  15. Determination of heavy metals in soils from dump site of tanneries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heavy metals were determined in soil samples at the dump site, Challawa town, Karfi Irrigation site and farmlands near the dump site by flame Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). The results showed that soil at the dump site contains significant amount of toxic elements. Hence remediation processes were ...

  16. Soil Aggregation, Organic Carbon Concentration, and Soil Bulk Density As Affected by Cover Crop Species in a No-Tillage System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Stephan Nascente

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil aggregation and the distribution of total organic carbon (TOC may be affected by soil tillage and cover crops. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of crop rotation with cover crops on soil aggregation, TOC concentration in the soil aggregate fractions, and soil bulk density under a no-tillage system (NTS and conventional tillage system (CTS, one plowing and two disking. This was a three-year study with cover crop/rice/cover crop/rice rotations in the Brazilian Cerrado. A randomized block experimental design with six treatments and three replications was used. The cover crops (treatments were: fallow, Panicum maximum, Brachiaria ruziziensis, Brachiaria brizantha, and millet (Pennisetum glaucum. An additional treatment, fallow plus CTS, was included as a control. Soil samples were collected at the depths of 0.00-0.05 m, 0.05-0.10 m, and 0.10-0.20 m after the second rice harvest. The treatments under the NTS led to greater stability in the soil aggregates (ranging from 86.33 to 95.37 % than fallow plus CTS (ranging from 74.62 to 85.94 %. Fallow plus CTS showed the highest number of aggregates smaller than 2 mm. The cover crops affected soil bulk density differently, and the millet treatment in the NTS had the lowest values. The cover crops without incorporation provided the greatest accumulation of TOC in the soil surface layers. The TOC concentration was positively correlated with the aggregate stability index in all layers and negatively correlated with bulk density in the 0.00-0.10 m layer.

  17. Effect of resin system on the mechanical properties and water absorption of kenaf fibre reinforced laminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassmann, S.; Paskaramoorthy, R.; Reid, R.G.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the mechanical and water absorption properties of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) fibre reinforced laminates made of three different resin systems. The use of different resin systems is considered so that potentially complex and expensive fibre treatments are avoided. The resin systems used include a polyester, a vinyl ester and an epoxy. Laminates of 15%, 22.5% and 30% fibre volume fraction were manufactured by resin transfer moulding. The laminates were tested for strength and modulus under tensile and flexural loading. Additionally, tests were carried out on laminates to determine the impact energy, impact strength and water absorption. The results revealed that properties were affected in markedly different ways by the resin system and the fibre volume fraction. Polyester laminates showed good modulus and impact properties, epoxy laminates displayed good strength values and vinyl ester laminates exhibited good water absorption characteristics. Scanning electron microscope studies show that epoxy laminates fail by fibre fracture, polyester laminates by fibre pull-out and vinyl ester laminates by a combination of the two. A comparison between kenaf and glass laminates revealed that the specific tensile and flexural moduli of both laminates are comparable at the volume fraction of 15%. However, glass laminates have much better specific properties than the kenaf laminates at high fibre volume fractions for all three resins used.

  18. An indigenous soil classification system for Bellona Island - a raised atoll in the Solomon Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, Bo; Breuning-Madsen, Henrik; Bruun, Thilde Bech

    2010-01-01

    One of the challenges of evaluating existing traditional farming systems is to combine local knowledge and modern scientific methods and terminology. This requires an evaluation of indigenous soil classification in modern terms. This paper focuses on an indigenous soil classification system...... perceive the same four out of seven soil types as highly useful for cultivation and rank these soil types similarly according to their suitability for different crops such as yam, watermelon, cassava and sweet potato. It is concluded that the indigenous soil classification is in line with the soil...... production potential and useful for land evaluation on Bellona....

  19. Effects of soil stripping and dressing for decontamination of radioactive materials on soil fertility of agricultural land

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshino, Namiko; Takahashi, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Saitou, Kunihito

    2015-01-01

    Farms that were highly contaminated with radioactive materials following the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident were decontaminated by removing topsoil and subsequently dressing with fresh soil. We investigated the chemical properties of soils following such decontamination on farms in Iitate village, Fukushima. The nitrogen content of dressed soil was considerably lower than that of the subsoil that was not stripped for decontamination, as a result of which the amount of dressed soil greatly affected the soil fertility of decontaminated farms. The potassium (K) content of soil differs markedly depending on the type of soil dressing material used; accordingly, the type of soil dressing material affected the soil K content on decontaminated farms. On most of the decontaminated farms where sandy soils were used as the soil dressing material, soil exchangeable K contents were less than 25 mg K_2O/100 g, which is the criterion value for inhibiting cesium absorption in rice and soybean cultivation. However, even in the soil dressing material from agricultural land, soil K content after soil dressing was generally lower than that before soil dressing. During fallow management and at the restart of cultivation on decontaminated farms, it is important to know in advance the chemical properties of soil and take the necessary measures based on this information. (author)

