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Sample records for sodium silicate stabilization

  1. Influence of the type of aqueous sodium silicate on the stabilization and rheology of kaolin clay suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izak, Piotr; Ogłaza, Longin; Mozgawa, Włodzimierz; Mastalska-Popławska, Joanna; Stempkowska, Agata

    2018-05-01

    To avoid agglomeration and sedimentation of grains, ceramic slurries should be modified by stabilizers in order to increase the electrostatic interactions between the dispersed particles. In this study we present the spectral analysis of aqueous sodium silicates obtained by different synthesis methods and their influence on the rheological properties of kaolin based slurries. Infrared and Raman spectra can be used to describe the structure of silicate structural units present in aqueous sodium silicates. It was confirmed that the best stabilization results possess aqueous sodium silicates of the silicate moduli of about 2 and the optimal concentration of the used fluidizer is 0.3 wt% to the kaolin clay dry mass. One of the most important conclusions is that the synthesis method of the fluidizer has no significant effect on its stabilization properties but used medium does create adequate stabilization mechanism depending on the silicate structures present in the sodium silicate solution.

  2. Final report on the safety assessment of potassium silicate, sodium metasilicate, and sodium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Amy R

    2005-01-01

    Potassium Silicate, Sodium Metasilicate, and Sodium Silicate combine metal cations with silica to form inorganic salts used as corrosion inhibitors in cosmetics. Sodium Metasilicate also functions as a chelating agent and Sodium Silicate as a buffering and pH adjuster. Sodium Metasilicate is currently used in 168 formulations at concentrations ranging from 13% to 18%. Sodium Silicate is currently used in 24 formulations at concentrations ranging from 0.3% to 55%. Potassium Silicate and Sodium Silicate have been reported as being used in industrial cleaners and detergents. Sodium Metasilicate is a GRAS (generally regarded as safe) food ingredient. Aqueous solutions of Sodium Silicate species are a part of a chemical continuum of silicates based on an equilibrium of alkali, water, and silica. pH determines the solubility of silica and, together with concentration, determines the degree of polymerization. Sodium Silicate administered orally is readily absorbed from the alimentary canal and excreted in the urine. The toxicity of these silicates has been related to the molar ratio of SiO2/Na2O and the concentration being used. The Sodium Metasilicate acute oral LD50 ranged from 847 mg/kg in male rats to 1349.3 mg/kg in female rats and from 770 mg/kg in female mice to 820 mg/kg in male mice. Gross lesions of variable severity were found in the oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus, stomach, larynx, lungs, and kidneys of dogs receiving 0.25 g/kg or more of a commercial detergent containing Sodium Metasilicate; similar lesions were also seen in pigs administered the same detergent and dose. Male rats orally administered 464 mg/kg of a 20% solution containing either 2.0 or 2.4 to 1.0 ratio of sodium oxide showed no signs of toxicity, whereas doses of 1000 and 2150 mg/kg produced gasping, dypsnea, and acute depression. Dogs fed 2.4 g/kg/day of Sodium Silicate for 4 weeks had gross renal lesions but no impairment of renal function. Dermal irritation of Potassium Silicate, Sodium

  3. Effect of silicate module of water glass on rheological parameters of poly(sodium acrylate)/sodium silicate hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastalska-Popiawska, J.; Izak, P.

    2017-01-01

    The poly(sodium acrylate)/sodium silicate hydrogels were synthesized in the presence of sodium thiosulphate and potassium persulphate as the redox initiators and N,N’-methylene-bisacrylamide as the cross-linking monomer. 20 wt% aqueous solution of sodium acrylate was polymerized together with water glass with different silicate modules (M) from 1.74 to 2.29, in three mass ratio of the monomer solution to the water glass 2:1, 1:1 and 1:2. Such obtained hybrid composites were rheologically tested using the oscillation method. It allowed to designate the crossover point during polymerization, as well as to define the viscoelastic properties of the casted hydrogel samples one week after the reaction. The obtained results of the oscillation measurements showed that cross-linking reaction proceeds very quickly and the lower the silicate module is, the process starts faster. After the completion of the reaction the silicate-polymer hydrogels are strongly elastic materials and the highest elasticity characterizes systems with the mass ratio 1:2, i.e. with the highest water glass content.

  4. Suppressive effects of a polymer sodium silicate solution on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sodium silicate was dissolved in water in either a monomer form or polymer form; the effects of both forms of sodium silicate aqueous solution on rose powdery mildew and root rot diseases of miniature rose were examined. Both forms of sodium silicate aqueous solution were applied to the roots of the miniature rose.

  5. Conversion of rice hull ash into soluble sodium silicate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Luiz Foletto

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Sodium silicate is used as raw material for several purposes: silica gel production, preparation of catalysts, inks, load for medicines, concrete hardening accelerator, component of detergents and soaps, refractory constituent and deflocculant in clay slurries. In this work sodium silicate was produced by reacting rice hull ash (RHA and aqueous sodium hydroxide, in open and closed reaction systems. The studied process variables were time, temperature of reaction and composition of the reaction mixture (expressed in terms of molar ratios NaOH/SiO2 and H2O/SiO2. About 90% silica conversion contained in the RHA into sodium silicate was achieved in closed system at 200 °C. The results showed that sodium silicate production from RHA can generate aggregate value to this residue.

  6. Preparation and properties of isotropic Nd-Fe-B bonded magnets with sodium silicate binder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.Q.; Hu, R.J.; Yue, M., E-mail: yueming@bjut.edu.cn; Yin, Y.X.; Zhang, D.T.

    2017-08-01

    Graphical abstract: To improve the working temperature of bonded Nd-Fe-B magnets, the heat-resistant binder, sodium silicate, was used to prepare new type bonded Nd-Fe-B magnets. The three-dimensional Si-O-Si structure formed in the curing process has excellent strength; it can ensure that the bonded magnets have a certain shape and usable magnetic properties when working at 200 °C. - Highlights: • Sodium silicate enables bonded Nd-Fe-B magnets to be used for higher operation temperatures. • The sodium silicate bonded magnets exhibit usable maximum energy product of 4.057 MGOe at 200 °C. • The compressive strength of sodium silicate bonded magnets is twice bigger than that of epoxy resin bonded magnets. - Abstract: In present study, sodium silicate, a kind of heat-resistant binder, was used to prepare bonded Nd-Fe-B magnets with improved thermal stability and mechanical strength. Effect of curing temperature and curing time of the new binder to the magnetic properties, microstructure, and mechanical strength of the magnets was systematically investigated. Fracture surface morphology observation show that sodium silicate in bonded magnets could completely be cured at 175 °C for 40 min, and the magnets prepared under this condition exhibit optimal properties. They exhibit usable magnetic properties of B{sub r} of 4.66 kGs, H{sub cj} of 4.84 kOe, and (BH){sub max} of 4.06 MGOe at 200 °C. Moreover, the magnets possess high compressive strength of 63 MPa.

  7. Synthesis of Non-Toxic Silica Particles Stabilized by Molecular Complex Oleic-Acid/Sodium Oleate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spataru, Catalin Ilie; Ianchis, Raluca; Petcu, Cristian; Nistor, Cristina Lavinia; Purcar, Violeta; Trica, Bogdan; Nitu, Sabina Georgiana; Somoghi, Raluca; Alexandrescu, Elvira; Oancea, Florin; Donescu, Dan

    2016-11-19

    The present work is focused on the preparation of biocompatible silica particles from sodium silicate, stabilized by a vesicular system containing oleic acid (OLA) and its alkaline salt (OLANa). Silica nanoparticles were generated by the partial neutralization of oleic acid (OLA), with the sodium cation present in the aqueous solutions of sodium silicate. At the molar ratio OLA/Na⁺ = 2:1, the molar ratio (OLA/OLANa = 1:1) required to form vesicles, in which the carboxyl and carboxylate groups have equal concentrations, was achieved. In order to obtain hydrophobically modified silica particles, octadecyltriethoxysilane (ODTES) was added in a sodium silicate sol-gel mixture at different molar ratios. The interactions between the octadecyl groups from the modified silica and the oleyl chains from the OLA/OLANa stabilizing system were investigated via simultaneous thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) (TG-DSC) analyses.A significant decrease in vaporization enthalpy and an increase in amount of ODTES were observed. Additionally, that the hydrophobic interaction between OLA and ODTES has a strong impact on the hybrids' final morphology and on their textural characteristics was revealed. The highest hydrodynamic average diameter and the most negative ζ potential were recorded for the hybrid in which the ODTES/sodium silicate molar ratio was 1:5. The obtained mesoporous silica particles, stabilized by the OLA/OLANa vesicular system, may find application as carriers for hydrophobic bioactive molecules.

  8. Synthesis of Non-Toxic Silica Particles Stabilized by Molecular Complex Oleic-Acid/Sodium Oleate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spataru, Catalin Ilie; Ianchis, Raluca; Petcu, Cristian; Nistor, Cristina Lavinia; Purcar, Violeta; Trica, Bogdan; Nitu, Sabina Georgiana; Somoghi, Raluca; Alexandrescu, Elvira; Oancea, Florin; Donescu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The present work is focused on the preparation of biocompatible silica particles from sodium silicate, stabilized by a vesicular system containing oleic acid (OLA) and its alkaline salt (OLANa). Silica nanoparticles were generated by the partial neutralization of oleic acid (OLA), with the sodium cation present in the aqueous solutions of sodium silicate. At the molar ratio OLA/Na+ = 2:1, the molar ratio (OLA/OLANa = 1:1) required to form vesicles, in which the carboxyl and carboxylate groups have equal concentrations, was achieved. In order to obtain hydrophobically modified silica particles, octadecyltriethoxysilane (ODTES) was added in a sodium silicate sol–gel mixture at different molar ratios. The interactions between the octadecyl groups from the modified silica and the oleyl chains from the OLA/OLANa stabilizing system were investigated via simultaneous thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) (TG-DSC) analyses.A significant decrease in vaporization enthalpy and an increase in amount of ODTES were observed. Additionally, that the hydrophobic interaction between OLA and ODTES has a strong impact on the hybrids’ final morphology and on their textural characteristics was revealed. The highest hydrodynamic average diameter and the most negative ζ potential were recorded for the hybrid in which the ODTES/sodium silicate molar ratio was 1:5. The obtained mesoporous silica particles, stabilized by the OLA/OLANa vesicular system, may find application as carriers for hydrophobic bioactive molecules. PMID:27869768

  9. Synthesis of Non-Toxic Silica Particles Stabilized by Molecular Complex Oleic-Acid/Sodium Oleate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin Ilie Spataru

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The present work is focused on the preparation of biocompatible silica particles from sodium silicate, stabilized by a vesicular system containing oleic acid (OLA and its alkaline salt (OLANa. Silica nanoparticles were generated by the partial neutralization of oleic acid (OLA, with the sodium cation present in the aqueous solutions of sodium silicate. At the molar ratio OLA/Na+ = 2:1, the molar ratio (OLA/OLANa = 1:1 required to form vesicles, in which the carboxyl and carboxylate groups have equal concentrations, was achieved. In order to obtain hydrophobically modified silica particles, octadecyltriethoxysilane (ODTES was added in a sodium silicate sol–gel mixture at different molar ratios. The interactions between the octadecyl groups from the modified silica and the oleyl chains from the OLA/OLANa stabilizing system were investigated via simultaneous thermogravimetry (TG and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC (TG-DSC analyses.A significant decrease in vaporization enthalpy and an increase in amount of ODTES were observed. Additionally, that the hydrophobic interaction between OLA and ODTES has a strong impact on the hybrids’ final morphology and on their textural characteristics was revealed. The highest hydrodynamic average diameter and the most negative ζ potential were recorded for the hybrid in which the ODTES/sodium silicate molar ratio was 1:5. The obtained mesoporous silica particles, stabilized by the OLA/OLANa vesicular system, may find application as carriers for hydrophobic bioactive molecules.

  10. Application of Sodium Silicate Enhances Cucumber Resistance to Fusarium Wilt and Alters Soil Microbial Communities

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    Xingang Zhou

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Exogenous silicates can enhance plant resistance to pathogens and change soil microbial communities. However, the relationship between changes in soil microbial communities and enhanced plant resistance remains unclear. Here, effects of exogenous sodium silicate on cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. seedling resistance to Fusarium wilt caused by the soil-borne pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cucumerinum Owen (FOC were investigated by drenching soil with 2 mM sodium silicate. Soil bacterial and fungal community abundances and compositions were estimated by real-time PCR and high-throughput amplicon sequencing; then, feedback effects of changes in soil biota on cucumber seedling resistance to FOC were assessed. Moreover, effects of sodium silicate on the growth of FOC and Streptomyces DHV3-2, an antagonistic bacterium to FOC, were investigated both in vitro and in the soil environment. Results showed that exogenous sodium silicate enhanced cucumber seedling growth and resistance to FOC. In bare soil, sodium silicate increased bacterial and fungal community abundances and diversities. In cucumber-cultivated soil, sodium silicate increased bacterial community abundances, but decreased fungal community abundances and diversities. Sodium silicate also changed soil bacterial and fungal communality compositions, and especially, decreased the relative abundances of microbial taxa containing plant pathogens but increased these with plant-beneficial potentials. Moreover, sodium silicate increased the abundance of Streptomyces DHV3-2 in soil. Soil biota from cucumber-cultivated soil treated with sodium silicate decreased cucumber seedling Fusarium wilt disease index, and enhanced cucumber seedling growth and defense-related enzyme activities in roots. Sodium silicate at pH 9.85 inhibited FOC abundance in vitro, but did not affect FOC abundance in soil. Overall, our results suggested that, in cucumber-cultivated soil, sodium silicate increased cucumber seedling

  11. Suppressive effects of a polymer sodium silicate solution on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohsen

    2015-10-21

    Oct 21, 2015 ... suppressive effects of sodium silicate in the polymer form were confirmed against powdery mildew and ... crops (such as rice) controls diseases and could reduce ... negative charge and sodium ions with a positive charge.

  12. XANES analysis of calcium and sodium phosphates and silicates and hydroxyapatite-Bioglass (registered) 45S5 co-sintered bioceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirkiran, Hande; Hu Yongfeng; Zuin, Lucia; Appathurai, Narayana; Aswath, Pranesh B.

    2011-01-01

    Bioglass (registered) 45S5 was co-sintered with hydroxyapatite at 1200 deg. C. When small amounts ( 5 (PO 4 ) 2 SiO 4 and Na 3 Ca 6 (PO 4 ) 5 in an amorphous silicate matrix respectively. These chemistries show improved bioactivity compared to hydroxyapatite and are the subject of this study. The structure of several crystalline calcium and sodium phosphates and silicates as well as the co-sintered hydroxyapatite-Bioglass (registered) 45S5 bioceramics were examined using XANES spectroscopy. The nature of the crystalline and amorphous phases were studied using silicon (Si) and phosphorus (P) K- and L 2,3 -edge and calcium (Ca) K-edge XANES. Si L 2,3 -edge spectra of sintered bioceramic compositions indicates that the primary silicates present in these compositions are sodium silicates in the amorphous state. From Si K-edge spectra, it is shown that the silicates are in a similar structural environment in all the sintered bioceramic compositions with 4-fold coordination. Using P L 2,3 -edge it is clearly shown that there is no evidence of sodium phosphate present in the sintered bioceramic compositions. In the P K-edge spectra, the post-edge shoulder peak at around 2155 eV indicates that this shoulder to be more defined for calcium phosphate compounds with decreasing solubility and increasing thermodynamic stability. This shoulder peak is more noticeable in hydroxyapatite and β-TCP indicating greater stability of the phosphate phase. The only spectra that does not show a noticeable peak is the composition with Na 3 Ca 6 (PO 4 ) 5 in a silicate matrix indicating that it is more soluble compared to the other compositions.

  13. Enzyme stabilization by glass-derived silicates in glass-exposed aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, J.A.; Moffett, J.R.; Arun, P.; Lam, D.; Todorov, T.I.; Brothers, A.B.; Anick, D.J.; Centeno, J.; Namboodiri, M.A.A.; Jonas, W.B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the solutes leaching from glass containers into aqueous solutions, and to show that these solutes have enzyme activity stabilizing effects in very dilute solutions. Methods: Enzyme assays with acetylcholine esterase were used to analyze serially succussed and diluted (SSD) solutions prepared in glass and plastic containers. Aqueous SSD preparations starting with various solutes, or water alone, were prepared under several conditions, and tested for their solute content and their ability to affect enzyme stability in dilute solution. Results: We confirm that water acts to dissolve constituents from glass vials, and show that the solutes derived from the glass have effects on enzymes in the resultant solutions. Enzyme assays demonstrated that enzyme stability in purified and deionized water was enhanced in SSD solutions that were prepared in glass containers, but not those prepared in plastic. The increased enzyme stability could be mimicked in a dose-dependent manner by the addition of silicates to the purified, deionized water that enzymes were dissolved in. Elemental analyses of SSD water preparations made in glass vials showed that boron, silicon, and sodium were present at micromolar concentrations. Conclusions: These results show that silicates and other solutes are present at micromolar levels in all glass-exposed solutions, whether pharmaceutical or homeopathic in nature. Even though silicates are known to have biological activity at higher concentrations, the silicate concentrations we measured in homeopathic preparations were too low to account for any purported in vivo efficacy, but could potentially influence in vitro biological assays reporting homeopathic effects. ?? 2009 The Faculty of Homeopathy.

  14. Wastewater reuse in liquid sodium silicate manufacturing in alexandria, egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Gaber A; Abd El-Salam, Magda M; Arafa, Anwar K

    2009-01-01

    Soluble sodium silicates (waterglass) are liquids containing dissolved glass which have some water like properties. They are widely used in industry as sealants, binders, deflocculants, emulsifiers and buffers. Their most common applications in Egypt are in the pulp and paper industry (where they improve the brightness and efficiency of peroxide bleaching) and the detergent industry, in which they improve the action of the detergent and lower the viscosity of liquid soaps. The survey results showed that the production was carried out batch-wise, in an autoclave (dissolver). Sodium silicate in the state of crushed glass was charged in an autoclave (dissolver) with sodium hydroxide and water. The product is filtered through a press. The left over sludge (mud and silicates impurities) is emptied into the local sewer system. Also, sludge (silica gel) was discharged from the neutralization process of the generated alkaline wastewater and consequently clogging the sewerage system. So this study was carried out to modify the current wastewater management system which eliminates sludge formation, the discharge of higher pH wastewater to the sewer system, and to assess its environmental and economic benefits. To assess the characteristics of wastewater to be reused, physico-chemical parameters of 12 samples were tested using standard methods. The survey results showed that a total capacity of the selected enterprise was 540 tons of liquid sodium silicates monthly. The total amount of wastewater being discharged was 335 m3/month. Reusing of wastewater as feed autoclave water reduced water consumption of 32.1% and reduced wastewater discharge/month that constitutes 89.6% as well as saving in final product of 6 ton/month. It was concluded that reusing of wastewater generated from liquid sodium silicate manufacturing process resulted in cheaper and environmental-friendly product.

  15. Evaluation of the effect of sodium silicate addition to mine backfill, Gelfill − Part 1

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    M. Kermani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the mechanical properties of sodium silicate-fortified backfill, called Gelfill, were investigated by conducting a series of laboratory experiments. Two configurations were tested, i.e. Gelfill and cemented hydraulic fill (CHF. The Gelfill has an alkali activator such as sodium silicate in its materials in addition to primary materials of mine backfill which are tailings, water and binders. Large numbers of samples of Gelfill and CHF with various mixture designs were cast and cured for over 28 d. The mechanical properties of samples were investigated using uniaxial compression test, and the results were compared with those of reference samples made without sodium silicate. The test results indicated that the addition of an appropriate amount of an alkali activator such as sodium silicate can enhance the mechanical (uniaxial compressive strength and physical (water retention properties of backfill. The microstructure analysis conducted by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP revealed that the addition of sodium silicate can modify the pore size distribution and total porosity of Gelfill, which can contribute to the better mechanical properties of Gelfill. It was also shown that the time and rate of drainage in the Gelfill specimens are less than those in CHF specimens made without sodium silicate. Finally, the study showed that the addition of sodium silicate can reduce the required setting time of mine backfill, which can contribute to increase mine production in accordance with the mine safety.

  16. Effect of the addition of Na2O on the thermal stability of alumino silicated glasses rich in rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassalle-Herraud, Olivier; Matecki, Marc; Glorieux, Benoit; Sadiki, Najim; Montoullout, Valerie; Dussossoy, Jean-Luc

    2006-01-01

    Alumino silicated glasses rich in rare earths have been prepared by concentrated solar way. Their recrystallization, the structural and microstructural properties as well as the mechanical and thermal properties of these glasses have been studied. The results show the effect of sodium addition on the thermal stability of the materials, the vitreous transition temperature and the recrystallization temperature. A heat treatment has allowed to reveal the formation of sodium apatite micro-crystallites and of lanthanum silicate in the glasses. (O.M.)

  17. Long-term Effects of Relative Humidity on Properties of Microwave Hardened Moulding Sand with Sodium Silicate

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    Stachowicz M.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Moulding sands containing sodium silicate (water-glass belong to the group of porous mixture with low resistance to increased humidity. Thanks to hydrophilic properties of hardened or even overheated binder, possible is application of effective methods of hydrous reclamation consisting in its secondary hydration. For the same reason (hydrophilia of the binder, moulds and foundry cores made of high-silica moulding sands with sodium silicate are susceptible to the action of components of atmospheric air, including the contained steam. This paper presents results of a research on the effect of (relative humidity on mechanical and technological properties of microwave-hardened moulding mixtures. Specimens of the moulding sand containing 1.5 wt% of sodium water-glass with module 2.5 were subjected, in a laboratory climatic chamber, to long-term action of steam contained in the chamber atmosphere. Concentration of water in atmospheric air was stabilized for 28 days (672 h according to the relative humidity parameter that was ca. 40%, 60% and 80% at constant temperature 20 °C. In three cycles of the examinations, the specimens were taken out from the chamber every 7 days (168 h and their mechanical and technological parameters were determined. It was found on the grounds of laboratory measurements that moulds and cores hardened with microwaves are susceptible to action of atmospheric air and presence of water (as steam intensifies action of the air components on glassy film of sodium silicate. Microwave-hardened moulding sands containing sodium silicate may be stored on a long-term basis in strictly determined atmospheric conditions only, at reduced humidity. In spite of a negative effect of steam contained in the air, the examined moulding mixtures maintain a part of their mechanical and technological properties, so the moulds and foundry cores stored in specified, controlled conditions could be still used in manufacture.

  18. XANES analysis of calcium and sodium phosphates and silicates and hydroxyapatite-Bioglass (registered) 45S5 co-sintered bioceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirkiran, Hande [Graduate Student, Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX (United States); Hu Yongfeng; Zuin, Lucia [Beamline Scientist, Canadian Light Source, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Appathurai, Narayana [Beamline Scientist, Synchrotron Radiation Center, Madison, WI (United States); Aswath, Pranesh B., E-mail: aswath@uta.edu [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX (United States)

    2011-03-12

    Bioglass (registered) 45S5 was co-sintered with hydroxyapatite at 1200 deg. C. When small amounts (< 5 wt.%) of Bioglass (registered) 45S5 was added it behaved as a sintering aid and also enhanced the decomposition of hydroxyapatite to {beta}-tricalcium phosphate. However when 10 wt.% and 25 wt.% Bioglass (registered) 45S5 was used it resulted in the formation of Ca{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}Ca{sub 6}(PO{sub 4}){sub 5} in an amorphous silicate matrix respectively. These chemistries show improved bioactivity compared to hydroxyapatite and are the subject of this study. The structure of several crystalline calcium and sodium phosphates and silicates as well as the co-sintered hydroxyapatite-Bioglass (registered) 45S5 bioceramics were examined using XANES spectroscopy. The nature of the crystalline and amorphous phases were studied using silicon (Si) and phosphorus (P) K- and L{sub 2,3}-edge and calcium (Ca) K-edge XANES. Si L{sub 2,3}-edge spectra of sintered bioceramic compositions indicates that the primary silicates present in these compositions are sodium silicates in the amorphous state. From Si K-edge spectra, it is shown that the silicates are in a similar structural environment in all the sintered bioceramic compositions with 4-fold coordination. Using P L{sub 2,3}-edge it is clearly shown that there is no evidence of sodium phosphate present in the sintered bioceramic compositions. In the P K-edge spectra, the post-edge shoulder peak at around 2155 eV indicates that this shoulder to be more defined for calcium phosphate compounds with decreasing solubility and increasing thermodynamic stability. This shoulder peak is more noticeable in hydroxyapatite and {beta}-TCP indicating greater stability of the phosphate phase. The only spectra that does not show a noticeable peak is the composition with Na{sub 3}Ca{sub 6}(PO{sub 4}){sub 5} in a silicate matrix indicating that it is more soluble compared to the other compositions.

  19. The Impact of Microwave Penetration Depth on the Process of Heating the Moulding Sand with Sodium Silicate

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    Nowak D.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the impact of microwave penetration depth on the process of heating the moulding sand with sodium silicate. For each material it is affected by: the wavelength in vacuum and the real and imaginary components of the relative complex electrical permittivity εr for a selected measurement frequency. Since the components are not constant values and they change depending on the electrical parameters of materials and the frequency of the electromagnetic wave, it is indispensable to carry out laboratory measurements to determine them. Moreover, the electrical parameters of materials are also affected by: temperature, packing degree, humidity and conductivity. The measurements of the dielectric properties of moulding sand with sodium silicate was carried out using the perturbation method on a stand of waveguide resonance cavity. The real and imaginary components of the relative complex electrical permittivity was determined for moulding sand at various contents of sodium silicate and at various packing degrees of the samples. On the basis of the results the microwave penetration depth of moulding sand with sodium silicate was established. Relative literature contains no such data that would be essential to predicting an effective process of microwave heating of moulding sand with sodium silicate. Both the packing degree and the amount of sodium silicate in moulding sand turned out to affect the penetration depth, which directly translates into microwave power density distribution in the process of microwave heating of moulding sand with sodium silicate.

  20. Calcined clay lightweight ceramics made with wood sawdust and sodium silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santis, Bruno Carlos de; Rossignolo, Joao Adriano, E-mail: desantis.bruno@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Pirassununga, SP (Brazil); Morelli, Marcio Raymundo [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais

    2016-11-15

    This paper aims to study the influence of including wood sawdust and sodium silicate in the production process of calcined clay lightweight ceramics. In the production process first, a sample used by a company that produces ceramic products in Brazil was collected. The sample was analysed by techniques of liquidity (LL) and plasticity (LP) limits, particle size analysis, specific mass, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF). From the clay, specimens of pure clay and mixtures with wood sawdust (10%, 20% and 30% by mass) and sodium silicate were produced and fired at a temperature of 900 deg C. These specimens were submitted to tests of water absorption, porosity, specific mass and compressive strength. Results of this research indicate that the incorporation of wood sawdust and sodium silicate in the ceramic paste specimens can be useful to make calcined clay lightweight ceramics with special characteristics (low values of water absorption and specific mass and high values of compressive strength), which could be used to produce calcined clay lightweight aggregates to be used in structural concrete. (author)

  1. Thermogravimetric analysis of phase transitions in cement compositions mixed by sodium silicate solution

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    Fedosov Sergey Viktorovich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the capability to modify cement by mechanical activation of sodium silicate water solution. Admixtures or blends of binding agents were employed for modifying concrete properties. The liquid glass is applied to protect from chemically or physically unfavorable environmental impacts, such as acidic medium and high temperature. The sodium silicate is a high-capacity setting accelerator. The increasing of the liquid glass proportion in the mix leads to the degradation of the cement paste plasticity and for this reason it is necessary to reduce the amount of liquid glass in the cement paste. The activation of dilute water solution of sodium silicate into rotary pulsating apparatus directly before tempering of the cement paste is an effective way to decrease mass fraction of liquid glass in the cement paste. The results of the combined influence of liquid glass and mechanical activation on physicochemical processes taking place in cement stone are represented in this research. Thermogravimetric analysis was used in order to study cement blends. Thermogravimetric analysis of modified cement stone assays was performed by thermo analyzer SETARAM TGA 92-24. The results of the analysis of phase transition taking place under high-temperature heating of cement stone modified by the mechanical activation of the water solution of the sodium silicate were introduced. Thermograms of cement stone assays were obtained at different hardening age. The comparison of these thermograms allows us to come to a conclusion on the formation and the retention during long time of a more dense structure of the composite matrix mixed by the mechanical activation of sodium silicate water solution. The relation between the concrete composition and its strength properties was stated. Perhaps, the capability of modified concrete to keep calcium ions in sparingly soluble hydrosilicates leads to the increase in its durability and corrosion resistance.

  2. Activity of NaOH buffered by silicate solids in molten sodium acetate-water at 3170C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weres, O.; Tsao, L.

    1988-01-01

    Silica and sodium acetate are present in the steam generator tube sheet crevices of many nuclear power plants. Trace solutes in the condensate are tremendously concentrated in the crevices by boiling. Sparingly soluble sodium silicates and other solids precipitate from the crevice liquid leaving an extremely concentrated molten mixture of water, sodium acetate and other salts. The precipitates buffer the activity of sodium hydroxide in the superheated liquid that remains. The activity of NaOH corresponding to the buffers quartz/sodium disilicate and sodium disilicate/sodium metasilicate at 317 0 C has been determined experimentally. The sodium hydroxide content of a sodium acetate-water melt buffered by these reactions was determined by chemical analysis, and the corresponding activity of NaOH at temperature was calculated using the recently published Pitzer-Simonson Model of molten salt-water mixtures. The molten mixture of sodium acetate and water plays the role solvent in these experiments and calculations. The free energies of formation of solid sodium silicates at 317 0 C were also determined. The activity of NaOH corresponding to other silicate and phosphate buffers was calculated using published thermodynamic data and estimated from phase diagrams

  3. Phosphorus Elimination at Sodium Silicate from Quartz Sand Roasted with Complexation using Chitosan-EDTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyuningsih, S.; Ramelan, A. H.; Suharty, N. S.; Handayani, M.; Firdiyono, F.; Sulistiyono, E.; Munawaroh, H.; Sari, P. P.; Kristiawan, Y. R.

    2018-03-01

    A phosphorus elimination from sodium silicate solution has been studied. Phosphorus elimination was performed by adding chitosan-EDTA to remove cation phosphorus. Characterization of chitosan-EDTA material was performed using FT-IR, while the decreasing level of phosphorus content was analyzed by quantitative analysis using spectrophotometer UV-Vis refers to SNI 06-6989-2004. The results showed that the content of the sodium silicate can be reduced up to 67.1% through Chitosan-EDTA complexation with phosphorus.

  4. Development of an immobilization process for heavy metal containing galvanic solid wastes by use of sodium silicate and sodium tetraborate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydın, Ahmet Alper, E-mail: ahmetalperaydin@gmail.com [Chair of Urban Water Systems Engineering, Technische Universität München, Am Coulombwall, 85748 Garching (Germany); Aydın, Adnan [Istanbul Bilim University, School of Health, Esentepe, Istanbul, Sisli, 34394 (Turkey)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • A new physico-chemical process below 1000 °C for immobilization of galvanic sludges. • Sodium tetraborate and sodium silicate have been used as additives. • A strategy for adjustment of solid waste/additive mixture composition is presented. • Strategy is valid for wastes of hydrometallurgical and electro-plating processes. • Lower energy consumption and treated waste volume, shorter process time are provided. - Abstract: Heavy metal containing sludges from wastewater treatment plants of electroplating industries are designated as hazardous waste since their improper disposal pose high risks to environment. In this research, heavy metal containing sludges of electroplating industries in an organized industrial zone of Istanbul/Turkey were used as real-sample model for development of an immobilization process with sodium tetraborate and sodium silicate as additives. The washed sludges have been precalcined in a rotary furnace at 900 °C and fritted at three different temperatures of 850 °C, 900 °C and 950 °C. The amounts of additives were adjusted to provide different acidic and basic oxide ratios in the precalcined sludge-additive mixtures. Leaching tests were conducted according to the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure Method 1311 of US-EPA. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) and flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) have been used to determine the physical and chemical changes in the products. Calculated oxide molar ratios in the precalcined sludge-additive mixtures and their leaching results have been used to optimize the stabilization process and to determine the intervals of the required oxide ratios which provide end-products resistant to leaching procedure of US-EPA. The developed immobilization-process provides lower energy consumption than sintering-vitrification processes of glass–ceramics.

  5. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the active substances, sodium carbonate peroxyhydrate coated with sodium carbonate and sodium silicate, bentonite, sodium chloride, sodium carbonate for use in active food contact materials

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF)

    2013-01-01

    This scientific opinion of the Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety evaluation of the powder mixture of the active substances sodium carbonate peroxyhydrate coated with sodium carbonate and sodium silicate (FCM substance No 1009), bentonite (CAS No 1302-78-9, FCM No 393), sodium chloride (CAS No 7647-14-5, FCM No 985), sodium carbonate (CAS No 497-19-8, FCM No 1008) which are intended to be used as combined oxygen generator and carbon...

  6. Reuse of waste foundry sand through interaction with sodium silicate binder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, J.C.; Chinelatto, A.S.A.; Chinelatto, A.L.; Oliveira, I.L.

    2012-01-01

    Green sand molds are used in metal casting process. However, after heating, activated bentonite present in green sand lose the binding properties, and part of the foundry sand has to be discarded from the process. The ABNT NBR 15.984/2011 establishes the management of waste foundry sand (WFS) avoiding disposal in landfills. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility of reusing the WFS from the study of their interaction with sodium silicate binder. Studies with silica sand and new green sand was performed to compare the results obtained with the WFS. The characterizations of the samples were performed by measures the compressive strength, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that there is interaction of the sodium silicate with the WFS as well as with the silica sand and green sand. (author)

  7. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF SILICATE MUD CONTAMINATION WITH CALCIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The silicate-based drilling fluid is a low solids KCl/polymer system with the addition of soluble sodium or potassium silicate to enhance inhibition and wellbore stability. Silicate-based drilling fluids exhibit remarkable shale and chalk stabilizing properties, resulting in gauge hole and the formation of firm cuttings when drilling reactive shales and soft chalks. Silicates protect shales by in-situ gellation when exposed to the neutral pore fluid and precipitation, which occurs on contact with divalent ions present at the surface of the shale. Also, silicates prevent the dispersion and washouts when drilling soft chalk by reacting with the Ca2+ ions present on chalk surfaces of cutting and wellbore to form a protective film. The silicate-based drilling fluid can be used during drilling hole section through shale interbeded anhydrite formations because of its superior shale stabilizing characteristics. However, drilling through the anhydrite can decrease the silicate concentration and change rheological and filtration fluid properties. So, the critical concentration of calcium ions should be investigated by lab tests. This paper details the mechanism of shale inhibition using silicate-based drilling fluid, and presents results of lab tests conducted to ascertain the effect of Ca2+ ions on silicate level in the fluid and the fluid properties.

  8. New Silica Magnetite Sorbent: The Influence of Variations of Sodium Silicate Concentrations on Silica Magnetite Character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmiyawati, C.; Pratiwi, P. I.; Darmawan, A.

    2018-04-01

    The adsorption capacity of an adsorbent is determined by the adsorbent and the adsorbate properties. The character of the adsorbent will play a major role in its ability to adsorb the corresponding adsorbate. Therefore, in this study we looked at the effects of variations of sodium silicate concentrations on the resulting magnetite silica adsorbent properties. The application of silica coating on the magnetite was carried out through a sol-gel process with sodium silicate and HCl precursors. Based on the characterization data obtained, it was found that the silica coating on magnetite can increase the resistance to acid leaching, increase the particle size, but decrease the magnetic properties of the magnetite. Based on Gas Sorption Analyzer (GSA) and X-ray Difraction (XRD) data it can successively be determined that increase in concentration of sodium silicate will increase the surface area and amorphous structure of the Silica Magnetie.

  9. Effect of natural fiber types and sodium silicate coated on natural fiber mat/PLA composites: Tensile properties and rate of fire propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongpin, C.; Srimuk, J.; hipkam, N.; Wachirapong, P.

    2015-07-01

    In this study, 3 types of natural fibres, i.e. jute, sisal and abaca, were plain weaved to fibre mat. Before weaving, the fibres were treated with 5% NaOH to remove hemi cellulose and lignin. The weaving was performed by hand using square wooden block fit with nails for weaving using one and two types of natural fibres as weft and warp fibre to produce natural fibre mat. The fibre mat was also impregnated in sodium silicate solution extracted from rich husk ash. The pH of the solution was adjusted to pH 7 using H2SO4 before impregnation. After predetermined time, sodium silicate was gelled and deposited on the mat. The fabric mat and sodium silicate coated mat were then impregnated with PLA solution to produce prepreg. Dried pepreg was laminated with PLA sheet using compressing moulding machine to obtain natural fibre mat/PLA composite. The composite containing abaca aligned in longitudinal direction with respect to tension force enhanced Young's modulus more than 300%. Fibre mat composites with abaca aligned in longitudinal direction also showed tensile strength enhancement nearly 400% higher than neat PLA. After coating with sodium silicate, the tensile modulus of the composites was found slightly increased. The silicate coating was disadvantage on tensile strength of the composite due to the effect of sodium hydroxide solution that was used as solvent for silicate extraction from rice husk ash. However, sodium silicate could retard rate of fire propagation about 50%compare to neat PLA and about 10% reduction compared to fibre mat composites without sodium silicate coated fibre mat.

  10. Effect of natural fiber types and sodium silicate coated on natural fiber mat/PLA composites: Tensile properties and rate of fire propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thongpin, C; Srimuk, J; Hipkam, N; Wachirapong, P

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 3 types of natural fibres, i.e. jute, sisal and abaca, were plain weaved to fibre mat. Before weaving, the fibres were treated with 5% NaOH to remove hemi cellulose and lignin. The weaving was performed by hand using square wooden block fit with nails for weaving using one and two types of natural fibres as weft and warp fibre to produce natural fibre mat. The fibre mat was also impregnated in sodium silicate solution extracted from rich husk ash. The pH of the solution was adjusted to pH 7 using H 2 SO 4 before impregnation. After predetermined time, sodium silicate was gelled and deposited on the mat. The fabric mat and sodium silicate coated mat were then impregnated with PLA solution to produce prepreg. Dried pepreg was laminated with PLA sheet using compressing moulding machine to obtain natural fibre mat/PLA composite. The composite containing abaca aligned in longitudinal direction with respect to tension force enhanced Young's modulus more than 300%. Fibre mat composites with abaca aligned in longitudinal direction also showed tensile strength enhancement nearly 400% higher than neat PLA. After coating with sodium silicate, the tensile modulus of the composites was found slightly increased. The silicate coating was disadvantage on tensile strength of the composite due to the effect of sodium hydroxide solution that was used as solvent for silicate extraction from rice husk ash. However, sodium silicate could retard rate of fire propagation about 50%compare to neat PLA and about 10% reduction compared to fibre mat composites without sodium silicate coated fibre mat. (paper)

  11. Theoretical and practical aspects of aqueous solution sodium silicate modifying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizuryaev Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research deals with the use of liquid glass in industry particularly for porous filler production. The aim of this paper is to show the necessity liquid glass modification for the purpose of its rheological characteristics change for raw granules formation and providing given structure after porization. Data on chemical liquid glass modification are provided by adding sodium chloride. Moreover, inert mineral additives influence on porous filler properties are shown in this paper. The basic principles of light concrete composition selection are specified. Test results of light concrete on the developed porous sodium silicate filler are given.

  12. Influence of sodium silicate concentration on structural and tribological properties of microarc oxidation coatings on 2017A aluminum alloy substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polat, Aytekin; Makaraci, Murat; Usta, Metin

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, thick and hard oxide coatings resistant to wear were produced on 2017A-T6 Al alloy by the microarc oxidation (MAO) technique in an alkali electrolyte consisting of different sodium silicate concentrations (0-8 g/l). The coatings were characterized by means of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and surface profilometry. Microhardness, scratch adhesion and pin-on-disk sliding wear tests were also performed to evaluate the tribological properties of the coatings. The influence of sodium silicate concentration on the structural and tribological properties of the MAO coatings was discussed. Results reveal that increasing sodium silicate concentration from 0 to 8 g/l in the electrolyte caused an increase in the electrolyte conductivity (from 7.71 to 18.1 mS/cm) and a decrease in positive final voltage (from 627 to 590 V) in the MAO process. In response to the increase in sodium silicate concentration, the thickness, surface roughness (R a ) and critical load (L c ) corresponding to adhesive failure of the coatings were increased simultaneously from 74 to 144 μm, and 4.4 to 6.58 μm, and 127.76 to 198.54 N, respectively. At the same time, the phase structure and composition of the coatings also varied by the participation of silicate ions in the reactions and their incorporation into the coating structure. Moreover, it was observed that the coating formed in the low sodium silicate concentration (4 g/l) had higher surface hardness (2020 HV) and improved wear resistance than the one (1800 HV) formed in the high sodium silicate concentration (8 g/l). The coatings produced in three different electrolytic solutions provided an excellent wear resistance and a load carrying capacity compared to the uncoated aluminum alloy.

  13. Steam based conversion coating on AA6060 alloy: Effect of sodium silicate chemistry and corrosion performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Bordo, Kirill; Tabrizian, Naja; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2017-11-01

    Surface treatment of aluminium alloy AA6060 using an industrially applicable pilot steam jet system with and without silicate chemistry has been investigated. Treatment using steam alone and steam with silicate, resulted in an oxide layer formation with thickness ∼425 nm and ∼160 nm, respectively. Moreover, the use of sodium silicate resulted in the formation of distinct microstructure and incorporation of silicate into the oxide film. These oxide films reduced the anodic activity 4 times, while the corrosion protection by silicate containing oxide was the function of its concentration. Further, in acid salt spray and filiform corrosion tests, oxide layer containing silicate exhibited two times higher corrosion resistance.

  14. Long-term stability of sodium caseinate-stabilized nanoemulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerramilli, Manispuritha; Ghosh, Supratim

    2017-01-01

    Oil-in-water (5 wt%) nanoemulsions were prepared with different concentration (2.5-10 wt%) of sodium caseinate as a sole emulsifier and their long-term storage stability was investigated for 6 months. Previous studies associated with sodium caseinate looked only into nanoemulsion formation; hence the challenges with long-term stability were not addressed. All nanoemulsions displayed an average droplet size sodium caseinate-stabilized nanoemulsions.

  15. Sodium Silicate Behavior in Porous Media Applied for In-Depth Profile Modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein A. Akhlaghi Amiri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses alkaline sodium silicate (Na-silicate behavior in porous media. One of the advantages of the Na-silicate system is its water-like injectivity during the placement stage. Mixing Na-silicate with saline water results in metal silicate precipitation as well as immediate gelation. This work demonstrated that low salinity water (LSW, sea water diluted 25 times could be used as a pre-flush in flooding operations. A water override phenomenon was observed during gel formation which is caused by gravity segregation. Dynamic adsorption tests in the sand-packed tubes showed inconsiderable adsorbed silicon density (about 8.5 × 10−10 kg/cm3 for a solution with 33 mg/L silicon content, which is less than the estimated mono-layer adsorption density of 1.4 × 10−8 kg/cm3. Na-silicate enhanced water sweep efficiency after application in a dual-permeability sand-pack system, without leak off into the oil-bearing low permeability (LP zone. Field-scale numerical sensitivity studies in a layered reservoir demonstrated that higher permeability and viscosity contrasts and lower vertical/horizontal permeability ratio result in lower Na-silicate leakoff into the matrix. The length of the mixing zone between reservoir water and the injected Na-silicate solution, which is formed by low salinity pre-flush, acts as a buffer zone.

  16. Steam based conversion coating on AA6060 alloy: Effect of sodium silicate chemistry and corrosion performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Bordo, Kirill; Tabrizian, Naja

    2017-01-01

    . Moreover, the use of sodium silicate resulted in the formation of distinct microstructure and incorporation of silicate into the oxide film. These oxide films reduced the anodic activity 4 times, while the corrosion protection by silicate containing oxide was the function of its concentration. Further......Surface treatment of aluminium alloy AA6060 using an industrially applicable pilot steam jet system with and without silicate chemistry has been investigated. Treatment using steam alone and steam with silicate, resulted in an oxide layer formation with thickness ∼425 nm and ∼160 nm, respectively......, in acid salt spray and filiform corrosion tests, oxide layer containing silicate exhibited two times higher corrosion resistance....

  17. Comparison of Effect of Sodium Silicate Particle Size in Nutritional Solution on Physiological Growth Trials of Maize Seedlings under Cadmium Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Saadatian

    2017-10-01

    completely randomized design with four replications the. Treatments were included cadmium (CdSO4 stress levels (Zero, 50 and 100 μmol l-1 and sodium silicate treatments (control (Zero, Nano and micro particles with 2 mM concentration. Results and Discussion The results showed that the effects of sodium silicate, cadmium and their interactions on membrane stability index, specific leaf area, stomatal conductance, Fv/Fm, height, stem diameter, leaf area, shoot dry weight, root dry weight and shoot to root weight ratio was significant. But interaction between cadmium and sodium silicate on relative water content and leaf chlorophyll index was not significant. By increasing of Cd concentration, membrane stability index, chlorophyll index, Fv/Fm, relative water content, specific leaf area, stomatal conductance, height, stem diameter, leaf area, shoot dry weight and root dry weight trials reduced compared to control significantly. In no cadmium condition, sodium silicate nano-particles application reduced height, stem diameter, leaf area and shoot dry weight 12.8, 9, 34.2 and 23.2% compared to control, respectively. In contrast, using of micro particles in non-stress condition, had a positive effect on above mentioned traits. But in 50 μmol l-1 Cd, nano-particles increased membrane stability index, specific leaf area, stomatal conductance, stem diameter and shoot dry weight trials, significantly. At highest concentration of cadmium, effect of micro particles on membrane stability index, stomatal conductance and shoot to root was higher than nano-particles. Also, using of nano particles had a positive effect on above mentioned traits in Cd stress condition. In general, application of nano particles in non-cadmium stress conditions had phytotoxicity effects on corn and only in cadmium stress condition, the effect of these particles showed their positive effect. Conclusions In general, silicon nanoparticles were only beneficial effect of cadmium stress. Hence, the use of sodium

  18. Study the Properties of Sodium Silicate Composite as a Barrier Separating Between the Internal Oil Distillation Towers and Chemical Fumes of Crude Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    سلام حسين علي

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The study of surface hardness, wear resistance, adhesion strength, electrochemical corrosion resistance and thermal conductivity of coatings composed from sodium silicate was prepared using graphite micro-size particles and carbon nano particles as fillers respectively of concentration of (1-5%, for the purpose of covering and protecting the oil distillation towers. The results showed that the sodium silicate coating reinforced with carbon nano-powder has higher resistance to stitches, mechanical wear, adhesive and thermal conductivity than graphite/sodium silicate composite especially when the ratio 5% and 1%, the electrochemical corrosion test confirmed that the coating process of stainless steel 304 lead to increasing the corrosion resistance, where the reinforcing of sodium silicate lead to a significant improvement in the corrosion resistance, the corrosion resistance behavior change depending on the type of reinforcement material, this is consistent with the field test results.

  19. Rice husk-derived sodium silicate as a highly efficient and low-cost basic heterogeneous catalyst for biodiesel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roschat, Wuttichai; Siritanon, Theeranun; Yoosuk, Boonyawan; Promarak, Vinich

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Rice husk-derived sodium silicate exhibits high potential as a low-cost solid catalyst for industrial biodiesel production. - Highlights: • Rice husk-derived sodium silicate was employed as a high performance catalyst for biodiesel production. • 97% yield of FAME was achieved in 30 min at 65 °C. • The room-temperature transesterification gave 94% yield of FAME after only 150 min. - Abstract: In the present work, rice husk-derived sodium silicate was prepared and employed as a solid catalyst for simple conversion of oils to biodiesel via the transesterification reaction. The catalyst was characterized by TG–DTA, XRD, XRF, FT-IR, SEM, BET and Hammett indicator method. Under the optimal reaction conditions of catalyst loading amount of 2.5 wt.%, methanol/oil molar ratio of 12:1, the prepared catalysts gave 97% FAME yield in 30 min at 65 °C, and 94% FAME yield in 150 min at room temperature. The transesterification was proved to be pseudo-first order reaction with the activation energy (Ea) and the frequency factor (A) of 48.30 kJ/mol and 2.775 × 10"6 min"−"1 respectively. Purification with a cation-exchange resin efficiently removed all soluble ions providing high-quality biodiesel product that meets all the ASTM and EN standard specifications. Rice husk-derived sodium silicate showed high potential to be used as a low-cost, easy to prepare and high performance solid catalyst for biodiesel synthesis.

  20. Effect of Silver Nanoparticles and Sodium Silicate on Vase Life and Quality of Cut Chrysanthemum Dendranthema grandiflorum L. (Flower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kazemipour

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dendranthema grandiflorum L. is one of the widely cultivated flowers around the world for producing of cut flowers. Nanometer-sized silver particles are used in various applications as an anti-microbial compound. This experiment was carried out to study the effects of silver nanoparticles (0, 5, 10 and 20 mg/L and sodium silicate (0, 50, 100 and 150 mg/L on longevity and quality of cut chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflorum L. flowers. A factorial experiment was conducted based on randomized complete block design with 16 treatments, 3 replications, 48 plots and 192 cut flowers. The cut flowers were pulsed for 24 h with pulse solutions and then transported to 300 mg L-1 8-hidroxy quinoline sulfate and 3% sucrose. The characteristics such as vase life, loss of fresh weight, number of bacterial colonies in stem, lipid peroxidation, and activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD were measured. Results showed that all treatments had positive effects on the vase life of flowers. Pulse solution with 10 mg/L silver nanoparticles and 100 mg/L sodium silicate and interaction between them, increased vase life compared to the control (3.21, 4.46 and 8.50 days, respectively. In addition, the flowers pulsed with silver nanoparticles and sodium silicate exhibited higher activity of SOD, compared to control. The present study showed that using proper concentrations of silver nanoparticles and sodium silicate can enhance the vase life of cut chrysanthemum flowers.

  1. Diblock Copolymer/Layered Silicate Nanocomposite Thin Film Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limary, Ratchana; Green, Peter

    2000-03-01

    The stability of thin film symmetric diblock copolymers blended with layered silicate nanocomposites were examined using a combination of optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Two cases were examined PS-b-PMMA (polystyrene-b-polymethylacrylate) blended with montmorillonite stoichiometrically loaded with alkyl ammonium ions, OLS(S), and PS-b-PMMA blended with montmorillonite loaded with excess alkyl ammonium ions, OLS(E). XRD spectra show an increase in the gallery spacing of the OLSs, indicating that the copolymer chains have intercalated the layered silicates. AFM images reveal a distinct difference between the two nanocomposite thin films: regions in the vicinity of OLS(S) aggregates were depleted of material, while in the vicinity of OLS(E) aggregates, dewetting of the substrate occurred. We show that the stability of the copolymer/OLS nanocomposite films is determined by the enthalpic driving force associated with intercalation of the copolymer chains into the galleries of the modified OLS layers and by the substrate/organic modifier interactions.

  2. Biological and therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and some ortho-silicic acid-releasing compounds: New perspectives for therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurkić Lela Munjas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Silicon (Si is the most abundant element present in the Earth's crust besides oxygen. However, the exact biological roles of silicon remain unknown. Moreover, the ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4, as a major form of bioavailable silicon for both humans and animals, has not been given adequate attention so far. Silicon has already been associated with bone mineralization, collagen synthesis, skin, hair and nails health atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, immune system enhancement, and with some other disorders or pharmacological effects. Beside the ortho-silicic acid and its stabilized formulations such as choline chloride-stabilized ortho-silicic acid and sodium or potassium silicates (e.g. M2SiO3; M= Na,K, the most important sources that release ortho-silicic acid as a bioavailable form of silicon are: colloidal silicic acid (hydrated silica gel, silica gel (amorphous silicon dioxide, and zeolites. Although all these compounds are characterized by substantial water insolubility, they release small, but significant, equilibrium concentration of ortho-silicic acid (H4SiO4 in contact with water and physiological fluids. Even though certain pharmacological effects of these compounds might be attributed to specific structural characteristics that result in profound adsorption and absorption properties, they all exhibit similar pharmacological profiles readily comparable to ortho-silicic acid effects. The most unusual ortho-silicic acid-releasing agents are certain types of zeolites, a class of aluminosilicates with well described ion(cation-exchange properties. Numerous biological activities of some types of zeolites documented so far might probably be attributable to the ortho-silicic acid-releasing property. In this review, we therefore discuss biological and potential therapeutic effects of ortho-silicic acid and ortho-silicic acid -releasing silicon compounds as its major natural sources.

  3. Transition metal ions in silicate melts. I. Manganese in sodium silicate melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, C; White, W B

    1980-01-01

    Optical absorption spectra obtained on glasses quenched from sodium silicate melts show Mn/sup 3 +/ to be the dominant species for melts heated in air and Mn/sup 2 +/ to be the dominant species for melts heated at P/sub O/sub 2// = 10/sup -17/ bar. The absorption spectrum of Mn/sup 3 +/ consists of an intense band at 20,000 cm/sup -1/ with a 15,000 cm/sup -1/ satellite possibly arising from the Jahn-Teller effect. The independence of the spectrum from melt composition and the high band intensity is offered as evidence for a distinct Mn/sup 3 +/ complex in the melt. The spectrum of Mn/sup 2 +/ is weak and many expected bands are not observed. A two-band luminescence spectrum from Mn/sup 2 +/ has been tentatively interpreted as due to Mn/sup 2 +/ in interstitial sites in the network and Mn/sup 2 +/ coordiated by non-bridging oxygens.

  4. Aqueous Dispersions of Silica Stabilized with Oleic Acid Obtained by Green Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nistor, Cristina Lavinia; Ianchis, Raluca; Ghiurea, Marius; Nicolae, Cristian-Andi; Spataru, Catalin-Ilie; Culita, Daniela Cristina; Pandele Cusu, Jeanina; Fruth, Victor; Oancea, Florin; Donescu, Dan

    2016-01-05

    The present study describes for the first time the synthesis of silica nanoparticles starting from sodium silicate and oleic acid (OLA). The interactions between OLA and sodium silicate require an optimal OLA/OLANa molar ratio able to generate vesicles that can stabilize silica particles obtained by the sol-gel process of sodium silicate. The optimal molar ratio of OLA/OLANa can be ensured by a proper selection of OLA and respectively of sodium silicate concentration. The titration of sodium silicate with OLA revealed a stabilization phenomenon of silica/OLA vesicles and the dependence between their average size and reagent's molar ratio. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements emphasized the successful synthesis of silica nanoparticles starting from renewable materials, in mild condition of green chemistry. By grafting octadecyltrimethoxysilane on the initial silica particles, an increased interaction between silica particles and the OLA/OLANa complex was achieved. This interaction between the oleyl and octadecyl chains resulted in the formation of stable gel-like aqueous systems. Subsequently, olive oil and an oleophylic red dye were solubilized in these stable aqueous systems. This great dispersing capacity of oleosoluble compounds opens new perspectives for future green chemistry applications. After the removal of water and of the organic chains by thermal treatment, mesoporous silica was obtained.

  5. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: SILICATE TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION - SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION OF PCP AND INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SOILS - SELMA, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Technolgy Evaluation Report evaluates the solidification/stabilization process of Silicate Technology Corporation (STC) for the on-site treatment of contaminated soil The STC immobilization technology uses a proprietary product (FMS Silicate) to chemically stabilize and ...

  6. Aqueous Dispersions of Silica Stabilized with Oleic Acid Obtained by Green Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Lavinia Nistor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes for the first time the synthesis of silica nanoparticles starting from sodium silicate and oleic acid (OLA. The interactions between OLA and sodium silicate require an optimal OLA/OLANa molar ratio able to generate vesicles that can stabilize silica particles obtained by the sol-gel process of sodium silicate. The optimal molar ratio of OLA/OLANa can be ensured by a proper selection of OLA and respectively of sodium silicate concentration. The titration of sodium silicate with OLA revealed a stabilization phenomenon of silica/OLA vesicles and the dependence between their average size and reagent’s molar ratio. Dynamic light scattering (DLS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM measurements emphasized the successful synthesis of silica nanoparticles starting from renewable materials, in mild condition of green chemistry. By grafting octadecyltrimethoxysilane on the initial silica particles, an increased interaction between silica particles and the OLA/OLANa complex was achieved. This interaction between the oleyl and octadecyl chains resulted in the formation of stable gel-like aqueous systems. Subsequently, olive oil and an oleophylic red dye were solubilized in these stable aqueous systems. This great dispersing capacity of oleosoluble compounds opens new perspectives for future green chemistry applications. After the removal of water and of the organic chains by thermal treatment, mesoporous silica was obtained.

  7. EFFECT OF SODIUM SILICATE TO SODIUM HYDROXIDE RATIOS ON DURABILITY OF GEOPOLYMER MORTARS CONTAINING NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL POZZOLANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nurhayat Degirmenci

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to provide the experimental data on the sulphate and acid performance of geopolymer mortar containing pozzolanic materials such as fly ash (FA, ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS and natural zeolite (NZ. The alkaline solution was the combination of sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solution with the ratio (Na ₂SiO₃/NaOH of 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0. The molarity of sodium hydroxide was fixed as 10. The performances of geopolymer mortar were measured in terms of sodium and magnesium sulphate resistance and sulphuric and hydrochlorich acid resistance with 5% and 10 % concentration after 24 weeks. The evaluations were measured as visual observation, measurement of weight change and residual compressive strength. It has been observed that Na ₂SiO₃/NaOH ratio is effective on residual compressive strength of geopolymer mortar in both sulphate and acid exposure. The higher ratio of Na ₂SiO₃/NaOH results in a higher residual compressive strength. The GGBS based geopolymer mortar has a very good resistance in acid media in terms of weight loss and residual compressive strength. The inclusion of FA in the GGBS based geopolymer mixture was found to be a suitable base of geopolymer mortar under ambient curing conditions.

  8. Polymer/Silicate Nanocomposites Developed for Improved Strength and Thermal Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sandi G.

    2003-01-01

    Over the past decade, polymer-silicate nanocomposites have been attracting considerable attention as a method of enhancing polymer properties. The nanometer dimensions of the dispersed silicate reinforcement can greatly improve the mechanical, thermal, and gas barrier properties of a polymer matrix. In a study at the NASA Glenn Research Center, the dispersion of small amounts (less than 5 wt%) of an organically modified layered silicate (OLS) into the polymer matrix of a carbon-fiber-reinforced composite has improved the thermal stability of the composite. The enhanced barrier properties of the polymer-clay hybrid are believed to slow the diffusion of oxygen into the bulk polymer, thereby slowing oxidative degradation of the polymer. Electron-backscattering images show cracking of a nanocomposite matrix composite in comparison to a neat resin matrix composite. The images show that dispersion of an OLS into the matrix resin reduces polymer oxidation during aging and reduces the amount of cracking in the matrix significantly. Improvements in composite flexural strength, flexural modulus, and interlaminar shear strength were also obtained with the addition of OLS. An increase of up to 15 percent in these mechanical properties was observed in composites tested at room temperature and 288 C. The best properties were seen with low silicate levels, 1 to 3 wt%, because of the better dispersion of the silicate in the polymer matrix.

  9. Incorporation of bitumen and calcium silicate in cement and lime stabilized soil blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, W. H.; Cheah, C. B.; Ramli, M.; Al-Sakkaf, Y. K.

    2017-04-01

    Providing affordable housing is the most critical problem in many of the developing countries. Using earth materials in building construction is one of the feasible methods to address this issue and it can be a way towards sustainable construction as well. However, the published information on the stabilized soil blocks is limited. Therefore, the present study is conducted to examine the characterization of the soils and engineering properties of the stabilized soil blocks. Four types of stabilizer were used in the study, namely; cement, slaked lime, bitumen emulsion and calcium silicate. Cement and slaked lime were added at different percentages in the range of 5% to 15%, with interval of 2.5%. The percentage was determined based on weight of soil. Meanwhile, bitumen emulsion and calcium silicate were incorporated at various percentages together with 10% of cement. Dosage of bitumen emulsion is in the range of 2% to 10% at interval of 2% while calcium silicate was incorporated at 0.50%, 0.75%, 1.00%, 1.25%, 1.50% and 2.00%. Results show that cement is the most viable stabilizer for the soil block among all stabilizers in this study. The bulk density, optimum moisture content and compressive strengths were increased with the increasing cement content. The most suitable cement content was 10% added at moisture content of 12%. Lime, bitumen and calcium contents were recommended at 5.0%, 6.0% and 1.25%, respectively.

  10. Identification and Purification of Nyalo River Silica Sand as Raw Material for the Synthesis of Sodium Silicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aini, S.; Nizar, U. K.; NST, A. Amelia; Efendi, J.

    2018-04-01

    This research is on identification and purification of silica sand from Nyalo River. It will be used as a raw material for synthesis of sodium silicate. Silica sand was separated from clay by washing it with water, and then the existing alumina and iron oxide were removed by soaking the silica sand with 1 M HNO3 solution. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the silica sand with X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence revealed that, silica sand existed in quartz form and contained a small amount of impurity oxide such as Al2O3, K2O, MgO, CaO, Fe2O3 with percentage below the minimum threshold. The percentages of silica were 80.59% before purification. After three purificationsteps the silica percentage become 98.38%. It exceedsthe minimum threshold of silica percentage for industry.So, the silica sand from Nyalo River has high potency as a raw material for sodium silicate synthesizing.

  11. SILICATE TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION'S SOLIDIFICATION/ STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC AND INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SOILS - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Applications Analysis Report evaluates the solidification/stabilization treatment process of Silicate Technology Corporation (STC) for the on-site treatment of hazardous waste. The STC immobilization technology utilizes a proprietary product (FMS Silicate) to chemically stab...

  12. Stability of aqueous-alkaline sodium borohydride formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkina, V.G.; Shabunya, S.I.; Kalinin, V.I.; Martynenko, V.V.

    2008-01-01

    Stability of sodium borohydride in the form of concentrated solutions and suspensions and solids corresponding to a crystal hydrate in composition was studied. The effects of temperature, concentrations of sodium borohydride and alkali, and nature of alkali metal cation on the rate of sodium borohydride hydrolysis were studied [ru

  13. Polymer/Silicate Nanocomposites Developed for Improved Thermal Stability and Barrier Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sandi G.

    2001-01-01

    The nanoscale reinforcement of polymers is becoming an attractive means of improving the properties and stability of polymers. Polymer-silicate nanocomposites are a relatively new class of materials with phase dimensions typically on the order of a few nanometers. Because of their nanometer-size features, nanocomposites possess unique properties typically not shared by more conventional composites. Polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites can attain a certain degree of stiffness, strength, and barrier properties with far less ceramic content than comparable glass- or mineral-reinforced polymers. Reinforcement of existing and new polyimides by this method offers an opportunity to greatly improve existing polymer properties without altering current synthetic or processing procedures.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of silica gel from siliceous sands of southern Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sdiri

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work aimed to achieve valorization of Albian sands for the preparation of sodium silicates that are commonly used as a precursor to prepare silica gel. A siliceous sand sample was mixed with sodium carbonate and heated at a high temperature (1060 °C to prepare sodium silicates. The sodium silicates were dissolved in distilled water to obtain high quality sodium silicate solution. Hydrochloric acid was then slowly added to the hydrated sodium silicates to obtain silica gel. The collected raw siliceous sands, as well as the prepared silica gels, were characterized by different techniques, such as X-ray fluorescence (XRF, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and thermal analysis (DSC. XRF confirmed that the detrital sand deposits of southern Tunisia contain high amounts of silica, with content ranging from 88.8% to 97.5%. The internal porosity varied between 17% and 22%, and the specific surface area was less than 5 m2/g. After the treatment described above, it was observed that the porosity of the obtained silica gel reached 57% and the specific surface area exceeded 340 m2/g. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms showed that the prepared silica gels are microporous and mesoporous materials with high adsorption capacities. These results suggest that the obtained silica gels are promising materials for numerous environmental applications.

  15. Comparison of silicon nanoparticles and silicate treatments in fenugreek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazaralian, Sanam; Majd, Ahmad; Irian, Saeed; Najafi, Farzaneh; Ghahremaninejad, Farrokh; Landberg, Tommy; Greger, Maria

    2017-06-01

    Silicon (Si) fertilization improves crop cultivation and is commonly added in the form of soluble silicates. However, most natural plant-available Si originates from plant formed amorphous SiO 2 particles, phytoliths, similar to SiO 2 -nanoparticles (SiNP). In this work we, therefore, compared the effect by sodium silicate and that of SiNP on Si accumulation, activity of antioxidative stress enzymes catalase, peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, lignification of xylem cell walls and activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) as well as expression of genes for the putative silicon transporter (PST), defensive (Tfgd 1) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and protein in fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.) grown in hydroponics. The results showed that Si was taken up from both silicate and SiNP treatments and increasing sodium silicate addition increased the translocation of Si to the shoot, while this was not shown with increasing SiNP addition. The silicon transporter PST was upregulated at a greater level when sodium silicate was added compared with SiNP addition. There were no differences in effects between sodium silicate and SiNP treatments on the other parameters measured. Both treatments increased the uptake and accumulation of Si, xylem cell wall lignification, cell wall thickness, PAL activity and protein concentration in seedlings, while there was no effect on antioxidative enzyme activity. Tfgd 1 expression was strongly downregulated in leaves at Si addition. The similarity in effects by silicate and SiNP would be due to that SiNP releases silicate, which may be taken up, shown by a decrease in SiNP particle size with time in the medium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Structural relaxation dynamics and annealing effects of sodium silicate glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, Mohamed; Piazza, Francesco; Guimbretière, Guillaume; Canizarès, Aurélien; Vaills, Yann

    2013-05-09

    Here we report high-precision measurements of structural relaxation dynamics in the glass transition range at the intermediate and short length scale for a strong sodium silicate glass during long annealing times. We evidence for the first time the heterogeneous dynamics at the intermediate range order by probing the acoustic longitudinal frequency in the GHz region by Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy. Or, from in-situ Raman measurements, we show that relaxation is indeed homogeneous at the interatomic length scale. Our results show that the dynamics at the intermediate range order contains two distinct relaxation time scales, a fast and a slow component, differing by about a 10-fold factor below Tg and approaching to one another past the glass transition. The slow relaxation time agrees with the shear relaxation time, proving that Si-O bond breaking constitutes the primary control of structural relaxation at the intermediate range order.

  17. Enhanced electrochemical stability of carbon-coated antimony nanoparticles with sodium alginate binder for sodium-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Feng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The poor cycling stability of antimony during a repeated sodium ion insertion and desertion process is the key issue, which leads to an unsatisfactory application as an anode material in a sodium-ion battery. Addressed at this, we report a facile two-step method to coat antimony nanoparticles with an ultrathin carbon layer of few nanometers (denoted Sb@C NPs for sodium-ion battery anode application. This carbon layer could buffer the volume change of antimony in the charge-discharge process and improve the battery cycle performance. Meanwhile, this carbon coating could also enhance the interfacial stability by firmly connecting the sodium alginate binders through its oxygen-rich surface. Benefitted from these advantages, an improved initial discharge capacity (788.5 mA h g−1 and cycling stability capacity (553 mA h g−1 after 50 times cycle have been obtained in a battery using Sb@C NPs as anode materials at 50 mA g−1. Keywords: Sodium-ion battery, Antimony, Sodium alginate, Liquid-phase reduction, Carbon coating

  18. DESEMPENHO FÍSICO-MECÂNICO DE SOLO ARGILOSO ESTABILIZADO COM CAL E SILICATO DE SÓDIO VISANDO À APLICAÇÃO EM CONSTRUÇÕES RURAIS PHYSICAL AND MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF A CLAYEY SOIL STABILIZED WITH LIME AND SODIUM SILICATE FOR RURAL BUILDING PURPOSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley Jorge Freire

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    O uso de aditivos químicos em solos destinados à construção civil visa melhorar as suas características mecânicas e o seu comportamento sob a ação da água. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar o efeito da incorporação ao solo de estabilizantes químicos (cal e silicato de sódio sobre as propriedades mecânicas de um solo argiloso. Os teores de cal foram de 0%, 6% e 10%, e a dosagem de silicato de sódio foi de 4%. O solo foi submetido a ensaios de caracterização a fim de se determinar seus principais índices físicos. Foram moldados corpos-de-prova cilíndricos com 127 mm de altura e 100 mm de diâmetro, os quais foram curados em câmara úmida por 7, 28 e 56 dias. Após cada período de cura os corpos-de-prova foram submetidos ao ensaio de compressão simples. O ensaio de absorção de água foi realizado aos sete dias. Somente o teor de 10% de cal associada ao silicato de sódio permitiu atingir o mínimo de resistência exigido pela norma para tijolos de solo-cimento, e em termos de capacidade de absorção total, nenhum tratamento atingiu os valores recomendados por essa norma. Os resultados sugerem um uso promissor do silicato de sódio com vistas à melhoria das propriedades físico-mecânicas relacionadas à resistência e à durabilidade de solos destinados à construções rurais.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Solo-cal; resistência à compressão; estabilização de solos; terra para construção.

    Use of chemical stabilizers in earth aims at improving mechanical characteristics and behavior under water influence. The objective of this research was to study the effect of chemical additives (lime and sodium silicate on mechanical properties of a clayey soil. The lime rates in the soil-lime mixtures were 0%, 6%, and 10%, and the sodium silicate rate was 4%. Soil was

  19. Experimental Evaluation of Sodium Silicate-Based Nanosilica against Chloride Effects in Offshore Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Min; Kim, Hak-Young; Heo, Young-Sun; Jung, Sang-Jin

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of a new pore filling material, named sodium silicate-based nanosilica (SS), on resisting the diffusion of the chloride ions. The proposed SS is chosen, mainly due to its smaller particle size, compared to the conventional ethyl silicate-based nanosilica. Each particle of SS is chemically treated to have the negative (−) charge on its surface. Four types of mixes with different amounts of partial replacement with fly ash and slag are prepared. Effect of water to binder ratios (0.35, 0.40, and 0.45) is also examined. Test results showed that the inclusion of SS was significantly beneficial for protecting the concrete from chloride attack. At a given strength, the SS inclusion in concrete was up to three times more effective than the control concrete without SS. It is believed that these excellent results are attributed to the small particle size and the chemical surface treatment of SS. In this study, experiments of compressive strength, hydration heat, accelerated neutralization, and sulfate erosion tests were also conducted to find the general effect of SS inclusion on the fundamental properties and durability of concrete. PMID:25574486

  20. Experimental Evaluation of Sodium Silicate-Based Nanosilica against Chloride Effects in Offshore Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Min Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of a new pore filling material, named sodium silicate-based nanosilica (SS, on resisting the diffusion of the chloride ions. The proposed SS is chosen, mainly due to its smaller particle size, compared to the conventional ethyl silicate-based nanosilica. Each particle of SS is chemically treated to have the negative (− charge on its surface. Four types of mixes with different amounts of partial replacement with fly ash and slag are prepared. Effect of water to binder ratios (0.35, 0.40, and 0.45 is also examined. Test results showed that the inclusion of SS was significantly beneficial for protecting the concrete from chloride attack. At a given strength, the SS inclusion in concrete was up to three times more effective than the control concrete without SS. It is believed that these excellent results are attributed to the small particle size and the chemical surface treatment of SS. In this study, experiments of compressive strength, hydration heat, accelerated neutralization, and sulfate erosion tests were also conducted to find the general effect of SS inclusion on the fundamental properties and durability of concrete.

  1. Improved mechanical and corrosion properties of nickel composite coatings by incorporation of layered silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tientong, J. [University of North Texas, Department of Chemistry, 1155 Union Circle #305070, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Ahmad, Y.H. [Center for Advanced Materials, P.O. Box 2713, Qatar University, Doha (Qatar); Nar, M.; D' Souza, N. [University of North Texas, Department of Mechanical and Energy Engineering, Denton, TX 76207 (United States); Mohamed, A.M.A. [Center for Advanced Materials, P.O. Box 2713, Qatar University, Doha (Qatar); Golden, T.D., E-mail: tgolden@unt.edu [University of North Texas, Department of Chemistry, 1155 Union Circle #305070, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Layered silicates as exfoliated montmorillonite are incorporated into nickel films by electrodeposition, enhancing both corrosion resistance and hardness. Films were deposited onto stainless steel from a plating solution adjusted to pH 9 containing nickel sulfate, sodium citrate, and various concentrations of exfoliated montmorillonite. The presence of the incorporated layered silicate was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The composite films were also compact and smooth like the pure nickel films deposited under the same conditions as shown by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction results showed that incorporation of layered silicates into the film do not affect the nickel crystalline fcc structure. The nanocomposite films exhibited improved stability and adhesion. Pure nickel films cracked and peeled from the substrate when immersed in 3.5% NaCl solution within 5 days, while the nanocomposite films remained attached even after 25 days. The corrosion resistance of the nickel nanocomposites was also improved compared to nickel films. Nickel-layered silicate composites showed a 25% increase in Young's modulus and a 20% increase in hardness over pure nickel films. - Highlights: • 0.05–2% of layered silicates are incorporated into crystalline nickel films. • Resulting composite films had improved stability and adhesion. • Corrosion resistance improved for the composite films. • Hardness improved 20% and young's modulus improved 25% for the composite films.

  2. Metabolic attributes, yield and stability of milk in Jersey cows fed diets containing sodium citrate and sodium bicarbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Tempel Stumpf

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the inclusion of sodium citrate and sodium bicarbonate in the diet of lactating Jersey cows, and its effects on the metabolic attributes, productivity and stability of milk. We evaluated urinary pH, levels of glucose and urea in blood, body weight, body condition score, milk yield, milk stability (ethanol test, and milk physicochemical properties of 17 cows fed diets containing sodium citrate (100 g per cow per day, sodium bicarbonate (40 g per cow per day or no additives. Assessments were made at the 28th and 44th days. Supply of sodium citrate or bicarbonate has no influence on the metabolic attributes, productivity, body weight, and body condition score of the cows, neither on the composition and stability of milk.

  3. Influence of iron on crystallization behavior and thermal stability of the insulating materials - porous calcium silicates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haastrup, Sonja; Yu, Donghong; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2017-01-01

    The properties of porous calcium silicate for high temperature insulation are strongly influenced by impurities. In this work we determine the influence of Fe3+ on the crystallization behavior and thermal stability of hydrothermally derived calcium silicate. We synthesize porous calcium silicate...... with Ca/Si molar ratio of 1, to which Fe2O3 is added with Fe/Si molar ratios of 0.1, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0, and 1.3%. Structure and morphology of the porous calcium silicate, with different iron concentrations, are investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). FTIR...... measurements reveal a pronounced decrease in the number of Q3 sites in the calcium silicate with an increase of Fe3+, and thereby lower the crystal fraction of xonotlite (Ca6Si6O17(OH)2) phase, and increase the crystal fractions of tobermorite(Ca5Si6O16(OH)2·4H2O) and calcite (CaCO3) phases, as confirmed...

  4. Silicate grout curtains behaviour for the protection of coastal aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elektorowicz, M.; Chifrina, R.; Hesnawi, R.

    1997-01-01

    Tests were performed to evaluate the behaviour of silicate grout with different reagents (ethylacetate - formamide SA and calcium chloride SC) in pure silica sand and natural soils from coastal areas containing organic matter, clayey soil and silica sand. The grouted specimens were tested with simulated fresh and salt water. The setting process during chemical grouting in the soil and sand was studied. The grouting of soil and sand with SA caused a transfer to the environment of some compounds: sodium formate, sodium acetate, ammonia and part of the initial ethylacetate and formamide. This process had a tendency to decrease for approximately 4 months. The stability of specimens was low. The grouting of soil and sand with SC caused no significant contamination of the environment. The increase of pH of environmental water was even less than with SA grouting. Also, the stability of specimens is higher in comparison with SA grouting. Salt water protected the specimens grouted with SA and SC from destruction and prevented contamination

  5. Hydrothermal synthesis of meso porous silica MCM-41 using commercial sodium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melendez O, H. I.; Mercado S, A.; Garcia C, L. A.; Castruita, G.; Perera M, Y A.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, ordered meso porous silica MCM-41 was prepared by hydrothermal synthesis using industrial-grade sodium silicate (Na 2 SiO 3 ) as silica source, hexadecyltrimethyl-ammonium bromide (CTAB) as template agent and ethyl acetate as ph regulator. The influence of CTAB/SiO 2 molar ratio, reaction time, aging temperature, and co-surfactant type on the structural and morphological properties of the obtained silica was studied. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. Ordered meso porous MCM-41 silica was obtained at 80 C by using a range of CTAB/SiO 2 molar ratio from 0.35 to 0.71 and reaction times up to 72 h and isopropanol (i-Pr OH) as co-surfactant. (Author)

  6. The study of thermal interaction and microstructure of sodium silicate/bentonite composite under microwave radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subannajui, Kittitat, E-mail: kittitat.sub@mahidol.ac.th [Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, 272 Rama VI Road, Ratchathewi District, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Center of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Research Unit, Mahidol University, 272 Rama VI Road, Ratchathewi District, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2016-12-01

    The commercial heating oven usually consumes the power around 2500–3000 Watt and the temperature inside the oven is still below 350 °C. If we need to increase a temperature above 500 °C, a special heating setup with a higher power furnace is required. However, in this work, we propose a composite material that interacts with 2.45 GHz 500 Watt microwave and rapidly redeems the thermal energy with the temperature around 600–900 °C. The composite amorphous material easily forms liquid ceramics phase with a high temperature output and responds to the microwave radiation better than that of the solid phase. During the heating process, phase transformation occurs. This method is very effective and can be used to drastically reduce the power consumption of any heating process. - Highlights: • Amorphous phase transforms to liquid phase by microwave radiation. • Pure sodium silicate and pure bentonite cannot show temperature overshoot. • Silicate-bentonite composite shows a high temperature overshoot above 700 °C. • A rapid heating crucible for the annealing application is fabricated.

  7. Inorganic polymers from laterite using activation with phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution: Mechanical and microstructural properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassinantti Gualtieri, Magdalena, E-mail: magdalena.gualtieri@unimore.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria " Enzo Ferrari" , Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Romagnoli, Marcello [Dipartimento di Ingegneria " Enzo Ferrari" , Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Pollastri, Simone; Gualtieri, Alessandro F. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via S. Eufemia 19I, I-41121 Modena (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Geopolymers from laterite, an iron-rich soil available in developing countries, have great potential as building materials. In this work, laterite from Togo (Africa) was used to prepare geopolymers using both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution. Microstructural properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and mercury porosimetry, whereas thermal properties were evaluated by thermal analyses. The local environment of iron was studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XANES region). The mechanical properties were determined. Modulus of Rupture and Young's modulus fell in the ranges 3.3–4.5 MPa and 12–33 GPa, respectively, rendering the materials good candidates for construction purposes. Heating above 900 °C results in weight-gain, presumably due to iron redox reactions. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy data evidence changes in the chemical and structural environments of iron following thermal treatment of geopolymers. These changes indicate interaction between the geopolymer structure and iron during heating, possibly leading to redox properties. -- Highlights: •Geopolymerization of laterite is promising for fabrication of building materials. •Both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution can be used for activation. •Thermally activated redox properties of the inorganic polymers were observed.

  8. Inorganic polymers from laterite using activation with phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution: Mechanical and microstructural properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enzo Ferrari, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy))" data-affiliation=" (Dipartimento di Ingegneria Enzo Ferrari, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy))" >Lassinantti Gualtieri, Magdalena; Enzo Ferrari, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy))" data-affiliation=" (Dipartimento di Ingegneria Enzo Ferrari, Università degli studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy))" >Romagnoli, Marcello; Pollastri, Simone; Gualtieri, Alessandro F.

    2015-01-01

    Geopolymers from laterite, an iron-rich soil available in developing countries, have great potential as building materials. In this work, laterite from Togo (Africa) was used to prepare geopolymers using both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution. Microstructural properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and mercury porosimetry, whereas thermal properties were evaluated by thermal analyses. The local environment of iron was studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XANES region). The mechanical properties were determined. Modulus of Rupture and Young's modulus fell in the ranges 3.3–4.5 MPa and 12–33 GPa, respectively, rendering the materials good candidates for construction purposes. Heating above 900 °C results in weight-gain, presumably due to iron redox reactions. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy data evidence changes in the chemical and structural environments of iron following thermal treatment of geopolymers. These changes indicate interaction between the geopolymer structure and iron during heating, possibly leading to redox properties. -- Highlights: •Geopolymerization of laterite is promising for fabrication of building materials. •Both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution can be used for activation. •Thermally activated redox properties of the inorganic polymers were observed

  9. Hydrothermal synthesis of meso porous silica MCM-41 using commercial sodium silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendez O, H. I.; Mercado S, A.; Garcia C, L. A.; Castruita, G.; Perera M, Y A., E-mail: ivan_melendez380@hotmail.com [Centro de Investigacion en Quimica Aplicada, Bldv. Enrique Reyna Hermosillo No. 140, Saltillo 25294, Coahuila (Mexico)

    2013-08-01

    In this work, ordered meso porous silica MCM-41 was prepared by hydrothermal synthesis using industrial-grade sodium silicate (Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}) as silica source, hexadecyltrimethyl-ammonium bromide (CTAB) as template agent and ethyl acetate as ph regulator. The influence of CTAB/SiO{sub 2} molar ratio, reaction time, aging temperature, and co-surfactant type on the structural and morphological properties of the obtained silica was studied. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. Ordered meso porous MCM-41 silica was obtained at 80 C by using a range of CTAB/SiO{sub 2} molar ratio from 0.35 to 0.71 and reaction times up to 72 h and isopropanol (i-Pr OH) as co-surfactant. (Author)

  10. Oriented color centres being formed in anisotropic action of optical radiation on sodium-silicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barinova, N.A.; Glebov, L.B.; Dokuchaev, V.G.; Savel'ev, V.L.

    1992-01-01

    A study was made of anisotropy of absorption of hole colour centres appearing in sodium-silicate glass due to anisotropic action of UV radiation. In case of such action in the field of long-wave edge of their fundamental absorption oriented hole colour centres occurs with maximum of absorption bands to 2.0, 2.8, 4.1 eV. Principal direction of hole colour centres orientation in this case coincides with orientation of ionized glass matrix centres. Orientation of such kind is connected with selective ionization of disorderedly oriented centres forming edge of fundamental absorption. Value of guided dichroism of colour centres absorption is determined by hole migration

  11. Sodium Silicate Gel Effect on Cemented Tailing Backfill That Contains Lead-Zinc Smelting Slag at Early Ages

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Lijie; Li, Wenchen; Yang, Xiaocong; Xu, Wenyuan

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study on the priming effect of sodium silicate gel (SS) on cemented tailing backfill (CTB) that contains lead-zinc smelting slag. CTB and cemented paste (CP) containing lead-zinc smelting slag samples with SS of 0 and 0.4% of the mass of the slag were prepared and cured at 20°C for 1, 3, 7, and 28 days. Mechanical test and pore structure analyses were performed on the studied CTB samples, microstructural analyses (X-ray diffraction analysis a...

  12. Effect of Moisture Content of Chitin-Calcium Silicate on Rate of Degradation of Cefotaxime Sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nimry, Suhair S; Alkhamis, Khouloud A

    2018-04-01

    Assessment of incompatibilities between active pharmaceutical ingredient and pharmaceutical excipients is an important part of preformulation studies. The objective of the work was to assess the effect of moisture content of chitin calcium silicate of two size ranges (two specific surface areas) on the rate of degradation of cefotaxime sodium. The surface area of the excipient was determined using adsorption method. The effect of moisture content of a given size range on the stability of the drug was determined at 40°C in the solid state. The moisture content was determined at the beginning and the end of the kinetic study using TGA. The degradation in solution was studied for comparison. Increasing the moisture content of the excipient of size range 63-180 μm (surface area 7.2 m 2 /g) from 3.88 to 8.06% increased the rate of degradation of the drug more than two times (from 0.0317 to 0.0718 h -1 ). While an opposite trend was observed for the excipient of size range moisture content moisture content of 8.54%, and the degradation in solid state at both moisture contents was higher than that in solution (0.0871 h -1 ). In conclusion, the rate of degradation in solid should be studied taking into consideration the specific surface area and moisture content of the excipient at the storage condition and it may be higher than that in solution.

  13. Sodium caseinate stabilized zein colloidal particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashok R; Bouwens, Elisabeth C M; Velikov, Krassimir P

    2010-12-08

    The present work deals with the preparation and stabilization of zein colloidal particles using sodium caseinate as electrosteric stabilizer. Colloidal particles with well-defined size range (120-150 nm) and negative surface potential (-29 to -47 mV) were obtained using a simple antisolvent precipitation method. Due to the presence of caseinate, the stabilized colloidal particles showed a shift of isoelectric point (IEP) from 6.0 to around pH 5.0 and thus prevent the aggregation of zein near its native IEP (pH 6.2). The particles also showed good stability to varying ionic strength (15 mM-1.5 M NaCl). Furthermore, stabilized particles retained the property of redispersibility after drying. In vitro protein hydrolysis study confirmed that the presence of caseinate did not alter the digestibility of zein. Such colloidal particles could potentially serve as all-natural delivery systems for bioactive molecules in food, pharmaceutical, and agricultural formulations.

  14. Effect of antimony-oxide on the shielding properties of some sodium-boro-silicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoulfakar, A M; Abdel-Ghany, A M; Abou-Elnasr, T Z; Mostafa, A G; Salem, S M; El-Bahnaswy, H H

    2017-09-01

    Some sodium-silicate-boro-antimonate glasses having the molecular composition [(20) Na 2 O - (20) SiO 2 - (60-x) B 2 O 3 - (x) Sb 2 O 3 (where x takes the values 0, 5 … or 20)] have been prepared by the melt quenching method. The melting and annealing temperatures were 1500 and 650K respectively. The amorphous nature of the prepared samples was confirmed by using X-ray diffraction analysis. Both the experimental and empirical density and molar volume values showed gradual increase with increasing Sb 2 O 3 content. The empirical densities showed higher values than those obtained experimentally, while the empirical molar volume values appeared lower than those obtained experimentally, which confirm the amorphous nature and randomness character of the studied samples. The experimentally obtained shielding parameters were approximately coincident with those obtained theoretically by applying WinXCom program. At low gamma-ray energies (0.356 and 0.662MeV) Sb 2 O 3 has approximately no effect on the total Mass Attenuation Coefficient, while at high energies it acts to increase the total Mass Attenuation Coefficient gradually. The obtained Half Value Layer and Mean Free Path values showed gradual decrease as Sb 2 O 3 was gradually increased. Also, the Total Mass Attenuation Coefficient values obtained between about 0.8 and 3.0MeV gamma-ray energy showed a slight decrease, as gamma-ray photon energy increased. This may be due to the differences between the Attenuation Coefficients of both antimony and boron oxides at various gamma-ray photon energies. However, it can be stated that the addition of Sb 2 O 3 into sodium-boro-silicate glasses increases the gamma-ray Attenuation Coefficient and the best sample is that contains 20 mol% of Sb 2 O 3 , which is operating well at 0.356 and 0.662MeV gamma-ray. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Stability of sodium bicarbonate solutions in polyolefin bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wear, Jennifer; McPherson, Timothy B; Kolling, William M

    2010-06-15

    The stability of sodium bicarbonate solutions in sterile water for injection or 5% dextrose injection stored at 21-24 degrees C or 2-4 degrees C was evaluated. Sodium bicarbonate injection was obtained in 50-mL vials of 8.4% (1 meq/mL). A total of 50, 100, or 150 meq of sodium bicarbonate was added to each 1-L polyolefin bag of either sterile water for injection or 5% dextrose injection. All solutions were prepared in a laminar-airflow hood using aseptic technique. Bags were punctured once to remove headspace air and once for the addition of each 50 meq of sodium bicarbonate. Six replicates of each test solution were prepared. The solutions were stored at 21-24 degrees C and 2-4 degrees C. Control solutions (50 and 150 meq) were similarly prepared in triplicate. Control solutions were sparged with either nitrogen gas or oxygen gas before storage. Sodium bicarbonate stability was assessed by measuring solution pH. Bicarbonate content was measured utilizing titration. Both pH and bicarbonate concentrations were measured immediately upon preparation and on days 3, 5, and 7 for both test and control solutions. All 95% confidence interval values for sample solution pH remained within 7.0-8.5 for seven days at 2-4 degrees C. Sodium bicarbonate solutions of 50, 100, and 150 meq in sterile water for injection or 5% dextrose injection were stable for up to seven days when refrigerated. The 50-meq solution was stable for up to 48 hours when stored at room temperature, and the 100- and 150-meq solutions were stable for up to 30 hours when stored at room temperature.

  16. Ionic conductivity of sodium silicate glasses grown within confined volume of mesoporous silica template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Soumi; Saha, Shyamal Kumar; Chakravorty, Dipankar

    2018-04-01

    Nanodimensional sodium silicate glasses of composition 30Na2O.70SiO2 has been prepared within the pores of 5.5 nm of mesoporous silica as a template using the surfactant P123. The nanocomposite was characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Electrical conductivity of the sample was studied by ac impedance spectroscopy. The activation energy for ionic conduction was found to be 0.13 eV with dc conductivity at room temperature of 10-6 S-cm-1. This is attributed to the creation of oxygen ion vacancies at the interface of mesoporous silica and nanoglass arising out of the presence of Si2+ species in the system. These nanocomposites are expected to be useful for applications in sodiumion battery for storage of renewable energy.

  17. Compatibility and stability of aloxi (palonosetron hydrochloride) admixed with dexamethasone sodium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trissel, Lawrence A; Zhang, Yanping

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the physical and chemical stability of palonosetron hydrochloride 0.25 mg admixed with dexamethasone (as sodium phophate) 10 mg or 20 mg in 5% dextrose injection or 0.9% sodium chloride injection in polyvinylchloride minibags, and also admixed with dexamethasone (as sodium phosphate) 3.3 mg in 5% dextrose injection or 0.9% sodium chloride injection in polypropylene syringes, at 4 deg C stored in the dark for 14 days, and at 23 deg C exposed to normal laboratory fluorescent light over 48 hours. Test samples of palonosetron hydrochloride 5 micrograms/mL with dexamethasone (as sodium phosphate) 0.2 mg/mL and also 0.4 mg/mL were prepared in polyvinylchloride minibags of each infusion solution. Additionally, palonosetron hydrochloride 25 micrograms/mL with dexamethasone (as sodium phosphate) 0.33 mg/mL in each infusion solution were prepared as 10 mL of test solution in 20-mL polypropylene syringes. Evaluations for physical and chemical stability were performed on samples taken initially and after 1, 3, 7 and 14 days of storage at 4 deg C and after 1, 4, 24 and 48 hours at 23 deg C. Physical stability was assessed using visual observation in normal room light and using a high-intensity monodirectional light beam. In addition, turbidity and particle content were measured electronically. Chemical stability of the drug was evaluated by using a stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatographic analytical technique. All samples were physically compatible throughout the study. The solutions remained clear and showed little or no change in particulate burden and haze level. Additionally, little or no loss of palonosetron hydrochloride and dexamethasone occurred in any of the samples at either temperature throughout the entire study period. Admixtures of palonosetron hydrochloride with dexamethasone sodium phosphate in 5% dextrose injection or in 0.9% sodium chloride injection packaged in polyvinylchloride minibags or in

  18. Relationship between the color stability and impurity profile of cefotaxime sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hua; Cui, Xuejun; Liu, Baoshu; Zhang, Junli

    2017-09-15

    The color grade, mainly introduced in the processes of semisynthesis and storage, is an important index used to evaluate the quality of cefotaxime sodium. Because the drug itself is prone to degradation under susceptible conditions, including those involving moisture, heat, ultraviolet light, acids, alkalis, and oxidants, and a series of degradation products as impurities are generated. In this study, the factors affecting color grade stability and the degradation mechanisms of cefotaxime sodium were investigated by designing different accelerated stability tests under the aforementioned conditions. The degradation extent was studied by using analytical methods, such as a solution color comparison method, ultraviolet spectrophotometry, and HPLC. The relationship between the color grade stability of cefotaxime sodium and its impurity profile has been explored, and a reasonable degradation mechanism has been proposed. The manufacturing conditions of inspection have been optimized, and a scientific basis for drug packaging, storage, and transportation conditions has been established. The results show that the color grade stability of cefotaxime sodium is related to the impurity profile to some degree, and the difference between the actual color and the standard color can reflect the levels of impurities to some extent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Stability constants for silicate adsorbed to ferrihydrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Christian Bruun; Wetche, T.P.; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten

    1994-01-01

    Intrinsic surface acidity constants (K(a1)intr, K(a2)intr) and surface complexation constant for adsorption of orthosilicate onto synthetic ferrihydrite (K(Si) for the complex = FeOSi(OH)3) have been determined from acid/base titrations in 0.001-0.1 m NaClO4 electrolytes and silicate adsorption...... experiments in 0.01 m NaNO3 electrolyte (pH 3-6). The surface equilibrium constants were calculated according to the two-layer model by Dzombak & Morel (1990). Near equilibrium between protons/hydroxyls in solution and the ferrihydrite surface was obtained within minutes while equilibration with silicate...

  20. Stability of extemporaneously prepared sodium phenylbutyrate oral suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruthers, Regine L; Johnson, Cary E

    2007-07-15

    In an effort to minimize barriers to compliance and adherence and to improve the accuracy of dosage measurement, sugar-containing and sugar-free sodium phenylbutyrate suspensions were formulated, and the stability of these products over a 90-day period was determined. An oral suspension of sodium phenylbutyrate 200 mg/mL was prepared by thoroughly grinding 12 g of Sodium Phenylbutyrate Powder, USP, in a glass mortar. Thirty milliliters of Ora-Plus and 30 mL of either Ora-Sweet or Ora-Sweet SF were mixed and added to the powder to make a final volume of 60 mL. Three identical samples of each formulation were prepared and placed in 2-oz amber plastic bottles with child-resistant caps and were stored at room temperature. A 500-microL sample was withdrawn from each of the six bottles with a micropipette immediately after preparation and at 7, 14, 28, 60, and 90 days. After further dilution to an expected concentration of 100 microg/mL with the mobile phase, the samples were assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Stability was defined as the retention of at least 90% of the initial concentration. At least 95% of the initial sodium phenylbutyrate concentration remained throughout the 90-day study period in both preparations. There were no detectable changes in color, odor, taste, and pH and no visible microbial growth in any sample. Extemporaneously compounded suspensions of sodium phenylbutyrate, 200 mg/mL, in a 1:1 mixture of Ora-Plus and Ora-Sweet or Ora-Sweet SF were stable for at least 90 days when stored in 2-oz amber plastic bottles at room temperature.

  1. Formation of magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) cement pastes using sodium hexametaphosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Tingting [Faculty of Infrastructure Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Department of Materials, Centre for Advanced Structural Ceramics, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Vandeperre, Luc J. [Department of Materials, Centre for Advanced Structural Ceramics, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cheeseman, Christopher R., E-mail: c.cheeseman@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    Magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) gel is formed by the reaction of brucite with amorphous silica during sulphate attack in concrete and M-S-H is therefore regarded as having limited cementing properties. The aim of this work was to form M-S-H pastes, characterise the hydration reactions and assess the resulting properties. It is shown that M-S-H pastes can be prepared by reacting magnesium oxide (MgO) and silica fume (SF) at low water to solid ratio using sodium hexametaphosphate (NaHMP) as a dispersant. Characterisation of the hydration reactions by x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis shows that brucite and M-S-H gel are formed and that for samples containing 60 wt.% SF and 40 wt.% MgO all of the brucites react with SF to form M-S-H gel. These M-S-H cement pastes were found to have compressive strengths in excess of 70 MPa.

  2. Studies on gelation of sodium silicate hydrosol for immobilization of high level liquid waste (HLLW).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Raouf, M W [Hot Lab. Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Sharaf El-deen, A N; El-Dessouky, M M [Military Technical College, Kobry El-Kobbah, Cairo (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    Immobilization of the simulated high-level liquid waste (HLLW) was performed via the gelation with sodium silicate hydrosol at room temperature. The simulated waste in this study, was represented by the electrolytes of Li, Na, K, Cs, Co and Sr at different concentrations. Specific loading of the liquid waste with 0.6 M Mg (NO{sub 3})2 and tailoring with Al salts were tried during most of the gelation processes. Mineral acid (HCl or {sub 3}) were added during the gelation processes to achieve the gel point, especially when lower concentrations of the simulated waste were used. The obtained hydrogel were dried to obtain the solid gel form. The gelation processes were investigated in terms of the different factors that affected them, namely: temperature, pH, changes in the concentration of the initial hydrosol and the used electrolytes. The efficiency of the gelation processes was investigated from the ratio of the amount of simulated waste reacted (m mole) to the initial silicate used (m mole), i.e. X value. Lower X values were observed when using multi valent cations (higher polarizing power). A special effect of increasing the sorption of metal cations in the silica matrix was observed when Al{sup 3+} replaced Si{sup 4+} in the three-dimensional network structure of the matrix. 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Effect of antioxidants and silicates on peroxides in povidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Ajit S; Rao, Venkatramana M; Desai, Divyakant S

    2012-01-01

    Reactive peroxides in povidone often lead to degradation of oxidation-labile drugs. To reduce peroxide concentration in povidone, the roles of storage conditions, antioxidants, and silicates were investigated. Povidone alone and its physical mixtures with ascorbic acid, propyl gallate, sodium sulfite, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), or butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) were stored at 25 °C and 40 °C, at 11%, 32%, and 50% relative humidity. In addition, povidone solution in methanol was equilibrated with silicates (silica gel and molecular sieves), followed by solvent evaporation to recover povidone powder. Peroxide concentrations in povidone were measured. The concentration of peroxides in povidone increased under very-low-humidity storage conditions. Among the antioxidants, ascorbic acid, propyl gallate, and sodium sulfite reduced the peroxide concentration in povidone, whereas BHA and BHT did not. Water solubility appeared to determine the effectiveness of antioxidants. Also, some silicates significantly reduced peroxide concentration in povidone without affecting its functionality as a tablet binder. Porosity of silicates was critical to their ability to reduce the peroxide concentration in povidone. A combination of these approaches can reduce the initial peroxide concentration in povidone and minimize peroxide growth under routine storage conditions. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Physical and oxidative stability of high fat fish oil-in-water emulsions stabilized with combinations of sodium caseinate and sodium alginate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yesiltas, Betül; García Moreno, Pedro Jesús; Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke

    2017-01-01

    .2 ratio NaCas:NaAlg by Box-Behnken's design, the formulae 70%-1.4%-1.2 was decided due to high fish oil content's decreasing effect on droplet size and peroxide value. Practical applications: Physically and oxidatively stable high fat (50-70%) omega-3 delivery fish oil-in-water emulsions are of high......A systematic study was carried out in order to evaluate the physical and oxidative stability of high fat omega-3 delivery fish oil-in-water emulsions stabilized with combinations of sodium caseinate (NaCas) and sodium alginate (NaAlg). The influence of 3 factors related to emulsion composition...... (fish oil content: 50, 60 and 70%; total amount of NaCas and NaAlg: 1.4, 2.1 and 2.8 %; and ratio NaCas:NaAlg: 0.4, 1.2 and 2) on physical (droplet size, viscosity and zeta potential) and oxidative (primary and secondary oxidation products) parameters was evaluated. It was possible to produce emulsions...

  5. KINETICS OF A SILICATE COMPOSITION GELATION IN PRESENCE OF REACTION RATE REGULATING COMPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Titova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of organic and inorganic additions on the formation rate of the silicate gels standard systems – sodium silicate solution in model fresh water was studied. As a result of the experiments were selected optimum concentrations of additives - gelation time regulators

  6. Transglutaminase catalyzed cross-linking of sodium caseinate improves oxidative stability of flaxseed oil emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hairan; Forssell, Pirkko; Kylli, Petri; Lampi, Anna-Maija; Buchert, Johanna; Boer, Harry; Partanen, Riitta

    2012-06-20

    Sodium caseinate was modified by transglutaminase catalyzed cross-linking reaction prior to the emulsification process in order to study the effect of cross-linking on the oxidative stability of protein stabilized emulsions. The extent of the cross-linking catalyzed by different dosages of transglutaminase was investigated by following the ammonia production during the reaction and using SDS-PAGE gel. O/W emulsions prepared with the cross-linked and non-cross-linked sodium caseinates were stored for 30 days under the same conditions. Peroxide value measurement, oxygen consumption measurement, and headspace gas chromatography analysis were used to study the oxidative stability of the emulsions. The emulsion made of the cross-linked sodium caseinate showed an improved oxidative stability with reduced formation of fatty acid hydroperoxides and volatiles and a longer period of low rate oxygen consumption. The improving effect of transglutaminase catalyzed cross-linking could be most likely attributed to the enhanced physical stability of the interfacial protein layer against competitive adsorption by oil oxidation products.

  7. Sodium silicate solutions from dissolution of glasswastes. Statistical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres-Carrasco, M.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available It has studied the solubility process of four different waste glasses (with different particle sizes, 125 µm in alkaline solutions (NaOH and NaOH/Na₂CO₃ and water as a reference and under different conditions of solubility (at room temperature, at 80°C and a mechano-chemical process. Have established the optimal conditions of solubility and generation of sodium silicates solutions, and these were: the smaller particle size (Se ha estudiado el proceso de solubilidad de cuatro diferentes residuos vítreos (con distintas granulometrías, 125 µm en disoluciones alcalinas de NaOH y NaOH/Na₂CO₃ y agua como medio de referencia y bajo distintas condiciones de solubilidad (a temperatura ambiente, a 80°C y con un proceso mecano-químico. Se han establecido las condiciones óptimas de solubilidad y generación de disoluciones de silicato sódico, y estas son: menor tamaño de partícula del residuo vítreo (inferior a 45 µm, con la disolución de NaOH/Na₂CO₃ y tratamiento térmico a 80°C durante 6 horas de agitación. El análisis estadístico realizado a los resultados obtenidos da importancia a las variables estudiadas y a las interacciones de las mismas. A través de ²⁹Si RMN MAS se ha confirmado la formación, tras los procesos de disolución, de un silicato monomérico, apto para su utilización como activador en la preparación de cementos y hormigones alcalinos.

  8. Regularities in Low-Temperature Phosphatization of Silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savenko, A. V.

    2018-01-01

    The regularities in low-temperature phosphatization of silicates are defined from long-term experiments on the interaction between different silicate minerals and phosphate-bearing solutions in a wide range of medium acidity. It is shown that the parameters of the reaction of phosphatization of hornblende, orthoclase, and labradorite have the same values as for clayey minerals (kaolinite and montmorillonite). This effect may appear, if phosphotization proceeds, not after silicate minerals with a different structure and composition, but after a secondary silicate phase formed upon interaction between silicates and water and stable in a certain pH range. Variation in the parameters of the reaction of phosphatization at pH ≈ 1.8 is due to the stability of the silicate phase different from that at higher pH values.

  9. Reduction-induced inward diffusion and crystal growth on the surfaces of iron-bearing silicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, S.J.; Tao, H.Z.; Zhang, Y.F.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the sodium inward diffusion (i.e., sodium diffusion from surface toward interior) in iron containing alkaline earth silicate glasses under reducing conditions around Tg and the induced surface crystallization. The surface crystallization is caused by formation of a silicate-gel lay......+ ions have stronger bonds to oxygen and lower coordination number (4~5) than Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+ ions. In contrast, a cristobalite layer forms in Ca-, Sr- and Ba-containing glasses....

  10. Formation mechanisms of colloidal silica via sodium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, M.-S.; Huang, P.Y.; Yang, C.-H.

    2006-01-01

    Colloidal silica is formed by titrating active silicic acid into a heated KOH with seed solution. The colloidal silica formation mechanisms are investigated by sampling the heated solution during titration. In the initial stage, the added seeds were dissolved. This might due to the dilution of seed concentration, the addition of potassium hydroxide (KOH) and the heating at 100 deg. C. Homogenous nucleation and surface growth occur simultaneously in the second stage of colloidal silica formation. Homogenous nucleation is more important when the seed concentration is relatively low. On the other hand, surface growth plays an important role when the seed concentration is increased. In the middle seed concentration, the seed particles grow up and some new small particles are born by the homogenous nucleation process to form a bimodal size distribution product. As the titrating volume of active silicic acid exceeds a specific value in the last stage the particle size increases rapidly and the particle number decreases, which may be caused by the aggregation of particles. The intervals between each stage were varied with the seed concentration. Increasing the seed concentration led to the formation of uniform particle size colloidal silica

  11. Synthesis of non-siliceous mesoporous oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Dong; Schüth, Ferdi

    2014-01-07

    Mesoporous non-siliceous oxides have attracted great interest due to their unique properties and potential applications. Since the discovery of mesoporous silicates in 1990s, organic-inorganic assembly processes by using surfactants or block copolymers as soft templates have been considered as a feasible path for creating mesopores in metal oxides. However, the harsh sol-gel conditions and low thermal stabilities have limited the expansion of this method to various metal oxide species. Nanocasting, using ordered mesoporous silica or carbon as a hard template, has provided possibilities for preparing novel mesoporous materials with new structures, compositions and high thermal stabilities. This review concerns the synthesis, composition, and parameter control of mesoporous non-siliceous oxides. Four synthesis routes, i.e. soft-templating (surfactants or block copolymers as templates), hard-templating (mesoporous silicas or carbons as sacrificial templates), colloidal crystal templating (3-D ordered colloidal particles as a template), and super lattice routes, are summarized in this review. Mesoporous metal oxides with different compositions have different properties. Non-siliceous mesoporous oxides are comprehensively described, including a discussion of constituting elements, synthesis, and structures. General aspects concerning pore size control, atomic scale crystallinity, and phase control are also reviewed.

  12. Water speciation in sodium silicate glasses (quenched melts): A comprehensive NMR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, X.; Kanzaki, M.; Eguchi, J.

    2012-12-01

    Dissolution mechanism of water is an important factor governing how the dissolved water affects the physical and thermodynamic properties of silicate melts and glasses. Our previous studies have demonstrated that 1H MAS NMR in combination with 29Si-1H and 27Al-1H double-resonance NMR experiments is an effective approach for unambiguously differentiating and quantifying different water species in quenched silicate melts (glasses). Several contrasting dissolution mechanisms have been revealed depending on the melt composition: for relatively polymerized melts, the formation of SiOH/AlOH species (plus molecular H2O) and depolymerization of the network structure dominate; whereas for depolymerized Ca-Mg silicate melts, free OH (e.g. MgOH) become increasingly important (cf. [1]). The proportion of free OH species has been shown to decrease with both increasing melt polymerization (silica content) and decreasing field strength of the network modifying cations (from Mg to Ca). Our previous 1H and 29Si MAS NMR results for hydrous Na silicate glasses of limited compositions (Na2Si4O9 and Na2Si2O5) were consistent with negligible free OH (NaOH) species and depolymerizing effect of water dissolution [2]. On the other hand, there were also other studies that proposed the presence of significant NaOH species in hydrous glasses near the Na2Si2O5 composition. The purpose of this study is apply the approach of combined 1H MAS NMR and double-resonance (29Si-1H and 23Na-1H) NMR to gain unambiguous evidence for the OH speciation in Na silicate glasses (melts) as a function of composition. Hydrous Na silicate glasses containing mostly ≤ 1 wt% H2O for a range of Na/Si ratios from 0.33 to 1.33 have been synthesized by rapidly quenching melts either at 0.2 GPa using an internally heated gas pressure vessel or at 1 GPa using a piston cylinder high-pressure apparatus. NMR spectra have been acquired using a 9.4 T Varian Unity-Inova spectrometer. The 29Si and 1H chemical shifts are

  13. Stability-Indicating Assay for the Determination of Pentobarbital Sodium in Liquid Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Ajemni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A stability-indicating assay by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC method was developed for the determination of pentobarbital sodium in oral formulations: a drug used for infant sedation in computed tomography (CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scan. The chromatographic separation was achieved on a reversed-phase C18 column, using isocratic elution and a detector set at 214 nm. The optimized mobile phase consisted of a 0.01 M potassium buffer pH 3 and methanol (40 : 60, v/v. The flow rate was 1.0 mL/min and the run time of analysis was 5 min. The linearity of the method was demonstrated in the range of 5 to 250 μg/mL pentobarbital sodium solution (r2 = 0.999. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were 2.10 and 3.97 μg/mL, respectively. The intraday and interday precisions were less than 2.1%. Accuracy of the method ranged from 99.2 to 101.3%. Stability studies indicate that the drug is stable to sunlight and in aqueous solution. Accelerated pentobarbital sodium breakdown by strong alkaline, acidic, or oxidative stress produced noninterfering peaks. This method allows accurate and reliable determination of pentobarbital sodium for drug stability assay in pharmaceutical studies.

  14. Deinking of different furnishes of recycled MOW, ONP, and OMG pulps in silicate-free conditions using organic complex of PHASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Akbarpour

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Sodium silicate causes problems in papermaking such as deposit formation, decreased retention, and lower sheet strength. Due to these problems, chemical deinking of different recycled papers furnishes including 100% ONP, 80% ONP, and 20% OMG, and a combination of 70% ONP/ 20% OMG/ 10% MOW was accomplished using an organic complexing agent which included poly-hydroxyl acrylic acid and sodium salt (PHAAS in silicate-free conditions. PHAAS was utilized at four levels of 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and 1% (based on oven-dry weight of recycled paper rather than sodium silicate. The optical and physical properties of deinked pulp were compared to control pulp (conventional deinking containing 2% sodium silicate. The results showed that the paper brightness was improved and the yellowness, dirt count, and dirt area were decreased significantly by increasing PHAAS charge up to 0.9%. Also, in different recycled paper furnishes above mentioned, using different charges of PHAAS had different effects on paper opacity. Using different charges of PHAAS (especially 0.7 to 0.9% decreased paper caliper, increased paper air resistance, increased freeness, and gave similar or slightly better paper tear indices. Differences of tear indices were not significant at confidence level of 99%. Based on the present research, the use of 0.7 to 0.9% PHAAS in place of sodium silicate is advisable because of the better quality of final papers compared to conventional deinking process.

  15. UTILIZATION OF RICE HUSK AS RAW MATERIAL IN SYNTHESIS OF MESOPOROUS SILICATES MCM-41

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyanta Suyanta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The research about synthesis and characterization of MCM-41 from rice husk has been done. Silica (SiO2 was extracted from rice husk by refluxing with 3M hydrochloric solution at 80 °C for 3 h. The acid-leached rice husk was filtered, washed, dried and calcined at 650 °C for 6 h lead the rough powder of rice husk silica with light brown in color. Characterization was carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD and FTIR spectroscopy method. Rice husk silica was dissolved into the sodium hydroxide solution leading to the solution of sodium silicate, and used as silica source for the synthesis of MCM-41. MCM-41 was synthesized by hydrothermal process to the mixture prepared from 29 g of distilled water, 8.67 g of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTMAB, 9.31 g of sodium silicate solution, and amount mL of 1 M H2SO4. Hydrothermal process was carried out at 100 °C in a teflon-lined stainless steel autoclave heated in the oven for 36 h. The solid phase was filtered, then washed with deionised water, and dried in the oven at 100 °C for 2 h. The surfactant CTMAB was removed by calcination at 550 °C for 10 h with heating rate 2 °C/min. The as-synthesized and calcined crystals were characterized by using FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and N2 physisorption methods. In order to investigate the effect of silica source, the same procedure was carried out by using pure sodium silicate as silica source. It was concluded that silica extracted from rice husk can be used as raw materials in the synthesis of MCM-41, there is no significant difference in crystallinity and pore properties when was compared to material produced from commercial sodium silicate.

  16. Development of Silicate Extraction Method for Detection of Irradiated Potatoes by Thermoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teerasarn, Wannapha; Sudprasert, Wanwisa

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Thermoluminescence (TL) is a promising technique used for detection of irradiated foods. In practice, silicate minerals are first isolated from foods by density gradient with sodium poly tungstate of a density 2.0 g/cm 3 , which is very expensive. The study was carried out to develop a new low-cost reagent for silicate extraction. The silicate minerals were extracted from irradiated potatoes (at doses of 0, 0.05, 0.15, 0.25, 0.5 and 1 kGy) using potassium carbonate of a density 2 g/cm 3 . X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD) was employed to investigate the types of silicate minerals present in the extracts. The TL measurement was performed to identify the irradiation status of the samples using a TL reader. The results showed that quartz was found as the major mineral of the samples. The TL analysis of glow curve showed that irradiated potatoes exhibited a maximum glow peak between 208-280 c degree, where as non-irradiated potatoes exhibited a maximum glow peak between 289-351 C degree. The results clearly indicated that the silicate minerals can effectively be isolated from potatoes by using potassium carbonate instead of sodium poly tungstate for the purpose of irradiation identification. In this sense, the cost of irradiation identification will be reduced at least 20 times comparing to using the conventional extraction reagent

  17. Stability of i.v. admixture containing metoclopramide, diphenhydramine hydrochloride, and dexamethasone sodium phosphate in 0.9% sodium chloride injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintzel, Polly E; Zhao, Ting; Wen, Bo; Sun, Duxin

    2014-12-01

    The chemical stability of a sterile admixture containing metoclopramide 1.6 mg/mL, diphenhydramine hydrochloride 2 mg/mL, and dexamethasone sodium phosphate 0.16 mg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride injection was evaluated. Triplicate samples were prepared and stored at room temperature without light protection for a total of 48 hours. Aliquots from each sample were tested for chemical stability immediately after preparation and at 1, 4, 8, 24, and 48 hours using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Metoclopramide, diphenhydramine hydrochloride, and dexamethasone sodium phosphate were selectively monitored using multiple-reaction monitoring. Samples were diluted differently for quantitation using three individual LC-MS/MS methods. To determine the drug concentration of the three compounds in the samples, three calibration curves were constructed by plotting the peak area or the peak area ratio versus the concentration of the calibration standards of each tested compound. Apixaban was used as an internal standard. Linearity of the calibration curve was evaluated by the correlation coefficient r(2). Constituents of the admixture of metoclopramide 1.6 mg/mL, diphenhydramine hydrochloride 2 mg/mL, and dexamethasone sodium phosphate 0.16 mg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride injection retained more than 90% of their initial concentrations over 48 hours of storage at room temperature without protection from light. The observed variability in concentrations of these three compounds was within the limits of assay variability. An i.v. admixture containing metoclopramide 1.6 mg/mL, diphenhydramine hydrochloride 2 mg/mL, and dexamethasone sodium phosphate 0.16 mg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride injection was chemically stable for 48 hours when stored at room temperature without light protection. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Effect of Ultrasonic Treatment on Thermal Stability of the Cured Epoxy/Layered Silicate Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Y. Yuhana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ultrasonic treatment on thermal stability of binary systems containing epoxy and organic chemically modified montmorillonite (Cloisite 30B was studied. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD analysis were utilized. The mixing of epoxy and Cloisite 30B nanocomposites was performed by mechanical stirring, followed by 1 or 3-hour ultrasonic treatment, and polyetheramine as the curing agent. Both XRD and TEM analyses confirmed that the intercalation of Cloisite 30B was achieved. The d0 spacings for silicate in cured sample prepared at 1- and 3-hour duration of ultrasonic treatment were about 21 and 18 Å, respectively. This shows that shorter duration or ultrasonic treatment may be preferable to achieve higher d0 spacing of clay. This may be attributed to the increase in viscosity as homopolymerization process occurred, which restricts silicate dispersion. The 1-hour sonicated samples seem to be more thermally stable during the glass transition, but less stable during thermal decomposition process.

  19. Reactions between rocks and the hydroxides of calcium, sodium and potassium: progress report no. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Aardt, J.H.P.; Visser, S.

    1982-01-01

    The reaction between the hydroxides of calcium, sodium and potassium, and clay minerals, feldspars, and some rocks (aggregates for use in concrete) was investigated. The reaction products were examined by means of x-ray diffraction and chemical analysis. The solid reaction products identified were hydrated calcium silicates,hydrated calcium aluminates, and hydrated calcium alumina silicates. It was found that, in the presence of water, calcium hydroxide liberated alkali into solution if the rocks and minerals contained alkali metals in their structure. Two crystalline hydrated sodium calcium silicates (12A and 16A) were prepared in the system Na 2 O-CaO-SiO 2 -H 2 O at 80 degrees Celsius. The one compound (12A) was also observed when sodium hydroxide plus calcium hydroxide and water reacted with silica- or silicate-containing rocks

  20. Stabilized sulfur as cathodes for room temperature sodium-ion batteries.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yunhua [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Liu, Yang [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies; Zhu, Yujie [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Zheng, Shiyou [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Liu, Yihang [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Luo, Chao [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Gaskell, Karen [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Eichhorn, Bryan [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Wang, Chunsheng [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

    2013-05-01

    Sodium-sulfur batteries, offering high capacity and low cost, are promising alternative to lithium-ion batteries for large-scale energy storage applications. The conventional sodium-sulfur batteries, operating at a high temperature of 300–350°C in a molten state, could lead to severe safety problems. However, the room temperature sodium-sulfur batteries using common organic liuid electrolytes still face a significant challenge due to the dissolution of intermediate sodium polysulfides. For this study, we developed room temperatue sodium-sulfur batteries using a unique porous carbon/sulfur (C/S) composite cathode, which was synthesized by infusing sulfur vapor into porous carbon sphere particles at a high temperatrure of 600°C. The porous C/S composites delivered a reversible capacity of ~860 mAh/g and retained 83% after 300 cycles. The Coulombic efficiency of as high as 97% was observed over 300 cycles. The superior electrochemical performance is attrbuted to the super sulfur stability as evidenced by its lower sensitivity to probe beam irradiation in TEM, XPS and Raman charaterization and high evaperation temperature in TGA. The results make it promising for large-scale grid energy storage and electric vehicles.

  1. Preparation of β-belite using liquid alkali silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutník, P.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is the preparation of β-belite by a solid-state reaction using powdered limestone, amorphous silica and liquid alkali silicates. The raw materials were blended, the mixtures were agglomerated and then burnt. The resulting samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Free lime content in the β-belite samples was also determined. The effects of CaO/SiO2 ratio (1.6–2.1), burning temperature (800–1400 °C), utilization of different raw materials (silica fume, synthetic silica, potassium silicate, sodium silicate, potassium hydroxide) and burning time (0.5–16 h) on free lime content and mineralogical composition were investigated. The purest ?-belite samples were prepared from a mixture of powdered limestone, silica fume and liquid potassium silicate with a ratio CaO/SiO2 = 2 by burning at temperatures between 1100 and 1300 °C for more than 2 h. Decreasing of the CaO/SiO2 ratio led to rankinite formation and lower a burning temperature led to the formation of wollastonite. [es

  2. Na2MnSiO4 as an attractive high capacity cathode material for sodium-ion battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Markas; Ramar, Vishwanathan; Balaya, Palani

    2017-08-01

    Here we report a polyanion-based cathode material for sodium-ion batteries, Na2MnSiO4, registering impressive sodium storage performances with discharge capacity of 210 mAh g-1 at an average voltage of 3 V at 0.1 C, along with excellent long-term cycling stability (500 cycles at 1 C). Insertion/extraction of ∼1.5 mol of sodium ion per formula unit of the silicate-based compound is reported and the utilisation of Mn2+ ⇋ Mn4+ redox couple is also demonstrated by ex-situ XPS. Besides, this study involves a systematic investigation of influence of the electrolyte additive (with different content) on the sodium storage performance of Na2MnSiO4. The electrolyte additive forms an optimum protective passivation film on the electrode surface, successfully reducing manganese dissolution.

  3. Synthesis of calcium silicates by Pechini method and exchanging ions of sodium alginate-calcium chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores-Garay, K.A.; Martinez-Luevanos, A.; Cruz-Ortiz, B.R.; Garcia-Cerda, L.A.; Lopez-Badillo, C.M.

    2016-07-01

    Calcium silicates samples were synthesized using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and by Pechini methodology assisted with ion-exchange of sodium alginate, followed by a heat treatment of 800°C by two hours. A, B and C samples were obtained using 1.7×10−3M, 3.4×10−3M and 5.1×10−3M of TEOS, respectively, and without heat treatment; these samples were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and infrared spectroscopy with attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR). Furthermore, samples A800, B800 and C800 obtained using a heat treatment of 800° by two hours were characterized by FTIR-ATR, absorption technique (BET), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and by scanning electron microscopy. The XRD patterns indicate that sample A800 contains olivine (Ca2SiO4) in orthorhombic phase and wollastonite-2M (CaSiO3); sample B800 showed the earlier phases and quartz (SiO2), whereas sample C800 contains wollastonite phases and larnite-2M (Ca2SiO4). (Author)

  4. Characterization and leach investigations of sodium silicate matrices used for immobilization of radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharaf El-Deen, A N; El-Dessouky, M M; Helmy, M A [Petroleum Research Institue, Academy of Scientific Research, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt); Abed Raouf, M W; El-Dessouky, M I [Hot Lab. Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    In this study, simulated liquid waste and radioactive tracers of Cs-137 and Co-60 were used to represent the high-level liquid waste (HLLW). immobilization of the liquid waste was performed by its interaction with commercial sodium silicate hydrosol to the gel point, at room temperature. The candidate waste forms forms were fabricated from the obtained hydrogel through several steps including: drying the hydrogel to a solid gel form, crushing the solid to be in a powder from, pressing the powder to the green disk form using a cold pressing technique and finally the heat treatment of the green disks to the sintered form. Characterization for the obtained waste forms was carried out using: thermal analysis (TGA and DTA), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) techniques and porosity investigation. The leach tests for the prepared forms were conducted according to the international atomic energy agency (IAEA) standard test (static and accelerated). The static test was carried out for simulated and radioactive waste in distilled, bidistilled and ground water for 28 days. The accelerated (Soxhlet) test was conducted for simulated waste in deionized water for 72 hours. 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Effect of Sodium Carboxymethyl Celluloses on Water-catalyzed Self-degradation of 200-degree C-heated Alkali-Activated Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the usefulness of sodium carboxymethyl celluloses (CMC) in promoting self-degradation of 200°C-heated sodium silicate-activated slag/Class C fly ash cementitious material after contact with water. CMC emitted two major volatile compounds, CO2 and acetic acid, creating a porous structure in cement. CMC also reacted with NaOH from sodium silicate to form three water-insensitive solid reaction products, disodium glycolate salt, sodium glucosidic salt, and sodium bicarbonate. Other water-sensitive solid reaction products, such as sodium polysilicate and sodium carbonate, were derived from hydrolysates of sodium silicate. Dissolution of these products upon contact with water generated heat that promoted cement’s self-degradation. Thus, CMC of high molecular weight rendered two important features to the water-catalyzed self-degradation of heated cement: One was the high heat energy generated in exothermic reactions in cement; the other was the introduction of extensive porosity into cement.

  6. Stabilization of magnet assemblies of permanent magnet sodium flowmeters used in fast breeder reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajan, K.K., E-mail: kkrajan@igcar.gov.in; Vijayakumar, G.

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Stabilization procedure for ALNICO-5 permanent magnet material is evolved. • Effect of time and temperature on ALNICO-5 assembly is determined. • Suitability of ALNICO-5 flowmeters at high temperatures is established. • Temperature coefficient of flux density is determined. - Abstract: Permanent magnet flow meters (PMFMs) are used to measure the sodium flow in sodium cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Circuits. Prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR) which is under construction at Kalpakkam is a 500 MWe, sodium cooled, pool type reactor. Sodium flow measurement in various loops of the reactor is of prime importance from operational and safety point of view. To measure the flow of electrically conducting liquid sodium, in primary and secondary circuit pipe lines of PFBR, permanent magnet flow meters are used. PMFM is a non-invasive device, which works on the principle of generation of motional EMF by magnetic forces exerted on the charges in a moving conductor. Flowmeters of different pipe sizes ranging from 10 mm to 200 mm pipe diameter are required for PFBR. Long term performance of the flowmeters mainly depends on stability of permanent magnets used in flowmeters to generate constant magnetic field in stainless steel (SS) pipes. This paper describes the effects of time and temperature on permanent magnet assemblies made of ALNICO-V used in PFBR flowmeters. The stabilization methodology for ALNICO-V permanent magnet assemblies is evolved and established. Loss of magnetic field strength with respect to time and temperatures is determined by experiments and found negligible.

  7. Stability of diclofenac sodium oral suspensions packaged in amber polyvinyl chloride bottles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Ronald F; Pascuet, Elena; Ma, Carmen; Vaillancourt, Régis

    2010-01-01

    Prescribing of diclofenac for children usually involves a dose different from commercially available strengths. This drug is available only as tablets, which can be divided only so many times before the dose obtained becomes inaccurate. In addition, children may have difficulty swallowing tablets. For these reasons, a compounding formula for a liquid dosage form is essential to ensure effective delivery of the drug to pediatric patients. To develop a compounding formula for diclofenac sodium and to determine the extended physical and chemical stability of this compound when stored in amber polyvinyl chloride (PVC) prescription bottles under refrigeration and at room temperature. A suspension of diclofenac sodium (10 mg/mL) was prepared from commercially available diclofenac sodium tablets, with Ora-Blend as the suspending and flavouring agent. The suspension was packaged in 60-mL amber PVC prescription bottles and stored at either room temperature (23°C) or under refrigeration (5°C). Samples were collected on days 0, 7, 14, 21, 27, 56, and 93. Chemical stability was determined using a validated stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography method. At each sampling time, the suspensions were checked for changes in appearance (i.e., colour, layering, caking, ease of resuspension), odour, and pH. The diclofenac sodium suspensions were very stable, retaining at least 99.5% of the original concentration for up to 93 days, regardless of storage temperature. There were no apparent changes in the physical appearance of the suspensions, nor were there any substantial changes in odour or pH. Suspensions of diclofenac sodium (10 mg/mL) were quantitatively stable but difficult to prepare because of the enteric coating of the tablets. Therefore, it is recommended that diclofenac powder be used for the preparation of suspensions. For pediatric use, palatability is a consideration, and a masking agent should be added before administration. An expiry date of up to

  8. Effect of the coexistence of sodium caseinate and Tween 20 as stabilizers of food emulsions at acidic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugini, Luisa; Cinelli, Giuseppe; Cofelice, Martina; Ceglie, Andrea; Lopez, Francesco; Cuomo, Francesca

    2018-02-05

    In the present investigation the properties of edible nanoemulsions were studied. Sodium caseinate represents a good candidate for food emulsion preparations thanks to its surface-active properties and because it is perceived as a natural product by consumers. Nevertheless, it is very sensitive to acidic pH close to its isoelectric point and, if used as emulsion stabilizer, this aspect can negatively affect the emulsion stability. In order to prevent this drawback, sodium caseinate was used in combination with a non-ionic surfactant (Tween 20) as emulsifier of oil/water nanoemulsions. For these reasons, nanoemulsions stabilized by Tween 20, sodium caseinate and by a blend of the two emulsifiers were studied and compared according to their response to pH variations. Nanoemulsions were characterized for size of the dispersed phase with variation of time and temperature, for their rheological properties, for surface charge as a function of pH and for protein fluorescence. Noticeably, it was ascertained that, at pH close to caseinate isoelectric point, emulsions stabilized with the blend of caseinate and Tween 20 were more stable, compared with emulsions stabilized only with sodium caseinate. Such behavior was explained according to the composition of the emulsifiers at the oil/water interface where, at acidic pH, the presence of Tween 20 ensured the steric stabilization thus improving the role of sodium caseinate as emulsion stabilizer. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. USE OF LOCAL NATURAL SILICEOUS RAW MATERIAL AND WASTES FOR PRODUCTION OF HEAT-INSULATING FOAMCONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. U. Matsapulin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the resource base, reserves and the use of siliceous rocks, their economic feasibility of the use for production of building materials of new generation with low-energy and other costs. Presented are the results of laboratory research and testing technology of production of insulating foam from a composition based on an aqueous solution of sodium silicate obtained from the local siliceous rocks (diatomite and the liquid alkali component - soapstock, hardener from ferrochrome slag and waste carbonate rock able to harden at a low temperature processing ( 100-110 ° C.

  10. Improved sugar beet pectin-stabilized emulsions through complexation with sodium caseinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangyang; Fang, Yapeng; Phillips, Glyn O; Al-Assaf, Saphwan

    2013-02-13

    The study investigates the complexes formed between sodium caseinate (SC) and sugar beet pectin (SBP) and to harness them to stabilize SBP emulsions. We find that both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions are involved in the complexation. In SC/SBP mixed solution, soluble SC/SBP complexes first form on acidification and then aggregate into insoluble complexes, which disassociate into soluble polymers upon further decreasing pH. The critical pH's for the formation of soluble and insoluble complexes and disappearance of insoluble complexes are designated as pH(c), pH(φ), and pH(d), respectively. These critical pH values define four regions in the phase diagram of complexation, and SC/SBP emulsions were prepared in these regions. The results show that the stability of SBP-stabilized emulsion is greatly improved at low SC/SBP ratios and acidic pH's. This enhancement can be attributed to an increase in the amount of adsorbed SBP as a result of cooperative adsorption to sodium caseinate. Using a low ratio of SC/SBP ensured that all caseinate molecules are completely covered by adsorbed SBP chains, which eliminates possible instability induced by thermal aggregation of caseinate molecules resulting from stress acceleration at elevated temperatures. A mechanistic model for the behavior is proposed.

  11. Interfacial composition and stability of emulsions made with mixtures of commercial sodium caseinate and whey protein concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Aiqian

    2008-10-15

    The interfacial composition and the stability of oil-in-water emulsion droplets (30% soya oil, pH 7.0) made with mixtures of sodium caseinate and whey protein concentrate (WPC) (1:1 by protein weight) at various total protein concentrations were examined. The average volume-surface diameter (d32) and the total surface protein concentration of emulsion droplets were similar to those of emulsions made with both sodium caseinate alone and WPC alone. Whey proteins were adsorbed in preference to caseins at low protein concentrations (caseins were adsorbed in preference to whey proteins at high protein concentrations. The creaming stability of the emulsions decreased markedly as the total protein concentration of the system was increased above 2% (sodium caseinate >1%). This was attributed to depletion flocculation caused by the sodium caseinate in these emulsions. Whey proteins did not retard this instability in the emulsions made with mixtures of sodium caseinate and WPC. Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of sand base preparation on properties of chromite moulding sands with sodium silicate hardened with selected methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stachowicz M.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a research on the relation between thermal preparation of chromite sand base of moulding sands containing sodium silicate, hardened with selected physical and chemical methods, and structure of the created bonding bridges. Test specimens were prepared of chromite sand - fresh or baked at 950°C for 10 or 24 hours - mixed with 0.5 wt.% of the selected non-modified inorganic binder and, after forming, were hardened with CO2 or liquid esters, dried traditionally or heated with microwaves at 2.45 GHz. It was shown on the grounds of SEM observations that the time of baking the base sand and the hardening method significantly affect structure of the bonding bridges and are correlated with mechanical properties of the moulding sands. It was found that hardening chromite-based moulding mixtures with physical methods is much more favourable than hardening with chemical methods, guaranteeing also more than ten times higher mechanical properties.

  13. Mechanical properties of polymer-infiltrated-ceramic (sodium aluminum silicate) composites for dental restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Bencang; Li, Jing; Wang, Huining; Lin, Yuanhua; Shen, Yang; Li, Ming; Deng, Xuliang; Nan, Cewen

    2017-07-01

    To fabricate indirect restorative composites for CAD/CAM applications and evaluate the mechanical properties. Polymer-infiltrated-ceramic composites were prepared through infiltrating polymer into partially sintered sodium aluminum silicate ceramic blocks and curing. The corresponding samples were fabricated according to standard ISO-4049 using for mechanical properties measurement. The flexural strength and fracture toughness were measured using a mechanical property testing machine. The Vickers hardness and elastic modulus were calculated from the results of nano-indentation. The microstructures were investigated using secondary electron detector. The density of the porous ceramic blocks was obtained through TG-DTA. The conversion degrees were calculated from the results of mid-infrared spectroscopy. The obtained polymer infiltrated composites have a maximum flexural strength value of 214±6.5MPa, Vickers hardness of 1.76-2.30GPa, elastic modulus of 22.63-27.31GPa, fracture toughness of 1.76-2.35MPam 1/2 and brittleness index of 0.75-1.32μm -1/2 . These results were compared with those of commercial CAD/CAM blocks. Our results suggest that these materials with good mechanical properties are comparable to two commercial CAD/CAM blocks. The sintering temperature could dramatically influence the mechanical properties. Restorative composites with superior mechanical properties were produced. These materials mimic the properties of natural dentin and could be a promising candidate for CAD/CAM applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Combination of sodium caseinate and succinylated alginate improved stability of high fat fish oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesiltas, Betül; Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; García-Moreno, Pedro J; Anankanbil, Sampson; Guo, Zheng; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2018-07-30

    Sodium caseinate (CAS) and commercial sodium alginate (CA), long chain modified alginate (LCMA) or short chain modified alginate (SCMA) were used in combination for emulsifying and stabilizing high fat (50-70%) fish oil-in-water emulsions. Physical (creaming, droplet size, viscosity and protein determination) and oxidative (primary and secondary oxidation products) stabilities of the emulsions were studied during 12 days of storage. Creaming stability was higher for emulsions produced with alginates and CAS compared to emulsions prepared with only CAS. Combined use of CAS + LCMA performed better in terms of physical stability compared to emulsions produced with only CAS. However, the oxidative stability of this emulsion was inferior probably due to the presence of an unsaturated carbon chain in LCMA structure. CAS + SCMA emulsions not only showed better physical stability such as smaller droplet size, lower creaming and higher viscosity, but also had an improved oxidative stability than emulsions produced with only CAS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. COMPARISON OF SOL-GEL SILICATE COATINGS ON Ti SUBSTRATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIANA HORKAVCOVÁ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the submitted work was to prepare and to characterize two types of silicate coatings prepared by the sol-gel method using the dip-coating technique on a titanium substrate. Efforts have been made to use mechanical properties of bio-inert titanium and bioactive properties of a silicate layer enriched with an admixture of compounds identified below. The first group consisted of silicate coatings containing silver, brushite and monetite. The other group of silicate coatings contained calcium nitrate and triethyl phosphate. Mechanically and chemically treated titanium substrates were dipped into sols and dried and fired. Silicate coatings from the first group were also chemically treated in 10 mol.l-1 solution of sodium hydroxide. All coatings were measured to determine their adhesive and bioactive properties and furthermore the antibacterial properties were tested in the case of first group. Surfaces of the coated substrates were investigated after the firing and after the individual tests with optical and electron microscopy and X-ray microdiffraction. A tape test demonstrated excellent adhesive property of all coatings to the substrate, classified with degree 5. A static in vitro test demonstrated bioactivity of nearly all the coatings. The basic silicate coating from the first group and one type of coating from the second group were identified as inert. Antibacterial properties of silicate coatings containing silver showed to be different when tested against Escherichia coli bacteria. A complete inhibition of the growth of bacteria under our experimental conditions was observed for the coating containing silver and monetite and a partial inhibition of the growth of bacteria for coatings containing silver and silver in combination with brushite.

  16. Sodium Silicate Gel Effect on Cemented Tailing Backfill That Contains Lead-Zinc Smelting Slag at Early Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijie Guo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an experimental study on the priming effect of sodium silicate gel (SS on cemented tailing backfill (CTB that contains lead-zinc smelting slag. CTB and cemented paste (CP containing lead-zinc smelting slag samples with SS of 0 and 0.4% of the mass of the slag were prepared and cured at 20°C for 1, 3, 7, and 28 days. Mechanical test and pore structure analyses were performed on the studied CTB samples, microstructural analyses (X-ray diffraction analysis and thermal gravity analysis were performed on the studied CP samples, whereas the electrical conductivity of CTB was monitored. The results reveal that SS has a significant positive effect on cementitious activity of binder mixed by cement and lead-zinc smelting slag. This activation leads to the acceleration of binder hydration process, the formation of more cement hydration products in the CTBs, and the refinement of their pore structure, which is favorable for the strength development of CTB.