  20. Use of a parallel artificial membrane system to evaluate passive absorption and elimination in small fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jung-Hwan; Katz, Lynn E; Liljestrand, Howard M

    2006-12-01

    A parallel artificial lipid membrane system was developed to mimic passive mass transfer of hydrophobic organic chemicals in fish. In this physical model system, a membrane filter-supported lipid bilayer separates two aqueous phases that represent the external and internal aqueous environments of fish. To predict bioconcentration kinetics in small fish with this system, literature absorption and elimination rates were analyzed with an allometric diffusion model to quantify the mass transfer resistances in the aqueous and lipid phases of fish. The effect of the aqueous phase mass transfer resistance was controlled by adjusting stirring intensity to mimic bioconcentration rates in small fish. Twenty-three simple aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model compounds for purposes of evaluation. For most of the selected chemicals, literature absorption/elimination rates fall into the range predicted from measured membrane permeabilities and elimination rates of the selected chemicals determined by the diffusion model system.

  1. Development of soil taxation and soil classification as furthered by the Austrian Soil Science Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Soil taxation and soil classification are important drivers of soil science in Austria. However, the tasks are quite different: whereas soil taxation aims at the evaluation of the productivity potential of the soil, soil classification focusses on the natural development and - especially nowadays - on functionality of the soil. Since the foundation of the Austrian Soil Science Society (ASSS), representatives both directions of the description of the soil have been involved in the common actions of the society. In the first years it was a main target to improve and standardize field descriptions of the soil. Although both systems differ in the general layout, the experts should comply with identical approaches. According to this work, a lot of effort has been put into the standardization of the soil classification system, thus ensuring a common basis. The development, state of the art and further development of both classification and taxation systems initiated and carried out by the ASSS will be shown.

  2. Development of a combined soil-wash/in-furnace vitrification system for soil remediation at DOE sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pegg, I.L.; Guo, Y.; Lahoda, E.J.; Lai, Shan-Tao; Muller, I.S.; Ruller, J.; Grant, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    This report addresses research and development of technologies for treatment of radioactive and hazardous waste streams at DOE sites. Weldon Spring raffinate sludges were used in a direct vitrification study to investigate their use as fluxing agents in glass formulations when blended with site soil. Storm sewer sediments from the Oak Ridge, TN, Y-12 facility were used for soil washing followed by vitrification of the concentrates. Both waste streams were extensively characterized. Testing showed that both mercury and uranium could be removed from the Y-12 soil by chemical extraction resulting in an 80% volume reduction. Thermal desorption was used on the contaminant-enriched minority fraction to separate the mercury from the uranium. Vitrification tests demonstrated that high waste loading glasses could be produced from the radioactive stream and from the Weldon Spring wastes which showed very good leach resistance, and viscosities and electrical conductivities in the range suitable for joule-heated ceramic melter (JHCM) processing. The conceptual process described combines soil washing, thermal desorption, and vitrification to produce clean soil (about 90% of the input waste stream), non-radioactive mercury, and a glass wasteform; the estimated processing costs for that system are about $260--$400/yd 3 . Results from continuous melter tests performed using Duratek's advanced JHCM (Duramelter) system are also presented. Since life cycle cost estimates are driven largely by volume reduction considerations, the large volume reductions possible with these multi-technology, blended waste stream approaches can produce a more leach resistant wasteform at a lower overall cost than alternative technologies such as cementation

  3. Experimental assessment of an absorption cooling system utilizing a falling film absorber and generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domínguez-Inzunza, L.A.; Hernández-Magallanes, J.A.; Soto, P.; Jiménez, C.; Gutiérrez-Urueta, G.; Rivera, W.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new prototype of an absorption cooling system using NH_3/LiNO_3 was developed. • Falling films shell and tubes heat exchangers were used as absorber and generator. • Evaporator temperatures as low as 4 °C were achieved. • The COP varied between 0.27 and 0.62 depending on the system temperatures. • A flow recirculation in the absorber was implemented showing an increase in COP. - Abstract: This study presents the results of the evaluation of an ammonia/lithium nitrate absorption cooling system. The generator and the absorber are shell and tubes falling film heat exchangers while the rest of the components are compact plate heat exchangers. A parametric study was carried out in order to determine the coefficients of performance and cooling capacities at different operating conditions. Also, an analysis was carried out to determine the influence of the absorber solution recirculation on the system performance. The generator temperatures varied between 80 °C and 100 °C, while the cooling water temperatures varied from 20 °C to 34 °C. Cooling capacities up to 4.5 kW and evaporator temperatures as low as 4 °C were achieved with the system. The internal coefficients of performance varied between 0.3 and 0.62 depending on the system operating temperatures. The system also showed good stability and repeatability.