  17. Evaluation of Antioxidant Activity and Cytotoxicity of Cumin Seed Oil Nanoemulsion Stabilized by Sodium Caseinate- Guar Gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parastoo Farshi 1, Mahnaz Tabibiazar 2 * , Marjan Ghorbani 3, Hamed Hamishehkar 3

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this study was to prepare the sodium caseinate- guar gum stabilized nanoemulsion of cumin seed oil (Cumminum cyminum using ultrasonication method. Meanwhile, the effect of nanoemulsification on the antioxidant and cytotoxicity of the cumin seed oil was evaluated. Method: The effect of concentration of sodium casienate and guar gum was investigated on droplet size, thermal and oxidative stability of cumin seed oil nanoemulsion using TBARS and z-average measurements, the antioxidant activity was evaluated by DPPH scavenging and iron reducing power measurements. The biocompatibility and the cytotoxicity of the cumin seed oil nanoemulsion were evaluated by MTT assay test and compared with cumin seed oil and cumin seed oil free-nanoemulsion. Results: GC–MS analysis indicated 15 compounds in the cumin seed oil. The nanoemulsions were stabilized by sodium caseinate-guar gum complex. The minimum and stable droplets (155 ± 8 nm of nanoemulsion were formulated when the concentration of essential oil in oil phase was 30 % (w/w. DPPH radical scavenging ability, iron reducing power and cytotoxicity of nanoemulsified cumin seed oil were significantly higher than cumin seed oil (p<0.05 Conclusion: In this study, cumin seed oil nanoemulsion was prepared and stabilized by sodium caseinate- guar gum. The aforementioned nanoemulsion had good stability even after 60 days storage at 4ºC. Antioxidant and cytotoxicity of cumin seed oil were increased by nanoemulsification. It can be concluded that cumin seed oil nanoemulsion has the potential to use as natural preservative and anticancer product in food industry.

  18. Combination of sodium caseinate and succinylated alginate improved stability of high fat fish oil-in-water emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yesiltas, Betül; Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; García Moreno, Pedro Jesús

    2018-01-01

    Sodium caseinate (CAS) and commercial sodium alginate (CA), long chain modified alginate (LCMA) or short chain modified alginate (SCMA) were used in combination for emulsifying and stabilizing high fat (50–70%) fish oil-in-water emulsions. Physical (creaming, droplet size, viscosity and protein...

  19. Leaf application of silicic acid to upland rice and corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Costa Crusciol

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Si (stabilized silicic acid, Silamol® leaf application on mineral nutrition and yield in upland rice and corn crops. The treatments were the control (without Si and Si foliar split spraying using 2 L ha-1 of the Silamol® commercial product, with 0.8% soluble Si as concentrated stabilized silicic acid. Silicon leaf application increased the concentrations of K, Ca and Si in rice and corn leaves, the number of panicles per m2 of rice and the number of grains per ear of corn; accordingly, the Si leaf application provided a higher grain yield in both crops.

  20. Porous Silicates Modified with Zirconium Oxide and Sulfate Ions for Alcohol Dehydration Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heriberto Esteban Benito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous silicates were synthesized by a nonhydrothermal method, using sodium silicate as a source of silica and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as a template agent. Catalysts were characterized using thermogravimetric analysis, N2 physisorption, X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy, pyridine adsorption, potentiometric titration with n-butylamine, scanning electronic microscopy, and transmission electronic microscopy. The surface area of the materials synthesized was greater than 800 m2/g. The introduction of zirconium atoms within the porous silicates increased their acid strength from −42 to 115 mV, while the addition of sulfate ions raised this value to 470 mV. The catalytic activity for the dehydration of alcohols yields conversions of up to 70% for ethanol and 30% for methanol.

  1. Acoustic analysis of sodium boiling stability tests using THORS bundle 6A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheen, S.H.; Bobis, J.P.; Carey, W.M.

    1977-01-01

    Acoustic data from boiling stability tests on the THORS (Thermal-Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety) facility are presented and discussed. The THORS sodium loop is a high temperature test facility that contains the bundle 6A, a full length stimulated fuel subassembly with nineteen electrically heated pins. Boiling stability tests on the THORS facility were designed to determine if a stable boiling region exists during the thermal hydraulic test at normal and off-normal conditions. Boiling was observed and the stable boiling region was determined. The acoustic data observed by three ANL sodium-immersible microphones have provided the following information: (1) the boiling signal is clearly observed and shows a correlation with the inlet flow fluctuations; (2) the signal level and the repetition rate of the boiling signal are directly related to the applied heat flux; (3) a typical boiling pulse consists of a high frequency signal due mainly to the bubble collapse and a low frequency (approximately 75 Hz) void oscillation; (4) a boiling pulse yields a frequency spectrum with significant amplitudes up to 80 KHz as compared with 4 KHz for background pulses; and (5) the frequency content of a boiling pulse can be mostly explained in terms of various resonance frequencies of the loop. The characterization of these data is pertinent to the design of sodium boiling detection systems

  2. Confined Water in Layered Silicates: The Origin of Anomalous Thermal Expansion Behavior in Calcium-Silicate-Hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, N. M. Anoop; Wang, Bu; Falzone, Gabriel; Le Pape, Yann; Neithalath, Narayanan

    2016-01-01

    Water, under conditions of nanoscale confinement, exhibits anomalous dynamics, and enhanced thermal deformations, which may be further enhanced when such water is in contact with hydrophilic surfaces. Such heightened thermal deformations of water could control the volume stability of hydrated materials containing nanoconfined structural water. Understanding and predicting the thermal deformation coefficient (TDC, often referred to as the CTE, coefficient of thermal expansion), which represents volume changes induced in materials under conditions of changing temperature, is of critical importance for hydrated solids including: hydrogels, biological tissues, and calcium silicate hydrates, as changes in their volume can result in stress development, and cracking. By pioneering atomistic simulations, we examine the physical origin of thermal expansion in calcium-silicate-hydrates (C–S–H), the binding agent in concrete that is formed by the reaction of cement with water. We report that the TDC of C–S–H shows a sudden increase when the CaO/SiO_2 (molar ratio; abbreviated as Ca/Si) exceeds 1.5. This anomalous behavior arises from a notable increase in the confinement of water contained in the C–S–H’s nanostructure. We identify that confinement is dictated by the topology of the C–S–H’s atomic network. Altogether, the results suggest that thermal deformations of hydrated silicates can be altered by inducing compositional changes, which in turn alter the atomic topology and the resultant volume stability of the solids.

  3. Confined Water in Layered Silicates: The Origin of Anomalous Thermal Expansion Behavior in Calcium-Silicate-Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, N M Anoop; Wang, Bu; Falzone, Gabriel; Le Pape, Yann; Neithalath, Narayanan; Pilon, Laurent; Bauchy, Mathieu; Sant, Gaurav

    2016-12-28

    Water, under conditions of nanoscale confinement, exhibits anomalous dynamics, and enhanced thermal deformations, which may be further enhanced when such water is in contact with hydrophilic surfaces. Such heightened thermal deformations of water could control the volume stability of hydrated materials containing nanoconfined structural water. Understanding and predicting the thermal deformation coefficient (TDC, often referred to as the CTE, coefficient of thermal expansion), which represents volume changes induced in materials under conditions of changing temperature, is of critical importance for hydrated solids including: hydrogels, biological tissues, and calcium silicate hydrates, as changes in their volume can result in stress development, and cracking. By pioneering atomistic simulations, we examine the physical origin of thermal expansion in calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the binding agent in concrete that is formed by the reaction of cement with water. We report that the TDC of C-S-H shows a sudden increase when the CaO/SiO 2 (molar ratio; abbreviated as Ca/Si) exceeds 1.5. This anomalous behavior arises from a notable increase in the confinement of water contained in the C-S-H's nanostructure. We identify that confinement is dictated by the topology of the C-S-H's atomic network. Taken together, the results suggest that thermal deformations of hydrated silicates can be altered by inducing compositional changes, which in turn alter the atomic topology and the resultant volume stability of the solids.

  4. Effects of anticaking agents and relative humidity on the physical and chemical stability of powdered vitamin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipasek, Rebecca A; Taylor, Lynne S; Mauer, Lisa J

    2011-09-01

    Vitamin C is an essential nutrient that is widely used by the food industry in the powder form for both its nutritional and functional properties. However, vitamin C is deliquescent, and deliquescence has been linked to physical and chemical instabilities. Anticaking agents are often added to powder systems to delay or prevent caking, but little is known about their effect on the chemical stability of powders. In this study, various anticaking agents (calcium phosphate, calcium silicate, calcium stearate, corn starch, and silicon dioxide) were combined with sodium ascorbate at 2% and 50% w/w ratios and stored at various relative humidities (23%, 43%, 64%, 75%, 85%, and 98% RHs). Chemical and physical stability and moisture sorption were monitored over time. Additionally, saturated solution samples were stored at various pHs to determine the effect of surface pH and dissolution on the vitamin degradation rate. Storage RH, time, and anticaking agent type and ratio all significantly affected (P vitamin C stability. Silicon dioxide and calcium silicate (50% w/w) and calcium stearate (at both ratios) were the only anticaking agents to improve the physical stability of powdered sodium ascorbate while none of the anticaking agents improved its chemical stability. However, corn starch and calcium stearate had the least adverse effect on chemical stability. Dissolution rate and pH were also important factors affecting the chemical and physical stability of the powders. Therefore, monitoring storage environmental conditions and anticaking agent usage are important for understanding the stability of vitamin C. Anticaking agent type and ratio significantly affected the physical and chemical stability of vitamin C over time and over a range of RHs. No anticaking agent improved the chemical stability of the vitamin, and most caused an increase in chemical degradation even if physical stability was improved. It is possible that anticaking agents would greatly affect other

  5. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies of silicate based glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karim, D.; Lam, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    The application of the x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) technique to study the electronic structure and bonding of heavy metal oxides in alkali- and alkali-earth-silicate glasses had been demonstrated. The bonding characteristics of the iron oxide and uranium oxide in sodium silicate glasses were deduced from the changes in the oxygen 1s levels and the heavy metal core levels. It is reasonable to expect that the effect of leaching on the heavy metal ions can be monitored using the appropriate core levels of these ions. To study the effect of leaching on the glass forming network, the valence band structure of the bridging and nonbridging oxygens in sodium silicate glasses were investigated. The measurement of extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) is a relatively new analytical technique for obtaining short range (<5 A) structural information around atoms of a selected species in both solid and fluid systems. Experiments have recently begun to establish the feasibility of using EXAFS to study the bonding of actinides in silicate glasses. Because of the ability of EXAFS to yield specific structural data even in complex multicomponent systems, it could prove to be an invaluable tool in understanding glass structure

  6. Redox kinetics and mechanism in silicate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochain, B.

    2009-12-01

    This work contributes to better understand iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate melts. It was conducted on compositions in both Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -SiO 2 -FeO and Na 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 -FeO systems. The influence of boron-sodium and aluminum-sodium substitutions and iron content on properties and structure of glasses and on the iron redox kinetics has been studied by Raman, Moessbauer and XANES spectroscopies at the B and Fe K-edges. In borosilicate glasses, an increase in iron content or in the Fe 3+ /ΣFe redox state implies a structural rearrangement of the BO 4 species in the glass network whereas the BO 3 and BO 4 relative proportions remain nearly constant. In all studied glasses and melts, Fe 3+ is a network former in tetrahedral coordination, unless for aluminosilicates of ratio Al/Na≥1 where Fe 3+ is a network modifier in five-fold coordination. Near Tg, diffusion of network modifying cations controls the iron redox kinetics along with a flux of electron holes. At liquidus temperatures, oxygen diffusion is considered to be the mechanism that governs redox reactions. This study shows the role played by the silicate network polymerization on the redox kinetics. In borosilicate melts, iron redox kinetics depends on the boron speciation between BO 3 and BO 4 that depends itself on the sodium content. Furthermore, an increase in the network-former/network-modifier ratio implies a decrease in oxygen diffusion that results in a slowing down of the redox kinetics. The obtained results allow a description of the iron redox kinetics for more complex compositions as natural lavas or nuclear waste model glasses. (author)

  7. Preparation and physicochemical properties of surfactant-free emulsions using electrolytic-reduction ion water containing lithium magnesium sodium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okajima, Masahiro; Wada, Yuko; Hosoya, Takashi; Hino, Fumio; Kitahara, Yoshiyasu; Shimokawa, Ken-ichi; Ishii, Fumiyoshi

    2013-04-01

    Surfactant-free emulsions by adding jojoba oil, squalane, olive oil, or glyceryl trioctanoate (medium chain fatty acid triglycerides, MCT) to electrolytic-reduction ion water containing lithium magnesium sodium silicate (GE-100) were prepared, and their physiochemical properties (thixotropy, zeta potential, and mean particle diameter) were evaluated. At an oil concentration of 10%, the zeta potential was ‒22.3 ‒ ‒26.8 mV, showing no marked differences among the emulsions of various types of oil, but the mean particle diameters in the olive oil emulsion (327 nm) and MCT emulsion (295 nm) were smaller than those in the other oil emulsions (452-471 nm). In addition, measurement of the hysteresis loop area of each type of emulsion revealed extremely high thixotropy of the emulsion containing MCT at a low concentration and the olive emulsion. Based on these results, since surfactants and antiseptic agents markedly damage sensitive skin tissue such as that with atopic dermatitis, surfactant- and antiseptic-free emulsions are expected to be new bases for drugs for external use.

  8. Thermal properties and application of potential lithium silicate breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skokan, A.; Wedemeyer, H.; Vollath, D.; Gunther, E.

    1987-01-01

    Phase relations, thermal stability and preparation methods of the Li 2 O-rich silicates Li 8 SiO 6 and ''Li 6 SiO 5 '' have been investigated experimentally, the application of these compounds as solid breeder materials is discussed. In the second part of this contribution, the results of thermal expansion measurements on the silicates Li 2 SiO 3 , Li 4 SiO 4 and Li 8 SiO 6 are presented

  9. Thermal properties and application of potential lithium silicate breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skokan, A.; Wedemeyer, H.; Vollath, D.; Guenther, E.

    1986-01-01

    Phase relations, thermal stability and preparation methods of the Li 2 O-rich silicates Li 8 SiO 6 and 'Li 6 SiO 5 ' have been investigated experimentally, the application of these compounds as solid breeder materials is discussed. In the second part of this contribution, the results of thermal expansion measurements on the silicates Li 2 SiO 3 , Li 4 SiO 4 and Li 8 SiO 6 are presented. (author)

  10. Silicate bonded ceramics of laterites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagh, A.S.; Douse, V.

    1989-05-01

    Sodium silicate is vacuum impregnated in bauxite waste (red mud) at room temperature to develop ceramics of mechanical properties comparable to the sintered ceramics. For a concentration up to 10% the fracture toughness increases from 0.12 MNm -3/2 to 0.9 MNm -3/2 , and the compressive strength from 7 MNm -2 to 30 MNm -2 . The mechanical properties do not deteriorate, when soaked in water for an entire week. The viscosity and the concentration of the silicate solution are crucial, both for the success of the fabrication and the economics of the process. Similar successful results have been obtained for bauxite and lime stone, even though the latter has poor weathering properties. With scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis, an attempt is made to identify the crystals formed in the composite, which are responsible for the strength. The process is an economic alternative to the sintered ceramics in the construction industry in the tropical countries, rich in lateritic soils and poor in energy. Also the process has all the potential for further development in arid regions abundant in limestone. (author). 6 refs, 20 figs, 3 tabs

  11. Nanohydroxyapatite Silicate-Based Cement Improves the Primary Stability of Dental Implants: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Khorshidi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Insufficient cortical bone volume when placing implants can lead to lack of primary stability. The use of cement as a bone fill material in bone defects around dental implant could result in better clinical outcome. HA has shown excellent biological properties in implant dentistry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of nanohydroxyapatite powder (Nano-HA in combination with accelerated Portland cement (APC on implant primary stability in surgically created circumferential bone defects in a bovine rib in vitro model. Materials and Methods. Sixteen bovine rib bones and thirty-six implants of same type and size (4 mm × 10 mm were used. Implants were divided into six groups: no circumferential bone defect, defect and no grafting, bone chips grafting, Nano-HA grafting, APC grafting, and Nano-HA mixed to APC grafting (Nano-HA-APC. Circumferential defects around the implants were prepared. The implant stability quotient (ISQ values were measured before and after the grafting. Results. APC exhibited the highest ISQ values. A significant increase of ISQ values following the grafting of Nano-HA-APC (18.08±5.82 and APC alone (9.50±4.12 was achieved. Increase of ISQ values after 72 hours was 24.16±5.01 and 17.58±4.89, respectively. Nano-HA grafting alone exhibited the least rise in ISQ values. Conclusions. Nanohydroxyapatite silicate-based cement could improve the primary stability of dental implants in circumferential bone defect around implants.

  12. Comparative study on the change in index of refraction in ion-exchange interdiffusion in alkali-silicate glasses containing calcium, strontium, barium and titanium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livshits, V.Ya.; Marchuk, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    Different ability to ion exchange from the salts of lithium-sodium-silicate glass melt containing calcium (or strontium, or barium) and titanium oxides in addition has been shown. CaO, SrO and BaO have negative effect, but TiO 2 -positive one on the fullness of ion exchange of lithium-sodium and on the rate of interdiffusion in alkali-silicate glass. The value of change in index of refraction of glass with TiO 2 is twice higher than glass with calcium oxide (or strontium, or barium) as the fourth component

  13. Stability of penicillin G sodium diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride injection or 5% dextrose injection and stored in polyvinyl chloride bag containers and elastomeric pump containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mirza Akram; Friciu, Mihaela; Aubin, Sebastien; Leclair, Grégoire

    2014-04-15

    The stability of penicillin G sodium solutions stored in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) bags or elastomeric pump containers was studied. Test samples were prepared by diluting powdered penicillin G sodium (10 million units/10-mL vial) to solutions of 2,500 or 50,000 units/mL with 0.9% sodium chloride injection or 5% dextrose injection. The preparations were transferred to 250-mL PVC bags and elastomeric pump containers. All samples were prepared in triplicate and stored at 5°C. Chemical stability was measured by a stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) assay and by pH evaluation. Particulate matter was evaluated according to compendial standards using a light-obscuration particle count test. Preparations were visually examined throughout the study. After 21 days of storage, all test samples remained chemically stable, with an HPLC assay recovery value of more than 90% of the initial value. After 28 days, all samples prepared with either diluent and stored in PVC bags, as well as the samples diluted to 2,500 units/mL with sodium chloride injection and stored in elastomeric pump containers, did not meet the recovery acceptance limit. For all test samples, the mean pH consistently decreased during storage, from about 6.4 to about 5.5. Particle counts remained acceptable throughout the study, and no change in appearance was observed. Penicillin G for injection (2,500 and 50,000 units/mL) diluted in 0.9% sodium chloride injection or 5% dextrose injection and stored at 5°C in PVC containers or elastomeric pump containers was physically and chemically stable for a period of at least 21 days.

  14. Characterization and nutrient release from silicate rocks and influence on chemical changes in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Ramos Guelfi Silva

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of Brazilian agriculture has led to a heavy dependence on imported fertilizers to ensure the supply of the growing food demand. This fact has contributed to a growing interest in alternative nutrient sources, such as ground silicate rocks. It is necessary, however, to know the potential of nutrient release and changes these materials can cause in soils. The purpose of this study was to characterize six silicate rocks and evaluate their effects on the chemical properties of treated soil, assessed by chemical extractants after greenhouse incubation. The experimental design consisted of completely randomized plots, in a 3 x 6 factorial scheme, with four replications. The factors were potassium levels (0-control: without silicate rock application; 200; 400; 600 kg ha-1 of K2O, supplied as six silicate rock types (breccia, biotite schist, ultramafic rock, phlogopite schist and two types of mining waste. The chemical, physical and mineralogical properties of the alternative rock fertilizers were characterized. Treatments were applied to a dystrophic Red-Yellow Oxisol (Ferralsol, which was incubated for 100 days, at 70 % (w/w moisture in 3.7 kg/pots. The soil was evaluated for pH; calcium and magnesium were extracted with KCl 1 mol L-1; potassium, phosphorus and sodium by Mehlich 1; nickel, copper and zinc with DTPA; and the saturation of the cation exchange capacity was calculated for aluminum, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium, and overall base saturation. The alternative fertilizers affected soil chemical properties. Ultramafic rock and Chapada mining byproduct (CMB were the silicate rocks that most influenced soil pH, while the mining byproduct (MB led to high K levels. Zinc availability was highest in the treatments with mining byproduct and Cu in soil fertilized with Chapada and mining byproduct.

  15. Synthesis of a one-part geopolymer system for soil stabilizer using fly ash and volcanic ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tigue April Anne S.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach one-part geopolymer was employed to investigate the feasibility of enhancing the strength of in-situ soil for possible structural fill application in the construction industry. Geopolymer precursors such as fly ash and volcanic ash were utilized in this study for soil stabilization. The traditional geopolymer synthesis uses soluble alkali activators unlike in the case of ordinary Portland cement where only water is added to start the hydration process. This kind of synthesis is an impediment to geopolymer soil stabilizer commercial viability. Hence, solid alkali activators such as sodium silicate (SS, sodium hydroxide (SH, and sodium aluminate (SA were explored. The influence of amount of fly ash (15% and 25%, addition of volcanic ash (0% and 12.5%, and ratio of alkali activator SS:SH:SA (50:50:0, 33:33:33, 50:20:30 were investigated. Samples cured for 28 days were tested for unconfined compressive strength (UCS. To evaluate the durability, sample yielding highest UCS was subjected to sulfuric acid resistance test for 28 days. Analytical techniques such as X-ray fluorescence (XRF, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and scanning electron microscope/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX were performed to examine the elemental composition, mineralogical properties, and microstructure of the precursors and the geopolymer stabilized soil.

  16. Incorporation of Fe2O3, FeO and Al2O3 in silicate glasses and its effect on their structure and chemical stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Iseghem, P; De Grave, E; Peters, L; De Batist, R

    1983-09-01

    Large amounts of the glass intermediates Al2O3, Fe2O3 and FeO are present in the amorphous silicate slags developed at the S.C.K./C.E.N. for the conditioning of Pu contaminated radioactive waste. Strong ambiguity exists in literature about both the structural incorporation and the effect on the chemical stability of Fe2O3 and FeO. The chemical stability and its relationship to the glass structure therefore was investigated for a number of silicate base glasses, taking into consideration the following parameters (the amount of glass modifiers was kept constant at 16 mole %, equimolarly spread over Li2O, K2O, MgO and CaO): 1) Fe2Ox concentrations (x = 2 or 3) varying between 2.5 and 30 mole % (compensated by changes in SiO2 concentration); 2)Equimolar replacement of Fe2Ox by Al2O3 and Fe2Ox in all glasses listed in 1. The structural incorporation of Fe2Ox was investigated by 57 Fe Mossbauer Spectroscopy, the chemical stability by the Soxhlet corrosion test. The sample weight was measured after 14 days of corrosion, after drying and removal of the weakly bounded surface layer.

  17. Development of sodium disposal technology. Experiment of sodium compound solidification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Toshiyuki; Ohura, Masato; Yatoh, Yasuo

    2007-07-01

    A large amount of sodium containing radioactive waste will come up at the time of final shutdown/decommission of FBR plant. The radioactive waste is managed as solid state material in a closed can in Japan. As for the sodium, there is no established method to convert the radioactive sodium to solid waste. Further, the sodium is highly reactive. Thus, it is recommended to convert the sodium to a stable substance before the solidification process. One of the stabilizing methods is conversion of sodium into sodium hydroxide solution. These stabilization and solidification processes should be safe, economical, and efficient. In order to develop such sodium disposal technology, nonradioactive sodium was used and a basic experiment was performed. Waste-fluid Slag Solidification method was employed as the solidification process of sodium hydroxide solution. Experimental parameters were mixing ratio of the sodium hydroxide and the slag solidification material, temperature and concentration of the sodium hydroxide. The best parameters were obtained to achieve the maximum filling ratio of the sodium hydroxide under a condition of enough high compressive strength of the solidified waste. In a beaker level test, the solidified waste was kept in a long term and it was shown that there was no change of appearance, density, and also the compressive strength was kept at a target value. In a real scale test, homogeneous profiles of the density and the compressive strength were obtained. The compressive strength was higher than the target value. It was shown that the Waste-fluid Slag Solidification method can be applied to the solidification process of the sodium hydroxide solution, which was produced by the stabilization process. (author)

  18. Resistance of polyvinyl alcohol blends stabilized by sodium and ammonium salts of lignite humic acids against γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbora Bakajova; Jiri Kucerik; Michal Ilcin; Oga Hola

    2011-01-01

    The dried blends containing sodium and ammonium salts of lignite humic acids (humates, 0.5-10% w/w) in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) were exposed to high dosage of γ-irradiation in the range of doses 127-806 kGy. Resulted products were then tested for their stability using thermogravimetrical analysis. As a reference the non-treated blends were used since the pure PVA exposed to γ-irradiation very quickly lost its stability and resulting consistence did not allow the stability tests. Stabilities showed a strong concentration and counterion dependency. While sodium counterion caused mostly destabilization with increasing dose, the ammonium counterion acted in an opposite way. The tests carried out in a moisturizing container revealed the changes in water absorbing capacity of irradiated samples and allowed partial explanation of humate stabilizing effect. Generally, at lower concentration of a humate the increase was observed with an increase in the γ-irradiation dose and vice versa. The results confirmed the antioxidant and stabilizing effect of humic acids added to some synthetic polymers and their applicability in materials exposed to γ-irradiation. (author)

  19. Physical and chemical stability of palonosetron hydrochloride with dacarbazine and with methylprednisolone sodium succinate during simulated y-site administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trissel, Lawrence A; Zhang, Yanping; Xu, Quanyun A

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the physical and chemical stability of mixtures of undiluted palonosetron hydrochloride 50 micrograms/mL with dacarbazine 4 mg/mL and with methylprednisolone sodium succinate 5 mg/mL in 5% dextrose injection during simulated Y-site administration. Triplicate test samples were prepared by admixing 7.5 mL of palonosetron hydrochloride with 7.5 mL of dacarbazine solution and, separately, methylprednisolone sodium succinate solution. Physical stability was assessed by using a multistep evaluation procedure that included both turbidimetric and particulate measurement as well as visual inspection. Chemical stability was assessed by using stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatographic analytical techniques that determined drug concentrations. Evaluations were performed immediately after mixing and 1 and 4 hours after mixing. The palonosetron hydrochloride-dacarbazine samples were clear and colorless when viewed in normal fluorescent room light and when viewed with a Tyndall beam. Measured turbidities remained unchanged; particulate contents were low and exhibited little change. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that palonosetron hydrochloride and dacarbazine remained stable throughout the 4-hour test with no drug loss. Palonosetron hydrochloride is, therefore, physically compatible and chemically stable with dacarbazine during Y-site administration. Within 4 hours, the mixtures of palonosetron hydrochloride and methylprednisolone sodium succinate developed a microprecipitate that became a white precipitate visible to the unaided eye. The precipitate was analyzed and identified as methylprednisolone. Palonosetron hydrochloride is incompatible with methylprednisolone sodium succinate.

  20. Silicate species of water glass and insights for alkali-activated green cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Helén, E-mail: helen.jansson@chalmers.se [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Bernin, Diana, E-mail: diana.bernin@nmr.gu.se [Swedish NMR Centre, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, 41390 Sweden (Sweden); Ramser, Kerstin, E-mail: kerstin.ramser@ltu.se [Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, 971 87 Luleå (Sweden)

    2015-06-15

    Despite that sodium silicate solutions of high pH are commonly used in industrial applications, most investigations are focused on low to medium values of pH. Therefore we have investigated such solutions in a broad modulus range and up to high pH values (∼14) by use of infrared (IR) spectroscopy and silicon nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 29}Si-NMR). The results show that the modulus dependent pH value leads to more or less charged species, which affects the configurations of the silicate units. This in turn, influences the alkali-activation process of low CO{sub 2} footprint cements, i.e. materials based on industrial waste or by-products.

  1. Lightweight Heat Resistant Geopolymer-based Materials Synthesized from Red Mud and Rice Husk Ash Using Sodium Silicate Solution as Alkaline Activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoc Thang Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymer is an inorganic polymer composite with potentials to replace Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC-based materials in the future because of its lower energy consumption, minimal CO2 emissions and lower production cost as it utilizes industrial waste resources. Hence, geopolymerization and the process to produce geopolymers for various applications like building materials can be considered as green industry. Moreover, in our study, the raw materials we used are red mud and rice husk ash, which are are industrial and agricultural wastes that need to be managed to reduce their impact to the environment. The red mud and rice husk ash combined with sodium silicate (water glass solution were mixed to form geopolymer materials. Moreover, the geopolymer specimens were also tested for heat resistance at a temperature of 1000°C for 2 hours. Results suggest high heat resistance with an increase of compressive strength after exposed at high temperature.

  2. Degradation of wall paints due to sodium sulphate and sodium chloride crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz Gonçalves, T.

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available A test method for evaluating wall paints behaviour to soluble salts crystallization was developed at LNEC. in the present paper, a recent set of tests is described and discussed. The major objectives were: analysing and comparing the behaviour of a common emulsion {"plastic" paint and a silicate-based paint; observing and comparing the effect of sodium sulphate, sodium chloride and distilled water on the paints and on a non-painted stone; evaluating this test method adequacy and effectiveness. The silicate-based paint showed a resistance to soluble salts crystallization greater than the one of the plastic paint. However, the degradation pattern of the silicate-based paint (blistering of a filmic layer was similar to the one of organic paints and distinct from the one of pure mineral paints. The amount of damage that a saline solution can cause to wall paints cannot be inferred from the amount of damage it can cause to stone. Sodium chloride seems to be able to cause more severe degradation to wall paints than sodium sulphate. To the unpainted stone, sodium sulphate seems to be more damaging than sodium chloride. The test method seems adequate to observe and compare the behaviour of wall paints under soluble salts action. However, lower (around 0.5% concentrations for both sodium sulphate and sodium chloride should be tested in the future.

    RESUMEN En el LNEC se desarrolló una metodología de ensayo para evaluar la respuesta de pinturas aplicadas sobre paredes, frente a la cristalización de sales solubles. En este trabajo, se describen y discuten un conjunto de ensayos recientes. Los principales objetivos fueron: el análisis y la comparación del comportamiento de una pintura de emulsión común {''pintura plástica" y la de una pintura de silicato; la observación y la comparación de los efectos del sulfato de sodio, del cloruro de sodio y del agua destilada sobre las pinturas y sobre piedra no pintada; la evaluación de la adecuaci

  3. Effect of sodium carbonate solution on self-setting properties of tricalcium silicate bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiguang Huan; Jiang Chang

    2008-11-01

    In this study, the effects of sodium carbonate (Na(2)CO(3) ) solution with different concentrations (10, 15, 20, and 25 wt%) as liquid phase on the setting time and compressive strength of tricalcium silicate bone cements are investigated. The in vitro bioactivity and degradability of the resultant Ca(3)SiO(5)-Na(2)CO(3) solution paste was also studied. The results indicate that as the concentration of Na(2)CO(3) solution varies from 0 to 25 wt%, the initial and final setting time of the cement decrease significantly from 90 to 20 min and from 180 to 45 min, respectively. After setting for 24 h, the compressive strength of Ca(3)SiO(5)-Na(2)CO(3) solution paste reaches 5.1 MPa, which is significantly higher than that of Ca( 3)SiO(5)-water cement system. The in vitro bioactivity of the cements is investigated by soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 7 days. The results show that the Ca(3)SiO(5)-Na(2)CO( 3) solution bone cement has a good bioactivity and can degrade in Ringer's solution. The results indicate that Na(2)CO(3) solution as a liquid phase significantly improves the self-setting properties of Ca( 3)SiO(5) cement as compared to water. The Ca(3)SiO( 5) cement paste prepared using Na(2)CO(3) solution shows good bioactivity and moderate degradability, and the Ca(3)SiO( 5)-Na(2)CO(3) solution system may be used as degradable and bioactive bone defect filling materials.

  4. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Domka, Ludwik [Department of Metalorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, A. Mickiewicz University, Grunwaldzka 6, 60-780 Poznań (Poland); Skrzypczak, Andrzej [Institute of Chemical Technology, Poznań University of Technology, Berdychowo 4, 60-965 Poznań (Poland); Kozak, Maciej, E-mail: mkozak@amu.edu.pl [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The intercalation of dimeric surfactants changed the morphology of MMT samples. • XRD indicated structures formed by surfactant molecules in interlayer space. • The four-step thermal decomposition of dimeric surfactant, confirms intercalation. - Abstract: The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay – hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1′-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d{sub 001}) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  5. Preparation of composites of national rubber latex (NRL) - portland cement mould. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dessouki, A.M.; Taher, N.H.; El-Nahas, H.H.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare some polymeric mould using national rubber latex (NRL) - portland cement composites based on a delayed- action mechanism. Factors affecting the preparation process such as concentration, mixing percentage, additives and their effect on what is regarded as a delayed action coacervant combination was studied. Composites of national latex (NRL) - portland cement would were prepared as two separate parts. The stabilized natural rubber latex (NRL) 100 parts with hydroxy ethyl cellulose (HEC) 2 parts as stabilizer and a delayed - action coacervant (sodium meta silicate as a delaying agent) 5 parts on one hand and the dry blend of cement 65 parts soluble in 65 parts of water as a paste on the other hand were mixed thoroughly on site. (HEC) was added to the rubber latex to prevent the coagulation of the rubber latex with the electrolyte (sodium meta silicate) present in the rubber mixture. Two kinds of stabilization occurred in the rubber part, namely steric stabilization and the stabilization against electrolyte. The effect of delayed - action coacervant (sodium meta silicate) on the initial setting time of rubber - cement mould showed that the molding process did not occur at sodium meta silicate concentration less than 2.66 parts per 100 parts of rubber latex (phr), and the optimum concentration used was 5% parts of rubber latex. It was observed that addition of a delaying agent (Sodium meta silicate) to the rubber part enhanced the delaying mechanism in the time needed for the molding process, while the addition of the delaying agent to the cement part did not have any effect on retardation of the molding process. Chemical coacervants function mainly by reducing the ζ potential which is associated with the electrical double layer surrounding the latex particle. This reduction may brought about in at least three distinct ways which take place in the system studied. 5 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Preparation of composites of national rubber latex (NRL) - portland cement mould. Vol. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessouki, A M; Taher, N H; El-Nahas, H H [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Atomic Energy Athority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare some polymeric mould using national rubber latex (NRL) - portland cement composites based on a delayed- action mechanism. Factors affecting the preparation process such as concentration, mixing percentage, additives and their effect on what is regarded as a delayed action coacervant combination was studied. Composites of national latex (NRL) - portland cement would were prepared as two separate parts. The stabilized natural rubber latex (NRL) 100 parts with hydroxy ethyl cellulose (HEC) 2 parts as stabilizer and a delayed - action coacervant (sodium meta silicate as a delaying agent) 5 parts on one hand and the dry blend of cement 65 parts soluble in 65 parts of water as a paste on the other hand were mixed thoroughly on site. (HEC) was added to the rubber latex to prevent the coagulation of the rubber latex with the electrolyte (sodium meta silicate) present in the rubber mixture. Two kinds of stabilization occurred in the rubber part, namely steric stabilization and the stabilization against electrolyte. The effect of delayed - action coacervant (sodium meta silicate) on the initial setting time of rubber - cement mould showed that the molding process did not occur at sodium meta silicate concentration less than 2.66 parts per 100 parts of rubber latex (phr), and the optimum concentration used was 5% parts of rubber latex. It was observed that addition of a delaying agent (Sodium meta silicate) to the rubber part enhanced the delaying mechanism in the time needed for the molding process, while the addition of the delaying agent to the cement part did not have any effect on retardation of the molding process. Chemical coacervants function mainly by reducing the {zeta} potential which is associated with the electrical double layer surrounding the latex particle. This reduction may brought about in at least three distinct ways which take place in the system studied. 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Comparison of the colloidal stability, bioaccessibility and antioxidant activity of corn protein hydrolysate and sodium caseinate stabilized curcumin nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Hui; Yuan, Yang; Yang, Xiao-Quan; Wang, Jin-Mei; Guo, Jian; Lin, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    The aims of this work were to construct corn protein hydrolysate (CPH)-based curcumin nanoparticles (Cur NPs) and to compare the colloidal stability, bioaccessibility and antioxidant activity of the Cur NPs stabilized CPH and sodium caseinate (NaCas) respectively. The results indicated that Cur solubility could be considerably improved after the Cur NPs fabrication. The spectroscopy results demonstrated that the solubilization of Cur should be attributed to its complexation with CPH or NaCas. The Cur NPs exhibited good colloidal stability after 1 week's storage but showed smaller (40 nm) size in CPH than in NaCas (100 nm). After lyophilization, the Cur NPs powders showed good rehydration properties and chemical stability, and compared with NaCas, the size of Cur NPs stabilized by CPH was still smaller. Additionally, the Cur NPs exhibited higher chemical stability against the temperature compared with free Cur, and the CPH could protect Cur from degradation more efficiently. Comparing with NaCas, the Cur NPs stabilized by CPH exhibited better bioaccessibility and antioxidant activity. This study demonstrated that CPH may be better than NaCas in Cur NPs fabrication and it opens up the possibility of using hydrophobic protein hydrolysate to construct the NPs delivery system.

  8. Wear and chemistry of zirconium-silicate, aluminium-silicate and zirconium-aluminium-silicate glasses in alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouse, C.G.; Lemos Guenaga, C.M. de

    1984-01-01

    A study of the chemical durability, in alkaline solutions, of zirconium silicate, aluminium silicate, zirconium/aluminium silicate glasses as a function of glass composition is carried out. The glasses were tested using standard DIN-52322 method, where the glass samples are prepared in small polished pieces and attacked for 3 hours in a 800 ml solution of 1N (NaOH + NA 2 CO 3 ) at 97 0 C. The results show that the presence of ZrO 2 in the glass composition increases its chemical durability to alkaline attack. Glasses of the aluminium/zirconium silicate series were melted with and without TiO 2 . It was shown experimentally that for this series of glasses, the presence of both TiO 2 and ZrO 2 gave better chemical durability results. However, the best overall results were obtained from the simpler zirconium silicate glasses, where it was possible to make glasses with higher values of ZrO 2 . (Author) [pt

  9. A novel tarantula toxin stabilizes the deactivated voltage sensor of bacterial sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cheng; Zhou, Xi; Nguyen, Phuong Tran; Zhang, Yunxiao; Hu, Zhaotun; Zhang, Changxin; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; DeCaen, Paul G; Liang, Songping; Liu, Zhonghua

    2017-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na V s) are activated by transiting the voltage sensor from the deactivated to the activated state. The crystal structures of several bacterial Na V s have captured the voltage sensor module (VSM) in an activated state, but structure of the deactivated voltage sensor remains elusive. In this study, we sought to identify peptide toxins stabilizing the deactivated VSM of bacterial Na V s. We screened fractions from several venoms and characterized a cystine knot toxin called JZTx-27 from the venom of tarantula Chilobrachys jingzhao as a high-affinity antagonist of the prokaryotic Na V s Ns V Ba (nonselective voltage-gated Bacillus alcalophilus ) and NaChBac (bacterial sodium channel from Bacillus halodurans ) (IC 50 = 112 nM and 30 nM, respectively). JZTx-27 was more efficacious at weaker depolarizing voltages and significantly slowed the activation but accelerated the deactivation of Ns V Ba, whereas the local anesthetic drug lidocaine was shown to antagonize Ns V Ba without affecting channel gating. Mutation analysis confirmed that JZTx-27 bound to S3-4 linker of Ns V Ba, with F98 being the critical residue in determining toxin affinity. All electrophysiological data and in silico analysis suggested that JZTx-27 trapped VSM of Ns V Ba in one of the deactivated states. In mammalian Na V s, JZTx-27 preferably inhibited the inactivation of Na V 1.5 by targeting the fourth transmembrane domain. To our knowledge, this is the first report of peptide antagonist for prokaryotic Na V s. More important, we proposed that JZTx-27 stabilized the Ns V Ba VSM in the deactivated state and may be used as a probe to determine the structure of the deactivated VSM of Na V s.-Tang, C., Zhou, X., Nguyen, P. T., Zhang, Y., Hu, Z., Zhang, C., Yarov-Yarovoy, V., DeCaen, P. G., Liang, S., Liu, Z. A novel tarantula toxin stabilizes the deactivated voltage sensor of bacterial sodium channel. © FASEB.

  10. Stability of Fentanyl Citrate, Hydromorphone Hydrochloride, Ketamine Hydrochloride, Midazolam, Morphine Sulfate, and Pentobarbital Sodium in Polypropylene Syringes

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Collin; MacKay, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Determine the stability of fentanyl 10 mcg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride, fentanyl 10 mcg/mL in 5% dextrose, fentanyl 50 mcg/mL, hydromorphone 100 mcg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride, ketamine 10 mg/mL, midazolam 0.4 mg/mL in 5% dextrose, midazolam 5 mg/mL, morphine 1 mg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride, morphine 1 mg/mL in 5% dextrose, and pentobarbital 50 mg/mL when stored as single drug entities at room temperature in polypropylene syringes. Methods: Four 5 mL samples of each drug and concentra...

  11. Radiochemical investigations to the complex formation of uranium (VI) with silicic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrnecek, E.

    1997-12-01

    The complexation of tracer amounts of UO 2 2+ by silicic acid was investigated by an extraction method using 2,5. 10 -3 M 1-(2-thenoyl)-3,3,3-trifloroacetone (IMA) in benzene as extractant at 25 degree C. The tracer used in the experiments was uranium-232, which has been separated from its daughter nuclides by ion exchange from 10 M HCl on Dowex 1x2. The ionic strength in the aqueous phase for the extractions was kept constant at 0,2 M (Na, H)ClO 4 and the pH was varied between pH 2,5 and pH 4,5. For the determination of the stability constants, a silicic acid concentration of 0,01 M, 0,03 M and 0,067 M in the (Na, H)ClO 4 solution was used. The time- and pH- dependence of the polymerization of these silicic acid solutions was determined by kinetical investigations with an ammoniumheptamolybdate-reagent. The uranium concentration in the aqueous and organic phases was determined by liquid scintillation counting using α/β -discrimination. The stability constants determined were log Q1, = -2,20 for the reaction UO 2 2+ Si(OH) 4 = UO 2 OSi(OH) 3 + + H + and Q 2 = -5,87 for the reaction of the polymeric silicate UO 2 2+ (-SiOH) j (-SiOH) j-2 (SiO) 2 UO 2 +2 H + . The influence of silicate on the speciation calculations for uranium in a model natural water is also discussed. (author)

  12. Radiation stability of sodium titanate ion exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenna, B.T.

    1980-02-01

    Sodium titanate and sodium titanate loaded macroreticular resin are being considered as ion exchangers to remove 90 Sr and actinides from the large volume of defense waste stored at Hanford Site in Washington. Preliminary studies to determine the radiation effect on Sr +2 and I - capacity of these ion-exchange materials were conducted. Samples of sodium titanate powder, sodium titanate loaded macroreticular resin, as well as the nitrate form of macroreticular anion resin were irradiated with up to 2 x 10 9 Rads of 60 Co gamma rays. Sodium titanate cation capacity decreased about 50% while the sodium titanate loaded macroeticular resin displayed a dramatic decrease in cation capacity when irradiated with 10 8 -10 9 Rad. The latter decrease is tentatively ascribed to radiation damage to the organic portion which subsequently inhibits interaction with the contained sodium titanate. The anion capacity of both macroreticular resin and sodium titanate loaded macroreticular resin exhibited significant decreases with increasing radiation exposure. These results suggest that consideration should be given to the potential effects of radiation degradation if column regeneration is to be used. 5 figures, 2 tables

  13. Bismuth silicate glass containing heavy metal oxide as a promising radiation shielding material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elalaily, Nagia A.; Abou-Hussien, Eman M.; Saad, Ebtisam A.

    2016-12-01

    Optical and FTIR spectroscopic measurements and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) properties have been utilized to investigate and characterize the given compositions of binary bismuth silicate glasses. In this work, it is aimed to study the possibility of using the prepared bismuth silicate glasses as a good shielding material for γ-rays in which adding bismuth oxide to silicate glasses causes distinguish increase in its density by an order of magnitude ranging from one to two more than mono divalent oxides. The good thermal stability and high density of the bismuth-based silicate glass encourage many studies to be undertaken to understand its radiation shielding efficiency. For this purpose a glass containing 20% bismuth oxide and 80% SiO2 was prepared using the melting-annealing technique. In addition the effects of adding some alkali heavy metal oxides to this glass, such as PbO, BaO or SrO, were also studied. EPR measurements show that the prepared glasses have good stability when exposed to γ-irradiation. The changes in the FTIR spectra due to the presence of metal oxides were referred to the different housing positions and physical properties of the respective divalent Sr2+, Ba2+ and Pb2+ ions. Calculations of optical band gap energies were presented for some selected glasses from the UV data to support the probability of using these glasses as a gamma radiation shielding material. The results showed stability of both optical and magnetic spectra of the studied glasses toward gamma irradiation, which validates their irradiation shielding behavior and suitability as the radiation shielding candidate materials.

  14. Formation of colloids of the tetravalent uranium under influence of silicate in neutral and low alkaline aqueous systems; Bildung von Kolloiden des tetravalenten Urans unter Einfluss von Silikat in neutralen und schwachalkalischen waessrigen Systemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulbricht, Isabell

    2016-03-30

    This work includes the preparation and characterization of new uranium(IV) colloids which are formed and stabilized in the near neutral pH range and under environmentally relevant conditions. Conclusions on stability behavior and particle size distributions were drawn based on results obtained by dynamic light scattering, zeta potential measurements, as well as ultrafiltration and ultracentrifugation in combination with element analyzes. Spectroscopic methodes confirmed the tetravalent state of uranium in the experiments. Unlike empirical data, it is possible to generate long-term stable uranium(IV) colloids at higher concentrations. By addition of geochemical components such as carbonate and silicate, they are stable and resistant in the near neutral pH range over a long period. It was found that dissolved silica plays an essential role in the preparation of colloids. Colloid-borne uranium(IV) up to a concentration of 10{sup -3} mol/L, corresponding to 0,238 g/L, is stabilized in solutions. This concentration is about three orders of magnitude higher than so far known silicate-free aqueous uranium(IV) colloids. Through the use of different analytical methods (invasive and non-invasive) it could be shown that the resulting uranium(IV) colloids are in the nanoscalar range. A high mobility can be assumed in aquatic systems. Evidence is provided by photon correlation spectroscopy, ultrafiltration, and ultracentrifugation that uranium(IV) can form silicate-containing colloids of a size lower than 20 nm. The particles are generated in near neutral to slightly alkaline solutions containing geochemical relevant components (carbonate, silicate, sodium ions). They remain stable in aqueous suspension over years. Electrostatic repulsion due to a negative zeta potential in the near-neutral to alkaline pH range caused by the silicate stabilizes the uranium(IV) colloids. The isoelectric point of the nanoparticles is shifted towards lower pH values by the silicate. The higher the

  15. Compatibility and Stability of Rolapitant Injectable Emulsion Admixed with Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, George; Yeung, Stanley; Chen, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist, 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptor antagonist, and dexamethasone combination therapy is the standard of care for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Herein, we describe the physical and chemical stability of an injectable emulsion of the Neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist rolapitant 185 mg in 92.5 mL (free base, 166.5 mg in 92.5 mL) admixed with either 2.5 mL of dexamethasone sodium phosphate (10 mg) or 5 mL of dexamethasone sodium phosphate (20 mg). Admixtures were prepared and stored in two types of container closures (glass and Crystal Zenith plastic bottles) and four types of intravenous administration tubing sets (or intravenous tubing sets). The assessment of the physical and chemical stability was conducted on admixtures packaged in bottled samples stored at room temperature (20°C to 25°C under fluorescent light) and evaluated at 0, 1, and 6 hours. For admixtures in intravenous tubing sets, the assessment of physicochemical stability was performed after 0 and 7 hours of storage at 20°C to 25°C, and then after 20 hours (total 27 hours) under refrigeration (2°C to 8°C) and protected from light. Physical stability was assessed by visually examining the bottle contents under normal room light and measuring turbidity and particulate matter. Chemical stability was assessed by measuring the pH of the admixture and determining drug concentrations through high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis. Results showed that all samples were physically compatible throughout the duration of the study. The admixtures stayed within narrow and acceptable ranges in pH, turbidity, and particulate matter. Admixtures of rolapitant and dexamethasone were chemically stable when stored in glass and Crystal Zenith bottles for at least 6 hours at room temperature, as well as in the four selected intravenous tubing sets for 7 hours at 20°C to 25°C and then for 20 (total 27 hours) hours at 2°C to 8°C. No loss of potency

  16. Synthesis and luminescence properties of erbium silicate thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miritello, Maria; Lo Savio, Roberto; Iacona, Fabio; Franzo, Giorgia; Bongiorno, Corrado; Priolo, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the structure and the room temperature luminescence of erbium silicate thin films deposited by rf magnetron sputtering. Films deposited on silicon oxide layers are characterized by good structural properties and excellent stability. The optical properties of these films are strongly improved by rapid thermal annealing processes performed in the range of temperature 800-1250 deg. C. In fact through the reduction of the defect density of the material, a very efficient room temperature photoluminescence at 1535 nm is obtained. We have also investigated the influence of the annealing ambient, by finding that treatments in O 2 atmosphere are significantly more efficient in improving the optical properties of the material with respect to processes in N 2 . Upconversion effects become effective only when erbium silicate is excited with high pump powers. The evidence that all Er atoms (about 10 22 cm -3 ) in erbium silicate films are optically active suggests interesting perspectives for optoelectronic applications of this material

  17. Stability of polymyxin B sulfate diluted in 0.9% sodium chloride injection and stored at 4 or 25 degrees C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jie; Figueroa, Deborah A; Lim, Tze-Peng; Chow, Diana S; Tam, Vincent H

    2010-07-15

    The stability of polymyxin B sulfate in infusion bags containing 0.9% sodium chloride injection stored at 4 and 25 degrees C was studied. Seven manufacturing batches of polymyxin B from different sources were tested. The products were reconstituted in sterile water for injection, diluted in infusion bags containing 0.9% sodium chloride injection, and stored at room temperature (25 degrees C) or under refrigeration (4 degrees C). Samples were withdrawn at the same time on days 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7. A modified microbiological assay was used to determine the concentrations, as indicated by zones of inhibition, of polymyxin B. Bordetella bronchiseptica served as the reference organism. Stability was defined as retention of >90% of the initial concentration. The decomposition kinetics of polymyxin B in 0.9% sodium chloride injection were evaluated by plotting the polymyxin B concentration remaining versus time. On average, the samples retained over 90% of their initial concentration for up to two days at both storage temperatures. All samples retained over 90% of their initial concentration at 24 hours. The decomposition kinetics of polymyxin B in infusion bags containing 0.9% sodium chloride injection exhibited pseudo-first-order kinetics, with rate constants of 0.024-0.075 day(-1) at 25 degrees C and 0.022-0.043 day(-1) at 4 degrees C (p > 0.05). Polymyxin B was stable for at least one day when stored at 4 or 25 degrees C in infusion bags containing 0.9% sodium chloride injection. Stability did not differ significantly between the two storage temperatures.

  18. Stability-Indicating HPLC Method for Simultaneous Determination of Chloramphenicol, Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate and Tetrahydrozoline Hydrochloride in Ophthalmic Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlAani, Hashem; Alnukkary, Yasmin

    2016-03-01

    A simple stability-indicating RP-HPLC assay method was developed and validated for quantitative determination of Chloramphenicol, Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate and Tetrahydrozoline Hydrochloride in ophthalmic solution in the presence of 2-amino-1-(4-nitrophenyl)propane-1,3-diol, a degradation product of Chloramphenicol, and Dexamethasone, a degradation product of Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate. Effective chromatographic separation was achieved using C18 column (250 mm, 4.6 mm i.d., 5 μm) with isocratic mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile - phosphate buffer (pH 4.0; 0.05 M) (30:70, v/v) at a flow rate of 1 mL/minute. The column temperature was maintained at 40°C and the detection wavelength was 230 nm. The proposed HPLC procedure was statistically validated according to the ICH guideline, and was proved to be stability-indicating by resolution of the APIs from their forced degradation products. The developed method is suitable for the routine analysis as well as stability studies.

  19. Molar volume, excess enthalpy, and Prigogine-Defay ratio of some silicate glasses with different (P,T) histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wondraczek, Lothar; Behrens, Harald

    2007-10-21

    Structural relaxation in silicate glasses with different (p,T) histories was experimentally examined by differential scanning calorimetry and measurements of molar volume under ambient pressure. Temperature and pressure-dependent rates of changes in molar volume and generation of excess enthalpy were determined for sodium trisilicate, soda lime silicate, and sodium borosilicate (NBS) compositions. From the derived data, Prigogine-Defay ratios are calculated and discussed. Changes of excess enthalpy are governed mainly by changes in short-range structure, as is shown for NBS where boron coordination is highly sensitive to pressure. For all three glasses, it is shown how the relaxation functions that underlie volume, enthalpy, and structural relaxation decouple for changes in cooling rates and pressure of freezing, respectively. The magnitude of the divergence between enthalpy and volume may be related to differences in structural sensitivity to changes in the (p,V,T,t) space on different length scales. The findings suggest that the Prigogine-Defay ratio is related to the magnitude of the discussed decoupling effect.

  20. Stability of tranexamic acid in 0.9% sodium chloride, stored in type 1 glass vials and ethylene/propylene copolymer plastic containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, Susan V; Sztajnkrycer, Matthew D; Jenkins, Donald A; Zietlow, Scott P; Berns, Kathleen S; Park, Myung S

    2014-01-01

    Tranexamic acid has recently been demonstrated to decrease all-cause mortality and deaths due to hemorrhage in trauma patients. The optimal administration of tranexamic acid is within one hour of injury, but not more than three hours from the time of injury. To aid with timely administration, a premixed solution of 1 gram tranexamic acid and 0.9% sodium chloride was proposed to be stocked as a medication in both the aeromedical transport helicopters and Emergency Department at Mayo Clinic Hospital--Rochester Saint Marys Campus. Since no published stability data exists for tranexamic acid diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride, this study was undertaken to determine the stability of tranexamic acid diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride while being stored in two types of containers. Stability was determined through the use of a stability-indicating high-performance liquid reverse phase chromatography assay, pH, and visual tests. Tranexamic acid solutions of 1 gram in 0.9% sodium chloride 65 mL were studied at predetermined intervals for 90 days in ethylene/propylene copolymer plastic containers, protected from light, and at both controlled room and refrigerated temperatures. Tranexamic acid solutions of 1 gram in 0.9% sodium chloride 50 mL were studied at predetermined intervals for 180 days in clear Type 1 borosilicate glass vials sealed with intact elastomeric, Flourotec-coated stoppers, stored protected from light at controlled room temperature. Solutions stored in the ethylene/propylene copolymer plastic containers at both storage temperatures maintained at least 98% of initial potency throughout the 90-day study period. Solutions stored in glass vials at controlled room temperature maintained at least 92% of initial potency throughout the 180-day study period. Visual and pH tests revealed stable, clear, colorless, and particulate-free solutions throughout the respective study periods.

  1. High calcium fly ash geopolymer stabilized lateritic soil and granulated blast furnace slag blends as a pavement base material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phummiphan, Itthikorn; Horpibulsuk, Suksun; Rachan, Runglawan; Arulrajah, Arul; Shen, Shui-Long; Chindaprasirt, Prinya

    2018-01-05

    Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GBFS) was used as a replacement material in marginal lateritic soil (LS) while class C Fly Ash (FA) was used as a precursor for the geopolymerization process to develop a low-carbon pavement base material at ambient temperature. Unconfined Compression Strength (UCS) tests were performed to investigate the strength development of geopolymer stabilized LS/GBFS blends. Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Diffraction analysis were undertaken to examine the role of the various influencing factors on UCS development. The influencing factors studied included GBFS content, Na 2 SiO 3 :NaOH ratio (NS:NH) and curing time. The 7-day soaked UCS of FA geopolymer stabilized LS/GBFS blends at various NS:NH ratios tested was found to satisfy the specifications of the Thailand national road authorities. The GBFS replacement was found to be insignificant for the improvement of the UCS of FA geopolymer stabilized LS/GBFS blends at low NS:NH ratio of 50:50. Microstructural analysis indicated the coexistence of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (CSH) and Sodium Alumino Silicate Hydrate products in FA geopolymer stabilized LS/GBFS blends. This research enables GBFS, which is traditionally considered as a waste material, to be used as a replacement and partially reactive material in FA geopolymer pavement applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Switch from Sodium Phenylbutyrate to Glycerol Phenylbutyrate Improved Metabolic Stability in an Adolescent with Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laemmle, Alexander; Stricker, Tamar; Häberle, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    A male patient, born in 1999, was diagnosed with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency as neonate and was managed with a strict low-protein diet supplemented with essential amino acids, L-citrulline, and L-arginine as well as sodium benzoate. He had an extensive history of hospitalizations for hyperammonemic crises throughout childhood and early adolescence, which continued after the addition of sodium phenylbutyrate in 2009. In December 2013 he was switched to glycerol phenylbutyrate, and his metabolic stability was greatly improved over the following 7 months prior to liver transplant.

  3. A simple, rapid and eco friendly method for determination of uranium in geological samples of low silicate matrix by ICP-OES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanuman, V.V.; Chakrapani, G.; Singh, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    A simple, rapid, cost effective and eco friendly decomposition and dissolution method is developed for the determination of uranium (U 3 O 8 ) by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectrometer (ICP-OES) in low silicate geological samples. The salts of Sodium di-hydrogen phosphate monohydrate and Sodium pyrophosphate deca hydrate are used in the ratio of 1:1 (phosphate flux) for the decomposition of low silicate matrix geological samples. Samples are decomposed by fusion with the phosphate flux after ignition and the dissolution is carried out using distilled water. If the samples contain >10% silica, they have been treated with little amount of (HF+HNO 3 ) prior to fusion with phosphate flux. These samples, are analysed by ICP-OES directly without any separation from the matrix. The spectral interferences of major matrix elements (Al, Ti, Fe, Mn, etc present in the sample) on uranium are studied and it is observed that their interferences are negligible, as dilution is required to bring uranium concentration into calibration range of instrument. This is the first time, the phosphate flux is used for decomposition of low silicate geological samples for uranium determination by ICP-OES

  4. Stabilization of lead in an alkali-activated municipal solid waste incineration fly ash-Pyrophyllite-based system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Kenji; Nakamura, Takafumi; Takaoka, Masaki; Aminuddin, Siti Fatimah; Oshita, Kazuyuki; Fujimori, Takashi

    2017-10-01

    This work focuses on the stabilization and speciation of lead (Pb) in a composite solid produced from an alkali-activated municipal solid waste incineration fly ash (MSWIFA)-pyophyllite-based system. The solid product was synthesized after mixtures of raw materials (dehydrated pyrophyllite, MSWIFA, 14 mol/L aqueous sodium hydroxide, and sodium silicate solution) were cured at 105 °C for 24 h. The product could reduce the leaching of Pb and the Pb concentration in the leachate was 7.0 × 10 -3 using the Japanese leaching test and 9.7 × 10 -4  mg/L using toxicity characteristics leaching procedure method, which satisfied the respective test criteria and successfully stabilized Pb in this system. The solid product had a compressive strength of 2 MPa and consisted mainly of crystalline phases. Scanning electron microscopy with X-ray analysis and X-ray absorption fine structure suggested that Pb was present along with Al, Si, and O, and that the atomic environment around the Pb was similar to that of PbSiO 3 . These results suggest that the alkali-activated MSWIFA-pyrophyllite-based system could be used to stabilize Pb in MSWIFA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Energetically benign synthesis of lanthanum silicate through “silica garden” route and its characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmar, Kavita [Central University of Jharkhand, Ranchi (India); Bhattacharjee, Santanu, E-mail: santanu@nmlindia.org [CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur (India)

    2017-06-15

    Lanthanum silicate synthesis through “silica garden” route has been reported as an alternative to energy intensive milling procedure. Under optimum conditions lanthanum chloride crystals react with water glass (sodium silicate) to produce self generating hollow lanthanum silicate precipitation tube(s) (LaSPT). The micro tubes are irregular, thick, white coloured and amorphous but are hierarchically built from smaller tubules of 10–20 nm diameters. They retain their amorphous nature on being heated up to 600 °C beyond which crystallization starts. The major phase in the LaSPT heated at 900 °C is La{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}. “As synthesized” LaSPT is heterogeneous and comprises non stoichiometric phases. The exterior and interior surfaces of these tubes are remarkably different in their morphology and chemical composition. LaSPT sintered at 1200 and 1300 °C show fair amount of ionic conductivity. - Graphical abstract: Lanthanum silicate precipitation tube (LaSPT) produced through ‘silica garden’ route offers a green alternative to energy intensive milling procedure. - Highlights: • La-silicate precipitation tube (LaSPT) synthesized via silica garden route. • The microtubes are irregular, thick, white coloured and amorphous. • They are hierarchically built from smaller tubules of 10–20 nm diameters. • The major phase in the LaSPT heated at 900 °C is La{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}. • LaSPT sintered at 1200 °C is fairly conducting.

  6. Energetically benign synthesis of lanthanum silicate through “silica garden” route and its characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmar, Kavita; Bhattacharjee, Santanu

    2017-01-01

    Lanthanum silicate synthesis through “silica garden” route has been reported as an alternative to energy intensive milling procedure. Under optimum conditions lanthanum chloride crystals react with water glass (sodium silicate) to produce self generating hollow lanthanum silicate precipitation tube(s) (LaSPT). The micro tubes are irregular, thick, white coloured and amorphous but are hierarchically built from smaller tubules of 10–20 nm diameters. They retain their amorphous nature on being heated up to 600 °C beyond which crystallization starts. The major phase in the LaSPT heated at 900 °C is La_2Si_2O_7. “As synthesized” LaSPT is heterogeneous and comprises non stoichiometric phases. The exterior and interior surfaces of these tubes are remarkably different in their morphology and chemical composition. LaSPT sintered at 1200 and 1300 °C show fair amount of ionic conductivity. - Graphical abstract: Lanthanum silicate precipitation tube (LaSPT) produced through ‘silica garden’ route offers a green alternative to energy intensive milling procedure. - Highlights: • La-silicate precipitation tube (LaSPT) synthesized via silica garden route. • The microtubes are irregular, thick, white coloured and amorphous. • They are hierarchically built from smaller tubules of 10–20 nm diameters. • The major phase in the LaSPT heated at 900 °C is La_2Si_2O_7. • LaSPT sintered at 1200 °C is fairly conducting.

  7. Extended stability of intravenous 0.9% sodium chloride solution after prolonged heating or cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puertos, Enrique

    2014-03-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the stability and sterility of an intravenous 0.9% sodium chloride solution that had been cooled or heated for an extended period of time. Fifteen sterile 1 L bags of 0.9% sodium chloride solution were randomly selected for this experiment. Five bags were refrigerated at an average temperature of 5.2°C, 5 bags were heated at an average temperature of 39.2°C, and 5 bags were stored at an average room temperature of 21.8°C to serve as controls. All samples were protected from light and stored for a period of 199 days prior to being assayed and analyzed for microbial and fungal growth. There was no clinically significant difference in the mean sodium values between the refrigerated samples, the heated samples, and the control group. There were no signs of microbial or fungal growth for the duration of the study. A sterile intravenous solution of 0.9% sodium chloride that was heated or cooled remained stable and showed no signs of microbial or fungal growth for a period of 199 days. This finding will allow hospitals and emergency medical technicians to significantly extend the expiration date assigned to these fluids and therefore obviate the need to change out these fluids every 28 days as recommended by the manufacturer.

  8. Structural and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from alite hydration in the presence of sodium and potassium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, Oscar; Giraldo, Carolina; Camargo, Sergio S.; Tobón, Jorge I.

    2015-01-01

    This research evaluates the effect of sodium and potassium hydroxide on the structure and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from the hydration of pure alite. Monoclinic (MIII) alite was synthesized and hydrated, using water-to-alite ratios of 0.5 and 0.6 and additions of 10% NaOH and KOH by weight of alite. Based on results of X-ray diffraction, isothermal calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nanoindentation, two different effects of the alkaline hydroxides on the hydration reaction of alite, both at early and later ages, can be identified: (i) a differentiated hydration process, attributed to an enhancement in calcium hydroxide (CH) precipitation and a stimulation of the C-S-H nuclei; and (ii) an increase in the elastic modulus of the C-S-H aggregations, attributed to an electrostatic attraction between positive charges from the alkaline cations and negative charges from the C-S-H structure

  9. Structural and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from alite hydration in the presence of sodium and potassium hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, Oscar, E-mail: oamendoz@unal.edu.co [Grupo del Cemento y Materiales de Construcción (CEMATCO). Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Facultad de Minas, Medellín (Colombia); Giraldo, Carolina [Cementos Argos S.A., Medellín (Colombia); Camargo, Sergio S. [Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro/COPPE, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tobón, Jorge I. [Grupo del Cemento y Materiales de Construcción (CEMATCO). Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Facultad de Minas, Medellín (Colombia)

    2015-08-15

    This research evaluates the effect of sodium and potassium hydroxide on the structure and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from the hydration of pure alite. Monoclinic (MIII) alite was synthesized and hydrated, using water-to-alite ratios of 0.5 and 0.6 and additions of 10% NaOH and KOH by weight of alite. Based on results of X-ray diffraction, isothermal calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nanoindentation, two different effects of the alkaline hydroxides on the hydration reaction of alite, both at early and later ages, can be identified: (i) a differentiated hydration process, attributed to an enhancement in calcium hydroxide (CH) precipitation and a stimulation of the C-S-H nuclei; and (ii) an increase in the elastic modulus of the C-S-H aggregations, attributed to an electrostatic attraction between positive charges from the alkaline cations and negative charges from the C-S-H structure.

  10. Nanostructured silicate polymer concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figovskiy Oleg L'vovich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been known that acid-resistant concretes on the liquid glass basis have high porosity (up to 18~20 %, low strength and insufficient water resistance. Significant increasing of silicate matrix strength and density was carried out by incorporation of special liquid organic alkali-soluble silicate additives, which block superficial pores and reduce concrete shrinkage deformation. It was demonstrated that introduction of tetrafurfuryloxisilane additive sharply increases strength, durability and shock resistance of silicate polymer concrete in aggressive media. The experiments showed, that the strength and density of silicate polymer concrete increase in case of decreasing liquid glass content. The authors obtained optimal content of silicate polymer concrete, which possesses increased strength, durability, density and crack-resistance. Diffusive permeability of concrete and its chemical resistance has been investigated in various corroding media.

  11. Tricalcium Phosphate Containing Sodium Hexametaphosphate as Polymer Suspension Stabilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rahbar Shamskar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Tricalcium phosphate as hydroxyapatite is used as a suspension stabilizer in styrene polymerization process. Particle size of TCP plays an essential role in the particles’ size distribution and geometrical form of polystyrene products. As the particle size of TCP is reduced, there will be much better chance to engulf the styrene particles. The higher the number of TCP particles surrounding each styrene particle, the lesser will be their tendency to form a large particle after collision. Therefore, there will be higher percentages of spherical polystyrene with small particle size and narrower size distribution in the product. Experimental results have indicated that the addition of sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP to the reaction mixture of lime and phosphoric acid, after drying the product by spray dryer, lead to decrease the size of TCP particles from ca. 5 μm (without SHMP to ca. 1.5 μm (with SHMP. In this study, the role of TCP containing SHMP as polymer suspension stabilizer and consequently the beads size of polystyrene is investigated in laboratory scale. The results show that despite addition of SHMP to the reaction mixture of lime and phosphoric acid decreases the TCP particles size and the mean bead size of the product of polystyrene become larger than the product prepared by TCP without SHMP.

  12. Cross-linking proteins by laccase: Effects on the droplet size and rheology of emulsions stabilized by sodium caseinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, A C K; Perrechil, F A; Costa, A A S; Santana, R C; Cunha, R L

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of laccase and ferulic acid on the characteristics of oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by sodium caseinate at different pH (3, 5 and 7). Emulsions were prepared by high pressure homogenization of soybean oil with sodium caseinate solution containing varied concentrations of laccase (0, 1 and 5mg/mL) and ferulic acid (5 and 10mM). Laccase treatment and pH exerted a strong influence on the properties with a consequent effect on stability, structure and rheology of emulsions stabilized by Na-caseinate. At pH7, O/W emulsions were kinetically stable due to the negative protein charge which enabled electrostatic repulsion between oil droplets resulting in an emulsion with small droplet size, low viscosity, pseudoplasticity and viscoelastic properties. The laccase treatment led to emulsions showing shear-thinning behavior as a result of a more structured system. O/W emulsions at pH5 and 3 showed phase separation due to the proximity to protein pI, but the laccase treatment improved their stability of emulsions especially at pH3. At pH3, the addition of ferulic acid and laccase produced emulsions with larger droplet size but with narrower droplet size distribution, increased viscosity, pseudoplasticity and viscoelastic properties (gel-like behavior). Comparing laccase treatments, the combined addition of laccase and ferulic acid generally produced emulsions with lower stability (pH5), larger droplet size (pH3, 5 and 7) and higher pseudoplasticity (pH5 and 7) than emulsion with only ferulic acid. The results suggested that the cross-linking of proteins by laccase and ferulic acid improved protein emulsifying properties by changing functional mechanisms of the protein on emulsion structure and rheology, showing that sodium caseinate can be successfully used in acid products when treated with laccase. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. High-performance polymer/layered silicate nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidecker, Matthew J.

    High-performance layered-silicate nanocomposites of Polycarbonate (PC), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), and their blends were produced via conventional melt-blending techniques. The focus of this thesis was on the fundamentals of dispersion, control of thermal stability, maintenance of melt-blending processing conditions, and on optimization of the composites' mechanical properties via the design of controlled and thermodynamically favorable nano-filler dispersions within the polymer matrices. PET and PC require high temperatures for melt-processing, rendering impractical the use of conventional/commercial organically-modified layered-silicates, since the thermal degradation temperatures of their ammonium surfactants lies below the typical processing temperatures. Thus, different surfactant chemistries must be employed in order to develop melt-processable nanocomposites, also accounting for polymer matrix degradation due to water (PET) or amine compounds (PC). Novel high thermal-stability surfactants were developed and employed in montmorillonite nanocomposites of PET, PC, and PC/PET blends, and were compared to the respective nanocomposites based on conventional quaternary-ammonium modified montmorillonites. Favorable dispersion was achieved in all cases, however, the overall material behavior -- i.e., the combination of crystallization, mechanical properties, and thermal degradation -- was better for the nanocomposites based on the thermally-stable surfactant fillers. Studies were also done to trace, and ultimately limit, the matrix degradation of Polycarbonate/montmorillonite nanocomposites, through varying the montmorillonite surfactant chemistry, processing conditions, and processing additives. Molecular weight degradation was, maybe surprisingly, better controlled in the conventional quaternary ammonium based nanocomposites -- even though the thermal stability of the organically modified montmorillonites was in most cases the lowest. Dependence of the

  14. Validation of a stability-indicating spectrometric method for the determination of sulfacetamide sodium in pure form and ophthalmic preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sulfacetamide sodium is a widely used sulfonamide for ophthalmic infections. Objective: A number of analytical methods have been reported for the analysis of sulfacetamide but they lack the ability to determine both the active drug and its major degradation product, sulfanilamide, simultaneously in a sample. Materials and Methods: In the present study a simple, rapid and economical stability-indicating UV spectrometric method has been validated for the simultaneous assay of sulfacetamide sodium and sulfanilamide in pure form and in ophthalmic preparations. Results: The method has been found to be accurate (recovery 100.03 ±0.589% and precise (RSD 0.587% with detectable and quantifiable limits of 1.67×10–6 M (0.04 mg% and 5.07×10–6 M (0.13 mg%, respectively for the assay of pure sulfacetamide sodium. The method is also found to be accurate and precise to small changes in wavelength, pH and buffer concentration as well as to forced degradation. The study further includes the validation of the method for the assay of pure sulfanilamide in solution, which has been found to be accurate, precise and robust. Conclusion: The results indicate that the proposed two-component spectrometric method is stability-indicating and can be used for the simultaneous assay of both sulfacetamide sodium and sulfanilamide in synthetic mixtures and degraded solutions.

  15. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and... Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used as an anticaking agent in animal feed, provided that the amount of calcium silicate does not...

  16. Stability of methadone hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection in single-dose plastic containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denson, D D; Crews, J C; Grummich, K W; Stirm, E J; Sue, C A

    1991-03-01

    The stability of methadone hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride injection in flexible polyvinyl chloride containers was studied. Commercially available methadone hydrochloride 20 mg/mL and 25-mL single-dose bags of 0.9% sodium chloride injection were used. Six samples each were prepared at methadone hydrochloride concentrations of 1, 2, and 5 mg/mL. The solutions were stored at room temperature and were not protected from light. Immediately after preparation and after two, three, and four weeks of storage, each of the 18 samples was divided into three aliquots, each of which was analyzed in duplicate for methadone hydrochloride concentration by gas chromatography. There was less than 10% change in methadone hydrochloride concentration in any sample throughout the four-week study period. Methadone hydrochloride at concentrations of 1, 2, and 5 mg/mL prepared in commercially available flexible polyvinyl chloride containers of 0.9% sodium chloride injection and stored at room temperature without deliberate protection from light is stable for at least four weeks.

  17. Immobilisation of active concrete debris using soluble sodium silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, S.N.; Jull, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    Demolition of concrete biological shields will generate large quantities of active demolition debris. The size distribution of such concrete may range from pieces of size less than one tonne down to dust. Handling and disposal methods for this material are still the subject of current research. Although the literature indicates that the mechanisms of silicate/concrete interaction are not well understood, successful setting of the smaller size fraction of concrete demolition debris can be achieved at laboratory scale. Hardened properties of the set slurry are also acceptable. A study of the full scale process has resulted in an outline design for a suitable on-site plant. Estimated capital costs of the equipment are of the order of pounds 1.1M. The project has shown that the material of less than 5mm particle size can be set by this technique. Whilst this meets the original objectives of immobilising dust, it had been hoped that the 10mm size material, (which will require removal from the larger debris before grouting can take place) could also be disposed of by the slurry setting technique. Co-disposal of slurry and large active items in the same container is unlikely to be worthwhile. 14 tabs., 5 figs., 30 refs

  18. Improvement of stability of oil-in-water emulsions containing caseinate-coated droplets by addition of sodium alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallandre, S; Decker, E A; McClements, D J

    2007-11-01

    The potential of sodium alginate for improving the stability of emulsions containing caseinate-coated droplets was investigated. One wt% corn oil-in-water emulsions containing anionic caseinate-coated droplets (0.15 wt% sodium caseinate) and anionic sodium alginate (0 to 1 wt%) were prepared at pH 7. The pH of these emulsions was then adjusted to 3.5, so that the anionic alginate molecules adsorbed to the cationic caseinate-coated droplets. Extensive droplet aggregation occurred when there was insufficient alginate to completely saturate the droplet surfaces due to bridging flocculation, and when the nonadsorbed alginate concentration was high enough to induce depletion flocculation. Emulsions with relatively small particle sizes could be formed over a range of alginate concentrations (0.1 to 0.4 wt%). The influence of pHs (3 to 7) and sodium chloride (0 to 500 mM) on the properties of primary (0 wt% alginate) and secondary (0.15 wt% alginate) emulsions was studied. Alginate adsorbed to the droplet surfaces at pHs 3, 4, and 5, but not at pHs 6 and 7, due to electrostatic attraction between anionic groups on the alginate and cationic groups on the adsorbed caseinate. Secondary emulsions had better stability than primary emulsions at pH values near caseinate's isoelectric point (pHs 4 and 5). In addition, secondary emulsions were stable up to higher ionic strengths (< 300 mM) than primary emulsions (<50 mM). The controlled electrostatic deposition method utilized in this study could be used to extend the range of application of dairy protein emulsifiers in the food industry.

  19. Recovery of sodium hydroxide and silica from zirconium oxide plant effluent of Nuclear Fuel Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajpai, M.B.; Shenoi, M.R.K.; Keni, V.S.

    1994-01-01

    Sodium hydroxide (lye) and silica can be recovered in pure form from the alkaline sodium silicate waste of Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad. Electrolytic method was used to amalgamate the sodium present in an electrolyser with flowing mercury as cathode and nickel as anode. The amalgam is then denuded with water in a graphite packed tower to recover mercury for recycling to the electrolyser and sodium hydroxide lye. Sodium hydroxide lye can be recycled in the zirconium oxide plant. Silica is recovered from the spent electrolyte by ion exchange method using cation exchange resin. Both the process details are described in this paper, with experimental data useful for the scale up. The process converts waste to value products. (author)

  20. Stability-indicating HPLC–DAD methods for determination of two binary mixtures: Rabeprazole sodium–mosapride citrate and rabeprazole sodium–itopride hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed M. El-Fatatry

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Two selective stability-indicating HPLC methods are described for determination of rabeprazole sodium (RZ–mosapride citrate (MR and RZ–itopride hydrochloride (IO mixtures in the presence of their ICH-stress formed degradation products. Separations were achieved on X-Bridge C18 column using two mobile phases: the first for RZ–MR mixture consisted of acetonitrile: 0.025 M KH2PO4 solution: TEA (30:69:1 v/v; pH 7.0; the second for RZ–IO mixture was at ratio of 25:74:1 (v/v; pH 9.25. The detection wavelength was 283 nm. The two methods were validated and validation acceptance criteria were met in all cases. Peak purity testing using contrast angle theory, relative absorbance and log A versus the wavelengths plots were presented. The % recoveries of the intact drugs were between 99.1% and 102.2% with RSD% values less than 1.6%. Application of the proposed HPLC methods indicated that the methods could be adopted to follow the stability of their formulations. Keywords: Rabeprazole sodium, Mosapride citrate, Itopride hydrochloride, Stability-indicating HPLC–DAD, Peak purity

  1. Stability of tacrolimus injection diluted in 0.9% sodium chloride injection and stored in Excel bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Alan L; Zhang, Yanping; Kawedia, Jitesh D; Shank, Brandon R; Deaver, Melissa A; Kramer, Mark A

    2016-12-15

    The chemical stability and physical compatibility of tacrolimus i.v. infusion solutions prepared in Excel bags and stored at 23 or 4 °C for up to nine days were studied. Tacrolimus admixtures (2, 4, and 8 μg/mL) were prepared in Excel bags using 0.9% sodium chloride injection and stored at 23 °C without protection from light or at 4 °C in the dark. Test samples were withdrawn from triplicate bag solutions immediately after preparation and at predetermined time intervals (1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 days). Chemical stability was assessed by measuring tacrolimus concentrations using a validated stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography assay. The physical stability of the admixtures was assessed by visual examination and by measuring turbidity, particle size, and drug content. All test solutions stored at 23 or 4 °C had a no greater than 6% loss of the initial tacrolimus concentration throughout the nine-day study period. All test samples of tacrolimus admixtures, under both storage conditions, were without precipitation and remained clear initially and throughout the nine-day observation period. Changes in turbidities were minor; measured particulates remained few in number in all samples throughout the study. Extemporaneously prepared infusion solutions of tacrolimus 2, 4, and 8 μg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride injection in Excel bags were chemically and physically stable for at least nine days when stored at room temperature (23 °C) without protection from light and when stored in a refrigerator (4 °C) in the dark. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of Different Irrigation Solutions on the Colour Stability of Three Calcium Silicate-Based Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobhnamayan F

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Statement of Problem: Previous studies have shown discoloration of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA in contact with root canal irrigation solutions. However, there are limited data on colour stability of other calcium silicate–based materials (CSMs. Objectives: This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the colour stability of three CSMs in contact with different irrigation solutions. Materials and Methods: Three CSMs including White MTA (wMTA Angelus, calcium enriched mixture (CEM, and Biodentine were assessed in this study. Forty five samples of each material were mixed according to the manufactures’ instructions and then placed in silicone tubes. After 24 hours, the materials were removed from the moulds and 9 samples of each material left dry or immersed in normal saline, 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCL, 2% chlorhexidinegluconate (CHX, or 17%EDTA for 24 hours. Colour changes were measured with a spectrophotometer. Data were evaluated with 2-way analysis of variance, one way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc tests. Results: The highest discoloration of all materials was observed after contact with CHX. In the MTA Angelus and CEM cement groups, significant differences were observed between CHX and NaOCl and also between these two irrigants with the other three irrigants (p < 0.05. In the Biodentine group, CHX created statistically significant discoloration compared to other irrigants (p < 0.05. Only wMTA Angelus showed a significantly higher discoloration in contact with EDTA compared to normal saline and dry condition (p < 0.05. wMTA Angelus showed a significantly higher colour change compared with CEM cement and Biodentine after contact with NaOCl, CHX, and EDTA (p < 0.05. Conclusions: The contact of wMTA, CEM cement, and Biodentine with CHX should be avoided because this leads to severe discoloration. Contact with sodium hypochlorite also leads to discoloration of wMTA and CEM cements. Among of the three tested materials, w

  3. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL STABILITY ANALYSIS OF COSMETIC MULTI- PLE EMULSIONS LOADED WITH ASCORBYL PALMITATE AND SODIUM ASCORBYL PHOSPHATE SALTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Hira; Akhtar, Naveed; Ali, Atif; Khan, Haji M Shoaib; Sohail, Muhammad; Naeem, Muhammad; Nawaz, Zarqa

    2016-09-01

    Stability of hydrophilic and lipophilic vitamin C derivatives for quenching synergistic antioxidant activities and to treat oxidative related diseases is a major issue. This study was aimed to encapsulate hydrophilic and lipophilic vitamin C derivatives (ascorbyl palmitate and sodium ascorbyl phosphate) as functional ingredients in a newly formulated multiple emulsion of the W//W type to attain the synergistic antioxidant effects and the resultant system's long term physical and chemical stability. Several multiple emulsions using the same concentration of emulsifiers but different concentrations of ascorbyl palmitate and sodium ascorbyl phosphate were developed. Three finally selected multiple emulsions (ME₁, ME₂ and ME₃) were evaluated for physical stability in terms of rheology, microscopy, conductivity, pH, and organoleptic characteristics under different storage conditions for 3 months. Chemical stability was determined by HPLC on Sykam GmbH HPLC system (Germany), equipped with a variable UV detector. Results showed that at accelerated storage conditions all the three multiple emulsions had shear thinning behavior of varying shear stress with no influence of location of functional ingredients in a carrier system. Conductivity values increased and pH values remained within the skin pH range for 3 months. Microscopic analysis showed an increase in globule size with the passage of time, especially at higher temperatures while decreased at low temperatures. Centrifugation test did not cause phase separation till the 45th day, but little effects after 2 months. Chemical stability analysis by HPLC at the end of 3 months showed that ascorbyl palmitate and sodium ascorbyl phosphate were almost stable in all multiple emulsions with no influence of their location in a carrier system. Multiple emulsions were found a stable carrier for hydrophilic and lipophilic vitamin C derivatives to enhance their desired effects. Considering that many topical formulations

  4. Fabrication, characterization and antimicrobial activities of thymol-loaded zein nanoparticles stabilized by sodium caseinate-chitosan hydrochloride double layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaqiong; Niu, Yuge; Luo, Yangchao; Ge, Mei; Yang, Tian; Yu, Liangli Lucy; Wang, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Thymol-loaded zein nanoparticles stabilized with sodium caseinate (SC) and chitosan hydrochloride (CHC) were prepared and characterized. The SC stabilized nanoparticles had well-defined size range and negatively charged surface. Due to the presence of SC, the stabilized zein nanoparticles showed a shift of isoelectric point from 6.18 to 5.05, and had a desirable redispersibility in water at neutral pH after lyophilization. Coating with CHC onto the SC stabilized zein nanoparticles resulted in increased particle size, reversal of zeta potential value from negative to positive, and improved encapsulation efficiency. Both thymol-loaded zein nanoparticles and SC stabilized zein nanoparticles had a spherical shape and smooth surface, while the surfaces of CHC-SC stabilized zein nanoparticles seemed rough and had some clumps. Encapsulated thymol was more effective in suppressing gram-positive bacterium than un-encapsulated thymol for a longer time period. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Suitability assessment of grey water quality treated with an upflow-downflow siliceous sand/marble waste filtration system for agricultural and industrial purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaabane, Safa; Riahi, Khalifa; Hamrouni, Hédi; Thayer, Béchir Ben

    2017-04-01

    The present study examines the suitability assessment of an upflow-downflow siliceous sand/marble waste filtration system for treatment and reuse of grey water collected from bathrooms of the student residential complex at the Higher Institute of Engineering Medjez El Bab (Tunisia). Once the optimization of grey water pre-treatment system has been determined, the filtration system was operated at different hydraulic loading rate and media filter proportions in order to assess the suitability of treated grey water for irrigational purpose according to salinity hazard, sodium hazard, magnesium hazard, permeability index, water infiltration rate, and widely used graphical methods. Suitability of the treated grey water for industrial purpose was evaluated in terms of foaming, corrosion, and scaling. Under optimal operational conditions, results reveals that treated grey water samples with an upflow-downflow siliceous sand/marble waste filtration system may be considered as a good and an excellent water quality suitable for irrigation purpose. However, treated grey water was found not appropriate for industrial purpose due to high concentrations of calcium and sodium that can generate foaming and scaling harm to boilers. These results suggest that treated grey water with an upflow-downflow siliceous sand/marble waste filtration system would support production when used as irrigation water.

  6. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely...

  7. Determination of silica in silicates by differential spectrophotometry as α-molybdosilicic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohlweiler, O.A.; Meditsch, J.O.; Silva, S.

    1980-01-01

    A method for determining silica in silicates by differential spectrophotometry, using β-molybdosilic acid, is described. The sample is attacked by a mixture of boron trioxide and lithium carbonate (10:1). α-molydbosilicic acid is developed in a buffered solution (pH approximatelly 3.9) containing acetic acid and sodium acetate. The analytical procedure involves a series of preliminary steps which were previously elaborated for the gravimetric determination of silica as oxine molybdosilicate and which account for the removal of phosphorus, titanium and zirconium through ion exchange resins. (C.L.B.) [pt

  8. From illite/smectite clay to mesoporous silicate adsorbent for efficient removal of chlortetracycline from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenbo; Tian, Guangyan; Zong, Li; Zhou, Yanmin; Kang, Yuru; Wang, Qin; Wang, Aiqin

    2017-01-01

    A series of mesoporous silicate adsorbents with superior adsorption performance for hazardous chlortetracycline (CTC) were sucessfully prepared via a facile one-pot hydrothermal reaction using low-cost illite/smectite (IS) clay, sodium silicate and magnesium sulfate as the starting materials. In this process, IS clay was "teared up" and then "rebuilt" as new porous silicate adsorbent with high specific surface area of 363.52m 2 /g (about 8.7 folds higher than that of IS clay) and very negative Zeta potential (-34.5mV). The inert SiOSi (Mg, Al) bonds in crystal framework of IS were broken to form Si(Al) O - groups with good adsorption activity, which greatly increased the adsorption sites served for holding much CTC molecules. Systematic evaluation on adsorption properties reveals the optimal silicate adsorbent can adsorb 408.81mg/g of CTC (only 159.7mg/g for raw IS clay) and remove 99.3% (only 46.5% for raw IS clay) of CTC from 100mg/L initial solution (pH3.51; adsorption temperature 30°C; adsorbent dosage, 3g/L). The adsorption behaviors of CTC onto the adsorbent follows the Langmuir isotherm model, Temkin equation and pseudo second-order kinetic model. The mesopore adsorption, electrostatic attraction and chemical association mainly contribute to the enhanced adsorption properties. As a whole, the high-efficient silicate adsorbent could be candidates to remove CTC from the wastewater with high amounts of CTC. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Stability indicating high performance thin-layer chromatographic method for simultaneous estimation of pantoprazole sodium and itopride hydrochloride in combined dosage form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Bageshwar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A specific, precise and stability indicating high-performance thin-layer chromatographic method for simultaneous estimation of pantoprazole sodium and itopride hydrochloride in pharmaceutical formulations was developed and validated. The method employed TLC aluminium plates precoated with silica gel 60F254 as the stationary phase. The solvent system consisted of methanol:water:ammonium acetate; 4.0:1.0:0.5 (v/v/v. This system was found to give compact and dense spots for both itopride hydrochloride (Rf value of 0.55±0.02 and pantoprazole sodium (Rf value of 0.85±0.04. Densitometric analysis of both drugs was carried out in the reflectance–absorbance mode at 289 nm. The linear regression analysis data for the calibration plots showed a good linear relationship with R2=0.9988±0.0012 in the concentration range of 100–400 ng for pantoprazole sodium. Also, the linear regression analysis data for the calibration plots showed a good linear relationship with R2=0.9990±0.0008 in the concentration range of 200–1200 ng for itopride hydrochloride. The method was validated for specificity, precision, robustness and recovery. Statistical analysis proves that the method is repeatable and selective for the estimation of both the said drugs. As the method could effectively separate the drug from its degradation products, it can be employed as a stability indicating method. Keywords: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, Itopride hydrochloride, Pantoprazole sodium, High performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC, Stability indicating, Forced degradation

  10. Recovery of sodium hydroxide and silica from zirconium oxide plant effluent of Nuclear Fuel Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajpai, M B; Shenoi, M R.K.; Keni, V S [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    Sodium hydroxide (lye) and silica can be recovered in pure form from the alkaline sodium silicate waste of Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad. Electrolytic method was used to amalgamate the sodium present in an electrolyser with flowing mercury as cathode and nickel as anode. The amalgam is then denuded with water in a graphite packed tower to recover mercury for recycling to the electrolyser and sodium hydroxide lye. Sodium hydroxide lye can be recycled in the zirconium oxide plant. Silica is recovered from the spent electrolyte by ion exchange method using cation exchange resin. Both the process details are described in this paper, with experimental data useful for the scale up. The process converts waste to value products. (author). 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Solidification/stabilization of ash from medical waste incineration into geopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzanakos, Konstantinos; Mimilidou, Aliki; Anastasiadou, Kalliopi; Stratakis, Antonis; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2014-10-01

    In the present work, bottom and fly ash, generated from incinerated medical waste, was used as a raw material for the production of geopolymers. The stabilization (S/S) process studied in this paper has been evaluated by means of the leaching and mechanical properties of the S/S solids obtained. Hospital waste ash, sodium hydroxide, sodium silicate solution and metakaolin were mixed. Geopolymers were cured at 50°C for 24h. After a certain aging time of 7 and 28 days, the strength of the geopolymer specimens, the leachability of heavy metals and the mineralogical phase of the produced geopolymers were studied. The effects of the additions of fly ash and calcium compounds were also investigated. The results showed that hospital waste ash can be utilized as source material for the production of geopolymers. The addition of fly ash and calcium compounds considerably improves the strength of the geopolymer specimens (2-8 MPa). Finally, the solidified matrices indicated that geopolymerization process is able to reduce the amount of the heavy metals found in the leachate of the hospital waste ash. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate on the dispersion stability of ceramic glaze suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satchawan, Suphapan; Naksata, Wimol; Rattanakawin, Chairoj; Thiansem, Sakdiphon; Arqueropanyo, Orn-anong [Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand); Panya, Preecha [Kamphaengphet Rajabhat University, Kamphaengphet (Thailand); Sooksamiti, Ponlayuth [The Office of Primary Industries and Mines Region 3, Chiang Mai (Thailand); Scales, Peter J. [The University of Melbourne, Parkville Victoria (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) was used to render the stability of ceramic glaze dispersion which is composed of limestone, feldspar, quartz, kaolin and ferric oxide. The measured zeta potential showed negative values for the systems in deionized water and 0.001 M MgCl{sub 2} media at pH above 2, but a positive value was observed in 0.1M MgCl{sub 2} at pH higher than 6.7. Adsorption of SDBS in aqueous suspensions of ceramic glaze in deionized water and in 0.001 M MgCl{sub 2}, within the concentration range studied, followed both the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, but the Freundlich isotherm was more favored. Adsorption of SDBS in 0.1M MgCl{sub 2} corresponded to the Freundlich isotherm. From dispersion stability investigation, SDBS could render the suspension in deionized water and in 0.001 mM MgCl{sub 2} more than in 0.1 mM MgCl{sub 2}.

  13. Effect of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate on the dispersion stability of ceramic glaze suspension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satchawan, Suphapan; Naksata, Wimol; Rattanakawin, Chairoj; Thiansem, Sakdiphon; Arqueropanyo, Orn-anong; Panya, Preecha; Sooksamiti, Ponlayuth; Scales, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) was used to render the stability of ceramic glaze dispersion which is composed of limestone, feldspar, quartz, kaolin and ferric oxide. The measured zeta potential showed negative values for the systems in deionized water and 0.001 M MgCl 2 media at pH above 2, but a positive value was observed in 0.1M MgCl 2 at pH higher than 6.7. Adsorption of SDBS in aqueous suspensions of ceramic glaze in deionized water and in 0.001 M MgCl 2 , within the concentration range studied, followed both the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, but the Freundlich isotherm was more favored. Adsorption of SDBS in 0.1M MgCl 2 corresponded to the Freundlich isotherm. From dispersion stability investigation, SDBS could render the suspension in deionized water and in 0.001 mM MgCl 2 more than in 0.1 mM MgCl 2

  14. Environmental silicate nano-biocomposites

    CERN Document Server

    Pollet, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Environmental Silicate Nano-Biocomposites focuses on nano-biocomposites, which are obtained by the association of silicates such as bioclays with biopolymers. By highlighting recent developments and findings, green and biodegradable nano-composites from both renewable and biodegradable polymers are explored. This includes coverage of potential markets such as packaging, agricultures, leisure and the fast food industry. The knowledge and experience of more than twenty international experts in diverse fields, from chemical and biochemical engineering to applications, is brought together in four different sections covering: Biodegradable polymers and Silicates, Clay/Polyesters Nano-biocomposites, Clay/Agropolymers Nano-biocomposites, and Applications and biodegradation of Nano-biocomposites. By exploring the relationships between the biopolymer structures, the processes, and the final properties Environmental Silicate Nano-Biocomposites explains how to design nano-materials to develop new, valuable, environmenta...

  15. Mechanical Properties and Durability of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings in Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladinovich, Daniel S.; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings are being developed and tested for use with SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) gas turbine engine components. Several oxide and silicate based compositons are being studied for use as top-coat and intermediate layers in a three or more layer environmental barrier coating system. Specifically, the room temperature Vickers-indentation-fracture-toughness testing and high-temperature stability reaction studies with Calcium Magnesium Alumino-Silicate (CMAS or "sand") are being conducted using advanced testing techniques such as high pressure burner rig tests as well as high heat flux laser tests.

  16. SILICATE COMPOSITION OF THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogerty, S.; Forrest, W.; Watson, D. M.; Koch, I.; Sargent, B. A.

    2016-01-01

    The composition of silicate dust in the diffuse interstellar medium and in protoplanetary disks around young stars informs our understanding of the processing and evolution of the dust grains leading up to planet formation. An analysis of the well-known 9.7 μ m feature indicates that small amorphous silicate grains represent a significant fraction of interstellar dust and are also major components of protoplanetary disks. However, this feature is typically modeled assuming amorphous silicate dust of olivine and pyroxene stoichiometries. Here, we analyze interstellar dust with models of silicate dust that include non-stoichiometric amorphous silicate grains. Modeling the optical depth along lines of sight toward the extinguished objects Cyg OB2 No. 12 and ζ Ophiuchi, we find evidence for interstellar amorphous silicate dust with stoichiometry intermediate between olivine and pyroxene, which we simply refer to as “polivene.” Finally, we compare these results to models of silicate emission from the Trapezium and protoplanetary disks in Taurus.

  17. SILICATE COMPOSITION OF THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogerty, S.; Forrest, W.; Watson, D. M.; Koch, I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Sargent, B. A., E-mail: sfogerty@pas.rochester.edu [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2016-10-20

    The composition of silicate dust in the diffuse interstellar medium and in protoplanetary disks around young stars informs our understanding of the processing and evolution of the dust grains leading up to planet formation. An analysis of the well-known 9.7 μ m feature indicates that small amorphous silicate grains represent a significant fraction of interstellar dust and are also major components of protoplanetary disks. However, this feature is typically modeled assuming amorphous silicate dust of olivine and pyroxene stoichiometries. Here, we analyze interstellar dust with models of silicate dust that include non-stoichiometric amorphous silicate grains. Modeling the optical depth along lines of sight toward the extinguished objects Cyg OB2 No. 12 and ζ Ophiuchi, we find evidence for interstellar amorphous silicate dust with stoichiometry intermediate between olivine and pyroxene, which we simply refer to as “polivene.” Finally, we compare these results to models of silicate emission from the Trapezium and protoplanetary disks in Taurus.

  18. Stability-indicating HPLC-DAD methods for determination of two binary mixtures: Rabeprazole sodium-mosapride citrate and rabeprazole sodium-itopride hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fatatry, Hamed M; Mabrouk, Mokhtar M; Hewala, Ismail I; Emam, Ehab H

    2014-08-01

    Two selective stability-indicating HPLC methods are described for determination of rabeprazole sodium (RZ)-mosapride citrate (MR) and RZ-itopride hydrochloride (IO) mixtures in the presence of their ICH-stress formed degradation products. Separations were achieved on X-Bridge C18 column using two mobile phases: the first for RZ-MR mixture consisted of acetonitrile: 0.025 M KH 2 PO 4 solution: TEA (30:69:1 v/v; pH 7.0); the second for RZ-IO mixture was at ratio of 25:74:1 (v/v; pH 9.25). The detection wavelength was 283 nm. The two methods were validated and validation acceptance criteria were met in all cases. Peak purity testing using contrast angle theory, relative absorbance and log  A versus the wavelengths plots were presented. The % recoveries of the intact drugs were between 99.1% and 102.2% with RSD% values less than 1.6%. Application of the proposed HPLC methods indicated that the methods could be adopted to follow the stability of their formulations.

  19. Evaluation of cyclonic ash, commercial Na-silicates, lime and phosphoric acid for metal immobilisation purposes in contaminated soils in Flanders (Belgium)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geebelen, Wouter; Sappin-Didier, Valerie; Ruttens, Ann; Carleer, Robert; Yperman, Jan; Bongue-Boma, Kwele; Mench, Michel; Lelie, Niels van der; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2006-01-01

    In order to reduce the health risks associated with historically enriched metal smelting sites in Flanders (Belgium), the capacities of a non-beringite cyclonic ash and commercial Na-silicates to fix metals and create conditions to restore vegetation cover were evaluated and compared to lime and H 3 PO 4 . All tested amendments reduced Ca(NO 3 ) 2 -extractable soil metal concentrations and reduced metal uptake in Agrostis capillaris seedlings. Sodium released by Na-silicates was possibly toxic to bean plants while an isotopic dilution technique revealed that metals were only weakly sorbed by silicates (i.e. reversible sorption). Cyclonic ash appeared more efficient than lime in both reducing oxidative stress in beans and Zn, Cu and Pb uptake in grasses. The metal fixing mechanism for both amendments appeared similar (i.e. irreversible fixation at constant pH), in contrast to H 3 PO 4 where at least part of the immobilised Cd was irreversibly fixed across a range of pH. - Metal immobilising capacities of Na-silicates are weak, while the active mechanism of cyclonic ash is the same as lime

  20. Modifying Silicates for Better Dispersion in Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sandi

    2005-01-01

    An improved chemical modification has been developed to enhance the dispersion of layered silicate particles in the formulation of a polymer/silicate nanocomposite material. The modification involves, among other things, the co-exchange of an alkyl ammonium ion and a monoprotonated diamine with interlayer cations of the silicate. The net overall effects of the improved chemical modification are to improve processability of the nanocomposite and maximize the benefits of dispersing the silicate particles into the polymer. Some background discussion is necessary to give meaning to a description of this development. Polymer/silicate nanocomposites are also denoted polymer/clay composites because the silicate particles in them are typically derived from clay particles. Particles of clay comprise layers of silicate platelets separated by gaps called "galleries." The platelet thickness is 1 nm. The length varies from 30 nm to 1 m, depending on the silicate. In order to fully realize the benefits of polymer/silicate nanocomposites, it is necessary to ensure that the platelets become dispersed in the polymer matrices. Proper dispersion can impart physical and chemical properties that make nanocomposites attractive for a variety of applications. In order to achieve nanometer-level dispersion of a layered silicate into a polymer matrix, it is typically necessary to modify the interlayer silicate surfaces by attaching organic functional groups. This modification can be achieved easily by ion exchange between the interlayer metal cations found naturally in the silicate and protonated organic cations - typically protonated amines. Long-chain alkyl ammonium ions are commonly chosen as the ion-exchange materials because they effectively lower the surface energies of the silicates and ease the incorporation of organic monomers or polymers into the silicate galleries. This completes the background discussion. In the present improved modification of the interlayer silicate surfaces

  1. A validated stability indicating high-performance liquid chromatographic method for simultaneous estimation of cefuroxime sodium and sulbactam sodium in injection dosage form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falguni M Patel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A fixed dose combination of cefuroxime sodium (β lactam antibiotic and sulbactam sodium (β Lactamase inhibitor is used in ratio of 2:1 as powder for injection for the treatment of resistant lower respiratory tract and other infections. Aims: A simple, precise, and accurate ion-pair reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC method was developed and validated for determination of cefuroxime Na(CEF and sulbactam Na(SUL in injection. Materials and Methods: Isocratic RP-HPLC separation was achieved on an ACE C 18 column (150×4.6 mm id, 5 μm particle size using the mobile phase 0.002 M tetrabutylammonium hydroxide sulfate (TBAH in 10 mm potassium di-hydrogen phosphate buffer-acetonitrile (86:14 v/v, pH 3.7 at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min. Results and Conclusion: The retention time of sulbactam Na and cefuroxime Na were 3.2 min and 10.2 min, respectively. The ion-pairing reagent improved the retention of highly polar sulbactam Na on reverse-phase column. The detection was performed at 210 nm. The method was validated for linearity, precision, accuracy, robustness, solution stability, and specificity. The method was validated for linearity, precision, accuracy, robustness, solution stability, and specificity. The method was linear in the concentration range of 10-100 μg/ml for cefuroxime Na and 5-50 μg/ml for sulbactam Na, with a correlation coefficient of 0.9999 and 0.9998 for the respective drugs. The intraday precision was 0.13-0.21% and 0.48-0.65%, and the interday precision was 0.32-0.81% and 0.60-0.83% for cefuroxime Na and sulbactam Na, respectively. The accuracy (recovery was found to be in the range of 98.76-100.61% and 98.99-100.30% for cefuroxime Na and sulbactam Na, respectively. The drugs were found to degrade under hydrolytic and oxidative conditions. The drugs could be effectively separated from different degradation products, and hence the method can be used for stability analysis.

  2. Bond strength and interfacial morphology of orthodontic brackets bonded to eroded enamel treated with calcium silicate-sodium phosphate salts or resin infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costenoble, Aline; Vennat, Elsa; Attal, Jean-Pierre; Dursun, Elisabeth

    2016-11-01

     To investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded to eroded enamel treated with preventive approaches and to examine the enamel/bracket interfaces.  Ninety-one brackets were bonded to seven groups of enamel samples: sound; eroded; eroded+treated with calcium silicate-sodium phosphate salts (CSP); eroded+infiltrated by ICON ® ; eroded+infiltrated by ICON ® and brackets bonded with 1-month delay; eroded+infiltrated by an experimental resin; and eroded+infiltrated by an experimental resin and brackets bonded with 1-month delay. For each group, 12 samples were tested in SBS and bond failure was assessed with the adhesive remnant index (ARI); one sample was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM).  Samples treated with CSP or infiltration showed no significant differences in SBS values with sound samples. Infiltrated samples followed by a delayed bonding showed lower SBS values. All of the values remained acceptable. The ARI scores were significantly higher for sound enamel, eroded, and treated with CSP groups than for all infiltrated samples. SEM examinations corroborated the findings.  Using CSP or resin infiltration before orthodontic bonding does not jeopardize the bonding quality. The orthodontic bonding should be performed shortly after the resin infiltration.

  3. Anodizing of magnesium alloy AZ31 in alkaline solutions with silicate under continuous sparking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Liyuan; Yu Xia; Yang Zhihui; Wang Yunyan; Okido, Masazumi

    2008-01-01

    Anodization is a useful technique for forming protective films on magnesium alloys and improves its corrosion resistance. Based on the alkaline electrolyte solution with primary oxysalt developed previously, the optimum secondary oxysalt was selected by comparing the anti-corrosion property of anodic film. The structure, component and surface morphology of anodic film and cross-section were analyzed using energy dispersion spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The corrosion process was detected by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results showed that secondary oxysalt addition resulted in different anodizing processes, sparking or non-sparking. Sodium silicate was the most favorable additive of electrolyte, in which anodic film with the strongest corrosion resistance was obtained. The effects of process parameters, such as silicate concentration, applied current density and temperature, were also investigated. High temperature did not improve anti-property of anodic film, while applying high current density resulted in more porous surface of film

  4. Biocompatible transferrin-conjugated sodium hexametaphosphate-stabilized gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity and cellular uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parab, Harshala J; Huang, Jing-Hong; Liu, Ru-Shi; Lai, Tsung-Ching; Jan, Yi-Hua; Wang, Jui-Ling; Hsiao, Michael; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Hwu, Yeu-Kuang; Tsai, Din Ping; Chuang, Shih-Yi; Pang, Jong-Hwei S

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility of using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for biomedical applications has led to considerable interest in the development of novel synthetic protocols and surface modification strategies for AuNPs to produce biocompatible molecular probes. This investigation is, to our knowledge, the first to elucidate the synthesis and characterization of sodium hexametaphosphate (HMP)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au-HMP) in an aqueous medium. The role of HMP, a food additive, as a polymeric stabilizing and protecting agent for AuNPs is elucidated. The surface modification of Au-HMP nanoparticles was carried out using polyethylene glycol and transferrin to produce molecular probes for possible clinical applications. In vitro cell viability studies performed using as-synthesized Au-HMP nanoparticles and their surface-modified counterparts reveal the biocompatibility of the nanoparticles. The transferrin-conjugated nanoparticles have significantly higher cellular uptake in J5 cells (liver cancer cells) than control cells (oral mucosa fibroblast cells), as determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This study demonstrates the possibility of using an inexpensive and non-toxic food additive, HMP, as a stabilizer in the large-scale generation of biocompatible and monodispersed AuNPs, which may have future diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  5. Biocompatible transferrin-conjugated sodium hexametaphosphate-stabilized gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity and cellular uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parab, Harshala J; Huang, Jing-Hong; Liu, Ru-Shi [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lai, Tsung-Ching; Jan, Yi-Hua; Wang, Jui-Ling; Hsiao, Michael; Chen, Chung-Hsuan [Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Hwu, Yeu-Kuang [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Din Ping [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chuang, Shih-Yi; Pang, Jong-Hwei S, E-mail: rsliu@ntu.edu.tw, E-mail: mhsiao@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-30

    The feasibility of using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for biomedical applications has led to considerable interest in the development of novel synthetic protocols and surface modification strategies for AuNPs to produce biocompatible molecular probes. This investigation is, to our knowledge, the first to elucidate the synthesis and characterization of sodium hexametaphosphate (HMP)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au-HMP) in an aqueous medium. The role of HMP, a food additive, as a polymeric stabilizing and protecting agent for AuNPs is elucidated. The surface modification of Au-HMP nanoparticles was carried out using polyethylene glycol and transferrin to produce molecular probes for possible clinical applications. In vitro cell viability studies performed using as-synthesized Au-HMP nanoparticles and their surface-modified counterparts reveal the biocompatibility of the nanoparticles. The transferrin-conjugated nanoparticles have significantly higher cellular uptake in J5 cells (liver cancer cells) than control cells (oral mucosa fibroblast cells), as determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This study demonstrates the possibility of using an inexpensive and non-toxic food additive, HMP, as a stabilizer in the large-scale generation of biocompatible and monodispersed AuNPs, which may have future diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  6. Polymer/Silicate Nanocomposites Used to Manufacture Gas Storage Tanks With Reduced Permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sandi G.; Johnston, Chris

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been considerable research in the area of polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites. This research has shown that the dispersion of small amounts of an organically modified layered silicate improves the polymer strength, modulus, thermal stability, and barrier properties. There have been several reports on the dispersion of layered silicates in an epoxy matrix. Potential enhancements to the barrier properties of epoxy/silicate nanocomposites make this material attractive for low permeability tankage. Polymer matrix composites (PMCs) have several advantages for cryogenic storage tanks. They are lightweight, strong, and stiff; therefore, a smaller fraction of a vehicle's potential payload capacity is used for propellant storage. Unfortunately, the resins typically used to make PMC tanks have higher gas permeability than metals. This can lead to hydrogen loss through the body of the tank instead of just at welds and fittings. One approach to eliminate this problem is to build composite tanks with thin metal liners. However, although these tanks provide good permeability performance, they suffer from a substantial mismatch in the coefficient of thermal expansion, which can lead to failure of the bond between the liner and the body of the tank. Both problems could be addressed with polymersilicate nanocomposites, which exhibit reduced hydrogen permeability, making them potential candidates for linerless PMC tanks. Through collaboration with Northrop Grumman and Michigan State University, nanocomposite test tanks were manufactured for the NASA Glenn Research Center, and the helium permeability was measured. An organically modified silicate was prepared at Michigan State University and dispersed in an epoxy matrix (EPON 826/JeffamineD230). The epoxy/silicate nanocomposites contained either 0 or 5 wt% of the organically modified silicate. The tanks were made by filament winding carbon fibers with the nanocomposite resin. Helium permeability

  7. Dechlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by sodium carboxymethyl cellulose-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Hongyi; Han, Jian; Baig, Shams Ali; Xu, Xinhua

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► CMC-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles were synthesized and used for 2,4-D removal. ► Particle stability, ζ-potential and IEP of non- and stabilized Pd/Fe were compared. ► Dechlorination of 2,4-D by different Pd/Fe systems was investigated. ► The reaction mechanism has been discussed and presented in the article. ► Effects of CMC/Fe mass ratio and pH were also investigated. - Abstract: This paper describes the synthesis of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles and their applications to the dechlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) under controlled laboratorial conditions. For this purpose batch mode experiments were conducted to understand the effects of CMC on the surface characteristics of Pd/Fe nanoparticles, optimum removal of 2,4-D and other surface interactions mechanism. Our experimental results demonstrated considerable enhancements in particle stability and chemical reactivity with the addition of CMC to Pd/Fe nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis indicated that CMC-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles were well dispersed, and nanoparticles remained in suspension for days compared to non-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles precipitated within minutes. The isoelectric point (IEP) of the nanoparticles shifted from pH 6.5 to 2.5, suggesting that CMC-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles were negatively charged over a wider pH range. Our batch experiments demonstrated that CMC-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles (0.6 g Fe L −1 ) were able to remove much higher levels of 2,4-D with only one intermediate 2-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (2-CPA) and the final organic product phenoxyacetic acid (PA), than non-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles or microsized Pd/Fe particles. The removal percentage of 2,4-D increased from 10% to nearly 100% as the reaction pH decreased from 11.5 to 2.5. The optimal CMC/Fe mass ratio for the dechlorination of 2,4-D was determined to be 5/1, and the removal of 2,4-D was

  8. Method of chemical analysis of silicate rocks (1962); Methode d'analyse chimique des roches silicatees (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouget, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    A rapid method of analysis for the physical and chemical determination of the major constituents of silicate rocks is described. Water losses at 100 deg. C and losses of volatile elements at 1000 deg. C are estimated after staying in oven for these temperatures, or by mean of a thermo-balance. The determination of silica is made by a double insolubilization with hydrochloric acid on attack solution with sodium carbonate; total iron and aluminium, both with calcium and magnesium, after ammoniacal precipitation of Fe and Al, are determined on the filtration product of silica by titrimetry-photometry of their complexes with EDTA. The alkalis Na and K by flame spectrophotometry, Mn by colorimetry of the permanganate, and Ti by mean of his complex with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, are determined on fluosulfuric attack solution. Phosphorus is determined by his complex with 'molybdenum blue' on a fluoro-nitro-boric attack solution; iron is estimated by potentiometry, with the help of bichromate on hydrofluoric solution. (author) [French] Une methode d'analyse rapide est decrite pour la determination physico-chimique des constituants principaux des roches silicatees. Les pertes en eau a 100 deg. C et en matieres volatiles a 1000 deg. C sont evaluees apres passage au four a ces temperatures, ou a l'aide d'une thermobalance. La determination de la silice se fait par double insolubilisation a l'acide chlorhydrique, sur une attaque au carbonate de sodium; le fer total et l'aluminium ainsi que le calcium et le magnesium, apres precipitation a l'ammoniaque des deux premiers metaux, sont determines sur le filtrat de la silice par titrimetrie-photometrie de leurs complexes avec l'E.D.T.A. Les alcalins sodium et potassium par spectrophotometrie de flamme, le manganese par colorimetrie du permanganate, le titane a l'aide de son complexe avec l'eau oxygenee, sont determines sur une attaque fluosulfurique. Le phosphore est determine par son complexe du 'bleu de molybdene' sur une attaque fluo

  9. Estabilidad de las gotas orales de picosulfato de sodio Stability of sodium picosulphate oral drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Herrera Santi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Las gotas orales de picosulfato de sodio son muy efectivas en el tratamiento del estreñimiento agudo y crónico en paciente de todas las edades. Se realizó un estudio de estabilidad de una formulación de picosulfato de sodio, para su administración por vía oral, que cumpliera con los requisitos de calidad exigidos para el producto, como: características organolépticas, pH, valoración y conteo microbiológico. Como resultado se logró una formulación con un tiempo de vida útil de 12 meses, a temperatura ambiente de 30 ± 2 °C. Se mantuvieron invariables sus características físicas, químicas y microbiológicas durante el estudio de estabilidad realizado.The oral drops of sodium picosulphate are very effective in the treatment of acute and chronic constipation in patients of all ages. It was conducted a stability study of a formulation of sodium picosulphate for its oral administration that meets all the quality requirements demanded for the product, such as: organoleptic characteristics, pH, assessment and microbiological count. As a result, it was attained a formulation with a time of useful life of 12 months, at an ambient temperature of 30 ± 2 °C. Its physical, chemical and microbiological characteristics remained invariable during the stability study

  10. Report of sodium cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murai, Hitoshi; Shima, Akira; Oba, Toshisaburo; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki

    1975-01-01

    The damage of components for LMFBRs due to sodium cavitation is serious problem. This report summarizes the following items, (1) mechanism of the incipience of sodium cavitation, (2) damage due to sodium cavitation, (3) detection method for sodium cavitation, and (4) estimation method for sodium cavitation by the comparison with water cavitation. Materials were collected from the reports on liquid metal cavitation, sodium cavitation and water cavitation published from 1965 to now. The mechanism of the incipience of sodium cavitation cavitation parameters (mean location, distributed amount or occurrence aspect and stability), experiment of causing cavitation with Venturi tube, and growth of bubbles within superheated sodium. The sodium cavitation damage was caused by magnetostriction vibration method and with Venturi tube. The state of damage was investigated with the cavitation performance of a sodium pump, and the damage was examined in view of the safety of LMFBR plants. Sodium cavitation was detected with acoustic method, radiation method, and electric method. The effect of physical property of liquid on incipient cavitation was studied. These are thermodynamic effect based on quasistatic thermal equilibrium condition and the effect of the physical property of liquid based on bubble dynamics. (Iwase, T.)

  11. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c) Limitations...

  12. Structure-rheology relations in sodium caseinate containing systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruis, H.G.M.

    2007-01-01

    The general aim of the work described in this thesis was to investigate structure-rheologyrelations for dairy related products, focusing on model systems containing sodium caseinate. The acid inducedgelationof sodium caseinate, of sodium caseinate stabilized emulsions, and the effect of shear on the

  13. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c) Limitations...

  14. Hydrolytic Stability of 3-Aminopropylsilane Coupling Agent on Silica and Silicate Surfaces at Elevated Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okhrimenko, Denis; Budi, Akin; Ceccato, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    and compared its properties with those on complex silicate surfaces such as those used by industry (mineral fibers and fiber melt wafers). The APS was deposited from aqueous and organic (toluene) solutions and studied with surface sensitive techniques, including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic...

  15. Effects of Aqueous Solutions on the Slow Crack Growth of Soda-Lime-Silicate Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Bronson D.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    The slow crack growth (SCG) parameters of soda-lime-silicate were measured in distilled and saltwater of various concentrations in order to determine if the presence of salt and the contaminate formation of a weak sodium film affects stress corrosion susceptibility. Past research indicates that solvents affect the rate of crack growth; however, the effects of salt have not been studied. The results indicate a small but statistically significant effect on the SCG parameters A and n at high concentrations; however, for typical engineering purposes, the effect can be ignored.

  16. Eugenol Nanoemulsion Stabilized with Zein and Sodium Caseinate by Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yue

    2017-03-31

    Eugenol-loaded nanoemulsion by zein and sodium caseinate (NaCas) was prepared without using specific equipment or organic solvents. The deprotonated eugenol in hot alkaline was added to NaCas/zein mixtures with different mass ratios at pH 11.5 and then neutralized to pH 7.0. The nanoemulsions showed a well-defined diameter (around 109-139 nm) and a negative surface potential (from -28.5 to -35.8 mV) with spherical morphology. The entrapment efficiency (EE) of 1% (v/v) eugenol reached 84.24% by 2% (m/v) NaCas/zein at a mass ratio of 1:1. This formulation also showed the narrowest size distribution and extraordinary stability during ambient storage (22 °C) up to 30 days and retained good redispersibility after spray- or freeze-drying. The current study showed a promising clean and low-cost strategy to deliver lipophilic compounds containing the hydroxyl group.

  17. Sorption of radionuclides on mesoporous Sn(IV) silicate: a new sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepehrian, H. [Jaber Ibn Hayan Research Labs., Nuclear Science and Technology Research Inst., AEOI, Tehran (Iran); Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Univ. of Tarbiat Moallem, Tehran (Iran); Yavari, R.; Ghannadi Maragheh, M. [Jaber Ibn Hayan Research Labs., Nuclear Science and Technology Research Inst., AEOI, Tehran (Iran); Husain, S.W. [Dept. of Applied Chemistry, Univ. of Tarbiat Moallem, Tehran (Iran)

    2008-07-01

    Four different samples of mesoporous Sn(IV) silicate with varying mole ratio of Si/Sn have been used to study the sorption behavior of 18 radionuclides on these materials. Ion-exchange capacity, SEM, distribution coefficient and chemical stability have been studied and discussed. Separation of Tl(I) from Th(IV), Cs(I) from Th(IV) and Cs(I) from Zr(IV) have been developed on columns of this sorbent. (orig.)

  18. Sorption of radionuclides on mesoporous Sn(IV) silicate: a new sorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepehrian, H.; Yavari, R.; Ghannadi Maragheh, M.; Husain, S.W.

    2008-01-01

    Four different samples of mesoporous Sn(IV) silicate with varying mole ratio of Si/Sn have been used to study the sorption behavior of 18 radionuclides on these materials. Ion-exchange capacity, SEM, distribution coefficient and chemical stability have been studied and discussed. Separation of Tl(I) from Th(IV), Cs(I) from Th(IV) and Cs(I) from Zr(IV) have been developed on columns of this sorbent. (orig.)

  19. NON-AUTOCLAVE SILICATE BRICK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Yaglov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a technology for obtaining bricks on the basis of lime-silica mixtures where chemical interactions are practically completely realized in dispersive state at the stage of preparation of binding contact maturing and raw mixture as a whole. The role of forming operation (moulding is changed in principle because in this case conversion of dispersive system into a rock-like solid occurs and due to this the solid obtains complete water-resistance in contact with water immediately after forming operation. Theoretical basis for the developed technology is capability of silicate dispersive substances (hydrated calcium silicate to transit in non-stable state, to form a rock-like water-resistant solid in the moment of mechanical load application during forming process. Specific feature of the proposed method is an exclusion of additional operations for autoclaving of products from the process of obtaining a silicate brick.Synthetic hydrated calcium silicate in contrast to natural ones are more uniform in composition and structure, they contain less impurities and they are characterized by dispersive composition and due to the mentioned advantages they find wider practical application. Contact-condensation binders permit to manipulate product properties on their basis and ensure maximum correspondence to the requirements of the concrete application. Raw material sources for obtaining synthetic hydrated calcium silicates are practically un-limited because calcium-silicon containing substances are found as in various technogenic wastes so in natural compounds as well. So the problem for obtaining hydrated calcium silicates having contact-condensation ability for structure formation becomes more and more actual one. This transition is considered as dependent principally on arrangement rate of substance particles which determined the level of its instability.

  20. The mast cell stabilizer sodium cromoglycate reduces histamine release and status epilepticus-induced neuronal damage in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Dorado, María Guadalupe; Santana-Gómez, César Emmanuel; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra Adela; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-05-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate changes in the histamine release, mast cell number and neuronal damage in hippocampus induced by status epilepticus. We also evaluated if sodium cromoglycate, a stabilizer of mast cells with a possible stabilizing effect on the membrane of neurons, was able to prevent the release of histamine, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate during the status epilepticus. During microdialysis experiments, rats were treated with saline (SS-SE) or sodium cromoglycate (CG-SE) and 30 min later received the administration of pilocarpine to induce status epilepticus. Twenty-four hours after the status epilepticus, the brains were used to determine the neuronal damage and the number of mast cells in hippocampus. During the status epilepticus, SS-SE group showed an enhanced release of histamine (138.5%, p = 0.005), GABA (331 ± 91%, p ≤ 0.001) and glutamate (467%, p ≤ 0.001), even after diazepam administration. One day after the status epilepticus, SS-SE group demonstrated increased number of mast cells in Stratum pyramidale of CA1 (88%, p status epilepticus (p = 0.048), absence of wet-dog shakes, reduced histamine (but not GABA and glutamate) release, lower number of mast cells (p = 0.008) and reduced neuronal damage in hippocampus. Our data revealed that histamine, possibly from mast cells, is released in hippocampus during the status epilepticus. This effect may be involved in the subsequent neuronal damage and is diminished with sodium cromoglycate pretreatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Stabilizing sodium hypochlorite at high pH: effects on soft tissue and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungbluth, Holger; Marending, Monika; De-Deus, Gustavo; Sener, Beatrice; Zehnder, Matthias

    2011-05-01

    When sodium hypochlorite solutions react with tissue, their pH drops and tissue sorption decreases. We studied whether stabilizing a NaOCl solution at a high pH would increase its soft-tissue dissolution capacity and effects on the dentin matrix compared with a standard NaOCl solution of the same concentration and similar initial pH. NaOCl solutions were prepared by mixing (1:1) a 10% stock solution with water (standard) or 2 mol/L NaOH (stabilized). Physiological saline and 1 mol/L NaOH served as the controls. Chlorine content and alkaline capacity of NaOCl solutions were determined. Standardized porcine palatal soft-tissue specimens and human root dentin bars were exposed to test and control solutions. Weight loss percentage was assessed in the soft-tissue dissolution assay. Three-point bending tests were performed on the root dentin bars to determine the modulus of elasticity and flexural strength. Values between groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance with the Bonferroni correction for multiple testing (α pH level of 7.5, respectively. The stabilized NaOCl dissolved significantly more soft tissue than the standard solution, and the pH remained high. It also caused a higher loss in elastic modulus and flexure strength (P < .05) than the control solutions, whereas the standard solution did not. NaOH-stabilized NaOCl solutions have a higher alkaline capacity and are thus more proteolytic than standard counterparts. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A-thermal elastic behavior of silicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabia, Mohammed Kamel; Degioanni, Simon; Martinet, Christine; Le Brusq, Jacques; Champagnon, Bernard; Vouagner, Dominique

    2016-02-24

    Depending on the composition of silicate glasses, their elastic moduli can increase or decrease as function of the temperature. Studying the Brillouin frequency shift of these glasses versus temperature allows the a-thermal composition corresponding to an intermediate glass to be determined. In an intermediate glass, the elastic moduli are independent of the temperature over a large temperature range. For sodium alumino-silicate glasses, the a-thermal composition is close to the albite glass (NaAlSi3O8). The structural origin of this property is studied by in situ high temperature Raman scattering. The structure of the intermediate albite glass and of silica are compared at different temperatures between room temperature and 600 °C. When the temperature increases, it is shown that the high frequency shift of the main band at 440 cm(-1) in silica is a consequence of the cristobalite-like alpha-beta transformation of 6-membered rings. This effect is stronger in silica than bond elongation (anharmonic effects). As a consequence, the elastic moduli of silica increase as the temperature increases. In the albite glass, the substitution of 25% of Si(4+) ions by Al(3+) and Na(+) ions decreases the proportion of SiO2 6-membered rings responsible for the silica anomaly. The effects of the silica anomaly balance the anharmonicity in albite glass and give rise to an intermediate a-thermal glass. Different networks, formers or modifiers, can be added to produce different a-thermal glasses with useful mechanical or chemical properties.

  3. Heteroaggregation of lipid droplets coated with sodium caseinate and lactoferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Figueiredo Furtado, Guilherme; Michelon, Mariano; de Oliveira, Davi Rocha Bernardes; da Cunha, Rosiane Lopes

    2016-11-01

    Formation and characterization of droplet heteroaggregates were investigated by mixing two emulsions previously stabilized by proteins oppositely charged. Emulsions were composed of 5vol.% of sunflower oil and 95vol.% of sodium caseinate or lactoferrin aqueous dispersions. They were produced using ultrasound with fixed power (300W) and sonication time (6min). Different volume ratios (0-100%) of sodium caseinate-stabilized emulsion (droplet diameter around 1.75μm) to lactoferrin-stabilized emulsion (droplet diameter around 1.55μm) were mixed under conditions that both proteins showed opposite charges (pH7). Influence of ionic strength (0-400mM NaCl) on the heteroaggregates stability was also evaluated. Creaming stability, zeta potential, microstructure, mean particle diameter and rheological properties of the heteroaggregates were measured. These properties depended on the volume ratio (0-100%) of sodium caseinate to lactoferrin-stabilized emulsion (C:L) and the ionic strength. In the absence of salt, different zeta potential values were obtained, rheological properties (viscosity and elastic moduli) were improved and the largest heteroaggregates were formed at higher content of lactoferrin-stabilized emulsion (60-80%). The system containing 40 and 60vol.% of sodium caseinate and lactoferrin stabilized emulsion, respectively, presented good stability against phase separation besides showing enhanced rheological and size properties due to extensive droplets aggregation. Phase separation was observed only in the absence of sodium caseinate, demonstrating the higher susceptibility of lactoferrin to NaCl. The heteroaggregates produced may be useful functional agents for texture modification and controlled release since different rheological properties and sizes can be achieved depending on protein concentrations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantum chemical evaluation for the stability of liquid sodium containing titanium nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Ai; Inaba, Kenji; Ishizawa, Yukie; Miura, Ryuji; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Miyamoto, Akira; Saito, Jun-ichi; Ara, Kuniaki

    2015-01-01

    Recently, liquid sodium containing titanium nanoparticles (LSnanop) have attracted considerable attention. In this study, suspension state of Ti nanoparticle in liquid sodium was quantum chemically evaluated. The atomic interaction between Ti nanoparticles and sodium atoms in the liquid sodium medium was investigated. There were some literatures which gained quantum chemical insight into a nanoparticle with the surrounding sodium atom. However, liquid sodium medium itself together with a Ti nanoparticle under the realistic temperature has not yet been investigated theoretically. To overcome the problem of conventional theoretical method, we applied computationally low-load Tight Binding Quantum Chemical Molecular Dynamics (TB-QCMD) calculation method to investigate the suspension state of the Ti nanoparticle in liquid sodium metal. (author)

  5. Application of l-ascorbic acid and its derivatives (sodium ascorbyl phosphate and magnesium ascorbyl phosphate) in topical cosmetic formulations: stability studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smaoui, S.; Hilima, H.B.

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to formulate and subsequently evaluate a topical skin-care cream (o/w emulsion) from l-ascorbic acid and its derivatives (sodium ascorbyl phosphate and magnesium ascorbyl phosphate) at 2% versus its vehicle (Control). Formulations were developed by entrapping it in the oily phase of o/w emulsion and were stored at 8 degree C, 25 degree C and 40 degree C (in incubator) for a period of four weeks to investigate their stability. In the physical analysis, the evaluation parameters consisted of color, smell, phase separation, centrifugation, and liquefaction. Chemical stability of both derivatives was established by HPLC analysis. In the chemical analysis, the formulation with sodium ascorbyl phosphate was more stable than those with magnesium ascorbyl phosphate and l-ascorbic acid. The microbiological stability of the formulations was also evaluated. The findings indicated that the formulations with l-ascorbic acid and its derivatives were efficient against the proliferation of various spoilage microorganisms, including aerobic plate counts as well as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and yeast and mold counts. The results presented in this work showed good stability throughout the experimental period. Newly formulated emulsion proved to exhibit a number of promising properties and attributes that might open new opportunities for the construction of more efficient, safe, and cost-effective skin-care, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical products. (author)

  6. Stability of Fentanyl Citrate, Hydromorphone Hydrochloride, Ketamine Hydrochloride, Midazolam, Morphine Sulfate, and Pentobarbital Sodium in Polypropylene Syringes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Collin; MacKay, Mark

    2015-12-16

    Determine the stability of fentanyl 10 mcg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride, fentanyl 10 mcg/mL in 5% dextrose, fentanyl 50 mcg/mL, hydromorphone 100 mcg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride, ketamine 10 mg/mL, midazolam 0.4 mg/mL in 5% dextrose, midazolam 5 mg/mL, morphine 1 mg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride, morphine 1 mg/mL in 5% dextrose, and pentobarbital 50 mg/mL when stored as single drug entities at room temperature in polypropylene syringes. Four 5 mL samples of each drug and concentration were prepared in 10 mL polypropylene syringes. The samples were stored at ambient room temperature in a locked cabinet. Triplicate determinations of drug concentration for each sample were performed initially, on day 50 or 51, and on day 100 using high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection. With the exception of the hydromorphone 100 mcg/mL dilution, all compounds were found to contain greater than 95% of their initial concentration remaining at 100 days. Each sample remained clear and colorless when visually inspected.

  7. Foam capacity and stability of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) on the presence of contaminant coffee and Cd ions in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haryanto, B.; Chang, C. H.; Kuo, A. T.; Siswarni, M. Z.; Sinaga, T. M. A.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the effect of the coffee colloidal particle and Cd ion contaminant on the foam capacity and stability of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution was investigated. The foam was generated by using a foam generator. The foam capacity of SDS was first evaluated at different concentrations. After the foam capacity reaching a constant value, the foam stability was then measured by flowing to a column. The results showed that the presence the coffee colloidal particles or Cd ions in the solution would decrease the foam capacity and stability of SDS. In addition, the decreased foam capacity and stability was more pronounced in the presence of coffee colloidal particles than Cd ions. The colloidal particles may have stronger interaction with SDS and thus reduce the formation of the foam.

  8. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Silicate Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Costa, Gustavo C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Silicates are a common class of materials that are often exposed to high temperatures. The behavior of these materials needs to be understood for applications as high temperature coatings in material science as well as the constituents of lava for geological considerations. The vaporization behavior of these materials is an important aspect of their high temperature behavior and it also provides fundamental thermodynamic data. The application of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS) to silicates is discussed. There are several special considerations for silicates. The first is selection of an appropriate cell material, which is either nearly inert or has well-understood interactions with the silicate. The second consideration is proper measurement of the low vapor pressures. This can be circumvented by using a reducing agent to boost the vapor pressure without changing the solid composition or by working at very high temperatures. The third consideration deals with kinetic barriers to vaporization. The measurement of these barriers, as encompassed in a vaporization coefficient, is discussed. Current measured data of rare earth silicates for high temperature coating applications are discussed. In addition, data on magnesium-iron-silicates (olivine) are presented and discussed.

  9. Dechlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by sodium carboxymethyl cellulose-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hongyi, E-mail: zhouhy@zjut.edu.cn [College of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Han, Jian [College of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Baig, Shams Ali; Xu, Xinhua [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2011-12-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CMC-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles were synthesized and used for 2,4-D removal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Particle stability, {zeta}-potential and IEP of non- and stabilized Pd/Fe were compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dechlorination of 2,4-D by different Pd/Fe systems was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reaction mechanism has been discussed and presented in the article. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of CMC/Fe mass ratio and pH were also investigated. - Abstract: This paper describes the synthesis of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles and their applications to the dechlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) under controlled laboratorial conditions. For this purpose batch mode experiments were conducted to understand the effects of CMC on the surface characteristics of Pd/Fe nanoparticles, optimum removal of 2,4-D and other surface interactions mechanism. Our experimental results demonstrated considerable enhancements in particle stability and chemical reactivity with the addition of CMC to Pd/Fe nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis indicated that CMC-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles were well dispersed, and nanoparticles remained in suspension for days compared to non-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles precipitated within minutes. The isoelectric point (IEP) of the nanoparticles shifted from pH 6.5 to 2.5, suggesting that CMC-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles were negatively charged over a wider pH range. Our batch experiments demonstrated that CMC-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles (0.6 g Fe L{sup -1}) were able to remove much higher levels of 2,4-D with only one intermediate 2-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (2-CPA) and the final organic product phenoxyacetic acid (PA), than non-stabilized Pd/Fe nanoparticles or microsized Pd/Fe particles. The removal percentage of 2,4-D increased from 10% to nearly 100% as the reaction pH decreased from 11

  10. Effect of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} dopant on electrical and optical properties of potassium sodium niobate silicate glass-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongsiri, Ploypailin [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sirisoonthorn, Somnuk [National Metal and Materials Technology Center, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Pengpat, Kamonpan, E-mail: kamonpan.p@cmu.ac.th [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The KNN–SiO{sub 2} doped Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass-ceramics was prepared by incorporation method. • High dielectric constant (458.41 at 100 kHz) and low loss (0.0005) could be obtained. • TEM and SEM confirmed the existence of KNN crystals embedded in glass matrix. • The Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} dopant causes insignificant effect on modifying E{sub g} value. - Abstract: In this study, transparent glass-ceramics from potassium sodium niobate (KNN)-silicate glass system doped with erbium oxide (Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were successfully prepared by incorporation method. KNN was added in glass batches as heterogeneous nucleating agent. The KNN powder was mixed with SiO{sub 2} and Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} dopant with KNN and Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} content varied between 70–80 and 0.5–1.0 mol%, respectively. Each batch was subsequently melted at 1300 °C for 15 min in a platinum crucible using an electric furnace. The quenched glasses were then subjected to heat treatment at various temperatures for 4 h. XRD results showed that the prepared glass ceramics contained crystals of KNN solid solution. In contrary, dielectric constant (ϵ{sub r}) and dielectric loss (tan δ) were found to increase with increasing heat treatment temperature. Additionally, optical properties such as absorbance and energy band gap have been investigated.

  11. Polymer-Layered Silicate Nanocomposites for Cryotank Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Meador, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Previous composite cryotank designs have relied on the use of conventional composite materials to reduce microcracking and permeability. However, revolutionary advances in nanotechnology derived materials may enable the production of ultra-lightweight cryotanks with significantly enhanced durability and damage tolerance, as well as reduced propellant permeability. Layered silicate nanocomposites are especially attractive in cryogenic storage tanks based on results that have been reported for epoxy nanocomposite systems. These materials often exhibit an order of magnitude reduction in gas permeability when compared to the base resin. In addition, polymer-silicate nanocomposites have been shown to yield improved dimensional stability, strength, and toughness. The enhancement in material performance of these systems occurs without property trade-offs which are often observed in conventionally filled polymer composites. Research efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center have led to the development of epoxy-clay nanocomposites with 70% lower hydrogen permeability than the base epoxy resin. Filament wound carbon fiber reinforced tanks made with this nanocomposite had a five-fold lower helium leak rate than the corresponding tanks made without clay. The pronounced reduction observed with the tank may be due to flow induced alignment of the clay layers during processing. Additionally, the nanocomposites showed CTE reductions of up to 30%, as well as a 100% increase in toughness.