  4. The fate of arsenic in soil-plant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Jiménez, Eduardo; Esteban, Elvira; Peñalosa, Jesús M

    2012-01-01

    excluders), and some plants are useful for soil reclamation and in sustainable agriculture, The status of current scientific knowledge allows us to manage As contamination in the soil-plant system and to mitigate arsenic's effects. Phytoremediation is an emerging technology suitable for reclaiming As-contaminated soils and waters. Phytoextraction has been used to clean As-contaminated soils, although its applicability has not yet reached maturity. Phytostabilization has been employed to reduce environmental risk by confining As as an inert form in soils and has shown success in both laboratory experiments and in field trials. Phytofiltration has been used to treat As-enriched waters. Such treatment removes As when it is accumulated in plants grown in or on water. In agricultural food production, appropriate soil management and plant variety/species selection can minimize As-associated human dis- eases and the transfer of As within the food chain. Selecting suitable plants for use on As-contaminated soils may also enhance alternative land use, such as for energy or raw material production.

  5. Tillage system affects microbiological properties of soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, A.; de Santiago, A.; Avilés, M.; Perea, F.

    2012-04-01

    Shannon (H') and Gini (1-G) diversity index of microbial communities were determined in soil samples (0-10 cm depth) taken in autumn 2009. All the enzymatic activities and the biomass estimated by viable cell counting were significantly higher under no-till than under conventional tillage. However, only fluorescents pseudomonas population was increased under no-till, meanwhile oligotrophic bacteria and actinomycetes populations were higher with conventional tillage than with no-till. Overall, there was a higher use all the group of carbon sources used in the BiologR test with conventional tillage than with no-till, by except amines and phenols which showed non-significant differences. This reveals different physiological profiles in the microbial communities under both tillage systems. The Gini diversity was significantly lower with no-till than with conventional tillage. It can be concluded that no-till increases microbial biomass in soil and subsequently enzymatic activities likely ascribed to an increased organic matter content. Under low availability of hydrocarbon sources in soil due to conventional tillage, which promotes a decrease in the organic matter content of the soil, populations of oligotrophods and the diversity of microbial communities are increased. Under these conditions, there must not be dominant carbon sources promoting the selection of microorganisms with a given physiological profile. The reduced hydrocarbon availability and the higher diversity contribute to explain the increased use of carbon sources used in Biolog with conventional tillage than with no-till.

  6. Study of radioactive sr and Cs in soil and soil /plant system at Inshas region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eissa, H.S.M.

    2008-01-01

    The radioactive fallout is considered one of the most major environmental problems that threats public health. The work presented in this thesis is carried out to investigate the level of radioactivity in different environmental samples of soils and vegetations collected from different locations around the NRC at Inshas area and the area nearby (about 30 km radius). Six different locations: Inshas, Shebeen, Abu-Zaabal, Al-Oboor in addition to two sites in the nuclear research center (old reactor and protection department sites) were chosen for the collection of the soil and plant samples. Most typical egyptian soils (sandy, sandyloam, clayey)from three different places (Al-Oboor, Abu-Zaabal, and Shebeen El-Kanatter) were selected for the experiments carried out under laboratory conditions. The plants investigated were grass, old trees and wheat. Cs 137 and Sr 90 were chosen to represent the most important long-lived radionuclides considering the human health, since these nuclides can enter human body via food chain and increase the radiation burden for many years. The following points are considered in this work: 1- Natural radionuclides concentration in different environmental samples of soil and plant especially (grasses and leaves of old trees) were determined using high resolution gamma-spectroscopic system (hyper-pure germanium detector). 2-Two groups of elements have been determined directly in two plant samples from each location (one grass, and the other old trees) together with their corresponding soils.3- Transfer factors (often used to describe the uptake of the radioisotope from soil to plant)of the log-lived radionuclides 137 Cs and 90 from soil to the wheat plant have been studied by radiotracer experiments .4- The sorption behavior of Cs and Sr radionuclides by the different soil types was investigated kinetically using batch techniques.

  7. Correlation of the Rock Mass Rating (RMR) System with the Unified Soil Classification System (USCS): Introduction of the Weak Rock Mass Rating System (W-RMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Sean N.; Kallu, Raj R.; Barnard, Chase K.