  12. Rice husks as a sustainable silica source for hierarchical flower-like metal silicate architectures assembled into ultrathin nanosheets for adsorption and catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shouwei; Gao, Huihui; Li, Jiaxing; Huang, Yongshun; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Hayat, Tasawar; Xu, Xijin; Wang, Xiangke

    2017-01-05

    Metal silicates have attracted extensive interests due to their unique structure and promising properties in adsorption and catalysis. However, their applications were hampered by the complex and expensive synthesis. In this paper, three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical flower-like metal silicate, including magnesium silicate, zinc silicate, nickel silicate and cobalt silicate, were for the first time prepared by using rice husks as a sustainable silicon source. The flower-like morphology, interconnected ultrathin nanosheets structure and high specific surface area endowed them with versatile applications. Magnesium silicate was used as an adsorbent with the maximum adsorption capacities of 557.9, 381.3, and 482.8mg/g for Pb 2+ , tetracycline (TC), and UO 2 2+ , respectively. Ni nanoparticles/silica (Ni NPs/SiO 2 ) exhibited high catalytic activity and good stability for 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) reduction within only ∼160s, which can be attributed to the ultra-small particle size (∼6.8nm), good dispersion and high loading capacity of Ni NPs. Considering the abundance and renewability of rice husks, metal silicate with complex architecture can be easily produced at a large scale and become a sustainable and reliable resource for multifunctional applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Effects of Salt Water on the Slow Crack Growth of Soda Lime Silicate Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Bronson D.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    The slow crack growth parameters of soda-lime silicate were measured in distilled and salt water of various concentrations in order to determine if stress corrosion susceptibility is affected by the presence of salt and the contaminate formation of a weak sodium film. Past research indicates that solvents effect the rate of crack growth, however, the effects of salt have not been studied. The results indicate a small but statistically significant effect on the slow crack growth parameters A and n. However, for typical engineering purposes, the effect can be ignored.

  14. Understanding the defect chemistry of alkali metal strontium silicate solid solutions: insights from experiment and theory

    KAUST Repository

    Bayliss, Ryan D.; Cook, Stuart N.; Scanlon, David O.; Fearn, Sarah; Cabana, Jordi; Greaves, Colin; Kilner, John A.; Skinner, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    © the Partner Organisations 2014. Recent reports of remarkably high oxide ion conduction in a new family of strontium silicates have been challenged. It has recently been demonstrated that, in the nominally potassium substituted strontium germanium silicate material, the dominant charge carrier was not the oxygen ion, and furthermore that the material was not single phase (R. D. Bayliss et. al., Energy Environ. Sci., 2014, DOI: 10.1039/c4ee00734d). In this work we re-investigate the sodium-doped strontium silicate material that was reported to exhibit the highest oxide ion conductivity in the solid solution, nominally Sr0.55Na0.45SiO2.775. The results show lower levels of total conductivity than previously reported and sub-micron elemental mapping demonstrates, in a similar manner to that reported for the Sr0.8K0.2Si0.5Ge0.5O2.9 composition, an inhomogeneous chemical distribution correlating with a multiphase material. It is also shown that the conductivity is not related to protonic mobility. A density functional theory computational approach provides a theoretical justification for these new results, related to the high energetic costs associated with oxygen vacancy formation. This journal is

  15. Understanding the defect chemistry of alkali metal strontium silicate solid solutions: insights from experiment and theory

    KAUST Repository

    Bayliss, Ryan D.

    2014-09-24

    © the Partner Organisations 2014. Recent reports of remarkably high oxide ion conduction in a new family of strontium silicates have been challenged. It has recently been demonstrated that, in the nominally potassium substituted strontium germanium silicate material, the dominant charge carrier was not the oxygen ion, and furthermore that the material was not single phase (R. D. Bayliss et. al., Energy Environ. Sci., 2014, DOI: 10.1039/c4ee00734d). In this work we re-investigate the sodium-doped strontium silicate material that was reported to exhibit the highest oxide ion conductivity in the solid solution, nominally Sr0.55Na0.45SiO2.775. The results show lower levels of total conductivity than previously reported and sub-micron elemental mapping demonstrates, in a similar manner to that reported for the Sr0.8K0.2Si0.5Ge0.5O2.9 composition, an inhomogeneous chemical distribution correlating with a multiphase material. It is also shown that the conductivity is not related to protonic mobility. A density functional theory computational approach provides a theoretical justification for these new results, related to the high energetic costs associated with oxygen vacancy formation. This journal is

  16. [Effect of sodium carbonate assisted hydrothermal process on heavy metals stabilization in medical waste incinerator fly ash].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian; Li, Xiao-dong; Chi, Yong; Yan, Jian-hua

    2010-04-01

    A sodium carbonate assisted hydrothermal process was induced to stabilize the fly ash from medical waste incinerator. The results showed that sodium carbonate assisted hydrothermal process reduced the heavy metals leachability of fly ash, and the heavy metal waste water from the process would not be a secondary pollution. The leachability of heavy metals studied in this paper were Cd 1.97 mg/L, Cr 1.56 mg/L, Cu 2.56 mg/L, Mn 17.30 mg/L, Ni 1.65 mg/L, Pb 1.56 mg/L and Zn 189.00 mg/L, and after hydrothermal process with the optimal experimental condition (Na2CO3/fly ash dosage = 5/20, reaction time = 8 h, L/S ratio = 10/1) the leachability reduced to < 0.02 mg/L for Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and 0.05 mg/L for Zn, according to GB 5085.3-2007. Meanwhile, the concentrations of heavy metals in effluent after hydrothermal process were less than 0.8 mg/L. The heavy metals leachability and concentration in effluent reduced with prolonged reaction time. Prolonged aging can affect the leachability of metals as solids become more crystalline, and heavy metals transferred inside of crystalline. The mechanism of heavy metal stabilization can be concluded to the co precipitation and adsorption effect of aluminosilicates formation, crystallization and aging process.

  17. Effect of layered silicate content on the morphology and thermal properties of Poly(vinyl alcohol) films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Jessica R.M.B. da; Santos, Barbara F.F. dos; Leite, Itamara F.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of layered silicate content on the morphology and thermal properties of PVA films. The PVA/layered silicate (AN) films were prepared by intercalation solution, using 1 to 2% of bentonite with respect to the PVA total weight. Then the films were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Results of the FTIR revealed interaction between the functional groups of the PVA and the layered silicate. The XRD analysis showed that nanocomposites with intercalated and partially exfoliated morphology were obtained. The results of TG showed that the nanocomposite PVA/2%AN showed higher thermal stability compared to PVA/1%AN. The DSC results showed that the addition of AN to the PVA did not affect crystallization rate, as well as promoted a reduction in glass transition temperature and melting of the PVA. (author)

  18. Polymer-Layer Silicate Nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Potarniche, Catalina-Gabriela

    Nowadays, some of the material challenges arise from a performance point of view as well as from recycling and biodegradability. Concerning these aspects, the development of polymer layered silicate nanocomposites can provide possible solutions. This study investigates how to obtain polymer layered...... with a spectacular improvement up to 300 % in impact strength were obtained. In the second part of this study, layered silicate bio-nanomaterials were obtained starting from natural compounds and taking into consideration their biocompatibility properties. These new materials may be used for drug delivery systems...... and as biomaterials due to their high biocompatible properties, and because they have the advantage of being biodegradable. The intercalation process of natural compounds within silicate platelets was investigated. By uniform dispersing of binary nanohybrids in a collagen matrix, nanocomposites with intercalated...

  19. An evaluation of the effectiveness of a chemical additive based on sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate, and sodium nitrite on the fermentation and aerobic stability of corn silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Limin; Smith, Megan L; Benjamim da Silva, Erica; Windle, Michelle C; da Silva, Thiago C; Polukis, Stephanie A

    2018-04-11

    We evaluated the effectiveness of an additive comprising sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate, and sodium nitrite (SSL) as active ingredients for its ability to improve the aerobic stability of corn silages made in North America. In experiment 1, treatment with SSL (1.5 and 2.0 L/t) on whole-plant corn (WPC) was compared with treatment with an additive containing buffered propionic acid and citric acid (BPA; 2 L/t) on corn harvested at 32 and 38% DM and ensiled for 120 d. Silage treated with BPA was higher in ammonia-N and propionic acid relative to other treatments. Treatments with all of the additives had numerically, but not statistically, fewer yeasts compared with untreated silage. Both application rates of SSL resulted in lower concentrations of ethanol compared with untreated and BPA silages. Treatment with BPA improved the aerobic stability of silages compared with untreated silage, but the effect from SSL was markedly greater. In experiment 2, WPC was untreated or treated with 2 or 3 L of SSL/t or a microbial inoculant containing Enterococcus faecium M74, Lactobacillus plantarum CH6072, and Lactobacillus buchneri LN1819 (final total lactic acid bacteria application rate of 150,000 cfu/g of fresh forage). Silages were air stressed for 24 h at 28 and 42 d of storage and ensiled for 49 d before opening. Inoculation had no effect on acid end products, ethanol, number of yeasts, or aerobic stability compared with other treatments. Treatment with SSL decreased the amount of ethanol, had no effect on number of yeasts, and improved aerobic stability in a dose-dependent manner compared with other treatments. In experiment 3, WPC was untreated or treated with 2 L of SSL/t and ensiled for 5, 15, and 30 d. Treatment with SSL resulted in silage with fewer yeasts and lower concentrations of ethanol after all times of ensiling compared with untreated silage. In addition, SSL improved aerobic stability after each period of ensiling, but the effect was more at 15 and 30 d

  20. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c...

  1. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c...

  2. Antibacterial Activity of Silicate Bioceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Sheng; NING Congqin; ZHOU Yue; CHEN Lei; LIN Kaili; CHANG Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Four kinds of pure silicate ceramic particles, CaSiO3, Ca3SiO5, bredigite and akermanite were prepared and their bactericidal effects were systematically investigated. The phase compositions of these silicate ceramics were characterized by XRD. The ionic concentration meas urement revealed that the Calcium (Ca) ion concentration were relatively higher in Ca3SiO5 and bredigite, and much lower in CaSiO3 and akermanite. Accordingly, the pH values of the four silicate ceramics extracts showed a positive correlation with the particle concentrations. Meanwhile, by decreasing the particle size, higher Ca ion concentrations can be achieved, leading to the increase of aqueous pH value as well. In summary, all of the four silicate ceramics tested in our study showed antibacterial effect in a dose-dependent manner. Generally, the order of their antibacterial activity against E.coli from strong to weak is Ca3SiO5, bredigite, CaSiO3 and akermanite.

  3. Amended Silicated for Mercury Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Butz; Thomas Broderick; Craig Turchi

    2006-12-31

    Amended Silicates{trademark}, a powdered, noncarbon mercury-control sorbent, was tested at Duke Energy's Miami Fort Station, Unit 6 during the first quarter of 2006. Unit 6 is a 175-MW boiler with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The plant burns run-of-the-river eastern bituminous coal with typical ash contents ranging from 8-15% and sulfur contents from 1.6-2.6% on an as-received basis. The performance of the Amended Silicates sorbent was compared with that for powdered activated carbon (PAC). The trial began with a period of baseline monitoring during which no sorbent was injected. Sampling during this and subsequent periods indicated mercury capture by the native fly ash was less than 10%. After the baseline period, Amended Silicates sorbent was injected at several different ratios, followed by a 30-day trial at a fixed injection ratio of 5-6 lb/MMACF. After this period, PAC was injected to provide a comparison. Approximately 40% mercury control was achieved for both the Amended Silicates sorbent and PAC at injection ratios of 5-6 lbs/MMACF. Higher injection ratios did not achieve significantly increased removal. Similar removal efficiencies have been reported for PAC injection trials at other plants with cold-side ESPs, most notably for plants using medium to high sulfur coal. Sorbent injection did not detrimentally impact plant operations and testing confirmed that the use of Amended Silicates sorbent does not degrade fly ash quality (unlike PAC). The cost for mercury control using either PAC or Amended Silicates sorbent was estimated to be equivalent if fly ash sales are not a consideration. However, if the plant did sell fly ash, the effective cost for mercury control could more than double if those sales were no longer possible, due to lost by-product sales and additional cost for waste disposal. Accordingly, the use of Amended Silicates sorbent could reduce the overall cost of mercury control by 50% or more versus PAC for locations where

  4. Dog rose (Rosa canina L.) as a functional ingredient in porcine frankfurters without added sodium ascorbate and sodium nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossen, Els; Utrera, Mariana; De Smet, Stefaan; Morcuende, David; Estévez, Mario

    2012-12-01

    The effect of dog rose (Rosa canina L.; RC), rich in polyphenols and ascorbic acid, on lipid and protein oxidation, colour stability and texture of frankfurters was investigated. Four treatments were prepared: with 5 or 30 g/kg RC extract and without sodium ascorbate and sodium nitrite (5RC and 30RC, respectively), a positive control (with sodium ascorbate and sodium nitrite; PC) and a negative control (without sodium ascorbate, sodium nitrite or RC extract; NC). Hexanal values were much higher throughout storage in NC compared to RC and PC frankfurters (Prose can act as a natural antioxidant in frankfurters, but not as full replacer for sodium nitrite. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Interstellar silicate analogs for grain-surface reaction experiments: Gas-phase condensation and characterization of the silicate dust grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabri, T.; Jäger, C. [Laboratory Astrophysics Group of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena Institute of Solid State Physics, Helmholtzweg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Gavilan, L.; Lemaire, J. L.; Vidali, G. [Observatoire de Paris/Université de Cergy-Pontoise, 5 mail Gay Lussac, F-95000 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Mutschke, H. [Laboratory Astrophysics Group of the Astrophysical Institute and University Observatory, Friedrich Schiller University Jena Schillergässchen 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Henning, T., E-mail: tolou.sabri@uni-jena.de [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-01-10

    Amorphous, astrophysically relevant silicates were prepared by laser ablation of siliceous targets and subsequent quenching of the evaporated atoms and clusters in a helium/oxygen gas atmosphere. The described gas-phase condensation method can be used to synthesize homogeneous and astrophysically relevant silicates with different compositions ranging from nonstoichiometric magnesium iron silicates to pyroxene- and olivine-type stoichiometry. Analytical tools have been used to characterize the morphology, composition, and spectral properties of the condensates. The nanometer-sized silicate condensates represent a new family of cosmic dust analogs that can generally be used for laboratory studies of cosmic processes related to condensation, processing, and destruction of cosmic dust in different astrophysical environments. The well-characterized silicates comprising amorphous Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, as well as the corresponding crystalline silicates forsterite and fayalite, produced by thermal annealing of the amorphous condensates, have been used as real grain surfaces for H{sub 2} formation experiments. A specifically developed ultra-high vacuum apparatus has been used for the investigation of molecule formation experiments. The results of these molecular formation experiments on differently structured Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} described in this paper will be the topic of the next paper of this series.

  6. Comparison of the dimensional stability of alginate impressions disinfected with 1% sodium hypochlorite using the spray or immersion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oderinu, O H; Adegbulugbe, I C; Shaba, O P

    2007-01-01

    To determine and compare the dimensional stability of alginate impressions disinfected with Sodium hypochlorite using the spray and immersion methods. Alginate impressions of a master model of truncated metal cones were made and disinfected with 1% sodium hypochlorite constituted from 3.5% household bleach using the spray and immersion technique for 10; 20 and 30 minutes. Impressions were cast in dental stone and the linear dimensional differences between the inter-abutment distances were measured with an electronic caliper. One sample T test and percentage differences were calculated. There were no statistically significant differences in dimensions of alginate impressions of the control and those disinfected by either spraying or immersion methods when compared with the master model at 10 minutes. However, there was a statistically significant difference at 20 and 30 minutes. The spray technique showed the least percentage difference from the master model. Disinfection of alginate impressions with 1% sodium hypochlorite constituted from commercially available household bleach by the spray or immersion techniques for ten minutes will produce casts with minimal dimensional changes.

  7. Water quality characterization in some birimian aquifers of the Birim Basin, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, B.-Y.; Yidana, S.M.; Anku, Y.; Akabzaa, T.; Asiedu, D.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the main controls on the hydrochemistry of groundwater in the study area. Mass balance modeling was used simultaneously with multivariate R-mode hierarchical cluster analysis to determine the significant sources of variation in the hydrochemistry. Two water types have been revealed in this area: (1) waters influenced more significantly by the weathering of silicate minerals from the underlying geology, and are rich in silica, sodium, calcium, bicarbonate, and magnesium ions, and (2) waters that have been influenced by the effects of fertilizers and other anthropogenic activities in the area. Mineral speciation and silicate mineral stability diagrams generated from the data suggest that montmorillonite, probably derived from the incongruent dissolution of feldspars and micas, is the most stable silicate phase in the groundwater. The apparent incongruent weathering of silicate minerals in the groundwater system has led to the enrichment of sodium, calcium, magnesium and bicarbonate ions as well as silica, leading to the supersaturation of calcite, aragonite, dolomite and quartz. Stability in the montmorillonite field suggests restricted flow conditions whereby groundwater residence time is relatively high, leading to greater contact of groundwater with the rock to enhance weathering. Cation exchange processes have also been determined to play minor roles in the hydrochemistry.

  8. A study on the structure and thermal stability of titanate nano-tubes as a function of sodium content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgado, E.; Abreu, M.A.S. de; Pravia, O.R.C. [Petrobras S.A./Cenpes, Research and Development Centre, Cidade Univ., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Marinkovic, B.A.; Jardim, P.M.; Rizzo, F.C. [Pontifical Catholic Univ., Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Araujo, A.S. [University of Rio Grande do Norte, Dept. of Chemistry, RN (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    Titanate Nano-Tubes (TTNT) were synthesized by hydrothermal treatment of TiO{sub 2} anatase in 10 M NaOH at 120 C followed by repeated water washing, with and without ion exchanging by HCl 0.1 M. Samples with different contents of remnant sodium in nano-tubes were characterized, as synthesized and after heat-treatment, by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, thermal analysis and N{sub 2} adsorption. It was demonstrated that TTNT consisted of a tri-titanate structure with general formula Na{sub x}H{sub 2}-xTi{sub 3}O{sub 7}.nH{sub 2}O, where 0{<=}x{<=}2 and n{<=}1.2, depending on the degree of proton exchange after washing. As-synthesized nano-tubes retained interlayer water in its multi-walled structure. The removal of sodium reduced the amount of this intercalated water and increased the specific surface area, while thermal stability was reduced. The mechanism through which TTNT dehydrated and converted into their condensed titanates and/or TiO{sub 2} polymorphs after thermal treatment as a function of the sodium content was discussed and a schematic picture of the thermal transformations was proposed. (authors)

  9. A study on the structure and thermal stability of titanate nano-tubes as a function of sodium content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgado, E.; Abreu, M.A.S. de; Pravia, O.R.C.; Marinkovic, B.A.; Jardim, P.M.; Rizzo, F.C.; Araujo, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    Titanate Nano-Tubes (TTNT) were synthesized by hydrothermal treatment of TiO 2 anatase in 10 M NaOH at 120 C followed by repeated water washing, with and without ion exchanging by HCl 0.1 M. Samples with different contents of remnant sodium in nano-tubes were characterized, as synthesized and after heat-treatment, by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, thermal analysis and N 2 adsorption. It was demonstrated that TTNT consisted of a tri-titanate structure with general formula Na x H 2 -xTi 3 O 7 .nH 2 O, where 0≤x≤2 and n≤1.2, depending on the degree of proton exchange after washing. As-synthesized nano-tubes retained interlayer water in its multi-walled structure. The removal of sodium reduced the amount of this intercalated water and increased the specific surface area, while thermal stability was reduced. The mechanism through which TTNT dehydrated and converted into their condensed titanates and/or TiO 2 polymorphs after thermal treatment as a function of the sodium content was discussed and a schematic picture of the thermal transformations was proposed. (authors)

  10. Overview of JGC soil washing and site stabilization (SWSS) concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetsch, S.; Fujimura, Y.; Sauda, K.; Yagi, T.; Suzuki, K.

    1991-01-01

    The JGC Soil Washing and Site Stabilization (SWSS) concept is to wash heavy metal and uranium-contaminated soils using well demonstrated techniques, and to follow that process with its innovative stabilization process, to fix the remaining contaminates within a stable matrix. In addition, the solution used to wash the soil is stripped of contaminates, so that it can be reused. This process reduces the total amount of wastes generated from washing the soil, since not only can the solution be reused, but often the extracted contaminates can be recovered for industrial use. The stabilization portion of the concept is based on a family of proprietary fixing agents which can render the remaining contaminates insoluble. These agents are significantly different from other (generally silicate) agents used for stabilizing contaminated soils in that they appear to bond more strongly to heavy metal contaminants than the silicate-based reagents, resulting in improved leach-rate performance when combined with bentonite or portland cement stabilization

  11. Effect of moisture and chitosan layered silicate on morphology and properties of chitosan/layered silicates films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.R.M.B. da; Santos, B.F.F. dos; Leite, I.F.

    2014-01-01

    Thin chitosan films have been for some time an object of practical assessments. However, to obtain biopolymers capable of competing with common polymers a significant improvement in their properties is required. Currently, the technology of obtaining polymer/layered silicates nanocomposites has proven to be a good alternative. This work aims to evaluate the effect of chitosan content (CS) and layered silicates (AN) on the morphology and properties of chitosan/ layered silicate films. CS/AN bionanocomposites were prepared by the intercalation by solution in the proportion 1:1 and 5:1. Then were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), diffraction (XRD) and X-ray thermogravimetry (TG). It is expected from the acquisition of films, based on different levels of chitosan and layered silicates, choose the best composition to serve as a matrix for packaging drugs and thus be used for future research. (author)

  12. Use of long-term stable CsPbBr3 perovskite quantum dots in phospho-silicate glass for highly efficient white LEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Xiaoxuan; Hu, Zemin; Jiang, Jutao; He, Meiling; Zhou, Lei; Xiang, Weidong; Liang, Xiaojuan

    2017-10-05

    We report the synthesis of CsPbBr 3 QDs with great stability and high quantum yield in phospho-silicate glass, which was fabricated by using a heat-treatment approach, for white light emitting devices. QD glasses exhibited excellent photo- and thermal stability, and significantly prolonged the lifetime of light emitters under ambient air conditions.

  13. Evidence of yttrium silicate inclusions in YSZ-porcelain veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, Brian R; Griggs, Jason A; Neidigh, John; Piascik, Jeffrey R

    2014-04-01

    This report introduces the discovery of crystalline defects that can form in the porcelain veneering layer when in contact with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ). The focus was on dental prostheses and understanding the defects that form in the YSZ/porcelain system; however the data reported herein may have broader implications toward the use and stability of YSZ-based ceramics in general. Specimens were cut from fully sintered YSZ plates and veneering porcelain was applied (X-ray (EDAX) was used for microstructural and elemental analysis. EDAX, for chemical analysis and transmission electron diffraction (TED) for structural analysis were both performed in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). Additionally, in order to spatially resolve Y-rich precipitates, micro-CT scans were conducted at varying depths within the porcelain veneer. Local EDAX (SEM) was performed in the regions of visible inclusions and showed significant increases in yttrium concentration. TEM specimens also showed apparent inclusions in the porcelain and selected area electron diffraction was performed on these regions and found the inclusions to be crystalline and identified as either yttrium-silicate (Y2 SiO5 ) or yttrium-disilicate (Y2 Si2 O7 ). Micro-CT data showed that yttrium-silicate precipitates were distributed throughout the thickness of the porcelain veneer. Future studies are needed to determine whether many of the premature failures associated with this materials system may be the result of crystalline flaws that form as a result of high temperature yttrium diffusion near the surfaces of YSZ. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Effects of sodium salt types on the intermolecular interaction of sodium alginate/antarctic krill protein composite fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Guo, Jing; Liu, Yuanfa; Chen, Shuang; Zhang, Sen; Yu, Yue

    2018-06-01

    Sodium alginate (SA) and antarctic krill protein (AKP) were blended to fabricate the SA/AKP composite fibers by the conventional wet spinning method using 5% CaCl 2 as coagulation solution. The sodium salt was added to the SA/AKP solution to adjust the ionization degree and intermolecular interaction of composite system. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the influences of sodium salt types (NaCl, CH 3 COONa, Na 2 SO 4 ) on the intermolecular interaction of SA/AKP composite fibers. The intermolecular interaction, morphology, crystallinity, thermal stability and mechanical properties of SA/AKP composite fibers were analyzed by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results show that the types of sodium salt have obvious influences on the content of both β-sheet, intermolecular hydrogen bond, breaking strength and surface morphology in SA/AKP composite fibers, but have a negligible effect on the crystallinity and thermal stability. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Thermochemistry of dense hydrous magnesium silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Kunal; Burnley, Pamela; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    1994-01-01

    Recent experimental investigations under mantle conditions have identified a suite of dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) phases that could be conduits to transport water to at least the 660 km discontinuity via mature, relatively cold, subducting slabs. Water released from successive dehydration of these phases during subduction could be responsible for deep focus earthquakes, mantle metasomatism and a host of other physico-chemical processes central to our understanding of the earth's deep interior. In order to construct a thermodynamic data base that can delineate and predict the stability ranges for DHMS phases, reliable thermochemical and thermophysical data are required. One of the major obstacles in calorimetric studies of phases synthesized under high pressure conditions has been limitation due to the small (less than 5 mg) sample mass. Our refinement of calorimeter techniques now allow precise determination of enthalpies of solution of less than 5 mg samples of hydrous magnesium silicates. For example, high temperature solution calorimetry of natural talc (Mg(0.99) Fe(0.01)Si4O10(OH)2), periclase (MgO) and quartz (SiO2) yield enthalpies of drop solution at 1044 K to be 592.2 (2.2), 52.01 (0.12) and 45.76 (0.4) kJ/mol respectively. The corresponding enthalpy of formation from oxides at 298 K for talc is minus 5908.2 kJ/mol agreeing within 0.1 percent to literature values.

  16. Cellular morphology of organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on alkali alumino-silicate matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdolotti, Letizia; Liguori, Barbara; Capasso, Ilaria; Caputo, Domenico; Lavorgna, Marino; Iannace, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on an alkali alumino-silicate matrix were prepared by using different foaming methods. Initially, the synthesis of an inorganic matrix by using aluminosilicate particles, activated through a sodium silicate solution, was performed at room temperature. Subsequently the viscous paste was foamed by using three different methods. In the first method, gaseous hydrogen produced by the oxidization of Si powder in an alkaline media, was used as blowing agent to generate gas bubbles in the paste. In the second method, the porous structure was generated by mixing the paste with a "meringue" type of foam previously prepared by whipping, under vigorous stirring, a water solution containing vegetal proteins as surfactants. In the third method, a combination of these two methods was employed. The foamed systems were consolidated for 24 hours at 40°C and then characterized by FTIR, X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compression tests. Low density foams (˜500 Kg/m3) with good cellular structure and mechanical properties were obtained by combining the "meringue" approach with the use of the chemical blowing agent based on Si.

  17. Sodium Hypochlorite and Sodium Bromide Individualized and Stabilized Carbon Nanotubes in Water

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xuezhu

    2017-09-20

    Aggregation is a major problem for hydrophobic carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in water because it reduces the effective particle concentration, prevents particles from entering the medium, and leads to unstable electronic device performances when a colloidal solution is used. Molecular ligands such as surfactants can help the particles to disperse, but they tend to degrade the electrical properties of CNTs. Therefore, self-dispersed particles without the need for surfactant are highly desirable. We report here, for the first time to our knowledge, that CNT particles with negatively charged hydrophobic/water interfaces can easily self-disperse themselves in water via pretreating the nanotubes with a salt solution with a low concentration of sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) and sodium bromide (NaBr). The obtained aqueous CNT suspensions exhibit stable and superior colloidal performances. A series of pH titration experiments confirmed the presence and role of the electrical double layers on the surface of the salted carbon nanotubes and of functional groups and provided an in-depth understanding of the phenomenon.

  18. Sodium Hypochlorite and Sodium Bromide Individualized and Stabilized Carbon Nanotubes in Water

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xuezhu; Zhou, Jian; Colombo, Veronica; Xin, Yangyang; Tao, Ran; Lubineau, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    Aggregation is a major problem for hydrophobic carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in water because it reduces the effective particle concentration, prevents particles from entering the medium, and leads to unstable electronic device performances when a colloidal solution is used. Molecular ligands such as surfactants can help the particles to disperse, but they tend to degrade the electrical properties of CNTs. Therefore, self-dispersed particles without the need for surfactant are highly desirable. We report here, for the first time to our knowledge, that CNT particles with negatively charged hydrophobic/water interfaces can easily self-disperse themselves in water via pretreating the nanotubes with a salt solution with a low concentration of sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) and sodium bromide (NaBr). The obtained aqueous CNT suspensions exhibit stable and superior colloidal performances. A series of pH titration experiments confirmed the presence and role of the electrical double layers on the surface of the salted carbon nanotubes and of functional groups and provided an in-depth understanding of the phenomenon.

  19. 21 CFR 172.846 - Sodium stearoyl lactylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.846 Sodium stearoyl lactylate. The food additive sodium stearoyl... emulsifier, stabilizer, or texturizer in snack dips, at a level not to exceed 0.2 percent by weight of the...

  20. STABILITY OF EMULSIFIER-FREE EMULSION COPOLYMERIZATION OF METHYL METHACRYLATE/ BUTYL ACRYLATE/SODIUM MONO(ETHYL POLYOXYETHYLENE) MALEATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mao-gen Zhang; Zhi-xue Weng; Zhi-ming Huang; Zu-ren Pan

    1999-01-01

    A series of new water-soluble bifunctional comonomers having both carboxyl and alkyl polyoxyethylene groups, such as sodium mono(ethyl polyoxyethylene) maleate (ZE series) with various molecular weights of polyoxyethylene ethyl ether, were synthesized and characterized. The effects of the structural factor, the amount and feeding mode of the comonomers, the initiator concentration and polymerization temperature on the stability of emulsifier-free emulsion copolymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and butyl acrylate (BA) in the presence of a small amount of ZE with potassium persulfate as initiator were investigated. Stable, almost monodispersed MMA/BA/ZE emulsifier-free latex particles were prepared.

  1. Silicate complexation of NpO2+ ion in perchlorate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, P.N.; Choppin, G.R.

    2007-01-01

    Complexation behavior of NpO 2 + with ortho-silicic acid (o-SA) has been studied using solvent extraction at ionic strengths varying from 0.10 to 1.00M (NaClO 4 ) at pcH 3.68±0.08 and 25 deg C with bis-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP) as the extractant. The stability constant value (log β 1 ) for the 1:1 complex, NpO 2 (OSi(OH) 3 ), was found to decrease with increase in ionic strength of the aqueous phase [6.83±0.01 at I = 0.10M to 6.51±0.02 at I = 1.00M]. These values have been fitted in the SIT model expression and compared with similar values of complexation of the metal ions Am 3+ , Eu 3+ , UO 2 2+ , PuO 2 2+ , Np 4+ , Ni 2+ and Co 2+ . The speciation of NpO 2 + -o-silicate/carbonate system has been calculated as a function of pcH under ground water conditions. (author)

  2. Stability indicating high performance thin-layer chromatographic method for simultaneous estimation of pantoprazole sodium and itopride hydrochloride in combined dosage form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bageshwar, Deepak; Khanvilkar, Vineeta; Kadam, Vilasrao

    2011-11-01

    A specific, precise and stability indicating high-performance thin-layer chromatographic method for simultaneous estimation of pantoprazole sodium and itopride hydrochloride in pharmaceutical formulations was developed and validated. The method employed TLC aluminium plates precoated with silica gel 60F 254 as the stationary phase. The solvent system consisted of methanol:water:ammonium acetate; 4.0:1.0:0.5 (v/v/v). This system was found to give compact and dense spots for both itopride hydrochloride ( R f value of 0.55±0.02) and pantoprazole sodium ( R f value of 0.85±0.04). Densitometric analysis of both drugs was carried out in the reflectance-absorbance mode at 289 nm. The linear regression analysis data for the calibration plots showed a good linear relationship with R 2 =0.9988±0.0012 in the concentration range of 100-400 ng for pantoprazole sodium. Also, the linear regression analysis data for the calibration plots showed a good linear relationship with R 2 =0.9990±0.0008 in the concentration range of 200-1200 ng for itopride hydrochloride. The method was validated for specificity, precision, robustness and recovery. Statistical analysis proves that the method is repeatable and selective for the estimation of both the said drugs. As the method could effectively separate the drug from its degradation products, it can be employed as a stability indicating method.

  3. Effect of Sodium Salicylate on the Viscoelastic Properties and Stability of Polyacrylate-Based Hydrogels for Medical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Kolarova Raskova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation was made into the effect exerted by the presence of sodium salicylate (0–2 wt.%, in Carbomer-based hydrogel systems, on processing conditions, rheological and antimicrobial properties in tests against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli bacterial strains, and examples of yeast (Candida albicans and mould (Aspergillus niger. In addition, the work presents an examination of long-term stability by means of aging over one year the given hydrogels at 8°C and 25°C. The results show that 0.5 wt.% NaSal demonstrated a noticeable effect on the hydrogel neutralization process, viscosity, and antimicrobial properties against all of the tested microorganisms. The long-term stability studies revealed that hydrogels can maintain antimicrobial activity as well as viscosity to a degree that would be sufficient for practical use.

  4. Adsorption of aqueous silicate on hematite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.; Ticknor, K.V.

    1997-08-01

    During radioisotope sorption studies, adsorption of silicate from synthetic groundwaters by synthetic hematite was observed. To further investigate this observation, the adsorption of silicate onto hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) powder from a neutral, aqueous NaC1 solution (0.1 mol/dm 3 ), containing 2.56 x 10 -4 mol/dm 3 of Si added as Na 2 SiO 3 ·9H 2 O, was measured at ∼21 deg C. Equilibrium adsorption of silicate amounted to ∼1.93 μmol/m 2 (one Si(O,OH) 4 moiety per 86 A 2 ). It is important to take this adsorption into account when evaluating the ability of iron oxides to adsorb other species, especially anions, from groundwaters. Silicate adsorption is known to diminish the ability of iron oxides to adsorb other anions. (author)

  5. Investigation on Er{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} co-doped silicate glass for ~2 µm fiber lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xueqiang; Huang, Feifei; Cheng, Jimeng; Fan, Xiaokang; Gao, Song [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhang, Junjie [College of Materials Science and Technology, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Hu, Lili [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Chen, Danping, E-mail: dpchen2008@aliyun.com [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2015-06-15

    A stable Er{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} co-doped lead silicate glass is developed. Luminescent properties are recorded under pumping with 808 and 1550 nm lasers. Energy-transfer mechanism and efficiency are analyzed. Energy-transfer efficiency from Er{sup 3+}:{sup 4}I{sub 13/2} to Ho{sup 3+}:{sup 5}I{sub 7} reaches 93.8% at 3 mol% Ho{sub 2}O{sub 3} doping concentration. Strong luminescence is detected when pumped at 1550 nm because of efficient energy transfer from Er{sup 3+}:{sup 4}I{sub 13/2} to Ho{sup 3+}:{sup 5}I{sub 7}. Peak gain coefficient at 2056 nm is detected as 1.62 cm{sup −1}. The excellent luminescent property and high stability indicate that Er{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} co-doped lead silicate glass can be applied in 2 µm fiber lasers. - Highlights: • Er{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} co-doped silicate glasses with high stability are prepared. • Strong luminescence is detected under pump of 1550 nm lasers owing to efficient energy transfer from Er{sup 3+} to Ho{sup 3+}. • Transfer efficiency is calculated to be 93.8% when Ho{sub 2}O{sub 3} doping concentration is up to 3 mol%. • Gain coefficient peaks at 2056 nm to be 1.62 cm{sup −1}.

  6. Effects of sodium caseinate concentration and storage conditions on the oxidative stability of oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O' Dwyer, Sandra P; O' Beirne, David; Eidhin, Deirdre Ní; O' Kennedy, Brendan T

    2013-06-01

    The oxidative stability of various oils (sunflower, camelina and fish) and 20% oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions, were examined. The mean particle size decreased from 1179 to 325 nm as sodium caseinate (emulsifier) concentration was increased from 0.25% to 3% in O/W emulsions (Psodium caseinate concentration increased, and similarly decreased as microfluidisation pressure increased (P<0.05). Increasing storage temperature of the emulsions from 5 to 60°C, resulted in lower detectable lipid oxidation products during storage (P<0.05). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Anionic silicate organic frameworks constructed from hexacoordinate silicon centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeser, Jérôme; Prill, Dragica; Bojdys, Michael J.; Fayon, Pierre; Trewin, Abbie; Fitch, Andrew N.; Schmidt, Martin U.; Thomas, Arne

    2017-10-01

    Crystalline frameworks composed of hexacoordinate silicon species have thus far only been observed in a few high pressure silicate phases. By implementing reversible Si-O chemistry for the crystallization of covalent organic frameworks, we demonstrate the simple one-pot synthesis of silicate organic frameworks based on octahedral dianionic SiO6 building units. Clear evidence of the hexacoordinate environment around the silicon atoms is given by 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. Characterization by high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction, density functional theory calculation and analysis of the pair-distribution function showed that those anionic frameworks—M2[Si(C16H10O4)1.5], where M = Li, Na, K and C16H10O4 is 9,10-dimethylanthracene-2,3,6,7-tetraolate—crystallize as two-dimensional hexagonal layers stabilized in a fully eclipsed stacking arrangement with pronounced disorder in the stacking direction. Permanent microporosity with high surface area (up to 1,276 m2 g-1) was evidenced by gas-sorption measurements. The negatively charged backbone balanced with extra-framework cations and the permanent microporosity are characteristics that are shared with zeolites.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of functional copolymer/organo-silicate nanoarchitectures through interlamellar complex-radical (coterpolymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The functional copolymers, having a combination of rigid/flexible linkages and an ability of complex-formation with interlayered surface of organo-silicate, and their nanocomposites have been synthesized by interlamellar complex-radical (coterpolymerization of intercalated monomer complexes of maleic anhydride (MA and itaconic acid (IA with dimethyl dodecylamine surface modified montmorillonite (organo-MMT (MA…DMDA-MMT and IA…DMDA-MMT n-butyl methacrylate (BMA and/or BMA/styrene monomer mixtures. The results of nanocomposite structure–composition– property relationship studies indicate that interlamellar complex-formation between anhydride/acid units and surface alkyl amine and rigid/flexible linkage balance in polymer chains are important factors providing the effective intercalation/ exfoliation of the polymer chains into the silicate galleries, the formation of nanostructural hybrids with higher thermal stability, dynamic mechanical behaviour and well dispersed morphology.

  9. Clarification of sodium silicate solutions derived from diatomites, to improve their industrial expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar Cantillano, Eduardo

    2000-01-01

    solutions of soluble silicates synthesized have been clarified in Costa Rica from diatomite in almost 50% of their initial coloration. Clarification and removal of iron oxides have been achieved in a higher order of 50% m/m expressed as Fe 2 O 3 . Activated carbon treatment has clarified the scope of [31-57]%, but not significantly decreases the iron content. The application of NaClO to 3% m/m clarifies the scope of [28-51]%, and reduced iron by 48% m/m. The land alone has been shown that is not very effective filter to clarify, [0-14]%, but is effective for the stripping of iron by 68% m/m. Other procedures are effective in clarifying the scope of [42-51]% and reduced the amount of iron in the field of [48-66]%. The synthesis of soluble glasses is possible to clarify for conditioning with commercial purposes diverse, treatment methodologies and analytical control, simple and economical. (author) [es

  10. Study of the electroplating mechanism and physicochemical proprieties of deposited Ni-W-Silicate composite alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sassi, W.; Dhouibi, L.; Berçot, P.; Rezrazi, M.; Triki, E.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, layers based on Nickel-Tungsten (Ni-W) were electroplated from citrate-ammonia bath with and without silicate addition. Firstly, Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance (EQCM) and Global Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy (GDOES) were used to investigate the electroplating mechanism of both coatings. The gain mass was 14 and 4.13 μg cm −2 for Ni-W-Sil and Ni-W coatings, respectively. Secondly, the morphology of the composite alloy shows a smooth and homogenous surface with compact cauliflower like-structure identified as silicate incorporation. Finally, after a long immersion into chloride solution, Ni-W-Sil composite film showed a good surface stability and a remarkable mechanical hardness. These proprieties enhanced the electrochemical behavior of the composite alloy

  11. Silicates materials of high vacuum technology

    CERN Document Server

    Espe, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Materials of High Vacuum Technology, Volume 2: Silicates covers silicate insulators of special importance to vacuum technology. The book discusses the manufacture, composition, and physical and chemical properties of technical glasses, quartz glass, quartzware, vycor glass, ceramic materials, mica, and asbestos.

  12. Process for the conversion of sugars to lactic acid and 2-hydroxy-3-butenoic acid or esters thereof comprising a metallo-silicate material and a metal ion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    A process for the preparation of lactic acid and 2-hydroxy- 3-butenoic acid or esters thereof from a sugar in the presence of a metallo-silicate material, a metal ion and a solvent, wherein the metal ion is selected from one or more of the group consisting of potassium ions, sodium ions, lithium...

  13. ∼2 μm fluorescence radiative dynamics and energy transfer between Er3+ and Tm3+ ions in silicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ming; Liu, Xueqiang; Guo, Yanyan; Hao, Wei; Hu, Lili; Zhang, Junjie

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A Er 3+ /Tm 3+ co-doped silicate glass with good thermal stability (k gl = 0.402 for STE glass) is prepared. • Efficient ∼2 μm emission is observed under 808 nm and 980 nm laser excitation. • The glass structure and spectroscopic properties are confirmed by optical absorption, IR transmission, Raman and fluorescence studies. • The content of OH groups deceases efficiently after fluorine ions are introduced. • The energy transfer coefficient from Er 3+ to Tm 3+ in STFE glass is 13.39 × 10 −40 cm 6 /s. - Abstract: A Er 3+ /Tm 3+ co-doped silicate glass with good thermal stability is prepared by melt-quenching method. An efficient emission of ∼2 μm is observed under different selective laser excitations. The optical absorption and transmission spectra, Raman spectra, and emission spectra are tested to characterize ∼2 μm emission properties of Er 3+ /Tm 3+ co-doped silicate glasses and a reasonable energy transfer mechanism of ∼2 μm emission between Er 3+ and Tm 3+ ions is proposed. Based on the optical absorption spectra, the Judd–Ofelt parameters and radiative properties were calculated. Intense ∼2 μm emission is obtained from Er 3+ /Tm 3+ co-doped silicate glasses due to the efficient energy transfer from Er 3+ to Tm 3+ ions. The energy transfer coefficient from Er 3+ to Tm 3+ ions can reach as high as 13.39 × 10 −40 cm 6 /s. In addition, the population of the OH groups is decreased and the ∼2 μm emission is effectively enhanced with fluoride introduction. The emission property, together with good thermal property, indicates that Er 3+ /Tm 3+ co-doped silicate glass is a potential kind of laser glass for efficient ∼2 μm laser

  14. Location of silicic caldera formation in arc settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Gwyneth R; Mahood, Gail A [Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, 450 Serra, Mall, Building 320, Stanford, CA 94305-2115 (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Silicic calderas are the surface expressions of silicic magma chambers, and thus their study may yield information about what tectonic and crustal features favor the generation of evolved magma. The goal of this study is to determine whether silicic calderas in arc settings are preferentially located behind the volcanic front. After a global analysis of young, arc-related calderas, we find that silicic calderas at continental margins do form over a wide area behind the front, as compared to other types of arc volcanoes.

  15. Excess Sodium Tetraphenylborate and Intermediates Decomposition Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, M.J.

    1998-12-07

    The stability of excess amounts of sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) in the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) facility depends on a number of variables. Concentration of palladium, initial benzene, and sodium ion as well as temperature provide the best opportunities for controlling the decomposition rate. This study examined the influence of these four variable on the reactivity of palladium-catalyzed sodium tetraphenylborate decomposition. Also, single effects tests investigated the reactivity of simulants with continuous stirring and nitrogen ventilation, with very high benzene concentrations, under washed sodium concentrations, with very high palladium concentrations, and with minimal quantities of excess NaTPB.

  16. Bismuth silicate glass: A new choice for 2 μm fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jia; Zhao, Guoying; Tian, Ying; Chen, Wei; Hu, Lili

    2012-11-01

    We report on a new Yb3+/Tm3+/Ho3+ co-doped bismuth silicate glass: SiO2-Bi2O3-R2O (R = Li, Na, K) for 2 μm fiber lasers. Bi2O3 was introduced into alkali silicate glass to optimize 2 μm emission properties. Physical, chemical and spectroscopic properties of Yb3+/Tm3+/Ho3+ co-doped SiO2-Bi2O3-R2O (SBR) glass were presented. The Yb3+/Tm3+/Ho3+ co-doped SBR glass shows excellent thermal stability (ΔT = 162 °C), an intense 2.0 μm emission pumped by 980 nm LD with a lifetime of 1.33 ms and width of 168 nm, large maximum emission cross section of Ho3+ (5.3 × 10-21 cm2), thus large σemτ product (7.049 × 10-24 cm2 s), which suggest its application in 2 μm fiber lasers.

  17. Physical and Chemical Stability of Urapidil in 0.9% Sodium Chloride in Elastomeric Infusion Pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, Cristina; Leggieri, Anna; Rabbia, Franco; Veglio, Franco; Baietto, Lorena; Fulcheri, Chiara; De Nicolò, Amedeo; De Perri, Giovanni; D'Avolio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Urapidil is an antihypertensive agent, usually administered through intravenous bolus injection, slow-intravenous infusion, or continuous-drug infusion by perfusor. Since to date no evidences are available on drug stability in elastomeric pumps, patients have to be hospitalized. The purpose of this study was to validate an ultra-performance liquid chromatographic method to evaluate urapidil stability in an elastomeric infusion pump, in order to allow continuous infusion as home-care treatment. Analyses were conducted by diluting urapidil in an elastomeric pump. Two concentrations were evaluated: 1.6 mg/mL and 3.3 mg/mL. For the analyses, a reverse-phase ultra-performance liquid chromatographic- photodiode array detection instrument was used. Stressed degradation, pH changes, and visual clarity were used as stability indicators up to 10 days after urapidil solution preparation. The drug showed no more than 5% degradation during the test period at room temperature. No pH changes and no evidences of incompatibility were observed. Stress tests resulted in appreciable observation of degradation products. Considering the observed mean values, urapidil hydrochloride in sodium chloride 0.9% in elastomeric infusion pumps is stable for at least 10 days. These results indicate that this treatment could be administered at home for a prolonged duration (at least 7 days) with a satisfactory response. Copyright© by International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding, Inc.

  18. Validation of a stability-indicating hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatographic method for the quantitative determination of vitamin k3 (menadione sodium bisulfite) in injectable solution formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Mashhour M; Abu-Lafi, Saleh A; Hallak, Hussein O

    2013-01-01

    A simple, specific, accurate, and stability-indicating method was developed and validated for the quantitative determination of menadione sodium bisulfite in the injectable solution formulation. The method is based on zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (ZIC-HILIC) coupled with a photodiode array detector. The desired separation was achieved on the ZIC-HILIC column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) at 25°C temperature. The optimized mobile phase consisted of an isocratic solvent mixture of 200mM ammonium acetate (NH4AC) solution and acetonitrile (ACN) (20:80; v/v) pH-adjusted to 5.7 by glacial acetic acid. The mobile phase was fixed at 0.5 ml/min and the analytes were monitored at 261 nm using a photodiode array detector. The effects of the chromatographic conditions on the peak retention, peak USP tailing factor, and column efficiency were systematically optimized. Forced degradation experiments were carried out by exposing menadione sodium bisulfite standard and the injectable solution formulation to thermal, photolytic, oxidative, and acid-base hydrolytic stress conditions. The degradation products were well-resolved from the main peak and the excipients, thus proving that the method is a reliable, stability-indicating tool. The method was validated as per ICH and USP guidelines (USP34/NF29) and found to be adequate for the routine quantitative estimation of menadione sodium bisulfite in commercially available menadione sodium bisulfite injectable solution dosage forms.

  19. An effective method to screen sodium-based layered materials for sodium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Zihe; Yao, Sai; Chen, An; Zhao, Xudong; Zhou, Zhen

    2018-03-01

    Due to the high cost and insufficient resource of lithium, sodium-ion batteries are widely investigated for large-scale applications. Typically, insertion-type materials possess better cyclic stability than alloy-type and conversion-type ones. Therefore, in this work, we proposed a facile and effective method to screen sodium-based layered materials based on Materials Project database as potential candidate insertion-type materials for sodium ion batteries. The obtained Na-based layered materials contains 38 kinds of space group, which reveals that the credibility of our screening approach would not be affected by the space group. Then, some important indexes of the representative materials, including the average voltage, volume change and sodium ion mobility, were further studied by means of density functional theory computations. Some materials with extremely low volume changes and Na diffusion barriers are promising candidates for sodium ion batteries. We believe that our classification algorithm could also be used to search for other alkali and multivalent ion-based layered materials, to accelerate the development of battery materials.

  20. EFFECT OF AGING TIME TOWARD CRYSTALLINITY OF PRODUCTS IN SYNTHESIS OF MESOPOROUS SILICATES MCM-41

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyanta Suyanta

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Researches about the effects of aging time toward crystallinity of products in the synthesis of mesoporous silicates MCM-41 have been done. MCM-41 was synthesized by hydrothermal treatment to the mixture of sodium silicate, sodium hydroxide, cetyltrimetylammoniumbromide (CTMAB and aquadest in the molar ratio of 8Na2SiO3 : CTMAB : NaOH : 400H2O. Hydrothermal treatment was carried out at 110 °C in a teflon-lined stainless steel autoclave heated in the oven, with variation of aging time, i.e.: 4, 8, 12, 16, 24, 36, 48, and 72 h respectively. The solid phase were filtered, then washed with deionised water, and dried in the oven at 100 °C for 2 h. The surfactant CTMAB was removed by calcinations at 550 °C for 10 h with heating rate 2 °C/min. The as-synthesized and calcined powders were characterized by using FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction method. The relative crystallinity of products was evaluated based on the intensity of d100 peaks. The best product was characterized by using N2 physisorption method in order to determine the specific surface area, mean pore diameter, lattice parameter, and pore walls thickness. It was concluded that the relative crystallinity of the products was sensitively influenced by the aging time. The highest relative crystallinity was achieved when used 36 h of aging time in hydrothermal treatment. In this optimum condition the product has 946.607 m2g-1 of specific surface area, 3.357 nm of mean pore diameter, 4.533 nm of lattice parameter, and 1.176 nm of pore walls thickness.

  1. Hydrochemical characterization of groundwater in the Akyem area, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banoeng-Yakubo, B.; Yidana, S.M.; Anku, Y.; Akabzaa, T.; Asiedu, D.

    2008-01-01

    The Akyem area is a small farming community located in southeastern Ghana. Groundwater samples from wells in the area were analyzed for concentrations of the major ions, silica, electrical conductivity and pH. The objective was to determine the main controls on the hydrochemistry of ground-water. Mass balance modeling was used together with multivariate R-mode hierarchical cluster analysis to determine the significant sources of variation in the hydrochemistry. Two water types exist in this area. The first is influenced most by the weathering of silicate minerals from the underlying geology, and is thus rich in silica, sodium, calcium, bicarbonate, and magnesium ions. The second is water that has been influenced by the effects of fertilizers and other anthropogenic activities in the area. Mineral speciation and silicate mineral stability diagrams suggest that montmorillonite, probably derived from the incongruent dissolution of feldspars and micas, is the most stable silicate phase in the groundwaters. The apparent incongruent weathering of silicate minerals in the groundwater system has led to the enrichment of sodium, calcium, magnesium and bicarbonate ions as well as silica, leading to the supersaturation of calcite, aragonite, dolomite and quartz. Stability in the montmorillonite field suggests restricted flow conditions and a long groundwater residence time, leading to greater exposure of the rock to weathering. Cation exchange processes appear to play minor roles in the hydrochemistry of groundwater.

  2. Designing solid-liquid interphases for sodium batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Choudhury, Snehashis

    2017-10-06

    Secondary batteries based on earth-abundant sodium metal anodes are desirable for both stationary and portable electrical energy storage. Room-temperature sodium metal batteries are impractical today because morphological instability during recharge drives rough, dendritic electrodeposition. Chemical instability of liquid electrolytes also leads to premature cell failure as a result of parasitic reactions with the anode. Here we use joint density-functional theoretical analysis to show that the surface diffusion barrier for sodium ion transport is a sensitive function of the chemistry of solid–electrolyte interphase. In particular, we find that a sodium bromide interphase presents an exceptionally low energy barrier to ion transport, comparable to that of metallic magnesium. We evaluate this prediction by means of electrochemical measurements and direct visualization studies. These experiments reveal an approximately three-fold reduction in activation energy for ion transport at a sodium bromide interphase. Direct visualization of sodium electrodeposition confirms large improvements in stability of sodium deposition at sodium bromide-rich interphases.

  3. A novel pharmaceutical excipient: Coprecipitation of calcium and magnesium silicate using brine-seawater in date palm cellulose as an absorbing host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hamaidi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to produce a cost competitive and innovative pharmaceutical additive with multi-purpose use in the pharmaceutical industry from Saudi Arabia natural resources and bio-wastes. The waste substance, brine, and the naturally occurring compound, sodium silica, were reacted together to produce water insoluble calcium and magnesium silicate salts [WISS]. The purity index WISS was compared with synthetic Mg silicae.The produced particle size was 1.994 µm. Date palm cellulose [DPC] with a high purity index [0.99] was produced from the biomass waste of date palm tree. DPC was used as a host for coprecipitation of synthetic calcium magnesium silicate within its intimate structures. The interaction between the cellulose polymer and silicates is physical in nature. WISS-DPC was more flowable than DPC. In SEM, the particles of DPC were fibrous and irregular in shape, while WISS-DPC showed more regular shape than DPC. Tablets prepared from WISS-DPC were harder and had lower disintegration time at all compression forces compared to those made from DPC. The produced excipient had excellent compaction and disintegration properties and could be used as a superdisintegrant and tablet binder in pharmaceutical industries.

  4. Structure-rheology relations in sodium caseinate containing systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ruis, H.G.M.

    2007-01-01

    The general aim of the work described in this thesis was to investigate structure-rheologyrelations for dairy related products, focusing on model systems containing sodium caseinate. The acid inducedgelationof sodium caseinate, of sodium caseinate stabilized emulsions, and the effect of shear on the structure formation was characterized. Special attention was given to the sol-gel transition point, which was defined by a frequency independent loss tangent. It was shown that the sol-gel transit...

  5. On crystallochemistry of uranil silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorenko, G.A.; Moroz, I.Kh.; Zhil'tsova, I.G.

    1975-01-01

    A crystallochemical analysis has been made of uranil silicates. It is shown that on crystallochemical grounds it is justified to distinguish among them uranophane-kasolite, soddyite and viksite groups differing in the uranil-anion [SiO 4 ] -4 ratio and, as a consequence, in their crystallochemical structures. Widespread silicates of the uranophane-kasolite group is the formation of polytype modifications where, depending on the interlaminar cation, crystalline structures are formed with various packing of single-type uranil-anion layers. It has been shown experimentally that silicates of the uranophanekasolite group contain no oxonium ion in their crystalline structures. Minerals of the viksite group belong to a group of isostructural (homeotypic) laminated formation apt to form phases of different degrees of hydration. Phases with a smaller interlaminar cation form hydrates with a greater number of water molecules in the formulas unit

  6. Development of fast reactor containment safety analysis code, CONTAIN-LMR. (3) Improvement of sodium-concrete reaction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Munemichi; Doi, Daisuke; Seino, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    A computer code, CONTAIN-LMR, is an integrated analysis tool to predict the consequence of severe accident in a liquid metal fast reactor. Because a sodium-concrete reaction behavior is one of the most important phenomena in the accident, a Sodium-Limestone Concrete Ablation Model (SLAM) has been developed and installed into the original CONTAIN code at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the U.S. The SLAM treats chemical reaction kinetics between the sodium and the concrete compositions mechanistically using a three-region model, containing a pool (sodium and reaction debris) region, a dry (boundary layer (B/L) and dehydrated concrete) region, and a wet (hydrated concrete) region, the application is limited to the reaction between sodium and limestone concrete. In order to apply SLAM to the reaction between sodium and siliceous concrete which is an ordinary structural concrete in Japan, the chemical reaction kinetics model has been improved to consider the new chemical reactions between sodium and silicon dioxide. The improved model was validated to analyze a series of sodium-concrete experiments which were conducted in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). It has been found that relatively good agreement between calculation and experimental results is obtained and the CONTAIN-LMR code has been validated with regard to the sodium-concrete reaction phenomena. (author)

  7. Compatibility and stability of morphine sulphate and naloxone hydrochloride in 0.9% sodium chloride for injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistner, Charlotte; Ensom, Mary H H; Decarie, Diane; Lauder, Gillian; Carr, Roxane R

    2013-05-01

    Naloxone may be administered in conjunction with morphine to reduce the risk of opioid-induced pruritis. Combining these drugs for coadministration may be beneficial, but little is known about their physical compatibility and stability in combined solutions. To describe the physical compatibility and stability of morphine sulphate and naloxone hydrochloride (at various concentrations) in IV admixtures. The physical compatibility and stability of admixtures of morphine 1000 μg/mL and naloxone 4 μg/mL, 12.5 μg/mL, and 25 μg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride were studied. For each concentration of naloxone, one bag was stored at room temperature (22°C) for 72 h and one bag was stored under refrigeration (4°C) for 30 days. For all preparations, physical characteristics, including pH, colour, and formation of precipitate, were evaluated. The samples were also analyzed by a stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatographic method. Stability was defined as the retention of at least 90% of the initial concentration. No notable changes in pH or colour and no macroprecipitation were observed in any of the preparations after storage at 22°C for up to 72 h or at 4°C for up to 30 days. All preparations maintained more than 90% of the initial concentrations of morphine and naloxone at the end of the respective study periods. The calculated lower limit of the 95% confidence interval also indicated that 90% or more of the initial concentration remained at the end of each study period. Admixtures of morphine sulphate and naloxone hydrochloride were stable for 72 h at room temperature and for 30 days with refrigeration.

  8. Comparison of lead removal behaviors and generation of water-soluble sodium compounds in molten lead glass under a reductive atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Takashi; Nishimura, Fumihiro; Xu, Zhanglian; Yonezawa, Susumu

    2018-06-01

    We propose a method of reduction-melting at 1000 °C, using a sodium-based flux, to recover lead from cathode-ray tube funnel glass. To recover the added sodium from the treated glass, we combined a reduction-melting process with a subsequent annealing step at 700 °C, generating water-soluble sodium compounds in the molten glass. Using this combined process, this study compares lead removal behavior and the generation of water-soluble sodium compounds (sodium silicates and carbonates) in order to gain fundamental information to enhance the recovery of both lead and sodium. We find that lead removal increases with increasing melting time, whereas the generation efficiency of water-soluble sodium increases and decreases periodically. In particular, near 90% lead removal, the generation of water-soluble sodium compounds decreased sharply, increasing again with the prolongation of melting time. This is due to the different crystallization and phase separation efficiencies of water-soluble sodium in molten glass, whose structure continuously changes with lead removal. Previous studies used a melting time of 60 min in the processes. However, in this study, we observe that a melting time of 180 min enhances the water-soluble sodium generation efficiency.

  9. geometric models for lateritic soil stabilized with cement

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    stabilized lateritic soil and also to develop geometric models. The compaction, California .... on how effective limited field data are put to use in decision-making. ..... silicates was described as the most important phase of cement and the ...

  10. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  11. FFTF vertical sodium storage tank preliminary thermal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    In the FFTF Shutdown Program, sodium from the primary and secondary heat transport loops, Interim Decay Storage (IDS), and Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) will be transferred to four large storage tanks for temporary storage. Three of the storage tanks will be cylindrical vertical tanks having a diameter of 28 feet, height of 22 feet and fabricated from carbon steel. The fourth tank is a horizontal cylindrical tank but is not the subject of this report. The storage tanks will be located near the FFTF in the 400 Area and rest on a steel-lined concrete slab in an enclosed building. The purpose of this work is to document the thermal analyses that were performed to ensure that the vertical FFTF sodium storage tank design is feasible from a thermal standpoint. The key criterion for this analysis is the time to heat up the storage tank containing frozen sodium at ambient temperature to 400 F. Normal operating conditions include an ambient temperature range of 32 F to 120 F. A key parameter in the evaluation of the sodium storage tank is the type of insulation. The baseline case assumed six inches of calcium silicate insulation. An alternate case assumed refractory fiber (Cerablanket) insulation also with a thickness of six inches. Both cases assumed a total electrical trace heat load of 60 kW, with 24 kW evenly distributed on the bottom head and 36 kW evenly distributed on the tank side wall

  12. Rechargeable sodium all-solid-state battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Weidong; Li, Yutao; Xin, Sen; Goodenough, John B.

    2017-01-01

    A reversible plating/stripping of a dendrite-free metallic-sodium anode with a reduced anode/ceramic interfacial resistance is created by a thin interfacial interlayer formed in situ or by the introduction of a dry polymer film. Wetting of the sodium on the interfacial interlayer suppresses dendrite formation and growth at different discharge/charge C-rates. Furthermore, all-solid-state batteries were obtained with a high cycling stability and Coulombic efficiency at 65 °C.

  13. Stability study of methotrexate in 0.9% sodium chloride injection and 5% dextrose injection with limit tests for impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Klaus; Bogedal Jorgensen, Lene; Lindegaard Berg, Dorthe

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Results of an evaluation of the stability of methotrexate in 0.9% sodium chloride injection and 5% dextrose injection are presented. Methods. Methotrexate concentrated solution (100 mg/mL) was diluted to nominal concentrations of 0.2 and 20 mg/mL in infusion bags containing 0.9% sodium...... chloride injection or 5% dextrose injection. The filled bags were stored for 28 days at 25 °C and 60% relative humidity and protected from light. Samples were withdrawn for analysis on the day of preparation and after 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. The test program included visual inspections, measurements...... in amounts of known and unknown degradation products were detected. In 5% dextrose injection, methotrexate at the higher concentration was stable for 28 days, with minor formation of degradation products; in the 0.2-mg/mL solution, however, methotrexate was stable for only 3 days. At later time points...

  14. Characterization and mechanical properties of coatings on magnesium by micro arc oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durdu, Salih; Usta, Metin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The commercial pure magnesium was coated by MAO in sodium silicate and sodium phosphate. ► Coatings produced in the phosphate electrolyte are thicker than ones in the silicate electrolyte. ► Coatings in the silicate electrolyte are harder than ones in the phosphate electrolyte. ► Adhesion strength of coatings increases with increasing coating thickness. ► The wear resistance of the coated commercial pure magnesium is improved. - Abstracts: The commercial pure magnesium was coated by micro arc oxidation method in different aqueous solution, containing sodium silicate and sodium phosphate. Micro arc oxidation process was carried out at 0.060 A/cm 2 , 0.085 A/cm 2 and 0.140 A/cm 2 current densities for 30 min. The thickness, phase composition, morphology, hardness, adhesion strength and wear resistance of coatings were analyzed by eddy current, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), micro hardness tester, scratch tester and ball-on disk tribometer, respectively. The average thicknesses of the micro arc oxidized coatings ranged from 27 to 48 μm for sodium silicate solution and from 45 to 75 μm for sodium phosphate solution. The dominant phases formed on the pure magnesium were found to be a mixture of spinel Mg 2 SiO 4 (Forsterite) and MgO (Periclase) for sodium silicate solution and Mg 3 (PO 4 ) 2 (Farringtonite) and MgO (Periclase) for sodium phosphate solution. The average hardnesses of the micro arc oxidized coatings were between 260 HV and 470 HV for sodium silicate solution and between 175 HV and 260 HV for sodium phosphate solution. Adhesion strengths and wear resistances of coatings produced in sodium silicate solution were higher than those of the ones in sodium phosphate solution due to high hardness of coatings produced in sodium silicate solution.

  15. Lattice thermal conductivity of silicate glasses at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y. Y.; Hsieh, W. P.

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of the thermodynamic and transport properties of magma holds the key to understanding the thermal evolution and chemical differentiation of Earth. The discovery of the remnant of a deep magma ocean above the core mantle boundary (CMB) from seismic observations suggest that the CMB heat flux would strongly depend on the thermal conductivity, including lattice (klat) and radiative (krad) components, of dense silicate melts and major constituent minerals around the region. Recent measurements on the krad of dense silicate glasses and lower-mantle minerals show that krad of dense silicate glasses could be significantly smaller than krad of the surrounding solid mantle phases, and therefore the dense silicate melts would act as a thermal insulator in deep lower mantle. This conclusion, however, remains uncertain due to the lack of direct measurements on the lattice thermal conductivity of silicate melts under relevant pressure-temperature conditions. Besides the CMB, magmas exist in different circumstances beneath the surface of the Earth. Chemical compositions of silicate melts vary with geological and geodynamic settings of the melts and have strong influences on their thermal properties. In order to have a better view of heat transport within the Earth, it is important to study compositional and pressure dependences of thermal properties of silicate melts. Here we report experimental results on lattice thermal conductivities of silicate glasses with basaltic and rhyolitic compositions up to Earth's lower mantle pressures using time-domain thermoreflectance coupled with diamond-anvil cell techniques. This study not only provides new data for the thermal conductivity of silicate melts in the Earth's deep interior, but is crucial for further understanding of the evolution of Earth's complex internal structure.

  16. Electrode Materials for Lithium/Sodium-Ion Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Yanbin

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of electrode materials for lithium/sodium ion batteries and their structural stability during lithium/sodium insertion/extraction are the two essential issues that have limited battery application in the fields requiring long cycle life and high safety. During her PhD studies, Yanbin...... Shen systematically investigated the controlled synthesis of electrode materials for lithium/sodium ion batteries. She also investigated their formation mechanisms and structural evolution during the operation of batteries using in situ/operando X-ray diffraction techniques. The research findings...... provide insights into formation mechanisms of Li4Ti5O12 anode material from both hydrothermal and solid-state reaction. The results also contribute to a thorough understanding of the intercalation and decay mechanisms of O3/P2 layered sodium cathode materials in sodium ion batteries....

  17. environmental studies for removal of some radioactive elements using zirconium silicate as inorganic ion exchange material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Aryan, Y.F.A.

    2007-01-01

    inorganic ion exchangers have a good potential than the commonly used organic ones for removal and separation of radionuclides from irradiated nuclear fuel solutions. therefore, the main aim of this work is directed to find the optimum conditions for removal of some radionuclides such as Cs + ,Co 2+ ,and Eu 3+ by the prepared zirconium silicate as cation exchanger. the following items will be involved:-1- preparation of zirconium silicate as a cation exchanger. 2- characterization of the prepared exchanger using IR spectra, X-ray diffraction patterns, DTA and TG analyses. 3-chemical stability, capacity and equilibrium measurements will be determined on the materials using at different conditions (heating temperature and reaction temperature). 4- ion exchange isotherms. 5- breakthrough curves for removal of the investigated metal ions on the prepared exchanger under certain conditions

  18. Post-Formation Sodium Loss on the Moon: A Bulk Estimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, P.; Killen, R. M.; Airapetian, V.; Petro, N. E.; Mandell, A. M.

    2018-01-01

    The Moon and Earth are generally similar in terms of composition, but there exist variations in the abundance of certain elements among the two bodies. These differences are a likely consequence of differing physical evolution of the two bodies over the solar system's history. While previous works have assumed this may be due to conditions during the Moonâ€"TM"s formation, we explore the likelihood that the observed depletion in Sodium in lunar samples may be partially due to post-formation mechanisms. Solar effects, loss from a primordial atmosphere and impacts are some of the dominant post-formation mechanisms that we examine. We describe how our past and current modeling efforts indicate that a significant fraction of the observed depletion of sodium in lunar samples relative to a bulk silicate earth composition may have been due to solar activity, atmospheric loss and impacts. Using profiles of sodium abundances from lunar crustal samples may thus serve as a powerful tool towards exploring conditions on the Moon's surface throughout solar system history. Conditions on the Moon immediately after formation may still be recorded in the lunar crust and may provide a window towards interpreting observations from some of the first rocky exoplanets that will be most amenable to characterization. Potential spatial variation of sodium in the lunar crust may be a relevant consideration for future sample return efforts. Sodium Depletion in the Lunar Crust: Lunar

  19. High Pressure/Temperature Metal Silicate Partitioning of Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shofner, G. A.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Campbell, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of chemical elements during metal/silicate segregation and their resulting distribution in Earth's mantle and core provide insight into core formation processes. Experimental determination of partition coefficients allows calculations of element distributions that can be compared to accepted values of element abundances in the silicate (mantle) and metallic (core) portions of the Earth. Tungsten (W) is a moderately siderophile element and thus preferentially partitions into metal versus silicate under many planetary conditions. The partitioning behavior has been shown to vary with temperature, silicate composition, oxygen fugacity, and pressure. Most of the previous work on W partitioning has been conducted at 1-bar conditions or at relatively low pressures, i.e. pressure. Predictions based on extrapolation of existing data and parameterizations suggest an increased pressured dependence on metal/ silicate partitioning of W at higher pressures 5. However, the dependence on pressure is not as well constrained as T, fO2, and silicate composition. This poses a problem because proposed equilibration pressures for core formation range from 27 to 50 GPa, falling well outside the experimental range, therefore requiring exptrapolation of a parametereized model. Higher pressure data are needed to improve our understanding of W partitioning at these more extreme conditions.

  20. Spectral properties of porphyrins in the systems with layered silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceklovsky, A.

    2009-03-01

    This work is focused on investigation of hybrid materials based on layered silicates, representing host inorganic component, and porphyrin dyes as organic guest. Aqueous colloidal dispersions, as well as thin solid films of layered silicate/porphyrin systems were studied. Modification of photophysical properties, such as absorption and fluorescence of molecules, adsorbed or incorporated in layered silicate hosts, were studied mainly to spread the knowledge about the environments suitable for incorporating aromatic compounds, providing photoactive properties of potential technological interest. TMPyP cations interact with the surfaces of layered silicates via electrostatic interactions. The extent of dye adsorption on colloidal particles of the silicates is influenced by the CEC values and swelling ability of silicates. Interaction of porphyrins with layered silicate hosts leads to significant changes of dye spectral properties. One of the key parameters that has a crucial impact on this interaction is the layer charge of silicate template. Other factors influence the resulting spectral properties of hybrid systems, such as the method of hybrid material preparation, the material's type (colloid, film), and the modification of the silicate host. Molecular orientation studies using linearly-polarized spectroscopies in VIS and IR regions revealed that TMPyP molecules were oriented in almost parallel fashion with respect to the silicate surface plane. Slightly higher values of the orientation angle of TMPyP transition moment were observed for the TMPyP/FHT system. Thus, flattening of the guest TMPyP molecules is the next important factor (mainly in the systems with lower layer charge), influencing its spectral properties upon the interaction with layered silicates. Fluorescence was effectively quenched in the systems based on solid films prepared from the high concentration of the dye (10-3 mol.dm-3). The quenching is most probably related to the structure of the

  1. The kinetic fragility of natural silicate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordano, Daniele; Dingwell, Donald B

    2003-01-01

    Newtonian viscosities of 19 multicomponent natural and synthetic silicate liquids, with variable contents of SiO 2 (41-79 wt%), Al 2 O 3 (10-19 wt%), TiO 2 (0-3 wt%), FeO tot (0-11 wt%); alkali oxides (5-17 wt%), alkaline-earth oxides (0-35 wt%), and minor oxides, obtained at ambient pressure using the high-temperature concentric cylinder, the low-temperature micropenetration, and the parallel plates techniques, have been analysed. For each silicate liquid, regression of the experimentally determined viscosities using the well known Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) equation allowed the viscosity of all these silicates to be accurately described. The results of these fits, which provide the basis for the subsequent analysis here, permit qualitative and quantitative correlations to be made between the VFT adjustable parameters (A VFT , B VFT , and T 0 ). The values of B VFT and T 0 , calibrated via the VFT equation, are highly correlated. Kinetic fragility appears to be correlated with the number of non-bridging oxygens per tetrahedrally coordinated cation (NBO/T). This is taken to infer that melt polymerization controls melt fragility in liquid silicates. Thus NBO/T might form an useful ingredient of a structure-based model of non-Arrhenian viscosity in multicomponent silicate melts

  2. Synthesis, characterization of CaF2 doped silicate glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Madeeha; Zia, Rehana; Mirza, Ambreen; Hussain, Tousif; Bashir, Farooq; Anjum, Safia

    2017-06-01

    This paper reports the fabrication and characterization of silicate glass-ceramics doped with (0-12mol%) CaF 2 . TGA-DSC analysis was carried out to determine the crystallization temperature and stability of glass measured by two glass parameters; Hruby parameter K H =(T x -T g )/(T L -T x ) and Weinberg parameter K W =(T c -T g )/T L . It was found that with CaF 2 doping improved sinterability at low temperature and provided stability to the glass. The XRD pattern exhibits a single phase of combeite and doping of CaF 2 cause increase in crystallite size. Microstructure of samples was also improved with CaF 2 addition, pores were significantly reduced. After 15days immersion in simulated body fluid all samples developed apatite layer onto its surface. Hence, the addition of CaF 2 provided bioactive glass-ceramic material having a low processing temperature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Calcium titanium silicate based glass-ceramic for nuclear waste immobilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, K.; Srivastav, A. P.; Goswami, M.; Krishnan, Madangopal

    2018-04-01

    Titanate based ceramics (synroc) have been studied for immobilisation of nuclear wastes due to their high radiation and thermal stability. The aim of this study is to synthesis glass-ceramic with stable phases from alumino silicate glass composition and study the loading behavior of actinides in glass-ceramics. The effects of CaO and TiO2 addition on phase evolution and structural properties of alumino silicate based glasses with nominal composition x(10CaO-9TiO2)-y(10Na2O-5 Al2O3-56SiO2-10B2O3); where z = x/y = 1.4-1.8 are reported. The glasses are prepared by melt-quench technique and characterized for thermal and structural properties using DTA and Raman Spectroscopy. Glass transition and peak crystallization temperatures decrease with increase of CaO and TiO2 content, which implies the weakening of glass network and increased tendency of glasses towards crystallization. Sphene (CaTiSiO5) and perovskite (CaTiO3) crystalline phases are confirmed from XRD which are well known stable phase for conditioning of actinides. The microsturcture and elemental analysis indicate the presence of actinide in stable crystalline phases.

  4. Reactivity enhancement of iron sulfide nanoparticles stabilized by sodium alginate: Taking Cr (VI) removal as an example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jun; Wang, Xian-Bin; Zeng, Raymond J., E-mail: rzeng@ustc.edu.cn

    2017-07-05

    Highlights: • Sodium alginate can be used to stabilize FeS nanoparticles. • FeS-SA enhances Cr(VI) removal efficiency from 65% to 100% compared to naked FeS. • Reduction and adsorption respectively account for 82% and 18% of Cr removal by FeS-SA. • Analysis of reaction products reveals the co-existence of α-FeOOH, S{sub 8}, and Cr(OH){sub 3.} - Abstract: The widespread distribution of chromium(VI) in the environment leads to groundwater contamination. The use of iron sulfide (FeS) to remove Cr(VI) has therefore been proposed. However, aggregation is one of the main problems associated with the use of FeS nanoparticles prepared by traditional methods In this study, we used sodium alginate (SA) to stabilize FeS nanoparticles (FeS-SA). SA could prevent aggregation of FeS by the concurrent electrostatic repulsion and steric hindrance. Homogeneously dispersed FeS-SA nanoparticles 100 nm in diameter were observed. FeS-SA showed high efficiency in Cr(VI) removal, corresponding to an enhancement of efficiency from 65% (7.50 mmol Cr(VI) per g FeS) to 100% (11.54 mmol Cr per g FeS) relative to that achieved with naked FeS. Analysis of reaction products by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed the co-existence of α-FeOOH, S{sub 8}, and Cr(OH){sub 3} that apparently were introduced by Fe(II), S(−II), and Cr(VI), respectively. In-depth analysis of the removal mechanism revealed that reduction and adsorption respectively account for 82% and 18% of the Cr removal. In addition, higher pH and CaCl{sub 2} concentration resulted in lower removal efficiency. This study provides a promising application of SA in enhancing FeS reactivity for the remediation of groundwater pollution.

  5. Silicate enamel for alloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ket'ko, K.K.

    1976-01-01

    The use of silicate enamels in the metallurgical industry is discussed. Presented are the composition and the physico-chemical properties of the silicate enamel developed at the factory 'Krasnyj Oktyabr'. This enamel can be used in the working conditions both in the liquid and the solid state. In so doing the enamel is melted at 1250 to 1300 deg C, granulated and then reduced to a fraction of 0.3 to 0.5 mm. The greatest homogeneity is afforded by a granulated enamel. The trials have shown that the conversion of the test ingots melted under a layer of enamel leads to the smaller number of the ingots rejected for surface defect reasons and the lower metal consumption for slab cleaning. The cost of the silicate enamel is somewhat higher than that of synthetic slags but its application to the melting of stainless steels is still economically beneficial and technologically reasonable. Preliminary calculations only for steel EhI4IEh have revealed that the use of this enamel saves annually over 360000 roubles [ru

  6. Microencapsulation of Ginger Volatile Oil Based on Gelatin/Sodium Alginate Polyelectrolyte Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lixia; Yang, Shiwei; Cao, Jinli; Zhao, Shaohua; Wang, Wuwei

    2016-01-01

    The coacervation between gelatin and sodium alginate for ginger volatile oil (GVO) microencapsulation as functions of mass ratio, pH and concentration of wall material and core material load was evaluated. The microencapsulation was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). SEM and FT-IR studies indicated the formation of polyelectrolyte complexation between gelatin and sodium alginate and successful encapsulation of GVO into the microcapsules. Thermal property study showed that the crosslinked microparticles exhibited higher thermal stability than the neat GVO, gelatin, and sodium alginate. The stability of microencapsulation of GVO in a simulated gastric and an intestinal situation in vitro was also studied. The stability results indicated that the release of GVO from microcapsules was much higher in simulated intestinal fluid, compared with that in simulated-gastric fluid.

  7. Stability of Diphenhydramine Hydrochloride, Lorazepam, and Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate in 0.9% Sodium Chloride Stored in Polypropylene Syringes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Collin R; Halford, Zachery; MacKay, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting is problematic for many patients undergoing chemotherapy. Multiple-drug treatments have been developed to mitigate chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting. A patient-controlled infusion of diphenhydramine hydrochloride, lorazepam, and dexamethasone sodium phosphate has been studied in patients who are refractory to first-line therapy. Unfortunately, the physical and chemical compatibility of this three-drug combination is not available in the published literature. Chemical compatibility was evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Visual observation was employed to detect change in color, clarity, or gas evolution. Turbidity and pH measurements were performed in conjunction with visual observation at hours 0, 24, and 48. Results showed that diphenhydramine hydrochloride 4 mg/mL, lorazepam 0.16 mg/mL, and dexamethasone sodium phosphate 0.27 mg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride stored in polypropylene syringes were compatible, and components retained greater than 95% of their original concentration over 48 hours when stored at room temperature.

  8. A novel solid self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (S-SNEDDS) for improved stability and oral bioavailability of an oily drug, 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-3-acetyl-rac-glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeong Soo; Yang, Eun Su; Kim, Dong Shik; Kim, Dong Wuk; Yoo, Hye Hyun; Yong, Chul Soon; Youn, Yu Seok; Oh, Kyung Taek; Jee, Jun-Pil; Kim, Jong Oh; Jin, Sung Giu; Choi, Han Gon

    2017-11-01

    To develop a novel solid self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (S-SNEDDS) for a water-insoluble oily drug, 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-3-acetyl-rac-glycerol (PLAG) with improved stability and oral bioavailability, numerous S-SNEDDS were prepared with surfactant, hydrophilic polymer, antioxidant, and calcium silicate (porous carrier) using the spray-drying method. Their physicochemical properties were evaluated using emulsion droplet size analysis, SEM and PXRD. Moreover, the solubility, dissolution, stability, and pharmacokinetics of the selected S-SNEDDS were assessed compared with the drug and a commercial soft capsule. Sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) with the highest drug solubility were selected as surfactant and hydrophilic polymer, respectively. Among the antioxidants tested, only butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) could completely protect the drug from oxidative degradation. The S-SNEDDS composed of PLAG/SLS/HPMC/BHA/calcium silicate at a weight ratio of 1: 0.25: 0.1: 0.0002: 0.5 provided an emulsion droplet size of less than 300 nm. In this S-SNEDDS, the drug and other ingredients might exist in the pores of carrier and attach onto its surface. It considerably improved the drug stability (about 100 vs. 70%, 60 °C for 5 d) and dissolution (about 80 vs. 20% in 60 min) compared to the commercial soft capsule. Moreover, the S-SNEDDS gave higher AUC, C max , and T max values than the commercial soft capsule; in particular, the former improved the oral bioavailability of PLAG by about 3-fold. Our results suggested that this S-SNEDDS provided excellent stability and oral bioavailability of PLAG. Thus, this S-SNEDDS would be recommended as a powerful oral drug delivery system for an oily drug, PLAG.

  9. Transformation of Sodium Bicarbonate and CO2 into Sodium Formate over NiPd Nanoparticle Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengnan; Zhang, Jiaguang; Yan, Ning

    2013-09-01

    The present research systematically investigated, for the first time, the transformation of sodium bicarbonate and CO2 into sodium formate over a series of Ni based metal nanoparticles (NPs). Ni NPs and eight NiM (M stands for a second metal) NPs were prepared by a facile wet chemical process and then their catalytic performance were evaluated in sodium bicarbonate hydrogenation. Bimetallic NiPd NPs with a composition of 7:3 were found to be superior for this reaction, which are more active than both pure Ni and Pd NPs. Hot filtration experiment suggested the NPs to be the truly catalytic active species and kinetic analysis indicated the reaction mechanism to be different than most homogeneous catalysts. The enhanced activity of the bimetallic nanoparticles may be attributed to their smaller size and improved stability.

  10. Influences of sodium carbonate on physicochemical properties of lansoprazole in designed multiple coating pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Yang, Min; Fan, Jun Hong; Feng, Cai Xia; Zhang, Su Juan; Wang, Jin Xu; Guan, Pei Pei; Wu, Wei

    2010-09-01

    Lansoprazole (LSP), a proton-pump inhibitor, belongs to class II drug. It is especially instable to heat, light, and acidic media, indicating that fabrication of a formulation stabilizing the drug is difficult. The addition of alkaline stabilizer is the most powerful method to protect the drug in solid formulations under detrimental environment. The purpose of the study was to characterize the designed multiple coating pellets of LSP containing an alkaline stabilizer (sodium carbonate) and assess the effect of the stabilizer on the physicochemical properties of the drug. The coated pellets were prepared by layer-layer film coating with a fluid-bed coater. In vitro release and acid-resistance studies were carried out in simulated gastric fluid and simulated intestinal fluid, respectively. Furthermore, the moisture-uptake test was performed to evaluate the influence of sodium carbonate on the drug stability. The results indicate that the drug exists in the amorphous state or small (nanometer size) particles without crystallization even after storage at 40°C/75% for 5 months. The addition of sodium carbonate to the pellet protects the drug from degradation in simulated gastric fluid in a dose-dependent manner. The moisture absorbed into the pellets has a detrimental effect on the drug stability. The extent of drug degradation is directly correlated with the content of moisture absorption. In conclusion, these results suggest that the presence of sodium carbonate influence the physicochemical properties of LSP, and the designed multiple coating pellets enhance the drug stability.

  11. Heterogeneous nucleation of protein crystals on fluorinated layered silicate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Ino

    Full Text Available Here, we describe an improved system for protein crystallization based on heterogeneous nucleation using fluorinated layered silicate. In addition, we also investigated the mechanism of nucleation on the silicate surface. Crystallization of lysozyme using silicates with different chemical compositions indicated that fluorosilicates promoted nucleation whereas the silicates without fluorine did not. The use of synthesized saponites for lysozyme crystallization confirmed that the substitution of hydroxyl groups contained in the lamellae structure for fluorine atoms is responsible for the nucleation-inducing property of the nucleant. Crystallization of twelve proteins with a wide range of pI values revealed that the nucleation promoting effect of the saponites tended to increase with increased substitution rate. Furthermore, the saponite with the highest fluorine content promoted nucleation in all the test proteins regardless of their overall net charge. Adsorption experiments of proteins on the saponites confirmed that the density of adsorbed molecules increased according to the substitution rate, thereby explaining the heterogeneous nucleation on the silicate surface.

  12. Color and oxidative stability of nitrite-free cured meat after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahidi, F.; Pegg, R.B.; Shamsuzzaman, K.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of 5 and 10 kGy irradiation on the color and oxidative stability of meats treated with nitrite or a nitrite-free curing system were investigated. The nitrite-free curing system consisted of the preformed cooked cured-meat pigment, sodium ascorbate and sodium tripolyphosphate with or without sodium acid pyrophosphate. Irradiation had no detrimental effects on the color or flavor of either cured samples. Polyphosphates had a beneficial effect on oxidative stability but had a slight detrimental effect on color stability of irradiated samples

  13. Decomposition of Sodium Tetraphenylborate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    The chemical decomposition of aqueous alkaline solutions of sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) has been investigated. The focus of the investigation is on the determination of additives and/or variables which influence NaTBP decomposition. This document describes work aimed at providing better understanding into the relationship of copper (II), solution temperature, and solution pH to NaTPB stability

  14. Colloidal properties of sodium caseinate-stabilized nanoemulsions prepared by a combination of a high-energy homogenization and evaporative ripening methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes de Oca-Ávalos, J M; Candal, R J; Herrera, M L

    2017-10-01

    Nanoemulsions stabilized by sodium caseinate (NaCas) were prepared using a combination of a high-energy homogenization and evaporative ripening methods. The effects of protein concentration and sucrose addition on physical properties were analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS), Turbiscan analysis, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Droplets sizes were smaller (~100nm in diameter) than the ones obtained by other methods (200 to 2000nm in diameter). The stability behavior was also different. These emulsions were not destabilized by creaming. As droplets were so small, gravitational forces were negligible. On the contrary, when they showed destabilization the main mechanism was flocculation. Stability of nanoemulsions increased with increasing protein concentrations. Nanoemulsions with 3 or 4wt% NaCas were slightly turbid systems that remained stable for at least two months. According to SAXS and Turbiscan results, aggregates remained in the nano range showing small tendency to aggregation. In those systems, interactive forces were weak due to the small diameter of flocs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The re-emergence of sodium ion batteries: testing, processing, and manufacturability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Samuel; Kendrick, Emma

    2018-01-01

    With the re-emergence of sodium ion batteries (NIBs), we discuss the reasons for the recent interests in this technology and discuss the synergies between lithium ion battery (LIB) and NIB technologies and the potential for NIB as a “drop-in” technology for LIB manufacturing. The electrochemical testing of sodium materials in sodium metal anode arrangements is reviewed. The performance, stability, and polarization of the sodium in these test cells lead to alternative testing in three-electrode and alternative anode cell configurations. NIB manufacturability is also discussed, together with the impact that the material stability has upon the electrodes and coating. Finally, full-cell NIB technologies are reviewed, and literature proof-of-concept cells give an idea of some of the key differences in the testing protocols of these batteries. For more commercially relevant formats, safety, passive voltage control through cell balancing and cell formation aspects are discussed. PMID:29910609

  16. Wind-eroded silicate as a source of hydrogen peroxide on Mars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Ebbe Norskov; Merrison, Jonathan P.; Jensen, Svend Knak

    -sists of silicates [4] that due to wind erosion has a very fine grained texture. Based on the composition of the surface material and investigations showing that crushing of silicates can give rise to reactive oxygen species [5], we hypothesized that wind erosion of silicates can explain the reactivity of Martian...... soil. Wind-erosion of silicate could thus be one of several causes of the soil’s reactivity. As our experiments show, the globally distributed wind eroded silicate dust can lead to the production of hydrogen peroxide which might explain the reactivity of the Martian soil. The reactivity of eroded...

  17. Treatment of active concrete waste arising from the dismantling of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barody, I.I.; Langridge, D.G.; Speyer, D.S.; Towell, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes an investigation into a method of immobilizing dust following demolition of a concrete structure. It considers a number of materials that could be used for this purpose and selects sodium silicate for detailed assessment as a first choice, based on various practical factors. Part A dealing with the chemical aspects shows that sodium silicate will successfully encapsulate dust in bulk and will affix that left attached to rubble and which is not easily removable. It determines the technology of use of sodium silicate and its properties in relation to dust encapsulation paying attention to the effect of the silica/alkali ratio on the properties of sodium silicate solutions. Part B, dealing with the engineering and process aspects, examines how the dust may be collected and stabilized with silicate. The preferred process from operational considerations is to pelletize the dust, so that it can be held in a harmless form. The pellets can be packed economically with more active material. A study of pneumatic conveying shows that the feasibility of collection by suction nozzle, conveying and separation from the air stream is not in doubt. Pelletizing machines are selected from those in use on other materials. The most successful machines are a pan agglomerator and various forms of briquetting roller compaction machines. A comparison is made of the properties of pellets made in these trials. This leads to recommendations of the most suitable pelletizing machine and process parameters for a pilot plant. For a remotely controlled pelletizing process the proportions of dust in different particle size ranges has to be controlled, particularly to ensure the presence of a sufficient quantity of fine particles. The strength of binder solution and the dustbinder ratio must also be controlled to optima established to suit the dust

  18. Effect of cross-linking of interfacial sodium caseinate by natural processing on the oxidative stability of oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoon, Pui Yeu; Paul, Lake N; Burgner, John W; San Martin-Gonzalez, M Fernanda; Narsimhan, Ganesan

    2014-04-02

    This study investigated how enzymatic cross-linking of interfacial sodium caseinate and emulsification, via high-pressure homogenization, influenced the intrinsic oxidative stability of 4% (w/v) menhaden oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by 1% (w/v) caseinate at pH 7. Oil oxidation was monitored by the ferric thiocyanate perioxide value assay. Higher homogenization pressure resulted in improved intrinsic emulsion oxidative stability, which is attributed to increased interfacial cross-linking as indicated by higher weighted average sedimentation coefficients of interfacial protein species (from 11.2 S for 0 kpsi/0.1 MPa to 18 S for 20 kpsi/137.9 MPa). Moderate dosage of transglutaminase at 0.5-1.0 U/mL emulsion enhanced intrinsic emulsion oxidative stability further, despite a contradictory reduction in the antioxidant property of cross-linked caseinate as tested by the 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) assay. This implied the prominent role of cross-linked interfacial caseinate as a physical barrier for oxygen transfer, hence its efficacy in retarding oil oxidation.

  19. Synthesis and stability of α-tricalcium phosphate doped with dicalcium silicate in the system Ca3(PO4)2-Ca2SiO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, I.M.; Velasquez, P.A.; De Aza, P.N.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to synthesize materials of α-tricalcium phosphate doped with small amounts of dicalcium silicate, by solid state reaction, at high temperature and slow cooling to room temperature. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, showing that there is a region between 0.5 and 4.0 wt.% of dicalcium silicate where solid solution α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCPss) is stable to room temperature.

  20. Long-term stability of temocillin in dextrose 5% and in sodium chloride 0.9% polyolefin bags at 5 ± 3°C after freeze-thaw treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolin, C; Hecq, J-D; Tulkens, P; Vanbeckbergen, D; Jamart, J; Galanti, L

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the stability of a mixture of temocillin 20mg/ml in 5% dextrose and in 0.9% sodium chloride polyolefin bags after freezing, microwave thawing and long-term storage at 5±3°C. The stability of ten polyolefin bags containing 20mg/ml of temocillin, five bags in 5% dextrose and five bags in 0.9% sodium chloride, prepared under aseptic conditions was studied after freezing for 1 month at -20°C, thawing in a microwave oven with a validated cycle, and stored at 5±3°C. Over 30 days, temocillin concentrations were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Visual inspections, microscope observation, spectrophotometric measurements and pH measurements were also performed. No precipitation occurred in the preparations but minor colour change was observed. No microaggregate was observed with optical microscopy or revealed by a change of absorbance. Based on a shelf life of 95% residual potency, temocillin infusions were stable at least 11 days in 5% dextrose and 14 days in 0.9% sodium chloride after freezing and microwave thawing (corresponding at the period where 95% lower confidence limit of the concentration-time profile remained superior to 95% of the initial concentration). During this period, the pH values of drug solutions have been observed to decrease without affecting chromatographic parameters. Within these limits, temocillin in 5% dextrose and in 0.9% sodium chloride infusions may be prepared and frozen in advance by a centralized intravenous admixture service then thawed before use in clinical units. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Facile synthesis of chondroitin sulfate-stabilized gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Wei, E-mail: weilixj8510@163.com [School of Science, Henan Agricultural University, No. 95 Wenhua Road, Zhengzhou, Henan 450002 (China); Li Xin; Su Hui; Zhao Shiju; Li Yanyun; Hu Jiandong [School of Science, Henan Agricultural University, No. 95 Wenhua Road, Zhengzhou, Henan 450002 (China)

    2011-02-15

    A facile and simple method for the synthesis of biocompatible gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) at room temperature has been developed by using sodium borohydride as the reducing agent and employing an inexpensive water-soluble chondroitin sulfate (CS) biopolymer as the stabilizing agent. The as-prepared AuNPs were characterized with ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Additionally, the stability of AuNPs in aqueous solution was investigated as a function of the electrolyte sodium chloride concentration. The experimental results showed that even high sodium chloride concentration (1 M) also did not destabilize the colloidal gold solution. So it could be speculated that the high stability of AuNPs should be attributed to the electrostatic repulsion and steric hindrance between the AuNPs stabilized by CS molecules, which wrapped around the surface of as-prepared AuNPs and prevented their agglomeration, and simultaneously improve biocompatibility of AuNPs as well.

  2. Facile synthesis of chondroitin sulfate-stabilized gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wei; Li Xin; Su Hui; Zhao Shiju; Li Yanyun; Hu Jiandong

    2011-01-01

    A facile and simple method for the synthesis of biocompatible gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) at room temperature has been developed by using sodium borohydride as the reducing agent and employing an inexpensive water-soluble chondroitin sulfate (CS) biopolymer as the stabilizing agent. The as-prepared AuNPs were characterized with ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Additionally, the stability of AuNPs in aqueous solution was investigated as a function of the electrolyte sodium chloride concentration. The experimental results showed that even high sodium chloride concentration (1 M) also did not destabilize the colloidal gold solution. So it could be speculated that the high stability of AuNPs should be attributed to the electrostatic repulsion and steric hindrance between the AuNPs stabilized by CS molecules, which wrapped around the surface of as-prepared AuNPs and prevented their agglomeration, and simultaneously improve biocompatibility of AuNPs as well.

  3. Interfacial properties of chitosan/sodium dodecyl sulfate complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milinković Jelena R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary formulations of cosmetic and pharmaceutical emulsions may be achieved by using combined polymer/surfactant system, which can form complexes with different structure and physicochemical properties. Such complexation can lead to additional stabilization of the emulsion products. For these reasons, the main goal of this study was to investigate the interfacial properties of chitosan/sodium dodecyl sulfate complexes. In order to understand the stabilization mechanism, the interface of the oil/water systems that contained mixtures of chitosan and sodium dodecyl sulfate, was studied by measuring the interfacial tension. Considering the fact that the properties of the oil phase has influence on the adsorption process, three different types of oil were investigated: medium-chain triglycerides (semi-synthetic oil, paraffin oil (mineral oil and natural oil obtained from the grape seed. The surface tension measurements at the oil/water interface, for chitosan water solutions, indicate a poor surface activity of this biopolymer. Addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate to chitosan solution causes a significant decrease in the interfacial tension for all investigated oils. The results of this study are important for understanding the influence of polymer-surfactant interactions on the properties of the solution and stability of dispersed systems. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. III46010

  4. Studies Conducted of Sodium Carbonate Contaminant Found on the Wing Leading Edge and the Nose Cap of the Space Shuttle Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Palou, Jaime J.

    2003-01-01

    In early 2001, three of the space shuttle orbiters were found to have a sodium carbonate contaminant on the wing leading edge and nose cap. These parts are made of a reinforced carbon/carbon material protected by silicon carbide (SiC) and a glass coating. The glass coating is known as Type A and is primarily sodium silicate with particles of SiC. NASA Glenn Research Center's Environmental Durability Branch was asked to determine the chemistry of this deposit formation and assess any possible detrimental effects. At low temperatures, the reverse reaction is favorable. Previous studies of the corrosion of glass show that carbon dioxide in the presence of water does form sodium carbonate on sodium silicate glass (ref. 1). It is quite likely that a similar scenario exists for the orbiter wing leading edge. All three orbiters that formed sodium carbonate were exposed to rain. This formation of sodium carbonate was duplicated in the laboratory. The Type A glass, which coats the wing leading edge and nose cap, was made in a freestanding form and exposed to water in two separate experiments. In one set of experiments, the coating was placed in a petri dish filled with water. As the water evaporated, sodium carbonate formed. In another case, water was slowly dripped on the coating and sodium carbonate formed. The sodium carbonate was detected by chemical analysis and, in some cases, xray diffraction showed a hydrated sodium carbonate. The next step was to examine possible detrimental effects of this sodium carbonate. There are three likely scenarios for the sodium carbonate deposit: (1) it may be removed with a simple rinse, (2) it may remain and flow back into the Type A glass after heating during reentry, or (3) it may remain and flow onto unprotected SiC and/or other parts after heating during reentry. The effect of case 1 is to remove the Na2O constituent from the Type A glass, thus decreasing its effectiveness as a sealant. Even so, overall, it is probably the best

  5. The effect of sodium chloride on the dissolution of calcium silicate hydrate gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.; Harris, A.W.; Manning, M.; Chambers, A.; Swanton, S.W.

    2006-01-01

    The use of cement based materials will be widespread in the long-term management of radioactive materials in the United Kingdom. One of the applications could be the Nirex reference vault backfill (NRVB) as an engineered barrier within a deep geological repository. NRVB confers alkaline conditions, which would provide a robust chemical barrier through the control of the solubility of some key radionuclides, enhanced sorption and minimised corrosion of steel containers. An understanding of the dissolution of C-S-H gels in cement under the appropriate conditions (e.g., saline groundwaters) is necessary to demonstrate the expected evolution of the chemistry over time and to provide sufficient cement to buffer the porewater conditions for the required time. A programme of experimental work has been undertaken to investigate C-S-H gel dissolution behaviour in sodium chloride solutions and the effect of calcium/silicon ratio (C/S), temperature and cation type on this behaviour. Reductions in calcium concentration and pH values were observed with samples equilibrated at 45 deg. C compared to those prepared at 25 deg. C. The effect of salt cation type on salt-concentration dependence of the dissolution of C-S-H gels was investigated by the addition of lithium or potassium chloride in place of sodium chloride for gels with a C/S of 1.0 and 1.8. With a C/S of 1.0, similar increases in dissolved calcium concentration with increasing ionic strength were recorded for the different salts. However, at a C/S of 1.8, anomalously high calcium concentrations were observed in the presence of lithium

  6. PETROLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY OF CALC-SILICATE SCHISTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR OKONKOWO

    2012-02-29

    silicate reaction bands have higher contents of CaO and Sr and lower concentrations of K2O, Rb, Ni, and Ba relative to the calc-silicate schists; and relatively higher SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, MgO, Na2O, K2O and P2O5 and lower ...

  7. The application of silicon and silicates in dentistry: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lührs, A-K; Geurtsen, Werner

    2009-01-01

    Silicates and silicate-based compounds are frequently used materials in dentistry. One of their major applications is their use as fillers in different dental filling materials such as glass-ionomer cements, compomers, composites, and adhesive systems. In these materials, the fillers react with acids during the setting process or they improve the mechanical properties by increasing physical resistance, thermal expansion coefficient and radiopacity in acrylic filling materials. They also reduce polymerization shrinkage, and increase esthetics as well as handling properties. Furthermore, silicates are used for the tribochemical silication of different surfaces such as ceramics or alloys. The silicate layer formed in this process is the chemical basis for silanes that form a bond between this layer and the organic composite matrix. It also provides a micromechanical bond between the surface of the material and the composite matrix. Silicates are also a component of dental ceramics, which are frequently used in dentistry, for instance for veneers, inlays, and onlays, for denture teeth, and for full-ceramic crowns or as crown veneering materials.

  8. Surface charges and Np(V) sorption on amorphous Al- and Fe- silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Nero, M.; Assada, A.; Barillon, R.; Duplatre, G.; Made, B.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Sorption onto Si-rich alteration layers of crystalline minerals and nuclear glasses, and onto amorphous secondary silicates of rocks and soils, are expected to retard the migration of actinides in the near- and far-field of HLW repositories. We present experimental and modeling studies on the effects of silicate structure and bulk chemistry, and of solution chemistry, on charges and adsorption of neptunyl ions at surfaces of synthetic, amorphous or poorly ordered silica, Al-silicates and Fe-silicates. The Al-silicates display similar pH-dependent surface charges characterized by predominant Si-O - Si sites, and similar surface affinities for neptunyl ions, irrespective to their Si/Al molar ratio (varying from 10 to 4.3). Such experimental features are explained by incorporation of Al atoms in tetrahedral position in the silicate lattice, leading to only trace amounts of high-affinity Al-OH surface groups due to octahedral Al. By contrast, the structure of the Fe-silicates ensures the occurrence of high-affinity Fe-OH surface groups, whose concentration is shown by proton adsorption measurements to increase with decreasing of the silicate Si/Fe molar ratio (from 10 to 2.3). Nevertheless, experimental data of the adsorption of neptunyl and electrolyte ions show unexpectedly weak effect of the Si/Fe ratio, and suggest predominant Si-OH surface groups. A possible explanation is that aqueous silicate anions, released by dissolution, adsorb at OH Fe - surface groups and / or precipitate as silica gel coatings, because experimental solutions were found at near-equilibrium with respect to amorphous silica. Therefore, the environmental sorption of Np(V) onto Si-rich, amorphous or poorly ordered Al-silicates may primarily depend on pH and silicate specific surface areas, given the low overall chemical affinity of such phases for dissolved metals. By contrast, the sorption of Np(V) on natural, amorphous or poorly ordered Fe-silicates may be a

  9. Effects of fluoride and other halogen ions on the external stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whorlow, K.M.; Hutto, F.B. Jr.

    1997-07-01

    The drip procedure from the Standard Test Method for Evaluating the Influence of Thermal Insulation on External Stress Corrosion Cracking Tendency of Austenitic Stainless Steel (ASTM C 692-95a) was used to research the effect of halogens and inhibitors on the External Stress Corrosion Cracking (ESCC) of Type 304 stainless steel as it applies to Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.36, Nonmetallic Thermal Insulation for Austenitic Stainless Steel. The solutions used in this research were prepared using pure chemical reagents to simulate the halogens and inhibitors found in insulation extraction solutions. The results indicated that sodium silicate compounds that were higher in sodium were more effective for preventing chloride-induced ESCC in Type 304 austenitic stainless steel. Potassium silicate (all-silicate inhibitor) was not as effective as sodium silicate. Limited testing with sodium hydroxide (all-sodium inhibitor) indicated that it may be effective as an inhibitor. Fluoride, bromide, and iodide caused minimal ESCC which could be effectively inhibited by sodium silicate. The addition of fluoride to the chloride/sodium silicate systems at the threshold of ESCC appeared to have no synergistic effect on ESCC. The mass ratio of sodium + silicate (mg/kg) to chloride (mg/kg) at the lower end of the NRC RG 1.36 Acceptability Curve was not sufficient to prevent ESCC using the methods of this research

  10. Properties of Tricalcium Silicate Sealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Issam; Naaman, Alfred; Camilleri, Josette

    2016-10-01

    Sealers based on tricalcium silicate cement aim at an interaction of the sealer with the root canal wall, alkalinity with potential antimicrobial activity, and the ability to set in a wet field. The aim of this study was to characterize and investigate the properties of a new tricalcium silicate-based sealer and verify its compliance to ISO 6876 (2012). A new tricalcium silicate-based sealer (Bio MM; St Joseph University, Beirut, Lebanon), BioRoot RCS (Septodont, St Maure de Fosses, France), and AH Plus (Dentsply, DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany) were investigated. Characterization using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis was performed. Furthermore, sealer setting time, flow, film thickness, and radiopacity were performed following ISO specifications. pH and ion leaching in solution were assessed by pH analysis and inductively coupled plasma. Bio MM and BioRoot RCS were both composed of tricalcium silicate and tantalum oxide in Bio MM and zirconium oxide in BioRoot RCS. In addition, the Bio MM contained calcium carbonate and a phosphate phase. The inorganic components of AH Plus were calcium tungstate and zirconium oxide. AH Plus complied with the ISO norms for both flow and film thickness. BioRoot RCS and Bio MM exhibited a lower flow and a higher film thickness than that specified for sealer cements in ISO 6876. All test sealers exhibited adequate radiopacity. Bio MM interacted with physiologic solution, thus showing potential for bioactivity. Sealer properties were acceptable and comparable with other sealers available clinically. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of sodium content on the properties of bioactive glasses for use in air abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Imran; Tylkowski, Maxi; Müller, Steffen; Janicki, Tomasz; Brauer, Delia S; Hill, Robert G

    2013-12-01

    Air abrasion is used in minimally invasive dentistry for preparing cavities, while removing no or little sound dentine or enamel, and the use of bioactive glass (rather than alumina) as an abrasive could aid in tooth remineralization. Melt-derived bioactive glasses (SiO2-P2O5-CaO-CaF2-Na2O) with low sodium content (0 to 10 mol% Na2O in exchange for CaO) for increased hardness, high phosphate content for high bioactivity and fluoride content for release of fluoride and formation of fluorapatite were produced, and particles between 38 and 80 µm in size were used for cutting soda-lime silicate glass microscope slides and human enamel. Vickers hardness increased with decreasing Na2O content, owing to a more compact silicate network in low sodium content glasses, resulting in shorter cutting times. Cutting times using bioactive glass were significantly longer than using the alumina control (29 µm) when tested on microscope slides; however, glasses showed more comparable results when cutting human enamel. The bioactive glasses formed apatite in Tris buffer within 6 h, which was significantly faster than Bioglass® 45S5 (24 h), suggesting that the hardness of the glasses makes them suitable for air abrasion application, while their high bioactivity and fluoride content make them of interest for tooth remineralization.

  12. Sorption of caesium and strontium onto calcium silicate hydrate in saline groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, D.; Fujita, T.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the concept for radioactive waste disposal in Japan, cement is a potential waste packaging and backfilling material and is expected to provide chemical containment. The sorption of radionuclides onto cement materials, which controls the aqueous concentrations of elements in the pore-water, is a very important parameter when considering the release of radionuclides from the near field of a cementitious radioactive waste repository. Many safety assessment calculations currently assume radionuclide retardation as linear sorption equilibrium and describe it with a distribution ratio (R d value). In this study, the sorption mechanism is discussed by measuring the sorption isotherm of caesium, strontium (10 -5 ∼ 10 -2 mol dm -3 ) and sodium (10 -4 ∼ 10 -1 mol dm -3 ) onto Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H gel, Ca/Si 0.65 ∼ 1.2) at a liquid:solid ratio of 100:1, to support the assumption. In addition, the competitive sorption between caesium or strontium, and sodium is studied by sorption measurements using a range of sodium chloride concentration to simulate different ionic strengths in saline groundwater. The initial and equilibrated aqueous compositions were measured in the sorption experiments and it was found that caesium, strontium and sodium were sorbed by substitution for Ca in C-S-H phases by examining the mass balance. Based on the experimental results, we propose a modelling approach in which the ion-exchange model is employed and the presence of some calcium sites with different ion-exchange log K values in C-S-H is assumed by considering the composition and the structure of C-S-H. The modelling calculation results predict the measured Rd values well and also describe the competition of sorption of caesium or strontium, and sodium in the experiments. The log K values for sorption of each cation element decreased as Ca/Si ratio of C-S-H gel increased. This agrees with the trend that C-S-H gel is negatively charged at low

  13. Thermal stability of synthetic thyroid hormone l-thyroxine and l-thyroxine sodium salt hydrate both pure and in pharmaceutical formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledeţi, Ionuţ; Ledeţi, Adriana; Vlase, Gabriela; Vlase, Titus; Matusz, Petru; Bercean, Vasile; Şuta, Lenuţa-Maria; Piciu, Doina

    2016-06-05

    In this paper, the thermal stability of pure l-thyroxine (THY) and l-thyroxine sodium salt hydrate (THYSS) vs. two pharmaceutical solid formulations commercialized on both Romanian and European market (with a content of 100μg, respectively 200μg THYSS per tablet) were investigated. In order to determine whether the presence of excipients affects the thermal stability of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), the preliminary study of thermal stability in air atmosphere was completed with an in-depth solid-state kinetic study. By kinetic analysis, the non-isothermal degradation of the selected active pharmaceutical ingredients vs. the solid formulation with strength of 200μg THYSS per tablet was investigated. Isoconversional methods (Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and Friedman) were employed for the estimation of activation energies values, at five different heating rates, β=5, 7, 10, 12 and 15°Cmin(-1). Also, a fourth method was applied in the processing of data, namely NPK, allowing an objective separation in the physical and chemical processes that contribute to the thermal degradation of the selected compounds. A discussion of thermal stability from the kinetic point of view is also presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Transformation of Sodium Bicarbonate and CO2 into Sodium Formate over NiPd Nanoparticle Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengnan eWang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The present research systematically investigated, for the first time, the transformation of sodium bicarbonate and CO2 into sodium formate over a series of Ni based metal nanoparticles (NPs. Ni NPs and eight NiM (M stands for a second metal NPs were prepared by a facile wet chemical process and then their catalytic performance were evaluated in sodium bicarbonate hydrogenation. Bimetallic NiPd NPs with a composition of 7:3 were found to be superior for this reaction, which are more active than both pure Ni and Pd NPs. Hot filtration experiment suggested the NPs to be the truly catalytic active species and kinetic analysis indicated the reaction mechanism to be different than most homogeneous catalysts. The enhanced activity of the bimetallic nanoparticles may be attributed to their smaller size and improved stability.

  15. Simultaneous Formation of Artificial SEI Film and 3D Host for Stable Metallic Sodium Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Li, Bin; Wang, Shuai; Yang, Shubin

    2017-11-22

    Metallic sodium is a promising anode for sodium-based batteries, owing to its high theoretical capacity (1165 mAh g -1 ) and low potential (-2.714 V vs standard hydrogen electrode). However, the growth of sodium dendrites and the infinite volume change of metallic sodium during sodium striping/plating result in a low Coulombic efficiency and poor cycling stability, generating a safety hazard of sodium-based batteries. Here, an efficient approach was proposed to simultaneously generate an artificial SEI film and 3D host for metallic sodium based on a conversion reaction (CR) between sodium and MoS 2 (4Na + MoS 2 = 2Na 2 S + Mo) at room temperature. In the resultant sodium-MoS 2 hybrid after the conversion reaction (Na-MoS 2 (CR)), the production Na 2 S is homogeneously dispersed on the surface of metallic sodium, which can act as an artificial SEI film, efficiently preventing the growth of sodium dendrites; the residual MoS 2 nanosheets can construct a 3D host to confine metallic sodium, accommodating largely the volume change of sodium. Consequently, the Na-MoS 2 (CR) hybrid exhibits very low overpotential of 25 mV and a very long cycle stability more than 1000 cycles. This novel strategy is promising to promote the development of metal (lithium, sodium, zinc)-based electrodes.

  16. Alginate/sodium caseinate aqueous-core capsules: a pH-responsive matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Messaoud, Ghazi; Sánchez-González, Laura; Jacquot, Adrien; Probst, Laurent; Desobry, Stéphane

    2015-02-15

    Alginate capsules have several applications. Their functionality depends considerably on their permeability, chemical and mechanical stability. Consequently, the creation of composite system by addition of further components is expected to control mechanical and release properties of alginate capsules. Alginate and alginate-sodium caseinate composite liquid-core capsules were prepared by a simple extrusion. The influence of the preparation pH and sodium caseinate concentration on capsules physico-chemical properties was investigated. Results showed that sodium caseinate influenced significantly capsules properties. As regards to the membrane mechanical stability, composite capsules prepared at pH below the isoelectric point of sodium caseinate exhibited the highest surface Young's modulus, increasing with protein content, explained by potential electrostatic interactions between sodium caseinate amino-groups and alginate carboxylic group. The kinetic of cochineal red A release changed significantly for composite capsules and showed a pH-responsive release. Sodium caseinate-dye mixture studied by absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed complex formation at pH 2 by electrostatic interactions between sodium caseinate tryptophan residues and cochineal red sulfonate-groups. Consequently, the release mechanism was explained by membrane adsorption process. This global approach is useful to control release mechanism from macro and micro-capsules by incorporating guest molecules which can interact with the entrapped molecule under specific conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Repackaged sodium valproate tablets--Meeting quality and adherence to ensure seizure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmayne, Nichola; Robertson, Sherryl; Kockler, Jutta; Llewelyn, Victoria; Haywood, Alison; Glass, Beverley

    2015-09-01

    Sodium valproate, which is commonly repacked to assist with adherence to ensure seizure control, is hygroscopic and therefore sensitive to moisture. The aim of this study was thus to determine the stability implications of removing the enteric coated tablets from their original packaging and repackaging into a Dose Administration Aid (DAA) with storage under various environmental conditions. Physicochemical stability of enteric coated sodium valproate tablets repackaged into a DAA and stored at controlled room temperature, accelerated and refrigerated conditions was evaluated for 28 days. A validated high performance liquid chromatography method was used for the quantitation of the drug content. Although the chemical stability (sodium valproate between 95 and 105% of labelled content) was maintained for 28 days for all storage conditions, for those tablets stored under accelerated conditions the integrity of the enteric coat was compromised after only 8 days. Repackaging of enteric coated sodium valproate should be undertaken with caution and be informed by storage climate. This is particularly relevant for those patients living in hot, humid environments where they should be advised to store their DAA in a refrigerator. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Silicic magma generation at Askja volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmarsson, O.

    2009-04-01

    Rate of magma differentiation is an important parameter for hazard assessment at active volcanoes. However, estimates of these rates depend on proper understanding of the underlying magmatic processes and magma generation. Differences in isotope ratios of O, Th and B between silicic and in contemporaneous basaltic magmas have been used to emphasize their origin by partial melting of hydrothermally altered metabasaltic crust in the rift-zones favoured by a strong geothermal gradient. An alternative model for the origin of silicic magmas in the Iceland has been proposed based on U-series results. Young mantle-derived mafic protolith is thought to be metasomatized and partially melted to form the silicic end-member. However, this model underestimates the compositional variations of the hydrothermally-altered basaltic crust. New data on U-Th disequilibria and O-isotopes in basalts and dacites from Askja volcano reveal a strong correlation between (230Th/232Th) and delta 18O. The 1875 AD dacite has the lowest Th- and O isotope ratios (0.94 and -0.24 per mille, respectively) whereas tephra of evolved basaltic composition, erupted 2 months earlier, has significantly higher values (1.03 and 2.8 per mille, respectively). Highest values are observed in the most recent basalts (erupted in 1920 and 1961) inside the Askja caldera complex and out on the associated fissure swarm (Sveinagja basalt). This correlation also holds for older magma such as an early Holocene dacites, which eruption may have been provoked by rapid glacier thinning. Silicic magmas at Askja volcano thus bear geochemical signatures that are best explained by partial melting of extensively hydrothermally altered crust and that the silicic magma source has remained constant during the Holocene at least. Once these silicic magmas are formed they appear to erupt rapidly rather than mixing and mingling with the incoming basalt heat-source that explains lack of icelandites and the bi-modal volcanism at Askja

  19. Molecular studies on di-sodium tartrate molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, P.; Jayakumar, S.; George, Preethamary; Shubashree, N. S.; Ahmed. M, Anees

    2015-06-01

    Structural characterization is important for the development of new material. The acoustical parameters such as Free Length, Internal Pressure have been measured from ultrasonic velocity, density for di sodium tartrate an optically active molecule at different temperatures using ultrasonic interferometer of frequency (2MHZ). The ultrasonic velocity increases with increase in concentration there is an increase in solute-solvent interaction. The stability constant had been calculated. SEM with EDAX studies has been done for Di-sodium tartrate an optically active molecule.

  20. Room temperature synthesis of Si-MCM-41 using polymeric version of ethyl silicate as a source of silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaydhankar, T.R.; Samuel, V.; Jha, R.K.; Kumar, R.; Joshi, P.N.

    2007-01-01

    Synthesis of mesoporous MCM-41 materials at room temperature using less expensive polymeric version of ethyl silicate (40 wt% SiO 2 ) as a source of silica was established. The influence of crucial synthesis parameters such as molar ratios of H 2 O/NH 4 OH, NH 4 OH/SiO 2 and CTMABr/SiO 2 in gel on the quality of the phase formed was investigated. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and low temperature N 2 adsorption-desorption isotherms have been employed to characterize the products. The magnitude of orderness, textural properties and thermal stability of the Si-MCM-41 samples prepared under identical judiciously pre-controlled synthesis conditions using ethyl silicate and conventional tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) were assessed. Even though, ethyl silicate has proved to be suitable source for the preparation of MCM-41 at room temperature, there exists an optimum value of H 2 O/NH 4 OH for different NH 4 OH/SiO 2 molar ratios in the gel. Changes in the morphology were observed when NH 4 OH/SiO 2 , H 2 O/NH 4 OH molar ratios in the gels were changed

  1. The effect of sage, sodium erythorbate and a mixture of sage and sodium erythorbate on the quality of turkey meatballs stored under vacuum and modified atmosphere conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpińska-Tymoszczyk, M

    2010-12-01

    1. The combined effect of sage (S), sodium erythorbate (SE), a mixture of sage and sodium erythorbate (MIX) and vacuum packaging (VP) and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on the quality of cooked turkey meatballs stored at 4°C was investigated. The physicochemical properties (colour, MDA, AV, pH, water activity), microbiological quality characteristics (counts of mesophilic and psychrotrophic bacteria, fungi, coliforms and Clostridium sp.) and flavour attributes of meatballs were determined. 2. The values of the colour parameters L*, a* and b* were affected by the additives and packaging method. The colour of meatballs was better protected by sodium erythorbate than by sage or a mixture of sage and sodium erythorbate. The additives effectively stabilised lipids against oxidation and slowed down hydrolytic changes in turkey meatballs. Sage and a mixture of sage and sodium erythorbate showed stronger antioxidant properties than sodium erythorbate added alone. Products with additives were characterised by better sensory quality than control samples. Sage and MIX prevented the growth of mesophilic and psychrotrophic bacteria. All additives inhibited the growth of coliforms. 3. MAP was more effective than VP in maintaining the microbial and sensory quality stability of cooked turkey meatballs. However, VP appears to be a better method as regards the maintaining of lipid stability in turkey meatballs.

  2. Study of chemical stability of lemon oil components in sodium caseinate-lactose glycoconjugate-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions using solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabik, Hassan; Achouri, Allaoua; Alfaro, Maria; Pelletier, Marylène; Belanger, Denis; Britten, Michel; Fustier, Patrick

    2014-07-25

    A headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method was developed to quantify lemon oil components and their degradation products in oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions prepared with sodium caseinate-heated-lactose (NaC-T + Lact) glycoconjugates as wall materials at two pH values (3.0 and 6.8). NaC-T + Lact conjugates had a significantly lower solubility at both pHs. Hydrolysis prior to glycation enhanced the solubility of glycoconjugates. Glycation with lactose did not improve the emulsion activity of NaC, while caseinate glycoconjugates showed much stronger antioxidant activity than the NaC-control sample. This might be due to the presence of melanoidins formed between the sugar and amino acid compounds as supported by the increase in browning intensity. Among the SPME-fibres tested, carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane (CAR/PDMS) provided better results in terms of sensitivity and selectivity for oil lemon components and their degradation products. Storage studies of these emulsions demonstrated that glycated NaC-T + Lact showed protection against peroxidation compared to the control. However, acidic pH conditions altered their stability over storage time. The major off-flavor components (α-terpineol and carvone) were inhibited in emulsions stabilized with glycated NaC, particularly at pH 6.8. The use of NaC-T + Lact conjugates showed improved encapsulation efficiency and stability and could be used as potential food ingredient-emulsifiers for stabilising citrus oils against oxidative degradation in food and beverage applications.

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Modified Epoxy Resins by Silicic Acid Tetraethyl Ester and Nano-SiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李海燕; 张之圣

    2004-01-01

    A kind of modified epoxy resins was obtained by condensation of epoxy resin with silicic acid tetraethyl ester(TEOS) and nano-SiO2. The reactions were performed with hydrochloric acid as a catalyst at 63 °C.The structure, thermal stability and morphological characteristics of the modified epoxy resins were studied through infrared spectra(FT-IR) analysis, thermogravimetric (TG) analysis and scanning electron microscopy respectively. It has been found from the IR and TG study that modified epoxy resins have greater thermal stability than epoxy resins, and its thermal stability has been improved by the formation of inter-crosslinked network structure. The modified epoxy resins exhibit heterogeneous morphology and heterogeneity increases with more TEOS feeding, which in turn confirms the formation of inter-crosslinked network structure in modified epoxy resins.

  4. Giant siliceous spicules from the deep-sea glass sponge Monorhaphis chuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2009-01-01

    Only 13 years after realizing, during a repair of a telegraph cable pulled out from the deep sea, that the depth of the ocean is plentifully populated with a highly diverse fauna and flora, the Challenger expedition (1873-1876) treasured up a rich collection of vitreous sponges (Hexactinellida). They had been described by Schulze and represent the phylogenetically oldest class of siliceous sponges (phylum Porifera); they are eye-catching because of their distinct body plan, which relies on a filigree skeleton. It is constructed by an array of morphologically determined elements, the spicules. Soon after, during the German Deep Sea Expedition "Valdivia" (1898-1899), Schulze could describe the largest siliceous hexactinellid sponge on Earth, the up to 3-m high Monorhaphis chuni, which develops the equally largest bio-silica structure, the giant basal spicules (3 mx10 mm). Using these spicules as a model, basic knowledge on the morphology, formation, and development of the skeletal elements could be achieved. They are formed by a proteinaceous scaffold (composed of a 27-kDa protein), which mediates the formation of the siliceous lamellae, into which the proteins are encased. The high number of 800 of 5-10 microm thick lamellae is concentrically arranged around the axial canal. The silica matrix is composed of almost pure silicon oxide, providing it with unusually optophysical properties, which are superior to those of man-made waveguides. Experiments might suggest that the spicules function in vivo as a nonocular photoreception system. In addition, the spicules have exceptional mechanical properties, combining mechanical stability with strength and stiffness. Like demosponges, also the hexactinellids synthesize their silica enzymatically, via the enzyme silicatein (27-kDa protein). It is suggested that these basic insights will surely contribute to a further applied utilization and exploration of silica in bio-material/biomedical science.

  5. Sodium Velocity Maps on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to measure two-dimensional maps of sodium velocities on the Mercury surface and examine the maps for evidence of sources or sinks of sodium on the surface. The McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope and the Stellar Spectrograph were used to measure Mercury spectra that were sampled at 7 milliAngstrom intervals. Observations were made each day during the period October 5-9, 2010. The dawn terminator was in view during that time. The velocity shift of the centroid of the Mercury emission line was measured relative to the solar sodium Fraunhofer line corrected for radial velocity of the Earth. The difference between the observed and calculated velocity shift was taken to be the velocity vector of the sodium relative to Earth. For each position of the spectrograph slit, a line of velocities across the planet was measured. Then, the spectrograph slit was stepped over the surface of Mercury at 1 arc second intervals. The position of Mercury was stabilized by an adaptive optics system. The collection of lines were assembled into an images of surface reflection, sodium emission intensities, and Earthward velocities over the surface of Mercury. The velocity map shows patches of higher velocity in the southern hemisphere, suggesting the existence of sodium sources there. The peak earthward velocity occurs in the equatorial region, and extends to the terminator. Since this was a dawn terminator, this might be an indication of dawn evaporation of sodium. Leblanc et al. (2008) have published a velocity map that is similar.

  6. Effects of diquafosol sodium eye drops on tear film stability in short BUT type of dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki-Den, Seika; Iseda, Hiroyuki; Dogru, Murat; Shimazaki, Jun

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the effects of diquafosol sodium (DQS) eye drops, a purinergic P2Y2 receptor agonist, on tear film stability in patients with unstable tear film (UTF). Two prospective studies were conducted. One was an exploratory nonrandomized trial on 39 eyes with dry eye symptoms and short tear film break-up time (BUT), but without epithelial damage. Changes in symptoms, BUT, Schirmer value, and ocular surface fluorescein staining (FS) scores were studied for 3 months. The other was a randomized clinical trial of DQS and artificial tears (AT) in 17 eyes with short BUT. Eyes with decreased Schirmer values (≤ 5 mm) were excluded. Changes in symptoms, BUT, FS scores, and tear film stability using continuous corneal topographic analysis were studied for 4 weeks. In the exploratory study, while Schirmer values were not significantly increased, significant improvements in symptoms and BUT were noted at both 1 and 3 months. In the randomized clinical trial, significant improvements in symptoms were noted in the DQS group, but not in the AT group, at 2 weeks. BUT was significantly prolonged in the DQS group at 4 weeks but not in the AT group. No significant changes were noted in FS scores or tear film stability. DQS improved subjective symptoms and prolonged BUT in eyes with UTF not associated with low tear secretion and ocular surface epithelial damage. Because many patients who have UTF are refractory to conventional treatments, DQS may offer benefits in the treatment of dry eyes.

  7. Synthesis, characterization and magnetic properties of a manganese (II) silicate containing frustrated S=5/2 zig–zag ladders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandão, P.; Santos, A.M. dos; Paixão, L.S.; Reis, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    The hydrothermal synthesis, structural characterization and magnetic properties of a manganese silicate with ideal formula of NaMn 2 Si 3 O 8 (OH) is reported. This compound is a synthetic analog to the naturally occurring mineral Serandite. The crystal structure comprises MnO 6 octahedra and SiO 4 tetrahedra. The MnO 6 share four edges with neighboring octahedra forming double chains. These chains are connected by silicate chains Si 3 O 8 (OH) resulting in an open framework structure with six-member ring channels where sodium ions are located. From the magnetic point of view, the intra-chain exchange between neighboring S=5/2 manganese ions is weak, partly due to the distortion observed in the octahedra, but also due to the frustrated topology of the chain. A successful fitting of the magnetic susceptibility was obtained by considering a double chain numerical model with Monte Carlo derived empirical parameters. -- Graphical abstract: A manganese silicate prepared hydrothermally with formula NaMn 2 Si 3 O 8 (OH) possessing the structure of the mineral Serandite contains doubled chains of edge-sharing MnO 6 octahedra. The magnetic susceptibility was measured and shows an antiferromagnetic behavior. Highlights: • Characterization of a synthetic analog to the mineral Serandite: NaMn 2 Si 3 O 8 (OH). • Fitting of the magnetic susceptibility considering a classical regular chain. • Weak metal–oxygen–metal super-exchange interactions; antiferromagnetic in nature. • Elevated degree of frustration along the chain, without sign of interchain ordering

  8. Development of antibacterial paper coated with sodium hyaluronate stabilized curcumin-Ag nanohybrid and chitosan via polyelectrolyte complexation for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao Kummara, Madhusudana; Kumar, Anuj; Soo, Han Sung

    2017-11-01

    Sodium hyaluronate (HA) stabilized curcumin-Ag (Cur-Ag) hybrid nanoparticles were prepared in the water-ethanol mixture under constant mechanical stirring condition. The obtained HA stabilized Cur-Ag hybrid nanoparticles were characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction to confirm the formation and structural interactions. The obtained Cur-Ag hybrid nanoparticles showed spherical shape with their size range 5-12 nm that was increased with the increasing a amount of silver ions as confirmed by transmission electron microscopic analysis. Further, a fibrous cellulose filter paper was impregnated with these hybrid nanoparticles and chitosan (CS) as biopolymer via polyelectrolyte complexation. The morphological analysis confirmed the uniform distribution of hybrid nanoparticle system onto the cellulose fibers of the fibrous filter paper. As per disc diffusion method, the Cur-Ag hybrid nanoparticles impregnated CS-coated filter paper exhibited excellent antibacterial properties against gram-negative Escherichia coli (E.coli) bacteria compared to HA stabilized Cur only. Moreover, as prepared hybrid nanoparticles impregnated biocomposite system is eco-friendly with efficient antibacterial property and have good potential to be used in medical applications.

  9. Structure and properties of polymer-silicate nanocomposites based on polytetrafluoroethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sleptsova, Sardana A.; Okhlopkova, Aitalina A. [North-Eastern Federal University, Yakutsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-01

    The results of physicomechanical, tribological , and structural investigation of polytetrafluoroethylene based polymers and natural layered silicates are reported. It is shown that the tribological behaviour of the composites can be significantly improved by introducing a small amount of activated silicates. The results of structural examination of the composite friction surfaces by scanning-probe microscopy and IR spectroscopy are discussed. Key words: polytetrafluoroethylene, layered silicates, wear resistance, friction coefficient, structure, IR-spectrum.

  10. Dendrite-Free Sodium-Metal Anodes for High-Energy Sodium-Metal Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bing; Li, Peng; Zhang, Jinqiang; Wang, Dan; Munroe, Paul; Wang, Chengyin; Notten, Peter H L; Wang, Guoxiu

    2018-05-31

    Sodium (Na) metal is one of the most promising electrode materials for next-generation low-cost rechargeable batteries. However, the challenges caused by dendrite growth on Na metal anodes restrict practical applications of rechargeable Na metal batteries. Herein, a nitrogen and sulfur co-doped carbon nanotube (NSCNT) paper is used as the interlayer to control Na nucleation behavior and suppress the Na dendrite growth. The N- and S-containing functional groups on the carbon nanotubes induce the NSCNTs to be highly "sodiophilic," which can guide the initial Na nucleation and direct Na to distribute uniformly on the NSCNT paper. As a result, the Na-metal-based anode (Na/NSCNT anode) exhibits a dendrite-free morphology during repeated Na plating and striping and excellent cycling stability. As a proof of concept, it is also demonstrated that the electrochemical performance of sodium-oxygen (Na-O 2 ) batteries using the Na/NSCNT anodes show significantly improved cycling performances compared with Na-O 2 batteries with bare Na metal anodes. This work opens a new avenue for the development of next-generation high-energy-density sodium-metal batteries. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Silicon K-edge XANES spectra of silicate minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dien; Bancroft, G. M.; Fleet, M. E.; Feng, X. H.

    1995-03-01

    Silicon K-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra of a selection of silicate and aluminosilicate minerals have been measured using synchrotron radiation (SR). The spectra are qualitatively interpreted based on MO calculation of the tetrahedral SiO{4/4-}cluster. The Si K-edge generally shifts to higher energy with increased polymerization of silicates by about 1.3 eV, but with considerable overlap for silicates of different polymerization types. The substitution of Al for Si shifts the Si K-edge to lower energy. The chemical shift of Si K-edge is also sensitive to cations in more distant atom shells; for example, the Si K-edge shifts to lower energy with the substitution of Al for Mg in octahedral sites. The shifts of the Si K-edge show weak correlation with average Si-O bond distance (dSi-O), Si-O bond valence (sSi-O) and distortion of SiO4 tetrahedra, due to the crystal structure complexity of silicate minerals and multiple factors effecting the x-ray absorption processes.

  12. First principle study of sodium decorated graphyne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Utpal, E-mail: utpalchemiitkgp@yahoo.com [Assam University, Silchar (India); Bhattacharya, Barnali [Assam University, Silchar (India); Seriani, Nicola [The Abdus Salam ICTP, Trieste (Italy)

    2015-11-05

    Highlights: • Presence of Na decreases the stability of the system. • Na-decorated graphyne compounds are metallic and might be used in electronics. • The sodium-adsorbed graphyne can be used as electrodes in Na-ion battery. - Abstract: We present first-principles calculations of the electronic properties of Na-decorated graphyne. This structure of the graphyne family is a direct band gap semiconductor with a band gap of 0.44 eV in absence of sodium, but Na-decorated graphyne compounds are metallic, and can then be employed as carbon-based conductors. Metallization is due to charge donation from sodium to carbon. Pristine graphyne is more stable than Na-decorated graphyne, therefore is seems probable that, if this material should be employed as electrode in Na-ion batteries, it would lead to the formation of metallic sodium rather than well dispersed sodium ions. On the other side, this property might be useful if graphyne is employed in water desalination. Finally, the abrupt change from a semiconducting to a metallic state in presence of a small amount of sodium might be exploited in electronics, e.g. for the production of smooth metal–semiconductor interfaces through spatially selective deposition of sodium.

  13. Mitigating the effect of siloxanes on internal combustion engines using landfill gasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besmann, Theodore M

    2014-01-21

    A waste gas combustion method that includes providing a combustible fuel source, in which the combustible fuel source is composed of at least methane and siloxane gas. A sodium source or magnesium source is mixed with the combustible fuel source. Combustion of the siloxane gas of the combustible fuel source produces a silicon containing product. The sodium source or magnesium source reacts with the silicon containing product to provide a sodium containing glass or sodium containing silicate, or a magnesium containing silicate. By producing the sodium containing glass or sodium containing silicate, or the magnesium containing silicate, or magnesium source for precipitating particulate silica instead of hard coating, the method may reduce or eliminate the formation of silica deposits within the combustion chamber and the exhaust components of the internal combustion engine.

  14. Sodium hydrazinidoborane: a chemical hydrogen-storage material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moury, Romain; Demirci, Umit B; Ichikawa, Takayuki; Filinchuk, Yaroslav; Chiriac, Rodica; van der Lee, Arie; Miele, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Herein, we present the successful synthesis and full characterization (by (11) B magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction) of sodium hydrazinidoborane (NaN2 H3 BH3 , with a hydrogen content of 8.85 wt %), a new material for chemical hydrogen storage. Using lab-prepared pure hydrazine borane (N2 H4 BH3 ) and commercial sodium hydride as precursors, sodium hydrazinidoborane was synthesized by ball-milling at low temperature (-30 °C) under an argon atmosphere. Its thermal stability was assessed by thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. It was found that under heating sodium hydrazinidoborane starts to liberate hydrogen below 60 °C. Within the range of 60-150 °C, the overall mass loss is as high as 7.6 wt %. Relative to the parent N2 H4 BH3 , sodium hydrazinidoborane shows improved dehydrogenation properties, further confirmed by dehydrogenation experiments under prolonged heating at constant temperatures of 80, 90, 95, 100, and 110 °C. Hence, sodium hydrazinidoborane appears to be more suitable for chemical hydrogen storage than N2 H4 BH3 . Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Annual report 1974. Sodium technology development programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The sodium technology development program comprises a number of separate research programs in the field of designing and testing parts and components for the SNR-300 reactor. Design studies and theoretical studies on cold trapping and the behavior of hydrogen in sodium circuits are reported. A preliminary test program for fighting sodium fires is completed. Results of research done on vibration measurements and counter-current mixing in a dummy tube bundle of a S.N.R. spiralized steam generator with counter-current flow are reported briefly. Research done in the field of heat transfer, pressure drop and bubble dynamics of a straight pipe steam generator are also briefly reported. To determine the influence of spiral diameter of the spiralized pipe on heat transfer in a spiralized pipe heat exchanger, a second testsection will be built in 1975. Research was reported on pump viscoseals, bearing stability, rotordynamics and bearing materials for sodium pumps. Research done on the properties of SNR-construction materials at high temperature and long time exposure and corrosion in sodium are reported. Fundamental research on corrosion accompanied this research. The report closes with results of weldability, mechanized-welding and remote welding of sodium-wetted surfaces

  16. Lead-silicate glass optical microbubble resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Pengfei, E-mail: pengfei.wang@dit.ie [Photonics Research Centre, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin Street, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Ward, Jonathan; Yang, Yong; Chormaic, Síle Nic [Light-Matter Interactions Unit, OIST Graduate University, 1919-1 Tancha, Onna-son, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan); Feng, Xian; Brambilla, Gilberto [Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Farrell, Gerald [Photonics Research Centre, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin Street, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2015-02-09

    Microbubble whispering gallery resonators have the potential to become key components in a variety of active and passive photonic circuit devices by offering a range of significant functionalities. Here, we report on the fabrication, optical characterization, and theoretical analysis of lead-silicate glass and optical microbubble resonators. Evanescent field coupling to the microbubbles was achieved using a 1 μm diameter, silica microfiber at a wavelength of circa 775 nm. High Q-factor modes were efficiently excited in both single-stem and two-stem, lead-silicate glass, and microbubble resonators, with bubble diameters of 38 μm (single-stem) and 48 μm (two-stem). Whispering gallery mode resonances with Q-factors as high as 2.3 × 10{sup 5} (single-stem) and 7 × 10{sup 6} (two-stem) were observed. By exploiting the high-nonlinearity of the lead-silicate glass, this work will act as a catalyst for studying a range of nonlinear optical effects in microbubbles, such as Raman scattering and four-wave mixing, at low optical powers.