    2016-11-01

    Underground gold mines in Nevada are exploiting increasingly deeper ore bodies comprised of weak to very weak rock masses. The Rock Mass Rating (RMR) classification system is widely used at underground gold mines in Nevada and is applicable in fair to good-quality rock masses, but is difficult to apply and loses reliability in very weak rock mass to soil-like material. Because very weak rock masses are transition materials that border engineering rock mass and soil classification systems, soil classification may sometimes be easier and more appropriate to provide insight into material behavior and properties. The Unified Soil Classification System (USCS) is the most likely choice for the classification of very weak rock mass to soil-like material because of its accepted use in tunnel engineering projects and its ability to predict soil-like material behavior underground. A correlation between the RMR and USCS systems was developed by comparing underground geotechnical RMR mapping to laboratory testing of bulk samples from the same locations, thereby assigning a numeric RMR value to the USCS classification that can be used in spreadsheet calculations and geostatistical analyses. The geotechnical classification system presented in this paper including a USCS-RMR correlation, RMR rating equations, and the Geo-Pick Strike Index is collectively introduced as the Weak Rock Mass Rating System (W-RMR). It is the authors' hope that this system will aid in the classification of weak rock masses and more usable design tools based on the RMR system. More broadly, the RMR-USCS correlation and the W-RMR system help define the transition between engineering soil and rock mass classification systems and may provide insight for geotechnical design in very weak rock masses.

  8. [Effects of simulated acid rain on respiration rate of cropland system with different soil pH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xue-zhu; Zhang, Gao-chuan; Li, Hui

    2009-10-15

    To evaluate the effects of acid rain on the respiration rate of cropland system, an outdoor pot experiment was conducted with paddy soils of pH 5.48 (S1), pH 6.70 (S1) and pH 8.18 (S3) during the 2005-2007 wheat-growing seasons. The cropland system was exposed to acid rain by spraying the wheat foliage and irrigating the soil with simulated rainwater of T1 (pH 6.0), T2 (pH 6.0, ionic concentration was twice as rainwater T1), and T3 (pH 4.4, ionic concentration was twice as rainwater T1), respectively. The static opaque chamber-gas chromatograph method was used to measure CO2 fluxes from cropland system. The results showed that acid rain affected the respiration rate of cropland system through crop plant, and the cropland system could adapt to acid rain. Acid rainwater significantly increased the average respiration rate in alkaline soil (S3) cropland system, while it had no significant effects on the average respiration rate in neutral soil (S2) and acidic soil (S1) cropland systems. During 2005-2006, after the alkaline soil cropland system was treated with rainwater T3, the average respiration rate was 23.6% and 27.6% higher than that of alkaline soil cropland system treated with rainwater T1 and T2, respectively. During March to April, the respiration rate was enhanced with the increase of rainwater ionic concentration, while it was dropped with the decrease of rainwater pH value in acidic soil cropland system. It was demonstrated that soil pH and crop plant played important roles on the respiration rate of cropland system.

  9. Influence of soil composition in the determination of chromium by atomic absorption spectrometry with flame air / acetylene; Influencia de la composicion del suelo en la determinacion de cromo por espectrometria de absorcion atomica con llama aire/acetileno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran Sosa, Ibis; Granda Valdes, Mayra [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de La Habana, La Habana (Cuba); Pomares Alfonso, Mario Simeon, E-mail: mpomares@imre.oc.uh.cu [Instituto de Ciencias y Tecnologia de Materiales, Universidad de La Habana, La Habana (Cuba)

    2014-07-01

    The Air-acetylene Flame Atomic Absorption determination of chromium is a complex task, being strongly influenced by sample composition and instrumental conditions. The objective of this work was to study the influence of Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, and Na on the absorption of chromium in the air-acetylene flame, both separately and combined in solution, when acetylene flow and burner height vary. Dissolutions of the mixtures simulated the composition of four soils from the Quibu River Basin in Havana, Cuba. Chromium absorption first increased and then decreased with increment of acetylene flow for shorter burner heights (∼ 2-4 mm); while a continuous increase was observed for larger heights (> 4 mm). This behavior was the same in the presence and absence of interfering chemical element, mentioned above. On the other hand, the dependence of the magnitude of the interference with acetylene flow and burner height was complex and dependent on the interfering element, particularly at larger heights where the behavior of Al was remarkably different. The interference of the four mixtures of Al, Ca, K, Fe, Mg and Na decreased in comparison to individual interfering effects and was less dependent on acetylene flow and burner height. Finally, a significant reduction of interference on chromium determination in soil samples was achieved by an adequate selection of acetylene flow and burner height.