  17. I-Xe dating of silicate and troilite from IAB iron meteorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemeyer, S.

    1979-01-01

    Silicate and troilite (FeS) from IAB irons were analyzed by the I-Xe technique. Four IAB silicate samples gave well-defined I-Xe ages [in millions of years relative to Bjurbole: - 3.7 +- 0.3 for Woodbine, -0.7 +- 0.6 for Mundrabilla, + 1.4 +- 0.7 for Copiapo, and +2.6 +- 0.6 for Landes. The ( 129 Xe/ 132 Xe)sub(trapped) ratios are consistent with previous values for chondrites, with the exception of Landes which has an extraordinary trapped ratio of 3.5 +- 0.2. Both analyses of silicate from Pitts gave anomalous I-Xe patterns. Troilite samples were also analyzed: Pitts troilite gave a complex I-Xe pattern, which suggests an age of +17 Myr; Mundrabilla troilite defined a good I-Xe correlation, which after correction for neutron capture on 128 Te gave an age of -10.8 +- 0.7 Myr. Thus, low-melting troilite predates high-melting silicate in Mundrabilla. Abundances of Ga, Ge, and Ni in metal from these meteorites are correlated with I-Xe ages of the silicate; meteorites with older silicates have greater Ni contents. No model easily accounts for this result as well as other properties of IAB irons; nevertheless, these results, taken at face value, favour a nebular formation model. The great age of troilite from Mundrabilla suggests that this troilite formed in a different nebular region from the silicate and metal, and was later mechanically mixed with these other phases. The correlation between the trace elements in the metal and the I-Xe ages of the silicate provides one of the first known instances in which another well-defined meteoritic property correlates with I-Xe ages. In addition, almost all the 129 Xe in Mundrabilla silicate (etched in acid) was correlated with 128 Xe. These two results further support the validity of the I-Xe dating method. (author)

  18. On the Relation of Silicates and SiO Maser in Evolved Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jiaming; Jiang, Biwei, E-mail: bjiang@bnu.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2017-04-01

    The SiO molecule is one of the candidates for the seed of silicate dust in the circumstellar envelope of evolved stars, but this opinion is challenged. In this work we investigate the relation of the SiO maser emission power and the silicate dust emission power. With both our own observation by using the PMO/Delingha 13.7 m telescope and archive data, a sample is assembled of 21 SiO v  = 1, J  = 2 − 1 sources and 28 SiO v  = 1, J  = 1 − 0 sources that exhibit silicate emission features in the ISO /SWS spectrum as well. The analysis of their SiO maser and silicate emission power indicates a clear correlation, which is not against the hypothesis that the SiO molecules are the seed nuclei of silicate dust. On the other hand, no correlation is found between SiO maser and silicate crystallinity, which may imply that silicate crystallinity does not correlate with mass-loss rate.

  19. Long term thermal energy storage with stable supercooled sodium acetate trihydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dannemand, Mark; Schultz, Jørgen M.; Johansen, Jakob Berg

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing stable supercooling of sodium acetate trihydrate makes it possible to store thermal energy partly loss free. This principle makes seasonal heat storage in compact systems possible. To keep high and stable energy content and cycling stability phase separation of the storage material must...... it expands and will cause a pressure built up in a closed chamber which might compromise stability of the supercooling. This can be avoided by having an air volume above the phase change material connected to an external pressure less expansion tank. Supercooled sodium acetate trihydrate at 20 °C stores up...

  20. Immobilization of myoglobin in sodium alginate composite membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Cecília de Souza Figueiredo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe immobilization of myoglobin in sodium alginate films was investigated with the aim of evaluating the protein stability in an ionic polymeric matrix. Myoglobin was chosen due to the resemblance to each hemoglobin tetramer. Sodium alginate, being a natural polysaccharide, was selected as the polymeric matrix because of its chemical structure and film-forming ability. To improve the mechanical resistance of sodium alginate films, the polymer was deposited over the surface of a cellulose acetate support by means of ultrafiltration. The ionic crosslink of sodium alginate was investigated by calcium ions. Composite membrane characterization comprised water swelling tests, water flux, SEM images and UV-visible spectroscopy. The electrostatic interaction between the protein and the polysaccharide did not damage the UV-visible pattern of native myoglobin. A good affinity between sodium alginate and cellulose acetate was observed. The top layer of the dense composite membrane successfully immobilized Myoglobin, retaining the native UV-visible pattern for two months.

  1. Composition characteristics and regularities of dissolving of hydroxyapatite materials obtained in water solutions with varied content of silicate ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solonenko, A. P.

    2018-01-01

    Research aimed at developing new bioactive materials for the repair of defects in bone tissues, do not lose relevance due to the strengthening of the regenerative approach in medicine. From this point of view, materials based on calcium phosphates, including silicate ions, consider as one of the most promising group of substances. Methods of synthesis and properties of hydroxyapatite doped with various amounts of SiO4 4- ions are described in literature. In the present work synthesis of a solid phase in the systems Ca(NO3)2 - (NH4)2HPO4 - Na2SiO3 - NH4OH - H2O (Cca/CP = 1.70) performed with a wide range of sodium silicate additive concentration (y = CSi/CP = 0 ÷ 5). It is established that under the studied conditions at y ≥ 0.3 highly dispersed poorly crystallized apatite containing isomorphic impurities of CO3 2- and SiO4 4- precipitates in a mixture with calcium hydrosilicate and SiO2. It is shown that the resulting composites can gradually dissolve in physiological solution and initiate passive formation of the mineral component of hard tissues.

  2. EFFECT OF SILICATE ON GRAM STAINING AND VIABILITY OF PNEUMOCOCCI AND OTHER BACTERIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Colin M.; Roe, Amy S.

    1956-01-01

    Application of silicate solutions to living or heat-killed pneumococci and to certain "viridans" streptococci causes their conversion from a Gram-positive to a Gram-negative state. The original staining properties can be restored by suspending the silicate-treated bacteria in alkaline solutions of various salts but not by simple washing in water. Living pneumococci and the strains of streptococci whose staining properties are similarly affected are killed when suspended in silicate solutions. In other Gram-positive species silicate causes conversion to Gram negativity but restoration to positivity occurs upon washing in water. In a third group of Gram-positive organisms silicate has no effect on the Gram reaction. The viability of organisms in these two groups is unaffected by silicate under the conditions employed. No effect on staining or viability of Gram-negative bacteria has been observed. The effects of silicate on staining and viability are inhibited by nutrient broth or whole serum but not by purified serum albumin. Lecithin, choline, and other substituted ammonium compounds also inhibit the effects of silicate on pneumococci. PMID:13306854

  3. Off-label use of sodium valproate for schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einav Horowitz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Off-label use of a drug not according to its regulatory labeling has become common in medicine, especially in the field of psychiatry. Mood stabilizers are intended to be used to attenuate mood fluctuations in bipolar disorder, but their use has spread to patients with schizophrenia, as it provides greater control of impulsivity and aggressiveness. Sodium valproate is one of the most frequently used mood stabilizers in psychiatry. This study determined the prevalence of off-label use of sodium valproate for schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder in Abarbanel Psychiatric Hospital and the demographic and clinical characteristics associated with its use. METHODS: Retrospective study of patients hospitalized in 2011-2012 with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder in one of three general psychiatric wards. RESULTS: Valproate use was significantly lower in the geriatric group (11.6% vs. 20.1%, chi square  = 4.7, p = .03, in patients with schizophrenia (14.1% vs. schizoaffective disorder (35.2%, chi square  = 29, p<.001 and in patients receiving both atypical and typical antipsychotics (23.3% vs. 16.4%, p = .04. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, diagnosis and the combination of atypical and typical antipsychotics predicted the use of sodium valproate. The number of other medications prescribed did not predict sodium valproate use. CONCLUSIONS: Off-label use of sodium valproate in psychiatric patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder is extensive, especially in younger patients and those with schizoaffective disorder. More research is needed to determine whether it is being prescribed appropriately.

  4. Carbonation of metal silicates for long-term CO2 sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blencoe, James G; Palmer, Donald A; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Beard, James S

    2014-03-18

    In a preferred embodiment, the invention relates to a process of sequestering carbon dioxide. The process comprises the steps of: (a) reacting a metal silicate with a caustic alkali-metal hydroxide to produce a hydroxide of the metal formerly contained in the silicate; (b) reacting carbon dioxide with at least one of a caustic alkali-metal hydroxide and an alkali-metal silicate to produce at least one of an alkali-metal carbonate and an alkali-metal bicarbonate; and (c) reacting the metal hydroxide product of step (a) with at least one of the alkali-metal carbonate and the alkali-metal bicarbonate produced in step (b) to produce a carbonate of the metal formerly contained in the metal silicate of step (a).

  5. Synthesis, Structure, and Sodium Mobility of Sodium Vanadium Nitridophosphate: A Zero-Strain and Safe High Voltage Cathode Material for Sodium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Herein, the nitridophosphate Na3V(PO33N is synthesized by solid state method. X-ray diffraction (XRD and Rietveld refinement confirm the cubic symmetry with P213 space group. The material exhibits very good thermal stability and high operating voltage of 4.0 V vs. Na/Na+ due to V3+/V4+ redox couple. In situ X-ray diffraction studies confirm the two-phase (de-sodiation process to occur with very low volume changes. The refinement of the sodium occupancies reveal the low accessibility of sodium cations in the Na2 and Na3 sites as the main origin for the lower experimental capacity (0.38 eq. Na+, 28 mAh g−1 versus the theoretical one (1.0 eq. Na+, 74 mAh g−1. These observations provide valuable information for the further optimization of this materials class in order to access their theoretical electrochemical performance as a potentially interesting zero-strain and safe high-voltage cathode material for sodium-ion batteries.

  6. Viscosity of Heterogeneous Silicate Melts: A Non-Newtonian Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuangzhuang; Blanpain, Bart; Guo, Muxing

    2017-12-01

    The recently published viscosity data of heterogeneous silicate melts with well-documented structure and experimental conditions are critically re-analyzed and tabulated. By using these data, a non-Newtonian viscosity model incorporating solid fraction, solid shape, and shear rate is proposed on the basis of the power-law equation. This model allows calculating the viscosity of the heterogeneous silicate melts with solid fraction up to 34 vol pct. The error between the calculated and measured data is evaluated to be 32 pct, which is acceptable considering the large error in viscosity measurement of the completely liquid silicate melt.

  7. Decomposition of pre calcined aluminium silicate ores of Afghanistan by hydrochloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khomidi, A.K.; Mamatov, E.D.

    2015-01-01

    Present article is devoted to decomposition of pre calcined aluminium silicate ores of Afghanistan by hydrochloric acid. The physicochemical properties of initial aluminium silicate ores were studied by means of X-ray phase, differential thermal and silicate analysis. The chemical composition of aluminium containing ores was determined. The optimal conditions of interaction of initial and pre calcined siallites with hydrochloric acid were defined. The kinetics of acid decomposition of aluminium silicate ores was studied as well.

  8. Influence of sodium content on the properties of bioactive glasses for use in air abrasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, Imran; Brauer, Delia S; Hill, Robert G; Tylkowski, Maxi; Müller, Steffen; Janicki, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Air abrasion is used in minimally invasive dentistry for preparing cavities, while removing no or little sound dentine or enamel, and the use of bioactive glass (rather than alumina) as an abrasive could aid in tooth remineralization. Melt-derived bioactive glasses (SiO 2 –P 2 O 5 –CaO–CaF 2 –Na 2 O) with low sodium content (0 to 10 mol% Na 2 O in exchange for CaO) for increased hardness, high phosphate content for high bioactivity and fluoride content for release of fluoride and formation of fluorapatite were produced, and particles between 38 and 80 µm in size were used for cutting soda-lime silicate glass microscope slides and human enamel. Vickers hardness increased with decreasing Na 2 O content, owing to a more compact silicate network in low sodium content glasses, resulting in shorter cutting times. Cutting times using bioactive glass were significantly longer than using the alumina control (29 µm) when tested on microscope slides; however, glasses showed more comparable results when cutting human enamel. The bioactive glasses formed apatite in Tris buffer within 6 h, which was significantly faster than Bioglass® 45S5 (24 h), suggesting that the hardness of the glasses makes them suitable for air abrasion application, while their high bioactivity and fluoride content make them of interest for tooth remineralization. (paper)

  9. NIM gas controlled sodium heat pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X.; Zhang, J. T.; Merlone, A.; Duan, Y.; Wang, W.

    2013-09-01

    Gas controlled heat pipes (GCHPs) provide a uniform, stable and reproducible temperature zone to calibrate thermometers and thermocouples, and to realize defining fixed points using a calorimetric method. Therefore, to perform such investigations, a GCHP furnace using sodium as its working fluid was constructed at the National Institute of Metrology (NIM), China. Also, investigations into the thermal characteristics of the NIM gas controlled sodium heat pipe were carried out. The temperature stability over 5 hours was better than ±0.25 mK while controlling the pressure at 111250 Pa. The temperature uniformity within 14 cm from the bottom of the thermometer well was within 0.3 mK. While keeping the pressure stable at the same value, 17 temperature determinations were performed over 14 days, obtaining a temperature reproducibility of 1.27 mK. Additionally, the NIM gas controlled sodium heat pipe was compared with the sodium heat pipe produced by INRiM. The temperature in the INRiM sodium heat pipe operating at 111250 Pa was determined, obtaining a difference of 21 mK with respect to the NIM GCHP. This difference was attributed to sodium impurities, pressure controller capabilities and reproducibility, and instabilities of high temperature standard platinum resistance thermometers (HTSPRTs). Further investigations will be carried out on extending the pressure/temperature range and connecting both GCHPs to the same pressure line.

  10. Investigation of Thermal Stability of P2-NaxCoO2 Cathode Materials for Sodium Ion Batteries Using Real-Time Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sooyeon; Lee, Yongho; Jo, Eunmi; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Choi, Wonchang; Kim, Seung Min; Chang, Wonyoung

    2017-06-07

    Here, we take advantage of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate the thermal stability of P2-type Na x CoO 2 cathode materials for sodium ion batteries, which are promising candidates for next-generation lithium ion batteries. A double-tilt TEM heating holder was used to directly characterize the changes in the morphology and the crystallographic and electronic structures of the materials with increase in temperature. The electron diffraction patterns and the electron energy loss spectra demonstrated the presence of cobalt oxides (Co 3 O 4 , CoO) and even metallic cobalt (Co) at higher temperatures as a result of reduction of Co ions and loss of oxygen. The bright-field TEM images revealed that the surface of Na x CoO 2 becomes porous at high temperatures. Higher cutoff voltages result in degrading thermal stability of Na x CoO 2 . The observations herein provide a valuable insight that thermal stability is one of the important factors to be considered in addition to the electrochemical properties when developing new electrode materials for novel battery systems.

  11. SILICATE EVOLUTION IN BROWN DWARF DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riaz, B.

    2009-01-01

    We present a compositional analysis of the 10 μm silicate spectra for brown dwarf disks in the Taurus and Upper Scorpius (UppSco) star-forming regions, using archival Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph observations. A variety in the silicate features is observed, ranging from a narrow profile with a peak at 9.8 μm, to nearly flat, low-contrast features. For most objects, we find nearly equal fractions for the large-grain and crystalline mass fractions, indicating both processes to be active in these disks. The median crystalline mass fraction for the Taurus brown dwarfs is found to be 20%, a factor of ∼2 higher than the median reported for the higher mass stars in Taurus. The large-grain mass fractions are found to increase with an increasing strength in the X-ray emission, while the opposite trend is observed for the crystalline mass fractions. A small 5% of the Taurus brown dwarfs are still found to be dominated by pristine interstellar medium-like dust, with an amorphous submicron grain mass fraction of ∼87%. For 15% of the objects, we find a negligible large-grain mass fraction, but a >60% small amorphous silicate fraction. These may be the cases where substantial grain growth and dust sedimentation have occurred in the disks, resulting in a high fraction of amorphous submicron grains in the disk surface. Among the UppSco brown dwarfs, only usd161939 has a signal-to-noise ratio high enough to properly model its silicate spectrum. We find a 74% small amorphous grain and a ∼26% crystalline mass fraction for this object.

  12. Isolation and stabilization of dark red food dye from beta vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisa, A.U.; Firdous, S.; Ijaz, N.

    2006-01-01

    Natural highly coloured dark red pigment was isolated from Beta vulgaris. In paste and powdered form. Total colouring matter of the concentrated colour was 1.86% and 4.5%, respectively, for the paste and powdered forms, calculated as betanine. Sodium benzoate (0.01%) was used as the stabilizer for paste, while silicon dioxide (2%) was added in addition to sodium benzoate (0.01%) for storage of the red colour in powdered form. Other parameters that may influence the stability of the colour, such as pH temperature and relative humidity, were studied. Toxicity evaluation, and lead and arsenic levels were determined. The addition of stabilizers, like citric acid, ascorbic acid, EDTA and sodium chloride, were also investigated, none of which showed useful effect. (author)

  13. I-Xe dating of silicate and troilite from IAB iron meteorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemeyer, S.

    1978-01-01

    The IAB iron meteorites may be related to the chondrites; siderophile elements in the metal matrix have chondritic abundances, and the abundant silicate inclusions are chondritic both in mineralogy and in chemical composition. Silicate and troilite (FeS) and IAB irons were analyzed by the I-Xe technique. Four IAB silicate samples gave well-defined I-Xe ages [in millions of years relative to Bjurboele; the monitor error (+-2.5 m.y.) is not included]: -3.7 +- 0.3 for Woodbine, -0.7 +- 0.6 for Mundrabilla, +1.4 +- 0.7 for Copiapo, and +2.6 +- 0.6 for Landes. The ( 129 Xe/ 132 Xe)/sub trapped/ ratios are consistent with previous values for chondrites, with the exception of Landes which has an extraordinary trapped ratio of 3.5 +- 0.2. Both analyses of silicate from Pitts gave anomalous I-Xe patterns: intermediate-temperature points defined good correlations but higher-temperature (greater than or equal to 1400 0 C) points lay above (extra 129 Xe) these lines. The two correlations have different slopes, so it cannot be assigned a definite I-Xe age to Pitts silicate. Troilite samples from Mundrabilla and Pitts were also analyzed: Pitts troilite gave a complex I-Xe pattern, which suggests an age of +17 m.y.; Mundrabilla troilite defined a good I-Xe correlation, which after correction for neutron capture on 128 Te an age of -10.8 +- 0.7 m.y. Thus, surprisingly, low-melting troilite substantially predates high-melting silicate in Mundrabilla. Abundances of Ga, Ge, and Ni in metal from these meteorites are correlated with I-Xe ages of the silicate (referred to henceforth as the metal-silicate correlation). After exploring possible relationships between the I-Xe ages and other properties of the IAB group, it was concluded that the metal-silicate correlation, the old Mundrabilla troilite, and other results favor a nebular formation model (e.g. Wasson, 1970a)

  14. Production of a calcium silicate cement material from alginate impression material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washizawa, Norimasa; Narusawa, Hideaki; Tamaki, Yukimichi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize biomaterials from daily dental waste. Since alginate impression material contains silica and calcium salts, we aimed to synthesize calcium silicate cement from alginate impression material. Gypsum-based investment material was also investigated as control. X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that although firing the set gypsum-based and modified investment materials at 1,200°C produced calcium silicates, firing the set alginate impression material did not. However, we succeeded when firing the set blend of pre-fired set alginate impression material and gypsum at 1,200°C. SEM observations of the powder revealed that the featured porous structures of diatomite as an alginate impression material component appeared useful for synthesizing calcium silicates. Experimentally fabricated calcium silicate powder was successfully mixed with phosphoric acid solution and set by depositing the brushite. Therefore, we conclude that the production of calcium silicate cement material is possible from waste alginate impression material.

  15. Form-stable LiNO_3–NaNO_3–KNO_3–Ca(NO_3)_2/calcium silicate composite phase change material (PCM) for mid-low temperature thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Zhu; Leng, Guanghui; Ye, Feng; Ge, Zhiwei; Liu, Chuanping; Wang, Li; Huang, Yun; Ding, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The figure (a) displays the microstructure of calcium silicate and the inset figure is the LiNO_3–NaNO_3–KNO_3–Ca(NO_3)_2/calcium silicate composite PCM. Calcium silicate is used as a porous skeleton material which could absorb large amounts of the nitrate PCM in voids and prevent the PCM from leakage during phase change process. Figure (b) shows the heat capacity of the composite PCM and the inset figure is the DSC curve of the composite. It indicates that this composite has a low melting point (103.5 °C) and good energy storage property. Based on the novel LiNO_3–NaNO_3–KNO_3–Ca(NO_3)_2/calcium silicate composite PCM, this work involves fabrication process, thermal and microstructural characterization, and chemical and physical stability measurements. - Highlights: • A novel LiNO_3–NaNO_3–KNO_3–Ca(NO_3)_2/calcium silicate composite PCM was prepared. • It has a low melting point (103.5 °C) and could remain stable until 585.5 °C. • It could keep form-stable without leakage during phase change process. • Thermal conductivity of the composite PCM reaches up to 1.177 W m"−"1 K"−"1. • It shows good thermal reliability after 1000 times heating and cooling cycling. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel form-stable LiNO_3–NaNO_3–KNO_3–Ca(NO_3)_2/calcium silicate composite PCM was developed by cold compression and sintering. The eutectic quaternary nitrate is used as PCM, while calcium silicate is used as structural supporting material. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) shows the PCM and the supporting material have good chemical compatibility. This composite PCM has a low melting point (103.5 °C) and remain stable without decomposition until 585.5 °C. Moreover, this composite shows excellent long term stability after 1000 melting and freezing cycles. Thermal conductivity of the composite was measured to be 1.177 W m"−"1 K"−"1, and that could be increased by adding thermal conductivity enhancers into the composite

  16. Potassium Silicate Foliar Fertilizer Grade from Geothermal Sludge and Pyrophyllite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muljani Srie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Potassium silicate fertilizer grade were successfully produced by direct fusion of silica (SiO2 and potasium (KOH and K2CO3 in furnaces at temperatures up to melting point of mixture. The geothermal sludge (98% SiO2 and the pyrophyllite (95% SiO2 were used as silica sources. The purposes of the study was to synthesise potassium silicate fertilizer grade having solids concentrations in the range of 31-37% K2O, and silica in the range of 48-54% SiO2. The weight ratio of silicon dioxide/potasium solid being 1:1 to 5:1. Silica from geothermal sludge is amorphous, whereas pyrophylite is crystalline phase. The results showed that the amount of raw materials needed to get the appropriate molar ratio of potassium silicate fertilizer grade are different, as well as the fusion temperature of the furnace. Potassium silicate prepared from potassium hydroxide and geothermal sludge produced a low molar ratio (2.5: 1 to 3: 1. The potassium required quite small (4:1 in weight ratio, and on a fusion temperature of about 900 °C. Meanwhile, the potassium silicate prepared from pyrophyllite produced a high molar ratio (1.4 - 9.4 and on a fusion temperature of about 1350 °C, so that potassium needed large enough to meet the required molar ratio for the fertilizer grade. The product potassium silicate solid is amorphous with a little trace of crystalline.

  17. [Stabilization and long-term effect of chromium contaminated soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Luo, Qi-Shi; Zhang, Chang-Bo; Tan, Liang; Li, Xu

    2013-10-01

    Short-term (3 d and 28 d) and long-term (1 a) stabilization effects of Cr contaminated soil were investigated through nature curing, using four amendments including ferrous sulfide, ferrous sulfate, zero-valent iron and sodium dithionite. The results indicated that ferrous sulfide and zero-valent iron were not helpful for the stabilization of Cr(VI) when directly used because of their poor solubility and immobility. Ferrous sulfate could effectively and rapidly decrease total leaching Cr and Cr(VI) content. The stabilization effect was further promoted by the generation of iron hydroxides after long-term curing. Sodium dithionite also had positive effect on soil stabilization. Appropriate addition ratio of the two chemicals could help maintain the soil pH in range of 6-8.

  18. A new inexpensive electrochemical meter for oxygen in sodium coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Periaswami, G.; Rajan Babu, S.S.; Mathews, C.K.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the development of an inexpensive oxygen meter for sodium coolant and gives the results of the test experiments. Calcia stabilized zirconia has been found to have necessary domain boundary characteristics at low temperatures for use as oxygen sensor in liquid sodium system. It is possible to obtain acceptable sensor cell resistance at temperatures as low as 230 C if K, K 2 O or Na, Na 2 O is used as reference electrode. The performance of these cells has been tested in bench top sodium loops over long periods. Their performance in terms of cell-out put variation with change in oxygen concentration in sodium has been found to be satisfactory. They also have sufficiently long life times since the kinetics of sodium attack on the electrolyte is slow at low temperatures. (author). 17 refs., 6 figs

  19. Controlled structure and properties of silicate nanoparticle networks for incorporation of biosystem components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Kawanishi, Toru; Hasegawa, Toshiaki; Takaoka, Akio; Kato, Masaru; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa; Utsunomiya-Tate, Naoko

    2011-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles are of technological interest in many fields. We created silicate nanoparticle hydrogels that effectively incorporated biomolecules that are unstable and involved in complicated reactions. The size of the silicate nanoparticles strongly affected both the physical characteristics of the resulting hydrogel and the activity of biomolecules incorporated within the hydrogel. We used high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to analyze in detail the hydrogel network patterns formed by the silicate nanoparticles. We obtained clear nanostructured images of biomolecule-nanoparticle composite hydrogels. The TEM images also showed that larger silicate nanoparticles (22 nm) formed more loosely associated silicate networks than did smaller silicate nanoparticles (7 nm). The loosely associated networks formed from larger silicate nanoparticles might facilitate substrate diffusion through the network, thus promoting the observed increased activity of the entrapped biomolecules. This doubled the activity of the incorporated biosystems compared with that of biosystems prepared by our own previously reported method. We propose a reaction scheme to explain the formation of the silicate nanoparticle networks. The successful incorporation of biomolecules into the nanoparticle hydrogels, along with the high level of activity exhibited by the biomolecules required for complicated reaction within the gels, demonstrates the nanocomposites' potential for use in medical applications.

  20. Identification of an Extremely 180-Rich Presolar Silicate Grain in Acfer 094

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Messenger, S.

    2009-01-01

    Presolar silicate grains have been abundantly identified since their first discovery less than a decade ago [1,2,3]. The O isotopic compositions of both silicate and oxide stardust indicate the vast majority (>90%) condensed around Orich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Though both presolar phases have average sizes of 300 nm, grains larger than 1 m are extremely uncommon for presolar silicates. Thus, while numerous isotopic systems have been measured in presolar oxide grains [4], very few isotopic analyses for presolar silicates exist outside of O and Si [2,5]. And still, these measurements suffer from isotopic dilution with surrounding matrix material [6]. We conduct a search for presolar silicates in the primitive carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094 and in some cases obtain high spatial resolution, high precision isotopic ratios.

  1. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.; Chae, S. R.; Benmore, C. J.; Wenk, H. R.; Monteiro, P. J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  2. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.

    2010-05-11

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  3. Modulacion de la mesoestructura y composicion en silices nanoparticuladas con porosidad jerarquica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Tatay, Jose Manuel

    The objectives of this thesis were: 1) Ensure the development of a reproducible method of synthesis of nanoparticulate bimodal silicas (NBS), UVM-7 type, to enable fine and independent control of both pore systems, intra- and interparticle. Is intended to confirm that by controlling the physicochemical procedural variables as the concentration of surfactant and the dielectric constant of the reaction medium, along with a strategy of well defined and easy synthesis, can lead to the obtainment of a NBS material showing characteristics topological significantly different. 2) The synthesis of new bimodal mesoporous nanocrystalline materials, UVM-7 type, using a cheap source of silicon and simplifying the maximum synthesis. Starting from a cheap inorganic precursor such as sodium silicate, seeks a path of simple, reproducible, fast and with the least possible number of synthesis reaction steps with a view to future production at industrial level of the mesoporous silica nanoparticulate. 3) A detailed characterization of the new material called UVM-10. Check the similarities and differences of this nanoparticulate mesoporous silica obtained from a cheap source of silicon with respect to the reference materials (UVM-7 and MCM-41). The study of UVM-10 was carried out by all mesoporous solids characterization techniques available in the ICMUV. 4) Within a characterization and adequacy of the UVM-10 for future application as catalyst support, have studied possible routes of synthesis and subsequent optimization that will produce the UVM-10 silica doped with various hetero (Al and Ti). 5) Chemical knowledge transfer has acquired the ability to obtain a nanoparticulate hierarchical bimodal porosity from a silicon source but condensed by a synthesis route elapses in homogeneous phase material. This material renamed UVM-12 type silica. 6) Finally, it has been suggested a comparative thermal stability between the various silicas (UVM-7, UVM-UVM-10 and 12). In general, the main

  4. The preparation, physicochemical properties, and the cohesive energy of liquid sodium containing titanium nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Jun-ichi; Itami, Toshio; Ara, Kuniaki

    2012-01-01

    Liquid sodium containing titanium nanoparticles (LSnanop) of 10-nm diameter was prepared by dispersing titanium nanoparticles (2 at.% Ti) into liquid sodium with the addition of stirring and ultrasonic sound wave. The titanium nanoparticles themselves were prepared by the vapor deposition method. This new liquid metal, LSnanop, shows a remarkable stability due to the Brownian motion of nanoparticles in liquid sodium medium. In addition, the difference of measured heat of reaction to water between this LSnanop and liquid sodium indicates the existence of cohesive energy between the liquid sodium medium and dispersed titanium nanoparticles. The origin of the cohesive energy, which serves to stabilize this new liquid metal, was explained by the model of screened nanoparticles in liquid sodium. In this model, negatively charged nanoparticles with transferred electrons from liquid sodium are surrounded by the positively charged screening shell, which may inhibit the gathering of nanoparticles by the “Coulombic repulsion coating.” The atomic volume of LSnanop shows the shrinkage from the linear law, which also suggests the existence of cohesive energy. The viscosity of LSnanop is almost the same as that of liquid sodium. This behavior was explained by the Einstein equation. The surface tension of LSnanop is 17 % larger than that of liquid sodium. The cohesive energy and the negative adsorption may be responsible to this increase. Titanium nanoparticles in liquid sodium seem to be free from the Coulomb fission. This new liquid metal containing nanoparticles suggests the possibility to prepare various stable suspensions with new properties.

  5. Radiochemical separation of {sup 231}Pa from siliceous cake prior to its determination by gamma ray spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalvi, Aditi A. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Analytical Chemistry Div.; Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai (India); Verma, Rakesh

    2017-07-01

    A simple and fast radiochemical method for the separation of protactinium ({sup 231}Pa) from siliceous cake for its determination by gamma ray spectrometry is described. The method involves (a) a novel approach, the fusion of the siliceous cake with sodium peroxide, (b) the dissolution of the fused mass in nitric acid and (c) the co-precipitation of {sup 231}Pa with manganese dioxide formed in-situ by the addition of solid manganous sulfate and potassium permanganate to the solution. The fusion, effected in a single step, is simpler and highly effective in comparison to methods reported hitherto in literature. The radiochemical yield of {sup 231}Pa, determined using 311.9 keV gamma ray of {sup 233}Pa radiotracer is quantitative (∝90%). The decontamination factors calculated using gamma ray spectrometry and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence measurements show that the separation from the interfering radionuclides is high whereas separation from major and minor elements is good. Separation by ion-exchange method in hydrochloric acid, hydrofluoric acid and oxalic acid media have comparatively much lower yields. The concentration of {sup 231}Pa in the siliceous cake measured using interference-free 283.6 keV gamma ray was found to be (6.4 ± 0.33) μg kg{sup -1}. The measured concentration of {sup 231}Pa was well above the limit of quantitation whereas the coefficient of variation was ∝5%. The improvement in the limit of detection was due to the reduction in spectral background. Systematic evaluation of various uncertainty parameters showed that the major contributors to the combined uncertainty were efficiency of the high purity germanium detector and the counting statistics. The present sample decomposition and separation methods are robust, simple to perform and can be effectively used for the determination and hence source prospecting of protactinium.

  6. Crystallochemical characteristics of alkali calcium silicates from charoitites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozhdestvenskaya, I.V.; Nikishova, L.V.

    2002-01-01

    The characteristic features of the crystal structures of alkali calcium silicates from various deposits are considered. The structures of these minerals, which were established by single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods, are described as the combinations of large construction modules, including the alternating layers of alkali cations and tubular silicate radicals (in canasite, frankamenite, miserite, and agrellite) and bent ribbons linked through hydrogen bonds in the layers (in tinaksite and tokkoite). The incorporation of impurities and the different ways of ordering them have different effects on the structures of these minerals and give rise to the formation of superstructures accompanied by a change of the space group (frankamenite-canasite), leading, in turn, to different mutual arrangements of the layers of silicate tubes and the formation of pseudopolytypes (agrellites), structure deformation, and changes in the unit-cell parameters (tinaksite-tokkoite)

  7. Energetic Processing of Interstellar Silicate Grains by Cosmic Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bringa, E M; Kucheyev, S O; Loeffler, M J; Baragiola, R A; Tielens, A G Q M; Dai, Z R; Graham, G; Bajt, S; Bradley, J; Dukes, C A; Felter, T E; Torres, D F; van Breugel, W

    2007-03-28

    While a significant fraction of silicate dust in stellar winds has a crystalline structure, in the interstellar medium nearly all of it is amorphous. One possible explanation for this observation is the amorphization of crystalline silicates by relatively 'low' energy, heavy ion cosmic rays. Here we present the results of multiple laboratory experiments showing that single-crystal synthetic forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) amorphizes when irradiated by 10 MeV Xe{sup ++} ions at large enough fluences. Using modeling, we extrapolate these results to show that 0.1-5.0 GeV heavy ion cosmic rays can rapidly ({approx}70 Million yrs) amorphize crystalline silicate grains ejected by stars into the interstellar medium.

  8. Solubilities of sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate in simulated nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, D.A.; Herting, D.L.

    1984-09-01

    Solubilities were determined for sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate in synthetic nuclear waste liquor. Solubilities were determined as a function of temperature and solution composition (concentrations of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate). Temperature had the greatest effect on the solubilities of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite and a somewhat lesser effect on sodium aluminate solubility. Hydroxide had a great effect on the solubilities of all three salts. Other solution components had minor effects. 2 references, 8 figures, 11 tables

  9. Phase Stability and Thermal Conductivity of Composite Environmental Barrier Coatings on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkel, Samantha; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Advanced environmental barrier coatings are being developed to protect SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites in harsh combustion environments. The current coating development emphasis has been placed on the significantly improved cyclic durability and combustion environment stability in high-heat-flux and high velocity gas turbine engine environments. Environmental barrier coating systems based on hafnia (HfO2) and ytterbium silicate, HfO2-Si nano-composite bond coat systems have been processed and their stability and thermal conductivity behavior have been evaluated in simulated turbine environments. The incorporation of Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNT) into high stability (HfO2) and/or HfO2-silicon composite bond coats, along with ZrO2, HfO2 and rare earth silicate composite top coat systems, showed promise as excellent environmental barriers to protect the SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites.

  10. Alkali-Activated Natural Pozzolan/Slag Binder for Sustainable Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najimi, Meysam

    This study aimed to fully replace Portland cement (PC) with environmentally friendly binders capable of improving longevity of concrete. The new binders consisted of different proportions of natural Pozzolan and slag which were alkaline-activated with various combinations of sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate. A step-by-step research program was designed to (1) develop alkali-activated natural Pozzolan/slag pastes with adequate fresh and strength properties, (2) produce alkali-activated natural Pozzolan/slag mortars to assess the effects of dominant variables on their plastic and hardened properties, and (3) finally produce and assess fresh, mechanical, dimensional, transport and durability properties of alkali-activated natural Pozzolan/slag concretes. The major variables included in this study were binder combination (natural Pozzolan/slag combinations of 70/30, 50/50 and 30/70), activator combination (sodium silicate/sodium hydroxide combinations of 20/80, 25/75 and 30/70), and sodium hydroxide concentration (1, 1.75 and 2.5M). The experimental program assessed performance of alkali-activated natural Pozzolan/slag mixtures including fresh properties (flow and setting times), unit weights (fresh, demolded and oven-dry), mechanical properties (compressive and tensile strengths, and modulus of elasticity), transport properties (absorption, rapid chloride penetration, and rapid chloride migration), durability (frost resistance, chloride induced corrosion, and resistance to sulfuric acid attack), and dimensional stability (drying shrinkage). This study also compared the performance of alkali-activated natural Pozzolan/slag concretes with that of an equivalent reference Portland cement concrete having a similar flow and strength characteristics. The results of this study revealed that it was doable to find optimum binder proportions, activator combinations and sodium hydroxide concentrations to achieve adequate plastic and hardened properties. Nearly for all studied

  11. Deep-Earth Equilibration between Molten Iron and Solid Silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, M.; Zurkowski, C. C.; Chidester, B.; Campbell, A.

    2017-12-01

    Elemental partitioning between iron-rich metals and silicate minerals influences the properties of Earth's deep interior, and is ultimately responsible for the nature of the core-mantle boundary. These interactions between molten iron and solid silicates were influential during planetary accretion, and persist today between the mantle and liquid outer core. Here we report the results of diamond anvil cell experiments at lower mantle conditions (40 GPa, >2500 K) aimed at examining systems containing a mixture of metals (iron or Fe-16Si alloy) and silicates (peridotite). The experiments were conducted at pressure-temperature conditions above the metallic liquidus but below the silicate solidus, and the recovered samples were analyzed by FIB/SEM with EDS to record the compositions of the coexisting phases. Each sample formed a three-phase equilibrium between bridgmanite, Fe-rich metallic melt, and an oxide. In one experiment, using pure Fe, the quenched metal contained 6 weight percent O, and the coexisting oxide was ferropericlase. The second experiment, using Fe-Si alloy, was highly reducing; its metal contained 10 wt% Si, and the coexisting mineral was stishovite. The distinct mineralogies of the two experiments derived from their different starting metals. These results imply that metallic composition is an important factor in determining the products of mixed phase iron-silicate reactions. The properties of deep-Earth interfaces such as the core-mantle boundary could be strongly affected by their metallic components.

  12. Carbonation of metal silicates for long-term CO.sub.2 sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blencoe, James G.; Palmer, Donald A.; Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Beard, James S.

    2017-08-01

    In a preferred embodiment, the invention relates to a process of sequestering carbon dioxide. The process comprises the steps of: (a) reacting a metal silicate with a caustic alkali-metal hydroxide to produce a hydroxide of the metal formerly contained in the silicate; (b) reacting carbon dioxide with at least one of a caustic alkali-metal hydroxide and an alkali-metal silicate to produce at least one of an alkali-metal carbonate and an alkali-metal bicarbonate; and (c) reacting the metal hydroxide product of step (a) with at least one of the alkali-metal carbonate and the alkali-metal bicarbonate produced in step (b) to produce a carbonate of the metal formerly contained in the metal silicate of step (a).

  13. Carbonation of metal silicates for long-term CO.sub.2 sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blencoe, James G [Harriman, TN; Palmer, Donald A [Oliver Springs, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M [Knoxville, TN; Beard, James S [Martinsville, VA

    2012-02-14

    In a preferred embodiment, the invention relates to a process of sequestering carbon dioxide. The process comprises the steps of: (a) reacting a metal silicate with a caustic alkali-metal hydroxide to produce a hydroxide of the metal formerly contained in the silicate; (b) reacting carbon dioxide with at least one of a caustic alkali-metal hydroxide and an alkali-metal silicate to produce at least one of an alkali-metal carbonate and an alkali-metal bicarbonate; and (c) reacting the metal hydroxide product of step (a) with at least one of the alkali-metal carbonate and the alkali-metal bicarbonate produced in step (b) to produce a carbonate of the metal formerly contained in the metal silicate of step (a).

  14. Stability constant of the trisglycinto metal complexes | Na'aliya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The stability constants of iron, manganese, cobalt, and nickel complexes of glycine have been determined in aqueous solution by potentiometric titration with standard sodium hydroxide solution. The values of the stepwise stability constants were obtained by ORIGIN '50' program. The overall stability constants of the ...

  15. Q-Speciation and Network Structure Evolution in Invert Calcium Silicate Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaseman, Derrick C; Retsinas, A; Kalampounias, A G; Papatheodorou, G N; Sen, S

    2015-07-02

    Binary silicate glasses in the system CaO-SiO2 are synthesized over an extended composition range (42 mol % ≤ CaO ≤ 61 mol %), using container-less aerodynamic levitation techniques and CO2-laser heating. The compositional evolution of Q speciation in these glasses is quantified using (29)Si and (17)O magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results indicate progressive depolymerization of the silicate network upon addition of CaO and significant deviation of the Q speciation from the binary model. The equilibrium constants for the various Q species disproportionation reactions for these glasses are found to be similar to (much smaller than) those characteristic of Li (Mg)-silicate glasses, consistent with the corresponding trends in the field strengths of these modifier cations. Increasing CaO concentration results in an increase in the packing density and structural rigidity of these glasses and consequently in their glass transition temperature Tg. This apparent role reversal of conventional network-modifying cations in invert alkaline-earth silicate glasses are compared and contrasted with that in their alkali silicate counterparts.

  16. Selection of steam generator materials for sodium cooled fast breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, P.

    1977-01-01

    The sodium water heat exchangers are now considered as the stumbling block in the development of liquid metal cooled fast breeders, due to the risk of sodium-water reactions. The selection of the materials for these tube-bundles has been very broad, for the different existing, or in-project, reactors in the world: low alloy 2 1/4 Cr - 1 Mo steels (unstabilized or stabilized); 9 Cr - 1 Mo ferritic steel; 18 Cr - 10 Ni austenitic stainless steels; alloy 800. On can also add other ferritic steels, as 9 Cr - 2 Mo stabilized, which are studied for this application. In the framework of the E.D.F.-C.E.A. working group a major effort was undertaken to study the characteristics of these various materials with respect to the main criteria governing construction of the tube bundles and their performance in service: mechanical characteristics at high temperature; fabrication and welding; behavior with respect to mass transfer in sodium; carburization and decarburization; corrosion resistance. The main lines and results of this program are described [fr

  17. Materials properties of hafnium and zirconium silicates: Metal interdiffusion and dopant penetration studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo Lopez, Manuel Angel

    Hafnium and Zirconium based gate dielectrics are considered potential candidates to replace SiO2 or SiON as the gate dielectric in CMOS processing. Furthermore, the addition of nitrogen into this pseudo-binary alloy has been shown to improve their thermal stability, electrical properties, and reduce dopant penetration. Because CMOS processing requires high temperature anneals (up to 1050°C), it is important to understand the diffusion properties of any metal associated with the gate dielectric in silicon at these temperatures. In addition, dopant penetration from the doped polysilicon gate into the Si channel at these temperatures must also be studied. Impurity outdiffusion (Hf, Zr) from the dielectric, or dopant (B, As, P) penetration through the dielectric into the channel region would likely result in deleterious effects upon the carrier mobility. In this dissertation extensive thermal stability studies of alternate gate dielectric candidates ZrSixOy and HfSixO y are presented. Dopant penetration studies from doped-polysilicon through HfSixOy and HfSixOyNz are also presented. Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), Heavy Ion RBS (HI-RBS), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM), and Time of Flight and Dynamic Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS, D-SIMS) methods were used to characterize these materials. The dopant diffusivity is calculated by modeling of the dopant profiles in the Si substrate. In this disseration is reported that Hf silicate films are more stable than Zr silicate films, from the metal interdiffusion point of view. On the other hand, dopant (B, As, and P) penetration is observed for HfSixO y films. However, the addition of nitrogen to the Hf - Si - O systems improves the dopant penetration properties of the resulting HfSi xOyNz films.

  18. The stable Cr isotopic compositions of chondrites and silicate planetary reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, Ronny; Merdian, Alexandra; Holmden, Chris; Kleinhanns, Ilka C.; Haßler, Kathrin; Wille, Martin; Reitter, Elmar

    2016-06-01

    The depletion of chromium in Earth's mantle (∼2700 ppm) in comparison to chondrites (∼4400 ppm) indicates significant incorporation of chromium into the core during our planet's metal-silicate differentiation, assuming that there was no significant escape of the moderately volatile element chromium during the accretionary phase of Earth. Stable Cr isotope compositions - expressed as the ‰-difference in 53Cr/52Cr from the terrestrial reference material SRM979 (δ53/52CrSRM979 values) - of planetary silicate reservoirs might thus yield information about the conditions of planetary metal segregation processes when compared to chondrites. The stable Cr isotopic compositions of 7 carbonaceous chondrites, 11 ordinary chondrites, 5 HED achondrites and 2 martian meteorites determined by a double spike MC-ICP-MS method are within uncertainties indistinguishable from each other and from the previously determined δ53/52CrSRM979 value of -0.124 ± 0.101‰ for the igneous silicate Earth. Extensive quality tests support the accuracy of the stable Cr isotope determinations of various meteorites and terrestrial silicates reported here. The uniformity in stable Cr isotope compositions of samples from planetary silicate mantles and undifferentiated meteorites indicates that metal-silicate differentiation of Earth, Mars and the HED parent body did not cause measurable stable Cr isotope fractionation between these two reservoirs. Our results also imply that the accretionary disc, at least in the inner solar system, was homogeneous in its stable Cr isotopic composition and that potential volatility loss of chromium during accretion of the terrestrial planets was not accompanied by measurable stable isotopic fractionation. Small but reproducible variations in δ53/52CrSRM979 values of terrestrial magmatic rocks point to natural stable Cr isotope variations within Earth's silicate reservoirs. Further and more detailed studies are required to investigate whether silicate

  19. Non-conservative controls on distribution of dissolved silicate in Cochin Backwaters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Balachandran, K.K.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.; Joseph, T.; Nair, M.

    Cochin backwater system was studied with regard to dissolved silicate (DSi) to understand its seasonal distribution and behaviour during estuarine mixing. Silicate had a linear relationship with salinity during the high river discharge period...

  20. E-Beam-Cured Layered-Silicate and Spherical Silica Epoxy Nanocomposites (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Chenggang; Anderson, David P

    2007-01-01

    .... The nanofillers can be two dimensional (layered-silicate) and zero dimensional (spherical silica). Both the spherical silica epoxy nanocomposite and the layered-silicate epoxy nanocomposite can be cured to a high degree of curing...

  1. Determination of Formulation Conditions Allowing Double Emulsions Stabilized by PGPR and Sodium Caseinate to Be Used as Capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nollet, Maxime; Laurichesse, Eric; Besse, Samantha; Soubabère, Olivier; Schmitt, Véronique

    2018-02-27

    Water-in-oil-in-water (W 1 /O/W 2 ) double emulsions stabilized by polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR), a lipophilic food grade small polymer, and sodium caseinate, a hydrophilic milk protein, were developed to encapsulate vitamin B12, a model hydrophilic substance easy to titrate. Using rheology, sensitive to drop size evolution and water fluxes, static light scattering, and microscopy both giving the evolution of drops' size and vitamin B12 titration assessing the encapsulation, we were able to detect independently the double emulsion drop size, the encapsulation loss, and the flux of water as a function of time. By differentiating the PGPR required to cover the W 1 -droplets' surface from PGPR in excess in the oil phase, we built a PGPR-inner droplet volume fraction diagram highlighting the domains where the double emulsion is stable toward encapsulation and/or water fluxes. We demonstrated the key role played by nonadsorbed PGPR concentration in the intermediate sunflower oil phase on the emulsion stability while, surprisingly, the inner droplet volume fraction had no effect on the emulsion stability. At low PGPR concentration, a release of vitamin B12 was observed and the leakage mechanism of coalescence between droplets and oil-water interface of the oily drops (also called globules hereafter), was identified using confocal microscopy. For high enough PGPR content, the emulsions were stable and may therefore serve as efficient capsules without need of an additional gelling, thickening, complexion or interface rigidifying agent. We generalized these results with the encapsulation of an insecticide: Cydia pomonella granulovirus used in organic arboriculture.

  2. SOFT X-RAY IRRADIATION OF SILICATES: IMPLICATIONS FOR DUST EVOLUTION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciaravella, A.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.; Jiménez-Escobar, A. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, P.za Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Chen, Y.-J.; Huang, C.-H. [Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli City, Taoyuan County 32054, Taiwan (China); Muñoz Caro, G. M. [Centro de Astrobiología (INTA-CSIC), Carretera de Ajalvir, km 4, Torrejón de Ardoz, E-28850 Madrid (Spain); Venezia, A. M., E-mail: aciaravella@astropa.unipa.it [ISMN—CNR, Via Ugo La Malfa 153, I-90146 Palermo (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    The processing of energetic photons on bare silicate grains was simulated experimentally on silicate films submitted to soft X-rays of energies up to 1.25 keV. The silicate material was prepared by means of a microwave assisted sol–gel technique. Its chemical composition reflects the Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} stoichiometry with residual impurities due to the synthesis method. The experiments were performed using the spherical grating monochromator beamline at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Taiwan. We found that soft X-ray irradiation induces structural changes that can be interpreted as an amorphization of the processed silicate material. The present results may have relevant implications in the evolution of silicate materials in X-ray-irradiated protoplanetary disks.

  3. Topotactic condensation of layer silicates with ferrierite-type layers forming porous tectosilicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marler, B; Wang, Y; Song, J; Gies, H

    2014-07-21

    medium strong hydrogen bonds (d[O···O] ≈ 2.65 Å) are transformed into poorly ordered framework silicates. Some rules of thumb can be established concerning the successful zeolite synthesis via a topotactic condensation of layered precursors. Favourably, the precursor (i) possesses already a well ordered structure without defects, (ii) contains strong inter-layer hydrogen bonds and does not contain strong intra-layer hydrogen bonds and (iii) contains a suitable cation. The nature of the organic cation (size, geometry, flexibility, thermal stability) plays a key role in the formation of a microporous tectosilicate with well ordered structure. RUB-36 which meets these criteria yields a well ordered condensation product (RUB-37).

  4. Stability studies of lincomycin hydrochloride in aqueous solution and intravenous infusion fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czarniak P

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Petra Czarniak, Michael Boddy, Bruce Sunderland, Jeff D Hughes School of Pharmacy, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chemical stability of Lincocin® (lincomycin hydrochloride in commonly used intravenous fluids at room temperature (25°C, at accelerated-degradation temperatures and in selected buffer solutions.Materials and methods: The stability of Lincocin® injection (containing lincomycin 600 mg/2 mL as the hydrochloride stored at 25°C±0.1°C in sodium lactate (Hartmann’s, 0.9% sodium chloride, 5% glucose, and 10% glucose solutions was investigated over 31 days. Forced degradation of Lincocin® in hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide, and hydrogen peroxide was performed at 60°C. The effect of pH on the degradation rate of lincomycin hydrochloride stored at 80°C was determined.Results: Lincomycin hydrochloride was found to maintain its shelf life at 25°C in sodium lactate (Hartmann’s solution, 0.9% sodium chloride solution, 5% glucose solution, and 10% glucose solution, with less than 5% lincomycin degradation occurring in all intravenous solutions over a 31-day period. Lincomycin hydrochloride showed less rapid degradation at 60°C in acid than in basic solution, but degraded rapidly in hydrogen peroxide. At all pH values tested, lincomycin followed first-order kinetics. It had the greatest stability near pH 4 when stored at 80°C (calculated shelf life of 4.59 days, and was least stable at pH 2 (calculated shelf life of 0.38 days.Conclusion: Lincocin® injection was chemically found to have a shelf life of at least 31 days at 25°C when added to sodium lactate (Hartmann’s solution, 0.9% sodium chloride solution, 5% glucose solution, and 10% glucose solution. Solutions prepared at approximately pH 4 are likely to have optimum stability. Keywords: lincomycin, stability, pH, intravenous fluids, IV additives

  5. Cadmium Immobilization in Soil using Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Stabilized Magnetite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Farrokhian Firouzi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Some methods of contaminated soils remediation reduces the mobile fraction of trace elements, which could contaminate groundwater or be taken up by soil organisms. Cadmium (Cd as a heavy metal has received much attention in the past few decades due to its potential toxic impact on soil organism activity and compositions. Cadmium is a soil pollutant of no known essential biological functions, and may pose threats to soil-dwelling organisms and human health. Soil contamination with Cd usually originates from mining and smelting activities, atmospheric deposition from metallurgical industries, incineration of plastics and batteries, land application of sewage sludge, and burning of fossil fuels. Heavy metal immobilization using amendments is a simple and rapid method for the reduction of heavy metal pollution. One way of the assessment of contaminated soils is sequential extraction procedure. Sequential extraction of heavy metals in soils is an appropriate way to determine soil metal forms including soluble, exchangeable, carbonate, oxides of iron and manganese, and the residual. Its results are valuable in prediction of bioavailability, leaching rate and elements transformation in contaminated agricultural soils. Materials and Methods The objective of this study was to synthesize magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4 stabilized with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS and to investigate the effect of its different percentages (0, 1, 2.5, 5, and 10% on the different fractions of cadmium in soil by sequential extraction method. The nanoparticles were synthesized following the protocol described by Si et al. (19. The investigations were carried out with a loamy sand topsoil. Before use, the soil was air-dried, homogenized and sieved (

  6. Sorption of Europium in zirconium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia R, G.

    2004-01-01

    Some minerals have the property of sipping radioactive metals in solution, that it takes advantage to manufacture contention barriers that are placed in the repositories of nuclear wastes. The more recent investigations are focused in the development of new technologies guided to the sorption of alpha emissors on minerals which avoid their dispersion in the environment. In an effort to contribute to the understanding of this type of properties, some studies of sorption of Europium III are presented like homologous of the americium, on the surface of zirconium silicate (ZrSiO 4 ). In this work the results of sorption experiences are presented as well as the interpretation of the phenomena of the formation of species in the surface of the zirconium silicate. (Author)

  7. Effects of ionization on silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primak, W.

    1982-02-01

    This evaluation of radiation effects in silicate glasses caused by ionization is based on our own investigations, on material collected in our files (reports, articles, and notes), and on a computer literature search through recent issues of Physics Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts (and the apparently pertinent references which appeared). Some of our recent results, available heretofore only in internal correspondence, are presented in some detail. It is concluded that research into the behavior of silicate glasses generally will be required before the specific effects in the radioactive waste storage glasses can be properly understood and evaluated. Two particular neglected areas of investigation are targeted for immediate concern: a kinetic analysis of annealing data and the acquisition of data on effects of irradiation at controlled elevated temperatures

  8. Obtainment and characterization of pure and doped gadolinium oxy ortho silicates with terbium III, precursor of luminescent silicates with sulphur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simoneti, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    Silicate and sulfide lattices are uniquely efficient luminescent materials to excitation by cathodic rays and furthermore the cathodoluminescence study of these compounds have been few investigated. In this work it has been prepared, characterized and investigated some spectroscopic properties of pure and Tb a+ - activated Gd 2 Si O 3 system and it has been tried to substitute oxygen by sulphur in order to obtain this or sulfide-silicate lattices. Products were characterized by vibrational infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction patterns and electronic emission in UV-VIS region. (author)

  9. Wind-Eroded Silicate as a Source of Hydrogen Peroxide on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, E. N.; Merrison, J. P.; Jensen, S. K.; Nørnberg, P.; Finster, K.

    2014-07-01

    Laboratory simulations show that wind-eroded silicate can be a source of hydrogen peroxide. The ubiquitous, fine-grained silicate dust might thus explain the oxidizing properties of the martian soil and affect the preservation of organic compounds.

  10. Dialysate sodium and sodium gradient in maintenance hemodialysis: a neglected sodium restriction approach?

    OpenAIRE

    Munoz Mendoza, Jair; Sun, Sumi; Chertow, Glenn M.; Moran, John; Doss, Sheila; Schiller, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Background. A higher sodium gradient (dialysate sodium minus pre-dialysis plasma sodium) during hemodialysis (HD) has been associated with sodium loading; however, its role is not well studied. We hypothesized that a sodium dialysate prescription resulting in a higher sodium gradient is associated with increases in interdialytic weight gain (IDWG), blood pressure (BP) and thirst.

  11. Stability studies of lincomycin hydrochloride in aqueous solution and intravenous infusion fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarniak, Petra; Boddy, Michael; Sunderland, Bruce; Hughes, Jeff D

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chemical stability of Lincocin(®) (lincomycin hydrochloride) in commonly used intravenous fluids at room temperature (25°C), at accelerated-degradation temperatures and in selected buffer solutions. The stability of Lincocin(®) injection (containing lincomycin 600 mg/2 mL as the hydrochloride) stored at 25°C±0.1°C in sodium lactate (Hartmann's), 0.9% sodium chloride, 5% glucose, and 10% glucose solutions was investigated over 31 days. Forced degradation of Lincocin(®) in hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide, and hydrogen peroxide was performed at 60°C. The effect of pH on the degradation rate of lincomycin hydrochloride stored at 80°C was determined. Lincomycin hydrochloride w as found to maintain its shelf life at 25°C in sodium lactate (Hartmann's) solution, 0.9% sodium chloride solution, 5% glucose solution, and 10% glucose solution, with less than 5% lincomycin degradation occurring in all intravenous solutions over a 31-day period. Lincomycin hydrochloride showed less rapid degradation at 60°C in acid than in basic solution, but degraded rapidly in hydrogen peroxide. At all pH values tested, lincomycin followed first-order kinetics. It had the greatest stability near pH 4 when stored at 80°C (calculated shelf life of 4.59 days), and was least stable at pH 2 (calculated shelf life of 0.38 days). Lincocin(®) injection was chemically found to have a shelf life of at least 31 days at 25°C when added to sodium lactate (Hartmann's) solution, 0.9% sodium chloride solution, 5% glucose solution, and 10% glucose solution. Solutions prepared at approximately pH 4 are likely to have optimum stability.

  12. Experimental evidence for Mo isotope fractionation between metal and silicate liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hin, Remco C.; Burkhardt, Christoph; Schmidt, Max W.; Bourdon, Bernard; Kleine, Thorsten

    2013-10-01

    Stable isotope fractionation of siderophile elements may inform on the conditions and chemical consequences of core-mantle differentiation in planetary objects. The extent to which Mo isotopes fractionate during such metal-silicate segregation, however, is so far unexplored. We have therefore investigated equilibrium fractionation of Mo isotopes between liquid metal and liquid silicate to evaluate the potential of Mo isotopes as a new tool to study core formation. We have performed experiments at 1400 and 1600 °C in a centrifuging piston cylinder. Tin was used to lower the melting temperature of the Fe-based metal alloys to double spike technique. In experiments performed at 1400 °C, the 98Mo/95Mo ratio of silicate is 0.19±0.03‰ (95% confidence interval) heavier than that of metal. This fractionation is not significantly affected by the presence or absence of carbon. Molybdenum isotope fractionation is furthermore independent of oxygen fugacity in the range IW -1.79 to IW +0.47, which are plausible values for core formation. Experiments at 1600 °C show that, at equilibrium, the 98Mo/95Mo ratio of silicate is 0.12±0.02‰ heavier than that of metal and that the presence or absence of Sn does not affect this fractionation. Equilibrium Mo isotope fractionation between liquid metal and liquid silicate as a function of temperature can therefore be described as ΔMoMetal-Silicate98/95=-4.70(±0.59)×105/T2. Our experiments show that Mo isotope fractionation may be resolvable up to metal-silicate equilibration temperatures of about 2500 °C, rendering Mo isotopes a novel tool to investigate the conditions of core formation in objects ranging from planetesimals to Earth sized bodies.

  13. Relationships between mineralization and silicic volcanism in the central Andes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, P.W.; Halls, C.; Baker, M.C.W.

    1983-10-01

    Studies of late Tertiary silicic volcanic centers in the Western and Eastern Cordilleras of the Central Andes show that three volcanic environments are appropriate sites for mineralization: (1) ring-fracture extrusions post-dating large calderas; (2) similar extrusions within ignimbrite shields; and (3) isolated, small silicic volcanoes. Subvolcanic tin mineralization in the Eastern Cordillera is located in silicic stocks and associated breccias of Miocene age. The Cerro Rico stock, Potosi, Bolivia, contains tin and silver mineralization and has an intrusion age apparently millions of years younger than that of the associated Kari Kari caldera. Similar age relationships between mineralization and caldera formation have been described from the San Juan province, Colorado. The vein deposits of Chocaya, southern Bolivia, were emplaced in the lower part of an ignimbrite shield, a type of volcanic edifice as yet unrecognized in comparable areas of silicic volcanism. The El Salvador porphyry copper deposit, Chile, is related to silicic stocks which may have been intruded along a caldera ring fracture. Existing models for the genesis of porphyry copper deposits suggest that they formed in granodioritic stocks located in the infrastructure of andesitic stratovolcanoes. The dome of La Soufriere, Guadeloupe is proposed as a modern analog for the surface expression of subvolcanic mineralization processes, the phreatic eruptions there suggesting the formation of hydrothermal breccia bodies in depth.

  14. Synthesis, characterization and modelling of zinc and silicate co-substituted hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friederichs, Robert J; Chappell, Helen F; Shepherd, David V; Best, Serena M

    2015-07-06

    Experimental chemistry and atomic modelling studies were performed here to investigate a novel ionic co-substitution in hydroxyapatite (HA). Zinc, silicate co-substituted HA (ZnSiHA) remained phase pure after heating to 1100 °C with Zn and Si amounts of 0.6 wt% and 1.2 wt%, respectively. Unique lattice expansions in ZnSiHA, silicate Fourier transform infrared peaks and changes to the hydroxyl IR stretching region suggested Zn and silicate co-substitution in ZnSiHA. Zn and silicate insertion into HA was modelled using density functional theory (DFT). Different scenarios were considered where Zn substituted for different calcium sites or at a 2b site along the c-axis, which was suspected in singly substituted ZnHA. The most energetically favourable site in ZnSiHA was Zn positioned at a previously unreported interstitial site just off the c-axis near a silicate tetrahedron sitting on a phosphate site. A combination of experimental chemistry and DFT modelling provided insight into these complex co-substituted calcium phosphates that could find biomedical application as a synthetic bone mineral substitute. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and modelling of zinc and silicate co-substituted hydroxyapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friederichs, Robert J.; Chappell, Helen F.; Shepherd, David V.; Best, Serena M.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental chemistry and atomic modelling studies were performed here to investigate a novel ionic co-substitution in hydroxyapatite (HA). Zinc, silicate co-substituted HA (ZnSiHA) remained phase pure after heating to 1100°C with Zn and Si amounts of 0.6 wt% and 1.2 wt%, respectively. Unique lattice expansions in ZnSiHA, silicate Fourier transform infrared peaks and changes to the hydroxyl IR stretching region suggested Zn and silicate co-substitution in ZnSiHA. Zn and silicate insertion into HA was modelled using density functional theory (DFT). Different scenarios were considered where Zn substituted for different calcium sites or at a 2b site along the c-axis, which was suspected in singly substituted ZnHA. The most energetically favourable site in ZnSiHA was Zn positioned at a previously unreported interstitial site just off the c-axis near a silicate tetrahedron sitting on a phosphate site. A combination of experimental chemistry and DFT modelling provided insight into these complex co-substituted calcium phosphates that could find biomedical application as a synthetic bone mineral substitute. PMID:26040597

  16. Estimation of surface elasticity by the thickness change of liquid film and its correlation with foam stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jung Ryoul; Park, Jai Koo [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-04-30

    The relationship between foam stability and surface elasticity by the thickness change of liquid film was investigated. Foam stability was measured by draining liquid volume and decreasing gas volume as a function of time. Foam was formed by the fixed gas-injection the surfactant aqueous solution of different concentration. The used surfactants were sodium lauryl sulfate, hexadecane sulfonic acid sodium salt, and octane sulfonic acid sodium salt. Thickness of liquid film was estimated by using the volume ratio of liquid to gas in foam and surface elasticity of lamella was calculated by the surface tension and adsorbed amount. The thinning of liquid film is due to the combined effects of gravity and capillary suction, it would be ruptured at the minimum of lamella thickness which is called critical thickness. The lamella thickness of bubble which was formed at CMC(critical micelle concentration) was very thin. In the case of sodium lauryl sulfate, the thinning of lamella was continued in the range of measurement. The critical thicknesses of octane sulfonic acid sodium salt solution, hexadecane sulfonic acid sodium salt solution were determined to 0.479{approx}0.316, 0.209{approx}0.200 {mu}m, respectively. It was found that the tendency for foam stability was similar to that of lamella thickness. It was considered that foam which was formed at CMC has very high stability, and the order of foam stability for surfactant aqueous solution was sodium lauryl sulfate > hexadecane sulfonic acid sodium salt > octane sulfonic acid sodium salt. These results was considered that the lamella-rupturing was retarded by the relatively high surface elasticity of lamella. The saturated adsorption of surfactant was determined to 3.25{approx}3.04 * 10{sup -6} mol/m{sup 2} and the surface elasticity of lamella was also determined to 3{approx}56 mN/m. (author). 19 refs., 1 tab., 11 figs.

  17. AC electrical breakdown phenomena of epoxy/layered silicate nanocomposite in needle-plate electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Jun; Lee, Jae-Young

    2013-05-01

    Epoxy/layered silicate nanocomposite for the insulation of heavy electric equipments were prepared by dispersing 1 wt% of a layered silicate into an epoxy matrix with a homogenizing mixer and then AC electrical treeing and breakdown tests were carried out. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation showed that nano-sized monolayers were exfoliated from a multilayered silicate in the epoxy matrix. When the nano-sized silicate layers were incorporated into the epoxy matrix, the breakdown rate in needle-plate electrode geometry was 10.6 times lowered than that of the neat epoxy resin under the applied electrical field of 520.9 kV/mm at 30 degrees C, and electrical tree propagated with much more branches in the epoxy/layered silicate nanocomposite. These results showed that well-dispersed nano-sized silicate layers retarded the electrical tree growth rate. The effects of applied voltage and ambient temperature on the tree initiation, growth, and breakdown rate were also studied, and it was found that the breakdown rate was largely increased, as the applied voltage and ambient temperature increased.

  18. New Silicate Phosphors for a White LED(Electronic Displays)

    OpenAIRE

    Toda, Kenji; Kawakami, Yoshitaka; Kousaka, Shin-ichiro; Ito, Yutaka; Komeno, Akira; Uematsu, Kazuyoshi; Sato, Mineo

    2006-01-01

    We focus on the development of new silicate phosphors for a white LED. In the europium doped silicate system, four LED phosphor candidates-Li_2SrSiO_4:Eu^, Ba_9Sc_2Si_6O_:Eu^, Ca_3Si_2O_7:Eu^ and Ba_2MgSi_2O_7:Eu^ were found. Luminescent properties under near UV and visible excitation were investigated for the new Eu^ doped LED silicate phosphors. These new phosphors have a relatively strong absorption band in a long wavelength region.

  19. Development of Li+ alumino-silicate ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.; Greenway, W.; Lidia, S.; Anders, A.; Kwan, J.

    2009-01-01

    To uniformly heat targets to electron-volt temperatures for the study of warm dense matter, one strategy is to deposit most of the ion energy at the peak of energy loss (dE/dx) with a low (E < 5 MeV) kinetic energy beam and a thin target. Lower mass ions have a peak dE/dx at a lower kinetic energy. To this end, a small lithium (Li+) alumino-silicate source has been fabricated, and its emission limit has been measured. These surface ionization sources are heated to 1000-1150 C where they preferentially emit singly ionized alkali ions. Alumino-silicates sources of K+ and Cs+ have been used extensively in beam experiments, but there are additional challenges for the preparation of high-quality Li+ sources: There are tighter tolerances in preparing and sintering the alumino-silicate to the substrate to produce an emitter that gives uniform ion emission, sufficient current density and low beam emittance. We report on recent measurements ofhigh ( up to 35 mA/cm2) current density from a Li+ source. Ion species identification of possible contaminants is being verified with a Wien (E x B) filter, and via time-of-flight.

  20. Tip-induced nanoreactor for silicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming; Ma, Liran; Liang, Yong; Gao, Yuan; Luo, Jianbin

    2015-09-01

    Nanoscale scientific issues have attracted an increasing amount of research interest due to their specific size-effect and novel structure-property. From macro to nano, materials present some unique chemical reactivity that bulk materials do not own. Here we introduce a facile method to generate silicate with nanoscale control based on the establishment of a confined space between a meso/nanoscale tungsten tip and a smooth silica/silicon substrate. During the process, local water-like droplets deposition can be obviously observed in the confinement between the Si/SiO2 surfaces and the KOH-modified tungsten tip. By the combination of in-situ optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, we were able to take a deep insight of both the product composition and the underlying mechanism of such phenomena. It was indicated that such nanoreactor for silicate could be quite efficient as a result of the local capillarity and electric field effect, with implications at both nano and meso scales.

  1. Radiation effects in silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibler, N.E.; Howitt, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    The study of radiation effects in complex silicate glasses has received renewed attention because of their use in special applications such as high level nuclear waste immobilization and fiber optics. Radiation changes the properties of these glasses by altering their electronic and atomic configurations. These alterations or defects may cause dilatations or microscopic phase changes along with absorption centers that limit the optical application of the glasses. Atomic displacements induced in the already disordered structure of the glasses may affect their use where heavy irradiating particles such as alpha particles, alpha recoils, fission fragments, or accelerated ions are present. Large changes (up to 1%) in density may result. In some cases the radiation damage may be severe enough to affect the durability of the glass in aqueous solutions. In the paper, the authors review the literature concerning radiation effects on density, durability, stored energy, microstructure and optical properties of silicate glasses. Both simple glasses and complex glasses used for immobilization of nuclear waste are considered

  2. All-Solid-State Sodium-Selective Electrode with a Solid Contact of Chitosan/Prussian Blue Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanushree Ghosh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Conventional ion-selective electrodes with a liquid junction have the disadvantage of potential drift. All-solid-state ion-selective electrodes with solid contact in between the metal electrode and the ion-selective membrane offer high capacitance or conductance to enhance potential stability. Solution-casted chitosan/Prussian blue nanocomposite (ChPBN was employed as the solid contact layer for an all-solid-state sodium ion-selective electrode in a potentiometric sodium ion sensor. Morphological and chemical analyses confirmed that the ChPBN is a macroporous network of chitosan that contains abundant Prussian blue nanoparticles. Situated between a screen-printed carbon electrode and a sodium-ionophore-filled polyvinylchloride ion-selective membrane, the ChPBN layer exhibited high redox capacitance and fast charge transfer capability, which significantly enhanced the performance of the sodium ion-selective electrode. A good Nernstian response with a slope of 52.4 mV/decade in the linear range from 10−4–1 M of NaCl was observed. The stability of the electrical potential of the new solid contact was tested by chronopotentiometry, and the capacitance of the electrode was 154 ± 4 µF. The response stability in terms of potential drift was excellent (1.3 µV/h for 20 h of continuous measurement. The ChPBN proved to be an efficient solid contact to enhance the potential stability of the all-solid-state ion-selective electrode.

  3. Operation of the water-to-sodium leak detection system at the experimental breeder reactor II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterhout, M.M.

    1978-01-01

    A water-to-sodium leak detection system was installed at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II in April 1975. The system is designed for early detection of steam generator leaks, using hydrogen meters at the sodium outlets of the evaporators and superheaters. The leak detectors operate by measuring the rate of diffusion of hydrogen from the liquid sodium through a nickel membrane into a dynamic vacuum system. The advantages of this detection system are rapid response time, high sensitivity, stability, and reliability. The system was operated on an experimental basis for the first two years. During this period, data were obtained on detector stability, reliability, maintenance needs, computer interface requirements, calibration, and background hydrogen-level fluctuations. A generic defect in the original detectors was also discovered, requiring redesign of the units. When the new units were installed and proven to be reliable, the system was made fully operational. The data from the hydrogen meters are now used as the primary basis for detection of water-to-sodium leaks

  4. Introduction of Sodium Fire Extinguishing System for STELLA-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gam, Dayoung; Kim, Jong-Man; Jung, Min-Hwan; Eoh, Jae-Hyuk; Jeong, Eoh Jiyoung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    This characteristic is a big advantage as a thermal transfer fluid. However, the high reactivity of sodium, especially with water and oxygen, and white aerosol in the event of fire can cause serious accidents. Thus, large sodium facility needs a specific-developed fire extinguishing system for a safe experiment. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has conducted sodium heat transfer experiments using the facility named the Sodium Integral Effect Test Loop for Safety Simulation and Assessment (STELLA-1). STELLA-1 fully equipped a sodium fire extinguishing system for the safe experiment and fire spread prevention. In this paper, a preparation of the fire extinguishing system of STELLA-1 facility is introduced. This paper can provide an example of how to design a sodium fire extinguishing system for a large sodium experiment facility. In this paper, a preparation of the fire extinguishment system for STELLA-1 as a large sodium experiment facility was introduced and explained. For safe operation of the liquid sodium utility, it is important to equip specific-developed fire extinguishing system because of the chemical characteristics of sodium. Operators should know the process and operating manual before conducting an experiment to prevent hazardous situation. Though the dry chemical extinguishing agent put out the fire target, removing agent at high temperature state can cause re-combustion. Thus, extinguishment confirmation work should be conducted after sufficient cooling time to stabilize the surface. And in case of fire at a sealed room, a method making the percentage of oxygen low(injecting nitrogen gas or argon gas) is effective.

  5. Introduction of Sodium Fire Extinguishing System for STELLA-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gam, Dayoung; Kim, Jong-Man; Jung, Min-Hwan; Eoh, Jae-Hyuk; Jeong, Eoh Jiyoung

    2015-01-01

    This characteristic is a big advantage as a thermal transfer fluid. However, the high reactivity of sodium, especially with water and oxygen, and white aerosol in the event of fire can cause serious accidents. Thus, large sodium facility needs a specific-developed fire extinguishing system for a safe experiment. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has conducted sodium heat transfer experiments using the facility named the Sodium Integral Effect Test Loop for Safety Simulation and Assessment (STELLA-1). STELLA-1 fully equipped a sodium fire extinguishing system for the safe experiment and fire spread prevention. In this paper, a preparation of the fire extinguishing system of STELLA-1 facility is introduced. This paper can provide an example of how to design a sodium fire extinguishing system for a large sodium experiment facility. In this paper, a preparation of the fire extinguishment system for STELLA-1 as a large sodium experiment facility was introduced and explained. For safe operation of the liquid sodium utility, it is important to equip specific-developed fire extinguishing system because of the chemical characteristics of sodium. Operators should know the process and operating manual before conducting an experiment to prevent hazardous situation. Though the dry chemical extinguishing agent put out the fire target, removing agent at high temperature state can cause re-combustion. Thus, extinguishment confirmation work should be conducted after sufficient cooling time to stabilize the surface. And in case of fire at a sealed room, a method making the percentage of oxygen low(injecting nitrogen gas or argon gas) is effective

  6. The foil equilibration method for carbon in sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgstedt, H; Frees, G; Peric, Z [Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, Institute of Materials and Solid State Research, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1980-05-01

    Among the non-metallic impurities in sodium, carbon plays an important role since at high temperatures the structural materials exposed to sodium are subject to carburization and decarburization depending on the carbon activity of the sodium. Carburization of austenitic stainless steels leads to reduction in ductility and fatigue properties whereas decarburization results in a decrease in the high temperature creep strength. A knowledge of the carbon activities in sodium will help understanding of the carbon transfer phenomena in operating sodium systems of the fast reactors, and also carbon diffusion, microstructural stability and mechanical behaviour of materials under different service conditions. An understanding of the carbon behaviour in sodium becomes difficult in view of the complexities of the different species present as elemental carbon, carbide, acetylide, carbonate, and cyanide. Carbon estimation techniques for sodium presently in use are: chemical analytical methods, on-line carbon monitors, and oil equilibration method. Various chemical methods have been developed for the estimation of different species like acetylide, cyanide, carbonate, elemental carbon, and total carbon in sodium. All these methods are time consuming and subject to various errors. The on-line monitors developed for carbon in sodium are able to give continuous indication of carbon activities and have higher sensitivity than the chemical methods. A still more simple method for the determination of carbon activities is by the foil equilibration first published by Natesan et al. Because of its simplicity like the vanadium wire equilibration for oxygen it is being used widely for the estimation of carbon activities in sodium systems. Carbon concentrations in operating sodium systems estimated by this procedure by applying solubility relation to carbon activities have yielded very low values of carbon, lower than the sensitivity limits of the chemical estimation methods. Foil

  7. The foil equilibration method for carbon in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstedt, H.; Frees, G.; Peric, Z.

    1980-01-01

    Among the non-metallic impurities in sodium, carbon plays an important role since at high temperatures the structural materials exposed to sodium are subject to carburization and decarburization depending on the carbon activity of the sodium. Carburization of austenitic stainless steels leads to reduction in ductility and fatigue properties whereas decarburization results in a decrease in the high temperature creep strength. A knowledge of the carbon activities in sodium will help understanding of the carbon transfer phenomena in operating sodium systems of the fast reactors, and also carbon diffusion, microstructural stability and mechanical behaviour of materials under different service conditions. An understanding of the carbon behaviour in sodium becomes difficult in view of the complexities of the different species present as elemental carbon, carbide, acetylide, carbonate, and cyanide. Carbon estimation techniques for sodium presently in use are: chemical analytical methods, on-line carbon monitors, and oil equilibration method. Various chemical methods have been developed for the estimation of different species like acetylide, cyanide, carbonate, elemental carbon, and total carbon in sodium. All these methods are time consuming and subject to various errors. The on-line monitors developed for carbon in sodium are able to give continuous indication of carbon activities and have higher sensitivity than the chemical methods. A still more simple method for the determination of carbon activities is by the foil equilibration first published by Natesan et al. Because of its simplicity like the vanadium wire equilibration for oxygen it is being used widely for the estimation of carbon activities in sodium systems. Carbon concentrations in operating sodium systems estimated by this procedure by applying solubility relation to carbon activities have yielded very low values of carbon, lower than the sensitivity limits of the chemical estimation methods. Foil

  8. Natural penetrating radiation inside silicate dwellings in Chengdu and recommendation on permissible limits for radioactivity of building material made of silicate cinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guangzao

    1984-01-01

    This paper reports the results of external exposure rate of penetrating radiation inside silicate dwellings in Chengdu. The average exposure rate was 24.3+-3.5 R/h. It was evidently higher than of red brick dwellings. The average effective equivalent of the population in silicate dwellings was 123.4+-10.4 mrem/y and the average additional dose was 29.5+-12.5 mrem/y. The permissible limits recommended for silicate building material would be 6 pCi/g, 7 pCi/g and 102 pCi/g for 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K, respectively. The total activity must fulfill the formula of Csub(Ra)/6 + Csub(Th)/7 + Csub(k)/102 1. Under ordinary condition the exposure rate (10+background) R/h of penetrating radiation from the surface of dry building material might be taken as the permissible limit for dwellings and other public buildings

  9. Calcium and magnesium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lothenbach, B.; L'Hopital, E.; Nied, D.; Achiedo, G.; Dauzeres, A.

    2015-01-01

    Deep geological disposals are planed to discard long-lived intermediate-level and high-level radioactive wastes. Clay-based geological barriers are expected to limit the ingress of groundwater and to reduce the mobility of radioelements. In the interaction zone between the cement and the clay based material alteration can occur. Magnesium silicate hydrates (M-S-H) have been observed due to the reaction of magnesium sulfate containing groundwater with cements or in the interaction zone between low-pH type cement and clays. M-S-H samples synthesized in the laboratory showed that M-S-H has a variable composition within 0.7 ≤ Mg/Si ≤ 1.5. TEM/EDS analyses show an homogeneous gel with no defined structure. IR and 29 Si NMR data reveal a higher polymerization degree of the silica network in M-S-H compared to calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H). The presence of mainly Q 3 silicate tetrahedrons in M-S-H indicates a sheet like or a triple-chain silica structure while C-S-H is characterised by single chain-structure. The clear difference in the silica structure and the larger ionic radius of Ca 2+ (1.1 Angstrom) compared to Mg 2+ (0.8 Angstrom) make the formation of an extended solid solution between M-S-H and C-S-H gel improbable. In fact, the analyses of synthetic samples containing both magnesium and calcium in various ratios indicate the formation of separate M-S-H and C-S-H gels with no or very little uptake of magnesium in CS-H or calcium in M-S-H

  10. Rubber curing chemistry governing the orientation of layered silicate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of curing systems on the orientation and the dispersion of the layered silicates in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber nanocomposite is reported. Significant differences in X-ray diffraction pattern between peroxide curing and sulfur curing was observed. Intense X-ray scattering values in the XRD experiments from peroxide cured vulcanizates indicate an orientation of the layers in a preferred direction as evinced by transmission electron micrographs. However, sulfur cured vulcanizates show no preferential orientation of the silicate particles. Nevertheless, a closer inspection of transmission electron microscopy (TEM images of peroxide and sulfur cured samples shows exfoliated silicate layers in the acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR matrix. It was revealed in the prevailing study that the use of an excess amount of stearic acid in the formulation of the sulfur curing package leads to almost exfoliated type X-ray scattering pattern.

  11. Silicate Phases on the Surfaces of Trojan Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Audrey; Emery, Joshua P.; Lindsay, Sean S.

    2017-10-01

    Determining the origin of asteroids provides an effective means of constraining the solar system’s dynamic past. Jupiter Trojan asteroids (hereafter Trojans) may help in determining the amount of radial mixing that occurred during giant planet migration. Previous studies aimed at characterizing surface composition show that Trojans have low albedo surfaces and are spectrally featureless in the near infrared. The thermal infrared (TIR) wavelength range has advantages for detecting silicates on low albedo asteroids such as Trojans. The 10 μm region exhibits strong features due to the Si-O fundamental molecular vibrations. Silicates that formed in the inner solar system likely underwent thermal annealing, and thus are crystalline, whereas silicates that accreted in the outer solar system experienced less thermal processing, and therefore are more likely to have remained in an amorphous phase. We hypothesize that the Trojans formed in the outer solar system (i.e., the Kuiper Belt), and therefore will have a more dominant amorphous spectral silicate component. With TIR spectra from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we identify mineralogical features from the surface of 11 Trojan asteroids. Fine-grain mixtures of crystalline pyroxene and olivine exhibit a 10 μm feature with sharp cutoffs between about 9 μm and 12 μm, which create a broad flat plateau. Amorphous phases, when present, smooth the sharp emission features, resulting in a dome-like shape. Preliminary results indicate that the surfaces of analyzed Trojans contain primarily amorphous silicates. Emissivity spectra of asteroids 1986 WD and 4709 Ennomos include small peaks in the 10 μm region, diagnostic of small amounts of crystalline olivine. One explanation is that Trojans formed in the same region as Kuiper Belt objects, and when giant planet migration ensued, they were swept into Jupiter’s stable Lagrange points where they are found today. As such, it is possible that an ancestral group of Kuiper Belt

  12. Uranium-thorium silicates, with specific reference to the species in the Witwatersrand reefs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smits, G.

    1987-01-01

    (U,Th)-silicates form two complete series of anhydrous and hydrated species with general formulae (U,Th)SiO 4 and (U,Th)SiO 4 .nH 2 O respectively. The end-members of the anhydrous series are anhydrous coffinite and thorite, and those of the hydrated series, coffinite and thorogummite. Although the silicates are relatively rare in nature, coffinite is a common ore mineral in uranium deposits of the sandstone type. In the Witwatersrand reefs, (U,Th)-silicates are extremely rare in most reefs, except for the Elsburg Reefs on the West Rand Goldfield and the Dominion Reef. In these reefs detrital uraninite has been partly or entirely transformed to (U,Th)-silicates of coffinite composition, but thorite and thorogummite of detrital origin are also found in the Dominion Reef. In leaching tests on polished sections of rock samples containing (U,Th)-silicates, a dilute sulphuric acid solution, to which ferric iron had been added, was used as the lixiviant. It appeared that the dissolution of coffinite is less rapid than that of uraninite and uraniferous leucoxene. However, the reaction of silicates of high thorium content is much slower, and was not completed during the tests

  13. Phosphate Framework Electrode Materials for Sodium Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yongjin; Zhang, Jiexin; Xiao, Lifen; Ai, Xinping; Cao, Yuliang; Yang, Hanxi

    2017-05-01

    Sodium ion batteries (SIBs) have been considered as a promising alternative for the next generation of electric storage systems due to their similar electrochemistry to Li-ion batteries and the low cost of sodium resources. Exploring appropriate electrode materials with decent electrochemical performance is the key issue for development of sodium ion batteries. Due to the high structural stability, facile reaction mechanism and rich structural diversity, phosphate framework materials have attracted increasing attention as promising electrode materials for sodium ion batteries. Herein, we review the latest advances and progresses in the exploration of phosphate framework materials especially related to single-phosphates, pyrophosphates and mixed-phosphates. We provide the detailed and comprehensive understanding of structure-composition-performance relationship of materials and try to show the advantages and disadvantages of the materials for use in SIBs. In addition, some new perspectives about phosphate framework materials for SIBs are also discussed. Phosphate framework materials will be a competitive and attractive choice for use as electrodes in the next-generation of energy storage devices.

  14. Characterization of reaction products in sodium-oxygen batteries : An electrolyte concentration study

    OpenAIRE

    Hedman, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, the discharge products formed at the cathode and the performance and cell chemistry of sodium-oxygen batteries have been studied. This was carried out using different NaOTf salt concentrations. The influence of different salt concentrations on sodium-oxygen batteries was investigated since it has been shown that increasing the salt concentration beyond conventional concentrations could result in advantages such as increased stability of the electrolytes towards decomposition, ...

  15. Synthesis of yttrium silicate luminescent materials by sol-gel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhipov, D.V.; Vasina, O.Yu.; Popovich, N.V.; Galaktionov, S.S.; Soshchin, N.P.

    1996-01-01

    Several yttrium-silicate composition with Y 2 O 3 content within 44-56% have been synthesized. it is ascertained that employment of sol-gel technique permits preparation of luminescent materials on yttrium silicate basis, which compare favourably with bath-produced specimens. The influence of phase composition of sol-gel phosphors on basic performance indices: intensity and luminescence spectrum, has been analyzed

  16. Development of Biomedical Polymer-Silicate Nanocomposites: A Materials Science Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Jung Wu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical polymer-silicate nanocomposites have potential to become critically important to the development of biomedical applications, ranging from diagnostic and therapeutic devices, tissue regeneration and drug delivery matrixes to various bio-technologies that are inspired by biology but have only indirect biomedical relation. The fundamental understanding of polymer-nanoparticle interactions is absolutely necessary to control structure-property relationships of materials that need to work within the chemical, physical and biological constraints required by an application. This review summarizes the most recent published strategies to design and develop polymer-silicate nanocomposites (including clay based silicate nanoparticles and bioactive glass nanoparticles for a variety of biomedical applications. Emerging trends in bio-technological and biomedical nanocomposites are highlighted and potential new fields of applications are examined.

  17. Measurement of the efficacy of calcium silicate for the protection and repair of dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Alexander S; Patel, Anisha N; Al Botros, Rehab; Snowden, Michael E; McKelvey, Kim; Unwin, Patrick R; Ashcroft, Alexander T; Carvell, Mel; Joiner, Andrew; Peruffo, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the formation of hydroxyapatite (HAP) from calcium silicate and the deposition of calcium silicate onto sound and acid eroded enamel surfaces in order to investigate its repair and protective properties. Calcium silicate was mixed with phosphate buffer for seven days and the resulting solids analysed for crystalline phases by Raman spectroscopy. Deposition studies were conducted on bovine enamel surfaces. Acid etched regions were produced on the enamel surfaces using scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) with acid filled pipettes and varying contact times. Following treatment with calcium silicate, the deposition was visualised with FE-SEM and etch pit volumes were measured by AFM. A second set of bovine enamel specimens were pre-treated with calcium silicate and fluoride, before acid exposure with the SECCM. The volumes of the resultant acid etched pits were measured using AFM and the intrinsic rate constant for calcium loss was calculated. Raman spectroscopy confirmed that HAP was formed from calcium silicate. Deposition studies demonstrated greater delivery of calcium silicate to acid eroded than sound enamel and that the volume of acid etched enamel pits was significantly reduced following one treatment (penamel was 0.092 ± 0.008 cm/s. This was significantly reduced, 0.056 ± 0.005 cm/s, for the calcium silicate treatments (penamel surfaces. Calcium silicate can provide significant protection of sound enamel from acid challenges. Calcium silicate is a material that has potential for a new approach to the repair of demineralised enamel and the protection of enamel from acid attacks, leading to significant dental hard tissue benefits. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The utilization of waste by-products for removing silicate from mineral processing wastewater via chemical precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jianhua; Sun, Wei; Hu, Yuehua; Gao, Zhiyong; Liu, Runqing; Zhang, Qingpeng; Liu, Hang; Meng, Xiangsong

    2017-11-15

    This study investigates an environmentally friendly technology that utilizes waste by-products (waste acid and waste alkali liquids) to treat mineral processing wastewater. Chemical precipitation is used to remove silicate from scheelite (CaWO 4 ) cleaning flotation wastewater and the waste by-products are used as a substitute for calcium chloride (CaCl 2 ). A series of laboratory experiments is conducted to explain the removal of silicate and the characterization and formation mechanism of calcium silicate. The results show that silicate removal reaches 90% when the Ca:Si molar ratio exceeds 1.0. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirm the characterization and formation of calcium silicate. The pH is the key factor for silicate removal, and the formation of polysilicic acid with a reduction of pH can effectively improve the silicate removal and reduce the usage of calcium. The economic analysis shows that the treatment costs with waste acid (0.63 $/m 3 ) and waste alkali (1.54 $/m 3 ) are lower than that of calcium chloride (2.38 $/m 3 ). The efficient removal of silicate is confirmed by industrial testing at a plant. The results show that silicate removal reaches 85% in the recycled water from tailings dam. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Low-sodium meat products: retaining salty taste for sweet health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Arun Kumar; Banerjee, Rituparna

    2012-01-01

    There is a positive correlation between excessive intake of sodium and incidence of hypertension. As diet is the main source of sodium, awareness among people regarding its possible role upon health has driven demand for various low sodium foods including meat products. Meat products contribute a significant amount of dietary sodium, thus maligning their own image. However, this is not an easy task as common salt affects taste and flavor, functional attributes, stability, and food safety of meat products. The various properties such as taste and flavor, binding, as well as microbiological characteristics should be given due care while developing low salt meat products and accordingly different approaches have been proposed for processing of such products. Potassium chloride has been mostly used to replace sodium; however, a number of other salts, flavor enhancers, bitter blockers and water, as well as fat binders have also been attempted either alone or in different combinations. A number of low sodium meat products have been developed but their economy and consumer acceptability are the major concerns needing proper attention. In future it is anticipated that these challenges would be overcome to provide well acceptable and cost-effective healthier meat products to the consumers.

  20. Carbonate formation in non-aqueous environments by solid-gas carbonation of silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, S. J.; Thompson, S. P.; Evans, A.; Parker, J. E.

    2012-02-01

    We have produced synthetic analogues of cosmic silicates using the Sol Gel method, producing amorphous silicates of composition Mg(x)Ca(1-x)SiO3. Using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction on Beamline I11 at the Diamond Light Source, together with a newly-commissioned gas cell, real-time powder diffraction scans have been taken of a range of silicates exposed to CO2 under non-ambient conditions. The SXPD is complemented by other techniques including Raman and Infrared Spectroscopy and SEM imaging.

  1. Activation of Ca(OH){sub 2} using different siliceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karatepe, N.; Ersoy-Mericboyu, A.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    1999-04-01

    Siliceous materials such as silica fume, bentonite and diatomite were mixed with Ca(OH){sub 2} and hydrated at different conditions to produce reactive SO{sub 2} sorbents. Two different hydration methods were used, namely atmospheric and pressure hydration. The effects of the hydration temperature, time and siliceous material/Ca(OH){sub 2} weight ratio on the physical properties of the activated sorbents wereinvestigated. A statistical design technique was applied by use of a two-level factorial design matrix to interpret experimental results. In atmospheric hydration, it was found that increasing the temperature and hydration time caused an increase in the total surface area of the sorbents. But, increasing the siliceous material/Ca(OH){sub 2} weight ratio caused a decrease in the total surface area of the sorbents. In pressure hydration, mathematical analysis showed that the surface area of the activated sorbents was positively affected by the hydration variables. Thermogravimetric measurements showed that increasing the amount of reacted Ca(OH){sub 2} during hydration caused an increase in the surface area of the sorbent. X-ray diffraction studies also indicated that calcium silicate hydrates were the principal Ca-containing species formed during hydration.

  2. Physical Characteristics of Chitosan Based Film Modified With Silica and Polyethylene Glycol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Widhi Mahatmanti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, development of film materials is focused on finding the films with high chemical and physical stabilities. Organic based material such as chitosan produces films with low physical stability, and hence addition of inorganic materials necessary. In this research, the effect of silica and polyethylene glycol (PEG addition on the properties of chitosan based films has been investigated. Precursors used to produce films included chitosan with the deacetylation degree of 83% and sodium silicate solution as the silica source. A simple synthesis in a one-pot process was carried out by mixing 1%(w of chitosan solution in 2%(v/v acetate acid and sodium silicate solution (27% SiO2 in various composition ratios and casting the solution on a glass dish. The tensile strength and percentage of elongation decrease with increasing the silica content. The tensile strength tends to decline with addition of PEG, but the elongation percentage of the film increases. Hydrophilicity of the film decreases with the addition of silica and increases with the addition of PEG. The addition of silica and PEG does not change significantly the morphology of the film and functional groups indicating the domination of physical interaction among active sites in the film components.

  3. Determination of reactivity rates of silicate particle-size fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Cristina Fernandes Deus

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of sources used for soil acidity correction depends on reactivity rate (RR and neutralization power (NP, indicated by effective calcium carbonate (ECC. Few studies establish relative efficiency of reactivity (RER for silicate particle-size fractions, therefore, the RER applied for lime are used. This study aimed to evaluate the reactivity of silicate materials affected by particle size throughout incubation periods in comparison to lime, and to calculate the RER for silicate particle-size fractions. Six correction sources were evaluated: three slags from distinct origins, dolomitic and calcitic lime separated into four particle-size fractions (2, 0.84, 0.30 and <0.30-mm sieves, and wollastonite, as an additional treatment. The treatments were applied to three soils with different texture classes. The dose of neutralizing material (calcium and magnesium oxides was applied at equal quantities, and the only variation was the particle-size material. After a 90-day incubation period, the RER was calculated for each particle-size fraction, as well as the RR and ECC of each source. The neutralization of soil acidity of the same particle-size fraction for different sources showed distinct solubility and a distinct reaction between silicates and lime. The RER for slag were higher than the limits established by Brazilian legislation, indicating that the method used for limes should not be used for the slags studied here.

  4. Effectiveness of Chlorinated Water, Sodium Hypochlorite, Sodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the efficacy of chlorinated water, sodium hypochlorite solution, sodium chloride solution and sterile distilled water in eliminating pathogenic bacteria on the surfaces of raw vegetables. Lettuce vegetables were dipped in different concentrations of chlorinated water, sodium hypochlorite solution, sodium ...

  5. Electrical conductivity studies of nanocrystalline lanthanum silicate synthesized by sol-gel route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nallamuthu, N.; Prakash, I.; Satyanarayana, N.; Venkateswarlu, M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Nanocrystalline La 10 Si 6 O 27 material was synthesized by sol-gel method. → TG/DTA curves predicted the thermal behavior of the material. → FTIR spectra confirmed the formation of SiO 4 and La-O network in the La 10 Si 6 O 27 . → XRD patterns confirmed the formation of pure crystalline La 10 Si 6 O 27 phase. → The grain interior and the grain boundary conductivities are evaluated. - Abstract: Nanocrystalline apatite type structured lanthanum silicate (La 10 Si 6 O 27 ) sample was synthesized by sol-gel process. Thermal behavior of the dried gel of lanthanum silicate sample was studied using TG/DTA. The structural coordination of the dried gel of lanthanum silicate, calcined at various temperatures, was identified from the observed FTIR spectral results. The observed XRD patterns of the calcined dried gel were compared with the ICDD data and confirmed the formation of crystalline lanthanum silicate phase. The average crystalline size of La 10 Si 6 O 27 was calculated using the Scherrer formula and it is found to be ∼80 nm. The observed SEM images of the lanthanum silicate indicate the formation of the spherical particles and the existence of O, Si and La in the lanthanum silicate are confirmed from the SEM-EDX spectrum. The grain and grain boundary conductivities are evaluated by analyzing the measured impedance data, using winfit software, obtained at different temperatures, of La 10 Si 6 O 27 sample. Also, the observed grain and grain boundary conductivity behaviors of the La 10 Si 6 O 27 sample are analysed using brick layer model. The electrical permittivity and electrical modulus were calculated from the measured impedance data and were analyzed by fitting through the Havriliak and Negami function to describe the dielectric relaxation behavior of the nanocrystalline lanthanum silicate.

  6. Methylated silicates may explain the release of chlorinated methane from Martian soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Ebbe N.; Jensen, Svend J. Knak; Nørnberg, Per; Finster, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The only organic compounds that have been detected in the Martian soil are simple chlorinated compounds released from heated surface material. However, the sources of the organic carbon are in dispute. Wind abraded silicates, which are widespread on the Martian surface, can sequester atmospheric methane which generates methylated silicates and thus could provide a mechanism for accumulation of reduced carbon in the surface soil. In this study we show that thermal volatilization of methylated silicates in the presence of perchlorate leads to the production of chlorinated methane. Thus, methylated silicates could be a source of the organic carbon released as chlorinated methane upon thermal volatilization of Martian soil samples. Further, our experiments show that the ratio of the different chlorinated compounds produced is dependent on the mass ratio of perchlorate to organic carbon in the soil.

  7. Nanocomposite Materials for the Sodium-Ion Battery: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yaru; Lai, Wei-Hong; Miao, Zongcheng; Chou, Shu-Lei

    2018-02-01

    Clean energy has become an important topic in recent decades because of the serious global issues related to the development of energy, such as environmental contamination, and the intermittence of the traditional energy sources. Creating new battery-related energy storage facilities is an urgent subject for human beings to address and for solutions for the future. Compared with lithium-based batteries, sodium-ion batteries have become the new focal point in the competition for clean energy solutions and have more potential for commercialization due to the huge natural abundance of sodium. Nevertheless, sodium-ion batteries still exhibit some challenges, like inferior electrochemical performance caused by the bigger ionic size of Na + ions, the detrimental volume expansion, and the low conductivity of the active materials. To solve these issues, nanocomposites have recently been applied as a new class of electrodes to enhance the electrochemical performance in sodium batteries based on advantages that include the size effect, high stability, and excellent conductivity. In this Review, the recent development of nanocomposite materials applied in sodium-ion batteries is summarized, and the existing challenges and the potential solutions are presented. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Catalytic mechanism of sodium compounds in black liquor during gasification of coal black liquor slurry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuang Jianping; Zhou Junhu; Zhou Zhijun; Liu Jianzhong; Cen Kefa

    2008-01-01

    The coal black liquor slurry (CBLS) was composed of coal and black pulping liquor, which has plenty of sodium compounds, lignin and cellulose. The sodium compounds have a catalytic effect on the gasification process of coal black liquor slurry, while lignin and cellulose enhance the heat value. Alkali-catalyzed gasification experiments of CBLS and CWS (coal water slurry) are investigated on the thermobalance and fixed bed reactor. The residues of the gasification of CBLS and CWS are analyzed by XRD, SEM and FT-IR. It is found that many micro- and mesopores and zigzag faces exist in the surface of the CBLS coke, which play a key role in the catalytic gasification. Sodium can enhance the reaction potential, weaken the bond of C-O and improve the gasification reaction rate. XRD results show that sodium aluminum silicate and nepheline are the main crystal components of the CBLS and CWS. The C-O stretching vibration peak in the 1060 cm -1 band in the CBLS shifts to 995.65 cm -1 in the CBLS coke after partial gasification. This means that the energy of the C-O stretching vibration in the CBLS carbon matrix decreases, so the structure of the carbon matrix is more liable to react with an oxygen ion or hydroxide ion. The amplitude of the C-O stretching vibration peak is augmented step by step due to the ground-excited level jump of the C-O band

  9. Silicates in Alien Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This plot of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescopes shows that asteroid dust around a dead 'white dwarf' star contains silicates a common mineral on Earth. The data were taken primarily by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, an instrument that breaks light apart into its basic constituents. The yellow dots show averaged data from the spectrograph, while the orange triangles show older data from Spitzer's infrared array camera. The white dwarf is called GD 40.

  10. Silicate melts density, buoyancy relations and the dynamics of magmatic processes in the upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Valle, Carmen; Malfait, Wim J.

    2016-04-01

    Although silicate melts comprise only a minor volume fraction of the present day Earth, they play a critical role on the Earth's geochemical and geodynamical evolution. Their physical properties, namely the density, are a key control on many magmatic processes, including magma chamber dynamics and volcanic eruptions, melt extraction from residual rocks during partial melting, as well as crystal settling and melt migration. However, the quantitative modeling of these processes has been long limited by the scarcity of data on the density and compressibility of volatile-bearing silicate melts at relevant pressure and temperature conditions. In the last decade, new experimental designs namely combining large volume presses and synchrotron-based techniques have opened the possibility for determining in situ the density of a wide range of dry and volatile-bearing (H2O and CO2) silicate melt compositions at high pressure-high temperature conditions. In this contribution we will illustrate some of these progresses with focus on recent results on the density of dry and hydrous felsic and intermediate melt compositions (rhyolite, phonolite and andesite melts) at crustal and upper mantle conditions (up to 4 GPa and 2000 K). The new data on felsic-intermediate melts has been combined with in situ data on (ultra)mafic systems and ambient pressure dilatometry and sound velocity data to calibrate a continuous, predictive density model for hydrous and CO2-bearing silicate melts with applications to magmatic processes down to the conditions of the mantle transition zone (up to 2773 K and 22 GPa). The calibration dataset consist of more than 370 density measurements on high-pressure and/or water-and CO2-bearing melts and it is formulated in terms of the partial molar properties of the oxide components. The model predicts the density of volatile-bearing liquids to within 42 kg/m3 in the calibration interval and the model extrapolations up to 3000 K and 100 GPa are in good agreement

  11. Calc-silicate mineralization in active geothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, D.K.; Schiffman, P.; Elders, W.A.; Williams, A.E.; McDowell, S.D.

    1983-01-01

    The detailed study of calc-silicate mineral zones and coexisting phase relations in the Cerro Prieto geothermal system were used as examples for thermodynamic evaluation of phase relations among minerals of variable composition and to calculate the chemical characteristics of hydrothermal solutions compatible with the observed calc-silicate assemblages. In general there is a close correlation between calculated and observed fluid compositions. Calculated fugacities of O{sub 2} at about 320{degrees}C in the Cerro Prieto geothermal system are about five orders of magnitude less than that at the nearby Salton Sea geothermal system. This observation is consistent with the occurrence of Fe{sup 3+} rich epidotes in the latter system and the presence of prehnite at Cerro Prieto.

  12. Insight into silicate-glass corrosion mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cailleteau, C; Angeli, F; Gin, S; Jollivet, P [CEA VALRHO, DEN, Lab Etude Comportement Long Terme, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze, (France); Devreux, F [Ecole Polytech, CNRS, Lab Phys Mat Condensee, F-91128 Palaiseau, (France); Jestin, J [CEA, CNRS, Lab Leon Brillouin, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Spalla, O [CEA, DSM, Lab Interdisciplinaire Org Nanometr et Supramol, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)

    2008-07-01

    The remarkable chemical durability of silicate glass makes it suitable for a wide range of applications. The slowdown of the aqueous glass corrosion kinetics that is frequently observed at long time is generally attributed to chemical affinity effects (saturation of the solution with respect to silica). Here, we demonstrate a new mechanism and highlight the impact of morphological transformations in the alteration layer on the leaching kinetics. A direct correlation between structure and reactivity is revealed by coupling the results of several structure-sensitive experiments with numerical simulations at mesoscopic scale. The sharp drop in the corrosion rate is shown to arise from densification of the outer layers of the alteration film, leading to pore closure. The presence of insoluble elements in the glass can inhibit the film restructuring responsible for this effect. This mechanism may be more broadly applicable to silicate minerals. (authors)

  13. The preparation of zinc silicate/ZnO particles and their use as an efficient UV absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podbrscek, Peter [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Drazic, Goran [Department for Nanostructured Materials, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Anzlovar, Alojz [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Center of Excellence for Polymer Materials and Technologies, Tehnoloski Park 24, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Orel, Zorica Crnjak, E-mail: zorica.crnjak.orel@ki.si [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Center of Excellence for Polymer Materials and Technologies, Tehnoloski Park 24, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} We used innovative gel-route in order to prepare zinc silicate/ZnO nano-particles. {yields} Continuous reactor was efficient for synthesizing ZnO and zinc silicate/ZnO precursors. {yields} Introduction of Si into reaction mixture influenced on particle size and their photoactivity. {yields} Prepared particles are appropriate for UV absorbers in polymers. -- Abstract: The formation of zinc silicate/ZnO particles synthesized by a two-step method and their incorporation into PMMA is presented. In the first step a segmented-flow tubular reactor was used for the continuous room-temperature preparation of a zinc silicate/Zn(OH){sub 2} gel that was thermally treated after rinsing and drying in the second step. The same preparation procedure was also employed for the synthesis of pure ZnO and pure zinc silicate particles. It was found that the presence of the zinc silicate phase significantly influenced the final particle size, decreased the degree of crystallization and reduced the particles' UV absorption capabilities. The reduced photocatalytic activity of the zinc silicate/ZnO particles indicated that the majority of ZnO crystallites were formed inside the zinc silicate matrix. The nanocomposite prepared from zinc silicate/ZnO particles (0.04 wt.%) and PMMA showed high UV shielding and at the same time sufficient transmittance in the visible-light region.

  14. The preparation of zinc silicate/ZnO particles and their use as an efficient UV absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podbrscek, Peter; Drazic, Goran; Anzlovar, Alojz; Orel, Zorica Crnjak

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We used innovative gel-route in order to prepare zinc silicate/ZnO nano-particles. → Continuous reactor was efficient for synthesizing ZnO and zinc silicate/ZnO precursors. → Introduction of Si into reaction mixture influenced on particle size and their photoactivity. → Prepared particles are appropriate for UV absorbers in polymers. -- Abstract: The formation of zinc silicate/ZnO particles synthesized by a two-step method and their incorporation into PMMA is presented. In the first step a segmented-flow tubular reactor was used for the continuous room-temperature preparation of a zinc silicate/Zn(OH) 2 gel that was thermally treated after rinsing and drying in the second step. The same preparation procedure was also employed for the synthesis of pure ZnO and pure zinc silicate particles. It was found that the presence of the zinc silicate phase significantly influenced the final particle size, decreased the degree of crystallization and reduced the particles' UV absorption capabilities. The reduced photocatalytic activity of the zinc silicate/ZnO particles indicated that the majority of ZnO crystallites were formed inside the zinc silicate matrix. The nanocomposite prepared from zinc silicate/ZnO particles (0.04 wt.%) and PMMA showed high UV shielding and at the same time sufficient transmittance in the visible-light region.

  15. EFFECT OF STABILIZERS ON THE CHEMICAL AND PHOTODEGRADATION OF ASCORBIC ACID IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Ahmad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ascorbic acid (vitamin C is susceptible to light and air and forms various degradation products. A number of stabilizers have been used to study their effect on the degradation of ascorbic acid (AH2 in dark and light at pH 4.0 and 6.0 alone and in combination with citric and tartaric acids. The assay of AH2 in degraded solutions was performed by a specific UV spectrometric method. The degradation product of AH2 at pH 4.0 and 6.0 was identified as dehydroascorbic acid. The degradation of AH2 has been found to follow first-order kinetics. The apparent first-order rate constants, t90 and percent inhibition in rate in the presence of stabilizers and the second-order rate constants for the interaction of stabilizers with AH2 have been determined. The highest stabilizing effect on AH2 was found by sodium metabisulfite, followed by sodium sulfite, sodium bisulfate, sodium thiosulfate and thiourea. The pH of the solutions has also been found to influence the degradation of AH2 as the rates are higher at pH 6.0 compared to those of pH 4.0, probably due to the ionization of AH2. A synergistic effect has been observed when citric or tartaric acid was added to the solutions containing stabilizers where citric acid showed comparatively better effect.

  16. Potassium silicate and calcium silicate on the resistance of soybean to Phakopsora pachyrhizi infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Cruz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The control of Asian Soybean Rust (ASR, caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, has been difficult due to the aggressiveness of the pathogen and the lack of resistant cultivars. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of spray of potassium silicate (PS and soil amendment with calcium silicate (CS on soybean resistance to ASR. The PS solution was sprayed to leaves 24 hours prior to fungal inoculation while CS was amended to the soil at thirty-five days before sowing. The infection process of P. pachyrhizi was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The uredia on leaves of plants sprayed with PS were smaller and more compact than those observed on the leaves of plants grown in soil amended with CS or in soil non-amended with CS (control treatment. On leaves of plants from the control treatment, uredia produced many urediniospores at 9 days after inoculation, and the ASR severity was 15, 8 and 9%, respectively, for plants from control, PS and CS treatments. In conclusion, the spray of PS contributed to reduce the number of uredia per cm² of leaf area and both PS spray and CS resulted in lower ASR symptoms.

  17. Photoluminescence properties and energy-transfer of thermal-stable Ce3+, Mn2+-codoped barium strontium lithium silicate red phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xinguo; Gong Menglian

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Excited by UV, strong red luminescence is observed from Ce 3+ , Mn 2+ -codoped barium strontium lithium silicate (BSLS), while violet-blue emission from Ce 3+ sole doped BSLS. → These results indicate the Mn 2+ -derived red emission is originated by an efficient Ce 3+ → Mn 2+ energy transfer. → The red emission becomes stronger with increased Sr content, and shows red-shift. → These phosphors demonstrate good thermal stability even in 180 o C, which is suitable for NUV LED application. - Abstract: A series of thermal-stable Ce 3+ , Mn 2+ -codoped barium strontium lithium silicate (BSLS) phosphors was synthesized by a high-temperature solid-state reaction. The XRD patterns of this phosphor seem to be a new phase that has not been reported before. BSLS:Ce 3+ , Mn 2+ showed two emission bands under 365 nm excitation: one observed at 421 nm was attributed to Ce 3+ emission, and the other found in red region was assigned to Mn 2+ emission through Ce 3+ -Mn 2+ efficient energy transfer. The Mn 2+ emission shifted red along with the replacement of barium by strontium, which was due to the change of crystal field. A composition-optimized phosphor, BSLS:0.10Ce 3+ , 0.05Mn 2+ (Ba = 65), exhibited strong and broad red-emitting and supreme thermal stability. The results suggest that this phosphor is suitable as a red component for NUV LED or high pressure Hg vapor (HPMV) lamp.

  18. Valence determination of rare earth elements in lanthanide silicates by L 3-XANES spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravtsova, Antonina N; Guda, Alexander A; Soldatov, Alexander V; Goettlicher, Joerg; Taroev, Vladimir K; Suvorova, Lyudmila F; Tauson, Vladimir L; Kashaev, Anvar A

    2016-01-01

    Lanthanide silicates have been hydrothermally synthesized using Cu and Ni containers. Chemical formulae of the synthesized compounds correspond to K 3 Eu[Si 6 O 15 ] 2H 2 O, HK 6 Eu[Si 10 O 25 ], K 7 Sm 3 [Si 12 O 32 ], K 2 Sm[AlSi 4 O 12 ] 0.375H 2 O, K 4 Yb 2 [Si 8 O 21 ], K 4 Ce 2 [Al 2 Si 8 O 24 ]. The oxidation state of lanthanides (Eu, Ce, Tb, Sm, Yb) in these silicates has been determined using XANES spectroscopy at the Eu, Ce, Tb, Sm, Yb, L 3 - edges. The experimental XANES spectra were recorded using the synchrotron radiation source ANKA (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology) and the X-ray laboratory spectrometer Rigaku R- XAS. By comparing the absorption edge energies and white line intensities of the silicates with the ones of reference spectra the oxidation state of lanthanides Eu, Ce, Tb, Sm, Yb has been found to be equal to +3 in all investigated silicates except of the Ce-containing silicate from the run in Cu container where the cerium oxidation state ranges from +3 (Ce in silicate apatite and in a KCe silicate with Si 12 O 32 layers) to +4 (starting CeO 2 or oxidized Ce 2 O 3 ). (paper)

  19. Properties of ambient cured blended alkali activated cement concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talha Junaid, M.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents results of the development and strength properties of ambient-cured alkali activated geopolymer concrete (GPC). The study looks at the strength properties, such as compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, and elastic modulus of such concretes and its dependency on various parameters. The parameters studied in this work are the type and proportions of pre-cursor materials, type of activator and their respective ratios and the curing time. Two types of pre-cursor material; low calcium fly ash (FA) and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) were activated using different proportions of sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solutions. The results indicate that ambient cured geopolymer concrete can be manufactured to match strength properties of ordinary Portland cement concrete (OPC). The strength properties of GPC are dependent on the type and ratio of activator and the proportion of GGBFS used. Increasing the percentage of GGBFS increased the compressive and tensile strengths, while reducing the setting time of the mix. The effect of GGBFS on strength was more pronounced in mixes that contained sodium silicate as activator solution. Unlike OPC, ambient-cured GPC containing sodium silicate gain most of their strength in the first 7 days and there is no change in strength thereafter. However, GPC mixes not containing sodium silicate only achieve a fraction of their strength at 7 days and extended curing is required for such concretes to gain full strength. The results also indicate that the elastic modulus values of GPC mixes without sodium silicate are comparable to OPC while mixes with sodium silicate have elastic modulus values much lower than ordinary concrete.

  20. Stability of solubilized benzodiazepine receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.J; Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, R.A

    1997-01-01

    According to the observations of other researchers, benzodiazepine receptors solubilized with sodium deoxycholate are unstable, but stability can be improved by exchanging deoxycholate for Triton X-100. In our experiments we conclude that the choice of detergent is not the restrictive factor for the

  1. Sodium deoxycholate-decorated zein nanoparticles for a stable colloidal drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Agnese; Paolino, Donatella; Iannone, Michelangelo; Palma, Ernesto; Fresta, Massimo; Cosco, Donato

    2018-01-01

    The use of biopolymers is increasing in drug delivery, thanks to the peculiar properties of these compounds such as their biodegradability, availability, and the possibility of modulating their physico-chemical characteristics. In particular, protein-based systems such as albumin are able to interact with many active compounds, modulating their biopharmaceutical properties. Zein is a protein of 20-40 kDa made up of many hydrophobic amino acids, generally regarded as safe (GRAS) and used as a coating material. In this investigation, zein was combined with various surfactants in order to obtain stable nanosystems by means of the nanoprecipitation technique. Specific parameters, eg, temperature, pH value, Turbiscan Stability Index, serum stability, in vitro cytotoxicity and entrapment efficiency of various model compounds were investigated, in order to identify the nanoformulation most useful for a systemic drug delivery application. The use of non-ionic and ionic surfactants such as Tween 80, poloxamer 188, and sodium deoxycholate allowed us to obtain nanoparticles characterized by a mean diameter of 100-200 nm when a protein concentration of 2 mg/mL was used. The surface charge was modulated by means of the protein concentration and the nature of the stabilizer. The most suitable nanoparticle formulation to be proposed as a colloidal drug delivery system was obtained using sodium deoxycholate (1.25% w/v) because it was characterized by a narrow size distribution, a good storage stability after freeze-drying and significant feature of retaining lipophilic and hydrophilic compounds. The sodium deoxycholate-coated zein nanoparticles are stable biocompatible colloidal carriers to be used as useful drug delivery systems.

  2. Addition of sodium caseinate to skim milk increases nonsedimentable casein and causes significant changes in rennet-induced gelation, heat stability, and ethanol stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yingchen; Kelly, Alan L; O'Mahony, James A; Guinee, Timothy P

    2017-02-01

    The protein content of skim milk was increased from 3.3 to 4.1% (wt/wt) by the addition of a blend of skim milk powder and sodium caseinate (NaCas), in which the weight ratio of skim milk powder to NaCas was varied from 0.8:0.0 to 0.0:0.8. Addition of NaCas increased the levels of nonsedimentable casein (from ∼6 to 18% of total casein) and calcium (from ∼36 to 43% of total calcium) and reduced the turbidity of the fortified milk, to a degree depending on level of NaCas added. Rennet gelation was adversely affected by the addition of NaCas at 0.2% (wt/wt) and completely inhibited at NaCas ≥0.4% (wt/wt). Rennet-induced hydrolysis was not affected by added NaCas. The proportion of total casein that was nonsedimentable on centrifugation (3,000 × g, 1 h, 25°C) of the rennet-treated milk after incubation for 1 h at 31°C increased significantly on addition of NaCas at ≥0.4% (wt/wt). Heat stability in the pH range 6.7 to 7.2 and ethanol stability at pH 6.4 were enhanced by the addition of NaCas. It is suggested that the negative effect of NaCas on rennet gelation is due to the increase in nonsedimentable casein, which upon hydrolysis by chymosin forms into small nonsedimentable particles that physically come between, and impede the aggregation of, rennet-altered para-casein micelles, and thereby inhibit the development of a gel network. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Carbonate-silicate liquid immiscibility in the mantle propels kimberlite magma ascent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenetsky, Vadim S.; Yaxley, Gregory M.

    2015-06-01

    Kimberlite is a rare volcanic rock renowned as the major host of diamonds and originated at the base of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Although kimberlite magmas are dense in crystals and deeply-derived rock fragments, they ascend to the surface extremely rapidly, enabling diamonds to survive. The unique physical properties of kimberlite magmas depend on the specific compositions of their parental melts that, in absence of historical eruptions and due to pervasive alteration of kimberlite rocks, remain highly debatable. We explain exceptionally rapid ascent of kimberlite magma from mantle depths by combining empirical data on the essentially carbonatite composition of the kimberlite primary melts and experimental evidence on interaction of the carbonate liquids with mantle minerals. Our experimental study shows that orthopyroxene is completely dissolved in a Na2CO3 melt at 2.0-5.0 GPa and 1000-1200 °C. The dissolution of orthopyroxene results in homogeneous silicate-carbonate melt at 5.0 GPa and 1200 °C, and is followed by unmixing of carbonate and carbonated silicate melts and formation of stable magmatic emulsion at lower pressures and temperatures. The dispersed silicate melt has a significant capacity for storing a carbonate component in the deep mantle (13 wt% CO2 at 2.0 GPa). We envisage that this component reaches saturation and is gradually released as CO2 bubbles, as the silicate melt globules are transported upwards through the lithosphere by the carbonatite magma. The globules of unmixed, CO2-rich silicate melt are continuously produced upon further reaction between the natrocarbonatite melt and mantle peridotite. On decompression the dispersed silicate melt phase ensures a continuous supply of CO2 bubbles that decrease density and increase buoyancy and promote rapid ascent of the magmatic emulsion.

  4. Field and Experimental Constraints on the Dynamics of Replenished Silicic Magma Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, A. A.; Jellinek, M.

    2008-12-01

    The underlying causes of catastrophic caldera-forming volcanic eruptions remain poorly understood. However, the occurrence of magma mixing within bimodal systems has become increasingly linked with such eruptions. In particular, buoyancy effects related to unstable density contrasts arising as a result of silicic- basaltic magma interactions may play an important role in the growth, differentiation and catastrophic eruption of silicic magma chambers. Evidence of such magmatic interactions can be found in layered intrusions from the Coastal Maine Magmatic Province (USA), where well-exposed cross-sections reveal hundreds of laterally-extensive basaltic sheets, apparently injected as intrusive lava flows onto the growing floors of silicic magma chambers. Interfaces between mafic and silicic layers are commonly sharply defined and exhibit deformation parallel to the inferred direction of palaeo-gravity. Our field observations suggest that the cooling, settling and buckling of gravitationally-unstable mafic replenishments may have driven large-scale (basalt layer depth) and small- scale (crystal diameter) upwelling and/or overturning of underlying buoyant silicic cumulate material. In order to characterize the full range of buoyancy effects, we carried out extensive spectral analysis of high- resolution digital field measurements from the Pleasant Bay and Mount Desert Island intrusions. In many cases, Rayleigh-Taylor theory and the longest measured wavelength of deformation indicate that a large and potentially-quantifiable fraction of the original, pre-replenishment silicic cumulate thickness may be missing, implying that vertical mass transfer has occurred. In addition, the shortest wavelengths of deformation are generally consistent with observed length-scales of crystals and clumps of crystals at these localities. With the aim of understanding the initial conditions that gave rise to these field observations, we conduct a series of laboratory experiments in which we

  5. Silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, W.

    1988-01-01

    Vitrification of liquid high-level radioactive wastes has received the greatest attention, world-wide, compared to any other HLW solidification process. The waste form is a borosilicate-based glass. The production of phosphate-based glass has been abandoned in the western world. Only in the Soviet Union are phosphate-based glasses still being developed. Vitrification techniques, equipment and processes and their remote operation have been developed and studied for almost thirty years and have reached a high degree of technical maturity. Industrial demonstration of the vitrification process has been in progress since 1978. This chapter is a survey of world-wide research and development efforts in nuclear waste glasses and its production technology. The principal glasses considered are silicate glasses which contain boron, i.e., borosilicate glasses

  6. Chemical alteration of calcium silicate hydrates in saline groundwater. Mechanism of sorption of Na on C-S-H and effect of NaCl on leaching of Ca from C-S-H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Daisuke; Fujita, Tomonari

    2004-01-01

    In the concept for TRU waste disposal in Japan, cement is a potential waste packaging and backfilling material and is expected to provide chemical containment. In the presence of some reactive ions in a saline groundwater, the chemical properties of cement materials should be affected. In this study, the mechanism of sorption of sodium (Na) on C-S-H and the effect of sodium chloride (NaCl) concentration on dissolution of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) are discussed by measuring the sorption isotherm of sodium onto C-S-H gel (Ca/Si = 0.65-1.2). Based on the experimental results, it is showed that sodium sorbs by substitution for Ca in C-S-H phases and leaching of Ca from C-S-H is enhanced in NaCl solution ( -1 mol dm -3 ). The results of sorption experiments are reasonably well modelled by the ion-exchange model assuming some calcium sites with different ion-exchange log K values. It is also suggested that the dissolution of C-S-H can be modelled reasonably well by considering the effect of ionic strength on activity coefficients of aqueous species for high Ca/Si ratio of C-S-H, and the effect of exchange of sodium with calcium of C-S-H on leaching of Ca becomes obvious for lower Ca/Si ratio of C-S-H. (author)

  7. Selective silicate-directed motility in diatoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondoc, Karen Grace V.; Heuschele, Jan; Gillard, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    the major sink in the global Si cycle. Dissolved silicic acid (dSi) availability frequently limits diatom productivity and influences species composition of communities. We show that benthic diatoms selectively perceive and behaviourally react to gradients of dSi. Cell speed increases under d...

  8. Mid-infrared spectra of cometary dust: the evasion of its silicate mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, H.; Chigai, T.; Yamamoto, T.

    2008-04-01

    Infrared spectra of dust in cometary comae provide a way to identify its silicate constituents, and this is crucial for correctly understanding the condition under which our planetary system is formed. Recent studies assign a newly detected peak at a wavelength of 9.3 μm to pyroxenes and regard them as the most abundant silicate minerals in comets. Here we dispense with this pyroxene hypothesis to numerically reproduce the infrared features of cometary dust in the framework of our interstellar dust models. Presolar interstellar dust in a comet is modeled as fluffy aggregates consisting of submicrometer-sized organic grains with an amorphous-silicate core that undergoes nonthermal crystallization in a coma. We assert that forsterite (Mg2SiO4) is the carrier of all the observed features, including the 9.3 μm peak and that the major phase of iron is sulfides rather than iron-rich silicates.

  9. X-ray emission spectroscopy study of iron silicate catalyst FeZSM-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csencsits, R.; Lyman, C.E.; Gronsky, R.

    1988-03-01

    Iron silicate analogs of the zeolite ZMS-5 may be directly synthesized from iron silicate gels in a manner which differs slightly from the alumino-silicate ZSM-5. The resultant white, crystalline iron silicate is referred to as FeZSM-5 in the as-synthesized form. Thermal treatment removes the organic crystal-directing agent and moves some of the framework iron into non-framework sites producing the calcined form of the molecular sieve FeZSM-5. Homogeneity in the distribution of catalytic iron throughout the particles is desired in an optimal catalyst. Distribution of the iron throughout the framework in the as-synthesized forms would affect the final distribution of catalytic iron in the calcined and steamed forms; thus, the iron distribution throughout the as-synthesized and calcined forms of FeZSM-5 were studied using the high spatial resolution on the analytical electron microscope. 7 refs., 3 figs

  10. Evaluation of dimensional stability of Iralgin and Alginoplast alginates after disinfection by sodium hypochlorite (5.2% with immersion and spraying methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojdani M

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Infection control is an integral part of dentistry and dental impressions are considered an important issue in cross contamination. The aim of this study was to investigate the dimensional stability of two irreversible hydrocolloid materials, Alginoplast and Iralgin after disinfection with 5.2% sodium hypochlorite, used with immersion and spraying methods. Material and Methods: In this experimental study, impressions were made of a master mandibular arch (Typodont containing three stainless steel inserts on the occlucal surface of both mandibular first molars and in the lingual surface of the mandibular central incisors, which served as reference marks for making measurements. Two types of irreversible hydrocolloid (Iralgin and Alginoplast were tested. 5.2% sodium hypochlorite was used in two methods of spraying and immersion to disinfect the samples. The control group was not disinfected. Casts were made of type III gypsum. Stone casts were measured with a Nikon profile projector.Kruskall-Wallis and Mann-Witney test were used for statistical analysis using p<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: Casts prepared from Alginoplast disinfected by spraying method, were 0.38 % larger in anteroposterior and 0.06% smaller in cross arch dimensions, whereas those prepared from Alginoplast immersed in hypochlorite were 0.47% larger in anteroposterior and 0.11% smaller in cross arch dimensions. Casts made from Iralgin were smaller after both methods of disinfecting, (0.01% smaller in anteroposterior and 0.001% smaller in cross-arch dimensions after spraying and 0.04% smaller in anteroposterior and 0.03% smaller in cross-arch dimensions after immersing in sodium hypochlorite. Conclusion: Alginoplast and Iralgin impressions can be immersed or sprayed for disinfection without compromising the accuracy needed for diagnostic and opposing casts, as well as removable partial denture construction.

  11. Silicate bonding properties: Investigation through thermal conductivity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzini, M; Cesarini, E; Cagnoli, G; Campagna, E; Losurdo, G; Martelli, F; Piergiovanni, F; Vetrano, F [INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Haughian, K; Hough, J; Martin, I; Reid, S; Rowan, S; Veggel, A A van, E-mail: lorenzini@fi.infn.i [SUPA, University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Kelvin Building G12 8QQ Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-01

    A direct approach to reduce the thermal noise contribution to the sensitivity limit of a GW interferometric detector is the cryogenic cooling of the mirrors and mirrors suspensions. Future generations of detectors are foreseen to implement this solution. Silicon has been proposed as a candidate material, thanks to its very low intrinsic loss angle at low temperatures and due to its very high thermal conductivity, allowing the heat deposited in the mirrors by high power lasers to be efficiently extracted. To accomplish such a scheme, both mirror masses and suspension elements must be made of silicon, then bonded together forming a quasi-monolithic stage. Elements can be assembled using hydroxide-catalysis silicate bonding, as for silica monolithic joints. The effect of Si to Si bonding on suspension thermal conductance has therefore to be experimentally studied. A measurement of the effect of silicate bonding on thermal conductance carried out on 1 inch thick silicon bonded samples, from room temperature down to 77 K, is reported. In the explored temperature range, the silicate bonding does not seem to affect in a relevant way the sample conductance.

  12. Research on Frequency Control of Grid Connected Sodium-Sulfur Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Fenglin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium sulfur battery is the only energy storage battery with large capacity and high energy density. It has a great application prospect in the peak load shifting of power grid, due to the lack of domestic research on it, it is urgent to evaluate the effect of grid-connection of sodium sulfur battery scientifically. According to the experimental data of the sodium sulfur battery project, the battery model is built. Compared with the real discharge curve, the error of the model simulation curve is small, so the battery model is effective. The AC / DC power grid model is built, and the rectifier and inverter control circuits are designed to simulate the scenario that the wind turbine and the battery are supplied to the passive load. The simulation results show that the grid-connected model of the sodium sulfur battery under the two control strategies can stabilize the larger frequency fluctuation.

  13. Silicate fertilization of tropical soils: silicon availability and recovery index of sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Sartori de Camargo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane is considered a Si-accumulating plant, but in Brazil, where several soil types are used for cultivation, there is little information about silicon (Si fertilization. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the silicon availability, uptake and recovery index of Si from the applied silicate on tropical soils with and without silicate fertilization, in three crops. The experiments in pots (100 L were performed with specific Si rates (0, 185, 370 and 555 kg ha-1 Si, three soils (Quartzipsamment-Q, 6 % clay; Rhodic Hapludox-RH, 22 % clay; and Rhodic Acrudox-RA, 68 % clay, with four replications. The silicon source was Ca-Mg silicate. The same Ca and Mg quantities were applied to all pots, with lime and/or MgCl2, when necessary. Sugarcane was harvested in the plant cane and first- and second-ratoon crops. The silicon rates increased soil Si availability and Si uptake by sugarcane and had a strong residual effect. The contents of soluble Si were reduced by harvesting and increased with silicate application in the following decreasing order: Q>RH>RA. The silicate rates promoted an increase in soluble Si-acetic acid at harvest for all crops and in all soils, except RA. The amounts of Si-CaCl2 were not influenced by silicate in the ratoon crops. The plant Si uptake increased according to the Si rates and was highest in RA at all harvests. The recovery index of applied Si (RI of sugarcane increased over time, and was highest in RA.

  14. Compatibility of refractory materials with boiling sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meacham, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    The program employed to determine the compatibility of commercially available refractories with boiling sodium is described. The effects of impurities contained within the refractory material, and their relations with the refractory's physical stability are discussed. Also, since consideration of refractories for use as an insulating material within Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Plants (LMFBR's) is currently under investigation; recommendations, based upon this program, are presented

  15. Development of LEAP-JET code for sodium-water reaction analysis. Validation by sodium-water reaction tests (SWAT-1R)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, Hiroshi; Hamada, Hirotsugu

    2004-03-01

    The sodium-water reaction event in an FBR steam generator (SG) has influence on the safety, economical efficiency, etc. of the plant, so that the selection of design base leak (DBL) of the SG is considered as one of the important matters. The clarification of the sodium-water reaction phenomenon and the development of an analysis model are necessary to estimate the sodium-water reaction event with high accuracy and rationality in selecting the DBL. The reaction jet model is pointed out as a part of the necessary improvements to evaluate the overheating tube rupture of large SGs, since the behavior of overheating tube rupture is largely affected by the reaction jet conditions outside the tube. Therefore, LEAP-JET has been developed as an analysis code for the simulation of sodium-water reactions. This document shows the validation of the LEAP-JET code by the Sodium-Water Reaction Test (SWAT-1R). The following results have been obtained: (1) The reaction rate constant, K, is estimated at between 0.001≤K≤0.1 from the LEAP-JET analysis of the SWAT-1R data. (2) The analytical results on the high-temperature region and the behaviors of reaction consumption (Na, H 2 O) and products (H 2 , NaOH, Na 2 O) are considered to be physically reasonable. (3) The LEAP-JET analysis shows the tendency of overestimation in the maximum temperature and temperature distribution of the reaction jet. (4) In the LEAP-JET analysis, the numerical calculation becomes unstably, especially in the mesh containing quite small sodium mass. Therefore, it is necessary to modify the computational algorism to stabilize it and obtain the optimum value of K in sodium-water reactions. (author)

  16. Origins of saccharide-dependent hydration at aluminate, silicate, and aluminosilicate surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benjamin J; Rawal, Aditya; Funkhouser, Gary P; Roberts, Lawrence R; Gupta, Vijay; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Chmelka, Bradley F

    2011-05-31

    Sugar molecules adsorbed at hydrated inorganic oxide surfaces occur ubiquitously in nature and in technologically important materials and processes, including marine biomineralization, cement hydration, corrosion inhibition, bioadhesion, and bone resorption. Among these examples, surprisingly diverse hydration behaviors are observed for oxides in the presence of saccharides with closely related compositions and structures. Glucose, sucrose, and maltodextrin, for example, exhibit significant differences in their adsorption selectivities and alkaline reaction properties on hydrating aluminate, silicate, and aluminosilicate surfaces that are shown to be due to the molecular architectures of the saccharides. Solid-state (1)H, (13)C, (29)Si, and (27)Al nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy measurements, including at very high magnetic fields (19 T), distinguish and quantify the different molecular species, their chemical transformations, and their site-specific adsorption on different aluminate and silicate moieties. Two-dimensional NMR results establish nonselective adsorption of glucose degradation products containing carboxylic acids on both hydrated silicates and aluminates. In contrast, sucrose adsorbs intact at hydrated silicate sites and selectively at anhydrous, but not hydrated, aluminate moieties. Quantitative surface force measurements establish that sucrose adsorbs strongly as multilayers on hydrated aluminosilicate surfaces. The molecular structures and physicochemical properties of the saccharides and their degradation species correlate well with their adsorption behaviors. The results explain the dramatically different effects that small amounts of different types of sugars have on the rates at which aluminate, silicate, and aluminosilicate species hydrate, with important implications for diverse materials and applications.

  17. Development and radiation stability of glasses for highly radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, A.R.; Dalton, J.T.; Hudson, B.; Marples, J.A.C.

    1976-01-01

    The variation of formation temperature, crystallizing behaviour and leach resistance with composition changes for sodium-lithium borosilicate glasses suitable for vitrifying Magnox waste are discussed. Viscosities have been measured between 400 and 1050 0 C. The principal crystal phases which occur have been identified as magnesium silicate, magnesium borate and ceria. The leach rate of polished discs in pure water at 100 0 C does not decrease with time if account is taken of the fragile siliceous layer that is observed to occur. The effect of 100 years' equivalent α- and β-irradiation on glass properties is discussed. Stored energy release experiments demonstrated that energy is released over a wide temperature range so that it cannot be triggered catastrophically. Temperatures required to release energy are dependent upon the original storage temperature. Helium release is by Fick's diffusion law up to at least 30% of the total inventory, with diffusion coefficients similar to those for comparable borosilicate glasses. Leach rates were not measurably affected by α-radiation. β-radiation in a Van de Graaff accelerator did not change physical properties, but irradiation in an electron microscope caused minute bubbles in lithium-containing glasses above 200 0 C. (author)

  18. Analyses and predictions of the thermodynamic properties and phase diagrams of silicate systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blander, M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Pelton, A.; Eriksson, G. (Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    Molten silicates are ordered solutions which can not be well represented by the usual polynomial representation of deviations from ideal solution behavior (i.e. excess free energies of mixing). An adaptation of quasichemical theory which is capable of describing the properties of ordered solutions represents the measured properties of binary silicates over broad ranges of composition and temperature. For simple silicates such as the MgO-FeO-SiO{sub 2} ternary system, in which silica is the only acid component, a combining rule generally leads to good predictions of ternary solutions from those of the binaries. In basic solutions, these predictions are consistent with those of the conformal ionic solution theory. Our results indicate that our approach could provide a potentially powerful tool for representing and predicting the properties of multicomponent molten silicates.

  19. Analyses and predictions of the thermodynamic properties and phase diagrams of silicate systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blander, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Pelton, A.; Eriksson, G. [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering

    1992-07-01

    Molten silicates are ordered solutions which can not be well represented by the usual polynomial representation of deviations from ideal solution behavior (i.e. excess free energies of mixing). An adaptation of quasichemical theory which is capable of describing the properties of ordered solutions represents the measured properties of binary silicates over broad ranges of composition and temperature. For simple silicates such as the MgO-FeO-SiO{sub 2} ternary system, in which silica is the only acid component, a combining rule generally leads to good predictions of ternary solutions from those of the binaries. In basic solutions, these predictions are consistent with those of the conformal ionic solution theory. Our results indicate that our approach could provide a potentially powerful tool for representing and predicting the properties of multicomponent molten silicates.